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Sample records for genome sequencing annotation

  1. Intra-species sequence comparisons for annotating genomes

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    Boffelli, Dario; Weer, Claire V.; Weng, Li; Lewis, Keith D.; Shoukry, Malak I.; Pachter, Lior; Keys, David N.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-07-15

    Analysis of sequence variation among members of a single species offers a potential approach to identify functional DNA elements responsible for biological features unique to that species. Due to its high rate of allelic polymorphism and ease of genetic manipulability, we chose the sea squirt, Ciona intestinalis, to explore intra-species sequence comparisons for genome annotation. A large number of C. intestinalis specimens were collected from four continents and a set of genomic intervals amplified, resequenced and analyzed to determine the mutation rates at each nucleotide in the sequence. We found that regions with low mutation rates efficiently demarcated functionally constrained sequences: these include a set of noncoding elements, which we showed in C intestinalis transgenic assays to act as tissue-specific enhancers, as well as the location of coding sequences. This illustrates that comparisons of multiple members of a species can be used for genome annotation, suggesting a path for the annotation of the sequenced genomes of organisms occupying uncharacterized phylogenetic branches of the animal kingdom and raises the possibility that the resequencing of a large number of Homo sapiens individuals might be used to annotate the human genome and identify sequences defining traits unique to our species. The sequence data from this study has been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. AY667278-AY667407.

  2. Combined evidence annotation of transposable elements in genome sequences.

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    Hadi Quesneville

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs are mobile, repetitive sequences that make up significant fractions of metazoan genomes. Despite their near ubiquity and importance in genome and chromosome biology, most efforts to annotate TEs in genome sequences rely on the results of a single computational program, RepeatMasker. In contrast, recent advances in gene annotation indicate that high-quality gene models can be produced from combining multiple independent sources of computational evidence. To elevate the quality of TE annotations to a level comparable to that of gene models, we have developed a combined evidence-model TE annotation pipeline, analogous to systems used for gene annotation, by integrating results from multiple homology-based and de novo TE identification methods. As proof of principle, we have annotated "TE models" in Drosophila melanogaster Release 4 genomic sequences using the combined computational evidence derived from RepeatMasker, BLASTER, TBLASTX, all-by-all BLASTN, RECON, TE-HMM and the previous Release 3.1 annotation. Our system is designed for use with the Apollo genome annotation tool, allowing automatic results to be curated manually to produce reliable annotations. The euchromatic TE fraction of D. melanogaster is now estimated at 5.3% (cf. 3.86% in Release 3.1, and we found a substantially higher number of TEs (n = 6,013 than previously identified (n = 1,572. Most of the new TEs derive from small fragments of a few hundred nucleotides long and highly abundant families not previously annotated (e.g., INE-1. We also estimated that 518 TE copies (8.6% are inserted into at least one other TE, forming a nest of elements. The pipeline allows rapid and thorough annotation of even the most complex TE models, including highly deleted and/or nested elements such as those often found in heterochromatic sequences. Our pipeline can be easily adapted to other genome sequences, such as those of the D. melanogaster heterochromatin or other

  3. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using GeneScan and BLAST

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew M. Lynn; Chakresh Kumar Jain; K. Kosalai; Pranjan Barman; Nupur Thakur; Harish Batra; Alok Bhattacharya

    2001-04-01

    Genomic sequence data are often available well before the annotated sequence is published. We present a method for analysis of genomic DNA to identify coding sequences using the GeneScan algorithm and characterize these resultant sequences by BLAST. The routines are used to develop a system for automated annotation of genome DNA sequences.

  4. Sequencing and annotated analysis of an Estonian human genome.

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    Lilleoja, Rutt; Sarapik, Aili; Reimann, Ene; Reemann, Paula; Jaakma, Ülle; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev

    2012-02-01

    In present study we describe the sequencing and annotated analysis of the individual genome of Estonian. Using SOLID technology we generated 2,449,441,916 of 50-bp reads. The Bioscope version 1.3 was used for mapping and pairing of reads to the NCBI human genome reference (build 36, hg18). Bioscope enables also the annotation of the results of variant (tertiary) analysis. The average mapping of reads was 75.5% with total coverage of 107.72 Gb. resulting in mean fold coverage of 34.6. We found 3,482,975 SNPs out of which 352,492 were novel. 21,222 SNPs were in coding region: 10,649 were synonymous SNPs, 10,360 were nonsynonymous missense SNPs, 155 were nonsynonymous nonsense SNPs and 58 were nonsynonymous frameshifts. We identified 219 CNVs with total base pair coverage of 37,326,300 bp and 87,451 large insertion/deletion polymorphisms covering 10,152,256 bp of the genome. In addition, we found 285,864 small size insertion/deletion polymorphisms out of which 133,969 were novel. Finally, we identified 53 inversions, 19 overlapped genes and 2 overlapped exons. Interestingly, we found the region in chromosome 6 to be enriched with the coding SNPs and CNVs. This study confirms previous findings, that our genomes are more complex and variable as thought before. Therefore, sequencing of the personal genomes followed by annotation would improve the analysis of heritability of phenotypes and our understandings on the functions of genome.

  5. An integrated computational pipeline and database to support whole-genome sequence annotation.

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    Mungall, C J; Misra, S; Berman, B P; Carlson, J; Frise, E; Harris, N; Marshall, B; Shu, S; Kaminker, J S; Prochnik, S E; Smith, C D; Smith, E; Tupy, J L; Wiel, C; Rubin, G M; Lewis, S E

    2002-01-01

    We describe here our experience in annotating the Drosophila melanogaster genome sequence, in the course of which we developed several new open-source software tools and a database schema to support large-scale genome annotation. We have developed these into an integrated and reusable software system for whole-genome annotation. The key contributions to overall annotation quality are the marshalling of high-quality sequences for alignments and the design of a system with an adaptable and expandable flexible architecture.

  6. AGeS: a software system for microbial genome sequence annotation.

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    Kamal Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The annotation of genomes from next-generation sequencing platforms needs to be rapid, high-throughput, and fully integrated and automated. Although a few Web-based annotation services have recently become available, they may not be the best solution for researchers that need to annotate a large number of genomes, possibly including proprietary data, and store them locally for further analysis. To address this need, we developed a standalone software application, the Annotation of microbial Genome Sequences (AGeS system, which incorporates publicly available and in-house-developed bioinformatics tools and databases, many of which are parallelized for high-throughput performance. METHODOLOGY: The AGeS system supports three main capabilities. The first is the storage of input contig sequences and the resulting annotation data in a central, customized database. The second is the annotation of microbial genomes using an integrated software pipeline, which first analyzes contigs from high-throughput sequencing by locating genomic regions that code for proteins, RNA, and other genomic elements through the Do-It-Yourself Annotation (DIYA framework. The identified protein-coding regions are then functionally annotated using the in-house-developed Pipeline for Protein Annotation (PIPA. The third capability is the visualization of annotated sequences using GBrowse. To date, we have implemented these capabilities for bacterial genomes. AGeS was evaluated by comparing its genome annotations with those provided by three other methods. Our results indicate that the software tools integrated into AGeS provide annotations that are in general agreement with those provided by the compared methods. This is demonstrated by a >94% overlap in the number of identified genes, a significant number of identical annotated features, and a >90% agreement in enzyme function predictions.

  7. Genome sequencing and annotation of Morganella sp. SA36

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    Samy Selim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report draft genome sequence of Morganella sp. Strain SA36, isolated from water spring in Aljouf region, Saudi Arabia. The draft genome size is 2,564,439 bp with a G + C content of 51.1% and contains 6 rRNA sequence (single copies of 5S, 16S & 23S rRNA. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. LDNQ00000000.

  8. Genome sequencing and annotation of Stenotrophomonas sp. SAM8

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    Samy Selim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report draft genome sequence of Stenotrophomonas sp. strain SAM8, isolated from environmental water. The draft genome size is 3,665,538 bp with a G + C content of 67.2% and contains 6 rRNA sequence (single copies of 5S, 16S & 23S rRNA. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. LDAV00000000.

  9. Genome sequencing and annotation of Proteus sp. SAS71

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    Samy Selim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report draft genome sequence of Proteus sp. strain SAS71, isolated from water spring in Aljouf region, Saudi Arabia. The draft genome size is 3,037,704 bp with a G + C content of 39.3% and contains 6 rRNA sequence (single copies of 5S, 16S & 23S rRNA. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. LDIU00000000.

  10. Genome sequencing and annotation of Cellulomonas sp. HZM

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    Patric Chua

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the draft genome sequence of Cellulomonas sp. HZM, isolated from a tropical peat swamp forest. The draft genome size is 3,559,280 bp with a G + C content of 73% and contains 3 rRNA sequences (single copies of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNA.

  11. Genome sequencing and annotation of Aeromonas sp. HZM

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    Patric Chua

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the draft genome sequence of Aeromonas sp. strain HZM, isolated from tropical peat swamp forest soil. The draft genome size is 4,451,364 bp with a G + C content of 61.7% and contains 10 rRNA sequences (eight copies of 5S rRNA genes, single copy of 16S and 23S rRNA each. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. JEMQ00000000.

  12. BG7: A New Approach for Bacterial Genome Annotation Designed for Next Generation Sequencing Data

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    Pareja-Tobes, Pablo; Manrique, Marina; Pareja-Tobes, Eduardo; Pareja, Eduardo; Tobes, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    BG7 is a new system for de novo bacterial, archaeal and viral genome annotation based on a new approach specifically designed for annotating genomes sequenced with next generation sequencing technologies. The system is versatile and able to annotate genes even in the step of preliminary assembly of the genome. It is especially efficient detecting unexpected genes horizontally acquired from bacterial or archaeal distant genomes, phages, plasmids, and mobile elements. From the initial phases of the gene annotation process, BG7 exploits the massive availability of annotated protein sequences in databases. BG7 predicts ORFs and infers their function based on protein similarity with a wide set of reference proteins, integrating ORF prediction and functional annotation phases in just one step. BG7 is especially tolerant to sequencing errors in start and stop codons, to frameshifts, and to assembly or scaffolding errors. The system is also tolerant to the high level of gene fragmentation which is frequently found in not fully assembled genomes. BG7 current version – which is developed in Java, takes advantage of Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud computing features, but it can also be run locally in any operating system. BG7 is a fast, automated and scalable system that can cope with the challenge of analyzing the huge amount of genomes that are being sequenced with NGS technologies. Its capabilities and efficiency were demonstrated in the 2011 EHEC Germany outbreak in which BG7 was used to get the first annotations right the next day after the first entero-hemorrhagic E. coli genome sequences were made publicly available. The suitability of BG7 for genome annotation has been proved for Illumina, 454, Ion Torrent, and PacBio sequencing technologies. Besides, thanks to its plasticity, our system could be very easily adapted to work with new technologies in the future. PMID:23185310

  13. Re-annotation and re-analysis of the Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168 genome sequence

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    Dorrell Nick

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is the leading bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis in the developed world. To improve our understanding of this important human pathogen, the C. jejuni NCTC11168 genome was sequenced and published in 2000. The original annotation was a milestone in Campylobacter research, but is outdated. We now describe the complete re-annotation and re-analysis of the C. jejuni NCTC11168 genome using current database information, novel tools and annotation techniques not used during the original annotation. Results Re-annotation was carried out using sequence database searches such as FASTA, along with programs such as TMHMM for additional support. The re-annotation also utilises sequence data from additional Campylobacter strains and species not available during the original annotation. Re-annotation was accompanied by a full literature search that was incorporated into the updated EMBL file [EMBL: AL111168]. The C. jejuni NCTC11168 re-annotation reduced the total number of coding sequences from 1654 to 1643, of which 90.0% have additional information regarding the identification of new motifs and/or relevant literature. Re-annotation has led to 18.2% of coding sequence product functions being revised. Conclusions Major updates were made to genes involved in the biosynthesis of important surface structures such as lipooligosaccharide, capsule and both O- and N-linked glycosylation. This re-annotation will be a key resource for Campylobacter research and will also provide a prototype for the re-annotation and re-interpretation of other bacterial genomes.

  14. Functional annotation from the genome sequence of the giant panda.

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    Huo, Tong; Zhang, Yinjie; Lin, Jianping

    2012-08-01

    The giant panda is one of the most critically endangered species due to the fragmentation and loss of its habitat. Studying the functions of proteins in this animal, especially specific trait-related proteins, is therefore necessary to protect the species. In this work, the functions of these proteins were investigated using the genome sequence of the giant panda. Data on 21,001 proteins and their functions were stored in the Giant Panda Protein Database, in which the proteins were divided into two groups: 20,179 proteins whose functions can be predicted by GeneScan formed the known-function group, whereas 822 proteins whose functions cannot be predicted by GeneScan comprised the unknown-function group. For the known-function group, we further classified the proteins by molecular function, biological process, cellular component, and tissue specificity. For the unknown-function group, we developed a strategy in which the proteins were filtered by cross-Blast to identify panda-specific proteins under the assumption that proteins related to the panda-specific traits in the unknown-function group exist. After this filtering procedure, we identified 32 proteins (2 of which are membrane proteins) specific to the giant panda genome as compared against the dog and horse genomes. Based on their amino acid sequences, these 32 proteins were further analyzed by functional classification using SVM-Prot, motif prediction using MyHits, and interacting protein prediction using the Database of Interacting Proteins. Nineteen proteins were predicted to be zinc-binding proteins, thus affecting the activities of nucleic acids. The 32 panda-specific proteins will be further investigated by structural and functional analysis.

  15. The draft genome sequence and annotation of the desert woodrat Neotoma lepida

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    Michael Campbell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the de novo draft genome sequence for a vertebrate mammalian herbivore, the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida. This species is of ecological and evolutionary interest with respect to ingestion, microbial detoxification and hepatic metabolism of toxic plant secondary compounds from the highly toxic creosote bush (Larrea tridentata and the juniper shrub (Juniperus monosperma. The draft genome sequence and annotation have been deposited at GenBank under the accession LZPO01000000.

  16. The draft genome sequence and annotation of the desert woodrat Neotoma lepida.

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    Campbell, Michael; Oakeson, Kelly F; Yandell, Mark; Halpert, James R; Dearing, Denise

    2016-09-01

    We present the de novo draft genome sequence for a vertebrate mammalian herbivore, the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida). This species is of ecological and evolutionary interest with respect to ingestion, microbial detoxification and hepatic metabolism of toxic plant secondary compounds from the highly toxic creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) and the juniper shrub (Juniperus monosperma). The draft genome sequence and annotation have been deposited at GenBank under the accession LZPO01000000.

  17. A pipeline for automated annotation of yeast genome sequences by a conserved-synteny approach

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    Proux-Wéra Estelle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeasts are a model system for exploring eukaryotic genome evolution. Next-generation sequencing technologies are poised to vastly increase the number of yeast genome sequences, both from resequencing projects (population studies and from de novo sequencing projects (new species. However, the annotation of genomes presents a major bottleneck for de novo projects, because it still relies on a process that is largely manual. Results Here we present the Yeast Genome Annotation Pipeline (YGAP, an automated system designed specifically for new yeast genome sequences lacking transcriptome data. YGAP does automatic de novo annotation, exploiting homology and synteny information from other yeast species stored in the Yeast Gene Order Browser (YGOB database. The basic premises underlying YGAP's approach are that data from other species already tells us what genes we should expect to find in any particular genomic region and that we should also expect that orthologous genes are likely to have similar intron/exon structures. Additionally, it is able to detect probable frameshift sequencing errors and can propose corrections for them. YGAP searches intelligently for introns, and detects tRNA genes and Ty-like elements. Conclusions In tests on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on the genomes of Naumovozyma castellii and Tetrapisispora blattae newly sequenced with Roche-454 technology, YGAP outperformed another popular annotation program (AUGUSTUS. For S. cerevisiae and N. castellii, 91-93% of YGAP's predicted gene structures were identical to those in previous manually curated gene sets. YGAP has been implemented as a webserver with a user-friendly interface at http://wolfe.gen.tcd.ie/annotation.

  18. Genome Sequence and Annotation of Colletotrichum higginsianum, a Causal Agent of Crucifer Anthracnose Disease.

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    Zampounis, Antonios; Pigné, Sandrine; Dallery, Jean-Félix; Wittenberg, Alexander H J; Zhou, Shiguo; Schwartz, David C; Thon, Michael R; O'Connell, Richard J

    2016-08-18

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an ascomycete fungus causing anthracnose disease on numerous cultivated plants in the family Brassicaceae, as well as the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana We report an assembly of the nuclear genome and gene annotation of this pathogen, which was obtained using a combination of PacBio long-read sequencing and optical mapping. Copyright © 2016 Zampounis et al.

  19. Whole genome sequence and genome annotation of Colletotrichum acutatum, causal agent of anthracnose in pepper plants in South Korea

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    Joon-Hee Han

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum acutatum is a destructive fungal pathogen which causes anthracnose in a wide range of crops. Here we report the whole genome sequence and annotation of C. acutatum strain KC05, isolated from an infected pepper in Kangwon, South Korea. Genomic DNA from the KC05 strain was used for the whole genome sequencing using a PacBio sequencer and the MiSeq system. The KC05 genome was determined to be 52,190,760 bp in size with a G + C content of 51.73% in 27 scaffolds and to contain 13,559 genes with an average length of 1516 bp. Gene prediction and annotation were performed by incorporating RNA-Seq data. The genome sequence of the KC05 was deposited at DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession number LUXP00000000.

  20. Whole genome sequence and genome annotation of Colletotrichum acutatum, causal agent of anthracnose in pepper plants in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Joon-Hee; Chon, Jae-Kyung; Ahn, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Ik-Young; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2016-06-01

    Colletotrichum acutatum is a destructive fungal pathogen which causes anthracnose in a wide range of crops. Here we report the whole genome sequence and annotation of C. acutatum strain KC05, isolated from an infected pepper in Kangwon, South Korea. Genomic DNA from the KC05 strain was used for the whole genome sequencing using a PacBio sequencer and the MiSeq system. The KC05 genome was determined to be 52,190,760 bp in size with a G + C content of 51.73% in 27 scaffolds and to contain 13,559 genes with an average length of 1516 bp. Gene prediction and annotation were performed by incorporating RNA-Seq data. The genome sequence of the KC05 was deposited at DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession number LUXP00000000.

  1. Analysis of high-throughput sequencing and annotation strategies for phage genomes.

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    Matthew R Henn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial viruses (phages play a critical role in shaping microbial populations as they influence both host mortality and horizontal gene transfer. As such, they have a significant impact on local and global ecosystem function and human health. Despite their importance, little is known about the genomic diversity harbored in phages, as methods to capture complete phage genomes have been hampered by the lack of knowledge about the target genomes, and difficulties in generating sufficient quantities of genomic DNA for sequencing. Of the approximately 550 phage genomes currently available in the public domain, fewer than 5% are marine phage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To advance the study of phage biology through comparative genomic approaches we used marine cyanophage as a model system. We compared DNA preparation methodologies (DNA extraction directly from either phage lysates or CsCl purified phage particles, and sequencing strategies that utilize either Sanger sequencing of a linker amplification shotgun library (LASL or of a whole genome shotgun library (WGSL, or 454 pyrosequencing methods. We demonstrate that genomic DNA sample preparation directly from a phage lysate, combined with 454 pyrosequencing, is best suited for phage genome sequencing at scale, as this method is capable of capturing complete continuous genomes with high accuracy. In addition, we describe an automated annotation informatics pipeline that delivers high-quality annotation and yields few false positives and negatives in ORF calling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These DNA preparation, sequencing and annotation strategies enable a high-throughput approach to the burgeoning field of phage genomics.

  2. CGKB: an annotation knowledge base for cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. methylation filtered genomic genespace sequences

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    Spraggins Thomas A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.] is one of the most important food and forage legumes in the semi-arid tropics because of its ability to tolerate drought and grow on poor soils. It is cultivated mostly by poor farmers in developing countries, with 80% of production taking place in the dry savannah of tropical West and Central Africa. Cowpea is largely an underexploited crop with relatively little genomic information available for use in applied plant breeding. The goal of the Cowpea Genomics Initiative (CGI, funded by the Kirkhouse Trust, a UK-based charitable organization, is to leverage modern molecular genetic tools for gene discovery and cowpea improvement. One aspect of the initiative is the sequencing of the gene-rich region of the cowpea genome (termed the genespace recovered using methylation filtration technology and providing annotation and analysis of the sequence data. Description CGKB, Cowpea Genespace/Genomics Knowledge Base, is an annotation knowledge base developed under the CGI. The database is based on information derived from 298,848 cowpea genespace sequences (GSS isolated by methylation filtering of genomic DNA. The CGKB consists of three knowledge bases: GSS annotation and comparative genomics knowledge base, GSS enzyme and metabolic pathway knowledge base, and GSS simple sequence repeats (SSRs knowledge base for molecular marker discovery. A homology-based approach was applied for annotations of the GSS, mainly using BLASTX against four public FASTA formatted protein databases (NCBI GenBank Proteins, UniProtKB-Swiss-Prot, UniprotKB-PIR (Protein Information Resource, and UniProtKB-TrEMBL. Comparative genome analysis was done by BLASTX searches of the cowpea GSS against four plant proteomes from Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Medicago truncatula, and Populus trichocarpa. The possible exons and introns on each cowpea GSS were predicted using the HMM-based Genscan gene predication program and the

  3. The Fast Changing Landscape of Sequencing Technologies and Their Impact on Microbial Genome Assemblies and Annotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Quest, Daniel J [ORNL; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Clum, Alicia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Cottingham, Robert W [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2012-01-01

    Background: The emergence of next generation sequencing (NGS) has provided the means for rapid and high throughput sequencing and data generation at low cost, while concomitantly creating a new set of challenges. The number of available assembled microbial genomes continues to grow rapidly and their quality reflects the quality of the sequencing technology used, but also of the analysis software employed for assembly and annotation. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this work, we have explored the quality of the microbial draft genomes across various sequencing technologies. We have compared the draft and finished assemblies of 133 microbial genomes sequenced at the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute and finished at the Los Alamos National Laboratory using a variety of combinations of sequencing technologies, reflecting the transition of the institute from Sanger-based sequencing platforms to NGS platforms. The quality of the public assemblies and of the associated gene annotations was evaluated using various metrics. Results obtained with the different sequencing technologies, as well as their effects on downstream processes, were analyzed. Our results demonstrate that the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system, the primary sequencing technology currently used for de novo genome sequencing and assembly at JGI, has various advantages in terms of total sequence throughput and cost, but it also introduces challenges for the downstream analyses. In all cases assembly results although on average are of high quality, need to be viewed critically and consider sources of errors in them prior to analysis. Conclusion: These data follow the evolution of microbial sequencing and downstream processing at the JGI from draft genome sequences with large gaps corresponding to missing genes of significant biological role to assemblies with multiple small gaps (Illumina) and finally to assemblies that generate almost complete genomes (Illumina+PacBio).

  4. Genome sequencing and annotation of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB PR10 strain

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    Mohd Zakihalani A. Halim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of a multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain PR10 (MDR-TB PR10 isolated from a patient diagnosed with tuberculosis. The size of the draft genome MDR-TB PR10 is 4.34 Mbp with 65.6% of G + C content and consists of 4637 predicted genes. The determinants were categorized by RAST into 400 subsystems with 4286 coding sequences and 50 RNAs. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number CP010968.

  5. Mercator: a fast and simple web server for genome scale functional annotation of plant sequence data.

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    Lohse, Marc; Nagel, Axel; Herter, Thomas; May, Patrick; Schroda, Michael; Zrenner, Rita; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stitt, Mark; Usadel, Björn

    2014-05-01

    Next-generation technologies generate an overwhelming amount of gene sequence data. Efficient annotation tools are required to make these data amenable to functional genomics analyses. The Mercator pipeline automatically assigns functional terms to protein or nucleotide sequences. It uses the MapMan 'BIN' ontology, which is tailored for functional annotation of plant 'omics' data. The classification procedure performs parallel sequence searches against reference databases, compiles the results and computes the most likely MapMan BINs for each query. In the current version, the pipeline relies on manually curated reference classifications originating from the three reference organisms (Arabidopsis, Chlamydomonas, rice), various other plant species that have a reviewed SwissProt annotation, and more than 2000 protein domain and family profiles at InterPro, CDD and KOG. Functional annotations predicted by Mercator achieve accuracies above 90% when benchmarked against manual annotation. In addition to mapping files for direct use in the visualization software MapMan, Mercator provides graphical overview charts, detailed annotation information in a convenient web browser interface and a MapMan-to-GO translation table to export results as GO terms. Mercator is available free of charge via http://mapman.gabipd.org/web/guest/app/Mercator.

  6. Genome sequencing and annotation of Acinetobacter junii strain MTCC 11364

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    Indu Khatri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Acinetobacter consists of 31 validly published species ubiquitously distributed in nature and primarily associated with nosocomial infection. We report the 3.5 Mb draft genome of the Acinetobacter junii strain MTCC 11364. The genome has a G + C content of 38.0% and includes 3 rRNA genes (5S, 23S, 16S and 64 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes.

  7. Sequence and annotation of the apicoplast genome of the human pathogen Babesia microti.

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    Aprajita Garg

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan intraerythrocytic parasite Babesia microti is an emerging human pathogen and the primary cause of human babesiosis, a malaria-like illness endemic in the United States. The pathogen is transmitted to humans by the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis, and by transfusion of blood from asymptomatic B. microti-infected donors. Whereas the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of this parasite have been sequenced, assembled and annotated, its apicoplast genome remained incomplete, mainly due to its low representation and high A+T content. Here we report the complete sequence and annotation of the apicoplast genome of the B. microti R1 isolate. The genome consists of a 28.7 kb circular molecule encoding primarily functions important for maintenance of the apicoplast DNA, transcription, translation and maturation of organellar proteins. Genome analysis and annotation revealed a unique gene structure and organization of the B. microti apicoplast genome and suggest that all metabolic and non-housekeeping functions in this organelle are nuclear-encoded. B. microti apicoplast functions are significantly different from those of the host, suggesting that they might be useful as targets for development of potent and safe therapies for the treatment of human babesiosis.

  8. Genome sequencing and annotation of Amycolatopsis azurea DSM 43854T

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    Indu Khatri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the 9.2 Mb genome of the azureomycin A and B antibiotic producing strain Amycolatopsis azurea isolated from a Japanese soil sample. The draft genome of strain DSM 43854T consists of 9,223,451 bp with a G + C content of 69.0% and the genome contains 3 rRNA genes (5S–23S–16S and 58 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes. The homology searches revealed that the PKS gene clusters are supposed to be responsible for the biosynthesis of naptomycin, macbecin, rifamycin, mitomycin, maduropeptin enediyne, neocarzinostatin enediyne, C-1027 enediyne, calicheamicin enediyne, landomycin, simocyclinone, medermycin, granaticin, polyketomycin, teicoplanin, balhimycin, vancomycin, staurosporine, rubradirin and complestatin.

  9. NCBI Reference Sequences (RefSeq): current status, new features and genome annotation policy.

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    Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana; Brown, Garth R; Maglott, Donna R

    2012-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database is a collection of genomic, transcript and protein sequence records. These records are selected and curated from public sequence archives and represent a significant reduction in redundancy compared to the volume of data archived by the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration. The database includes over 16,00 organisms, 2.4 × 0(6) genomic records, 13 × 10(6) proteins and 2 × 10(6) RNA records spanning prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses (RefSeq release 49, September 2011). The RefSeq database is maintained by a combined approach of automated analyses, collaboration and manual curation to generate an up-to-date representation of the sequence, its features, names and cross-links to related sources of information. We report here on recent growth, the status of curating the human RefSeq data set, more extensive feature annotation and current policy for eukaryotic genome annotation via the NCBI annotation pipeline. More information about the resource is available online (see http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/).

  10. Identification and annotation of promoter regions in microbial genome sequences on the basis of DNA stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vetriselvi Rangannan; Manju Bansal

    2007-08-01

    Analysis of various predicted structural properties of promoter regions in prokaryotic as well as eukaryotic genomes had earlier indicated that they have several common features, such as lower stability, higher curvature and less bendability, when compared with their neighboring regions. Based on the difference in stability between neighboring upstream and downstream regions in the vicinity of experimentally determined transcription start sites, a promoter prediction algorithm has been developed to identify prokaryotic promoter sequences in whole genomes. The average free energy (E) over known promoter sequences and the difference (D) between E and the average free energy over the entire genome (G) are used to search for promoters in the genomic sequences. Using these cutoff values to predict promoter regions across entire Escherichia coli genome, we achieved a reliability of 70% when the predicted promoters were cross verified against the 960 transcription start sites (TSSs) listed in the Ecocyc database. Annotation of the whole E. coli genome for promoter region could be carried out with 49% accuracy. The method is quite general and it can be used to annotate the promoter regions of other prokaryotic genomes.

  11. A field guide to whole-genome sequencing, assembly and annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekblom, Robert; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2014-11-01

    Genome sequencing projects were long confined to biomedical model organisms and required the concerted effort of large consortia. Rapid progress in high-throughput sequencing technology and the simultaneous development of bioinformatic tools have democratized the field. It is now within reach for individual research groups in the eco-evolutionary and conservation community to generate de novo draft genome sequences for any organism of choice. Because of the cost and considerable effort involved in such an endeavour, the important first step is to thoroughly consider whether a genome sequence is necessary for addressing the biological question at hand. Once this decision is taken, a genome project requires careful planning with respect to the organism involved and the intended quality of the genome draft. Here, we briefly review the state of the art within this field and provide a step-by-step introduction to the workflow involved in genome sequencing, assembly and annotation with particular reference to large and complex genomes. This tutorial is targeted at scientists with a background in conservation genetics, but more generally, provides useful practical guidance for researchers engaging in whole-genome sequencing projects.

  12. Exploring an Annotated Sequence Assembly of the Perennial Ryegrass Genome for Genomic Regions Enriched for Trait Associated Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Stephen; Cericola, Fabio; Janss, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is an outbreeding diploid species and one of the most important forage crops used in temperate agriculture. We have developed a draft sequence assembly of the perennial ryegrass genome and annotated it with the aid of RNA-seq data from various genotypes, plant...

  13. Whole genome shotgun sequencing of Brassica oleracea and its application to gene discovery and annotation in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Ayele, Mulu; Haas, Brian J.; Kumar, Nikhil; Wu, Hank; Xiao, Yongli; Van Aken, Susan; Utterback, Teresa R.; WORTMAN, Jennifer R.; White, Owen R.; Town, Christopher D

    2005-01-01

    Through comparative studies of the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana and its close relative Brassica oleracea, we have identified conserved regions that represent potentially functional sequences overlooked by previous Arabidopsis genome annotation methods. A total of 454,274 whole genome shotgun sequences covering 283 Mb (0.44×) of the estimated 650 Mb Brassica genome were searched against the Arabidopsis genome, and conserved Arabidopsis genome sequences (CAGSs) were identified. Of these ...

  14. Annotation-based genome-wide SNP discovery in the large and complex Aegilops tauschii genome using next-generation sequencing without a reference genome sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Ming-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many plants have large and complex genomes with an abundance of repeated sequences. Many plants are also polyploid. Both of these attributes typify the genome architecture in the tribe Triticeae, whose members include economically important wheat, rye and barley. Large genome sizes, an abundance of repeated sequences, and polyploidy present challenges to genome-wide SNP discovery using next-generation sequencing (NGS of total genomic DNA by making alignment and clustering of short reads generated by the NGS platforms difficult, particularly in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Results An annotation-based, genome-wide SNP discovery pipeline is reported using NGS data for large and complex genomes without a reference genome sequence. Roche 454 shotgun reads with low genome coverage of one genotype are annotated in order to distinguish single-copy sequences and repeat junctions from repetitive sequences and sequences shared by paralogous genes. Multiple genome equivalents of shotgun reads of another genotype generated with SOLiD or Solexa are then mapped to the annotated Roche 454 reads to identify putative SNPs. A pipeline program package, AGSNP, was developed and used for genome-wide SNP discovery in Aegilops tauschii-the diploid source of the wheat D genome, and with a genome size of 4.02 Gb, of which 90% is repetitive sequences. Genomic DNA of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78 was sequenced with the Roche 454 NGS platform. Genomic DNA and cDNA of Ae. tauschii accession AS75 was sequenced primarily with SOLiD, although some Solexa and Roche 454 genomic sequences were also generated. A total of 195,631 putative SNPs were discovered in gene sequences, 155,580 putative SNPs were discovered in uncharacterized single-copy regions, and another 145,907 putative SNPs were discovered in repeat junctions. These SNPs were dispersed across the entire Ae. tauschii genome. To assess the false positive SNP discovery rate, DNA

  15. Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 Genome Revisited: Sequence Update and Re-Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Victor G.; Tirumalai, Madhan R.; Montazari, Saied; Checinska, Aleksandra; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus strain SAFR-032 is a non-pathogenic spore-forming bacterium exhibiting an anomalously high persistence in bactericidal environments. In its dormant state, it is capable of withstanding doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation or hydrogen peroxide, which are lethal for the vast majority of microorganisms. This unusual resistance profile has made SAFR-032 a reference strain for studies of bacterial spore resistance. The complete genome sequence of B. pumilus SAFR-032 was published in 2007 early in the genomics era. Since then, the SAFR-032 strain has frequently been used as a source of genetic/genomic information that was regarded as representative of the entire B. pumilus species group. Recently, our ongoing studies of conservation of gene distribution patterns in the complete genomes of various B. pumilus strains revealed indications of misassembly in the B. pumilus SAFR-032 genome. Synteny-driven local genome resequencing confirmed that the original SAFR-032 sequence contained assembly errors associated with long sequence repeats. The genome sequence was corrected according to the new findings. In addition, a significantly improved annotation is now available. Gene orders were compared and portions of the genome arrangement were found to be similar in a wide spectrum of Bacillus strains. PMID:27351589

  16. Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 Genome Revisited: Sequence Update and Re-Annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor G Stepanov

    Full Text Available Bacillus pumilus strain SAFR-032 is a non-pathogenic spore-forming bacterium exhibiting an anomalously high persistence in bactericidal environments. In its dormant state, it is capable of withstanding doses of ultraviolet (UV radiation or hydrogen peroxide, which are lethal for the vast majority of microorganisms. This unusual resistance profile has made SAFR-032 a reference strain for studies of bacterial spore resistance. The complete genome sequence of B. pumilus SAFR-032 was published in 2007 early in the genomics era. Since then, the SAFR-032 strain has frequently been used as a source of genetic/genomic information that was regarded as representative of the entire B. pumilus species group. Recently, our ongoing studies of conservation of gene distribution patterns in the complete genomes of various B. pumilus strains revealed indications of misassembly in the B. pumilus SAFR-032 genome. Synteny-driven local genome resequencing confirmed that the original SAFR-032 sequence contained assembly errors associated with long sequence repeats. The genome sequence was corrected according to the new findings. In addition, a significantly improved annotation is now available. Gene orders were compared and portions of the genome arrangement were found to be similar in a wide spectrum of Bacillus strains.

  17. Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 Genome Revisited: Sequence Update and Re-Annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Victor G; Tirumalai, Madhan R; Montazari, Saied; Checinska, Aleksandra; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Fox, George E

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus strain SAFR-032 is a non-pathogenic spore-forming bacterium exhibiting an anomalously high persistence in bactericidal environments. In its dormant state, it is capable of withstanding doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation or hydrogen peroxide, which are lethal for the vast majority of microorganisms. This unusual resistance profile has made SAFR-032 a reference strain for studies of bacterial spore resistance. The complete genome sequence of B. pumilus SAFR-032 was published in 2007 early in the genomics era. Since then, the SAFR-032 strain has frequently been used as a source of genetic/genomic information that was regarded as representative of the entire B. pumilus species group. Recently, our ongoing studies of conservation of gene distribution patterns in the complete genomes of various B. pumilus strains revealed indications of misassembly in the B. pumilus SAFR-032 genome. Synteny-driven local genome resequencing confirmed that the original SAFR-032 sequence contained assembly errors associated with long sequence repeats. The genome sequence was corrected according to the new findings. In addition, a significantly improved annotation is now available. Gene orders were compared and portions of the genome arrangement were found to be similar in a wide spectrum of Bacillus strains.

  18. Identification of novel biomass-degrading enzymes from genomic dark matter: Populating genomic sequence space with functional annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Hailan; Froula, Jeff; Du, Changbin; Kim, Tae-Wan; Hawley, Erik R; Bauer, Stefan; Wang, Zhong; Ivanova, Nathalia; Clark, Douglas S; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    Although recent nucleotide sequencing technologies have significantly enhanced our understanding of microbial genomes, the function of ∼35% of genes identified in a genome currently remains unknown. To improve the understanding of microbial genomes and consequently of microbial processes it will be crucial to assign a function to this "genomic dark matter." Due to the urgent need for additional carbohydrate-active enzymes for improved production of transportation fuels from lignocellulosic biomass, we screened the genomes of more than 5,500 microorganisms for hypothetical proteins that are located in the proximity of already known cellulases. We identified, synthesized and expressed a total of 17 putative cellulase genes with insufficient sequence similarity to currently known cellulases to be identified as such using traditional sequence annotation techniques that rely on significant sequence similarity. The recombinant proteins of the newly identified putative cellulases were subjected to enzymatic activity assays to verify their hydrolytic activity towards cellulose and lignocellulosic biomass. Eleven (65%) of the tested enzymes had significant activity towards at least one of the substrates. This high success rate highlights that a gene context-based approach can be used to assign function to genes that are otherwise categorized as "genomic dark matter" and to identify biomass-degrading enzymes that have little sequence similarity to already known cellulases. The ability to assign function to genes that have no related sequence representatives with functional annotation will be important to enhance our understanding of microbial processes and to identify microbial proteins for a wide range of applications.

  19. Bioinformatics for plant genome annotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiers, M.W.E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Large amounts of genome sequence data are available and much more will become available in the near future. A DNA sequence alone has, however, limited use. Genome annotation is required to assign biological interpretation to the DNA sequence. This thesis describ

  20. Re-annotation of the genome sequence of Helicobacter pylori 26695.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Tiago; Correia, Daniela M; Rocha, Miguel; Rocha, Isabel

    2013-11-15

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacterium that colonizes the human epithelia, causing duodenal and gastric ulcers, and gastric cancer. The genome of H. pylori 26695 has been previously sequenced and annotated. In addition, two genome-scale metabolic models have been developed. In order to maintain accurate and relevant information on coding sequences (CDS) and to retrieve new information, the assignment of new functions to Helicobacter pylori 26695s genes was performed in this work. The use of software tools, on-line databases and an annotation pipeline for inspecting each gene allowed the attribution of validated EC numbers and TC numbers to metabolic genes encoding enzymes and transport proteins, respectively. 1212 genes encoding proteins were identified in this annotation, being 712 metabolic genes and 500 non-metabolic, while 191 new functions were assignment to the CDS of this bacterium. This information provides relevant biological information for the scientific community dealing with this organism and can be used as the basis for a new metabolic model reconstruction.

  1. High-density rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarray design using early-stage rhesus genome sequence information and human genome annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magness Charles L

    2007-01-01

    a closely related species. Conclusion The number of different genes represented on microarrays for unfinished genomes can be greatly increased by matching known gene transcript annotations from a closely related species with sequence data from the unfinished genome. Signal intensity on both EST- and genome-derived arrays was highly correlated with probe distance from the 3' UTR, information often missing from ESTs yet present in early-stage genome projects.

  2. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based on transcr......The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...

  3. CpGAVAS, an integrated web server for the annotation, visualization, analysis, and GenBank submission of completely sequenced chloroplast genome sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complete sequences of chloroplast genomes provide wealthy information regarding the evolutionary history of species. With the advance of next-generation sequencing technology, the number of completely sequenced chloroplast genomes is expected to increase exponentially, powerful computational tools annotating the genome sequences are in urgent need. Results We have developed a web server CPGAVAS. The server accepts a complete chloroplast genome sequence as input. First, it predicts protein-coding and rRNA genes based on the identification and mapping of the most similar, full-length protein, cDNA and rRNA sequences by integrating results from Blastx, Blastn, protein2genome and est2genome programs. Second, tRNA genes and inverted repeats (IR are identified using tRNAscan, ARAGORN and vmatch respectively. Third, it calculates the summary statistics for the annotated genome. Fourth, it generates a circular map ready for publication. Fifth, it can create a Sequin file for GenBank submission. Last, it allows the extractions of protein and mRNA sequences for given list of genes and species. The annotation results in GFF3 format can be edited using any compatible annotation editing tools. The edited annotations can then be uploaded to CPGAVAS for update and re-analyses repeatedly. Using known chloroplast genome sequences as test set, we show that CPGAVAS performs comparably to another application DOGMA, while having several superior functionalities. Conclusions CPGAVAS allows the semi-automatic and complete annotation of a chloroplast genome sequence, and the visualization, editing and analysis of the annotation results. It will become an indispensible tool for researchers studying chloroplast genomes. The software is freely accessible from http://www.herbalgenomics.org/cpgavas.

  4. NCBI prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Badretdin, Azat; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Nawrocki, Eric P; Zaslavsky, Leonid; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Pruitt, Kim D; Borodovsky, Mark; Ostell, James

    2016-08-19

    Recent technological advances have opened unprecedented opportunities for large-scale sequencing and analysis of populations of pathogenic species in disease outbreaks, as well as for large-scale diversity studies aimed at expanding our knowledge across the whole domain of prokaryotes. To meet the challenge of timely interpretation of structure, function and meaning of this vast genetic information, a comprehensive approach to automatic genome annotation is critically needed. In collaboration with Georgia Tech, NCBI has developed a new approach to genome annotation that combines alignment based methods with methods of predicting protein-coding and RNA genes and other functional elements directly from sequence. A new gene finding tool, GeneMarkS+, uses the combined evidence of protein and RNA placement by homology as an initial map of annotation to generate and modify ab initio gene predictions across the whole genome. Thus, the new NCBI's Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP) relies more on sequence similarity when confident comparative data are available, while it relies more on statistical predictions in the absence of external evidence. The pipeline provides a framework for generation and analysis of annotation on the full breadth of prokaryotic taxonomy. For additional information on PGAP see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/annotation_prok/ and the NCBI Handbook, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK174280/.

  5. Gene discovery in the hamster: a comparative genomics approach for gene annotation by sequencing of hamster testis cDNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Shafiq A

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete genome annotation will likely be achieved through a combination of computer-based analysis of available genome sequences combined with direct experimental characterization of expressed regions of individual genomes. We have utilized a comparative genomics approach involving the sequencing of randomly selected hamster testis cDNAs to begin to identify genes not previously annotated on the human, mouse, rat and Fugu (pufferfish genomes. Results 735 distinct sequences were analyzed for their relatedness to known sequences in public databases. Eight of these sequences were derived from previously unidentified genes and expression of these genes in testis was confirmed by Northern blotting. The genomic locations of each sequence were mapped in human, mouse, rat and pufferfish, where applicable, and the structure of their cognate genes was derived using computer-based predictions, genomic comparisons and analysis of uncharacterized cDNA sequences from human and macaque. Conclusion The use of a comparative genomics approach resulted in the identification of eight cDNAs that correspond to previously uncharacterized genes in the human genome. The proteins encoded by these genes included a new member of the kinesin superfamily, a SET/MYND-domain protein, and six proteins for which no specific function could be predicted. Each gene was expressed primarily in testis, suggesting that they may play roles in the development and/or function of testicular cells.

  6. Improving pan-genome annotation using whole genome multiple alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salzberg Steven L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid annotation and comparisons of genomes from multiple isolates (pan-genomes is becoming commonplace due to advances in sequencing technology. Genome annotations can contain inconsistencies and errors that hinder comparative analysis even within a single species. Tools are needed to compare and improve annotation quality across sets of closely related genomes. Results We introduce a new tool, Mugsy-Annotator, that identifies orthologs and evaluates annotation quality in prokaryotic genomes using whole genome multiple alignment. Mugsy-Annotator identifies anomalies in annotated gene structures, including inconsistently located translation initiation sites and disrupted genes due to draft genome sequencing or pseudogenes. An evaluation of species pan-genomes using the tool indicates that such anomalies are common, especially at translation initiation sites. Mugsy-Annotator reports alternate annotations that improve consistency and are candidates for further review. Conclusions Whole genome multiple alignment can be used to efficiently identify orthologs and annotation problem areas in a bacterial pan-genome. Comparisons of annotated gene structures within a species may show more variation than is actually present in the genome, indicating errors in genome annotation. Our new tool Mugsy-Annotator assists re-annotation efforts by highlighting edits that improve annotation consistency.

  7. An Introduction to Genome Annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Michael S; Yandell, Mark

    2015-12-17

    Genome projects have evolved from large international undertakings to tractable endeavors for a single lab. Accurate genome annotation is critical for successful genomic, genetic, and molecular biology experiments. These annotations can be generated using a number of approaches and available software tools. This unit describes methods for genome annotation and a number of software tools commonly used in gene annotation.

  8. Automatic annotation of organellar genomes with DOGMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyman, Stacia; Jansen, Robert K.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-06-01

    Dual Organellar GenoMe Annotator (DOGMA) automates the annotation of extra-nuclear organellar (chloroplast and animal mitochondrial) genomes. It is a web-based package that allows the use of comparative BLAST searches to identify and annotate genes in a genome. DOGMA presents a list of putative genes to the user in a graphical format for viewing and editing. Annotations are stored on our password-protected server. Complete annotations can be extracted for direct submission to GenBank. Furthermore, intergenic regions of specified length can be extracted, as well the nucleotide sequences and amino acid sequences of the genes.

  9. Genome scaffolding and annotation for the pathogen vector Ixodes ricinus by ultra-long single molecule sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramaro, Wibke J; Hunewald, Oliver E; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Muller, Claude P

    2017-02-08

    Global warming and other ecological changes have facilitated the expansion of Ixodes ricinus tick populations. Ixodes ricinus is the most important carrier of vector-borne pathogens in Europe, transmitting viruses, protozoa and bacteria, in particular Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato), the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis, the most prevalent vector-borne disease in humans in the Northern hemisphere. To faster control this disease vector, a better understanding of the I. ricinus tick is necessary. To facilitate such studies, we recently published the first reference genome of this highly prevalent pathogen vector. Here, we further extend these studies by scaffolding and annotating the first reference genome by using ultra-long sequencing reads from third generation single molecule sequencing. In addition, we present the first genome size estimation for I. ricinus ticks and the embryo-derived cell line IRE/CTVM19. 235,953 contigs were integrated into 204,904 scaffolds, extending the currently known genome lengths by more than 30% from 393 to 516 Mb and the N50 contig value by 87% from 1643 bp to a N50 scaffold value of 3067 bp. In addition, 25,263 sequences were annotated by comparison to the tick's North American relative Ixodes scapularis. After (conserved) hypothetical proteins, zinc finger proteins, secreted proteins and P450 coding proteins were the most prevalent protein categories annotated. Interestingly, more than 50% of the amino acid sequences matching the homology threshold had 95-100% identity to the corresponding I. scapularis gene models. The sequence information was complemented by the first genome size estimation for this species. Flow cytometry-based genome size analysis revealed a haploid genome size of 2.65Gb for I. ricinus ticks and 3.80 Gb for the cell line. We present a first draft sequence map of the I. ricinus genome based on a PacBio-Illumina assembly. The I. ricinus genome was shown to be 26% (500 Mb) larger than the genome of its

  10. Draft genome sequence and annotation of Lactobacillus acetotolerans BM-LA14527, a beer-spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyan; Li, Lin; Peters, Brian M; Li, Bing; Deng, Yang; Xu, Zhenbo; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2016-09-01

    Lactobacillus acetotolerans is a hard-to-culture beer-spoilage bacterium capable of entering into the viable putative nonculturable (VPNC) state. As part of an initial strategy to investigate the phenotypic behavior of L. acetotolerans, draft genome sequencing was performed. Results demonstrated a total of 1824 predicted annotated genes, with several potential VPNC- and beer-spoilage-associated genes identified. Importantly, this is the first genome sequence of L. acetotolerans as beer-spoilage bacteria and it may aid in further analysis of L. acetotolerans and other beer-spoilage bacteria, with direct implications for food safety control in the beer brewing industry.

  11. Integrative analysis of functional genomic annotations and sequencing data to identify rare causal variants via hierarchical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela eCapanu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the small number of rare causal variants contributing to disease has beena major focus of investigation in recent years, but represents a formidable statisticalchallenge due to the rare frequencies with which these variants are observed. In thiscommentary we draw attention to a formal statistical framework, namely hierarchicalmodeling, to combine functional genomic annotations with sequencing data with theobjective of enhancing our ability to identify rare causal variants. Using simulations weshow that in all configurations studied, the hierarchical modeling approach has superiordiscriminatory ability compared to a recently proposed aggregate measure of deleteriousness,the Combined Annotation-Dependent Depletion (CADD score, supportingour premise that aggregate functional genomic measures can more accurately identifycausal variants when used in conjunction with sequencing data through a hierarchicalmodeling approach

  12. Genome sequencing and annotation of Amycolatopsis vancoresmycina strain DSM 44592T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjot Kaur

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the 9.0-Mb draft genome of Amycolatopsis vancoresmycina strain DSM 44592T, isolated from Indian soil sample; produces antibiotic vancoresmycin. Draft genome of strain DSM44592T consists of 9,037,069 bp with a G+C content of 71.79% and 8340 predicted protein coding genes and 57 RNAs. RAST annotation indicates that strains Streptomyces sp. AA4 (score 521, Saccharomonospora viridis DSM 43017 (score 400 and Actinosynnema mirum DSM 43827 (score 372 are the closest neighbors of the strain DSM 44592T.

  13. Genomic sequence around butterfly wing development genes: annotation and comparative analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês C Conceição

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of genomic sequence allows characterization of genome content and organization, and access beyond gene-coding regions for identification of functional elements. BAC libraries, where relatively large genomic regions are made readily available, are especially useful for species without a fully sequenced genome and can increase genomic coverage of phylogenetic and biological diversity. For example, no butterfly genome is yet available despite the unique genetic and biological properties of this group, such as diversified wing color patterns. The evolution and development of these patterns is being studied in a few target species, including Bicyclus anynana, where a whole-genome BAC library allows targeted access to large genomic regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterize ∼1.3 Mb of genomic sequence around 11 selected genes expressed in B. anynana developing wings. Extensive manual curation of in silico predictions, also making use of a large dataset of expressed genes for this species, identified repetitive elements and protein coding sequence, and highlighted an expansion of Alcohol dehydrogenase genes. Comparative analysis with orthologous regions of the lepidopteran reference genome allowed assessment of conservation of fine-scale synteny (with detection of new inversions and translocations and of DNA sequence (with detection of high levels of conservation of non-coding regions around some, but not all, developmental genes. CONCLUSIONS: The general properties and organization of the available B. anynana genomic sequence are similar to the lepidopteran reference, despite the more than 140 MY divergence. Our results lay the groundwork for further studies of new interesting findings in relation to both coding and non-coding sequence: 1 the Alcohol dehydrogenase expansion with higher similarity between the five tandemly-repeated B. anynana paralogs than with the corresponding B. mori orthologs, and 2 the high

  14. High-coverage sequencing and annotated assembly of the genome of the Australian dragon lizard Pogona vitticeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Arthur; Li, Qiye; Lian, Jinmin; O'Meally, Denis; Deakin, Janine; Wang, Zongji; Zhang, Pei; Fujita, Matthew; Patel, Hardip R; Holleley, Clare E; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Xiuwen; Matsubara, Kazumi; Waters, Paul; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Sarre, Stephen D; Zhang, Guojie

    2015-01-01

    The lizards of the family Agamidae are one of the most prominent elements of the Australian reptile fauna. Here, we present a genomic resource built on the basis of a wild-caught male ZZ central bearded dragon Pogona vitticeps. The genomic sequence for P. vitticeps, generated on the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, comprised 317 Gbp (179X raw read depth) from 13 insert libraries ranging from 250 bp to 40 kbp. After filtering for low-quality and duplicated reads, 146 Gbp of data (83X) was available for assembly. Exceptionally high levels of heterozygosity (0.85 % of single nucleotide polymorphisms plus sequence insertions or deletions) complicated assembly; nevertheless, 96.4 % of reads mapped back to the assembled scaffolds, indicating that the assembly included most of the sequenced genome. Length of the assembly was 1.8 Gbp in 545,310 scaffolds (69,852 longer than 300 bp), the longest being 14.68 Mbp. N50 was 2.29 Mbp. Genes were annotated on the basis of de novo prediction, similarity to the green anole Anolis carolinensis, Gallus gallus and Homo sapiens proteins, and P. vitticeps transcriptome sequence assemblies, to yield 19,406 protein-coding genes in the assembly, 63 % of which had intact open reading frames. Our assembly captured 99 % (246 of 248) of core CEGMA genes, with 93 % (231) being complete. The quality of the P. vitticeps assembly is comparable or superior to that of other published squamate genomes, and the annotated P. vitticeps genome can be accessed through a genome browser available at https://genomics.canberra.edu.au.

  15. Genome Annotation Transfer Utility (GATU: rapid annotation of viral genomes using a closely related reference genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upton Chris

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since DNA sequencing has become easier and cheaper, an increasing number of closely related viral genomes have been sequenced. However, many of these have been deposited in GenBank without annotations, severely limiting their value to researchers. While maintaining comprehensive genomic databases for a set of virus families at the Viral Bioinformatics Resource Center http://www.biovirus.org and Viral Bioinformatics – Canada http://www.virology.ca, we found that researchers were unnecessarily spending time annotating viral genomes that were close relatives of already annotated viruses. We have therefore designed and implemented a novel tool, Genome Annotation Transfer Utility (GATU, to transfer annotations from a previously annotated reference genome to a new target genome, thereby greatly reducing this laborious task. Results GATU transfers annotations from a reference genome to a closely related target genome, while still giving the user final control over which annotations should be included. GATU also detects open reading frames present in the target but not the reference genome and provides the user with a variety of bioinformatics tools to quickly determine if these ORFs should also be included in the annotation. After this process is complete, GATU saves the newly annotated genome as a GenBank, EMBL or XML-format file. The software is coded in Java and runs on a variety of computer platforms. Its user-friendly Graphical User Interface is specifically designed for users trained in the biological sciences. Conclusion GATU greatly simplifies the initial stages of genome annotation by using a closely related genome as a reference. It is not intended to be a gene prediction tool or a "complete" annotation system, but we have found that it significantly reduces the time required for annotation of genes and mature peptides as well as helping to standardize gene names between related organisms by transferring reference genome

  16. Genome Annotation Transfer Utility (GATU): rapid annotation of viral genomes using a closely related reference genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcherepanov, Vasily; Ehlers, Angelika; Upton, Chris

    2006-06-13

    Since DNA sequencing has become easier and cheaper, an increasing number of closely related viral genomes have been sequenced. However, many of these have been deposited in GenBank without annotations, severely limiting their value to researchers. While maintaining comprehensive genomic databases for a set of virus families at the Viral Bioinformatics Resource Center http://www.biovirus.org and Viral Bioinformatics - Canada http://www.virology.ca, we found that researchers were unnecessarily spending time annotating viral genomes that were close relatives of already annotated viruses. We have therefore designed and implemented a novel tool, Genome Annotation Transfer Utility (GATU), to transfer annotations from a previously annotated reference genome to a new target genome, thereby greatly reducing this laborious task. GATU transfers annotations from a reference genome to a closely related target genome, while still giving the user final control over which annotations should be included. GATU also detects open reading frames present in the target but not the reference genome and provides the user with a variety of bioinformatics tools to quickly determine if these ORFs should also be included in the annotation. After this process is complete, GATU saves the newly annotated genome as a GenBank, EMBL or XML-format file. The software is coded in Java and runs on a variety of computer platforms. Its user-friendly Graphical User Interface is specifically designed for users trained in the biological sciences. GATU greatly simplifies the initial stages of genome annotation by using a closely related genome as a reference. It is not intended to be a gene prediction tool or a "complete" annotation system, but we have found that it significantly reduces the time required for annotation of genes and mature peptides as well as helping to standardize gene names between related organisms by transferring reference genome annotations to the target genome. The program is freely

  17. Promoter prediction and annotation of microbial genomes based on DNA sequence and structural responses to superhelical stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benham Craig J

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our previous studies, we found that the sites in prokaryotic genomes which are most susceptible to duplex destabilization under the negative superhelical stresses that occur in vivo are statistically highly significantly associated with intergenic regions that are known or inferred to contain promoters. In this report we investigate how this structural property, either alone or together with other structural and sequence attributes, may be used to search prokaryotic genomes for promoters. Results We show that the propensity for stress-induced DNA duplex destabilization (SIDD is closely associated with specific promoter regions. The extent of destabilization in promoter-containing regions is found to be bimodally distributed. When compared with DNA curvature, deformability, thermostability or sequence motif scores within the -10 region, SIDD is found to be the most informative DNA property regarding promoter locations in the E. coli K12 genome. SIDD properties alone perform better at detecting promoter regions than other programs trained on this genome. Because this approach has a very low false positive rate, it can be used to predict with high confidence the subset of promoters that are strongly destabilized. When SIDD properties are combined with -10 motif scores in a linear classification function, they predict promoter regions with better than 80% accuracy. When these methods were tested with promoter and non-promoter sequences from Bacillus subtilis, they achieved similar or higher accuracies. We also present a strictly SIDD-based predictor for annotating promoter sequences in complete microbial genomes. Conclusion In this report we show that the propensity to undergo stress-induced duplex destabilization (SIDD is a distinctive structural attribute of many prokaryotic promoter sequences. We have developed methods to identify promoter sequences in prokaryotic genomes that use SIDD either as a sole predictor or in

  18. Towards Viral Genome Annotation Standards, Report from the 2010 NCBI Annotation Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brister, James Rodney; Bao, Yiming; Kuiken, Carla; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Le Mercier, Philippe; Leplae, Raphael; Madupu, Ramana; Scheuermann, Richard H; Schobel, Seth; Seto, Donald; Shrivastava, Susmita; Sterk, Peter; Zeng, Qiandong; Klimke, William; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2010-10-01

    Improvements in DNA sequencing technologies portend a new era in virology and could possibly lead to a giant leap in our understanding of viral evolution and ecology. Yet, as viral genome sequences begin to fill the world's biological databases, it is critically important to recognize that the scientific promise of this era is dependent on consistent and comprehensive genome annotation. With this in mind, the NCBI Genome Annotation Workshop recently hosted a study group tasked with developing sequence, function, and metadata annotation standards for viral genomes. This report describes the issues involved in viral genome annotation and reviews policy recommendations presented at the NCBI Annotation Workshop.

  19. Whole genome sequences and annotation of Micrococcus luteus SUBG006, a novel phytopathogen of mango

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    Purvi M. Rakhashiya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Actinobaceria, Micrococcus luteus SUBG006 was isolated from infected leaves of Mangifera indica L. vr. Nylon in Rajkot, (22.30°N, 70.78°E, Gujarat, India. The genome size is 3.86 Mb with G + C content of 69.80% and contains 112 rRNA sequences (5S, 16S and 23S. The whole genome sequencing has been deposited in DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number JOKP00000000.

  20. Chloroplast Genome Sequence Annotation of Dendrobium nobile (Asparagales: Orchidaceae), an Endangered Medicinal Orchid from Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Devendra; Konhar, Ruchishree; Debnath, Manish; Parameswaran, Sriram; Sundar, Durai; Tandon, Pramod

    2017-05-19

    Orchidaceae constitutes one of the largest families of angiosperms. Owing to the significance of orchids in plant biology, market needs and current sustainable technology levels, basic research on the biology of orchids and their applications in the orchid industry is increasing. Although chloroplast (cp) genomes continue to be evolutionarily informative, there is very limited information available on orchid chloroplast genomes in public repositories. Here, we report the complete cp genome sequence of Dendrobium nobile from Northeast India (Orchidaceae, Asparagales), bearing the GenBank accession number KX377961, which will provide valuable information for future research on orchid genomics and evolution, as well as the medicinal value of orchids. Phylogenetic analyses using Bayesian methods recovered a monophyletic grouping of all Dendrobium species (D. nobile, D. huoshanense, D. officinale, D. pendulum, D. strongylanthum and D. chrysotoxum). The relationships recovered among the representative orchid species from the four subfamilies, i.e., Cypripedioideae, Epidendroideae, Orchidoideae and Vanilloideae, were consistent within the family Orchidaceae.

  1. JGI Plant Genomics Gene Annotation Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Shengqiang; Rokhsar, Dan; Goodstein, David; Hayes, David; Mitros, Therese

    2014-07-14

    Plant genomes vary in size and are highly complex with a high amount of repeats, genome duplication and tandem duplication. Gene encodes a wealth of information useful in studying organism and it is critical to have high quality and stable gene annotation. Thanks to advancement of sequencing technology, many plant species genomes have been sequenced and transcriptomes are also sequenced. To use these vastly large amounts of sequence data to make gene annotation or re-annotation in a timely fashion, an automatic pipeline is needed. JGI plant genomics gene annotation pipeline, called integrated gene call (IGC), is our effort toward this aim with aid of a RNA-seq transcriptome assembly pipeline. It utilizes several gene predictors based on homolog peptides and transcript ORFs. See Methods for detail. Here we present genome annotation of JGI flagship green plants produced by this pipeline plus Arabidopsis and rice except for chlamy which is done by a third party. The genome annotations of these species and others are used in our gene family build pipeline and accessible via JGI Phytozome portal whose URL and front page snapshot are shown below.

  2. Software for computing and annotating genomic ranges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lawrence

    Full Text Available We describe Bioconductor infrastructure for representing and computing on annotated genomic ranges and integrating genomic data with the statistical computing features of R and its extensions. At the core of the infrastructure are three packages: IRanges, GenomicRanges, and GenomicFeatures. These packages provide scalable data structures for representing annotated ranges on the genome, with special support for transcript structures, read alignments and coverage vectors. Computational facilities include efficient algorithms for overlap and nearest neighbor detection, coverage calculation and other range operations. This infrastructure directly supports more than 80 other Bioconductor packages, including those for sequence analysis, differential expression analysis and visualization.

  3. Rapid annotation of anonymous sequences from genome projects using semantic similarities and a weighting scheme in gene ontology.

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    Paolo Fontana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Large-scale sequencing projects have now become routine lab practice and this has led to the development of a new generation of tools involving function prediction methods, bringing the latter back to the fore. The advent of Gene Ontology, with its structured vocabulary and paradigm, has provided computational biologists with an appropriate means for this task. METHODOLOGY: We present here a novel method called ARGOT (Annotation Retrieval of Gene Ontology Terms that is able to process quickly thousands of sequences for functional inference. The tool exploits for the first time an integrated approach which combines clustering of GO terms, based on their semantic similarities, with a weighting scheme which assesses retrieved hits sharing a certain number of biological features with the sequence to be annotated. These hits may be obtained by different methods and in this work we have based ARGOT processing on BLAST results. CONCLUSIONS: The extensive benchmark involved 10,000 protein sequences, the complete S. cerevisiae genome and a small subset of proteins for purposes of comparison with other available tools. The algorithm was proven to outperform existing methods and to be suitable for function prediction of single proteins due to its high degree of sensitivity, specificity and coverage.

  4. Bioinformatics Assisted Gene Discovery and Annotation of Human Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    As the sequencing stage of human genome project is near the end, the work has begun for discovering novel genes from genome sequences and annotating their biological functions. Here are reviewed current major bioinformatics tools and technologies available for large scale gene discovery and annotation from human genome sequences. Some ideas about possible future development are also provided.

  5. Towards a Library of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for (meta)genomic annotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Cochrane, Guy; Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gussman, Aaron; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Klimke, William; Kyrpides, Nikos; Madupu, Ramana; Markowitz, Victor; Tatusova, Tatiana; Thomson, Nick; White, Owen

    2008-04-01

    Genome annotations describe the features of genomes and accompany sequences in genome databases. The methodologies used to generate genome annotation are diverse and typically vary amongst groups. Descriptions of the annotation procedure are helpful in interpreting genome annotation data. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for genome annotation describe the processes that generate genome annotations. Some groups are currently documenting procedures but standards are lacking for structure and content of annotation SOPs. In addition, there is no central repository to store and disseminate procedures and protocols for genome annotation. We highlight the importance of SOPs for genome annotation and endorse a central online repository of SOPs.

  6. Towards a Library of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for (meta)genomic annotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Cochrane, Guy; Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gussman, Aaron; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Klimke, William; Kyrpides, Nikos; Madupu, Ramana; Markowitz, Victor; Tatusova, Tatiana; Thomson, Nick; White, Owen

    2008-04-01

    Genome annotations describe the features of genomes and accompany sequences in genome databases. The methodologies used to generate genome annotation are diverse and typically vary amongst groups. Descriptions of the annotation procedure are helpful in interpreting genome annotation data. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for genome annotation describe the processes that generate genome annotations. Some groups are currently documenting procedures but standards are lacking for structure and content of annotation SOPs. In addition, there is no central repository to store and disseminate procedures and protocols for genome annotation. We highlight the importance of SOPs for genome annotation and endorse a central online repository of SOPs.

  7. Rapid high resolution genotyping of Francisella tularensis by whole genome sequence comparison of annotated genes ("MLST+".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus H Antwerpen

    Full Text Available The zoonotic disease tularemia is caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. This pathogen is considered as a category A select agent with potential to be misused in bioterrorism. Molecular typing based on DNA-sequence like canSNP-typing or MLVA has become the accepted standard for this organism. Due to the organism's highly clonal nature, the current typing methods have reached their limit of discrimination for classifying closely related subpopulations within the subspecies F. tularensis ssp. holarctica. We introduce a new gene-by-gene approach, MLST+, based on whole genome data of 15 sequenced F. tularensis ssp. holarctica strains and apply this approach to investigate an epidemic of lethal tularemia among non-human primates in two animal facilities in Germany. Due to the high resolution of MLST+ we are able to demonstrate that three independent clones of this highly infectious pathogen were responsible for these spatially and temporally restricted outbreaks.

  8. Challenges in Whole-Genome Annotation of Pyrosequenced Eukaryotic Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2009-04-17

    Pyrosequencing technologies such as 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina vastly lower the cost of nucleotide sequencing compared to the traditional Sanger method, and thus promise to greatly expand the number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. However, the new technologies also bring new challenges such as shorter reads and new kinds and higher rates of sequencing errors, which complicate genome assembly and gene prediction. At JGI we are deploying 454 technology for the sequencing and assembly of ever-larger eukaryotic genomes. Here we describe our first whole-genome annotation of a purely 454-sequenced fungal genome that is larger than a yeast (>30 Mbp). The pezizomycotine (filamentous ascomycote) Aspergillus carbonarius belongs to the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex, members of which are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as agricultural toxigens. Application of a modified version of the standard JGI Annotation Pipeline has so far predicted ~;;10k genes. ~;;12percent of these preliminary annotations suffer a potential frameshift error, which is somewhat higher than the ~;;9percent rate in the Sanger-sequenced and conventionally assembled and annotated genome of fellow Aspergillus section Nigri member A. niger. Also,>90percent of A. niger genes have potential homologs in the A. carbonarius preliminary annotation. Weconclude, and with further annotation and comparative analysis expect to confirm, that 454 sequencing strategies provide a promising substrate for annotation of modestly sized eukaryotic genomes. We will also present results of annotation of a number of other pyrosequenced fungal genomes of bioenergy interest.

  9. Gene calling and bacterial genome annotation with BG7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobes, Raquel; Pareja-Tobes, Pablo; Manrique, Marina; Pareja-Tobes, Eduardo; Kovach, Evdokim; Alekhin, Alexey; Pareja, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    New massive sequencing technologies are providing many bacterial genome sequences from diverse taxa but a refined annotation of these genomes is crucial for obtaining scientific findings and new knowledge. Thus, bacterial genome annotation has emerged as a key point to investigate in bacteria. Any efficient tool designed specifically to annotate bacterial genomes sequenced with massively parallel technologies has to consider the specific features of bacterial genomes (absence of introns and scarcity of nonprotein-coding sequence) and of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies (presence of errors and not perfectly assembled genomes). These features make it convenient to focus on coding regions and, hence, on protein sequences that are the elements directly related with biological functions. In this chapter we describe how to annotate bacterial genomes with BG7, an open-source tool based on a protein-centered gene calling/annotation paradigm. BG7 is specifically designed for the annotation of bacterial genomes sequenced with NGS. This tool is sequence error tolerant maintaining their capabilities for the annotation of highly fragmented genomes or for annotating mixed sequences coming from several genomes (as those obtained through metagenomics samples). BG7 has been designed with scalability as a requirement, with a computing infrastructure completely based on cloud computing (Amazon Web Services).

  10. Annotation of the protein coding regions of the equine genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestand, Matthew S.; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S.; Coleman, Stephen J.;

    2015-01-01

    Current gene annotation of the horse genome is largely derived from in silico predictions and cross-species alignments. Only a small number of genes are annotated based on equine EST and mRNA sequences. To expand the number of equine genes annotated from equine experimental evidence, we sequenced...

  11. KSHV 2.0: a comprehensive annotation of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus genome using next-generation sequencing reveals novel genomic and functional features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Arias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Productive herpesvirus infection requires a profound, time-controlled remodeling of the viral transcriptome and proteome. To gain insights into the genomic architecture and gene expression control in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, we performed a systematic genome-wide survey of viral transcriptional and translational activity throughout the lytic cycle. Using mRNA-sequencing and ribosome profiling, we found that transcripts encoding lytic genes are promptly bound by ribosomes upon lytic reactivation, suggesting their regulation is mainly transcriptional. Our approach also uncovered new genomic features such as ribosome occupancy of viral non-coding RNAs, numerous upstream and small open reading frames (ORFs, and unusual strategies to expand the virus coding repertoire that include alternative splicing, dynamic viral mRNA editing, and the use of alternative translation initiation codons. Furthermore, we provide a refined and expanded annotation of transcription start sites, polyadenylation sites, splice junctions, and initiation/termination codons of known and new viral features in the KSHV genomic space which we have termed KSHV 2.0. Our results represent a comprehensive genome-scale image of gene regulation during lytic KSHV infection that substantially expands our understanding of the genomic architecture and coding capacity of the virus.

  12. DNAVis: interactive visualization of comparative genome annotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiers, M.W.E.J.; Wetering, van de H.; Peeters, T.H.J.M.; Wijk, van J.J.; Nap, J.P.H.

    2006-01-01

    The software package DNAVis offers a fast, interactive and real-time visualization of DNA sequences and their comparative genome annotations. DNAVis implements advanced methods of information visualization such as linked views, perspective walls and semantic zooming, in addition to the display of he

  13. Genome sequencing and annotation of Acinetobacter gyllenbergii strain MTCC 11365T

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    Nitin Kumar Singh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Acinetobacter consists of 31 validly published species ubiquitously distributed in nature and primarily associated with nosocomial infection. We report 4.3 Mb genome of the Acinetobacter gyllenbergii strain MTCC 11365T. The draft genome of A. gyllenbergii has a G + C content of 41.0% and includes 3 rRNA genes (5S, 23S, 16S and 67 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes.

  14. Genome sequencing and annotation of Acinetobacter gerneri strain MTCC 9824T

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    Nitin Kumar Singh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Acinetobacter consists of 31 validly published species ubiquitously distributed in nature and primarily associated with nosocomial infection. We report the 4.4 Mb genome of Acinetobacter gerneri strain MTCC 9824T. The genome has a G + C content of 38.0% and includes 3 rRNA genes (5S, 23S16S and 64 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes.

  15. Genome sequencing and annotation of Acinetobacter haemolyticus strain MTCC 9819T

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    Indu Khatri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Acinetobacter consists of 31 validly published species ubiquitously distributed in nature and primarily associated with nosocomial infection. We report the 3.4 Mb genome of Acinetobacter haemolyticus strain MTCC 9819T. The genome has a G + C content of 40.0% and includes 3 rRNA genes (5S, 23S, 16S and 65 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes.

  16. Genome sequencing and annotation of Afipia septicemium strain OHSU_II

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    Philip Yang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the 5.1 Mb noncontiguous draft genome of Afipia septicemium strain OHSU_II, isolated from blood of a female patient. The genome consists of 5,087,893 bp circular chromosome with no identifiable autonomous plasmid with a G + C content of 61.09% and contains 4898 protein-coding genes and 49 RNA genes including 3 rRNA genes and 46 tRNA genes.

  17. Genome sequencing and annotation of Acinetobacter guillouiae strain MSP 4-18

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    Nitin Kumar Singh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Acinetobacter consists of 31 validly published species ubiquitously distributed in nature and primarily associated with nosocomial infection. We report the 4.8 Mb genome of Acinetobacter guillouiae MSP 4-18, isolated from a mangrove soil sample from Parangipettai (11°30′N, 79°47′E, Tamil Nadu, India. The draft genome of A. guillouiae MSP 4-18 has a G + C content of 38.0% and includes 3 rRNA genes (5S, 23S, 16S and 69 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes.

  18. The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzny, Donna M; Scherer, Steven E; Kaul, Rajinder

    2006-01-01

    After the completion of a draft human genome sequence, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium has proceeded to finish and annotate each of the 24 chromosomes comprising the human genome. Here we describe the sequencing and analysis of human chromosome 3, one of the largest human chr...

  19. Assessment and improvement of Indian-origin rhesus macaque and Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaque genome annotations using deep transcriptome sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinxia; Pipes, Lenore; Xiong, Hao; Green, Richard R.; Jones, Daniel C.; Ruzzo, Walter L.; Schroth, Gary P.; Mason, Christopher E.; Palermo, Robert E.; Katze, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The genome annotations of rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques, two of the most common nonhuman primate animal models, are limited. Methods We analyzed large-scale macaque RNA-based next-generation sequencing (RNAseq) data to identify un-annotated macaque transcripts. Results For both macaque species, we uncovered thousands of novel isoforms for annotated genes and thousands of un-annotated intergenic transcripts enriched with non-coding RNAs. We also identified thousands of transcript sequences which are partially or completely ‘missing’ from current macaque genome assemblies. We showed that many newly identified transcripts were differentially expressed during SIV infection of rhesus macaques or during Ebola virus infection of cynomolgus macaques. Conclusions For two important macaque species, we uncovered thousands of novel isoforms and un-annotated intergenic transcripts including coding and non-coding RNAs, polyadenylated and non-polyadenylated transcripts. This resource will greatly improve future macaque studies, as demonstrated by their applications in infectious disease studies. PMID:24810475

  20. An integrated pipeline for next generation sequencing and annotation of the complete mitochondrial genome of the giant intestinal fluke, Fasciolopsis buski (Lankester, 1857) Looss, 1899.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Devendra Kumar; Ghatani, Sudeep; Shylla, Jollin A; Sahu, Ranjana; Mullapudi, Nandita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Tandon, Veena

    2013-01-01

    Helminths include both parasitic nematodes (roundworms) and platyhelminths (trematode and cestode flatworms) that are abundant, and are of clinical importance. The genetic characterization of parasitic flatworms using advanced molecular tools is central to the diagnosis and control of infections. Although the nuclear genome houses suitable genetic markers (e.g., in ribosomal (r) DNA) for species identification and molecular characterization, the mitochondrial (mt) genome consistently provides a rich source of novel markers for informative systematics and epidemiological studies. In the last decade, there have been some important advances in mtDNA genomics of helminths, especially lung flukes, liver flukes and intestinal flukes. Fasciolopsis buski, often called the giant intestinal fluke, is one of the largest digenean trematodes infecting humans and found primarily in Asia, in particular the Indian subcontinent. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies now provide opportunities for high throughput sequencing, assembly and annotation within a short span of time. Herein, we describe a high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics pipeline for mt genomics for F. buski that emphasizes the utility of short read NGS platforms such as Ion Torrent and Illumina in successfully sequencing and assembling the mt genome using innovative approaches for PCR primer design as well as assembly. We took advantage of our NGS whole genome sequence data (unpublished so far) for F. buski and its comparison with available data for the Fasciola hepatica mtDNA as the reference genome for design of precise and specific primers for amplification of mt genome sequences from F. buski. A long-range PCR was carried out to create an NGS library enriched in mt DNA sequences. Two different NGS platforms were employed for complete sequencing, assembly and annotation of the F. buski mt genome. The complete mt genome sequences of the intestinal fluke comprise 14,118 bp and is thus the shortest

  1. An integrated pipeline for next generation sequencing and annotation of the complete mitochondrial genome of the giant intestinal fluke, Fasciolopsis buski (Lankester, 1857 Looss, 1899

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra Kumar Biswal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Helminths include both parasitic nematodes (roundworms and platyhelminths (trematode and cestode flatworms that are abundant, and are of clinical importance. The genetic characterization of parasitic flatworms using advanced molecular tools is central to the diagnosis and control of infections. Although the nuclear genome houses suitable genetic markers (e.g., in ribosomal (r DNA for species identification and molecular characterization, the mitochondrial (mt genome consistently provides a rich source of novel markers for informative systematics and epidemiological studies. In the last decade, there have been some important advances in mtDNA genomics of helminths, especially lung flukes, liver flukes and intestinal flukes. Fasciolopsis buski, often called the giant intestinal fluke, is one of the largest digenean trematodes infecting humans and found primarily in Asia, in particular the Indian subcontinent. Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies now provide opportunities for high throughput sequencing, assembly and annotation within a short span of time. Herein, we describe a high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics pipeline for mt genomics for F. buski that emphasizes the utility of short read NGS platforms such as Ion Torrent and Illumina in successfully sequencing and assembling the mt genome using innovative approaches for PCR primer design as well as assembly. We took advantage of our NGS whole genome sequence data (unpublished so far for F. buski and its comparison with available data for the Fasciola hepatica mtDNA as the reference genome for design of precise and specific primers for amplification of mt genome sequences from F. buski. A long-range PCR was carried out to create an NGS library enriched in mt DNA sequences. Two different NGS platforms were employed for complete sequencing, assembly and annotation of the F. buski mt genome. The complete mt genome sequences of the intestinal fluke comprise 14,118 bp and is thus the

  2. Genome sequencing and annotation of Geobacillus sp. 1017, a hydrocarbon-oxidizing thermophilic bacterium isolated from a heavy oil reservoir (China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly V. Kadnikov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The draft genome sequence of Geobacillus sp. strain 1017, a thermophilic aerobic oil-oxidizing bacterium isolated from formation water of the Dagang high-temperature oilfield, China, is presented here. The genome comprised 3.6 Mbp, with the G + C content of 51.74%. The strain had a number of genes responsible for numerous metabolic and transport systems, exopolysaccharide biosynthesis, and decomposition of sugars and aromatic compounds, as well as the genes related to resistance to metals and metalloids. The genome sequence is available at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no MQMG00000000. This genome is annotated for elucidation of the genomic and phenotypic diversity of new thermophilic alkane-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Geobacillus.

  3. Annotation of selection strengths in viral genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCauley, Stephen; de Groot, Saskia; Mailund, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: Viral genomes tend to code in overlapping reading frames to maximize information content. This may result in atypical codon bias and particular evolutionary constraints. Due to the fast mutation rate of viruses, there is additional strong evidence for varying selection between intra......- and intergenomic regions. The presence of multiple coding regions complicates the concept of Ka/Ks ratio, and thus begs for an alternative approach when investigating selection strengths. Building on the paper by McCauley & Hein (2006), we develop a method for annotating a viral genome coding in overlapping...... may thus achieve an annotation both of coding regions as well as selection strengths, allowing us to investigate different selection patterns and hypotheses. Results: We illustrate our method by applying it to a multiple alignment of four HIV2 sequences, as well as four Hepatitis B sequences. We...

  4. Inconsistencies of genome annotations in apicomplexan parasites revealed by 5'-end-one-pass and full-length sequences of oligo-capped cDNAs

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    Sugano Sumio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apicomplexan parasites are causative agents of various diseases including malaria and have been targets of extensive genomic sequencing. We generated 5'-EST collections for six apicomplexa parasites using our full-length oligo-capping cDNA library method. To improve upon the current genome annotations, as well as to validate the importance for physical cDNA clone resources, we generated a large-scale collection of full-length cDNAs for several apicomplexa parasites. Results In this study, we used a total of 61,056 5'-end-single-pass cDNA sequences from Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. yoelii, P. berghei, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Toxoplasma gondii. We compared these partially sequenced cDNA sequences with the currently annotated gene models and observed significant inconsistencies between the two datasets. In particular, we found that on average 14% of the exons in the current gene models were not supported by any cDNA evidence, and that 16% of the current gene models may contain at least one mis-annotation and should be re-evaluated. We also identified a large number of transcripts that had been previously unidentified. For 732 cDNAs in T. gondii, the entire sequences were determined in order to evaluate the annotated gene models at the complete full-length transcript level. We found that 41% of the T. gondii gene models contained at least one inconsistency. We also identified and confirmed by RT-PCR 140 previously unidentified transcripts found in the intergenic regions of the current gene annotations. We show that the majority of these discrepancies are due to questionable predictions of one or two extra exons in the upstream or downstream regions of the genes. Conclusion Our data indicates that the current gene models are likely to still be incomplete and have much room for improvement. Our unique full-length cDNA information is especially useful for further refinement of the annotations for the genomes of

  5. Re-annotation of the physical map of Glycine max for polyploid-like regions by BAC end sequence driven whole genome shotgun read assembly

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    Shultz Jeffry

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the world's most important food crops have either polyploid genomes or homeologous regions derived from segmental shuffling following polyploid formation. The soybean (Glycine max genome has been shown to be composed of approximately four thousand short interspersed homeologous regions with 1, 2 or 4 copies per haploid genome by RFLP analysis, microsatellite anchors to BACs and by contigs formed from BAC fingerprints. Despite these similar regions,, the genome has been sequenced by whole genome shotgun sequence (WGS. Here the aim was to use BAC end sequences (BES derived from three minimum tile paths (MTP to examine the extent and homogeneity of polyploid-like regions within contigs and the extent of correlation between the polyploid-like regions inferred from fingerprinting and the polyploid-like sequences inferred from WGS matches. Results Results show that when sequence divergence was 1–10%, the copy number of homeologous regions could be identified from sequence variation in WGS reads overlapping BES. Homeolog sequence variants (HSVs were single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 89% and single nucleotide indels (SNIs 10%. Larger indels were rare but present (1%. Simulations that had predicted fingerprints of homeologous regions could be separated when divergence exceeded 2% were shown to be false. We show that a 5–10% sequence divergence is necessary to separate homeologs by fingerprinting. BES compared to WGS traces showed polyploid-like regions with less than 1% sequence divergence exist at 2.3% of the locations assayed. Conclusion The use of HSVs like SNPs and SNIs to characterize BACs wil improve contig building methods. The implications for bioinformatic and functional annotation of polyploid and paleopolyploid genomes show that a combined approach of BAC fingerprint based physical maps, WGS sequence and HSV-based partitioning of BAC clones from homeologous regions to separate contigs will allow reliable de

  6. Bovine Genome Database: supporting community annotation and analysis of the Bos taurus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Childs Kevin L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A goal of the Bovine Genome Database (BGD; http://BovineGenome.org has been to support the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium (BGSAC in the annotation and analysis of the bovine genome. We were faced with several challenges, including the need to maintain consistent quality despite diversity in annotation expertise in the research community, the need to maintain consistent data formats, and the need to minimize the potential duplication of annotation effort. With new sequencing technologies allowing many more eukaryotic genomes to be sequenced, the demand for collaborative annotation is likely to increase. Here we present our approach, challenges and solutions facilitating a large distributed annotation project. Results and Discussion BGD has provided annotation tools that supported 147 members of the BGSAC in contributing 3,871 gene models over a fifteen-week period, and these annotations have been integrated into the bovine Official Gene Set. Our approach has been to provide an annotation system, which includes a BLAST site, multiple genome browsers, an annotation portal, and the Apollo Annotation Editor configured to connect directly to our Chado database. In addition to implementing and integrating components of the annotation system, we have performed computational analyses to create gene evidence tracks and a consensus gene set, which can be viewed on individual gene pages at BGD. Conclusions We have provided annotation tools that alleviate challenges associated with distributed annotation. Our system provides a consistent set of data to all annotators and eliminates the need for annotators to format data. Involving the bovine research community in genome annotation has allowed us to leverage expertise in various areas of bovine biology to provide biological insight into the genome sequence.

  7. Annotation of the protein coding regions of the equine genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestand, Matthew S.; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S.; Coleman, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Current gene annotation of the horse genome is largely derived from in silico predictions and cross-species alignments. Only a small number of genes are annotated based on equine EST and mRNA sequences. To expand the number of equine genes annotated from equine experimental evidence, we sequenced m...... and appear to be small errors in the equine reference genome, since they are also identified as homozygous variants by genomic DNA resequencing of the reference horse. Taken together, we provide a resource of equine mRNA structures and protein coding variants that will enhance equine and cross...

  8. Whole-Genome Sequence and Annotation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Phage Type 8 Strain EN1660

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Benjamin J.; Fitzgerald, Stephen F.; Kröger, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 8 strain EN1660, isolated from an outbreak in Thunder Bay, Canada, was sequenced to 46-fold coverage using an Illumina MiSeq with 300-bp paired-end sequencing chemistry to produce 28 contigs with an N50 value of 490,721 bp. PMID:28126943

  9. Comparative genomics in cyprinids: Common carp EST's help the annotation of the zebrafish genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christoffels, A.; Bartfai, R.; Srinivasan, H.; Komen, J.

    2006-01-01

    Background - Automatic annotation of sequenced eukaryotic genomes integrates a combination of methodologies such as ab-initio methods and alignment of homologous genes and/or proteins. For example, annotation of the zebrafish genome within Ensembl relies heavily on available cDNA and protein sequenc

  10. Applied bioinformatics: Genome annotation and transcriptome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Vikas

    and dhurrin, which have not previously been characterized in blueberries. There are more than 44,500 spider species with distinct habitats and unique characteristics. Spiders are masters of producing silk webs to catch prey and using venom to neutralize. The exploration of the genetics behind these properties...... japonicus (Lotus), Vaccinium corymbosum (blueberry), Stegodyphus mimosarum (spider) and Trifolium occidentale (clover). From a bioinformatics data analysis perspective, my work can be divided into three parts; genome annotation, small RNA, and gene expression analysis. Lotus is a legume of significant...... has just started. We have assembled and annotated the first two spider genomes to facilitate our understanding of spiders at the molecular level. The need for analyzing the large and increasing amount of sequencing data has increased the demand for efficient, user friendly, and broadly applicable...

  11. GLANET: genomic loci annotation and enrichment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlu, Burçak; Firtina, Can; Keles, Sündüz; Tastan, Oznur

    2017-09-15

    Genomic studies identify genomic loci representing genetic variations, transcription factor (TF) occupancy, or histone modification through next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Interpreting these loci requires evaluating them with known genomic and epigenomic annotations. We present GLANET as a comprehensive annotation and enrichment analysis tool which implements a sampling-based enrichment test that accounts for GC content and/or mappability biases, jointly or separately. GLANET annotates and performs enrichment analysis on these loci with a rich library. We introduce and perform novel data-driven computational experiments for assessing the power and Type-I error of its enrichment procedure which show that GLANET has attained high statistical power and well-controlled Type-I error rate. As a key feature, users can easily extend its library with new gene sets and genomic intervals. Other key features include assessment of impact of single nucleotide variants (SNPs) on TF binding sites and regulation based pathway enrichment analysis. GLANET can be run using its GUI or on command line. GLANET's source code is available at https://github.com/burcakotlu/GLANET . Tutorials are provided at https://glanet.readthedocs.org . burcak@ceng.metu.edu.tr or oznur.tastan@cs.bilkent.edu.tr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Interspecific Comparison and annotation of two complete mitochondrial genome sequences from the plant pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millenbaugh, Bonnie A; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Torriani, Stefano F.F.; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Kema, Gert H.J.; McDonald, Bruce A.

    2007-12-07

    The mitochondrial genomes of two isolates of the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola were sequenced completely and compared to identify polymorphic regions. This organism is of interest because it is phylogenetically distant from other fungi with sequenced mitochondrial genomes and it has shown discordant patterns of nuclear and mitochondrial diversity. The mitochondrial genome of M. graminicola is a circular molecule of approximately 43,960 bp containing the typical genes coding for 14 proteins related to oxidative phosphorylation, one RNA polymerase, two rRNA genes and a set of 27 tRNAs. The mitochondrial DNA of M. graminicola lacks the gene encoding the putative ribosomal protein (rps5-like), commonly found in fungal mitochondrial genomes. Most of the tRNA genes were clustered with a gene order conserved with many other ascomycetes. A sample of thirty-five additional strains representing the known global mt diversity was partially sequenced to measure overall mitochondrial variability within the species. Little variation was found, confirming previous RFLP-based findings of low mitochondrial diversity. The mitochondrial sequence of M. graminicola is the first reported from the family Mycosphaerellaceae or the order Capnodiales. The sequence also provides a tool to better understand the development of fungicide resistance and the conflicting pattern of high nuclear and low mitochondrial diversity in global populations of this fungus.

  13. antiSMASH : rapid identification, annotation and analysis of secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters in bacterial and fungal genome sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Blin, Kai; Cimermancic, Peter; de Jager, Victor; Zakrzewski, Piotr; Fischbach, Michael A.; Weber, Tilmann; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal secondary metabolism is a rich source of novel bioactive compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications as antibiotics, anti-tumor drugs or cholesterol-lowering drugs. To find new drug candidates, microbiologists are increasingly relying on sequencing genomes of a wide var

  14. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  15. Solving the Problem: Genome Annotation Standards before the Data Deluge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimke, William; O'Donovan, Claire; White, Owen; Brister, J. Rodney; Clark, Karen; Fedorov, Boris; Mizrachi, Ilene; Pruitt, Kim D.; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    The promise of genome sequencing was that the vast undiscovered country would be mapped out by comparison of the multitude of sequences available and would aid researchers in deciphering the role of each gene in every organism. Researchers recognize that there is a need for high quality data. However, different annotation procedures, numerous databases, and a diminishing percentage of experimentally determined gene functions have resulted in a spectrum of annotation quality. NCBI in collaboration with sequencing centers, archival databases, and researchers, has developed the first international annotation standards, a fundamental step in ensuring that high quality complete prokaryotic genomes are available as gold standard references. Highlights include the development of annotation assessment tools, community acceptance of protein naming standards, comparison of annotation resources to provide consistent annotation, and improved tracking of the evidence used to generate a particular annotation. The development of a set of minimal standards, including the requirement for annotated complete prokaryotic genomes to contain a full set of ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and proteins encoding core conserved functions, is an historic milestone. The use of these standards in existing genomes and future submissions will increase the quality of databases, enabling researchers to make accurate biological discoveries. PMID:22180819

  16. Using Apollo to browse and edit genome annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sima; Harris, Nomi

    2006-01-01

    An annotation is any feature that can be tied to genomic sequence, such as an exon, transcript, promoter, or transposable element. As biological knowledge increases, annotations of different types need to be added and modified, and links to other sources of information need to be incorporated, to allow biologists to easily access all of the available sequence analysis data and design appropriate experiments. The Apollo genome browser and editor offers biologists these capabilities. Apollo can display many different types of computational evidence, such as alignments and similarities based on BLAST searches (UNITS 3.3 & 3.4), and enables biologists to utilize computational evidence to create and edit gene models and other genomic features, e.g., using experimental evidence to refine exon-intron structures predicted by gene prediction algorithms. This protocol describes simple ways to browse genome annotation data, as well as techniques for editing annotations and loading data from different sources.

  17. ASAP: Amplification, sequencing & annotation of plastomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folta Kevin M

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Availability of DNA sequence information is vital for pursuing structural, functional and comparative genomics studies in plastids. Traditionally, the first step in mining the valuable information within a chloroplast genome requires sequencing a chloroplast plasmid library or BAC clones. These activities involve complicated preparatory procedures like chloroplast DNA isolation or identification of the appropriate BAC clones to be sequenced. Rolling circle amplification (RCA is being used currently to amplify the chloroplast genome from purified chloroplast DNA and the resulting products are sheared and cloned prior to sequencing. Herein we present a universal high-throughput, rapid PCR-based technique to amplify, sequence and assemble plastid genome sequence from diverse species in a short time and at reasonable cost from total plant DNA, using the large inverted repeat region from strawberry and peach as proof of concept. The method exploits the highly conserved coding regions or intergenic regions of plastid genes. Using an informatics approach, chloroplast DNA sequence information from 5 available eudicot plastomes was aligned to identify the most conserved regions. Cognate primer pairs were then designed to generate ~1 – 1.2 kb overlapping amplicons from the inverted repeat region in 14 diverse genera. Results 100% coverage of the inverted repeat region was obtained from Arabidopsis, tobacco, orange, strawberry, peach, lettuce, tomato and Amaranthus. Over 80% coverage was obtained from distant species, including Ginkgo, loblolly pine and Equisetum. Sequence from the inverted repeat region of strawberry and peach plastome was obtained, annotated and analyzed. Additionally, a polymorphic region identified from gel electrophoresis was sequenced from tomato and Amaranthus. Sequence analysis revealed large deletions in these species relative to tobacco plastome thus exhibiting the utility of this method for structural and

  18. Large-scale prokaryotic gene prediction and comparison to genome annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pernille; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    2005-01-01

    Motivation: Prokaryotic genomes are sequenced and annotated at an increasing rate. The methods of annotation vary between sequencing groups. It makes genome comparison difficult and may lead to propagation of errors when questionable assignments are adapted from one genome to another. Genome...... genefinder EasyGene. Comparison of the GenBank and RefSeq annotations with the EasyGene predictions reveals that in some genomes up to 60% of the genes may have been annotated with a wrong start codon, especially in the GC-rich genomes. The fractional difference between annotated and predicted confirms......-annotated. These results are based on the difference between the number of annotated genes not found by EasyGene and the number of predicted genes that are not annotated in GenBank. We argue that the average performance of our standardized and fully automated method is slightly better than the annotation....

  19. Genome cartography through domain annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponting, C P; Dickens, N J

    2001-01-01

    The evolutionary history of eukaryotic proteins involves rapid sequence divergence, addition and deletion of domains, and fusion and fission of genes. Although the protein repertoires of distantly related species differ greatly, their domain repertoires do not. To account for the great diversity of domain contexts and an unexpected paucity of ortholog conservation, we must categorize the coding regions of completely sequenced genomes into domain families, as well as protein families.

  20. MIPS: analysis and annotation of genome information in 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Dietmann, S; Frishman, D; Gregory, R; Mannhaupt, G; Mayer, K F X; Münsterkötter, M; Ruepp, A; Spannagl, M; Stümpflen, V; Rattei, T

    2008-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS-GSF, Neuherberg, Germany) combines automatic processing of large amounts of sequences with manual annotation of selected model genomes. Due to the massive growth of the available data, the depth of annotation varies widely between independent databases. Also, the criteria for the transfer of information from known to orthologous sequences are diverse. To cope with the task of global in-depth genome annotation has become unfeasible. Therefore, our efforts are dedicated to three levels of annotation: (i) the curation of selected genomes, in particular from fungal and plant taxa (e.g. CYGD, MNCDB, MatDB), (ii) the comprehensive, consistent, automatic annotation employing exhaustive methods for the computation of sequence similarities and sequence-related attributes as well as the classification of individual sequences (SIMAP, PEDANT and FunCat) and (iii) the compilation of manually curated databases for protein interactions based on scrutinized information from the literature to serve as an accepted set of reliable annotated interaction data (MPACT, MPPI, CORUM). All databases and tools described as well as the detailed descriptions of our projects can be accessed through the MIPS web server (http://mips.gsf.de).

  1. Comparative Omics-Driven Genome Annotation Refinement: Application across Yersiniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Jones, Marcus B.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Purvine, Samuel O.; Sanford, James; Monroe, Matthew E.; Brewer, Heather M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Ansong, Charles; Frank, Bryan C.; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott; Motin, Vladimir L.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2012-03-27

    Genome sequencing continues to be a rapidly evolving technology, yet most downstream aspects of genome annotation pipelines remain relatively stable or are even being abandoned. To date, the perceived value of manual curation for genome annotations is not offset by the real cost and time associated with the process. In order to balance the large number of sequences generated, the annotation process is now performed almost exclusively in an automated fashion for most genome sequencing projects. One possible way to reduce errors inherent to automated computational annotations is to apply data from 'omics' measurements (i.e. transcriptional and proteomic) to the un-annotated genome with a proteogenomic-based approach. This approach does require additional experimental and bioinformatics methods to include omics technologies; however, the approach is readily automatable and can benefit from rapid developments occurring in those research domains as well. The annotation process can be improved by experimental validation of transcription and translation and aid in the discovery of annotation errors. Here the concept of annotation refinement has been extended to include a comparative assessment of genomes across closely related species, as is becoming common in sequencing efforts. Transcriptomic and proteomic data derived from three highly similar pathogenic Yersiniae (Y. pestis CO92, Y. pestis pestoides F, and Y. pseudotuberculosis PB1/+) was used to demonstrate a comprehensive comparative omic-based annotation methodology. Peptide and oligo measurements experimentally validated the expression of nearly 40% of each strain's predicted proteome and revealed the identification of 28 novel and 68 previously incorrect protein-coding sequences (e.g., observed frameshifts, extended start sites, and translated pseudogenes) within the three current Yersinia genome annotations. Gene loss is presumed to play a major role in Y. pestis acquiring its niche as a virulent

  2. Current challenges in genome annotation through structural biology and bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Nicholas; de Beer, Tjaart A P; Thornton, Janet M

    2012-10-01

    With the huge volume in genomic sequences being generated from high-throughout sequencing projects the requirement for providing accurate and detailed annotations of gene products has never been greater. It is proving to be a huge challenge for computational biologists to use as much information as possible from experimental data to provide annotations for genome data of unknown function. A central component to this process is to use experimentally determined structures, which provide a means to detect homology that is not discernable from just the sequence and permit the consequences of genomic variation to be realized at the molecular level. In particular, structures also form the basis of many bioinformatics methods for improving the detailed functional annotations of enzymes in combination with similarities in sequence and chemistry. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. De novo genome assembly and annotation of Australia's largest freshwater fish, the Murray cod (Maccullochella peelii), from Illumina and Nanopore sequencing read.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Christopher M; Tan, Mun Hua; Harrisson, Katherine A; Lee, Yin Peng; Croft, Laurence J; Sunnucks, Paul; Pavlova, Alexandra; Gan, Han Ming

    2017-08-01

    One of the most iconic Australian fish is the Murray cod, Maccullochella peelii (Mitchell 1838), a freshwater species that can grow to ∼1.8 metres in length and live to age ≥48 years. The Murray cod is of a conservation concern as a result of strong population contractions, but it is also popular for recreational fishing and is of growing aquaculture interest. In this study, we report the whole genome sequence of the Murray cod to support ongoing population genetics, conservation, and management research, as well as to better understand the evolutionary ecology and history of the species. A draft Murray cod genome of 633 Mbp (N50 = 109 974bp; BUSCO and CEGMA completeness of 94.2% and 91.9%, respectively) with an estimated 148 Mbp of putative repetitive sequences was assembled from the combined sequencing data of 2 fish individuals with an identical maternal lineage; 47.2 Gb of Illumina HiSeq data and 804 Mb of Nanopore data were generated from the first individual while 23.2 Gb of Illumina MiSeq data were generated from the second individual. The inclusion of Nanopore reads for scaffolding followed by subsequent gap-closing using Illumina data led to a 29% reduction in the number of scaffolds and a 55% and 54% increase in the scaffold and contig N50, respectively. We also report the first transcriptome of Murray cod that was subsequently used to annotate the Murray cod genome, leading to the identification of 26 539 protein-coding genes. We present the whole genome of the Murray cod and anticipate this will be a catalyst for a range of genetic, genomic, and phylogenetic studies of the Murray cod and more generally other fish species of the Percichthydae family. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Mitochondrial Disease Sequence Data Resource (MSeqDR): A global grass-roots consortium to facilitate deposition, curation, annotation, and integrated analysis of genomic data for the mitochondrial disease clinical and research communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Falk (Marni J.); L. Shen (Lishuang); M. Gonzalez (Michael); J. Leipzig (Jeremy); M.T. Lott (Marie T.); A.P.M. Stassen (Alphons P.M.); M.A. Diroma (Maria Angela); D. Navarro-Gomez (Daniel); P. Yeske (Philip); R. Bai (Renkui); R.G. Boles (Richard G.); V. Brilhante (Virginia); D. Ralph (David); J.T. DaRe (Jeana T.); R. Shelton (Robert); S.F. Terry (Sharon); Z. Zhang (Zhe); W.C. Copeland (William C.); M. van Oven (Mannis); H. Prokisch (Holger); D.C. Wallace; M. Attimonelli (Marcella); D. Krotoski (Danuta); S. Zuchner (Stephan); X. Gai (Xiaowu); S. Bale (Sherri); J. Bedoyan (Jirair); D.M. Behar (Doron); P. Bonnen (Penelope); L. Brooks (Lisa); C. Calabrese (Claudia); S. Calvo (Sarah); P.F. Chinnery (Patrick); J. Christodoulou (John); D. Church (Deanna); R. Clima (Rosanna); B.H. Cohen (Bruce H.); R.G.H. Cotton (Richard); I.F.M. de Coo (René); O. Derbenevoa (Olga); J.T. den Dunnen (Johan); D. Dimmock (David); G. Enns (Gregory); G. Gasparre (Giuseppe); A. Goldstein (Amy); I. Gonzalez (Iris); K. Gwinn (Katrina); S. Hahn (Sihoun); R.H. Haas (Richard H.); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); M. Hirano (Michio); D. Kerr (Douglas); D. Li (Dong); M. Lvova (Maria); F. Macrae (Finley); D. Maglott (Donna); E. McCormick (Elizabeth); G. Mitchell (Grant); V.K. Mootha (Vamsi K.); Y. Okazaki (Yasushi); A. Pujol (Aurora); M. Parisi (Melissa); J.C. Perin (Juan Carlos); E.A. Pierce (Eric A.); V. Procaccio (Vincent); S. Rahman (Shamima); H. Reddi (Honey); H. Rehm (Heidi); E. Riggs (Erin); R.J.T. Rodenburg (Richard); Y. Rubinstein (Yaffa); R. Saneto (Russell); M. Santorsola (Mariangela); C. Scharfe (Curt); C. Sheldon (Claire); E.A. Shoubridge (Eric); D. Simone (Domenico); B. Smeets (Bert); J.A.M. Smeitink (Jan); C. Stanley (Christine); A. Suomalainen (Anu); M.A. Tarnopolsky (Mark); I. Thiffault (Isabelle); D.R. Thorburn (David R.); J.V. Hove (Johan Van); L. Wolfe (Lynne); L.-J. Wong (Lee-Jun)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSuccess rates for genomic analyses of highly heterogeneous disorders can be greatly improved if a large cohort of patient data is assembled to enhance collective capabilities for accurate sequence variant annotation, analysis, and interpretation. Indeed, molecular diagnostics requires th

  5. Whole-Genome Sequencing and Annotation of Bacillus safensis RIT372 and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans RIT370 from Capsicum annuum (Bird's Eye Chili) and Capsicum chinense (Yellow Lantern Chili), Respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Huan You; Gan, Han Ming; Savka, Michael A; Triassi, Alexander J; Wheatley, Matthew S; Naqvi, Kubra F; Foxhall, Taylor E; Anauo, Michael J; Baldwin, Mariah L; Burkhardt, Russell N; O'Bryon, Isabelle G; Dailey, Lucas K; Busairi, Nurfatini Idayu; Keith, Robert C; Khair, Megat Hazmah Megat Mazhar; Rasul, Muhammad Zamir Mohd; Rosdi, Nur Aiman Mohd; Mountzouros, James R; Rhoads, Aleigha C; Selochan, Melissa A; Tautanov, Timur B; Polter, Steven J; Marks, Kayla D; Caraballo, Alexander A; Hudson, André O

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequences of Bacillus safensis RIT372 and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans RIT370 from Capsicum spp. Annotation revealed gene clusters for the synthesis of bacilysin, lichensin, and bacillibactin and sporulation killing factor (skfA) in Bacillus safensis RIT372 and turnerbactin and carotenoid in Pseudomonas oryzihabitans RIT370.

  6. MAKER2: an annotation pipeline and genome-database management tool for second-generation genome projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holt Carson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Second-generation sequencing technologies are precipitating major shifts with regards to what kinds of genomes are being sequenced and how they are annotated. While the first generation of genome projects focused on well-studied model organisms, many of today's projects involve exotic organisms whose genomes are largely terra incognita. This complicates their annotation, because unlike first-generation projects, there are no pre-existing 'gold-standard' gene-models with which to train gene-finders. Improvements in genome assembly and the wide availability of mRNA-seq data are also creating opportunities to update and re-annotate previously published genome annotations. Today's genome projects are thus in need of new genome annotation tools that can meet the challenges and opportunities presented by second-generation sequencing technologies. Results We present MAKER2, a genome annotation and data management tool designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 is a multi-threaded, parallelized application that can process second-generation datasets of virtually any size. We show that MAKER2 can produce accurate annotations for novel genomes where training-data are limited, of low quality or even non-existent. MAKER2 also provides an easy means to use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality; and it can use these data to update legacy annotations, significantly improving their quality. We also show that MAKER2 can evaluate the quality of genome annotations, and identify and prioritize problematic annotations for manual review. Conclusions MAKER2 is the first annotation engine specifically designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 scales to datasets of any size, requires little in the way of training data, and can use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality. It can also update and manage legacy genome annotation datasets.

  7. MAKER2: an annotation pipeline and genome-database management tool for second-generation genome projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Carson; Yandell, Mark

    2011-12-22

    Second-generation sequencing technologies are precipitating major shifts with regards to what kinds of genomes are being sequenced and how they are annotated. While the first generation of genome projects focused on well-studied model organisms, many of today's projects involve exotic organisms whose genomes are largely terra incognita. This complicates their annotation, because unlike first-generation projects, there are no pre-existing 'gold-standard' gene-models with which to train gene-finders. Improvements in genome assembly and the wide availability of mRNA-seq data are also creating opportunities to update and re-annotate previously published genome annotations. Today's genome projects are thus in need of new genome annotation tools that can meet the challenges and opportunities presented by second-generation sequencing technologies. We present MAKER2, a genome annotation and data management tool designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 is a multi-threaded, parallelized application that can process second-generation datasets of virtually any size. We show that MAKER2 can produce accurate annotations for novel genomes where training-data are limited, of low quality or even non-existent. MAKER2 also provides an easy means to use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality; and it can use these data to update legacy annotations, significantly improving their quality. We also show that MAKER2 can evaluate the quality of genome annotations, and identify and prioritize problematic annotations for manual review. MAKER2 is the first annotation engine specifically designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 scales to datasets of any size, requires little in the way of training data, and can use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality. It can also update and manage legacy genome annotation datasets.

  8. Restauro-G: A Rapid Genome Re-Annotation System for Comparative Genomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satoshi Tamaki; Kazuharu Arakawa; Nobuaki Kono; Masaru Tomita

    2007-01-01

    Annotations of complete genome sequences submitted directly from sequencing projects are diverse in terms of annotation strategies and update frequencies. These inconsistencies make comparative studies difficult. To allow rapid data preparation of a large number of complete genomes, automation and speed are important for genome re-annotation. Here we introduce an open-source rapid genome re-annotation software system, Restauro-G, specialized for bacterial genomes. Restauro-G re-annotates a genome by similarity searches utilizing the BLAST-Like Alignment Tool, referring to protein databases such as UniProt KB, NCBI nr, NCBI COGs, Pfam, and PSORTb. Re-annotation by Restauro-G achieved over 98% accuracy for most bacterial chromosomes in comparison with the original manually curated annotation of EMBL releases. Restauro-G was developed in the generic bioinformatics workbench G-language Genome Analysis Environment and is distributed at http://restauro-g.iab.keio.ac.jp/ under the GNU General Public License.

  9. Translational genomics for plant breeding with the genome sequence explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yang Jae; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Shim, Sangrea; Jeong, Haneul; Satyawan, Dani; Kim, Moon Young; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2016-04-01

    The use of next-generation sequencers and advanced genotyping technologies has propelled the field of plant genomics in model crops and plants and enhanced the discovery of hidden bridges between genotypes and phenotypes. The newly generated reference sequences of unstudied minor plants can be annotated by the knowledge of model plants via translational genomics approaches. Here, we reviewed the strategies of translational genomics and suggested perspectives on the current databases of genomic resources and the database structures of translated information on the new genome. As a draft picture of phenotypic annotation, translational genomics on newly sequenced plants will provide valuable assistance for breeders and researchers who are interested in genetic studies.

  10. VIGOR, an annotation program for small viral genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shiliang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The decrease in cost for sequencing and improvement in technologies has made it easier and more common for the re-sequencing of large genomes as well as parallel sequencing of small genomes. It is possible to completely sequence a small genome within days and this increases the number of publicly available genomes. Among the types of genomes being rapidly sequenced are those of microbial and viral genomes responsible for infectious diseases. However, accurate gene prediction is a challenge that persists for decoding a newly sequenced genome. Therefore, accurate and efficient gene prediction programs are highly desired for rapid and cost effective surveillance of RNA viruses through full genome sequencing. Results We have developed VIGOR (Viral Genome ORF Reader, a web application tool for gene prediction in influenza virus, rotavirus, rhinovirus and coronavirus subtypes. VIGOR detects protein coding regions based on sequence similarity searches and can accurately detect genome specific features such as frame shifts, overlapping genes, embedded genes, and can predict mature peptides within the context of a single polypeptide open reading frame. Genotyping capability for influenza and rotavirus is built into the program. We compared VIGOR to previously described gene prediction programs, ZCURVE_V, GeneMarkS and FLAN. The specificity and sensitivity of VIGOR are greater than 99% for the RNA viral genomes tested. Conclusions VIGOR is a user friendly web-based genome annotation program for five different viral agents, influenza, rotavirus, rhinovirus, coronavirus and SARS coronavirus. This is the first gene prediction program for rotavirus and rhinovirus for public access. VIGOR is able to accurately predict protein coding genes for the above five viral types and has the capability to assign function to the predicted open reading frames and genotype influenza virus. The prediction software was designed for performing high

  11. Alignment-Annotator web server: rendering and annotating sequence alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, Christoph; Fähling, Michael; Weyand, Birgit; Wieland, Thomas; Gille, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Alignment-Annotator is a novel web service designed to generate interactive views of annotated nucleotide and amino acid sequence alignments (i) de novo and (ii) embedded in other software. All computations are performed at server side. Interactivity is implemented in HTML5, a language native to web browsers. The alignment is initially displayed using default settings and can be modified with the graphical user interfaces. For example, individual sequences can be reordered or deleted using drag and drop, amino acid color code schemes can be applied and annotations can be added. Annotations can be made manually or imported (BioDAS servers, the UniProt, the Catalytic Site Atlas and the PDB). Some edits take immediate effect while others require server interaction and may take a few seconds to execute. The final alignment document can be downloaded as a zip-archive containing the HTML files. Because of the use of HTML the resulting interactive alignment can be viewed on any platform including Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, Android and iOS in any standard web browser. Importantly, no plugins nor Java are required and therefore Alignment-Anotator represents the first interactive browser-based alignment visualization. http://www.bioinformatics.org/strap/aa/ and http://strap.charite.de/aa/. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. MUTAGEN: Multi-user tool for annotating GENomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brugger, K.; Redder, P.; Skovgaard, Marie

    2003-01-01

    MUTAGEN is a free prokaryotic annotation system. It offers the advantages of genome comparison, graphical sequence browsers, search facilities and open-source for user-specific adjustments. The web-interface allows several users to access the system from standard desktop computers. The Sulfolobus...

  13. Assembly and annotation of full mitochondrial genomes for the corn rootworm species, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera and D. barberi (Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), using Next Generation Sequence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complete mitochondrial genomes for two corn rootworm species, Diabrotica v. virgifera (16,747 bp) and D. barberi (16,632; Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), were assembled from Illumina HiSeq2000 read data. Annotation indicated that the order and orientation of 13 protein coding genes (PCGs), and...

  14. Tool for rapid annotation of microbial SNPs (TRAMS): a simple program for rapid annotation of genomic variation in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumerman, Richard A; Tucker, Nicholas P; Herron, Paul R; Hoskisson, Paul A; Sangal, Vartul

    2013-09-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has been widely used to study genomic variation in a variety of prokaryotes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) resulting from genomic comparisons need to be annotated for their functional impact on the coding sequences. We have developed a program, TRAMS, for functional annotation of genomic SNPs which is available to download as a single file executable for WINDOWS users with limited computational experience and as a Python script for Mac OS and Linux users. TRAMS needs a tab delimited text file containing SNP locations, reference nucleotide and SNPs in variant strains along with a reference genome sequence in GenBank or EMBL format. SNPs are annotated as synonymous, nonsynonymous or nonsense. Nonsynonymous SNPs in start and stop codons are separated as non-start and non-stop SNPs, respectively. SNPs in multiple overlapping features are annotated separately for each feature and multiple nucleotide polymorphisms within a codon are combined before annotation. We have also developed a workflow for Galaxy, a highly used tool for analysing NGS data, to map short reads to a reference genome and extract and annotate the SNPs. TRAMS is a simple program for rapid and accurate annotation of SNPs that will be very useful for microbiologists in analysing genomic diversity in microbial populations.

  15. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Eudes; Aburjaile, Flavia F; Ramos, Rommel Tj

    2014-01-01

    and annotation will not be undertaken. It is important to know what is lost when we settle for a draft genome and to determine the "scientific value" of a newly sequenced genome. This review addresses the expected impact of newly sequenced genomes on antibacterial discovery and vaccinology. Also, it discusses...

  16. Genome annotation of a Saccharomyces sp. lager brewer's yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Marcela De León-Medina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The genome of lager brewer's yeast is a hybrid, with Saccharomyces eubayanus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as sub-genomes. Due to their specific use in the beer industry, relatively little information is available. The genome of brewing yeast was sequenced and annotated in this study. We obtained a genome size of 22.7 Mbp that consisted of 133 scaffolds, with 65 scaffolds larger than 10 kbp. With respect to the annotation, 9939 genes were obtained, and when they were submitted to a local alignment, we found that 53.93% of these genes corresponded to S. cerevisiae, while another 42.86% originated from S. eubayanus. Our results confirm that our strain is a hybrid of at least two different genomes.

  17. Improving the Caenorhabditis elegans genome annotation using machine learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Rätsch

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available For modern biology, precise genome annotations are of prime importance, as they allow the accurate definition of genic regions. We employ state-of-the-art machine learning methods to assay and improve the accuracy of the genome annotation of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The proposed machine learning system is trained to recognize exons and introns on the unspliced mRNA, utilizing recent advances in support vector machines and label sequence learning. In 87% (coding and untranslated regions and 95% (coding regions only of all genes tested in several out-of-sample evaluations, our method correctly identified all exons and introns. Notably, only 37% and 50%, respectively, of the presently unconfirmed genes in the C. elegans genome annotation agree with our predictions, thus we hypothesize that a sizable fraction of those genes are not correctly annotated. A retrospective evaluation of the Wormbase WS120 annotation [] of C. elegans reveals that splice form predictions on unconfirmed genes in WS120 are inaccurate in about 18% of the considered cases, while our predictions deviate from the truth only in 10%-13%. We experimentally analyzed 20 controversial genes on which our system and the annotation disagree, confirming the superiority of our predictions. While our method correctly predicted 75% of those cases, the standard annotation was never completely correct. The accuracy of our system is further corroborated by a comparison with two other recently proposed systems that can be used for splice form prediction: SNAP and ExonHunter. We conclude that the genome annotation of C. elegans and other organisms can be greatly enhanced using modern machine learning technology.

  18. Comparative genomic survey, exon-intron annotation and phylogenetic analysis of NAT-homologous sequences in archaea, protists, fungi, viruses, and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously published extensive genomic surveys [1-3], reporting NAT-homologous sequences in hundreds of sequenced bacterial, fungal and vertebrate genomes. We present here the results of our latest search of 2445 genomes, representing 1532 (70 archaeal, 1210 bacterial, 43 protist, 97 fungal,...

  19. MIPS: analysis and annotation of proteins from whole genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Amid, C; Arnold, R; Frishman, D; Güldener, U; Mannhaupt, G; Münsterkötter, M; Pagel, P; Strack, N; Stümpflen, V; Warfsmann, J; Ruepp, A

    2004-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS-GSF), Neuherberg, Germany, provides protein sequence-related information based on whole-genome analysis. The main focus of the work is directed toward the systematic organization of sequence-related attributes as gathered by a variety of algorithms, primary information from experimental data together with information compiled from the scientific literature. MIPS maintains automatically generated and manually annotated genome-specific databases, develops systematic classification schemes for the functional annotation of protein sequences and provides tools for the comprehensive analysis of protein sequences. This report updates the information on the yeast genome (CYGD), the Neurospora crassa genome (MNCDB), the database of complete cDNAs (German Human Genome Project, NGFN), the database of mammalian protein-protein interactions (MPPI), the database of FASTA homologies (SIMAP), and the interface for the fast retrieval of protein-associated information (QUIPOS). The Arabidopsis thaliana database, the rice database, the plant EST databases (MATDB, MOsDB, SPUTNIK), as well as the databases for the comprehensive set of genomes (PEDANT genomes) are described elsewhere in the 2003 and 2004 NAR database issues, respectively. All databases described, and the detailed descriptions of our projects can be accessed through the MIPS web server (http://mips.gsf.de).

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus 2166.

    OpenAIRE

    Karlyshev, Andrey V.; Melnikov, Vyacheslav G.; Kosarev, Igor V.; Abramov, Vyacheslav M.

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we present a draft sequence of the genome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain 2166, a potential novel probiotic. Genome annotation and read mapping onto a reference genome of L. rhamnosus strain GG allowed for the identification of the differences and similarities in the genomic contents and gene arrangements of these strains.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus 2166.

    OpenAIRE

    Karlyshev, Andrey V.; Melnikov, Vyacheslav G.; Kosarev, Igor V.; Abramov, Vyacheslav M.

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we present a draft sequence of the genome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain 2166, a potential novel probiotic. Genome annotation and read mapping onto a reference genome of L. rhamnosus strain GG allowed for the identification of the differences and similarities in the genomic contents and gene arrangements of these strains.

  2. Genome sequencing and annotation of Laceyella sacchari strain GS 1-1, isolated from hot spring, Chumathang, Leh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjot Kaur

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the 3.3-Mb draft genome of Laceyella sacchari strain GS 1-1, isolated from hot spring water sample, Chumathang, Leh, India. Draft genome of strain GS 1-1 consists of 3, 324, 316 bp with a G + C content of 48.8% and 3429 predicted protein coding genes and 75 RNAs. Geobacillus thermodenitrificans strain NG80-2, Geobacillus kaustophilus strain HTA426 and Geobacillus sp. Strain G11MC16 are the closest neighbors of the strain GS 1-1.

  3. Genepi: a blackboard framework for genome annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descorps-Declère, Stéphane; Ziébelin, Danielle; Rechenmann, François; Viari, Alain

    2006-10-12

    Genome annotation can be viewed as an incremental, cooperative, data-driven, knowledge-based process that involves multiple methods to predict gene locations and structures. This process might have to be executed more than once and might be subjected to several revisions as the biological (new data) or methodological (new methods) knowledge evolves. In this context, although a lot of annotation platforms already exist, there is still a strong need for computer systems which take in charge, not only the primary annotation, but also the update and advance of the associated knowledge. In this paper, we propose to adopt a blackboard architecture for designing such a system We have implemented a blackboard framework (called Genepi) for developing automatic annotation systems. The system is not bound to any specific annotation strategy. Instead, the user will specify a blackboard structure in a configuration file and the system will instantiate and run this particular annotation strategy. The characteristics of this framework are presented and discussed. Specific adaptations to the classical blackboard architecture have been required, such as the description of the activation patterns of the knowledge sources by using an extended set of Allen's temporal relations. Although the system is robust enough to be used on real-size applications, it is of primary use to bioinformatics researchers who want to experiment with blackboard architectures. In the context of genome annotation, blackboards have several interesting features related to the way methodological and biological knowledge can be updated. They can readily handle the cooperative (several methods are implied) and opportunistic (the flow of execution depends on the state of our knowledge) aspects of the annotation process.

  4. Genepi: a blackboard framework for genome annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziébelin Danielle

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome annotation can be viewed as an incremental, cooperative, data-driven, knowledge-based process that involves multiple methods to predict gene locations and structures. This process might have to be executed more than once and might be subjected to several revisions as the biological (new data or methodological (new methods knowledge evolves. In this context, although a lot of annotation platforms already exist, there is still a strong need for computer systems which take in charge, not only the primary annotation, but also the update and advance of the associated knowledge. In this paper, we propose to adopt a blackboard architecture for designing such a system Results We have implemented a blackboard framework (called Genepi for developing automatic annotation systems. The system is not bound to any specific annotation strategy. Instead, the user will specify a blackboard structure in a configuration file and the system will instantiate and run this particular annotation strategy. The characteristics of this framework are presented and discussed. Specific adaptations to the classical blackboard architecture have been required, such as the description of the activation patterns of the knowledge sources by using an extended set of Allen's temporal relations. Although the system is robust enough to be used on real-size applications, it is of primary use to bioinformatics researchers who want to experiment with blackboard architectures. Conclusion In the context of genome annotation, blackboards have several interesting features related to the way methodological and biological knowledge can be updated. They can readily handle the cooperative (several methods are implied and opportunistic (the flow of execution depends on the state of our knowledge aspects of the annotation process.

  5. The standard operating procedure of the DOE-JGI Microbial Genome Annotation Pipeline (MGAP v.4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia N; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tripp, H James; Paez-Espino, David; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Szeto, Ernest; Pillay, Manoj; Chen, I-Min A; Pati, Amrita; Nielsen, Torben; Markowitz, Victor M; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-01-01

    The DOE-JGI Microbial Genome Annotation Pipeline performs structural and functional annotation of microbial genomes that are further included into the Integrated Microbial Genome comparative analysis system. MGAP is applied to assembled nucleotide sequence datasets that are provided via the IMG submission site. Dataset submission for annotation first requires project and associated metadata description in GOLD. The MGAP sequence data processing consists of feature prediction including identification of protein-coding genes, non-coding RNAs and regulatory RNA features, as well as CRISPR elements. Structural annotation is followed by assignment of protein product names and functions.

  6. EuCAP, a Eukaryotic Community Annotation Package, and its application to the rice genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton John P

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the improvements of tools for automated annotation of genome sequences, manual curation at the structural and functional level can provide an increased level of refinement to genome annotation. The Institute for Genomic Research Rice Genome Annotation (hereafter named the Osa1 Genome Annotation is the product of an automated pipeline and, for this reason, will benefit from the input of biologists with expertise in rice and/or particular gene families. Leveraging knowledge from a dispersed community of scientists is a demonstrated way of improving a genome annotation. This requires tools that facilitate 1 the submission of gene annotation to an annotation project, 2 the review of the submitted models by project annotators, and 3 the incorporation of the submitted models in the ongoing annotation effort. Results We have developed the Eukaryotic Community Annotation Package (EuCAP, an annotation tool, and have applied it to the rice genome. The primary level of curation by community annotators (CA has been the annotation of gene families. Annotation can be submitted by email or through the EuCAP Web Tool. The CA models are aligned to the rice pseudomolecules and the coordinates of these alignments, along with functional annotation, are stored in the MySQL EuCAP Gene Model database. Web pages displaying the alignments of the CA models to the Osa1 Genome models are automatically generated from the EuCAP Gene Model database. The alignments are reviewed by the project annotators (PAs in the context of experimental evidence. Upon approval by the PAs, the CA models, along with the corresponding functional annotations, are integrated into the Osa1 Genome Annotation. The CA annotations, grouped by family, are displayed on the Community Annotation pages of the project website http://rice.tigr.org, as well as in the Community Annotation track of the Genome Browser. Conclusion We have applied EuCAP to rice. As of July 2007, the

  7. Missing genes in the annotation of prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wu-chun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-coding gene detection in prokaryotic genomes is considered a much simpler problem than in intron-containing eukaryotic genomes. However there have been reports that prokaryotic gene finder programs have problems with small genes (either over-predicting or under-predicting. Therefore the question arises as to whether current genome annotations have systematically missing, small genes. Results We have developed a high-performance computing methodology to investigate this problem. In this methodology we compare all ORFs larger than or equal to 33 aa from all fully-sequenced prokaryotic replicons. Based on that comparison, and using conservative criteria requiring a minimum taxonomic diversity between conserved ORFs in different genomes, we have discovered 1,153 candidate genes that are missing from current genome annotations. These missing genes are similar only to each other and do not have any strong similarity to gene sequences in public databases, with the implication that these ORFs belong to missing gene families. We also uncovered 38,895 intergenic ORFs, readily identified as putative genes by similarity to currently annotated genes (we call these absent annotations. The vast majority of the missing genes found are small (less than 100 aa. A comparison of select examples with GeneMark, EasyGene and Glimmer predictions yields evidence that some of these genes are escaping detection by these programs. Conclusions Prokaryotic gene finders and prokaryotic genome annotations require improvement for accurate prediction of small genes. The number of missing gene families found is likely a lower bound on the actual number, due to the conservative criteria used to determine whether an ORF corresponds to a real gene.

  8. Pattern matching in indeterminate and Arc-annotated sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumi, Md Tanvir Islam; Moosa, Tanaeem M; Rahman, M Sohel

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present efficient algorithms for finding indeterminate Arc-Annotated patterns in indeterminate Arc-Annotated references. Our algorithms run in O(m+ (nm) w) time where n and m are respectively the length of our reference and pattern strings and w is the target machine word size. Here we have assumed the alphabet size to be constant, because, indeterminate Arc-Annotated sequences are used to model biological sequences. Clearly, for short patterns, our algorithms run in linear time and efficient algorithms for matching short patterns to reference genomes have huge applications in practical settings. We have also applied our algorithms to scan the ncRNAs without pseudoknots. We scanned three whole human chromosomes and it took only 2.5 - 4 minutes to scan one whole chromosome for an ncRNA family. Some relevant patents are discussed in.

  9. Scaling up genome annotation using MAKER and work queue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, Andrew; Musgrave, Zachary; Kachmarck, Brian; Thain, Douglas; Emrich, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have enabled sequencing many genomes. Because of the overall increasing demand and the inherent parallelism available in many required analyses, these bioinformatics applications should ideally run on clusters, clouds and/or grids. We present a modified annotation framework that achieves a speed-up of 45x using 50 workers using a Caenorhabditis japonica test case. We also evaluate these modifications within the Amazon EC2 cloud framework. The underlying genome annotation (MAKER) is parallelised as an MPI application. Our framework enables it to now run without MPI while utilising a wide variety of distributed computing resources. This parallel framework also allows easy explicit data transfer, which helps overcome a major limitation of bioinformatics tools that often rely on shared file systems. Combined, our proposed framework can be used, even during early stages of development, to easily run sequence analysis tools on clusters, grids and clouds.

  10. SNAD: sequence name annotation-based designer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbalenya Alexander E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing diversity of biological data is tagged with unique identifiers (UIDs associated with polynucleotides and proteins to ensure efficient computer-mediated data storage, maintenance, and processing. These identifiers, which are not informative for most people, are often substituted by biologically meaningful names in various presentations to facilitate utilization and dissemination of sequence-based knowledge. This substitution is commonly done manually that may be a tedious exercise prone to mistakes and omissions. Results Here we introduce SNAD (Sequence Name Annotation-based Designer that mediates automatic conversion of sequence UIDs (associated with multiple alignment or phylogenetic tree, or supplied as plain text list into biologically meaningful names and acronyms. This conversion is directed by precompiled or user-defined templates that exploit wealth of annotation available in cognate entries of external databases. Using examples, we demonstrate how this tool can be used to generate names for practical purposes, particularly in virology. Conclusion A tool for controllable annotation-based conversion of sequence UIDs into biologically meaningful names and acronyms has been developed and placed into service, fostering links between quality of sequence annotation, and efficiency of communication and knowledge dissemination among researchers.

  11. Evaluation of Three Automated Genome Annotations for Halorhabdus utahensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Peter; Carney, Nick; DeLoache, Will

    2009-01-01

    in databases such as NCBI and used to validate subsequent annotation errors. We submitted the genome sequence of halophilic archaeon Halorhabdus utahensis to be analyzed by three genome annotation services. We have examined the output from each service in a variety of ways in order to compare the methodology...

  12. MITOS: improved de novo metazoan mitochondrial genome annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernt, Matthias; Donath, Alexander; Jühling, Frank; Externbrink, Fabian; Florentz, Catherine; Fritzsch, Guido; Pütz, Joern; Middendorf, Martin; Stadler, Peter F

    2013-11-01

    About 2000 completely sequenced mitochondrial genomes are available from the NCBI RefSeq data base together with manually curated annotations of their protein-coding genes, rRNAs, and tRNAs. This annotation information, which has accumulated over two decades, has been obtained with a diverse set of computational tools and annotation strategies. Despite all efforts of manual curation it is still plagued by misassignments of reading directions, erroneous gene names, and missing as well as false positive annotations in particular for the RNA genes. Taken together, this causes substantial problems for fully automatic pipelines that aim to use these data comprehensively for studies of animal phylogenetics and the molecular evolution of mitogenomes. The MITOS pipeline is designed to compute a consistent de novo annotation of the mitogenomic sequences. We show that the results of MITOS match RefSeq and MitoZoa in terms of annotation coverage and quality. At the same time we avoid biases, inconsistencies of nomenclature, and typos originating from manual curation strategies. The MITOS pipeline is accessible online at http://mitos.bioinf.uni-leipzig.de. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Assembly, Annotation, and Analysis of Multiple Mycorrhizal Fungal Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Initiative Consortium, Mycorrhizal Genomics; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis

    2013-03-08

    Mycorrhizal fungi play critical roles in host plant health, soil community structure and chemistry, and carbon and nutrient cycling, all areas of intense interest to the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To this end we are building on our earlier sequencing of the Laccaria bicolor genome by partnering with INRA-Nancy and the mycorrhizal research community in the MGI to sequence and analyze dozens of mycorrhizal genomes of all Basidiomycota and Ascomycota orders and multiple ecological types (ericoid, orchid, and ectomycorrhizal). JGI has developed and deployed high-throughput sequencing techniques, and Assembly, RNASeq, and Annotation Pipelines. In 2012 alone we sequenced, assembled, and annotated 12 draft or improved genomes of mycorrhizae, and predicted ~;;232831 genes and ~;;15011 multigene families, All of this data is publicly available on JGI MycoCosm (http://jgi.doe.gov/fungi/), which provides access to both the genome data and tools with which to analyze the data. Preliminary comparisons of the current total of 14 public mycorrhizal genomes suggest that 1) short secreted proteins potentially involved in symbiosis are more enriched in some orders than in others amongst the mycorrhizal Agaricomycetes, 2) there are wide ranges of numbers of genes involved in certain functional categories, such as signal transduction and post-translational modification, and 3) novel gene families are specific to some ecological types.

  14. A Web-based High-Throughput Tool for Next-Generation Sequence Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    annotation of a newly sequenced complete genome, can help devise new strategies in diagnostics and forensics . Moreover, these annotations, coupled...References 1. Hall, N., “Advanced sequencing technologies and their wider impact in microbiology ”, The Journal of Experimental Biology, 210(9), pp. 1518–1525

  15. Sma3s: A Three-Step Modular Annotator for Large Sequence Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Viguera, Enrique; Claros, M. Gonzalo; Trelles, Oswaldo; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J.

    2014-01-01

    Automatic sequence annotation is an essential component of modern ‘omics’ studies, which aim to extract information from large collections of sequence data. Most existing tools use sequence homology to establish evolutionary relationships and assign putative functions to sequences. However, it can be difficult to define a similarity threshold that achieves sufficient coverage without sacrificing annotation quality. Defining the correct configuration is critical and can be challenging for non-specialist users. Thus, the development of robust automatic annotation techniques that generate high-quality annotations without needing expert knowledge would be very valuable for the research community. We present Sma3s, a tool for automatically annotating very large collections of biological sequences from any kind of gene library or genome. Sma3s is composed of three modules that progressively annotate query sequences using either: (i) very similar homologues, (ii) orthologous sequences or (iii) terms enriched in groups of homologous sequences. We trained the system using several random sets of known sequences, demonstrating average sensitivity and specificity values of ∼85%. In conclusion, Sma3s is a versatile tool for high-throughput annotation of a wide variety of sequence datasets that outperforms the accuracy of other well-established annotation algorithms, and it can enrich existing database annotations and uncover previously hidden features. Importantly, Sma3s has already been used in the functional annotation of two published transcriptomes. PMID:24501397

  16. The DOE-JGI Standard Operating Procedure for the Annotations of the Microbial Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Chen, I-Min A.; Szeto, Ernest; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-05-20

    The DOE-JGI Microbial Annotation Pipeline (DOE-JGI MAP) supports gene prediction and/or functional annotation of microbial genomes towards comparative analysis with the Integrated Microbial Genome (IMG) system. DOE-JGI MAP annotation is applied on nucleotide sequence datasets included in the IMG-ER (Expert Review) version of IMG via the IMG ER submission site. Users can submit the sequence datasets consisting of one or more contigs in a multi-fasta file. DOE-JGI MAP annotation includes prediction of protein coding and RNA genes, as well as repeats and assignment of product names to these genes.

  17. The Rice Genome Knowledgebase (RGKbase): an annotation database for rice comparative genomics and evolutionary biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dapeng; Xia, Yan; Li, Xinna; Hou, Lixia; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, genomes of cultivated rice cultivars and their wild counterparts have been sequenced although most efforts are focused on genome assembly and annotation of two major cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) subspecies, 93-11 (indica) and Nipponbare (japonica). To integrate information from genome assemblies and annotations for better analysis and application, we now introduce a comparative rice genome database, the Rice Genome Knowledgebase (RGKbase, http://rgkbase.big.ac.cn/RGKbase/). RGKbase is built to have three major components: (i) integrated data curation for rice genomics and molecular biology, which includes genome sequence assemblies, transcriptomic and epigenomic data, genetic variations, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and the relevant literature; (ii) User-friendly viewers, such as Gbrowse, GeneBrowse and Circos, for genome annotations and evolutionary dynamics and (iii) Bioinformatic tools for compositional and synteny analyses, gene family classifications, gene ontology terms and pathways and gene co-expression networks. RGKbase current includes data from five rice cultivars and species: Nipponbare (japonica), 93-11 (indica), PA64s (indica), the African rice (Oryza glaberrima) and a wild rice species (Oryza brachyantha). We are also constantly introducing new datasets from variety of public efforts, such as two recent releases-sequence data from ∼1000 rice varieties, which are mapped into the reference genome, yielding ample high-quality single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions-deletions.

  18. IMG ER: A System for Microbial Genome Annotation Expert Review and Curation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Chen, I-Min A.; Chu, Ken; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-05-25

    A rapidly increasing number of microbial genomes are sequenced by organizations worldwide and are eventually included into various public genome data resources. The quality of the annotations depends largely on the original dataset providers, with erroneous or incomplete annotations often carried over into the public resources and difficult to correct. We have developed an Expert Review (ER) version of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system, with the goal of supporting systematic and efficient revision of microbial genome annotations. IMG ER provides tools for the review and curation of annotations of both new and publicly available microbial genomes within IMG's rich integrated genome framework. New genome datasets are included into IMG ER prior to their public release either with their native annotations or with annotations generated by IMG ER's annotation pipeline. IMG ER tools allow addressing annotation problems detected with IMG's comparative analysis tools, such as genes missed by gene prediction pipelines or genes without an associated function. Over the past year, IMG ER was used for improving the annotations of about 150 microbial genomes.

  19. BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal Matoq Saeed

    2015-08-18

    Background Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). Results The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACON’s utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27 %, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. Conclusions We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/

  20. BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkatawi, Manal; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-08-18

    Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACON's utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27%, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/ .

  1. Annotation-Based Whole Genomic Prediction and Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadarmideen, Haja; Do, Duy Ngoc; Janss, Luc;

    in their contribution to estimated genomic variances and in prediction of genomic breeding values by applying SNP annotation approaches to feed efficiency. Ensembl Variant Predictor (EVP) and Pig QTL database were used as the source of genomic annotation for 60K chip. Genomic prediction was performed using the Bayes...... prove useful for less heritable traits such as diseases and fertility...

  2. Experimental-confirmation and functional-annotation of predicted proteins in the chicken genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy Fiona M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chicken genome was sequenced because of its phylogenetic position as a non-mammalian vertebrate, its use as a biomedical model especially to study embryology and development, its role as a source of human disease organisms and its importance as the major source of animal derived food protein. However, genomic sequence data is, in itself, of limited value; generally it is not equivalent to understanding biological function. The benefit of having a genome sequence is that it provides a basis for functional genomics. However, the sequence data currently available is poorly structurally and functionally annotated and many genes do not have standard nomenclature assigned. Results We analysed eight chicken tissues and improved the chicken genome structural annotation by providing experimental support for the in vivo expression of 7,809 computationally predicted proteins, including 30 chicken proteins that were only electronically predicted or hypothetical translations in human. To improve functional annotation (based on Gene Ontology, we mapped these identified proteins to their human and mouse orthologs and used this orthology to transfer Gene Ontology (GO functional annotations to the chicken proteins. The 8,213 orthology-based GO annotations that we produced represent an 8% increase in currently available chicken GO annotations. Orthologous chicken products were also assigned standardized nomenclature based on current chicken nomenclature guidelines. Conclusion We demonstrate the utility of high-throughput expression proteomics for rapid experimental structural annotation of a newly sequenced eukaryote genome. These experimentally-supported predicted proteins were further annotated by assigning the proteins with standardized nomenclature and functional annotation. This method is widely applicable to a diverse range of species. Moreover, information from one genome can be used to improve the annotation of other genomes and

  3. Re-annotation of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome using a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellin, Esteban; Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Mercer, Tim R; Palfreyman, Robin W; Nielsen, Lars K

    2013-10-11

    Accurate bacterial genome annotations provide a framework to understanding cellular functions, behavior and pathogenicity and are essential for metabolic engineering. Annotations based only on in silico predictions are inaccurate, particularly for large, high G + C content genomes due to the lack of similarities in gene length and gene organization to model organisms. Here we describe a 2D systems biology driven re-annotation of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome using proteogenomics, a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, RNA-sequencing and small-RNA-sequencing. We observed transcription of more than 300 intergenic regions, detected 59 peptides in intergenic regions, confirmed 164 open reading frames previously annotated as hypothetical proteins and reassigned function to open reading frames using the genome-scale metabolic reconstruction. Finally, we present a novel way of mapping ribosomal binding sites across the genome by sequencing small RNAs. The work presented here describes a novel framework for annotation of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome. Based on experimental observations, the 2D annotation framework greatly reduces errors that are commonly made when annotating large-high G + C content genomes using computational prediction algorithms.

  4. Expressed Peptide Tags: An additional layer of data for genome annotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savidor, Alon [ORNL; Donahoo, Ryan S [ORNL; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Lamour, Kurt H [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    While genome sequencing is becoming ever more routine, genome annotation remains a challenging process. Identification of the coding sequences within the genomic milieu presents a tremendous challenge, especially for eukaryotes with their complex gene architectures. Here we present a method to assist the annotation process through the use of proteomic data and bioinformatics. Mass spectra of digested protein preparations of the organism of interest were acquired and searched against a protein database created by a six frame translation of the genome. The identified peptides were mapped back to the genome, compared to the current annotation, and then categorized as supporting or extending the current genome annotation. We named the classified peptides Expressed Peptide Tags (EPTs). The well annotated bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris was used as a control for the method and showed high degree of correlation between EPT mapping and the current annotation, with 86% of the EPTs confirming existing gene calls and less than 1% of the EPTs expanding on the current annotation. The eukaryotic plant pathogens Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora sojae, whose genomes have been recently sequenced and are much less well annotated, were also subjected to this method. A series of algorithmic steps were taken to increase the confidence of EPT identification for these organisms, including generation of smaller sub-databases to be searched against, and definition of EPT criteria that accommodates the more complex eukaryotic gene architecture. As expected, the analysis of the Phytophthora species showed less correlation between EPT mapping and their current annotation. While ~77% of Phytophthora EPTs supported the current annotation, a portion of them (7.2% and 12.6% for P. ramorum and P. sojae, respectively) suggested modification to current gene calls or identified novel genes that were missed by the current genome annotation of these organisms.

  5. The Diversity of Sequence and Chromosomal Distribution of New Transposable Element-Related Segments in the Rye Genome Revealed by FISH and Lineage Annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxin Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs in plant genomes exhibit a great variety of structure, sequence content and copy number, making them important drivers for species diversity and genome evolution. Even though a genome-wide statistic summary of TEs in rye has been obtained using high-throughput DNA sequencing technology, the accurate diversity of TEs in rye, as well as their chromosomal distribution and evolution, remains elusive due to the repetitive sequence assembling problems and the high dynamic and nested nature of TEs. In this study, using genomic plasmid library construction combined with dot-blot hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis, we successfully isolated 70 unique FISH-positive TE-related sequences including 47 rye genome specific ones: 30 showed homology or partial homology with previously FISH characterized sequences and 40 have not been characterized. Among the 70 sequences, 48 sequences carried Ty3/gypsy-derived segments, 7 sequences carried Ty1/copia-derived segments and 15 sequences carried segments homologous with multiple TE families. 26 TE lineages were found in the 70 sequences, and among these lineages, Wilma was found in sequences dispersed in all chromosome regions except telomeric positions; Abiba was found in sequences predominantly located at pericentromeric and centromeric positions; Wis, Carmilla, and Inga were found in sequences displaying signals dispersed from distal regions toward pericentromeric positions; except DNA transposon lineages, all the other lineages were found in sequences displaying signals dispersed from proximal regions toward distal regions. A high percentage (21.4% of chimeric sequences were identified in this study and their high abundance in rye genome suggested that new TEs might form through recombination and nested transposition. Our results also gave proofs that diverse TE lineages were arranged at centromeric and pericentromeric positions in rye, and lineages like

  6. Graph-based sequence annotation using a data integration approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Robert; Lysenko, Artem; Hindle, Matthew; Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Thiele, Ralf; Rawlings, Christopher; Köhler, Jacob; Taubert, Jan

    2008-08-25

    The automated annotation of data from high throughput sequencing and genomics experiments is a significant challenge for bioinformatics. Most current approaches rely on sequential pipelines of gene finding and gene function prediction methods that annotate a gene with information from different reference data sources. Each function prediction method contributes evidence supporting a functional assignment. Such approaches generally ignore the links between the information in the reference datasets. These links, however, are valuable for assessing the plausibility of a function assignment and can be used to evaluate the confidence in a prediction. We are working towards a novel annotation system that uses the network of information supporting the function assignment to enrich the annotation process for use by expert curators and predicting the function of previously unannotated genes. In this paper we describe our success in the first stages of this development. We present the data integration steps that are needed to create the core database of integrated reference databases (UniProt, PFAM, PDB, GO and the pathway database Ara-Cyc) which has been established in the ONDEX data integration system. We also present a comparison between different methods for integration of GO terms as part of the function assignment pipeline and discuss the consequences of this analysis for improving the accuracy of gene function annotation. The methods and algorithms presented in this publication are an integral part of the ONDEX system which is freely available from http://ondex.sf.net/.

  7. Insights into the annotated genome sequence of Methanoculleus bourgensis MS2(T), related to dominant methanogens in biogas-producing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Irena; Wibberg, Daniel; Stantscheff, Robbin; Stolze, Yvonne; Blom, Jochen; Eikmeyer, Felix-Gregor; Fracowiak, Jochen; König, Helmut; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2015-05-10

    The final step of the biogas production process, the methanogenesis, is frequently dominated by members of the genus Methanoculleus. In particular, the species Methanoculleus bourgensis was identified to play a role in different biogas reactor systems. The genome of the type strain M. bourgensis MS2(T), originally isolated from a sewage sludge digestor, was completely sequenced to analyze putative adaptive genome features conferring competitiveness within biogas reactor environments to the strain. Sequencing and assembly of the M. bourgensis MS2(T) genome yielded a chromosome with a size of 2,789,773 bp. Comparative analysis of M. bourgensis MS2(T) and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1 revealed significant similarities. The absence of genes for a putative ammonium uptake system may indicate that M. bourgensis MS2(T) is adapted to environments rich in ammonium/ammonia. Specific genes featuring predicted functions in the context of osmolyte production were detected in the genome of M. bourgensis MS2(T). Mapping of metagenome sequences derived from a production-scale biogas plant revealed that M. bourgensis MS2(T) almost completely comprises the genetic information of dominant methanogens present in the biogas reactor analyzed. Hence, availability of the M. bourgensis MS2(T) genome sequence may be valuable regarding further research addressing the performance of Methanoculleus species in agricultural biogas plants.

  8. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard A; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony V; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  9. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Hurt

    Full Text Available Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap. The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  10. HBVRegDB: Annotation, comparison, detection and visualization of regulatory elements in hepatitis B virus sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firth Andrew E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The many Hepadnaviridae sequences available have widely varied functional annotation. The genomes are very compact (~3.2 kb but contain multiple layers of functional regulatory elements in addition to coding regions. Key regions are subject to purifying selection, as mutations in these regions will produce non-functional viruses. Results These genomic sequences have been organized into a structured database to facilitate research at the molecular level. HBVRegDB is a comparative genomic analysis tool with an integrated underlying sequence database. The database contains genomic sequence data from representative viruses. In addition to INSDC and RefSeq annotation, HBVRegDB also contains expert and systematically calculated annotations (e.g. promoters and comparative genome analysis results (e.g. blastn, tblastx. It also contains analyses based on curated HBV alignments. Information about conserved regions – including primary conservation (e.g. CDS-Plotcon and RNA secondary structure predictions (e.g. Alidot – is integrated into the database. A large amount of data is graphically presented using the GBrowse (Generic Genome Browser adapted for analysis of viral genomes. Flexible query access is provided based on any annotated genomic feature. Novel regulatory motifs can be found by analysing the annotated sequences. Conclusion HBVRegDB serves as a knowledge database and as a comparative genomic analysis tool for molecular biologists investigating HBV. It is publicly available and complementary to other viral and HBV focused datasets and tools http://hbvregdb.otago.ac.nz. The availability of multiple and highly annotated sequences of viral genomes in one database combined with comparative analysis tools facilitates detection of novel genomic elements.

  11. A Human-Curated Annotation of the Candida albicans Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent sequencing and assembly of the genome for the fungal pathogen Candida albicans used simple automated procedures for the identification of putative genes. We have reviewed the entire assembly, both by hand and with additional bioinformatic resources, to accurately map and describe 6,354 genes and to identify 246 genes whose original database entries contained sequencing errors (or possibly mutations that affect their reading frame. Comparison with other fungal genomes permitted the identification of numerous fungus-specific genes that might be targeted for antifungal therapy. We also observed that, compared to other fungi, the protein-coding sequences in the C. albicans genome are especially rich in short sequence repeats. Finally, our improved annotation permitted a detailed analysis of several multigene families, and comparative genomic studies showed that C. albicans has a far greater catabolic range, encoding respiratory Complex 1, several novel oxidoreductases and ketone body degrading enzymes, malonyl-CoA and enoyl-CoA carriers, several novel amino acid degrading enzymes, a variety of secreted catabolic lipases and proteases, and numerous transporters to assimilate the resulting nutrients. The results of these efforts will ensure that the Candida research community has uniform and comprehensive genomic information for medical research as well as for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  12. Improved annotation through genome-scale metabolic modeling of Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Olsen, Peter; Hansen, Kim;

    2008-01-01

    to a genome scale metabolic model of A. oryzae. Results: Our assembled EST sequences we identified 1,046 newly predicted genes in the A. oryzae genome. Furthermore, it was possible to assign putative protein functions to 398 of the newly predicted genes. Noteworthy, our annotation strategy resulted......Background: Since ancient times the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae has been used in the fermentation industry for the production of fermented sauces and the production of industrial enzymes. Recently, the genome sequence of A. oryzae with 12,074 annotated genes was released but the number...... of hypothetical proteins accounted for more than 50% of the annotated genes. Considering the industrial importance of this fungus, it is therefore valuable to improve the annotation and further integrate genomic information with biochemical and physiological information available for this microorganism and other...

  13. Draft genome sequence of an aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species, A. bombycis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genome of the A. bombycis Type strain was sequenced using a Personal Genome Machine, followed by annotation of its predicted genes. The genome size for A. bombycis was found to be approximately 37 Mb and contained 12,266 genes. This announcement introduces a sequenced genome for an aflatoxigenic...

  14. Annotation of the Clostridium Acetobutylicum Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, M. J.

    2004-06-09

    The genome sequence of the solvent producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824, has been determined by the shotgun approach. The genome consists of a 3.94 Mb chromosome and a 192 kb megaplasmid that contains the majority of genes responsible for solvent production. Comparison of C. acetobutylicum to Bacillus subtilis reveals significant local conservation of gene order, which has not been seen in comparisons of other genomes with similar, or, in some cases, closer, phylogenetic proximity. This conservation allows the prediction of many previously undetected operons in both bacteria.

  15. Experimental annotation of the human genome using microarray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, D D; Schadt, E E; Armour, C D; He, Y D; Garrett-Engele, P; McDonagh, P D; Loerch, P M; Leonardson, A; Lum, P Y; Cavet, G; Wu, L F; Altschuler, S J; Edwards, S; King, J; Tsang, J S; Schimmack, G; Schelter, J M; Koch, J; Ziman, M; Marton, M J; Li, B; Cundiff, P; Ward, T; Castle, J; Krolewski, M; Meyer, M R; Mao, M; Burchard, J; Kidd, M J; Dai, H; Phillips, J W; Linsley, P S; Stoughton, R; Scherer, S; Boguski, M S

    2001-02-15

    The most important product of the sequencing of a genome is a complete, accurate catalogue of genes and their products, primarily messenger RNA transcripts and their cognate proteins. Such a catalogue cannot be constructed by computational annotation alone; it requires experimental validation on a genome scale. Using 'exon' and 'tiling' arrays fabricated by ink-jet oligonucleotide synthesis, we devised an experimental approach to validate and refine computational gene predictions and define full-length transcripts on the basis of co-regulated expression of their exons. These methods can provide more accurate gene numbers and allow the detection of mRNA splice variants and identification of the tissue- and disease-specific conditions under which genes are expressed. We apply our technique to chromosome 22q under 69 experimental condition pairs, and to the entire human genome under two experimental conditions. We discuss implications for more comprehensive, consistent and reliable genome annotation, more efficient, full-length complementary DNA cloning strategies and application to complex diseases.

  16. Improving microbial genome annotations in an integrated database context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Min A Chen

    Full Text Available Effective comparative analysis of microbial genomes requires a consistent and complete view of biological data. Consistency regards the biological coherence of annotations, while completeness regards the extent and coverage of functional characterization for genomes. We have developed tools that allow scientists to assess and improve the consistency and completeness of microbial genome annotations in the context of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG family of systems. All publicly available microbial genomes are characterized in IMG using different functional annotation and pathway resources, thus providing a comprehensive framework for identifying and resolving annotation discrepancies. A rule based system for predicting phenotypes in IMG provides a powerful mechanism for validating functional annotations, whereby the phenotypic traits of an organism are inferred based on the presence of certain metabolic reactions and pathways and compared to experimentally observed phenotypes. The IMG family of systems are available at http://img.jgi.doe.gov/.

  17. Annotation-Based Whole Genomic Prediction and Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadarmideen, Haja; Do, Duy Ngoc; Janss, Luc

    Cπ method and applied to 1,272 Duroc pigs with both genotypic and phenotypic records including residual (RFI) and daily feed intake (DFI), average daily gain (ADG) and back fat (BF)). Records were split into a training (968 pigs) and a validation dataset (304 pigs). SNPs were annotated by 14 different...... groups. Genomic prediction has accuracy comparable to an own phenotype and use of genomic prediction can be cost effective by replacing feed intake measurement. Use of genomic annotation of SNPs and QTL information had no largely significant impact on predictive accuracy for the current traits but may...... in their contribution to estimated genomic variances and in prediction of genomic breeding values by applying SNP annotation approaches to feed efficiency. Ensembl Variant Predictor (EVP) and Pig QTL database were used as the source of genomic annotation for 60K chip. Genomic prediction was performed using the Bayes...

  18. New statistical Methods of Genome-Scale Data Analysis in Life Science - Applications to enterobacterial Diagnostics, Meta-Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Gene Expression and functional Sequence Annotation

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Recent progresses and developments in molecular biology provide a wealth of new but insufficiently characterised data. This fund comprises amongst others biological data of genomic DNA, protein sequences, 3-dimensional protein structures as well as profiles of gene expression. In the present work, this information is used to develop new methods for the characterisation and classification of organisms and whole groups of organisms as well as to enhance the automated gain and transfer of inform...

  19. Correction of the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Ely

    Full Text Available Bacterial genome annotations are accumulating rapidly in the GenBank database and the use of automated annotation technologies to create these annotations has become the norm. However, these automated methods commonly result in a small, but significant percentage of genome annotation errors. To improve accuracy and reliability, we analyzed the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome utilizing computer programs Artemis and MICheck to manually examine the third codon position GC content, alignment to a third codon position GC frame plot peak, and matches in the GenBank database. We identified 11 new genes, modified the start site of 113 genes, and changed the reading frame of 38 genes that had been incorrectly annotated. Furthermore, our manual method of identifying protein-coding genes allowed us to remove 112 non-coding regions that had been designated as coding regions. The improved NA1000 genome annotation resulted in a reduction in the use of rare codons since noncoding regions with atypical codon usage were removed from the annotation and 49 new coding regions were added to the annotation. Thus, a more accurate codon usage table was generated as well. These results demonstrate that a comparison of the location of peaks third codon position GC content to the location of protein coding regions could be used to verify the annotation of any genome that has a GC content that is greater than 60%.

  20. Correction of the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Bert; Scott, LaTia Etheredge

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial genome annotations are accumulating rapidly in the GenBank database and the use of automated annotation technologies to create these annotations has become the norm. However, these automated methods commonly result in a small, but significant percentage of genome annotation errors. To improve accuracy and reliability, we analyzed the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome utilizing computer programs Artemis and MICheck to manually examine the third codon position GC content, alignment to a third codon position GC frame plot peak, and matches in the GenBank database. We identified 11 new genes, modified the start site of 113 genes, and changed the reading frame of 38 genes that had been incorrectly annotated. Furthermore, our manual method of identifying protein-coding genes allowed us to remove 112 non-coding regions that had been designated as coding regions. The improved NA1000 genome annotation resulted in a reduction in the use of rare codons since noncoding regions with atypical codon usage were removed from the annotation and 49 new coding regions were added to the annotation. Thus, a more accurate codon usage table was generated as well. These results demonstrate that a comparison of the location of peaks third codon position GC content to the location of protein coding regions could be used to verify the annotation of any genome that has a GC content that is greater than 60%.

  1. GHOSTX: A Fast Sequence Homology Search Tool for Functional Annotation of Metagenomic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shuji; Ishida, Takashi; Ohue, Masahito; Kakuta, Masanori; Akiyama, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomic analysis based on whole genome shotgun sequencing data requires fast protein sequence homology searches for predicting the function of proteins coded on metagenome short reads. However, huge amounts of sequence data cause even general homology search analyses using BLASTX to become difficult in terms of computational cost. GHOSTX is a sequence homology search tool specifically developed for functional annotation of metagenome sequences. The tool is more than 160 times faster than BLASTX and has sufficient search sensitivity for metagenomic analysis. Using this tool, user can perform functional annotation of metagenomic data within a short time and infer metabolic pathways within an environment.

  2. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eudes; GV; Barbosa; Flavia; F; Aburjaile; Rommel; TJ; Ramos; Adriana; R; Carneiro; Yves; Le; Loir; Jan; Baumbach; Anderson; Miyoshi; Artur; Silva; Vasco; Azevedo

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing(NGS) technologies have made high-throughput sequencing available to medium- and small-size laboratories, culminating in a tidal wave of genomic information. The quantity of sequenced bacterial genomes has not only brought excitement to the field of genomics but also heightened expectations that NGS would boost antibacterial discovery and vaccine development. Although many possible drug and vaccine targets have been discovered, the success rate of genome-based analysis has remained below expectations. Furthermore, NGS has had consequences for genome quality, resulting in an exponential increase in draft(partial data) genome deposits in public databases. If no further interests are expressed for a particular bacterial genome, it is more likely that the sequencing of its genome will be limited to a draft stage, and the painstaking tasks of completing the sequencing of its genome and annotation will not be undertaken. It is important to know what is lost when we settle for a draft genome and to determine the "scientific value" of a newly sequenced genome. This review addresses the expected impact of newly sequenced genomes on antibacterial discovery and vaccinology. Also, it discusses the factors that could be leading to the increase in the number of draft deposits and the consequent loss of relevant biological information.

  3. Complete genome sequence of an attenuated Sparfloxacin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome of a sparfloxacin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae vaccine strain 138spar is 1,838,126 bp in size. The genome has 1892 coding sequences and 82 RNAs. The annotation of the genome is added by the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline. The publishing of this genome will allo...

  4. DIYA: A Bacterial Annotation Pipeline for any Genomics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-12

    microbial genomes overnight (Mardis, 2008). These technologies have created many new small ‘genome centers’ ( Zwick , 2005). DIYA (Do-It- Yourself...2008) The development of PIPA: an integrated and automated pipeline for genome-wide protein function annotation. BMC Bioinformatics, 9, 52. Zwick ,M.E

  5. Comparative Annotation of Viral Genomes with Non-Conserved Gene Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, Saskia; Mailund, Thomas; Hein, Jotun

    2007-01-01

    allows for coding in unidirectional nested and overlapping reading frames, to annotate two homologous aligned viral genomes. Our method does not insist on conserved gene structure between the two sequences, thus making it applicable for the pairwise comparison of more distantly related sequences. Results......: We apply our method to 15 pairwise alignments of six different HIV2 genomes. Given sufficient evolutionary distance between the two sequences, we achieve sensitivity of about 84% and specificity of about 97%. We additionally annotate three pairwise alignments of the more distantly related HIV1...... and HIV2, as well as of two different Hepatitis Viruses, attaining results of ~87% sensitivity and ~98.5% specificity. We subsequently incorporate prior knowledge by "knowing" the gene structure of one sequence and annotating the other conditional on it. Boosting accuracy close to perfect we demonstrate...

  6. Genome Annotation and Transcriptomics of Oil-Producing Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-16

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0103 GENOME ANNOTATION AND TRANSCRIPTOMICS OF OIL-PRODUCING ALGAE Sabeeha Merchant UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES Final...2010 To 12-31-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GENOME ANNOTATION AND TRANSCRIPTOMICS OF OIL-PRODUCING ALGAE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0095 5b...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Most algae accumulate triacylglycerols (TAGs) when they are starved for essential nutrients like N, S, P (or Si in the case of some

  7. SeqAnt: A web service to rapidly identify and annotate DNA sequence variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Viren

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enormous throughput and low cost of second-generation sequencing platforms now allow research and clinical geneticists to routinely perform single experiments that identify tens of thousands to millions of variant sites. Existing methods to annotate variant sites using information from publicly available databases via web browsers are too slow to be useful for the large sequencing datasets being routinely generated by geneticists. Because sequence annotation of variant sites is required before functional characterization can proceed, the lack of a high-throughput pipeline to efficiently annotate variant sites can act as a significant bottleneck in genetics research. Results SeqAnt (Sequence Annotator is an open source web service and software package that rapidly annotates DNA sequence variants and identifies recessive or compound heterozygous loci in human, mouse, fly, and worm genome sequencing experiments. Variants are characterized with respect to their functional type, frequency, and evolutionary conservation. Annotated variants can be viewed on a web browser, downloaded in a tab-delimited text file, or directly uploaded in a BED format to the UCSC genome browser. To demonstrate the speed of SeqAnt, we annotated a series of publicly available datasets that ranged in size from 37 to 3,439,107 variant sites. The total time to completely annotate these data completely ranged from 0.17 seconds to 28 minutes 49.8 seconds. Conclusion SeqAnt is an open source web service and software package that overcomes a critical bottleneck facing research and clinical geneticists using second-generation sequencing platforms. SeqAnt will prove especially useful for those investigators who lack dedicated bioinformatics personnel or infrastructure in their laboratories.

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Nine Cyanobacterial Strains from Diverse Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tao; Hou, Shengwei

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the annotated draft genome sequences of nine different cyanobacteria, which were originally collected from different habitats, including hot springs, terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments, and cover four of the five morphological subsections of cyanobacteria. PMID:28254973

  9. Statistical approaches to use a model organism for regulatory sequences annotation of newly sequenced species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Liò

    Full Text Available A major goal of bioinformatics is the characterization of transcription factors and the transcriptional programs they regulate. Given the speed of genome sequencing, we would like to quickly annotate regulatory sequences in newly-sequenced genomes. In such cases, it would be helpful to predict sequence motifs by using experimental data from closely related model organism. Here we present a general algorithm that allow to identify transcription factor binding sites in one newly sequenced species by performing Bayesian regression on the annotated species. First we set the rationale of our method by applying it within the same species, then we extend it to use data available in closely related species. Finally, we generalise the method to handle the case when a certain number of experiments, from several species close to the species on which to make inference, are available. In order to show the performance of the method, we analyse three functionally related networks in the Ascomycota. Two gene network case studies are related to the G2/M phase of the Ascomycota cell cycle; the third is related to morphogenesis. We also compared the method with MatrixReduce and discuss other types of validation and tests. The first network is well known and provides a biological validation test of the method. The two cell cycle case studies, where the gene network size is conserved, demonstrate an effective utility in annotating new species sequences using all the available replicas from model species. The third case, where the gene network size varies among species, shows that the combination of information is less powerful but is still informative. Our methodology is quite general and could be extended to integrate other high-throughput data from model organisms.

  10. A Snapshot of the Emerging Tomato Genome Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas A. Mueller

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The genome of tomato ( L. is being sequenced by an international consortium of 10 countries (Korea, China, the United Kingdom, India, the Netherlands, France, Japan, Spain, Italy, and the United States as part of the larger “International Solanaceae Genome Project (SOL: Systems Approach to Diversity and Adaptation” initiative. The tomato genome sequencing project uses an ordered bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC approach to generate a high-quality tomato euchromatic genome sequence for use as a reference genome for the Solanaceae and euasterids. Sequence is deposited at GenBank and at the SOL Genomics Network (SGN. Currently, there are around 1000 BACs finished or in progress, representing more than a third of the projected euchromatic portion of the genome. An annotation effort is also underway by the International Tomato Annotation Group. The expected number of genes in the euchromatin is ∼40,000, based on an estimate from a preliminary annotation of 11% of finished sequence. Here, we present this first snapshot of the emerging tomato genome and its annotation, a short comparison with potato ( L. sequence data, and the tools available for the researchers to exploit this new resource are also presented. In the future, whole-genome shotgun techniques will be combined with the BAC-by-BAC approach to cover the entire tomato genome. The high-quality reference euchromatic tomato sequence is expected to be near completion by 2010.

  11. The draft genome sequence of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae, a companion to C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhagwati P; Sternberg, Paul W

    2003-01-01

    The publication of the draft genome sequence of Caenorhabditis briggsae improves the annotation of the genome of its close relative Caenorhabditis elegans and will facilitate comparative genomics and the study of the evolutionary changes during development.

  12. BioSAVE: Display of scored annotation within a sequence context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adryan Boris

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visualization of sequence annotation is a common feature in many bioinformatics tools. For many applications it is desirable to restrict the display of such annotation according to a score cutoff, as biological interpretation can be difficult in the presence of the entire data. Unfortunately, many visualisation solutions are somewhat static in the way they handle such score cutoffs. Results We present BioSAVE, a sequence annotation viewer with on-the-fly selection of visualisation thresholds for each feature. BioSAVE is a versatile OS X program for visual display of scored features (annotation within a sequence context. The program reads sequence and additional supplementary annotation data (e.g., position weight matrix matches, conservation scores, structural domains from a variety of commonly used file formats and displays them graphically. Onscreen controls then allow for live customisation of these graphics, including on-the-fly selection of visualisation thresholds for each feature. Conclusion Possible applications of the program include display of transcription factor binding sites in a genomic context or the visualisation of structural domain assignments in protein sequences and many more. The dynamic visualisation of these annotations is useful, e.g., for the determination of cutoff values of predicted features to match experimental data. Program, source code and exemplary files are freely available at the BioSAVE homepage.

  13. Scripps Genome ADVISER: Annotation and Distributed Variant Interpretation SERver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip H Pham

    Full Text Available Interpretation of human genomes is a major challenge. We present the Scripps Genome ADVISER (SG-ADVISER suite, which aims to fill the gap between data generation and genome interpretation by performing holistic, in-depth, annotations and functional predictions on all variant types and effects. The SG-ADVISER suite includes a de-identification tool, a variant annotation web-server, and a user interface for inheritance and annotation-based filtration. SG-ADVISER allows users with no bioinformatics expertise to manipulate large volumes of variant data with ease--without the need to download large reference databases, install software, or use a command line interface. SG-ADVISER is freely available at genomics.scripps.edu/ADVISER.

  14. Complete genome sequence of a virulent Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138P isolated from disease Nile tilapia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome of a virulent Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138P is 1838701 bp in size, containing 1831 genes. The genome has 1593 coding sequences, 152 pseudo genes, 16 rRNAs, 69 tRNAs, and 1 non-coding RNA. The annotation of the genome is added by the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipel...

  15. Sequencing and comparing whole mitochondrial genomes ofanimals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Macey, J. Robert; Medina, Monica

    2005-04-22

    Comparing complete animal mitochondrial genome sequences is becoming increasingly common for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a model for genome evolution. Not only are they much more informative than shorter sequences of individual genes for inferring evolutionary relatedness, but these data also provide sets of genome-level characters, such as the relative arrangements of genes, that can be especially powerful. We describe here the protocols commonly used for physically isolating mtDNA, for amplifying these by PCR or RCA, for cloning,sequencing, assembly, validation, and gene annotation, and for comparing both sequences and gene arrangements. On several topics, we offer general observations based on our experiences to date with determining and comparing complete mtDNA sequences.

  16. Malaria Genome Sequencing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    million cases and up to 2.7 million A whole chromosome shotgun sequencing strategy was used to deaths from malaria each year. The mortality levels are...deaths from malaria each year. The mortality levels are greatest in determine the genome sequence of P. falciparum clone 3D7. This sub-Saharan Africa...aminolevulinic acid dehydratase. Cura . Genet. 40, 391-398 (2002). 15. Lasonder, E. et al Analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum proteome by high-accuracy mass

  17. Genome sequencing conference II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    Genome Sequencing Conference 2 was held September 30 to October 30, 1990. 26 speaker abstracts and 33 poster presentations were included in the program report. New and improved methods for DNA sequencing and genetic mapping were presented. Many of the papers were concerned with accuracy and speed of acquisition of data with computers and automation playing an increasing role. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  18. The 2008 update of the Aspergillus nidulans genome annotation : A community effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortman, Jennifer Russo; Gilsenan, Jane Mabey; Joardar, Vinita; Deegan, Jennifer; Clutterbuck, John; Andersen, Mikael R.; Archer, David; Bencina, Mojca; Braus, Gerhard; Coutinho, Pedro; von Doehren, Hans; Doonan, John; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Durek, Pawel; Espeso, Eduardo; Fekete, Erzsebet; Flipphi, Michel; Garcia Estrada, Carlos; Geysens, Steven; Goldman, Gustavo; de Groot, Piet W. J.; Hansen, Kim; Harris, Steven D.; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Henrissat, Bernard; Hofmann, Gerald; Homan, Tim; Horio, Tetsuya; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; James, Steve; Jones, Meriel; Karaffa, Levente; Karanyi, Zsolt; Kato, Masashi; Keller, Nancy; Kelly, Diane E.; Kiel, Jan A. K. W.; Kim, Jung-Mi; van der Klei, Ida J.; Klis, Frans M.; Kovalchuk, Andriy; Krasevec, Nada; Kubicek, Christian P.; Liu, Bo; MacCabe, Andrew; Meyer, Vera; Mirabito, Pete; Miskei, Marton; Mos, Magdalena; Mullins, Jonathan; Nelson, David R.; Nielsen, Jens; Oakley, Berl R.; Osmani, Stephen A.; Pakula, Tiina; Paszewski, Andrzej; Paulsen, Ian; Pilsyk, Sebastian; Pocsi, Istvan; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F. J.; Ren, Qinghu; Robellet, Xavier; Robson, Geoff; Seiboth, Bernhard; van Solingen, Piet; Specht, Thomas; Sun, Jibin; Taheri-Talesh, Naimeh; Takeshita, Norio; Ussery, Dave; Vankuyk, Patricia A.; Visser, Hans; de Vondervoort, Peter J. I. van; Walton, Jonathan; Xiang, Xin; Xiong, Yi; Zeng, An Ping; Brandt, Bernd W.; Cornell, Michael J.; van den Hondel, Cees A. M. J. J.; Visser, Jacob; Oliver, Stephen G.; Turner, Geoffrey; Kraševec, Nada; Kuyk, Patricia A. van; Döhren, D.H.; van Seilboth, B; de Vries, R.

    The identification and annotation of protein-coding genes is one of the primary goals of whole-genome sequencing projects, and the accuracy of predicting the primary protein products of gene expression is vital to the interpretation of the available data and the design of downstream functional

  19. The 2008 update of the Aspergillus nidulans genome annotation : a community effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortman, Jennifer Russo; Gilsenan, Jane Mabey; Joardar, Vinita; Deegan, Jennifer; Clutterbuck, John; Andersen, Mikael R; Archer, David; Bencina, Mojca; Braus, Gerhard; Coutinho, Pedro; von Döhren, Hans; Doonan, John; Driessen, Arnold J M; Durek, Pawel; Espeso, Eduardo; Fekete, Erzsébet; Flipphi, Michel; Estrada, Carlos Garcia; Geysens, Steven; Goldman, Gustavo; de Groot, Piet W J; Hansen, Kim; Harris, Steven D; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Henrissat, Bernard; Hofmann, Gerald; Homan, Tim; Horio, Tetsuya; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; James, Steve; Jones, Meriel; Karaffa, Levente; Karányi, Zsolt; Kato, Masashi; Keller, Nancy; Kelly, Diane E; Kiel, Jan A K W; Kim, Jung-Mi; van der Klei, Ida J; Klis, Frans M; Kovalchuk, Andriy; Krasevec, Nada; Kubicek, Christian P; Liu, Bo; Maccabe, Andrew; Meyer, Vera; Mirabito, Pete; Miskei, Márton; Mos, Magdalena; Mullins, Jonathan; Nelson, David R; Nielsen, Jens; Oakley, Berl R; Osmani, Stephen A; Pakula, Tiina; Paszewski, Andrzej; Paulsen, Ian; Pilsyk, Sebastian; Pócsi, István; Punt, Peter J; Ram, Arthur F J; Ren, Qinghu; Robellet, Xavier; Robson, Geoff; Seiboth, Bernhard; van Solingen, Piet; Specht, Thomas; Sun, Jibin; Taheri-Talesh, Naimeh; Takeshita, Norio; Ussery, Dave; vanKuyk, Patricia A; Visser, Hans; van de Vondervoort, Peter J I; de Vries, Ronald P; Walton, Jonathan; Xiang, Xin; Xiong, Yi; Zeng, An Ping; Brandt, Bernd W; Cornell, Michael J; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; Visser, Jacob; Oliver, Stephen G; Turner, Geoffrey

    The identification and annotation of protein-coding genes is one of the primary goals of whole-genome sequencing projects, and the accuracy of predicting the primary protein products of gene expression is vital to the interpretation of the available data and the design of downstream functional

  20. The 2008 update of the Aspergillus nidulans genome annotation: A community effort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wortman, Jennifer Russo; Gilsenan, Jane Mabey; Joardar, Vinita

    2009-01-01

    The identification and annotation of protein-coding genes is one of the primary goals of whole-genome sequencing projects, and the accuracy of predicting the primary protein products of gene expression is vital to the interpretation of the available data and the design of downstream functional ap...

  1. The 2008 update of the Aspergillus nidulans genome annotation: A community effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortman, J.R.; Gilsenan, J.M.; Joardar, V.; Deegan, J.; Clutterbuck, J.; Andersen, M.R.; Archer, D.; Bencina, M.; Braus, G.; Coutinho, P.; von Döhren, H.; Doonan, J.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Durek, P.; Espeso, E.; Fekete, E.; Flipphi, M.; Estrada, C.G.; Geysens, S.; Goldman, G.; de Groot, P.W.J.; Hansen, K.; Harris, S.D.; Heinekamp, T.; Helmstaedt, K.; Henrissat, B.; Hofmann, G.; Homan, T.; Horio, T.; Horiuchi, H.; James, S.; Jones, M.; Karaffa, L.; Karányi, Z.; Kato, M.; Keller, N.; Kelly, D.E.; Kiel, J.A.K.W.; Kim, J.M.; van der Klei, I.J.; Klis, F.M.; Kovalchuk, A.; Kraševec, N.; Kubicek, C.P.; Liu, B.; MacCabe, A.; Meyer, V.; Mirabito, P.; Miskei, M.; Mos, M.; Mullins, J.; Nelson, D.R.; Nielsen, J.; Oakley, B.R.; Osmani, S.A.; Pakula, T.; Paszewski, A.; Paulsen, I.; Pilsyk, S.; Pócsi, I.; Punt, P.J.; Ram, A.F.J.; Ren, Q.; Robellet, X.; Robson, G.; Seiboth, B.; van Solingen, P.; Specht, T.; Sun, J.; Taheri-Talesh, N.; Takeshita, N.; Ussery, D.; vanKuyk, P.A.; Visser, H.; van de Vondervoort, P.J.I.; de Vries, R.P.; Walton, J.; Xiang, X.; Xiong, Y.; Zeng, A.P.; Brandt, B.W.; Cornell, M.J.; van den Hondel, C.A.M.J.J.; Visser, J.; Oliver, S.G.; Turner, G.

    2009-01-01

    The identification and annotation of protein-coding genes is one of the primary goals of whole-genome sequencing projects, and the accuracy of predicting the primary protein products of gene expression is vital to the interpretation of the available data and the design of downstream functional appli

  2. Genomic Sequence Variation Markup Language (GSVML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Jun; Kimura, Michio; Hiroi, Kaei; Ido, Keisuke; Yang, Woosung; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    With the aim of making good use of internationally accumulated genomic sequence variation data, which is increasing rapidly due to the explosive amount of genomic research at present, the development of an interoperable data exchange format and its international standardization are necessary. Genomic Sequence Variation Markup Language (GSVML) will focus on genomic sequence variation data and human health applications, such as gene based medicine or pharmacogenomics. We developed GSVML through eight steps, based on case analysis and domain investigations. By focusing on the design scope to human health applications and genomic sequence variation, we attempted to eliminate ambiguity and to ensure practicability. We intended to satisfy the requirements derived from the use case analysis of human-based clinical genomic applications. Based on database investigations, we attempted to minimize the redundancy of the data format, while maximizing the data covering range. We also attempted to ensure communication and interface ability with other Markup Languages, for exchange of omics data among various omics researchers or facilities. The interface ability with developing clinical standards, such as the Health Level Seven Genotype Information model, was analyzed. We developed the human health-oriented GSVML comprising variation data, direct annotation, and indirect annotation categories; the variation data category is required, while the direct and indirect annotation categories are optional. The annotation categories contain omics and clinical information, and have internal relationships. For designing, we examined 6 cases for three criteria as human health application and 15 data elements for three criteria as data formats for genomic sequence variation data exchange. The data format of five international SNP databases and six Markup Languages and the interface ability to the Health Level Seven Genotype Model in terms of 317 items were investigated. GSVML was developed as

  3. Next-generation sequencing strategies for characterizing the turkey genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalloul, Rami A; Zimin, Aleksey V; Settlage, Robert E; Kim, Sungwon; Reed, Kent M

    2014-02-01

    The turkey genome sequencing project was initiated in 2008 and has relied primarily on next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Our first efforts used a synergistic combination of 2 NGS platforms (Roche/454 and Illumina GAII), detailed bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) maps, and unique assembly tools to sequence and assemble the genome of the domesticated turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. Since the first release in 2010, efforts to improve the genome assembly, gene annotation, and genomic analyses continue. The initial assembly build (2.01) represented about 89% of the genome sequence with 17X coverage depth (931 Mb). Sequence contigs were assigned to 30 of the 40 chromosomes with approximately 10% of the assembled sequence corresponding to unassigned chromosomes (ChrUn). The sequence has been refined through both genome-wide and area-focused sequencing, including shotgun and paired-end sequencing, and targeted sequencing of chromosomal regions with low or incomplete coverage. These additional efforts have improved the sequence assembly resulting in 2 subsequent genome builds of higher genome coverage (25X/Build3.0 and 30X/Build4.0) with a current sequence totaling 1,010 Mb. Further, BAC with end sequences assigned to the Z/W and MG18 (MHC) chromosomes, ChrUn, or not placed in the previous build were isolated, deeply sequenced (Hi-Seq), and incorporated into the latest build (5.0). To aid in the annotation and to generate a gene expression atlas of major tissues, a comprehensive set of RNA samples was collected at various developmental stages of female and male turkeys. Transcriptome sequencing data (using Illumina Hi-Seq) will provide information to enhance the final assembly and ultimately improve sequence annotation. The most current sequence covers more than 95% of the turkey genome and should yield a much improved gene level of annotation, making it a valuable resource for studying genetic variations underlying economically important traits in poultry.

  4. Determining and comparing protein function in Bacterial genome sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla

    annotation of genes – the descriptions assigned to genes that describe the likely function of the encoded proteins. This process is limited by several factors, including the definition of a function which can be more or less specific as well as how many genes can actually be assigned a function based...... of this class have very little homology to other known genomes making functional annotation based on sequence similarity very difficult. Inspired in part by this analysis, an approach for comparative functional annotation was created based public sequenced genomes, CMGfunc. Functionally related groups...

  5. Prokaryotic Contig Annotation Pipeline Server: Web Application for a Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline Based on the Shiny App Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeonghyeok; Baek, Min-Jeong; Min, Byoungnam; Choi, In-Geol

    2017-09-01

    Genome annotation is a primary step in genomic research. To establish a light and portable prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline for use in individual laboratories, we developed a Shiny app package designated as "P-CAPS" (Prokaryotic Contig Annotation Pipeline Server). The package is composed of R and Python scripts that integrate publicly available annotation programs into a server application. P-CAPS is not only a browser-based interactive application but also a distributable Shiny app package that can be installed on any personal computer. The final annotation is provided in various standard formats and is summarized in an R markdown document. Annotation can be visualized and examined with a public genome browser. A benchmark test showed that the annotation quality and completeness of P-CAPS were reliable and compatible with those of currently available public pipelines.

  6. Sequencing and comparative analysis of the gorilla MHC genomic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilming, Laurens G; Hart, Elizabeth A; Coggill, Penny C; Horton, Roger; Gilbert, James G R; Clee, Chris; Jones, Matt; Lloyd, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Sims, Sarah; Whitehead, Siobhan; Wiley, David; Beck, Stephan; Harrow, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a critical role in vertebrate immune response and because the MHC is linked to a significant number of auto-immune and other diseases it is of great medical interest. Here we describe the clone-based sequencing and subsequent annotation of the MHC region of the gorilla genome. Because the MHC is subject to extensive variation, both structural and sequence-wise, it is not readily amenable to study in whole genome shotgun sequence such as the recently published gorilla genome. The variation of the MHC also makes it of evolutionary interest and therefore we analyse the sequence in the context of human and chimpanzee. In our comparisons with human and re-annotated chimpanzee MHC sequence we find that gorilla has a trimodular RCCX cluster, versus the reference human bimodular cluster, and additional copies of Class I (pseudo)genes between Gogo-K and Gogo-A (the orthologues of HLA-K and -A). We also find that Gogo-H (and Patr-H) is coding versus the HLA-H pseudogene and, conversely, there is a Gogo-DQB2 pseudogene versus the HLA-DQB2 coding gene. Our analysis, which is freely available through the VEGA genome browser, provides the research community with a comprehensive dataset for comparative and evolutionary research of the MHC.

  7. A Manual Curation Strategy to Improve Genome Annotation: Application to a Set of Haloarchael Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedhelm Pfeiffer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome annotation errors are a persistent problem that impede research in the biosciences. A manual curation effort is described that attempts to produce high-quality genome annotations for a set of haloarchaeal genomes (Halobacterium salinarum and Hbt. hubeiense, Haloferax volcanii and Hfx. mediterranei, Natronomonas pharaonis and Nmn. moolapensis, Haloquadratum walsbyi strains HBSQ001 and C23, Natrialba magadii, Haloarcula marismortui and Har. hispanica, and Halohasta litchfieldiae. Genomes are checked for missing genes, start codon misassignments, and disrupted genes. Assignments of a specific function are preferably based on experimentally characterized homologs (Gold Standard Proteins. To avoid overannotation, which is a major source of database errors, we restrict annotation to only general function assignments when support for a specific substrate assignment is insufficient. This strategy results in annotations that are resistant to the plethora of errors that compromise public databases. Annotation consistency is rigorously validated for ortholog pairs from the genomes surveyed. The annotation is regularly crosschecked against the UniProt database to further improve annotations and increase the level of standardization. Enhanced genome annotations are submitted to public databases (EMBL/GenBank, UniProt, to the benefit of the scientific community. The enhanced annotations are also publically available via HaloLex.

  8. Sequencing the maize genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martienssen, Robert A; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; O'Shaughnessy, Andrew; McCombie, W Richard

    2004-04-01

    Sequencing of complex genomes can be accomplished by enriching shotgun libraries for genes. In maize, gene-enrichment by copy-number normalization (high C(0)t) and methylation filtration (MF) have been used to generate up to two-fold coverage of the gene-space with less than 1 million sequencing reads. Simulations using sequenced bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones predict that 5x coverage of gene-rich regions, accompanied by less than 1x coverage of subclones from BAC contigs, will generate high-quality mapped sequence that meets the needs of geneticists while accommodating unusually high levels of structural polymorphism. By sequencing several inbred strains, we propose a strategy for capturing this polymorphism to investigate hybrid vigor or heterosis.

  9. Rapid identification of sequences for orphan enzymes to power accurate protein annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R Ramkissoon

    Full Text Available The power of genome sequencing depends on the ability to understand what those genes and their proteins products actually do. The automated methods used to assign functions to putative proteins in newly sequenced organisms are limited by the size of our library of proteins with both known function and sequence. Unfortunately this library grows slowly, lagging well behind the rapid increase in novel protein sequences produced by modern genome sequencing methods. One potential source for rapidly expanding this functional library is the "back catalog" of enzymology--"orphan enzymes," those enzymes that have been characterized and yet lack any associated sequence. There are hundreds of orphan enzymes in the Enzyme Commission (EC database alone. In this study, we demonstrate how this orphan enzyme "back catalog" is a fertile source for rapidly advancing the state of protein annotation. Starting from three orphan enzyme samples, we applied mass-spectrometry based analysis and computational methods (including sequence similarity networks, sequence and structural alignments, and operon context analysis to rapidly identify the specific sequence for each orphan while avoiding the most time- and labor-intensive aspects of typical sequence identifications. We then used these three new sequences to more accurately predict the catalytic function of 385 previously uncharacterized or misannotated proteins. We expect that this kind of rapid sequence identification could be efficiently applied on a larger scale to make enzymology's "back catalog" another powerful tool to drive accurate genome annotation.

  10. Rapid identification of sequences for orphan enzymes to power accurate protein annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkissoon, Kevin R; Miller, Jennifer K; Ojha, Sunil; Watson, Douglas S; Bomar, Martha G; Galande, Amit K; Shearer, Alexander G

    2013-01-01

    The power of genome sequencing depends on the ability to understand what those genes and their proteins products actually do. The automated methods used to assign functions to putative proteins in newly sequenced organisms are limited by the size of our library of proteins with both known function and sequence. Unfortunately this library grows slowly, lagging well behind the rapid increase in novel protein sequences produced by modern genome sequencing methods. One potential source for rapidly expanding this functional library is the "back catalog" of enzymology--"orphan enzymes," those enzymes that have been characterized and yet lack any associated sequence. There are hundreds of orphan enzymes in the Enzyme Commission (EC) database alone. In this study, we demonstrate how this orphan enzyme "back catalog" is a fertile source for rapidly advancing the state of protein annotation. Starting from three orphan enzyme samples, we applied mass-spectrometry based analysis and computational methods (including sequence similarity networks, sequence and structural alignments, and operon context analysis) to rapidly identify the specific sequence for each orphan while avoiding the most time- and labor-intensive aspects of typical sequence identifications. We then used these three new sequences to more accurately predict the catalytic function of 385 previously uncharacterized or misannotated proteins. We expect that this kind of rapid sequence identification could be efficiently applied on a larger scale to make enzymology's "back catalog" another powerful tool to drive accurate genome annotation.

  11. Rapid Identification of Sequences for Orphan Enzymes to Power Accurate Protein Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Sunil; Watson, Douglas S.; Bomar, Martha G.; Galande, Amit K.; Shearer, Alexander G.

    2013-01-01

    The power of genome sequencing depends on the ability to understand what those genes and their proteins products actually do. The automated methods used to assign functions to putative proteins in newly sequenced organisms are limited by the size of our library of proteins with both known function and sequence. Unfortunately this library grows slowly, lagging well behind the rapid increase in novel protein sequences produced by modern genome sequencing methods. One potential source for rapidly expanding this functional library is the “back catalog” of enzymology – “orphan enzymes,” those enzymes that have been characterized and yet lack any associated sequence. There are hundreds of orphan enzymes in the Enzyme Commission (EC) database alone. In this study, we demonstrate how this orphan enzyme “back catalog” is a fertile source for rapidly advancing the state of protein annotation. Starting from three orphan enzyme samples, we applied mass-spectrometry based analysis and computational methods (including sequence similarity networks, sequence and structural alignments, and operon context analysis) to rapidly identify the specific sequence for each orphan while avoiding the most time- and labor-intensive aspects of typical sequence identifications. We then used these three new sequences to more accurately predict the catalytic function of 385 previously uncharacterized or misannotated proteins. We expect that this kind of rapid sequence identification could be efficiently applied on a larger scale to make enzymology’s “back catalog” another powerful tool to drive accurate genome annotation. PMID:24386392

  12. Annotation and Re-Sequencing of Genes from De Novo Transcriptome Assembly of Abies alba (Pinaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Roschanski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: We present a protocol for the annotation of transcriptome sequence data and the identification of candidate genes therein using the example of the nonmodel conifer Abies alba. Methods and Results: A normalized cDNA library was built from an A. alba seedling. The sequencing on a 454 platform yielded more than 1.5 million reads that were de novo assembled into 25 149 contigs. Two complementary approaches were applied to annotate gene fragments that code for (1 well-known proteins and (2 proteins that are potentially adaptively relevant. Primer development and testing yielded 88 amplicons that could successfully be resequenced from genomic DNA. Conclusions: The annotation workflow offers an efficient way to identify potential adaptively relevant genes from the large quantity of transcriptome sequence data. The primer set presented should be prioritized for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection in adaptively relevant genes in A. alba.

  13. Arc-preserving subsequences of arc-annotated sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Vladimir Yu

    2011-01-01

    Arc-annotated sequences are useful in representing the structural information of RNA and protein sequences. The longest arc-preserving common subsequence problem has been introduced as a framework for studying the similarity of arc-annotated sequences. In this paper, we consider arc-annotated sequences with various arc structures. We consider the longest arc preserving common subsequence problem. In particular, we show that the decision version of the 1-{\\sc fragment LAPCS(crossing,chain)} and the decision version of the 0-{\\sc diagonal LAPCS(crossing,chain)} are {\\bf NP}-complete for some fixed alphabet $\\Sigma$ such that $|\\Sigma| = 2$. Also we show that if $|\\Sigma| = 1$, then the decision version of the 1-{\\sc fragment LAPCS(unlimited, plain)} and the decision version of the 0-{\\sc diagonal LAPCS(unlimited, plain)} are {\\bf NP}-complete.

  14. VESPA: software to facilitate genomic annotation of prokaryotic organisms through integration of proteomic and transcriptomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Elena S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The procedural aspects of genome sequencing and assembly have become relatively inexpensive, yet the full, accurate structural annotation of these genomes remains a challenge. Next-generation sequencing transcriptomics (RNA-Seq, global microarrays, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS-based proteomics have demonstrated immense value to genome curators as individual sources of information, however, integrating these data types to validate and improve structural annotation remains a major challenge. Current visual and statistical analytic tools are focused on a single data type, or existing software tools are retrofitted to analyze new data forms. We present Visual Exploration and Statistics to Promote Annotation (VESPA is a new interactive visual analysis software tool focused on assisting scientists with the annotation of prokaryotic genomes though the integration of proteomics and transcriptomics data with current genome location coordinates. Results VESPA is a desktop Java™ application that integrates high-throughput proteomics data (peptide-centric and transcriptomics (probe or RNA-Seq data into a genomic context, all of which can be visualized at three levels of genomic resolution. Data is interrogated via searches linked to the genome visualizations to find regions with high likelihood of mis-annotation. Search results are linked to exports for further validation outside of VESPA or potential coding-regions can be analyzed concurrently with the software through interaction with BLAST. VESPA is demonstrated on two use cases (Yersinia pestis Pestoides F and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 to demonstrate the rapid manner in which mis-annotations can be found and explored in VESPA using either proteomics data alone, or in combination with transcriptomic data. Conclusions VESPA is an interactive visual analytics tool that integrates high-throughput data into a genomic context to facilitate the discovery of structural mis-annotations

  15. Exploiting proteomic data for genome annotation and gene model validation in Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoriev Igor V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteomic data is a potentially rich, but arguably unexploited, data source for genome annotation. Peptide identifications from tandem mass spectrometry provide prima facie evidence for gene predictions and can discriminate over a set of candidate gene models. Here we apply this to the recently sequenced Aspergillus niger fungal genome from the Joint Genome Institutes (JGI and another predicted protein set from another A.niger sequence. Tandem mass spectra (MS/MS were acquired from 1d gel electrophoresis bands and searched against all available gene models using Average Peptide Scoring (APS and reverse database searching to produce confident identifications at an acceptable false discovery rate (FDR. Results 405 identified peptide sequences were mapped to 214 different A.niger genomic loci to which 4093 predicted gene models clustered, 2872 of which contained the mapped peptides. Interestingly, 13 (6% of these loci either had no preferred predicted gene model or the genome annotators' chosen "best" model for that genomic locus was not found to be the most parsimonious match to the identified peptides. The peptides identified also boosted confidence in predicted gene structures spanning 54 introns from different gene models. Conclusion This work highlights the potential of integrating experimental proteomics data into genomic annotation pipelines much as expressed sequence tag (EST data has been. A comparison of the published genome from another strain of A.niger sequenced by DSM showed that a number of the gene models or proteins with proteomics evidence did not occur in both genomes, further highlighting the utility of the method.

  16. Genomic Sequence Comparisons, 1987-2003 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George M. Church

    2004-07-29

    This project was to develop new DNA sequencing and RNA and protein quantitation methods and related genome annotation tools. The project began in 1987 with the development of multiplex sequencing (published in Science in 1988), and one of the first automated sequencing methods. This lead to the first commercial genome sequence in 1994 and to the establishment of the main commercial participants (GTC then Agencourt) in the public DOE/NIH genome project. In collaboration with GTC we contributed to one of the first complete DOE genome sequences, in 1997, that of Methanobacterium thermoautotropicum, a species of great relevance to energy-rich gas production.

  17. Functional annotation by identification of local surface similarities: a novel tool for structural genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanzoni Andreas

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein function is often dependent on subsets of solvent-exposed residues that may exist in a similar three-dimensional configuration in non homologous proteins thus having different order and/or spacing in the sequence. Hence, functional annotation by means of sequence or fold similarity is not adequate for such cases. Results We describe a method for the function-related annotation of protein structures by means of the detection of local structural similarity with a library of annotated functional sites. An automatic procedure was used to annotate the function of local surface regions. Next, we employed a sequence-independent algorithm to compare exhaustively these functional patches with a larger collection of protein surface cavities. After tuning and validating the algorithm on a dataset of well annotated structures, we applied it to a list of protein structures that are classified as being of unknown function in the Protein Data Bank. By this strategy, we were able to provide functional clues to proteins that do not show any significant sequence or global structural similarity with proteins in the current databases. Conclusion This method is able to spot structural similarities associated to function-related similarities, independently on sequence or fold resemblance, therefore is a valuable tool for the functional analysis of uncharacterized proteins. Results are available at http://cbm.bio.uniroma2.it/surface/structuralGenomics.html

  18. xGDBvm: A Web GUI-Driven Workflow for Annotating Eukaryotic Genomes in the Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvick, Jon; Standage, Daniel S; Merchant, Nirav; Brendel, Volker P

    2016-04-01

    Genome-wide annotation of gene structure requires the integration of numerous computational steps. Currently, annotation is arguably best accomplished through collaboration of bioinformatics and domain experts, with broad community involvement. However, such a collaborative approach is not scalable at today's pace of sequence generation. To address this problem, we developed the xGDBvm software, which uses an intuitive graphical user interface to access a number of common genome analysis and gene structure tools, preconfigured in a self-contained virtual machine image. Once their virtual machine instance is deployed through iPlant's Atmosphere cloud services, users access the xGDBvm workflow via a unified Web interface to manage inputs, set program parameters, configure links to high-performance computing (HPC) resources, view and manage output, apply analysis and editing tools, or access contextual help. The xGDBvm workflow will mask the genome, compute spliced alignments from transcript and/or protein inputs (locally or on a remote HPC cluster), predict gene structures and gene structure quality, and display output in a public or private genome browser complete with accessory tools. Problematic gene predictions are flagged and can be reannotated using the integrated yrGATE annotation tool. xGDBvm can also be configured to append or replace existing data or load precomputed data. Multiple genomes can be annotated and displayed, and outputs can be archived for sharing or backup. xGDBvm can be adapted to a variety of use cases including de novo genome annotation, reannotation, comparison of different annotations, and training or teaching.

  19. Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP): a comprehensive database for sweet orange genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Chen, Dijun; Lei, Yang; Chang, Ji-Wei; Hao, Bao-Hai; Xing, Feng; Li, Sen; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Chen, Ling-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most important and widely grown fruit crop with global production ranking firstly among all the fruit crops in the world. Sweet orange accounts for more than half of the Citrus production both in fresh fruit and processed juice. We have sequenced the draft genome of a double-haploid sweet orange (C. sinensis cv. Valencia), and constructed the Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP) to store and visualize the sequenced genomic and transcriptome data. CAP provides GBrowse-based organization of sweet orange genomic data, which integrates ab initio gene prediction, EST, RNA-seq and RNA-paired end tag (RNA-PET) evidence-based gene annotation. Furthermore, we provide a user-friendly web interface to show the predicted protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and metabolic pathways in sweet orange. CAP provides comprehensive information beneficial to the researchers of sweet orange and other woody plants, which is freely available at http://citrus.hzau.edu.cn/.

  20. PREPACT 2.0: Predicting C-to-U and U-to-C RNA Editing in Organelle Genome Sequences with Multiple References and Curated RNA Editing Annotation

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    RNA editing is vast in some genetic systems, with up to thousands of targeted C-to-U and U-to-C substitutions in mitochondria and chloroplasts of certain plants. Efficient prognoses of RNA editing in organelle genomes will help to reveal overlooked cases of editing. We present PREPACT 2.0 (http://www.prepact.de) with numerous enhancements of our previously developed Plant RNA Editing Prediction & Analysis Computer Tool. Reference organelle transcriptomes for editing prediction have been exten...

  1. BambooGDB: a bamboo genome database with functional annotation and an analysis platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hansheng; Peng, Zhenhua; Fei, Benhua; Li, Lubin; Hu, Tao; Gao, Zhimin; Jiang, Zehui

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo, as one of the most important non-timber forest products and fastest-growing plants in the world, represents the only major lineage of grasses that is native to forests. Recent success on the first high-quality draft genome sequence of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) provides new insights on bamboo genetics and evolution. To further extend our understanding on bamboo genome and facilitate future studies on the basis of previous achievements, here we have developed BambooGDB, a bamboo genome database with functional annotation and analysis platform. The de novo sequencing data, together with the full-length complementary DNA and RNA-seq data of moso bamboo composed the main contents of this database. Based on these sequence data, a comprehensively functional annotation for bamboo genome was made. Besides, an analytical platform composed of comparative genomic analysis, protein-protein interactions network, pathway analysis and visualization of genomic data was also constructed. As discovery tools to understand and identify biological mechanisms of bamboo, the platform can be used as a systematic framework for helping and designing experiments for further validation. Moreover, diverse and powerful search tools and a convenient browser were incorporated to facilitate the navigation of these data. As far as we know, this is the first genome database for bamboo. Through integrating high-throughput sequencing data, a full functional annotation and several analysis modules, BambooGDB aims to provide worldwide researchers with a central genomic resource and an extensible analysis platform for bamboo genome. BambooGDB is freely available at http://www.bamboogdb.org/. Database URL: http://www.bamboogdb.org.

  2. Genome Annotation in a Community College Cell Biology Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagley, C. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Biology Department at Salt Lake Community College has used the IMG-ACT toolbox to introduce a genome mapping and annotation exercise into the laboratory portion of its Cell Biology course. This project provides students with an authentic inquiry-based learning experience while introducing them to computational biology and contemporary learning…

  3. Genome Annotation in a Community College Cell Biology Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagley, C. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Biology Department at Salt Lake Community College has used the IMG-ACT toolbox to introduce a genome mapping and annotation exercise into the laboratory portion of its Cell Biology course. This project provides students with an authentic inquiry-based learning experience while introducing them to computational biology and contemporary learning…

  4. Why Assembling Plant Genome Sequences Is So Challenging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Seoane

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the biological and economic importance of plants, relatively few plant species have been sequenced. Only the genome sequence of plants with relatively small genomes, most of them angiosperms, in particular eudicots, has been determined. The arrival of next-generation sequencing technologies has allowed the rapid and efficient development of new genomic resources for non-model or orphan plant species. But the sequencing pace of plants is far from that of animals and microorganisms. This review focuses on the typical challenges of plant genomes that can explain why plant genomics is less developed than animal genomics. Explanations about the impact of some confounding factors emerging from the nature of plant genomes are given. As a result of these challenges and confounding factors, the correct assembly and annotation of plant genomes is hindered, genome drafts are produced, and advances in plant genomics are delayed.

  5. Why Assembling Plant Genome Sequences Is So Challenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claros, Manuel Gonzalo; Bautista, Rocío; Guerrero-Fernández, Darío; Benzerki, Hicham; Seoane, Pedro; Fernández-Pozo, Noé

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the biological and economic importance of plants, relatively few plant species have been sequenced. Only the genome sequence of plants with relatively small genomes, most of them angiosperms, in particular eudicots, has been determined. The arrival of next-generation sequencing technologies has allowed the rapid and efficient development of new genomic resources for non-model or orphan plant species. But the sequencing pace of plants is far from that of animals and microorganisms. This review focuses on the typical challenges of plant genomes that can explain why plant genomics is less developed than animal genomics. Explanations about the impact of some confounding factors emerging from the nature of plant genomes are given. As a result of these challenges and confounding factors, the correct assembly and annotation of plant genomes is hindered, genome drafts are produced, and advances in plant genomics are delayed. PMID:24832233

  6. The 2008 update of the Aspergillus nidulans genome annotation: a community effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortman, Jennifer Russo; Gilsenan, Jane Mabey; Joardar, Vinita; Deegan, Jennifer; Clutterbuck, John; Andersen, Mikael R.; Archer, David; Bencina, Mojca; Braus, Gerhard; Coutinho, Pedro; von Döhren, Hans; Doonan, John; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Durek, Pawel; Espeso, Eduardo; Fekete, Erzsébet; Flipphi, Michel; Estrada, Carlos Garcia; Geysens, Steven; Goldman, Gustavo; de Groot, Piet W.J.; Hansen, Kim; Harris, Steven D.; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Henrissat, Bernard; Hofmann, Gerald; Homan, Tim; Horio, Tetsuya; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; James, Steve; Jones, Meriel; Karaffa, Levente; Karányi, Zsolt; Kato, Masashi; Keller, Nancy; Kelly, Diane E.; Kiel, Jan A.K.W.; Kim, Jung-Mi; van der Klei, Ida J.; Klis, Frans M.; Kovalchuk, Andriy; Kraševec, Nada; Kubicek, Christian P.; Liu, Bo; MacCabe, Andrew; Meyer, Vera; Mirabito, Pete; Miskei, Márton; Mos, Magdalena; Mullins, Jonathan; Nelson, David R.; Nielsen, Jens; Oakley, Berl R.; Osmani, Stephen A.; Pakula, Tiina; Paszewski, Andrzej; Paulsen, Ian; Pilsyk, Sebastian; Pócsi, István; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F.J.; Ren, Qinghu; Robellet, Xavier; Robson, Geoff; Seiboth, Bernhard; Solingen, Piet van; Specht, Thomas; Sun, Jibin; Taheri-Talesh, Naimeh; Takeshita, Norio; Ussery, Dave; vanKuyk, Patricia A.; Visser, Hans; van de Vondervoort, Peter J.I.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Walton, Jonathan; Xiang, Xin; Xiong, Yi; Zeng, An Ping; Brandt, Bernd W.; Cornell, Michael J.; van den Hondel, Cees A.M.J.J.; Visser, Jacob; Oliver, Stephen G.; Turner, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    The identification and annotation of protein-coding genes is one of the primary goals of whole-genome sequencing projects, and the accuracy of predicting the primary protein products of gene expression is vital to the interpretation of the available data and the design of downstream functional applications. Nevertheless, the comprehensive annotation of eukaryotic genomes remains a considerable challenge. Many genomes submitted to public databases, including those of major model organisms, contain significant numbers of wrong and incomplete gene predictions. We present a community-based reannotation of the Aspergillus nidulans genome with the primary goal of increasing the number and quality of protein functional assignments through the careful review of experts in the field of fungal biology. PMID:19146970

  7. Comparative Annotation of Viral Genomes with Non-Conserved Gene Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, Saskia; Mailund, Thomas; Hein, Jotun

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: Detecting genes in viral genomes is a complex task. Due to the biological necessity of them being constrained in length, RNA viruses in particular tend to code in overlapping reading frames. Since one amino acid is encoded by a triplet of nucleic acids, up to three genes may be coded...... allows for coding in unidirectional nested and overlapping reading frames, to annotate two homologous aligned viral genomes. Our method does not insist on conserved gene structure between the two sequences, thus making it applicable for the pairwise comparison of more distantly related sequences. Results...... and HIV2, as well as of two different Hepatitis Viruses, attaining results of ~87% sensitivity and ~98.5% specificity. We subsequently incorporate prior knowledge by "knowing" the gene structure of one sequence and annotating the other conditional on it. Boosting accuracy close to perfect we demonstrate...

  8. cDNA2Genome: A tool for mapping and annotating cDNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhai Sandor

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last years several high-throughput cDNA sequencing projects have been funded worldwide with the aim of identifying and characterizing the structure of complete novel human transcripts. However some of these cDNAs are error prone due to frameshifts and stop codon errors caused by low sequence quality, or to cloning of truncated inserts, among other reasons. Therefore, accurate CDS prediction from these sequences first require the identification of potentially problematic cDNAs in order to speed up the posterior annotation process. Results cDNA2Genome is an application for the automatic high-throughput mapping and characterization of cDNAs. It utilizes current annotation data and the most up to date databases, especially in the case of ESTs and mRNAs in conjunction with a vast number of approaches to gene prediction in order to perform a comprehensive assessment of the cDNA exon-intron structure. The final result of cDNA2Genome is an XML file containing all relevant information obtained in the process. This XML output can easily be used for further analysis such us program pipelines, or the integration of results into databases. The web interface to cDNA2Genome also presents this data in HTML, where the annotation is additionally shown in a graphical form. cDNA2Genome has been implemented under the W3H task framework which allows the combination of bioinformatics tools in tailor-made analysis task flows as well as the sequential or parallel computation of many sequences for large-scale analysis. Conclusions cDNA2Genome represents a new versatile and easily extensible approach to the automated mapping and annotation of human cDNAs. The underlying approach allows sequential or parallel computation of sequences for high-throughput analysis of cDNAs.

  9. Classifying Genomic Sequences by Sequence Feature Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hua Liu; Dian Jiao; Xiao Sun

    2005-01-01

    Traditional sequence analysis depends on sequence alignment. In this study, we analyzed various functional regions of the human genome based on sequence features, including word frequency, dinucleotide relative abundance, and base-base correlation. We analyzed the human chromosome 22 and classified the upstream,exon, intron, downstream, and intergenic regions by principal component analysis and discriminant analysis of these features. The results show that we could classify the functional regions of genome based on sequence feature and discriminant analysis.

  10. Gene fusions and gene duplications: relevance to genomic annotation and functional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riley Monica

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli a model organism provides information for annotation of other genomes. Our analysis of its genome has shown that proteins encoded by fused genes need special attention. Such composite (multimodular proteins consist of two or more components (modules encoding distinct functions. Multimodular proteins have been found to complicate both annotation and generation of sequence similar groups. Previous work overstated the number of multimodular proteins in E. coli. This work corrects the identification of modules by including sequence information from proteins in 50 sequenced microbial genomes. Results Multimodular E. coli K-12 proteins were identified from sequence similarities between their component modules and non-fused proteins in 50 genomes and from the literature. We found 109 multimodular proteins in E. coli containing either two or three modules. Most modules had standalone sequence relatives in other genomes. The separated modules together with all the single (un-fused proteins constitute the sum of all unimodular proteins of E. coli. Pairwise sequence relationships among all E. coli unimodular proteins generated 490 sequence similar, paralogous groups. Groups ranged in size from 92 to 2 members and had varying degrees of relatedness among their members. Some E. coli enzyme groups were compared to homologs in other bacterial genomes. Conclusion The deleterious effects of multimodular proteins on annotation and on the formation of groups of paralogs are emphasized. To improve annotation results, all multimodular proteins in an organism should be detected and when known each function should be connected with its location in the sequence of the protein. When transferring functions by sequence similarity, alignment locations must be noted, particularly when alignments cover only part of the sequences, in order to enable transfer of the correct function. Separating multimodular proteins into module units makes

  11. Whole-Genome Sequences of Three Symbiotic Endozoicomonas Bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Neave, Matthew J.

    2014-08-14

    Members of the genus Endozoicomonas associate with a wide range of marine organisms. Here, we report on the whole-genome sequencing, assembly, and annotation of three Endozoicomonas type strains. These data will assist in exploring interactions between Endozoicomonas organisms and their hosts, and it will aid in the assembly of genomes from uncultivated Endozoicomonas spp.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium bifidum S17.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhurina, D.; Zomer, A.L.; Gleinser, M.; Brancaccio, V.F.; Auchter, M.; Waidmann, M.S.; Westermann, C.; Sinderen, D. van; Riedel, C.U.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report on the first completely annotated genome sequence of a Bifidobacterium bifidum strain. B. bifidum S17, isolated from feces of a breast-fed infant, was shown to strongly adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and has potent anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo. The genome se

  13. Reference sequence (RefSeq) database at NCBI: current status, taxonomic expansion, and functional annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Nuala A.; Wright, Mathew W.; Brister, J. Rodney; Ciufo, Stacy; Haddad, Diana; McVeigh, Rich; Rajput, Bhanu; Robbertse, Barbara; Smith-White, Brian; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Astashyn, Alexander; Badretdin, Azat; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga; Brover, Vyacheslav; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Choi, Jinna; Cox, Eric; Ermolaeva, Olga; Farrell, Catherine M.; Goldfarb, Tamara; Gupta, Tripti; Haft, Daniel; Hatcher, Eneida; Hlavina, Wratko; Joardar, Vinita S.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Li, Wenjun; Maglott, Donna; Masterson, Patrick; McGarvey, Kelly M.; Murphy, Michael R.; O'Neill, Kathleen; Pujar, Shashikant; Rangwala, Sanjida H.; Rausch, Daniel; Riddick, Lillian D.; Schoch, Conrad; Shkeda, Andrei; Storz, Susan S.; Sun, Hanzhen; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Tolstoy, Igor; Tully, Raymond E.; Vatsan, Anjana R.; Wallin, Craig; Webb, David; Wu, Wendy; Landrum, Melissa J.; Kimchi, Avi; Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Kitts, Paul; Murphy, Terence D.; Pruitt, Kim D.

    2016-01-01

    The RefSeq project at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) maintains and curates a publicly available database of annotated genomic, transcript, and protein sequence records (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/refseq/). The RefSeq project leverages the data submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC) against a combination of computation, manual curation, and collaboration to produce a standard set of stable, non-redundant reference sequences. The RefSeq project augments these reference sequences with current knowledge including publications, functional features and informative nomenclature. The database currently represents sequences from more than 55 000 organisms (>4800 viruses, >40 000 prokaryotes and >10 000 eukaryotes; RefSeq release 71), ranging from a single record to complete genomes. This paper summarizes the current status of the viral, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic branches of the RefSeq project, reports on improvements to data access and details efforts to further expand the taxonomic representation of the collection. We also highlight diverse functional curation initiatives that support multiple uses of RefSeq data including taxonomic validation, genome annotation, comparative genomics, and clinical testing. We summarize our approach to utilizing available RNA-Seq and other data types in our manual curation process for vertebrate, plant, and other species, and describe a new direction for prokaryotic genomes and protein name management. PMID:26553804

  14. Reference sequence (RefSeq) database at NCBI: current status, taxonomic expansion, and functional annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Nuala A; Wright, Mathew W; Brister, J Rodney; Ciufo, Stacy; Haddad, Diana; McVeigh, Rich; Rajput, Bhanu; Robbertse, Barbara; Smith-White, Brian; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Astashyn, Alexander; Badretdin, Azat; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga; Brover, Vyacheslav; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Choi, Jinna; Cox, Eric; Ermolaeva, Olga; Farrell, Catherine M; Goldfarb, Tamara; Gupta, Tripti; Haft, Daniel; Hatcher, Eneida; Hlavina, Wratko; Joardar, Vinita S; Kodali, Vamsi K; Li, Wenjun; Maglott, Donna; Masterson, Patrick; McGarvey, Kelly M; Murphy, Michael R; O'Neill, Kathleen; Pujar, Shashikant; Rangwala, Sanjida H; Rausch, Daniel; Riddick, Lillian D; Schoch, Conrad; Shkeda, Andrei; Storz, Susan S; Sun, Hanzhen; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Tolstoy, Igor; Tully, Raymond E; Vatsan, Anjana R; Wallin, Craig; Webb, David; Wu, Wendy; Landrum, Melissa J; Kimchi, Avi; Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Kitts, Paul; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D

    2016-01-04

    The RefSeq project at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) maintains and curates a publicly available database of annotated genomic, transcript, and protein sequence records (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/refseq/). The RefSeq project leverages the data submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC) against a combination of computation, manual curation, and collaboration to produce a standard set of stable, non-redundant reference sequences. The RefSeq project augments these reference sequences with current knowledge including publications, functional features and informative nomenclature. The database currently represents sequences from more than 55,000 organisms (>4800 viruses, >40,000 prokaryotes and >10,000 eukaryotes; RefSeq release 71), ranging from a single record to complete genomes. This paper summarizes the current status of the viral, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic branches of the RefSeq project, reports on improvements to data access and details efforts to further expand the taxonomic representation of the collection. We also highlight diverse functional curation initiatives that support multiple uses of RefSeq data including taxonomic validation, genome annotation, comparative genomics, and clinical testing. We summarize our approach to utilizing available RNA-Seq and other data types in our manual curation process for vertebrate, plant, and other species, and describe a new direction for prokaryotic genomes and protein name management.

  15. Using deep RNA sequencing for the structural annotation of the Laccaria bicolor mycorrhizal transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E Larsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate structural annotation is important for prediction of function and required for in vitro approaches to characterize or validate the gene expression products. Despite significant efforts in the field, determination of the gene structure from genomic data alone is a challenging and inaccurate process. The ease of acquisition of transcriptomic sequence provides a direct route to identify expressed sequences and determine the correct gene structure. METHODOLOGY: We developed methods to utilize RNA-seq data to correct errors in the structural annotation and extend the boundaries of current gene models using assembly approaches. The methods were validated with a transcriptomic data set derived from the fungus Laccaria bicolor, which develops a mycorrhizal symbiotic association with the roots of many tree species. Our analysis focused on the subset of 1501 gene models that are differentially expressed in the free living vs. mycorrhizal transcriptome and are expected to be important elements related to carbon metabolism, membrane permeability and transport, and intracellular signaling. Of the set of 1501 gene models, 1439 (96% successfully generated modified gene models in which all error flags were successfully resolved and the sequences aligned to the genomic sequence. The remaining 4% (62 gene models either had deviations from transcriptomic data that could not be spanned or generated sequence that did not align to genomic sequence. The outcome of this process is a set of high confidence gene models that can be reliably used for experimental characterization of protein function. CONCLUSIONS: 69% of expressed mycorrhizal JGI "best" gene models deviated from the transcript sequence derived by this method. The transcriptomic sequence enabled correction of a majority of the structural inconsistencies and resulted in a set of validated models for 96% of the mycorrhizal genes. The method described here can be applied to improve gene

  16. Using deep RNA sequencing for the structural annotation of the laccaria bicolor mycorrhizal transcriptome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, P. E.; Trivedi, G.; Sreedasyam, A.; Lu, V.; Podila, G. K.; Collart, F. R.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Alabama

    2010-07-06

    Accurate structural annotation is important for prediction of function and required for in vitro approaches to characterize or validate the gene expression products. Despite significant efforts in the field, determination of the gene structure from genomic data alone is a challenging and inaccurate process. The ease of acquisition of transcriptomic sequence provides a direct route to identify expressed sequences and determine the correct gene structure. We developed methods to utilize RNA-seq data to correct errors in the structural annotation and extend the boundaries of current gene models using assembly approaches. The methods were validated with a transcriptomic data set derived from the fungus Laccaria bicolor, which develops a mycorrhizal symbiotic association with the roots of many tree species. Our analysis focused on the subset of 1501 gene models that are differentially expressed in the free living vs. mycorrhizal transcriptome and are expected to be important elements related to carbon metabolism, membrane permeability and transport, and intracellular signaling. Of the set of 1501 gene models, 1439 (96%) successfully generated modified gene models in which all error flags were successfully resolved and the sequences aligned to the genomic sequence. The remaining 4% (62 gene models) either had deviations from transcriptomic data that could not be spanned or generated sequence that did not align to genomic sequence. The outcome of this process is a set of high confidence gene models that can be reliably used for experimental characterization of protein function. 69% of expressed mycorrhizal JGI 'best' gene models deviated from the transcript sequence derived by this method. The transcriptomic sequence enabled correction of a majority of the structural inconsistencies and resulted in a set of validated models for 96% of the mycorrhizal genes. The method described here can be applied to improve gene structural annotation in other species, provided

  17. Genome3D: exploiting structure to help users understand their sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Tony E.; Sillitoe, Ian; Andreeva, Antonina; Blundell, Tom L.; Buchan, Daniel W. A.; Chothia, Cyrus; Cozzetto, Domenico; Dana, José M.; Filippis, Ioannis; Gough, Julian; Jones, David T.; Kelley, Lawrence A; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Minneci, Federico; Mistry, Jaina

    2014-01-01

    Genome3D (http://www.genome3d.eu) is a collaborative resource that provides predicted domain annotations and structural models for key sequences. Since introducing Genome3D in a previous NAR paper, we have substantially extended and improved the resource. We have annotated representatives from Pfam families to improve coverage of diverse sequences and added a fast sequence search to the website to allow users to find Genome3D-annotated sequences similar to their own. We have improved and exte...

  18. Genome annotations - KOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available English ]; } else { document.getElementById(lang).innerHTML= '[ Japanese | English ]'; } } window.onload = ...e entry and the word BAC, PAC, chromosome Genomic, or Genomic sequence is included in the entry. Number of d

  19. A Probabilistic Genome-Wide Gene Reading Frame Sequence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Christian Theil; Mørk, Søren

    We introduce a new type of probabilistic sequence model, that model the sequential composition of reading frames of genes in a genome. Our approach extends gene finders with a model of the sequential composition of genes at the genome-level -- effectively producing a sequential genome annotation...... and are evaluated by the effect on prediction performance. Since bacterial gene finding to a large extent is a solved problem it forms an ideal proving ground for evaluating the explicit modeling of larger scale gene sequence composition of genomes. We conclude that the sequential composition of gene reading frames...... as output. The model can be used to obtain the most probable genome annotation based on a combination of i: a gene finder score of each gene candidate and ii: the sequence of the reading frames of gene candidates through a genome. The model --- as well as a higher order variant --- is developed and tested...

  20. Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB): an integrative and interactive database for rice genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiroaki; Lee, Sung Shin; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Numa, Hisataka; Kim, Jungsok; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Wakimoto, Hironobu; Yang, Ching-chia; Iwamoto, Masao; Abe, Takashi; Yamada, Yuko; Muto, Akira; Inokuchi, Hachiro; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Sasaki, Takuji; Itoh, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    The Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB, http://rapdb.dna.affrc.go.jp/) has been providing a comprehensive set of gene annotations for the genome sequence of rice, Oryza sativa (japonica group) cv. Nipponbare. Since the first release in 2005, RAP-DB has been updated several times along with the genome assembly updates. Here, we present our newest RAP-DB based on the latest genome assembly, Os-Nipponbare-Reference-IRGSP-1.0 (IRGSP-1.0), which was released in 2011. We detected 37,869 loci by mapping transcript and protein sequences of 150 monocot species. To provide plant researchers with highly reliable and up to date rice gene annotations, we have been incorporating literature-based manually curated data, and 1,626 loci currently incorporate literature-based annotation data, including commonly used gene names or gene symbols. Transcriptional activities are shown at the nucleotide level by mapping RNA-Seq reads derived from 27 samples. We also mapped the Illumina reads of a Japanese leading japonica cultivar, Koshihikari, and a Chinese indica cultivar, Guangluai-4, to the genome and show alignments together with the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and gene functional annotations through a newly developed browser, Short-Read Assembly Browser (S-RAB). We have developed two satellite databases, Plant Gene Family Database (PGFD) and Integrative Database of Cereal Gene Phylogeny (IDCGP), which display gene family and homologous gene relationships among diverse plant species. RAP-DB and the satellite databases offer simple and user-friendly web interfaces, enabling plant and genome researchers to access the data easily and facilitating a broad range of plant research topics.

  1. Annotation Of Novel And Conserved MicroRNA Genes In The Build 10 Sus scrofa Reference Genome And Determination Of Their Expression Levels In Ten Different Tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bo; Nielsen, Mathilde; Hedegaard, Jakob

    The DNA template used in the pig genome sequencing project was provided by a Duroc pig named TJ Tabasco. In an effort to annotate microRNA (miRNA) genes in the reference genome we have conducted deep sequencing to determine the miRNA transcriptomes in ten different tissues isolated from Pinky......, a genetically identical clone of TJ Tabasco. The purpose was to generate miRNA sequences that are highly homologous to the reference genome sequence, which along with computational prediction will improve confidence in the genomic annotation of miRNA genes. Based on homology searches of the sequence data...

  2. Annotation and sequence diversity of transposable elements in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eJackson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris is an important legume crop grown and consumed worldwide. With the availability of the common bean genome sequence, the next challenge is to annotate the genome and characterize functional DNA elements. Transposable elements (TEs are the most abundant component of plant genomes and can dramatically affect genome evolution and genetic variation. Thus, it is pivotal to identify TEs in the common bean genome. In this study, we performed a genome-wide transposon annotation in common bean using a combination of homology and sequence structure-based methods. We developed a 2.12-Mb transposon database which includes 791 representative transposon sequences and is available upon request or from www.phytozome.org. Of note, nearly all transposons in the database are previously unrecognized TEs. More than 5,000 transposon-related expressed sequence tags (ESTs were detected which indicates that some transposons may be transcriptionally active. Two Ty1-copia retrotransposon families were found to encode the envelope-like protein which has rarely been identified in plant genomes. Also, we identified an extra open reading frame (ORF termed ORF2 from 15 Ty3-gypsy families that was located between the ORF encoding the retrotransposase and the 3’LTR. The ORF2 was in opposite transcriptional orientation to retrotransposase. Sequence homology searches and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the ORF2 may have an ancient origin, but its function is not clear. This transposon data provides a useful resource for understanding the genome organization and evolution and may be used to identify active TEs for developing transposon-tagging system in common bean and other related genomes.

  3. Toward an Upgraded Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L.) Genome Annotation Using Proteogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Alison; Harpur, Brock A; Michaud, Sarah; Beavis, Ronald C; Kent, Clement F; Zayed, Amro; Foster, Leonard J

    2016-02-05

    The honey bee is a key pollinator in agricultural operations as well as a model organism for studying the genetics and evolution of social behavior. The Apis mellifera genome has been sequenced and annotated twice over, enabling proteomics and functional genomics methods for probing relevant aspects of their biology. One troubling trend that emerged from proteomic analyses is that honey bee peptide samples consistently result in lower peptide identification rates compared with other organisms. This suggests that the genome annotation can be improved, or atypical biological processes are interfering with the mass spectrometry workflow. First, we tested whether high levels of polymorphisms could explain some of the missed identifications by searching spectra against the reference proteome (OGSv3.2) versus a customized proteome of a single honey bee, but our results indicate that this contribution was minor. Likewise, error-tolerant peptide searches lead us to eliminate unexpected post-translational modifications as a major factor in missed identifications. We then used a proteogenomic approach with ~1500 raw files to search for missing genes and new exons, to revive discarded annotations and to identify over 2000 new coding regions. These results will contribute to a more comprehensive genome annotation and facilitate continued research on this important insect.

  4. nGASP - the nematode genome annotation assessment project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coghlan, A; Fiedler, T J; McKay, S J; Flicek, P; Harris, T W; Blasiar, D; Allen, J; Stein, L D

    2008-12-19

    While the C. elegans genome is extensively annotated, relatively little information is available for other Caenorhabditis species. The nematode genome annotation assessment project (nGASP) was launched to objectively assess the accuracy of protein-coding gene prediction software in C. elegans, and to apply this knowledge to the annotation of the genomes of four additional Caenorhabditis species and other nematodes. Seventeen groups worldwide participated in nGASP, and submitted 47 prediction sets for 10 Mb of the C. elegans genome. Predictions were compared to reference gene sets consisting of confirmed or manually curated gene models from WormBase. The most accurate gene-finders were 'combiner' algorithms, which made use of transcript- and protein-alignments and multi-genome alignments, as well as gene predictions from other gene-finders. Gene-finders that used alignments of ESTs, mRNAs and proteins came in second place. There was a tie for third place between gene-finders that used multi-genome alignments and ab initio gene-finders. The median gene level sensitivity of combiners was 78% and their specificity was 42%, which is nearly the same accuracy as reported for combiners in the human genome. C. elegans genes with exons of unusual hexamer content, as well as those with many exons, short exons, long introns, a weak translation start signal, weak splice sites, or poorly conserved orthologs were the most challenging for gene-finders. While the C. elegans genome is extensively annotated, relatively little information is available for other Caenorhabditis species. The nematode genome annotation assessment project (nGASP) was launched to objectively assess the accuracy of protein-coding gene prediction software in C. elegans, and to apply this knowledge to the annotation of the genomes of four additional Caenorhabditis species and other nematodes. Seventeen groups worldwide participated in nGASP, and submitted 47 prediction sets for 10 Mb of the C

  5. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 476, isolated from a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Watanabe, Shinya; Kirikae, Teruo

    2012-10-01

    Here, we report the completely annotated genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 476 isolated from a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) during pregnancy. The genome sequence will provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying STSS.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 476, Isolated from a Patient with Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; WATANABE, Shinya; Kirikae, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report the completely annotated genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 476 isolated from a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) during pregnancy. The genome sequence will provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying STSS.

  8. MIPS: a database for genomes and protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Frishman, D; Güldener, U; Mannhaupt, G; Mayer, K; Mokrejs, M; Morgenstern, B; Münsterkötter, M; Rudd, S; Weil, B

    2002-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS-GSF, Neuherberg, Germany) continues to provide genome-related information in a systematic way. MIPS supports both national and European sequencing and functional analysis projects, develops and maintains automatically generated and manually annotated genome-specific databases, develops systematic classification schemes for the functional annotation of protein sequences, and provides tools for the comprehensive analysis of protein sequences. This report updates the information on the yeast genome (CYGD), the Neurospora crassa genome (MNCDB), the databases for the comprehensive set of genomes (PEDANT genomes), the database of annotated human EST clusters (HIB), the database of complete cDNAs from the DHGP (German Human Genome Project), as well as the project specific databases for the GABI (Genome Analysis in Plants) and HNB (Helmholtz-Netzwerk Bioinformatik) networks. The Arabidospsis thaliana database (MATDB), the database of mitochondrial proteins (MITOP) and our contribution to the PIR International Protein Sequence Database have been described elsewhere [Schoof et al. (2002) Nucleic Acids Res., 30, 91-93; Scharfe et al. (2000) Nucleic Acids Res., 28, 155-158; Barker et al. (2001) Nucleic Acids Res., 29, 29-32]. All databases described, the protein analysis tools provided and the detailed descriptions of our projects can be accessed through the MIPS World Wide Web server (http://mips.gsf.de).

  9. Evolutionary interrogation of human biology in well-annotated genomic framework of rhesus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Jian; Liu, Chu-Jun; Yu, Peng; Zhong, Xiaoming; Chen, Jia-Yu; Yang, Xinzhuang; Peng, Jiguang; Yan, Shouyu; Wang, Chenqu; Zhu, Xiaotong; Xiong, Jingwei; Zhang, Yong E; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Li, Chuan-Yun

    2014-05-01

    With genome sequence and composition highly analogous to human, rhesus macaque represents a unique reference for evolutionary studies of human biology. Here, we developed a comprehensive genomic framework of rhesus macaque, the RhesusBase2, for evolutionary interrogation of human genes and the associated regulations. A total of 1,667 next-generation sequencing (NGS) data sets were processed, integrated, and evaluated, generating 51.2 million new functional annotation records. With extensive NGS annotations, RhesusBase2 refined the fine-scale structures in 30% of the macaque Ensembl transcripts, reporting an accurate, up-to-date set of macaque gene models. On the basis of these annotations and accurate macaque gene models, we further developed an NGS-oriented Molecular Evolution Gateway to access and visualize macaque annotations in reference to human orthologous genes and associated regulations (www.rhesusbase.org/molEvo). We highlighted the application of this well-annotated genomic framework in generating hypothetical link of human-biased regulations to human-specific traits, by using mechanistic characterization of the DIEXF gene as an example that provides novel clues to the understanding of digestive system reduction in human evolution. On a global scale, we also identified a catalog of 9,295 human-biased regulatory events, which may represent novel elements that have a substantial impact on shaping human transcriptome and possibly underpin recent human phenotypic evolution. Taken together, we provide an NGS data-driven, information-rich framework that will broadly benefit genomics research in general and serves as an important resource for in-depth evolutionary studies of human biology.

  10. ESTExplorer: an expressed sequence tag (EST) assembly and annotation platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Shivashankar H; Deshpande, Nandan; Gasser, Robin B; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2007-07-01

    The analysis of expressed sequence tag (EST) datasets offers a rapid and cost-effective approach to elucidate the transcriptome of an organism, but requiring several computational methods for assembly and annotation. ESTExplorer is a comprehensive workflow system for EST data management and analysis. The pipeline uses a 'distributed control approach' in which the most appropriate bioinformatics tools are implemented over different dedicated processors. Species-specific repeat masking and conceptual translation are in-built. ESTExplorer accepts a set of ESTs in FASTA format which can be analysed using programs selected by the user. After pre-processing and assembly, the dataset is annotated at the nucleotide and protein levels, following conceptual translation. Users may optionally provide ESTExplorer with assembled contigs for annotation purposes. Functionally annotated contigs/ESTs can be analysed individually. The overall outputs are gene ontologies, protein functional identifications in terms of mapping to protein domains and metabolic pathways. ESTExplorer has been applied successfully to annotate large EST datasets from parasitic nematodes and to identify novel genes as potential targets for parasite intervention. ESTExplorer runs on a Linux cluster and is freely available for the academic community at http://estexplorer.biolinfo.org.

  11. Transcriptome sequencing in an ecologically important tree species: assembly, annotation, and marker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benkman Craig W

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Massively parallel sequencing of cDNA is now an efficient route for generating enormous sequence collections that represent expressed genes. This approach provides a valuable starting point for characterizing functional genetic variation in non-model organisms, especially where whole genome sequencing efforts are currently cost and time prohibitive. The large and complex genomes of pines (Pinus spp. have hindered the development of genomic resources, despite the ecological and economical importance of the group. While most genomic studies have focused on a single species (P. taeda, genomic level resources for other pines are insufficiently developed to facilitate ecological genomic research. Lodgepole pine (P. contorta is an ecologically important foundation species of montane forest ecosystems and exhibits substantial adaptive variation across its range in western North America. Here we describe a sequencing study of expressed genes from P. contorta, including their assembly and annotation, and their potential for molecular marker development to support population and association genetic studies. Results We obtained 586,732 sequencing reads from a 454 GS XLR70 Titanium pyrosequencer (mean length: 306 base pairs. A combination of reference-based and de novo assemblies yielded 63,657 contigs, with 239,793 reads remaining as singletons. Based on sequence similarity with known proteins, these sequences represent approximately 17,000 unique genes, many of which are well covered by contig sequences. This sequence collection also included a surprisingly large number of retrotransposon sequences, suggesting that they are highly transcriptionally active in the tissues we sampled. We located and characterized thousands of simple sequence repeats and single nucleotide polymorphisms as potential molecular markers in our assembled and annotated sequences. High quality PCR primers were designed for a substantial number of the SSR loci

  12. Design and implementation of a database for Brucella melitensis genome annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hertogh, Benoît; Lahlimi, Leïla; Lambert, Christophe; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Depiereux, Eric

    2008-03-18

    The genome sequences of three Brucella biovars and of some species close to Brucella sp. have become available, leading to new relationship analysis. Moreover, the automatic genome annotation of the pathogenic bacteria Brucella melitensis has been manually corrected by a consortium of experts, leading to 899 modifications of start sites predictions among the 3198 open reading frames (ORFs) examined. This new annotation, coupled with the results of automatic annotation tools of the complete genome sequences of the B. melitensis genome (including BLASTs to 9 genomes close to Brucella), provides numerous data sets related to predicted functions, biochemical properties and phylogenic comparisons. To made these results available, alphaPAGe, a functional auto-updatable database of the corrected sequence genome of B. melitensis, has been built, using the entity-relationship (ER) approach and a multi-purpose database structure. A friendly graphical user interface has been designed, and users can carry out different kinds of information by three levels of queries: (1) the basic search use the classical keywords or sequence identifiers; (2) the original advanced search engine allows to combine (by using logical operators) numerous criteria: (a) keywords (textual comparison) related to the pCDS's function, family domains and cellular localization; (b) physico-chemical characteristics (numerical comparison) such as isoelectric point or molecular weight and structural criteria such as the nucleic length or the number of transmembrane helix (TMH); (c) similarity scores with Escherichia coli and 10 species phylogenetically close to B. melitensis; (3) complex queries can be performed by using a SQL field, which allows all queries respecting the database's structure. The database is publicly available through a Web server at the following url: http://www.fundp.ac.be/urbm/bioinfo/aPAGe.

  13. Genomic Sequencing of Orientia tsutsugamushi Strain Karp, an Assembly Comparable to the Genome Size of the Strain Ikeda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Chao, Chien-Chung; Lei, Haiyan; Li, Bingjie; Tsai, Shien; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Ching, Wei-Mei; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2016-08-18

    Orientia tsutsugamushi, an intracellular bacterium, belongs to the family Rickettsiaceae This study presents the draft genome sequence of strain Karp, with 2.0 Mb as the size of the completed genome. This nearly finished draft genome sequence was annotated with the RAST server and the contents compared to those of the other strains.

  14. Genomic Sequencing of Orientia tsutsugamushi Strain Karp, an Assembly Comparable to the Genome Size of the Strain Ikeda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Chao, Chien-Chung; Lei, Haiyan; Li, Bingjie; Tsai, Shien; Hung, Guo-Chiuan

    2016-01-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi, an intracellular bacterium, belongs to the family Rickettsiaceae. This study presents the draft genome sequence of strain Karp, with 2.0 Mb as the size of the completed genome. This nearly finished draft genome sequence was annotated with the RAST server and the contents compared to those of the other strains. PMID:27540052

  15. Supplementary Material for: BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal Matoq Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). Results The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACONâ s utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27 %, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. Conclusions We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/ .

  16. Draft genome sequence of Therminicola potens strain JR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne-Bailey, K.G.; Wrighton, K.C.; Melnyk, R.A.; Agbo, P.; Hazen, T.C.; Coates, J.D.

    2010-07-01

    'Thermincola potens' strain JR is one of the first Gram-positive dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) for which there is a complete genome sequence. Consistent with the physiology of this organism, preliminary annotation revealed an abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes that are putatively associated with the periplasm and cell surface in a Gram-positive bacterium. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain JR.

  17. Triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Goñi, J Ramon; de la Cruz, Xavier; Orozco, Modesto

    2004-01-01

    The existence of sequences in the human genome which can be a target for triplex formation, and accordingly are candidates for anti-gene therapies, has been studied by using bioinformatics tools. It was found that the population of triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences (TTS) is much more abundant than that expected from simple random models. The population of TTS is large in all the genome, without major differences between chromosomes. A wide analysis along annotated regions of th...

  18. The physics of DNA and the annotation of the Plasmodium falciparum genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeramian, E

    2000-09-19

    A gene identification procedure is formulated, based on large-scale structural analyses of genomic sequences. The structural property is the physical - thermal - stability of the DNA double-helix, as described by the classical helix-coil model. The analyses are detailed for the Plasmodium falciparum genome, which represents one of the most difficult cases for the gene identification problem (notably because of the extreme AT-richness of the genome). In this genome, the coding domains (either uninterrupted genes or exons in split genes) are accurately identified as regions of high thermal stability. The conclusion is based on the study of the available cloned genes, of which 17 examples are described in detail. These examples demonstrate that the physical criterion is valid for the detection of coding regions whose lengths extend from a few base pairs up to several thousand base pairs. Accordingly, the structural analyses can provide a powerful and convenient tool for the identification of complex genes in the P. falciparum genome. The limits of such a scheme are discussed. The gene identification procedure is applied to the completely sequenced chromosomes (2 and 3), and the results are compared with the database annotations. The structural analyses suggest more or less extensive revision to the annotations, and also allow new putative genes to be identified in the chromosome sequences. Several examples of such new genes are described in detail.

  19. MC-GenomeKey: a multicloud system for the detection and annotation of genomic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshazly, Hatem; Souilmi, Yassine; Tonellato, Peter J; Wall, Dennis P; Abouelhoda, Mohamed

    2017-01-20

    Next Generation Genome sequencing techniques became affordable for massive sequencing efforts devoted to clinical characterization of human diseases. However, the cost of providing cloud-based data analysis of the mounting datasets remains a concerning bottleneck for providing cost-effective clinical services. To address this computational problem, it is important to optimize the variant analysis workflow and the used analysis tools to reduce the overall computational processing time, and concomitantly reduce the processing cost. Furthermore, it is important to capitalize on the use of the recent development in the cloud computing market, which have witnessed more providers competing in terms of products and prices. In this paper, we present a new package called MC-GenomeKey (Multi-Cloud GenomeKey) that efficiently executes the variant analysis workflow for detecting and annotating mutations using cloud resources from different commercial cloud providers. Our package supports Amazon, Google, and Azure clouds, as well as, any other cloud platform based on OpenStack. Our package allows different scenarios of execution with different levels of sophistication, up to the one where a workflow can be executed using a cluster whose nodes come from different clouds. MC-GenomeKey also supports scenarios to exploit the spot instance model of Amazon in combination with the use of other cloud platforms to provide significant cost reduction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first solution that optimizes the execution of the workflow using computational resources from different cloud providers. MC-GenomeKey provides an efficient multicloud based solution to detect and annotate mutations. The package can run in different commercial cloud platforms, which enables the user to seize the best offers. The package also provides a reliable means to make use of the low-cost spot instance model of Amazon, as it provides an efficient solution to the sudden termination of spot

  20. Sequence ID and annotation information - Gclust Server | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Gclust Server Sequence ID and annotation information Data detail Data name Sequence ID and ann...e specifying the ID, length and annotation information of the amino acid sequences of the predicted proteins...f amino acid sequence (Sequence ID) Field 2 Length of amino acid sequence Field 3 Ann...of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Sequence ID and annotation information - Gclust Server | LSDB Archive ...

  1. Sequencing, annotation and comparative analysis of nine BACs of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yang; Cai, Jing; Li, JianWen; Li, Bo; Lin, RunMao; Tian, Feng; Wang, XiaoLing; Wang, Jun

    2010-01-01

    A 10-fold BAC library for giant panda was constructed and nine BACs were selected to generate finish sequences. These BACs could be used as a validation resource for the de novo assembly accuracy of the whole genome shotgun sequencing reads of giant panda newly generated by the Illumina GA sequencing technology. Complete sanger sequencing, assembly, annotation and comparative analysis were carried out on the selected BACs of a joint length 878 kb. Homologue search and de novo prediction methods were used to annotate genes and repeats. Twelve protein coding genes were predicted, seven of which could be functionally annotated. The seven genes have an average gene size of about 41 kb, an average coding size of about 1.2 kb and an average exon number of 6 per gene. Besides, seven tRNA genes were found. About 27 percent of the BAC sequence is composed of repeats. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using neighbor-join algorithm across five species, including giant panda, human, dog, cat and mouse, which reconfirms dog as the most related species to giant panda. Our results provide detailed sequence and structure information for new genes and repeats of giant panda, which will be helpful for further studies on the giant panda.

  2. Sequencing,annotation and comparative analysis of nine BACs of the giant panda(Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A 10-fold BAC library for the giant panda was constructed and nine BACs were selected to generate finish sequences.These BACs could be used as a validation resource for the de novo assembly accuracy of the whole genome shotgun sequencing reads of the giant panda newly generated by Illumina GA sequencing technology.Complete Sanger sequencing,assembly,annotation and comparative analysis were carried out on the selected BACs of a joint length 878 kb.Homologue search and de novo prediction methods were used to annotate genes and repeats.Twelve protein coding genes were predicted,seven of which could be functionally annotated.The seven genes have an average gene size of about 41 kb,an average coding size of about 1.2 kb and an average exon number of 6 per gene.Besides,seven tRNA genes were found.About 27 percent of the BAC sequence is composed of repeats.A phylogenetic tree was constructed using a neighbor-join algorithm across five species,including the giant panda,human,dog,cat and mouse,which reconfirms dog as the most closely related species to the giant panda.Our results provide detailed sequence and structure information for new genes and repeats of the giant panda,which will be helpful for further studies about the giant panda.

  3. Discovery and annotation of small proteins using genomics, proteomics and computational approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaohan; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Jawdy, Sara; Abraham, Paul E.; Lankford, Patricia K.; Adams, Rachel M.; Shah, Manesh B.; Hettich, Robert L.; Lindquist, Erika; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Gunter, Lee E.; Pennacchio, Christa; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2011-03-02

    Small proteins (10 200 amino acids aa in length) encoded by short open reading frames (sORF) play important regulatory roles in various biological processes, including tumor progression, stress response, flowering, and hormone signaling. However, ab initio discovery of small proteins has been relatively overlooked. Recent advances in deep transcriptome sequencing make it possible to efficiently identify sORFs at the genome level. In this study, we obtained 2.6 million expressed sequence tag (EST) reads from Populus deltoides leaf transcriptome and reconstructed full-length transcripts from the EST sequences. We identified an initial set of 12,852 sORFs encoding proteins of 10 200 aa in length. Three computational approaches were then used to enrich for bona fide protein-coding sORFs from the initial sORF set: (1) codingpotential prediction, (2) evolutionary conservation between P. deltoides and other plant species, and (3) gene family clustering within P. deltoides. As a result, a high-confidence sORF candidate set containing 1469 genes was obtained. Analysis of the protein domains, non-protein-coding RNA motifs, sequence length distribution, and protein mass spectrometry data supported this high-confidence sORF set. In the high-confidence sORF candidate set, known protein domains were identified in 1282 genes (higher-confidence sORF candidate set), out of which 611 genes, designated as highest-confidence candidate sORF set, were supported by proteomics data. Of the 611 highest-confidence candidate sORF genes, 56 were new to the current Populus genome annotation. This study not only demonstrates that there are potential sORF candidates to be annotated in sequenced genomes, but also presents an efficient strategy for discovery of sORFs in species with no genome annotation yet available.

  4. Advancing Trypanosoma brucei genome annotation through ribosome profiling and spliced leader mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Marilyn; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Vasconcelos, Elton J R; Jensen, Bryan C; Myler, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    Since the initial publication of the trypanosomatid genomes, curation has been ongoing. Here we make use of existing Trypanosoma brucei ribosome profiling data to provide evidence of ribosome occupancy (and likely translation) of mRNAs from 225 currently unannotated coding sequences (CDSs). A small number of these putative genes correspond to extra copies of previously annotated genes, but 85% are novel. The median size of these novels CDSs is small (81 aa), indicating that past annotation work has excelled at detecting large CDSs. Of the unique CDSs confirmed here, over half have candidate orthologues in other trypanosomatid genomes, most of which were not yet annotated as protein-coding genes. Nonetheless, approximately one-third of the new CDSs were found only in T. brucei subspecies. Using ribosome footprints, RNA-Seq and spliced leader mapping data, we updated previous work to definitively revise the start sites for 414 CDSs as compared to the current gene models. The data pointed to several regions of the genome that had sequence errors that altered coding region boundaries. Finally, we consolidated this data with our previous work to propose elimination of 683 putative genes as protein-coding and arrive at a view of the translatome of slender bloodstream and procyclic culture form T. brucei.

  5. Transcriptome sequencing and annotation for the Jamaican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy I Shaw

    Full Text Available The Jamaican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis is one of the most common bats in the tropical Americas. It is thought to be a potential reservoir host of Tacaribe virus, an arenavirus closely related to the South American hemorrhagic fever viruses. We performed transcriptome sequencing and annotation from lung, kidney and spleen tissues using 454 and Illumina platforms to develop this species as an animal model. More than 100,000 contigs were assembled, with 25,000 genes that were functionally annotated. Of the remaining unannotated contigs, 80% were found within bat genomes or transcriptomes. Annotated genes are involved in a broad range of activities ranging from cellular metabolism to genome regulation through ncRNAs. Reciprocal BLAST best hits yielded 8,785 sequences that are orthologous to mouse, rat, cattle, horse and human. Species tree analysis of sequences from 2,378 loci was used to achieve 95% bootstrap support for the placement of bat as sister to the clade containing horse, dog, and cattle. Through substitution rate estimation between bat and human, 32 genes were identified with evidence for positive selection. We also identified 466 immune-related genes, which may be useful for studying Tacaribe virus infection of this species. The Jamaican fruit bat transcriptome dataset is a resource that should provide additional candidate markers for studying bat evolution and ecology, and tools for analysis of the host response and pathology of disease.

  6. Open access to sequence: Browsing the Pichia pastoris genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graf Alexandra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The first genome sequences of the important yeast protein production host Pichia pastoris have been released into the public domain this spring. In order to provide the scientific community easy and versatile access to the sequence, two web-sites have been installed as a resource for genomic sequence, gene and protein information for P. pastoris: A GBrowse based genome browser was set up at http://www.pichiagenome.org and a genome portal with gene annotation and browsing functionality at http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/webtools/bogas. Both websites are offering information on gene annotation and function, regulation and structure. In addition, a WiKi based platform allows all users to create additional information on genes, proteins, physiology and other items of P. pastoris research, so that the Pichia community can benefit from exchange of knowledge, data and materials.

  7. DNApod: DNA polymorphism annotation database from next-generation sequence read archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Takako; Tanizawa, Yasuhiro; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Ohta, Tazro; Nikoh, Naruo; Shimizu, Tokurou; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kurata, Nori; Nagasaki, Hideki; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS), datasets for DNA polymorphisms among various species and strains have been produced, stored, and distributed. However, reliability varies among these datasets because the experimental and analytical conditions used differ among assays. Furthermore, such datasets have been frequently distributed from the websites of individual sequencing projects. It is desirable to integrate DNA polymorphism data into one database featuring uniform quality control that is distributed from a single platform at a single place. DNA polymorphism annotation database (DNApod; http://tga.nig.ac.jp/dnapod/) is an integrated database that stores genome-wide DNA polymorphism datasets acquired under uniform analytical conditions, and this includes uniformity in the quality of the raw data, the reference genome version, and evaluation algorithms. DNApod genotypic data are re-analyzed whole-genome shotgun datasets extracted from sequence read archives, and DNApod distributes genome-wide DNA polymorphism datasets and known-gene annotations for each DNA polymorphism. This new database was developed for storing genome-wide DNA polymorphism datasets of plants, with crops being the first priority. Here, we describe our analyzed data for 679, 404, and 66 strains of rice, maize, and sorghum, respectively. The analytical methods are available as a DNApod workflow in an NGS annotation system of the DNA Data Bank of Japan and a virtual machine image. Furthermore, DNApod provides tables of links of identifiers between DNApod genotypic data and public phenotypic data. To advance the sharing of organism knowledge, DNApod offers basic and ubiquitous functions for multiple alignment and phylogenetic tree construction by using orthologous gene information. PMID:28234924

  8. Sequencing, annotation and analysis of the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Tchitchek

    Full Text Available The Syrian hamster (golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus is gaining importance as a new experimental animal model for multiple pathogens, including emerging zoonotic diseases such as Ebola. Nevertheless there are currently no publicly available transcriptome reference sequences or genome for this species.A cDNA library derived from mRNA and snRNA isolated and pooled from the brains, lungs, spleens, kidneys, livers, and hearts of three adult female Syrian hamsters was sequenced. Sequence reads were assembled into 62,482 contigs and 111,796 reads remained unassembled (singletons. This combined contig/singleton dataset, designated as the Syrian hamster transcriptome, represents a total of 60,117,204 nucleotides. Our Mesocricetus auratus Syrian hamster transcriptome mapped to 11,648 mouse transcripts representing 9,562 distinct genes, and mapped to a similar number of transcripts and genes in the rat. We identified 214 quasi-complete transcripts based on mouse annotations. Canonical pathways involved in a broad spectrum of fundamental biological processes were significantly represented in the library. The Syrian hamster transcriptome was aligned to the current release of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell transcriptome and genome to improve the genomic annotation of this species. Finally, our Syrian hamster transcriptome was aligned against 14 other rodents, primate and laurasiatheria species to gain insights about the genetic relatedness and placement of this species.This Syrian hamster transcriptome dataset significantly improves our knowledge of the Syrian hamster's transcriptome, especially towards its future use in infectious disease research. Moreover, this library is an important resource for the wider scientific community to help improve genome annotation of the Syrian hamster and other closely related species. Furthermore, these data provide the basis for development of expression microarrays that can be used in functional genomics studies.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum deleyianum type strain (5175T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Lang, Elke [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Sulfurospirillum deleyianum Schumacher et al. 1993 is the type species of the genus Sulfurospirillum. S. deleyianum is a model organism for studying sulfur reduction and dissimilatory nitrate reduction as energy source for growth. Also, it is a prominent model organism for studying the structural and functional characteristics of the cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Sulfurospirillum. The 2,306,351 bp long genome with its 2291 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2009-05-20

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the genus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobiaceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomicrobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Gordonia bronchialis type strain (3410T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Jando, Marlen [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2010-01-01

    Gordonia bronchialis Tsukamura 1971 is the type species of the genus. G. bronchialis is a human-pathogenic organism that has been isolated from a large variety of human tissues. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Gordoniaceae. The 5,290,012 bp long genome with its 4,944 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium vaccae Type Strain ATCC 25954

    KAUST Repository

    Ho, Y. S.

    2012-10-26

    Mycobacterium vaccae is a rapidly growing, nontuberculous Mycobacterium species that is generally not considered a human pathogen and is of major pharmaceutical interest as an immunotherapeutic agent. We report here the annotated genome sequence of the M. vaccae type strain, ATCC 25954.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Siphophage Silence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Jonathan A; Farmer, Nicholas G; Cahill, Jesse L; Rasche, Eric S; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F

    2015-10-08

    Silence is a newly isolated siphophage that infects Bacillus megaterium, a soil bacterium that is used readily in research and commercial applications. A study of B. megaterium phage Silence will enhance our knowledge of the diversity of Bacillus phages. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence and annotated features of Silence. Copyright © 2015 Solis et al.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Myophage Mater

    OpenAIRE

    Lancaster, Jacob C.; Hodde, Mary K.; Hernandez, Adriana C.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium is a ubiquitous, soil inhabiting Gram-positive bacterium that is a common model organism and is used in industrial applications for protein production. The following reports the complete sequencing and annotation of the genome of B. megaterium myophage Mater and describes the major features identified.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Siphophage Silence

    OpenAIRE

    Solis, Jonathan A.; Farmer, Nicholas G.; Cahill, Jesse L.; Rasche, Eric S.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2015-01-01

    Silence is a newly isolated siphophage that infects Bacillus megaterium, a soil bacterium that is used readily in research and commercial applications. A study of B. megaterium phage Silence will enhance our knowledge of the diversity of Bacillus phages. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence and annotated features of Silence.

  16. Detecting long tandem duplications in genomic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audemard Eric

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting duplication segments within completely sequenced genomes provides valuable information to address genome evolution and in particular the important question of the emergence of novel functions. The usual approach to gene duplication detection, based on all-pairs protein gene comparisons, provides only a restricted view of duplication. Results In this paper, we introduce ReD Tandem, a software using a flow based chaining algorithm targeted at detecting tandem duplication arrays of moderate to longer length regions, with possibly locally weak similarities, directly at the DNA level. On the A. thaliana genome, using a reference set of tandem duplicated genes built using TAIR,a we show that ReD Tandem is able to predict a large fraction of recently duplicated genes (dS  Conclusions ReD Tandem allows to identify large tandem duplications without any annotation, leading to agnostic identification of tandem duplications. This approach nicely complements the usual protein gene based which ignores duplications involving non coding regions. It is however inherently restricted to relatively recent duplications. By recovering otherwise ignored events, ReD Tandem gives a more comprehensive view of existing evolutionary processes and may also allow to improve existing annotations.

  17. Whole-exome/genome sequencing and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grody, Wayne W; Thompson, Barry H; Hudgins, Louanne

    2013-12-01

    As medical genetics has progressed from a descriptive entity to one focused on the functional relationship between genes and clinical disorders, emphasis has been placed on genomics. Genomics, a subelement of genetics, is the study of the genome, the sum total of all the genes of an organism. The human genome, which is contained in the 23 pairs of nuclear chromosomes and in the mitochondrial DNA of each cell, comprises >6 billion nucleotides of genetic code. There are some 23,000 protein-coding genes, a surprisingly small fraction of the total genetic material, with the remainder composed of noncoding DNA, regulatory sequences, and introns. The Human Genome Project, launched in 1990, produced a draft of the genome in 2001 and then a finished sequence in 2003, on the 50th anniversary of the initial publication of Watson and Crick's paper on the double-helical structure of DNA. Since then, this mass of genetic information has been translated at an ever-increasing pace into useable knowledge applicable to clinical medicine. The recent advent of massively parallel DNA sequencing (also known as shotgun, high-throughput, and next-generation sequencing) has brought whole-genome analysis into the clinic for the first time, and most of the current applications are directed at children with congenital conditions that are undiagnosable by using standard genetic tests for single-gene disorders. Thus, pediatricians must become familiar with this technology, what it can and cannot offer, and its technical and ethical challenges. Here, we address the concepts of human genomic analysis and its clinical applicability for primary care providers.

  18. Draft genome sequences of two closely-related aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species obtained from the Ivory Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genomes of the A. ochraceoroseus and A. rambellii type strains were sequenced using a personal genome machine, followed by annotation of their genes. The genome size for A. ochraceoroseus was found to be approximately 23 Mb and contained 7,837 genes, while the A. rambellii genome was found to be...

  19. Large-Scale Sequencing: The Future of Genomic Sciences Colloquium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret Riley; Merry Buckley

    2009-01-01

    , since not only are their genomes available, but they are also accompanied by data on environment and physiology that can be used to understand the resulting data. As single cell isolation methods improve, there should be a shift toward incorporating uncultured organisms and communities into this effort. Efforts to sequence cultivated isolates should target characterized isolates from culture collections for which biochemical data are available, as well as other cultures of lasting value from personal collections. The genomes of type strains should be among the first targets for sequencing, but creative culture methods, novel cell isolation, and sorting methods would all be helpful in obtaining organisms we have not yet been able to cultivate for sequencing. The data that should be provided for strains targeted for sequencing will depend on the phylogenetic context of the organism and the amount of information available about its nearest relatives. Annotation is an important part of transforming genome sequences into useful resources, but it represents the most significant bottleneck to the field of comparative genomics right now and must be addressed. Furthermore, there is a need for more consistency in both annotation and achieving annotation data. As new annotation tools become available over time, re-annotation of genomes should be implemented, taking advantage of advancements in annotation techniques in order to capitalize on the genome sequences and increase both the societal and scientific benefit of genomics work. Given the proper resources, the knowledge and ability exist to be able to select model systems, some simple, some less so, and dissect them so that we may understand the processes and interactions at work in them. Colloquium participants suggest a five-pronged, coordinated initiative to exhaustively describe six different microbial ecosystems, designed to describe all the gene diversity, across genomes. In this effort, sequencing should be complemented

  20. Evidence-based gene models for structural and functional annotations of the oil palm genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kuang-Lim; Tatarinova, Tatiana V; Rosli, Rozana; Amiruddin, Nadzirah; Azizi, Norazah; Halim, Mohd Amin Ab; Sanusi, Nik Shazana Nik Mohd; Jayanthi, Nagappan; Ponomarenko, Petr; Triska, Martin; Solovyev, Victor; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi; Murphy, Denis; Low, Eng-Ti Leslie

    2017-09-08

    Oil palm is an important source of edible oil. The importance of the crop, as well as its long breeding cycle (10-12 years) has led to the sequencing of its genome in 2013 to pave the way for genomics-guided breeding. Nevertheless, the first set of gene predictions, although useful, had many fragmented genes. Classification and characterization of genes associated with traits of interest, such as those for fatty acid biosynthesis and disease resistance, were also limited. Lipid-, especially fatty acid (FA)-related genes are of particular interest for the oil palm as they specify oil yields and quality. This paper presents the characterization of the oil palm genome using different gene prediction methods and comparative genomics analysis, identification of FA biosynthesis and disease resistance genes, and the development of an annotation database and bioinformatics tools. Using two independent gene-prediction pipelines, Fgenesh++ and Seqping, 26,059 oil palm genes with transcriptome and RefSeq support were identified from the oil palm genome. These coding regions of the genome have a characteristic broad distribution of GC3 (fraction of cytosine and guanine in the third position of a codon) with over half the GC3-rich genes (GC3 ≥ 0.75286) being intronless. In comparison, only one-seventh of the oil palm genes identified are intronless. Using comparative genomics analysis, characterization of conserved domains and active sites, and expression analysis, 42 key genes involved in FA biosynthesis in oil palm were identified. For three of them, namely EgFABF, EgFABH and EgFAD3, segmental duplication events were detected. Our analysis also identified 210 candidate resistance genes in six classes, grouped by their protein domain structures. We present an accurate and comprehensive annotation of the oil palm genome, focusing on analysis of important categories of genes (GC3-rich and intronless), as well as those associated with important functions, such as FA

  1. Tidying up international nucleotide sequence databases: ecological, geographical and sequence quality annotation of its sequences of mycorrhizal fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leho Tedersoo

    Full Text Available Sequence analysis of the ribosomal RNA operon, particularly the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region, provides a powerful tool for identification of mycorrhizal fungi. The sequence data deposited in the International Nucleotide Sequence Databases (INSD are, however, unfiltered for quality and are often poorly annotated with metadata. To detect chimeric and low-quality sequences and assign the ectomycorrhizal fungi to phylogenetic lineages, fungal ITS sequences were downloaded from INSD, aligned within family-level groups, and examined through phylogenetic analyses and BLAST searches. By combining the fungal sequence database UNITE and the annotation and search tool PlutoF, we also added metadata from the literature to these accessions. Altogether 35,632 sequences belonged to mycorrhizal fungi or originated from ericoid and orchid mycorrhizal roots. Of these sequences, 677 were considered chimeric and 2,174 of low read quality. Information detailing country of collection, geographical coordinates, interacting taxon and isolation source were supplemented to cover 78.0%, 33.0%, 41.7% and 96.4% of the sequences, respectively. These annotated sequences are publicly available via UNITE (http://unite.ut.ee/ for downstream biogeographic, ecological and taxonomic analyses. In European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/, the annotated sequences have a special link-out to UNITE. We intend to expand the data annotation to additional genes and all taxonomic groups and functional guilds of fungi.

  2. Using the NCBI Map Viewer to browse genomic sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsberg, Tyra G

    2011-04-01

    This unit includes a basic protocol with an introduction to the Map Viewer, describing how to perform a simple text-based search of genome annotations to view the genomic context of a gene, navigate along a chromosome, zoom in and out, and change the displayed maps to hide and show information. It also describes some of NCBI's sequence-analysis tools, which are provided as links from the Map Viewer. The alternate protocols describe different ways to query the genome sequence, and also illustrate additional features of the Map Viewer. Alternate Protocol 1 shows how to perform and interpret the results of a BLAST search against the human genome. Alternate Protocol 2 demonstrates how to retrieve a list of all genes between two STS markers. Finally, Alternate Protocol 3 shows how to find all annotated members of a gene family.

  3. MIPS: analysis and annotation of proteins from whole genomes in 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Frishman, D; Mayer, K F X; Münsterkötter, M; Noubibou, O; Pagel, P; Rattei, T; Oesterheld, M; Ruepp, A; Stümpflen, V

    2006-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS at the GSF), Neuherberg, Germany, provides resources related to genome information. Manually curated databases for several reference organisms are maintained. Several of these databases are described elsewhere in this and other recent NAR database issues. In a complementary effort, a comprehensive set of >400 genomes automatically annotated with the PEDANT system are maintained. The main goal of our current work on creating and maintaining genome databases is to extend gene centered information to information on interactions within a generic comprehensive framework. We have concentrated our efforts along three lines (i) the development of suitable comprehensive data structures and database technology, communication and query tools to include a wide range of different types of information enabling the representation of complex information such as functional modules or networks Genome Research Environment System, (ii) the development of databases covering computable information such as the basic evolutionary relations among all genes, namely SIMAP, the sequence similarity matrix and the CABiNet network analysis framework and (iii) the compilation and manual annotation of information related to interactions such as protein-protein interactions or other types of relations (e.g. MPCDB, MPPI, CYGD). All databases described and the detailed descriptions of our projects can be accessed through the MIPS WWW server (http://mips.gsf.de).

  4. Complete genome sequence of the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora strain ATCC 49946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwinia amylovora causes the economically important disease fire blight that affects rosaceous plants, especially pear and apple. Here we report the complete genome sequence and annotation of strain ATCC 49946. The analysis of the sequence and its comparison with sequenced genomes of closely related...

  5. Semantic Assembly and Annotation of Draft RNAseq Transcripts without a Reference Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptitsyn, Andrey; Temanni, Ramzi; Bouchard, Christelle; Anderson, Peter A V

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes are one of the first sources of high-throughput genomic data that have benefitted from the introduction of Next-Gen Sequencing. As sequencing technology becomes more accessible, transcriptome sequencing is applicable to multiple organisms for which genome sequences are unavailable. Currently all methods for de novo assembly are based on the concept of matching the nucleotide context overlapping between short fragments-reads. However, even short reads may still contain biologically relevant information which can be used as hints in guiding the assembly process. We propose a computational workflow for the reconstruction and functional annotation of expressed gene transcripts that does not require a reference genome sequence and can be tolerant to low coverage, high error rates and other issues that often lead to poor results of de novo assembly in studies of non-model organisms. We start with either raw sequences or the output of a context-based de novo transcriptome assembly. Instead of mapping reads to a reference genome or creating a completely unsupervised clustering of reads, we assemble the unknown transcriptome using nearest homologs from a public database as seeds. We consider even distant relations, indirectly linking protein-coding fragments to entire gene families in multiple distantly related genomes. The intended application of the proposed method is an additional step of semantic (based on relations between protein-coding fragments) scaffolding following traditional (i.e. based on sequence overlap) de novo assembly. The method we developed was effective in analysis of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata transcriptome and may be applicable in other studies of gene expression in species lacking a high quality reference genome sequence. Our algorithms are implemented in C and designed for parallel computation using a high-performance computer. The software is available free of charge via an open source license.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Aggregatibacter (Haemophilus) aphrophilus NJ8700.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bonaventura, Maria Pia; DeSalle, Rob; Pop, Mihai; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Figurski, David H; Fine, Daniel H; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Planet, Paul J

    2009-07-01

    We report the finished and annotated genome sequence of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus strain NJ8700, a strain isolated from the oral flora of a healthy individual, and discuss characteristics that may affect its dual roles in human health and disease. This strain has a rough appearance, and its genome contains genes encoding a type VI secretion system and several factors that may participate in host colonization.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Aggregatibacter (Haemophilus) aphrophilus NJ8700▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bonaventura, Maria Pia; DeSalle, Rob; Pop, Mihai; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Figurski, David H.; Fine, Daniel H.; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Planet, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the finished and annotated genome sequence of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus strain NJ8700, a strain isolated from the oral flora of a healthy individual, and discuss characteristics that may affect its dual roles in human health and disease. This strain has a rough appearance, and its genome contains genes encoding a type VI secretion system and several factors that may participate in host colonization. PMID:19447908

  8. High-throughput proteogenomics of Ruegeria pomeroyi: seeding a better genomic annotation for the whole marine Roseobacter clade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie-Oleza Joseph A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structural and functional annotation of genomes is now heavily based on data obtained using automated pipeline systems. The key for an accurate structural annotation consists of blending similarities between closely related genomes with biochemical evidence of the genome interpretation. In this work we applied high-throughput proteogenomics to Ruegeria pomeroyi, a member of the Roseobacter clade, an abundant group of marine bacteria, as a seed for the annotation of the whole clade. Results A large dataset of peptides from R. pomeroyi was obtained after searching over 1.1 million MS/MS spectra against a six-frame translated genome database. We identified 2006 polypeptides, of which thirty-four were encoded by open reading frames (ORFs that had not previously been annotated. From the pool of 'one-hit-wonders', i.e. those ORFs specified by only one peptide detected by tandem mass spectrometry, we could confirm the probable existence of five additional new genes after proving that the corresponding RNAs were transcribed. We also identified the most-N-terminal peptide of 486 polypeptides, of which sixty-four had originally been wrongly annotated. Conclusions By extending these re-annotations to the other thirty-six Roseobacter isolates sequenced to date (twenty different genera, we propose the correction of the assigned start codons of 1082 homologous genes in the clade. In addition, we also report the presence of novel genes within operons encoding determinants of the important tricarboxylic acid cycle, a feature that seems to be characteristic of some Roseobacter genomes. The detection of their corresponding products in large amounts raises the question of their function. Their discoveries point to a possible theory for protein evolution that will rely on high expression of orphans in bacteria: their putative poor efficiency could be counterbalanced by a higher level of expression. Our proteogenomic analysis will increase

  9. ChIP-Seq-Annotated Heliconius erato Genome Highlights Patterns of cis-Regulatory Evolution in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James J; van der Burg, Karin R L; Mazo-Vargas, Anyi; Reed, Robert D

    2016-09-13

    Uncovering phylogenetic patterns of cis-regulatory evolution remains a fundamental goal for evolutionary and developmental biology. Here, we characterize the evolution of regulatory loci in butterflies and moths using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) annotation of regulatory elements across three stages of head development. In the process we provide a high-quality, functionally annotated genome assembly for the butterfly, Heliconius erato. Comparing cis-regulatory element conservation across six lepidopteran genomes, we find that regulatory sequences evolve at a pace similar to that of protein-coding regions. We also observe that elements active at multiple developmental stages are markedly more conserved than elements with stage-specific activity. Surprisingly, we also find that stage-specific proximal and distal regulatory elements evolve at nearly identical rates. Our study provides a benchmark for genome-wide patterns of regulatory element evolution in insects, and it shows that developmental timing of activity strongly predicts patterns of regulatory sequence evolution.

  10. Specialized microbial databases for inductive exploration of microbial genome sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabau Cédric

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enormous amount of genome sequence data asks for user-oriented databases to manage sequences and annotations. Queries must include search tools permitting function identification through exploration of related objects. Methods The GenoList package for collecting and mining microbial genome databases has been rewritten using MySQL as the database management system. Functions that were not available in MySQL, such as nested subquery, have been implemented. Results Inductive reasoning in the study of genomes starts from "islands of knowledge", centered around genes with some known background. With this concept of "neighborhood" in mind, a modified version of the GenoList structure has been used for organizing sequence data from prokaryotic genomes of particular interest in China. GenoChore http://bioinfo.hku.hk/genochore.html, a set of 17 specialized end-user-oriented microbial databases (including one instance of Microsporidia, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, a member of Eukarya has been made publicly available. These databases allow the user to browse genome sequence and annotation data using standard queries. In addition they provide a weekly update of searches against the world-wide protein sequences data libraries, allowing one to monitor annotation updates on genes of interest. Finally, they allow users to search for patterns in DNA or protein sequences, taking into account a clustering of genes into formal operons, as well as providing extra facilities to query sequences using predefined sequence patterns. Conclusion This growing set of specialized microbial databases organize data created by the first Chinese bacterial genome programs (ThermaList, Thermoanaerobacter tencongensis, LeptoList, with two different genomes of Leptospira interrogans and SepiList, Staphylococcus epidermidis associated to related organisms for comparison.

  11. Overview of errors in the reference sequence and annotation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and variation amongst its isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Köser, Claudio U.

    2012-06-01

    Since its publication in 1998, the genome sequence of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain has acted as the cornerstone for the study of tuberculosis. In this review we address some of the practical aspects that have come to light relating to the use of H37Rv throughout the past decade which are of relevance for the ongoing genomic and laboratory studies of this pathogen. These include errors in the genome reference sequence and its annotation, as well as the recently detected variation amongst isolates of H37Rv from different laboratories. © 2011 Elsevier B.V..

  12. Genome Wide Re-Annotation of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus with New Insights into Genes Involved in Biomass Degradation and Hydrogen Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupoor Chowdhary

    Full Text Available Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus has proven itself to be an excellent candidate for biological hydrogen (H2 production, but still it has major drawbacks like sensitivity to high osmotic pressure and low volumetric H2 productivity, which should be considered before it can be used industrially. A whole genome re-annotation work has been carried out as an attempt to update the incomplete genome information that causes gap in the knowledge especially in the area of metabolic engineering, to improve the H2 producing capabilities of C. saccharolyticus. Whole genome re-annotation was performed through manual means for 2,682 Coding Sequences (CDSs. Bioinformatics tools based on sequence similarity, motif search, phylogenetic analysis and fold recognition were employed for re-annotation. Our methodology could successfully add functions for 409 hypothetical proteins (HPs, 46 proteins previously annotated as putative and assigned more accurate functions for the known protein sequences. Homology based gene annotation has been used as a standard method for assigning function to novel proteins, but over the past few years many non-homology based methods such as genomic context approaches for protein function prediction have been developed. Using non-homology based functional prediction methods, we were able to assign cellular processes or physical complexes for 249 hypothetical sequences. Our re-annotation pipeline highlights the addition of 231 new CDSs generated from MicroScope Platform, to the original genome with functional prediction for 49 of them. The re-annotation of HPs and new CDSs is stored in the relational database that is available on the MicroScope web-based platform. In parallel, a comparative genome analyses were performed among the members of genus Caldicellulosiruptor to understand the function and evolutionary processes. Further, with results from integrated re-annotation studies (homology and genomic context approach, we strongly

  13. Apollo2Go: a web service adapter for the Apollo genome viewer to enable distributed genome annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayer Klaus FX

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apollo, a genome annotation viewer and editor, has become a widely used genome annotation and visualization tool for distributed genome annotation projects. When using Apollo for annotation, database updates are carried out by uploading intermediate annotation files into the respective database. This non-direct database upload is laborious and evokes problems of data synchronicity. Results To overcome these limitations we extended the Apollo data adapter with a generic, configurable web service client that is able to retrieve annotation data in a GAME-XML-formatted string and pass it on to Apollo's internal input routine. Conclusion This Apollo web service adapter, Apollo2Go, simplifies the data exchange in distributed projects and aims to render the annotation process more comfortable. The Apollo2Go software is freely available from ftp://ftpmips.gsf.de/plants/apollo_webservice.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the Porcine Isolate Enterococcus faecalis D32

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zischka, Melanie; Kuenne, Carsten; Blom, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    The complete and annotated genome sequence of Enterococcus faecalis D32, a commensal strain isolated from a Danish pig, suggests putative adaptation to the porcine host and absence of distinct virulence-associated traits....

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of the Novel Leech Symbiont Mucinivorans hirudinis M3T

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Michael C.; Bomar, Lindsey; Graf, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    Mucinivorans hirudinis M3T was isolated from the digestive tract of the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, and is the type species of a new genus within the Rikenellaceae. Here, we report the complete annotated genome sequence of this bacterium.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Novel Leech Symbiont Mucinivorans hirudinis M3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael C; Bomar, Lindsey; Graf, Joerg

    2015-02-05

    Mucinivorans hirudinis M3(T) was isolated from the digestive tract of the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, and is the type species of a new genus within the Rikenellaceae. Here, we report the complete annotated genome sequence of this bacterium.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Strain G-12-005

    OpenAIRE

    Berland, Jean-Luc; Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; Bablishvili, Nino; Gauthier, Marie; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Infection caused by drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a growing concern, especially in eastern Europe. We report an annotated draft genome sequence of M. tuberculosis strain G-12-005 obtained from a patient in Georgia.

  18. Genome, functional gene annotation, and nuclear transformation of the heterokont oleaginous alga Nannochloropsis oceanica CCMP1779.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Vieler

    Full Text Available Unicellular marine algae have promise for providing sustainable and scalable biofuel feedstocks, although no single species has emerged as a preferred organism. Moreover, adequate molecular and genetic resources prerequisite for the rational engineering of marine algal feedstocks are lacking for most candidate species. Heterokonts of the genus Nannochloropsis naturally have high cellular oil content and are already in use for industrial production of high-value lipid products. First success in applying reverse genetics by targeted gene replacement makes Nannochloropsis oceanica an attractive model to investigate the cell and molecular biology and biochemistry of this fascinating organism group. Here we present the assembly of the 28.7 Mb genome of N. oceanica CCMP1779. RNA sequencing data from nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted growth conditions support a total of 11,973 genes, of which in addition to automatic annotation some were manually inspected to predict the biochemical repertoire for this organism. Among others, more than 100 genes putatively related to lipid metabolism, 114 predicted transcription factors, and 109 transcriptional regulators were annotated. Comparison of the N. oceanica CCMP1779 gene repertoire with the recently published N. gaditana genome identified 2,649 genes likely specific to N. oceanica CCMP1779. Many of these N. oceanica-specific genes have putative orthologs in other species or are supported by transcriptional evidence. However, because similarity-based annotations are limited, functions of most of these species-specific genes remain unknown. Aside from the genome sequence and its analysis, protocols for the transformation of N. oceanica CCMP1779 are provided. The availability of genomic and transcriptomic data for Nannochloropsis oceanica CCMP1779, along with efficient transformation protocols, provides a blueprint for future detailed gene functional analysis and genetic engineering of Nannochloropsis

  19. WikiGenomes: an open web application for community consumption and curation of gene annotation data in Wikidata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Tim E; Lelong, Sebastien; Burgstaller-Muehlbacher, Sebastian; Waagmeester, Andra; Diesh, Colin; Dunn, Nathan; Munoz-Torres, Monica; Stupp, Gregory S; Wu, Chunlei; Su, Andrew I; Good, Benjamin M

    2017-01-01

    With the advancement of genome-sequencing technologies, new genomes are being sequenced daily. Although these sequences are deposited in publicly available data warehouses, their functional and genomic annotations (beyond genes which are predicted automatically) mostly reside in the text of primary publications. Professional curators are hard at work extracting those annotations from the literature for the most studied organisms and depositing them in structured databases. However, the resources don't exist to fund the comprehensive curation of the thousands of newly sequenced organisms in this manner. Here, we describe WikiGenomes (wikigenomes.org), a web application that facilitates the consumption and curation of genomic data by the entire scientific community. WikiGenomes is based on Wikidata, an openly editable knowledge graph with the goal of aggregating published knowledge into a free and open database. WikiGenomes empowers the individual genomic researcher to contribute their expertise to the curation effort and integrates the knowledge into Wikidata, enabling it to be accessed by anyone without restriction. www.wikigenomes.org.

  20. Biological Database of Images and Genomes: tools for community annotations linking image and genomic information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Andrew T; Jurkovic, Dominika A; Balish, Mitchell F; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-01-01

    Genomic data and biomedical imaging data are undergoing exponential growth. However, our understanding of the phenotype–genotype connection linking the two types of data is lagging behind. While there are many types of software that enable the manipulation and analysis of image data and genomic data as separate entities, there is no framework established for linking the two. We present a generic set of software tools, BioDIG, that allows linking of image data to genomic data. BioDIG tools can be applied to a wide range of research problems that require linking images to genomes. BioDIG features the following: rapid construction of web-based workbenches, community-based annotation, user management and web services. By using BioDIG to create websites, researchers and curators can rapidly annotate a large number of images with genomic information. Here we present the BioDIG software tools that include an image module, a genome module and a user management module. We also introduce a BioDIG-based website, MyDIG, which is being used to annotate images of mycoplasmas. Database URL: BioDIG website: http://biodig.org BioDIG source code repository: http://github.com/FriedbergLab/BioDIG The MyDIG database: http://mydig.biodig.org/ PMID:23550062

  1. The Arabidopsis lyrata genome sequence and the basis of rapid genome size change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Tina T.; Pattyn, Pedro; Bakker, Erica G.; Cao, Jun; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Clark, Richard M.; Fahlgren, Noah; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Haberer, Georg; Hollister, Jesse D.; Ossowski, Stephan; Ottilar, Robert P.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Spannagl, Manuel; Wang, Xi; Yang, Liang; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Bergelson, Joy; Carrington, James C.; Gaut, Brandon S.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef; Guo, Ya-Long

    2011-04-29

    In our manuscript, we present a high-quality genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana relative, Arabidopsis lyrata, produced by dideoxy sequencing. We have performed the usual types of genome analysis (gene annotation, dN/dS studies etc. etc.), but this is relegated to the Supporting Information. Instead, we focus on what was a major motivation for sequencing this genome, namely to understand how A. thaliana lost half its genome in a few million years and lived to tell the tale. The rather surprising conclusion is that there is not a single genomic feature that accounts for the reduced genome, but that every aspect centromeres, intergenic regions, transposable elements, gene family number is affected through hundreds of thousands of cuts. This strongly suggests that overall genome size in itself is what has been under selection, a suggestion that is strongly supported by our demonstration (using population genetics data from A. thaliana) that new deletions seem to be driven to fixation.

  2. Fast Genome-Wide Functional Annotation through Orthology Assignment by eggNOG-Mapper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Forslund, Kristoffer; Coelho, Luis Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Orthology assignment is ideally suited for functional inference. However, because predicting orthology is computationally intensive at large scale, and most pipelines are relatively inaccessible (e.g., new assignments only available through database updates), less precise homology-based functional...... transfer is still the default for (meta-)genome annotation. We, therefore, developed eggNOG-mapper, a tool for functional annotation of large sets of sequences based on fast orthology assignments using precomputed clusters and phylogenies from the eggNOG database. To validate our method, we benchmarked...... Gene Ontology (GO) predictions against two widely used homology-based approaches: BLAST and InterProScan. Orthology filters applied to BLAST results reduced the rate of false positive assignments by 11%, and increased the ratio of experimentally validated terms recovered over all terms assigned per...

  3. Biased distribution of DNA uptake sequences towards genome maintenance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, T.; Rodland, E.A.; Lagesen, K.

    2004-01-01

    coding regions are the DNA uptake sequences (DUS) required for natural genetic transformation. More importantly, we found a significantly higher density of DUS within genes involved in DNA repair, recombination, restriction-modification and replication than in any other annotated gene group......Repeated sequence signatures are characteristic features of all genomic DNA. We have made a rigorous search for repeat genomic sequences in the human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae and found that by far the most frequent 9-10mers residing within...

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae Biovar Intermedius NCTC 5011

    OpenAIRE

    Sangal, Vartul; Nicholas P Tucker; Burkovski, Andreas; Hoskisson, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    We report an annotated draft genome of the human pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae bv. intermedius NCTC 5011. This strain is the first C. diphtheriae bv. intermedius strain to be sequenced, and our results provide a useful comparison to the other primary disease-causing biovars, C. diphtheriae bv. gravis and C. diphtheriae bv. mitis. The sequence has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank with the accession number AJVH01000000.

  5. Draft genome sequence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae biovar intermedius NCTC 5011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangal, Vartul; Tucker, Nicholas P; Burkovski, Andreas; Hoskisson, Paul A

    2012-09-01

    We report an annotated draft genome of the human pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae bv. intermedius NCTC 5011. This strain is the first C. diphtheriae bv. intermedius strain to be sequenced, and our results provide a useful comparison to the other primary disease-causing biovars, C. diphtheriae bv. gravis and C. diphtheriae bv. mitis. The sequence has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank with the accession number AJVH01000000.

  6. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Novel Escherichia coli Bacteriophages Belonging to New Phage Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstens, Alexander B; Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the sequencing and genome annotations of a set of four Escherichia coli bacteriophages (phages) belonging to newly discovered groups previously consisting of only a single phage and thus expand our knowledge of these phage groups.......Here, we describe the sequencing and genome annotations of a set of four Escherichia coli bacteriophages (phages) belonging to newly discovered groups previously consisting of only a single phage and thus expand our knowledge of these phage groups....

  7. Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP: a comprehensive database for sweet orange genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wang

    Full Text Available Citrus is one of the most important and widely grown fruit crop with global production ranking firstly among all the fruit crops in the world. Sweet orange accounts for more than half of the Citrus production both in fresh fruit and processed juice. We have sequenced the draft genome of a double-haploid sweet orange (C. sinensis cv. Valencia, and constructed the Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP to store and visualize the sequenced genomic and transcriptome data. CAP provides GBrowse-based organization of sweet orange genomic data, which integrates ab initio gene prediction, EST, RNA-seq and RNA-paired end tag (RNA-PET evidence-based gene annotation. Furthermore, we provide a user-friendly web interface to show the predicted protein-protein interactions (PPIs and metabolic pathways in sweet orange. CAP provides comprehensive information beneficial to the researchers of sweet orange and other woody plants, which is freely available at http://citrus.hzau.edu.cn/.

  8. The de novo genome assembly and annotation of a female domestic dromedary of North African origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitak, Robert R; Mohandesan, Elmira; Corander, Jukka; Burger, Pamela A

    2016-01-01

    The single-humped dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) is the most numerous and widespread of domestic camel species and is a significant source of meat, milk, wool, transportation and sport for millions of people. Dromedaries are particularly well adapted to hot, desert conditions and harbour a variety of biological and physiological characteristics with evolutionary, economic and medical importance. To understand the genetic basis of these traits, an extensive resource of genomic variation is required. In this study, we assembled at 65× coverage, a 2.06 Gb draft genome of a female dromedary whose ancestry can be traced to an isolated population from the Canary Islands. We annotated 21,167 protein-coding genes and estimated ~33.7% of the genome to be repetitive. A comparison with the recently published draft genome of an Arabian dromedary resulted in 1.91 Gb of aligned sequence with a divergence of 0.095%. An evaluation of our genome with the reference revealed that our assembly contains more error-free bases (91.2%) and fewer scaffolding errors. We identified ~1.4 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms with a mean density of 0.71 × 10(-3) per base. An analysis of demographic history indicated that changes in effective population size corresponded with recent glacial epochs. Our de novo assembly provides a useful resource of genomic variation for future studies of the camel's adaptations to arid environments and economically important traits. Furthermore, these results suggest that draft genome assemblies constructed with only two differently sized sequencing libraries can be comparable to those sequenced using additional library sizes, highlighting that additional resources might be better placed in technologies alternative to short-read sequencing to physically anchor scaffolds to genome maps.

  9. The assembly and annotation of the complete Rufous-bellied thrush mitochondrial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes de Sá, Pablo; Veras, Adonney; Fontana, Carla Suertegaray; Aleixo, Alexandre; Burlamaqui, Tibério; Mello, Claudio Vianna; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Prosdocimi, Francisco; Ramos, Rommel; Schneider, Maria; Silva, Artur

    2017-03-01

    Among known bird species, oscines are one of the few groups that produce complex vocalizations due to vocal learning. One of the most conspicuous oscine passerines in southeastern South America is the Rufous-bellied Thrush, Turdus rufiventris. The complete mitochondrial genome of this species was sequenced with the Illumina HiSeq platform (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA), assembled using MITObim software and annotated by MITOS web server and Artemis software. This mitogenome contained 16 669 bases, organized as 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, two ribosomal RNAs, and a control region (d-loop). The sequencing of the Rufous-bellied Thrush mitochondrial genome is of particular interest for better understanding of population genetics and phylogeography of the Turdidae family.

  10. Maize microarray annotation database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Dave K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology has matured over the past fifteen years into a cost-effective solution with established data analysis protocols for global gene expression profiling. The Agilent-016047 maize 44 K microarray was custom-designed from EST sequences, but only reporter sequences with EST accession numbers are publicly available. The following information is lacking: (a reporter - gene model match, (b number of reporters per gene model, (c potential for cross hybridization, (d sense/antisense orientation of reporters, (e position of reporter on B73 genome sequence (for eQTL studies, and (f functional annotations of genes represented by reporters. To address this, we developed a strategy to annotate the Agilent-016047 maize microarray, and built a publicly accessible annotation database. Description Genomic annotation of the 42,034 reporters on the Agilent-016047 maize microarray was based on BLASTN results of the 60-mer reporter sequences and their corresponding ESTs against the maize B73 RefGen v2 "Working Gene Set" (WGS predicted transcripts and the genome sequence. The agreement between the EST, WGS transcript and gDNA BLASTN results were used to assign the reporters into six genomic annotation groups. These annotation groups were: (i "annotation by sense gene model" (23,668 reporters, (ii "annotation by antisense gene model" (4,330; (iii "annotation by gDNA" without a WGS transcript hit (1,549; (iv "annotation by EST", in which case the EST from which the reporter was designed, but not the reporter itself, has a WGS transcript hit (3,390; (v "ambiguous annotation" (2,608; and (vi "inconclusive annotation" (6,489. Functional annotations of reporters were obtained by BLASTX and Blast2GO analysis of corresponding WGS transcripts against GenBank. The annotations are available in the Maize Microarray Annotation Database http://MaizeArrayAnnot.bi.up.ac.za/, as well as through a GBrowse annotation file that can be uploaded to

  11. MitoBamAnnotator: A web-based tool for detecting and annotating heteroplasmy in human mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, Ilia; Nagar, Tal; Mishmar, Dan; Rubin, Eitan

    2011-11-01

    The use of Next-Generation Sequencing of mitochondrial DNA is becoming widespread in biological and clinical research. This, in turn, creates a need for a convenient tool that detects and analyzes heteroplasmy. Here we present MitoBamAnnotator, a user friendly web-based tool that allows maximum flexibility and control in heteroplasmy research. MitoBamAnnotator provides the user with a comprehensively annotated overview of mitochondrial genetic variation, allowing for an in-depth analysis with no prior knowledge in programming.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Foster, Brian [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Clum, Alicia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sun, Hui [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Analysis and Functional Annotation of an Expressed Sequence Tag Collection for Tropical Crop Sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettore, André L.; da Silva, Felipe R.; Kemper, Edson L.; Souza, Glaucia M.; da Silva, Aline M.; Ferro, Maria Inês T.; Henrique-Silva, Flavio; Giglioti, Éder A.; Lemos, Manoel V.F.; Coutinho, Luiz L.; Nobrega, Marina P.; Carrer, Helaine; França, Suzelei C.; Bacci, Maurício; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Gomes, Suely L.; Nunes, Luiz R.; Camargo, Luis E.A.; Siqueira, Walter J.; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Thiemann, Otavio H.; Kuramae, Eiko E.; Santelli, Roberto V.; Marino, Celso L.; Targon, Maria L.P.N.; Ferro, Jesus A.; Silveira, Henrique C.S.; Marini, Danyelle C.; Lemos, Eliana G.M.; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B.; Tambor, José H.M.; Carraro, Dirce M.; Roberto, Patrícia G.; Martins, Vanderlei G.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; de Oliveira, Regina C.; Truffi, Daniela; Colombo, Carlos A.; Rossi, Magdalena; de Araujo, Paula G.; Sculaccio, Susana A.; Angella, Aline; Lima, Marleide M.A.; de Rosa, Vicente E.; Siviero, Fábio; Coscrato, Virginia E.; Machado, Marcos A.; Grivet, Laurent; Di Mauro, Sonia M.Z.; Nobrega, Francisco G.; Menck, Carlos F.M.; Braga, Marilia D.V.; Telles, Guilherme P.; Cara, Frank A.A.; Pedrosa, Guilherme; Meidanis, João; Arruda, Paulo

    2003-01-01

    To contribute to our understanding of the genome complexity of sugarcane, we undertook a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) program. More than 260,000 cDNA clones were partially sequenced from 26 standard cDNA libraries generated from different sugarcane tissues. After the processing of the sequences, 237,954 high-quality ESTs were identified. These ESTs were assembled into 43,141 putative transcripts. Of the assembled sequences, 35.6% presented no matches with existing sequences in public databases. A global analysis of the whole SUCEST data set indicated that 14,409 assembled sequences (33% of the total) contained at least one cDNA clone with a full-length insert. Annotation of the 43,141 assembled sequences associated almost 50% of the putative identified sugarcane genes with protein metabolism, cellular communication/signal transduction, bioenergetics, and stress responses. Inspection of the translated assembled sequences for conserved protein domains revealed 40,821 amino acid sequences with 1415 Pfam domains. Reassembling the consensus sequences of the 43,141 transcripts revealed a 22% redundancy in the first assembling. This indicated that possibly 33,620 unique genes had been identified and indicated that >90% of the sugarcane expressed genes were tagged. PMID:14613979

  14. VIGOR extended to annotate genomes for additional 12 different viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiliang; Sundaram, Jaideep P; Stockwell, Timothy B

    2012-07-01

    A gene prediction program, VIGOR (Viral Genome ORF Reader), was developed at J. Craig Venter Institute in 2010 and has been successfully performing gene calling in coronavirus, influenza, rhinovirus and rotavirus for projects at the Genome Sequencing Center for Infectious Diseases. VIGOR uses sequence similarity search against custom protein databases to identify protein coding regions, start and stop codons and other gene features. Ribonucleicacid editing and other features are accurately identified based on sequence similarity and signature residues. VIGOR produces four output files: a gene prediction file, a complementary DNA file, an alignment file, and a gene feature table file. The gene feature table can be used to create GenBank submission. VIGOR takes a single input: viral genomic sequences in FASTA format. VIGOR has been extended to predict genes for 12 viruses: measles virus, mumps virus, rubella virus, respiratory syncytial virus, alphavirus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, norovirus, metapneumovirus, yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, parainfluenza virus and Sendai virus. VIGOR accurately detects the complex gene features like ribonucleicacid editing, stop codon leakage and ribosomal shunting. Precisely identifying the mat_peptide cleavage for some viruses is a built-in feature of VIGOR. The gene predictions for these viruses have been evaluated by testing from 27 to 240 genomes from GenBank.

  15. Filtering "genic" open reading frames from genomic DNA samples for advanced annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sblattero Daniele

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to carry out experimental gene annotation, DNA encoding open reading frames (ORFs derived from real genes (termed "genic" in the correct frame is required. When genes are correctly assigned, isolation of genic DNA for functional annotation can be carried out by PCR. However, not all genes are correctly assigned, and even when correctly assigned, gene products are often incorrectly folded when expressed in heterologous hosts. This is a problem that can sometimes be overcome by the expression of protein fragments encoding domains, rather than full-length proteins. One possible method to isolate DNA encoding such domains would to "filter" complex DNA (cDNA libraries, genomic and metagenomic DNA for gene fragments that confer a selectable phenotype relying on correct folding, with all such domains present in a complex DNA sample, termed the “domainome”. Results In this paper we discuss the preparation of diverse genic ORF libraries from randomly fragmented genomic DNA using ß-lactamase to filter out the open reading frames. By cloning DNA fragments between leader sequences and the mature ß-lactamase gene, colonies can be selected for resistance to ampicillin, conferred by correct folding of the lactamase gene. Our experiments demonstrate that the majority of surviving colonies contain genic open reading frames, suggesting that ß-lactamase is acting as a selectable folding reporter. Furthermore, different leaders (Sec, TAT and SRP, normally translocating different protein classes, filter different genic fragment subsets, indicating that their use increases the fraction of the “domainone” that is accessible. Conclusions The availability of ORF libraries, obtained with the filtering method described here, combined with screening methods such as phage display and protein-protein interaction studies, or with protein structure determination projects, can lead to the identification and structural determination of

  16. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archibald, A.L.; Bolund, L.; Churcher, C.; Fredholm, M.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Harlizius, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. Results - Assemblies of the B

  17. Generation of Physical Map Contig-Specific Sequences Useful for Whole Genome Sequence Scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanliang; Ninwichian, Parichart; Liu, Shikai; Zhang, Jiaren; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Sun, Fanyue; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2013-01-01

    Along with the rapid advances of the nextgen sequencing technologies, more and more species are added to the list of organisms whose whole genomes are sequenced. However, the assembled draft genome of many organisms consists of numerous small contigs, due to the short length of the reads generated by nextgen sequencing platforms. In order to improve the assembly and bring the genome contigs together, more genome resources are needed. In this study, we developed a strategy to generate a valuable genome resource, physical map contig-specific sequences, which are randomly distributed genome sequences in each physical contig. Two-dimensional tagging method was used to create specific tags for 1,824 physical contigs, in which the cost was dramatically reduced. A total of 94,111,841 100-bp reads and 315,277 assembled contigs are identified containing physical map contig-specific tags. The physical map contig-specific sequences along with the currently available BAC end sequences were then used to anchor the catfish draft genome contigs. A total of 156,457 genome contigs (~79% of whole genome sequencing assembly) were anchored and grouped into 1,824 pools, in which 16,680 unique genes were annotated. The physical map contig-specific sequences are valuable resources to link physical map, genetic linkage map and draft whole genome sequences, consequently have the capability to improve the whole genome sequences assembly and scaffolding, and improve the genome-wide comparative analysis as well. The strategy developed in this study could also be adopted in other species whose whole genome assembly is still facing a challenge. PMID:24205335

  18. Generation of physical map contig-specific sequences useful for whole genome sequence scaffolding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanliang Jiang

    Full Text Available Along with the rapid advances of the nextgen sequencing technologies, more and more species are added to the list of organisms whose whole genomes are sequenced. However, the assembled draft genome of many organisms consists of numerous small contigs, due to the short length of the reads generated by nextgen sequencing platforms. In order to improve the assembly and bring the genome contigs together, more genome resources are needed. In this study, we developed a strategy to generate a valuable genome resource, physical map contig-specific sequences, which are randomly distributed genome sequences in each physical contig. Two-dimensional tagging method was used to create specific tags for 1,824 physical contigs, in which the cost was dramatically reduced. A total of 94,111,841 100-bp reads and 315,277 assembled contigs are identified containing physical map contig-specific tags. The physical map contig-specific sequences along with the currently available BAC end sequences were then used to anchor the catfish draft genome contigs. A total of 156,457 genome contigs (~79% of whole genome sequencing assembly were anchored and grouped into 1,824 pools, in which 16,680 unique genes were annotated. The physical map contig-specific sequences are valuable resources to link physical map, genetic linkage map and draft whole genome sequences, consequently have the capability to improve the whole genome sequences assembly and scaffolding, and improve the genome-wide comparative analysis as well. The strategy developed in this study could also be adopted in other species whose whole genome assembly is still facing a challenge.

  19. VESPA: Software to Facilitate Genomic Annotation of Prokaryotic Organisms Through Integration of Proteomic and Transcriptomic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Elena S.; McCue, Lee Ann; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Walker, Julia; Kobold, Mark A.; Webb, Samantha R.; Payne, Samuel H.; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N.; Cannon, William R.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2012-04-25

    Visual Exploration and Statistics to Promote Annotation (VESPA) is an interactive visual analysis software tool that facilitates the discovery of structural mis-annotations in prokaryotic genomes. VESPA integrates high-throughput peptide-centric proteomics data and oligo-centric or RNA-Seq transcriptomics data into a genomic context. The data may be interrogated via visual analysis across multiple levels of genomic resolution, linked searches, exports and interaction with BLAST to rapidly identify location of interest within the genome and evaluate potential mis-annotations.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis OPF15T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, James G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Han, James [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lapidus, Alla [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Peters, Lin [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Walston Davenport, Karen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Detter, John C. [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Han, Cliff S. [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tapia, Roxanne [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Land, Miriam L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hauser, Loren [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kyrpides, Nikos C. [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Ivanova, Natalia N. [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Bruce, David [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Cottingham, Robert W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-04-11

    Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis OPF15T was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park and grows optimally at 83 oC. The OPF15T genome was finished at the Joint Genome Institute and the 1.6 Mb sequence has been annotated and deposited for future genomic studies aimed at understanding microbial processes and nutrient cycles in high-temperature environments.

  1. The complete genome sequence of the Arcobacter butzleri cattle isolate 7h1h

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcobacter butzleri strain 7h1h was isolated in the UK from a clinically healthy dairy cow. The genome of this isolate was sequenced to completion. Here we present the annotation and analysis of the completed 7h1h genome, as well as comparison of this genome to the existing A. butzleri RM4018 and ED...

  2. PeakAnalyzer: Genome-wide annotation of chromatin binding and modification loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammoja Kairi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional genomic studies involving high-throughput sequencing and tiling array applications, such as ChIP-seq and ChIP-chip, generate large numbers of experimentally-derived signal peaks across the genome under study. In analyzing these loci to determine their potential regulatory functions, areas of signal enrichment must be considered relative to proximal genes and regulatory elements annotated throughout the target genome Regions of chromatin association by transcriptional regulators should be distinguished as individual binding sites in order to enhance downstream analyses, such as the identification of known and novel consensus motifs. Results PeakAnalyzer is a set of high-performance utilities for the automated processing of experimentally-derived peak regions and annotation of genomic loci. The programs can accurately subdivide multimodal regions of signal enrichment into distinct subpeaks corresponding to binding sites or chromatin modifications, retrieve genomic sequences encompassing the computed subpeak summits, and identify positional features of interest such as intersection with exon/intron gene components, proximity to up- or downstream transcriptional start sites and cis-regulatory elements. The software can be configured to run either as a pipeline component for high-throughput analyses, or as a cross-platform desktop application with an intuitive user interface. Conclusions PeakAnalyzer comprises a number of utilities essential for ChIP-seq and ChIP-chip data analysis. High-performance implementations are provided for Unix pipeline integration along with a GUI version for interactive use. Source code in C++ and Java is provided, as are native binaries for Linux, Mac OS X and Windows systems.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae ALF3 Isolated from Alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, James; Dornbusch, Melinda R; Samac, Deborah; Studholme, David J

    2016-02-11

    We report here the annotated draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain ALF3, isolated in Wyoming. A comparison of this genome sequence with those of closely related strains of P. syringae adapted to other hosts will facilitate research into interactions between this pathogen and alfalfa.

  4. Genome Sequence of Pantoea sp. Strain Sc 1, an Opportunistic Cotton Pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Medrano, Enrique G.; Bell, Alois A.

    2012-01-01

    Pantoea is comprised of a broad spectrum of species, including plant pathogens. Here, we provide an annotated genome sequence of Pantoea sp. strain Sc 1, which was isolated from a diseased cotton boll. This research provides the first genome sequence of a bona fide Pantoea sp. insect-vectored cotton pathogen.

  5. Genome sequence of Pantoea sp. strain Sc 1, an opportunistic cotton pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Enrique G; Bell, Alois A

    2012-06-01

    Pantoea is comprised of a broad spectrum of species, including plant pathogens. Here, we provide an annotated genome sequence of Pantoea sp. strain Sc 1, which was isolated from a diseased cotton boll. This research provides the first genome sequence of a bona fide Pantoea sp. insect-vectored cotton pathogen.

  6. Partitioning SNPs Identified By GBS into Genome Annotation Classes and Calculating SNP-Explained Variances for Heading Date and Disease Resistance from the Resulting Genomic Relationship Matrices - Lolium perenne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Stephen; Cericola, Fabio; Janss, Luc;

    2015-01-01

    , and an average protein Annotation Edit Distance (AED) of 0.14. Genotyping-By-Sequencing (GBS) data was generated after genome complexity reduction with ApeKI for 995 breeding families. Data was aligned against the annotated sequence assembly, and we identified variants at over 1.8 million positions, which were......,273 SNPs), genes with NB-ARC domains (9,056 SNPs), intron (168,023 SNPs), and inter-genic (1,420,866 SNPs). Genomic relationship matrices were created for each annotation class and SNP-explained variances for heading date and disease resistance were calculated...

  7. Detecting overlapping coding sequences in virus genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Chris M

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting new coding sequences (CDSs in viral genomes can be difficult for several reasons. The typically compact genomes often contain a number of overlapping coding and non-coding functional elements, which can result in unusual patterns of codon usage; conservation between related sequences can be difficult to interpret – especially within overlapping genes; and viruses often employ non-canonical translational mechanisms – e.g. frameshifting, stop codon read-through, leaky-scanning and internal ribosome entry sites – which can conceal potentially coding open reading frames (ORFs. Results In a previous paper we introduced a new statistic – MLOGD (Maximum Likelihood Overlapping Gene Detector – for detecting and analysing overlapping CDSs. Here we present (a an improved MLOGD statistic, (b a greatly extended suite of software using MLOGD, (c a database of results for 640 virus sequence alignments, and (d a web-interface to the software and database. Tests show that, from an alignment with just 20 mutations, MLOGD can discriminate non-overlapping CDSs from non-coding ORFs with a typical accuracy of up to 98%, and can detect CDSs overlapping known CDSs with a typical accuracy of 90%. In addition, the software produces a variety of statistics and graphics, useful for analysing an input multiple sequence alignment. Conclusion MLOGD is an easy-to-use tool for virus genome annotation, detecting new CDSs – in particular overlapping or short CDSs – and for analysing overlapping CDSs following frameshift sites. The software, web-server, database and supplementary material are available at http://guinevere.otago.ac.nz/mlogd.html.

  8. New local potential useful for genome annotation and 3D modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Cohen, Fred E.

    2003-07-17

    A new potential energy function representing the conformational preferences of sequentially local regions of a protein backbone is presented. This potential is derived from secondary structure probabilities such as those produced by neural network-based prediction methods. The potential is applied to the problem of remote homolog identification, in combination with a distance dependent inter-residue potential and position-based scoring matrices. This fold recognition jury is implemented in a Java application called JThread. These methods are benchmarked on several test sets, including one released entirely after development and parameterization of JThread. In benchmark tests to identify known folds structurally similar (but not identical) to the native structure of a sequence, JThread performs significantly better than PSI-BLAST, with 10 percent more structures correctly identified as the most likely structural match in a fold library, and 20 percent more structures correctly narrowed down to a set of five possible candidates. JThread also significantly improves the average sequence alignment accuracy, from 53 percent to 62 percent of residues correctly aligned. Reliable fold assignments and alignments are identified, making the method useful for genome annotation. JThread is applied to predicted open reading frames (ORFs) from the genomes of Mycoplasma genitalium and Drosophila melanogaster, identifying 20 new structural annotations in the former and 801 in the latter.

  9. Synergistic use of plant-prokaryote comparative genomics for functional annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waller Jeffrey C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying functions for all gene products in all sequenced organisms is a central challenge of the post-genomic era. However, at least 30-50% of the proteins encoded by any given genome are of unknown or vaguely known function, and a large number are wrongly annotated. Many of these ‘unknown’ proteins are common to prokaryotes and plants. We set out to predict and experimentally test the functions of such proteins. Our approach to functional prediction integrates comparative genomics based mainly on microbial genomes with functional genomic data from model microorganisms and post-genomic data from plants. This approach bridges the gap between automated homology-based annotations and the classical gene discovery efforts of experimentalists, and is more powerful than purely computational approaches to identifying gene-function associations. Results Among Arabidopsis genes, we focused on those (2,325 in total that (i are unique or belong to families with no more than three members, (ii occur in prokaryotes, and (iii have unknown or poorly known functions. Computer-assisted selection of promising targets for deeper analysis was based on homology-independent characteristics associated in the SEED database with the prokaryotic members of each family. In-depth comparative genomic analysis was performed for 360 top candidate families. From this pool, 78 families were connected to general areas of metabolism and, of these families, specific functional predictions were made for 41. Twenty-one predicted functions have been experimentally tested or are currently under investigation by our group in at least one prokaryotic organism (nine of them have been validated, four invalidated, and eight are in progress. Ten additional predictions have been independently validated by other groups. Discovering the function of very widespread but hitherto enigmatic proteins such as the YrdC or YgfZ families illustrates the power of our approach

  10. Generation, functional annotation and comparative analysis of black spruce (Picea mariana) ESTs: an important conifer genomic resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ishminder K; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Rajora, Om P

    2013-10-11

    EST (expressed sequence tag) sequences and their annotation provide a highly valuable resource for gene discovery, genome sequence annotation, and other genomics studies that can be applied in genetics, breeding and conservation programs for non-model organisms. Conifers are long-lived plants that are ecologically and economically important globally, and have a large genome size. Black spruce (Picea mariana), is a transcontinental species of the North American boreal and temperate forests. However, there are limited transcriptomic and genomic resources for this species. The primary objective of our study was to develop a black spruce transcriptomic resource to facilitate on-going functional genomics projects related to growth and adaptation to climate change. We conducted bidirectional sequencing of cDNA clones from a standard cDNA library constructed from black spruce needle tissues. We obtained 4,594 high quality (2,455 5' end and 2,139 3' end) sequence reads, with an average read-length of 532 bp. Clustering and assembly of ESTs resulted in 2,731 unique sequences, consisting of 2,234 singletons and 497 contigs. Approximately two-thirds (63%) of unique sequences were functionally annotated. Genes involved in 36 molecular functions and 90 biological processes were discovered, including 24 putative transcription factors and 232 genes involved in photosynthesis. Most abundantly expressed transcripts were associated with photosynthesis, growth factors, stress and disease response, and transcription factors. A total of 216 full-length genes were identified. About 18% (493) of the transcripts were novel, representing an important addition to the Genbank EST database (dbEST). Fifty-seven di-, tri-, tetra- and penta-nucleotide simple sequence repeats were identified. We have developed the first high quality EST resource for black spruce and identified 493 novel transcripts, which may be species-specific related to life history and ecological traits. We have also

  11. Complete genome sequence of "Thioalkalivibrio sulfidophilus" HL-EbGr7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyzer, Gerard; Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Lapidus, Alla; Clum, Alicia; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; d'Haeseleer, Patrick; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-02-14

    "Thioalkalivibrio sulfidophilus" HL-EbGr7 is an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB) belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria. The strain was found to predominate a full-scale bioreactor, removing sulfide from biogas. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain HL-EbGr7 and its annotation. The genome was sequenced within the Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program, because of its relevance to the sustainable removal of sulfide from bio- and industrial waste gases.

  12. Comparative genomic analysis of the family Iridoviridae: re-annotating and defining the core set of iridovirus genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upton Chris

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the family Iridoviridae can cause severe diseases resulting in significant economic and environmental losses. Very little is known about how iridoviruses cause disease in their host. In the present study, we describe the re-analysis of the Iridoviridae family of complex DNA viruses using a variety of comparative genomic tools to yield a greater consensus among the annotated sequences of its members. Results A series of genomic sequence comparisons were made among, and between the Ranavirus and Megalocytivirus genera in order to identify novel conserved ORFs. Of these two genera, the Megalocytivirus genomes required the greatest number of altered annotations. Prior to our re-analysis, the Megalocytivirus species orange-spotted grouper iridovirus and rock bream iridovirus shared 99% sequence identity, but only 82 out of 118 potential ORFs were annotated; in contrast, we predict that these species share an identical complement of genes. These annotation changes allowed the redefinition of the group of core genes shared by all iridoviruses. Seven new core genes were identified, bringing the total number to 26. Conclusion Our re-analysis of genomes within the Iridoviridae family provides a unifying framework to understand the biology of these viruses. Further re-defining the core set of iridovirus genes will continue to lead us to a better understanding of the phylogenetic relationships between individual iridoviruses as well as giving us a much deeper understanding of iridovirus replication. In addition, this analysis will provide a better framework for characterizing and annotating currently unclassified iridoviruses.

  13. Blobology: exploring raw genome data for contaminants, symbionts and parasites using taxon-annotated GC-coverage plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujai eKumar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Generating the raw data for a de novo genome assembly project for a target eukaryotic species is relatively easy. This democratisation of access to large-scale data has allowed many research teams to plan to assemble the genomes of non-model organisms. These new genome targets are very different from the traditional, inbred, laboratory reared model organisms. They are often small, and cannot be isolated free of their environment - whether ingested food, the surrounding host organism of parasites, or commensal and symbiotic organisms attached to or within the individuals sampled. Preparation of pure DNA originating from a single species can be technically impossible, but assembly of mixed-organism DNA can be difficult, as most genome assemblers perform poorly when faced with multiple genomes in different stoichiometries. This class of problem is common in metagenomic datasets that deliberately try to capture all the genomes present in an environment, but replicon assembly is not often the goal of such programmes. Here we present an approach to extracting from mixed DNA sequence data subsets that correspond to single species' genomes and thus improving genome assembly. We use both numerical (proportion of GC bases and read coverage and biological (best-matching sequence in annotated databases indicators to aid partitioning of draft assembly contigs, and the reads that contribute to those contigs, into distinct bins that can then be subjected to rigorous, optimised assembly, through the use of taxon-annotated GC-coverage plots (TAGC plots. We also present Blobsplorer, a tool that aids exploration and selection of subsets from TAGC annotated data. Partitioning the data in this way can rescue poorly assembled genomes, and reveal unexpected symbionts and commensals in eukaryotic genome projects. The TAGC plot pipeline script is available from http://github.com/blaxterlab/blobology, and the Blobsplorer tool from https://github.com/mojones/Blobsplorer.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Shewanella putrefaciens. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidelberg, John F.

    2001-04-01

    Seventy percent of the costs for genome sequencing Shewanella putrefaciens (oneidensis) were requested. These funds were expected to allow completion of the low-pass (5-fold) random sequencing and complete closure and annotation of the 200 kbp plasmid. Because of cost reduction that occurred during the period of this grant, these goals have been far exceeded. Currently, the S. putrefaciens genome is very nearly completely closed, even though the genome was significantly larger than expected and extremely repetitive. The entire genome sequence has been made BLAST searchable on the TIGR web page, and an extensive effort has been made to make data and analyses available to all researchers working on S. putrefaciens (oneidensis).

  15. Proteomics-based confirmation of protein expression and correction of annotation errors in the Brucella abortus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaki Fadi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis is a major bacterial zoonosis affecting domestic livestock and wild mammals, as well as humans around the globe. While conducting proteomics studies to better understand Brucella abortus virulence, we consolidated the proteomic data collected and compared it to publically available genomic data. Results The proteomic data was compiled from several independent comparative studies of Brucella abortus that used either outer membrane blebs, cytosols, or whole bacteria grown in media, as well as intracellular bacteria recovered at different times following macrophage infection. We identified a total of 621 bacterial proteins that were differentially expressed in a condition-specific manner. For 305 of these proteins we provide the first experimental evidence of their expression. Using a custom-built protein sequence database, we uncovered 7 annotation errors. We provide experimental evidence of expression of 5 genes that were originally annotated as non-expressed pseudogenes, as well as start site annotation errors for 2 other genes. Conclusions An essential element for ensuring correct functional studies is the correspondence between reported genome sequences and subsequent proteomics studies. In this study, we have used proteomics evidence to confirm expression of multiple proteins previously considered to be putative, as well as correct annotation errors in the genome of Brucella abortus strain 2308.

  16. Use of Modern Chemical Protein Synthesis and Advanced Fluorescent Assay Techniques to Experimentally Validate the Functional Annotation of Microbial Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent, Stephen [University of Chicago

    2012-07-20

    The objective of this research program was to prototype methods for the chemical synthesis of predicted protein molecules in annotated microbial genomes. High throughput chemical methods were to be used to make large numbers of predicted proteins and protein domains, based on microbial genome sequences. Microscale chemical synthesis methods for the parallel preparation of peptide-thioester building blocks were developed; these peptide segments are used for the parallel chemical synthesis of proteins and protein domains. Ultimately, it is envisaged that these synthetic molecules would be ‘printed’ in spatially addressable arrays. The unique ability of total synthesis to precision label protein molecules with dyes and with chemical or biochemical ‘tags’ can be used to facilitate novel assay technologies adapted from state-of-the art single molecule fluorescence detection techniques. In the future, in conjunction with modern laboratory automation this integrated set of techniques will enable high throughput experimental validation of the functional annotation of microbial genomes.

  17. Sequence and comparative analysis of the chicken genome provide unique perspectives on vertebrate evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hillier, LaDeana W.; Miller, Webb; Birney, Ewan; Warren, Wesley; Hardison, Ross C.; Chris P Ponting; Bork, Peer; Burt, Peer; Martien A M Groenen; Delany, Mary E.; Dodgson, Jerry B; Chinwalla, Asif; Cliften, Paul F; Sandra W Clifton; Delehaunty, Kimberly D

    2004-01-01

    We present here a draft genome sequence of the red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus. Because the chicken is a modern descendant of the dinosaurs and the first non-mammalian amniote to have its genome sequenced, the draft sequence of its genome--composed of approximately one billion base pairs of sequence and an estimated 20,000-23,000 genes--provides a new perspective on vertebrate genome evolution, while also improving the annotation of mammalian genomes. For example, the evolutionary distance bet...

  18. Genomic variant annotation workflow for clinical applications [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Thurnherr

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Annotation and interpretation of DNA aberrations identified through next-generation sequencing is becoming an increasingly important task. Even more so in the context of data analysis pipelines for medical applications, where genomic aberrations are associated with phenotypic and clinical features. Here we describe a workflow to identify potential gene targets in aberrated genes or pathways and their corresponding drugs. To this end, we provide the R/Bioconductor package rDGIdb, an R wrapper to query the drug-gene interaction database (DGIdb. DGIdb accumulates drug-gene interaction data from 15 different resources and allows filtering on different levels. The rDGIdb package makes these resources and tools available to R users. Moreover, rDGIdb queries can be automated through incorporation of the rDGIdb package into NGS sequencing pipelines.

  19. Emerging applications of read profiles towards the functional annotation of the genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pundhir, Sachin; Poirazi, Panayiota; Gorodkin, Jan

    2015-01-01

    to the research question addressed. Several strategies have been employed at varying levels of abstraction ranging from a somewhat ad hoc to a more systematic analysis of read profiles. These include methods which can compare read profiles, e.g., from direct (non-sequence based) alignments to classification...... is typically a result of the protocol designed to address specific research questions. The sequencing results in reads, which when mapped to a reference genome often leads to the formation of distinct patterns (read profiles). Interpretation of these read profiles is essential for their analysis in relation...... of patterns into functional groups. In this review, we highlight the emerging applications of read profiles for the annotation of non-coding RNA and cis-regulatory elements (CREs) such as enhancers and promoters. We also discuss the biological rationale behind their formation....

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Sporidiobolus salmonicolor CBS 6832, a Red-Pigmented Basidiomycetous Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Marco A; Almeida, João M G C F; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gonçalves, Paula

    2015-05-21

    We report the genome sequencing and annotation of the basidiomycetous red-pigmented yeast Sporidiobolus salmonicolor strain CBS 6832. The current assembly contains 395 scaffolds, for a total size of about 20.5 Mb and a G+C content of ~61.3%. The genome annotation predicts 5,147 putative protein-coding genes. Copyright © 2015 Coelho et al.

  1. EST-PAC a web package for EST annotation and protein sequence prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strahm Yvan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the decreasing cost of DNA sequencing technology and the vast diversity of biological resources, researchers increasingly face the basic challenge of annotating a larger number of expressed sequences tags (EST from a variety of species. This typically consists of a series of repetitive tasks, which should be automated and easy to use. The results of these annotation tasks need to be stored and organized in a consistent way. All these operations should be self-installing, platform independent, easy to customize and amenable to using distributed bioinformatics resources available on the Internet. In order to address these issues, we present EST-PAC a web oriented multi-platform software package for expressed sequences tag (EST annotation. EST-PAC provides a solution for the administration of EST and protein sequence annotations accessible through a web interface. Three aspects of EST annotation are automated: 1 searching local or remote biological databases for sequence similarities using Blast services, 2 predicting protein coding sequence from EST data and, 3 annotating predicted protein sequences with functional domain predictions. In practice, EST-PAC integrates the BLASTALL suite, EST-Scan2 and HMMER in a relational database system accessible through a simple web interface. EST-PAC also takes advantage of the relational database to allow consistent storage, powerful queries of results and, management of the annotation process. The system allows users to customize annotation strategies and provides an open-source data-management environment for research and education in bioinformatics.

  2. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Alan L.; Bolund, Lars; Churcher, Carol;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. RESULTS: Assemblies......) is under construction and will incorporate whole genome shotgun sequence (WGS) data providing > 30x genome coverage. The WGS sequence, most of which comprise short Illumina/Solexa reads, were generated from DNA from the same single Duroc sow as the source of the BAC library from which clones were...

  3. A kingdom-specific protein domain HMM library for improved annotation of fungal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Stephen G

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pfam is a general-purpose database of protein domain alignments and profile Hidden Markov Models (HMMs, which is very popular for the annotation of sequence data produced by genome sequencing projects. Pfam provides models that are often very general in terms of the taxa that they cover and it has previously been suggested that such general models may lack some of the specificity or selectivity that would be provided by kingdom-specific models. Results Here we present a general approach to create domain libraries of HMMs for sub-taxa of a kingdom. Taking fungal species as an example, we construct a domain library of HMMs (called Fungal Pfam or FPfam using sequences from 30 genomes, consisting of 24 species from the ascomycetes group and two basidiomycetes, Ustilago maydis, a fungal pathogen of maize, and the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. In addition, we include the Microsporidion Encephalitozoon cuniculi, an obligate intracellular parasite, and two non-fungal species, the oomycetes Phytophthora sojae and Phytophthora ramorum, both plant pathogens. We evaluate the performance in terms of coverage against the original 30 genomes used in training FPfam and against five more recently sequenced fungal genomes that can be considered as an independent test set. We show that kingdom-specific models such as FPfam can find instances of both novel and well characterized domains, increases overall coverage and detects more domains per sequence with typically higher bitscores than Pfam for the same domain families. An evaluation of the effect of changing E-values on the coverage shows that the performance of FPfam is consistent over the range of E-values applied. Conclusion Kingdom-specific models are shown to provide improved coverage. However, as the models become more specific, some sequences found by Pfam may be missed by the models in FPfam and some of the families represented in the test set are not present in FPfam

  4. Resequencing of the common marmoset genome improves genome assemblies and gene-coding sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kengo; Kuroki, Yoko; Kumita, Wakako; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kawai, Jun; Iriki, Atsushi; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-11-20

    The first draft of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) genome was published by the Marmoset Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium. The draft was based on whole-genome shotgun sequencing, and the current assembly version is Callithrix_jacches-3.2.1, but there still exist 187,214 undetermined gap regions and supercontigs and relatively short contigs that are unmapped to chromosomes in the draft genome. We performed resequencing and assembly of the genome of common marmoset by deep sequencing with high-throughput sequencing technology. Several different sequence runs using Illumina sequencing platforms were executed, and 181 Gbp of high-quality bases including mate-pairs with long insert lengths of 3, 8, 20, and 40 Kbp were obtained, that is, approximately 60× coverage. The resequencing significantly improved the MGSAC draft genome sequence. The N50 of the contigs, which is a statistical measure used to evaluate assembly quality, doubled. As a result, 51% of the contigs (total length: 299 Mbp) that were unmapped to chromosomes in the MGSAC draft were merged with chromosomal contigs, and the improved genome sequence helped to detect 5,288 new genes that are homologous to human cDNAs and the gaps in 5,187 transcripts of the Ensembl gene annotations were completely filled.

  5. Insights from the genome annotation of Elizabethkingia anophelis from the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phanidhar Kukutla

    Full Text Available Elizabethkingia anophelis is a dominant bacterial species in the gut ecosystem of the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae. We recently sequenced the genomes of two strains of E. anophelis, R26T and Ag1, isolated from different strains of A. gambiae. The two bacterial strains are identical with a few exceptions. Phylogenetically, Elizabethkingia is closer to Chryseobacterium and Riemerella than to Flavobacterium. In line with other Bacteroidetes known to utilize various polymers in their ecological niches, the E. anophelis genome contains numerous TonB dependent transporters with various substrate specificities. In addition, several genes belonging to the polysaccharide utilization system and the glycoside hydrolase family were identified that could potentially be of benefit for the mosquito carbohydrate metabolism. In agreement with previous reports of broad antibiotic resistance in E. anophelis, a large number of genes encoding efflux pumps and β-lactamases are present in the genome. The component genes of resistance-nodulation-division type efflux pumps were found to be syntenic and conserved in different taxa of Bacteroidetes. The bacterium also displays hemolytic activity and encodes several hemolysins that may participate in the digestion of erythrocytes in the mosquito gut. At the same time, the OxyR regulon and antioxidant genes could provide defense against the oxidative stress that is associated with blood digestion. The genome annotation and comparative genomic analysis revealed functional characteristics associated with the symbiotic relationship with the mosquito host.

  6. Whole-genome sequence of the first sequence type 27 Brucella ceti strain isolated from European waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvnjak, Sanja; Spicic, Silvio; Kusar, Darja

    2017-01-01

    Brucella spp. that cause marine brucellosis are becoming more important, as the disease appears to be more widespread than originally thought. Here, we report a whole and annotated genome sequence of Brucella ceti CRO350, a sequence type 27 strain isolated from a bottlenose dolphin carcass found...

  7. Identification of new genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti using the Genome Sequencer FLX system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Roderick V

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sinorhizobium meliloti is an agriculturally important model symbiont. There is an ongoing need to update and improve its genome annotation. In this study, we used a high-throughput pyrosequencing approach to sequence the transcriptome of S. meliloti, and search for new bacterial genes missed in the previous genome annotation. This is the first report of sequencing a bacterial transcriptome using the pyrosequencing technology. Results Our pilot sequencing run generated 19,005 reads with an average length of 136 nucleotides per read. From these data, we identified 20 new genes. These new gene transcripts were confirmed by RT-PCR and their possible functions were analyzed. Conclusion Our results indicate that high-throughput sequence analysis of bacterial transcriptomes is feasible and next-generation sequencing technologies will greatly facilitate the discovery of new genes and improve genome annotation.

  8. Genome Sequences of Eight Morphologically Diverse Alphaproteobacteria▿

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Pamela J.B.; Kysela, David T.; Buechlein, Aaron; Hemmerich, Chris; Brun, Yves V

    2011-01-01

    The Alphaproteobacteriacomprise morphologically diverse bacteria, including many species of stalked bacteria. Here we announce the genome sequences of eight alphaproteobacteria, including the first genome sequences of species belonging to the genera Asticcacaulis, Hirschia, Hyphomicrobium, and Rhodomicrobium.

  9. Genome sequences of eight morphologically diverse Alphaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Buechlein, Aaron; Hemmerich, Chris; Brun, Yves V

    2011-09-01

    The Alphaproteobacteria comprise morphologically diverse bacteria, including many species of stalked bacteria. Here we announce the genome sequences of eight alphaproteobacteria, including the first genome sequences of species belonging to the genera Asticcacaulis, Hirschia, Hyphomicrobium, and Rhodomicrobium.

  10. Genome Sequences of Eight Morphologically Diverse Alphaproteobacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Pamela J. B.; Kysela, David T.; Buechlein, Aaron; Hemmerich, Chris; Brun, Yves V.

    2011-01-01

    The Alphaproteobacteriacomprise morphologically diverse bacteria, including many species of stalked bacteria. Here we announce the genome sequences of eight alphaproteobacteria, including the first genome sequences of species belonging to the genera Asticcacaulis, Hirschia, Hyphomicrobium, and Rhodomicrobium. PMID:21705585

  11. Draft genome sequence of the silver pomfret fish, Pampus argenteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMomin, Sabah; Kumar, Vinod; Al-Amad, Sami; Al-Hussaini, Mohsen; Dashti, Talal; Al-Enezi, Khaznah; Akbar, Abrar

    2016-01-01

    Silver pomfret, Pampus argenteus, is a fish species from coastal waters. Despite its high commercial value, this edible fish has not been sequenced. Hence, its genetic and genomic studies have been limited. We report the first draft genome sequence of the silver pomfret obtained using a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology. We assembled 38.7 Gb of nucleotides into scaffolds of 350 Mb with N50 of about 1.5 kb, using high quality paired end reads. These scaffolds represent 63.7% of the estimated silver pomfret genome length. The newly sequenced and assembled genome has 11.06% repetitive DNA regions, and this percentage is comparable to that of the tilapia genome. The genome analysis predicted 16 322 genes. About 91% of these genes showed homology with known proteins. Many gene clusters were annotated to protein and fatty-acid metabolism pathways that may be important in the context of the meat texture and immune system developmental processes. The reference genome can pave the way for the identification of many other genomic features that could improve breeding and population-management strategies, and it can also help characterize the genetic diversity of P. argenteus.

  12. Genome Sequence of Mycobacteriophage Momo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Welkin H; Bina, Elizabeth A; Brahme, Indraneel S; Hill, Amy B; Himmelstein, Philip H; Hunsicker, Sara M; Ish, Amanda R; Le, Tinh S; Martin, Mary M; Moscinski, Catherine N; Shetty, Sameer A; Swierzewski, Tomasz; Iyengar, Varun B; Kim, Hannah; Schafer, Claire E; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Bowman, Charles A; Russell, Daniel A; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-06-18

    Momo is a newly discovered phage of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155. Momo has a double-stranded DNA genome 154,553 bp in length, with 233 predicted protein-encoding genes, 34 tRNA genes, and one transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) gene. Momo has a myoviral morphology and shares extensive nucleotide sequence similarity with subcluster C1 mycobacteriophages. Copyright © 2015 Pope et al.

  13. GAMOLA2, a Comprehensive Software Package for the Annotation and Curation of Draft and Complete Microbial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altermann, Eric; Lu, Jingli; McCulloch, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Expert curated annotation remains one of the critical steps in achieving a reliable biological relevant annotation. Here we announce the release of GAMOLA2, a user friendly and comprehensive software package to process, annotate and curate draft and complete bacterial, archaeal, and viral genomes. GAMOLA2 represents a wrapping tool to combine gene model determination, functional Blast, COG, Pfam, and TIGRfam analyses with structural predictions including detection of tRNAs, rRNA genes, non-coding RNAs, signal protein cleavage sites, transmembrane helices, CRISPR repeats and vector sequence contaminations. GAMOLA2 has already been validated in a wide range of bacterial and archaeal genomes, and its modular concept allows easy addition of further functionality in future releases. A modified and adapted version of the Artemis Genome Viewer (Sanger Institute) has been developed to leverage the additional features and underlying information provided by the GAMOLA2 analysis, and is part of the software distribution. In addition to genome annotations, GAMOLA2 features, among others, supplemental modules that assist in the creation of custom Blast databases, annotation transfers between genome versions, and the preparation of Genbank files for submission via the NCBI Sequin tool. GAMOLA2 is intended to be run under a Linux environment, whereas the subsequent visualization and manual curation in Artemis is mobile and platform independent. The development of GAMOLA2 is ongoing and community driven. New functionality can easily be added upon user requests, ensuring that GAMOLA2 provides information relevant to microbiologists. The software is available free of charge for academic use.

  14. 家蚕黑胸败血芽孢杆菌基因组测序及结构分析和功能注释%Genome Sequencing, Structural Analysis and Functional Annotations of Bacillus bombysepticus from the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程廷才; 林平; 金盛凯; 付博华; 龙仁文; 夏庆友

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus bombyseptieus is one of the common bacterial pathogens causing bacterial black thorax septicemia in silkworm (Bombyx mori).In this paper,sequence features as well as structural and functional annotations of B.bombyseptieus genome were focused based on sequencing and assembly of B.bombyseptieus genomic sequences.We generated 2.1 Gb of raw data from sequencing,with a coverage of more than 360-fold to the genome,and assembled them into a 5.87 Mb genome of B.bombyseptieus,including two replicons,one of nuclear genome (5 295.783 kb) and one of plasmid genome (577.809 kb).Percentage of repeat sequences accounts for 1.179 2% in the nuclear genome,which contains 136 non-coding RNAs and 5 298 predicted protein-coding genes.The functional annotation of B.bombyseptieus genome using KEGG and COG databases showed that most genes are involved in transportation,amino acid metabolism and carbohydrate metabolism.Genomic syntenic analysis indicated that B.bombyseptieus is closely related to bacteria of Bacillus genus.These results will help find the key virulence factor of B.bombyseptieus and facilitate the understanding of its infection mechanism and interaction with host.%黑胸败血芽孢杆菌(Bacillus bombyseptieus)是家蚕细菌性败血病的常见病原之一.在获得黑胸败血芽孢杆菌基因组完成图的基础上,对该菌株的基因组测序、基因组序列结构特征以及基因功能注释等信息进行分析.该菌株的基因组测序数据量达到2.1 Gb,基因组覆盖度超过360倍,基因组组装大小为5.87 Mb,包含2个复制子——1个核基因组(5 295.783 kb)和1个质粒基因组(577.809kb);基因组重复序列比率为1.179 2%,包含136个非编码RNA和5 298个编码基因.测序得到的基因组数据通过KEGG和COG数据库进行功能注释,主要与物质转运、氨基酸代谢、碳水化合物代谢等相关.基因组共线性分析表明黑胸败血芽孢杆菌与芽孢杆菌属细菌的亲缘关系较近.该研

  15. Manual annotation and analysis of the defensin gene cluster in the C57BL/6J mouse reference genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougan Gordon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host defense peptides are a critical component of the innate immune system. Human alpha- and beta-defensin genes are subject to copy number variation (CNV and historically the organization of mouse alpha-defensin genes has been poorly defined. Here we present the first full manual genomic annotation of the mouse defensin region on Chromosome 8 of the reference strain C57BL/6J, and the analysis of the orthologous regions of the human and rat genomes. Problems were identified with the reference assemblies of all three genomes. Defensins have been studied for over two decades and their naming has become a critical issue due to incorrect identification of defensin genes derived from different mouse strains and the duplicated nature of this region. Results The defensin gene cluster region on mouse Chromosome 8 A2 contains 98 gene loci: 53 are likely active defensin genes and 22 defensin pseudogenes. Several TATA box motifs were found for human and mouse defensin genes that likely impact gene expression. Three novel defensin genes belonging to the Cryptdin Related Sequences (CRS family were identified. All additional mouse defensin loci on Chromosomes 1, 2 and 14 were annotated and unusual splice variants identified. Comparison of the mouse alpha-defensins in the three main mouse reference gene sets Ensembl, Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI, and NCBI RefSeq reveals significant inconsistencies in annotation and nomenclature. We are collaborating with the Mouse Genome Nomenclature Committee (MGNC to establish a standardized naming scheme for alpha-defensins. Conclusions Prior to this analysis, there was no reliable reference gene set available for the mouse strain C57BL/6J defensin genes, demonstrating that manual intervention is still critical for the annotation of complex gene families and heavily duplicated regions. Accurate gene annotation is facilitated by the annotation of pseudogenes and regulatory elements. Manually curated gene

  16. Complete genome sequence of Nakamurella multipartita type strain (Y-104).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Hope; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Sims, David; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Detter, John C; Brettin, Thomas; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-03-30

    Nakamurella multipartita (Yoshimi et al. 1996) Tao et al. 2004 is the type species of the monospecific genus Nakamurella in the actinobacterial suborder Frankineae. The nonmotile, coccus-shaped strain was isolated from activated sludge acclimated with sugar-containing synthetic wastewater, and is capable of accumulating large amounts of polysaccharides in its cells. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Nakamurellaceae. The 6,060,298 bp long single replicon genome with its 5415 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans type strain (5575T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Schroder, Maren [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Gleim, Dorothea [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2009-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans Widdel and Pfennig 1977 was one of the first sulfate-reducing bacteria known to grow with acetate as sole energy and carbon source. It is able to oxidize substrates completely to carbon dioxide with sulfate as the electron acceptor, which is reduced to hydrogen sulfide. All available data about this species are based on strain 5575T, isolated from piggery waste in Germany. Here we describe the features of this organ-ism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a Desulfotomaculum species with validly published name. The 4,545,624 bp long single replicon genome with its 4370 protein-coding and 100 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Arcobacter nitrofigilis type strain (CIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2010-01-01

    Arcobacter nitrofigilis (McClung et al. 1983) Vandamme et al. 1991 is the type species of the genus Arcobacter in the epsilonproteobacterial family Campylobacteraceae. The species was first described in 1983 as Campylobacter nitrofigilis [1] after its detection as a free-living, nitrogen-fixing Campylobacter species associated with Spartina alterniflora Loisel. roots [2]. It is of phylogenetic interest because of its lifestyle as a symbiotic organism in a marine environment in contrast to many other Arcobacter species which are associated with warm-blooded animals and tend to be pathogenic. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a type stain of the genus Arcobacter. The 3,192,235 bp genome with its 3,154 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Halorhabdus utahensis type strain (AX-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain; Tindall, Brian J; Pomrenke, Helga; Göker, Markus; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-11-22

    Halorhabdus utahensis Wainø et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus, which is of phylogenetic interest because of its location on one of the deepest branches within the very extensive euryarchaeal family Halobacteriaceae. H. utahensis is a free-living, motile, rod shaped to pleomorphic, Gram-negative archaeon, which was originally isolated from a sediment sample collected from the southern arm of Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA. When grown on appropriate media, H. utahensis can form polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the a member of halobacterial genus Halorhabdus, and the 3,116,795 bp long single replicon genome with its 3027 protein-coding and 48 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clum, Alicia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lang, Elke [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the ge-nus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobia-ceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome se-quence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomi-crobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Genomic organization, annotation, and ligand-receptor inferences of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptor genes based on comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in host defense, organogenesis, hematopoiesis, and neuronal communication. Forty-two chemokines and 19 cognate receptors have been found in the human genome. Prior to this report, only 11 chicken chemokines and 7 receptors had been reported. The objectives of this study were to systematically identify chicken chemokines and their cognate receptor genes in the chicken genome and to annotate these genes and ligand-receptor binding by a comparative genomics approach. Results Twenty-three chemokine and 14 chemokine receptor genes were identified in the chicken genome. All of the chicken chemokines contained a conserved CC, CXC, CX3C, or XC motif, whereas all the chemokine receptors had seven conserved transmembrane helices, four extracellular domains with a conserved cysteine, and a conserved DRYLAIV sequence in the second intracellular domain. The number of coding exons in these genes and the syntenies are highly conserved between human, mouse, and chicken although the amino acid sequence homologies are generally low between mammalian and chicken chemokines. Chicken genes were named with the systematic nomenclature used in humans and mice based on phylogeny, synteny, and sequence homology. Conclusion The independent nomenclature of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptors suggests that the chicken may have ligand-receptor pairings similar to mammals. All identified chicken chemokines and their cognate receptors were identified in the chicken genome except CCR9, whose ligand was not identified in this study. The organization of these genes suggests that there were a substantial number of these genes present before divergence between aves and mammals and more gene duplications of CC, CXC, CCR, and CXCR subfamilies in mammals than in aves after the divergence.

  2. Genome sequence and genetic diversity of European ash trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollars, Elizabeth S A; Harper, Andrea L; Kelly, Laura J;

    2016-01-01

    Ash trees (genus Fraxinus, family Oleaceae) are widespread throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but are being devastated in Europe by the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, causing ash dieback, and in North America by the herbivorous beetle Agrilus planipennis. Here we sequence the genome of a low......-heterozygosity Fraxinus excelsior tree from Gloucestershire, UK, annotating 38,852 protein-coding genes of which 25% appear ash specific when compared with the genomes of ten other plant species. Analyses of paralogous genes suggest a whole-genome duplication shared with olive (Olea europaea, Oleaceae). We also re......-sequence 37 F. excelsior trees from Europe, finding evidence for apparent long-term decline in effective population size. Using our reference sequence, we re-analyse association transcriptomic data, yielding improved markers for reduced susceptibility to ash dieback. Surveys of these markers in British...

  3. Annotation of Two Large Contiguous Regions from the Haemonchus contortus Genome Using RNA-seq and Comparative Analysis with Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Roz; Hunt, Martin; Protasio, Anna V.; Saunders, Gary; Mungall, Karen; Laing, Steven; Jackson, Frank; Quail, Michael; Beech, Robin; Berriman, Matthew; Gilleard, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of numerous parasitic nematodes are currently being sequenced, but their complexity and size, together with high levels of intra-specific sequence variation and a lack of reference genomes, makes their assembly and annotation a challenging task. Haemonchus contortus is an economically significant parasite of livestock that is widely used for basic research as well as for vaccine development and drug discovery. It is one of many medically and economically important parasites within the strongylid nematode group. This group of parasites has the closest phylogenetic relationship with the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, making comparative analysis a potentially powerful tool for genome annotation and functional studies. To investigate this hypothesis, we sequenced two contiguous fragments from the H. contortus genome and undertook detailed annotation and comparative analysis with C. elegans. The adult H. contortus transcriptome was sequenced using an Illumina platform and RNA-seq was used to annotate a 409 kb overlapping BAC tiling path relating to the X chromosome and a 181 kb BAC insert relating to chromosome I. In total, 40 genes and 12 putative transposable elements were identified. 97.5% of the annotated genes had detectable homologues in C. elegans of which 60% had putative orthologues, significantly higher than previous analyses based on EST analysis. Gene density appears to be less in H. contortus than in C. elegans, with annotated H. contortus genes being an average of two-to-three times larger than their putative C. elegans orthologues due to a greater intron number and size. Synteny appears high but gene order is generally poorly conserved, although areas of conserved microsynteny are apparent. C. elegans operons appear to be partially conserved in H. contortus. Our findings suggest that a combination of RNA-seq and comparative analysis with C. elegans is a powerful approach for the annotation and analysis of strongylid nematode genomes

  4. Comparative Analysis and Functional Annotation of a Large Expressed Sequence Tag Collection of Apple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Gasic

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 34 apple ( × Borkh. cDNA libraries were constructed from root, leaf, bud, shoot, flower, and fruit tissues, at various developmental stages and/or under biotic or abiotic stress conditions, and of several genotypes. From these libraries, 190,425 clones were partially sequenced from the 5′ end and 42,619 clones were sequenced from the 3′ end, and a total of 182,241 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs were obtained. These coalesced into 23,442 tentative contigs and 9843 singletons, for a total of 33,825 apple unigenes. Functional annotation of this unigene set revealed an even distribution of apple sequences among the three main gene ontology categories. Of ∼33,000 apple unigenes, 8437 (25% had no detectable homologs ( >0.1 in the genome. When the entire apple unigene set was compared with the entire citrus [ (L. Osbeck] unigene set and the poplar ( Torr. & Gray predicted proteome, both members of the core eudicot and rosids clade, 13,521 of apple unigenes matched one or more sequences in citrus, while 25,817 had counterparts in the poplar protein database. Apple––citrus–poplar comparisons revealed closer evolutionary relationships between apple and poplar than with the other two species. Genes involved in basic metabolic pathways appear to be largely conserved among apple, citrus, poplar, and .

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Novel Temperate Clostridium difficile Phage phiCDIF1296T

    OpenAIRE

    Wittmann, Johannes; Riedel, Thomas; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Gronow, Sabine; Overmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile contains many integrated and extrachromosomal genetic elements. In this study, we determined, annotated, and analyzed the complete genome of the C. difficile bacteriophage phiCDIF1296T using single-molecule real-time sequencing technology. To our knowledge, this represents the largest genome (131 kb) of a temperate C. difficile phage recognized so far.

  6. Whole-genome sequencing of 234 bulls facilitates mapping of monogenic and complex traits in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daetwyler, Hans D; Capitan, Aurélien; Pausch, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The 1000 bull genomes project supports the goal of accelerating the rates of genetic gain in domestic cattle while at the same time considering animal health and welfare by providing the annotated sequence variants and genotypes of key ancestor bulls. In the first phase of the 1000 bull genomes p...

  7. Draft genome sequences of Pantoea agglomerans and Pantoea vagans isolates associated with termites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Marike; de Maayer, Pieter; Thomas-Poulsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    these two species. The genomes of two isolates obtained from fungus-growing termites in South Africa were sequenced, assembled and annotated. A high number of orthologous genes are conserved within and between these species. The difference in genome size between P. agglomerans MP2 (4,733,829 bp) and P...

  8. Complete genome sequence of thermophilic Bacillus smithii type strain DSM 4216T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosma, Elleke Fenna; Koehorst, Jasper J.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.

    2016-01-01

    determined the complete genomic sequence of the B. smithii type strain DSM 4216T, which consists of a 3,368,778 bp chromosome (GenBank accession number CP012024.1) and a 12,514 bp plasmid (GenBank accession number CP012025.1), together encoding 3880 genes. Genome annotation via RAST was complemented...

  9. Draft genome sequences of the Pseudomonas fluorescens biocontrol strains Wayne1R and Wood1R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Xiaoqing; Gurel, Fulya Baysal; Meulia, Tea; McSpadden Gardener, Brian B

    2012-02-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains Wayne1R and Wood1R have proven capacities to improve plant health. Here we report the draft genome sequences and automatic annotations of both strains. Genome comparisons reveal similarities with P. fluorescens strain Pf-5, reveal the novelty of Wood1R, and indicate some genes that may be related to biocontrol.

  10. Draft genome sequences of pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae ALF3 isolated from alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the annotated draft genome of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain ALF3, isolated in Wyoming, USA. Comparison of this genome sequence with those of closely related strains of P. syringae pv. syringae adapted to other hosts will facilitate research into interactions between this pathoge...

  11. Complete genome sequence of the Antarctic Halorubrum lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain J; DasSarma, Priya; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Bruce, David C; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff S; Larimer, Frank; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Ivanova, Natalia; Richardson, Paul; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Woese, Carl R; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-01-01

    Halorubrum lacusprofundi is an extreme halophile within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain ACAM 34 was isolated from Deep Lake, Antarctica. H. lacusprofundi is of phylogenetic interest because it is distantly related to the haloarchaea that have previously been sequenced. It is also of interest because of its psychrotolerance. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34 and its annotation. This genome is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Wickerhamomyces ciferrii NRRL Y-1031 F-60-10

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Jessica; Andrea, Heiko; Blom, Jochen; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Rückert, Christian; Schorsch, Christoph; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Farwick,Mike; Goesmann, Alexander; Pühler, Alfred; Schaffer, Steffen; Tauch, Andreas; Köhler, Tim; Brinkrolf, Karina

    2012-01-01

    Wickerhamomyces ciferrii is a microorganism characterized by the production and secretion of large amounts of acetylated sphingoid bases, in particular tetraacetyl phytosphingosine. Here, we present the 15.90-Mbp draft genome sequence of W. ciferrii NRRL Y-1031 F-60-10 generated by pyrosequencing and de novo assembly. The draft genome sequence comprising 364 contigs in 150 scaffolds was annotated and covered 6,702 protein-coding sequences. This information will contribute to the metabolic eng...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium ummariense Strain RL-3, a Hexachlorocyclohexane-Degrading Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Puneet; Dua, Ankita; Sangwan, Naseer; Oldach, Phoebe; Khurana, J P; Lal, Rup

    2013-11-14

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-degrading bacterium Sphingobium ummariense strain RL-3, which was isolated from the HCH dumpsite located in Lucknow, India (27°00'N and 81°09'E). The annotated draft genome sequence (4.75 Mb) of strain RL-3 consisted of 139 contigs, 4,645 coding sequences, and 65% G+C content.

  14. Bacillus anthracis genome organization in light of whole transcriptome sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey; Zhu, Wenhan; Passalacqua, Karla D.; Bergman, Nicholas; Borodovsky, Mark

    2010-03-22

    Emerging knowledge of whole prokaryotic transcriptomes could validate a number of theoretical concepts introduced in the early days of genomics. What are the rules connecting gene expression levels with sequence determinants such as quantitative scores of promoters and terminators? Are translation efficiency measures, e.g. codon adaptation index and RBS score related to gene expression? We used the whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing of a bacterial pathogen Bacillus anthracis to assess correlation of gene expression level with promoter, terminator and RBS scores, codon adaptation index, as well as with a new measure of gene translational efficiency, average translation speed. We compared computational predictions of operon topologies with the transcript borders inferred from RNA-Seq reads. Transcriptome mapping may also improve existing gene annotation. Upon assessment of accuracy of current annotation of protein-coding genes in the B. anthracis genome we have shown that the transcriptome data indicate existence of more than a hundred genes missing in the annotation though predicted by an ab initio gene finder. Interestingly, we observed that many pseudogenes possess not only a sequence with detectable coding potential but also promoters that maintain transcriptional activity.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus erythropolis NSX2, an Actinobacterium Isolated from a Cadmium-Contaminated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egidi, Eleonora; Wood, Jennifer L.; Fox, Edward M.; Liu, Wuxing

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis NSX2 is a rhizobacterium isolated from a heavy metal–contaminated environment. The 6.2-Mb annotated genome sequence shows that this strain harbors genes associated with heavy-metal resistance and xenobiotics degradation. PMID:27795276

  16. Heterogeneous data analysis for annotation of microRNAs and novel genome assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yanju

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is the collection of four published papers demonstrating annotation of genes and microRNAs with the aid of bioinformatics, in particular using heterogeneous data integration. Gene annotation is the process of detecting the structure and biological function of the raw DNA sequences; while

  17. Estimating gene gain and loss rates in the presence of error in genome assembly and annotation using CAFE 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mira V; Thomas, Gregg W C; Lugo-Martinez, Jose; Hahn, Matthew W

    2013-08-01

    Current sequencing methods produce large amounts of data, but genome assemblies constructed from these data are often fragmented and incomplete. Incomplete and error-filled assemblies result in many annotation errors, especially in the number of genes present in a genome. This means that methods attempting to estimate rates of gene duplication and loss often will be misled by such errors and that rates of gene family evolution will be consistently overestimated. Here, we present a method that takes these errors into account, allowing one to accurately infer rates of gene gain and loss among genomes even with low assembly and annotation quality. The method is implemented in the newest version of the software package CAFE, along with several other novel features. We demonstrate the accuracy of the method with extensive simulations and reanalyze several previously published data sets. Our results show that errors in genome annotation do lead to higher inferred rates of gene gain and loss but that CAFE 3 sufficiently accounts for these errors to provide accurate estimates of important evolutionary parameters.

  18. Genomic annotation of the meningioma tumor suppressor locus on chromosome 1p34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulman, Erik P; White, Peter S; Brodeur, Garrett M

    2004-01-29

    Meningioma is a frequently occurring tumor of the meninges surrounding the central nervous system. Loss of the short arm of chromosome 1 (1p) is the second most frequent chromosomal abnormality observed in these tumors. Previously, we identified a 3.7 megabase (Mb) region of consistent deletion on 1p33-p34 in a panel of 157 tumors. Loss of this region was associated with advanced disease and predictive for tumor relapse. In this report, a high-resolution integrated map of the region was constructed (CompView) to identify all markers in the smallest region of overlapping deletion (SRO). A regional somatic cell hybrid panel was used to more precisely localize those markers identified in CompView as within or overlapping the region. Additional deletion mapping using microsatellites localized to the region narrowed the SRO to approximately 2.8 Mb. The 88 markers remaining in the SRO were used to screen genomic databases to identify large-insert clones. Clones were assembled into a physical map of the region by PCR-based, sequence-tagged site (STS) content mapping. A sequence from clones was used to validate STS content by electronic PCR and to identify transcripts. A minimal tiling path of 43 clones was constructed across the SRO. Sequence data from the most current sequence assembly were used for further validation. A total of 59 genes were ordered within the SRO. In all, 17 of these were selected as likely candidates based on annotation using Gene Ontology Consortium terms, including the MUTYH, PRDX1, FOXD2, FOXE3, PTCH2, and RAD54L genes. This annotation of a putative tumor suppressor locus provides a resource for further analysis of meningioma candidate genes.

  19. The mitochondrial genome sequence and molecular phylogeny of the turkey, Meleagris gallopavo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, X; Silva, P; Gyenai, K B; Xu, J; Geng, T; Tu, Z; Samuels, D C; Smith, E J

    2009-04-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mtGenome) has been little studied in the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), a species for which there is no publicly available mtGenome sequence. Here, we used PCR-based methods with 19 pairs of primers designed from the chicken and other species to develop a complete turkey mtGenome sequence. The entire sequence (16,717 bp) of the turkey mtGenome was obtained, and it exhibited 85% similarity to the chicken mtGenome sequence. Thirteen genes and 24 RNAs (22 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs) were annotated. An mtGenome-based phylogenetic analysis indicated that the turkey is most closely related to the chicken, Gallus gallus, and quail, Corturnix japonica. Given the importance of the mtGenome, the present work adds to the growing genomic resources needed to define the genetic mechanisms that underlie some economically significant traits in the turkey.

  20. Annotating the Function of the Human Genome with Gene Ontology and Disease Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhou, Wenyang; Ren, Jun; Dong, Lixiang; Wang, Yadong; Jin, Shuilin; Cheng, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences indicated that function annotation of human genome in molecular level and phenotype level is very important for systematic analysis of genes. In this study, we presented a framework named Gene2Function to annotate Gene Reference into Functions (GeneRIFs), in which each functional description of GeneRIFs could be annotated by a text mining tool Open Biomedical Annotator (OBA), and each Entrez gene could be mapped to Human Genome Organisation Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) gene symbol. After annotating all the records about human genes of GeneRIFs, 288,869 associations between 13,148 mRNAs and 7,182 terms, 9,496 associations between 948 microRNAs and 533 terms, and 901 associations between 139 long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and 297 terms were obtained as a comprehensive annotation resource of human genome. High consistency of term frequency of individual gene (Pearson correlation = 0.6401, p = 2.2e - 16) and gene frequency of individual term (Pearson correlation = 0.1298, p = 3.686e - 14) in GeneRIFs and GOA shows our annotation resource is very reliable.

  1. The JCVI standard operating procedure for annotating prokaryotic metagenomic shotgun sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, David M; Goll, Johannes; Murphy, Sean; Kumar, Prateek; Zafar, Nikhat; Thiagarajan, Mathangi; Madupu, Ramana; Davidsen, Tanja; Kagan, Leonid; Kravitz, Saul; Rusch, Douglas B; Yooseph, Shibu

    2010-03-30

    The JCVI metagenomics analysis pipeline provides for the efficient and consistent annotation of shotgun metagenomics sequencing data for sampling communities of prokaryotic organisms. The process can be equally applied to individual sequence reads from traditional Sanger capillary electrophoresis sequences, newer technologies such as 454 pyrosequencing, or sequence assemblies derived from one or more of these data types. It includes the analysis of both coding and non-coding genes, whether full-length or, as is often the case for shotgun metagenomics, fragmentary. The system is designed to provide the best-supported conservative functional annotation based on a combination of trusted homology-based scientific evidence and computational assertions and an annotation value hierarchy established through extensive manual curation. The functional annotation attributes assigned by this system include gene name, gene symbol, GO terms, EC numbers, and JCVI functional role categories.

  2. The future of transposable element annotation and their classification in the light of functional genomics - what we can learn from the fables of Jean de la Fontaine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arensburger, Peter; Piégu, Benoît; Bigot, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Transposable element (TE) science has been significantly influenced by the pioneering ideas of David Finnegan near the end of the last century, as well as by the classification systems that were subsequently developed. Today, whole genome TE annotation is mostly done using tools that were developed to aid gene annotation rather than to specifically study TEs. We argue that further progress in the TE field is impeded both by current TE classification schemes and by a failure to recognize that TE biology is fundamentally different from that of multicellular organisms. Novel genome wide TE annotation methods are helping to redefine our understanding of TE sequence origins and evolution. We briefly discuss some of these new methods as well as ideas for possible alternative classification schemes. Our hope is to encourage the formation of a society to organize a larger debate on these questions and to promote the adoption of standards for annotation and an improved TE classification.

  3. Fungal genome sequencing: basic biology to biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Krishna Kant

    2016-08-01

    The genome sequences provide a first glimpse into the genomic basis of the biological diversity of filamentous fungi and yeast. The genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a small genome size, unicellular growth, and rich history of genetic and molecular analyses was a milestone of early genomics in the 1990s. The subsequent completion of fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and genetic model, Neurospora crassa initiated a revolution in the genomics of the fungal kingdom. In due course of time, a substantial number of fungal genomes have been sequenced and publicly released, representing the widest sampling of genomes from any eukaryotic kingdom. An ambitious genome-sequencing program provides a wealth of data on metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into medical science, agriculture science, ecology, bioremediation, bioenergy, and the biotechnology industry. Fungal genomics have higher potential to positively affect human health, environmental health, and the planet's stored energy. With a significant increase in sequenced fungal genomes, the known diversity of genes encoding organic acids, antibiotics, enzymes, and their pathways has increased exponentially. Currently, over a hundred fungal genome sequences are publicly available; however, no inclusive review has been published. This review is an initiative to address the significance of the fungal genome-sequencing program and provides the road map for basic and applied research.

  4. Whole genome sequencing of Chinese clearhead icefish, Protosalanx hyalocranius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Xu, Dongpo; Li, Jia; Bian, Chao; Duan, Jinrong; Zhou, Yanfeng; Zhang, Minying; You, Xinxin; You, Yang; Chen, Jieming; Yu, Hui; Xu, Gangchun; Fang, Di-An; Qiang, Jun; Jiang, Shulun; He, Jie; Xu, Junmin; Shi, Qiong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Xu, Pao

    2017-04-01

    Chinese clearhead icefish, Protosalanx hyalocranius , is a representative icefish species with economic importance and special appearance. Due to its great economic value in China, the fish was introduced into Lake Dianchi and several other lakes from the Lake Taihu half a century ago. Similar to the Sinocyclocheilus cavefish, the clearhead icefish has certain cavefish-like traits, such as transparent body and nearly scaleless skin. Here, we provide the whole genome sequence of this surface-dwelling fish and generated a draft genome assembly, aiming at exploring molecular mechanisms for the biological interests. A total of 252.1 Gb of raw reads were sequenced. Subsequently, a novel draft genome assembly was generated, with the scaffold N50 reaching 1.163 Mb. The genome completeness was estimated to be 98.39 % by using the CEGMA evaluation. Finally, we annotated 19 884 protein-coding genes and observed that repeat sequences account for 24.43 % of the genome assembly. We report the first draft genome of the Chinese clearhead icefish. The genome assembly will provide a solid foundation for further molecular breeding and germplasm resource protection in Chinese clearhead icefish, as well as other icefishes. It is also a valuable genetic resource for revealing the molecular mechanisms for the cavefish-like characters.

  5. Next-Generation Sequencing and the Crustacean Immune System: The Need for Alternatives in Immune Gene Annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K F; Greenwood, Spencer J

    2016-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing has been a huge benefit to investigators studying non-model species. High-throughput gene expression studies, which were once restricted to animals with extensive genomic resources, can now be applied to any species. Transcriptomic studies using RNA-Seq can discover hundreds of thousands of transcripts from any species of interest. The power and limitation of these techniques is the sheer size of the dataset that is acquired. Parsing these large datasets is becoming easier as more bioinformatic tools are available for biologists without extensive computer programming expertise. Gene annotation and physiological pathway tools such as Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Orthology enable the application of the vast amount of information acquired from model organisms to non-model species. While noble in nature, utilization of these tools can inadvertently misrepresent transcriptomic data from non-model species via annotation omission. Annotation followed by molecular pathway analysis highlights pathways that are disproportionately affected by disease, stress, or the physiological condition being examined. Problems occur when gene annotation procedures only recognizes a subset, often 50% or less, of the genes differently expressed from a non-model organisms. Annotated transcripts normally belong to highly conserved metabolic or regulatory genes that likely have a secondary or tertiary role, if any at all, in immunity. They appear to be disproportionately affected simply because conserved genes are most easily annotated. Evolutionarily induced specialization of physiological pathways is a driving force of adaptive evolution, but it results in genes that have diverged sufficiently to prevent their identification and annotation through conventional gene or protein databases. The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight some of the challenges faced when annotating crustacean immune genes by using an American lobster

  6. Large-Scale Sequencing: The Future of Genomic Sciences Colloquium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret Riley; Merry Buckley

    2009-01-01

    , since not only are their genomes available, but they are also accompanied by data on environment and physiology that can be used to understand the resulting data. As single cell isolation methods improve, there should be a shift toward incorporating uncultured organisms and communities into this effort. Efforts to sequence cultivated isolates should target characterized isolates from culture collections for which biochemical data are available, as well as other cultures of lasting value from personal collections. The genomes of type strains should be among the first targets for sequencing, but creative culture methods, novel cell isolation, and sorting methods would all be helpful in obtaining organisms we have not yet been able to cultivate for sequencing. The data that should be provided for strains targeted for sequencing will depend on the phylogenetic context of the organism and the amount of information available about its nearest relatives. Annotation is an important part of transforming genome sequences into useful resources, but it represents the most significant bottleneck to the field of comparative genomics right now and must be addressed. Furthermore, there is a need for more consistency in both annotation and achieving annotation data. As new annotation tools become available over time, re-annotation of genomes should be implemented, taking advantage of advancements in annotation techniques in order to capitalize on the genome sequences and increase both the societal and scientific benefit of genomics work. Given the proper resources, the knowledge and ability exist to be able to select model systems, some simple, some less so, and dissect them so that we may understand the processes and interactions at work in them. Colloquium participants suggest a five-pronged, coordinated initiative to exhaustively describe six different microbial ecosystems, designed to describe all the gene diversity, across genomes. In this effort, sequencing should be complemented

  7. The use of multiple hierarchically independent gene ontology terms in gene function prediction and genome annotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kourmpetis, Y.I.A.; Burgt, van der A.; Bink, M.C.A.M.; Braak, ter C.J.F.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) is a widely used controlled vocabulary for the description of gene function. In this study we quantify the usage of multiple and hierarchically independent GO terms in the curated genome annotations of seven well-studied species. In most genomes, significant proportions (6 -

  8. Using Microbial Genome Annotation as a Foundation for Collaborative Student Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kelynne E.; Richardson, John M.

    2013-01-01

    We used the Integrated Microbial Genomes Annotation Collaboration Toolkit as a framework to incorporate microbial genomics research into a microbiology and biochemistry course in a way that promoted student learning of bioinformatics and research skills and emphasized teamwork and collaboration as evidenced through multiple assessment mechanisms.…

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of an Obligately Methylotrophic Methanogen, Methanococcoides methylutens, Isolated from Marine Sediment

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Yue

    2014-11-20

    Methanococcoides methylutens, the type species of the genus Methanococcoides, is a slightly halophilic methanogenic archaeon with a methylotrophic metabolism. Here, we present the annotated draft genome sequence of M. methylutens, which comprises 2,508,511 bp with 2,482 coding sequences, 51 tRNA genes, and a G+C content of 42.5%.

  10. Draft genome sequence of the Algerian bee Apis mellifera intermissa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizar Jamal Haddad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apis mellifera intermissa is the native honeybee subspecies of Algeria. A. m. intermissa occurs in Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco, between the Atlas and the Mediterranean and Atlantic coasts. This bee is very important due to its high ability to adapt to great variations in climatic conditions and due to its preferable cleaning behavior. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this honey bee, its Whole Genome Shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession JSUV00000000. The 240-Mb genome is being annotated and analyzed. Comparison with the genome of other Apis mellifera sub-species promises to yield insights into the evolution of adaptations to high temperature and resistance to Varroa parasite infestation.

  11. Draft genome sequence of the Algerian bee Apis mellifera intermissa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nizar Jamal; Loucif-Ayad, Wahida; Adjlane, Noureddine; Saini, Deepti; Manchiganti, Rushiraj; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; AlShagoor, Banan; Batainh, Ahmed Mahmud; Mugasimangalam, Raja

    2015-06-01

    Apis mellifera intermissa is the native honeybee subspecies of Algeria. A. m. intermissa occurs in Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco, between the Atlas and the Mediterranean and Atlantic coasts. This bee is very important due to its high ability to adapt to great variations in climatic conditions and due to its preferable cleaning behavior. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this honey bee, its Whole Genome Shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession JSUV00000000. The 240-Mb genome is being annotated and analyzed. Comparison with the genome of other Apis mellifera sub-species promises to yield insights into the evolution of adaptations to high temperature and resistance to Varroa parasite infestation.

  12. On genome annotation of Brucellaphage Gadvasu (BpG): discovery of ORFans for integrated systems biology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachra, Deepti; Kaur, Pushpinder; Siddavatam, Prasad; Suravajhala, Prashanth; Saxena, Hari Mohan

    2015-12-01

    Brucellaphage Gadvasu (BpG) is a lytic phage infecting Brucella spp. Brucellaphages contain dsDNA as genetic material and are short-tailed particles with host-specificity. Here, we report the challenges on annotation in the complete genome sequence of BpG when compared with that of a recent broad host-range brucellaphage Pr, an original reference genome. The extracted DNA was subjected to genome sequencing with Illumina technology and assembled using SSAKE/Velvet. A significant number of genes were found to be similar between the phages with sequence analysis revealing conserved open reading frames that correspond to 33 gene ontology classifiers, transcriptional terminators and a few putative transcriptional promoters. The analyses revealed that the genome constitutes 1269 contigs and 275 genes encoding 260 proteins. The sequence comparison from the reference data indicated that the genome shares an approximately 70 % nucleotide similarity and differs mainly in the region encoding proteins. We bring this commentary providing an overview of how this exemplar genome can allow us to understand these known unknown regions in brucellaphages.

  13. Statistical analysis of genomic protein family and domain controlled annotations for functional investigation of classified gene lists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masseroli Marco

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing protein family and domain based annotations constitute important information to understand protein functions and gain insight into relations among their codifying genes. To allow analyzing of gene proteomic annotations, we implemented novel modules within GFINDer, a Web system we previously developed that dynamically aggregates functional and phenotypic annotations of user-uploaded gene lists and allows performing their statistical analysis and mining. Results Exploiting protein information in Pfam and InterPro databanks, we developed and added in GFINDer original modules specifically devoted to the exploration and analysis of functional signatures of gene protein products. They allow annotating numerous user-classified nucleotide sequence identifiers with controlled information on related protein families, domains and functional sites, classifying them according to such protein annotation categories, and statistically analyzing the obtained classifications. In particular, when uploaded nucleotide sequence identifiers are subdivided in classes, the Statistics Protein Families&Domains module allows estimating relevance of Pfam or InterPro controlled annotations for the uploaded genes by highlighting protein signatures significantly more represented within user-defined classes of genes. In addition, the Logistic Regression module allows identifying protein functional signatures that better explain the considered gene classification. Conclusion Novel GFINDer modules provide genomic protein family and domain analyses supporting better functional interpretation of gene classes, for instance defined through statistical and clustering analyses of gene expression results from microarray experiments. They can hence help understanding fundamental biological processes and complex cellular mechanisms influenced by protein domain composition, and contribute to unveil new biomedical knowledge about the codifying genes.

  14. The Pinus taeda genome is characterized by diverse and highly diverged repetitive sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yandell Mark

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In today's age of genomic discovery, no attempt has been made to comprehensively sequence a gymnosperm genome. The largest genus in the coniferous family Pinaceae is Pinus, whose 110-120 species have extremely large genomes (c. 20-40 Gb, 2N = 24. The size and complexity of these genomes have prompted much speculation as to the feasibility of completing a conifer genome sequence. Conifer genomes are reputed to be highly repetitive, but there is little information available on the nature and identity of repetitive units in gymnosperms. The pines have extensive genetic resources, with approximately 329000 ESTs from eleven species and genetic maps in eight species, including a dense genetic map of the twelve linkage groups in Pinus taeda. Results We present here the Sanger sequence and annotation of ten P. taeda BAC clones and Genome Analyzer II whole genome shotgun (WGS sequences representing 7.5% of the genome. Computational annotation of ten BACs predicts three putative protein-coding genes and at least fifteen likely pseudogenes in nearly one megabase of sequence. We found three conifer-specific LTR retroelements in the BACs, and tentatively identified at least 15 others based on evidence from the distantly related angiosperms. Alignment of WGS sequences to the BACs indicates that 80% of BAC sequences have similar copies (≥ 75% nucleotide identity elsewhere in the genome, but only 23% have identical copies (99% identity. The three most common repetitive elements in the genome were identified and, when combined, represent less than 5% of the genome. Conclusions This study indicates that the majority of repeats in the P. taeda genome are 'novel' and will therefore require additional BAC or genomic sequencing for accurate characterization. The pine genome contains a very large number of diverged and probably defunct repetitive elements. This study also provides new evidence that sequencing a pine genome using a WGS approach is

  15. Dry and wet approaches for genome-wide functional annotation of conventional and unconventional transcriptional activators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Levati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs are master gene products that regulate gene expression in response to a variety of stimuli. They interact with DNA in a sequence-specific manner using a variety of DNA-binding domain (DBD modules. This allows to properly position their second domain, called “effector domain”, to directly or indirectly recruit positively or negatively acting co-regulators including chromatin modifiers, thus modulating preinitiation complex formation as well as transcription elongation. At variance with the DBDs, which are comprised of well-defined and easily recognizable DNA binding motifs, effector domains are usually much less conserved and thus considerably more difficult to predict. Also not so easy to identify are the DNA-binding sites of TFs, especially on a genome-wide basis and in the case of overlapping binding regions. Another emerging issue, with many potential regulatory implications, is that of so-called “moonlighting” transcription factors, i.e., proteins with an annotated function unrelated to transcription and lacking any recognizable DBD or effector domain, that play a role in gene regulation as their second job. Starting from bioinformatic and experimental high-throughput tools for an unbiased, genome-wide identification and functional characterization of TFs (especially transcriptional activators, we describe both established (and usually well affordable as well as newly developed platforms for DNA-binding site identification. Selected combinations of these search tools, some of which rely on next-generation sequencing approaches, allow delineating the entire repertoire of TFs and unconventional regulators encoded by the any sequenced genome.

  16. The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, V; Gwilliam, R; Rajandream, M-A; Lyne, M; Lyne, R; Stewart, A; Sgouros, J; Peat, N; Hayles, J; Baker, S; Basham, D; Bowman, S; Brooks, K; Brown, D; Brown, S; Chillingworth, T; Churcher, C; Collins, M; Connor, R; Cronin, A; Davis, P; Feltwell, T; Fraser, A; Gentles, S; Goble, A; Hamlin, N; Harris, D; Hidalgo, J; Hodgson, G; Holroyd, S; Hornsby, T; Howarth, S; Huckle, E J; Hunt, S; Jagels, K; James, K; Jones, L; Jones, M; Leather, S; McDonald, S; McLean, J; Mooney, P; Moule, S; Mungall, K; Murphy, L; Niblett, D; Odell, C; Oliver, K; O'Neil, S; Pearson, D; Quail, M A; Rabbinowitsch, E; Rutherford, K; Rutter, S; Saunders, D; Seeger, K; Sharp, S; Skelton, J; Simmonds, M; Squares, R; Squares, S; Stevens, K; Taylor, K; Taylor, R G; Tivey, A; Walsh, S; Warren, T; Whitehead, S; Woodward, J; Volckaert, G; Aert, R; Robben, J; Grymonprez, B; Weltjens, I; Vanstreels, E; Rieger, M; Schäfer, M; Müller-Auer, S; Gabel, C; Fuchs, M; Düsterhöft, A; Fritzc, C; Holzer, E; Moestl, D; Hilbert, H; Borzym, K; Langer, I; Beck, A; Lehrach, H; Reinhardt, R; Pohl, T M; Eger, P; Zimmermann, W; Wedler, H; Wambutt, R; Purnelle, B; Goffeau, A; Cadieu, E; Dréano, S; Gloux, S; Lelaure, V; Mottier, S; Galibert, F; Aves, S J; Xiang, Z; Hunt, C; Moore, K; Hurst, S M; Lucas, M; Rochet, M; Gaillardin, C; Tallada, V A; Garzon, A; Thode, G; Daga, R R; Cruzado, L; Jimenez, J; Sánchez, M; del Rey, F; Benito, J; Domínguez, A; Revuelta, J L; Moreno, S; Armstrong, J; Forsburg, S L; Cerutti, L; Lowe, T; McCombie, W R; Paulsen, I; Potashkin, J; Shpakovski, G V; Ussery, D; Barrell, B G; Nurse, P; Cerrutti, L

    2002-02-21

    We have sequenced and annotated the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), which contains the smallest number of protein-coding genes yet recorded for a eukaryote: 4,824. The centromeres are between 35 and 110 kilobases (kb) and contain related repeats including a highly conserved 1.8-kb element. Regions upstream of genes are longer than in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), possibly reflecting more-extended control regions. Some 43% of the genes contain introns, of which there are 4,730. Fifty genes have significant similarity with human disease genes; half of these are cancer related. We identify highly conserved genes important for eukaryotic cell organization including those required for the cytoskeleton, compartmentation, cell-cycle control, proteolysis, protein phosphorylation and RNA splicing. These genes may have originated with the appearance of eukaryotic life. Few similarly conserved genes that are important for multicellular organization were identified, suggesting that the transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes required more new genes than did the transition from unicellular to multicellular organization.

  17. First fungal genome sequence from Africa: A preliminary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Sutherland

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most significant breakthroughs in the biological sciences this century will emerge from the development of next generation sequencing technologies. The ease of availability of DNA sequence made possible through these new technologies has given researchers opportunities to study organisms in a manner that was not possible with Sanger sequencing. Scientists will, therefore, need to embrace genomics, as well as develop and nurture the human capacity to sequence genomes and utilise the ’tsunami‘ of data that emerge from genome sequencing. In response to these challenges, we sequenced the genome of Fusarium circinatum, a fungal pathogen of pine that causes pitch canker, a disease of great concern to the South African forestry industry. The sequencing work was conducted in South Africa, making F. circinatum the first eukaryotic organism for which the complete genome has been sequenced locally. Here we report on the process that was followed to sequence, assemble and perform a preliminary characterisation of the genome. Furthermore, details of the computer annotation and manual curation of this genome are presented. The F. circinatum genome was found to be nearly 44 million bases in size, which is similar to that of four other Fusarium genomes that have been sequenced elsewhere. The genome contains just over 15 000 open reading frames, which is less than that of the related species, Fusarium oxysporum, but more than that for Fusarium verticillioides. Amongst the various putative gene clusters identified in F. circinatum, those encoding the secondary metabolites fumosin and fusarin appeared to harbour evidence of gene translocation. It is anticipated that similar comparisons of other loci will provide insights into the genetic basis for pathogenicity of the pitch canker pathogen. Perhaps more importantly, this project has engaged a relatively large group of scientists

  18. Homology-based annotation of non-coding RNAs in the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santana Clara

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomes are trematode parasites of the phylum Platyhelminthes. They are considered the most important of the human helminth parasites in terms of morbidity and mortality. Draft genome sequences are now available for Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum. Non-coding RNA (ncRNA plays a crucial role in gene expression regulation, cellular function and defense, homeostasis, and pathogenesis. The genome-wide annotation of ncRNAs is a non-trivial task unless well-annotated genomes of closely related species are already available. Results A homology search for structured ncRNA in the genome of S. mansoni resulted in 23 types of ncRNAs with conserved primary and secondary structure. Among these, we identified rRNA, snRNA, SL RNA, SRP, tRNAs and RNase P, and also possibly MRP and 7SK RNAs. In addition, we confirmed five miRNAs that have recently been reported in S. japonicum and found two additional homologs of known miRNAs. The tRNA complement of S. mansoni is comparable to that of the free-living planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, although for some amino acids differences of more than a factor of two are observed: Leu, Ser, and His are overrepresented, while Cys, Meth, and Ile are underrepresented in S. mansoni. On the other hand, the number of tRNAs in the genome of S. japonicum is reduced by more than a factor of four. Both schistosomes have a complete set of minor spliceosomal snRNAs. Several ncRNAs that are expected to exist in the S. mansoni genome were not found, among them the telomerase RNA, vault RNAs, and Y RNAs. Conclusion The ncRNA sequences and structures presented here represent the most complete dataset of ncRNA from any lophotrochozoan reported so far. This data set provides an important reference for further analysis of the genomes of schistosomes and indeed eukaryotic genomes at large.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Cronobacter turicensis LMG 23827, a Food-Borne Pathogen Causing Deaths in Neonates ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Here, we report the complete and annotated genome sequence of Cronobacter turicensis, an opportunistic food-borne pathogen, which is known as a rare but important cause of life-threatening neonatal infections. Among all proteins of C. turicensis, 223 have been annotated as virulence- and disease-related proteins.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Cronobacter turicensis LMG 23827, a food-borne pathogen causing deaths in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Roger; Lehner, Angelika; Tischler, Patrick; Rattei, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report the complete and annotated genome sequence of Cronobacter turicensis, an opportunistic food-borne pathogen, which is known as a rare but important cause of life-threatening neonatal infections. Among all proteins of C. turicensis, 223 have been annotated as virulence- and disease-related proteins.

  1. Microbial genomics: from sequence to function.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, I

    2000-01-01

    The era of genomics (the study of genes and their function) began a scant dozen years ago with a suggestion by James Watson that the complete DNA sequence of the human genome be determined. Since that time, the human genome project has attracted a great deal of attention in the scientific world and the general media; the scope of the sequencing effort, and the extraordinary value that it will provide, has served to mask the enormous progress in sequencing other genomes. Microbial genome seque...

  2. ChIP-Seq-Annotated Heliconius erato Genome Highlights Patterns of cis-Regulatory Evolution in Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Lewis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Uncovering phylogenetic patterns of cis-regulatory evolution remains a fundamental goal for evolutionary and developmental biology. Here, we characterize the evolution of regulatory loci in butterflies and moths using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq annotation of regulatory elements across three stages of head development. In the process we provide a high-quality, functionally annotated genome assembly for the butterfly, Heliconius erato. Comparing cis-regulatory element conservation across six lepidopteran genomes, we find that regulatory sequences evolve at a pace similar to that of protein-coding regions. We also observe that elements active at multiple developmental stages are markedly more conserved than elements with stage-specific activity. Surprisingly, we also find that stage-specific proximal and distal regulatory elements evolve at nearly identical rates. Our study provides a benchmark for genome-wide patterns of regulatory element evolution in insects, and it shows that developmental timing of activity strongly predicts patterns of regulatory sequence evolution.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of a Highly Flagellated, Fast-Swimming Archaeon, Methanocaldococcus villosus Strain KIN24-T80 (DSM 22612)

    KAUST Repository

    Thennarasu, Sugumar

    2013-07-11

    We report the draft genome sequence of a hyperthermophilic Methanocaldococcus villosus strain, KIN24-T80. The gene associated with its heavy flagellum formation was annotated in the 1.2-Mb draft genome sequence, and this strain may be a good model system to study the extensive functional role of flagella and their fast motor activity.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading, Genetically Engineered Bioluminescent Bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Archana; Layton, Alice C.; Williams, Daniel E.; Smartt, Abby E.; Ripp, Steven; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Brown, Steven D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of ∼6.1 Mb of sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over five genomic islands, a prophage, and two plasmids. PMID:21742869

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading, Genetically Engineered Bioluminescent Bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Archana [ORNL; Layton, Alice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Williams, Daniel W [ORNL; Smart, Abby E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ripp, Steven Anthony [ORNL; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of {approx}6.1 Mb sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over 5 genomic islands, a prophage and two plasmids.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Campylobacter coli Strain IPSID-1 Isolated from a Patient with Immunoproliferative Small Intestinal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscuolo, Alexis; de la Blanchardière, Arnaud; Coeuret, Solène; Passet, Virginie; Saguet-Rysanek, Virginie; Vergnaud, Michel; Verdon, Renaud; Leclercq, Alexandre; Lecuit, Marc; Brisse, Sylvain

    2014-03-13

    The genome sequence and annotation of Campylobacter coli strain IPSID-1 are reported here. This bacterial isolate is the first to be cultured from a patient with immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID). The draft genome sequence is 1.683 Mb long, comprises 64 contigs, and has 31.26% G+C content.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading, Genetically Engineered Bioluminescent Bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Archana; Layton, Alice C.; Williams, Daniel E.; Smartt, Abby E.; Ripp, Steven; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Brown, Steven D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of ∼6.1 Mb of sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over five genomic islands, a prophage, and two plasmids.

  8. Sequencing of the complete genome of an araphid pennate diatom Synedra acus subsp. radians from Lake Baikal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galachyants, Y P; Zakharova, Yu R; Petrova, D P; Morozov, A A; Sidorov, I A; Marchenkov, A M; Logacheva, M D; Markelov, M L; Khabudaev, K V; Likhoshway, Ye V; Grachev, M A

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput method of sequencing was applied to determine the complete nucleotide sequence of an araphid pennate diatom Synedra acus subsp. radians from Lake Baikal (East Siberia). The assembled genome has a total length of 98 Mbp, the mean coverage is 33x. Structure-functional annotation of the genome was performed.

  9. Draft genome sequence of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading, genetically engineered bioluminescent bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Archana; Layton, Alice C; Williams, Daniel E; Smartt, Abby E; Ripp, Steven; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Brown, Steven D; Sayler, Gary S

    2011-09-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of ∼6.1 Mb of sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over five genomic islands, a prophage, and two plasmids.

  10. Comparison of methods for genomic localization of gene trap sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrin Thomas E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene knockouts in a model organism such as mouse provide a valuable resource for the study of basic biology and human disease. Determining which gene has been inactivated by an untargeted gene trapping event poses a challenging annotation problem because gene trap sequence tags, which represent sequence near the vector insertion site of a trapped gene, are typically short and often contain unresolved residues. To understand better the localization of these sequences on the mouse genome, we compared stand-alone versions of the alignment programs BLAT, SSAHA, and MegaBLAST. A set of 3,369 sequence tags was aligned to build 34 of the mouse genome using default parameters for each algorithm. Known genome coordinates for the cognate set of full-length genes (1,659 sequences were used to evaluate localization results. Results In general, all three programs performed well in terms of localizing sequences to a general region of the genome, with only relatively subtle errors identified for a small proportion of the sequence tags. However, large differences in performance were noted with regard to correctly identifying exon boundaries. BLAT correctly identified the vast majority of exon boundaries, while SSAHA and MegaBLAST missed the majority of exon boundaries. SSAHA consistently reported the fewest false positives and is the fastest algorithm. MegaBLAST was comparable to BLAT in speed, but was the most susceptible to localizing sequence tags incorrectly to pseudogenes. Conclusion The differences in performance for sequence tags and full-length reference sequences were surprisingly small. Characteristic variations in localization results for each program were noted that affect the localization of sequence at exon boundaries, in particular.

  11. Comparative high-throughput transcriptome sequencing and development of SiESTa, the Silene EST annotation database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marais Gabriel AB

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Silene is widely used as a model system for addressing ecological and evolutionary questions in plants, but advances in using the genus as a model system are impeded by the lack of available resources for studying its genome. Massively parallel sequencing cDNA has recently developed into an efficient method for characterizing the transcriptomes of non-model organisms, generating massive amounts of data that enable the study of multiple species in a comparative framework. The sequences generated provide an excellent resource for identifying expressed genes, characterizing functional variation and developing molecular markers, thereby laying the foundations for future studies on gene sequence and gene expression divergence. Here, we report the results of a comparative transcriptome sequencing study of eight individuals representing four Silene and one Dianthus species as outgroup. All sequences and annotations have been deposited in a newly developed and publicly available database called SiESTa, the Silene EST annotation database. Results A total of 1,041,122 EST reads were generated in two runs on a Roche GS-FLX 454 pyrosequencing platform. EST reads were analyzed separately for all eight individuals sequenced and were assembled into contigs using TGICL. These were annotated with results from BLASTX searches and Gene Ontology (GO terms, and thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were characterized. Unassembled reads were kept as singletons and together with the contigs contributed to the unigenes characterized in each individual. The high quality of unigenes is evidenced by the proportion (49% that have significant hits in similarity searches with the A. thaliana proteome. The SiESTa database is accessible at http://www.siesta.ethz.ch. Conclusion The sequence collections established in the present study provide an important genomic resource for four Silene and one Dianthus species and will help to

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium amycolatum Strain ICIS 53 Isolated from a Female Urogenital Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladysheva, Irina V; Cherkasov, Sergey V; Khlopko, Yuriy A; Plotnikov, Andrey O; Gogoleva, Natalya E

    2016-11-10

    This report describes the draft genome sequence of Corynebacterium amycolatum strain ICIS 53, isolated from the reproductive tract of a healthy woman. The size of the genome was 2,460,257 bp (58.98% G+C content). Annotation revealed 2,173 coding sequences, including 2,076 proteins, 7 rRNA genes, and 53 tRNA genes.

  13. Genome-wide functional annotation of Phomopsis longicolla isolate MSPL 10-6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Darwish

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Phomopsis seed decay of soybean is caused primarily by the seed-borne fungal pathogen Phomopsis longicolla (syn. Diaporthe longicolla. This disease severely decreases soybean seed quality, reduces seedling vigor and stand establishment, and suppresses yield. It is one of the most economically important soybean diseases. In this study we annotated the entire genome of P. longicolla isolate MSPL 10-6, which was isolated from field-grown soybean seed in Mississippi, USA. This study represents the first reported genome-wide functional annotation of a seed borne fungal pathogen in the Diaporthe–Phomopsis complex. The P. longicolla genome annotation will enable research into the genetic basis of fungal infection of soybean seed and provide information for the study of soybean–fungal interactions. The genome annotation will also be a valuable resource for the research and agricultural communities. It will aid in the development of new control strategies for this pathogen. The annotations can be found from: http://bioinformatics.towson.edu/phomopsis_longicolla/download.html. NCBI accession number is: AYRD00000000.

  14. Pigs in sequence space: A 0.66X coverage pig genome survey based on shotgun sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Schierup, M.H.; Jorgensen, F.G.

    2005-01-01

    efficient in pig compared to human, but not as efficient as in mouse, and pig seems to have an isochore structure most similar to the structure in human. Conclusion: The addition of the pig to the set of species sequenced at low coverage adds to the understanding of selective pressures that have acted...... sequences (0.66X coverage) from the pig genome. The data are hereby released (NCBI Trace repository with center name "SDJVP", and project name "Sino-Danish Pig Genome Project") together with an initial evolutionary analysis. The non-repetitive fraction of the sequences was aligned to the UCSC human......-mouse alignment and the resulting three-species alignments were annotated using the human genome annotation. Ultra-conserved elements and miRNAs were identified. The results show that for each of these types of orthologous data, pig is much closer to human than mouse is. Purifying selection has been more...

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of a Potential Probiotic, Lactobacillus pentosus MP-10, Isolated from Fermented Aloreña Table Olives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Montoro, Beatriz; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Hidalgo Pestaña, Marina; Caballero Gómez, Natacha; Franz, Charles M. A. P.; Gálvez, Antonio; Benomar, Nabil

    2016-01-01

    We report here a 3,698,214-bp complete genome sequence of a potential probiotic Lactobacillus pentosus strain, MP-10, isolated from brines of naturally fermented Aloreña green table olives; it is considered the largest sequenced genome among lactobacilli to date. The annotated genome sequence revealed the presence of 3,558 open reading frames (ORFs) and 87 structural RNAs. PMID:27634988

  16. Genome assembly and annotation of Arabidopsis halleri, a model for heavy metal hyperaccumulation and evolutionary ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskine, Roman V; Paape, Timothy; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Akama, Satoru; Sese, Jun; Shimizu, Kentaro K

    2016-09-27

    The self-incompatible species Arabidopsis halleri is a close relative of the self-compatible model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The broad European and Asian distribution and heavy metal hyperaccumulation ability make A. halleri a useful model for ecological genomics studies. We used long-insert mate-pair libraries to improve the genome assembly of the A. halleri ssp. gemmifera Tada mine genotype (W302) collected from a site with high contamination by heavy metals in Japan. After five rounds of forced selfing, heterozygosity was reduced to 0.04%, which facilitated subsequent genome assembly. Our assembly now covers 196 Mb or 78% of the estimated genome size and achieved scaffold N50 length of 712 kb. To validate assembly and annotation, we used synteny of A. halleri Tada mine with a previously published high-quality reference assembly of a closely related species, Arabidopsis lyrata. Further validation of the assembly quality comes from synteny and phylogenetic analysis of the HEAVY METAL ATPASE4 (HMA4) and METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN1 (MTP1) regions using published sequences from European A. halleri for comparison. Three tandemly duplicated copies of HMA4, key gene involved in cadmium and zinc hyperaccumulation, were assembled on a single scaffold. The assembly will enhance the genomewide studies of A. halleri as well as the allopolyploid Arabidopsis kamchatica derived from A. lyrata and A. halleri. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. What’s in the genome of a filamentous fungus? Analysis of the Neurospora genome sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannhaupt, Gertrud; Montrone, Corinna; Haase, Dirk; Mewes, H. Werner; Aign, Verena; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Fartmann, Berthold; Nyakatura, Gerald; Kempken, Frank; Maier, Josef; Schulte, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    The German Neurospora Genome Project has assembled sequences from ordered cosmid and BAC clones of linkage groups II and V of the genome of Neurospora crassa in 13 and 12 contigs, respectively. Including additional sequences located on other linkage groups a total of 12 Mb were subjected to a manual gene extraction and annotation process. The genome comprises a small number of repetitive elements, a low degree of segmental duplications and very few paralogous genes. The analysis of the 3218 identified open reading frames provides a first overview of the protein equipment of a filamentous fungus. Significantly, N.crassa possesses a large variety of metabolic enzymes including a substantial number of enzymes involved in the degradation of complex substrates as well as secondary metabolism. While several of these enzymes are specific for filamentous fungi many are shared exclusively with prokaryotes. PMID:12655011

  18. De novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequencing of whole genomic DNA provides first evidence of DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iorizzo Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence analysis of organelle genomes has revealed important aspects of plant cell evolution. The scope of this study was to develop an approach for de novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequence data from total genomic DNA. Results Sequencing data from a carrot 454 whole genome library were used to develop a de novo assembly of the mitochondrial genome. Development of a new bioinformatic tool allowed visualizing contig connections and elucidation of the de novo assembly. Southern hybridization demonstrated recombination across two large repeats. Genome annotation allowed identification of 44 protein coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA. Identification of the plastid genome sequence allowed organelle genome comparison. Mitochondrial intergenic sequence analysis allowed detection of a fragment of DNA specific to the carrot plastid genome. PCR amplification and sequence analysis across different Apiaceae species revealed consistent conservation of this fragment in the mitochondrial genomes and an insertion in Daucus plastid genomes, giving evidence of a mitochondrial to plastid transfer of DNA. Sequence similarity with a retrotransposon element suggests a possibility that a transposon-like event transferred this sequence into the plastid genome. Conclusions This study confirmed that whole genome sequencing is a practical approach for de novo assembly of higher plant mitochondrial genomes. In addition, a new aspect of intercompartmental genome interaction was reported providing the first evidence for DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome. The approach used here could be used more broadly to sequence and assemble mitochondrial genomes of diverse species. This information will allow us to better understand intercompartmental interactions and cell evolution.

  19. Genome sequence and description of Anaerosalibacter massiliensis sp. nov.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dione

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Anaerosalibacter massiliensis sp. nov. strain ND1T (= CSUR P762 = DSM 27308 is the type strain of A. massiliensis sp. nov., a new species within the genus Anaerosalibacter. This strain, the genome of which is described here, was isolated from the faecal flora of a 49-year-old healthy Brazilian man. Anaerosalibacter massiliensis is a Gram-positive, obligate anaerobic rod and member of the family Clostridiaceae. With the complete genome sequence and annotation, we describe here the features of this organism. The 3 197 911 bp long genome (one chromosome but no plasmid contains 3271 protein-coding and 62 RNA genes, including six rRNA genes.

  20. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dendrobium nobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenjin; Niu, Zhitao; Zhu, Shuying; Ye, Meirong; Ding, Xiaoyu

    2016-11-01

    The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of Dendrobium nobile, an endangered and traditional Chinese medicine with important economic value, is presented in this article. The total genome size is 150,793 bp, containing a large single copy (LSC) region (84,939 bp) and a small single copy region (SSC) (13,310 bp) which were separated by two inverted repeat (IRs) regions (26,272 bp). The overall GC contents of the plastid genome were 38.8%. In total, 130 unique genes were annotated and they were consisted of 76 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Fourteen genes contained one or two introns.

  1. NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq): a curated non-redundant sequence database of genomes, transcripts and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana; Maglott, Donna R

    2005-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/) provides a non-redundant collection of sequences representing genomic data, transcripts and proteins. Although the goal is to provide a comprehensive dataset representing the complete sequence information for any given species, the database pragmatically includes sequence data that are currently publicly available in the archival databases. The database incorporates data from over 2400 organisms and includes over one million proteins representing significant taxonomic diversity spanning prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses. Nucleotide and protein sequences are explicitly linked, and the sequences are linked to other resources including the NCBI Map Viewer and Gene. Sequences are annotated to include coding regions, conserved domains, variation, references, names, database cross-references, and other features using a combined approach of collaboration and other input from the scientific community, automated annotation, propagation from GenBank and curation by NCBI staff.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Streptobacillus moniliformis type strain (9901T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Matt; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla; Ivanova, Natalia; Copeland, Alex; Lucas, Susan; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sims, David; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Brettin, Thomas; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Spröer, Cathrin; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chain, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Streptobacillus moniliformis Levaditi et al. 1925 is the type and sole species of the genus Streptobacillus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the sparsely populated and neither taxonomically nor genomically much accessed family 'Leptotrichiaceae' within the phylum Fusobacteria. The 'Leptotrichiaceae' have not been well characterized, genomically or taxonomically. S. moniliformis,is a Gram-negative, non-motile, pleomorphic bacterium and is the etiologic agent of rat bite fever and Haverhill fever. Strain 9901T, the type strain of the species, was isolated from a patient with rat bite fever. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is only the second completed genome sequence of the order Fusobacteriales and no more than the third sequence from the phylum Fusobacteria. The 1,662,578 bp long chromosome and the 10,702 bp plasmid with a total of 1511 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes are part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304670

  3. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 8530

    OpenAIRE

    Pittet, Vanessa; Ewen, Emily; Bushell, Barry R.; Ziola, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is found in the human gastrointestinal tract and is important for probiotics. We became interested in L. rhamnosus isolate ATCC 8530 in relation to beer spoilage and hops resistance. We report here the genome sequence of this isolate, along with a brief comparison to other available L. rhamnosus genome sequences.

  4. PEST sequences in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum: a genomic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Angus

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibitors of the protease calpain are known to have selectively toxic effects on Plasmodium falciparum. The enzyme has a natural inhibitor calpastatin and in eukaryotes is responsible for turnover of proteins containing short sequences enriched in certain amino acids (PEST sequences. The genome of P. falciparum was searched for this protease, its natural inhibitor and putative substrates. Methods The publicly available P. falciparum genome was found to have too many errors to permit reliable analysis. An earlier annotation of chromosome 2 was instead examined. PEST scores were determined for all annotated proteins. The published genome was searched for calpain and calpastatin homologs. Results Typical PEST sequences were found in 13% of the proteins on chromosome 2, including a surprising number of cell-surface proteins. The annotated calpain gene has a non-biological "intron" that appears to have been created to avoid an unrecognized frameshift. Only the catalytic domain has significant similarity with the vertebrate calpains. No calpastatin homologs were found in the published annotation. Conclusion A calpain gene is present in the genome and many putative substrates of this enzyme have been found. Calpastatin homologs may be found once the re-annotation is completed. Given the selective toxicity of calpain inhibitors, this enzyme may be worth exploring further as a potential drug target.

  5. Annotated genes and nonannotated genomes: cross-species use of Gene Ontology in ecology and evolution research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primmer, C R; Papakostas, S; Leder, E H; Davis, M J; Ragan, M A

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in molecular technologies have opened up unprecedented opportunities for molecular ecologists to better understand the molecular basis of traits of ecological and evolutionary importance in almost any organism. Nevertheless, reliable and systematic inference of functionally relevant information from these masses of data remains challenging. The aim of this review is to highlight how the Gene Ontology (GO) database can be of use in resolving this challenge. The GO provides a largely species-neutral source of information on the molecular function, biological role and cellular location of tens of thousands of gene products. As it is designed to be species-neutral, the GO is well suited for cross-species use, meaning that, functional annotation derived from model organisms can be transferred to inferred orthologues in newly sequenced species. In other words, the GO can provide gene annotation information for species with nonannotated genomes. In this review, we describe the GO database, how functional information is linked with genes/gene products in model organisms, and how molecular ecologists can utilize this information to annotate their own data. Then, we outline various applications of GO for enhancing the understanding of molecular basis of traits in ecologically relevant species. We also highlight potential pitfalls, provide step-by-step recommendations for conducting a sound study in nonmodel organisms, suggest avenues for future research and outline a strategy for maximizing the benefits of a more ecological and evolutionary genomics-oriented ontology by ensuring its compatibility with the GO. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Sequencing, De Novo assembly and annotation of the Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, Transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata is a major pest and a serious threat to potato cultivation throughout the northern hemisphere. Despite its high importance for invasion biology, phenology and pest management, little is known about L. decemlineata from a genomic perspective. We subjected European L. decemlineata adult and larval transcriptome samples to 454-FLX massively-parallel DNA sequencing to characterize a basal set of genes from this species. We created a combined assembly of the adult and larval datasets including the publicly available midgut larval Roche 454 reads and provided basic annotation. We were particularly interested in diapause-specific genes and genes involved in pesticide and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt resistance. RESULTS: Using 454-FLX pyrosequencing, we obtained a total of 898,048 reads which, together with the publicly available 804,056 midgut larval reads, were assembled into 121,912 contigs. We established a repository of genes of interest, with 101 out of the 108 diapause-specific genes described in Drosophila montana; and 621 contigs involved in insecticide resistance, including 221 CYP450, 45 GSTs, 13 catalases, 15 superoxide dismutases, 22 glutathione peroxidases, 194 esterases, 3 ADAM metalloproteases, 10 cadherins and 98 calmodulins. We found 460 putative miRNAs and we predicted a significant number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (29,205 and microsatellite loci (17,284. CONCLUSIONS: This report of the assembly and annotation of the transcriptome of L. decemlineata offers new insights into diapause-associated and insecticide-resistance-associated genes in this species and provides a foundation for comparative studies with other species of insects. The data will also open new avenues for researchers using L. decemlineata as a model species, and for pest management research. Our results provide the basis for performing future gene expression and functional analysis in L

  7. Maize genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Lance E; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; O'Shaughnessy, Andrew L; Balija, Vivekanand S; Nascimento, Lidia U; Dike, Sujit; de la Bastide, Melissa; Martienssen, Robert A; McCombie, W Richard

    2003-12-19

    Gene enrichment strategies offer an alternative to sequencing large and repetitive genomes such as that of maize. We report the generation and analysis of nearly 100,000 undermethylated (or methylation filtration) maize sequences. Comparison with the rice genome reveals that methylation filtration results in a more comprehensive representation of maize genes than those that result from expressed sequence tags or transposon insertion sites sequences. About 7% of the repetitive DNA is unmethylated and thus selected in our libraries, but potentially active transposons and unmethylated organelle genomes can be identified. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction can be used to finish the maize transcriptome.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Archaeoglobus profundus type strain (AV18T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Jan, Mathias [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Eichinger, Konrad [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Archaeoglobus profundus (Burggraf et al. 1990) is a hyperthermophilic archaeon in the euryarchaeal class Archaeoglobi, which is currently represented by six validly named species and two taxonomically challenged 'Geoglobus' strains, all belonging to the same family Archaeoglobaceae. All members were isolated from marine hydrothermal habitats and are obligate anaerobes. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the second completed genome sequence of a member of the class Archaeoglobi. The 1,563,423 bp genome with its 1,858 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Sanguibacter keddieii type strain (ST-74T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Natalia; Sikorski, Johannes; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D' haeseleer, Patrik; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Goker, Markus; Pukall, Rudiger; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-20

    Sanguibacter keddieii is the type species of the genus Sanguibacter, the only described genus within the family of Sanguibacteraceae. Phylogenetically, this family is located in the neighbourhood of the genus Oerskovia and the family Cellulomonadaceae within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. The strain described in this report was isolated from blood of apparently healthy cows. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the family Sanguibacteraceae, and the 4,253,413 bp long single replicon genome with its 3735 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. TAPDANCE: An automated tool to identify and annotate transposon insertion CISs and associations between CISs from next generation sequence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarver Aaron L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation sequencing approaches applied to the analyses of transposon insertion junction fragments generated in high throughput forward genetic screens has created the need for clear informatics and statistical approaches to deal with the massive amount of data currently being generated. Previous approaches utilized to 1 map junction fragments within the genome and 2 identify Common Insertion Sites (CISs within the genome are not practical due to the volume of data generated by current sequencing technologies. Previous approaches applied to this problem also required significant manual annotation. Results We describe Transposon Annotation Poisson Distribution Association Network Connectivity Environment (TAPDANCE software, which automates the identification of CISs within transposon junction fragment insertion data. Starting with barcoded sequence data, the software identifies and trims sequences and maps putative genomic sequence to a reference genome using the bowtie short read mapper. Poisson distribution statistics are then applied to assess and rank genomic regions showing significant enrichment for transposon insertion. Novel methods of counting insertions are used to ensure that the results presented have the expected characteristics of informative CISs. A persistent mySQL database is generated and utilized to keep track of sequences, mappings and common insertion sites. Additionally, associations between phenotypes and CISs are also identified using Fisher’s exact test with multiple testing correction. In a case study using previously published data we show that the TAPDANCE software identifies CISs as previously described, prioritizes them based on p-value, allows holistic visualization of the data within genome browser software and identifies relationships present in the structure of the data. Conclusions The TAPDANCE process is fully automated, performs similarly to previous labor intensive approaches

  11. Human Genome Sequencing in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Following the “finished,” euchromatic, haploid human reference genome sequence, the rapid development of novel, faster, and cheaper sequencing technologies is making possible the era of personalized human genomics. Personal diploid human genome sequences have been generated, and each has contributed to our better understanding of variation in the human genome. We have consequently begun to appreciate the vastness of individual genetic variation from single nucleotide to structural variants. Translation of genome-scale variation into medically useful information is, however, in its infancy. This review summarizes the initial steps undertaken in clinical implementation of personal genome information, and describes the application of whole-genome and exome sequencing to identify the cause of genetic diseases and to suggest adjuvant therapies. Better analysis tools and a deeper understanding of the biology of our genome are necessary in order to decipher, interpret, and optimize clinical utility of what the variation in the human genome can teach us. Personal genome sequencing may eventually become an instrument of common medical practice, providing information that assists in the formulation of a differential diagnosis. We outline herein some of the remaining challenges. PMID:22248320

  12. Generation, analysis and functional annotation of expressed sequence tags from the ectoparasitic mite Psoroptes ovis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Fiona

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sheep scab is caused by Psoroptes ovis and is arguably the most important ectoparasitic disease affecting sheep in the UK. The disease is highly contagious and causes and considerable pruritis and irritation and is therefore a major welfare concern. Current methods of treatment are unsustainable and in order to elucidate novel methods of disease control a more comprehensive understanding of the parasite is required. To date, no full genomic DNA sequence or large scale transcript datasets are available and prior to this study only 484 P. ovis expressed sequence tags (ESTs were accessible in public databases. Results In order to further expand upon the transcriptomic coverage of P. ovis thus facilitating novel insights into the mite biology we undertook a larger scale EST approach, incorporating newly generated and previously described P. ovis transcript data and representing the largest collection of P. ovis ESTs to date. We sequenced 1,574 ESTs and assembled these along with 484 previously generated P. ovis ESTs, which resulted in the identification of 1,545 unique P. ovis sequences. BLASTX searches identified 961 ESTs with significant hits (E-value P. ovis ESTs. Gene Ontology (GO analysis allowed the functional annotation of 880 ESTs and included predictions of signal peptide and transmembrane domains; allowing the identification of potential P. ovis excreted/secreted factors, and mapping of metabolic pathways. Conclusions This dataset currently represents the largest collection of P. ovis ESTs, all of which are publicly available in the GenBank EST database (dbEST (accession numbers FR748230 - FR749648. Functional analysis of this dataset identified important homologues, including house dust mite allergens and tick salivary factors. These findings offer new insights into the underlying biology of P. ovis, facilitating further investigations into mite biology and the identification of novel methods of intervention.

  13. Protein annotation in the era of personal genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holberg Blicher, Thomas; Gupta, Ramneek; Wesolowska, Agata;

    2010-01-01

    the differences between many individuals of the same species-humans in particular-the focus needs be on the functional impact of individual residue variation. To fulfil the promises of personal genomics, we need to start asking not only what is in a genome but also how millions of small differences between...

  14. The genome sequence of parrot bornavirus 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianhua; Tizard, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Although several new avian bornaviruses have recently been described, information on their evolution, virulence, and sequence are often limited. Here we report the complete genome sequence of parrot bornavirus 5 (PaBV-5) isolated from a case of proventricular dilatation disease in a Palm cockatoo (Probosciger aterrimus). The complete genome consists of 8842 nucleotides with distinct 5' and 3' end sequences. This virus shares nucleotide sequence identities of 69-74 % with other bornaviruses in the genomic regions excluding the 5' and 3' terminal sequences. Phylogenetic analysis based on the genomic regions demonstrated this new isolate is an isolated branch within the clade that includes the aquatic bird bornaviruses and the passerine bornaviruses. Based on phylogenetic analyses and its low nucleotide sequence identities with other bornavirus, we support the proposal that PaBV-5 be assigned to a new bornavirus species:- Psittaciform 2 bornavirus.

  15. Complete genome sequence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Massimiliano; Costelli, Cristina; Malavasi, Veronica; Cusano, Roberto; Concas, Alessandro; Angius, Andrea; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of mitochondrial genome of the Chlorella sorokiniana strain (SAG 111-8 k) is presented in this work. Within the Chlorella genus, it represents the second species with a complete sequenced and annotated mitochondrial genome (GenBank accession no. KM241869). The genome consists of circular chromosomes of 52,528 bp and encodes a total of 31 protein coding genes, 3 rRNAs and 26 tRNAs. The overall AT contents of the C. sorokiniana mtDNA is 70.89%, while the coding sequence is of 97.4%.

  16. Integrating multiple genome annotation databases improves the interpretation of microarray gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Breandan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Affymetrix GeneChip is a widely used gene expression profiling platform. Since the chips were originally designed, the genome databases and gene definitions have been considerably updated. Thus, more accurate interpretation of microarray data requires parallel updating of the specificity of GeneChip probes. We propose a new probe remapping protocol, using the zebrafish GeneChips as an example, by removing nonspecific probes, and grouping the probes into transcript level probe sets using an integrated zebrafish genome annotation. This genome annotation is based on combining transcript information from multiple databases. This new remapping protocol, especially the new genome annotation, is shown here to be an important factor in improving the interpretation of gene expression microarray data. Results Transcript data from the RefSeq, GenBank and Ensembl databases were downloaded from the UCSC genome browser, and integrated to generate a combined zebrafish genome annotation. Affymetrix probes were filtered and remapped according to the new annotation. The influence of transcript collection and gene definition methods was tested using two microarray data sets. Compared to remapping using a single database, this new remapping protocol results in up to 20% more probes being retained in the remapping, leading to approximately 1,000 more genes being detected. The differentially expressed gene lists are consequently increased by up to 30%. We are also able to detect up to three times more alternative splicing events. A small number of the bioinformatics predictions were confirmed using real-time PCR validation. Conclusions By combining gene definitions from multiple databases, it is possible to greatly increase the numbers of genes and splice variants that can be detected in microarray gene expression experiments.

  17. A combined approach for genome wide protein function annotation/prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benso, Alfredo; Di Carlo, Stefano; Ur Rehman, Hafeez

    2013-01-01

    proteins in functional genomics and biology in general motivates the use of computational techniques well orchestrated to accurately predict their functions. METHODS: We propose a computational flow for the functional annotation of a protein able to assign the most probable functions to a protein...

  18. Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-01

    Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Cyanobacteria) Strain ITEP-A1 Isolated from a Brazilian Semiarid Freshwater Body: Evidence of Saxitoxin and Cylindrospermopsin Synthetase Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzi,Adriana Sturion; Genivaldo Gueiros Z. Silva; Lopes, Fabyano Alvares Cardoso; Chia, Mathias Ahii; Edwards, Robert A.; Bittencourt-Oliveira, Maria Carmo

    2016-01-01

    Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii ITEP-A1 is a saxitoxin-producing cyanobacterium. We report the draft genome sequence of ITEP-A1, which comprised 195 contigs that were assembled with SPAdes and annotated with Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology. The identified genome sequence had 3,605,836 bp, 40.1% G+C, and predicted 3,553 coding sequences (including the synthetase genes).

  20. Genome sequence and comparative analysis of Avibacterium paragallinarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, David; Chumbe, Ana; Torres, Michael; Alzamora, Ofelia; Ramirez, Manuel; Valdivia-Olarte, Hugo; Gutierrez, Andres Hazaet; Izquierdo-Lara, Ray; Saravia, Luis Enrique; Zavaleta, Milagros; Tataje-Lavanda, Luis; Best, Ivan; Fernández-Sánchez, Manolo; Icochea, Eliana; Zimic, Mirko; Fernández-Díaz, Manolo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Avibacterium paragallinarum, the causative agent of infectious coryza, is a highly contagious respiratory acute disease of poultry, which affects commercial chickens, laying hens and broilers worldwide. Methodology: In this study, we performed the whole genome sequencing, assembly and annotation of a Peruvian isolate of A. paragallinarum. Genome was sequenced in a 454 GS FLX Titanium system. De novo assembly was performed and annotation was completed with GS De Novo Assembler 2.6 using the H. influenzae str. F3031 gene model. Manual curation of the genome was performed with Artemis. Putative function of genes was predicted with Blast2GO. Virulence factors were identified by comparison with the Virulence Factor Database. Results: The genome obtained has a length of 2.47 Mb with 40.66% of GC content. Seventy five large contigs (>500 nt) were obtained, which comprised 1,204 predicted genes. All the contigs are available in Genbank [GenBank: PRJNA64665]. A total of 103 virulence factors, reported in the Virulence Factor Database, were found in A. paragallinarum. Forty four of them are present in 7 species of Haemophilus, which are related with pathogenesis, virulence and host immune system evasion. A tetracycline-resistance associated transposon (Tn10), was found in A. paragallinarum, possibly acting as a defense mechanism. Discussion and conclusion: The availability of A. paragallinarum genome represents an important source of information for the development of diagnostic tests, genotyping, and novel antigens for potential vaccines against infectious coryza. Identification of virulence factors contributes to better understanding the pathogenesis, and planning efforts for prevention and control of the disease. PMID:23861570

  1. Complete genome sequence of Streptobacillus moniliformis type strain (9901T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Sproer, Cathrin [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2009-01-01

    Streptobacillus moniliformis Levaditi et al. 1925 is the sole and type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the sparsely populated and neither taxonomically nor genomically much accessed family 'Leptotrichiaceae' within the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. S. moniliformis, a Gram-negative, non-motile and pleomorphic bacterium, is the etiologic agent of rat bite fever and Haverhill fever. Strain 9901T, the type strain of the species, was isolated from a patient with rat bite fever. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is only the second completed genome sequence of the order 'Fusobacteriales' and no more than the third sequence from the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. The 1,662,578 bp long chromosome and the 10,702 bp plasmid with a total of 1511 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes are part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mayilraj, Shanmugam [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2009-01-01

    Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Chen, Feng; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Tindall, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  4. ChickVD: a sequence variation database for the chicken genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; He, Ximiao; Ruan, Jue

    2005-01-01

    Working in parallel with the efforts to sequence the chicken (Gallus gallus) genome, the Beijing Genomics Institute led an international team of scientists from China, USA, UK, Sweden, The Netherlands and Germany to map extensive DNA sequence variation throughout the chicken genome by sampling DNA...... from domestic breeds. Using the Red Jungle Fowl genome sequence as a reference, we identified 3.1 million non-redundant DNA sequence variants. To facilitate the application of our data to avian genetics and to provide a foundation for functional and evolutionary studies, we created the 'Chicken...... Variation Database' (ChickVD). A graphical MapView shows variants mapped onto the chicken genome in the context of gene annotations and other features, including genetic markers, trait loci, cDNAs, chicken orthologs of human disease genes and raw sequence traces. ChickVD also stores information...

  5. Strategies for complete plastid genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyford, Alex D; Ness, Rob W

    2016-10-28

    Plastid sequencing is an essential tool in the study of plant evolution. This high-copy organelle is one of the most technically accessible regions of the genome, and its sequence conservation makes it a valuable region for comparative genome evolution, phylogenetic analysis and population studies. Here, we discuss recent innovations and approaches for de novo plastid assembly that harness genomic tools. We focus on technical developments including low-cost sequence library preparation approaches for genome skimming, enrichment via hybrid baits and methylation-sensitive capture, sequence platforms with higher read outputs and longer read lengths, and automated tools for assembly. These developments allow for a much more streamlined assembly than via conventional short-range PCR. Although newer methods make complete plastid sequencing possible for any land plant or green alga, there are still challenges for producing finished plastomes particularly from herbarium material or from structurally divergent plastids such as those of parasitic plants.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis INTA Fr7-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Marcelo F.; Ortiz, Elio M.; Sauka, Diego H.; Benintende, Graciela B.; Zandomeni, Rubén O.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the complete annotated 6,035,547-bp draft genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis INTA Fr7-4. This strain contains three cry8 and two vip1 and vip2 insecticidal toxin genes. PMID:28360155

  7. Complete genome sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain isolated from a known cotton insect boll vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (associated with bacterial pneumonia) was previously isolated from Nezara viridula, a significant vector of cotton boll-rot pathogens. We provide the first annotated genome sequence of the cotton opportunistic strain K. pneumoniae 5-1. This data provides guidance to study the...

  8. Draft genome sequence of Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica BD11-00177

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, J.P.M.; Sjödin, A.; Maraha, B.; Hajer, G.F.; Forsman, M.; Verspui, E.; Frenay, H.M.E.; Notermans, D.W.; Vries, M.C. de; Reubsaet, F.A.G.; Paauw, A.; Roeselers, G.

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium in the class Gammaproteobacteria. This strain is of interest because it is the etiologic agent of tularemia and a highly virulent category A biothreat agent. Here we describe the draft genome sequence and annotation of Francisella tular

  9. Whole-Genome Sequence and Classification of 11 Endophytic Bacteria from Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans)

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the whole-genome sequences and annotation of 11 endophytic bacteria from poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) vine tissue. Five bacteria belong to the genus Pseudomonas, and six single members from other genera were found present in interior vine tissue of poison ivy.

  10. Whole-Genome Sequence and Classification of 11 Endophytic Bacteria from Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phuong N; Tan, Nicholas E H; Lee, Yin Peng; Gan, Han Ming; Polter, Steven J; Dailey, Lucas K; Hudson, André O; Savka, Michael A

    2015-11-19

    Here, we report the whole-genome sequences and annotation of 11 endophytic bacteria from poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) vine tissue. Five bacteria belong to the genus Pseudomonas, and six single members from other genera were found present in interior vine tissue of poison ivy.

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of 10 Microbacterium spp., with Emphasis on Heavy Metal-Contaminated Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corretto, Erika; Antonielli, Livio; Sessitsch, Angela; Kidd, Petra; Weyens, Nele; Brader, Günter

    2015-05-14

    Microbacterium spp. isolated from heavy metal (HM)-contaminated environments (soil and plants) can play a role in mobilization processes and in the phytoextraction of HM. Here, we report the whole-genome sequences and annotation of 10 Microbacterium spp. isolated from both HM-contaminated and -noncontaminated compartments. Copyright © 2015 Corretto et al.

  12. Complete genome sequence of the commensal Streptococcus salivarius strain JIM8777.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guédon, Eric; Delorme, Christine; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Loux, Valentin; Couloux, Arnaud; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Layec, Séverine; Galleron, Nathalie; Almeida, Mathieu; van de Guchte, Maarten; Kennedy, Sean P; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is a prevalent species of the human oropharyngeal tract with an important role in oral ecology. Here, we report the complete 2.2-Mb genome sequence and annotation of strain JIM8777, which was recently isolated from the oral cavity of a healthy, dentate infant. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Strain G-12-005

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; Bablishvili, Nino; Gauthier, Marie; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Infection caused by drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a growing concern, especially in eastern Europe. We report an annotated draft genome sequence of M. tuberculosis strain G-12-005 obtained from a patient in Georgia. PMID:24812221

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Escherichia Phage ADB-2 Isolated from a Fecal Sample of Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhensdadia, D V; Bhimani, H D; Rawal, C M; Kothari, V V; Raval, V H; Kothari, C R; Patel, A B; Bhatt, V D; Parmar, N R; Sajnani, M R; Koringa, P G; Joshi, C G; Singh, S P; Kothari, R K

    2013-03-14

    Escherichia phage ADB-2 was isolated from a chicken fecal sample. It is a virulent phage and shows effective inhibition of Escherichia coli strains. Here we announce the completely sequenced genome of Escherichia phage ADB-2, and major findings from its annotation are described.

  15. Plantagora: modeling whole genome sequencing and assembly of plant genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Barthelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genomics studies are being revolutionized by the next generation sequencing technologies, which have made whole genome sequencing much more accessible to the average researcher. Whole genome sequencing with the new technologies is a developing art that, despite the large volumes of data that can be produced, may still fail to provide a clear and thorough map of a genome. The Plantagora project was conceived to address specifically the gap between having the technical tools for genome sequencing and knowing precisely the best way to use them. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For Plantagora, a platform was created for generating simulated reads from several different plant genomes of different sizes. The resulting read files mimicked either 454 or Illumina reads, with varying paired end spacing. Thousands of datasets of reads were created, most derived from our primary model genome, rice chromosome one. All reads were assembled with different software assemblers, including Newbler, Abyss, and SOAPdenovo, and the resulting assemblies were evaluated by an extensive battery of metrics chosen for these studies. The metrics included both statistics of the assembly sequences and fidelity-related measures derived by alignment of the assemblies to the original genome source for the reads. The results were presented in a website, which includes a data graphing tool, all created to help the user compare rapidly the feasibility and effectiveness of different sequencing and assembly strategies prior to testing an approach in the lab. Some of our own conclusions regarding the different strategies were also recorded on the website. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Plantagora provides a substantial body of information for comparing different approaches to sequencing a plant genome, and some conclusions regarding some of the specific approaches. Plantagora also provides a platform of metrics and tools for studying the process of sequencing and assembly

  16. Annotated expressed sequence tags and cDNA microarrays for studies of brain and behavior in the honey bee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Charles W; Band, Mark R; Bonaldo, Maria F; Kumar, Charu G; Liu, Lei; Pardinas, Jose R; Robertson, Hugh M; Soares, M Bento; Robinson, Gene E

    2002-04-01

    To accelerate the molecular analysis of behavior in the honey bee (Apis mellifera), we created expressed sequence tag (EST) and cDNA microarray resources for the bee brain. Over 20,000 cDNA clones were partially sequenced from a normalized (and subsequently subtracted) library generated from adult A. mellifera brains. These sequences were processed to identify 15,311 high-quality ESTs representing 8912 putative transcripts. Putative transcripts were functionally annotated (using the Gene Ontology classification system) based on matching gene sequences in Drosophila melanogaster. The brain ESTs represent a broad range of molecular functions and biological processes, with neurobiological classifications particularly well represented. Roughly half of Drosophila genes currently implicated in synaptic transmission and/or behavior are represented in the Apis EST set. Of Apis sequences with open reading frames of at least 450 bp, 24% are highly diverged with no matches to known protein sequences. Additionally, over 100 Apis transcript sequences conserved with other organisms appear to have been lost from the Drosophila genome. DNA microarrays were fabricated with over 7000 EST cDNA clones putatively representing different transcripts. Using probe derived from single bee brain mRNA, microarrays detected gene expression for 90% of Apis cDNAs two standard deviations greater than exogenous control cDNAs. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to Genbank data library under accession nos. BI502708-BI517278. The sequences are also available at http://titan.biotec.uiuc.edu/bee/honeybee_project.htm.

  17. GI-SVM: A sensitive method for predicting genomic islands based on unannotated sequence of a single genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bingxin; Leong, Hon Wai

    2016-02-01

    Genomic islands (GIs) are clusters of functionally related genes acquired by lateral genetic transfer (LGT), and they are present in many bacterial genomes. GIs are extremely important for bacterial research, because they not only promote genome evolution but also contain genes that enhance adaption and enable antibiotic resistance. Many methods have been proposed to predict GI. But most of them rely on either annotations or comparisons with other closely related genomes. Hence these methods cannot be easily applied to new genomes. As the number of newly sequenced bacterial genomes rapidly increases, there is a need for methods to detect GI based solely on sequences of a single genome. In this paper, we propose a novel method, GI-SVM, to predict GIs given only the unannotated genome sequence. GI-SVM is based on one-class support vector machine (SVM), utilizing composition bias in terms of k-mer content. From our evaluations on three real genomes, GI-SVM can achieve higher recall compared with current methods, without much loss of precision. Besides, GI-SVM allows flexible parameter tuning to get optimal results for each genome. In short, GI-SVM provides a more sensitive method for researchers interested in a first-pass detection of GI in newly sequenced genomes.

  18. Five Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences from Diospyros: Genome Organization and Comparative Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Fu

    Full Text Available Diospyros is the largest genus in Ebenaceae, comprising more than 500 species with remarkable economic value, especially Diospyros kaki Thunb., which has traditionally been an important food resource in China, Korea, and Japan. Complete chloroplast (cp genomes from D. kaki, D. lotus L., D. oleifera Cheng., D. glaucifolia Metc., and Diospyros 'Jinzaoshi' were sequenced using Illumina sequencing technology. This is the first cp genome reported in Ebenaceae. The cp genome sequences of Diospyros ranged from 157,300 to 157,784 bp in length, presenting a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats each separated by one large and one small single-copy region. For each cp genome, 134 genes were annotated, including 80 protein-coding, 31 tRNA, and 4 rRNA unique genes. In all, 179 repeats and 283 single sequence repeats were identified. Four hypervariable regions, namely, intergenic region of trnQ_rps16, trnV_ndhC, and psbD_trnT, and intron of ndhA, were identified in the Diospyros genomes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the whole cp genome, protein-coding, and intergenic and intron sequences indicated that D. oleifera is closely related to D. kaki and could be used as a model plant for future research on D. kaki; to our knowledge, this is proposed for the first time. Further, these analyses together with two large deletions (301 and 140 bp in the cp genome of D. 'Jinzaoshi', support its placement as a new species in Diospyros. Both maximum parsimony and likelihood analyses for 19 taxa indicated the basal position of Ericales in asterids and suggested that Ebenaceae is monophyletic in Ericales.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Virginia [University of Florida; Nong, Guang [University of Florida; St. John, Franz J. [US Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; Dickstein, Ellen [University of Florida; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Martin, Joel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Jones, Jeffrey B. [University of Florida; Ingram, Lonnie O. [University of Florida; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T. [University of Florida; Preston, James F. [University of Florida

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) wood, is able to efficiently depolymerize, assimilate and metabolize 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, the predominant structural component of hardwood hemicelluloses. A basis for this capability was first supported by the identification of genes and characterization of encoded enzymes and has been further defined by the sequencing and annotation of the complete genome, which we describe. In addition to genes implicated in the utilization of -1,4-xylan, genes have also been identified for the utilization of other hemicellulosic polysaccharides. The genome of Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 contains 7,184,930 bp in a single replicon with 6,288 protein-coding and 122 RNA genes. Uniquely prominent are 874 genes encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. The prevalence and organization of these genes support a metabolic potential for bioprocessing of hemicellulose fractions derived from lignocellulosic resources.

  20. Microbial species delineation using whole genome sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatics, Kostas; Pati, Amrita; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos

    2014-10-20

    Species assignments in prokaryotes use a manual, poly-phasic approach utilizing both phenotypic traits and sequence information of phylogenetic marker genes. With thousands of genomes being sequenced every year, an automated, uniform and scalable approach exploiting the rich genomic information in whole genome sequences is desired, at least for the initial assignment of species to an organism. We have evaluated pairwise genome-wide Average Nucleotide Identity (gANI) values and alignment fractions (AFs) for nearly 13,000 genomes using our fast implementation of the computation, identifying robust and widely applicable hard cut-offs for species assignments based on AF and gANI. Using these cutoffs, we generated stable species-level clusters of organisms, which enabled the identification of several species mis-assignments and facilitated the assignment of species for organisms without species definitions.

  1. Genomic Prediction from Whole Genome Sequence in Livestock: The 1000 Bull Genomes Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, Benjamin J; MacLeod, Iona M; Daetwyler, Hans D

    Advantages of using whole genome sequence data to predict genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) include better persistence of accuracy of GEBV across generations and more accurate GEBV across breeds. The 1000 Bull Genomes Project provides a database of whole genome sequenced key ancestor bulls...

  2. Evaluation of relational and NoSQL database architectures to manage genomic annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Wade L; Nelson, Brent G; Felker, Donn K; Durant, Thomas J S; Torres, Richard

    2016-12-01

    While the adoption of next generation sequencing has rapidly expanded, the informatics infrastructure used to manage the data generated by this technology has not kept pace. Historically, relational databases have provided much of the framework for data storage and retrieval. Newer technologies based on NoSQL architectures may provide significant advantages in storage and query efficiency, thereby reducing the cost of data management. But their relative advantage when applied to biomedical data sets, such as genetic data, has not been characterized. To this end, we compared the storage, indexing, and query efficiency of a common relational database (MySQL), a document-oriented NoSQL database (MongoDB), and a relational database with NoSQL support (PostgreSQL). When used to store genomic annotations from the dbSNP database, we found the NoSQL architectures to outperform traditional, relational models for speed of data storage, indexing, and query retrieval in nearly every operation. These findings strongly support the use of novel database technologies to improve the efficiency of data management within the biological sciences.

  3. Genomic prediction using QTL derived from whole genome sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum, Rasmus Froberg; Su, Guosheng; Janss, Luc

    This study investigated the gain in accuracy of genomic prediction when a small number of significant variants from single marker analysis based on whole genome sequence data were added to the regular 54k SNP data. Analyses were performed for Nordic Holstein and Danish Jersey animals, using eithe...

  4. MGmapper: Reference based mapping and taxonomy annotation of metagenomics sequence reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Thomas Nordahl; Lukjancenko, Oksana; Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Maddalena Sperotto, Maria; Lund, Ole; Møller Aarestrup, Frank; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    An increasing amount of species and gene identification studies rely on the use of next generation sequence analysis of either single isolate or metagenomics samples. Several methods are available to perform taxonomic annotations and a previous metagenomics benchmark study has shown that a vast number of false positive species annotations are a problem unless thresholds or post-processing are applied to differentiate between correct and false annotations. MGmapper is a package to process raw next generation sequence data and perform reference based sequence assignment, followed by a post-processing analysis to produce reliable taxonomy annotation at species and strain level resolution. An in-vitro bacterial mock community sample comprised of 8 genuses, 11 species and 12 strains was previously used to benchmark metagenomics classification methods. After applying a post-processing filter, we obtained 100% correct taxonomy assignments at species and genus level. A sensitivity and precision at 75% was obtained for strain level annotations. A comparison between MGmapper and Kraken at species level, shows MGmapper assigns taxonomy at species level using 84.8% of the sequence reads, compared to 70.5% for Kraken and both methods identified all species with no false positives. Extensive read count statistics are provided in plain text and excel sheets for both rejected and accepted taxonomy annotations. The use of custom databases is possible for the command-line version of MGmapper, and the complete pipeline is freely available as a bitbucked package (https://bitbucket.org/genomicepidemiology/mgmapper). A web-version (https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MGmapper) provides the basic functionality for analysis of small fastq datasets.

  5. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Total-Genome-Sequenced Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Voldby; Cosentino, Salvatore; Rasmussen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Accurate strain identification is essential for anyone working with bacteria. For many species, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered the "gold standard" of typing, but it is traditionally performed in an expensive and time-consuming manner. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS...... the MLST databases are downloaded monthly, and the best-matching MLST alleles of the specified MLST scheme are found using a BLAST-based ranking method. The sequence type is then determined by the combination of alleles identified. The method was tested on preassembled genomes from 336 isolates covering 56...... MLST schemes, on short sequence reads from 387 isolates covering 10 schemes, and on a small test set of short sequence reads from 29 isolates for which the sequence type had been determined by traditional methods. The method presented here enables investigators to determine the sequence types...

  6. The characterization of twenty sequenced human genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Pelak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the analysis of twenty human genomes to evaluate the prospects for identifying rare functional variants that contribute to a phenotype of interest. We sequenced at high coverage ten "case" genomes from individuals with severe hemophilia A and ten "control" genomes. We summarize the number of genetic variants emerging from a study of this magnitude, and provide a proof of concept for the identification of rare and highly-penetrant functional variants by confirming that the cause of hemophilia A is easily recognizable in this data set. We also show that the number of novel single nucleotide variants (SNVs discovered per genome seems to stabilize at about 144,000 new variants per genome, after the first 15 individuals have been sequenced. Finally, we find that, on average, each genome carries 165 homozygous protein-truncating or stop loss variants in genes representing a diverse set of pathways.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of the Novel Temperate Clostridium difficile Phage phiCDIF1296T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Johannes; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Gronow, Sabine; Overmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile contains many integrated and extrachromosomal genetic elements. In this study, we determined, annotated, and analyzed the complete genome of the C. difficile bacteriophage phiCDIF1296T using single-molecule real-time sequencing technology. To our knowledge, this represents the largest genome (131 kb) of a temperate C. difficile phage recognized so far. PMID:26294621

  8. Non-redundant patent sequence databases with value-added annotations at two levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weizhong; McWilliam, Hamish; de la Torre, Ana Richart; Grodowski, Adam; Benediktovich, Irina; Goujon, Mickael; Nauche, Stephane; Lopez, Rodrigo

    2010-01-01

    The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) provides public access to patent data, including abstracts, chemical compounds and sequences. Sequences can appear multiple times due to the filing of the same invention with multiple patent offices, or the use of the same sequence by different inventors in different contexts. Information relating to the source invention may be incomplete, and biological information available in patent documents elsewhere may not be reflected in the annotation of the sequence. Search and analysis of these data have become increasingly challenging for both the scientific and intellectual-property communities. Here, we report a collection of non-redundant patent sequence databases, which cover the EMBL-Bank nucleotides patent class and the patent protein databases and contain value-added annotations from patent documents. The databases were created at two levels by the use of sequence MD5 checksums. Sequences within a level-1 cluster are 100% identical over their whole length. Level-2 clusters were defined by sub-grouping level-1 clusters based on patent family information. Value-added annotations, such as publication number corrections, earliest publication dates and feature collations, significantly enhance the quality of the data, allowing for better tracking and cross-referencing. The databases are available format: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/patentdata/nr/.

  9. Non-redundant patent sequence databases with value-added annotations at two levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weizhong; McWilliam, Hamish; de la Torre, Ana Richart; Grodowski, Adam; Benediktovich, Irina; Goujon, Mickael; Nauche, Stephane; Lopez, Rodrigo

    2010-01-01

    The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) provides public access to patent data, including abstracts, chemical compounds and sequences. Sequences can appear multiple times due to the filing of the same invention with multiple patent offices, or the use of the same sequence by different inventors in different contexts. Information relating to the source invention may be incomplete, and biological information available in patent documents elsewhere may not be reflected in the annotation of the sequence. Search and analysis of these data have become increasingly challenging for both the scientific and intellectual-property communities. Here, we report a collection of non-redundant patent sequence databases, which cover the EMBL-Bank nucleotides patent class and the patent protein databases and contain value-added annotations from patent documents. The databases were created at two levels by the use of sequence MD5 checksums. Sequences within a level-1 cluster are 100% identical over their whole length. Level-2 clusters were defined by sub-grouping level-1 clusters based on patent family information. Value-added annotations, such as publication number corrections, earliest publication dates and feature collations, significantly enhance the quality of the data, allowing for better tracking and cross-referencing. The databases are available format: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/patentdata/nr/. PMID:19884134

  10. A video annotation methodology for interactive video sequence generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindley, C.A.; Earnshaw, R.A.; Vince, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The FRAMES project within the RDN CRC (Cooperative Research Centre for Research Data Networks) has developed an experimental environment for dynamic virtual video sequence synthesis from databases of video data. A major issue for the development of dynamic interactive video applications of this type

  11. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics reveal a repertoire of putative pathogenicity genes in chilli anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum truncatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Soumya; Nandineni, Madhusudan R

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum truncatum, a major fungal phytopathogen, causes the anthracnose disease on an economically important spice crop chilli (Capsicum annuum), resulting in huge economic losses in tropical and sub-tropical countries. It follows a subcuticular intramural infection strategy on chilli with a short, asymptomatic, endophytic phase, which contrasts with the intracellular hemibiotrophic lifestyle adopted by most of the Colletotrichum species. However, little is known about the molecular determinants and the mechanism of pathogenicity in this fungus. A high quality whole genome sequence and gene annotation based on transcriptome data of an Indian isolate of C. truncatum from chilli has been obtained. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed a rich repertoire of pathogenicity genes in C. truncatum encoding secreted proteins, effectors, plant cell wall degrading enzymes, secondary metabolism associated proteins, with potential roles in the host-specific infection strategy, placing it next only to the Fusarium species. The size of genome assembly, number of predicted genes and some of the functional categories were similar to other sequenced Colletotrichum species. The comparative genomic analyses with other species and related fungi identified some unique genes and certain highly expanded gene families of CAZymes, proteases and secondary metabolism associated genes in the genome of C. truncatum. The draft genome assembly and functional annotation of potential pathogenicity genes of C. truncatum provide an important genomic resource for understanding the biology and lifestyle of this important phytopathogen and will pave the way for designing efficient disease control regimens.

  12. Genome sequence and analysis of Lactobacillus helveticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eCremonesi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological characterization of lactobacilli is historically well developed, but the genomic analysis is recent. Because of the widespread use of L. helveticus in cheese technology, information concerning the heterogeneity in this species is accumulating rapidly. Recently, the genome of five L. helveticus strains was sequenced to completion and compared with other genomically characterized lactobacilli. The genomic analysis of the first sequenced strain, L. helveticus DPC 4571, isolated from cheese and selected for its characteristics of rapid lysis and high proteolytic activity, has revealed a plethora of genes with industrial potential including those responsible for key metabolic functions such as proteolysis, lipolysis, and cell lysis. These genes and their derived enzymes can facilitate the production of cheese and cheese derivatives with potential for use as ingredients in consumer foods. In addition, L. helveticus has the potential to produce peptides with a biological function, such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activity, in fermented dairy products, demonstrating the therapeutic value of this species. A most intriguing feature of the genome of L. helveticus is the remarkable similarity in gene content with many intestinal lactobacilli. Comparative genomics has allowed the identification of key gene sets that facilitate a variety of lifestyles including adaptation to food matrices or the gastrointestinal tract.As genome sequence and functional genomic information continues to explode, key features of the genomes of L. helveticus strains continue to be discovered, answering many questions but also raising many new ones.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Anaerococcus prevotii type strain (PC1T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaButti, Kurt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Steenblock, Katja [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Anaerococcus prevotii (Foubert and Douglas 1948) Ezaki et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its arguable assignment to the provisionally arranged family Peptostreptococcaceae . A. prevotii is an obligate anaerobic coccus, usually arranged in clumps or tetrads. The strain, whose genome is described here, was originally isolated from human plasma; other strains of the species were also isolated from clinical specimen. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus. Next to Finegoldia magna, A. prevotii is only the second species from the family Peptostreptococcaceae for which a complete genome sequence is described. The 1,998,633 bp long genome (chromosome and one plasmid) with its 1852 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Microbacterium sp. Strain Alg239_V18, an Actinobacterium Retrieved from the Marine Sponge Spongia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Elham; Gonçalves, Jorge M S; Reis, Margarida; Costa, Rodrigo

    2017-01-19

    Here, we describe the draft genome sequence of Microbacterium sp. strain Alg239_V18, an actinobacterium retrieved from the marine sponge Spongia sp. Genome annotation revealed a vast gene repertoire involved in antibiotic and heavy metal-resistance, and a versatile carbohydrate assimilation metabolism with potential for chitin utilization.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Methanohalophilus mahii Strain DAL1 Reconstructed from a Hydraulic Fracturing-Produced Water Metagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipus, Daniel; Vikram, Amit

    2016-01-01

    We report here the 1,882,100-bp draft genome sequence of Methanohalophilus mahii strain DAL1, recovered from Marcellus Shale hydraulic fracturing-produced water using metagenomic contig binning. Genome annotation revealed several key methanogenesis genes and provides valuable information on archaeal activity associated with hydraulic fracturing-produced water environments. PMID:27587817

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of a Potential Novel Bacillus sp. Strain, FJAT-18017, Isolated from a Potato Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Hong; Wang, Jie-Ping; Che, Jian-Mei; Chen, Qian-Qian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-18017 was isolated from a potato field in Xinjiang, China. This paper is the first report, to our knowledge, to demonstrate the fully sequenced and completely annotated genome of Bacillus sp. FJAT-18017. The genome size is 5,265,521 bp. The average G+C content was 42.42%. PMID:28104649

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Brucella melitensis Strain ADMAS-G1, Isolated from Placental Fluids of an Aborted Goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shome, Rajeswari; Krithiga, Natesan; Muttannagouda, Revanasiddappa Biradar; Veeregowda, Belamaranahalli Muniveerappa; Swati, Sahay; Shome, Bibek Ranjan; Vishnu, Udayakumar; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rahman, Habibur; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2013-10-10

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of the Brucella melitensis strain designated ADMAS-G1, isolated from placental fluids of an aborted goat. The length of the genome is 3,284,982 bp, with a 57.3% GC content. A total of 3,325 protein-coding genes and 63 RNA genes were predicted.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Brucella melitensis Strain ADMAS-G1, Isolated from Placental Fluids of an Aborted Goat

    OpenAIRE

    Shome, Rajeswari; Krithiga, Natesan; Muttannagouda, Revanasiddappa Biradar; Veeregowda, Belamaranahalli Muniveerappa; Swati, Sahay; Shome, Bibek Ranjan; Vishnu, Udayakumar; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rahman, Habibur; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of the Brucella melitensis strain designated ADMAS-G1, isolated from placental fluids of an aborted goat. The length of the genome is 3,284,982 bp, with a 57.3% GC content. A total of 3,325 protein-coding genes and 63 RNA genes were predicted.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Desulfomicrobium baculatum type strain (XT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Schneider, Susan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2009-01-01

    Desulfomicrobium baculatum is the type species of the genus Desulfomicrobium, which is the type genus of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae. It is of phylogenetic interest because of the isolated location of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae within the order Desulfovibrionales. D. baculatum strain XT is a Gram-negative, motile, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from wa-ter-saturated manganese carbonate ore. It is strictly anaerobic and does not require NaCl for growth, although NaCl concentrations up to 6% (w/v) are tolerated. The metabolism is respi-ratory or fermentative. In the presence of sulfate, pyruvate and lactate are incompletely oxi-dized to acetate and CO2. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the deltaproteobacterial family Desulfomicrobiaceae, and this 3,942,657 bp long single replicon genome with its 3494 protein-coding and 72 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. Complete genome sequence Methanothermus fervidus type strain (V24ST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Djao, Olivier Duplex [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Misra, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Eichinger, Konrad [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Methanothermus fervidus Stetter 1982 is the type strain of the genus Methanothermus. This hyperthermophilic genus is of a thought to be endemic in Icelandic hot springs. M. fervidus was not only the first characterized organism with a maximal growth temperature (97 C) close to the boiling point of water, but also the first archaeon in which a detailed functional analysis of its histone protein was reported and the first one in which the function of 2,3-cyclodiphosphoglycerate in thermoadaptation was characterized. Strain V24ST is of interest because of its very low substrate ranges, it grows only on H2 + CO2. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Methanothermaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,243,342 bp long genome with its 1,311 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Desulfomicrobium baculatum type strain (XT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Alex; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Schneider, Susanne; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Lucas, Susan

    2009-05-20

    Desulfomicrobium baculatum is the type species of the genus Desulfomicrobium, which is the type genus of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae. It is of phylogenetic interest because of the isolated location of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae within the order Desulfovibrionales. D. baculatum strain XT is a Gram-negative, motile, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from water-saturated manganese carbonate ore. It is strictly anaerobic and does not require NaCl for growth, although NaCl concentrations up to 6percent (w/v) are tolerated. The metabolism is respiratory or fermentative. In the presence of sulfate, pyruvate and lactate are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO2. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the deltaproteobacterial family Desulfomicrobiaceae, and this 3,942,657 bp long single replicon genome with its 3494 protein-coding and 72 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. The genome sequence and insights into the immunogenetics of the bananaquit (Passeriformes: Coereba flaveola).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonides, Jennifer; Ricklefs, Robert; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2017-03-01

    Avian genomics, especially of non-model species, is in its infancy relative to mammalian genomics. Here, we describe the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of a new avian genome, that of the bananaquit Coereba flaveola (Passeriformes: Thraupidae). We produced ∼30-fold coverage of the genome with an assembly size of ca. 1.2 Gb, including approximately 16,500 annotated genes. Passerine birds, such as the bananaquit, are commonly infected by avian malarial parasites (Haemosporida), which presumably drive adaptive evolution of immunogenetic loci within the host genome. In the context of our research on the distribution of avian Haemosporida, we specifically characterized immune loci, including toll-like receptor (TLR) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. Additionally, we identified novel molecular markers in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), both genome-wide and within identified immune loci. We discovered nine TLR genes and four MHC genes and identified five other TLR- or MHC- associated genes. Genome-wide, over 6 million high-quality SNPs were annotated, including 568 within TLR genes and 102 in MHC genes. This newly described genome and immune characterization expands the knowledge base for avian genomics and phylogenetics and allows for immune genotyping in the bananaquit, providing tools for the investigation of host-parasite coevolution.

  3. Breaking the 1000-gene barrier for Mimivirus using ultra-deep genome and transcriptome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claverie Jean-Michel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mimivirus, a giant dsDNA virus infecting Acanthamoeba, is the prototype of the mimiviridae family, the latest addition to the family of the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs. Its 1.2 Mb-genome was initially predicted to encode 917 genes. A subsequent RNA-Seq analysis precisely mapped many transcript boundaries and identified 75 new genes. Findings We now report a much deeper analysis using the SOLiD™ technology combining RNA-Seq of the Mimivirus transcriptome during the infectious cycle (202.4 Million reads, and a complete genome re-sequencing (45.3 Million reads. This study corrected the genome sequence and identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms. Our results also provided clear evidence of previously overlooked transcription units, including an important RNA polymerase subunit distantly related to Euryarchea homologues. The total Mimivirus gene count is now 1018, 11% greater than the original annotation. Conclusions This study highlights the huge progress brought about by ultra-deep sequencing for the comprehensive annotation of virus genomes, opening the door to a complete one-nucleotide resolution level description of their transcriptional activity, and to the realistic modeling of the viral genome expression at the ultimate molecular level. This work also illustrates the need to go beyond bioinformatics-only approaches for the annotation of short protein and non-coding genes in viral genomes.

  4. Genome sequence and genetic diversity of European ash trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollars, Elizabeth S A; Harper, Andrea L; Kelly, Laura J; Sambles, Christine M; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Ricardo H; Swarbreck, David; Kaithakottil, Gemy; Cooper, Endymion D; Uauy, Cristobal; Havlickova, Lenka; Worswick, Gemma; Studholme, David J; Zohren, Jasmin; Salmon, Deborah L; Clavijo, Bernardo J; Li, Yi; He, Zhesi; Fellgett, Alison; McKinney, Lea Vig; Nielsen, Lene Rostgaard; Douglas, Gerry C; Kjær, Erik Dahl; Downie, J Allan; Boshier, David; Lee, Steve; Clark, Jo; Grant, Murray; Bancroft, Ian; Caccamo, Mario; Buggs, Richard J A

    2017-01-12

    Ash trees (genus Fraxinus, family Oleaceae) are widespread throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but are being devastated in Europe by the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, causing ash dieback, and in North America by the herbivorous beetle Agrilus planipennis. Here we sequence the genome of a low-heterozygosity Fraxinus excelsior tree from Gloucestershire, UK, annotating 38,852 protein-coding genes of which 25% appear ash specific when compared with the genomes of ten other plant species. Analyses of paralogous genes suggest a whole-genome duplication shared with olive (Olea europaea, Oleaceae). We also re-sequence 37 F. excelsior trees from Europe, finding evidence for apparent long-term decline in effective population size. Using our reference sequence, we re-analyse association transcriptomic data, yielding improved markers for reduced susceptibility to ash dieback. Surveys of these markers in British populations suggest that reduced susceptibility to ash dieback may be more widespread in Great Britain than in Denmark. We also present evidence that susceptibility of trees to H. fraxineus is associated with their iridoid glycoside levels. This rapid, integrated, multidisciplinary research response to an emerging health threat in a non-model organism opens the way for mitigation of the epidemic.

  5. Complete genome sequence of arracacha mottle virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orílio, Anelise F; Lucinda, Natalia; Dusi, André N; Nagata, Tatsuya; Inoue-Nagata, Alice K

    2013-01-01

    Arracacha mottle virus (AMoV) is the only potyvirus reported to infect arracacha (Arracacia xanthorrhiza) in Brazil. Here, the complete genome sequence of an isolate of AMoV was determined to be 9,630 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3' poly-A tail, and encoding a polyprotein of 3,135 amino acids and a putative P3N-PIPO protein. Its genomic organization is typical of a member of the genus Potyvirus, containing all conserved motifs. Its full genome sequence shared 56.2 % nucleotide identity with sunflower chlorotic mottle virus and verbena virus Y, the most closely related viruses.

  6. Virtual Ribosome - a comprehensive DNA translation tool with support for integration of sequence feature annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    Virtual Ribosome is a DNA translation tool with two areas of focus. ( i) Providing a strong translation tool in its own right, with an integrated ORF finder, full support for the IUPAC degenerate DNA alphabet and all translation tables defined by the NCBI taxonomy group, including the use...... of alternative start codons. ( ii) Integration of sequences feature annotation - in particular, native support for working with files containing intron/ exon structure annotation. The software is available for both download and online use at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/VirtualRibosome/....

  7. Algal functional annotation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations to interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes

  8. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vattipally B Sreenu; Pankaj Kumar; Javaregowda Nagaraju; Hampapathalu A Nagarajaram

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are the repetitive nucleotide sequences of motifs of length 1–6 bp. They are scattered throughout the genomes of all the known organisms ranging from viruses to eukaryotes. Microsatellites undergo mutations in the form of insertions and deletions (INDELS) of their repeat units with some bias towards insertions that lead to microsatellite tract expansion. Although prokaryotic genomes derive some plasticity due to microsatellite mutations they have in-built mechanisms to arrest undue expansions of microsatellites and one such mechanism is constituted by post-replicative DNA repair enzymes MutL, MutH and MutS. The mycobacterial genomes lack these enzymes and as a null hypothesis one could expect these genomes to harbour many long tracts. It is therefore interesting to analyse the mycobacterial genomes for distribution and abundance of microsatellites tracts and to look for potentially polymorphic microsatellites. Available mycobacterial genomes, Mycobacterium avium, M. leprae, M. bovis and the two strains of M. tuberculosis (CDC1551 and H37Rv) were analysed for frequencies and abundance of SSRs. Our analysis revealed that the SSRs are distributed throughout the mycobacterial genomes at an average of 220–230 SSR tracts per kb. All the mycobacterial genomes contain few regions that are conspicuously denser or poorer in microsatellites compared to their expected genome averages. The genomes distinctly show scarcity of long microsatellites despite the absence of a post-replicative DNA repair system. Such severe scarcity of long microsatellites could arise as a result of strong selection pressures operating against long and unstable sequences although influence of GC-content and role of point mutations in arresting microsatellite expansions can not be ruled out. Nonetheless, the long tracts occasionally found in coding as well as non-coding regions may account for limited genome plasticity in these genomes.

  9. A Draft Genome Sequence for Ensete ventricosum, the Drought-Tolerant “Tree Against Hunger”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Harrison

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a draft genome sequence for enset (Ensete ventricosum available via the Sequence Read Archive (accession number SRX202265 and GenBank (accession number AMZH01. Enset feeds 15 million people in Ethiopia, but is arguably the least studied African crop. Our sequence data suggest a genome size of approximately 547 megabases, similar to the 523-megabase genome of the closely related banana (Musa acuminata. At least 1.8% of the annotated M. acuminata genes are not conserved in E. ventricosum. Furthermore, enset contains genes not present in banana, including reverse transcriptases and virus-like sequences as well as a homolog of the RPP8-like resistance gene. We hope that availability of genome-wide sequence data will stimulate and accelerate research on this important but neglected crop.

  10. Sequencing the Cotton Genomes-Gossypium spp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PATERSON Andrew H

    2008-01-01

    @@ The genomes of most major crops,including cotton,will be fully sequenced in the next fewyears.Cotton is unusual,although not unique,in that we will need to sequence not only cultivated(tetraploid) genotypes but their diploid progenitors,to understand how elite cottons have surpassedthe productivity and quality of their progenitors.

  11. Next Generation Semiconductor Based Sequencing of the Donkey (Equus asinus Genome Provided Comparative Sequence Data against the Horse Genome and a Few Millions of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bertolini

    Full Text Available Few studies investigated the donkey (Equus asinus at the whole genome level so far. Here, we sequenced the genome of two male donkeys using a next generation semiconductor based sequencing platform (the Ion Proton sequencer and compared obtained sequence information with the available donkey draft genome (and its Illumina reads from which it was originated and with the EquCab2.0 assembly of the horse genome. Moreover, the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Analyzer was used to sequence reduced representation libraries (RRL obtained from a DNA pool including donkeys of different breeds (Grigio Siciliano, Ragusano and Martina Franca. The number of next generation sequencing reads aligned with the EquCab2.0 horse genome was larger than those aligned with the draft donkey genome. This was due to the larger N50 for contigs and scaffolds of the horse genome. Nucleotide divergence between E. caballus and E. asinus was estimated to be ~ 0.52-0.57%. Regions with low nucleotide divergence were identified in several autosomal chromosomes and in the whole chromosome X. These regions might be evolutionally important in equids. Comparing Y-chromosome regions we identified variants that could be useful to track donkey paternal lineages. Moreover, about 4.8 million of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the donkey genome were identified and annotated combining sequencing data from Ion Proton (whole genome sequencing and Ion Torrent (RRL runs with Illumina reads. A higher density of SNPs was present in regions homologous to horse chromosome 12, in which several studies reported a high frequency of copy number variants. The SNPs we identified constitute a first resource useful to describe variability at the population genomic level in E. asinus and to establish monitoring systems for the conservation of donkey genetic resources.

  12. Next Generation Semiconductor Based Sequencing of the Donkey (Equus asinus) Genome Provided Comparative Sequence Data against the Horse Genome and a Few Millions of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Francesca; Scimone, Concetta; Geraci, Claudia; Schiavo, Giuseppina; Utzeri, Valerio Joe; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Few studies investigated the donkey (Equus asinus) at the whole genome level so far. Here, we sequenced the genome of two male donkeys using a next generation semiconductor based sequencing platform (the Ion Proton sequencer) and compared obtained sequence information with the available donkey draft genome (and its Illumina reads from which it was originated) and with the EquCab2.0 assembly of the horse genome. Moreover, the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Analyzer was used to sequence reduced representation libraries (RRL) obtained from a DNA pool including donkeys of different breeds (Grigio Siciliano, Ragusano and Martina Franca). The number of next generation sequencing reads aligned with the EquCab2.0 horse genome was larger than those aligned with the draft donkey genome. This was due to the larger N50 for contigs and scaffolds of the horse genome. Nucleotide divergence between E. caballus and E. asinus was estimated to be ~ 0.52-0.57%. Regions with low nucleotide divergence were identified in several autosomal chromosomes and in the whole chromosome X. These regions might be evolutionally important in equids. Comparing Y-chromosome regions we identified variants that could be useful to track donkey paternal lineages. Moreover, about 4.8 million of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the donkey genome were identified and annotated combining sequencing data from Ion Proton (whole genome sequencing) and Ion Torrent (RRL) runs with Illumina reads. A higher density of SNPs was present in regions homologous to horse chromosome 12, in which several studies reported a high frequency of copy number variants. The SNPs we identified constitute a first resource useful to describe variability at the population genomic level in E. asinus and to establish monitoring systems for the conservation of donkey genetic resources.