WorldWideScience

Sample records for genome variation project

  1. The African Genome Variation Project shapes medical genetics in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdasani, Deepti; Carstensen, Tommy; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Pagani, Luca; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Hatzikotoulas, Konstantinos; Karthikeyan, Savita; Iles, Louise; Pollard, Martin O; Choudhury, Ananyo; Ritchie, Graham R S; Xue, Yali; Asimit, Jennifer; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Young, Elizabeth H; Pomilla, Cristina; Kivinen, Katja; Rockett, Kirk; Kamali, Anatoli; Doumatey, Ayo P; Asiki, Gershim; Seeley, Janet; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Jallow, Muminatou; Tollman, Stephen; Mekonnen, Ephrem; Ekong, Rosemary; Oljira, Tamiru; Bradman, Neil; Bojang, Kalifa; Ramsay, Michele; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Bekele, Endashaw; Motala, Ayesha; Norris, Shane A; Pirie, Fraser; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Rotimi, Charles; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Sandhu, Manjinder S

    2015-01-15

    Given the importance of Africa to studies of human origins and disease susceptibility, detailed characterization of African genetic diversity is needed. The African Genome Variation Project provides a resource with which to design, implement and interpret genomic studies in sub-Saharan Africa and worldwide. The African Genome Variation Project represents dense genotypes from 1,481 individuals and whole-genome sequences from 320 individuals across sub-Saharan Africa. Using this resource, we find novel evidence of complex, regionally distinct hunter-gatherer and Eurasian admixture across sub-Saharan Africa. We identify new loci under selection, including loci related to malaria susceptibility and hypertension. We show that modern imputation panels (sets of reference genotypes from which unobserved or missing genotypes in study sets can be inferred) can identify association signals at highly differentiated loci across populations in sub-Saharan Africa. Using whole-genome sequencing, we demonstrate further improvements in imputation accuracy, strengthening the case for large-scale sequencing efforts of diverse African haplotypes. Finally, we present an efficient genotype array design capturing common genetic variation in Africa.

  2. Singapore Genome Variation Project: a haplotype map of three Southeast Asian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Yik-Ying; Sim, Xueling; Ong, Rick T H; Tan, Adrian K S; Chen, Jieming; Tantoso, Erwin; Small, Kerrin S; Ku, Chee-Seng; Lee, Edmund J D; Seielstad, Mark; Chia, Kee-Seng

    2009-11-01

    The Singapore Genome Variation Project (SGVP) provides a publicly available resource of 1.6 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 268 individuals from the Chinese, Malay, and Indian population groups in Southeast Asia. This online database catalogs information and summaries on genotype and phased haplotype data, including allele frequencies, assessment of linkage disequilibrium (LD), and recombination rates in a format similar to the International HapMap Project. Here, we introduce this resource and describe the analysis of human genomic variation upon agglomerating data from the HapMap and the Human Genome Diversity Project, providing useful insights into the population structure of the three major population groups in Asia. In addition, this resource also surveyed across the genome for variation in regional patterns of LD between the HapMap and SGVP populations, and for signatures of positive natural selection using two well-established metrics: iHS and XP-EHH. The raw and processed genetic data, together with all population genetic summaries, are publicly available for download and browsing through a web browser modeled with the Generic Genome Browser.

  3. A comparison of cataloged variation between International HapMap Consortium and 1000 Genomes Project data

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Since publication of the human genome in 2003, geneticists have been interested in risk variant associations to resolve the etiology of traits and complex diseases. The International HapMap Consortium undertook an effort to catalog all common variation across the genome (variants with a minor allele frequency (MAF) of at least 5% in one or more ethnic groups). HapMap along with advances in genotyping technology led to genome-wide association studies which have identified common var...

  4. Structural variations in pig genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paudel, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Paudel, Y. (2015). Structural variations in pig genomes. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, the Netherlands Structural variations are chromosomal rearrangements such as insertions-deletions (INDELs), duplications, inversions, translocations, and copy number variations (CNVs

  5. Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Fortson, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Joyce, G. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Kimble, H. J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Max, C. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Prince, T. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, P. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Woodin, W. H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  6. Big Data Analysis of Human Genome Variations

    KAUST Repository

    Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-01-25

    Since the human genome draft sequence was in public for the first time in 2000, genomic analyses have been intensively extended to the population level. The following three international projects are good examples for large-scale studies of human genome variations: 1) HapMap Data (1,417 individuals) (http://hapmap.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/downloads/genotypes/2010-08_phaseII+III/forward/), 2) HGDP (Human Genome Diversity Project) Data (940 individuals) (http://www.hagsc.org/hgdp/files.html), 3) 1000 genomes Data (2,504 individuals) http://ftp.1000genomes.ebi.ac.uk/vol1/ftp/release/20130502/ If we can integrate all three data into a single volume of data, we should be able to conduct a more detailed analysis of human genome variations for a total number of 4,861 individuals (= 1,417+940+2,504 individuals). In fact, we successfully integrated these three data sets by use of information on the reference human genome sequence, and we conducted the big data analysis. In particular, we constructed a phylogenetic tree of about 5,000 human individuals at the genome level. As a result, we were able to identify clusters of ethnic groups, with detectable admixture, that were not possible by an analysis of each of the three data sets. Here, we report the outcome of this kind of big data analyses and discuss evolutionary significance of human genomic variations. Note that the present study was conducted in collaboration with Katsuhiko Mineta and Kosuke Goto at KAUST.

  7. FROG - Fingerprinting Genomic Variation Ontology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Abinaya

    Full Text Available Genetic variations play a crucial role in differential phenotypic outcomes. Given the complexity in establishing this correlation and the enormous data available today, it is imperative to design machine-readable, efficient methods to store, label, search and analyze this data. A semantic approach, FROG: "FingeRprinting Ontology of Genomic variations" is implemented to label variation data, based on its location, function and interactions. FROG has six levels to describe the variation annotation, namely, chromosome, DNA, RNA, protein, variations and interactions. Each level is a conceptual aggregation of logically connected attributes each of which comprises of various properties for the variant. For example, in chromosome level, one of the attributes is location of variation and which has two properties, allosomes or autosomes. Another attribute is variation kind which has four properties, namely, indel, deletion, insertion, substitution. Likewise, there are 48 attributes and 278 properties to capture the variation annotation across six levels. Each property is then assigned a bit score which in turn leads to generation of a binary fingerprint based on the combination of these properties (mostly taken from existing variation ontologies. FROG is a novel and unique method designed for the purpose of labeling the entire variation data generated till date for efficient storage, search and analysis. A web-based platform is designed as a test case for users to navigate sample datasets and generate fingerprints. The platform is available at http://ab-openlab.csir.res.in/frog.

  8. Clinical Interpretation of Genomic Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayitoğlu, Müge

    2016-09-05

    Novel high-throughput sequencing technologies generate large-scale genomic data and are used extensively for disease mapping of monogenic and/or complex disorders, personalized treatment, and pharmacogenomics. Next-generation sequencing is rapidly becoming routine tool for diagnosis and molecular monitoring of patients to evaluate therapeutic efficiency. The next-generation sequencing platforms generate huge amounts of genetic variation data and it remains a challenge to interpret the variations that are identified. Such data interpretation needs close collaboration among bioinformaticians, clinicians, and geneticists. There are several problems that must be addressed, such as the generation of new algorithms for mapping and annotation, harmonization of the terminology, correct use of nomenclature, reference genomes for different populations, rare disease variant databases, and clinical reports.

  9. The Materials Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aourag, H.

    2008-09-01

    In the past, the search for new and improved materials was characterized mostly by the use of empirical, trial- and-error methods. This picture of materials science has been changing as the knowledge and understanding of fundamental processes governing a material's properties and performance (namely, composition, structure, history, and environment) have increased. In a number of cases, it is now possible to predict a material's properties before it has even been manufactured thus greatly reducing the time spent on testing and development. The objective of modern materials science is to tailor a material (starting with its chemical composition, constituent phases, and microstructure) in order to obtain a desired set of properties suitable for a given application. In the short term, the traditional "empirical" methods for developing new materials will be complemented to a greater degree by theoretical predictions. In some areas, computer simulation is already used by industry to weed out costly or improbable synthesis routes. Can novel materials with optimized properties be designed by computers? Advances in modelling methods at the atomic level coupled with rapid increases in computer capabilities over the last decade have led scientists to answer this question with a resounding "yes'. The ability to design new materials from quantum mechanical principles with computers is currently one of the fastest growing and most exciting areas of theoretical research in the world. The methods allow scientists to evaluate and prescreen new materials "in silico" (in vitro), rather than through time consuming experimentation. The Materials Genome Project is to pursue the theory of large scale modeling as well as powerful methods to construct new materials, with optimized properties. Indeed, it is the intimate synergy between our ability to predict accurately from quantum theory how atoms can be assembled to form new materials and our capacity to synthesize novel materials atom

  10. [Human genomic project and human genomic haplotype map project: opportunitiy, challenge and strategy in stomatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui-qing; Zeng, Xin; Wang, Zhi

    2010-08-01

    The human genomic project and the international HapMap project were designed to create a genome-wide database of patterns of human genetic variation, with the expectation that these patterns would be useful for genetic association studies of common diseases, thus lead to molecular diagnosis and personnel therapy. The article briefly reviewed the creation, target and achievement of those two projects. Furthermore, the authors have given four suggestions in facing to the opportunities and challenges brought by the two projects, including cultivation improvement of elites, cross binding of multi-subjects, strengthening construction of research base and initiation of natural key scientific project.

  11. Genome size variation in Begonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitte, Angelo; Leus, Leen; Eeckhaut, Tom; Vanstechelman, Ives; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Van Bockstaele, Erik

    2009-10-01

    The genome sizes of a Begonia collection comprising 37 species and 23 hybrids of African, Asiatic, Middle American, and South American origin were screened using flow cytometry. Within the collection, 1C values varied between 0.23 and 1.46 pg DNA. Genome sizes were, in most cases, not positively correlated with chromosome number, but with pollen size. A 12-fold difference in mean chromosome size was found between the genotypes with the largest and smallest chromosomes. In general, chromosomes from South American genotypes were smaller than chromosomes of African, Asian, or Middle American genotypes, except for B. boliviensis and B. pearcei. Cytological chromosome studies in different genotypes showed variable chromosome numbers, length, width, and total chromosome volume, which confirmed the diversity in genome size. Large secondary constrictions were present in several investigated genotypes. These data show that chromosome number and structure exhibit a great deal of variation within the genus Begonia, and likely help to explain the large number of taxa found within the genus.

  12. From genomic variation to personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesolowska, Agata; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    Genomic variation is the basis of interindividual differences in observable traits and disease susceptibility. Genetic studies are the driving force of personalized medicine, as many of the differences in treatment efficacy can be attributed to our genomic background. The rapid development of nex...... alternative to data-driven genome-wide association studies. Finally, the findings of the presented studies set new directions for future pharmacognenetic investigations and provide a framework for future implementation of personalized medicine.......Genomic variation is the basis of interindividual differences in observable traits and disease susceptibility. Genetic studies are the driving force of personalized medicine, as many of the differences in treatment efficacy can be attributed to our genomic background. The rapid development...... the thesis and includes some final remarks on the perspectives of genomic variation research and personalized medicine. In summary, this thesis demonstrates the feasibility of integrative analyses of genomic variations and introduces large-scale hypothesis-driven SNP exploration studies as an emerging...

  13. Malaria Genome Sequencing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    million cases and up to 2.7 million A whole chromosome shotgun sequencing strategy was used to deaths from malaria each year. The mortality levels are...deaths from malaria each year. The mortality levels are greatest in determine the genome sequence of P. falciparum clone 3D7. This sub-Saharan Africa...aminolevulinic acid dehydratase. Cura . Genet. 40, 391-398 (2002). 15. Lasonder, E. et al Analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum proteome by high-accuracy mass

  14. The Human Genome Diversity Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalli-Sforza, L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Human Genome Diversity Project (HGD Project) is an international anthropology project that seeks to study the genetic richness of the entire human species. This kind of genetic information can add a unique thread to the tapestry knowledge of humanity. Culture, environment, history, and other factors are often more important, but humanity`s genetic heritage, when analyzed with recent technology, brings another type of evidence for understanding species` past and present. The Project will deepen the understanding of this genetic richness and show both humanity`s diversity and its deep and underlying unity. The HGD Project is still largely in its planning stages, seeking the best ways to reach its goals. The continuing discussions of the Project, throughout the world, should improve the plans for the Project and their implementation. The Project is as global as humanity itself; its implementation will require the kinds of partnerships among different nations and cultures that make the involvement of UNESCO and other international organizations particularly appropriate. The author will briefly discuss the Project`s history, describe the Project, set out the core principles of the Project, and demonstrate how the Project will help combat the scourge of racism.

  15. All about the Human Genome Project (HGP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genome Resources Access to the full human sequence All About The Human Genome Project (HGP) The Human ... an international research effort to sequence and map all of the genes - together known as the genome - ...

  16. Genomics technologies to study structural variations in the grapevine genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardone Maria Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Grapevine is one of the most important crop plants in the world. Recently there was great expansion of genomics resources about grapevine genome, thus providing increasing efforts for molecular breeding. Current cultivars display a great level of inter-specific differentiation that needs to be investigated to reach a comprehensive understanding of the genetic basis of phenotypic differences, and to find responsible genes selected by cross breeding programs. While there have been significant advances in resolving the pattern and nature of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on plant genomes, few data are available on copy number variation (CNV. Furthermore association between structural variations and phenotypes has been described in only a few cases. We combined high throughput biotechnologies and bioinformatics tools, to reveal the first inter-varietal atlas of structural variation (SV for the grapevine genome. We sequenced and compared four table grape cultivars with the Pinot noir inbred line PN40024 genome as the reference. We detected roughly 8% of the grapevine genome affected by genomic variations. Taken into account phenotypic differences existing among the studied varieties we performed comparison of SVs among them and the reference and next we performed an in-depth analysis of gene content of polymorphic regions. This allowed us to identify genes showing differences in copy number as putative functional candidates for important traits in grapevine cultivation.

  17. Insights into structural variations and genome rearrangements in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periwal, Vinita; Scaria, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Structural variations (SVs) are genomic rearrangements that affect fairly large fragments of DNA. Most of the SVs such as inversions, deletions and translocations have been largely studied in context of genetic diseases in eukaryotes. However, recent studies demonstrate that genome rearrangements can also have profound impact on prokaryotic genomes, leading to altered cell phenotype. In contrast to single-nucleotide variations, SVs provide a much deeper insight into organization of bacterial genomes at a much better resolution. SVs can confer change in gene copy number, creation of new genes, altered gene expression and many other functional consequences. High-throughput technologies have now made it possible to explore SVs at a much refined resolution in bacterial genomes. Through this review, we aim to highlight the importance of the less explored field of SVs in prokaryotic genomes and their impact. We also discuss its potential applicability in the emerging fields of synthetic biology and genome engineering where targeted SVs could serve to create sophisticated and accurate genome editing.

  18. Genomic Sequence Variation Markup Language (GSVML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Jun; Kimura, Michio; Hiroi, Kaei; Ido, Keisuke; Yang, Woosung; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    With the aim of making good use of internationally accumulated genomic sequence variation data, which is increasing rapidly due to the explosive amount of genomic research at present, the development of an interoperable data exchange format and its international standardization are necessary. Genomic Sequence Variation Markup Language (GSVML) will focus on genomic sequence variation data and human health applications, such as gene based medicine or pharmacogenomics. We developed GSVML through eight steps, based on case analysis and domain investigations. By focusing on the design scope to human health applications and genomic sequence variation, we attempted to eliminate ambiguity and to ensure practicability. We intended to satisfy the requirements derived from the use case analysis of human-based clinical genomic applications. Based on database investigations, we attempted to minimize the redundancy of the data format, while maximizing the data covering range. We also attempted to ensure communication and interface ability with other Markup Languages, for exchange of omics data among various omics researchers or facilities. The interface ability with developing clinical standards, such as the Health Level Seven Genotype Information model, was analyzed. We developed the human health-oriented GSVML comprising variation data, direct annotation, and indirect annotation categories; the variation data category is required, while the direct and indirect annotation categories are optional. The annotation categories contain omics and clinical information, and have internal relationships. For designing, we examined 6 cases for three criteria as human health application and 15 data elements for three criteria as data formats for genomic sequence variation data exchange. The data format of five international SNP databases and six Markup Languages and the interface ability to the Health Level Seven Genotype Model in terms of 317 items were investigated. GSVML was developed as

  19. Copy number variation in the bovine genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadista, João; Thomsen, Bo; Holm, Lars-Erik;

    2010-01-01

    to genetic variation in cattle. Results We designed and used a set of NimbleGen CGH arrays that tile across the assayable portion of the cattle genome with approximately 6.3 million probes, at a median probe spacing of 301 bp. This study reports the highest resolution map of copy number variation...... in the cattle genome, with 304 CNV regions (CNVRs) being identified among the genomes of 20 bovine samples from 4 dairy and beef breeds. The CNVRs identified covered 0.68% (22 Mb) of the genome, and ranged in size from 1.7 to 2,031 kb (median size 16.7 kb). About 20% of the CNVs co-localized with segmental...

  20. ENGINES: exploring single nucleotide variation in entire human genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salas Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation ultra-sequencing technologies are starting to produce extensive quantities of data from entire human genome or exome sequences, and therefore new software is needed to present and analyse this vast amount of information. The 1000 Genomes project has recently released raw data for 629 complete genomes representing several human populations through their Phase I interim analysis and, although there are certain public tools available that allow exploration of these genomes, to date there is no tool that permits comprehensive population analysis of the variation catalogued by such data. Description We have developed a genetic variant site explorer able to retrieve data for Single Nucleotide Variation (SNVs, population by population, from entire genomes without compromising future scalability and agility. ENGINES (ENtire Genome INterface for Exploring SNVs uses data from the 1000 Genomes Phase I to demonstrate its capacity to handle large amounts of genetic variation (>7.3 billion genotypes and 28 million SNVs, as well as deriving summary statistics of interest for medical and population genetics applications. The whole dataset is pre-processed and summarized into a data mart accessible through a web interface. The query system allows the combination and comparison of each available population sample, while searching by rs-number list, chromosome region, or genes of interest. Frequency and FST filters are available to further refine queries, while results can be visually compared with other large-scale Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP repositories such as HapMap or Perlegen. Conclusions ENGINES is capable of accessing large-scale variation data repositories in a fast and comprehensive manner. It allows quick browsing of whole genome variation, while providing statistical information for each variant site such as allele frequency, heterozygosity or FST values for genetic differentiation. Access to the data mart

  1. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Joachim; Durgahee, Bibi Sehnaaz Begum; Eilbeck, Karen; Antezana, Erick; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO) specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA), GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations. Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology's GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations); examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0) and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use.

  2. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology

    KAUST Repository

    Baran, Joachim

    2015-05-05

    Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO) specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA), GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations. Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology’s GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations); examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0) and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use.

  3. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Baran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA, GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations.Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology’s GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations; examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0 and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use.

  4. Whole-genome sequence variation, population structure and demographic history of the Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francioli, Laurent C.; Menelaou, Andronild; Pulit, Sara L.; Van Dijk, Freerk; Palamara, Pier Francesco; Elbers, Clara C.; Neerincx, Pieter B. T.; Ye, Kai; Guryev, Victor; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Deelen, Patrick; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Van Oven, Mannis; Vermaat, Martijn; Li, Mingkun; Laros, Jeroen F. J.; Karssen, Lennart C.; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Amin, Najaf; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; Kattenberg, Mathijs; Dijkstra, Martijn; Byelas, Heorhiy; Van Settenl, Jessica; Van Schaik, Barbera D. C.; Bot, Jan; Nijman, Isaac J.; Renkens, Ivo; Marscha, Tobias; Schonhuth, Alexander; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Polak, Paz; Sohail, Mashaal; Vuzman, Dana; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Van Enckevort, David; Mei, Hailiang; Koval, Vyacheslav; Moed, Ma-Tthijs H.; Van der Velde, K. Joeri; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Isaacs, Aaron; McCarroll, Steven A.; Beekrnan, Marian; De Craen, Anton J. M.; Suchiman, H. Eka D.; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Platteel, Mathieu; Veldink, Jan H.; Van den Berg, Leonard H.; Pitts, Steven J.; Potluri, Shobha; Sundar, Purnima; Cox, David R.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Den Dunnen, Johan T.; Stoneking, Mark; De Knijff, Peter; Kayser, Manfred; Li, Qibin; Li, Yingrui; Du, Yuanping; Chen, Ruoyan; Cao, Hongzhi; Li, Ning; Cao, Sujie; Wang, Jun; Bovenberg, Jasper A.; Peer, Itsik; Slagboom, P. Eline; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; De Bakker, Paul I. W.; Swertz, Morris A.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing enables complete characterization of genetic variation, but geographic clustering of rare alleles demands many diverse populations be studied. Here we describe the Genome of the Netherlands (GoNL) Project, in which we sequenced the whole genomes of 250 Dutch parent-offspring

  5. Parasite Genome Projects and the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Degrave

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the human genome project, a great number of genome projects on other "model" organism have been initiated, some of them already completed. Several initiatives have also been started on parasite genomes, mainly through support from WHO/TDR, involving North-South and South-South collaborations, and great hopes are vested in that these initiatives will lead to new tools for disease control and prevention, as well as to the establishment of genomic research technology in developing countries. The Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, using the clone CL-Brener as starting point, has made considerable progress through the concerted action of more than 20 laboratories, most of them in the South. A brief overview of the current state of the project is given

  6. Online resources for genomic structural variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Tam P; Church, Deanna M

    2012-01-01

    Genomic structural variation (SV) can be thought of on a continuum from a single base pair insertion/deletion (INDEL) to large megabase-scale rearrangements involving insertions, deletions, duplications, inversions, or translocations of whole chromosomes or chromosome arms. These variants can occur in coding or noncoding DNA, they can be inherited or arise sporadically in the germline or somatic cells. Many of these events are segregating in the population and can be considered common alleles while others are new alleles and thus rare events. All species studied to date harbor structural variants and these may be benign, contributing to phenotypes such as sensory perception and immunity, or pathogenic resulting in genomic disorders including DiGeorge/velocardiofacial, Smith-Margenis, Williams-Beuren, and Prader-Willi syndromes. As structural variants are identified, validated, and their significance, origin, and prevalence are elucidated, it is of critical importance that these data be collected and collated in a way that can be easily accessed and analyzed. This chapter describes current structural variation online resources (see Fig. 1 and Table 1), highlights the challenges in capturing, storing, and displaying SV data, and discusses how dbVar and DGVa, the genomic structural variation databases developed at NCBI and EBI, respectively, were designed to address these issues.

  7. The Human Genome Project: big science transforms biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Leroy; Rowen, Lee

    2013-01-01

    The Human Genome Project has transformed biology through its integrated big science approach to deciphering a reference human genome sequence along with the complete sequences of key model organisms. The project exemplifies the power, necessity and success of large, integrated, cross-disciplinary efforts - so-called 'big science' - directed towards complex major objectives. In this article, we discuss the ways in which this ambitious endeavor led to the development of novel technologies and analytical tools, and how it brought the expertise of engineers, computer scientists and mathematicians together with biologists. It established an open approach to data sharing and open-source software, thereby making the data resulting from the project accessible to all. The genome sequences of microbes, plants and animals have revolutionized many fields of science, including microbiology, virology, infectious disease and plant biology. Moreover, deeper knowledge of human sequence variation has begun to alter the practice of medicine. The Human Genome Project has inspired subsequent large-scale data acquisition initiatives such as the International HapMap Project, 1000 Genomes, and The Cancer Genome Atlas, as well as the recently announced Human Brain Project and the emerging Human Proteome Project.

  8. Burkholderia pseudomallei genome plasticity associated with genomic island variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Currie Bart J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a soil-dwelling saprophyte and the cause of melioidosis. Horizontal gene transfer contributes to the genetic diversity of this pathogen and may be an important determinant of virulence potential. The genome contains genomic island (GI regions that encode a broad array of functions. Although there is some evidence for the variable distribution of genomic islands in B. pseudomallei isolates, little is known about the extent of variation between related strains or their association with disease or environmental survival. Results Five islands from B. pseudomallei strain K96243 were chosen as representatives of different types of genomic islands present in this strain, and their presence investigated in other B. pseudomallei. In silico analysis of 10 B. pseudomallei genome sequences provided evidence for the variable presence of these regions, together with micro-evolutionary changes that generate GI diversity. The diversity of GIs in 186 isolates from NE Thailand (83 environmental and 103 clinical isolates was investigated using multiplex PCR screening. The proportion of all isolates positive by PCR ranged from 12% for a prophage-like island (GI 9, to 76% for a metabolic island (GI 16. The presence of each of the five GIs did not differ between environmental and disease-associated isolates (p > 0.05 for all five islands. The cumulative number of GIs per isolate for the 186 isolates ranged from 0 to 5 (median 2, IQR 1 to 3. The distribution of cumulative GI number did not differ between environmental and disease-associated isolates (p = 0.27. The presence of GIs was defined for the three largest clones in this collection (each defined as a single sequence type, ST, by multilocus sequence typing; these were ST 70 (n = 15 isolates, ST 54 (n = 11, and ST 167 (n = 9. The rapid loss and/or acquisition of gene islands was observed within individual clones. Comparisons were drawn between isolates obtained

  9. The Chlamydomonas genome project: a decade on

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaby, Ian K.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten; Tourasse, Nicolas; Hom, Erik F. Y.; Lopez, David; Aksoy, Munevver; Grossman, Arthur; Umen, James; Dutcher, Susan; Porter, Mary; King, Stephen; Witman, George; Stanke, Mario; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Goodstein, David; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Vallon, Olivier; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Prochnik, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a popular unicellular organism for studying photosynthesis, cilia biogenesis and micronutrient homeostasis. Ten years since its genome project was initiated, an iterative process of improvements to the genome and gene predictions has propelled this organism to the forefront of the “omics” era. Housed at Phytozome, the Joint Genome Institute’s (JGI) plant genomics portal, the most up-to-date genomic data include a genome arranged on chromosomes and high-quality gene models with alternative splice forms supported by an abundance of RNA-Seq data. Here, we present the past, present and future of Chlamydomonas genomics. Specifically, we detail progress on genome assembly and gene model refinement, discuss resources for gene annotations, functional predictions and locus ID mapping between versions and, importantly, outline a standardized framework for naming genes. PMID:24950814

  10. Genomic Prediction from Whole Genome Sequence in Livestock: The 1000 Bull Genomes Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, Benjamin J; MacLeod, Iona M; Daetwyler, Hans D

    Advantages of using whole genome sequence data to predict genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) include better persistence of accuracy of GEBV across generations and more accurate GEBV across breeds. The 1000 Bull Genomes Project provides a database of whole genome sequenced key ancestor bulls...

  11. Patterns of genome size variation in snapping shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Nicholas W; Hultgren, Kristin; Chak, Solomon Tin Chi; Gregory, T Ryan; Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2016-06-01

    Although crustaceans vary extensively in genome size, little is known about how genome size may affect the ecology and evolution of species in this diverse group, in part due to the lack of large genome size datasets. Here we investigate interspecific, intraspecific, and intracolony variation in genome size in 39 species of Synalpheus shrimps, representing one of the largest genome size datasets for a single genus within crustaceans. We find that genome size ranges approximately 4-fold across Synalpheus with little phylogenetic signal, and is not related to body size. In a subset of these species, genome size is related to chromosome size, but not to chromosome number, suggesting that despite large genomes, these species are not polyploid. Interestingly, there appears to be 35% intraspecific genome size variation in Synalpheus idios among geographic regions, and up to 30% variation in Synalpheus duffyi genome size within the same colony.

  12. Genome-Wide Associations of Gene Expression Variation in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  13. Genome-wide associations of gene expression variation in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E Stranger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  14. The life cycle of a genome project: perspectives and guidelines inspired by insect genome projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, Alexie

    2016-01-01

    Many research programs on non-model species biology have been empowered by genomics. In turn, genomics is underpinned by a reference sequence and ancillary information created by so-called "genome projects". The most reliable genome projects are the ones created as part of an active research program and designed to address specific questions but their life extends past publication. In this opinion paper I outline four key insights that have facilitated maintaining genomic communities: the key role of computational capability, the iterative process of building genomic resources, the value of community participation and the importance of manual curation. Taken together, these ideas can and do ensure the longevity of genome projects and the growing non-model species community can use them to focus a discussion with regards to its future genomic infrastructure.

  15. Genomic variation in Salmonella enterica core genes for epidemiological typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Lukjancenko, Oksana; Rundsten, Carsten Friis

    2012-01-01

    Background: Technological advances in high throughput genome sequencing are making whole genome sequencing (WGS) available as a routine tool for bacterial typing. Standardized procedures for identification of relevant genes and of variation are needed to enable comparison between studies and over...... genomes and evaluate their value as typing targets, comparing whole genome typing and traditional methods such as 16S and MLST. A consensus tree based on variation of core genes gives much better resolution than 16S and MLST; the pan-genome family tree is similar to the consensus tree, but with higher...... that there is a positive selection towards mutations leading to amino acid changes. Conclusions: Genomic variation within the core genome is useful for investigating molecular evolution and providing candidate genes for bacterial genome typing. Identification of genes with different degrees of variation is important...

  16. Genome-wide profiling of structural genomic variations in Korean HapMap individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Seol Bae

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Structural genomic variation study, along with microarray technology development has provided many genomic resources related with architecture of human genome, and led to the fact that human genome structure is a lot more complicated than previously thought. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the case of International HapMap Project, Epstein-Barr various immortalized cell lines were preferably used over blood in order to get a larger number of genomic DNA. However, genomic aberration stemming from immortalization process, biased representation of the donor tissue, and culture process may influence the accuracy of SNP genotypes. In order to identify chromosome aberrations including loss of heterozygosity (LOH, large-scale and small-scale copy number variations, we used Illumina HumanHap500 BeadChip (555,352 markers on Korean HapMap individuals (n = 90 to obtain Log R ratio and B allele frequency information, and then utilized the data with various programs including Illumina ChromoZone, cnvParition and PennCNV. As a result, we identified 28 LOHs (>3 mb and 35 large-scale CNVs (>1 mb, with 4 samples having completely duplicated chromosome. In addition, after checking the sample quality (standard deviation of log R ratio <0.30, we selected 79 samples and used both signal intensity and B allele frequency simultaneously for identification of small-scale CNVs (<1 mb to discover 4,989 small-scale CNVs. Identified CNVs in this study were successfully validated using visual examination of the genoplot images, overlapping analysis with previously reported CNVs in DGV, and quantitative PCR. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, we describe the result of the identified chromosome aberrations in Korean HapMap individuals, and expect that these findings will provide more meaningful information on the human genome.

  17. Genome size variation in the genus Avena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Honghai; Martin, Sara L; Bekele, Wubishet A; Latta, Robert G; Diederichsen, Axel; Peng, Yuanying; Tinker, Nicholas A

    2016-03-01

    Genome size is an indicator of evolutionary distance and a metric for genome characterization. Here, we report accurate estimates of genome size in 99 accessions from 26 species of Avena. We demonstrate that the average genome size of C genome diploid species (2C = 10.26 pg) is 15% larger than that of A genome species (2C = 8.95 pg), and that this difference likely accounts for a progression of size among tetraploid species, where AB genome configuration had similar genome sizes (average 2C = 25.74 pg). Genome size was mostly consistent within species and in general agreement with current information about evolutionary distance among species. Results also suggest that most of the polyploid species in Avena have experienced genome downsizing in relation to their diploid progenitors. Genome size measurements could provide additional quality control for species identification in germplasm collections, especially in cases where diploid and polyploid species have similar morphology.

  18. The Simons Genome Diversity Project: 300 genomes from 142 diverse populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Swapan; Li, Heng; Lipson, Mark; Mathieson, Iain; Gymrek, Melissa; Racimo, Fernando; Zhao, Mengyao; Chennagiri, Niru; Nordenfelt, Susanne; Tandon, Arti; Skoglund, Pontus; Lazaridis, Iosif; Sankararaman, Sriram; Fu, Qiaomei; Rohland, Nadin; Renaud, Gabriel; Erlich, Yaniv; Willems, Thomas; Gallo, Carla; Spence, Jeffrey P.; Song, Yun S.; Poletti, Giovanni; Balloux, Francois; van Driem, George; de Knijff, Peter; Romero, Irene Gallego; Jha, Aashish R.; Behar, Doron M.; Bravi, Claudio M.; Capelli, Cristian; Hervig, Tor; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Posukh, Olga L.; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Toncheva, Draga; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Xue, Yali; Abdullah, M. Syafiq; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Beall, Cynthia M.; Di Rienzo, Anna; Jeong, Choongwon; Starikovskaya, Elena B.; Metspalu, Ene; Parik, Jüri; Villems, Richard; Henn, Brenna M.; Hodoglugil, Ugur; Mahley, Robert; Sajantila, Antti; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Wee, Joseph T. S.; Khusainova, Rita; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Litvinov, Sergey; Ayodo, George; Comas, David; Hammer, Michael; Kivisild, Toomas; Klitz, William; Winkler, Cheryl; Labuda, Damian; Bamshad, Michael; Jorde, Lynn B.; Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Watkins, W. Scott; Metspalu, Mait; Dryomov, Stanislav; Sukernik, Rem; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Pääbo, Svante; Kelso, Janet; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David

    2016-01-01

    We report the Simons Genome Diversity Project (SGDP) dataset: high quality genomes from 300 individuals from 142 diverse populations. These genomes include at least 5.8 million base pairs that are not present in the human reference genome. Our analysis reveals key features of the landscape of human genome variation, including that the rate of accumulation of mutations has accelerated by about 5% in non-Africans compared to Africans since divergence. We show that the ancestors of some pairs of present-day human populations were substantially separated by 100,000 years ago, well before the archaeologically attested onset of behavioral modernity. We also demonstrate that indigenous Australians, New Guineans and Andamanese do not derive substantial ancestry from an early dispersal of modern humans; instead, their modern human ancestry is consistent with coming from the same source as that in other non-Africans. PMID:27654912

  19. The Simons Genome Diversity Project: 300 genomes from 142 diverse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Swapan; Li, Heng; Lipson, Mark; Mathieson, Iain; Gymrek, Melissa; Racimo, Fernando; Zhao, Mengyao; Chennagiri, Niru; Nordenfelt, Susanne; Tandon, Arti; Skoglund, Pontus; Lazaridis, Iosif; Sankararaman, Sriram; Fu, Qiaomei; Rohland, Nadin; Renaud, Gabriel; Erlich, Yaniv; Willems, Thomas; Gallo, Carla; Spence, Jeffrey P; Song, Yun S; Poletti, Giovanni; Balloux, Francois; van Driem, George; de Knijff, Peter; Romero, Irene Gallego; Jha, Aashish R; Behar, Doron M; Bravi, Claudio M; Capelli, Cristian; Hervig, Tor; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Posukh, Olga L; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Toncheva, Draga; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Xue, Yali; Abdullah, M Syafiq; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Beall, Cynthia M; Di Rienzo, Anna; Jeong, Choongwon; Starikovskaya, Elena B; Metspalu, Ene; Parik, Jüri; Villems, Richard; Henn, Brenna M; Hodoglugil, Ugur; Mahley, Robert; Sajantila, Antti; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Wee, Joseph T S; Khusainova, Rita; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Litvinov, Sergey; Ayodo, George; Comas, David; Hammer, Michael F; Kivisild, Toomas; Klitz, William; Winkler, Cheryl A; Labuda, Damian; Bamshad, Michael; Jorde, Lynn B; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Watkins, W Scott; Metspalu, Mait; Dryomov, Stanislav; Sukernik, Rem; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Pääbo, Svante; Kelso, Janet; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David

    2016-10-13

    Here we report the Simons Genome Diversity Project data set: high quality genomes from 300 individuals from 142 diverse populations. These genomes include at least 5.8 million base pairs that are not present in the human reference genome. Our analysis reveals key features of the landscape of human genome variation, including that the rate of accumulation of mutations has accelerated by about 5% in non-Africans compared to Africans since divergence. We show that the ancestors of some pairs of present-day human populations were substantially separated by 100,000 years ago, well before the archaeologically attested onset of behavioural modernity. We also demonstrate that indigenous Australians, New Guineans and Andamanese do not derive substantial ancestry from an early dispersal of modern humans; instead, their modern human ancestry is consistent with coming from the same source as that of other non-Africans.

  20. Genetic variation and the de novo assembly of human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, Mark J P; Wilson, Richard K; Eichler, Evan E

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of genetic variation and the assembly of genome sequences are both inextricably linked to advances in DNA-sequencing technology. Short-read massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our ability to discover genetic variation but is insufficient to generate high-quality genome assemblies or resolve most structural variation. Full resolution of variation is only guaranteed by complete de novo assembly of a genome. Here, we review approaches to genome assembly, the nature of gaps or missing sequences, and biases in the assembly process. We describe the challenges of generating a complete de novo genome assembly using current technologies and the impact that being able to perfectly sequence the genome would have on understanding human disease and evolution. Finally, we summarize recent technological advances that improve both contiguity and accuracy and emphasize the importance of complete de novo assembly as opposed to read mapping as the primary means to understanding the full range of human genetic variation.

  1. Cancer Genome Anatomy Project | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the research community access to biological tissue characterization data. Request a free copy of the CGAP Website Virtual Tour CD from ocg@mail.nih.gov.

  2. Intrapopulation Genome Size Variation in D. melanogaster Reflects Life History Variation and Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Lisa L.; Huang, Wen; Quinn, Andrew M.; Ahuja, Astha; Alfrejd, Ben; Gomez, Francisco E.; Hjelmen, Carl E.; Moore, Kristi L.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.; Johnston, J. Spencer; Tarone, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    We determined female genome sizes using flow cytometry for 211 Drosophila melanogaster sequenced inbred strains from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and found significant conspecific and intrapopulation variation in genome size. We also compared several life history traits for 25 lines with large and 25 lines with small genomes in three thermal environments, and found that genome size as well as genome size by temperature interactions significantly correlated with survival to pupation and adulthood, time to pupation, female pupal mass, and female eclosion rates. Genome size accounted for up to 23% of the variation in developmental phenotypes, but the contribution of genome size to variation in life history traits was plastic and varied according to the thermal environment. Expression data implicate differences in metabolism that correspond to genome size variation. These results indicate that significant genome size variation exists within D. melanogaster and this variation may impact the evolutionary ecology of the species. Genome size variation accounts for a significant portion of life history variation in an environmentally dependent manner, suggesting that potential fitness effects associated with genome size variation also depend on environmental conditions. PMID:25057905

  3. Intrapopulation genome size variation in D. melanogaster reflects life history variation and plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa L Ellis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We determined female genome sizes using flow cytometry for 211 Drosophila melanogaster sequenced inbred strains from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and found significant conspecific and intrapopulation variation in genome size. We also compared several life history traits for 25 lines with large and 25 lines with small genomes in three thermal environments, and found that genome size as well as genome size by temperature interactions significantly correlated with survival to pupation and adulthood, time to pupation, female pupal mass, and female eclosion rates. Genome size accounted for up to 23% of the variation in developmental phenotypes, but the contribution of genome size to variation in life history traits was plastic and varied according to the thermal environment. Expression data implicate differences in metabolism that correspond to genome size variation. These results indicate that significant genome size variation exists within D. melanogaster and this variation may impact the evolutionary ecology of the species. Genome size variation accounts for a significant portion of life history variation in an environmentally dependent manner, suggesting that potential fitness effects associated with genome size variation also depend on environmental conditions.

  4. Total variation projection with first order schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadili, Jalal M; Peyre, Gabriel

    2011-03-01

    This article proposes a new algorithm to compute the projection on the set of images whose total variation is bounded by a constant. The projection is computed through a dual formulation that is solved by first order non-smooth optimization methods. This yields an iterative algorithm that applies iterative soft thresholding to the dual vector field, and for which we establish convergence rate on the primal iterates. This projection algorithm can then be used as a building block in a variety of applications such as solving inverse problems under a total variation constraint, or for texture synthesis. Numerical results are reported to illustrate the usefulness and potential applicability of our TV projection algorithm on various examples including denoising, texture synthesis, inpainting, deconvolution and tomography problems. We also show that our projection algorithm competes favorably with state-of-the-art TV projection methods in terms of convergence speed.

  5. Copy number variation in the horse genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Ghosh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a 400K WG tiling oligoarray for the horse and applied it for the discovery of copy number variations (CNVs in 38 normal horses of 16 diverse breeds, and the Przewalski horse. Probes on the array represented 18,763 autosomal and X-linked genes, and intergenic, sub-telomeric and chrY sequences. We identified 258 CNV regions (CNVRs across all autosomes, chrX and chrUn, but not in chrY. CNVs comprised 1.3% of the horse genome with chr12 being most enriched. American Miniature horses had the highest and American Quarter Horses the lowest number of CNVs in relation to Thoroughbred reference. The Przewalski horse was similar to native ponies and draft breeds. The majority of CNVRs involved genes, while 20% were located in intergenic regions. Similar to previous studies in horses and other mammals, molecular functions of CNV-associated genes were predominantly in sensory perception, immunity and reproduction. The findings were integrated with previous studies to generate a composite genome-wide dataset of 1476 CNVRs. Of these, 301 CNVRs were shared between studies, while 1174 were novel and require further validation. Integrated data revealed that to date, 41 out of over 400 breeds of the domestic horse have been analyzed for CNVs, of which 11 new breeds were added in this study. Finally, the composite CNV dataset was applied in a pilot study for the discovery of CNVs in 6 horses with XY disorders of sexual development. A homozygous deletion involving AKR1C gene cluster in chr29 in two affected horses was considered possibly causative because of the known role of AKR1C genes in testicular androgen synthesis and sexual development. While the findings improve and integrate the knowledge of CNVs in horses, they also show that for effective discovery of variants of biomedical importance, more breeds and individuals need to be analyzed using comparable methodological approaches.

  6. Copy number variation in the horse genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sharmila; Qu, Zhipeng; Das, Pranab J; Fang, Erica; Juras, Rytis; Cothran, E Gus; McDonell, Sue; Kenney, Daniel G; Lear, Teri L; Adelson, David L; Chowdhary, Bhanu P; Raudsepp, Terje

    2014-10-01

    We constructed a 400K WG tiling oligoarray for the horse and applied it for the discovery of copy number variations (CNVs) in 38 normal horses of 16 diverse breeds, and the Przewalski horse. Probes on the array represented 18,763 autosomal and X-linked genes, and intergenic, sub-telomeric and chrY sequences. We identified 258 CNV regions (CNVRs) across all autosomes, chrX and chrUn, but not in chrY. CNVs comprised 1.3% of the horse genome with chr12 being most enriched. American Miniature horses had the highest and American Quarter Horses the lowest number of CNVs in relation to Thoroughbred reference. The Przewalski horse was similar to native ponies and draft breeds. The majority of CNVRs involved genes, while 20% were located in intergenic regions. Similar to previous studies in horses and other mammals, molecular functions of CNV-associated genes were predominantly in sensory perception, immunity and reproduction. The findings were integrated with previous studies to generate a composite genome-wide dataset of 1476 CNVRs. Of these, 301 CNVRs were shared between studies, while 1174 were novel and require further validation. Integrated data revealed that to date, 41 out of over 400 breeds of the domestic horse have been analyzed for CNVs, of which 11 new breeds were added in this study. Finally, the composite CNV dataset was applied in a pilot study for the discovery of CNVs in 6 horses with XY disorders of sexual development. A homozygous deletion involving AKR1C gene cluster in chr29 in two affected horses was considered possibly causative because of the known role of AKR1C genes in testicular androgen synthesis and sexual development. While the findings improve and integrate the knowledge of CNVs in horses, they also show that for effective discovery of variants of biomedical importance, more breeds and individuals need to be analyzed using comparable methodological approaches.

  7. Child Development and Structural Variation in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Haraksingh, Rajini; Grubert, Fabian; Abyzov, Alexej; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation of the human genome sequence is the insertion, deletion, or rearrangement of stretches of DNA sequence sized from around 1,000 to millions of base pairs. Over the past few years, structural variation has been shown to be far more common in human genomes than previously thought. Very little is currently known about the effects…

  8. Child Development and Structural Variation in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Haraksingh, Rajini; Grubert, Fabian; Abyzov, Alexej; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation of the human genome sequence is the insertion, deletion, or rearrangement of stretches of DNA sequence sized from around 1,000 to millions of base pairs. Over the past few years, structural variation has been shown to be far more common in human genomes than previously thought. Very little is currently known about the effects…

  9. Exploring functional elements and genomic variation in the noncoding genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heesch, S.A.A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression regulation is a delicate process that depends on multiple aspects including genome structure and transcription factor binding to DNA elements. The majority of our genome consists of noncoding DNA, which was shown to be crucial in providing the correct context for genome function. Alt

  10. Exploring functional elements and genomic variation in the noncoding genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heesch, S.A.A.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/336463286

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression regulation is a delicate process that depends on multiple aspects including genome structure and transcription factor binding to DNA elements. The majority of our genome consists of noncoding DNA, which was shown to be crucial in providing the correct context for genome function. Alt

  11. VIGoR: Variational Bayesian Inference for Genome-Wide Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Onogi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide regression using a number of genome-wide markers as predictors is now widely used for genome-wide association mapping and genomic prediction. We developed novel software for genome-wide regression which we named VIGoR (variational Bayesian inference for genome-wide regression. Variational Bayesian inference is computationally much faster than widely used Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms. VIGoR implements seven regression methods, and is provided as a command line program package for Linux/Mac, and as a cross-platform R package. In addition to model fitting, cross-validation and hyperparameter tuning using cross-validation can be automatically performed by modifying a single argument. VIGoR is available at https://github.com/Onogi/VIGoR. The R package is also available at https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/VIGoR/index.html.

  12. The Human Genome Project and Biology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Highlights the importance of the Human Genome Project in educating the public about genetics. Discusses four challenges that science educators must address: teaching for conceptual understanding, the nature of science, the personal and social impact of science and technology, and the principles of technology. Contains 45 references. (JRH)

  13. Identification of Sesame Genomic Variations from Genome Comparison of Landrace and Variety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Zhu, Xiaodong; Yu, Jingyin; Wang, Linhai; Zhang, Yanxin; Li, Donghua; Zhou, Rong; Zhang, Xiurong

    2016-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is one of the main oilseed crops, providing vegetable oil and protein to human. Landrace is the gene source of variety, carrying many desire alleles for genetic improvement. Despite the importance of sesame landrace, genome of sesame landrace remains unexplored and genomic variations between landrace and variety still is not clear. To identify the genomic variations between sesame landrace and variety, two representative sesame landrace accessions, "Baizhima" and "Mishuozhima," were selected and re-sequenced. The genome sequencing and de novo assembling of the two sesame landraces resulted in draft genomes of 267 Mb and 254 Mb, respectively, with the contig N50 more than 47 kb. Totally, 1,332,025 SNPs and 506,245 InDels were identified from the genome of "Baizhima" and "Mishuozhima" by comparison of the genome of a variety "Zhongzhi13." Among the genomic variations, 70,018 SNPs and 8311 InDels were located in the coding regions of genes. Genomic variations may contribute to variation of sesame agronomic traits such as flowering time, plant height, and oil content. The identified genomic variations were successfully used in the QTL mapping and the black pigment synthesis gene, PPO, was found to be the candidate gene of sesame seed coat color. The comprehensively compared genomes of sesame landrace and modern variety produced massive useful genomic information, constituting a powerful tool to support genetic research, and molecular breeding of sesame.

  14. Identification of Sesame Genomic Variations from Genome Comparison of Landrace and Variety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Zhu, Xiaodong; Yu, Jingyin; Wang, Linhai; Zhang, Yanxin; Li, Donghua; Zhou, Rong; Zhang, Xiurong

    2016-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is one of the main oilseed crops, providing vegetable oil and protein to human. Landrace is the gene source of variety, carrying many desire alleles for genetic improvement. Despite the importance of sesame landrace, genome of sesame landrace remains unexplored and genomic variations between landrace and variety still is not clear. To identify the genomic variations between sesame landrace and variety, two representative sesame landrace accessions, “Baizhima” and “Mishuozhima,” were selected and re-sequenced. The genome sequencing and de novo assembling of the two sesame landraces resulted in draft genomes of 267 Mb and 254 Mb, respectively, with the contig N50 more than 47 kb. Totally, 1,332,025 SNPs and 506,245 InDels were identified from the genome of “Baizhima” and “Mishuozhima” by comparison of the genome of a variety “Zhongzhi13.” Among the genomic variations, 70,018 SNPs and 8311 InDels were located in the coding regions of genes. Genomic variations may contribute to variation of sesame agronomic traits such as flowering time, plant height, and oil content. The identified genomic variations were successfully used in the QTL mapping and the black pigment synthesis gene, PPO, was found to be the candidate gene of sesame seed coat color. The comprehensively compared genomes of sesame landrace and modern variety produced massive useful genomic information, constituting a powerful tool to support genetic research, and molecular breeding of sesame. PMID:27536315

  15. Justice and the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

  16. Justice and the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

  17. Genomic variation in Salmonella enterica core genes for epidemiological typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leekitcharoenphon Pimlapas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological advances in high throughput genome sequencing are making whole genome sequencing (WGS available as a routine tool for bacterial typing. Standardized procedures for identification of relevant genes and of variation are needed to enable comparison between studies and over time. The core genes--the genes that are conserved in all (or most members of a genus or species--are potentially good candidates for investigating genomic variation in phylogeny and epidemiology. Results We identify a set of 2,882 core genes clusters based on 73 publicly available Salmonella enterica genomes and evaluate their value as typing targets, comparing whole genome typing and traditional methods such as 16S and MLST. A consensus tree based on variation of core genes gives much better resolution than 16S and MLST; the pan-genome family tree is similar to the consensus tree, but with higher confidence. The core genes can be divided into two categories: a few highly variable genes and a larger set of conserved core genes, with low variance. For the most variable core genes, the variance in amino acid sequences is higher than for the corresponding nucleotide sequences, suggesting that there is a positive selection towards mutations leading to amino acid changes. Conclusions Genomic variation within the core genome is useful for investigating molecular evolution and providing candidate genes for bacterial genome typing. Identification of genes with different degrees of variation is important especially in trend analysis.

  18. Implications of the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitcher, P.

    1998-11-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP), launched in 1991, aims to map and sequence the human genome by 2006. During the fifteen-year life of the project, it is projected that $3 billion in federal funds will be allocated to it. The ultimate aims of spending this money are to analyze the structure of human DNA, to identify all human genes, to recognize the functions of those genes, and to prepare for the biology and medicine of the twenty-first century. The following summary examines some of the implications of the program, concentrating on its scientific import and on the ethical and social problems that it raises. Its aim is to expose principles that might be used in applying the information which the HGP will generate. There is no attempt here to translate the principles into detailed proposals for legislation. Arguments and discussion can be found in the full report, but, like this summary, that report does not contain any legislative proposals.

  19. The human genome project and the future of medical practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The human genome project and the future of medical practice. ... the planning stages of the human genome project, the technology and sequence data ... the quality of healthcare available in the resource-rich and the resource-poor countries.

  20. Origins of the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, Robert

    1993-07-01

    The human genome project was borne of technology, grew into a science bureaucracy in the US and throughout the world, and is now being transformed into a hybrid academic and commercial enterprise. The next phase of the project promises to veer more sharply toward commercial application, harnessing both the technical prowess of molecular biology and the rapidly growing body of knowledge about DNA structure to the pursuit of practical benefits. Faith that the systematic analysis of DNA structure will prove to be a powerful research tool underlies the rationale behind the genome project. The notion that most genetic information is embedded in the sequence of CNA base pairs comprising chromosomes is a central tenet. A rough analogy is to liken an organism's genetic code to computer code. The coal of the genome project, in this parlance, is to identify and catalog 75,000 or more files (genes) in the software that directs construction of a self-modifying and self-replicating system -- a living organism.

  1. Origins of the Human Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Deegan, Robert (Affiliation: Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences)

    1993-07-01

    The human genome project was borne of technology, grew into a science bureaucracy in the United States and throughout the world, and is now being transformed into a hybrid academic and commercial enterprise. The next phase of the project promises to veer more sharply toward commercial application, harnessing both the technical prowess of molecular biology and the rapidly growing body of knowledge about DNA structure to the pursuit of practical benefits. Faith that the systematic analysis of DNA structure will prove to be a powerful research tool underlies the rationale behind the genome project. The notion that most genetic information is embedded in the sequence of CNA base pairs comprising chromosomes is a central tenet. A rough analogy is to liken an organism's genetic code to computer code. The coal of the genome project, in this parlance, is to identify and catalog 75,000 or more files (genes) in the software that directs construction of a self-modifying and self-replicating system -- a living organism.

  2. The Human Genome Diversity (HGD) Project. Summary document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    In 1991 a group of human geneticists and molecular biologists proposed to the scientific community that a world wide survey be undertaken of variation in the human genome. To aid their considerations, the committee therefore decided to hold a small series of international workshops to explore the major scientific issues involved. The intention was to define a framework for the project which could provide a basis for much wider and more detailed discussion and planning--it was recognized that the successful implementation of the proposed project, which has come to be known as the Human Genome Diversity (HGD) Project, would not only involve scientists but also various national and international non-scientific groups all of which should contribute to the project`s development. The international HGD workshop held in Sardinia in September 1993 was the last in the initial series of planning workshops. As such it not only explored new ground but also pulled together into a more coherent form much of the formal and informal discussion that had taken place in the preceding two years. This report presents the deliberations of the Sardinia workshop within a consideration of the overall development of the HGD Project to date.

  3. An overview of the human genome project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batzer, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The human genome project is one of the most ambitious scientific projects to date, with the ultimate goal being a nucleotide sequence for all four billion bases of human DNA. In the process of determining the nucleotide sequence for each base, the location, function, and regulatory regions from the estimated 100,000 human genes will be identified. The genome project itself relies upon maps of the human genetic code derived from several different levels of resolution. Genetic linkage analysis provides a low resolution genome map. The information for genetic linkage maps is derived from the analysis of chromosome specific markers such as Sequence Tagged Sites (STSs), Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTRs) or other polymorphic (highly informative) loci in a number of different-families. Using this information the location of an unknown disease gene can be limited to a region comprised of one million base pairs of DNA or less. After this point, one must construct or have access to a physical map of the region of interest. Physical mapping involves the construction of an ordered overlapping (contiguous) set of recombinant DNA clones. These clones may be derived from a number of different vectors including cosmids, Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs), P1 derived Artificial Chromosomes (PACs), somatic cell hybrids, or Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs). The ultimate goal for physical mapping is to establish a completely overlapping (contiguous) set of clones for the entire genome. After a gene or region of interest has been localized using physical mapping the nucleotide sequence is determined. The overlap between genetic mapping, physical mapping and DNA sequencing has proven to be a powerful tool for the isolation of disease genes through positional cloning.

  4. Perspectives on human genetic variation from the HapMap Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVean, Gil; Spencer, Chris C A; Chaix, Raphaelle

    2005-10-01

    The completion of the International HapMap Project marks the start of a new phase in human genetics. The aim of the project was to provide a resource that facilitates the design of efficient genome-wide association studies, through characterising patterns of genetic variation and linkage disequilibrium in a sample of 270 individuals across four geographical populations. In total, over one million SNPs have been typed across these genomes, providing an unprecedented view of human genetic diversity. In this review we focus on what the HapMap Project has taught us about the structure of human genetic variation and the fundamental molecular and evolutionary processes that shape it.

  5. Perspectives on human genetic variation from the HapMap Project.

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT The completion of the International HapMap Project marks the start of a new phase in human genetics. The aim of the project was to provide a resource that facilitates the design of efficient genome-wide association studies, through characterising patterns of genetic variation and linkage disequilibrium in a sample of 270 individuals across four geographical populations. In total, over one million SNPs have been typed across these genomes, providing an unprecedented view of human gene...

  6. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU XueMei; XIAO HuaSheng

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high.throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome. These variants include copy number variations (CNVs), inversions, insertions, deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences. This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences. Particularly, we highlight the array-based, PCR-based and sequencing-based assays, including array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA), multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), paired-end mapping (PEM), and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  7. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high-throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome.These variants include copy number variations(CNVs),inversions,insertions,deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences.This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences.Particularly,we highlight the array-based,PCR-based and sequencing-based assays,including array-based comparative genomic hybridization(aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis(ROMA),multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization(MAPH),multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA),paired-end mapping(PEM),and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies.Furthermore,we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  8. Exuberant innovation: The Human Genome Project

    CERN Document Server

    Gisler, Monika; Woodard, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed synthesis of the development of the Human Genome Project (HGP) from 1986 to 2003 in order to test the "social bubble" hypothesis that strong social interactions between enthusiastic supporters of the HGP weaved a network of reinforcing feedbacks that led to a widespread endorsement and extraordinary commitment by those involved in the project, beyond what would be rationalized by a standard cost-benefit analysis in the presence of extraordinary uncertainties and risks. The vigorous competition and race between the initially public project and several private initiatives is argued to support the social bubble hypothesis. We also present quantitative analyses of the concomitant financial bubble concentrated on the biotech sector. Confirmation of this hypothesis is offered by the present consensus that it will take decades to exploit the fruits of the HGP, via a slow and arduous process aiming at disentangling the extraordinary complexity of the human complex body. The HGP has ushered other...

  9. Chambolle's Projection Algorithm for Total Variation Denoising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Duran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Denoising is the problem of removing the inherent noise from an image. The standard noise model is additive white Gaussian noise, where the observed image f is related to the underlying true image u by the degradation model f=u+n, and n is supposed to be at each pixel independently and identically distributed as a zero-mean Gaussian random variable. Since this is an ill-posed problem, Rudin, Osher and Fatemi introduced the total variation as a regularizing term. It has proved to be quite efficient for regularizing images without smoothing the boundaries of the objects. This paper focuses on the simple description of the theory and on the implementation of Chambolle's projection algorithm for minimizing the total variation of a grayscale image. Furthermore, we adapt the algorithm to the vectorial total variation for color images. The implementation is described in detail and its parameters are analyzed and varied to come up with a reliable implementation.

  10. Phenotypic impact of genomic structural variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Symmons, Orsolya; Spitz, François;

    2013-01-01

    Genomic structural variants have long been implicated in phenotypic diversity and human disease, but dissecting the mechanisms by which they exert their functional impact has proven elusive. Recently however, developments in high-throughput DNA sequencing and chromosomal engineering technology have...... facilitated the analysis of structural variants in human populations and model systems in unprecedented detail. In this Review, we describe how structural variants can affect molecular and cellular processes, leading to complex organismal phenotypes, including human disease. We further present advances...

  11. Genome Architecture and Its Roles in Human Copy Number Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Besides single-nucleotide variants in the human genome, large-scale genomic variants, such as copy number variations (CNVs, are being increasingly discovered as a genetic source of human diversity and the pathogenic factors of diseases. Recent experimental findings have shed light on the links between different genome architectures and CNV mutagenesis. In this review, we summarize various genomic features and discuss their contributions to CNV formation. Genomic repeats, including both low-copy and high-copy repeats, play important roles in CNV instability, which was initially known as DNA recombination events. Furthermore, it has been found that human genomic repeats can also induce DNA replication errors and consequently result in CNV mutations. Some recent studies showed that DNA replication timing, which reflects the high-order information of genomic organization, is involved in human CNV mutations. Our review highlights that genome architecture, from DNA sequence to high-order genomic organization, is an important molecular factor in CNV mutagenesis and human genomic instability.

  12. Salmon and steelhead genetics and genomics - Epigenetic and genomic variation in salmon and steelhead

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct analyses of epigenetic and genomic variation in Chinook salmon and steelhead to determine influence on phenotypic expression of life history traits. Genetic,...

  13. Genome projects 5W1H: what, where, when, why, how and in which population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Fidanoğlu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Genome projects aim to decode an organism's complete set of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, which can be described as the living code of organism. The idea of the Human Genome Project (HGP was conceived in the early 1980s. The project was started at 1990 and finished at 2003. The sequencing of the whole human genome derived from the DNA of several anonymous volunteers, costed 3.8 billion dollars. In order to annotate the genome data, the 'topography of the genome' and the anatomy of the genes should have been revealed. For this purpose, genome projects of several model organisms was carried out in parallel with HGP with the aim to identify basic structural components, organizational structure and evolutionarily development of the genome. With the advent of microarray technology in the early 2000s, high-throughput screening of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs and Copy Number Variations (CNVs became feasible. After the completion of HGP in 13 years, James D. Watson's genome was sequenced with 1 million dollar budget in just 2 months using next generation sequencing technology. Today a human genome can be sequenced in just one day with the cost of 6.600 USD. In this reviev the HGP which created big expectations especially in medicine will be explained from its start to the present. Then we will summarize the studies paving the road to personalized medicine emphasizing the fact that to reveal the meaning of genomic information, it should become computable.

  14. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project

    OpenAIRE

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D.; Debra J. H. Mathews

    2015-01-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) Project is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with...

  15. Global assessment of genomic variation in cattle by genome resequencing and high-throughput genotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Bujie; Fadista, João; Thomsen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    sequence of a single Holstein Friesian bull with data from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array technologies to determine a comprehensive spectrum of genomic variation. The performance of resequencing SNP detection was assessed by combining SNPs that were...... of split-read and read-pair approaches proved to be complementary in finding different signatures. CNVs were identified on the basis of the depth of sequenced reads, and by using SNP and CGH arrays. Conclusions Our results provide high resolution mapping of diverse classes of genomic variation...

  16. Population genetic inference from personal genome data: impact of ancestry and admixture on human genomic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Jeffrey M; Gravel, Simon; Byrnes, Jake; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Musharoff, Shaila; Bryc, Katarzyna; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Brisbin, Abra; Sheth, Vrunda; Chen, Rong; McLaughlin, Stephen F; Peckham, Heather E; Omberg, Larsson; Bormann Chung, Christina A; Stanley, Sarah; Pearlstein, Kevin; Levandowsky, Elizabeth; Acevedo-Acevedo, Suehelay; Auton, Adam; Keinan, Alon; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Eng, Celeste; Burchard, Esteban G; Russell, Archie; Reynolds, Andy; Clark, Andrew G; Reese, Martin G; Lincoln, Stephen E; Butte, Atul J; De La Vega, Francisco M; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2012-10-05

    Full sequencing of individual human genomes has greatly expanded our understanding of human genetic variation and population history. Here, we present a systematic analysis of 50 human genomes from 11 diverse global populations sequenced at high coverage. Our sample includes 12 individuals who have admixed ancestry and who have varying degrees of recent (within the last 500 years) African, Native American, and European ancestry. We found over 21 million single-nucleotide variants that contribute to a 1.75-fold range in nucleotide heterozygosity across diverse human genomes. This heterozygosity ranged from a high of one heterozygous site per kilobase in west African genomes to a low of 0.57 heterozygous sites per kilobase in segments inferred to have diploid Native American ancestry from the genomes of Mexican and Puerto Rican individuals. We show evidence of all three continental ancestries in the genomes of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and African American populations, and the genome-wide statistics are highly consistent across individuals from a population once ancestry proportions have been accounted for. Using a generalized linear model, we identified subtle variations across populations in the proportion of neutral versus deleterious variation and found that genome-wide statistics vary in admixed populations even once ancestry proportions have been factored in. We further infer that multiple periods of gene flow shaped the diversity of admixed populations in the Americas-70% of the European ancestry in today's African Americans dates back to European gene flow happening only 7-8 generations ago.

  17. Genome-wide sequence variations among Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yi eHsu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. ap, the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD, infects many farmed ruminants, wildlife animals and humans. To better understand the molecular pathogenesis of these infections, we analyzed the whole genome sequences of several M. ap and M. avium subspecies avium (M. avium strains isolated from various hosts and environments. Using Next-generation sequencing technology, all 6 M. ap isolates showed a high percentage of homology (98% to the reference genome sequence of M. ap K-10 isolated from cattle. However, 2 M. avium isolates (DT 78 and Env 77 showed significant sequence diversity from the reference strain M. avium 104. The genomes of M. avium isolates DT 78 and Env 77 exhibited only 87% and 40% homology, respectively, to the M. avium 104 reference genome. Within the M. ap isolates, genomic rearrangements (insertions/deletions, Indels were not detected, and only unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were observed among the 6 M. ap strains. While most of the SNPs (~100 in M. ap genomes were non-synonymous, a total of ~ 6000 SNPs were detected among M. avium genomes, most of them were synonymous suggesting a differential selective pressure between M. ap and M. avium isolates. In addition, SNPs-based phylo-genomic analysis showed that isolates from goat and Oryx are closely related to the cattle (K-10 strain while the human isolate (M. ap 4B is closely related to the environmental strains, indicating environmental source to human infections. Overall, SNPs were the most common variations among M. ap isolates while SNPs in addition to Indels were prevalent among M. avium isolates. Genomic variations will be useful in designing host-specific markers for the analysis of mycobacterial evolution and for developing novel diagnostics directed against Johne’s disease in animals.

  18. Genomics :GTL project quarterly report April 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rintoul, Mark Daniel; Martino, Anthony A.; Palenik, Brian; Heffelfinger, Grant S.; Xu, Ying; Geist, Al; Gorin, Andrey

    2005-11-01

    This SAND report provides the technical progress through April 2005 of the Sandia-led project, ''Carbon Sequestration in Synechococcus Sp.: From Molecular Machines to Hierarchical Modeling'', funded by the DOE Office of Science GenomicsGTL Program. Understanding, predicting, and perhaps manipulating carbon fixation in the oceans has long been a major focus of biological oceanography and has more recently been of interest to a broader audience of scientists and policy makers. It is clear that the oceanic sinks and sources of CO{sub 2} are important terms in the global environmental response to anthropogenic atmospheric inputs of CO{sub 2} and that oceanic microorganisms play a key role in this response. However, the relationship between this global phenomenon and the biochemical mechanisms of carbon fixation in these microorganisms is poorly understood. In this project, we will investigate the carbon sequestration behavior of Synechococcus Sp., an abundant marine cyanobacteria known to be important to environmental responses to carbon dioxide levels, through experimental and computational methods. This project is a combined experimental and computational effort with emphasis on developing and applying new computational tools and methods. Our experimental effort will provide the biology and data to drive the computational efforts and include significant investment in developing new experimental methods for uncovering protein partners, characterizing protein complexes, identifying new binding domains. We will also develop and apply new data measurement and statistical methods for analyzing microamy experiments. Computational tools will be essential to our efforts to discover and characterize the function of the molecular machines of Synechococcus. To this end, molecular simulation methods will be coupled with knowledge discovery from diverse biological data sets for high-throughput discovery and characterization of protein-protein complexes. In

  19. Genomic Copy Number Variation in Disorders of Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To highlight recent discoveries in the area of genomic copy number variation in neuropsychiatric disorders including intellectual disability, autism, and schizophrenia. To emphasize new principles emerging from this area, involving the genetic architecture of disease, pathophysiology, and diagnosis. Method: Review of studies published…

  20. Mapping copy number variation by population-scale genome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Ryan E.; Walter, Klaudia; Stewart, Chip;

    2011-01-01

    Genomic structural variants (SVs) are abundant in humans, differing from other forms of variation in extent, origin and functional impact. Despite progress in SV characterization, the nucleotide resolution architecture of most SVs remains unknown. We constructed a map of unbalanced SVs (that is, ...

  1. Repetitive elements, architects of genomic variation in Verticillium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vascular wilt pathogens in the genus Verticillium show considerable variation with respect to their host ranges, genomic organization, and the variety and number of transposable elements (TEs) that they carry. These families of TE sequences were first documented in the wide host range, plant pathog...

  2. Life in our hands? Some ethical perspectives on the human genome and human genome diversity projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius W. du Toit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article dealt with implications of the human genome and the human genome diversity project. It examined some theological implications, such as: humans as the image of God, God as the creator of life, the changed role of miracles and healings in religion, the sacredness of nature, life and the genome. Ethical issues that were addressed include eugenics, germline intervention, determinism and the human genome diversity project. Economic and legal factors that play a role were also discussed. Whilst positive aspects of genome research were considered, a critical stance was adopted towards patenting the human genome and some concluding guidelines were proposed.

  3. International network of cancer genome projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudson, Thomas J.; Anderson, Warwick; Aretz, Axel; Barker, Anna D.; Bell, Cindy; Bernabe, Rosa R.; Bhan, M. K.; Calvo, Fabien; Eerola, Iiro; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Guttmacher, Alan; Guyer, Mark; Hemsley, Fiona M.; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Kerr, David; Klatt, Peter; Kolar, Patrik; Kusuda, Jun; Lane, David P.; Laplace, Frank; Lu, Youyong; Nettekoven, Gerd; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Rao, T. S.; Remacle, Jacques; Schafer, Alan J.; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Stratton, Michael R.; Vockley, Joseph G.; Watanabe, Koichi; Yang, Huanming; Yuen, Matthew M. F.; Knoppers, M.; Bobrow, Martin; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Dressler, Lynn G.; Dyke, Stephanie O. M.; Joly, Yann; Kato, Kazuto; Kennedy, Karen L.; Nicolas, Pilar; Parker, Michael J.; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M.; Shaw, Kenna M.; Wallace, Susan; Wiesner, Georgia L.; Zeps, Nikolajs; Lichter, Peter; Biankin, Andrew V.; Chabannon, Christian; Chin, Lynda; Clement, Bruno; de Alava, Enrique; Degos, Francoise; Ferguson, Martin L.; Geary, Peter; Hayes, D. Neil; Johns, Amber L.; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Penny, Robert; Piris, Miguel A.; Sarin, Rajiv; Scarpa, Aldo; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; van de Vijver, Marc; Futreal, P. Andrew; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Bayes, Monica; Bowtell, David D. L.; Campbell, Peter J.; Estivill, Xavier; Grimmond, Sean M.; Gut, Ivo; Hirst, Martin; Lopez-Otin, Carlos; Majumder, Partha; Marra, Marco; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Ning, Zemin; Puente, Xose S.; Ruan, Yijun; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Stratton, Michael R.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Swerdlow, Harold; Velculescu, Victor E.; Wilson, Richard K.; Xue, Hong H.; Yang, Liu; Spellman, Paul T.; Bader, Gary D.; Boutros, Paul C.; Campbell, Peter J.; Flicek, Paul; Getz, Gad; Guigo, Roderic; Guo, Guangwu; Haussler, David; Heath, Simon; Hubbard, Tim J.; Jiang, Tao; Jones, Steven M.; Li, Qibin; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Luo, Ruibang; Pearson, John V.; Puente, Xose S.; Quesada, Victor; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Sander, Chris; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Speed, Terence P.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Valencia, Alfonso; Wheeler, David A.; Wu, Honglong; Zhao, Shancen; Zhou, Guangyu; Stein, Lincoln D.; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J.; Joly, Yann; Jones, Steven M.; Lathrop, Mark; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Ouellette, B. F. Francis; Spellman, Paul T.; Teague, Jon W.; Thomas, Gilles; Valencia, Alfonso; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Kennedy, Karen L.; Axton, Myles; Dyke, Stephanie O. M.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Gunter, Chris; Guyer, Mark; McPherson, John D.; Miller, Linda J.; Ozenberger, Brad; Kasprzyk, Arek; Zhang, Junjun; Haider, Syed A.; Wang, Jianxin; Yung, Christina K.; Cross, Anthony; Liang, Yong; Gnaneshan, Saravanamuttu; Guberman, Jonathan; Hsu, Jack; Bobrow, Martin; Chalmers, Don R. C.; Hasel, Karl W.; Joly, Yann; Kaan, Terry S. H.; Kennedy, Karen L.; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Lowrance, William W.; Masui, Tohru; Nicolas, Pilar; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Vergely, Catherine; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Grimmond, Sean M.; Biankin, Andrew V.; Bowtell, David D. L.; Cloonan, Nicole; Defazio, Anna; Eshleman, James R.; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Gardiner, Brooke A.; Kench, James G.; Scarpa, Aldo; Sutherland, Robert L.; Tempero, Margaret A.; Waddell, Nicola J.; Wilson, Peter J.; Gallinger, Steve; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Chin, Lynda; DePinho, Ronald A.; Thayer, Sarah; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi; Shazand, Kamran; Beck, Timothy; Sam, Michelle; Timms, Lee; Ballin, Vanessa; Lu, Youyong; Ji, Jiafu; Zhang, Xiuqing; Chen, Feng; Hu, Xueda; Zhou, Guangyu; Yang, Qi; Tian, Geng; Zhang, Lianhai; Xing, Xiaofang; Li, Xianghong; Zhu, Zhenggang; Yu, Yingyan; Yu, Jun; Yang, Huanming; Lathrop, Mark; Tost, Joerg; Brennan, Paul; Holcatova, Ivana; Zaridze, David; Brazma, Alvis; Egevad, Lars; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Banks, Rosamonde Elizabeth; Uhlen, Mathias; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Viksna, Juris; Ponten, Fredrik; Skryabin, Konstantin; Stratton, Michael R.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Birney, Ewan; Borg, Ake; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Caldas, Carlos; Foekens, John A.; Martin, Sancha; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Sotiriou, Christos; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Thomas, Gilles; van de Vijver, Marc; van't Veer, Laura; Birnbaum, Daniel; Blanche, Helene; Boucher, Pascal; Boyault, Sandrine; Chabannon, Christian; Gut, Ivo; Masson-Jacquemier, Jocelyne D.; Lathrop, Mark; Pauporte, Iris; Pivot, Xavier; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tabone, Eric; Theillet, Charles; Thomas, Gilles; Tost, Joerg; Treilleux, Isabelle; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Clement, Bruno; Decaens, Thomas; Degos, Francoise; Franco, Dominique; Gut, Ivo; Gut, Marta; Heath, Simon; Lathrop, Mark; Samuel, Didier; Thomas, Gilles; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Lichter, Peter; Eils, Roland; Brors, Benedikt; Korbel, Jan O.; Korshunov, Andrey; Landgraf, Pablo; Lehrach, Hans; Pfister, Stefan; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Reifenberger, Guido; Taylor, Michael D.; von Kalle, Christof; Majumder, Partha P.; Sarin, Rajiv; Scarpa, Aldo; Pederzoli, Paolo; Lawlor, Rita T.; Delledonne, Massimo; Bardelli, Alberto; Biankin, Andrew V.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Gress, Thomas; Klimstra, David; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Kusuda, Jun; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Miyano, Satoru; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazuto; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Campo, Elias; Lopez-Otin, Carlos; Estivill, Xavier; Guigo, Roderic; de Sanjose, Silvia; Piris, Miguel A.; Montserrat, Emili; Gonzalez-Diaz, Marcos; Puente, Xose S.; Jares, Pedro; Valencia, Alfonso; Himmelbaue, Heinz; Quesada, Victor; Bea, Silvia; Stratton, Michael R.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Campbell, Peter J.; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Richardson, Andrea L.; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; van de Vijver, Marc; Thomas, Gilles; Masson-Jacquemier, Jocelyne D.; Aparicio, Samuel; Borg, Ake; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Caldas, Carlos; Foekens, John A.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; van't Veer, Laura; Easton, Douglas F.; Spellman, Paul T.; Martin, Sancha; Chin, Lynda; Collins, Francis S.; Compton, Carolyn C.; Ferguson, Martin L.; Getz, Gad; Gunter, Chris; Guyer, Mark; Hayes, D. Neil; Lander, Eric S.; Ozenberger, Brad; Penny, Robert; Peterson, Jane; Sander, Chris; Speed, Terence P.; Spellman, Paul T.; Wheeler, David A.; Wilson, Richard K.; Chin, Lynda; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Lander, Eric S.; Lichter, Peter; Stratton, Michael R.; Bobrow, Martin; Burke, Wylie; Collins, Francis S.; DePinho, Ronald A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Green, Anthony R.; Guyer, Mark; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Hubbard, Tim J.; Kallioniemi, Olli P.; Kennedy, Karen L.; Ley, Timothy J.; Liu, Edison T.; Lu, Youyong; Majumder, Partha; Marra, Marco; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Schafer, Alan J.; Spellman, Paul T.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Wainwright, Brandon J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Yang, Huanming

    2010-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) was launched to coordinate large-scale cancer genome studies in tumours from 50 different cancer types and/or subtypes that are of clinical and societal importance across the globe. Systematic studies of more than 25,000 cancer genomes at the genomic

  4. Nuclear DNA content in Sinningia (Gesneriaceae); intraspecific genome size variation and genome characterization in S. speciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitlin, David; Pierce, Andrew J

    2010-12-01

    The Gesneriaceae (Lamiales) is a family of flowering plants comprising >3000 species of mainly tropical origin, the most familiar of which is the cultivated African violet (Saintpaulia spp.). Species of Gesneriaceae are poorly represented in the lists of taxa sampled for genome size estimation; measurements are available for three species of Ramonda and one each of Haberlea, Saintpaulia, and Streptocarpus, all species of Old World origin. We report here nuclear genome size estimates for 10 species of Sinningia, a neotropical genus largely restricted to Brazil. Flow cytometry of leaf cell nuclei showed that holoploid genome size in Sinningia is very small (approximately two times the size of the Arabidopsis genome), and is small compared to the other six species of Gesneriaceae with genome size estimates. We also documented intraspecific genome size variation of 21%-26% within a group of wild Sinningia speciosa (Lodd.) Hiern collections. In addition, we analyzed 1210 genome survey sequences from S. speciosa to characterize basic features of the nuclear genome such as guanine-cytosine content, types of repetitive elements, numbers of protein-coding sequences, and sequences unique to S. speciosa. We included several other angiosperm species as genome size standards, one of which was the snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.; Veronicaceae, Lamiales). Multiple measurements on three accessions indicated that the genome size of A. majus is ~633 × 10⁶ base pairs, which is approximately 40% of the previously published estimate.

  5. Weeding out the genes: the Arabidopsis genome project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martienssen, R A

    2000-05-01

    The Arabidopsis genome sequence is scheduled for completion at the end of this year (December 2000). It will be the first higher plant genome to be sequenced, and will allow a detailed comparison with bacterial, yeast and animal genomes. Already, two of the five chromosomes have been sequenced, and we have had our first glimpse of higher eukaryotic centromeres, and the structure of heterochromatin. The implications for understanding plant gene function, genome structure and genome organization are profound. In this review, the lessons learned for future genome projects are reviewed as well as a summary of the initial findings in Arabidopsis.

  6. Personal and population genomics of human regulatory variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernot, Benjamin; Stergachis, Andrew B; Maurano, Matthew T; Vierstra, Jeff; Neph, Shane; Thurman, Robert E; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Akey, Joshua M

    2012-09-01

    The characteristics and evolutionary forces acting on regulatory variation in humans remains elusive because of the difficulty in defining functionally important noncoding DNA. Here, we combine genome-scale maps of regulatory DNA marked by DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) from 138 cell and tissue types with whole-genome sequences of 53 geographically diverse individuals in order to better delimit the patterns of regulatory variation in humans. We estimate that individuals likely harbor many more functionally important variants in regulatory DNA compared with protein-coding regions, although they are likely to have, on average, smaller effect sizes. Moreover, we demonstrate that there is significant heterogeneity in the level of functional constraint in regulatory DNA among different cell types. We also find marked variability in functional constraint among transcription factor motifs in regulatory DNA, with sequence motifs for major developmental regulators, such as HOX proteins, exhibiting levels of constraint comparable to protein-coding regions. Finally, we perform a genome-wide scan of recent positive selection and identify hundreds of novel substrates of adaptive regulatory evolution that are enriched for biologically interesting pathways such as melanogenesis and adipocytokine signaling. These data and results provide new insights into patterns of regulatory variation in individuals and populations and demonstrate that a large proportion of functionally important variation lies beyond the exome.

  7. Genomic variation landscape of the human gut microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schloissnig, Siegfried; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Sunagawa, Shinichi

    2013-01-01

    Whereas large-scale efforts have rapidly advanced the understanding and practical impact of human genomic variation, the practical impact of variation is largely unexplored in the human microbiome. We therefore developed a framework for metagenomic variation analysis and applied it to 252 faecal...... metagenomes of 207 individuals from Europe and North America. Using 7.4 billion reads aligned to 101 reference species, we detected 10.3 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 107,991 short insertions/deletions, and 1,051 structural variants. The average ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous...... polymorphism rates of 0.11 was more variable between gut microbial species than across human hosts. Subjects sampled at varying time intervals exhibited individuality and temporal stability of SNP variation patterns, despite considerable composition changes of their gut microbiota. This indicates...

  8. Genic intolerance to functional variation and the interpretation of personal genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavé Petrovski

    Full Text Available A central challenge in interpreting personal genomes is determining which mutations most likely influence disease. Although progress has been made in scoring the functional impact of individual mutations, the characteristics of the genes in which those mutations are found remain largely unexplored. For example, genes known to carry few common functional variants in healthy individuals may be judged more likely to cause certain kinds of disease than genes known to carry many such variants. Until now, however, it has not been possible to develop a quantitative assessment of how well genes tolerate functional genetic variation on a genome-wide scale. Here we describe an effort that uses sequence data from 6503 whole exome sequences made available by the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project (ESP. Specifically, we develop an intolerance scoring system that assesses whether genes have relatively more or less functional genetic variation than expected based on the apparently neutral variation found in the gene. To illustrate the utility of this intolerance score, we show that genes responsible for Mendelian diseases are significantly more intolerant to functional genetic variation than genes that do not cause any known disease, but with striking variation in intolerance among genes causing different classes of genetic disease. We conclude by showing that use of an intolerance ranking system can aid in interpreting personal genomes and identifying pathogenic mutations.

  9. Discrepancy variation of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats in eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huan; Cai, Shengli; Yan, Binlun; Chen, Baiyao; Yu, Fei

    2009-01-01

    To address whether there are differences of variation among repeat motif types and among taxonomic groups, we present here an analysis of variation and correlation of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats in eukaryotic genomes. Ten taxonomic groups were compared, those being primates, mammalia (excluding primates and rodentia), rodentia, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles, insects, molluscs, plants and fungi, respectively. The data used in the analysis is from the literature published in the Journal of Molecular Ecology Notes. Analysis of variation reveals that there are no significant differences between AC and AG repeat motif types. Moreover, the number of alleles correlates positively with the copy number in both AG and AC repeats. Similar conclusions can be obtained from each taxonomic group. These results strongly suggest that the increase of SSR variation is almost linear with the increase of the copy number of each repeat motif. As well, the results suggest that the variability of SSR in the genomes of low-ranking species seem to be more than that of high-ranking species, excluding primates and fungi.

  10. Genomic Variation in Natural Populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Charles H.; Stevens, Kristian; Cardeno, Charis; Lee, Yuh Chwen G.; Schrider, Daniel R.; Pool, John E.; Langley, Sasha A.; Suarez, Charlyn; Corbett-Detig, Russell B.; Kolaczkowski, Bryan; Fang, Shu; Nista, Phillip M.; Holloway, Alisha K.; Kern, Andrew D.; Dewey, Colin N.; Song, Yun S.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Begun, David J.

    2012-01-01

    This report of independent genome sequences of two natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster (37 from North America and 6 from Africa) provides unique insight into forces shaping genomic polymorphism and divergence. Evidence of interactions between natural selection and genetic linkage is abundant not only in centromere- and telomere-proximal regions, but also throughout the euchromatic arms. Linkage disequilibrium, which decays within 1 kbp, exhibits a strong bias toward coupling of the more frequent alleles and provides a high-resolution map of recombination rate. The juxtaposition of population genetics statistics in small genomic windows with gene structures and chromatin states yields a rich, high-resolution annotation, including the following: (1) 5′- and 3′-UTRs are enriched for regions of reduced polymorphism relative to lineage-specific divergence; (2) exons overlap with windows of excess relative polymorphism; (3) epigenetic marks associated with active transcription initiation sites overlap with regions of reduced relative polymorphism and relatively reduced estimates of the rate of recombination; (4) the rate of adaptive nonsynonymous fixation increases with the rate of crossing over per base pair; and (5) both duplications and deletions are enriched near origins of replication and their density correlates negatively with the rate of crossing over. Available demographic models of X and autosome descent cannot account for the increased divergence on the X and loss of diversity associated with the out-of-Africa migration. Comparison of the variation among these genomes to variation among genomes from D. simulans suggests that many targets of directional selection are shared between these species. PMID:22673804

  11. Potential Value of Genomic Copy Number Variations in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjun Zhuo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a devastating neuropsychiatric disorder affecting approximately 1% of the global population, and the disease has imposed a considerable burden on families and society. Although, the exact cause of schizophrenia remains unknown, several lines of scientific evidence have revealed that genetic variants are strongly correlated with the development and early onset of the disease. In fact, the heritability among patients suffering from schizophrenia is as high as 80%. Genomic copy number variations (CNVs are one of the main forms of genomic variations, ubiquitously occurring in the human genome. An increasing number of studies have shown that CNVs account for population diversity and genetically related diseases, including schizophrenia. The last decade has witnessed rapid advances in the development of novel genomic technologies, which have led to the identification of schizophrenia-associated CNVs, insight into the roles of the affected genes in their intervals in schizophrenia, and successful manipulation of the target CNVs. In this review, we focus on the recent discoveries of important CNVs that are associated with schizophrenia and outline the potential values that the study of CNVs will bring to the areas of schizophrenia research, diagnosis, and therapy. Furthermore, with the help of the novel genetic tool known as the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats-associated nuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9 system, the pathogenic CNVs as genomic defects could be corrected. In conclusion, the recent novel findings of schizophrenia-associated CNVs offer an exciting opportunity for schizophrenia research to decipher the pathological mechanisms underlying the onset and development of schizophrenia as well as to provide potential clinical applications in genetic counseling, diagnosis, and therapy for this complex mental disease.

  12. Intra-genomic variation in the ribosomal repeats of nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly M Bik

    Full Text Available Ribosomal loci represent a major tool for investigating environmental diversity and community structure via high-throughput marker gene studies of eukaryotes (e.g. 18S rRNA. Since the estimation of species' abundance is a major goal of environmental studies (by counting numbers of sequences, understanding the patterns of rRNA copy number across species will be critical for informing such high-throughput approaches. Such knowledge is critical, given that ribosomal RNA genes exist within multi-copy repeated arrays in a genome. Here we measured the repeat copy number for six nematode species by mapping the sequences from whole genome shotgun libraries against reference sequences for their rRNA repeat. This revealed a 6-fold variation in repeat copy number amongst taxa investigated, with levels of intragenomic variation ranging from 56 to 323 copies of the rRNA array. By applying the same approach to four C. elegans mutation accumulation lines propagated by repeated bottlenecking for an average of ~400 generations, we find on average a 2-fold increase in repeat copy number (rate of increase in rRNA estimated at 0.0285-0.3414 copies per generation, suggesting that rRNA repeat copy number is subject to selection. Within each Caenorhabditis species, the majority of intragenomic variation found across the rRNA repeat was observed within gene regions (18S, 28S, 5.8S, suggesting that such intragenomic variation is not a product of selection for rRNA coding function. We find that the dramatic variation in repeat copy number among these six nematode genomes would limit the use of rRNA in estimates of organismal abundance. In addition, the unique pattern of variation within a single genome was uncorrelated with patterns of divergence between species, reflecting a strong signature of natural selection for rRNA function. A better understanding of the factors that control or affect copy number in these arrays, as well as their rates and patterns of evolution

  13. Genomic variability in Mexican chicken population using Copy Number Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Gorla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variants (CNVs are polymorphisms which influence phenotypic variation and are an important source of genetic variability [1]. In Mexico the backyard poultry population is a unique widespread Creole chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus population, an undefined cross among different breeds brought to Mexico from Europe and under natural selection for almost 500 years [2-3]. The aim of this study was to investigate genomic variation in the Mexican chicken population using CNVs. A total of 256 DNA samples genotyped with Axiom® Genome-Wide Chicken Genotyping Array were used in the analyses. The individual CNV calling, based on log-R ratio and B-allele frequency values, was performed using the Hidden Markov Model (HMM of PennCNV software on the autosomes [4-5]. CNVs were summarized to CNV regions (CNVRs at a population level (i.e. overlapping CNVs, using BEDTools. The HMM detected a total of 1924 CNVs in the genome of 256 samples resulting, at population level, in 1216 CNV regions, of which 959 gains, 226 losses and 31 complex CNVRs (i.e. containing both losses and gains, covering a total of 47 Mb of sequence length corresponding to 5,12 % of the chicken galGal4 assembly autosome. A comparison among this study and 7 previous reports about CNVs in chicken was performed, finding that the 1,216 CNVRs detected in this study overlap with 617 regions (51% mapped by others studies.   This study allowed a deep insight into the structural variation in the genome of unselected Mexican chicken population, which up to now has not been never genetically characterized with SNP markers. Based on a cluster analysis (pvclust – R package on CNV markers the population, even if presenting extreme morphological variation, does not resulted divided in differentiated genetic subpopulations. Finally this study provides a CNV map based on the 600K SNP chip array jointly with a genome-wide gene copy number estimates in Mexican chicken population.

  14. Genome downsizing and karyotype constancy in diploid and polyploid congeners: a model of genome size variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Lidia; Realini, María Florencia; Fourastié, María Florencia; García, Ana María; González, Graciela Esther

    2014-06-26

    Evolutionary chromosome change involves significant variation in DNA amount in diploids and genome downsizing in polyploids. Genome size and karyotype parameters of Hippeastrum species with different ploidy level were analysed. In Hippeastrum, polyploid species show less DNA content per basic genome than diploid species. The rate of variation is lower at higher ploidy levels. All the species have a basic number x = 11 and bimodal karyotypes. The basic karyotypes consist of four short metacentric chromosomes and seven large chromosomes (submetacentric and subtelocentric). The bimodal karyotype is preserved maintaining the relative proportions of members of the haploid chromosome set, even in the presence of genome downsizing. The constancy of the karyotype is maintained because changes in DNA amount are proportional to the length of the whole-chromosome complement and vary independently in the long and short sets of chromosomes. This karyotype constancy in taxa of Hippeastrum with different genome size and ploidy level indicates that the distribution of extra DNA within the complement is not at random and suggests the presence of mechanisms selecting for constancy, or against changes, in karyotype morphology.

  15. Rare and common regulatory variation in population-scale sequenced human genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen B Montgomery

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Population-scale genome sequencing allows the characterization of functional effects of a broad spectrum of genetic variants underlying human phenotypic variation. Here, we investigate the influence of rare and common genetic variants on gene expression patterns, using variants identified from sequencing data from the 1000 genomes project in an African and European population sample and gene expression data from lymphoblastoid cell lines. We detect comparable numbers of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs when compared to genotypes obtained from HapMap 3, but as many as 80% of the top expression quantitative trait variants (eQTVs discovered from 1000 genomes data are novel. The properties of the newly discovered variants suggest that mapping common causal regulatory variants is challenging even with full resequencing data; however, we observe significant enrichment of regulatory effects in splice-site and nonsense variants. Using RNA sequencing data, we show that 46.2% of nonsynonymous variants are differentially expressed in at least one individual in our sample, creating widespread potential for interactions between functional protein-coding and regulatory variants. We also use allele-specific expression to identify putative rare causal regulatory variants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that outlier expression values can be due to rare variant effects, and we approximate the number of such effects harboured in an individual by effect size. Our results demonstrate that integration of genomic and RNA sequencing analyses allows for the joint assessment of genome sequence and genome function.

  16. Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGAP generated a wide range of genomics data on cancerous cells that are accessible through easy-to-use online tools. Researchers, educators, and students can find "in silico" answers to biological questions through the CGAP website. Request a free copy of the CGAP Website Virtual Tour CD from ocg@mail.nih.gov to learn how to navigate the website.

  17. Regulatory hotspots in the malaria parasite genome dictate transcriptional variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Gonzales

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The determinants of transcriptional regulation in malaria parasites remain elusive. The presence of a well-characterized gene expression cascade shared by different Plasmodium falciparum strains could imply that transcriptional regulation and its natural variation do not contribute significantly to the evolution of parasite drug resistance. To clarify the role of transcriptional variation as a source of stain-specific diversity in the most deadly malaria species and to find genetic loci that dictate variations in gene expression, we examined genome-wide expression level polymorphisms (ELPs in a genetic cross between phenotypically distinct parasite clones. Significant variation in gene expression is observed through direct co-hybridizations of RNA from different P. falciparum clones. Nearly 18% of genes were regulated by a significant expression quantitative trait locus. The genetic determinants of most of these ELPs resided in hotspots that are physically distant from their targets. The most prominent regulatory locus, influencing 269 transcripts, coincided with a Chromosome 5 amplification event carrying the drug resistance gene, pfmdr1, and 13 other genes. Drug selection pressure in the Dd2 parental clone lineage led not only to a copy number change in the pfmdr1 gene but also to an increased copy number of putative neighboring regulatory factors that, in turn, broadly influence the transcriptional network. Previously unrecognized transcriptional variation, controlled by polymorphic regulatory genes and possibly master regulators within large copy number variants, contributes to sweeping phenotypic evolution in drug-resistant malaria parasites.

  18. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, N G; Shea, N [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  19. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, N. G.; Shea, N. eds.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  20. The Human Genome Project, and recent advances in personalized genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson BJ

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Brenda J Wilson, Stuart G Nicholls Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: The language of “personalized medicine” and “personal genomics” has now entered the common lexicon. The idea of personalized medicine is the integration of genomic risk assessment alongside other clinical investigations. Consistent with this approach, testing is delivered by health care professionals who are not medical geneticists, and where results represent risks, as opposed to clinical diagnosis of disease, to be interpreted alongside the entirety of a patient's health and medical data. In this review we consider the evidence concerning the application of such personalized genomics within the context of population screening, and potential implications that arise from this. We highlight two general approaches which illustrate potential uses of genomic information in screening. The first is a narrowly targeted approach in which genetic profiling is linked with standard population-based screening for diseases; the second is a broader targeting of variants associated with multiple single gene disorders, performed opportunistically on patients being investigated for unrelated conditions. In doing so we consider the organization and evaluation of tests and services, the challenge of interpretation with less targeted testing, professional confidence, barriers in practice, and education needs. We conclude by discussing several issues pertinent to health policy, namely: avoiding the conflation of genetics with biological determinism, resisting the “technological imperative”, due consideration of the organization of screening services, the need for professional education, as well as informed decision making and public understanding. Keywords: genomics, personalized medicine, ethics, population health, evidence, education

  1. Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: The one thousand microbial genomes (KMG-I) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Eisen, Jonathan A; Garrity, George; Lilburn, Timothy G; Beck, Brian J; Whitman, William B; Hugenholtz, Phil; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-15

    The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project was launched by the JGI in 2007 as a pilot project with the objective of sequencing 250 bacterial and archaeal genomes. The two major goals of that project were (a) to test the hypothesis that there are many benefits to the use the phylogenetic diversity of organisms in the tree of life as a primary criterion for generating their genome sequence and (b) to develop the necessary framework, technology and organization for large-scale sequencing of microbial isolate genomes. While the GEBA pilot project has not yet been entirely completed, both of the original goals have already been successfully accomplished, leading the way for the next phase of the project. Here we propose taking the GEBA project to the next level, by generating high quality draft genomes for 1,000 bacterial and archaeal strains. This represents a combined 16-fold increase in both scale and speed as compared to the GEBA pilot project (250 isolate genomes in 4+ years). We will follow a similar approach for organism selection and sequencing prioritization as was done for the GEBA pilot project (i.e. phylogenetic novelty, availability and growth of cultures of type strains and DNA extraction capability), focusing on type strains as this ensures reproducibility of our results and provides the strongest linkage between genome sequences and other knowledge about each strain. In turn, this project will constitute a pilot phase of a larger effort that will target the genome sequences of all available type strains of the Bacteria and Archaea.

  2. Rapid detection of structural variation in a human genome using nanochannel-based genome mapping technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hastie, Alex R.; Cao, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    mutations; however, none of the current detection methods are comprehensive, and currently available methodologies are incapable of providing sufficient resolution and unambiguous information across complex regions in the human genome. To address these challenges, we applied a high-throughput, cost......BACKGROUND: Structural variants (SVs) are less common than single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels in the population, but collectively account for a significant fraction of genetic polymorphism and diseases. Base pair differences arising from SVs are on a much higher order (>100 fold) than point...... mapping technology as a comprehensive and cost-effective method for detecting structural variation and studying complex regions in the human genome, as well as deciphering viral integration into the host genome....

  3. Characterization of copy number variation in genomic regions containing STR loci using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repnikova, Elena A; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bailes, Andrea; Weber, Cecilia; Erdman, Linda; McKinney, Aimee; Ramsey, Sarah; Hashimoto, Sayaka; Lamb Thrush, Devon; Astbury, Caroline; Reshmi, Shalini C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Pyatt, Robert E

    2013-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) loci are commonly used in forensic casework, familial analysis for human identification, and for monitoring hematopoietic cell engraftment after bone marrow transplant. Unexpected genetic variation leading to sequence and length differences in STR loci can complicate STR typing, and presents challenges in casework interpretation. Copy number variation (CNV) is a relatively recently identified form of genetic variation consisting of genomic regions present at variable copy numbers within an individual compared to a reference genome. Large scale population studies have demonstrated that likely all individuals carry multiple regions with CNV of 1kb in size or greater in their genome. To date, no study correlating genomic regions containing STR loci with CNV has been conducted. In this study, we analyzed results from 32,850 samples sent for clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis for the presence of CNV at regions containing the 13 CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) STR, and the Amelogenin X (AMELX) and Amelogenin Y (AMELY) loci. Thirty-two individuals with CNV involving STR loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 7, 11, 12, 13, 16, and 21, and twelve with CNV involving the AMELX/AMELY loci were identified. These results were correlated with data from publicly available databases housing information on CNV identified in normal populations and additional clinical cases. These collective results demonstrate the presence of CNV in regions containing 9 of the 13 CODIS STR and AMELX/Y loci. Further characterization of STR profiles within regions of CNV, additional cataloging of these variants in multiple populations, and contributing such examples to the public domain will provide valuable information for reliable use of these loci.

  4. Structural variation in two human genomes mapped at single-nucleotide resolution by whole genome de novo assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Zheng, Hancheng; Luo, Ruibang

    2011-01-01

    Here we use whole-genome de novo assembly of second-generation sequencing reads to map structural variation (SV) in an Asian genome and an African genome. Our approach identifies small- and intermediate-size homozygous variants (1-50 kb) including insertions, deletions, inversions and their precise...

  5. The Genome 10K Project: a way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Paten, Benedict; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    The Genome 10K Project was established in 2009 by a consortium of biologists and genome scientists determined to facilitate the sequencing and analysis of the complete genomes of 10,000 vertebrate species. Since then the number of selected and initiated species has risen from ∼26 to 277 sequenced or ongoing with funding, an approximately tenfold increase in five years. Here we summarize the advances and commitments that have occurred by mid-2014 and outline the achievements and present challenges of reaching the 10,000-species goal. We summarize the status of known vertebrate genome projects, recommend standards for pronouncing a genome as sequenced or completed, and provide our present and future vision of the landscape of Genome 10K. The endeavor is ambitious, bold, expensive, and uncertain, but together the Genome 10K Consortium of Scientists and the worldwide genomics community are moving toward their goal of delivering to the coming generation the gift of genome empowerment for many vertebrate species.

  6. A decade of human genome project conclusion: Scientific diffusion about our genome knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Fernanda; Góes, Andréa

    2016-05-06

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) was initiated in 1990 and completed in 2003. It aimed to sequence the whole human genome. Although it represented an advance in understanding the human genome and its complexity, many questions remained unanswered. Other projects were launched in order to unravel the mysteries of our genome, including the ENCyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). This review aims to analyze the evolution of scientific knowledge related to both the HGP and ENCODE projects. Data were retrieved from scientific articles published in 1990-2014, a period comprising the development and the 10 years following the HGP completion. The fact that only 20,000 genes are protein and RNA-coding is one of the most striking HGP results. A new concept about the organization of genome arose. The ENCODE project was initiated in 2003 and targeted to map the functional elements of the human genome. This project revealed that the human genome is pervasively transcribed. Therefore, it was determined that a large part of the non-protein coding regions are functional. Finally, a more sophisticated view of chromatin structure emerged. The mechanistic functioning of the genome has been redrafted, revealing a much more complex picture. Besides, a gene-centric conception of the organism has to be reviewed. A number of criticisms have emerged against the ENCODE project approaches, raising the question of whether non-conserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Thus, HGP and ENCODE projects accomplished a great map of the human genome, but the data generated still requires further in depth analysis. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:215-223, 2016.

  7. PolyTB: A genomic variation map for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    KAUST Repository

    Coll, Francesc

    2014-02-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the second major cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide. Recent advances in DNA sequencing are leading to the ability to generate whole genome information in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC). The identification of informative genetic variants such as phylogenetic markers and those associated with drug resistance or virulence will help barcode Mtb in the context of epidemiological, diagnostic and clinical studies. Mtb genomic datasets are increasingly available as raw sequences, which are potentially difficult and computer intensive to process, and compare across studies. Here we have processed the raw sequence data (>1500 isolates, eight studies) to compile a catalogue of SNPs (n = 74,039, 63% non-synonymous, 51.1% in more than one isolate, i.e. non-private), small indels (n = 4810) and larger structural variants (n = 800). We have developed the PolyTB web-based tool (http://pathogenseq.lshtm.ac.uk/polytb) to visualise the resulting variation and important meta-data (e.g. in silico inferred strain-types, location) within geographical map and phylogenetic views. This resource will allow researchers to identify polymorphisms within candidate genes of interest, as well as examine the genomic diversity and distribution of strains. PolyTB source code is freely available to researchers wishing to develop similar tools for their pathogen of interest. 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Unexpected cross-species contamination in genome sequencing projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samier Merchant

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The raw data from a genome sequencing project sometimes contains DNA from contaminating organisms, which may be introduced during sample collection or sequence preparation. In some instances, these contaminants remain in the sequence even after assembly and deposition of the genome into public databases. As a result, searches of these databases may yield erroneous and confusing results. We used efficient microbiome analysis software to scan the draft assembly of domestic cow, Bos taurus, and identify 173 small contigs that appeared to derive from microbial contaminants. In the course of verifying these findings, we discovered that one genome, Neisseria gonorrhoeae TCDC-NG08107, although putatively a complete genome, contained multiple sequences that actually derived from the cow and sheep genomes. Our findings illustrate the need to carefully validate findings of anomalous DNA that rely on comparisons to either draft or finished genomes.

  9. Transcriptome, methylome and genomic variations analysis of ectopic thyroid glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Abu-Khudir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congenital hypothyroidism from thyroid dysgenesis (CHTD is predominantly a sporadic disease characterized by defects in the differentiation, migration or growth of thyroid tissue. Of these defects, incomplete migration resulting in ectopic thyroid tissue is the most common (up to 80%. Germinal mutations in the thyroid-related transcription factors NKX2.1, FOXE1, PAX-8, and NKX2.5 have been identified in only 3% of patients with sporadic CHTD. Moreover, a survey of monozygotic twins yielded a discordance rate of 92%, suggesting that somatic events, genetic or epigenetic, probably play an important role in the etiology of CHTD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess the role of somatic genetic or epigenetic processes in CHTD, we analyzed gene expression, genome-wide methylation, and structural genome variations in normal versus ectopic thyroid tissue. In total, 1011 genes were more than two-fold induced or repressed. Expression array was validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR for 100 genes. After correction for differences in thyroid activation state, 19 genes were exclusively associated with thyroid ectopy, among which genes involved in embryonic development (e.g. TXNIP and in the Wnt pathway (e.g. SFRP2 and FRZB were observed. None of the thyroid related transcription factors (FOXE1, HHEX, NKX2.1, NKX2.5 showed decreased expression, whereas PAX8 expression was associated with thyroid activation state. Finally, the expression profile was independent of promoter and CpG island methylation and of structural genome variations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first integrative molecular analysis of ectopic thyroid tissue. Ectopic thyroids show a differential gene expression compared to that of normal thyroids, although molecular basis could not be defined. Replication of this pilot study on a larger cohort could lead to unraveling the elusive cause of defective thyroid migration during embryogenesis.

  10. The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia a comprehensive full-length cDNA collection and sequence database. High-level functional annotation is based on sequence homology search, expression profiling, mapping and protein-protein interactions. More than 1000000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced and classified into 128000 clusters, and 60000 representative clones were fully sequenced representing 24000 clear protein-encoding genes. The application of the mouse genome database for positional cloning and gene network regulation analysis is reported.

  11. Effective Normalization for Copy Number Variation Detection from Whole Genome Sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janevski, A.; Varadan, V.; Kamalakaran, S.; Banerjee, N.; Dimitrova, D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Whole genome sequencing enables a high resolution view ofthe human genome and provides unique insights into genome structureat an unprecedented scale. There have been a number of tools to infer copy number variation in the genome. These tools while validatedalso include a number of parame

  12. An integrated map of genetic variation from 1.092 human genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    By characterizing the geographic and functional spectrum of human genetic variation, the 1000 Genomes Project aims to build a resource to help to understand the genetic contribution to disease. Here we describe the genomes of 1,092 individuals from 14 populations, constructed using a combination...... deletions. We show that individuals from different populations carry different profiles of rare and common variants, and that low-frequency variants show substantial geographic differentiation, which is further increased by the action of purifying selection. We show that evolutionary conservation and coding...... consequence are key determinants of the strength of purifying selection, that rare-variant load varies substantially across biological pathways, and that each individual contains hundreds of rare non-coding variants at conserved sites, such as motif-disrupting changes in transcription-factor-binding sites...

  13. Identification of genomic indels and structural variations using split reads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urban Alexander E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have demonstrated the genetic significance of insertions, deletions, and other more complex structural variants (SVs in the human population. With the development of the next-generation sequencing technologies, high-throughput surveys of SVs on the whole-genome level have become possible. Here we present split-read identification, calibrated (SRiC, a sequence-based method for SV detection. Results We start by mapping each read to the reference genome in standard fashion using gapped alignment. Then to identify SVs, we score each of the many initial mappings with an assessment strategy designed to take into account both sequencing and alignment errors (e.g. scoring more highly events gapped in the center of a read. All current SV calling methods have multilevel biases in their identifications due to both experimental and computational limitations (e.g. calling more deletions than insertions. A key aspect of our approach is that we calibrate all our calls against synthetic data sets generated from simulations of high-throughput sequencing (with realistic error models. This allows us to calculate sensitivity and the positive predictive value under different parameter-value scenarios and for different classes of events (e.g. long deletions vs. short insertions. We run our calculations on representative data from the 1000 Genomes Project. Coupling the observed numbers of events on chromosome 1 with the calibrations gleaned from the simulations (for different length events allows us to construct a relatively unbiased estimate for the total number of SVs in the human genome across a wide range of length scales. We estimate in particular that an individual genome contains ~670,000 indels/SVs. Conclusions Compared with the existing read-depth and read-pair approaches for SV identification, our method can pinpoint the exact breakpoints of SV events, reveal the actual sequence content of insertions, and cover the whole

  14. Genomic and gene variation in Mycoplasma hominis strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Andersen, H; Birkelund, Svend

    1987-01-01

    DNAs from 14 strains of Mycoplasma hominis isolated from various habitats, including strain PG21, were analyzed for genomic heterogeneity. DNA-DNA filter hybridization values were from 51 to 91%. Restriction endonuclease digestion patterns, analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, revealed...... no identity or cluster formation between strains. Variation within M. hominis rRNA genes was analyzed by Southern hybridization of EcoRI-cleaved DNA hybridized with a cloned fragment of the rRNA gene from the mycoplasma strain PG50. Five of the M. hominis strains showed identical hybridization patterns....... These hybridization patterns were compared with those of 12 other mycoplasma species, which showed a much more complex band pattern. Cloned nonribosomal RNA gene fragments of M. hominis PG21 DNA were analyzed, and the fragments were used to demonstrate heterogeneity among the strains. A monoclonal antibody against...

  15. The human genome project: Prospects and implications for clinical medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.D.; Waterston, R.H. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1991-10-09

    The recently initiated human genome project is a large international effort to elucidate the genetic architecture of the genomes of man and several model organisms. The initial phases of this endeavor involve the establishment of rough blueprints (maps) of the genetic landscape of these genomes, with the long-term goal of determining their precise nucleotide sequences and identifying the genes. The knowledge gained by these studies will provide a vital tool for the study of many biologic processes and will have a profound impact on clinical medicine.

  16. Total Variation and Tomographic Imaging from Projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide

    2011-01-01

    Total Variation (TV) regularization is a powerful technique for image reconstruction tasks such as denoising, in-painting, and deblurring, because of its ability to produce sharp edges in the images. In this talk we discuss the use of TV regularization for tomographic imaging, where we compute a 2D...... incorporates our prior information about the solution and thus compensates for the loss of accuracy in the data. A consequence is that smaller data acquisition times can be used, thus reducing a patients exposure to X-rays in medical scanning and speeding up non-destructive measurements in materials science....

  17. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D; Mathews, Debra J H

    2015-08-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) PROJECT is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with this field of research and operate under a common set of principles. In this commentary, we survey the current ethics and regulatory landscape of synthetic biology and present the Sc2.0 Statement of Ethics and Governance to which all members of the project adhere. This statement focuses on four aspects of the Sc2.0 PROJECT: societal benefit, intellectual property, safety, and self-governance. We propose that such project-level agreements are an important, valuable, and flexible model of self-regulation for similar global, large-scale synthetic biology projects in order to maximize the benefits and minimize potential harms. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  18. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D.; Mathews, Debra J. H.

    2015-01-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) Project is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with this field of research and operate under a common set of principles. In this commentary, we survey the current ethics and regulatory landscape of synthetic biology and present the Sc2.0 Statement of Ethics and Governance to which all members of the project adhere. This statement focuses on four aspects of the Sc2.0 Project: societal benefit, intellectual property, safety, and self-governance. We propose that such project-level agreements are an important, valuable, and flexible model of self-regulation for similar global, large-scale synthetic biology projects in order to maximize the benefits and minimize potential harms. PMID:26272997

  19. Variation in salamanders: an essay on genomes, development, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockes, Jeremy P

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration is studied in a few model species of salamanders, but the ten families of salamanders show considerable variation, and this has implications for our understanding of salamander biology. The most recent classification of the families identifies the cryptobranchoidea as the basal group which diverged in the early Jurassic. Variation in the sizes of genomes is particularly obvious, and reflects a major contribution from transposable elements which is already present in the basal group.Limb development has been a focus for evodevo studies, in part because of the variable property of pre-axial dominance which distinguishes salamanders from other tetrapods. This is thought to reflect the selective pressures that operate on a free-living aquatic larva, and might also be relevant for the evolution of limb regeneration. Recent fossil evidence suggests that both pre-axial dominance and limb regeneration were present 300 million years ago in larval temnospondyl amphibians that lived in mountain lakes. A satisfying account of regeneration in salamanders may need to address all these different aspects in the future.

  20. Genome Project Standards in a New Era of Sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GSC Consortia; HMP Jumpstart Consortia; Chain, P. S. G.; Grafham, D. V.; Fulton, R. S.; FitzGerald, M. G.; Hostetler, J.; Muzny, D.; Detter, J. C.; Ali, J.; Birren, B.; Bruce, D. C.; Buhay, C.; Cole, J. R.; Ding, Y.; Dugan, S.; Field, D.; Garrity, G. M.; Gibbs, R.; Graves, T.; Han, C. S.; Harrison, S. H.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Khouri, H. M.; Kodira, C. D.; Kolker, E.; Kyrpides, N. C.; Lang, D.; Lapidus, A.; Malfatti, S. A.; Markowitz, V.; Metha, T.; Nelson, K. E.; Parkhill, J.; Pitluck, S.; Qin, X.; Read, T. D.; Schmutz, J.; Sozhamannan, S.; Strausberg, R.; Sutton, G.; Thomson, N. R.; Tiedje, J. M.; Weinstock, G.; Wollam, A.

    2009-06-01

    For over a decade, genome 43 sequences have adhered to only two standards that are relied on for purposes of sequence analysis by interested third parties (1, 2). However, ongoing developments in revolutionary sequencing technologies have resulted in a redefinition of traditional whole genome sequencing that requires a careful reevaluation of such standards. With commercially available 454 pyrosequencing (followed by Illumina, SOLiD, and now Helicos), there has been an explosion of genomes sequenced under the moniker 'draft', however these can be very poor quality genomes (due to inherent errors in the sequencing technologies, and the inability of assembly programs to fully address these errors). Further, one can only infer that such draft genomes may be of poor quality by navigating through the databases to find the number and type of reads deposited in sequence trace repositories (and not all genomes have this available), or to identify the number of contigs or genome fragments deposited to the database. The difficulty in assessing the quality of such deposited genomes has created some havoc for genome analysis pipelines and contributed to many wasted hours of (mis)interpretation. These same novel sequencing technologies have also brought an exponential leap in raw sequencing capability, and at greatly reduced prices that have further skewed the time- and cost-ratios of draft data generation versus the painstaking process of improving and finishing a genome. The resulting effect is an ever-widening gap between drafted and finished genomes that only promises to continue (Figure 1), hence there is an urgent need to distinguish good and poor datasets. The sequencing institutes in the authorship, along with the NIH's Human Microbiome Project Jumpstart Consortium (3), strongly believe that a new set of standards is required for genome sequences. The following represents a set of six community-defined categories of genome sequence standards that better

  1. A genome-wide survey of genetic variation in gorillas using reduced representation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylwyn Scally

    Full Text Available All non-human great apes are endangered in the wild, and it is therefore important to gain an understanding of their demography and genetic diversity. Whole genome assembly projects have provided an invaluable foundation for understanding genetics in all four genera, but to date genetic studies of multiple individuals within great ape species have largely been confined to mitochondrial DNA and a small number of other loci. Here, we present a genome-wide survey of genetic variation in gorillas using a reduced representation sequencing approach, focusing on the two lowland subspecies. We identify 3,006,670 polymorphic sites in 14 individuals: 12 western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla and 2 eastern lowland gorillas (Gorilla beringei graueri. We find that the two species are genetically distinct, based on levels of heterozygosity and patterns of allele sharing. Focusing on the western lowland population, we observe evidence for population substructure, and a deficit of rare genetic variants suggesting a recent episode of population contraction. In western lowland gorillas, there is an elevation of variation towards telomeres and centromeres on the chromosomal scale. On a finer scale, we find substantial variation in genetic diversity, including a marked reduction close to the major histocompatibility locus, perhaps indicative of recent strong selection there. These findings suggest that despite their maintaining an overall level of genetic diversity equal to or greater than that of humans, population decline, perhaps associated with disease, has been a significant factor in recent and long-term pressures on wild gorilla populations.

  2. Genomic variation in recently collected maize landraces from Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, María Clara; Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Vázquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Breña-Ochoa, Alejandra; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Piñero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The present dataset comprises 36,931 SNPs genotyped in 46 maize landraces native to Mexico as well as the teosinte subspecies Zea maiz ssp. parviglumis and ssp. mexicana. These landraces were collected directly from farmers mostly between 2006 and 2010. We accompany these data with a short description of the variation within each landrace, as well as maps, principal component analyses and neighbor joining trees showing the distribution of the genetic diversity relative to landrace, geographical features and maize biogeography. High levels of genetic variation were detected for the maize landraces (HE = 0.234 to 0.318 (mean 0.311), while slightly lower levels were detected in Zea m. mexicana and Zea m. parviglumis (HE = 0.262 and 0.234, respectively). The distribution of genetic variation was better explained by environmental variables given by the interaction of altitude and latitude than by landrace identity. This dataset is a follow up product of the Global Native Maize Project, an initiative to update the data on Mexican maize landraces and their wild relatives, and to generate information that is necessary for implementing the Mexican Biosafety Law. PMID:26981357

  3. Genomic variation in recently collected maize landraces from Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Clara Arteaga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present dataset comprises 36,931 SNPs genotyped in 46 maize landraces native to Mexico as well as the teosinte subspecies Zea maiz ssp. parviglumis and ssp. mexicana. These landraces were collected directly from farmers mostly between 2006 and 2010. We accompany these data with a short description of the variation within each landrace, as well as maps, principal component analyses and neighbor joining trees showing the distribution of the genetic diversity relative to landrace, geographical features and maize biogeography. High levels of genetic variation were detected for the maize landraces (HE = 0.234 to 0.318 (mean 0.311, while slightly lower levels were detected in Zea m. mexicana and Zea m. parviglumis (HE = 0.262 and 0.234, respectively. The distribution of genetic variation was better explained by environmental variables given by the interaction of altitude and latitude than by landrace identity. This dataset is a follow up product of the Global Native Maize Project, an initiative to update the data on Mexican maize landraces and their wild relatives, and to generate information that is necessary for implementing the Mexican Biosafety Law.

  4. Genomic variation in recently collected maize landraces from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, María Clara; Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Vázquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Breña-Ochoa, Alejandra; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Eguiarte, Luis E; Piñero, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The present dataset comprises 36,931 SNPs genotyped in 46 maize landraces native to Mexico as well as the teosinte subspecies Zea maiz ssp. parviglumis and ssp. mexicana. These landraces were collected directly from farmers mostly between 2006 and 2010. We accompany these data with a short description of the variation within each landrace, as well as maps, principal component analyses and neighbor joining trees showing the distribution of the genetic diversity relative to landrace, geographical features and maize biogeography. High levels of genetic variation were detected for the maize landraces (H E = 0.234 to 0.318 (mean 0.311), while slightly lower levels were detected in Zea m. mexicana and Zea m. parviglumis (H E = 0.262 and 0.234, respectively). The distribution of genetic variation was better explained by environmental variables given by the interaction of altitude and latitude than by landrace identity. This dataset is a follow up product of the Global Native Maize Project, an initiative to update the data on Mexican maize landraces and their wild relatives, and to generate information that is necessary for implementing the Mexican Biosafety Law.

  5. [The Human Genome Project and the right to intellectual property].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambrón, A

    2000-01-01

    The Human Genome Project was designed to achieve two objectives. The scientific goal was the mapping and sequencing of the human genome and the social objective was to benefit the health and well-being of humanity. Although the first objective is nearing successful conclusion, the same cannot be said for the second, mainly because the benefits will take some time to be applicable and effective, but also due to the very nature of the project. The HGP also had a clear economic dimension, which has had a major bearing on its social side. Operating in the midst of these three dimensions is the right to intellectual property (although not just this right), which has facilitated the granting of patents on human genes. Put another way, the carrying out of the HGP has required the privatisation of knowledge of the human genome, and this can be considered an attack on the genetic heritage of mankind.

  6. Enhancing Biology Instruction with the Human Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxeda, Rosa J.; Moore-Russo, Deborah A.

    2003-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a recent scientific milestone that has received notable attention. This article shows how a biology course is using the HGP to enhance students' experiences by providing awareness of cutting edge research, with information on new emerging career options, and with opportunities to consider ethical questions raised…

  7. The Human Genome Project: Biology, Computers, and Privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Mary Ann G.; Drexler, Edward; Gottesman, Kay S.; Goulding, Philip G.; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Micikas, Lynda B.; Mural, Richard J.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Zola, John

    This module, for high school teachers, is the second of two modules about the Human Genome Project (HGP) produced by the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). The first section of this module provides background information for teachers about the structure and objectives of the HGP, aspects of the science and technology that underlie the…

  8. Human Genome Project and cystic fibrosis--a symbiotic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoi, L G; Smith, C L

    1999-11-01

    When Watson and Crick determined the structure of DNA in 1953, a biological revolution began. One result of this revolution is the Human Genome Project. The primary goal of this international project is to obtain the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome by the year 2005. Although molecular biologists and geneticists are most enthusiastic about the Human Genome Project, all areas of clinical medicine and fields of biology will be affected. Cystic fibrosis is the most common, inherited, lethal disease of white persons. In 1989, researchers located the cystic fibrosis gene on the long arm of chromosome 7 by a technique known as positional cloning. The most common mutation (a 3-base pair deletion) of the cystic fibrosis gene occurs in 70% of patients with cystic fibrosis. The knowledge gained from genetic research on cystic fibrosis will help researchers develop new therapies (e.g., gene) and improve standard therapies (e.g., pharmacologic) so that a patient's life span is increased and quality of life is improved. The purpose of this review is twofold. First, the article provides an overview of the Human Genome Project and its clinical significance in advancing interdisciplinary care for patients with cystic fibrosis. Second, the article includes a discussion of the genetic basis, pathophysiology, and management of cystic fibrosis.

  9. Reconsidering democracy - History of the human genome project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijer, M

    What options are open for people-citizens, politicians, and other nonscientists-to become actively involved in and anticipate new directions in the life sciences? In addressing this question, this article focuses on the start of the Human Genome Project (1985-1990). By contrasting various models of

  10. Reconsidering democracy - History of the human genome project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijer, M

    2003-01-01

    What options are open for people-citizens, politicians, and other nonscientists-to become actively involved in and anticipate new directions in the life sciences? In addressing this question, this article focuses on the start of the Human Genome Project (1985-1990). By contrasting various models of

  11. Mapping our genes: The genome projects: How big, how fast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1988-04-01

    For the past 2 years, scientific and technical journals in biology and medicine have extensively covered a debate about whether and how to determine the function and order of human genes on human chromosomes and when to determine the sequence of molecular building blocks that comprise DNA in those chromosomes. In 1987, these issues rose to become part of the public agenda. The debate involves science, technology, and politics. Congress is responsible for /open quotes/writing the rules/close quotes/ of what various federal agencies do and for funding their work. This report surveys the points made so far in the debate, focusing on those that most directly influence the policy options facing the US Congress. Congressional interest focused on how to assess the rationales for conducting human genome projects, how to fund human genome projects (at what level and through which mechanisms), how to coordinate the scientific and technical programs of the several federal agencies and private interests already supporting various genome projects, and how to strike a balance regarding the impact of genome projects on international scientific cooperation and international economic competition in biotechnology. OTA prepared this report with the assistance of several hundred experts throughout the world. 342 refs., 26 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Mapping Our Genes: The Genome Projects: How Big, How Fast

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    For the past 2 years, scientific and technical journals in biology and medicine have extensively covered a debate about whether and how to determine the function and order of human genes on human chromosomes and when to determine the sequence of molecular building blocks that comprise DNA in those chromosomes. In 1987, these issues rose to become part of the public agenda. The debate involves science, technology, and politics. Congress is responsible for �writing the rules� of what various federal agencies do and for funding their work. This report surveys the points made so far in the debate, focusing on those that most directly influence the policy options facing the US Congress. Congressional interest focused on how to assess the rationales for conducting human genome projects, how to fund human genome projects (at what level and through which mechanisms), how to coordinate the scientific and technical programs of the several federal agencies and private interests already supporting various genome projects, and how to strike a balance regarding the impact of genome projects on international scientific cooperation and international economic competition in biotechnology. The Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) prepared this report with the assistance of several hundred experts throughout the world.

  13. Relevance of the Human Genome Project to inherited metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, J

    1994-01-01

    The Human Genome Project is an international effort to identify the complete structure of the human genome. HUGO, the Human Genome Organization, facilitates international cooperation and exchange of information while the Genome Data Base will act as the on-line information retrieval and storage system for the huge amount of information being accumulated. The clinical register MIM (Mendelian Inheritance in Man) established by Victor McKusick is now an on-line resource that will allow biochemists working with inborn errors of metabolism to access the rapidly expanding body of knowledge. Biochemical and molecular genetics are complementary and should draw together to find solutions to the academic and clinical problems posed by inborn errors of metabolism.

  14. New cooperative projection neural network for nonlinearly constrained variational inequality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA YouSheng

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a new cooperative projection neural network (CPNN), which combines automat-ically three individual neural network models with a common projection term. As a special case, the proposed CPNN can include three recent recurrent neural networks for solving monotone variational in-equality problems with limit or linear constraints, respectively. Under the monotonicity condition of the corresponding Lagrangian mapping, the proposed CPNN is theoretically guaranteed to solve monotone variational inequality problems and a class of nonmonotone variational inequality problems with linear and nonlinear constraints. Unlike the extended projection neural network, the proposed CPNN has no limitation on the initial point for global convergence. Compared with other related cooperative neural networks and numerical optimization algorithms, the proposed CPNN has a low computational complex-ity and requires weak convergence conditions. An application in real-time grasping force optimization and examples demonstrate good performance of the proposed CPNN.

  15. Natural selection affects multiple aspects of genetic variation at putatively peutral sites across the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmueller, Kirk E; Albrechtsen, Anders; Li, Yingrui

    2011-01-01

    A major question in evolutionary biology is how natural selection has shaped patterns of genetic variation across the human genome. Previous work has documented a reduction in genetic diversity in regions of the genome with low recombination rates. However, it is unclear whether other summaries...... affected multiple aspects of linked neutral variation throughout the human genome and that positive selection is not required to explain these observations....... these questions by analyzing three different genome-wide resequencing datasets from European individuals. We document several significant correlations between different genomic features. In particular, we find that average minor allele frequency and diversity are reduced in regions of low recombination...

  16. Copy Number Variation Analysis by Array Analysis of Single Cells Following Whole Genome Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome amplification is required to ensure the availability of sufficient material for copy number variation analysis of a genome deriving from an individual cell. Here, we describe the protocols we use for copy number variation analysis of non-fixed single cells by array-based approaches following single-cell isolation and whole genome amplification. We are focusing on two alternative protocols, an isothermal and a PCR-based whole genome amplification method, followed by either comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) or SNP array analysis, respectively.

  17. PGen: large-scale genomic variations analysis workflow and browser in SoyKB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Khan, Saad M; Wang, Juexin; Rynge, Mats; Zhang, Yuanxun; Zeng, Shuai; Chen, Shiyuan; Maldonado Dos Santos, Joao V; Valliyodan, Babu; Calyam, Prasad P; Merchant, Nirav; Nguyen, Henry T; Xu, Dong; Joshi, Trupti

    2016-10-06

    With the advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and significant reductions in sequencing costs, it is now possible to sequence large collections of germplasm in crops for detecting genome-scale genetic variations and to apply the knowledge towards improvements in traits. To efficiently facilitate large-scale NGS resequencing data analysis of genomic variations, we have developed "PGen", an integrated and optimized workflow using the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) high-performance computing (HPC) virtual system, iPlant cloud data storage resources and Pegasus workflow management system (Pegasus-WMS). The workflow allows users to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion-deletions (indels), perform SNP annotations and conduct copy number variation analyses on multiple resequencing datasets in a user-friendly and seamless way. We have developed both a Linux version in GitHub ( https://github.com/pegasus-isi/PGen-GenomicVariations-Workflow ) and a web-based implementation of the PGen workflow integrated within the Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB), ( http://soykb.org/Pegasus/index.php ). Using PGen, we identified 10,218,140 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1,398,982 indels from analysis of 106 soybean lines sequenced at 15X coverage. 297,245 non-synonymous SNPs and 3330 copy number variation (CNV) regions were identified from this analysis. SNPs identified using PGen from additional soybean resequencing projects adding to 500+ soybean germplasm lines in total have been integrated. These SNPs are being utilized for trait improvement using genotype to phenotype prediction approaches developed in-house. In order to browse and access NGS data easily, we have also developed an NGS resequencing data browser ( http://soykb.org/NGS_Resequence/NGS_index.php ) within SoyKB to provide easy access to SNP and downstream analysis results for soybean researchers. PGen workflow has been optimized for the most

  18. Somatic genomic variations in extra-embryonic tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2010-05-21

    In the mature chorion, one of the membranes that exist during pregnancy between the developing fetus and mother, human placental cells form highly specialized tissues composed of mesenchyme and floating or anchoring villi. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found that human invasive cytotrophoblasts isolated from anchoring villi or the uterine wall had gained individual chromosomes; however, chromosome losses were detected infrequently. With chromosomes gained in what appeared to be a chromosome-specific manner, more than half of the invasive cytotrophoblasts in normal pregnancies were found to be hyperdiploid. Interestingly, the rates of hyperdiploid cells depended not only on gestational age, but were strongly associated with the extraembryonic compartment at the fetal-maternal interface from which they were isolated. Since hyperdiploid cells showed drastically reduced DNA replication as measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, we conclude that aneuploidy is a part of the normal process of placentation potentially limiting the proliferative capabilities of invasive cytotrophoblasts. Thus, under the special circumstances of human reproduction, somatic genomic variations may exert a beneficial, anti-neoplastic effect on the organism.

  19. Genome-wide mapping of copy number variation in humans: comparative analysis of high resolution array platforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini R Haraksingh

    Full Text Available Accurate and efficient genome-wide detection of copy number variants (CNVs is essential for understanding human genomic variation, genome-wide CNV association type studies, cytogenetics research and diagnostics, and independent validation of CNVs identified from sequencing based technologies. Numerous, array-based platforms for CNV detection exist utilizing array Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP genotyping or both. We have quantitatively assessed the abilities of twelve leading genome-wide CNV detection platforms to accurately detect Gold Standard sets of CNVs in the genome of HapMap CEU sample NA12878, and found significant differences in performance. The technologies analyzed were the NimbleGen 4.2 M, 2.1 M and 3×720 K Whole Genome and CNV focused arrays, the Agilent 1×1 M CGH and High Resolution and 2×400 K CNV and SNP+CGH arrays, the Illumina Human Omni1Quad array and the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. The Gold Standards used were a 1000 Genomes Project sequencing-based set of 3997 validated CNVs and an ultra high-resolution aCGH-based set of 756 validated CNVs. We found that sensitivity, total number, size range and breakpoint resolution of CNV calls were highest for CNV focused arrays. Our results are important for cost effective CNV detection and validation for both basic and clinical applications.

  20. From genomes to pangenomes: understanding variation among individuals and species

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Vinuesa, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    This tutorial illustrates how to analyze pan-genomes using GET_HOMOLOGUES and GET_HOMOLOGUES-EST. After a short introduction, where the main concepts are illustrated, the remaining sections cover the installation and typical operations required to analyze and annotate genomes and transcriptomes from a pan-genome perspective, in which individuals or species contribute genetic material to a pool.

  1. A genome-to-genome analysis of associations between human genetic variation, HIV-1 sequence diversity, and viral control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartha, István; Carlson, Jonathan M; Brumme, Chanson J; McLaren, Paul J; Brumme, Zabrina L; John, Mina; Haas, David W; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Dalmau, Judith; López-Galíndez, Cecilio; Casado, Concepción; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Bernasconi, Enos; Vernazza, Pietro; Klimkait, Thomas; Yerly, Sabine; O'Brien, Stephen J; Listgarten, Jennifer; Pfeifer, Nico; Lippert, Christoph; Fusi, Nicolo; Kutalik, Zoltán; Allen, Todd M; Müller, Viktor; Harrigan, P Richard; Heckerman, David; Telenti, Amalio; Fellay, Jacques

    2013-10-29

    HIV-1 sequence diversity is affected by selection pressures arising from host genomic factors. Using paired human and viral data from 1071 individuals, we ran >3000 genome-wide scans, testing for associations between host DNA polymorphisms, HIV-1 sequence variation and plasma viral load (VL), while considering human and viral population structure. We observed significant human SNP associations to a total of 48 HIV-1 amino acid variants (pgenome-to-genome approach highlights sites of genomic conflict and is a strategy generally applicable to studies of host-pathogen interaction. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01123.001.

  2. Genomic instability is associated with natural life span variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    Full Text Available Increasing genomic instability is associated with aging in eukaryotes, but the connection between genomic instability and natural variation in life span is unknown. We have quantified chronological life span and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH in 11 natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that genomic instability increases and mitotic asymmetry breaks down during chronological aging. The age-dependent increase of genomic instability generally lags behind the drop of viability and this delay accounts for approximately 50% of the observed natural variation of replicative life span in these yeast isolates. We conclude that the abilities of yeast strains to tolerate genomic instability co-vary with their replicative life spans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first quantitative evidence that demonstrates a link between genomic instability and natural variation in life span.

  3. Genomic variation across the Yellow-rumped Warbler species complex

    OpenAIRE

    Toews, David P.L.; Brelsford, Alan; Grossen, Christine; Milá, Borja; Irwin, Darren E.

    2016-01-01

    Populations that have experienced long periods of geographic isolation will diverge over time. The application of highthroughput sequencing technologies to study the genomes of related taxa now allows us to quantify, at a fine scale, the consequences of this divergence across the genome. Throughout a number of studies, a notable pattern has emerged. In many cases, estimates of differentiation across the genome are strongly heterogeneous; however, the evolutionary processes driving this striki...

  4. Factors causing cost variation for constructing wastewater projects in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remon Fayek Aziz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cost is one of the major considerations throughout the project management life cycle and can be regarded as one of the most important parameters of a project and the driving force of project success. Despite its proven importance, it is common to see a construction project failing to achieve its objectives within the specific cost. Cost variation is a very frequent phenomenon and is almost associated with nearly constructing all wastewater projects. Maintaining steady cost projection on wastewater projects had been recently an issue of serious concern, both to the client and project contractors. Cost deviation from initial cost plan had been prevalent on construction sites. However, little or no effort has been made to curtail the phenomenon, this research work attempts to identify, investigate and rank factors perceived to affect cost variation in the Egyptian wastewater projects with respect to their relative importance so as to proffer possible ways of coping with this phenomenon. To achieve this objective, author invited practitioners and experts, comprising a statistically representative sample, to participate in a structured questionnaire survey. Brain storming was taken into consideration, through which a number of cost variation factors were identified for constructing wastewater projects. Totally 52 factors were short-listed to be made part of the questionnaire survey and the survey was conducted with experts and representatives from private, public and local general construction firms. The data were analyzed using Relative Importance Index, ranking and simple percentages. It was analytically discovered that factors such as: (1 Lowest bidding procurement method; (2 Additional work; (3 Bureaucracy in bidding/tendering method; (4 Wrong method of cost estimation; and (5 Funding problems were critical for causing cost variation, while (1 Inaccurate cost estimation; (2 Mode of financing and payment for completed work; (3 Unexpected ground

  5. The environmental genome project: ethical, legal, and social implications.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, R R; Barrett, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences is supporting a multiyear research initiative examining genetic influences on environmental response. Proponents of this new initiative, known as the Environmental Genome Project, hope that the information learned will improve our understanding of environmentally associated diseases and allow clinicians and public health officials to target disease-prevention strategies to those who are at increased risk. Despite these potential benefits...

  6. EVA: Exome Variation Analyzer, an efficient and versatile tool for filtering strategies in medical genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutant Sophie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole exome sequencing (WES has become the strategy of choice to identify a coding allelic variant for a rare human monogenic disorder. This approach is a revolution in medical genetics history, impacting both fundamental research, and diagnostic methods leading to personalized medicine. A plethora of efficient algorithms has been developed to ensure the variant discovery. They generally lead to ~20,000 variations that have to be narrow down to find the potential pathogenic allelic variant(s and the affected gene(s. For this purpose, commonly adopted procedures which implicate various filtering strategies have emerged: exclusion of common variations, type of the allelics variants, pathogenicity effect prediction, modes of inheritance and multiple individuals for exome comparison. To deal with the expansion of WES in medical genomics individual laboratories, new convivial and versatile software tools have to implement these filtering steps. Non-programmer biologists have to be autonomous combining themselves different filtering criteria and conduct a personal strategy depending on their assumptions and study design. Results We describe EVA (Exome Variation Analyzer, a user-friendly web-interfaced software dedicated to the filtering strategies for medical WES. Thanks to different modules, EVA (i integrates and stores annotated exome variation data as strictly confidential to the project owner, (ii allows to combine the main filters dealing with common variations, molecular types, inheritance mode and multiple samples, (iii offers the browsing of annotated data and filtered results in various interactive tables, graphical visualizations and statistical charts, (iv and finally offers export files and cross-links to external useful databases and softwares for further prioritization of the small subset of sorted candidate variations and genes. We report a demonstrative case study that allowed to identify a new candidate gene

  7. nGASP - the nematode genome annotation assessment project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coghlan, A; Fiedler, T J; McKay, S J; Flicek, P; Harris, T W; Blasiar, D; Allen, J; Stein, L D

    2008-12-19

    While the C. elegans genome is extensively annotated, relatively little information is available for other Caenorhabditis species. The nematode genome annotation assessment project (nGASP) was launched to objectively assess the accuracy of protein-coding gene prediction software in C. elegans, and to apply this knowledge to the annotation of the genomes of four additional Caenorhabditis species and other nematodes. Seventeen groups worldwide participated in nGASP, and submitted 47 prediction sets for 10 Mb of the C. elegans genome. Predictions were compared to reference gene sets consisting of confirmed or manually curated gene models from WormBase. The most accurate gene-finders were 'combiner' algorithms, which made use of transcript- and protein-alignments and multi-genome alignments, as well as gene predictions from other gene-finders. Gene-finders that used alignments of ESTs, mRNAs and proteins came in second place. There was a tie for third place between gene-finders that used multi-genome alignments and ab initio gene-finders. The median gene level sensitivity of combiners was 78% and their specificity was 42%, which is nearly the same accuracy as reported for combiners in the human genome. C. elegans genes with exons of unusual hexamer content, as well as those with many exons, short exons, long introns, a weak translation start signal, weak splice sites, or poorly conserved orthologs were the most challenging for gene-finders. While the C. elegans genome is extensively annotated, relatively little information is available for other Caenorhabditis species. The nematode genome annotation assessment project (nGASP) was launched to objectively assess the accuracy of protein-coding gene prediction software in C. elegans, and to apply this knowledge to the annotation of the genomes of four additional Caenorhabditis species and other nematodes. Seventeen groups worldwide participated in nGASP, and submitted 47 prediction sets for 10 Mb of the C

  8. Hawaiian Drosophila genomes: size variation and evolutionary expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Elysse M; Gall, Joseph G; Jonas, Mark

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports genome sizes of one Hawaiian Scaptomyza and 16 endemic Hawaiian Drosophila species that include five members of the antopocerus species group, one member of the modified mouthpart group, and ten members of the picture wing clade. Genome size expansions have occurred independently multiple times among Hawaiian Drosophila lineages, and have resulted in an over 2.3-fold range of genome sizes among species, with the largest observed in Drosophila cyrtoloma (1C = 0.41 pg). We find evidence that these repeated genome size expansions were likely driven by the addition of significant amounts of heterochromatin and satellite DNA. For example, our data reveal that the addition of seven heterochromatic chromosome arms to the ancestral haploid karyotype, and a remarkable proportion of ~70 % satellite DNA, account for the greatly expanded size of the D. cyrtoloma genome. Moreover, the genomes of 13/17 Hawaiian picture wing species are composed of substantial proportions (22-70 %) of detectable satellites (all but one of which are AT-rich). Our results suggest that in this tightly knit group of recently evolved species, genomes have expanded, in large part, via evolutionary amplifications of satellite DNA sequences in centric and pericentric domains (especially of the X and dot chromosomes), which have resulted in longer acrocentric chromosomes or metacentrics with an added heterochromatic chromosome arm. We discuss possible evolutionary mechanisms that may have shaped these patterns, including rapid fixation of novel expanded genomes during founder-effect speciation.

  9. Genomic and karyotypic variation in Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Gokhman

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830 has served as a model insect for over a century. Sequencing of the 11 additional Drosophila Fallen, 1823 species marks substantial progress in comparative genomics of this genus. By comparison, practically nothing is known about the genome size or genome sequences of parasitic wasps of Drosophila. Here, we present the first comparative analysis of genome size and karyotype structures of Drosophila parasitoids of the Leptopilina Förster, 1869 and Ganaspis Förster, 1869 species. The gametic genome size of Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896 is larger than those of the three Leptopilina species studied. The genome sizes of all parasitic wasps studied here are also larger than those known for all Drosophila species. Surprisingly, genome sizes of these Drosophila parasitoids exceed the average value known for all previously studied Hymenoptera. The haploid chromosome number of both Leptopilina heterotoma (Thomson, 1862 and L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 is ten. A chromosomal fusion appears to have produced a distinct karyotype for L. boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979 (n = 9, whose genome size is smaller than that of wasps of the L. heterotoma clade. Like L. boulardi, the haploid chromosome number for G. xanthopoda is also nine. Our studies reveal a positive, but non linear, correlation between the genome size and total chromosome length in Drosophila parasitoids. These Drosophila parasitoids differ widely in their host range, and utilize different infection strategies to overcome host defense. Their comparative genomics, in relation to their exceptionally well-characterized hosts, will prove to be valuable for understanding the molecular basis of the host-parasite arms race and how such mechanisms shape the genetic structures of insect communities.

  10. Overview of the creative genome: effects of genome structure and sequence on the generation of variation and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporale, Lynn Helena

    2012-09-01

    This overview of a special issue of Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences discusses uneven distribution of distinct types of variation across the genome, the dependence of specific types of variation upon distinct classes of DNA sequences and/or the induction of specific proteins, the circumstances in which distinct variation-generating systems are activated, and the implications of this work for our understanding of evolution and of cancer. Also discussed is the value of non text-based computational methods for analyzing information carried by DNA, early insights into organizational frameworks that affect genome behavior, and implications of this work for comparative genomics. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Genomic analysis reveals major determinants of cis-regulatory variation in Capsella grandiflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steige, Kim A; Laenen, Benjamin; Reimegård, Johan; Scofield, Douglas G; Slotte, Tanja

    2017-01-31

    Understanding the causes of cis-regulatory variation is a long-standing aim in evolutionary biology. Although cis-regulatory variation has long been considered important for adaptation, we still have a limited understanding of the selective importance and genomic determinants of standing cis-regulatory variation. To address these questions, we studied the prevalence, genomic determinants, and selective forces shaping cis-regulatory variation in the outcrossing plant Capsella grandiflora We first identified a set of 1,010 genes with common cis-regulatory variation using analyses of allele-specific expression (ASE). Population genomic analyses of whole-genome sequences from 32 individuals showed that genes with common cis-regulatory variation (i) are under weaker purifying selection and (ii) undergo less frequent positive selection than other genes. We further identified genomic determinants of cis-regulatory variation. Gene body methylation (gbM) was a major factor constraining cis-regulatory variation, whereas presence of nearby transposable elements (TEs) and tissue specificity of expression increased the odds of ASE. Our results suggest that most common cis-regulatory variation in C. grandiflora is under weak purifying selection, and that gene-specific functional constraints are more important for the maintenance of cis-regulatory variation than genome-scale variation in the intensity of selection. Our results agree with previous findings that suggest TE silencing affects nearby gene expression, and provide evidence for a link between gbM and cis-regulatory constraint, possibly reflecting greater dosage sensitivity of body-methylated genes. Given the extensive conservation of gbM in flowering plants, this suggests that gbM could be an important predictor of cis-regulatory variation in a wide range of plant species.

  12. Genome Size in North American Fireflies: Substantial Variation Likely Driven by Neutral Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J. Spencer; Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F.; Hjelmen, Carl E.; Hanrahan, Shawn J.; Korunes, Katharine; Hall, David

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Eukaryotic genomes show tremendous size variation across taxa. Proximate explanations for genome size variation include differences in ploidy and amounts of noncoding DNA, especially repetitive DNA. Ultimate explanations include selection on physiological correlates of genome size such as cell size, which in turn influence body size, resulting in the often-observed correlation between body size and genome size. In this study, we examined body size and repetitive DNA elements in relationship to the evolution of genome size in North American representatives of a single beetle family, the Lampyridae (fireflies). The 23 species considered represent an excellent study system because of the greater than 5-fold range of genome sizes, documented here using flow cytometry, and the 3-fold range in body size, measured using pronotum width. We also identified common genomic repetitive elements using low-coverage sequencing. We found a positive relationship between genome size and repetitive DNA, particularly retrotransposons. Both genome size and these elements were evolving as expected given phylogenetic relatedness. We also tested whether genome size varied with body size and found no relationship. Together, our results suggest that genome size is evolving neutrally in fireflies. PMID:28541478

  13. Are we Genomic Mosaics? Variations of the Genome of Somatic Cells can Contribute to Diversify our Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, P A; Salamini, F; Sgaramella, V

    2010-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidences support the hypothesis that the genomes and the epigenomes may be different in the somatic cells of complex organisms. In the genome, the differences range from single base substitutions to chromosome number; in the epigenome, they entail multiple postsynthetic modifications of the chromatin. Somatic genome variations (SGV) may accumulate during development in response both to genetic programs, which may differ from tissue to tissue, and to environmental stimuli, which are often undetected and generally irreproducible. SGV may jeopardize physiological cellular functions, but also create novel coding and regulatory sequences, to be exposed to intraorganismal Darwinian selection. Genomes acknowledged as comparatively poor in genes, such as humans', could thus increase their pristine informational endowment. A better understanding of SGV will contribute to basic issues such as the "nature vs nurture" dualism and the inheritance of acquired characters. On the applied side, they may explain the low yield of cloning via somatic cell nuclear transfer, provide clues to some of the problems associated with transdifferentiation, and interfere with individual DNA analysis. SGV may be unique in the different cells types and in the different developmental stages, and thus explain the several hundred gaps persisting in the human genomes "completed" so far. They may compound the variations associated to our epigenomes and make of each of us an "(epi)genomic" mosaic. An ensuing paradigm is the possibility that a single genome (the ephemeral one assembled at fertilization) has the capacity to generate several different brains in response to different environments.

  14. G-protein genomic association with normal variation in gray matter density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J.; Calhoun, V.D.; Arias-Vasquez, A.; Zwiers, M.P.; Hulzen, K. van; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Fisher, S.E.; Franke, B.; Turner, J.A.; Liu, J.

    2015-01-01

    While detecting genetic variations underlying brain structures helps reveal mechanisms of neural disorders, high data dimensionality poses a major challenge for imaging genomic association studies. In this work, we present the application of a recently proposed approach, parallel independent

  15. Transposable element distribution, abundance and role in genome size variation in the genus Oryza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccolo, Andrea; Sebastian, Aswathy; Talag, Jayson; Yu, Yeisoo; Kim, HyeRan; Collura, Kristi; Kudrna, Dave; Wing, Rod A

    2007-08-29

    The genus Oryza is composed of 10 distinct genome types, 6 diploid and 4 polyploid, and includes the world's most important food crop - rice (Oryza sativa [AA]). Genome size variation in the Oryza is more than 3-fold and ranges from 357 Mbp in Oryza glaberrima [AA] to 1283 Mbp in the polyploid Oryza ridleyi [HHJJ]. Because repetitive elements are known to play a significant role in genome size variation, we constructed random sheared small insert genomic libraries from 12 representative Oryza species and conducted a comprehensive study of the repetitive element composition, distribution and phylogeny in this genus. Particular attention was paid to the role played by the most important classes of transposable elements (Long Terminal Repeats Retrotransposons, Long interspersed Nuclear Elements, helitrons, DNA transposable elements) in shaping these genomes and in their contributing to genome size variation. We identified the elements primarily responsible for the most strikingly genome size variation in Oryza. We demonstrated how Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons belonging to the same families have proliferated to very different extents in various species. We also showed that the pool of Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposons is substantially conserved and ubiquitous throughout the Oryza and so its origin is ancient and its existence predates the speciation events that originated the genus. Finally we described the peculiar behavior of repeats in the species Oryza coarctata [HHKK] whose placement in the Oryza genus is controversial. Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons are the major component of the Oryza genomes analyzed and, along with polyploidization, are the most important contributors to the genome size variation across the Oryza genus. Two families of Ty3-gypsy elements (RIRE2 and Atlantys) account for a significant portion of the genome size variations present in the Oryza genus.

  16. Transposable element distribution, abundance and role in genome size variation in the genus Oryza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collura Kristi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Oryza is composed of 10 distinct genome types, 6 diploid and 4 polyploid, and includes the world's most important food crop – rice (Oryza sativa [AA]. Genome size variation in the Oryza is more than 3-fold and ranges from 357 Mbp in Oryza glaberrima [AA] to 1283 Mbp in the polyploid Oryza ridleyi [HHJJ]. Because repetitive elements are known to play a significant role in genome size variation, we constructed random sheared small insert genomic libraries from 12 representative Oryza species and conducted a comprehensive study of the repetitive element composition, distribution and phylogeny in this genus. Particular attention was paid to the role played by the most important classes of transposable elements (Long Terminal Repeats Retrotransposons, Long interspersed Nuclear Elements, helitrons, DNA transposable elements in shaping these genomes and in their contributing to genome size variation. Results We identified the elements primarily responsible for the most strikingly genome size variation in Oryza. We demonstrated how Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons belonging to the same families have proliferated to very different extents in various species. We also showed that the pool of Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposons is substantially conserved and ubiquitous throughout the Oryza and so its origin is ancient and its existence predates the speciation events that originated the genus. Finally we described the peculiar behavior of repeats in the species Oryza coarctata [HHKK] whose placement in the Oryza genus is controversial. Conclusion Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons are the major component of the Oryza genomes analyzed and, along with polyploidization, are the most important contributors to the genome size variation across the Oryza genus. Two families of Ty3-gypsy elements (RIRE2 and Atlantys account for a significant portion of the genome size variations present in the Oryza genus.

  17. A high-definition view of functional genetic variation from natural yeast genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Anders; Simpson, Jared T; Salinas, Francisco; Barré, Benjamin; Parts, Leopold; Zia, Amin; Nguyen Ba, Alex N; Moses, Alan M; Louis, Edward J; Mustonen, Ville; Warringer, Jonas; Durbin, Richard; Liti, Gianni

    2014-04-01

    The question of how genetic variation in a population influences phenotypic variation and evolution is of major importance in modern biology. Yet much is still unknown about the relative functional importance of different forms of genome variation and how they are shaped by evolutionary processes. Here we address these questions by population level sequencing of 42 strains from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its closest relative S. paradoxus. We find that genome content variation, in the form of presence or absence as well as copy number of genetic material, is higher within S. cerevisiae than within S. paradoxus, despite genetic distances as measured in single-nucleotide polymorphisms being vastly smaller within the former species. This genome content variation, as well as loss-of-function variation in the form of premature stop codons and frameshifting indels, is heavily enriched in the subtelomeres, strongly reinforcing the relevance of these regions to functional evolution. Genes affected by these likely functional forms of variation are enriched for functions mediating interaction with the external environment (sugar transport and metabolism, flocculation, metal transport, and metabolism). Our results and analyses provide a comprehensive view of genomic diversity in budding yeast and expose surprising and pronounced differences between the variation within S. cerevisiae and that within S. paradoxus. We also believe that the sequence data and de novo assemblies will constitute a useful resource for further evolutionary and population genomics studies.

  18. CREST maps somatic structural variation in cancer genomes with base-pair resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianmin; Mullighan, Charles G; Easton, John; Roberts, Stefan; Heatley, Sue L; Ma, Jing; Rusch, Michael C; Chen, Ken; Harris, Christopher C; Ding, Li; Holmfeldt, Linda; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Fan, Xian; Wei, Lei; Zhao, David; Obenauer, John C; Naeve, Clayton; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Downing, James R; Zhang, Jinghui

    2011-06-12

    We developed 'clipping reveals structure' (CREST), an algorithm that uses next-generation sequencing reads with partial alignments to a reference genome to directly map structural variations at the nucleotide level of resolution. Application of CREST to whole-genome sequencing data from five pediatric T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) and a human melanoma cell line, COLO-829, identified 160 somatic structural variations. Experimental validation exceeded 80%, demonstrating that CREST had a high predictive accuracy.

  19. CREST maps somatic structural variation in cancer genomes with base-pair resolution

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    We developed CREST (Clipping REveals STructure), an algorithm that uses next-generation sequencing reads with partial alignments to a reference genome to directly map structural variations at the nucleotide level of resolution. Application of CREST to whole-genome sequencing data from five pediatric T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) and a human melanoma cell line, COLO-829, identified 160 somatic structural variations. Experimental validation exceeded 80% demonstrating that CRE...

  20. The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenner, Marsha W; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2007-12-31

    The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource of information for genome and metagenome projects world-wide. GOLD provides access to complete and ongoing projects and their associated metadata through pre-computed lists and a search page. The database currently incorporates information for more than 2900 sequencing projects, of which 639 have been completed and the data deposited in the public databases. GOLD is constantly expanding to provide metadata information related to the project and the organism and is compliant with the Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence (MIGS) specifications.

  1. The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2009: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liolios, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Phil; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-09-01

    The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource for centralized monitoring of genome and metagenome projects worldwide. Both complete and ongoing projects, along with their associated metadata, can be accessed in GOLD through precomputed tables and a search page. As of September 2009, GOLD contains information for more than 5800 sequencing projects, of which 1100 have been completed and their sequence data deposited in a public repository. GOLD continues to expand, moving toward the goal of providing the most comprehensive repository of metadata information related to the projects and their organisms/environments in accordance with the Minimum Information about a (Meta)Genome Sequence (MIGS/MIMS) specification.

  2. MAKER2: an annotation pipeline and genome-database management tool for second-generation genome projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holt Carson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Second-generation sequencing technologies are precipitating major shifts with regards to what kinds of genomes are being sequenced and how they are annotated. While the first generation of genome projects focused on well-studied model organisms, many of today's projects involve exotic organisms whose genomes are largely terra incognita. This complicates their annotation, because unlike first-generation projects, there are no pre-existing 'gold-standard' gene-models with which to train gene-finders. Improvements in genome assembly and the wide availability of mRNA-seq data are also creating opportunities to update and re-annotate previously published genome annotations. Today's genome projects are thus in need of new genome annotation tools that can meet the challenges and opportunities presented by second-generation sequencing technologies. Results We present MAKER2, a genome annotation and data management tool designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 is a multi-threaded, parallelized application that can process second-generation datasets of virtually any size. We show that MAKER2 can produce accurate annotations for novel genomes where training-data are limited, of low quality or even non-existent. MAKER2 also provides an easy means to use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality; and it can use these data to update legacy annotations, significantly improving their quality. We also show that MAKER2 can evaluate the quality of genome annotations, and identify and prioritize problematic annotations for manual review. Conclusions MAKER2 is the first annotation engine specifically designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 scales to datasets of any size, requires little in the way of training data, and can use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality. It can also update and manage legacy genome annotation datasets.

  3. MAKER2: an annotation pipeline and genome-database management tool for second-generation genome projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Carson; Yandell, Mark

    2011-12-22

    Second-generation sequencing technologies are precipitating major shifts with regards to what kinds of genomes are being sequenced and how they are annotated. While the first generation of genome projects focused on well-studied model organisms, many of today's projects involve exotic organisms whose genomes are largely terra incognita. This complicates their annotation, because unlike first-generation projects, there are no pre-existing 'gold-standard' gene-models with which to train gene-finders. Improvements in genome assembly and the wide availability of mRNA-seq data are also creating opportunities to update and re-annotate previously published genome annotations. Today's genome projects are thus in need of new genome annotation tools that can meet the challenges and opportunities presented by second-generation sequencing technologies. We present MAKER2, a genome annotation and data management tool designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 is a multi-threaded, parallelized application that can process second-generation datasets of virtually any size. We show that MAKER2 can produce accurate annotations for novel genomes where training-data are limited, of low quality or even non-existent. MAKER2 also provides an easy means to use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality; and it can use these data to update legacy annotations, significantly improving their quality. We also show that MAKER2 can evaluate the quality of genome annotations, and identify and prioritize problematic annotations for manual review. MAKER2 is the first annotation engine specifically designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 scales to datasets of any size, requires little in the way of training data, and can use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality. It can also update and manage legacy genome annotation datasets.

  4. Evaluating the performance of commercial whole-genome marker sets for capturing common genetic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montpetit Alexandre

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New technologies have enabled genome-wide association studies to be conducted with hundreds of thousands of genotyped SNPs. Several different first-generation genome-wide panels of SNPs have been commercialized. The total amount of common genetic variation is still unknown; however, the coverage of commercial panels can be evaluated against reference population samples genotyped by the International HapMap project. Less information is available about coverage in samples from other populations. Results In this study we compare four commercial panels: the HumanHap 300 and HumanHap 550 Array Sets from the Illumina Infinium series and the Mapping 100 K and Mapping 500 K Array Sets from the Affymetrix GeneChip series. Tagging performance is compared among HapMap CEPH (CEU, Asian (JPT, CHB and Yoruba (YRI population samples. It is also evaluated in an Estonian population sample with more than 1000 individuals genotyped in two 500-kbp ENCODE regions of chromosome 2: ENr112 on 2p16.3 and ENr131 on 2p37.1. Conclusion We found that in a non-reference Caucasian population, commercial SNP panels provide levels of coverage similar to those in the HapMap CEPH population sample. We present the proportions of universal and population-specific SNPs in all the commercial platforms studied.

  5. The life cycle of a genome project: perspectives and guidelines inspired by insect genome projects [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexie Papanicolaou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many research programs on non-model species biology have been empowered by genomics. In turn, genomics is underpinned by a reference sequence and ancillary information created by so-called “genome projects”. The most reliable genome projects are the ones created as part of an active research program and designed to address specific questions but their life extends past publication. In this opinion paper I outline four key insights that have facilitated maintaining genomic communities: the key role of computational capability, the iterative process of building genomic resources, the value of community participation and the importance of manual curation. Taken together, these ideas can and do ensure the longevity of genome projects and the growing non-model species community can use them to focus a discussion with regards to its future genomic infrastructure.

  6. Characterizing genomic variation of Arabidopsis thaliana: the roles of geography and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Jesse R; Des Marais, David L; McKay, John K; Richards, James H; Juenger, Thomas E; Keitt, Timothy H

    2012-11-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana inhabits diverse climates and exhibits varied phenology across its range. Although A. thaliana is an extremely well-studied model species, the relationship between geography, growing season climate and its genetic variation is poorly characterized. We used redundancy analysis (RDA) to quantify the association of genomic variation [214 051 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)] with geography and climate among 1003 accessions collected from 447 locations in Eurasia. We identified climate variables most correlated with genomic variation, which may be important selective gradients related to local adaptation across the species range. Climate variation among sites of origin explained slightly more genomic variation than geographical distance. Large-scale spatial gradients and early spring temperatures explained the most genomic variation, while growing season and summer conditions explained the most after controlling for spatial structure. SNP variation in Scandinavia showed the greatest climate structure among regions, possibly because of relatively consistent phenology and life history of populations in this region. Climate variation explained more variation among nonsynonymous SNPs than expected by chance, suggesting that much of the climatic structure of SNP correlations is due to changes in coding sequence that may underlie local adaptation.

  7. Detecting microsatellites within genomes: significant variation among algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivals Eric

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites are short, tandemly-repeated DNA sequences which are widely distributed among genomes. Their structure, role and evolution can be analyzed based on exhaustive extraction from sequenced genomes. Several dedicated algorithms have been developed for this purpose. Here, we compared the detection efficiency of five of them (TRF, Mreps, Sputnik, STAR, and RepeatMasker. Results Our analysis was first conducted on the human X chromosome, and microsatellite distributions were characterized by microsatellite number, length, and divergence from a pure motif. The algorithms work with user-defined parameters, and we demonstrate that the parameter values chosen can strongly influence microsatellite distributions. The five algorithms were then compared by fixing parameters settings, and the analysis was extended to three other genomes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Neurospora crassa and Drosophila melanogaster spanning a wide range of size and structure. Significant differences for all characteristics of microsatellites were observed among algorithms, but not among genomes, for both perfect and imperfect microsatellites. Striking differences were detected for short microsatellites (below 20 bp, regardless of motif. Conclusion Since the algorithm used strongly influences empirical distributions, studies analyzing microsatellite evolution based on a comparison between empirical and theoretical size distributions should therefore be considered with caution. We also discuss why a typological definition of microsatellites limits our capacity to capture their genomic distributions.

  8. Prospects for the Chinese Human Genome Project (HGP)at the beginning of next century

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chinese Human Genome Project (CHGP) as part of the international human genome research has achieved significant progress and created a solid foundation for further development. While participating in the human genome sequencing and gene discovery, the emphasis of CHGP in the next century will be laid on functional genomics. The strategy, resources and some policy issues will be addressed.

  9. Evolution and Variation of the SARS-CoV Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfei Hu; Zizhang Zhang; Wei Wei; Songgang Li; Jun Wang; Jian Wang; Jun Yu; Huanming Yang; Jing Wang; Jing Xu; Wei Li; Yujun Han; Yan Li; Jia Ji; Jia Ye; Zhao Xu

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the evolution of pathogens is of great medical and biological significance to the prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of infectious diseases. In order to understand the origin and evolution of the SARS-CoV (severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus), we collected complete genome sequences of all viruses available in GenBank, and made comparative analyses with the SARSCoV. Genomic signature analysis demonstrates that the coronaviruses all take the TGTT as their richest tetranucleotide except the SARS-CoV. A detailed analysis of the forty-two complete SARS-CoV genome sequences revealed the existence of two distinct genotypes, and showed that these isolates could be classified into four groups. Our manual analysis of the BLASTN results demonstrates that the HE (hemagglutinin-esterase) gene exists in the SARS-CoV, and many mutations made it unfamiliar to us.

  10. Structural genomic variation as risk factor for idiopathic recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagirnaja, Liina; Palta, Priit; Kasak, Laura;

    2014-01-01

    within RM study group revealed significant enrichment of loci related to innate immunity and immunoregulatory pathways essential for immune tolerance at fetomaternal interface. As a major finding, we report a multicopy duplication (61.6 kb) at 5p13.3 conferring increased maternal risk to RM in Estonia...... and identify common rearrangements modulating risk to RM. Genome-wide screening of Estonian RM patients and fertile controls identified excessive cumulative burden of CNVs (5.4 and 6.1 Mb per genome) in two RM cases possibly increasing their individual disease risk. Functional profiling of all rearranged genes...... and Denmark (meta-analysis, n = 309/205, odds ratio = 4.82, P = 0.012). Comparison to Estonian population-based cohort (total, n = 1000) confirmed the risk for Estonian female cases (P = 7.9 × 10(-4) ). Datasets of four cohorts from the Database of Genomic Variants (total, n = 5,846 subjects) exhibited...

  11. Documenting genomics: Applying archival theory to preserving the records of the Human Genome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The Human Genome Archive Project (HGAP) aimed to preserve the documentary heritage of the UK's contribution to the Human Genome Project (HGP) by using archival theory to develop a suitable methodology for capturing the results of modern, collaborative science. After assessing past projects and different archival theories, the HGAP used an approach based on the theory of documentation strategy to try to capture the records of a scientific project that had an influence beyond the purely scientific sphere. The HGAP was an archival survey that ran for two years. It led to ninety scientists being contacted and has, so far, led to six collections being deposited in the Wellcome Library, with additional collections being deposited in other UK repositories. In applying documentation strategy the HGAP was attempting to move away from traditional archival approaches to science, which have generally focused on retired Nobel Prize winners. It has been partially successful in this aim, having managed to secure collections from people who are not 'big names', but who made an important contribution to the HGP. However, the attempt to redress the gender imbalance in scientific collections and to improve record-keeping in scientific organisations has continued to be difficult to achieve.

  12. Global spectrum of copy number variations reveals genome organizational plasticity and proposes new migration routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Vishweswaraiah, Sangeetha; Lingaiah, Kusuma; Murthy, Megha; Suresh, Raviraj V; Manjegowda, Dinesh S; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2015-01-01

    Global spectrum of CNVs is required to catalog variations to provide a high-resolution on the dynamics of genome-organization and human migration. In this study, we performed genome-wide genotyping using high-resolution arrays and identified 44,109 CNVs from 1,715 genomes across 12 populations. The study unraveled the force of independent evolutionary dynamics on genome-organizational plasticity across populations. We demonstrated the use of CNV tool to study human migration and identified a second major settlement establishing new migration routes in addition to existing ones.

  13. Genome Variation Within Triticale in Comparison to its Wheat and Rye Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome variation in the intergeneric wheat-rye hybrid triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack) has been a puzzle to scientists and plant breeders since the first triticale was synthesized. The existence of unexplained genetic variation in triticale as compared to the parents has been a hindrance to bre...

  14. Copy number variation in Fayoumi and Leghorn chickens analyzed using array comparative genomic hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abernathy, J.; Li, X.; Jia, X.; Chou, W.; Lamont, S.J.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Zhou, H.

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation refers to regions along chromosomes that harbor a type of structural variation, such as duplications or deletions. Copy number variants (CNVs) play a role in many important traits as well as in genetic diversity. Previous analyses of chickens using array comparative genomic hyb

  15. ChickVD: a sequence variation database for the chicken genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; He, Ximiao; Ruan, Jue

    2005-01-01

    Working in parallel with the efforts to sequence the chicken (Gallus gallus) genome, the Beijing Genomics Institute led an international team of scientists from China, USA, UK, Sweden, The Netherlands and Germany to map extensive DNA sequence variation throughout the chicken genome by sampling DNA...... from domestic breeds. Using the Red Jungle Fowl genome sequence as a reference, we identified 3.1 million non-redundant DNA sequence variants. To facilitate the application of our data to avian genetics and to provide a foundation for functional and evolutionary studies, we created the 'Chicken...... Variation Database' (ChickVD). A graphical MapView shows variants mapped onto the chicken genome in the context of gene annotations and other features, including genetic markers, trait loci, cDNAs, chicken orthologs of human disease genes and raw sequence traces. ChickVD also stores information...

  16. Using multilocus sequence typing to study bacterial variation: prospects in the genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Keith A; Maiden, Martin C J

    2014-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) indexes the sequence variation present in a small number (usually seven) of housekeeping gene fragments located around the bacterial genome. Unique alleles at these loci are assigned arbitrary integer identifiers, which effectively summarizes the variation present in several thousand base pairs of genome sequence information as a series of numbers. Comparing bacterial isolates using allele-based methods efficiently corrects for the effects of lateral gene transfer present in many bacterial populations and is computationally efficient. This 'gene-by-gene' approach can be applied to larger collections of loci, such as the ribosomal protein genes used in ribosomal MLST (rMLST), up to and including the complete set of coding sequences present in a genome, whole-genome MLST (wgMLST), providing scalable, efficient and readily interpreted genome analysis.

  17. Theories of Population Variation in Genes and Genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Freddy

    as biologists, molecular biologists, breeders, biomathematicians, and biostatisticians. •    Up-to-date treatment of key areas in classical and modern theoretical population genetics •    In-depth coverage of coalescent theory •    Timely discussion of genomic effects of selection •    Inspired by...

  18. Genomic and gene variation in Mycoplasma hominis strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Andersen, H; Birkelund, Svend;

    1987-01-01

    DNAs from 14 strains of Mycoplasma hominis isolated from various habitats, including strain PG21, were analyzed for genomic heterogeneity. DNA-DNA filter hybridization values were from 51 to 91%. Restriction endonuclease digestion patterns, analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, revealed no ide...

  19. Structural genomic variation as risk factor for idiopathic recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagirnaja, Liina; Palta, Priit; Kasak, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent miscarriage (RM) is a multifactorial disorder with acknowledged genetic heritability that affects ∼3% of couples aiming at childbirth. As copy number variants (CNVs) have been shown to contribute to reproductive disease susceptibility, we aimed to describe genome-wide profile of CNVs...

  20. Theories of Population Variation in Genes and Genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Freddy

    genetics, while emphasizing the close interplay between theory and empiricism. Traditional topics such as genetic and phenotypic variation, mutation, migration, and linkage are covered and advanced by contemporary coalescent theory, which describes the genealogy of genes in a population, ultimately...

  1. A new biophysical metric for interrogating the information content in human genome sequence variation: Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindesay, James; Mason, Tshela E; Ricks-Santi, Luisel; Hercules, William; Kurian, Philip; Dunston, Georgia M

    2012-02-01

    The 21(st) century emergence of genomic medicine is shifting the paradigm in biomedical science from the population phenotype to the individual genotype. In characterizing the biology of disease and health disparities in population genetics, human populations are often defined by the most common alleles in the group. This definition poses difficulties when categorizing individuals in the population who do not have the most common allele(s). Various epidemiological studies have shown an association between common genomic variation, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and common diseases. We hypothesize that information encoded in the structure of SNP haploblock variation in the human leukocyte antigen-disease related (HLA-DR) region of the genome illumines molecular pathways and cellular mechanisms involved in the regulation of host adaptation to the environment. In this paper we describe the development and application of the normalized information content (NIC) as a novel metric based on SNP haploblock variation. The NIC facilitates translation of biochemical DNA sequence variation into a biophysical quantity derived from Boltzmann's canonical ensemble in statistical physics and used widely in information theory. Our normalization of this information metric allows for comparisons of unlike, or even unrelated, regions of the genome. We report here NIC values calculated for HLA-DR SNP haploblocks constructed by Haploview, a product of the International Haplotype Map Project. These haploblocks were scanned for potential regulatory elements using ConSite and miRBase, publicly available bioinformatics tools. We found that all of the haploblocks with statistically low NIC values contained putative transcription factor binding sites and microRNA motifs, suggesting correlation with genomic regulation. Thus, we were able to relate a mathematical measure of information content in HLA-DR SNP haploblocks to biologically relevant functional knowledge embedded in

  2. Genomes to life project : quarterly report October 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2004-01-01

    This SAND report provides the technical progress through October 2003 of the Sandia-led project, 'Carbon Sequestration in Synechococcus Sp.: From Molecular Machines to Hierarchical Modeling,' funded by the DOE Office of Science Genomes to Life Program. Understanding, predicting, and perhaps manipulating carbon fixation in the oceans has long been a major focus of biological oceanography and has more recently been of interest to a broader audience of scientists and policy makers. It is clear that the oceanic sinks and sources of CO2 are important terms in the global environmental response to anthropogenic atmospheric inputs of CO2 and that oceanic microorganisms play a key role in this response. However, the relationship between this global phenomenon and the biochemical mechanisms of carbon fixation in these microorganisms is poorly understood. In this project, we will investigate the carbon sequestration behavior of Synechococcus Sp., an abundant marine cyanobacteria known to be important to environmental responses to carbon dioxide levels, through experimental and computational methods. This project is a combined experimental and computational effort with emphasis on developing and applying new computational tools and methods. Our experimental effort will provide the biology and data to drive the computational efforts and include significant investment in developing new experimental methods for uncovering protein partners, characterizing protein complexes, identifying new binding domains. We will also develop and apply new data measurement and statistical methods for analyzing microarray experiments. Computational tools will be essential to our efforts to discover and characterize the function of the molecular machines of Synechococcus. To this end, molecular simulation methods will be coupled with knowledge discovery from diverse biological data sets for high-throughput discovery and characterization of protein-protein complexes. In addition, we will

  3. Genomes to Life Project Quartely Report October 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffelfinger, Grant S.; Martino, Anthony; Rintoul, Mark Daniel; Geist, Al; Gorin, Andrey; Xu, Ying; Palenik, Brian

    2005-02-01

    This SAND report provides the technical progress through October 2004 of the Sandia-led project, %22Carbon Sequestration in Synechococcus Sp.: From Molecular Machines to Hierarchical Modeling,%22 funded by the DOE Office of Science Genomes to Life Program. Understanding, predicting, and perhaps manipulating carbon fixation in the oceans has long been a major focus of biological oceanography and has more recently been of interest to a broader audience of scientists and policy makers. It is clear that the oceanic sinks and sources of CO2 are important terms in the global environmental response to anthropogenic atmospheric inputs of CO2 and that oceanic microorganisms play a key role in this response. However, the relationship between this global phenomenon and the biochemical mechanisms of carbon fixation in these microorganisms is poorly understood. In this project, we will investigate the carbon sequestration behavior of Synechococcus Sp., an abundant marine cyanobacteria known to be important to environmental responses to carbon dioxide levels, through experimental and computational methods. This project is a combined experimental and computational effort with emphasis on developing and applying new computational tools and methods. Our experimental effort will provide the biology and data to drive the computational efforts and include significant investment in developing new experimental methods for uncovering protein partners, characterizing protein complexes, identifying new binding domains. We will also develop and apply new data measurement and statistical methods for analyzing microarray experiments. Computational tools will be essential to our efforts to discover and characterize the function of the molecular machines of Synechococcus. To this end, molecular simulation methods will be coupled with knowledge discovery from diverse biological data sets for high-throughput discovery and characterization of protein-protein complexes. In addition, we will develop

  4. Genomes to Life Project Quarterly Report April 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffelfinger, Grant S.; Martino, Anthony; Rintoul, Mark Daniel; Geist, Al; Gorin, Andrey; Xu, Ying; Palenik, Brian

    2006-02-01

    This SAND report provides the technical progress through April 2005 of the Sandia-led project, "Carbon Sequestration in Synechococcus Sp.: From Molecular Machines to Hierarchical Modeling," funded by the DOE Office of Science Genomics:GTL Program. Understanding, predicting, and perhaps manipulating carbon fixation in the oceans has long been a major focus of biological oceanography and has more recently been of interest to a broader audience of scientists and policy makers. It is clear that the oceanic sinks and sources of CO2 are important terms in the global environmental response to anthropogenic atmospheric inputs of CO2 and that oceanic microorganisms play a key role in this response. However, the relationship between this global phenomenon and the biochemical mechanisms of carbon fixation in these microorganisms is poorly understood. In this project, we will investigate the carbon sequestration behavior of Synechococcus Sp., an abundant marine cyanobacteria known to be important to environmental responses to carbon dioxide levels, through experimental and computational methods. This project is a combined experimental and computational effort with emphasis on developing and applying new computational tools and methods. Our experimental effort will provide the biology and data to drive the computational efforts and include significant investment in developing new experimental methods for uncovering protein partners, characterizing protein complexes, identifying new binding domains. We will also develop and apply new data measurement and statistical methods for analyzing microarray experiments. Computational tools will be essential to our efforts to discover and characterize the function of the molecular machines of Synechococcus. To this end, molecular simulation methods will be coupled with knowledge discovery from diverse biological data sets for high-throughput discovery and characterization of protein-protein complexes. In addition, we will develop a set of

  5. Identification of genomic regions associated with phenotypic variation between dog breeds using selection mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaysse, Amaury; Ratnakumar, Abhirami; Derrien, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    across the genome in dog breeds are the result of both selection and genetic drift, but extended blocks of homozygosity on a megabase scale appear to be best explained by selection. Further elucidation of the variants under selection will help to uncover the genetic basis of complex traits and disease....... breeds using a newly developed high-density genotyping array consisting of >170,000 evenly spaced SNPs. We first identify 44 genomic regions exhibiting extreme differentiation across multiple breeds. Genetic variation in these regions correlates with variation in several phenotypic traits that vary...... to provide a list of variants that may directly affect these traits. This study provides a catalogue of genomic regions showing extreme reduction in genetic variation or population differentiation in dogs, including many linked to phenotypic variation. The many blocks of reduced haplotype diversity observed...

  6. Variational optimization with infinite projected entangled-pair states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corboz, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    We present a scheme to perform an iterative variational optimization with infinite projected entangled-pair states, a tensor network ansatz for a two-dimensional wave function in the thermodynamic limit, to compute the ground state of a local Hamiltonian. The method is based on a systematic summation of Hamiltonian contributions using the corner-transfer-matrix method. Benchmark results for challenging problems are presented, including the two-dimensional Heisenberg model, the Shastry-Sutherland model, and the t -J model, which show that the variational scheme yields considerably more accurate results than the previously best imaginary-time evolution algorithm, with a similar computational cost and with a faster convergence towards the ground state.

  7. Application of bioinformatics in cardiovascular genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tragante Do O, V.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research made a remarkable progress in the past 20 years, with the Human Genome Project, which sequenced an entire genome; the HapMap project, that identified common genetic variation in hundreds of genomes from different populations; and the 1000 Genomes project, which identified common and

  8. Cyanobacteria Maintain Constant Protein Concentration despite Genome Copy-Number Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Yu; O'Shea, Erin K

    2017-04-18

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 has multiple copies of its single chromosome, and the copy number varies in individual cells, providing an ideal system to study the effect of genome copy-number variation on cell size and gene expression. Using single-cell fluorescence imaging, we found that protein concentration remained constant across individual cells regardless of genome copy number. Cell volume and the total protein amount from a single gene were both positively, linearly correlated with genome copy number, suggesting that changes in cell volume play an important role in buffering genome copy-number variance. This study provides a quantitative examination of gene expression regulation in cells with variable genome copies and sheds light on the compensation mechanisms for variance in genome copy number. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Using large-scale genome variation cohorts to decipher the molecular mechanism of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, Nina; Mardin, Balca R; Yakneen, Sergei; Korbel, Jan O

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing genomic structural variations (SVs) in the human genome remains challenging, and there is a growing interest to understand somatic SVs occurring in cancer, a disease of the genome. A havoc-causing SV process known as chromothripsis scars the genome when localized chromosome shattering and repair occur in a one-off catastrophe. Recent efforts led to the development of a set of conceptual criteria for the inference of chromothripsis events in cancer genomes and to the development of experimental model systems for studying this striking DNA alteration process in vitro. We discuss these approaches, and additionally touch upon current "Big Data" efforts that employ hybrid cloud computing to enable studies of numerous cancer genomes in an effort to search for commonalities and differences in molecular DNA alteration processes in cancer.

  10. Genomic variation in the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xi; Schwartz, John C; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    Production of a vast antibody repertoire is essential for the protection against pathogens. Variable region germline complexity contributes to repertoire diversity and is a standard feature of mammalian immunoglobulin loci, but functional V region genes are limited in swine. For example, the porcine lambda light chain locus is composed of 23 variable (V) genes and 4 joining (J) genes, but only 10 or 11 V and 2 J genes are functional. Allelic variation in V and J may increase overall diversity within a population, yet lead to repertoire holes in individuals lacking key alleles. Previous studies focused on heavy chain genetic variation, thus light chain allelic diversity is not known. We characterized allelic variation of the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable (IGLV) region genes. All intact IGLV genes in 81 pigs were amplified, sequenced, and analyzed to determine their allelic variation and functionality. We observed mutational variation across the entire length of the IGLV genes, in both framework and complementarity determining regions (CDRs). Three recombination hotspot motifs were also identified suggesting that non-allelic homologous recombination is an evolutionarily alternative mechanism for generating germline antibody diversity. Functional alleles were greatest in the most highly expressed families, IGLV3 and IGLV8. At the population level, allelic variation appears to help maintain the potential for broad antibody repertoire diversity in spite of reduced gene segment choices and limited germline sequence modification. The trade-off may be a reduction in repertoire diversity within individuals that could result in an increased variation in immunity to infectious disease and response to vaccination.

  11. [Phylogenetic relationships and intraspecific variation of D-genome Aegilops L. as revealed by RAPD analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriunova, S V; Kochieva, E Z; Chikida, N N; Pukhal'skiĭ, V A

    2004-05-01

    RAPD analysis was carried out to study the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of polyploid Aegilops species, which contain the D genome as a component of the alloploid genome, and diploid Aegilops tauschii, which is a putative donor of the D genome for common wheat. In total, 74 accessions of six D-genome Aegilops species were examined. The highest intraspecific variation (0.03-0.21) was observed for Ae. tauschii. Intraspecific distances between accessions ranged 0.007-0.067 in Ae. cylindrica, 0.017-0.047 in Ae. vavilovii, and 0.00-0.053 in Ae. juvenalis. Likewise, Ae. ventricosa and Ae. crassa showed low intraspecific polymorphism. The among-accession difference in alloploid Ae. ventricosa (genome DvNv) was similar to that of one parental species, Ae. uniaristata (N), and substantially lower than in the other parent, Ae. tauschii (D). The among-accession difference in Ae. cylindrica (CcDc) was considerably lower than in either parent, Ae. tauschii (D) or Ae. caudata (C). With the exception of Ae. cylindrica, all D-genome species--Ae. tauschii (D), Ae. ventricosa (DvNv), Ae. crassa (XcrDcrl and XcrDcrlDcr2), Ae. juvenalis (XjDjUj), and Ae. vavilovii (XvaDvaSva)--formed a single polymorphic cluster, which was distinct from clusters of other species. The only exception, Ae. cylindrica, did not group with the other D-genome species, but clustered with Ae. caudata (C), a donor of the C genome. The cluster of these two species was clearly distinct from the cluster of the other D-genome species and close to a cluster of Ae. umbellulata (genome U) and Ae. ovata (genome UgMg). Thus, RAPD analysis for the first time was used to estimate and to compare the interpopulation polymorphism and to establish the phylogenetic relationships of all diploid and alloploid D-genome Aegilops species.

  12. Anchored pseudo-de novo assembly of human genomes identifies extensive sequence variation from unmapped sequence reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber-Hammond, Joshua J; Brown, Kim H

    2016-07-01

    The human genome reference (HGR) completion marked the genomics era beginning, yet despite its utility universal application is limited by the small number of individuals used in its development. This is highlighted by the presence of high-quality sequence reads failing to map within the HGR. Sequences failing to map generally represent 2-5 % of total reads, which may harbor regions that would enhance our understanding of population variation, evolution, and disease. Alternatively, complete de novo assemblies can be created, but these effectively ignore the groundwork of the HGR. In an effort to find a middle ground, we developed a bioinformatic pipeline that maps paired-end reads to the HGR as separate single reads, exports unmappable reads, de novo assembles these reads per individual and then combines assemblies into a secondary reference assembly used for comparative analysis. Using 45 diverse 1000 Genomes Project individuals, we identified 351,361 contigs covering 195.5 Mb of sequence unincorporated in GRCh38. 30,879 contigs are represented in multiple individuals with ~40 % showing high sequence complexity. Genomic coordinates were generated for 99.9 %, with 52.5 % exhibiting high-quality mapping scores. Comparative genomic analyses with archaic humans and primates revealed significant sequence alignments and comparisons with model organism RefSeq gene datasets identified novel human genes. If incorporated, these sequences will expand the HGR, but more importantly our data highlight that with this method low coverage (~10-20×) next-generation sequencing can still be used to identify novel unmapped sequences to explore biological functions contributing to human phenotypic variation, disease and functionality for personal genomic medicine.

  13. A Variational Bayes Genomic-Enabled Prediction Model with Genotype × Environment Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osval A. Montesinos-López

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There are Bayesian and non-Bayesian genomic models that take into account G×E interactions. However, the computational cost of implementing Bayesian models is high, and becomes almost impossible when the number of genotypes, environments, and traits is very large, while, in non-Bayesian models, there are often important and unsolved convergence problems. The variational Bayes method is popular in machine learning, and, by approximating the probability distributions through optimization, it tends to be faster than Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. For this reason, in this paper, we propose a new genomic variational Bayes version of the Bayesian genomic model with G×E using half-t priors on each standard deviation (SD term to guarantee highly noninformative and posterior inferences that are not sensitive to the choice of hyper-parameters. We show the complete theoretical derivation of the full conditional and the variational posterior distributions, and their implementations. We used eight experimental genomic maize and wheat data sets to illustrate the new proposed variational Bayes approximation, and compared its predictions and implementation time with a standard Bayesian genomic model with G×E. Results indicated that prediction accuracies are slightly higher in the standard Bayesian model with G×E than in its variational counterpart, but, in terms of computation time, the variational Bayes genomic model with G×E is, in general, 10 times faster than the conventional Bayesian genomic model with G×E. For this reason, the proposed model may be a useful tool for researchers who need to predict and select genotypes in several environments.

  14. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the "core team", facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination.

  15. Rapid detection of structural variation in a human genome using nanochannel-based genome mapping technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hastie, Alex R.; Cao, Dandan;

    2014-01-01

    than 1 kb. Excluding the 59 SVs (54 insertions/deletions, 5 inversions) that overlap with N-base gaps in the reference assembly hg19, 666 non-gap SVs remained, and 396 of them (60%) were verified by paired-end data from whole-genome sequencing-based re-sequencing or de novo assembly sequence from...... fosmid data. Of the remaining 270 SVs, 260 are insertions and 213 overlap known SVs in the Database of Genomic Variants. Overall, 609 out of 666 (90%) variants were supported by experimental orthogonal methods or historical evidence in public databases. At the same time, genome mapping also provides...

  16. Genomic variation at the tips of the adaptive radiation of Darwin's finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Jaime A; Cooper, Elizabeth A; Hendry, Andrew P; Podos, Jeffrey; De León, Luis F; Raeymaekers, Joost A M; MacMillan, W Owen; Uy, J Albert C

    2016-11-01

    Adaptive radiation unfolds as selection acts on the genetic variation underlying functional traits. The nature of this variation can be revealed by studying the tips of an ongoing adaptive radiation. We studied genomic variation at the tips of the Darwin's finch radiation; specifically focusing on polymorphism within, and variation among, three sympatric species of the genus Geospiza. Using restriction site-associated DNA (RAD-seq), we characterized 32 569 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from which 11 outlier SNPs for beak and body size were uncovered by a genomewide association study (GWAS). Principal component analysis revealed that these 11 SNPs formed four statistically linked groups. Stepwise regression then revealed that the first PC score, which included 6 of the 11 top SNPs, explained over 80% of the variation in beak size, suggesting that selection on these traits influences multiple correlated loci. The two SNPs most strongly associated with beak size were near genes associated with beak morphology across deeper branches of the radiation: delta-like 1 homologue (DLK1) and high-mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2). Our results suggest that (i) key adaptive traits are associated with a small fraction of the genome (11 of 32 569 SNPs), (ii) SNPs linked to the candidate genes are dispersed throughout the genome (on several chromosomes), and (iii) micro- and macro-evolutionary variation (roots and tips of the radiation) involve some shared and some unique genomic regions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Worldwide patterns of genomic variation and admixture in gray wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhenxin; Silva, Pedro; Gronau, Ilan; Wang, Shuoguo; Armero, Aitor Serres; Schweizer, Rena M; Ramirez, Oscar; Pollinger, John; Galaverni, Marco; Ortega Del-Vecchyo, Diego; Du, Lianming; Zhang, Wenping; Zhang, Zhihe; Xing, Jinchuan; Vilà, Carles; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Godinho, Raquel; Yue, Bisong; Wayne, Robert K

    2016-02-01

    The gray wolf (Canis lupus) is a widely distributed top predator and ancestor of the domestic dog. To address questions about wolf relationships to each other and dogs, we assembled and analyzed a data set of 34 canine genomes. The divergence between New and Old World wolves is the earliest branching event and is followed by the divergence of Old World wolves and dogs, confirming that the dog was domesticated in the Old World. However, no single wolf population is more closely related to dogs, supporting the hypothesis that dogs were derived from an extinct wolf population. All extant wolves have a surprisingly recent common ancestry and experienced a dramatic population decline beginning at least ∼30 thousand years ago (kya). We suggest this crisis was related to the colonization of Eurasia by modern human hunter-gatherers, who competed with wolves for limited prey but also domesticated them, leading to a compensatory population expansion of dogs. We found extensive admixture between dogs and wolves, with up to 25% of Eurasian wolf genomes showing signs of dog ancestry. Dogs have influenced the recent history of wolves through admixture and vice versa, potentially enhancing adaptation. Simple scenarios of dog domestication are confounded by admixture, and studies that do not take admixture into account with specific demographic models are problematic. © 2016 Fan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Genomes to life project quarterly report June 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2005-01-01

    This SAND report provides the technical progress through June 2004 of the Sandia-led project, ''Carbon Sequestration in Synechococcus Sp.: From Molecular Machines to Hierarchical Modeling'', funded by the DOE Office of Science Genomes to Life Program. Understanding, predicting, and perhaps manipulating carbon fixation in the oceans has long been a major focus of biological oceanography and has more recently been of interest to a broader audience of scientists and policy makers. It is clear that the oceanic sinks and sources of CO{sub 2} are important terms in the global environmental response to anthropogenic atmospheric inputs of CO{sub 2} and that oceanic microorganisms play a key role in this response. However, the relationship between this global phenomenon and the biochemical mechanisms of carbon fixation in these microorganisms is poorly understood. In this project, we will investigate the carbon sequestration behavior of Synechococcus Sp., an abundant marine cyanobacteria known to be important to environmental responses to carbon dioxide levels, through experimental and computational methods. This project is a combined experimental and computational effort with emphasis on developing and applying new computational tools and methods. Our experimental effort will provide the biology and data to drive the computational efforts and include significant investment in developing new experimental methods for uncovering protein partners, characterizing protein complexes, identifying new binding domains. We will also develop and apply new data measurement and statistical methods for analyzing microarray experiments. Computational tools will be essential to our efforts to discover and characterize the function of the molecular machines of Synechococcus. To this end, molecular simulation methods will be coupled with knowledge discovery from diverse biological data sets for high-throughput discovery and characterization of protein-protein complexes

  19. Human Genome Teacher Networking Project, Final Report, April 1, 1992 - March 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Debra

    1999-10-01

    Project to provide education regarding ethical legal and social implications of Human Genome Project to high school science teachers through two consecutive summer workshops, in class activities, and peer teaching workshops.

  20. The UK Human Genome Mapping Project online computing service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysavy, F R; Bishop, M J; Gibbs, G P; Williams, G W

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of computing and networking facilities developed by the Medical Research Council to provide online computing support to the Human Genome Mapping Project (HGMP) in the UK. The facility is connected to a number of other computing facilities in various centres of genetics and molecular biology research excellence, either directly via high-speed links or through national and international wide-area networks. The paper describes the design and implementation of the current system, a 'client/server' network of Sun, IBM, DEC and Apple servers, gateways and workstations. A short outline of online computing services currently delivered by this system to the UK human genetics research community is also provided. More information about the services and their availability could be obtained by a direct approach to the UK HGMP-RC.

  1. Genomes to Life Project Quarterly Report April 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffelfinger, Grant S.; Martino, Anthony; Rintoul, Mark Daniel; Geist, Al; Gorin, Andrey; Xu, Ying; Palenik, Brian

    2006-02-01

    This SAND report provides the technical progress through April 2005 of the Sandia-led project, "Carbon Sequestration in Synechococcus Sp.: From Molecular Machines to Hierarchical Modeling," funded by the DOE Office of Science Genomics:GTL Program. Understanding, predicting, and perhaps manipulating carbon fixation in the oceans has long been a major focus of biological oceanography and has more recently been of interest to a broader audience of scientists and policy makers. It is clear that the oceanic sinks and sources of CO2 are important terms in the global environmental response to anthropogenic atmospheric inputs of CO2 and that oceanic microorganisms play a key role in this response. However, the relationship between this global phenomenon and the biochemical mechanisms of carbon fixation in these microorganisms is poorly understood. In this project, we will investigate the carbon sequestration behavior of Synechococcus Sp., an abundant marine cyanobacteria known to be important to environmental responses to carbon dioxide levels, through experimental and computational methods. This project is a combined experimental and computational effort with emphasis on developing and applying new computational tools and methods. Our experimental effort will provide the biology and data to drive the computational efforts and include significant investment in developing new experimental methods for uncovering protein partners, characterizing protein complexes, identifying new binding domains. We will also develop and apply new data measurement and statistical methods for analyzing microarray experiments. Computational tools will be essential to our efforts to discover and characterize the function of the molecular machines of Synechococcus. To this end, molecular simulation methods will be coupled with knowledge discovery from diverse biological data sets for high-throughput discovery and characterization of protein-protein complexes. In addition, we will develop a set of

  2. Intra-specific variation in genome size in maize: cytological and phenotypic correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realini, María Florencia; Poggio, Lidia; Cámara-Hernández, Julián; González, Graciela Esther

    2016-01-01

    Genome size variation accompanies the diversification and evolution of many plant species. Relationships between DNA amount and phenotypic and cytological characteristics form the basis of most hypotheses that ascribe a biological role to genome size. The goal of the present research was to investigate the intra-specific variation in the DNA content in maize populations from Northeastern Argentina and further explore the relationship between genome size and the phenotypic traits seed weight and length of the vegetative cycle. Moreover, cytological parameters such as the percentage of heterochromatin as well as the number, position and sequence composition of knobs were analysed and their relationships with 2C DNA values were explored. The populations analysed presented significant differences in 2C DNA amount, from 4.62 to 6.29 pg, representing 36.15 % of the inter-populational variation. Moreover, intra-populational genome size variation was found, varying from 1.08 to 1.63-fold. The variation in the percentage of knob heterochromatin as well as in the number, chromosome position and sequence composition of the knobs was detected among and within the populations. Although a positive relationship between genome size and the percentage of heterochromatin was observed, a significant correlation was not found. This confirms that other non-coding repetitive DNA sequences are contributing to the genome size variation. A positive relationship between DNA amount and the seed weight has been reported in a large number of species, this relationship was not found in the populations studied here. The length of the vegetative cycle showed a positive correlation with the percentage of heterochromatin. This result allowed attributing an adaptive effect to heterochromatin since the length of this cycle would be optimized via selection for an appropriate percentage of heterochromatin. PMID:26644343

  3. Copy number variation detection in whole-genome sequencing data using the Bayesian information criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Ruibin; Hadjipanayis, Angela G; Luquette, Lovelace J; Kim, Tae-Min; Lee, Eunjung; Zhang, Jianhua; Johnson, Mark D; Muzny, Donna M; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Peter J

    2011-11-15

    DNA copy number variations (CNVs) play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of cancer and confer susceptibility to a variety of human disorders. Array comparative genomic hybridization has been used widely to identify CNVs genome wide, but the next-generation sequencing technology provides an opportunity to characterize CNVs genome wide with unprecedented resolution. In this study, we developed an algorithm to detect CNVs from whole-genome sequencing data and applied it to a newly sequenced glioblastoma genome with a matched control. This read-depth algorithm, called BIC-seq, can accurately and efficiently identify CNVs via minimizing the Bayesian information criterion. Using BIC-seq, we identified hundreds of CNVs as small as 40 bp in the cancer genome sequenced at 10× coverage, whereas we could only detect large CNVs (> 15 kb) in the array comparative genomic hybridization profiles for the same genome. Eighty percent (14/16) of the small variants tested (110 bp to 14 kb) were experimentally validated by quantitative PCR, demonstrating high sensitivity and true positive rate of the algorithm. We also extended the algorithm to detect recurrent CNVs in multiple samples as well as deriving error bars for breakpoints using a Gibbs sampling approach. We propose this statistical approach as a principled yet practical and efficient method to estimate CNVs in whole-genome sequencing data.

  4. Genomes to Life Project Quartely Report October 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffelfinger, Grant S.; Martino, Anthony; Rintoul, Mark Daniel; Geist, Al; Gorin, Andrey; Xu, Ying; Palenik, Brian

    2005-02-01

    This SAND report provides the technical progress through October 2004 of the Sandia-led project, %22Carbon Sequestration in Synechococcus Sp.: From Molecular Machines to Hierarchical Modeling,%22 funded by the DOE Office of Science Genomes to Life Program. Understanding, predicting, and perhaps manipulating carbon fixation in the oceans has long been a major focus of biological oceanography and has more recently been of interest to a broader audience of scientists and policy makers. It is clear that the oceanic sinks and sources of CO2 are important terms in the global environmental response to anthropogenic atmospheric inputs of CO2 and that oceanic microorganisms play a key role in this response. However, the relationship between this global phenomenon and the biochemical mechanisms of carbon fixation in these microorganisms is poorly understood. In this project, we will investigate the carbon sequestration behavior of Synechococcus Sp., an abundant marine cyanobacteria known to be important to environmental responses to carbon dioxide levels, through experimental and computational methods. This project is a combined experimental and computational effort with emphasis on developing and applying new computational tools and methods. Our experimental effort will provide the biology and data to drive the computational efforts and include significant investment in developing new experimental methods for uncovering protein partners, characterizing protein complexes, identifying new binding domains. We will also develop and apply new data measurement and statistical methods for analyzing microarray experiments. Computational tools will be essential to our efforts to discover and characterize the function of the molecular machines of Synechococcus. To this end, molecular simulation methods will be coupled with knowledge discovery from diverse biological data sets for high-throughput discovery and characterization of protein-protein complexes. In addition, we will develop

  5. Genome resequencing in Populus: Revealing large-scale genome variation and implications on specialized-trait genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Priya, Ranjan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    To date, Populus ranks among a few plant species with a complete genome sequence and other highly developed genomic resources. With the first genome sequence among all tree species, Populus has been adopted as a suitable model organism for genomic studies in trees. However, far from being just a model species, Populus is a key renewable economic resource that plays a significant role in providing raw materials for the biofuel and pulp and paper industries. Therefore, aside from leading frontiers of basic tree molecular biology and ecological research, Populus leads frontiers in addressing global economic challenges related to fuel and fiber production. The latter fact suggests that research aimed at improving quality and quantity of Populus as a raw material will likely drive the pursuit of more targeted and deeper research in order to unlock the economic potential tied in molecular biology processes that drive this tree species. Advances in genome sequence-driven technologies, such as resequencing individual genotypes, which in turn facilitates large scale SNP discovery and identification of large scale polymorphisms are key determinants of future success in these initiatives. In this treatise we discuss implications of genome sequence-enable technologies on Populus genomic and genetic studies of complex and specialized-traits.

  6. Genome-wide profiling of genetic variation in Agrobacterium-transformed rice plants*#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-xu; Wu, San-ling; Liu, Yan-hua; Jin, Gu-lei; Zhao, Hai-jun; Fan, Long-jiang; Shu, Qing-yao

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation has been widely used in producing transgenic plants, and was recently used to generate “transgene-clean” targeted genomic modifications coupled with the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas9) system. Although tremendous variation in morphological and agronomic traits, such as plant height, seed fertility, and grain size, was observed in transgenic plants, the underlying mechanisms are not yet well understood, and the types and frequency of genetic variation in transformed plants have not been fully disclosed. To reveal the genome-wide variation in transformed plants, we sequenced the genomes of five independent T0 rice plants using next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques. Bioinformatics analyses followed by experimental validation revealed the following: (1) in addition to transfer-DNA (T-DNA) insertions, three transformed plants carried heritable plasmid backbone DNA of variable sizes (855–5216 bp) and in different configurations with the T-DNA insertions (linked or apart); (2) each transgenic plant contained an estimated 338–1774 independent genetic variations (single nucleotide variations (SNVs) or small insertion/deletions); and (3) 2–6 new Tos17 insertions were detected in each transformed plant, but no other transposable elements or bacterial genomic DNA. PMID:27921404

  7. Massive genomic variation and strong selection in Arabidopsis thaliana lines from Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzer, Alexander; Zhang, Qingrun; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J; Korte, Arthur; Nizhynska, Viktoria; Voronin, Viktor; Korte, Pamela; Sedman, Laura; Mandáková, Terezie; Lysak, Martin A; Seren, Ümit; Hellmann, Ines; Nordborg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in sequencing, the goal of obtaining a comprehensive view of genetic variation in populations is still far from reached. We sequenced 180 lines of A. thaliana from Sweden to obtain as complete a picture as possible of variation in a single region. Whereas simple polymorphisms in the unique portion of the genome are readily identified, other polymorphisms are not. The massive variation in genome size identified by flow cytometry seems largely to be due to 45S rDNA copy number variation, with lines from northern Sweden having particularly large numbers of copies. Strong selection is evident in the form of long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD), as well as in LD between nearby compensatory mutations. Many footprints of selective sweeps were found in lines from northern Sweden, and a massive global sweep was shown to have involved a 700-kb transposition. PMID:23793030

  8. Ethical considerations of research policy for personal genome analysis: the approach of the Genome Science Project in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minari, Jusaku; Shirai, Tetsuya; Kato, Kazuto

    2014-12-01

    As evidenced by high-throughput sequencers, genomic technologies have recently undergone radical advances. These technologies enable comprehensive sequencing of personal genomes considerably more efficiently and less expensively than heretofore. These developments present a challenge to the conventional framework of biomedical ethics; under these changing circumstances, each research project has to develop a pragmatic research policy. Based on the experience with a new large-scale project-the Genome Science Project-this article presents a novel approach to conducting a specific policy for personal genome research in the Japanese context. In creating an original informed-consent form template for the project, we present a two-tiered process: making the draft of the template following an analysis of national and international policies; refining the draft template in conjunction with genome project researchers for practical application. Through practical use of the template, we have gained valuable experience in addressing challenges in the ethical review process, such as the importance of sharing details of the latest developments in genomics with members of research ethics committees. We discuss certain limitations of the conventional concept of informed consent and its governance system and suggest the potential of an alternative process using information technology.

  9. The lawful uses of knowledge from the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grad, F.P.

    1994-04-15

    Part I of this study deals with the right to know or not to know personal genetic information, and examines available legal protections of the right of privacy and the adverse effect of the disclosure of genetic information both on employment and insurance interests and on self esteem and protection of personal integrity. The study examines the rationale for the legal protection of privacy as the protection of a public interest. It examines the very limited protections currently available for privacy interests, including genetic privacy interests, and concludes that there is a need for broader, more far-reaching legal protections. The second part of the study is based on the assumption that as major a project as the Human Genome Project, spending billions of dollars on science which is health related, will indeed be applied for preventive and therapeutic public health purposes, as it has been in the past. It also addresses the recurring fear that public health initiatives in the genetic area must evolve a new eugenic agenda, that we must not repeat the miserable discriminatory experiences of the past.

  10. Structural genomic variation in childhood epilepsies with complex phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbig, Ingo; Swinkels, Marielle E M; Aten, Emmelien

    2014-01-01

    A genetic contribution to a broad range of epilepsies has been postulated, and particularly copy number variations (CNVs) have emerged as significant genetic risk factors. However, the role of CNVs in patients with epilepsies with complex phenotypes is not known. Therefore, we investigated the role...... of CNVs in patients with unclassified epilepsies and complex phenotypes. A total of 222 patients from three European countries, including patients with structural lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dysmorphic features, and multiple congenital anomalies, were clinically evaluated and screened...... for CNVs. MRI findings including acquired or developmental lesions and patient characteristics were subdivided and analyzed in subgroups. MRI data were available for 88.3% of patients, of whom 41.6% had abnormal MRI findings. Eighty-eight rare CNVs were discovered in 71 out of 222 patients (31...

  11. THEORETICAL AND NUMERICAL COMPARISON ON DOUBLE-PROJECTION METHODS FOR VARIATIONAL INEQUALITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yiju; SUN Wenyu

    2003-01-01

    Recently, double projection methods for solving variational inequalities have received much attention due to their fewer projection times at each iteration. In this paper, we unify these double projection methods within two unified frameworks, which contain the existing double projection methods as special cases. On the basis of this unification, theoretical and numerical comparison between these double projection methods is presented.

  12. Estimating variation within the genes and inferring the phylogeny of 186 sequenced diverse Escherichia coli genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaas Rolf S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli exists in commensal and pathogenic forms. By measuring the variation of individual genes across more than a hundred sequenced genomes, gene variation can be studied in detail, including the number of mutations found for any given gene. This knowledge will be useful for creating better phylogenies, for determination of molecular clocks and for improved typing techniques. Results We find 3,051 gene clusters/families present in at least 95% of the genomes and 1,702 gene clusters present in 100% of the genomes. The former 'soft core' of about 3,000 gene families is perhaps more biologically relevant, especially considering that many of these genome sequences are draft quality. The E. coli pan-genome for this set of isolates contains 16,373 gene clusters. A core-gene tree, based on alignment and a pan-genome tree based on gene presence/absence, maps the relatedness of the 186 sequenced E. coli genomes. The core-gene tree displays high confidence and divides the E. coli strains into the observed MLST type clades and also separates defined phylotypes. Conclusion The results of comparing a large and diverse E. coli dataset support the theory that reliable and good resolution phylogenies can be inferred from the core-genome. The results further suggest that the resolution at the isolate level may, subsequently be improved by targeting more variable genes. The use of whole genome sequencing will make it possible to eliminate, or at least reduce, the need for several typing steps used in traditional epidemiology.

  13. Phylogeny, rate variation, and genome size evolution of Pelargonium (Geraniaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Gibby, Mary; Jansen, Robert K

    2012-09-01

    The phylogeny of 58 Pelargonium species was estimated using five plastid markers (rbcL, matK, ndhF, rpoC1, trnL-F) and one mitochondrial gene (nad5). The results confirmed the monophyly of three major clades and four subclades within Pelargonium but also indicate the need to revise some sectional classifications. This phylogeny was used to examine karyotype evolution in the genus: plotting chromosome sizes, numbers and 2C-values indicates that genome size is significantly correlated with chromosome size but not number. Accelerated rates of nucleotide substitution have been previously detected in both plastid and mitochondrial genes in Pelargonium, but sparse taxon sampling did not enable identification of the phylogenetic distribution of these elevated rates. Using the multigene phylogeny as a constraint, we investigated lineage- and locus-specific heterogeneity of substitution rates in Pelargonium for an expanded number of taxa and demonstrated that both plastid and mitochondrial genes have had accelerated substitution rates but with markedly disparate patterns. In the plastid, the exons of rpoC1 have significantly accelerated substitution rates compared to its intron and the acceleration was mainly due to nonsynonymous substitutions. In contrast, the mitochondrial gene, nad5, experienced substantial acceleration of synonymous substitution rates in three internal branches of Pelargonium, but this acceleration ceased in all terminal branches. Several lineages also have dN/dS ratios significantly greater than one for rpoC1, indicating that positive selection is acting on this gene, whereas the accelerated synonymous substitutions in the mitochondrial gene are the result of elevated mutation rates.

  14. Sequencing the CHO DXB11 genome reveals regional variations in genomic stability and haploidy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Christian Schrøder; Kristensen, Claus; Betenbaugh, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The DHFR negative CHO DXB11 cell line (also known as DUX-B11 and DUKX) was historically the first CHO cell line to be used for large scale production of heterologous proteins and is still used for production of a number of complex proteins.  Results: Here we present the genomic sequen...

  15. European sea bass genome and its variation provide insights into adaptation to euryhalinity and speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tine, Mbaye; Kuhl, Heiner; Gagnaire, Pierre-Alexandre; Louro, Bruno; Desmarais, Erick; Martins, Rute S.T.; Hecht, Jochen; Knaust, Florian; Belkhir, Khalid; Klages, Sven; Dieterich, Roland; Stueber, Kurt; Piferrer, Francesc; Guinand, Bruno; Bierne, Nicolas; Volckaert, Filip A. M.; Bargelloni, Luca; Power, Deborah M.; Bonhomme, François; Canario, Adelino V. M.; Reinhardt, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is a temperate-zone euryhaline teleost of prime importance for aquaculture and fisheries. This species is subdivided into two naturally hybridizing lineages, one inhabiting the north-eastern Atlantic Ocean and the other the Mediterranean and Black seas. Here we provide a high-quality chromosome-scale assembly of its genome that shows a high degree of synteny with the more highly derived teleosts. We find expansions of gene families specifically associated with ion and water regulation, highlighting adaptation to variation in salinity. We further generate a genome-wide variation map through RAD-sequencing of Atlantic and Mediterranean populations. We show that variation in local recombination rates strongly influences the genomic landscape of diversity within and differentiation between lineages. Comparing predictions of alternative demographic models to the joint allele-frequency spectrum indicates that genomic islands of differentiation between sea bass lineages were generated by varying rates of introgression across the genome following a period of geographical isolation. PMID:25534655

  16. Genomic variation in rice: genesis of highly polymorphic linkage blocks during domestication.

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    Tian Tang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Genomic regions that are unusually divergent between closely related species or racial groups can be particularly informative about the process of speciation or the operation of natural selection. The two sequenced genomes of cultivated Asian rice, Oryza sativa, reveal that at least 6% of the genomes are unusually divergent. Sequencing of ten unlinked loci from the highly divergent regions consistently identified two highly divergent haplotypes with each locus in nearly complete linkage disequilibrium among 25 O. sativa cultivars and 35 lines from six wild species. The existence of two highly divergent haplotypes in high divergence regions in species from all geographical areas (Africa, Asia, and Oceania was in contrast to the low polymorphism and low linkage disequilibrium that were observed in other parts of the genome, represented by ten reference loci. While several natural processes are likely to contribute to this pattern of genomic variation, domestication may have greatly exaggerated the trend. In this hypothesis, divergent haplotypes that were adapted to different geographical and ecological environments migrated along with humans during the development of domesticated varieties. If true, these high divergence regions of the genome would be enriched for loci that contribute to the enormous range of phenotypic variation observed among domesticated breeds.

  17. Experimental evidence for ecological selection on genome variation in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompert, Zachariah; Comeault, Aaron A; Farkas, Timothy E; Feder, Jeffrey L; Parchman, Thomas L; Buerkle, C Alex; Nosil, Patrik

    2014-03-01

    Understanding natural selection's effect on genetic variation is a major goal in biology, but the genome-scale consequences of contemporary selection are not well known. In a release and recapture field experiment we transplanted stick insects to native and novel host plants and directly measured allele frequency changes within a generation at 186,576 genetic loci. We observed substantial, genome-wide allele frequency changes during the experiment, most of which could be attributed to random mortality (genetic drift). However, we also documented that selection affected multiple genetic loci distributed across the genome, particularly in transplants to the novel host. Host-associated selection affecting the genome acted on both a known colour-pattern trait as well as other (unmeasured) phenotypes. We also found evidence that selection associated with elevation affected genome variation, although our experiment was not designed to test this. Our results illustrate how genomic data can identify previously underappreciated ecological sources and phenotypic targets of selection. © 2013 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and CNRS.

  18. Whole-genome sequencing reveals the diversity of cattle copy number variations and multicopy genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Structural and functional impacts of copy number variations (CNVs) on livestock genomes are not yet well understood. We identified 1853 CNV regions using population-scale sequencing data generated from 75 cattle representing 8 breeds (Angus, Brahman, Gir, Holstein, Jersey, Limousin, Nelore, Romagnol...

  19. Comparison of variations detection between whole-genome amplification methods used in single-cell resequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yong; Wu, Kui; Shi, Xulian;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-cell resequencing (SCRS) provides many biomedical advances in variations detection at the single-cell level, but it currently relies on whole genome amplification (WGA). Three methods are commonly used for WGA: multiple displacement amplification (MDA), degenerate-oligonucleoti...

  20. Identification of Nucleotide Variation in Genomes Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, H.J.W.C.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of genome-wide variation has taken a huge leap forward with the introduction of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Variant discovery requires sampling of a number of haplotypes. This can be either the two haplotypes of a diploid organism or multiple haplotypes in a population. Va

  1. Ultra Deep Sequencing of a Baculovirus Population Reveals Widespread Genomic Variations

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    Aurélien Chateigner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses rely on widespread genetic variation and large population size for adaptation. Large DNA virus populations are thought to harbor little variation though natural populations may be polymorphic. To measure the genetic variation present in a dsDNA virus population, we deep sequenced a natural strain of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus. With 124,221X average genome coverage of our 133,926 bp long consensus, we could detect low frequency mutations (0.025%. K-means clustering was used to classify the mutations in four categories according to their frequency in the population. We found 60 high frequency non-synonymous mutations under balancing selection distributed in all functional classes. These mutants could alter viral adaptation dynamics, either through competitive or synergistic processes. Lastly, we developed a technique for the delimitation of large deletions in next generation sequencing data. We found that large deletions occur along the entire viral genome, with hotspots located in homologous repeat regions (hrs. Present in 25.4% of the genomes, these deletion mutants presumably require functional complementation to complete their infection cycle. They might thus have a large impact on the fitness of the baculovirus population. Altogether, we found a wide breadth of genomic variation in the baculovirus population, suggesting it has high adaptive potential.

  2. Genomic analysis of local variation and recent evolution in Plasmodium vivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Richard D; Amato, Roberto; Auburn, Sarah; Miotto, Olivo; Almagro-Garcia, Jacob; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Suon, Seila; Mao, Sivanna; Noviyanti, Rintis; Trimarsanto, Hidayat; Marfurt, Jutta; Anstey, Nicholas M; William, Timothy; Boni, Maciej F; Dolecek, Christiane; Tran, Hien Tinh; White, Nicholas J; Michon, Pascal; Siba, Peter; Tavul, Livingstone; Harrison, Gabrielle; Barry, Alyssa; Mueller, Ivo; Ferreira, Marcelo U; Karunaweera, Nadira; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Gao, Qi; Hubbart, Christina; Hart, Lee; Jeffery, Ben; Drury, Eleanor; Mead, Daniel; Kekre, Mihir; Campino, Susana; Manske, Magnus; Cornelius, Victoria J; MacInnis, Bronwyn; Rockett, Kirk A; Miles, Alistair; Rayner, Julian C; Fairhurst, Rick M; Nosten, Francois; Price, Ric N; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2016-08-01

    The widespread distribution and relapsing nature of Plasmodium vivax infection present major challenges for the elimination of malaria. To characterize the genetic diversity of this parasite in individual infections and across the population, we performed deep genome sequencing of >200 clinical samples collected across the Asia-Pacific region and analyzed data on >300,000 SNPs and nine regions of the genome with large copy number variations. Individual infections showed complex patterns of genetic structure, with variation not only in the number of dominant clones but also in their level of relatedness and inbreeding. At the population level, we observed strong signals of recent evolutionary selection both in known drug resistance genes and at new loci, and these varied markedly between geographical locations. These findings demonstrate a dynamic landscape of local evolutionary adaptation in the parasite population and provide a foundation for genomic surveillance to guide effective strategies for control and elimination of P. vivax.

  3. Genomic Variation of Inbreeding and Ancestry in the Remaining Two Isle Royale Wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Philip W; Kardos, Marty; Peterson, Rolf O; Vucetich, John A

    2017-03-01

    Inbreeding, relatedness, and ancestry have traditionally been estimated with pedigree information, however, molecular genomic data can provide more detailed examination of these properties. For example, pedigree information provides estimation of the expected value of these measures but molecular genomic data can estimate the realized values of these measures in individuals. Here, we generate the theoretical distribution of inbreeding, relatedness, and ancestry for the individuals in the pedigree of the Isle Royale wolves, the first examination of such variation in a wild population with a known pedigree. We use the 38 autosomes of the dog genome and their estimated map lengths in our genomic analysis. Although it is known that the remaining wolves are highly inbred, closely related, and descend from only 3 ancestors, our analyses suggest that there is significant variation in the realized inbreeding and relatedness around pedigree expectations. For example, the expected inbreeding in a hypothetical offspring from the 2 remaining wolves is 0.438 but the realized 95% genomic confidence interval is from 0.311 to 0.565. For individual chromosomes, a substantial proportion of the whole chromosomes are completely identical by descent. This examination provides a background to use when analyzing molecular genomic data for individual levels of inbreeding, relatedness, and ancestry. The level of variation in these measures is a function of the time to the common ancestor(s), the number of chromosomes, and the rate of recombination. In the Isle Royale wolf population, the few generations to a common ancestor results in the high variance in genomic inbreeding. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. AluScan: a method for genome-wide scanning of sequence and structure variations in the human genome

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    Mei Lingling

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To complement next-generation sequencing technologies, there is a pressing need for efficient pre-sequencing capture methods with reduced costs and DNA requirement. The Alu family of short interspersed nucleotide elements is the most abundant type of transposable elements in the human genome and a recognized source of genome instability. With over one million Alu elements distributed throughout the genome, they are well positioned to facilitate genome-wide sequence amplification and capture of regions likely to harbor genetic variation hotspots of biological relevance. Results Here we report on the use of inter-Alu PCR with an enhanced range of amplicons in conjunction with next-generation sequencing to generate an Alu-anchored scan, or 'AluScan', of DNA sequences between Alu transposons, where Alu consensus sequence-based 'H-type' PCR primers that elongate outward from the head of an Alu element are combined with 'T-type' primers elongating from the poly-A containing tail to achieve huge amplicon range. To illustrate the method, glioma DNA was compared with white blood cell control DNA of the same patient by means of AluScan. The over 10 Mb sequences obtained, derived from more than 8,000 genes spread over all the chromosomes, revealed a highly reproducible capture of genomic sequences enriched in genic sequences and cancer candidate gene regions. Requiring only sub-micrograms of sample DNA, the power of AluScan as a discovery tool for genetic variations was demonstrated by the identification of 357 instances of loss of heterozygosity, 341 somatic indels, 274 somatic SNVs, and seven potential somatic SNV hotspots between control and glioma DNA. Conclusions AluScan, implemented with just a small number of H-type and T-type inter-Alu PCR primers, provides an effective capture of a diversity of genome-wide sequences for analysis. The method, by enabling an examination of gene-enriched regions containing exons, introns, and

  5. Copy number variation in the genomes of twelve natural isolates of Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Flibotte Stephane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variation is an important component of genetic variation in higher eukaryotes. The extent of natural copy number variation in C. elegans is unknown outside of 2 highly divergent wild isolates and the canonical N2 Bristol strain. Results We have used array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH to detect copy number variation in the genomes of 12 natural isolates of Caenorhabditis elegans. Deletions relative to the canonical N2 strain are more common in these isolates than duplications, and indels are enriched in multigene families on the autosome arms. Among the strains in our study, the Hawaiian and Madeiran strains (CB4856 and JU258 carry the largest number of deletions, followed by the Vancouver strain (KR314. Overall we detected 510 different deletions affecting 1136 genes, or over 5% of the genes in the canonical N2 genome. The indels we identified had a median length of 2.7 kb. Since many deletions are found in multiple isolates, deletion loci were used as markers to derive an unrooted tree to estimate genetic relatedness among the strains. Conclusion Copy number variation is extensive in C. elegans, affecting over 5% of the genes in the genome. The deletions we have detected in natural isolates of C. elegans contribute significantly to the number of deletion alleles available to researchers. The relationships between strains are complex and different regions of the genome possess different genealogies due to recombination throughout the natural history of the species, which may not be apparent in studies utilizing smaller numbers of genetic markers.

  6. Genomic analysis of QTLs and genes altering natural variation in stochastic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Gomez, Jose M; Corwin, Jason A; Joseph, Bindu; Maloof, Julin N; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2011-09-01

    Quantitative genetic analysis has long been used to study how natural variation of genotype can influence an organism's phenotype. While most studies have focused on genetic determinants of phenotypic average, it is rapidly becoming understood that stochastic noise is genetically determined. However, it is not known how many traits display genetic control of stochastic noise nor how broadly these stochastic loci are distributed within the genome. Understanding these questions is critical to our understanding of quantitative traits and how they relate to the underlying causal loci, especially since stochastic noise may be directly influenced by underlying changes in the wiring of regulatory networks. We identified QTLs controlling natural variation in stochastic noise of glucosinolates, plant defense metabolites, as well as QTLs for stochastic noise of related transcripts. These loci included stochastic noise QTLs unique for either transcript or metabolite variation. Validation of these loci showed that genetic polymorphism within the regulatory network alters stochastic noise independent of effects on corresponding average levels. We examined this phenomenon more globally, using transcriptomic datasets, and found that the Arabidopsis transcriptome exhibits significant, heritable differences in stochastic noise. Further analysis allowed us to identify QTLs that control genomic stochastic noise. Some genomic QTL were in common with those altering average transcript abundance, while others were unique to stochastic noise. Using a single isogenic population, we confirmed that natural variation at ELF3 alters stochastic noise in the circadian clock and metabolism. Since polymorphisms controlling stochastic noise in genomic phenotypes exist within wild germplasm for naturally selected phenotypes, this suggests that analysis of Arabidopsis evolution should account for genetic control of stochastic variance and average phenotypes. It remains to be determined if natural

  7. Understanding the Human Genome Project -- A Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that contribute to human disease. In 1953, James Watson and Francis Crick described the double helix structure ... of sequencing whole exomes or genomes, groundbreaking comparative genomic studies are now identifiying the causes of rare ...

  8. The next evolutionary synthesis: from Lamarck and Darwin to genomic variation and systems biology

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    Bard Jonathan BL

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolutionary synthesis, the standard 20th century view of how evolutionary change occurs, is based on selection, heritable phenotypic variation and a very simple view of genes. It is therefore unable to incorporate two key aspects of modern molecular knowledge: first is the richness of genomic variation, so much more complicated than simple mutation, and second is the opaque relationship between the genotype and its resulting phenotype. Two new and important books shed some light on how we should view evolutionary change now. Evolution: a view from the 21st century by J.A. Shapiro (2011, FT Press Science, New Jersey, USA. pp. 246. $34.99. examines the richness of genomic variation and its implications. Transformations of Lamarckism: from Subtle Fluids to Molecular Biology edited by S.B. Gissis & E. Jablonka (2011, MIT Press, Cambridge, USA. pp. 457 includes some 40 papers that anyone with an interest in the history of evolutionary thought and the relationship between the environment and the genome will want to read. This review discusses both books within the context of contemporary evolutionary thinking and points out that neither really comes to terms with today's key systems-biology question: how does mutation-induced variation in a molecular network generate variation in the resulting phenotype?

  9. Adaptive potential of genomic structural variation in human and mammalian evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, David W; Lee, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Because phenotypic innovations must be genetically heritable for biological evolution to proceed, it is natural to consider new mutation events as well as standing genetic variation as sources for their birth. Previous research has identified a number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms that underlie a subset of adaptive traits in organisms. However, another well-known class of variation, genomic structural variation, could have even greater potential to produce adaptive phenotypes, due to the variety of possible types of alterations (deletions, insertions, duplications, among others) at different genomic positions and with variable lengths. It is from these dramatic genomic alterations, and selection on their phenotypic consequences, that adaptations leading to biological diversification could be derived. In this review, using studies in humans and other mammals, we highlight examples of how phenotypic variation from structural variants might become adaptive in populations and potentially enable biological diversification. Phenotypic change arising from structural variants will be described according to their immediate effect on organismal metabolic processes, immunological response and physical features. Study of population dynamics of segregating structural variation can therefore provide a window into understanding current and historical biological diversification.

  10. Localising loci underlying complex trait variation using Regional Genomic Relationship Mapping.

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    Yoshitaka Nagamine

    Full Text Available The limited proportion of complex trait variance identified in genome-wide association studies may reflect the limited power of single SNP analyses to detect either rare causative alleles or those of small effect. Motivated by studies that demonstrate that loci contributing to trait variation may contain a number of different alleles, we have developed an analytical approach termed Regional Genomic Relationship Mapping that, like linkage-based family methods, integrates variance contributed by founder gametes within a pedigree. This approach takes advantage of very distant (and unrecorded relationships, and this greatly increases the power of the method, compared with traditional pedigree-based linkage analyses. By integrating variance contributed by founder gametes in the population, our approach provides an estimate of the Regional Heritability attributable to a small genomic region (e.g. 100 SNP window covering ca. 1 Mb of DNA in a 300000 SNP GWAS and has the power to detect regions containing multiple alleles that individually contribute too little variance to be detectable by GWAS as well as regions with single common GWAS-detectable SNPs. We use genome-wide SNP array data to obtain both a genome-wide relationship matrix and regional relationship ("identity by state" or IBS matrices for sequential regions across the genome. We then estimate a heritability for each region sequentially in our genome-wide scan. We demonstrate by simulation and with real data that, when compared to traditional ("individual SNP" GWAS, our method uncovers new loci that explain additional trait variation. We analysed data from three Southern European populations and from Orkney for exemplar traits - serum uric acid concentration and height. We show that regional heritability estimates are correlated with results from genome-wide association analysis but can capture more of the genetic variance segregating in the population and identify additional trait loci.

  11. Extreme recombination frequencies shape genome variation and evolution in the honeybee, Apis mellifera.

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    Andreas Wallberg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination is a fundamental cellular process, with important consequences for evolution and genome integrity. However, we know little about how recombination rates vary across the genomes of most species and the molecular and evolutionary determinants of this variation. The honeybee, Apis mellifera, has extremely high rates of meiotic recombination, although the evolutionary causes and consequences of this are unclear. Here we use patterns of linkage disequilibrium in whole genome resequencing data from 30 diploid honeybees to construct a fine-scale map of rates of crossing over in the genome. We find that, in contrast to vertebrate genomes, the recombination landscape is not strongly punctate. Crossover rates strongly correlate with levels of genetic variation, but not divergence, which indicates a pervasive impact of selection on the genome. Germ-line methylated genes have reduced crossover rate, which could indicate a role of methylation in suppressing recombination. Controlling for the effects of methylation, we do not infer a strong association between gene expression patterns and recombination. The site frequency spectrum is strongly skewed from neutral expectations in honeybees: rare variants are dominated by AT-biased mutations, whereas GC-biased mutations are found at higher frequencies, indicative of a major influence of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC, which we infer to generate an allele fixation bias 5 - 50 times the genomic average estimated in humans. We uncover further evidence that this repair bias specifically affects transitions and favours fixation of CpG sites. Recombination, via gBGC, therefore appears to have profound consequences on genome evolution in honeybees and interferes with the process of natural selection. These findings have important implications for our understanding of the forces driving molecular evolution.

  12. Viral small RNAs reveal the genomic variations of three grapevine vein clearing virus quasispecies populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Susanne; Qiu, Wenping

    2017-02-02

    Viral small RNAs (vsRNAs) include viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) that are initiators and products of RNA silencing, and small RNAs that are derived from viral RNAs with function still unknown. Sequencing of vsRNAs allows assembling of viral genomes and revelation of viral population variations at genomic levels. Grapevine vein clearing virus (GVCV) is a new member of the family Caulimoviridae whose DNA genome is replicated by reverse transcription of pre-genomic RNA molecules. In this short report, three genomic sequences of GVCV were assembled from vsRNAs that were isolated and sequenced from three individual grapevines in commercial vineyards and compared to the GVCV-CHA reference genome. Profiles of single nucleotide polymorphism among three viral populations indicated a closer relatedness between two populations in different grape cultivars at the same location than those in the same grape cultivar at different locations, suggesting the spread of GVCV populations among vineyards of close proximity. Classic types of vsiRNAs (21-nt, 22-nt, and 24-nt) were found in the three GVCV vsiRNA populations, but these did not produce alignment hotspots on the GVCV-CHA reference genome. The number of 36-nt reads is the highest among vsRNAs, the role of these vsRNAs remains unclear. The analysis of vsRNAs provides a first holistic picture of genomic variations among GVCV viral quasispecies populations that help monitor epidemics and evolution of GVCV populations, an emerging virus that is becoming a threat to grape production in the Midwest region of the USA.

  13. The evolution of the Anopheles 16 genomes project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neafsey, Daniel E.; Christophides, George K.; Collins, Frank H.; Emrich, Scott J.; Fontaine, Michael C.; Gelbart, William; Hahn, Matthew W.; Howell, Paul I.; Kafatos, Fotis C.; Lawson, Daniel; Muskavitch, Marc A. T.; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Williams, Louise J.; Besansky, Nora J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the imminent completion of a set of reference genome assemblies for 16 species of Anopheles mosquitoes. In addition to providing a generally useful resource for comparative genomic analyses, these genome sequences will greatly facilitate exploration of the capacity exhibited by some Anophe

  14. Array comparative genomic hybridization profiling analysis reveals deoxyribonucleic acid copy number variations associated with premature ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboura, Azzedine; Dupas, Claire; Tachdjian, Gérard; Portnoï, Marie-France; Bourcigaux, Nathalie; Dewailly, Didier; Frydman, René; Fauser, Bart; Ronci-Chaix, Nathalie; Donadille, Bruno; Bouchard, Philippe; Christin-Maitre, Sophie

    2009-11-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is defined by amenorrhea of at least 4- to 6-month duration, occurring before 40 yr of age, with two FSH levels in the postmenopausal range. Its etiology remains unknown in more than 80% of cases. Standard karyotypes, having a resolution of 5-10 Mb, have identified critical chromosomal regions, mainly located on the long arm of the X chromosome. Array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) analysis is able to detect submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangements with a higher genomic resolution. We searched for copy number variations (CNVs), using a-CGH analysis with a resolution of approximately 0.7 Mb, in a cohort of patients with POF. We prospectively included 99 women. Our study included a conventional karyotype and DNA microarrays comprising 4500 bacterial artificial chromosome clones spread on the entire genome. Thirty-one CNVs have been observed, three on the X chromosome and 28 on autosomal chromosomes. Data have been compared to control populations obtained from the Database of Genomic Variants (http://projects.tcag.ca/variation). Eight statistically significantly different CNVs have been identified in chromosomal regions 1p21.1, 5p14.3, 5q13.2, 6p25.3, 14q32.33, 16p11.2, 17q12, and Xq28. We report the first study of CNV analysis in a large cohort of Caucasian POF patients. In the eight statistically significant CNVs we report, we found five genes involved in reproduction, thus representing potential candidate genes in POF. The current study along with emerging information regarding CNVs, as well as data on their potential association with human diseases, emphasizes the importance of assessing CNVs in cohorts of POF women.

  15. Genomic profiling of plastid DNA variation in the Mediterranean olive tree

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    Dorado Gabriel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Characterisation of plastid genome (or cpDNA polymorphisms is commonly used for phylogeographic, population genetic and forensic analyses in plants, but detecting cpDNA variation is sometimes challenging, limiting the applications of such an approach. In the present study, we screened cpDNA polymorphism in the olive tree (Olea europaea L. by sequencing the complete plastid genome of trees with a distinct cpDNA lineage. Our objective was to develop new markers for a rapid genomic profiling (by Multiplex PCRs of cpDNA haplotypes in the Mediterranean olive tree. Results Eight complete cpDNA genomes of Olea were sequenced de novo. The nucleotide divergence between olive cpDNA lineages was low and not exceeding 0.07%. Based on these sequences, markers were developed for studying two single nucleotide substitutions and length polymorphism of 62 regions (with variable microsatellite motifs or other indels. They were then used to genotype the cpDNA variation in cultivated and wild Mediterranean olive trees (315 individuals. Forty polymorphic loci were detected on this sample, allowing the distinction of 22 haplotypes belonging to the three Mediterranean cpDNA lineages known as E1, E2 and E3. The discriminating power of cpDNA variation was particularly low for the cultivated olive tree with one predominating haplotype, but more diversity was detected in wild populations. Conclusions We propose a method for a rapid characterisation of the Mediterranean olive germplasm. The low variation in the cultivated olive tree indicated that the utility of cpDNA variation for forensic analyses is limited to rare haplotypes. In contrast, the high cpDNA variation in wild populations demonstrated that our markers may be useful for phylogeographic and populations genetic studies in O. europaea.

  16. Identification of genome-wide copy number variations among diverse pig breeds using SNP genotyping arrays.

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    Jiying Wang

    Full Text Available Copy number variations (CNVs are important forms of genetic variation complementary to SNPs, and can be considered as promising markers for some phenotypic and economically important traits or diseases susceptibility in domestic animals. In the present study, we performed a genome-wide CNV identification in 14 individuals selected from diverse populations, including six types of Chinese indigenous breeds, one Asian wild boar population, as well as three modern commercial foreign breeds. We identified 63 CNVRs in total, which covered 9.98 Mb of polymorphic sequence and corresponded to 0.36% of the genome sequence. The length of these CNVRs ranged from 3.20 to 827.21 kb, with an average of 158.37 kb and a median of 97.85 kb. Functional annotation revealed these identified CNVR have important molecular function, and may play an important role in exploring the genetic basis of phenotypic variability and disease susceptibility among pigs. Additionally, to confirm these potential CNVRs, we performed qPCR for 12 randomly selected CNVRs and 8 of them (66.67% were confirmed successfully. CNVs detected in diverse populations herein are essential complementary to the CNV map in the pig genome, which provide an important resource for studies of genomic variation and the association between various economically important traits and CNVs.

  17. Variation in genomic methylation in natural populations of chinese white poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kaifeng; Song, Yuepeng; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2013-01-01

    It is thought that methylcytosine can be inherited through meiosis and mitosis, and that epigenetic variation may be under genetic control or correlation may be caused by neutral drift. However, DNA methylation also varies with tissue, developmental stage, and environmental factors. Eliminating these factors, we analyzed the levels and patterns, diversity and structure of genomic methylcytosine in the xylem of nine natural populations of Chinese white poplar. On average, the relative total methylation and non-methylation levels were approximately 26.567% and 42.708% (Pdifferentiation (GST  = 0.159) were assessed by Shannon's diversity index. Co-inertia analysis indicated that methylation-sensitive polymorphism (MSP) and genomic methylation pattern (CG-CNG) profiles gave similar distributions. Using a between-group eigen analysis, we found that the Hebei and Shanxi populations were independent of each other, but the Henan population intersected with the other populations, to some degree. Genome methylation in Populus tomentosa presented tissue-specific characteristics and the relative 5'-CCGG methylation level was higher in xylem than in leaves. Meanwhile, the genome methylation in the xylem shows great epigenetic variation and could be fixed and inherited though mitosis. Compared to genetic structure, data suggest that epigenetic and genetic variation do not completely match.

  18. Genetic variation architecture of mitochondrial genome reveals the differentiation in Korean landrace and weedy rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei; He, Qiang; Park, Yong-Jin

    2017-03-03

    Mitochondrial genome variations have been detected despite the overall conservation of this gene content, which has been valuable for plant population genetics and evolutionary studies. Here, we describe mitochondrial variation architecture and our performance of a phylogenetic dissection of Korean landrace and weedy rice. A total of 4,717 variations across the mitochondrial genome were identified adjunct with 10 wild rice. Genetic diversity assessment revealed that wild rice has higher nucleotide diversity than landrace and/or weedy, and landrace rice has higher diversity than weedy rice. Genetic distance was suggestive of a high level of breeding between landrace and weedy rice, and the landrace showing a closer association with wild rice than weedy rice. Population structure and principal component analyses showed no obvious difference in the genetic backgrounds of landrace and weedy rice in mitochondrial genome level. Phylogenetic, population split, and haplotype network evaluations were suggestive of independent origins of the indica and japonica varieties. The origin of weedy rice is supposed to be more likely from cultivated rice rather than from wild rice in mitochondrial genome level.

  19. A genome-wide, fine-scale map of natural pigmentation variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héloïse Bastide

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Various approaches can be applied to uncover the genetic basis of natural phenotypic variation, each with their specific strengths and limitations. Here, we use a replicated genome-wide association approach (Pool-GWAS to fine-scale map genomic regions contributing to natural variation in female abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster, a trait that is highly variable in natural populations and highly heritable in the laboratory. We examined abdominal pigmentation phenotypes in approximately 8000 female European D. melanogaster, isolating 1000 individuals with extreme phenotypes. We then used whole-genome Illumina sequencing to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs segregating in our sample, and tested these for associations with pigmentation by contrasting allele frequencies between replicate pools of light and dark individuals. We identify two small regions near the pigmentation genes tan and bric-à-brac 1, both corresponding to known cis-regulatory regions, which contain SNPs showing significant associations with pigmentation variation. While the Pool-GWAS approach suffers some limitations, its cost advantage facilitates replication and it can be applied to any non-model system with an available reference genome.

  20. Genetic variation architecture of mitochondrial genome reveals the differentiation in Korean landrace and weedy rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei; He, Qiang; Park, Yong-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome variations have been detected despite the overall conservation of this gene content, which has been valuable for plant population genetics and evolutionary studies. Here, we describe mitochondrial variation architecture and our performance of a phylogenetic dissection of Korean landrace and weedy rice. A total of 4,717 variations across the mitochondrial genome were identified adjunct with 10 wild rice. Genetic diversity assessment revealed that wild rice has higher nucleotide diversity than landrace and/or weedy, and landrace rice has higher diversity than weedy rice. Genetic distance was suggestive of a high level of breeding between landrace and weedy rice, and the landrace showing a closer association with wild rice than weedy rice. Population structure and principal component analyses showed no obvious difference in the genetic backgrounds of landrace and weedy rice in mitochondrial genome level. Phylogenetic, population split, and haplotype network evaluations were suggestive of independent origins of the indica and japonica varieties. The origin of weedy rice is supposed to be more likely from cultivated rice rather than from wild rice in mitochondrial genome level. PMID:28256554

  1. Read clouds uncover variation in complex regions of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Alex; Liu, Yuling; Weng, Ziming; Kashef-Haghighi, Dorna; Newburger, Daniel E; West, Robert; Sidow, Arend; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2015-10-01

    Although an increasing amount of human genetic variation is being identified and recorded, determining variants within repeated sequences of the human genome remains a challenge. Most population and genome-wide association studies have therefore been unable to consider variation in these regions. Core to the problem is the lack of a sequencing technology that produces reads with sufficient length and accuracy to enable unique mapping. Here, we present a novel methodology of using read clouds, obtained by accurate short-read sequencing of DNA derived from long fragment libraries, to confidently align short reads within repeat regions and enable accurate variant discovery. Our novel algorithm, Random Field Aligner (RFA), captures the relationships among the short reads governed by the long read process via a Markov Random Field. We utilized a modified version of the Illumina TruSeq synthetic long-read protocol, which yielded shallow-sequenced read clouds. We test RFA through extensive simulations and apply it to discover variants on the NA12878 human sample, for which shallow TruSeq read cloud sequencing data are available, and on an invasive breast carcinoma genome that we sequenced using the same method. We demonstrate that RFA facilitates accurate recovery of variation in 155 Mb of the human genome, including 94% of 67 Mb of segmental duplication sequence and 96% of 11 Mb of transcribed sequence, that are currently hidden from short-read technologies.

  2. Detection of breed specific copy number variations in domestic chicken genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Saeed S; Mohammadabadi, Mohammadreza; Wu, Dong-Dong; Esmailizadeh, Ali

    2017-09-29

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are important large scale variants that are widespread in the genome and may contribute to phenotypic variation. Detection and characterization of CNVs can provide new insights into the genetic basis of important traits. Here, we performed whole genome short read sequence analysis to identify CNVs in two indigenous and commercial chicken breeds and evaluate the impact of the identified CNVs on breed specific traits. After filtration, a total of 12955 CNVs spanning (on average) about 9.42% of the chicken genome were found that made up 5467 CNV regions (CNVRs). Chicken quantitative trait loci (QTL) datasets and Ensembl gene annotations were used as resources for the estimation of potential phenotypic effects of our CNVRs on breed specific traits. In total, 34% of our detected CNVRs were also detected in earlier CNV studies. These CNVRs partly overlap with several previously reported QTL and gene ontology terms associated with some important traits, including shank length QTL in Creeper specific CNVRs and body weight and egg production characteristics as well as growth of muscles and body organs gene terms in the Arian commercial breed. Our findings provide new insights into the genomic structure of the chicken genome for an improved understanding of the potential roles of CNVRs in differentiating between breeds or lines.

  3. Marked variation in predicted and observed variability of tandem repeat loci across the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shields Denis C

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tandem repeat (TR variants in the human genome play key roles in a number of diseases. However, current models predicting variability are based on limited training sets. We conducted a systematic analysis of TRs of unit lengths 2–12 nucleotides in Whole Genome Shotgun (WGS sequences to define the extent of variation of 209,214 unique repeat loci throughout the genome. Results We applied a multivariate statistical model to predict TR variability. Predicted heterozygosity correlated with heterozygosity in the CEPH polymorphism database (correlation ρ = 0.29, p Conclusion Variability among 2–12-mer TRs in the genome can be modeled by a few parameters, which do not markedly differ according to unit length, consistent with a common mechanism for the generation of variability among such TRs. Analysis of the distributions of observed and predicted variants across the genome showed a general concordance, indicating that the repeat variation dataset does not exhibit strong regional ascertainment biases. This revealed a deficit of variant repeats in chromosomes 19 and Y – likely to reflect a reduction in 2-mer repeats in the former and a reduced level of recombination in the latter – and excesses in chromosomes 6, 13, 20 and 21.

  4. A genome-wide study of recombination rate variation in Bartonella henselae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Lionel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of recombination vary by three orders of magnitude in bacteria but the reasons for this variation is unclear. We performed a genome-wide study of recombination rate variation among genes in the intracellular bacterium Bartonella henselae, which has among the lowest estimated ratio of recombination relative to mutation in prokaryotes. Results The 1.9 Mb genomes of B. henselae strains IC11, UGA10 and Houston-1 genomes showed only minor gene content variation. Nucleotide sequence divergence levels were less than 1% and the relative rate of recombination to mutation was estimated to 1.1 for the genome overall. Four to eight segments per genome presented significantly enhanced divergences, the most pronounced of which were the virB and trw gene clusters for type IV secretion systems that play essential roles in the infection process. Consistently, multiple recombination events were identified inside these gene clusters. High recombination frequencies were also observed for a gene putatively involved in iron metabolism. A phylogenetic study of this gene in 80 strains of Bartonella quintana, B. henselae and B. grahamii indicated different population structures for each species and revealed horizontal gene transfers across Bartonella species with different host preferences. Conclusions Our analysis has shown little novel gene acquisition in B. henselae, indicative of a closed pan-genome, but higher recombination frequencies within the population than previously estimated. We propose that the dramatically increased fixation rate for recombination events at gene clusters for type IV secretion systems is driven by selection for sequence variability.

  5. Natural variation in genome architecture among 205 Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen; Massouras, Andreas; Inoue, Yutaka; Peiffer, Jason; Ràmia, Miquel; Tarone, Aaron M; Turlapati, Lavanya; Zichner, Thomas; Zhu, Dianhui; Lyman, Richard F; Magwire, Michael M; Blankenburg, Kerstin; Carbone, Mary Anna; Chang, Kyle; Ellis, Lisa L; Fernandez, Sonia; Han, Yi; Highnam, Gareth; Hjelmen, Carl E; Jack, John R; Javaid, Mehwish; Jayaseelan, Joy; Kalra, Divya; Lee, Sandy; Lewis, Lora; Munidasa, Mala; Ongeri, Fiona; Patel, Shohba; Perales, Lora; Perez, Agapito; Pu, LingLing; Rollmann, Stephanie M; Ruth, Robert; Saada, Nehad; Warner, Crystal; Williams, Aneisa; Wu, Yuan-Qing; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Zhang, Yiqing; Zhu, Yiming; Anholt, Robert R H; Korbel, Jan O; Mittelman, David; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Barbadilla, Antonio; Johnston, J Spencer; Stone, Eric A; Richards, Stephen; Deplancke, Bart; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2014-07-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) is a community resource of 205 sequenced inbred lines, derived to improve our understanding of the effects of naturally occurring genetic variation on molecular and organismal phenotypes. We used an integrated genotyping strategy to identify 4,853,802 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1,296,080 non-SNP variants. Our molecular population genomic analyses show higher deletion than insertion mutation rates and stronger purifying selection on deletions. Weaker selection on insertions than deletions is consistent with our observed distribution of genome size determined by flow cytometry, which is skewed toward larger genomes. Insertion/deletion and single nucleotide polymorphisms are positively correlated with each other and with local recombination, suggesting that their nonrandom distributions are due to hitchhiking and background selection. Our cytogenetic analysis identified 16 polymorphic inversions in the DGRP. Common inverted and standard karyotypes are genetically divergent and account for most of the variation in relatedness among the DGRP lines. Intriguingly, variation in genome size and many quantitative traits are significantly associated with inversions. Approximately 50% of the DGRP lines are infected with Wolbachia, and four lines have germline insertions of Wolbachia sequences, but effects of Wolbachia infection on quantitative traits are rarely significant. The DGRP complements ongoing efforts to functionally annotate the Drosophila genome. Indeed, 15% of all D. melanogaster genes segregate for potentially damaged proteins in the DGRP, and genome-wide analyses of quantitative traits identify novel candidate genes. The DGRP lines, sequence data, genotypes, quality scores, phenotypes, and analysis and visualization tools are publicly available.

  6. VarB Plus: An Integrated Tool for Visualization of Genome Variation Datasets

    KAUST Repository

    Hidayah, Lailatul

    2012-07-01

    Research on genomic sequences has been improving significantly as more advanced technology for sequencing has been developed. This opens enormous opportunities for sequence analysis. Various analytical tools have been built for purposes such as sequence assembly, read alignments, genome browsing, comparative genomics, and visualization. From the visualization perspective, there is an increasing trend towards use of large-scale computation. However, more than power is required to produce an informative image. This is a challenge that we address by providing several ways of representing biological data in order to advance the inference endeavors of biologists. This thesis focuses on visualization of variations found in genomic sequences. We develop several visualization functions and embed them in an existing variation visualization tool as extensions. The tool we improved is named VarB, hence the nomenclature for our enhancement is VarB Plus. To the best of our knowledge, besides VarB, there is no tool that provides the capability of dynamic visualization of genome variation datasets as well as statistical analysis. Dynamic visualization allows users to toggle different parameters on and off and see the results on the fly. The statistical analysis includes Fixation Index, Relative Variant Density, and Tajima’s D. Hence we focused our efforts on this tool. The scope of our work includes plots of per-base genome coverage, Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCoA), integration with a read alignment viewer named LookSeq, and visualization of geo-biological data. In addition to description of embedded functionalities, significance, and limitations, future improvements are discussed. The result is four extensions embedded successfully in the original tool, which is built on the Qt framework in C++. Hence it is portable to numerous platforms. Our extensions have shown acceptable execution time in a beta testing with various high-volume published datasets, as well as positive

  7. Background selection as baseline for nucleotide variation across the Drosophila genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeron, Josep M

    2014-06-01

    The constant removal of deleterious mutations by natural selection causes a reduction in neutral diversity and efficacy of selection at genetically linked sites (a process called Background Selection, BGS). Population genetic studies, however, often ignore BGS effects when investigating demographic events or the presence of other types of selection. To obtain a more realistic evolutionary expectation that incorporates the unavoidable consequences of deleterious mutations, we generated high-resolution landscapes of variation across the Drosophila melanogaster genome under a BGS scenario independent of polymorphism data. We find that BGS plays a significant role in shaping levels of variation across the entire genome, including long introns and intergenic regions distant from annotated genes. We also find that a very large percentage of the observed variation in diversity across autosomes can be explained by BGS alone, up to 70% across individual chromosome arms at 100-kb scale, thus indicating that BGS predictions can be used as baseline to infer additional types of selection and demographic events. This approach allows detecting several outlier regions with signal of recent adaptive events and selective sweeps. The use of a BGS baseline, however, is particularly appropriate to investigate the presence of balancing selection and our study exposes numerous genomic regions with the predicted signature of higher polymorphism than expected when a BGS context is taken into account. Importantly, we show that these conclusions are robust to the mutation and selection parameters of the BGS model. Finally, analyses of protein evolution together with previous comparisons of genetic maps between Drosophila species, suggest temporally variable recombination landscapes and, thus, local BGS effects that may differ between extant and past phases. Because genome-wide BGS and temporal changes in linkage effects can skew approaches to estimate demographic and selective events, future

  8. Background selection as baseline for nucleotide variation across the Drosophila genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M Comeron

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The constant removal of deleterious mutations by natural selection causes a reduction in neutral diversity and efficacy of selection at genetically linked sites (a process called Background Selection, BGS. Population genetic studies, however, often ignore BGS effects when investigating demographic events or the presence of other types of selection. To obtain a more realistic evolutionary expectation that incorporates the unavoidable consequences of deleterious mutations, we generated high-resolution landscapes of variation across the Drosophila melanogaster genome under a BGS scenario independent of polymorphism data. We find that BGS plays a significant role in shaping levels of variation across the entire genome, including long introns and intergenic regions distant from annotated genes. We also find that a very large percentage of the observed variation in diversity across autosomes can be explained by BGS alone, up to 70% across individual chromosome arms at 100-kb scale, thus indicating that BGS predictions can be used as baseline to infer additional types of selection and demographic events. This approach allows detecting several outlier regions with signal of recent adaptive events and selective sweeps. The use of a BGS baseline, however, is particularly appropriate to investigate the presence of balancing selection and our study exposes numerous genomic regions with the predicted signature of higher polymorphism than expected when a BGS context is taken into account. Importantly, we show that these conclusions are robust to the mutation and selection parameters of the BGS model. Finally, analyses of protein evolution together with previous comparisons of genetic maps between Drosophila species, suggest temporally variable recombination landscapes and, thus, local BGS effects that may differ between extant and past phases. Because genome-wide BGS and temporal changes in linkage effects can skew approaches to estimate demographic and

  9. Genomic copy number variation associated with clinical outcome in canine cutaneous mast cell tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jark, Paulo C; Mundin, Deborah B P; de Carvalho, Marcio

    2017-01-01

    from Group ST>12 and six from Group STGenomic DNA was extracted, and aCGH was performed using Agilent Canine Genome CGH Microarray 4×180 (ID-252 552 - Agilent, USA). Data analysis was carried out using Nexus program version 5.0 (Biodiscovery, USA). The group ST>12 presented 11±3.3 CNVs, while...... in DNA isolated from tumor cells by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). The aim of this study was to compare copy number variations (CNVs) in cutaneous mast cell tumors of dogs that survived less than six (ST12months (ST>12) from the date of diagnosis. Ten animals were used: four...

  10. Genome-wide detection of copy number variations among diverse horse breeds by array CGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shenyuan; Hou, Chenglin; Xing, Yanping; Cao, Junwei; Wu, Kaifeng; Liu, Chunxia; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yanru; Zhou, Huanmin

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have found that copy number variations (CNVs) are widespread in human and animal genomes. CNVs are a significant source of genetic variation, and have been shown to be associated with phenotypic diversity. However, the effect of CNVs on genetic variation in horses is not well understood. In the present study, CNVs in 6 different breeds of mare horses, Mongolia horse, Abaga horse, Hequ horse and Kazakh horse (all plateau breeds) and Debao pony and Thoroughbred, were determined using aCGH. In total, seven hundred CNVs were identified ranging in size from 6.1 Kb to 0.57 Mb across all autosomes, with an average size of 43.08 Kb and a median size of 15.11 Kb. By merging overlapping CNVs, we found a total of three hundred and fifty-three CNV regions (CNVRs). The length of the CNVRs ranged from 6.1 Kb to 1.45 Mb with average and median sizes of 38.49 Kb and 13.1 Kb. Collectively, 13.59 Mb of copy number variation was identified among the horses investigated and accounted for approximately 0.61% of the horse genome sequence. Five hundred and eighteen annotated genes were affected by CNVs, which corresponded to about 2.26% of all horse genes. Through the gene ontology (GO), genetic pathway analysis and comparison of CNV genes among different breeds, we found evidence that CNVs involving 7 genes may be related to the adaptation to severe environment of these plateau horses. This study is the first report of copy number variations in Chinese horses, which indicates that CNVs are ubiquitous in the horse genome and influence many biological processes of the horse. These results will be helpful not only in mapping the horse whole-genome CNVs, but also to further research for the adaption to the high altitude severe environment for plateau horses.

  11. Genomic analysis of natural selection and phenotypic variation in high-altitude mongolians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinchuan Xing

    Full Text Available Deedu (DU Mongolians, who migrated from the Mongolian steppes to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau approximately 500 years ago, are challenged by environmental conditions similar to native Tibetan highlanders. Identification of adaptive genetic factors in this population could provide insight into coordinated physiological responses to this environment. Here we examine genomic and phenotypic variation in this unique population and present the first complete analysis of a Mongolian whole-genome sequence. High-density SNP array data demonstrate that DU Mongolians share genetic ancestry with other Mongolian as well as Tibetan populations, specifically in genomic regions related with adaptation to high altitude. Several selection candidate genes identified in DU Mongolians are shared with other Asian groups (e.g., EDAR, neighboring Tibetan populations (including high-altitude candidates EPAS1, PKLR, and CYP2E1, as well as genes previously hypothesized to be associated with metabolic adaptation (e.g., PPARG. Hemoglobin concentration, a trait associated with high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans, is at an intermediate level in DU Mongolians compared to Tibetans and Han Chinese at comparable altitude. Whole-genome sequence from a DU Mongolian (Tianjiao1 shows that about 2% of the genomic variants, including more than 300 protein-coding changes, are specific to this individual. Our analyses of DU Mongolians and the first Mongolian genome provide valuable insight into genetic adaptation to extreme environments.

  12. Whole-Genome Sequencing Reveals Genetic Variation in the Asian House Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajing Teng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Whole-genome sequencing of wild-derived rat species can provide novel genomic resources, which may help decipher the genetics underlying complex phenotypes. As a notorious pest, reservoir of human pathogens, and colonizer, the Asian house rat, Rattus tanezumi, is successfully adapted to its habitat. However, little is known regarding genetic variation in this species. In this study, we identified over 41,000,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, plus insertions and deletions, through whole-genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses. Moreover, we identified over 12,000 structural variants, including 143 chromosomal inversions. Further functional analyses revealed several fixed nonsense mutations associated with infection and immunity-related adaptations, and a number of fixed missense mutations that may be related to anticoagulant resistance. A genome-wide scan for loci under selection identified various genes related to neural activity. Our whole-genome sequencing data provide a genomic resource for future genetic studies of the Asian house rat species and have the potential to facilitate understanding of the molecular adaptations of rats to their ecological niches.

  13. Whole-Genome Sequencing Reveals Genetic Variation in the Asian House Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Huajing; Zhang, Yaohua; Shi, Chengmin; Mao, Fengbiao; Hou, Lingling; Guo, Hongling; Sun, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Jianxu

    2016-07-07

    Whole-genome sequencing of wild-derived rat species can provide novel genomic resources, which may help decipher the genetics underlying complex phenotypes. As a notorious pest, reservoir of human pathogens, and colonizer, the Asian house rat, Rattus tanezumi, is successfully adapted to its habitat. However, little is known regarding genetic variation in this species. In this study, we identified over 41,000,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, plus insertions and deletions, through whole-genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses. Moreover, we identified over 12,000 structural variants, including 143 chromosomal inversions. Further functional analyses revealed several fixed nonsense mutations associated with infection and immunity-related adaptations, and a number of fixed missense mutations that may be related to anticoagulant resistance. A genome-wide scan for loci under selection identified various genes related to neural activity. Our whole-genome sequencing data provide a genomic resource for future genetic studies of the Asian house rat species and have the potential to facilitate understanding of the molecular adaptations of rats to their ecological niches.

  14. Empirical Study of the Origins and Causes of Variation Orders in Building Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Simon Eigbe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Variations or changes to construction plans have been identified as a major problem in construction projects. Variations have adverse impact on project delivery. Effective management of variations, therefore, is critical to accomplishing project objectives; and this commences with identifying the sources and causes of variations. This paper presents the results of a study of the origins and causes of variation orders in building projects within the Federal Government of Nigeria (FGN: Ministries, Departments, and Agencies (MDGs. Extensive review of relevant literature has been provided. The methodology adopted involved the use of structured questionnaires administered on the MDGs ensuring a fair representation of the geo-political zones of the country. Use was made of field assistants to facilitate the administration of questionnaires. An ex-post facto research design was also employed in the data gathering. Analysis of data was done using descriptive and inferential statistics. The results reveal that variation orders are common in building projects. The client was shown to be the most frequently involved origin agent of variation orders as a result of inadequate or unclear brief, and change in plan or scope. The study concludes with recommendations that project planning; and engagement of project officers are effective means of formulating clear project briefs in order to minimize variation orders and enhance project performance

  15. Nucleotide diversity maps reveal variation in diversity among wheat genomes and chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuire Patrick E

    2010-12-01

    chromosomal regions. The net effect of these factors in T. aestivum is large variation in diversity among genomes and chromosomes, which impacts the development of SNP markers and their practical utility. Accumulation of new mutations in older polyploid species, such as wild emmer, results in increased diversity and its more uniform distribution across the genome.

  16. Comparative genomic data of the Avian Phylogenomics Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guojie; Li, Bo; Li, Cai;

    2014-01-01

    , which include 38 newly sequenced avian genomes plus previously released or simultaneously released genomes of Chicken, Zebra finch, Turkey, Pigeon, Peregrine falcon, Duck, Budgerigar, Adelie penguin, Emperor penguin and the Medium Ground Finch. We hope that this resource will serve future efforts...... in an average N50 scaffold size of about 50 kb. Repetitive elements comprised 4%-22% of the bird genomes. The assembled scaffolds allowed the homology-based annotation of 13,000 ~ 17000 protein coding genes in each avian genome relative to chicken, zebra finch and human, as well as comparative and sequence...

  17. Mitogenomes from The 1000 Genome Project reveal new Near Eastern features in present-day Tuscans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Gómez-Carballa

    Full Text Available Genetic analyses have recently been carried out on present-day Tuscans (Central Italy in order to investigate their presumable recent Near East ancestry in connection with the long-standing debate on the origins of the Etruscan civilization. We retrieved mitogenomes and genome-wide SNP data from 110 Tuscans analyzed within the context of The 1000 Genome Project. For phylogeographic and evolutionary analysis we made use of a large worldwide database of entire mitogenomes (>26,000 and partial control region sequences (>180,000.Different analyses reveal the presence of typical Near East haplotypes in Tuscans representing isolated members of various mtDNA phylogenetic branches. As a whole, the Near East component in Tuscan mitogenomes can be estimated at about 8%; a proportion that is comparable to previous estimates but significantly lower than admixture estimates obtained from autosomal SNP data (21%. Phylogeographic and evolutionary inter-population comparisons indicate that the main signal of Near Eastern Tuscan mitogenomes comes from Iran.Mitogenomes of recent Near East origin in present-day Tuscans do not show local or regional variation. This points to a demographic scenario that is compatible with a recent arrival of Near Easterners to this region in Italy with no founder events or bottlenecks.

  18. Mitogenomes from The 1000 Genome Project Reveal New Near Eastern Features in Present-Day Tuscans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Amigo, Jorge; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic analyses have recently been carried out on present-day Tuscans (Central Italy) in order to investigate their presumable recent Near East ancestry in connection with the long-standing debate on the origins of the Etruscan civilization. We retrieved mitogenomes and genome-wide SNP data from 110 Tuscans analyzed within the context of The 1000 Genome Project. For phylogeographic and evolutionary analysis we made use of a large worldwide database of entire mitogenomes (>26,000) and partial control region sequences (>180,000). Results Different analyses reveal the presence of typical Near East haplotypes in Tuscans representing isolated members of various mtDNA phylogenetic branches. As a whole, the Near East component in Tuscan mitogenomes can be estimated at about 8%; a proportion that is comparable to previous estimates but significantly lower than admixture estimates obtained from autosomal SNP data (21%). Phylogeographic and evolutionary inter-population comparisons indicate that the main signal of Near Eastern Tuscan mitogenomes comes from Iran. Conclusions Mitogenomes of recent Near East origin in present-day Tuscans do not show local or regional variation. This points to a demographic scenario that is compatible with a recent arrival of Near Easterners to this region in Italy with no founder events or bottlenecks. PMID:25786119

  19. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, whole genome shotgun sequencing project first submission of genome sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The size and repetitive nature of the Rhipicephalus microplus genome makes obtaining a full genome sequence difficult. Cot filtration/selection techniques were used to reduce the repetitive fraction of the tick genome and enrich for the fraction of DNA with gene-containing regions. The Cot-selected ...

  20. Variations and classification of toxic epitopes related to celiac disease among α-gliadin genes from four Aegilops genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Wang, Shunli; Li, Shanshan; Ge, Pei; Li, Xiaohui; Ma, Wujun; Zeller, F J; Hsam, Sai L K; Yan, Yueming

    2012-07-01

    The α-gliadins are associated with human celiac disease. A total of 23 noninterrupted full open reading frame α-gliadin genes and 19 pseudogenes were cloned and sequenced from C, M, N, and U genomes of four diploid Aegilops species. Sequence comparison of α-gliadin genes from Aegilops and Triticum species demonstrated an existence of extensive allelic variations in Gli-2 loci of the four Aegilops genomes. Specific structural features were found including the compositions and variations of two polyglutamine domains (QI and QII) and four T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes. The mean numbers of glutamine residues in the QI domain in C and N genomes and the QII domain in C, N, and U genomes were much higher than those in Triticum genomes, and the QI domain in C and N genomes and the QII domain in C, M, N, and U genomes displayed greater length variations. Interestingly, the types and numbers of four T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes in α-gliadins from the four Aegilops genomes were significantly less than those from Triticum A, B, D, and their progenitor genomes. Relationships between the structural variations of the two polyglutamine domains and the distributions of four T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes were found, resulting in the α-gliadin genes from the Aegilops and Triticum genomes to be classified into three groups.

  1. Natural selection affects multiple aspects of genetic variation at putatively peutral sites across the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmueller, Kirk E; Albrechtsen, Anders; Li, Yingrui;

    2011-01-01

    throughout the genome. Further, we show that the widespread presence of weakly deleterious alleles, rather than a small number of strongly positively selected mutations, is responsible for the correlation between neutral genetic diversity and recombination rate. This work suggests that natural selection has......A major question in evolutionary biology is how natural selection has shaped patterns of genetic variation across the human genome. Previous work has documented a reduction in genetic diversity in regions of the genome with low recombination rates. However, it is unclear whether other summaries...... and that human diversity, human-chimp divergence, and average minor allele frequency are reduced near genes. Population genetic simulations show that either positive natural selection acting on favorable mutations or negative natural selection acting against deleterious mutations can explain these correlations...

  2. Natural variation in SAR11 marine bacterioplankton genomes inferred from metagenomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Larry J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One objective of metagenomics is to reconstruct information about specific uncultured organisms from fragmentary environmental DNA sequences. We used the genome of an isolate of the marine alphaproteobacterium SAR11 ('Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique'; strain HTCC1062, obtained from the cold, productive Oregon coast, as a query sequence to study variation in SAR11 metagenome sequence data from the Sargasso Sea, a warm, oligotrophic ocean gyre. Results The average amino acid identity of SAR11 genes encoded by the metagenomic data to the query genome was only 71%, indicating significant evolutionary divergence between the coastal isolates and Sargasso Sea populations. However, an analysis of gene neighbors indicated that SAR11 genes in the Sargasso Sea metagenomic data match the gene order of the HTCC1062 genome in 96% of cases (> 85,000 observations, and that rearrangements are most frequent at predicted operon boundaries. There were no conserved examples of genes with known functions being found in the coastal isolates, but not the Sargasso Sea metagenomic data, or vice versa, suggesting that core regions of these diverse SAR11 genomes are relatively conserved in gene content. However, four hypervariable regions were observed, which may encode properties associated with variation in SAR11 ecotypes. The largest of these, HVR2, is a 48 kb region flanked by the sole 5S and 23S genes in the HTCC1062 genome, and mainly encodes genes that determine cell surface properties. A comparison of two closely related 'Candidatus Pelagibacter' genomes (HTCC1062 and HTCC1002 revealed a number of "gene indels" in core regions. Most of these were found to be polymorphic in the metagenomic data and showed evidence of purifying selection, suggesting that the same "polymorphic gene indels" are maintained in physically isolated SAR11 populations. Conclusion These findings suggest that natural selection has conserved many core features of SAR11

  3. A biometrical genome search in rats reveals the multigenic basis of blood pressure variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schork, N J; Krieger, J E; Trolliet, M R; Franchini, K G; Koike, G; Krieger, E M; Lander, E S; Dzau, V J; Jacob, H J

    1995-09-01

    A genome-wide search for multiple loci influencing salt-loaded systolic blood pressure (NaSBP) variation among 188 F2 progeny from a cross between the Brown-Norway and spontaneously hypertensive rat strains was pursued in an effort to gain insight into the polygenic basis of blood pressure regulation. The results suggest that loci within five to six genomic regions collectively explain approximately 43% of the total NaSBP variation exhibited among the 188 F2 progeny. Many of these loci are in regions that previous studies have not implicated in blood pressure regulation. Ultimately, however, this study not only sheds light on the multigenic basis of blood pressure but provides further evidence that the identification of the genetic determinants of polygenic traits in mammals is possible with modern biometrical and molecular genetic tools in controlled settings (i.e., breeding paradigm and model organism).

  4. Genome-wide fine-scale recombination rate variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H Chan

    Full Text Available Estimating fine-scale recombination maps of Drosophila from population genomic data is a challenging problem, in particular because of the high background recombination rate. In this paper, a new computational method is developed to address this challenge. Through an extensive simulation study, it is demonstrated that the method allows more accurate inference, and exhibits greater robustness to the effects of natural selection and noise, compared to a well-used previous method developed for studying fine-scale recombination rate variation in the human genome. As an application, a genome-wide analysis of genetic variation data is performed for two Drosophila melanogaster populations, one from North America (Raleigh, USA and the other from Africa (Gikongoro, Rwanda. It is shown that fine-scale recombination rate variation is widespread throughout the D. melanogaster genome, across all chromosomes and in both populations. At the fine-scale, a conservative, systematic search for evidence of recombination hotspots suggests the existence of a handful of putative hotspots each with at least a tenfold increase in intensity over the background rate. A wavelet analysis is carried out to compare the estimated recombination maps in the two populations and to quantify the extent to which recombination rates are conserved. In general, similarity is observed at very broad scales, but substantial differences are seen at fine scales. The average recombination rate of the X chromosome appears to be higher than that of the autosomes in both populations, and this pattern is much more pronounced in the African population than the North American population. The correlation between various genomic features-including recombination rates, diversity, divergence, GC content, gene content, and sequence quality-is examined using the wavelet analysis, and it is shown that the most notable difference between D. melanogaster and humans is in the correlation between

  5. Comparative population genomics of latitudinal variation in Drosophila simulans and Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Heather E; Bergland, Alan O; O'Brien, Katherine R; Behrman, Emily L; Schmidt, Paul S; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2016-02-01

    Examples of clinal variation in phenotypes and genotypes across latitudinal transects have served as important models for understanding how spatially varying selection and demographic forces shape variation within species. Here, we examine the selective and demographic contributions to latitudinal variation through the largest comparative genomic study to date of Drosophila simulans and Drosophila melanogaster, with genomic sequence data from 382 individual fruit flies, collected across a spatial transect of 19 degrees latitude and at multiple time points over 2 years. Consistent with phenotypic studies, we find less clinal variation in D. simulans than D. melanogaster, particularly for the autosomes. Moreover, we find that clinally varying loci in D. simulans are less stable over multiple years than comparable clines in D. melanogaster. D. simulans shows a significantly weaker pattern of isolation by distance than D. melanogaster and we find evidence for a stronger contribution of migration to D. simulans population genetic structure. While population bottlenecks and migration can plausibly explain the differences in stability of clinal variation between the two species, we also observe a significant enrichment of shared clinal genes, suggesting that the selective forces associated with climate are acting on the same genes and phenotypes in D. simulans and D. melanogaster. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Modelling human regulatory variation in mouse: finding the function in genome-wide association studies and whole-genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Schmouth

    Full Text Available An increasing body of literature from genome-wide association studies and human whole-genome sequencing highlights the identification of large numbers of candidate regulatory variants of potential therapeutic interest in numerous diseases. Our relatively poor understanding of the functions of non-coding genomic sequence, and the slow and laborious process of experimental validation of the functional significance of human regulatory variants, limits our ability to fully benefit from this information in our efforts to comprehend human disease. Humanized mouse models (HuMMs, in which human genes are introduced into the mouse, suggest an approach to this problem. In the past, HuMMs have been used successfully to study human disease variants; e.g., the complex genetic condition arising from Down syndrome, common monogenic disorders such as Huntington disease and β-thalassemia, and cancer susceptibility genes such as BRCA1. In this commentary, we highlight a novel method for high-throughput single-copy site-specific generation of HuMMs entitled High-throughput Human Genes on the X Chromosome (HuGX. This method can be applied to most human genes for which a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC construct can be derived and a mouse-null allele exists. This strategy comprises (1 the use of recombineering technology to create a human variant-harbouring BAC, (2 knock-in of this BAC into the mouse genome using Hprt docking technology, and (3 allele comparison by interspecies complementation. We demonstrate the throughput of the HuGX method by generating a series of seven different alleles for the human NR2E1 gene at Hprt. In future challenges, we consider the current limitations of experimental approaches and call for a concerted effort by the genetics community, for both human and mouse, to solve the challenge of the functional analysis of human regulatory variation.

  7. Chromosome Numbers and Genome Size Variation in Indian Species of Curcuma (Zingiberaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong-Škorničková, Jana; Šída, Otakar; Jarolímová, Vlasta; Sabu, Mamyil; Fér, Tomáš; Trávníček, Pavel; Suda, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Genome size and chromosome numbers are important cytological characters that significantly influence various organismal traits. However, geographical representation of these data is seriously unbalanced, with tropical and subtropical regions being largely neglected. In the present study, an investigation was made of chromosomal and genome size variation in the majority of Curcuma species from the Indian subcontinent, and an assessment was made of the value of these data for taxonomic purposes. Methods Genome size of 161 homogeneously cultivated plant samples classified into 51 taxonomic entities was determined by propidium iodide flow cytometry. Chromosome numbers were counted in actively growing root tips using conventional rapid squash techniques. Key Results Six different chromosome counts (2n = 22, 42, 63, >70, 77 and 105) were found, the last two representing new generic records. The 2C-values varied from 1·66 pg in C. vamana to 4·76 pg in C. oligantha, representing a 2·87-fold range. Three groups of taxa with significantly different homoploid genome sizes (Cx-values) and distinct geographical distribution were identified. Five species exhibited intraspecific variation in nuclear DNA content, reaching up to 15·1 % in cultivated C. longa. Chromosome counts and genome sizes of three Curcuma-like species (Hitchenia caulina, Kaempferia scaposa and Paracautleya bhatii) corresponded well with typical hexaploid (2n = 6x = 42) Curcuma spp. Conclusions The basic chromosome number in the majority of Indian taxa (belonging to subgenus Curcuma) is x = 7; published counts correspond to 6x, 9x, 11x, 12x and 15x ploidy levels. Only a few species-specific C-values were found, but karyological and/or flow cytometric data may support taxonomic decisions in some species alliances with morphological similarities. Close evolutionary relationships among some cytotypes are suggested based on the similarity in homoploid genome sizes and geographical grouping

  8. [RAPD analysis of the intraspecific and interspecific variation and phylogenetic relationships of Aegilops L. species with the U genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriunova, S V; Chikida, N N; Kochieva, E Z

    2010-07-01

    RAPD analysis was used to study the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of polyploid Aegilops species with the U genome. In total, 115 DNA samples of eight polyploid species containing the U genome and the diploid species Ae. umbellulata (U) were examined. Substantial interspecific polymorphism was observed for the majority of the polyploid species with the U genome (interspecific differences, 0.01-0,2; proportion of polymorphic loci, 56.6-88.2%). Aegilops triuncialis was identified as the only alloploid species with low interspecific polymorphism (interspecific differences, 0-0.01, P = 50%) in the U-genome group. The U-genome Aegilops species proved to be separated from other species of the genus. The phylogenetic relationships were established for the U-genome species. The greatest separation within the U-genome group was observed for the US-genome species Ae. kotschyi and Ae. variabilis. The tetraploid species Ae. triaristata and Ae. columnaris, which had the UX genome, and the hexaploid species Ae. recta (UXN) were found to be related to each other and separate from the UM-genome species. A similarity was observed between the U M-genome species Ae. ovata and Ae. biuncialis, which had the UM genome, and the ancestral diploid U-genome species Ae. umbellulata. The UC-genome species Ae. triuncialis was rather separate and slightly similar to the UX-genome species.

  9. Variation in Genomic Methylation in Natural Populations of Chinese White Poplar

    OpenAIRE

    Kaifeng Ma; Yuepeng Song; Xiaohui Yang; Zhiyi Zhang; Deqiang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is thought that methylcytosine can be inherited through meiosis and mitosis, and that epigenetic variation may be under genetic control or correlation may be caused by neutral drift. However, DNA methylation also varies with tissue, developmental stage, and environmental factors. Eliminating these factors, we analyzed the levels and patterns, diversity and structure of genomic methylcytosine in the xylem of nine natural populations of Chinese white poplar. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: O...

  10. Identification of genomic regions associated with phenotypic variation between dog breeds using selection mapping.

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    Amaury Vaysse

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The extraordinary phenotypic diversity of dog breeds has been sculpted by a unique population history accompanied by selection for novel and desirable traits. Here we perform a comprehensive analysis using multiple test statistics to identify regions under selection in 509 dogs from 46 diverse breeds using a newly developed high-density genotyping array consisting of >170,000 evenly spaced SNPs. We first identify 44 genomic regions exhibiting extreme differentiation across multiple breeds. Genetic variation in these regions correlates with variation in several phenotypic traits that vary between breeds, and we identify novel associations with both morphological and behavioral traits. We next scan the genome for signatures of selective sweeps in single breeds, characterized by long regions of reduced heterozygosity and fixation of extended haplotypes. These scans identify hundreds of regions, including 22 blocks of homozygosity longer than one megabase in certain breeds. Candidate selection loci are strongly enriched for developmental genes. We chose one highly differentiated region, associated with body size and ear morphology, and characterized it using high-throughput sequencing to provide a list of variants that may directly affect these traits. This study provides a catalogue of genomic regions showing extreme reduction in genetic variation or population differentiation in dogs, including many linked to phenotypic variation. The many blocks of reduced haplotype diversity observed across the genome in dog breeds are the result of both selection and genetic drift, but extended blocks of homozygosity on a megabase scale appear to be best explained by selection. Further elucidation of the variants under selection will help to uncover the genetic basis of complex traits and disease.

  11. Genome-wide association study identified CNP12587 region underlying height variation in Chinese females.

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    Yin-Ping Zhang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human height is a highly heritable trait considered as an important factor for health. There has been limited success in identifying the genetic factors underlying height variation. We aim to identify sequence variants associated with adult height by a genome-wide association study of copy number variants (CNVs in Chinese. METHODS: Genome-wide CNV association analyses were conducted in 1,625 unrelated Chinese adults and sex specific subgroup for height variation, respectively. Height was measured with a stadiometer. Affymetrix SNP6.0 genotyping platform was used to identify copy number polymorphisms (CNPs. We constructed a genomic map containing 1,009 CNPs in Chinese individuals and performed a genome-wide association study of CNPs with height. RESULTS: We detected 10 significant association signals for height (p<0.05 in the whole population, 9 and 11 association signals for Chinese female and male population, respectively. A copy number polymorphism (CNP12587, chr18:54081842-54086942, p = 2.41 × 10(-4 was found to be significantly associated with height variation in Chinese females even after strict Bonferroni correction (p = 0.048. Confirmatory real time PCR experiments lent further support for CNV validation. Compared to female subjects with two copies of the CNP, carriers of three copies had an average of 8.1% decrease in height. An important candidate gene, ubiquitin-protein ligase NEDD4-like (NEDD4L, was detected at this region, which plays important roles in bone metabolism by binding to bone formation regulators. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest the important genetic variants underlying height variation in Chinese.

  12. Whole Genome Analysis of 132 Clinical Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Reveals Extensive Ploidy Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan O.; Sherlock, Gavin; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast has undergone several independent transitions from commercial to clinical lifestyles. The frequency of such transitions suggests that clinical yeast strains are derived from environmentally available yeast populations, including commercial sources. However, despite their important role in adaptive evolution, the prevalence of polyploidy and aneuploidy has not been extensively analyzed in clinical strains. In this study, we have looked for patterns governing the transition to clinical invasion in the largest screen of clinical yeast isolates to date. In particular, we have focused on the hypothesis that ploidy changes have influenced adaptive processes. We sequenced 144 yeast strains, 132 of which are clinical isolates. We found pervasive large-scale genomic variation in both overall ploidy (34% of strains identified as 3n/4n) and individual chromosomal copy numbers (36% of strains identified as aneuploid). We also found evidence for the highly dynamic nature of yeast genomes, with 35 strains showing partial chromosomal copy number changes and eight strains showing multiple independent chromosomal events. Intriguingly, a lineage identified to be baker’s/commercial derived with a unique damaging mutation in NDC80 was particularly prone to polyploidy, with 83% of its members being triploid or tetraploid. Polyploidy was in turn associated with a >2× increase in aneuploidy rates as compared to other lineages. This dataset provides a rich source of information on the genomics of clinical yeast strains and highlights the potential importance of large-scale genomic copy variation in yeast adaptation. PMID:27317778

  13. Exploration of presence/absence variation and corresponding polymorphic markers in soybean genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yufeng Wang; Tuanjie Zhao; Junyi Gai; Jiangjie Lu; Shouyi Chen; Liping Shu; Reid GPalmer; Guangnan Xing; Yan Li; Shouping Yang; Deyue Yu

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to reveal the genome-wide distribution of presence/absence variation (PAV) and to establish a database of polymorphic PAV markers in soybean. The 33 soybean whole-genome sequences were compared to each other with that of Wil iams 82 as a reference genome. A total of 33,127 PAVs were detected and 28,912 PAV markers with their primer sequences were designed as the database NJAUSoyPAV_1.0. The PAVs scattered on whole genome while only 518 (1.8%) over-lapped with simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in BARCSOYSSR_1.0 database. In a random sample of 800 PAVs, 713 (89.13%) showed polymorphism among the 12 differential genotypes. Using 126 PAVs and 108 SSRs to test a Chinese soybean germplasm col ection composed of 828 Glycine soja Sieb. et Zucc. and Glycine max (L.) Merr. accessions, the per locus al ele number and its variation appeared less in PAVs than in SSRs. The distinctness among al eles/bands of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) products showed better in PAVs than in SSRs, potential in accurate marker-assisted al ele selection. The association mapping results showed SSR þ PAV was more powerful than any single marker systems. The NJAUSoyPAV_1.0 database has enriched the source of PCR markers, and may fit the materials with a range of per locus al ele numbers, if jointly used with SSR markers.

  14. Genomic and functional characteristics of copy number variations in Angus cattle selected for resistance or susceptibility to gastrointestinal nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic structural variation is an important and abundant source of genetic and phenotypic variation. We previously reported an initial analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) in Angus cattle selected for resistance or susceptibility to intestinal nematodes. In this study, we performed a large sca...

  15. Sixteen new lung function signals identified through 1000 Genomes Project reference panel imputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Artigas, Maria Soler; Wain, Louise V.; Miller, Suzanne; Kheirallah, Abdul Kader; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Ntalla, Ioanna; Shrine, Nick; Obeidat, Ma'en; Trochet, Holly; McArdle, Wendy L.; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Hui, Jennie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Joshi, Peter K.; Teumer, Alexander; Albrecht, Eva; Imboden, Medea; Rawal, Rajesh; Lopez, Lorna M.; Marten, Jonathan; Enroth, Stefan; Surakka, Ida; Polasek, Ozren; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Granell, Raquel; Hysi, Pirro G.; Flexeder, Claudia; Mahajan, Anubha; Beilby, John; Bosse, Yohan; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Campbell, Harry; Gieger, Christian; Glaeser, Sven; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Grallert, Harald; Hammond, Chris J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heliovaara, Markku; Henderson, John; Hocking, Lynne; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hutri-Kahonen, Nina; Ingelsson, Erik; Johansson, Asa; Kemp, John P.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumar, Ashish; Lind, Lars; Melen, Erik; Musk, Arthur W.; Navarro, Pau; Nickle, David C.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ried, Janina S.; Ripatti, Samuli; Schulz, Holger; Scott, Robert A.; Sin, Don D.; Starr, John M.; Vinuela, Ana; Voelzke, Henry; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Zemunik, Tatijana; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Spector, Tim D.; Evans, David M.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Vitart, Veronique; Kahonen, Mika; Gyllensten, Ulf; Rudan, Igor; Deary, Ian J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Heinrich, Joachim; Stubbe, Beate; Wilson, James F.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; James, Alan L.; Morris, Andrew P.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hayward, Caroline; Sayers, Ian; Strachan, David P.; Hall, Ian P.; Tobin, Martin D.; Deloukas, Panos; Hansell, Anna L.; Hubbard, Richard; Jackson, Victoria E.; Marchini, Jonathan; Pavord, Ian; Thomson, Neil C.; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    Lung function measures are used in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In 38,199 European ancestry individuals, we studied genome-wide association of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC with 1000 Genomes Project (phase 1)-imputed genot

  16. A genomic overview of short genetic variations in a basal chordate, Ciona intestinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satou Yutaka

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the Ciona intestinalis genome contains many allelic polymorphisms, there is only limited data analyzed systematically. Establishing a dense map of genetic variations in C. intestinalis is necessary not only for linkage analysis, but also for other experimental biology including molecular developmental and evolutionary studies, because animals from natural populations are typically used for experiments. Results Here, we identified over three million candidate short genomic variations within a 110 Mb euchromatin region among five C. intestinalis individuals. The average nucleotide diversity was approximately 1.1%. Genetic variations were found at a similar density in intergenic and gene regions. Non-synonymous and nonsense nucleotide substitutions were found in 12,493 and 1,214 genes accounting for 81.9% and 8.0% of the entire gene set, respectively, and over 60% of genes in the single animal encode non-identical proteins between maternal and paternal alleles. Conclusions Our results provide a framework for studying evolution of the animal genome, as well as a useful resource for a wide range of C. intestinalis researchers.

  17. The Human Genome Project: Information access, management, and regulation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, J.D.; Micikas, L.B.

    1996-08-31

    The Human Genome Project is a large, internationally coordinated effort in biological research directed at creating a detailed map of human DNA. This report describes the access of information, management, and regulation of the project. The project led to the development of an instructional module titled The Human Genome Project: Biology, Computers, and Privacy, designed for use in high school biology classes. The module consists of print materials and both Macintosh and Windows versions of related computer software-Appendix A contains a copy of the print materials and discs containing the two versions of the software.

  18. Population Stratification and Underrepresentation of Indian Subcontinent Genetic Diversity in the 1000 Genomes Project Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Dhriti; Choudhury, Ananyo; Basu, Analabha; Ramsay, Michèle

    2016-12-31

    Genomic variation in Indian populations is of great interest due to the diversity of ancestral components, social stratification, endogamy and complex admixture patterns. With an expanding population of 1.2 billion, India is also a treasure trove to catalogue innocuous as well as clinically relevant rare mutations. Recent studies have revealed four dominant ancestries in populations from mainland India: Ancestral North-Indian (ANI), Ancestral South-Indian (ASI), Ancestral Tibeto-Burman (ATB) and Ancestral Austro-Asiatic (AAA). The 1000 Genomes Project (KGP) Phase-3 data include about 500 genomes from five linguistically defined Indian-Subcontinent (IS) populations (Punjabi, Gujrati, Bengali, Telugu and Tamil) some of whom are recent migrants to USA or UK. Comparative analyses show that despite the distinct geographic origins of the KGP-IS populations, the ANI component is predominantly represented in this dataset. Previous studies demonstrated population substructure in the HapMap Gujrati population, and we found evidence for additional substructure in the Punjabi and Telugu populations. These substructured populations have characteristic/significant differences in heterozygosity and inbreeding coefficients. Moreover, we demonstrate that the substructure is better explained by factors like differences in proportion of ancestral components, and endogamy driven social structure rather than invoking a novel ancestral component to explain it. Therefore, using language and/or geography as a proxy for an ethnic unit is inadequate for many of the IS populations. This highlights the necessity for more nuanced sampling strategies or corrective statistical approaches, particularly for biomedical and population genetics research in India.

  19. Analysis of genetic variation and potential applications in genome-scale metabolic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gonçalo Rocha Cardoso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation is the motor of evolution and allows organisms to overcome the environmental challenges they encounter. It can be both beneficial and harmful in the process of engineering cell factories for the production of proteins and chemicals. Throughout the history of biotechnology, there have been efforts to exploit genetic variation in our favor to create strains with favorable phenotypes. Genetic variation can either be present in natural populations or it can be artificially created by mutagenesis and selection or adaptive laboratory evolution. On the other hand, unintended genetic variation during a long term production process may lead to significant economic losses and it is important to understand how to control this type of variation. With the emergence of next-generation sequencing technologies, genetic variation in microbial strains can now be determined on an unprecedented scale and resolution by re-sequencing thousands of strains systematically. In this article, we review challenges in the integration and analysis of large-scale re-sequencing data, present an extensive overview of bioinformatics methods for predicting the effects of genetic variants on protein function, and discuss approaches for interfacing existing bioinformatics approaches with genome-scale models of cellular processes in order to predict effects of sequence variation on cellular phenotypes.

  20. Expression, tandem repeat copy number variation and stability of four macrosatellite arrays in the human genome

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    Chadwick Brian P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrosatellites are some of the largest variable number tandem repeats in the human genome, but what role these unusual sequences perform is unknown. Their importance to human health is clearly demonstrated by the 4q35 macrosatellite D4Z4 that is associated with the onset of the muscle degenerative disease facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Nevertheless, many other macrosatellite arrays in the human genome remain poorly characterized. Results Here we describe the organization, tandem repeat copy number variation, transmission stability and expression of four macrosatellite arrays in the human genome: the TAF11-Like array located on chromosomes 5p15.1, the SST1 arrays on 4q28.3 and 19q13.12, the PRR20 array located on chromosome 13q21.1, and the ZAV array at 9q32. All are polymorphic macrosatellite arrays that at least for TAF11-Like and SST1 show evidence of meiotic instability. With the exception of the SST1 array that is ubiquitously expressed, all are expressed at high levels in the testis and to a lesser extent in the brain. Conclusions Our results extend the number of characterized macrosatellite arrays in the human genome and provide the foundation for formulation of hypotheses to begin assessing their functional role in the human genome.

  1. The Genome of the Trinidadian Guppy, Poecilia reticulata, and Variation in the Guanapo Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künstner, Axel; Hoffmann, Margarete; Fraser, Bonnie A.; Kottler, Verena A.; Sharma, Eshita; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2016-01-01

    For over a century, the live bearing guppy, Poecilia reticulata, has been used to study sexual selection as well as local adaptation. Natural guppy populations differ in many traits that are of intuitively adaptive significance such as ornamentation, age at maturity, brood size and body shape. Water depth, light supply, food resources and predation regime shape these traits, and barrier waterfalls often separate contrasting environments in the same river. We have assembled and annotated the genome of an inbred single female from a high-predation site in the Guanapo drainage. The final assembly comprises 731.6 Mb with a scaffold N50 of 5.3 MB. Scaffolds were mapped to linkage groups, placing 95% of the genome assembly on the 22 autosomes and the X-chromosome. To investigate genetic variation in the population used for the genome assembly, we sequenced 10 wild caught male individuals. The identified 5 million SNPs correspond to an average nucleotide diversity (π) of 0.0025. The genome assembly and SNP map provide a rich resource for investigating adaptation to different predation regimes. In addition, comparisons with the genomes of other Poeciliid species, which differ greatly in mechanisms of sex determination and maternal resource allocation, as well as comparisons to other teleost genera can begin to reveal how live bearing evolved in teleost fish. PMID:28033408

  2. Variation in genome organization of the plant pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, D; Tosi, P; Creusot, F; Cooke, B M; Phan, T H; Dron, M; Langin, T

    1998-04-01

    The genome structure of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in a set of diverse isolates was investigated using a combination of physical and molecular approaches. Flow cytometric measurement of genome size revealed significant variation between strains, with the smallest genome representing 59% of the largest. Southern-blot profiles of a cloned fungal telomere revealed a total chromosome number varying from 9 to 12. Chromosome separations using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that these chromosomes belong to two distinct size classes: a variable number of small (< 2.5 Mb) polymorphic chromosomes and a set of unresolved chromosomes larger than 7 Mb. Two dispersed repeat elements were shown to cluster on distinct polymorphic minichromosomes. Single-copy flanking sequences from these repeat-containing clones specifically marked distinct small chromosomes. These markers were absent in some strains, indicating that part of the observed variability in genome organization may be explained by the presence or absence, in a given strain, of dispensable genomic regions and/or chromosomes.

  3. Connecting Anxiety and Genomic Copy Number Variation: A Genome-Wide Analysis in CD-1 Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Brenndörfer

    Full Text Available Genomic copy number variants (CNVs have been implicated in multiple psychiatric disorders, but not much is known about their influence on anxiety disorders specifically. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS and two additional array-based genotyping approaches, we detected CNVs in a mouse model consisting of two inbred mouse lines showing high (HAB and low (LAB anxiety-related behavior, respectively. An influence of CNVs on gene expression in the central (CeA and basolateral (BLA amygdala, paraventricular nucleus (PVN, and cingulate cortex (Cg was shown by a two-proportion Z-test (p = 1.6 x 10-31, with a positive correlation in the CeA (p = 0.0062, PVN (p = 0.0046 and Cg (p = 0.0114, indicating a contribution of CNVs to the genetic predisposition to trait anxiety in the specific context of HAB/LAB mice. In order to confirm anxiety-relevant CNVs and corresponding genes in a second mouse model, we further examined CD-1 outbred mice. We revealed the distribution of CNVs by genotyping 64 CD 1 individuals using a high-density genotyping array (Jackson Laboratory. 78 genes within those CNVs were identified to show nominally significant association (48 genes, or a statistical trend in their association (30 genes with the time animals spent on the open arms of the elevated plus-maze (EPM. Fifteen of them were considered promising candidate genes of anxiety-related behavior as we could show a significant overlap (permutation test, p = 0.0051 with genes within HAB/LAB CNVs. Thus, here we provide what is to our knowledge the first extensive catalogue of CNVs in CD-1 mice and potential corresponding candidate genes linked to anxiety-related behavior in mice.

  4. Genome variations associated with viral susceptibility and calcification in Emiliania huxleyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica U Kegel

    Full Text Available Emiliania huxleyi, a key player in the global carbon cycle is one of the best studied coccolithophores with respect to biogeochemical cycles, climatology, and host-virus interactions. Strains of E. huxleyi show phenotypic plasticity regarding growth behaviour, light-response, calcification, acidification, and virus susceptibility. This phenomenon is likely a consequence of genomic differences, or transcriptomic responses, to environmental conditions or threats such as viral infections. We used an E. huxleyi genome microarray based on the sequenced strain CCMP1516 (reference strain to perform comparative genomic hybridizations (CGH of 16 E. huxleyi strains of different geographic origin. We investigated the genomic diversity and plasticity and focused on the identification of genes related to virus susceptibility and coccolith production (calcification. Among the tested 31940 gene models a core genome of 14628 genes was identified by hybridization among 16 E. huxleyi strains. 224 probes were characterized as specific for the reference strain CCMP1516. Compared to the sequenced E. huxleyi strain CCMP1516 variation in gene content of up to 30 percent among strains was observed. Comparison of core and non-core transcripts sets in terms of annotated functions reveals a broad, almost equal functional coverage over all KOG-categories of both transcript sets within the whole annotated genome. Within the variable (non-core genome we identified genes associated with virus susceptibility and calcification. Genes associated with virus susceptibility include a Bax inhibitor-1 protein, three LRR receptor-like protein kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our list of transcripts associated with coccolith production will stimulate further research, e.g. by genetic manipulation. In particular, the V-type proton ATPase 16 kDa proteolipid subunit is proposed to be a plausible target gene for further calcification studies.

  5. Genetics of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Disease within the Frame of the Human Genome Project Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Vincent; Strickland, Alleene V.; Züchner, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathies comprise a group of monogenic disorders affecting the peripheral nervous system. CMT is characterized by a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neuropathies, involving all types of Mendelian inheritance patterns. Over 1,000 different mutations have been discovered in 80 disease-associated genes. Genetic research of CMT has pioneered the discovery of genomic disorders and aided in understanding the effects of copy number variation and the mechanisms of genomic rearrangements. CMT genetic study also unraveled common pathomechanisms for peripheral nerve degeneration, elucidated gene networks, and initiated the development of therapeutic approaches. The reference genome, which became available thanks to the Human Genome Project, and the development of next generation sequencing tools, considerably accelerated gene and mutation discoveries. In fact, the first clinical whole genome sequence was reported in a patient with CMT. Here we review the history of CMT gene discoveries, starting with technologies from the early days in human genetics through the high-throughput application of modern DNA analyses. We highlight the most relevant examples of CMT genes and mutation mechanisms, some of which provide promising treatment strategies. Finally, we propose future initiatives to accelerate diagnosis of CMT patients through new ways of sharing large datasets and genetic variants, and at ever diminishing costs. PMID:24705285

  6. Genetics of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT Disease within the Frame of the Human Genome Project Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Timmerman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT neuropathies comprise a group of monogenic disorders affecting the peripheral nervous system. CMT is characterized by a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neuropathies, involving all types of Mendelian inheritance patterns. Over 1,000 different mutations have been discovered in 80 disease-associated genes. Genetic research of CMT has pioneered the discovery of genomic disorders and aided in understanding the effects of copy number variation and the mechanisms of genomic rearrangements. CMT genetic study also unraveled common pathomechanisms for peripheral nerve degeneration, elucidated gene networks, and initiated the development of therapeutic approaches. The reference genome, which became available thanks to the Human Genome Project, and the development of next generation sequencing tools, considerably accelerated gene and mutation discoveries. In fact, the first clinical whole genome sequence was reported in a patient with CMT. Here we review the history of CMT gene discoveries, starting with technologies from the early days in human genetics through the high-throughput application of modern DNA analyses. We highlight the most relevant examples of CMT genes and mutation mechanisms, some of which provide promising treatment strategies. Finally, we propose future initiatives to accelerate diagnosis of CMT patients through new ways of sharing large datasets and genetic variants, and at ever diminishing costs.

  7. Epigenetic Variation in Monozygotic Twins: A Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Buccal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny van Dongen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is one of the most extensively studied epigenetic marks in humans. Yet, it is largely unknown what causes variation in DNA methylation between individuals. The comparison of DNA methylation profiles of monozygotic (MZ twins offers a unique experimental design to examine the extent to which such variation is related to individual-specific environmental influences and stochastic events or to familial factors (DNA sequence and shared environment. We measured genome-wide DNA methylation in buccal samples from ten MZ pairs (age 8–19 using the Illumina 450k array and examined twin correlations for methylation level at 420,921 CpGs after QC. After selecting CpGs showing the most variation in the methylation level between subjects, the mean genome-wide correlation (rho was 0.54. The correlation was higher, on average, for CpGs within CpG islands (CGIs, compared to CGI shores, shelves and non-CGI regions, particularly at hypomethylated CpGs. This finding suggests that individual-specific environmental and stochastic influences account for more variation in DNA methylation in CpG-poor regions. Our findings also indicate that it is worthwhile to examine heritable and shared environmental influences on buccal DNA methylation in larger studies that also include dizygotic twins.

  8. REVISITING MOLECULAR CLONING TO SOLVE GENOME SEQUENCING PROJECT CONFLICTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hugo A Barrera-Saldaña; Aarón Daniel Ramírez-Sánchez; Tiffany Editth Palacios-Tovar; Dionicio Aguirre-Treviño; Saúl Felipe Karr-de-León

    2017-01-01

    .... Molecular cloning was chosen as the most straight-forward strategy to solve the dilemma. The initial characterization of recombinant plasmids by restriction enzyme digestion confirmed the presence of two genomic sequences...

  9. Variation in genomic methylation in natural populations of chinese white poplar.

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    Kaifeng Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is thought that methylcytosine can be inherited through meiosis and mitosis, and that epigenetic variation may be under genetic control or correlation may be caused by neutral drift. However, DNA methylation also varies with tissue, developmental stage, and environmental factors. Eliminating these factors, we analyzed the levels and patterns, diversity and structure of genomic methylcytosine in the xylem of nine natural populations of Chinese white poplar. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On average, the relative total methylation and non-methylation levels were approximately 26.567% and 42.708% (P<0.001, respectively. Also, the relative CNG methylation level was higher than the relative CG methylation level. The relative methylation/non-methylation levels were significantly different among the nine natural populations. Epigenetic diversity ranged from 0.811 (Gansu to 1.211 (Shaanxi, and the coefficients of epigenetic differentiation (GST  = 0.159 were assessed by Shannon's diversity index. Co-inertia analysis indicated that methylation-sensitive polymorphism (MSP and genomic methylation pattern (CG-CNG profiles gave similar distributions. Using a between-group eigen analysis, we found that the Hebei and Shanxi populations were independent of each other, but the Henan population intersected with the other populations, to some degree. CONCLUSIONS: Genome methylation in Populus tomentosa presented tissue-specific characteristics and the relative 5'-CCGG methylation level was higher in xylem than in leaves. Meanwhile, the genome methylation in the xylem shows great epigenetic variation and could be fixed and inherited though mitosis. Compared to genetic structure, data suggest that epigenetic and genetic variation do not completely match.

  10. Antigen-presenting genes and genomic copy number variations in the Tasmanian devil MHC

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    Cheng Yuanyuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii is currently under threat of extinction due to an unusual fatal contagious cancer called Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD. DFTD is caused by a clonal tumour cell line that is transmitted between unrelated individuals as an allograft without triggering immune rejection due to low levels of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC diversity in Tasmanian devils. Results Here we report the characterization of the genomic regions encompassing MHC Class I and Class II genes in the Tasmanian devil. Four genomic regions approximately 960 kb in length were assembled and annotated using BAC contigs and physically mapped to devil Chromosome 4q. 34 genes and pseudogenes were identified, including five Class I and four Class II loci. Interestingly, when two haplotypes from two individuals were compared, three genomic copy number variants with sizes ranging from 1.6 to 17 kb were observed within the classical Class I gene region. One deletion is particularly important as it turns a Class Ia gene into a pseudogene in one of the haplotypes. This deletion explains the previously observed variation in the Class I allelic number between individuals. The frequency of this deletion is highest in the northwestern devil population and lowest in southeastern areas. Conclusions The third sequenced marsupial MHC provides insights into the evolution of this dynamic genomic region among the diverse marsupial species. The two sequenced devil MHC haplotypes revealed three copy number variations that are likely to significantly affect immune response and suggest that future work should focus on the role of copy number variations in disease susceptibility in this species.

  11. MicroRNAs and genomic variations: from Proteus tricks to Prometheus gift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Muller; Valeri, Nicola; Calin, George A

    2009-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs with regulatory functions. MiRNAs are aberrantly expressed in almost all human cancers, leading to abnormal levels of target genes. Recently, an increasing number of studies have addressed whether genomic variations including germ line or somatic mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms can count for miRNA abnormal expression by altering their biogenesis and/or affect the ability of miRNAs to bind to target messenger RNAs. Here, we provide an extensive review of the studies that have investigated variations occurring both in miRNA genes and in target genes and we discuss the possible clinical implications of these findings. Furthermore, we propose that sequence variations in miRNAs or interactor sites located in mRNAs can be involved in cancer predisposition.

  12. Insights into the Dekkera bruxellensis genomic landscape: comparative genomics reveals variations in ploidy and nutrient utilisation potential amongst wine isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Borneman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis is a major contaminant of industrial fermentations, such as those used for the production of biofuel and wine, where it outlasts and, under some conditions, outcompetes the major industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to investigate the level of inter-strain variation that is present within this economically important species, the genomes of four diverse D. bruxellensis isolates were compared. While each of the four strains was shown to contain a core diploid genome, which is clearly sufficient for survival, two of the four isolates have a third haploid complement of chromosomes. The sequences of these additional haploid genomes were both highly divergent from those comprising the diploid core and divergent between the two triploid strains. Similar to examples in the Saccharomyces spp. clade, where some allotriploids have arisen on the basis of enhanced ability to survive a range of environmental conditions, it is likely these strains are products of two independent hybridisation events that may have involved multiple species or distinct sub-species of Dekkera. Interestingly these triploid strains represent the vast majority (92% of isolates from across the Australian wine industry, suggesting that the additional set of chromosomes may confer a selective advantage in winery environments that has resulted in these hybrid strains all-but replacing their diploid counterparts in Australian winery settings. In addition to the apparent inter-specific hybridisation events, chromosomal aberrations such as strain-specific insertions and deletions and loss-of-heterozygosity by gene conversion were also commonplace. While these events are likely to have affected many phenotypes across these strains, we have been able to link a specific deletion to the inability to utilise nitrate by some strains of D. bruxellensis, a phenotype that may have direct impacts in the ability for these strains to compete with S

  13. Insights into the Dekkera bruxellensis genomic landscape: comparative genomics reveals variations in ploidy and nutrient utilisation potential amongst wine isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Anthony R; Zeppel, Ryan; Chambers, Paul J; Curtin, Chris D

    2014-02-01

    The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis is a major contaminant of industrial fermentations, such as those used for the production of biofuel and wine, where it outlasts and, under some conditions, outcompetes the major industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to investigate the level of inter-strain variation that is present within this economically important species, the genomes of four diverse D. bruxellensis isolates were compared. While each of the four strains was shown to contain a core diploid genome, which is clearly sufficient for survival, two of the four isolates have a third haploid complement of chromosomes. The sequences of these additional haploid genomes were both highly divergent from those comprising the diploid core and divergent between the two triploid strains. Similar to examples in the Saccharomyces spp. clade, where some allotriploids have arisen on the basis of enhanced ability to survive a range of environmental conditions, it is likely these strains are products of two independent hybridisation events that may have involved multiple species or distinct sub-species of Dekkera. Interestingly these triploid strains represent the vast majority (92%) of isolates from across the Australian wine industry, suggesting that the additional set of chromosomes may confer a selective advantage in winery environments that has resulted in these hybrid strains all-but replacing their diploid counterparts in Australian winery settings. In addition to the apparent inter-specific hybridisation events, chromosomal aberrations such as strain-specific insertions and deletions and loss-of-heterozygosity by gene conversion were also commonplace. While these events are likely to have affected many phenotypes across these strains, we have been able to link a specific deletion to the inability to utilise nitrate by some strains of D. bruxellensis, a phenotype that may have direct impacts in the ability for these strains to compete with S. cerevisiae.

  14. Poly(T) variation in heteroderid nematode mitochondrial genomes is predominantly an artefact of amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riepsamen, Angelique H; Gibson, Tracey; Rowe, Janet; Chitwood, David J; Subbotin, Sergei A; Dowton, Mark

    2011-02-01

    We assessed the rate of in vitro polymerase errors at polythymidine [poly(T)] tracts in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of a heteroderid nematode (Heterodera cajani). The mtDNA of these nematodes contain unusually high numbers of poly(T) tracts, and have previously been suggested to contain biological poly(T) length variation. However, using a cloned molecule, we observed that poly(T) variation was generated in vitro at regions containing more than six consecutive Ts. This artefactual error rate was estimated at 7.3 × 10(-5) indels/poly(T) tract >6 Ts/cycle. This rate was then compared to the rate of poly(T) variation detected after the amplification of a biological sample, in order to estimate the 'biological + artefactual' rate of poly(T) variation. There was no significant difference between the artefactual and the artefactual + biological rates, suggesting that the majority of poly(T) variation in the biological sample was artefactual. We then examined the generation of poly(T) variation in a range of templates with tracts up to 16 Ts long, utilizing a range of Heteroderidae species. We observed that T deletions occurred five times more frequently than insertions, and a trend towards increasing error rates with increasing poly(T) tract length. These findings have significant implications for studies involving genomes with many homopolymer tracts.

  15. An initial comparative map of copy number variations in the goat (Capra hircus genome

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    Casadio Rita

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goat (Capra hircus represents one of the most important farm animal species. It is reared in all continents with an estimated world population of about 800 million of animals. Despite its importance, studies on the goat genome are still in their infancy compared to those in other farm animal species. Comparative mapping between cattle and goat showed only a few rearrangements in agreement with the similarity of chromosome banding. We carried out a cross species cattle-goat array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH experiment in order to identify copy number variations (CNVs in the goat genome analysing animals of different breeds (Saanen, Camosciata delle Alpi, Girgentana, and Murciano-Granadina using a tiling oligonucleotide array with ~385,000 probes designed on the bovine genome. Results We identified a total of 161 CNVs (an average of 17.9 CNVs per goat, with the largest number in the Saanen breed and the lowest in the Camosciata delle Alpi goat. By aggregating overlapping CNVs identified in different animals we determined CNV regions (CNVRs: on the whole, we identified 127 CNVRs covering about 11.47 Mb of the virtual goat genome referred to the bovine genome (0.435% of the latter genome. These 127 CNVRs included 86 loss and 41 gain and ranged from about 24 kb to about 1.07 Mb with a mean and median equal to 90,292 bp and 49,530 bp, respectively. To evaluate whether the identified goat CNVRs overlap with those reported in the cattle genome, we compared our results with those obtained in four independent cattle experiments. Overlapping between goat and cattle CNVRs was highly significant (P Conclusions We describe a first map of goat CNVRs. This provides information on a comparative basis with the cattle genome by identifying putative recurrent interspecies CNVs between these two ruminant species. Several goat CNVs affect genes with important biological functions. Further studies are needed to evaluate the

  16. Genome size and phenotypic variation of Nymphaea (Nymphaeaceae species from Eastern Europe and temperate Asia

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    Magdalena Anna Dąbrowska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite long-term research, the aquatic genus Nymphaea still possesses major taxonomic challenges. High phenotypic plasticity and possible interspecific hybridization often make it impossible to identify individual specimens. The main aim of this study was to assess phenotypic variation in Nymphaea taxa sampled over a wide area of Eastern Europe and temperate Asia. Samples were identified based on species-specific genome sizes and diagnostic morphological characters for each taxon were then selected. A total of 353 specimens from 32 populations in Poland, Russia and Ukraine were studied, with nine biometric traits being examined. Although some specimens morphologically matched N. ×borealis (a hybrid between N. alba and N. candida according to published determination keys, only one hybrid individual was revealed based on genome size data. Other specimens with intermediate morphology possessed genome size corresponding to N. alba, N. candida or N. tetragona. This indicates that natural hybridization between N. alba and N. candida is not as frequent as previously suggested. Our results also revealed a considerably higher variation in the studied morphological traits (especially the quantitative ones in N. alba and N. candida than reported in the literature. A determination key for the investigated Nymphaea species is provided, based on taxonomically-informative morphological characters identified in our study.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of copy number variation in type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britney L Grayson

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D tends to cluster in families, suggesting there may be a genetic component predisposing to disease. However, a recent large-scale genome-wide association study concluded that identified genetic factors, single nucleotide polymorphisms, do not account for overall familiality. Another class of genetic variation is the amplification or deletion of >1 kilobase segments of the genome, also termed copy number variations (CNVs. We performed genome-wide CNV analysis on a cohort of 20 unrelated adults with T1D and a control (Ctrl cohort of 20 subjects using the Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 in combination with the Birdsuite copy number calling software. We identified 39 CNVs as enriched or depleted in T1D versus Ctrl. Additionally, we performed CNV analysis in a group of 10 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for T1D. Eleven of these 39 CNVs were also respectively enriched or depleted in the Twin cohort, suggesting that these variants may be involved in the development of islet autoimmunity, as the presently unaffected twin is at high risk for developing islet autoimmunity and T1D in his or her lifetime. These CNVs include a deletion on chromosome 6p21, near an HLA-DQ allele. CNVs were found that were both enriched or depleted in patients with or at high risk for developing T1D. These regions may represent genetic variants contributing to development of islet autoimmunity in T1D.

  18. HGD-Chn: The Database of Genome Diversity and Variation for Chinese Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-Sheng, Gui; Peng, Zhou; Cheng-Bo, Yang; Sheng-Bin, Li

    2009-04-01

    The Database of Genome Diversity and Variation for Chinese Populations is toward a more efficient utilization and sharing of the valuable yet diminishing genetic resources in China (including sample information of healthy populations, healthy pedigrees, disease population and disease pedigrees; genomic diversity data; disease-related allelic and haplotype data). Organization of the database can be divided into two parts: (1) Genetic resources of healthy people--Organizing genetic resources of healthy people. A variety of genetic markers (VNTR, STR, SNP, HLA, and enzyme markers, etc.) are chosen for their diversity among populations, with their distribution among different ethnic groups in China stored in the form of allelic frequency. A further analysis as well as an overall description of the Chinese population genetic structure is also being made possible. (2) Disease genetic resources--Four categories are mainly concerned: chromosomal diseases, monogenic diseases, polygenic diseases, and birth defects. For each kind of disease, the basic introduction and description, sample information, and allelic data of related gene are involved. Aside from research-oriented information, introductory courses oriented at general public covering fields of genomic diversity and variation, the related experimental techniques, standards and specifications could also be accessed in our website. Further more, flexible query and submit system with user-friendly interfaces are also integrated in our website to simplify the process of user-query and administrators' database maintenance work. Online data analyzing and managing tools are developed using bioinformatics algorithm and programming language for a better interpretation of the biological data.

  19. Large-Scale Release of Campylobacter Draft Genomes: Resources for Food Safety and Public Health from the 100K Pathogen Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bihua C.; Storey, Dylan B.; Kong, Nguyet; Chen, Poyin; Arabyan, Narine; Gilpin, Brent; Mason, Carl; Townsend, Andrea K.; Smith, Woutrina A.; Byrne, Barbara A.; Taff, Conor C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Campylobacter is a food-associated bacterium and a leading cause of foodborne illness worldwide, being associated with poultry in the food supply. This is the initial public release of 202 Campylobacter genome sequences as part of the 100K Pathogen Genome Project. These isolates represent global genomic diversity in the Campylobacter genus. PMID:28057746

  20. The FlyBase database of the Drosophila genome projects andcommunity literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelbart, William; Bayraktaroglu, Leyla; Bettencourt, Brian; Campbell, Kathy; Crosby, Madeline; Emmert, David; Hradecky, Pavel; Huang,Yanmei; Letovsky, Stan; Matthews, Beverly; Russo, Susan; Schroeder,Andrew; Smutniak, Frank; Zhou, Pinglei; Zytkovicz, Mark; Ashburner,Michael; Drysdale, Rachel; de Grey, Aubrey; Foulger, Rebecca; Millburn,Gillian; Yamada, Chihiro; Kaufman, Thomas; Matthews, Kathy; Gilbert, Don; Grumbling, Gary; Strelets, Victor; Shemen, C.; Rubin, Gerald; Berman,Brian; Frise, Erwin; Gibson, Mark; Harris, Nomi; Kaminker, Josh; Lewis,Suzanna; Marshall, Brad; Misra, Sima; Mungall, Christopher; Prochnik,Simon; Richter, John; Smith, Christopher; Shu, ShengQiang; Tupy,Jonathan; Wiel, Colin

    2002-09-16

    FlyBase (http://flybase.bio.indiana.edu/) provides an integrated view of the fundamental genomic and genetic data on the major genetic model Drosophila melanogaster and related species. FlyBase has primary responsibility for the continual reannotation of the D.melanogaster genome. The ultimate goal of the reannotation effort is to decorate the euchromatic sequence of the genome with as much biological information as is available from the community and from the major genome project centers. A complete revision of the annotations of the now-finished euchromatic genomic sequence has been completed. There are many points of entry to the genome within FlyBase, most notably through maps, gene products and ontologies, structured phenotypic and gene expression data, and anatomy.

  1. Transposon Insertions, Structural Variations, and SNPs Contribute to the Evolution of the Melon Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanseverino, Walter; Hénaff, Elizabeth; Vives, Cristina; Pinosio, Sara; Burgos-Paz, William; Morgante, Michele; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastián E; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Casacuberta, Josep Maria

    2015-10-01

    The availability of extensive databases of crop genome sequences should allow analysis of crop variability at an unprecedented scale, which should have an important impact in plant breeding. However, up to now the analysis of genetic variability at the whole-genome scale has been mainly restricted to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This is a strong limitation as structural variation (SV) and transposon insertion polymorphisms are frequent in plant species and have had an important mutational role in crop domestication and breeding. Here, we present the first comprehensive analysis of melon genetic diversity, which includes a detailed analysis of SNPs, SV, and transposon insertion polymorphisms. The variability found among seven melon varieties representing the species diversity and including wild accessions and highly breed lines, is relatively high due in part to the marked divergence of some lineages. The diversity is distributed nonuniformly across the genome, being lower at the extremes of the chromosomes and higher in the pericentromeric regions, which is compatible with the effect of purifying selection and recombination forces over functional regions. Additionally, this variability is greatly reduced among elite varieties, probably due to selection during breeding. We have found some chromosomal regions showing a high differentiation of the elite varieties versus the rest, which could be considered as strongly selected candidate regions. Our data also suggest that transposons and SV may be at the origin of an important fraction of the variability in melon, which highlights the importance of analyzing all types of genetic variability to understand crop genome evolution.

  2. Achilles' heel of pluripotent stem cells: genetic, genomic and epigenetic variations during prolonged culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Redi, Carlo Alberto; Garagna, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Pluripotent stem cells differentiate into almost any specialized adult cell type of an organism. PSCs can be derived either from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst-giving rise to embryonic stem cells-or after reprogramming of somatic terminally differentiated cells to obtain ES-like cells, named induced pluripotent stem cells. The potential use of these cells in the clinic, for investigating in vitro early embryonic development or for screening the effects of new drugs or xenobiotics, depends on capability to maintain their genome integrity during prolonged culture and differentiation. Both human and mouse PSCs are prone to genomic and (epi)genetic instability during in vitro culture, a feature that seriously limits their real potential use. Culture-induced variations of specific chromosomes or genes, are almost all unpredictable and, as a whole, differ among independent cell lines. They may arise at different culture passages, suggesting the absence of a safe passage number maintaining genome integrity and rendering the control of genomic stability mandatory since the very early culture passages. The present review highlights the urgency for further studies on the mechanisms involved in determining (epi)genetic and chromosome instability, exploiting the knowledge acquired earlier on other cell types.

  3. Population genomics of Pacific lamprey: adaptive variation in a highly dispersive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Jon E; Campbell, Nathan R; Close, David A; Docker, Margaret F; Narum, Shawn R

    2013-06-01

    Unlike most anadromous fishes that have evolved strict homing behaviour, Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) seem to lack philopatry as evidenced by minimal population structure across the species range. Yet unexplained findings of within-region population genetic heterogeneity coupled with the morphological and behavioural diversity described for the species suggest that adaptive genetic variation underlying fitness traits may be responsible. We employed restriction site-associated DNA sequencing to genotype 4439 quality filtered single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci for 518 individuals collected across a broad geographical area including British Columbia, Washington, Oregon and California. A subset of putatively neutral markers (N = 4068) identified a significant amount of variation among three broad populations: northern British Columbia, Columbia River/southern coast and 'dwarf' adults (F(CT) = 0.02, P ≪ 0.001). Additionally, 162 SNPs were identified as adaptive through outlier tests, and inclusion of these markers revealed a signal of adaptive variation related to geography and life history. The majority of the 162 adaptive SNPs were not independent and formed four groups of linked loci. Analyses with matsam software found that 42 of these outlier SNPs were significantly associated with geography, run timing and dwarf life history, and 27 of these 42 SNPs aligned with known genes or highly conserved genomic regions using the genome browser available for sea lamprey. This study provides both neutral and adaptive context for observed genetic divergence among collections and thus reconciles previous findings of population genetic heterogeneity within a species that displays extensive gene flow.

  4. Copy number variation is a fundamental aspect of the placental genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Roberta L; Chuong, Edward B; Rivera-Mulia, Juan Carlos; Gilbert, David M; Valouev, Anton; Baker, Julie C

    2014-05-01

    Discovery of lineage-specific somatic copy number variation (CNV) in mammals has led to debate over whether CNVs are mutations that propagate disease or whether they are a normal, and even essential, aspect of cell biology. We show that 1,000 N polyploid trophoblast giant cells (TGCs) of the mouse placenta contain 47 regions, totaling 138 Megabases, where genomic copies are underrepresented (UR). UR domains originate from a subset of late-replicating heterochromatic regions containing gene deserts and genes involved in cell adhesion and neurogenesis. While lineage-specific CNVs have been identified in mammalian cells, classically in the immune system where V(D)J recombination occurs, we demonstrate that CNVs form during gestation in the placenta by an underreplication mechanism, not by recombination nor deletion. Our results reveal that large scale CNVs are a normal feature of the mammalian placental genome, which are regulated systematically during embryogenesis and are propagated by a mechanism of underreplication.

  5. Copy number variation is a fundamental aspect of the placental genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta L Hannibal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of lineage-specific somatic copy number variation (CNV in mammals has led to debate over whether CNVs are mutations that propagate disease or whether they are a normal, and even essential, aspect of cell biology. We show that 1,000 N polyploid trophoblast giant cells (TGCs of the mouse placenta contain 47 regions, totaling 138 Megabases, where genomic copies are underrepresented (UR. UR domains originate from a subset of late-replicating heterochromatic regions containing gene deserts and genes involved in cell adhesion and neurogenesis. While lineage-specific CNVs have been identified in mammalian cells, classically in the immune system where V(DJ recombination occurs, we demonstrate that CNVs form during gestation in the placenta by an underreplication mechanism, not by recombination nor deletion. Our results reveal that large scale CNVs are a normal feature of the mammalian placental genome, which are regulated systematically during embryogenesis and are propagated by a mechanism of underreplication.

  6. Illumina based whole mitochondrial genome of Junonia iphita reveals minor intraspecific variation

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    Catherine Vanlalruati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the near complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome of Junonia iphita (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Nymphalinae was determined to be 14,892 bp. The gene order and orientation are identical to those in other butterfly species. The phylogenetic tree constructed from the whole mitogenomes using the 13 protein coding genes (PCGs defines the genetic relatedness of the two J. iphita species collected from two different regions. All the Junonia species clustered together, and were further subdivided into clade one consisting of J. almana and J. orithya and clade two comprising of the two J. iphita which were collected from Indo and Indochinese subregions separated by river barrier. Comparison between the two J. iphita sequences revealed minor variations and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms were identified at 51 sites amounting to 0.4% of the entire mitochondrial genome.

  7. Detection of genomic variation by selection of a 9 mb DNA region and high throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey I Nikolaev

    Full Text Available Detection of the rare polymorphisms and causative mutations of genetic diseases in a targeted genomic area has become a major goal in order to understand genomic and phenotypic variability. We have interrogated repeat-masked regions of 8.9 Mb on human chromosomes 21 (7.8 Mb and 7 (1.1 Mb from an individual from the International HapMap Project (NA12872. We have optimized a method of genomic selection for high throughput sequencing. Microarray-based selection and sequencing resulted in 260-fold enrichment, with 41% of reads mapping to the target region. 83% of SNPs in the targeted region had at least 4-fold sequence coverage and 54% at least 15-fold. When assaying HapMap SNPs in NA12872, our sequence genotypes are 91.3% concordant in regions with coverage > or = 4-fold, and 97.9% concordant in regions with coverage > or = 15-fold. About 81% of the SNPs recovered with both thresholds are listed in dbSNP. We observed that regions with low sequence coverage occur in close proximity to low-complexity DNA. Validation experiments using Sanger sequencing were performed for 46 SNPs with 15-20 fold coverage, with a confirmation rate of 96%, suggesting that DNA selection provides an accurate and cost-effective method for identifying rare genomic variants.

  8. Whole genome re-sequencing reveals genome-wide variations among parental lines of 16 mapping populations in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thudi, Mahendar; Khan, Aamir W; Kumar, Vinay; Gaur, Pooran M; Katta, Krishnamohan; Garg, Vanika; Roorkiwal, Manish; Samineni, Srinivasan; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-01-27

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is the second most important grain legume cultivated by resource poor farmers in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. In order to harness the untapped genetic potential available for chickpea improvement, we re-sequenced 35 chickpea genotypes representing parental lines of 16 mapping populations segregating for abiotic (drought, heat, salinity), biotic stresses (Fusarium wilt, Ascochyta blight, Botrytis grey mould, Helicoverpa armigera) and nutritionally important (protein content) traits using whole genome re-sequencing approach. A total of 192.19 Gb data, generated on 35 genotypes of chickpea, comprising 973.13 million reads, with an average sequencing depth of ~10 X for each line. On an average 92.18 % reads from each genotype were aligned to the chickpea reference genome with 82.17 % coverage. A total of 2,058,566 unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 292,588 Indels were detected while comparing with the reference chickpea genome. Highest number of SNPs were identified on the Ca4 pseudomolecule. In addition, copy number variations (CNVs) such as gene deletions and duplications were identified across the chickpea parental genotypes, which were minimum in PI 489777 (1 gene deletion) and maximum in JG 74 (1,497). A total of 164,856 line specific variations (144,888 SNPs and 19,968 Indels) with the highest percentage were identified in coding regions in ICC 1496 (21 %) followed by ICCV 97105 (12 %). Of 539 miscellaneous variations, 339, 138 and 62 were inter-chromosomal variations (CTX), intra-chromosomal variations (ITX) and inversions (INV) respectively. Genome-wide SNPs, Indels, CNVs, PAVs, and miscellaneous variations identified in different mapping populations are a valuable resource in genetic research and helpful in locating genes/genomic segments responsible for economically important traits. Further, the genome-wide variations identified in the present study can be used for developing high density SNP arrays for

  9. A global reference for human genetic variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auton, Adam; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; M. Altshuler, David;

    2015-01-01

    The 1000 Genomes Project set out to provide a comprehensive description of common human genetic variation by applying whole-genome sequencing to a diverse set of individuals from multiple populations. Here we report completion of the project, having reconstructed the genomes of 2,504 individuals ...

  10. Predictive Models of Recombination Rate Variation across the Drosophila melanogaster Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Andrew B.; Corchado, Johnny Cruz; Comeron, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    In all eukaryotic species examined, meiotic recombination, and crossovers in particular, occur non‐randomly along chromosomes. The cause for this non-random distribution remains poorly understood but some specific DNA sequence motifs have been shown to be enriched near crossover hotspots in a number of species. We present analyses using machine learning algorithms to investigate whether DNA motif distribution across the genome can be used to predict crossover variation in Drosophila melanogaster, a species without hotspots. Our study exposes a combinatorial non-linear influence of motif presence able to account for a significant fraction of the genome-wide variation in crossover rates at all genomic scales investigated, from 20% at 5-kb to almost 70% at 2,500-kb scale. The models are particularly predictive for regions with the highest and lowest crossover rates and remain highly informative after removing sub-telomeric and -centromeric regions known to have strongly reduced crossover rates. Transcriptional activity during early meiosis and differences in motif use between autosomes and the X chromosome add to the predictive power of the models. Moreover, we show that population-specific differences in crossover rates can be partly explained by differences in motif presence. Our results suggest that crossover distribution in Drosophila is influenced by both meiosis-specific chromatin dynamics and very local constitutive open chromatin associated with DNA motifs that prevent nucleosome stabilization. These findings provide new information on the genetic factors influencing variation in recombination rates and a baseline to study epigenetic mechanisms responsible for plastic recombination as response to different biotic and abiotic conditions and stresses. PMID:27492232

  11. Integrated analysis of copy number variation and genome-wide expression profiling in colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Hassan, Nur Zarina; Mokhtar, Norfilza Mohd; Kok Sin, Teow; Mohamed Rose, Isa; Sagap, Ismail; Harun, Roslan; Jamal, Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Integrative analyses of multiple genomic datasets for selected samples can provide better insight into the overall data and can enhance our knowledge of cancer. The objective of this study was to elucidate the association between copy number variation (CNV) and gene expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) samples and their corresponding non-cancerous tissues. Sixty-four paired CRC samples from the same patients were subjected to CNV profiling using the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad assay, and validation was performed using multiplex ligation probe amplification method. Genome-wide expression profiling was performed on 15 paired samples from the same group of patients using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Significant genes obtained from both array results were then overlapped. To identify molecular pathways, the data were mapped to the KEGG database. Whole genome CNV analysis that compared primary tumor and non-cancerous epithelium revealed gains in 1638 genes and losses in 36 genes. Significant gains were mostly found in chromosome 20 at position 20q12 with a frequency of 45.31% in tumor samples. Examples of genes that were associated at this cytoband were PTPRT, EMILIN3 and CHD6. The highest number of losses was detected at chromosome 8, position 8p23.2 with 17.19% occurrence in all tumor samples. Among the genes found at this cytoband were CSMD1 and DLC1. Genome-wide expression profiling showed 709 genes to be up-regulated and 699 genes to be down-regulated in CRC compared to non-cancerous samples. Integration of these two datasets identified 56 overlapping genes, which were located in chromosomes 8, 20 and 22. MLPA confirmed that the CRC samples had the highest gains in chromosome 20 compared to the reference samples. Interpretation of the CNV data in the context of the transcriptome via integrative analyses may provide more in-depth knowledge of the genomic landscape of CRC.

  12. Integrated analysis of copy number variation and genome-wide expression profiling in colorectal cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Zarina Ali Hassan

    Full Text Available Integrative analyses of multiple genomic datasets for selected samples can provide better insight into the overall data and can enhance our knowledge of cancer. The objective of this study was to elucidate the association between copy number variation (CNV and gene expression in colorectal cancer (CRC samples and their corresponding non-cancerous tissues. Sixty-four paired CRC samples from the same patients were subjected to CNV profiling using the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad assay, and validation was performed using multiplex ligation probe amplification method. Genome-wide expression profiling was performed on 15 paired samples from the same group of patients using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Significant genes obtained from both array results were then overlapped. To identify molecular pathways, the data were mapped to the KEGG database. Whole genome CNV analysis that compared primary tumor and non-cancerous epithelium revealed gains in 1638 genes and losses in 36 genes. Significant gains were mostly found in chromosome 20 at position 20q12 with a frequency of 45.31% in tumor samples. Examples of genes that were associated at this cytoband were PTPRT, EMILIN3 and CHD6. The highest number of losses was detected at chromosome 8, position 8p23.2 with 17.19% occurrence in all tumor samples. Among the genes found at this cytoband were CSMD1 and DLC1. Genome-wide expression profiling showed 709 genes to be up-regulated and 699 genes to be down-regulated in CRC compared to non-cancerous samples. Integration of these two datasets identified 56 overlapping genes, which were located in chromosomes 8, 20 and 22. MLPA confirmed that the CRC samples had the highest gains in chromosome 20 compared to the reference samples. Interpretation of the CNV data in the context of the transcriptome via integrative analyses may provide more in-depth knowledge of the genomic landscape of CRC.

  13. Exploring genetic variation in the tomato (Solanum section Lycopersicon) clade by whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflitos, Saulo; Schijlen, Elio; de Jong, Hans; de Ridder, Dick; Smit, Sandra; Finkers, Richard; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Gengyun; Li, Ning; Mao, Likai; Bakker, Freek; Dirks, Rob; Breit, Timo; Gravendeel, Barbara; Huits, Henk; Struss, Darush; Swanson-Wagner, Ruth; van Leeuwen, Hans; van Ham, Roeland C H J; Fito, Laia; Guignier, Laëtitia; Sevilla, Myrna; Ellul, Philippe; Ganko, Eric; Kapur, Arvind; Reclus, Emannuel; de Geus, Bernard; van de Geest, Henri; Te Lintel Hekkert, Bas; van Haarst, Jan; Smits, Lars; Koops, Andries; Sanchez-Perez, Gabino; van Heusden, Adriaan W; Visser, Richard; Quan, Zhiwu; Min, Jiumeng; Liao, Li; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Guangbiao; Yue, Zhen; Yang, Xinhua; Xu, Na; Schranz, Eric; Smets, Erik; Vos, Rutger; Rauwerda, Johan; Ursem, Remco; Schuit, Cees; Kerns, Mike; van den Berg, Jan; Vriezen, Wim; Janssen, Antoine; Datema, Erwin; Jahrman, Torben; Moquet, Frederic; Bonnet, Julien; Peters, Sander

    2014-10-01

    We explored genetic variation by sequencing a selection of 84 tomato accessions and related wild species representative of the Lycopersicon, Arcanum, Eriopersicon and Neolycopersicon groups, which has yielded a huge amount of precious data on sequence diversity in the tomato clade. Three new reference genomes were reconstructed to support our comparative genome analyses. Comparative sequence alignment revealed group-, species- and accession-specific polymorphisms, explaining characteristic fruit traits and growth habits in the various cultivars. Using gene models from the annotated Heinz 1706 reference genome, we observed differences in the ratio between non-synonymous and synonymous SNPs (dN/dS) in fruit diversification and plant growth genes compared to a random set of genes, indicating positive selection and differences in selection pressure between crop accessions and wild species. In wild species, the number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) exceeds 10 million, i.e. 20-fold higher than found in most of the crop accessions, indicating dramatic genetic erosion of crop and heirloom tomatoes. In addition, the highest levels of heterozygosity were found for allogamous self-incompatible wild species, while facultative and autogamous self-compatible species display a lower heterozygosity level. Using whole-genome SNP information for maximum-likelihood analysis, we achieved complete tree resolution, whereas maximum-likelihood trees based on SNPs from ten fruit and growth genes show incomplete resolution for the crop accessions, partly due to the effect of heterozygous SNPs. Finally, results suggest that phylogenetic relationships are correlated with habitat, indicating the occurrence of geographical races within these groups, which is of practical importance for Solanum genome evolution studies.

  14. Low frequency variants, collapsed based on biological knowledge, uncover complexity of population stratification in 1000 genomes project data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie B Moore

    Full Text Available Analyses investigating low frequency variants have the potential for explaining additional genetic heritability of many complex human traits. However, the natural frequencies of rare variation between human populations strongly confound genetic analyses. We have applied a novel collapsing method to identify biological features with low frequency variant burden differences in thirteen populations sequenced by the 1000 Genomes Project. Our flexible collapsing tool utilizes expert biological knowledge from multiple publicly available database sources to direct feature selection. Variants were collapsed according to genetically driven features, such as evolutionary conserved regions, regulatory regions genes, and pathways. We have conducted an extensive comparison of low frequency variant burden differences (MAF<0.03 between populations from 1000 Genomes Project Phase I data. We found that on average 26.87% of gene bins, 35.47% of intergenic bins, 42.85% of pathway bins, 14.86% of ORegAnno regulatory bins, and 5.97% of evolutionary conserved regions show statistically significant differences in low frequency variant burden across populations from the 1000 Genomes Project. The proportion of bins with significant differences in low frequency burden depends on the ancestral similarity of the two populations compared and types of features tested. Even closely related populations had notable differences in low frequency burden, but fewer differences than populations from different continents. Furthermore, conserved or functionally relevant regions had fewer significant differences in low frequency burden than regions under less evolutionary constraint. This degree of low frequency variant differentiation across diverse populations and feature elements highlights the critical importance of considering population stratification in the new era of DNA sequencing and low frequency variant genomic analyses.

  15. Investigating variation in replicability: A "Many Labs" replication project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, R.A.; Ratliff, K.A.; Vianello, M.; Adams, R.B.; Bahnik, S.; Bernstein, M.J.; Bocian, K.; Brandt, M.J.; Brooks, B.; Brumbaugh, C.C.; Cemalcilar, Z.; Chandler, J.; Cheong, W.; Davis, W.E.; Devos, T.; Eisner, M.; Frankowska, N.; Furrow, D.; Galliani, E.M.; Hasselman, F.W.; Hicks, J.A.; Hovermale, J.F.; Hunt, S.J.; Huntsinger, J.R.; IJzerman, H.; John, M.S.; Joy-Gaba, J.A.; Kappes, H.B.; Krueger, L.E.; Kurtz, J.; Levitan, C.A.; Mallett, R.K.; Morris, W.L.; Nelson, A.J.; Nier, J.A.; Packard, G.; Pilati, R.; Rutchick, A.M.; Schmidt, K.; Skorinko, J.L.M.; Smith, R.; Steiner, T.G.; Storbeck, J.; Van Swol, L.M.; Thompson, D.; Veer, A.E. van 't; Vaughn, L.A.; Vranka, M.; Wichman, A.L.; Woodzicka, J.A.; Nosek, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Although replication is a central tenet of science, direct replications are rare in psychology. This research tested variation in the replicability of 13 classic and contemporary effects across 36 independent samples totaling 6,344 participants. In the aggregate, 10 effects replicated consistently.

  16. Advances in biotechnology and informatics to link variation in the genome to phenotypes in plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appels, R; Barrero, R; Bellgard, M

    2013-03-01

    Advances in our understanding of genome structure provide consistent evidence for the existence of a core genome representing species classically defined by phenotype, as well as conditionally dispensable components of the genome that shows extensive variation between individuals of a given species. Generally, conservation of phenotypic features between species reflects conserved features of the genome; however, this is evidently not necessarily always the case as demonstrated by the analysis of the tunicate chordate Oikopleura dioica. In both plants and animals, the methylation activity of DNA and histones continues to present new variables for modifying (eventually) the phenotype of an organism and provides for structural variation that builds on the point mutations, rearrangements, indels, and amplification of retrotransposable elements traditionally considered. The translation of the advances in the structure/function analysis of the genome to industry is facilitated through the capture of research outputs in "toolboxes" that remain accessible in the public domain.

  17. Complete chloroplast genomes from apomictic Taraxacum (Asteraceae): Identity and variation between three microspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeský, Ľuboš; Schwarzacher, Trude; Gornall, Richard; Heslop-Harrison, Pat

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA sequences show substantial variation between higher plant species, and less variation within species, so are typically excellent markers to investigate evolutionary, population and genetic relationships and phylogenies. We sequenced the plastomes of Taraxacum obtusifrons Markl. (O978); T. stridulum Trávniček ined. (S3); and T. amplum Markl. (A978), three apomictic triploid (2n = 3x = 24) dandelions from the T. officinale agg. We aimed to characterize the variation in plastomes, define relationships and correlations with the apomictic microspecies status, and refine placement of the microspecies in the evolutionary or phylogenetic context of the Asteraceae. The chloroplast genomes of accessions O978 and S3 were identical and 151,322 bp long (where the nuclear genes are known to show variation), while A978 was 151,349 bp long. All three genomes contained 135 unique genes, with an additional copy of the trnF-GGA gene in the LSC region and 20 duplicated genes in the IR region, along with short repeats, the typical major Inverted Repeats (IR1 and IR2, 24,431bp long), and Large and Small Single Copy regions (LSC 83,889bp and SSC 18,571bp in O978). Between the two Taraxacum plastomes types, we identified 28 SNPs. The distribution of polymorphisms suggests some parts of the Taraxacum plastome are evolving at a slower rate. There was a hemi-nested inversion in the LSC region that is common to Asteraceae, and an SSC inversion from ndhF to rps15 found only in some Asteraceae lineages. A comparative repeat analysis showed variation between Taraxacum and the phylogenetically close genus Lactuca, with many more direct repeats of 40bp or more in Lactuca (1% larger plastome than Taraxacum). When individual genes and non-coding regions were for Asteraceae phylogeny reconstruction, not all showed the same evolutionary scenario suggesting care is needed for interpretation of relationships if a limited number of markers are used. Studying genotypic diversity in

  18. Complete chloroplast genomes from apomictic Taraxacum (Asteraceae): Identity and variation between three microspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Salih, Rubar Hussein; Majeský, Ľuboš; Schwarzacher, Trude; Gornall, Richard; Heslop-Harrison, Pat

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA sequences show substantial variation between higher plant species, and less variation within species, so are typically excellent markers to investigate evolutionary, population and genetic relationships and phylogenies. We sequenced the plastomes of Taraxacum obtusifrons Markl. (O978); T. stridulum Trávniček ined. (S3); and T. amplum Markl. (A978), three apomictic triploid (2n = 3x = 24) dandelions from the T. officinale agg. We aimed to characterize the variation in plastomes, define relationships and correlations with the apomictic microspecies status, and refine placement of the microspecies in the evolutionary or phylogenetic context of the Asteraceae. The chloroplast genomes of accessions O978 and S3 were identical and 151,322 bp long (where the nuclear genes are known to show variation), while A978 was 151,349 bp long. All three genomes contained 135 unique genes, with an additional copy of the trnF-GGA gene in the LSC region and 20 duplicated genes in the IR region, along with short repeats, the typical major Inverted Repeats (IR1 and IR2, 24,431bp long), and Large and Small Single Copy regions (LSC 83,889bp and SSC 18,571bp in O978). Between the two Taraxacum plastomes types, we identified 28 SNPs. The distribution of polymorphisms suggests some parts of the Taraxacum plastome are evolving at a slower rate. There was a hemi-nested inversion in the LSC region that is common to Asteraceae, and an SSC inversion from ndhF to rps15 found only in some Asteraceae lineages. A comparative repeat analysis showed variation between Taraxacum and the phylogenetically close genus Lactuca, with many more direct repeats of 40bp or more in Lactuca (1% larger plastome than Taraxacum). When individual genes and non-coding regions were for Asteraceae phylogeny reconstruction, not all showed the same evolutionary scenario suggesting care is needed for interpretation of relationships if a limited number of markers are used. Studying genotypic diversity in

  19. The 3,000 rice genomes project: new opportunities and challenges for future rice research

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jia-Yang; Wang, Jun; Zeigler, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Rice is the world’s most important staple grown by millions of small-holder farmers. Sustaining rice production relies on the intelligent use of rice diversity. The 3,000 Rice Genomes Project is a giga-dataset of publically available genome sequences (averaging 14× depth of coverage) derived from 3,000 accessions of rice with global representation of genetic and functional diversity. The seed of these accessions is available from the International Rice Genebank Collection. Together, they are ...

  20. Human genome education model project. Ethical, legal, and social implications of the human genome project: Education of interdisciplinary professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J.O. [Alliance of Genetic Support Groups, Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Lapham, E.V. [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Child Development Center

    1996-12-31

    This meeting was held June 10, 1996 at Georgetown University. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the human genome education model. Topics of discussion include the following: psychosocial issues; ethical issues for professionals; legislative issues and update; and education issues.

  1. ViVar: a comprehensive platform for the analysis and visualization of structural genomic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sante, Tom; Vergult, Sarah; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Trooskens, Geert; De Preter, Katleen; Dheedene, Annelies; Speleman, Frank; De Meyer, Tim; Menten, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Structural genomic variations play an important role in human disease and phenotypic diversity. With the rise of high-throughput sequencing tools, mate-pair/paired-end/single-read sequencing has become an important technique for the detection and exploration of structural variation. Several analysis tools exist to handle different parts and aspects of such sequencing based structural variation analyses pipelines. A comprehensive analysis platform to handle all steps, from processing the sequencing data, to the discovery and visualization of structural variants, is missing. The ViVar platform is built to handle the discovery of structural variants, from Depth Of Coverage analysis, aberrant read pair clustering to split read analysis. ViVar provides you with powerful visualization options, enables easy reporting of results and better usability and data management. The platform facilitates the processing, analysis and visualization, of structural variation based on massive parallel sequencing data, enabling the rapid identification of disease loci or genes. ViVar allows you to scale your analysis with your work load over multiple (cloud) servers, has user access control to keep your data safe and is easy expandable as analysis techniques advance. URL: https://www.cmgg.be/vivar/

  2. Validating Genome-Wide Association Candidates Controlling Quantitative Variation in Nodulation1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffin, Peter; Guhlin, Joseph; Atkins, Paul; Baltes, Nicholas J.; Denny, Roxanne

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies offer the opportunity to identify genes that contribute to naturally occurring variation in quantitative traits. However, GWA relies exclusively on statistical association, so functional validation is necessary to make strong claims about gene function. We used a combination of gene-disruption platforms (Tnt1 retrotransposons, hairpin RNA-interference constructs, and CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases) together with randomized, well-replicated experiments to evaluate the function of genes that an earlier GWA study in Medicago truncatula had identified as candidates contributing to variation in the symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia. We evaluated ten candidate genes found in six clusters of strongly associated single nucleotide polymorphisms, selected on the basis of their strength of statistical association, proximity to annotated gene models, and root or nodule expression. We found statistically significant effects on nodule production for three candidate genes, each validated in two independent mutants. Annotated functions of these three genes suggest their contributions to quantitative variation in nodule production occur through processes not previously connected to nodulation, including phosphorous supply and salicylic acid-related defense response. These results demonstrate the utility of GWA combined with reverse mutagenesis technologies to discover and validate genes contributing to naturally occurring variation in quantitative traits. The results highlight the potential for GWA to complement forward genetics in identifying the genetic basis of ecologically and economically important traits. PMID:28057894

  3. ViVar: a comprehensive platform for the analysis and visualization of structural genomic variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Sante

    Full Text Available Structural genomic variations play an important role in human disease and phenotypic diversity. With the rise of high-throughput sequencing tools, mate-pair/paired-end/single-read sequencing has become an important technique for the detection and exploration of structural variation. Several analysis tools exist to handle different parts and aspects of such sequencing based structural variation analyses pipelines. A comprehensive analysis platform to handle all steps, from processing the sequencing data, to the discovery and visualization of structural variants, is missing. The ViVar platform is built to handle the discovery of structural variants, from Depth Of Coverage analysis, aberrant read pair clustering to split read analysis. ViVar provides you with powerful visualization options, enables easy reporting of results and better usability and data management. The platform facilitates the processing, analysis and visualization, of structural variation based on massive parallel sequencing data, enabling the rapid identification of disease loci or genes. ViVar allows you to scale your analysis with your work load over multiple (cloud servers, has user access control to keep your data safe and is easy expandable as analysis techniques advance. URL: https://www.cmgg.be/vivar/

  4. A genome wide association study between copy number variation (CNV) and human height in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Li; Liang Zhang; Han Yan; Feng Pan; Zhixin Zhang; Yumei Peng; Qi Zhou; Lina He; Xuezhen Zhu; Jing Cheng; Lishu Zhang; Lijun Tan; Yaozhong Liu; Qing Tian; Hongwen Deng; Xiaogang Liu; Shufeng Lei; Tielin Yang; Xiangding Chen; Fang Zhang; Yue Fang; Yan Guo

    2010-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is a type of genetic variation which may have important roles in phenotypic variability and disease susceptibility. To hunt for genetic variants underlying human height variation, we performed a genome wide CNV association study for human height in 618 Chinese unrelated subjects using Affymetrix 500K array set. After adjusting for age and sex, we found that four CNVs at 6p21.3, 8p23.3-23.2, 9p23 and 16p12.1 were associated with human height (with borderline significant p value: 0.013, 0.011, 0.024, 0.049; respectively). However, after multiple tests correction, none of them was associated with human height. We observed that the gain of copy number (more than 2 copies) at 8p23.3-23.2 was associated with lower height (normal copy number vs. gain of copy number; 161.2 cm vs. 153.7 cm, p = 0.011), which accounted for 0.9% of height variation. Loss of copy number (less than 2 copies) at 6p21.3 was associated with 0.8% lower height (loss of copy number vs. normal copy number: 154.5 cm vs. 161.1 cm, p = 0.013). Since no important genes influencing height located in CNVs at loci of 8p23.3-23.2 and 6p21.3, the two CNVs may cause the structural rearrangements of neighbored important candidate genes, thus regulates the variation of height. Our results expand our knowledge of the genetic factors underlying height variation and the biological regulation of human height.

  5. Genome-wide association analyses using electronic health records identify new loci influencing blood pressure variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas J; Ehret, Georg B; Nandakumar, Priyanka; Ranatunga, Dilrini; Schaefer, Catherine; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Iribarren, Carlos; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Risch, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Longitudinal electronic health records on 99,785 Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort individuals provided 1,342,814 systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements for a genome-wide association study on long-term average systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure. We identified 39 new loci among 75 genome-wide significant loci (P ≤ 5 × 10(-8)), with most replicating in the combined International Consortium for Blood Pressure (ICBP; n = 69,396) and UK Biobank (UKB; n = 152,081) studies. Combining GERA with ICBP yielded 36 additional new loci, with most replicating in UKB. Combining all three studies (n = 321,262) yielded 241 additional genome-wide significant loci, although no replication sample was available for these. All associated loci explained 2.9%, 2.5%, and 3.1% of variation in systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure, respectively, in GERA non-Hispanic whites. Using multiple blood pressure measurements in GERA doubled the variance explained. A normalized risk score was associated with time to onset of hypertension (hazards ratio = 1.18, P = 8.2 × 10(-45)). Expression quantitative trait locus analysis of blood pressure loci showed enrichment in aorta and tibial artery.

  6. A genome wide survey of SNP variation reveals the genetic structure of sheep breeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Kijas

    Full Text Available The genetic structure of sheep reflects their domestication and subsequent formation into discrete breeds. Understanding genetic structure is essential for achieving genetic improvement through genome-wide association studies, genomic selection and the dissection of quantitative traits. After identifying the first genome-wide set of SNP for sheep, we report on levels of genetic variability both within and between a diverse sample of ovine populations. Then, using cluster analysis and the partitioning of genetic variation, we demonstrate sheep are characterised by weak phylogeographic structure, overlapping genetic similarity and generally low differentiation which is consistent with their short evolutionary history. The degree of population substructure was, however, sufficient to cluster individuals based on geographic origin and known breed history. Specifically, African and Asian populations clustered separately from breeds of European origin sampled from Australia, New Zealand, Europe and North America. Furthermore, we demonstrate the presence of stratification within some, but not all, ovine breeds. The results emphasize that careful documentation of genetic structure will be an essential prerequisite when mapping the genetic basis of complex traits. Furthermore, the identification of a subset of SNP able to assign individuals into broad groupings demonstrates even a small panel of markers may be suitable for applications such as traceability.

  7. CONAN: copy number variation analysis software for genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wichmann Heinz-Erich

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs revolutionized our perception of the genetic regulation of complex traits and diseases. Copy number variations (CNVs promise to shed additional light on the genetic basis of monogenic as well as complex diseases and phenotypes. Indeed, the number of detected associations between CNVs and certain phenotypes are constantly increasing. However, while several software packages support the determination of CNVs from SNP chip data, the downstream statistical inference of CNV-phenotype associations is still subject to complicated and inefficient in-house solutions, thus strongly limiting the performance of GWAS based on CNVs. Results CONAN is a freely available client-server software solution which provides an intuitive graphical user interface for categorizing, analyzing and associating CNVs with phenotypes. Moreover, CONAN assists the evaluation process by visualizing detected associations via Manhattan plots in order to enable a rapid identification of genome-wide significant CNV regions. Various file formats including the information on CNVs in population samples are supported as input data. Conclusions CONAN facilitates the performance of GWAS based on CNVs and the visual analysis of calculated results. CONAN provides a rapid, valid and straightforward software solution to identify genetic variation underlying the 'missing' heritability for complex traits that remains unexplained by recent GWAS. The freely available software can be downloaded at http://genepi-conan.i-med.ac.at.

  8. Genome-size Variation in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum: Flow Cytometry and Cytology Reveal Rampant Aneuploidy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise E. Costich

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Switchgrass ( L., a native perennial dominant of the prairies of North America, has been targeted as a model herbaceous species for biofeedstock development. A flow-cytometric survey of a core set of 11 primarily upland polyploid switchgrass accessions indicated that there was considerable variation in genome size within each accession, particularly at the octoploid (2 = 8 = 72 chromosome ploidy level. Highly variable chromosome counts in mitotic cell preparations indicated that aneuploidy was more common in octoploids (86.3% than tetraploids (23.2%. Furthermore, the incidence of hyper- versus hypoaneuploidy is equivalent in tetraploids. This is clearly not the case in octoploids, where close to 90% of the aneuploid counts are lower than the euploid number. Cytogenetic investigation using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH revealed an unexpected degree of variation in chromosome structure underlying the apparent genomic instability of this species. These results indicate that rapid advances in the breeding of polyploid biofuel feedstocks, based on the molecular-genetic dissection of biomass characteristics and yield, will be predicated on the continual improvement of our understanding of the cytogenetics of these species.

  9. A genome-wide analysis of putative functional and exonic variation associated with extremely high intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, S L; Pedroso, I; Kadeva, N; Miller, M B; Iacono, W G; McGue, M; Stergiakouli, E; Smith, G D; Putallaz, M; Lubinski, D; Meaburn, E L; Plomin, R; Simpson, M A

    2016-08-01

    Although individual differences in intelligence (general cognitive ability) are highly heritable, molecular genetic analyses to date have had limited success in identifying specific loci responsible for its heritability. This study is the first to investigate exome variation in individuals of extremely high intelligence. Under the quantitative genetic model, sampling from the high extreme of the distribution should provide increased power to detect associations. We therefore performed a case-control association analysis with 1409 individuals drawn from the top 0.0003 (IQ >170) of the population distribution of intelligence and 3253 unselected population-based controls. Our analysis focused on putative functional exonic variants assayed on the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We did not observe any individual protein-altering variants that are reproducibly associated with extremely high intelligence and within the entire distribution of intelligence. Moreover, no significant associations were found for multiple rare alleles within individual genes. However, analyses using genome-wide similarity between unrelated individuals (genome-wide complex trait analysis) indicate that the genotyped functional protein-altering variation yields a heritability estimate of 17.4% (s.e. 1.7%) based on a liability model. In addition, investigation of nominally significant associations revealed fewer rare alleles associated with extremely high intelligence than would be expected under the null hypothesis. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that rare functional alleles are more frequently detrimental than beneficial to intelligence.

  10. Shifting patterns of natural variation in the nuclear genome of caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Kazufusa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide analysis of variation within a species can reveal the evolution of fundamental biological processes such as mutation, recombination, and natural selection. We compare genome wide sequence differences between two independent isolates of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (CB4856 and CB4858 and the reference genome (N2. Results The base substitution pattern when comparing N2 against CB4858 reveals a transition over transversion bias (1.32:1 that is not present in CB4856. In CB4856, there is a significant bias in the direction of base substitution. The frequency of A or T bases in N2 that are G or C bases in CB4856 outnumber the opposite frequencies for transitions as well as transversions. These differences were not observed in the N2/CB4858 comparison. Similarly, we observed a strong bias for deletions over insertions in CB4856 (1.44: 1 that is not present in CB4858. In both CB4856 and CB4858, there is a significant correlation between SNP rate and recombination rate on the autosomes but not on the X chromosome. Furthermore, we identified numerous significant hotspots of variation in the CB4856-N2 comparison. In both CB4856 and CB4858, based on a measure of the strength of selection (ka/ks, all the chromosomes are under negative selection and in CB4856, there is no difference in the strength of natural selection in either the autosomes versus X or between any of the chromosomes. By contrast, in CB4858, ka/ks values are smaller in the autosomes than in the X chromosome. In addition, in CB4858, ka/ks values differ between chromosomes. Conclusions The clear bias of deletions over insertions in CB4856 suggests that either the CB4856 genome is becoming smaller or the N2 genome is getting larger. We hypothesize the hotspots found represent alleles that are shared between CB4856 and CB4858 but not N2. Because the ka/ks ratio in the X chromosome is higher than the autosomes on average in CB4858, purifying selection is

  11. Shifting patterns of natural variation in the nuclear genome of caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solorzano, Eleanne; Okamoto, Kazufusa; Datla, Pushpa; Sung, Way; Bergeron, R D; Thomas, W K

    2011-06-16

    Genome wide analysis of variation within a species can reveal the evolution of fundamental biological processes such as mutation, recombination, and natural selection. We compare genome wide sequence differences between two independent isolates of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (CB4856 and CB4858) and the reference genome (N2). The base substitution pattern when comparing N2 against CB4858 reveals a transition over transversion bias (1.32:1) that is not present in CB4856. In CB4856, there is a significant bias in the direction of base substitution. The frequency of A or T bases in N2 that are G or C bases in CB4856 outnumber the opposite frequencies for transitions as well as transversions. These differences were not observed in the N2/CB4858 comparison. Similarly, we observed a strong bias for deletions over insertions in CB4856 (1.44: 1) that is not present in CB4858. In both CB4856 and CB4858, there is a significant correlation between SNP rate and recombination rate on the autosomes but not on the X chromosome. Furthermore, we identified numerous significant hotspots of variation in the CB4856-N2 comparison.In both CB4856 and CB4858, based on a measure of the strength of selection (ka/ks), all the chromosomes are under negative selection and in CB4856, there is no difference in the strength of natural selection in either the autosomes versus X or between any of the chromosomes. By contrast, in CB4858, ka/ks values are smaller in the autosomes than in the X chromosome. In addition, in CB4858, ka/ks values differ between chromosomes. The clear bias of deletions over insertions in CB4856 suggests that either the CB4856 genome is becoming smaller or the N2 genome is getting larger. We hypothesize the hotspots found represent alleles that are shared between CB4856 and CB4858 but not N2. Because the ka/ks ratio in the X chromosome is higher than the autosomes on average in CB4858, purifying selection is reduced on the X chromosome.

  12. Genome-wide copy number variation analysis in a Chinese autism spectrum disorder cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui; Peng, Yu; Hu, Zhengmao; Li, Ying; Xun, Guanglei; Ou, Jianjun; Sun, Liangdan; Xiong, Zhimin; Liu, Yanling; Wang, Tianyun; Chen, Jingjing; Xia, Lu; Bai, Ting; Shen, Yidong; Tian, Qi; Hu, Yiqiao; Shen, Lu; Zhao, Rongjuan; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhang, Fengyu; Zhao, Jingping; Zou, Xiaobing; Xia, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) describes a group of neurodevelopmental disorders with high heritability, although the underlying genetic determinants of ASDs remain largely unknown. Large-scale whole-genome studies of copy number variation in Han Chinese samples are still lacking. We performed a genome-wide copy number variation analysis of 343 ASD trios, 203 patients with sporadic cases and 988 controls in a Chinese population using Illumina genotyping platforms to identify CNVs and related genes that may contribute to ASD risk. We identified 32 rare CNVs larger than 1 Mb in 31 patients. ASD patients were found to carry a higher global burden of rare, large CNVs than controls. Recurrent de novo or case-private CNVs were found at 15q11-13, Xp22.3, 15q13.1–13.2, 3p26.3 and 2p12. The de novo 15q11–13 duplication was more prevalent in this Chinese population than in those with European ancestry. Several genes, including GRAMD2 and STAM, were implicated as novel ASD risk genes when integrating whole-genome CNVs and whole-exome sequencing data. We also identified several CNVs that include known ASD genes (SHANK3, CDH10, CSMD1) or genes involved in nervous system development (NYAP2, ST6GAL2, GRM6). Besides, our study also implicated Contactins-NYAPs-WAVE1 pathway in ASD pathogenesis. Our findings identify ASD-related CNVs in a Chinese population and implicate novel ASD risk genes and related pathway for further study. PMID:28281572

  13. Remarkable variation in maize genome structure inferred from haplotype diversity at the bz locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; Dooner, Hugo K

    2006-11-21

    Maize is probably the most diverse of all crop species. Unexpectedly large differences among haplotypes were first revealed in a comparison of the bz genomic regions of two different inbred lines, McC and B73. Retrotransposon clusters, which comprise most of the repetitive DNA in maize, varied markedly in makeup, and location relative to the genes in the region and genic sequences, later shown to be carried by two helitron transposons, also differed between the inbreds. Thus, the allelic bz regions of these Corn Belt inbreds shared only a minority of the total sequence. To investigate further the variation caused by retrotransposons, helitrons, and other insertions, we have analyzed the organization of the bz genomic region in five additional cultivars selected because of their geographic and genetic diversity: the inbreds A188, CML258, and I137TN, and the land races Coroico and NalTel. This vertical comparison has revealed the existence of several new helitrons, new retrotransposons, members of every superfamily of DNA transposons, numerous miniature elements, and novel insertions flanked at either end by TA repeats, which we call TAFTs (TA-flanked transposons). The extent of variation in the region is remarkable. In pairwise comparisons of eight bz haplotypes, the percentage of shared sequences ranges from 25% to 84%. Chimeric haplotypes were identified that combine retrotransposon clusters found in different haplotypes. We propose that recombination in the common gene space greatly amplifies the variability produced by the retrotransposition explosion in the maize ancestry, creating the heterogeneity in genome organization found in modern maize.

  14. Identification of genome-wide copy number variations among diverse pig breeds by array CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that copy number variation (CNV in mammalian genomes contributes to phenotypic diversity, including health and disease status. In domestic pigs, CNV has been catalogued by several reports, but the extent of CNV and the phenotypic effects are far from clear. The goal of this study was to identify CNV regions (CNVRs in pigs based on array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH. Results Here a custom-made tiling oligo-nucleotide array was used with a median probe spacing of 2506 bp for screening 12 pigs including 3 Chinese native pigs (one Chinese Erhualian, one Tongcheng and one Yangxin pig, 5 European pigs (one Large White, one Pietrain, one White Duroc and two Landrace pigs, 2 synthetic pigs (Chinese new line DIV pigs and 2 crossbred pigs (Landrace × DIV pigs with a Duroc pig as the reference. Two hundred and fifty-nine CNVRs across chromosomes 1–18 and X were identified, with an average size of 65.07 kb and a median size of 98.74 kb, covering 16.85 Mb or 0.74% of the whole genome. Concerning copy number status, 93 (35.91% CNVRs were called as gains, 140 (54.05% were called as losses and the remaining 26 (10.04% were called as both gains and losses. Of all detected CNVRs, 171 (66.02% and 34 (13.13% CNVRs directly overlapped with Sus scrofa duplicated sequences and pig QTLs, respectively. The CNVRs encompassed 372 full length Ensembl transcripts. Two CNVRs identified by aCGH were validated using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. Conclusions Using 720 K array CGH (aCGH we described a map of porcine CNVs which facilitated the identification of structural variations for important phenotypes and the assessment of the genetic diversity of pigs.

  15. Human Genome Project: an attentive reading of the book of life?

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The idea to sequence all 3 billion bases of the humane genome started in the late 80s and the project began in the early 90s. In June 2000, the first "draft" was announced and in February, 2001 the final sequence was published by Science and Nature. Many debates about the ethical, legal and social issues originated from the Human Genome Project. The main questions are? "who should have access to an individual's genetic information?"; "will the genetic information be used as a discrimination t...

  16. A De Novo Genome Sequence Assembly of the Arabidopsis thaliana Accession Niederzenz-1 Displays Presence/Absence Variation and Strong Synteny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucker, Boas; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Rosleff Sörensen, Thomas; Stracke, Ralf; Viehöver, Prisca

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most important model organism for fundamental plant biology. The genome diversity of different accessions of this species has been intensively studied, for example in the 1001 genome project which led to the identification of many small nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small insertions and deletions (InDels). In addition, presence/absence variation (PAV), copy number variation (CNV) and mobile genetic elements contribute to genomic differences between A. thaliana accessions. To address larger genome rearrangements between the A. thaliana reference accession Columbia-0 (Col-0) and another accession of about average distance to Col-0, we created a de novo next generation sequencing (NGS)-based assembly from the accession Niederzenz-1 (Nd-1). The result was evaluated with respect to assembly strategy and synteny to Col-0. We provide a high quality genome sequence of the A. thaliana accession (Nd-1, LXSY01000000). The assembly displays an N50 of 0.590 Mbp and covers 99% of the Col-0 reference sequence. Scaffolds from the de novo assembly were positioned on the basis of sequence similarity to the reference. Errors in this automatic scaffold anchoring were manually corrected based on analyzing reciprocal best BLAST hits (RBHs) of genes. Comparison of the final Nd-1 assembly to the reference revealed duplications and deletions (PAV). We identified 826 insertions and 746 deletions in Nd-1. Randomly selected candidates of PAV were experimentally validated. Our Nd-1 de novo assembly allowed reliable identification of larger genic and intergenic variants, which was difficult or error-prone by short read mapping approaches alone. While overall sequence similarity as well as synteny is very high, we detected short and larger (affecting more than 100 bp) differences between Col-0 and Nd-1 based on bi-directional comparisons. The de novo assembly provided here and additional assemblies that will certainly be published in the future will allow to

  17. Crowdfunding the Azolla fern genome project: a grassroots approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fay-Wei; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2014-01-01

    Much of science progresses within the tight boundaries of what is often seen as a "black box". Though familiar to funding agencies, researchers and the academic journals they publish in, it is an entity that outsiders rarely get to peek into. Crowdfunding is a novel means that allows the public to participate in, as well as to support and witness advancements in science. Here we describe our recent crowdfunding efforts to sequence the Azolla genome, a little fern with massive green potential. Crowdfunding is a worthy platform not only for obtaining seed money for exploratory research, but also for engaging directly with the general public as a rewarding form of outreach.

  18. Structural variation in the chicken genome identified by paired-end next-generation DNA sequencing of reduced representation libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okimoto Ron

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation within individual genomes ranges from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to kilobase, and even megabase, sized structural variants (SVs, such as deletions, insertions, inversions, and more complex rearrangements. Although much is known about the extent of SVs in humans and mice, species in which they exert significant effects on phenotypes, very little is known about the extent of SVs in the 2.5-times smaller and less repetitive genome of the chicken. Results We identified hundreds of shared and divergent SVs in four commercial chicken lines relative to the reference chicken genome. The majority of SVs were found in intronic and intergenic regions, and we also found SVs in the coding regions. To identify the SVs, we combined high-throughput short read paired-end sequencing of genomic reduced representation libraries (RRLs of pooled samples from 25 individuals and computational mapping of DNA sequences from a reference genome. Conclusion We provide a first glimpse of the high abundance of small structural genomic variations in the chicken. Extrapolating our results, we estimate that there are thousands of rearrangements in the chicken genome, the majority of which are located in non-coding regions. We observed that structural variation contributes to genetic differentiation among current domesticated chicken breeds and the Red Jungle Fowl. We expect that, because of their high abundance, SVs might explain phenotypic differences and play a role in the evolution of the chicken genome. Finally, our study exemplifies an efficient and cost-effective approach for identifying structural variation in sequenced genomes.

  19. Genotype Imputation for Latinos Using the HapMap and 1000 Genomes Project Reference Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi eGao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Genotype imputation is a vital tool in genome-wide association studies (GWAS and meta-analyses of multiple GWAS results. Imputation enables researchers to increase genomic coverage and to pool data generated using different genotyping platforms. HapMap samples are often employed as the reference panel. More recently, the 1000 Genomes Project resource is becoming the primary source for reference panels. Multiple GWAS and meta-analyses are targeting Latinos, the most populous and fastest growing minority group in the US. However, genotype imputation resources for Latinos are rather limited compared to individuals of European ancestry at present, largely because of the lack of good reference data. One choice of reference panel for Latinos is one derived from the population of Mexican individuals in Los Angeles contained in the HapMap Phase 3 project and the 1000 Genomes Project. However, a detailed evaluation of the quality of the imputed genotypes derived from the public reference panels has not yet been reported. Using simulation studies, the Illumina OmniExpress GWAS data from the Los Angles Latino Eye Study and the MACH software package, we evaluated the accuracy of genotype imputation in Latinos. Our results show that the 1000 Genomes Project AMR+CEU+YRI reference panel provides the highest imputation accuracy for Latinos, and that also including Asian samples in the panel can reduce imputation accuracy. We also provide the imputation accuracy for each autosomal chromosome using the 1000 Genomes Project panel for Latinos. Our results serve as a guide to future imputation-based analysis in Latinos.

  20. Genotype Imputation for Latinos Using the HapMap and 1000 Genomes Project Reference Panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoyi; Haritunians, Talin; Marjoram, Paul; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Torres, Mina; Taylor, Kent D; Rotter, Jerome I; Gauderman, William J; Varma, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Genotype imputation is a vital tool in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and meta-analyses of multiple GWAS results. Imputation enables researchers to increase genomic coverage and to pool data generated using different genotyping platforms. HapMap samples are often employed as the reference panel. More recently, the 1000 Genomes Project resource is becoming the primary source for reference panels. Multiple GWAS and meta-analyses are targeting Latinos, the most populous, and fastest growing minority group in the US. However, genotype imputation resources for Latinos are rather limited compared to individuals of European ancestry at present, largely because of the lack of good reference data. One choice of reference panel for Latinos is one derived from the population of Mexican individuals in Los Angeles contained in the HapMap Phase 3 project and the 1000 Genomes Project. However, a detailed evaluation of the quality of the imputed genotypes derived from the public reference panels has not yet been reported. Using simulation studies, the Illumina OmniExpress GWAS data from the Los Angles Latino Eye Study and the MACH software package, we evaluated the accuracy of genotype imputation in Latinos. Our results show that the 1000 Genomes Project AMR + CEU + YRI reference panel provides the highest imputation accuracy for Latinos, and that also including Asian samples in the panel can reduce imputation accuracy. We also provide the imputation accuracy for each autosomal chromosome using the 1000 Genomes Project panel for Latinos. Our results serve as a guide to future imputation based analysis in Latinos.

  1. Genome sequence variation analysis of two SARS coronavirus isolates after passage in Vero cell culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Weiwu; LI Ning; HU Liangxiang; DU Zhenglin; GAO Qiang; GAO Hong; NING Ye; FENG Jidong; ZHANG Jiansan; YIN Weidong

    2004-01-01

    SARS coronavirus is an RNA virus whose replication is error-prone, which provides possibility for escape of host defenses, and even leads to evolution of new viral strains during the passage or the transmission. Lots of variations have been detected among different SARS-CoV strains. And a study on these variations is helpful for development of efficient vaccine. Moreover, the test of nucleic acid characterization and genetic stability of SARS-CoV is important in the research of inactivated vaccine. The whole genome sequences of two SARS coronavirus strains after passage in Vero cell culture were determined and were compared with those of early passages, respectively. Results showed that both SARS coronavirus strains have high genetic stability, although nearly 10 generations were passed. Four nucleotide variations were observed between the second passage and the 11th passage of Sino1 strain for identification of SARS inactivated vaccine. Moreover, only one nucleotide was different between the third passage and the 10th passage of Sino3 strain for SARS inactivated vaccine. Therefore, this study suggested it was possible to develop inactivated vaccine against SARS-CoV in the future.

  2. Inheritance and Variation of Genomic DNA Methylation in Diploid and Triploid Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qun; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng

    2016-02-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism that could be responsive to environmental changes indicating a potential role in natural selection and adaption. In order to evaluate an evolutionary role of DNA methylation, it is essential to first gain a better insight into inheritability. To address this question, this study investigated DNA methylation variation from parents to offspring in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas using fluorescent-labeled methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (F-MSAP) analysis. Most of parental methylated loci were stably transmitted to offspring segregating following Medelian expectation. However, methylated loci deviated more often than non-methylated loci and offspring showed a few de novo methylated loci indicating DNA methylation changes from parents to offspring. Interestingly, some male-specific methylated loci were found in this study which might help to explore sex determination in oyster. Despite environmental stimuli, genomic stresses such as polyploidization also can induce methylation changes. This study also compared global DNA methylation level and individual methylated loci between diploid and triploid oysters. Results showed no difference in global methylation state but a few ploidy-specific loci were detected. DNA methylation variation during polyploidization was less than autonomous methylation variation from parents to offspring.

  3. DNA variation of the mammalian major histocompatibility complex reflects genomic diversity and population history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuhki, Naoya; O' Brien, S.J. (National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a multigene complex of tightly linked homologous genes that encode cell surface antigens that play a key role in immune regulation and response to foreign antigens. In most species, MHC gene products display extreme antigenic polymorphism, and their variability has been interpreted to reflect an adaptive strategy for accommodating rapidly evolving infectious agents that periodically afflict natural populations. Determination of the extent of MHC variation has been limited to populations in which skin grafting is feasible or for which serological reagents have been developed. The authors present here a quantitative analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of MHC class I genes in several mammalian species (cats, rodents, humans) known to have very different levels of genetic diversity based on functional MHC assays and on allozyme surveys. When homologous class I probes were employed, a notable concordance was observed between the extent of MHC restriction fragment variation and functional MHC variation detected by skin grafts or genome-wide diversity estimated by allozyme screens. These results confirm the genetically depauperate character of the African cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, and the Asiatic lion, Panthera leo persica; further, they support the use of class I MHC molecular reagents in estimating the extent and character of genetic diversity in natural populations.

  4. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed organelle specific responses to temperature variations in algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, HyeonSeok; Hong, Seong-Joo; Yoo, Chan; Han, Mi-Ae; Lee, Hookeun; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Cho, Suhyung; Lee, Choul-Gyun; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is a critical environmental factor that affects microalgal growth. However, microalgal coping mechanisms for temperature variations are unclear. Here, we determined changes in transcriptome, total carbohydrate, total fatty acid methyl ester, and fatty acid composition of Tetraselmis sp. KCTC12432BP, a strain with a broad temperature tolerance range, to elucidate the tolerance mechanisms in response to large temperature variations. Owing to unavailability of genome sequence information, de novo transcriptome assembly coupled with BLAST analysis was performed using strand specific RNA-seq data. This resulted in 26,245 protein-coding transcripts, of which 83.7% could be annotated to putative functions. We identified more than 681 genes differentially expressed, suggesting an organelle-specific response to temperature variation. Among these, the genes related to the photosynthetic electron transfer chain, which are localized in the plastid thylakoid membrane, were upregulated at low temperature. However, the transcripts related to the electron transport chain and biosynthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine localized in mitochondria were upregulated at high temperature. These results show that the low energy uptake by repressed photosynthesis under low and high temperature conditions is compensated by different mechanisms, including photosystem I and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, respectively. This study illustrates that microalgae tolerate different temperature conditions through organelle specific mechanisms. PMID:27883062

  5. Strainer: software for analysis of population variation in community genomic datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyson Gene W

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomic analyses of microbial communities that are comprehensive enough to provide multiple samples of most loci in the genomes of the dominant organism types will also reveal patterns of genetic variation within natural populations. New bioinformatic tools will enable visualization and comprehensive analysis of this sequence variation and inference of recent evolutionary and ecological processes. Results We have developed a software package for analysis and visualization of genetic variation in populations and reconstruction of strain variants from otherwise co-assembled sequences. Sequencing reads can be clustered by matching patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms to generate predicted gene and protein variant sequences, identify conserved intergenic regulatory sequences, and determine the quantity and distribution of recombination events. Conclusion The Strainer software, a first generation metagenomic bioinformatics tool, facilitates comprehension and analysis of heterogeneity intrinsic in natural communities. The program reveals the degree of clustering among closely related sequence variants and provides a rapid means to generate gene and protein sequences for functional, ecological, and evolutionary analyses.

  6. Nuclear genomic control of naturally occurring variation in mitochondrial function in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Bu, Su; Harbison, Susan T; Slaughter, Juanita C; Mackay, Trudy F C; Moellering, Douglas R; De Luca, Maria

    2012-11-22

    Mitochondria are organelles found in nearly all eukaryotic cells that play a crucial role in cellular survival and function. Mitochondrial function is under the control of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. While the latter has been the focus of most genetic research, we remain largely ignorant about the nuclear-encoded genomic control of inter-individual variability in mitochondrial function. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster as our model organism to address this question. We quantified mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration rates and P:O ratio in mitochondria isolated from the thoraces of 40 sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel. We found significant within-population genetic variability for all mitochondrial traits. Hence, we performed genome-wide association mapping and identified 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in mitochondrial respiration and efficiency (P ≤1 × 10-5). Gene-centered regression models showed that 2-3 SNPs can explain 31, 13, and 18% of the phenotypic variation in state 3, state 4, and P:O ratio, respectively. Most of the genes tagged by the SNPs are involved in organ development, second messenger-mediated signaling pathways, and cytoskeleton remodeling. One of these genes, sallimus (sls), encodes a component of the muscle sarcomere. We confirmed the direct effect of sls on mitochondrial respiration using two viable mutants and their coisogenic wild-type strain. Furthermore, correlation network analysis revealed that sls functions as a transcriptional hub in a co-regulated module associated with mitochondrial respiration and is connected to CG7834, which is predicted to encode a protein with mitochondrial electron transfer flavoprotein activity. This latter finding was also verified in the sls mutants. Our results provide novel insights into the genetic factors regulating natural variation in mitochondrial function in D. melanogaster. The integrative genomic

  7. Reflections on Mental Retardation and Eugenics, Old and New: Mensa and the Human Genome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. David

    1994-01-01

    This article addresses the moral and ethical issues of mental retardation and a continuing legacy of belief in eugenics. It discusses the involuntary sterilization of Carrie Buck in 1927, support for legalized killing of subnormal infants by 47% of respondents to a Mensa survey, and implications of the Human Genome Project for the field of mental…

  8. Democratizing Human Genome Project Information: A Model Program for Education, Information and Debate in Public Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Miriam

    The "Mapping the Human Genome" project demonstrated that librarians can help whomever they serve in accessing information resources in the areas of biological and health information, whether it is the scientists who are developing the information or a member of the public who is using the information. Public libraries can guide library…

  9. Reflections on Mental Retardation and Eugenics, Old and New: Mensa and the Human Genome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. David

    1994-01-01

    This article addresses the moral and ethical issues of mental retardation and a continuing legacy of belief in eugenics. It discusses the involuntary sterilization of Carrie Buck in 1927, support for legalized killing of subnormal infants by 47% of respondents to a Mensa survey, and implications of the Human Genome Project for the field of mental…

  10. The Human Genome Project and Eugenics: Identifying the Impact on Individuals with Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuna, Jason

    2001-01-01

    This article explores the impact of the mapping work of the Human Genome Project on individuals with mental retardation and the negative effects of genetic testing. The potential to identify disabilities and the concept of eugenics are discussed, along with ethical issues surrounding potential genetic therapies. (Contains references.) (CR)

  11. Utilizing linkage disequilibrium information from Indian Genome Variation Database for mapping mutations: SCA12 case study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samira Bahl; Ikhlak Ahmed; The Indian Genome Variation Consortium; Mitali Mukerji

    2009-04-01

    Stratification in heterogeneous populations poses an enormous challenge in linkage disequilibrium (LD) based identification of causal loci using surrogate markers. In this study, we demonstrate the enormous potential of endogamous Indian populations for mapping mutations in candidate genes using minimal SNPs, mainly due to larger regions of LD. We show this by a case study of the PPP2R2B gene (∼400 kb) that harbours a CAG repeat, expansion of which has been implicated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 12 (SCA12). Using LD information derived from Indian Genome Variation database (IGVdb) on populations which share similar ethnic and linguistic backgrounds as the SCA12 study population, we could map the causal loci using a minimal set of three SNPs, without the generation of additional basal data from the ethnically matched population. We could also demonstrate transferability of tagSNPs from a related HapMap population for mapping the mutation.

  12. Principal component analysis reveals the 1000 Genomes Project does not sufficiently cover the human genetic diversity in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng eLu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The 1000 Genomes Project (1KG aims to provide a comprehensive resource on human genetic variations. With an effort of sequencing 2,500 individuals, 1KG is expected to cover the majority of the human genetic diversities worldwide. In this study, using analysis of population structure based on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs data, we examined and evaluated the coverage of genetic diversity of 1KG samples with the available genome-wide SNP data of 3,831 individuals representing 140 population samples worldwide. We developed a method to quantitatively measure and evaluate the genetic diversity revealed by population structure analysis. Our results showed that the 1KG does not have sufficient coverage of the human genetic diversity in Asia, especially in Southeast Asia. We suggested a good coverage of Southeast Asian populations be considered in 1KG or a regional effort should be initialized to provide a more comprehensive characterization of the human genetic diversity in Asia, which is important for both evolutionary and medical studies in the future.

  13. Mutations in MAPT gene cause chromosome instability and introduce copy number variations widely in the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giacomina; Conconi, Donatella; Panzeri, Elena; Redaelli, Serena; Piccoli, Elena; Paoletta, Laura; Dalprà, Leda; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the main function of promoting polymerization and stabilization of microtubules, other roles are being attributed to tau, now considered a multifunctional protein. In particular, previous studies suggest that tau is involved in chromosome stability and genome protection. We performed cytogenetic analysis, including molecular karyotyping, on lymphocytes and fibroblasts from patients affected by frontotemporal lobar degeneration carrying different mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene, to investigate the effects of these mutations on genome stability. Furthermore, we analyzed the response of mutated lymphoblastoid cell lines to genotoxic agents to evaluate the participation of tau to DNA repair systems. We found a significantly higher level of chromosome aberrations in mutated than in control cells. Mutated lymphocytes showed higher percentages of stable lesions, clonal and total aneuploidy (medians: 2 versus 0, p $\\ll$ 0.01; 1.5 versus 0, p $\\ll$ 0.01; 16.5 versus 0, p $\\ll$ 0.01, respectively). Fibroblasts of patients showed higher percentages of stable lesions, structural aberrations and total aneuploidy (medians: 0 versus 0, p = 0.03; 5.8 versus 0, p = 0.02; 26.5 versus 12.6, p $\\ll$ 0.01, respectively). In addition, the in depth analysis of DNA copy number variations showed a higher tendency to non-allelic homologous recombination in mutated cells. Finally, while our analysis did not support an involvement of tau in DNA repair systems, it revealed its role in stabilization of chromatin. In summary, our findings indicate a role of tau in genome and chromosome stability that can be ascribed to its function as a microtubule-associated protein as well as a protein protecting chromatin integrity through interaction with DNA.

  14. DESCARTES' RULE OF SIGNS AND THE IDENTIFIABILITY OF POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC MODELS FROM GENOMIC VARIATION DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Anand; Song, Yun S

    2014-01-01

    The sample frequency spectrum (SFS) is a widely-used summary statistic of genomic variation in a sample of homologous DNA sequences. It provides a highly efficient dimensional reduction of large-scale population genomic data and its mathematical dependence on the underlying population demography is well understood, thus enabling the development of efficient inference algorithms. However, it has been recently shown that very different population demographies can actually generate the same SFS for arbitrarily large sample sizes. Although in principle this nonidentifiability issue poses a thorny challenge to statistical inference, the population size functions involved in the counterexamples are arguably not so biologically realistic. Here, we revisit this problem and examine the identifiability of demographic models under the restriction that the population sizes are piecewise-defined where each piece belongs to some family of biologically-motivated functions. Under this assumption, we prove that the expected SFS of a sample uniquely determines the underlying demographic model, provided that the sample is sufficiently large. We obtain a general bound on the sample size sufficient for identifiability; the bound depends on the number of pieces in the demographic model and also on the type of population size function in each piece. In the cases of piecewise-constant, piecewise-exponential and piecewise-generalized-exponential models, which are often assumed in population genomic inferences, we provide explicit formulas for the bounds as simple functions of the number of pieces. Lastly, we obtain analogous results for the "folded" SFS, which is often used when there is ambiguity as to which allelic type is ancestral. Our results are proved using a generalization of Descartes' rule of signs for polynomials to the Laplace transform of piecewise continuous functions.

  15. Variation in the OC locus of Acinetobacter baumannii genomes predicts extensive structural diversity in the lipooligosaccharide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna J Kenyon

    Full Text Available Lipooligosaccharide (LOS is a complex surface structure that is linked to many pathogenic properties of Acinetobacter baumannii. In A. baumannii, the genes responsible for the synthesis of the outer core (OC component of the LOS are located between ilvE and aspS. The content of the OC locus is usually variable within a species, and examination of 6 complete and 227 draft A. baumannii genome sequences available in GenBank non-redundant and Whole Genome Shotgun databases revealed nine distinct new types, OCL4-OCL12, in addition to the three known ones. The twelve gene clusters fell into two distinct groups, designated Group A and Group B, based on similarities in the genes present. OCL6 (Group B was unique in that it included genes for the synthesis of L-Rhamnosep. Genetic exchange of the different configurations between strains has occurred as some OC forms were found in several different sequence types (STs. OCL1 (Group A was the most widely distributed being present in 18 STs, and OCL6 was found in 16 STs. Variation within clones was also observed, with more than one OC locus type found in the two globally disseminated clones, GC1 and GC2, that include the majority of multiply antibiotic resistant isolates. OCL1 was the most abundant gene cluster in both GC1 and GC2 genomes but GC1 isolates also carried OCL2, OCL3 or OCL5, and OCL3 was also present in GC2. As replacement of the OC locus in the major global clones indicates the presence of sub-lineages, a PCR typing scheme was developed to rapidly distinguish Group A and Group B types, and to distinguish the specific forms found in GC1 and GC2 isolates.

  16. Advances in biotechnology and linking outputs to variation in complex traits: Plant and Animal Genome meeting January 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appels, R; Barrero, R; Bellgard, M

    2012-03-01

    The Plant and Animal Genome (PAG, held annually) meeting in January 2012 provided insights into the advances in plant, animal, and microbe genome studies particularly as they impact on our understanding of complex biological systems. The diverse areas of biology covered included the advances in technologies, variation in complex traits, genome change in evolution, and targeting phenotypic changes, across the broad spectrum of life forms. This overview aims to summarize the major advances in research areas presented in the plenary lectures and does not attempt to summarize the diverse research activities covered throughout the PAG in workshops, posters, presentations, and displays by suppliers of cutting-edge technologies.

  17. Plasticity of the Leishmania genome leading to gene copy number variations and drug resistance [version 1; referees: 5 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claude N. Laffitte

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania has a plastic genome, and drug pressure can select for gene copy number variation (CNV. CNVs can apply either to whole chromosomes, leading to aneuploidy, or to specific genomic regions. For the latter, the amplification of chromosomal regions occurs at the level of homologous direct or inverted repeated sequences leading to extrachromosomal circular or linear amplified DNAs. This ability of Leishmania to respond to drug pressure by CNVs has led to the development of genomic screens such as Cos-Seq, which has the potential of expediting the discovery of drug targets for novel promising drug candidates.

  18. Genome-wide copy number variation analysis in adult attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Quiroga, Josep-Antoni; Sánchez-Mora, Cristina; Casas, Miguel; Garcia-Martínez, Iris; Bosch, Rosa; Nogueira, Mariana; Corrales, Montse; Palomar, Gloria; Vidal, Raquel; Coll-Tané, Mireia; Bayés, Mònica; Cormand, Bru; Ribasés, Marta

    2014-02-01

    Attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common psychiatric disorder with a worldwide prevalence of 5-6% in children and 4.4% in adults. Recently, copy number variations (CNVs) have been implicated in different neurodevelopmental disorders such as ADHD. Based on these previous reports that focused on pediatric cohorts, we hypothesize that structural variants may also contribute to adult ADHD and that such genomic variation may be enriched for CNVs previously identified in children with ADHD. To address this issue, we performed for the first time a whole-genome CNV study on 400 adults with ADHD and 526 screened controls. In agreement with recent reports in children with ADHD or in other psychiatric disorders, we identified a significant excess of insertions in ADHD patients compared to controls. The overall rate of CNVs >100 kb was 1.33 times higher in ADHD subjects than in controls (p = 2.4e-03), an observation mainly driven by a higher proportion of small events (from 100 kb to 500 kb; 1.35-fold; p = 1.3e-03). These differences remained significant when we considered CNVs that overlap genes or when structural variants spanning candidate genes for psychiatric disorders were evaluated, with duplications showing the greatest difference (1.41-fold, p = 0.024 and 2.85-fold, p = 8.5e-03, respectively). However, no significant enrichment was detected in our ADHD cohort for childhood ADHD-associated CNVs, CNVs previously identified in at least one ADHD patient or CNVs previously implicated in autism or schizophrenia. In conclusion, our study provides tentative evidence for a higher rate of CNVs in adults with ADHD compared to controls and contributes to the growing list of structural variants potentially involved in the etiology of the disease.

  19. A refined model of the genomic basis for phenotypic variation in vertebrate hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ângela M; Zepeda-Mendoza, M Lisandra; Bertelsen, Mads F; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Jarvis, Erich D; Gilbert, M Thomas P; da Fonseca, Rute R

    2015-06-30

    Hemostasis is a defense mechanism that enhances an organism's survival by minimizing blood loss upon vascular injury. In vertebrates, hemostasis has been evolving with the cardio-vascular and hemodynamic systems over the last 450 million years. Birds and mammals have very similar vascular and hemodynamic systems, thus the mechanism that blocks ruptures in the vasculature is expected to be the same. However, the speed of the process varies across vertebrates, and is particularly slow for birds. Understanding the differences in the hemostasis pathway between birds and mammals, and placing them in perspective to other vertebrates may provide clues to the genetic contribution to variation in blood clotting phenotype in vertebrates. We compiled genomic data corresponding to key elements involved in hemostasis across vertebrates to investigate its genetic basis and understand how it affects fitness. We found that: i) fewer genes are involved in hemostasis in birds compared to mammals; and ii) the largest differences concern platelet membrane receptors and components from the kallikrein-kinin system. We propose that lack of the cytoplasmic domain of the GPIb receptor subunit alpha could be a strong contributor to the prolonged bleeding phenotype in birds. Combined analysis of laboratory assessments of avian hemostasis with the first avian phylogeny based on genomic-scale data revealed that differences in hemostasis within birds are not explained by phylogenetic relationships, but more so by genetic variation underlying components of the hemostatic process, suggestive of natural selection. This work adds to our understanding of the evolution of hemostasis in vertebrates. The overlap with the inflammation, complement and renin-angiotensin (blood pressure regulation) pathways is a potential driver of rapid molecular evolution in the hemostasis network. Comparisons between avian species and mammals allowed us to hypothesize that the observed mammalian innovations might have

  20. Genomic and genie sequence variation in synthetic hexaploid wheat(AABBDD)as compared to their parental species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihong Nie; Zongfu Han; Lahu Lu; Yingyin Yao; Qixin Sun; Zhongfu Ni

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the genomic changes during the evolution of hexaploid wheat,two sets of synthetic hexaploid wheat from hybridization between maternal tetraploid wheat (AABB) and paternal diploid goat grass(DD)were used for DNA-AFLP and single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis to determine the genomic and genie variation in the synthetic hexaploid wheat.Results indicated that more DNA sequences from paternal diploid species wen eliminated in the synthetic hexaploid wheat than from maternal tetraploid wheat,suggesting that genome from parental species of lower ploidity tends to be eliminated preferentially.However,sequence variation detected by SSCP procedure was much lower than those detected by DNA-AFLP.which indicated that much less variation in the genie regions occurred in the synthetic hexaploid wheat.and sequence variations detected by DNA-AFLP could be derived mostly from non-coding regions and repetitive sequences.Our results also indicated that sequence variation in 4 genes can be detected in hybrid F1.which suggested that this type of sequence variation could be resulted from distant hybridization.It was interesting to note that 3 out of the 4 genes were mapped and clustered on the long alTll of chromosome 2D,which indicated that variation in genic sequences in synthetic hexaploid wheat might not be a randomized process.

  1. A genome-wide association study of copy number variations with umbilical hernia in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yi; Su, Ying; Ai, Huashui; Zhang, Zhiyan; Yang, Bin; Ruan, Guorong; Xiao, Shijun; Liao, Xinjun; Ren, Jun; Huang, Lusheng; Ding, Nengshui

    2016-06-01

    Umbilical hernia (UH) is one of the most common congenital defects in pigs, leading to considerable economic loss and serious animal welfare problems. To test whether copy number variations (CNVs) contribute to pig UH, we performed a case-control genome-wide CNV association study on 905 pigs from the Duroc, Landrace and Yorkshire breeds using the Porcine SNP60 BeadChip and penncnv algorithm. We first constructed a genomic map comprising 6193 CNVs that pertain to 737 CNV regions. Then, we identified eight CNVs significantly associated with the risk for UH in the three pig breeds. Six of seven significantly associated CNVs were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Notably, a rare CNV (CNV14:13030843-13059455) encompassing the NUGGC gene was strongly associated with UH (permutation-corrected P = 0.0015) in Duroc pigs. This CNV occurred exclusively in seven Duroc UH-affected individuals. SNPs surrounding the CNV did not show association signals, indicating that rare CNVs may play an important role in complex pig diseases such as UH. The NUGGC gene has been implicated in human omphalocele and inguinal hernia. Our finding supports that CNVs, including the NUGGC CNV, contribute to the pathogenesis of pig UH.

  2. Structural variation discovery in the cancer genome using next generation sequencing: Computational solutions and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Biao; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Morrison, Carl D.; Odunsi, Adekunle O.; Qin, Maochun; Wei, Lei; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.; Liu, Song; Wang, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Somatic Structural Variations (SVs) are a complex collection of chromosomal mutations that could directly contribute to carcinogenesis. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology has emerged as the primary means of interrogating the SVs of the cancer genome in recent investigations. Sophisticated computational methods are required to accurately identify the SV events and delineate their breakpoints from the massive amounts of reads generated by a NGS experiment. In this review, we provide an overview of current analytic tools used for SV detection in NGS-based cancer studies. We summarize the features of common SV groups and the primary types of NGS signatures that can be used in SV detection methods. We discuss the principles and key similarities and differences of existing computational programs and comment on unresolved issues related to this research field. The aim of this article is to provide a practical guide of relevant concepts, computational methods, software tools and important factors for analyzing and interpreting NGS data for the detection of SVs in the cancer genome. PMID:25849937

  3. Genome-wide copy number variation (CNV) in patients with autoimmune Addison's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Addison's disease (AD) is caused by an autoimmune destruction of the adrenal cortex. The pathogenesis is multi-factorial, involving genetic components and hitherto unknown environmental factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate if gene dosage in the form of copy number variation (CNV) could add to the repertoire of genetic susceptibility to autoimmune AD. Methods A genome-wide study using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 was conducted in 26 patients with AD. CNVs in selected genes were further investigated in a larger material of patients with autoimmune AD (n = 352) and healthy controls (n = 353) by duplex Taqman real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. Results We found that low copy number of UGT2B28 was significantly more frequent in AD patients compared to controls; conversely high copy number of ADAM3A was associated with AD. Conclusions We have identified two novel CNV associations to ADAM3A and UGT2B28 in AD. The mechanism by which this susceptibility is conferred is at present unclear, but may involve steroid inactivation (UGT2B28) and T cell maturation (ADAM3A). Characterization of these proteins may unravel novel information on the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. PMID:21851588

  4. Genome-wide copy number variation (CNV in patients with autoimmune Addison's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brønstad Ingeborg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Addison's disease (AD is caused by an autoimmune destruction of the adrenal cortex. The pathogenesis is multi-factorial, involving genetic components and hitherto unknown environmental factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate if gene dosage in the form of copy number variation (CNV could add to the repertoire of genetic susceptibility to autoimmune AD. Methods A genome-wide study using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 was conducted in 26 patients with AD. CNVs in selected genes were further investigated in a larger material of patients with autoimmune AD (n = 352 and healthy controls (n = 353 by duplex Taqman real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. Results We found that low copy number of UGT2B28 was significantly more frequent in AD patients compared to controls; conversely high copy number of ADAM3A was associated with AD. Conclusions We have identified two novel CNV associations to ADAM3A and UGT2B28 in AD. The mechanism by which this susceptibility is conferred is at present unclear, but may involve steroid inactivation (UGT2B28 and T cell maturation (ADAM3A. Characterization of these proteins may unravel novel information on the pathogenesis of autoimmunity.

  5. Genomic Structure and Variation of Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-Derived 2-Like 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Youn Cho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-density mapping of mammalian genomes has enabled a wide range of genetic investigations including the mapping of polygenic traits, determination of quantitative trait loci, and phylogenetic comparison. Genome sequencing analysis of inbred mouse strains has identified high-density single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for investigation of complex traits, which has become a useful tool for biomedical research of human disease to alleviate ethical and practical problems of experimentation in humans. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NRF2 encodes a key host defense transcription factor. This review describes genetic characteristics of human NRF2 and its homologs in other vertebrate species. NRF2 is evolutionally conserved and shares sequence homology among species. Compilation of publically available SNPs and other genetic mutations shows that human NRF2 is highly polymorphic with a mutagenic frequency of 1 per every 72 bp. Functional at-risk alleles and haplotypes have been demonstrated in various human disorders. In addition, other pathogenic alterations including somatic mutations and misregulated epigenetic processes in NRF2 have led to oncogenic cell survival. Comprehensive information from the current review addresses association of NRF2 variation and disease phenotypes and supports the new insights into therapeutic strategies.

  6. Distinct Contributions of Replication and Transcription to Mutation Rate Variation of Human Genomes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2012-03-23

    Here, we evaluate the contribution of two major biological processes—DNA replication and transcription—to mutation rate variation in human genomes. Based on analysis of the public human tissue transcriptomics data, high-resolution replicating map of Hela cells and dbSNP data, we present significant correlations between expression breadth, replication time in local regions and SNP density. SNP density of tissue-specific (TS) genes is significantly higher than that of housekeeping (HK) genes. TS genes tend to locate in late-replicating genomic regions and genes in such regions have a higher SNP density compared to those in early-replication regions. In addition, SNP density is found to be positively correlated with expression level among HK genes. We conclude that the process of DNA replication generates stronger mutational pressure than transcription-associated biological processes do, resulting in an increase of mutation rate in TS genes while having weaker effects on HK genes. In contrast, transcription-associated processes are mainly responsible for the accumulation of mutations in highly-expressed HK genes.

  7. The New Genomics: What Molecular Databases Can Tell Us About Human Population Variation and Endocrine Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotwein, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Major recent advances in genetics and genomics present unique opportunities for enhancing our understanding of human physiology and disease predisposition. Here I demonstrate how analysis of genomic information can provide new insights into endocrine systems, using the human growth hormone (GH) signaling pathway as an illustrative example. GH is essential for normal postnatal growth in children, and plays important roles in other biological processes throughout life. GH actions are mediated by the GH receptor, primarily via the JAK2 protein tyrosine kinase and the STAT5B transcription factor, and inactivating mutations in this pathway all lead to impaired somatic growth. Variation in GH signaling genes has been evaluated using DNA sequence data from the Exome Aggregation Consortium, a compendium of information from >60,000 individuals. Results reveal many potential missense and other alterations in the coding regions of GH1, GHR, JAK2, and STAT5B, with most changes being uncommon. The total number of different alleles per gene varied by ~threefold, from 101 for GH1 to 338 for JAK2. Several known disease-linked mutations in GH1, GHR, and JAK2 were present but infrequent in the population; however, three amino acid changes in GHR were sufficiently prevalent (~4% to 44% of chromosomes) to suggest that they are not disease causing. Collectively, these data provide new opportunities to understand how genetically driven variability in GH signaling and action may modify human physiology and disease. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  8. Concepts, Operations, and Feasibility of a Projection-Based Variation Control System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanciulescu, Stefan; Berger, Thorsten; Walkingshaw, Eric

    2016-01-01

    on a subset of all variants could ease the engineering of highly configurable software. We investigate the potential of one kind of such tools: projection-based variation control systems. For such systems we aim to understand: (i) what end-user operations they need to support, and (ii) whether they can...... realize the actual evolution of real-world, highly configurable software. We conduct an experiment that investigates variability-related evolution patterns and that evaluates the feasibility of a projection-based variation control system by replaying parts of the history of a highly configurable real......-world 3D printer firmware project. Among others, we show that the prototype variation control system does indeed support the evolution of a highly configurable system and that in general, it does not degrade the code....

  9. Convergence rates in constrained Tikhonov regularization: equivalence of projected source conditions and variational inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Jens; Hofmann, Bernd

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we enlighten the role of variational inequalities for obtaining convergence rates in Tikhonov regularization of nonlinear ill-posed problems with convex penalty functionals under convexity constraints in Banach spaces. Variational inequalities are able to cover solution smoothness and the structure of nonlinearity in a uniform manner, not only for unconstrained but, as we indicate, also for constrained Tikhonov regularization. In this context, we extend the concept of projected source conditions already known in Hilbert spaces to Banach spaces, and we show in the main theorem that such projected source conditions are to some extent equivalent to certain variational inequalities. The derived variational inequalities immediately yield convergence rates measured by Bregman distances.

  10. Evolutionary and Taxonomic Implications of Variation in Nuclear Genome Size: Lesson from the Grass Genus Anthoxanthum (Poaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumová, Zuzana; Krejčíková, Jana; Mandáková, Terezie; Suda, Jan; Trávníček, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The genus Anthoxanthum (sweet vernal grass, Poaceae) represents a taxonomically intricate polyploid complex with large phenotypic variation and its evolutionary relationships still poorly resolved. In order to get insight into the geographic distribution of ploidy levels and assess the taxonomic value of genome size data, we determined C- and Cx-values in 628 plants representing all currently recognized European species collected from 197 populations in 29 European countries. The flow cytometric estimates were supplemented by conventional chromosome counts. In addition to diploids, we found two low (rare 3x and common 4x) and one high (~16x-18x) polyploid levels. Mean holoploid genome sizes ranged from 5.52 pg in diploid A. alpinum to 44.75 pg in highly polyploid A. amarum, while the size of monoploid genomes ranged from 2.75 pg in tetraploid A. alpinum to 9.19 pg in diploid A. gracile. In contrast to Central and Northern Europe, which harboured only limited cytological variation, a much more complex pattern of genome sizes was revealed in the Mediterranean, particularly in Corsica. Eight taxonomic groups that partly corresponded to traditionally recognized species were delimited based on genome size values and phenotypic variation. Whereas our data supported the merger of A. aristatum and A. ovatum, eastern Mediterranean populations traditionally referred to as diploid A. odoratum were shown to be cytologically distinct, and may represent a new taxon. Autopolyploid origin was suggested for 4x A. alpinum. In contrast, 4x A. odoratum seems to be an allopolyploid, based on the amounts of nuclear DNA. Intraspecific variation in genome size was observed in all recognized species, the most striking example being the A. aristatum/ovatum complex. Altogether, our study showed that genome size can be a useful taxonomic marker in Anthoxathum to not only guide taxonomic decisions but also help resolve evolutionary relationships in this challenging grass genus.

  11. The evolutionary imprint of domestication on genome variation and function of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, John G; Salichos, Leonidas; Slot, Jason C; Rinker, David C; McGary, Kriston L; King, Jonas G; Klich, Maren A; Tabb, David L; McDonald, W Hayes; Rokas, Antonis

    2012-08-01

    The domestication of animals, plants, and microbes fundamentally transformed the lifestyle and demography of the human species [1]. Although the genetic and functional underpinnings of animal and plant domestication are well understood, little is known about microbe domestication [2-6]. Here, we systematically examined genome-wide sequence and functional variation between the domesticated fungus Aspergillus oryzae, whose saccharification abilities humans have harnessed for thousands of years to produce sake, soy sauce, and miso from starch-rich grains, and its wild relative A. flavus, a potentially toxigenic plant and animal pathogen [7]. We discovered dramatic changes in the sequence variation and abundance profiles of genes and wholesale primary and secondary metabolic pathways between domesticated and wild relative isolates during growth on rice. Our data suggest that, through selection by humans, an atoxigenic lineage of A. flavus gradually evolved into a "cell factory" for enzymes and metabolites involved in the saccharification process. These results suggest that whereas animal and plant domestication was largely driven by Neolithic "genetic tinkering" of developmental pathways, microbe domestication was driven by extensive remodeling of metabolism.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation, copy number variation, and gene expression in monozygotic twins discordant for primary biliary cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo eSelmi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC is an uncommon autoimmune disease with a homogeneous clinical phenotype that reflects incomplete disease concordance in monozygotic (MZ twins. We have taken advantage of a unique collection consisting of genomic DNA and mRNA from peripheral blood cells of female MZ twins (n=3 sets and sisters of similar age (n=8 pairs discordant for disease. We performed a genome-wide study to investigate differences in (i DNA methylation (using a custom tiled 4-plex array containing tiled 50-mers 19,084 randomly chosen methylation sites, (ii copy number variation (CNV (with a chip including markers derived from the 1000 Genomes Project, all three HapMap phases, and recently published studies, and/or (iii gene expression (by whole-genome expression arrays. Based on the results obtained from these three approaches we utilized quantitative PCR to compare the expression of candidate genes. Importantly, our data support consistent differences in discordant twins and siblings for the (i methylation profiles of 60 gene regions, (ii CNV of 10 genes, and (iii the expression of 2 interferon-dependent genes. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that 17 of these genes are differentially expressed in discordant sibling pairs. In conclusion, we report that MZ twins and sisters discordant for PBC manifest particular epigenetic differences and highlight the value of the epigenetic study of twins.

  13. Getting the Word Out on the Human Genome Project: A Course for Physicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sara L. Tobin

    2004-09-29

    Our project, ''Getting the Word Out on the Human Genome Project: A Course for Physicians,'' presented educational goals to convey the power and promise of the Human Genome Program to a variety of professional, educational, and public audiences. Our initial goal was to provide practicing physicians with a comprehensive multimedia tool to update their skills in the genomic era. We therefore created the multimedia courseware, ''The New Genetics: Courseware for Physicians. Molecular Concepts, Applications, and Ramifications.'' However, as the project moved forward, several unanticipated audiences found the courseware to be useful for instruction and for self-education, so an additional edition of the courseware ''The New Genetics: Medicine and the Human Genome. Molecular Concepts, Applications, and Ramifications'' was published simultaneously with the physician version. At the time that both versions of the courseware were being completed, Stanford's Office of Technology Licensing opted not to commercialize the courseware and offered a license-back agreement if the authors founded a commercial business. The authors thus became closely involved in marketing and sales, and several thousand copies of the courseware have been sold. Surprisingly, the non-physician version has turned out to be more in demand, and this has led us in several new directions, most of which involve undergraduate education. These are discussed in detail in the Report.

  14. Copy number variation identification and analysis of the chicken genome using a 60K SNP BeadChip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Y S; Li, J; Zhang, R; Lin, X R; Xu, J G; Xie, L; Xu, Z Q; Wang, L; Gan, J K; Xie, X J; He, J; Zhang, X Q

    2016-08-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is an important source of genetic variation in organisms and a main factor that affects phenotypic variation. A comprehensive study of chicken CNV can provide valuable information on genetic diversity and facilitate future analyses of associations between CNV and economically important traits in chickens. In the present study, an F2 full-sib chicken population (554 individuals), established from a cross between Xinghua and White Recessive Rock chickens, was used to explore CNV in the chicken genome. Genotyping was performed using a chicken 60K SNP BeadChip. A total of 1,875 CNV were detected with the PennCNV algorithm, and the average number of CNV was 3.42 per individual. The CNV were distributed across 383 independent CNV regions (CNVR) and covered 41 megabases (3.97%) of the chicken genome. Seven CNVR in 108 individuals were validated by quantitative real-time PCR, and 81 of these individuals (75%) also were detected with the PennCNV algorithm. In total, 274 CNVR (71.54%) identified in the current study were previously reported. Of these, 147 (38.38%) were reported in at least 2 studies. Additionally, 109 of the CNVR (28.46%) discovered here are novel. A total of 709 genes within or overlapping with the CNVR was retrieved. Out of the 2,742 quantitative trait loci (QTL) collected in the chicken QTL database, 43 QTL had confidence intervals overlapping with the CNVR, and 32 CNVR encompassed one or more functional genes. The functional genes located in the CNVR are likely to be the QTG that are associated with underlying economic traits. This study considerably expands our insight into the structural variation in the genome of chickens and provides an important resource for genomic variation, especially for genomic structural variation related to economic traits in chickens.

  15. Amplified fragment length polymorphism: an adept technique for genome mapping, genetic differentiation, and intraspecific variation in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Awanish; Misra, Pragya; Dube, Anuradha

    2013-02-01

    With the advent of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), genetic markers are now accessible for all organisms, including parasites. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) is a PCR-based marker for the rapid screening of genetic diversity and intraspecific variation. It is a potent fingerprinting technique for genomic DNAs of any origin or complexity and rapidly generates a number of highly replicable markers that allow high-resolution genotyping. AFLPs are convenient and reliable in comparison to other markers like random amplified polymorphic DNA, restriction fragment length polymorphism, and simple sequence repeat in terms of time and cost efficiency, reproducibility, and resolution as it does not require template DNA sequencing. In addition, AFLP essentially probes the entire genome at random, without prior sequence knowledge. So, AFLP markers have emerged as an advance type of genetic marker with broad application in genomic mapping, population genetics, and DNA fingerprinting and are ideally suited as screening tool for molecular markers linked with biological and clinical traits. This review describes the AFLP procedure and its applications and overview in the fingerprinting of a genome, which has been currently used in parasite genome research. We outline the AFLP procedure adapted for Leishmania genome study and discuss the benefits of AFLPs for assessing genetic variation and genome mapping over other existing molecular techniques. We highlight the possible use of AFLPs as genetic markers with its broad application in parasitological research because it allows random screening of the entire genome for linkage with genetic and clinical properties of the parasite. In this review, we have taken a pragmatic approach on the study of AFLP for genome mapping and polymorphism in protozoan parasites and conclude that AFLP is a very useful tool.

  16. Structural and Expressional Variations of the Mitochondrial Genome Conferring the Wild Abortive Type of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Lan Liu; Hong Xu; Jing-Xin Guo; Yao-Guang Liu

    2007-01-01

    The so-called "wild abortive" (WA) type of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) derived from a wild rice species Oryza rufipogon has been extensively used for hybrid rice breeding. However, extensive analysis of the structure of the related mitochondrial genome has not been reported, and the CMS-associated gene(s) remain unknown. In this study, we exploited a mitochondrial genome-wide strategy to examine the structural and expressional variations in the mitochondrial genome conferring the CMS. The entire mitochondrial genomes of a CMS-WA line and two normal fertile rice lines were amplified by Long-polymerase chain reaction into tilling fragments of up to 15.2 kb. Restriction and DNA blotting analyses of these fragments revealed that structural variations occurred in several regions in the WA mitochondrial genome, as compared to those of the fertile lines. All of the amplified fragments covering the entire mitochondrial genome were used as RNA blot probes to examine the mitochondrial expression profile among the CMS-WA and fertile lines. As a result, only two mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between the CMS-WA and the fertile lines, which were detected by a probe containing the nadS and orf153 genes and the other having the ribosomal protein gene rp15, respectively. These mRNAs are proposed to be the candidates for further identification and functional studies of the CMS gene.

  17. TP53 Variations in Human Cancers: New Lessons from the IARC TP53 Database and Genomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaoun, Liacine; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Ardin, Maude; Hollstein, Monica; Byrnes, Graham; Zavadil, Jiri; Olivier, Magali

    2016-09-01

    TP53 gene mutations are one of the most frequent somatic events in cancer. The IARC TP53 Database (http://p53.iarc.fr) is a popular resource that compiles occurrence and phenotype data on TP53 germline and somatic variations linked to human cancer. The deluge of data coming from cancer genomic studies generates new data on TP53 variations and attracts a growing number of database users for the interpretation of TP53 variants. Here, we present the current contents and functionalities of the IARC TP53 Database and perform a systematic analysis of TP53 somatic mutation data extracted from this database and from genomic data repositories. This analysis showed that IARC has more TP53 somatic mutation data than genomic repositories (29,000 vs. 4,000). However, the more complete screening achieved by genomic studies highlighted some overlooked facts about TP53 mutations, such as the presence of a significant number of mutations occurring outside the DNA-binding domain in specific cancer types. We also provide an update on TP53 inherited variants including the ones that should be considered as neutral frequent variations. We thus provide an update of current knowledge on TP53 variations in human cancer as well as inform users on the efficient use of the IARC TP53 Database.

  18. Genomic Copy Number Variations of the Complement Component C4B Gene Are Associated With Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukink, M.B.; Schellevis, R.L.; Boon, C.J.F.; Fauser, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Jong, E.K.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (cCSC) has recently been associated to variants in the complement factor H gene. To further investigate the role of the complement system in cCSC, the genomic copy number variations in the complement component 4 gene (C4) were studied. METHODS: C4A

  19. Genomic Copy Number Variations of the Complement Component C4B Gene Are Associated With Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukink, M.B.; Schellevis, R.L.; Boon, C.J.F.; Fauser, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Jong, E.K.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (cCSC) has recently been associated to variants in the complement factor H gene. To further investigate the role of the complement system in cCSC, the genomic copy number variations in the complement component 4 gene (C4) were studied. METHODS: C4A a

  20. Structural variation in the chicken genome identified by paired-end next-generation DNA sequencing of reduced representation libraries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, H.H.D.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Dibbits, B.W.; Vereijken, A.; Okimoto, R.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Variation within individual genomes ranges from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to kilobase, and even megabase, sized structural variants (SVs), such as deletions, insertions, inversions, and more complex rearrangements. Although much is known about the extent of SVs in humans and

  1. Genome-Wide Mapping of Structural Variations Reveals a Copy Number Variant That Determines Reproductive Morphology in Cucumber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.; Mao, L.; Chen, Junshi; Bu, F.; Li, G.; Sun, J.; Li, S.; Sun, H.; Jiao, C.; Blakely, R.; Pan, J.; Cai, R.; Luo, R.; Peer, Van de Y.; Jacobsen, E.; Fei, Z.; Huang, S.

    2015-01-01

    Structural variations (SVs) represent a major source of genetic diversity. However, the functional impact and formation mechanisms of SVs in plant genomes remain largely unexplored. Here, we report a nucleotide-resolution SV map of cucumber (Cucumis sativas) that comprises 26,788 SVs based on deep r

  2. Integration of genomic approaches to uncover sources of variation in age at puberty and reproductive longevity in sows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic variants associated with traits such as age at puberty and litter size could provide insight into the underlying genetic sources of variation impacting sow reproductive longevity and productivity. Genome wide characterization and gene expression profiling were employed using gilts from the U...

  3. Genome-wide copy number variation study associates metabotropic glutamate receptor gene networks with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elia, J.; Glessner, J.T.; Wang, K.; Takahashi, N.; Shtir, C.J.; Hadley, D.; Sleiman, P.M.; Zhang, H.; Kim, C.E.; Robison, R.; Lyon, G.J.; Flory, J.H.; Bradfield, J.P.; Imielinski, M.; Hou, C.; Frackelton, E.C.; Chiavacci, R.M.; Sakurai, T.; Rabin, C.; Middleton, F.A.; Thomas, K.A.; Garris, M.; Mentch, F.; Freitag, C.M.; Steinhausen, H.C.; Todorov, A.A.; Reif, A.; Rothenberger, A.; Franke, B.; Mick, E.O.; Roeyers, H.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Lesch, K.P.; Banaschewski, T.; Ebstein, R.P.; Mulas, F.; Oades, R.D.; Sergeant, J.A.; Sonuga-Barke, E.J.S.; Renner, T.J.; Romanos, M.; Romanos, J.; Warnke, A.; Walitza, S.; Meyer, J.; Palmason, H.; Seitz, C.; Loo, S.K.; Smalley, S.L.; Biederman, J.; Kent, L.; Asherson, P.; Anney, R.J.; Gaynor, J.W.; Shaw, P.; Devoto, M.; White, P.S.; Grant, S.F.; Buxbaum, J.D.; Rapoport, J.L.; Williams, N.M.; Nelson, S.F.; Faraone, S.V.; Hakonarson, H.

    2011-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common, heritable neuropsychiatric disorder of unknown etiology. We performed a whole-genome copy number variation (CNV) study on 1,013 cases with ADHD and 4,105 healthy children of European ancestry using 550,000 SNPs. We evaluated statistically

  4. Analysis of the genome-wide variations among multiple strains of the plant pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker M Andrew

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative, xylem-limited phytopathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is responsible for causing economically important diseases in grapevine, citrus and many other plant species. Despite its economic impact, relatively little is known about the genomic variations among strains isolated from different hosts and their influence on the population genetics of this pathogen. With the availability of genome sequence information for four strains, it is now possible to perform genome-wide analyses to identify and categorize such DNA variations and to understand their influence on strain functional divergence. Results There are 1,579 genes and 194 non-coding homologous sequences present in the genomes of all four strains, representing a 76. 2% conservation of the sequenced genome. About 60% of the X. fastidiosa unique sequences exist as tandem gene clusters of 6 or more genes. Multiple alignments identified 12,754 SNPs and 14,449 INDELs in the 1528 common genes and 20,779 SNPs and 10,075 INDELs in the 194 non-coding sequences. The average SNP frequency was 1.08 × 10-2 per base pair of DNA and the average INDEL frequency was 2.06 × 10-2 per base pair of DNA. On an average, 60.33% of the SNPs were synonymous type while 39.67% were non-synonymous type. The mutation frequency, primarily in the form of external INDELs was the main type of sequence variation. The relative similarity between the strains was discussed according to the INDEL and SNP differences. The number of genes unique to each strain were 60 (9a5c, 54 (Dixon, 83 (Ann1 and 9 (Temecula-1. A sub-set of the strain specific genes showed significant differences in terms of their codon usage and GC composition from the native genes suggesting their xenologous origin. Tandem repeat analysis of the genomic sequences of the four strains identified associations of repeat sequences with hypothetical and phage related functions. Conclusion INDELs and strain specific genes

  5. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq, DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq, and histone modifications (ChIP-seq. We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg.

  6. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chieh-Chun; Xiao, Shu; Xie, Dan; Cao, Xiaoyi; Song, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Ting; He, Chuan; Zhong, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq), DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq), and histone modifications (ChIP-seq). We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs) for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq) and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg).

  7. Genomic variation in the vomeronasal receptor gene repertoires of inbred mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynn Elizabeth H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vomeronasal receptors (VRs, expressed in sensory neurons of the vomeronasal organ, are thought to bind pheromones and mediate innate behaviours. The mouse reference genome has over 360 functional VRs arranged in highly homologous clusters, but the vast majority are of unknown function. Differences in these receptors within and between closely related species of mice are likely to underpin a range of behavioural responses. To investigate these differences, we interrogated the VR gene repertoire from 17 inbred strains of mice using massively parallel sequencing. Results Approximately half of the 6222 VR genes that we investigated could be successfully resolved, and those that were unambiguously mapped resulted in an extremely accurate dataset. Collectively VRs have over twice the coding sequence variation of the genome average; but we identify striking non-random distribution of these variants within and between genes, clusters, clades and functional classes of VRs. We show that functional VR gene repertoires differ considerably between different Mus subspecies and species, suggesting these receptors may play a role in mediating behavioural adaptations. Finally, we provide evidence that widely-used, highly inbred laboratory-derived strains have a greatly reduced, but not entirely redundant capacity for differential pheromone-mediated behaviours. Conclusions Together our results suggest that the unusually variable VR repertoires of mice have a significant role in encoding differences in olfactory-mediated responses and behaviours. Our dataset has expanded over nine fold the known number of mouse VR alleles, and will enable mechanistic analyses into the genetics of innate behavioural differences in mice.

  8. The Variation Theorem Applied to H-2+: A Simple Quantum Chemistry Computer Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiette, Alan G.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a student project which requires limited knowledge of Fortran and only minimal computing resources. The results illustrate such important principles of quantum mechanics as the variation theorem and the virial theorem. Presents sample calculations and the subprogram for energy calculations. (GS)

  9. Patterns of Genetic Variation in Woody Plant Species in the Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria L. Sork; Anthony Koop; Marie Ann de la Fuente; Paul Foster; Jay. Raveill

    1997-01-01

    We quantified current patterns of genetic variation of three woody plant species—Carya tomentosa (Juglandaceae), Quercus alba (Fagaceae), and Sassafras albidum (Lauraceae)—distributed throughout the nine Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project (MOFEP) study sites and evaluated the data in light of the MOFEP...

  10. Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP): a comprehensive database for sweet orange genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Chen, Dijun; Lei, Yang; Chang, Ji-Wei; Hao, Bao-Hai; Xing, Feng; Li, Sen; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Chen, Ling-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most important and widely grown fruit crop with global production ranking firstly among all the fruit crops in the world. Sweet orange accounts for more than half of the Citrus production both in fresh fruit and processed juice. We have sequenced the draft genome of a double-haploid sweet orange (C. sinensis cv. Valencia), and constructed the Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP) to store and visualize the sequenced genomic and transcriptome data. CAP provides GBrowse-based organization of sweet orange genomic data, which integrates ab initio gene prediction, EST, RNA-seq and RNA-paired end tag (RNA-PET) evidence-based gene annotation. Furthermore, we provide a user-friendly web interface to show the predicted protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and metabolic pathways in sweet orange. CAP provides comprehensive information beneficial to the researchers of sweet orange and other woody plants, which is freely available at http://citrus.hzau.edu.cn/.

  11. 1-CMDb: A Curated Database of Genomic Variations of the One-Carbon Metabolism Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Manoj K; Gadekar, Veerendra P; Jain, Aditya; Paul, Bobby; Rai, Padmalatha S; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2017-01-01

    The one-carbon metabolism pathway is vital in maintaining tissue homeostasis by driving the critical reactions of folate and methionine cycles. A myriad of genetic and epigenetic events mark the rate of reactions in a tissue-specific manner. Integration of these to predict and provide personalized health management requires robust computational tools that can process multiomics data. The DNA sequences that may determine the chain of biological events and the endpoint reactions within one-carbon metabolism genes remain to be comprehensively recorded. Hence, we designed the one-carbon metabolism database (1-CMDb) as a platform to interrogate its association with a host of human disorders. DNA sequence and network information of a total of 48 genes were extracted from a literature survey and KEGG pathway that are involved in the one-carbon folate-mediated pathway. The information generated, collected, and compiled for all these genes from the UCSC genome browser included the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), CpGs, copy number variations (CNVs), and miRNAs, and a comprehensive database was created. Furthermore, a significant correlation analysis was performed for SNPs in the pathway genes. Detailed data of SNPs, CNVs, CpG islands, and miRNAs for 48 folate pathway genes were compiled. The SNPs in CNVs (9670), CpGs (984), and miRNAs (14) were also compiled for all pathway genes. The SIFT score, the prediction and PolyPhen score, as well as the prediction for each of the SNPs were tabulated and represented for folate pathway genes. Also included in the database for folate pathway genes were the links to 124 various phenotypes and disease associations as reported in the literature and from publicly available information. A comprehensive database was generated consisting of genomic elements within and among SNPs, CNVs, CpGs, and miRNAs of one-carbon metabolism pathways to facilitate (a) single source of information and (b) integration into large-genome scale network

  12. Comprehensive long-span paired-end-tag mapping reveals characteristic patterns of structural variations in epithelial cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmer, Axel M; Yao, Fei; Inaki, Koichiro; Lee, Wah Heng; Ariyaratne, Pramila N; Teo, Audrey S M; Woo, Xing Yi; Zhang, Zhenshui; Zhao, Hao; Ukil, Leena; Chen, Jieqi P; Zhu, Feng; So, Jimmy B Y; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Poh, Wan Ting; Zawack, Kelson F B; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Gao, Song; Li, Guoliang; Kumar, Vikrant; Lim, Hui Ping J; Sia, Yee Yen; Chan, Chee Seng; Leong, See Ting; Neo, Say Chuan; Choi, Poh Sum D; Thoreau, Hervé; Tan, Patrick B O; Shahab, Atif; Ruan, Xiaoan; Bergh, Jonas; Hall, Per; Cacheux-Rataboul, Valère; Wei, Chia-Lin; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Sung, Wing-Kin; Bourque, Guillaume; Liu, Edison T; Ruan, Yijun

    2011-05-01

    Somatic genome rearrangements are thought to play important roles in cancer development. We optimized a long-span paired-end-tag (PET) sequencing approach using 10-Kb genomic DNA inserts to study human genome structural variations (SVs). The use of a 10-Kb insert size allows the identification of breakpoints within repetitive or homology-containing regions of a few kilobases in size and results in a higher physical coverage compared with small insert libraries with the same sequencing effort. We have applied this approach to comprehensively characterize the SVs of 15 cancer and two noncancer genomes and used a filtering approach to strongly enrich for somatic SVs in the cancer genomes. Our analyses revealed that most inversions, deletions, and insertions are germ-line SVs, whereas tandem duplications, unpaired inversions, interchromosomal translocations, and complex rearrangements are over-represented among somatic rearrangements in cancer genomes. We demonstrate that the quantitative and connective nature of DNA-PET data is precise in delineating the genealogy of complex rearrangement events, we observe signatures that are compatible with breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, and we discover that large duplications are among the initial rearrangements that trigger genome instability for extensive amplification in epithelial cancers.

  13. The Human Genome Project and Mental Retardation: An Educational Program. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Sharon

    1999-05-03

    The Arc, a national organization on mental retardation, conducted an educational program for members, many of whom have a family member with a genetic condition causing mental retardation. The project informed members about the Human Genome scientific efforts, conducted training regarding ethical, legal and social implications and involved members in issue discussions. Short reports and fact sheets on genetic and ELSI topics were disseminated to 2,200 of the Arc's leaders across the country and to other interested individuals. Materials produced by the project can e found on the Arc's web site, TheArc.org.

  14. The projection of a test genome onto a reference population and applications to humans and archaic hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Melinda A; Harris, Kelley; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a method for comparing a test genome with numerous genomes from a reference population. Sites in the test genome are given a weight, w, that depends on the allele frequency, x, in the reference population. The projection of the test genome onto the reference population is the average weight for each x, [Formula: see text]. The weight is assigned in such a way that, if the test genome is a random sample from the reference population, then [Formula: see text]. Using analytic theory, numerical analysis, and simulations, we show how the projection depends on the time of population splitting, the history of admixture, and changes in past population size. The projection is sensitive to small amounts of past admixture, the direction of admixture, and admixture from a population not sampled (a ghost population). We compute the projections of several human and two archaic genomes onto three reference populations from the 1000 Genomes project-Europeans, Han Chinese, and Yoruba-and discuss the consistency of our analysis with previously published results for European and Yoruba demographic history. Including higher amounts of admixture between Europeans and Yoruba soon after their separation and low amounts of admixture more recently can resolve discrepancies between the projections and demographic inferences from some previous studies.

  15. Evaluative profiling of arsenic sensing and regulatory systems in the human microbiome project genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Udensi, Udensi K; Simmons, Shaneka S; Hollman, Antoinesha L; Cain, Antia E; Olofinsae, Samson A; Hassan, Oluwabukola A; Kashim, Zainab A; Enejoh, Ojochenemi A; Fasesan, Deborah E; Nashiru, Oyekanmi

    2014-01-01

    The influence of environmental chemicals including arsenic, a type 1 carcinogen, on the composition and function of the human-associated microbiota is of significance in human health and disease. We have developed a suite of bioinformatics and visual analytics methods to evaluate the availability (presence or absence) and abundance of functional annotations in a microbial genome for seven Pfam protein families: As(III)-responsive transcriptional repressor (ArsR), anion-transporting ATPase (ArsA), arsenical pump membrane protein (ArsB), arsenate reductase (ArsC), arsenical resistance operon transacting repressor (ArsD), water/glycerol transport protein (aquaporins), and universal stress protein (USP). These genes encode function for sensing and/or regulating arsenic content in the bacterial cell. The evaluative profiling strategy was applied to 3,274 genomes from which 62 genomes from 18 genera were identified to contain genes for the seven protein families. Our list included 12 genomes in the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) from the following genera: Citrobacter, Escherichia, Lactobacillus, Providencia, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus. Gene neighborhood analysis of the arsenic resistance operon in the genome of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482, a human gut symbiont, revealed the adjacent arrangement of genes for arsenite binding/transfer (ArsD) and cytochrome c biosynthesis (DsbD_2). Visual analytics facilitated evaluation of protein annotations in 367 genomes in the phylum Bacteroidetes identified multiple genomes in which genes for ArsD and DsbD_2 were adjacently arranged. Cytochrome c, produced by a posttranslational process, consists of heme-containing proteins important for cellular energy production and signaling. Further research is desired to elucidate arsenic resistance and arsenic-mediated cellular energy production in the Bacteroidetes.

  16. Copy Number Variation of UGT 2B Genes in Indian Families Using Whole Genome Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash M. Veerappa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 2B (UGT2B is a family of genes involved in metabolizing steroid hormones and several other xenobiotics. These UGT2B genes are highly polymorphic in nature and have distinct polymorphisms associated with specific regions around the globe. Copy number variations (CNVs status of UGT2B17 in Indian population is not known and their disease associations have been inconclusive. It was therefore of interest to investigate the CNV profile of UGT2B genes. Methods. We investigated the presence of CNVs in UGT2B genes in 31 members from eight Indian families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 chip. Results. Our data revealed >50% of the study members carried CNVs in UGT2B genes, of which 76% showed deletion polymorphism. CNVs were observed more in UGT2B17 (76.4% than in UGT2B15 (17.6%. Molecular network and pathway analysis found enrichment related to steroid metabolic process, carboxylesterase activity, and sequence specific DNA binding. Interpretation and Conclusion. We report the presence of UGT2B gene deletion and duplication polymorphisms in Indian families. Network analysis indicates the substitutive role of other possible genes in the UGT activity. The CNVs of UGT2B genes are very common in individuals indicating that the effect is neutral in causing any suspected diseases.

  17. A variational Bayes algorithm for fast and accurate multiple locus genome-wide association analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezey Jason G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The success achieved by genome-wide association (GWA studies in the identification of candidate loci for complex diseases has been accompanied by an inability to explain the bulk of heritability. Here, we describe the algorithm V-Bay, a variational Bayes algorithm for multiple locus GWA analysis, which is designed to identify weaker associations that may contribute to this missing heritability. Results V-Bay provides a novel solution to the computational scaling constraints of most multiple locus methods and can complete a simultaneous analysis of a million genetic markers in a few hours, when using a desktop. Using a range of simulated genetic and GWA experimental scenarios, we demonstrate that V-Bay is highly accurate, and reliably identifies associations that are too weak to be discovered by single-marker testing approaches. V-Bay can also outperform a multiple locus analysis method based on the lasso, which has similar scaling properties for large numbers of genetic markers. For demonstration purposes, we also use V-Bay to confirm associations with gene expression in cell lines derived from the Phase II individuals of HapMap. Conclusions V-Bay is a versatile, fast, and accurate multiple locus GWA analysis tool for the practitioner interested in identifying weaker associations without high false positive rates.

  18. Association of genome variations in the renin-angiotensin system with physical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sgourou Argyro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine the genotype distribution and allelic frequencies of ACE (I/D, AGTR1 (A +1166 C, BDKRB2 (+9/−9 and LEP (G–2548A genomic variations in 175 Greek athletes who excelled at a national and/or international level and 169 healthy Greek adults to identify whether some particular combinations of these loci might serve as predictive markers for superior physical condition. Results The D/D genotype of the ACE gene (p = 0.034 combined with the simultaneous existence of BDKRB2 (+9/−9 (p = 0.001 or LEP (G/A (p = 0.021 genotypes was the most prevalent among female athletes compared to female controls. A statistical trend was also observed in BDKRB2 (+9/−9 and LEP (G–2548A heterozygous genotypes among male and female Greek athletes, and in ACE (I/D only in male athletes. Finally, both male and female athletes showed the highest rates in the AGTR1 (A/A genotype. Conclusions Our results suggest that the co-existence of ACE (D/D, BDKRB2 (+9/−9 or LEP (G/A genotypes in female athletes might be correlated with a superior level of physical performance.

  19. Whole-genome copy number variation analysis in anophthalmia and microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilter, K F; Reis, L M; Schneider, A; Bardakjian, T M; Abdul-Rahman, O; Kozel, B A; Zimmerman, H H; Broeckel, U; Semina, E V

    2013-11-01

    Anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M) represent severe developmental ocular malformations. Currently, mutations in known genes explain less than 40% of A/M cases. We performed whole-genome copy number variation analysis in 60 patients affected with isolated or syndromic A/M. Pathogenic deletions of 3q26 (SOX2) were identified in four independent patients with syndromic microphthalmia. Other variants of interest included regions with a known role in human disease (likely pathogenic) as well as novel rearrangements (uncertain significance). A 2.2-Mb duplication of 3q29 in a patient with non-syndromic anophthalmia and an 877-kb duplication of 11p13 (PAX6) and a 1.4-Mb deletion of 17q11.2 (NF1) in two independent probands with syndromic microphthalmia and other ocular defects were identified; while ocular anomalies have been previously associated with 3q29 duplications, PAX6 duplications, and NF1 mutations in some cases, the ocular phenotypes observed here are more severe than previously reported. Three novel regions of possible interest included a 2q14.2 duplication which cosegregated with microphthalmia/microcornea and congenital cataracts in one family, and 2q21 and 15q26 duplications in two additional cases; each of these regions contains genes that are active during vertebrate ocular development. Overall, this study identified causative copy number mutations and regions with a possible role in ocular disease in 17% of A/M cases.

  20. Enhancing genome-wide copy number variation identification by high density array CGH using diverse resources of pig breeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiying Wang

    Full Text Available Copy number variations (CNVs are important forms of genomic variation, and have attracted extensive attentions in humans as well as domestic animals. In the study, using a custom-designed 2.1 M array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH, genome-wide CNVs were identified among 12 individuals from diverse pig breeds, including one Asian wild population, six Chinese indigenous breeds and two modern commercial breeds (Yorkshire and Landrace, with one individual of the other modern commercial breed, Duroc, as the reference. A total of 1,344 CNV regions (CNVRs were identified, covering 47.79 Mb (∼1.70% of the pig genome. The length of these CNVRs ranged from 3.37 Kb to 1,319.0 Kb with a mean of 35.56 Kb and a median of 11.11 Kb. Compared with similar studies reported, most of the CNVRs (74.18% were firstly identified in present study. In order to confirm these CNVRs, 21 CNVRs were randomly chosen to be validated by quantitative real time PCR (qPCR and a high rate (85.71% of confirmation was obtained. Functional annotation of CNVRs suggested that the identified CNVRs have important function, and may play an important role in phenotypic and production traits difference among various breeds. Our results are essential complementary to the CNV map in the pig genome, which will provide abundant genetic markers to investigate association studies between various phenotypes and CNVs in pigs.

  1. Patterns of genomic variation in the poplar rust fungus Melampsora larici-populina identify pathogenesis-related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine ePersoons

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Melampsora larici-populina is a fungal pathogen responsible for foliar rust disease on poplar trees, which causes damage to forest plantations worldwide, particularly in Northern Europe. The reference genome of the isolate 98AG31 was previously sequenced using a whole genome shotgun strategy, revealing a large genome of 101 megabases containing 16,399 predicted genes, which included secreted protein genes representing poplar rust candidate effectors. In the present study, the genomes of 15 isolates collected over the past 20 years throughout the French territory, representing distinct virulence profiles, were characterized by massively parallel sequencing to assess genetic variation in the poplar rust fungus. Comparison to the reference genome revealed striking structural variations. Analysis of coverage and sequencing depth identified large missing regions between isolates related to the mating type loci. More than 611,824 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP positions were uncovered overall, indicating a remarkable level of polymorphism. Based on the accumulation of non-synonymous substitutions in coding sequences and the relative frequencies of synonymous and non-synonymous polymorphisms (i.e. PN/PS, we identify candidate genes that may be involved in fungal pathogenesis. Correlation between non-synonymous SNPs in genes encoding secreted proteins and pathotypes of the studied isolates revealed candidate genes potentially related to virulences 1, 6 and 8 of the poplar rust fungus.

  2. Estimating variation within the genes and inferring the phylogeny of 186 sequenced diverse Escherichia coli genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Rundsten, Carsten Friis; Ussery, David

    2012-01-01

    more biologically relevant, especially considering that many of these genome sequences are draft quality. The E. coli pan-genome for this set of isolates contains 16,373 gene clusters. A core-gene tree, based on alignment and a pan-genome tree based on gene presence/absence, maps the relatedness...

  3. Population- and genome-specific patterns of linkage disequilibrium and SNP variation in spring and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Kim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are ideally suited for the construction of high-resolution genetic maps, studying population evolutionary history and performing genome-wide association mapping experiments. Here, we used a genome-wide set of 1536 SNPs to study linkage disequilibrium (LD and population structure in a panel of 478 spring and winter wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum from 17 populations across the United States and Mexico. Results Most of the wheat oligo pool assay (OPA SNPs that were polymorphic within the complete set of 478 cultivars were also polymorphic in all subpopulations. Higher levels of genetic differentiation were observed among wheat lines within populations than among populations. A total of nine genetically distinct clusters were identified, suggesting that some of the pre-defined populations shared significant proportion of genetic ancestry. Estimates of population structure (FST at individual loci showed a high level of heterogeneity across the genome. In addition, seven genomic regions with elevated FST were detected between the spring and winter wheat populations. Some of these regions overlapped with previously mapped flowering time QTL. Across all populations, the highest extent of significant LD was observed in the wheat D-genome, followed by lower LD in the A- and B-genomes. The differences in the extent of LD among populations and genomes were mostly driven by differences in long-range LD ( > 10 cM. Conclusions Genome- and population-specific patterns of genetic differentiation and LD were discovered in the populations of wheat cultivars from different geographic regions. Our study demonstrated that the estimates of population structure between spring and winter wheat lines can identify genomic regions harboring candidate genes involved in the regulation of growth habit. Variation in LD suggests that breeding and selection had a different impact on each wheat genome both within and

  4. Genome-wide characteristics of copy number variation in Polish Holstein and Polish Red cattle using SNP genotyping assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgul, A; Jasielczuk, I; Szmatoła, T; Pawlina, K; Ząbek, T; Żukowski, K; Bugno-Poniewierska, M

    2015-04-01

    Copy number variation (CNV), which results from deletions or amplifications of large fragments of genomic DNA, is widespread in mammalian genomes and apart from its potential pathogenic effect it is considered as a source of natural genetic diversity. In cattle populations, this kind of genetic variability remains still insufficiently elucidated and studies focusing on the detection of new structural genomic variants in different cattle populations may contribute to a better understanding of cattle breeds' diversity and genetic basis of production traits. In this study, by using BovineSNP50 assay and cnvPartition algorithm we identified CNVs in two different cattle breeds: Holstein (859 animals) and Polish Red (301). In Holstein cattle we found 648 CNVs which could be reduced to 91 non-redundant variable genomic regions (CNVRs) covering in total 168.6 Mb of the genomic sequence. In Polish Red cattle we detected 62 CNVs, localized in 37 variable regions encompassing 22.3 Mb of the sequence, corresponding to 0.89 % of the autosomal genome. Within the regions we identified 1,192 unique RefSeq genes which are engaged in a variety of biological processes. High concordance of the regions' distribution was found between the studied breeds, however copy number variants seemed to be more common in Holstein cattle. About 26 % of the regions described in this study could be classified as newly identified. The results of this study will broaden the knowledge of CNVs in genomes of cattle of different breeds and will provide foundations for further research aiming to identify a relationship between this type of genetic variation and phenotypic traits.

  5. Structural variation of the human genome: mechanisms, assays, and role in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Claudia M B; Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R

    2011-02-01

    Genomic disorders are defined as diseases caused by rearrangements of the genome incited by a genomic architecture that conveys instability. Y-chromosome related dysfunctions such as male infertility are frequently associated with gross DNA rearrangements resulting from its peculiar genomic architecture. The Y-chromosome has evolved into a highly specialized chromosome to perform male functions, mainly spermatogenesis. Direct and inverted repeats, some of them palindromes with highly identical nucleotide sequences that can form DNA cruciform structures, characterize the genomic structure of the Y-chromosome long arm. Some particular Y chromosome genomic deletions can cause spermatogenic failure likely because of removal of one or more transcriptional units with a potential role in spermatogenesis. We describe mechanisms underlying the formation of human genomic rearrangements on autosomes and review Y-chromosome deletions associated with male infertility.

  6. The human genome project: Information management, access, and regulation. Technical progress report, 1 April--31 August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, J.D.; Micikas, L.B.

    1993-09-10

    Efforts are described to prepare educational materials including computer based as well as conventional type teaching materials for training interested high school and elementary students in aspects of Human Genome Project.

  7. Tool for rapid annotation of microbial SNPs (TRAMS): a simple program for rapid annotation of genomic variation in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumerman, Richard A; Tucker, Nicholas P; Herron, Paul R; Hoskisson, Paul A; Sangal, Vartul

    2013-09-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has been widely used to study genomic variation in a variety of prokaryotes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) resulting from genomic comparisons need to be annotated for their functional impact on the coding sequences. We have developed a program, TRAMS, for functional annotation of genomic SNPs which is available to download as a single file executable for WINDOWS users with limited computational experience and as a Python script for Mac OS and Linux users. TRAMS needs a tab delimited text file containing SNP locations, reference nucleotide and SNPs in variant strains along with a reference genome sequence in GenBank or EMBL format. SNPs are annotated as synonymous, nonsynonymous or nonsense. Nonsynonymous SNPs in start and stop codons are separated as non-start and non-stop SNPs, respectively. SNPs in multiple overlapping features are annotated separately for each feature and multiple nucleotide polymorphisms within a codon are combined before annotation. We have also developed a workflow for Galaxy, a highly used tool for analysing NGS data, to map short reads to a reference genome and extract and annotate the SNPs. TRAMS is a simple program for rapid and accurate annotation of SNPs that will be very useful for microbiologists in analysing genomic diversity in microbial populations.

  8. Genome size variation in Corchorus olitorius (Malvaceae s.l.) and its correlation with elevation and phenotypic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benor, Solomon; Fuchs, Jörg; Blattner, Frank R

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we report genome size variations in Corchorus olitorius L. (Malvaceae s.l.), a crop species known for its morphological plasticity and broad geographical distribution, and Corchorus capsularis L., the second widely cultivated species in the genus. Flow cytometric analyses were conducted with several tissues and nuclei isolation buffers using 69 accessions of C. olitorius and 4 accessions of C. capsularis, representing different habitats and geographical origins. The mean 2C nuclear DNA content (± SD) of C. olitorius was estimated to be 0.918 ± 0.011 pg, with a minimum of 0.882 ± 0.004 pg, and a maximum of 0.942 ± 0.004 pg. All studied plant materials were found to be diploid with 2n = 14. The genome size is negatively correlated with days to flowering (r = -0.29, p genome size and growing elevation (r = 0.59, p genome sizes of C. olitorius and C. capsularis are much smaller, and therewith closer to that of rice. The relatively small genome sizes will be of general advantage for any efforts into genomics or sequencing approaches of these species.

  9. Ethical challenges and innovations in the dissemination of genomic data: the experience of the PERSPECTIVE project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lévesque E

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Emmanuelle Lévesque,1 Bartha Maria Knoppers,1 Jacques Simard,2 1Department of Human Genetics, Centre for Genomics and Policy, McGill University, Montréal, 2Genomics Centre, CHU de Québec Research Center, Department of Molecular Medicine, Laval University, Québec City, QC, Canada Abstract: The importance of making genomic data available for future research is now widely recognized among the scientific community and policymakers. In this era of shared responsibility for data dissemination, improved patient care through research depends on the development of powerful and secure data-sharing systems. As part of the concerted effort to share research resources, the project entitled Personalized Risk Stratification for Prevention and Early Detection of Breast Cancer (PERSPECTIVE makes effective data sharing through the development of a data-sharing framework, one of its goals. The secondary uses of data from PERSPECTIVE for future research promise to enhance our knowledge of breast cancer etiologies without duplicating data-gathering efforts. Despite its benefit for research, we recognize the ethical challenges of data sharing on the local, national, and international levels. The effective management of ethical approvals for projects spanning across jurisdictions, the return of results to research participants, and research incentives and recognition for data production, are but a few pressing issues that need to be properly addressed. We discuss how we managed these issues and suggest how ongoing innovations might help to facilitate data sharing in future genomic research projects. Keywords: data sharing, research ethics, cancer

  10. Evidence of genomic adaptation to climate in Eucalyptus microcarpa: implications for adaptive potential to projected climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Rebecca; Hoffmann, Ary A; Dillon, Shannon K; Prober, Suzanne M

    2017-09-01

    Understanding whether populations can adapt in situ or whether interventions are required is of key importance for biodiversity management under climate change. Landscape genomics is becoming an increasingly important and powerful tool for rapid assessments of climate adaptation, especially in long-lived species such as trees. We investigated climate adaptation in Eucalyptus microcarpa using the DArTseq genomic approach. A combination of FST outlier and environmental association analyses were performed using > 4,200 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 26 populations spanning climate gradients in south-eastern Australia. Eighty-one SNPs were identified as putatively adaptive, based on significance in FST outlier tests and significant associations with one or more climate variables related to temperature (70 / 81), aridity (37 / 81) or precipitation (35 / 81). Adaptive SNPs were located on all 11 chromosomes, with no particular region associated with individual climate variables. Climate adaptation appeared to be characterized by subtle shifts in allele frequencies, with no consistent fixed differences identified. Based on these associations, we predict adaptation under projected changes in climate will include a suite of shifts in allele frequencies. Whether this can occur sufficiently rapidly through natural selection within populations, or would benefit from assisted gene migration, requires further evaluation. In some populations, the absence, or predicted increases to near fixation of particular adaptive alleles hint at potential limits to adaptive capacity. Together, these results reinforce the importance of standing genetic variation at the geographical level for maintaining species' evolutionary potential. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. A New Biophysical Metric for Interrogating the Information Content in Human Genome Sequence Variation: Proof of Concept

    CERN Document Server

    Lindesay, James; Ricks-Santi, Luisel; Hercules, William; Kurian, Philip; Dunston, Georgia M

    2011-01-01

    Various studies have shown an association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and common disease. We hypothesize that information encoded in the structure of SNP haploblock variation illumines molecular pathways and cellular mechanisms involved in the regulation of host adaptation to the environment. We developed and utilized the normalized information content (NIC), a novel metric based on SNP haploblock variation. We found that all SNP haploblocks with statistically low information content contained putative transcription factor binding sites and microRNA motifs. We were able to translate a biophysical, mathematical measure of common variants into a deeper understanding of the life sciences through analysis of biochemical patterns associated with SNP haploblock variation. We submit that this new metric, NIC, may be useful in decoding the functional significance of common variation in the human genome and in analyzing the regulation of molecular pathways involved in host adaptation to environmenta...

  12. The emergence of commercial genomics: analysis of the rise of a biotechnology subsector during the Human Genome Project, 1990 to 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechers, Ilse R; Perin, Noah C; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Development of the commercial genomics sector within the biotechnology industry relied heavily on the scientific commons, public funding, and technology transfer between academic and industrial research. This study tracks financial and intellectual property data on genomics firms from 1990 through 2004, thus following these firms as they emerged in the era of the Human Genome Project and through the 2000 to 2001 market bubble. A database was created based on an early survey of genomics firms, which was expanded using three web-based biotechnology services, scientific journals, and biotechnology trade and technical publications. Financial data for publicly traded firms was collected through the use of four databases specializing in firm financials. Patent searches were conducted using firm names in the US Patent and Trademark Office website search engine and the DNA Patent Database. A biotechnology subsector of genomics firms emerged in parallel to the publicly funded Human Genome Project. Trends among top firms show that hiring, capital improvement, and research and development expenditures continued to grow after a 2000 to 2001 bubble. The majority of firms are small businesses with great diversity in type of research and development, products, and services provided. Over half the public firms holding patents have the majority of their intellectual property portfolio in DNA-based patents. These data allow estimates of investment, research and development expenditures, and jobs that paralleled the rise of genomics as a sector within biotechnology between 1990 and 2004.

  13. Understanding the Causes and Implications of Endothelial Metabolic Variation in Cardiovascular Disease through Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGarrity, Sarah; Halldórsson, Haraldur; Palsson, Sirus

    2016-01-01

    of endothelial cell (EC) metabolism and its connections to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and explore the use of genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) for integrating metabolic and genomic data. GEMs combine gene expression and metabolic data acting as frameworks for their analysis and, ultimately, afford...... mechanistic understanding of how genetic variation impacts metabolism. We demonstrate how GEMs can be used to investigate CVD-related genetic variation, drug resistance mechanisms, and novel metabolic pathways in ECs. The application of GEMs in personalized medicine is also highlighted. Particularly, we focus...... on the potential of GEMs to identify metabolic biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and to discover methods of stratifying treatments for CVDs based on individual genetic markers. Recent advances in systems biology methodology, and how these methodologies can be applied to understand EC metabolism in both health...

  14. Excited electronic states from a variational approach based on symmetry-projected Hartree--Fock configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2013-01-01

    Recent work from our research group has demonstrated that symmetry-projected Hartree--Fock (HF) methods provide a compact representation of molecular ground state wavefunctions based on a superposition of non-orthogonal Slater determinants. The symmetry-projected ansatz can account for static correlations in a computationally efficient way. Here we present a variational extension of this methodology applicable to excited states of the same symmetry as the ground state. Benchmark calculations on the C$_2$ dimer with a modest basis set, which allows comparison with full configuration interaction results, indicate that this extension provides a high quality description of the low-lying spectrum for the entire dissociation profile. We apply the same methodology to obtain the full low-lying vertical excitation spectrum of formaldehyde, in good agreement with available theoretical and experimental data, as well as to a challenging model $C_{2v}$ insertion pathway for BeH$_2$. The variational excited state methodolo...

  15. A genome-wide investigation of copy number variation in patients with sporadic brain arteriovenous malformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrine Bendjilali

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain arteriovenous malformations (BAVM are clusters of abnormal blood vessels, with shunting of blood from the arterial to venous circulation and a high risk of rupture and intracranial hemorrhage. Most BAVMs are sporadic, but also occur in patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia, a Mendelian disorder caused by mutations in genes in the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling pathway. METHODS: To investigate whether copy number variations (CNVs contribute to risk of sporadic BAVM, we performed a genome-wide association study in 371 sporadic BAVM cases and 563 healthy controls, all Caucasian. Cases and controls were genotyped using the Affymetrix 6.0 array. CNVs were called using the PennCNV and Birdsuite algorithms and analyzed via segment-based and gene-based approaches. Common and rare CNVs were evaluated for association with BAVM. RESULTS: A CNV region on 1p36.13, containing the neuroblastoma breakpoint family, member 1 gene (NBPF1, was significantly enriched with duplications in BAVM cases compared to controls (P = 2.2×10(-9; NBPF1 was also significantly associated with BAVM in gene-based analysis using both PennCNV and Birdsuite. We experimentally validated the 1p36.13 duplication; however, the association did not replicate in an independent cohort of 184 sporadic BAVM cases and 182 controls (OR = 0.81, P = 0.8. Rare CNV analysis did not identify genes significantly associated with BAVM. CONCLUSION: We did not identify common CNVs associated with sporadic BAVM that replicated in an independent cohort. Replication in larger cohorts is required to elucidate the possible role of common or rare CNVs in BAVM pathogenesis.

  16. Folate network genetic variation, plasma homocysteine, and global genomic methylation content: a genetic association study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wernimont Susan M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence variants in genes functioning in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism are hypothesized to lead to changes in levels of homocysteine and DNA methylation, which, in turn, are associated with risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods 330 SNPs in 52 genes were studied in relation to plasma homocysteine and global genomic DNA methylation. SNPs were selected based on functional effects and gene coverage, and assays were completed on the Illumina Goldengate platform. Age-, smoking-, and nutrient-adjusted genotype--phenotype associations were estimated in regression models. Results Using a nominal P ≤ 0.005 threshold for statistical significance, 20 SNPs were associated with plasma homocysteine, 8 with Alu methylation, and 1 with LINE-1 methylation. Using a more stringent false discovery rate threshold, SNPs in FTCD, SLC19A1, and SLC19A3 genes remained associated with plasma homocysteine. Gene by vitamin B-6 interactions were identified for both Alu and LINE-1 methylation, and epistatic interactions with the MTHFR rs1801133 SNP were identified for the plasma homocysteine phenotype. Pleiotropy involving the MTHFD1L and SARDH genes for both plasma homocysteine and Alu methylation phenotypes was identified. Conclusions No single gene was associated with all three phenotypes, and the set of the most statistically significant SNPs predictive of homocysteine or Alu or LINE-1 methylation was unique to each phenotype. Genetic variation in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism, other than the well-known effects of the MTHFR c.665C>T (known as c.677 C>T, rs1801133, p.Ala222Val, is predictive of cardiovascular disease biomarkers.

  17. Fruits of human genome project and private venture, and their impact on life science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikekawa, A; Ikekawa, S

    2001-12-01

    A small knowledge base was created by organizing the Human Genome Project (HGP) and its related issues in "Science" magazines between 1996 and 2000. This base revealed the stunning achievement of HGP and a private venture and its impact on today's biology and life science. In the mid-1990, they encouraged the development of advanced high throughput automated DNA sequencers and the technologies that can analyse all genes at once in a systematic fashion. Using these technologies, they completed the genome sequence of human and various other organisms. These fruits opened the door to comparative genomics, functional genomics, the interdisprinary field between computer and biology, and proteomics. They have caused a shift in biological investigation from studying single genes or proteins to studying all genes or proteins at once, and causing revolutional changes in traditional biology, drug discovery and therapy. They have expanded the range of potential drug targets and have facilitated a shift in drug discovery programs toward rational target-based strategies. They have spawned pharmacogenomics that could give rise to a new generation of highly effective drugs that treat causes, not just symptoms. They should also cause a migration from the traditional medications that are safe and effective for every members of the population to personalized medicine and personalized therapy.

  18. A projected gradient method with nonmonotonic backtracking technique for solving convex constrained monotone variational inequality problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on a differentiable merit function proposed by Taji,et al in "Mathematical Programming,1993,58: 369-383",a projected gradient trust region method for the monotone variational inequality problem with convex constraints is presented.Theoretical analysis is given which proves that the proposed algorithm is globally convergent and has a local quadratic convergence rate under some reasonable conditions.The results of numerical experiments are reported to show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  19. Concepts, Operations, and Feasibility of a Projection-Based Variation Control System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanciulescu, Stefan; Berger, Thorsten; Walkingshaw, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Highly configurable software often uses preproces- sor annotations to handle variability. However, understanding, maintaining, and evolving code with such annotations is difficult, mainly because a developer has to work with all variants at a time. Dedicated methods and tools that allow working o......-world 3D printer firmware project. Among others, we show that the prototype variation control system does indeed support the evolution of a highly configurable system and that in general, it does not degrade the code....

  20. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathishkumar Natarajan

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L. and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, 'SCNU1154', 'Edisto47', 'MR-1', and 'PMR5'. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs. Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon.

  1. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Kim, Hoy-Taek; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Veerappan, Karpagam; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L.) and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, 'SCNU1154', 'Edisto47', 'MR-1', and 'PMR5'. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs). Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon.

  2. A role of genomic copy number variation in the complex behavioral phenotype of alcohol dependence: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Alexander E

    2012-09-01

    In their paper "Copy number variations in 6q14.1 and 5q13.2 are associated with alcohol dependence" Lin and colleagues report on the association between alcohol dependence and 2 duplication CNVs in the genome sequence, one containing 8 genes within its boundaries and another that contains no genes. In this commentary, I point out some of the opportunities and challenges that arise from such a finding.

  3. Genome-wide association implicates numerous genes and pleiotropy underlying ecological trait variation in natural populations of Populus trichocarpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKown, Athena [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Klapste, Jaroslav [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Guy, Robert [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Geraldes, Armando [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Porth, Ilga [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Hannemann, Jan [University of Victoria, Canada; Friedmann, Michael [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Ehlting, Juergen [University of Victoria, Canada; Cronk, Quentin [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; El-Kassaby, Yousry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mansfield, Shawn [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Douglas, Carl [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

    2014-01-01

    To uncover the genetic basis of phenotypic trait variation, we used 448 unrelated wild accessions of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) from natural populations throughout western North America. Extensive information from large-scale trait phenotyping (with spatial and temporal replications within a common garden) and genotyping (with a 34K Populus SNP array) of all accessions were used for gene discovery in a genome-wide association study (GWAS).

  4. Genetic variation and population substructure in outbred CD-1 mice: implications for genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Aldinger

    Full Text Available Outbred laboratory mouse populations are widely used in biomedical research. Since little is known about the degree of genetic variation present in these populations, they are not widely used for genetic studies. Commercially available outbred CD-1 mice are drawn from an extremely large breeding population that has accumulated many recombination events, which is desirable for genome-wide association studies. We therefore examined the degree of genome-wide variation within CD-1 mice to investigate their suitability for genetic studies. The CD-1 mouse genome displays patterns of linkage disequilibrium and heterogeneity similar to wild-caught mice. Population substructure and phenotypic differences were observed among CD-1 mice obtained from different breeding facilities. Differences in genetic variation among CD-1 mice from distinct facilities were similar to genetic differences detected between closely related human populations, consistent with a founder effect. This first large-scale genetic analysis of the outbred CD-1 mouse strain provides important considerations for the design and analysis of genetic studies in CD-1 mice.

  5. The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD) v.5: a metadata management system based on a four level (meta)genome project classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, T B K; Thomas, Alex D; Stamatis, Dimitri; Bertsch, Jon; Isbandi, Michelle; Jansson, Jakob; Mallajosyula, Jyothi; Pagani, Ioanna; Lobos, Elizabeth A; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-01-01

    The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD; http://www.genomesonline.org) is a comprehensive online resource to catalog and monitor genetic studies worldwide. GOLD provides up-to-date status on complete and ongoing sequencing projects along with a broad array of curated metadata. Here we report version 5 (v.5) of the database. The newly designed database schema and web user interface supports several new features including the implementation of a four level (meta)genome project classification system and a simplified intuitive web interface to access reports and launch search tools. The database currently hosts information for about 19,200 studies, 56,000 Biosamples, 56,000 sequencing projects and 39,400 analysis projects. More than just a catalog of worldwide genome projects, GOLD is a manually curated, quality-controlled metadata warehouse. The problems encountered in integrating disparate and varying quality data into GOLD are briefly highlighted. GOLD fully supports and follows the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Minimum Information standards.

  6. The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD) v.5: a metadata management system based on a four level (meta)genome project classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, T.B.K.; Thomas, Alex D.; Stamatis, Dimitri; Bertsch, Jon; Isbandi, Michelle; Jansson, Jakob; Mallajosyula, Jyothi; Pagani, Ioanna; Lobos, Elizabeth A.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2015-01-01

    The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD; http://www.genomesonline.org) is a comprehensive online resource to catalog and monitor genetic studies worldwide. GOLD provides up-to-date status on complete and ongoing sequencing projects along with a broad array of curated metadata. Here we report version 5 (v.5) of the database. The newly designed database schema and web user interface supports several new features including the implementation of a four level (meta)genome project classification system and a simplified intuitive web interface to access reports and launch search tools. The database currently hosts information for about 19 200 studies, 56 000 Biosamples, 56 000 sequencing projects and 39 400 analysis projects. More than just a catalog of worldwide genome projects, GOLD is a manually curated, quality-controlled metadata warehouse. The problems encountered in integrating disparate and varying quality data into GOLD are briefly highlighted. GOLD fully supports and follows the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Minimum Information standards. PMID:25348402

  7. The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD) v.5: a metadata management system based on a four level (meta)genome project classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Tatiparthi B. K. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Thomas, Alex D. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Stamatis, Dimitri [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Bertsch, Jon [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Isbandi, Michelle [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Jansson, Jakob [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Mallajosyula, Jyothi [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Pagani, Ioanna [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lobos, Elizabeth A. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Kyrpides, Nikos C. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-10-27

    The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD; http://www.genomesonline.org) is a comprehensive online resource to catalog and monitor genetic studies worldwide. GOLD provides up-to-date status on complete and ongoing sequencing projects along with a broad array of curated metadata. Within this paper, we report version 5 (v.5) of the database. The newly designed database schema and web user interface supports several new features including the implementation of a four level (meta)genome project classification system and a simplified intuitive web interface to access reports and launch search tools. The database currently hosts information for about 19 200 studies, 56 000 Biosamples, 56 000 sequencing projects and 39 400 analysis projects. More than just a catalog of worldwide genome projects, GOLD is a manually curated, quality-controlled metadata warehouse. The problems encountered in integrating disparate and varying quality data into GOLD are briefly highlighted. Lastly, GOLD fully supports and follows the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Minimum Information standards.

  8. Untying the Gordian knot of creation: metaphors for the Human Genome Project in Greek newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogorosi, Eleni

    2005-12-01

    This article studies the metaphorical expressions used by newspapers to present the near completion of the Human Genome Project (HGP) to the Greek public in the year 2000. The analysis, based on cognitive metaphor theory, deals with the most frequent or captivating metaphors used to refer to the human genome, which give rise to both conventional and novel expressions. The majority of creative metaphorical expressions participate in the discourse of hope and promise propagated by the Greek media in an attempt to present the HGP and its outcome in a favorable light. Instances of the competing discourse of fear and danger are much rarer but can also be found in creative metaphorical expressions. Metaphors pertaining to the Greek culture or to ancient Greek mythology tend to carry a special rhetorical force. However, it will be shown that the Greek press strategically used most of the metaphors that circulated globally at the time, not only culture specific ones.

  9. Ensembl variation resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin-Garcia Pablo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maturing field of genomics is rapidly increasing the number of sequenced genomes and producing more information from those previously sequenced. Much of this additional information is variation data derived from sampling multiple individuals of a given species with the goal of discovering new variants and characterising the population frequencies of the variants that are already known. These data have immense value for many studies, including those designed to understand evolution and connect genotype to phenotype. Maximising the utility of the data requires that it be stored in an accessible manner that facilitates the integration of variation data with other genome resources such as gene annotation and comparative genomics. Description The Ensembl project provides comprehensive and integrated variation resources for a wide variety of chordate genomes. This paper provides a detailed description of the sources of data and the methods for creating the Ensembl variation databases. It also explores the utility of the information by explaining the range of query options available, from using interactive web displays, to online data mining tools and connecting directly to the data servers programmatically. It gives a good overview of the variation resources and future plans for expanding the variation data within Ensembl. Conclusions Variation data is an important key to understanding the functional and phenotypic differences between individuals. The development of new sequencing and genotyping technologies is greatly increasing the amount of variation data known for almost all genomes. The Ensembl variation resources are integrated into the Ensembl genome browser and provide a comprehensive way to access this data in the context of a widely used genome bioinformatics system. All Ensembl data is freely available at http://www.ensembl.org and from the public MySQL database server at ensembldb.ensembl.org.

  10. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, Andrew R.; Esko, Tonu; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Pers, Tune H.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Chun, Audrey Y.; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U.; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E.; Maegi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C.; Scherag, Andre; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F.; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M.; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C.; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S.; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancakova, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W.; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Arnloev, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J.; Berne, Christian; Blueher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Boettcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M.; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H.; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E. Warwick; De Jong, Pim A.; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S. F.; Doerr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E.; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S.; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Graessler, Juergen; Groenberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K.; Hillege, Hans L.; Hlatky, Mark A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L.; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Bent; Johansson, Asa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N.; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindstroem, Jaana; Lobbens, Stephane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L.; McKenzie, Colin A.; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J.; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L.; Morken, Mario A.; Mueller, Gabriele; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M.; Noethen, Markus M.; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W.; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R.; Rose, Lynda M.; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A.; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shin, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sundstrom, Johan; Swertz, Morris A.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor V. A.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J.; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrieres, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W.; Hall, Alistair S.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John J. P.; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Mannisto, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, Andre; Matise, Tara C.; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Andrew D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ong, Ken K.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rice, Treva K.; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Toenjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stephane; Chambers, John C.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cooper, Richard S.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G.; Maerz, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njolstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Perola, Markus; Perusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E.; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saaristo, Timo E.; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P. Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D.; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Voelzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Ines; Fox, Caroline S.; North, Kari E.; Strachan, David P.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J.; Price, Alkes L.; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Weedon, Michael N.; Ingelsson, Erik; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Goddard, Michael E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Frayling, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated similar to 2,000,

  11. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Wood (Andrew); T. Esko (Tõnu); J. Yang (Jian); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); T.H. Pers (Tune); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); A.Y. Chu (Audrey Y); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); J. Luan; Z. Kutalik; N. Amin (Najaf); M.L. Buchkovich (Martin); D.C. Croteau-Chonka (Damien); F.R. Day (Felix); Y. Duan (Yanan); M. Fall (Magnus); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); T. Ferreira (Teresa); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Karjalainen (Juha); K.S. Lo (Ken Sin); A. Locke (Adam); R. Mägi (Reedik); E. Mihailov (Evelin); E. Porcu (Eleonora); J.C. Randall (Joshua); A. Scherag (Andre); A.A.E. Vinkhuyzen (Anna A.); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); T.W. Winkler (Thomas W.); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); J.H. Zhao; D. Absher (Devin); E. Albrecht (Eva); D. Anderson (David); J. Baron (Jeffrey); M. Beekman (Marian); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); G.B. Ehret (Georg); B. Feenstra; M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); K. Fischer (Krista); R.M. Fraser (Ross); A. Goel (Anuj); J. Gong (Jian); A.E. Justice (Anne); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); K. Kristiansson (Kati); U. Lim (Unhee); V. Lotay (Vaneet); J.C. Lui (Julian C); M. Mangino (Massimo); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A.S. Dimas (Antigone); C. Palmer (Cameron); D. Pasko (Dorota); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); I. Prokopenko (Inga); J.S. Ried (Janina); S. Ripke (Stephan); D. Shungin (Dmitry); A. Stancáková (Alena); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); Y.J. Sung (Yun Ju); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); A. Teumer (Alexander); S. Trompet (Stella); S.W. Van Der Laan (Sander W.); J. van Setten (Jessica); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); L. Yengo (Loic); W. Zhang (Weihua); U. Afzal (Uzma); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); G.M. Arscott (Gillian M.); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A. Barrett (Angela); C. Bellis (Claire); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); C. Berne (Christian); M. Blüher (Matthias); J.L. Bolton (Jennifer); Y. Böttcher (Yvonne); H.A. Boyd; M. Bruinenberg (M.); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); S. Buyske (Steven); I.H. Caspersen (Ida H.); P.S. Chines (Peter); R. Clarke (Robert); S. Claudi-Boehm (Simone); M.N. Cooper (Matthew); E.W. Daw (E Warwick); P.A. De Jong (Pim A); J. Deelen (Joris); G. Delgado; J.C. Denny (Josh C); R.A.M. Dhonukshe-Rutten (Rosalie); M. Dimitriou (Maria); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); M. Dörr (Marcus); N. Eklund (Niina); E. Eury (Elodie); L. Folkersen (Lasse); M. Garcia (Melissa); F. Geller (Frank); V. Giedraitis (Vilmantas); A. Go (Attie); H. Grallert (Harald); T.B. Grammer (Tanja B); J. Gräßler (Jürgen); H. Grönberg (Henrik); L.C.P.G.M. de Groot (Lisette); C.J. Groves (Christopher J.); J. Haessler (Jeff); P. Hall (Per); T. Haller (Toomas); G. Hallmans (Göran); M. Hannemann (Mario); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); M. Hassinen (Maija); C. Hayward (Caroline); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); Q. Helmer (Quinta); G. Hemani; A.K. Henders (Anjali); H.L. Hillege (Hans); M.A. Hlatky (Mark); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); P. Hoffmann (Per); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); T. Illig (Thomas); A. Isaacs (Aaron); A.L. James (Alan); J. Jeff (Janina); B. Johansen (Berit); A. Johansson (Åsa); G.J. Jolley (Jason); T. Juliusdottir (Thorhildur); M.J. Junttila (Juhani); M.M.L. Kho (Marcia); L. Kinnunen (Leena); N. Klopp (Norman); T. Kocher; W. Kratzer (Wolfgang); P. Lichtner (Peter); L. Lind (Lars); J. Lindström (Jaana); S. Lobbens (Stéphane); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); Y. Lu (Yingchang); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); A. Mahajan (Anubha); M. Maillard (Marc); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); C.A. McKenzie (Colin A.); S. McLachlan (Stela); P.J. McLaren (Paul J); C. Menni (Cristina); S. Merger (Sigrun); L. Milani (Lili); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); K.L. Monda (Keri); M.A. Morken (Mario); G. Müller (Gabriele); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); A.W. Musk (Arthur); N. Narisu (Narisu); M. Nauck (Matthias); I.M. Nolte (Ilja M.); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); L. Oozageer (Laticia); S. Pilz (Stefan); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); F. Renström (Frida); N.R. Robertson (Neil R.); L.M. Rose (Lynda M.); R. Roussel (Ronan); S. Sanna (Serena); H. Scharnagl (Hubert); S. Scholtens (Salome); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick R); H. Schunkert (Heribert); R.A. Scott (Robert); J.S. Sehmi (Joban); T. Seufferlein (Thomas); J. Shi (Jianxin); K. Silventoinen (Karri); J.H. Smit (Johannes H.); G.D. Smith; J. Smolonska (Joanna); A. Stanton (Alice); K. Stirrups (Kathy); D.J. Stott (David J); H.M. Stringham (Heather); J. Sundstrom (Johan); M. Swertz (Morris); A.C. Syvanen; B. Tayo (Bamidele); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); S. Van Dijk (Suzanne); N.M. van Schoor (Natasja); N. van der Velde (Nathalie); D. van Heemst (Diana); F.V.A. Van Oort (Floor V A); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); N. Verweij (Niek); J.M. Vonk (Judith M); L. Waite (Lindsay); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); R. Wennauer (Roman); L.R. Wilkens (Lynne R.); C. Willenborg (Christina); T. Wilsgaard (Tom); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A. Wong (Andrew); A. Wright (Alan); Q. Zhang (Qunyuan); D. Arveiler (Dominique); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); J. Beilby (John); R.N. Bergman (Richard); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); R. Biffar; J. Blangero (John); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan R.); P. Bovet (Pascal); P. Brambilla (Paolo); M.J. Brown (Morris); H. Campbell (Harry); M. Caulfield (Mark); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); F.S. Collins (Francis); F.S. Collins (Francis); D.C. Crawford (Dana); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); J. Danesh (John); U. de Faire (Ulf); H.M. den Ruijter (Hester ); R. Erbel (Raimund); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); J. Eriksson; M. Farrall (Martin); E. Ferrannini (Ele); J. Ferrieres (Jean); I. Ford; N.G. Forouhi (Nita); T. Forrester (Terrence); R.T. Gansevoort (Ron); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); C. Gieger (Christian); A. Golay (Alain); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); D.W. Haas (David W); A.S. Hall (Alistair); T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); A.C. Heath (Andrew C); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); L.A. Hindorff (Lucia A); A. Hingorani (Aroon); A. Hofman (Albert); G.K. Hovingh (Kees); S.E. Humphries (Steve E.); S.C. Hunt (Steven); E. Hypponen (Elina); K.B. Jacobs (Kevin); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); A. Jula (Antti); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); J.J.P. Kastelein (John); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); F. Kee (Frank); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); C. Kooperberg (Charles); S. Koskinen (Seppo); P. Kovacs (Peter); A. Kraja (Aldi); M. Kumari (Meena); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); T.A. Lakka (Timo); C. Langenberg (Claudia); L. Le Marchand (Loic); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); S. Lupoli (Sara); P.A. Madden; S. Männistö (Satu); P. Manunta (Paolo); A. Marette (Andre'); T.C. Matise (Tara C.); B. McKnight (Barbara); T. Meitinger (Thomas); F.L. Moll (Frans); G.W. Montgomery (Grant W.); A.D. Morris (Andrew); A.P. Morris (Andrew); J.C. Murray (Jeffrey); M. Nelis (Mari); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); K.K. Ong (Ken K.); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard); A. Peters (Annette); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); J.F. Price (Jackie F.); L. Qi (Lu); O. Raitakari (Olli); T. Rankinen (Tuomo); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); T.K. Rice (Treva K.); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn D.); I. Rudan (Igor); V. Salomaa (Veikko); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); J. Saramies (Jouko); M.A. Sarzynski (Mark A.); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter E. H.); S. Sebert (Sylvain); P. Sever (Peter); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); J. Sinisalo (Juha); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); R.P. Stolk; J.-C. Tardif (Jean-Claude); A. Tönjes (Anke); A. Tremblay (Angelo); E. Tremoli (Elena); J. Virtamo (Jarmo); M.-C. Vohl (Marie-Claude); P. Amouyel (Philippe); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert W.); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); M. Bochud (Murielle); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin P.); C. Bouchard (Claude); S. Cauchi (Stéphane); J.C. Chambers (John C.); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); R.S. Cooper (Richard S.); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); G.V. Dedoussis (George); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); P.W. Franks; P. Froguel (Philippe); L. Groop (Leif); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); A. Hamsten (Anders); M.G. Hayes (M. Geoffrey); J. Hui (Jennie); D. Hunter (David); K. Hveem (Kristian); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); M. Kivimaki (Mika); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laakso (Markku); Y. Liu (Yongmei); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); W. März (Winfried); M. Melbye (Mads); S. Moebus (Susanne); P. Munroe (Patricia); I. Njølstad (Inger); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); M. Perola (Markus); L. Perusse (Louis); U. Peters (Ulrike); J.E. Powell (Joseph); C. Power (Christine); T. Quertermous (Thomas); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); E. Reinmaa (Eva); P.M. Ridker (Paul); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); T. Saaristo (Timo); D. Saleheen; D. Schlessinger (David); P.E. Slagboom (P Eline); H. Snieder (Harold); T.D. Spector (Timothy); K. Strauch (Konstantin); M. Stumvoll (Michael); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); M. Uusitupa (Matti); P. van der Harst (Pim); H. Völzke (Henry); M. Walker (Mark); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); J.F. Wilson (James F); P. Zanen (Pieter); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); I.M. Heid (Iris); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); I. Barroso (Inês); C.S. Fox (Caroline S.); K.E. North (Kari); D.P. Strachan (David P.); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); A. Metspalu (Andres); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); L. Franke (Lude); C.J. Willer (Cristen); A. Price (Alkes); G. Lettre (Guillaume); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); M.N. Weedon (Michael); E. Ingelsson (Erik); J.R. O´Connell; G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); M.E. Goddard (Michael); P.M. Visscher (Peter); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); T.M. Frayling (Timothy)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractUsing genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated 1/42,

  12. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Wood (Andrew); T. Esko (Tõnu); J. Yang (Jian); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); T.H. Pers (Tune); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); A.Y. Chu (Audrey Y); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); J. Luan; Z. Kutalik; N. Amin (Najaf); M.L. Buchkovich (Martin); D.C. Croteau-Chonka (Damien); F.R. Day (Felix); Y. Duan (Yanan); M. Fall (Magnus); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); T. Ferreira (Teresa); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Karjalainen (Juha); K.S. Lo (Ken Sin); A. Locke (Adam); R. Mägi (Reedik); E. Mihailov (Evelin); E. Porcu (Eleonora); J.C. Randall (Joshua); A. Scherag (Andre); A.A.E. Vinkhuyzen (Anna A.); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); T.W. Winkler (Thomas W.); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); J.H. Zhao; D. Absher (Devin); E. Albrecht (Eva); D. Anderson (David); J. Baron (Jeffrey); M. Beekman (Marian); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); G.B. Ehret (Georg); B. Feenstra; M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); K. Fischer (Krista); R.M. Fraser (Ross); A. Goel (Anuj); J. Gong (Jian); A.E. Justice (Anne); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); K. Kristiansson (Kati); U. Lim (Unhee); V. Lotay (Vaneet); J.C. Lui (Julian C); M. Mangino (Massimo); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A.S. Dimas (Antigone); C. Palmer (Cameron); D. Pasko (Dorota); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); I. Prokopenko (Inga); J.S. Ried (Janina); S. Ripke (Stephan); D. Shungin (Dmitry); A. Stancáková (Alena); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); Y.J. Sung (Yun Ju); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); A. Teumer (Alexander); S. Trompet (Stella); S.W. Van Der Laan (Sander W.); J. van Setten (Jessica); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); L. Yengo (Loic); W. Zhang (Weihua); U. Afzal (Uzma); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); G.M. Arscott (Gillian M.); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A. Barrett (Angela); C. Bellis (Claire); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); C. Berne (Christian); M. Blüher (Matthias); J.L. Bolton (Jennifer); Y. Böttcher (Yvonne); H.A. Boyd; M. Bruinenberg (M.); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); S. Buyske (Steven); I.H. Caspersen (Ida H.); P.S. Chines (Peter); R. Clarke (Robert); S. Claudi-Boehm (Simone); M.N. Cooper (Matthew); E.W. Daw (E Warwick); P.A. De Jong (Pim A); J. Deelen (Joris); G. Delgado; J.C. Denny (Josh C); R.A.M. Dhonukshe-Rutten (Rosalie); M. Dimitriou (Maria); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); M. Dörr (Marcus); N. Eklund (Niina); E. Eury (Elodie); L. Folkersen (Lasse); M. Garcia (Melissa); F. Geller (Frank); V. Giedraitis (Vilmantas); A. Go (Attie); H. Grallert (Harald); T.B. Grammer (Tanja B); J. Gräßler (Jürgen); H. Grönberg (Henrik); L.C.P.G.M. de Groot (Lisette); C.J. Groves (Christopher J.); J. Haessler (Jeff); P. Hall (Per); T. Haller (Toomas); G. Hallmans (Göran); M. Hannemann (Mario); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); M. Hassinen (Maija); C. Hayward (Caroline); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); Q. Helmer (Quinta); G. Hemani; A.K. Henders (Anjali); H.L. Hillege (Hans); M.A. Hlatky (Mark); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); P. Hoffmann (Per); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); T. Illig (Thomas); A. Isaacs (Aaron); A.L. James (Alan); J. Jeff (Janina); B. Johansen (Berit); A. Johansson (Åsa); G.J. Jolley (Jason); T. Juliusdottir (Thorhildur); M.J. Junttila (Juhani); M.M.L. Kho (Marcia); L. Kinnunen (Leena); N. Klopp (Norman); T. Kocher; W. Kratzer (Wolfgang); P. Lichtner (Peter); L. Lind (Lars); J. Lindström (Jaana); S. Lobbens (Stéphane); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); Y. Lu (Yingchang); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); A. Mahajan (Anubha); M. Maillard (Marc); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); C.A. McKenzie (Colin A.); S. McLachlan (Stela); P.J. McLaren (Paul J); C. Menni (Cristina); S. Merger (Sigrun); L. Milani (Lili); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); K.L. Monda (Keri); M.A. Morken (Mario); G. Müller (Gabriele); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); A.W. Musk (Arthur); N. Narisu (Narisu); M. Nauck (Matthias); I.M. Nolte (Ilja M.); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); L. Oozageer (Laticia); S. Pilz (Stefan); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); F. Renström (Frida); N.R. Robertson (Neil R.); L.M. Rose (Lynda M.); R. Roussel (Ronan); S. Sanna (Serena); H. Scharnagl (Hubert); S. Scholtens (Salome); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick R); H. Schunkert (Heribert); R.A. Scott (Robert); J.S. Sehmi (Joban); T. Seufferlein (Thomas); J. Shi (Jianxin); K. Silventoinen (Karri); J.H. Smit (Johannes H.); G.D. Smith; J. Smolonska (Joanna); A. Stanton (Alice); K. Stirrups (Kathy); D.J. Stott (David J); H.M. Stringham (Heather); J. Sundstrom (Johan); M. Swertz (Morris); A.C. Syvanen; B. Tayo (Bamidele); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); S. Van Dijk (Suzanne); N.M. van Schoor (Natasja); N. van der Velde (Nathalie); D. van Heemst (Diana); F.V.A. Van Oort (Floor V A); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); N. Verweij (Niek); J.M. Vonk (Judith M); L. Waite (Lindsay); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); R. Wennauer (Roman); L.R. Wilkens (Lynne R.); C. Willenborg (Christina); T. Wilsgaard (Tom); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A. Wong (Andrew); A. Wright (Alan); Q. Zhang (Qunyuan); D. Arveiler (Dominique); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); J. Beilby (John); R.N. Bergman (Richard); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); R. Biffar; J. Blangero (John); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan R.); P. Bovet (Pascal); P. Brambilla (Paolo); M.J. Brown (Morris); H. Campbell (Harry); M. Caulfield (Mark); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); F.S. Collins (Francis); F.S. Collins (Francis); D.C. Crawford (Dana); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); J. Danesh (John); U. de Faire (Ulf); H.M. den Ruijter (Hester ); R. Erbel (Raimund); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); J. Eriksson; M. Farrall (Martin); E. Ferrannini (Ele); J. Ferrieres (Jean); I. Ford; N.G. Forouhi (Nita); T. Forrester (Terrence); R.T. Gansevoort (Ron); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); C. Gieger (Christian); A. Golay (Alain); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); D.W. Haas (David W); A.S. Hall (Alistair); T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); A.C. Heath (Andrew C); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); L.A. Hindorff (Lucia A); A. Hingorani (Aroon); A. Hofman (Albert); G.K. Hovingh (Kees); S.E. Humphries (Steve E.); S.C. Hunt (Steven); E. Hypponen (Elina); K.B. Jacobs (Kevin); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); A. Jula (Antti); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); J.J.P. Kastelein (John); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); F. Kee (Frank); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); C. Kooperberg (Charles); S. Koskinen (Seppo); P. Kovacs (Peter); A. Kraja (Aldi); M. Kumari (Meena); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); T.A. Lakka (Timo); C. Langenberg (Claudia); L. Le Marchand (Loic); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); S. Lupoli (Sara); P.A. Madden; S. Männistö (Satu); P. Manunta (Paolo); A. Marette (Andre'); T.C. Matise (Tara C.); B. McKnight (Barbara); T. Meitinger (Thomas); F.L. Moll (Frans); G.W. Montgomery (Grant W.); A.D. Morris (Andrew); A.P. Morris (Andrew); J.C. Murray (Jeffrey); M. Nelis (Mari); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); K.K. Ong (Ken K.); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard); A. Peters (Annette); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); J.F. Price (Jackie F.); L. Qi (Lu); O. Raitakari (Olli); T. Rankinen (Tuomo); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); T.K. Rice (Treva K.); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn D.); I. Rudan (Igor); V. Salomaa (Veikko); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); J. Saramies (Jouko); M.A. Sarzynski (Mark A.); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter E. H.); S. Sebert (Sylvain); P. Sever (Peter); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); J. Sinisalo (Juha); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); R.P. Stolk; J.-C. Tardif (Jean-Claude); A. Tönjes (Anke); A. Tremblay (Angelo); E. Tremoli (Elena); J. Virtamo (Jarmo); M.-C. Vohl (Marie-Claude); P. Amouyel (Philippe); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert W.); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); M. Bochud (Murielle); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin P.); C. Bouchard (Claude); S. Cauchi (Stéphane); J.C. Chambers (John C.); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); R.S. Cooper (Richard S.); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); G.V. Dedoussis (George); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); P.W. Franks; P. Froguel (Philippe); L. Groop (Leif); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); A. Hamsten (Anders); M.G. Hayes (M. Geoffrey); J. Hui (Jennie); D. Hunter (David); K. Hveem (Kristian); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); M. Kivimaki (Mika); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laakso (Markku); Y. Liu (Yongmei); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); W. März (Winfried); M. Melbye (Mads); S. Moebus (Susanne); P. Munroe (Patricia); I. Njølstad (Inger); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); M. Perola (Markus); L. Perusse (Louis); U. Peters (Ulrike); J.E. Powell (Joseph); C. Power (Christine); T. Quertermous (Thomas); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); E. Reinmaa (Eva); P.M. Ridker (Paul); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); T. Saaristo (Timo); D. Saleheen; D. Schlessinger (David); P.E. Slagboom (P Eline); H. Snieder (Harold); T.D. Spector (Timothy); K. Strauch (Konstantin); M. Stumvoll (Michael); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); M. Uusitupa (Matti); P. van der Harst (Pim); H. Völzke (Henry); M. Walker (Mark); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); J.F. Wilson (James F); P. Zanen (Pieter); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); I.M. Heid (Iris); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); I. Barroso (Inês); C.S. Fox (Caroline S.); K.E. North (Kari); D.P. Strachan (David P.); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); A. Metspalu (Andres); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); L. Franke (Lude); C.J. Willer (Cristen); A. Price (Alkes); G. Lettre (Guillaume); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); M.N. Weedon (Michael); E. Ingelsson (Erik); J.R. O´Connell; G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); M.E. Goddard (Michael); P.M. Visscher (Peter); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); T.M. Frayling (Timothy)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractUsing genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated 1/42,

  13. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Wood (Andrew); T. Esko (Tõnu); J. Yang (Jian); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); T.H. Pers (Tune); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); A.Y. Chu (Audrey Y); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); J. Luan; Z. Kutalik; N. Amin (Najaf); M.L. Buchkovich (Martin); D.C. Croteau-Chonka (Damien); F.R. Day (Felix); Y. Duan (Yanan); M. Fall (Magnus); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); T. Ferreira (Teresa); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Karjalainen (Juha); K.S. Lo (Ken Sin); A. Locke (Adam); R. Mägi (Reedik); E. Mihailov (Evelin); E. Porcu (Eleonora); J.C. Randall (Joshua); A. Scherag (Andre); A.A.E. Vinkhuyzen (Anna A.); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); T.W. Winkler (Thomas W.); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); J.H. Zhao; D. Absher (Devin); E. Albrecht (Eva); D. Anderson (David); J. Baron (Jeffrey); M. Beekman (Marian); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); G.B. Ehret (Georg); B. Feenstra; M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); K. Fischer (Krista); R.M. Fraser (Ross); A. Goel (Anuj); J. Gong (Jian); A.E. Justice (Anne); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); K. Kristiansson (Kati); U. Lim (Unhee); V. Lotay (Vaneet); J.C. Lui (Julian C); M. Mangino (Massimo); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A.S. Dimas (Antigone); C. Palmer (Cameron); D. Pasko (Dorota); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); I. Prokopenko (Inga); J.S. Ried (Janina); S. Ripke (Stephan); D. Shungin (Dmitry); A. Stancáková (Alena); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); Y.J. Sung (Yun Ju); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); A. Teumer (Alexander); S. Trompet (Stella); S.W. Van Der Laan (Sander W.); J. van Setten (Jessica); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); L. Yengo (Loic); W. Zhang (Weihua); U. Afzal (Uzma); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); G.M. Arscott (Gillian M.); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A. Barrett (Angela); C. Bellis (Claire); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); C. Berne (Christian); M. Blüher (Matthias); J.L. Bolton (Jennifer); Y. Böttcher (Yvonne); H.A. Boyd; M. Bruinenberg (M.); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); S. Buyske (Steven); I.H. Caspersen (Ida H.); P.S. Chines (Peter); R. Clarke (Robert); S. Claudi-Boehm (Simone); M.N. Cooper (Matthew); E.W. Daw (E Warwick); P.A. De Jong (Pim A); J. Deelen (Joris); G. Delgado; J.C. Denny (Josh C); R.A.M. Dhonukshe-Rutten (Rosalie); M. Dimitriou (Maria); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); M. Dörr (Marcus); N. Eklund (Niina); E. Eury (Elodie); L. Folkersen (Lasse); M. Garcia (Melissa); F. Geller (Frank); V. Giedraitis (Vilmantas); A. Go (Attie); H. Grallert (Harald); T.B. Grammer (Tanja B); J. Gräßler (Jürgen); H. Grönberg (Henrik); L.C.P.G.M. de Groot (Lisette); C.J. Groves (Christopher J.); J. Haessler (Jeff); P. Hall (Per); T. Haller (Toomas); G. Hallmans (Göran); M. Hannemann (Mario); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); M. Hassinen (Maija); C. Hayward (Caroline); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); Q. Helmer (Quinta); G. Hemani; A.K. Henders (Anjali); H.L. Hillege (Hans); M.A. Hlatky (Mark); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); P. Hoffmann (Per); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); T. Illig (Thomas); A. Isaacs (Aaron); A.L. James (Alan); J. Jeff (Janina); B. Johansen (Berit); A. Johansson (Åsa); G.J. Jolley (Jason); T. Juliusdottir (Thorhildur); M.J. Junttila (Juhani); M.M.L. Kho (Marcia); L. Kinnunen (Leena); N. Klopp (Norman); T. Kocher; W. Kratzer (Wolfgang); P. Lichtner (Peter); L. Lind (Lars); J. Lindström (Jaana); S. Lobbens (Stéphane); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); Y. Lu (Yingchang); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); A. Mahajan (Anubha); M. Maillard (Marc); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); C.A. McKenzie (Colin A.); S. McLachlan (Stela); P.J. McLaren (Paul J); C. Menni (Cristina); S. Merger (Sigrun); L. Milani (Lili); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); K.L. Monda (Keri); M.A. Morken (Mario); G. Müller (Gabriele); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); A.W. Musk (Arthur); N. Narisu (Narisu); M. Nauck (Matthias); I.M. Nolte (Ilja M.); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); L. Oozageer (Laticia); S. Pilz (Stefan); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); F. Renström (Frida); N.R. Robertson (Neil R.); L.M. Rose (Lynda M.); R. Roussel (Ronan); S. Sanna (Serena); H. Scharnagl (Hubert); S. Scholtens (Salome); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick R); H. Schunkert (Heribert); R.A. Scott (Robert); J.S. Sehmi (Joban); T. Seufferlein (Thomas); J. Shi (Jianxin); K. Silventoinen (Karri); J.H. Smit (Johannes H.); G.D. Smith; J. Smolonska (Joanna); A. Stanton (Alice); K. Stirrups (Kathy); D.J. Stott (David J); H.M. Stringham (Heather); J. Sundstrom (Johan); M. Swertz (Morris); A.C. Syvanen; B. Tayo (Bamidele); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); S. Van Dijk (Suzanne)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractUsing genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated

  14. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, Andrew R.; Esko, Tonu; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Pers, Tune H.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Chun, Audrey Y.; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U.; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E.; Maegi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C.; Scherag, Andre; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F.; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M.; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C.; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S.; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancakova, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W.; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Arnloev, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J.; Berne, Christian; Blueher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Boettcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M.; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H.; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E. Warwick; De Jong, Pim A.; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S. F.; Doerr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E.; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S.; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Graessler, Juergen; Groenberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K.; Hillege, Hans L.; Hlatky, Mark A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L.; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Bent; Johansson, Asa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N.; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindstroem, Jaana; Lobbens, Stephane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L.; McKenzie, Colin A.; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J.; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L.; Morken, Mario A.; Mueller, Gabriele; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M.; Noethen, Markus M.; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W.; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R.; Rose, Lynda M.; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A.; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shin, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sundstrom, Johan; Swertz, Morris A.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor V. A.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J.; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated similar to 2,000,

  15. Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB): an integrative and interactive database for rice genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiroaki; Lee, Sung Shin; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Numa, Hisataka; Kim, Jungsok; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Wakimoto, Hironobu; Yang, Ching-chia; Iwamoto, Masao; Abe, Takashi; Yamada, Yuko; Muto, Akira; Inokuchi, Hachiro; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Sasaki, Takuji; Itoh, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    The Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB, http://rapdb.dna.affrc.go.jp/) has been providing a comprehensive set of gene annotations for the genome sequence of rice, Oryza sativa (japonica group) cv. Nipponbare. Since the first release in 2005, RAP-DB has been updated several times along with the genome assembly updates. Here, we present our newest RAP-DB based on the latest genome assembly, Os-Nipponbare-Reference-IRGSP-1.0 (IRGSP-1.0), which was released in 2011. We detected 37,869 loci by mapping transcript and protein sequences of 150 monocot species. To provide plant researchers with highly reliable and up to date rice gene annotations, we have been incorporating literature-based manually curated data, and 1,626 loci currently incorporate literature-based annotation data, including commonly used gene names or gene symbols. Transcriptional activities are shown at the nucleotide level by mapping RNA-Seq reads derived from 27 samples. We also mapped the Illumina reads of a Japanese leading japonica cultivar, Koshihikari, and a Chinese indica cultivar, Guangluai-4, to the genome and show alignments together with the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and gene functional annotations through a newly developed browser, Short-Read Assembly Browser (S-RAB). We have developed two satellite databases, Plant Gene Family Database (PGFD) and Integrative Database of Cereal Gene Phylogeny (IDCGP), which display gene family and homologous gene relationships among diverse plant species. RAP-DB and the satellite databases offer simple and user-friendly web interfaces, enabling plant and genome researchers to access the data easily and facilitating a broad range of plant research topics.

  16. ELSI Bibliography: Ethical legal and social implications of the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesley, M.S. [comp.

    1993-11-01

    This second edition of the ELSI Bibliography provides a current and comprehensive resource for identifying publications on the major topics related to the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. Since the first edition of the ELSI Bibliography was printed last year, new publications and earlier ones identified by additional searching have doubled our computer database of ELSI publications to over 5600 entries. The second edition of the ELSI Bibliography reflects this growth of the underlying computer database. Researchers should note that an extensive collection of publications in the database is available for public use at the General Law Library of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  17. Preliminary Application of Precision Genomic Medicine Detecting Gene Variation in Patients with Multifocal Osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao-Qiang; Li, Ming-Hui; Gao, Peng; Lan, Ping-Heng; Fan, Bo; Xiao, Xin; Lu, Ya-Jie; Chen, Guo-Jing; Wang, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    the proximal tibia lesion and 113.1% ± 1.9% in the distal femur of patient HJF (P < 0.01) and 136.1% ± 10.8% in the proximal tibial lesion and 122.3% ± 5.5% in the proximal humerus of patient JZ (P = 0.0335). Furthermore, there were several anti-oncogenes in the somatic copy number variation lists analyzed from the two patients, especially TP53. However, no kataegis was found. Early and radical surgery accompanied by appropriate chemotherapy is the optimal means of treating MFOS. These patients may benefit from precision genomic medicine. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Variation, evolution, and correlation analysis of C+G content and genome or chromosome size in different kingdoms and phyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Du, Donglei

    2014-01-01

    C+G content (GC content or G+C content) is known to be correlated with genome/chromosome size in bacteria but the relationship for other kingdoms remains unclear. This study analyzed genome size, chromosome size, and base composition in most of the available sequenced genomes in various kingdoms. Genome size tends to increase during evolution in plants and animals, and the same is likely true for bacteria. The genomic C+G contents were found to vary greatly in microorganisms but were quite similar within each animal or plant subkingdom. In animals and plants, the C+G contents are ranked as follows: monocot plants>mammals>non-mammalian animals>dicot plants. The variation in C+G content between chromosomes within species is greater in animals than in plants. The correlation between average chromosome C+G content and chromosome length was found to be positive in Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria (but not in other analyzed bacterial phyla), Ascomycota fungi, and likely also in some plants; negative in some animals, insignificant in two protist phyla, and likely very weak in Archaea. Clearly, correlations between C+G content and chromosome size can be positive, negative, or not significant depending on the kingdoms/groups or species. Different phyla or species exhibit different patterns of correlation between chromosome-size and C+G content. Most chromosomes within a species have a similar pattern of variation in C+G content but outliers are common. The data presented in this study suggest that the C+G content is under genetic control by both trans- and cis- factors and that the correlation between C+G content and chromosome length can be positive, negative, or not significant in different phyla.

  19. Chromosomal Copy Number Variation in Saccharomyces pastorianus Is Evidence for Extensive Genome Dynamics in Industrial Lager Brewing Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, M; Bolat, I; Nijkamp, J F; Ramos, E; Luttik, M A H; Koopman, F; Geertman, J M; de Ridder, D; Pronk, J T; Daran, J-M

    2015-09-01

    Lager brewing strains of Saccharomyces pastorianus are natural interspecific hybrids originating from the spontaneous hybridization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces eubayanus. Over the past 500 years, S. pastorianus has been domesticated to become one of the most important industrial microorganisms. Production of lager-type beers requires a set of essential phenotypes, including the ability to ferment maltose and maltotriose at low temperature, the production of flavors and aromas, and the ability to flocculate. Understanding of the molecular basis of complex brewing-related phenotypic traits is a prerequisite for rational strain improvement. While genome sequences have been reported, the variability and dynamics of S. pastorianus genomes have not been investigated in detail. Here, using deep sequencing and chromosome copy number analysis, we showed that S. pastorianus strain CBS1483 exhibited extensive aneuploidy. This was confirmed by quantitative PCR and by flow cytometry. As a direct consequence of this aneuploidy, a massive number of sequence variants was identified, leading to at least 1,800 additional protein variants in S. pastorianus CBS1483. Analysis of eight additional S. pastorianus strains revealed that the previously defined group I strains showed comparable karyotypes, while group II strains showed large interstrain karyotypic variability. Comparison of three strains with nearly identical genome sequences revealed substantial chromosome copy number variation, which may contribute to strain-specific phenotypic traits. The observed variability of lager yeast genomes demonstrates that systematic linking of genotype to phenotype requires a three-dimensional genome analysis encompassing physical chromosomal structures, the copy number of individual chromosomes or chromosomal regions, and the allelic variation of copies of individual genes.

  20. Variation of the virus-related elements within syntenic genomes of the hyperthermophilic archaeon aeropyrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daifuku, Takashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of genome sequences of archaea and bacteria show their adaptation to different environmental conditions at the genomic level. Aeropyrum spp. are aerobic and hyperthermophilic archaea. Aeropyrum camini was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, and Aeropyrum pernix was i...... the genomes of A. camini and A. pernix were conserved, we observed nonsynteny that was attributed primarily to virus-related elements. Our findings indicated that the genomic diversification of Aeropyrum spp. is substantially caused by viruses.......The increasing number of genome sequences of archaea and bacteria show their adaptation to different environmental conditions at the genomic level. Aeropyrum spp. are aerobic and hyperthermophilic archaea. Aeropyrum camini was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, and Aeropyrum pernix...... having stable genomes, interference of synteny occurred with two proviruses, A. pernix spindle-shaped virus 1 (APSV1) and A. pernix ovoid virus 1 (APOV1), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) elements. Spacer sequences derived from the A. camini CRISPR showed significant...

  1. Discovery, genotyping and characterization of structural variation and novel sequence at single nucleotide resolution from de novo genome assemblies on a population scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Shujia; Rao, Junhua; Ye, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive recognition of genomic variation in one individual is important for understanding disease and developing personalized medication and treatment. Many tools based on DNA re-sequencing exist for identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms, small insertions and deletions (indels...

  2. Discovery, genotyping and characterization of structural variation and novel sequence at single nucleotide resolution from de novo genome assemblies on a population scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Shujia; Rao, Junhua; Ye, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive recognition of genomic variation in one individual is important for understanding disease and developing personalized medication and treatment. Many tools based on DNA re-sequencing exist for identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms, small insertions and deletions (indels) ...

  3. Discovery, genotyping and characterization of structural variation and novel sequence at single nucleotide resolution from de novo genome assemblies on a population scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Shujia; Rao, Junhua; Ye, Weijian;

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive recognition of genomic variation in one individual is important for understanding disease and developing personalized medication and treatment. Many tools based on DNA re-sequencing exist for identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms, small insertions and deletions (indels) ...

  4. Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP: a comprehensive database for sweet orange genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wang

    Full Text Available Citrus is one of the most important and widely grown fruit crop with global production ranking firstly among all the fruit crops in the world. Sweet orange accounts for more than half of the Citrus production both in fresh fruit and processed juice. We have sequenced the draft genome of a double-haploid sweet orange (C. sinensis cv. Valencia, and constructed the Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP to store and visualize the sequenced genomic and transcriptome data. CAP provides GBrowse-based organization of sweet orange genomic data, which integrates ab initio gene prediction, EST, RNA-seq and RNA-paired end tag (RNA-PET evidence-based gene annotation. Furthermore, we provide a user-friendly web interface to show the predicted protein-protein interactions (PPIs and metabolic pathways in sweet orange. CAP provides comprehensive information beneficial to the researchers of sweet orange and other woody plants, which is freely available at http://citrus.hzau.edu.cn/.

  5. Human Genome Project discoveries: Dialectics and rhetoric in the science of genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robidoux, Charlotte A.

    The Human Genome Project (HGP), a $437 million effort that began in 1990 to chart the chemical sequence of our three billion base pairs of DNA, was completed in 2003, marking the 50th anniversary that proved the definitive structure of the molecule. This study considered how dialectical and rhetorical arguments functioned in the science, political, and public forums over a 20-year period, from 1980 to 2000, to advance human genome research and to establish the official project. I argue that Aristotle's continuum of knowledge--which ranges from the probable on one end to certified or demonstrated knowledge on the other--provides useful distinctions for analyzing scientific reasoning. While contemporary scientific research seeks to discover certified knowledge, investigators generally employ the hypothetico-deductive or scientific method, which often yields probable rather than certain findings, making these dialectical in nature. Analysis of the discourse describing human genome research revealed the use of numerous rhetorical figures and topics. Persuasive and probable reasoning were necessary for scientists to characterize unknown genetic phenomena, to secure interest in and funding for large-scale human genome research, to solve scientific problems, to issue probable findings, to convince colleagues and government officials that the findings were sound and to disseminate information to the public. Both government and private venture scientists drew on these tools of reasoning to promote their methods of mapping and sequencing the genome. The debate over how to carry out sequencing was rooted in conflicting values. Scientists representing the academic tradition valued a more conservative method that would establish high quality results, and those supporting private industry valued an unconventional approach that would yield products and profits more quickly. Values in turn influenced political and public forum arguments. Agency representatives and investors sided

  6. Whole-Genome Resequencing Reveals Extensive Natural Variation in the Model Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzouri, Khaled M.; Rosas, Ulises; Bahmani, Tayebeh; Nelson, David R.; Abdrabu, Rasha; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    We performed whole-genome resequencing of 12 field isolates and eight commonly studied laboratory strains of the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to characterize genomic diversity and provide a resource for studies of natural variation. Our data support previous observations that Chlamydomonas is among the most diverse eukaryotic species. Nucleotide diversity is ∼3% and is geographically structured in North America with some evidence of admixture among sampling locales. Examination of predicted loss-of-function mutations in field isolates indicates conservation of genes associated with core cellular functions, while genes in large gene families and poorly characterized genes show a greater incidence of major effect mutations. De novo assembly of unmapped reads recovered genes in the field isolates that are absent from the CC-503 assembly. The laboratory reference strains show a genomic pattern of polymorphism consistent with their origin as the recombinant progeny of a diploid zygospore. Large duplications or amplifications are a prominent feature of laboratory strains and appear to have originated under laboratory culture. Extensive natural variation offers a new source of genetic diversity for studies of Chlamydomonas, including naturally occurring alleles that may prove useful in studies of gene function and the dissection of quantitative genetic traits. PMID:26392080

  7. A novel technique for measuring variations in DNA copy-number: competitive genomic polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakagawara Akira

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Changes in genomic copy number occur in many human diseases including cancer. Characterization of these changes is important for both basic understanding and diagnosis of these diseases. Microarrays have recently become the standard technique and are commercially available. However, it is useful to have an affordable technique to complement them. Results We describe a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based technique, termed competitive genomic PCR (CGP. The main characteristic of CGP is that different adaptors are added to the sample and control genomic DNAs after appropriate restriction enzyme digestion. These adaptor-supplemented DNAs are subjected to competitive PCR using an adaptor-primer and a locus-specific primer. The amplified products are then separated according to size differences between the adaptors. CGP eliminates the tedious steps inherent in quantitative PCR and achieves moderate throughput. Assays with different X chromosome numbers showed that it can provide accurate quantification. High-resolution analysis of neuroblastoma cell lines around the MYCN locus revealed novel junctions for amplification, which were not detected by a commercial array. Conclusion CGP is a moderate throughput technique for analyzing changes in genomic copy numbers. Because CGP can measure any genomic locus using PCR primers, it is especially useful for detailed analysis of a genomic region of interest.

  8. Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton City Board of Education (Ontario).

    Suggestions for studying the topic of variation of individuals and objects (balls) to help develop elementary school students' measurement, comparison, classification, evaluation, and data collection and recording skills are made. General suggestions of variables that can be investigated are made for the study of human variation. Twelve specific…

  9. Genetic Basis for Spontaneous Hybrid Genome Doubling during Allopolyploid Speciation of Common Wheat Shown by Natural Variation Analyses of the Paternal Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Nasuda, Shuhei; Ashida, Yasuyo; Nitta, Miyuki; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Takumi, Shigeo; Kawahara, Taihachi

    2013-01-01

    The complex process of allopolyploid speciation includes various mechanisms ranging from species crosses and hybrid genome doubling to genome alterations and the establishment of new allopolyploids as persisting natural entities. Currently, little is known about the genetic mechanisms that underlie hybrid genome doubling, despite the fact that natural allopolyploid formation is highly dependent on this phenomenon. We examined the genetic basis for the spontaneous genome doubling of triploid F1 hybrids between the direct ancestors of allohexaploid common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD genome), namely Triticumturgidum L. (AABB genome) and Aegilopstauschii Coss. (DD genome). An Ae. tauschii intraspecific lineage that is closely related to the D genome of common wheat was identified by population-based analysis. Two representative accessions, one that produces a high-genome-doubling-frequency hybrid when crossed with a T. turgidum cultivar and the other that produces a low-genome-doubling-frequency hybrid with the same cultivar, were chosen from that lineage for further analyses. A series of investigations including fertility analysis, immunostaining, and quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis showed that (1) production of functional unreduced gametes through nonreductional meiosis is an early step key to successful hybrid genome doubling, (2) first division restitution is one of the cytological mechanisms that cause meiotic nonreduction during the production of functional male unreduced gametes, and (3) six QTLs in the Ae. tauschii genome, most of which likely regulate nonreductional meiosis and its subsequent gamete production processes, are involved in hybrid genome doubling. Interlineage comparisons of Ae. tauschii’s ability to cause hybrid genome doubling suggested an evolutionary model for the natural variation pattern of the trait in which non-deleterious mutations in six QTLs may have important roles. The findings of this study demonstrated that the

  10. Genetic basis for spontaneous hybrid genome doubling during allopolyploid speciation of common wheat shown by natural variation analyses of the paternal species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Matsuoka

    Full Text Available The complex process of allopolyploid speciation includes various mechanisms ranging from species crosses and hybrid genome doubling to genome alterations and the establishment of new allopolyploids as persisting natural entities. Currently, little is known about the genetic mechanisms that underlie hybrid genome doubling, despite the fact that natural allopolyploid formation is highly dependent on this phenomenon. We examined the genetic basis for the spontaneous genome doubling of triploid F1 hybrids between the direct ancestors of allohexaploid common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD genome, namely Triticumturgidum L. (AABB genome and Aegilopstauschii Coss. (DD genome. An Ae. tauschii intraspecific lineage that is closely related to the D genome of common wheat was identified by population-based analysis. Two representative accessions, one that produces a high-genome-doubling-frequency hybrid when crossed with a T. turgidum cultivar and the other that produces a low-genome-doubling-frequency hybrid with the same cultivar, were chosen from that lineage for further analyses. A series of investigations including fertility analysis, immunostaining, and quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis showed that (1 production of functional unreduced gametes through nonreductional meiosis is an early step key to successful hybrid genome doubling, (2 first division restitution is one of the cytological mechanisms that cause meiotic nonreduction during the production of functional male unreduced gametes, and (3 six QTLs in the Ae. tauschii genome, most of which likely regulate nonreductional meiosis and its subsequent gamete production processes, are involved in hybrid genome doubling. Interlineage comparisons of Ae. tauschii's ability to cause hybrid genome doubling suggested an evolutionary model for the natural variation pattern of the trait in which non-deleterious mutations in six QTLs may have important roles. The findings of this study demonstrated

  11. TcruziDB, an Integrated Database, and the WWW Information Server for the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degrave Wim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Data analysis, presentation and distribution is of utmost importance to a genome project. A public domain software, ACeDB, has been chosen as the common basis for parasite genome databases, and a first release of TcruziDB, the Trypanosoma cruzi genome database, is available by ftp from ftp://iris.dbbm.fiocruz.br/pub/genomedb/TcruziDB as well as versions of the software for different operating systems (ftp://iris.dbbm.fiocruz.br/pub/unixsoft/. Moreover, data originated from the project are available from the WWW server at http://www.dbbm.fiocruz.br. It contains biological and parasitological data on CL Brener, its karyotype, all available T. cruzi sequences from Genbank, data on the EST-sequencing project and on available libraries, a T. cruzi codon table and a listing of activities and participating groups in the genome project, as well as meeting reports. T. cruzi discussion lists (tcruzi-l@iris.dbbm.fiocruz.br and tcgenics@iris.dbbm.fiocruz.br are being maintained for communication and to promote collaboration in the genome project

  12. Analysis of copy number variation in the rhesus macaque genome identifies candidate loci for evolutionary and human disease studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Arthur S; Gutiérrez-Arcelus, María; Perry, George H; Vallender, Eric J; Johnson, Welkin E; Miller, Gregory M; Korbel, Jan O; Lee, Charles

    2008-04-15

    Copy number variants (CNVs) are heritable gains and losses of genomic DNA in normal individuals. While copy number variation is widely studied in humans, our knowledge of CNVs in other mammalian species is more limited. We have designed a custom array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) platform with 385 000 oligonucleotide probes based on the reference genome sequence of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), the most widely studied non-human primate in biomedical research. We used this platform to identify 123 CNVs among 10 unrelated macaque individuals, with 24% of the CNVs observed in multiple individuals. We found that segmental duplications were significantly enriched at macaque CNV loci. We also observed significant overlap between rhesus macaque and human CNVs, suggesting that certain genomic regions are prone to recurrent CNV formation and instability, even across a total of approximately 50 million years of primate evolution ( approximately 25 million years in each lineage). Furthermore, for eight of the CNVs that were observed in both humans and macaques, previous human studies have reported a relationship between copy number and gene expression or disease susceptibility. Therefore, the rhesus macaque offers an intriguing, non-human primate outbred model organism with which hypotheses concerning the specific functions of phenotypically relevant human CNVs can be tested.

  13. Patterns of Genome-Wide Variation in Glossina fuscipes fuscipes Tsetse Flies from Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria-Soria, Andrea; Dunn, W Augustine; Telleria, Erich L; Evans, Benjamin R; Okedi, Loyce; Echodu, Richard; Warren, Wesley C; Montague, Michael J; Aksoy, Serap; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2016-06-01

    The tsetse fly Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Gff) is the insect vector of the two forms of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) that exist in Uganda. Understanding Gff population dynamics, and the underlying genetics of epidemiologically relevant phenotypes is key to reducing disease transmission. Using ddRAD sequence technology, complemented with whole-genome sequencing, we developed a panel of ∼73,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across the Gff genome that can be used for population genomics and to perform genome-wide-association studies. We used these markers to estimate genomic patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in Gff, and used the information, in combination with outlier-locus detection tests, to identify candidate regions of the genome under selection. LD in individual populations decays to half of its maximum value (r(2) max/2) between 1359 and 2429 bp. The overall LD estimated for the species reaches r(2) max/2 at 708 bp, an order of magnitude slower than in Drosophila Using 53 infected (Trypanosoma spp.) and uninfected flie