WorldWideScience

Sample records for genome institute progress

  1. DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, David

    2009-03-12

    -based sequencing process that dominated how sequencing was done in the last decade is being replaced by a variety of new processes and sequencing instruments. The JGI, with an increasing number of next-generation sequencers, whose throughput is 100- to 1,000-fold greater than the Sanger capillary-based sequencers, is increasingly focused in new directions on projects of scale and complexity not previously attempted. These new directions for the JGI come, in part, from the 2008 National Research Council report on the goals of the National Plant Genome Initiative as well as the 2007 National Research Council report on the New Science of Metagenomics. Both reports outline a crucial need for systematic large-scale surveys of the plant and microbial components of the biosphere as well as an increasing need for large-scale analysis capabilities to meet the challenge of converting sequence data into knowledge. The JGI is extensively discussed in both reports as vital to progress in these fields of major national interest. JGI's future plan for plants and microbes includes a systematic approach for investigation of these organisms at a scale requiring the special capabilities of the JGI to generate, manage, and analyze the datasets. JGI will generate and provide not only community access to these plant and microbial datasets, but also the tools for analyzing them. These activities will produce essential knowledge that will be needed if we are to be able to respond to the world's energy and environmental challenges. As the JGI Plant and Microbial programs advance, the JGI as a user facility is also evolving. The Institute has been highly successful in bending its technical and analytical skills to help users solve large complex problems of major importance, and that effort will continue unabated. The JGI will increasingly move from a central focus on 'one-off' user projects coming from small user communities to much larger scale projects driven by systematic and problem

  2. DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, David

    2009-03-12

    -based sequencing process that dominated how sequencing was done in the last decade is being replaced by a variety of new processes and sequencing instruments. The JGI, with an increasing number of next-generation sequencers, whose throughput is 100- to 1,000-fold greater than the Sanger capillary-based sequencers, is increasingly focused in new directions on projects of scale and complexity not previously attempted. These new directions for the JGI come, in part, from the 2008 National Research Council report on the goals of the National Plant Genome Initiative as well as the 2007 National Research Council report on the New Science of Metagenomics. Both reports outline a crucial need for systematic large-scale surveys of the plant and microbial components of the biosphere as well as an increasing need for large-scale analysis capabilities to meet the challenge of converting sequence data into knowledge. The JGI is extensively discussed in both reports as vital to progress in these fields of major national interest. JGI's future plan for plants and microbes includes a systematic approach for investigation of these organisms at a scale requiring the special capabilities of the JGI to generate, manage, and analyze the datasets. JGI will generate and provide not only community access to these plant and microbial datasets, but also the tools for analyzing them. These activities will produce essential knowledge that will be needed if we are to be able to respond to the world's energy and environmental challenges. As the JGI Plant and Microbial programs advance, the JGI as a user facility is also evolving. The Institute has been highly successful in bending its technical and analytical skills to help users solve large complex problems of major importance, and that effort will continue unabated. The JGI will increasingly move from a central focus on 'one-off' user projects coming from small user communities to much larger scale projects driven by systematic and problem

  3. 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-11-01

    In October 2012, we introduced a 10-Year Strategic Vision [http://bit.ly/JGI-Vision] for the Institute. A central focus of this Strategic Vision is to bridge the gap between sequenced genomes and an understanding of biological functions at the organism and ecosystem level. This involves the continued massive-scale generation of sequence data, complemented by orthogonal new capabilities to functionally annotate these large sequence data sets. Our Strategic Vision lays out a path to guide our decisions and ensure that the evolving set of experimental and computational capabilities available to DOE JGI users will continue to enable groundbreaking science.

  4. 2012 U.S. Department of Energy: Joint Genome Institute: Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, David [DOE JGI Public Affairs Manager

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) is to serve the diverse scientific community as a user facility, enabling the application of large-scale genomics and analysis of plants, microbes, and communities of microbes to address the DOE mission goals in bioenergy and the environment. The DOE JGI's sequencing efforts fall under the Eukaryote Super Program, which includes the Plant and Fungal Genomics Programs; and the Prokaryote Super Program, which includes the Microbial Genomics and Metagenomics Programs. In 2012, several projects made news for their contributions to energy and environment research.

  5. National Human Genome Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Director Organization Reports & Publications Español The National Human Genome Research Institute conducts genetic and genomic research, funds ... Landscape Social Media Videos Image Gallery Fact Sheets Human Genome Project Clinical Studies Genomic Careers DNA Day Calendar ...

  6. Massachussetts Institute of Technology progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-02-28

    This is the thirty-sixth progress report of the Laboratory for Nuclear Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Progress during the period of November 30, 1954 through February 28, 1955 is reported.

  7. Conceptualizing a Genomics Software Institute (GSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jack A; Catlett, Charlie; Desai, Narayan; Knight, Rob; White, Owen; Robbins, Robert; Sankaran, Rajesh; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Field, Dawn; Meyer, Folker

    2012-03-19

    Microbial ecology has been enhanced greatly by the ongoing 'omics revolution, bringing half the world's biomass and most of its biodiversity into analytical view for the first time; indeed, it feels almost like the invention of the microscope and the discovery of the new world at the same time. With major microbial ecology research efforts accumulating prodigious quantities of sequence, protein, and metabolite data, we are now poised to address environmental microbial research at macro scales, and to begin to characterize and understand the dimensions of microbial biodiversity on the planet. What is currently impeding progress is the need for a framework within which the research community can develop, exchange and discuss predictive ecosystem models that describe the biodiversity and functional interactions. Such a framework must encompass data and metadata transparency and interoperation; data and results validation, curation, and search; application programming interfaces for modeling and analysis tools; and human and technical processes and services necessary to ensure broad adoption. Here we discuss the need for focused community interaction to augment and deepen established community efforts, beginning with the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), to create a science-driven strategic plan for a Genomic Software Institute (GSI).

  8. A Taste of Algal Genomes from the Joint Genome Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-06-17

    Algae play profound roles in aquatic food chains and the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, provide models for the study of symbiosis, photosynthesis, and eukaryotic evolution, and are candidate sources for bio-fuels; all of these research areas are part of the mission of DOE's Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To date JGI has sequenced, assembled, annotated, and released to the public the genomes of 18 species and strains of algae, sampling almost all of the major clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. With more algal genomes currently undergoing analysis, JGI continues its commitment to driving forward basic and applied algal science. Among these ongoing projects are the pan-genome of the dominant coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, the interrelationships between the 4 genomes in the nucleomorph-containing Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta, and the search for symbiosis genes of lichens.

  9. 76 FR 58023 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  10. 76 FR 28056 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group, Genome Research Review... Scientific Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,...

  11. 78 FR 47674 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Progress and Planning Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Progress and Planning... workshop. SUMMARY: NIST announces the Genome in a Bottle Consortium meeting to be held on Thursday and Friday, August 15 and 16, 2013. The Genome in a Bottle Consortium is developing the reference...

  12. 77 FR 61770 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Genomic Medicine RFAs..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) ] Dated: October 4, 2012. David...

  13. 77 FR 28888 - National Human Genome Research Institute Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, ] Rockville,...

  14. 77 FR 60706 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Special Emphasis... Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of...

  15. 75 FR 8374 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Revolutionary..., National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076,...

  16. 78 FR 68856 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  17. Joint Genome Institute's Automation Approach and History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Simon

    2006-07-05

    Department of Energy/Joint Genome Institute (DOE/JGI) collaborates with DOE national laboratories and community users, to advance genome science in support of the DOE missions of clean bio-energy, carbon cycling, and bioremediation.

  18. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute's genomic medicine portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A

    2016-10-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual's genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of "Genomic Medicine Meetings," under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and difficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI's genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so.

  19. Inferring tumor progression from genomic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, Nicholas; Krasnitz, Alexander; Rodgers, Linda; Cook, Kerry; Meth, Jennifer; Kendall, Jude; Riggs, Michael; Eberling, Yvonne; Troge, Jennifer; Grubor, Vladimir; Levy, Dan; Lundin, Pär; Månér, Susanne; Zetterberg, Anders; Hicks, James; Wigler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cancer progression in humans is difficult to infer because we do not routinely sample patients at multiple stages of their disease. However, heterogeneous breast tumors provide a unique opportunity to study human tumor progression because they still contain evidence of early and intermediate subpopulations in the form of the phylogenetic relationships. We have developed a method we call Sector-Ploidy-Profiling (SPP) to study the clonal composition of breast tumors. SPP involves macro-dissecting tumors, flow-sorting genomic subpopulations by DNA content, and profiling genomes using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Breast carcinomas display two classes of genomic structural variation: (1) monogenomic and (2) polygenomic. Monogenomic tumors appear to contain a single major clonal subpopulation with a highly stable chromosome structure. Polygenomic tumors contain multiple clonal tumor subpopulations, which may occupy the same sectors, or separate anatomic locations. In polygenomic tumors, we show that heterogeneity can be ascribed to a few clonal subpopulations, rather than a series of gradual intermediates. By comparing multiple subpopulations from different anatomic locations, we have inferred pathways of cancer progression and the organization of tumor growth.

  20. 75 FR 10488 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NHGRI MAP Review... Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; LRP 2010 Teleconference. Date: April 7,...

  1. 78 FR 20933 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel Loan Repayment Program... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, Room 3055, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville,...

  2. 75 FR 52538 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel. Date: November 19-20..., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  3. 78 FR 14806 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel: Clinically Relevant... grant applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 4th Floor Conference Room,...

  4. 76 FR 35223 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Sequencing Centers...D, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research...

  5. 76 FR 65204 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Genomic Resource...: Rudy O. Pozzatti, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human...

  6. Plant database resources at The Institute for Genomic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Agnes P; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Quackenbush, John; Buell, C Robin; Town, Chris D

    2007-01-01

    With the completion of the genome sequences of the model plants Arabidopsis and rice, and the continuing sequencing efforts of other economically important crop plants, an unprecedented amount of genome sequence data is now available for large-scale genomics studies and analyses, such as the identification and discovery of novel genes, comparative genomics, and functional genomics. Efficient utilization of these large data sets is critically dependent on the ease of access and organization of the data. The plant databases at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) have been set up to maintain various data types including genomic sequence, annotation and analyses, expressed transcript assemblies and analyses, and gene expression profiles from microarray studies. We present here an overview of the TIGR database resources for plant genomics and describe methods to access the data.

  7. 75 FR 52537 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  8. 75 FR 2148 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group, Genome Research Review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  9. 78 FR 24223 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3rd floor Conf. Room 3146, 5635 Fishers...

  10. 76 FR 3643 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: January...

  11. 75 FR 62548 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... . Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  12. 76 FR 19780 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane... Assistance Program No. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April...

  13. 75 FR 80509 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: December 16, 2010. Jennifer S....

  14. 76 FR 9031 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  15. 75 FR 19984 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers...

  16. 78 FR 47715 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  17. 77 FR 71604 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel. Date: January 11, 2013..., National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076,...

  18. 78 FR 107 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3rd Floor Conference Room, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20851... Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers...

  19. 76 FR 79199 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  20. 75 FR 35821 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  1. The genome portal of the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute: 2014 updates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, Henrik [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Cantor, Michael [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Dusheyko, Serge [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Hua, Susan [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Poliakov, Alexander [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Shabalov, Igor [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Smirnova, Tatyana [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor V. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Dubchak, Inna [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    2013-11-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a national user facility, serves the diverse scientific community by providing integrated high-throughput sequencing and computational analysis to enable system-based scientific approaches in support of DOE missions related to clean energy generation and environmental characterization. The JGI Genome Portal (http://genome.jgi.doe.gov) provides unified access to all JGI genomic databases and analytical tools. The JGI maintains extensive data management systems and specialized analytical capabilities to manage and interpret complex genomic data. A user can search, download and explore multiple data sets available for all DOE JGI sequencing projects including their status, assemblies and annotations of sequenced genomes. In this paper, we describe major updates of the Genome Portal in the past 2 years with a specific emphasis on efficient handling of the rapidly growing amount of diverse genomic data accumulated in JGI.

  2. 78 FR 55752 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Sites for..., Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC...

  3. 76 FR 35224 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  4. 76 FR 5390 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... privacy. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NHGRI Sample Repository..., National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville, MD...

  5. 77 FR 58402 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; R25 DAP Sept. 2012...: National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, 3rd Floor Conference Room, Rockville, MD...

  6. 76 FR 22112 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Special Emphasis Panel... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April...

  7. 77 FR 20646 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Loan Repayment Program...: National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, 3rd Floor Conference Room, Rockville, MD...

  8. 77 FR 59933 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; ELSI CEERS RFA (SEP... Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville,...

  9. 76 FR 66076 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 19, 2011. Jennifer S....

  10. 77 FR 64816 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  11. 78 FR 56905 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; H3AFRICA ELSI Research.... Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, Suite 3055, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD...

  12. 78 FR 77477 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  13. 77 FR 35991 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  14. 78 FR 31953 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SEP-UDN Coordinating... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3rd Floor Conference Room, 3146, 5635...

  15. 78 FR 11898 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  16. 75 FR 8373 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, GWAS Comparing Design... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  17. 75 FR 60467 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute... intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  18. 76 FR 50486 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  19. 77 FR 50140 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  20. 76 FR 17930 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Genetic... Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville,...

  1. 78 FR 9707 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; H3Africa (RM-006, RM... Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville, MD 20852, (301)...

  2. 77 FR 22332 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, H3Africa Biorepository... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, 4076, Rockville, MD...

  3. 77 FR 12604 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... >Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, CIDR Contract. Date...: National Human Genome Reseach Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Room 4076, Rockville, MD 20852,...

  4. 75 FR 56115 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; CEGS DAP. Date... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September...

  5. 75 FR 48977 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  6. 76 FR 65204 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute... intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  7. 77 FR 31863 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel DAP R25 Eppig.... (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  8. 75 FR 32957 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Protein Resource RFA... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  9. 77 FR 64816 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute... intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  10. 76 FR 22407 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Loan Repayment Program....172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April 12, 2011. Jennifer...

  11. 77 FR 6810 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; CIDR Contract Renewal... Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville,...

  12. Genome-wide association studies in asthma: progress and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    March ME

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael E March,1 Patrick MA Sleiman,1,2 Hakon Hakonarson1,2 1Center for Applied Genomics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, 2Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Genetic studies of asthma have revealed that there is considerable heritability to the phenotype. An extensive history of candidate-gene studies has identified a long list of genes associated with immune function that are potentially involved in asthma pathogenesis. However, many of the results of candidate-gene studies have failed to be replicated, leaving in question the true impact of the implicated biological pathways on asthma. With the advent of genome-wide association studies, geneticists are able to examine the association of hundreds of thousands of genetic markers with a phenotype, allowing the hypothesis-free identification of variants associated with disease. Many such studies examining asthma or related phenotypes have been published, and several themes have begun to emerge regarding the biological pathways underpinning asthma. The results of many genome-wide association studies have currently not been replicated, and the large sample sizes required for this experimental strategy invoke difficulties with sample stratification and phenotypic heterogeneity. Recently, large collaborative groups of researchers have formed consortia focused on asthma, with the goals of sharing material and data and standardizing diagnosis and experimental methods. Additionally, research has begun to focus on genetic variants that affect the response to asthma medications and on the biology that generates the heterogeneity in the asthma phenotype. As this work progresses, it will move asthma patients closer to more specific, personalized medicine. Keywords: asthma, genetics, GWAS, pharmacogenetics, biomarkers

  13. Human Genome Program Report. Part 1, Overview and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  14. Human genome program report. Part 1, overview and progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  15. Genome evolution during progression to breast cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Newburger, D. E.

    2013-04-08

    Cancer evolution involves cycles of genomic damage, epigenetic deregulation, and increased cellular proliferation that eventually culminate in the carcinoma phenotype. Early neoplasias, which are often found concurrently with carcinomas and are histologically distinguishable from normal breast tissue, are less advanced in phenotype than carcinomas and are thought to represent precursor stages. To elucidate their role in cancer evolution we performed comparative whole-genome sequencing of early neoplasias, matched normal tissue, and carcinomas from six patients, for a total of 31 samples. By using somatic mutations as lineage markers we built trees that relate the tissue samples within each patient. On the basis of these lineage trees we inferred the order, timing, and rates of genomic events. In four out of six cases, an early neoplasia and the carcinoma share a mutated common ancestor with recurring aneuploidies, and in all six cases evolution accelerated in the carcinoma lineage. Transition spectra of somatic mutations are stable and consistent across cases, suggesting that accumulation of somatic mutations is a result of increased ancestral cell division rather than specific mutational mechanisms. In contrast to highly advanced tumors that are the focus of much of the current cancer genome sequencing, neither the early neoplasia genomes nor the carcinomas are enriched with potentially functional somatic point mutations. Aneuploidies that occur in common ancestors of neoplastic and tumor cells are the earliest events that affect a large number of genes and may predispose breast tissue to eventual development of invasive carcinoma.

  16. 76 FR 66731 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, DAP for CEGS-SEP. Date...@mail.nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  17. 75 FR 67380 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Ken D. Nakamura, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome... Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 26,...

  18. 76 FR 36930 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, DAP R-25. Date: July...@mail.nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  19. 77 FR 2304 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... given that the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) will host a series of meetings to enable... for Human Genome Research. Background materials on the proposed reorganization and...

  20. 77 FR 74676 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... Person: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute...@nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  1. The Cassava Genome: Current Progress, Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnik, Simon; Marri, Pradeep Reddy; Desany, Brian; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Kodira, Chinnappa; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Rodriguez, Fausto; Fauquet, Claude; Tohme, Joseph; Harkins, Timothy; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Rounsley, Steve

    2012-03-01

    The starchy swollen roots of cassava provide an essential food source for nearly a billion people, as well as possibilities for bioenergy, yet improvements to nutritional content and resistance to threatening diseases are currently impeded. A 454-based whole genome shotgun sequence has been assembled, which covers 69% of the predicted genome size and 96% of protein-coding gene space, with genome finishing underway. The predicted 30,666 genes and 3,485 alternate splice forms are supported by 1.4 M expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Maps based on simple sequence repeat (SSR)-, and EST-derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) already exist. Thanks to the genome sequence, a high-density linkage map is currently being developed from a cross between two diverse cassava cultivars: one susceptible to cassava brown streak disease; the other resistant. An efficient genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach is being developed to catalog SNPs both within the mapping population and among diverse African farmer-preferred varieties of cassava. These resources will accelerate marker-assisted breeding programs, allowing improvements in disease-resistance and nutrition, and will help us understand the genetic basis for disease resistance.

  2. Progress in Genome Editing Technology and Its Application in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Kai; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Zhu, Bin; Li, Maoteng

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing technology (GET) is a versatile approach that has progressed rapidly as a mechanism to alter the genotype and phenotype of organisms. However, conventional genome modification using GET cannot satisfy current demand for high-efficiency and site-directed mutagenesis, retrofitting of artificial nucleases has developed into a new avenue within this field. Based on mechanisms to recognize target genes, newly-developed GETs can generally be subdivided into three cleavage systems, pr...

  3. 76 FR 28056 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research...

  4. 78 FR 61851 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-04

    ... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research... Human Genome Research Institute, 4076 Conference Room, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20852... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  5. 77 FR 8268 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Human Genome...). Contact Person: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome...

  6. 75 FR 13558 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research...

  7. 75 FR 8977 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Nakamura, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research...-402-0838. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  8. 75 FR 2147 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of....), notice is hereby given of meetings of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The... of Committee: National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. Date: February 8-9, 2010....

  9. 78 FR 70063 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH...

  10. 76 FR 10909 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Nakamura, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research...-402-0838. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  11. 77 FR 2735 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of....), notice is hereby given of meetings of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The... of Committee: National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. Date: February 13-14, 2012....

  12. 78 FR 21382 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Human Genome... Person: Camilla E. Day, PhD., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research...

  13. 75 FR 46951 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The meeting will be...: National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. Date: September 13-14, 2010. Open: September 13,...

  14. 75 FR 44800 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The... Call). Contact Person: Mark S. Guyer, Director for Extramural Research, National Human Genome...

  15. 78 FR 66752 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, October 15, 2013, 01:00 p.m. to October 15, 2013, 02:30 p.m., National...

  16. 76 FR 3917 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, TRND--RFP... Person: Rudy O. Pozzatti, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human...

  17. 77 FR 55853 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research, September 10, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to September 11, 2012, 5 p.m., National Institutes...

  18. 77 FR 5035 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel Sequencing Technology..., Rockville, MD 20852, (301) 402-0838, nakamurk@mail.nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Human...

  19. 76 FR 63932 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, ENCODE Technology RFA...- 4280, mckenneyk@mail.nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172,...

  20. 75 FR 53703 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... review and funding cycle. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human...

  1. 76 FR 29772 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; ELSI-SEP. Date: June...: Rudy O. Pozzatti, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Human...

  2. 77 FR 27471 - National Human Genome Research Institute Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research, May 21, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to May 22, 2012, 5:00 p.m., National Institutes of Health,...

  3. In situ quantification of genomic instability in breast cancer progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe W.; Lockett, Stephen J.

    2003-05-15

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of breast and other solid cancers. Presumably caused by critical telomere reduction, GI is responsible for providing the genetic diversity required in the multi-step progression of the disease. We have used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and 3D image analysis to quantify genomic instability cell-by-cell in thick, intact tissue sections of normal breast epithelium, preneoplastic lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia), ductal carcinona is situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast. Our in situ-cell by cell-analysis of genomic instability shows an important increase of genomic instability in the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma, followed by a reduction of instability in invasive carcinoma. This pattern suggests that the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma corresponds to telomere crisis and invasive carcinoma is a consequence of telomerase reactivation afertelomere crisis.

  4. 77 FR 67385 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  5. 76 FR 65738 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  6. 78 FR 47715 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The meeting will be... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Human...

  7. 76 FR 71581 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  8. 78 FR 65342 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  9. 78 FR 64222 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... Committee, CEGS-- Initiative to Maximize Research Education in Genomics. Date: November 7-8, 2013. Time: 8..., Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Human Genome Research...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National...

  10. 75 FR 51828 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... for Human Genome Research. The meetings will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance..., PhD, Director for Extramural Research, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane...: National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. Date: May 16-17, 2011. Open: May 16, 2011, 8:30...

  11. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functional Annotation of Cancer Genomes Principal Investigator: William C. Hahn, M.D., Ph.D. The comprehensive characterization of cancer genomes has and will continue to provide an increasingly complete catalog of genetic alterations in specific cancers. However, most epithelial cancers harbor hundreds of genetic alterations as a consequence of genomic instability. Therefore, the functional consequences of the majority of mutations remain unclear.

  12. Genomic-Glycosylation Aberrations in Tumor Initiation, Progression and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carman K.M. Ip

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-translation modifications of proteins alter their functional activity and thus are key contributors of tumor initiation and progression. Glycosylation, one of the most common post-translational modifications of proteins, has been associated with tumorigenesis for decades. However, due to complexity in analysis of the functional effects of glycosylation, definitive information on the role of altered glycosylation in cancer is lacking. Importantly, imputing changes in glycosylation in proteins from analysis of DNA mutations has not been attempted globally. It is thus critical to elucidate the role of glycosylation in tumor pathophysiology as well as potential roles of altered glycosylation as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this review, we summarize the evidence that glycosylation regulates functions of a set of frequently mutated oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Moreover, we explore the potential that protein sequence changes engendered by genomic mutations broadly alter glycosylation and thus promote tumor initiation and progression.

  13. Being the Pioneer of Life Sciences in China--Introduction to Beijing Genomics Institute

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beijing Genomics Institute; Xin Zhang

    2004-01-01

    @@ The Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI) of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) was officially founded in December 2003. Its predecessor, Beijing Huada Genomics Research Center, has presented significant contributions to the development of life sciences in China by its excellent scientific innovations and achievements in the last five years.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Serovar Tolworthi Strain Pasteur Institute Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Kohzo; Nakashima, Kaede

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar tolworthi strain Pasteur Institute Standard was determined. The genome consists of a 5.9-Mb chromosome and eight plasmids, one of which is linear. The second largest plasmid (293 kb) carries the genes encoding insecticidal proteins. PMID:26139717

  15. 75 FR 26762 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research....nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research... No: 2010-11051] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National...

  16. Accelerating regulatory progress in multi-institutional research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Andrea R; Lauf, Sherry Lee; Pieper, Lisa E; Rowe, Jared; Vargas, Ileana M; Goff, Melissa A; Daley, Matthew F; Tuzzio, Leah; Steiner, John F

    2014-01-01

    Multi-institutional collaborations are necessary in order to create large and robust data sets that are needed to answer important comparative effectiveness research (CER) questions. Before scientific work can begin, a complex maze of administrative and regulatory requirements must be efficiently navigated to avoid project delays. Staff from research, regulatory, and administrative teams involved in three HMO Research Network (HMORN) multi-institutional collaborations developed and employed novel approaches: to secure and maintain Institutional Review Board (IRB) approvals; to enable data sharing, and to expedite subawards for two data-only minimal risk studies. These novel approaches accelerated required processes and approvals while maintaining regulatory, human subjects, and institutional protections. Outcomes from the processes described here are compared with processes outlined in the research and regulatory literature and with processes that have been used in previous multisite research collaborations. Research, regulatory, and administrative staff are essential contributors to the success of multi-institutional collaborations. Their flexibility, creativity, and effective communication skills can lead to the development of efficient approaches to achieving the necessary oversight for these complex projects. Elements of these specific strategies can be adapted and used by other research networks. Other efforts in these areas should be evaluated and shared. The processes that help develop a "learning research system" play an important and complementary role in sustaining multi-institutional research collaborations.

  17. The genomic dynamics during progression of lung adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Luo, Longhai; Luo, Wen; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Chao; Xiong, Teng; Li, Xiangchun; Meng, Xuan; Li, Lin; Zhang, Xiaopin; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zhixin

    2017-08-01

    Intra-tumor heterogeneity is a big barrier to precision medicine. To explore the underlying clonal diversity in lung adenocarcinomas, we selected nine individuals with whole-genome sequencing data from primary and matched metastatic tumors as a cohort for study. Similar global pattern of arm-level copy number changes and large variations of somatic single-nucleotide variant between the primary and metastasis are observed in the majority of cases. Importantly, we found breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycles acting as an important mechanism for underlying cancer gene amplification, such as amplification of CDK4, CDKN3 and FGFR1 in early stage. We also identified recurrent focal amplification of gene CCNY derived from BFB in two metastatic tumors, but not in primary tumor. Clonal analysis of case 236T demonstrated that mutational processes are varying with tumor progression. Collectively, our data provide new insights into genetic diversity and potential therapeutic target in lung adenocarcinoma.

  18. Progress in Genome Editing Technology and Its Application in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Zhu, Bin; Li, Maoteng

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing technology (GET) is a versatile approach that has progressed rapidly as a mechanism to alter the genotype and phenotype of organisms. However, conventional genome modification using GET cannot satisfy current demand for high-efficiency and site-directed mutagenesis, retrofitting of artificial nucleases has developed into a new avenue within this field. Based on mechanisms to recognize target genes, newly-developed GETs can generally be subdivided into three cleavage systems, protein-dependent DNA cleavage systems (i.e., zinc-finger nucleases, ZFN, and transcription activator-like effector nucleases, TALEN), RNA-dependent DNA cleavage systems (i.e., clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated proteins, CRISPR-Cas9, CRISPR-Cpf1, and CRISPR-C2c1), and RNA-dependent RNA cleavage systems (i.e., RNA interference, RNAi, and CRISPR-C2c2). All these techniques can lead to double-stranded (DSB) or single-stranded breaks (SSB), and result in either random mutations via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or targeted mutation via homologous recombination (HR). Thus, site-directed mutagenesis can be induced via targeted gene knock-out, knock-in, or replacement to modify specific characteristics including morphology-modification, resistance-enhancement, and physiological mechanism-improvement along with plant growth and development. In this paper, an non-comprehensive review on the development of different GETs as applied to plants is presented. PMID:28261237

  19. Progress in Genome Editing Technology and Its Application in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Zhu, Bin; Li, Maoteng

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing technology (GET) is a versatile approach that has progressed rapidly as a mechanism to alter the genotype and phenotype of organisms. However, conventional genome modification using GET cannot satisfy current demand for high-efficiency and site-directed mutagenesis, retrofitting of artificial nucleases has developed into a new avenue within this field. Based on mechanisms to recognize target genes, newly-developed GETs can generally be subdivided into three cleavage systems, protein-dependent DNA cleavage systems (i.e., zinc-finger nucleases, ZFN, and transcription activator-like effector nucleases, TALEN), RNA-dependent DNA cleavage systems (i.e., clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated proteins, CRISPR-Cas9, CRISPR-Cpf1, and CRISPR-C2c1), and RNA-dependent RNA cleavage systems (i.e., RNA interference, RNAi, and CRISPR-C2c2). All these techniques can lead to double-stranded (DSB) or single-stranded breaks (SSB), and result in either random mutations via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or targeted mutation via homologous recombination (HR). Thus, site-directed mutagenesis can be induced via targeted gene knock-out, knock-in, or replacement to modify specific characteristics including morphology-modification, resistance-enhancement, and physiological mechanism-improvement along with plant growth and development. In this paper, an non-comprehensive review on the development of different GETs as applied to plants is presented.

  20. 2016 Institutional Computing Progress Report for w14_firetec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Judith W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Linn, Rodman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-14

    This is a computing progress report for w14_firetec. FIRETEC simulations will explore the prescribed fire ignition methods to achieve burning objectives (understory reduction and ecosystem health) but at the same time minimize the risk of escaped fire.

  1. Convergence of advances in genomics, team science, and repositories as drivers of progress in psychiatric genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Thomas; Senthil, Geetha; Addington, Anjené M

    2015-01-01

    After many years of unfilled promise, psychiatric genetics has seen an unprecedented number of successes in recent years. We hypothesize that the field has reached an inflection point through a confluence of four key developments: advances in genomics; the orientation of the scientific community around large collaborative team science projects; the development of sample and data repositories; and a policy framework for sharing and accessing these resources. We discuss these domains and their effect on scientific progress and provide a perspective on why we think this is only the beginning of a new era in scientific discovery.

  2. Cross institutional collaboration in assessment : a case on progress testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vleuten, CPM; Schuwirth, LWT; Muijtjens, AMM; Thoben, AJNM; Cohen-Schotanus, J; Van Boven, CPA

    2004-01-01

    The practice of assessment is governed by an interesting paradox. On the one hand good assessment requires substantial resources which may exceed the capacity of a single institution and we have reason to doubt the quality of our in-house examinations. On the other hand, our parsimonity with regard

  3. Cross institutional collaboration in assessment : a case on progress testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vleuten, CPM; Schuwirth, LWT; Muijtjens, AMM; Thoben, AJNM; Cohen-Schotanus, J; Van Boven, CPA

    2004-01-01

    The practice of assessment is governed by an interesting paradox. On the one hand good assessment requires substantial resources which may exceed the capacity of a single institution and we have reason to doubt the quality of our in-house examinations. On the other hand, our parsimonity with regard

  4. Progress of International Cooperation Between RIPED and Foreign Institute

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shaoxian

    1996-01-01

    @@ As the petroleum exploration and development research center of CNPC, Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration & Development (RIPED) has conscientiously been engaged in international academic exchanges for years. Every year, hundreds of petroleum researchers and petroleum engineering experts come to RIPED taking part in various kinds or scales of academic exchange activities and joint-research work.

  5. Annual Research Progress Report Letterman Army Institute of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-30

    Institute of Research Department of Maxlllofaclal Sciences «ooNufc* Presidio of San Francisco, CA 94129 mUNCirU. IIIWtiTla»TO« (***•* UV " C/.J. A—*m...have been Inltltated or conducted under this work unit during the past year: STUDY MO. 19 The effect of stress and hydro- cortisone treatwent on...nutriture. A number or enzymes are known to require pyridOAal-P04 (P-PO^) as the active vitamin B6 cofactor, including the transarainase systems. The UV

  6. UNLV Information Science Research Institute quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-03-31

    Sections of this report include: symposium activity, staff activity, document analysis program, text-retrieval program, institute activity, etc. It is believed that as large, complete collections of documents become available in digital libraries, users will demand complete interaction with the information; document access mechanisms will have to grow beyond keywords and full-text searches to include browsing, searching of images, and searching on basis of abstract concepts. It is proposed to study the microform document conversion process, including image preprocessing, recognition, postprocessing for extracting information, and natural language techniques. Characterization of algorithms will allow generation of a system that automatically adapts to a wide range of image quality, thereby allowing large-scale conversion efforts. It is proposed to focus first on the NSF Antarctic database (approx. 55,000 documents).

  7. The Genome Portal of the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, Henrik; Cantor, Michael; Dushekyo, Serge; Hua, Susan; Poliakov, Alexander; Smirnova, Tatyana; Dubchak, Inna

    2014-03-14

    The JGI Genome Portal (http://genome.jgi.doe.gov) provides unified access to all JGI genomic databases and analytical tools. A user can search, download and explore multiple data sets available for all DOE JGI sequencing projects including their status, assemblies and annotations of sequenced genomes. Genome Portal in the past 2 years was significantly updated, with a specific emphasis on efficient handling of the rapidly growing amount of diverse genomic data accumulated in JGI. A critical aspect of handling big data in genomics is the development of visualization and analysis tools that allow scientists to derive meaning from what are otherwise terrabases of inert sequence. An interactive visualization tool developed in the group allows us to explore contigs resulting from a single metagenome assembly. Implemented with modern web technologies that take advantage of the power of the computer's graphical processing unit (gpu), the tool allows the user to easily navigate over a 100,000 data points in multiple dimensions, among many biologically meaningful parameters of a dataset such as relative abundance, contig length, and G+C content.

  8. Virginia Bioinformatics Institute scientists sequence genome of the nitrogen-fixing, soil-living bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Bland, Susan

    2009-01-01

    A collaboration of researchers, which includes scientists at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute and Virginia Tech, recently completed the genome sequence of Azotobacter vinelandii, uncovering important genetic information that will contribute to a more complete understanding of the biology of this versatile, soil-living bacterium.

  9. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU XueMei; XIAO HuaSheng

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high.throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome. These variants include copy number variations (CNVs), inversions, insertions, deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences. This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences. Particularly, we highlight the array-based, PCR-based and sequencing-based assays, including array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA), multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), paired-end mapping (PEM), and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  10. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high-throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome.These variants include copy number variations(CNVs),inversions,insertions,deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences.This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences.Particularly,we highlight the array-based,PCR-based and sequencing-based assays,including array-based comparative genomic hybridization(aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis(ROMA),multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization(MAPH),multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA),paired-end mapping(PEM),and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies.Furthermore,we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  11. Progress in the implementation of NCCN guidelines for distress management by member institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Kristine A; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2013-02-01

    A 2005 survey of NCCN Member Institutions was among the first studies to evaluate the extent to which key elements of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Distress Management were being implemented as part of routine clinical practice. This study seeks to characterize current implementation of the guidelines by NCCN Member Institutions 7 years after the original study. Institutional representatives appointed to the NCCN Distress Management Panel were asked to complete an online survey in June 2012. The survey was similar to the 2005 survey, except that it solicited additional details about screening procedures. The survey was completed by representatives from 20 of 22 NCCN Member Institutions (91%). (Note: In this calculation, 1 consortium cancer cancer was counted as 2 NCCN Member Institutions.) Responses indicate that routine screening for distress is being conducted at 70% of institutions, with 25% screening inpatients and 60% screening outpatients. Among institutions screening outpatients, 50% screen all outpatients and 50% screen only certain subgroups of outpatients. In terms of method, 85% of institutions conducting screening use a patient self-report measure either alone or in combination with an interview; the Distress Thermometer is used at 59% of institutions that use a self-report measure. Findings show modest progress since 2005 in implementing guideline recommendations regarding distress screening, with a 7% increase in institutions conducting any routine screening and a 10% increase in institutions screening all outpatients routinely. Greater progress is evident in the use of self-report measures as part of screening, with a 23% increase in their use alone or in combination with an interview.

  12. Research progress of genome editing and derivative technologies in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiwei, Shan; Caixia, Gao

    2015-10-01

    Genome editing technologies using engineered nucleases have been widely used in many model organisms. Genome editing with sequence-specific nuclease (SSN) creates DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the genomic target sites that are primarily repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways, which can be employed to achieve targeted genome modifications such as gene mutations, insertions, replacements or chromosome rearrangements. There are three major SSNs─zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system. In contrast to ZFN and TALEN, which require substantial protein engineering to each DNA target, the CRISPR/Cas9 system requires only a change in the guide RNA. For this reason, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple, inexpensive and versatile tool for genome engineering. Furthermore, a modified version of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been developed to recruit heterologous domains that can regulate endogenous gene expression, such as activation, depression and epigenetic regulation. In this review, we summarize the development and applications of genome editing technologies for basic research and biotechnology, as well as highlight challenges and future directions, with particular emphasis on plants.

  13. US Army Institute of Surgical Research Annual Research Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    Cellulitis diagnosed by clinical criteria and treated with penicillin will not be grounds for exclusion from the study. Patient pairs will be excluded... mitochondrial studies. In US Army Institute of Surgical Research Annual Research Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1983. San Antonio: US Government Printing

  14. International Power Institute`s quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, J.E.

    1998-10-30

    The International Power Institute (IPI) at Morehouse College has organized a team to design and create a Short Term Training Program for ESKOM Union Leaders which will last four weeks and take place at a location in South Africa to be designated by ESKOM. This proposal envisions a group of no more than 25 union leaders to be trained at the same time but the program could be expanded to accommodate up to 40 trainees. The program is designed around interactive training with lectures followed by discussion, case studies, trainee work groups, homework assignments and two field study visits. Also, the program is designed to have a number of ESKOM management people join the course for one day in the second week and one day at the end, in each case after a half day of preparation in separate sessions from the union leaders, to share with the trainees expectations and, at the end of the program, their course experiences. In addition, IPI has prepared a follow on proposal for a Long Term Training Program. This LT program is specified in less detail but can be expanded based on future discussions with ESKOM management. The training program is designed with the following objectives: determine and identify the most pressing problems facing ESKOM Union Leadership in their relationship with management; instill in the union leadership a heightened sense of purpose and willingness to take ownership of a process that will increase effective outcomes of meaningful, good faith bargaining; develop skills and experience leading to improved union administration; enhance realistic expectations and improve process knowledge to facilitate future labor negotiations and grievance proceedings; and provide participants with enhanced skills and knowledge to develop and/or strengthen a functioning, democratic work culture and structure internal to the union.

  15. From genome to proteome: great progress in the domesticated silkworm (Bombyx mori L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhonghua Zhou; Huijuan Yang; Boxiong Zhong

    2008-01-01

    As the only truly domesticated insect,the silkworm not only has great economic value,but it also has value as a model for genetics and molecular biology research.Genomics and proteomics have recently shown vast potential to be essential tools in domesticated silkworm research,especially after the completion of the Bombyx mori genome sequence.This paper reviews the progress of the domesticated silkworm genome,particularly focusing on its genetic map,physical map and functional genome.This review also presents proteomics,the proteomic technique and its application in silkworm research.

  16. DNA sequencing leads to genomics progress in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JiaYan; XIAO JingFa; ZHANG RuoSi; YU Jun

    2011-01-01

    1 Science in the large-scale sequencing era Ten years ago,the first draft sequence assembly of the human genome was completed [1],bringing biomedical research one-step closer toward the goal of revolutionizing diagnosis,prevention,and treatment of human diseases.Recently,journalists from the journal Nature surveyed more than 1000 life scientists regarding this laudable aim [2],obtaining substantially negative responses [3].However,almost all of those surveyed had been influenced,in one way or another,by the availability of the human genome sequence,and they also agreed with the notion that the "sequence is the start." The complexity of genome biology and almost every aspect of human biology is far greater than previously thought [4].

  17. Research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunsheng, Wang

    2016-08-01

    Population genomics, a new paradigm for population genetics, combine the concepts and techniques of genomics with the theoretical system of population genetics and improve our understanding of microevolution through identification of site-specific effect and genome-wide effects using genome-wide polymorphic sites genotypeing. With the appearance and improvement of the next generation high-throughput sequencing technology, the numbers of plant species with complete genome sequences increased rapidly and large scale resequencing has also been carried out in recent years. Parallel sequencing has also been done in some plant species without complete genome sequences. These studies have greatly promoted the development of population genomics and deepened our understanding of the genetic diversity, level of linking disequilibium, selection effect, demographical history and molecular mechanism of complex traits of relevant plant population at a genomic level. In this review, I briely introduced the concept and research methods of population genomics and summarized the research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing. I also discussed the prospect as well as existing problems of plant population genomics in order to provide references for related studies.

  18. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Identification of Therapeutic Targets Across Cancer Types | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Dana Farber Cancer Institute CTD2 Center focuses on the use of high-throughput genetic and bioinformatic approaches to identify and credential oncogenes and co-dependencies in cancers. This Center aims to provide the cancer research community with information that will facilitate the prioritization of targets based on both genomic and functional evidence, inform the most appropriate genetic context for downstream mechanistic and validation studies, and enable the translation of this information into therapeutics and diagnostics.

  19. Research progress in genomics of environmental and industrial microorganisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Microbes contribute to geochemical cycles in the ecosystem.They also play important roles in biodegradation and bioremediation of contaminated environments,and have great potential in energy conversion and regeneration.Up to date,at least 150 genomes of non-pathogenic microbes have been sequenced,of which,the majority are bacteria from various environments or of industrial uses.The emerging field ’metagenomics’ in combination with the high-throughput sequencing technology offers opportunities to discover new functions of microbes in the environment on a large scale,and has become the ’hot spot’ in the field of environmental microbiology.Seven genomes of bacteria from various extreme environments,including high temperature,high and low pressure,and extreme acidic regions,have been sequenced by researchers in China,leading to the discovery of metabolic pathways,genetic functions and new enzymes,which are related to the niches those bacteria occupy.These results were published in Nature,PNAS,Genome Research and other top international journals.In the meantime,several groups in China have started ’metagenomics’ programs.The outcomes of these researches are expected to generate a considerable number of novel findings,taking Chinese researchers to the frontier of genomics for environmental and industrial microorganisms.

  20. Research progress in genomics of environmental and industrial microorganisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; LIU Bin; ZHOU ZheMin

    2009-01-01

    Microbes contribute to geochemical cycles in the ecosystem. They also play important roles in bio-degradation and bioremediation of contaminated environments, and have great potential in energy conversion and regeneration. Up to date, at least 150 genomes of non-pathogenic microbes have been sequenced, of which, the majority are bacteria from various environments or of industrial uses. The emerging field 'metagenomics' in combination with the high-throughput sequencing technology offers opportunities to discover new functions of microbes in the environment on a large scale, and has be-come the 'hot spot' in the field of environmental microbiology. Seven genomes of bacteria from various extreme environments, including high temperature, high and low pressure, and extreme acidic regions, have been sequenced by researchers in China, leading to the discovery of metabolic pathways, genetic functions and new enzymes, which are related to the niches those bacteria occupy. These results were published in Nature, PNAS, Genome Research and other top international journals. In the meantime, several groups in China have started 'metagenomics' programs. The outcomes of these researches are expected to generate a considerable number of novel findings, taking Chinese researchers to the fron-tier of genomics for environmental and industrial microorganisms.

  1. Illumina Production Sequencing at the DOE Joint Genome Institute - Workflow and Optimizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarver, Angela; Fern, Alison; Diego, Matthew San; Kennedy, Megan; Zane, Matthew; Daum, Christopher; Hack, Christopher; Tang, Eric; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Roberts, Simon; Alexandre, Melanie; Harmon-Smith, Miranda; Lucas, Susan

    2010-06-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute?s (JGI) Production Sequencing group is committed to the generation of high-quality genomic DNA sequence to support the DOE mission areas of renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental characterization and clean-up. Within the JGI?s Production Sequencing group, the Illumina Genome Analyzer pipeline has been established as one of three sequencing platforms, along with Roche/454 and ABI/Sanger. Optimization of the Illumina pipeline has been ongoing with the aim of continual process improvement of the laboratory workflow. These process improvement projects are being led by the JGI?s Process Optimization, Sequencing Technologies, Instrumentation& Engineering, and the New Technology Production groups. Primary focus has been on improving the procedural ergonomics and the technicians? operating environment, reducing manually intensive technician operations with different tools, reducing associated production costs, and improving the overall process and generated sequence quality. The U.S. DOE JGI was established in 1997 in Walnut Creek, CA, to unite the expertise and resources of five national laboratories? Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest ? along with HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology. JGI is operated by the University of California for the U.S. DOE.

  2. Electric fish genomics: Progress, prospects, and new tools for neuroethology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchers, William R; Constantinou, Savvas J; Losilla, Mauricio; Gallant, Jason R

    2016-10-01

    Electric fish have served as a model system in biology since the 18th century, providing deep insight into the nature of bioelectrogenesis, the molecular structure of the synapse, and brain circuitry underlying complex behavior. Neuroethologists have collected extensive phenotypic data that span biological levels of analysis from molecules to ecosystems. This phenotypic data, together with genomic resources obtained over the past decades, have motivated new and exciting hypotheses that position the weakly electric fish model to address fundamental 21(st) century biological questions. This review article considers the molecular data collected for weakly electric fish over the past three decades, and the insights that data of this nature has motivated. For readers relatively new to molecular genetics techniques, we also provide a table of terminology aimed at clarifying the numerous acronyms and techniques that accompany this field. Next, we pose a research agenda for expanding genomic resources for electric fish research over the next 10years. We conclude by considering some of the exciting research prospects for neuroethology that electric fish genomics may offer over the coming decades, if the electric fish community is successful in these endeavors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. ETS-Associated Genomic Alterations including ETS2 Loss Markedly Affect Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0385 TITLE: ETS -Associated Genomic Alterations including ETS2 Loss Markedly Affect Prostate Cancer Progression...29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0385 ETS -Associated Genomic Alterations including ETS2 Loss Markedly Affect...upregulation of ERG, a transcription factor with oncogenic roles in other cancers such as leukemias and sarcomas (Tomlins, Rhodes et al. 2005; Turner

  4. Molecular genetics and genomics progress in urothelial bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, George J

    2013-11-01

    The clinical management of solid tumor patients has recently undergone a paradigm shift as the result of the accelerated advances in cancer genetics and genomics. Molecular diagnostics is now an integral part of routine clinical management in lung, colon, and breast cancer patients. In a disappointing contrast, molecular biomarkers remain largely excluded from current management algorithms of urologic malignancies. The need for new treatment alternatives and validated prognostic molecular biomarkers that can help clinicians identify patients in need of early aggressive management is pressing. Identifying robust predictive biomarkers that can stratify response to newly introduced targeted therapeutics is another crucially needed development. The following is a brief discussion of some promising candidate biomarkers that may soon become a part of clinical management of bladder cancers.

  5. [The challenge of education at the IMSS: how to become the advanced guard of institutional progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viniegra Velázquez, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    A panorama of the educative actions at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social is presented, and it is discussed why they have not had a significant impact in health care services. In order to explore how the explanation is in the working environment where the graduates of educative programs are inserted, it is analyzed the nature of the state, the organizational complexity of its institutions and how it is legitimated. It is recognized that the organizational complexity is constituted by the institution itself, its environments, groups, individuals, activities, and the way in which a certain type of interaction is carried out in the institutional management focused in control, as well as in the management centered in participation, which may influence the working environments in such a way that it works as a powerful antidote against degradation. The course of participative education at the IMSS is described, and how the consolidation of participative education and the operation of the institutional teaching career are about to constitute the most powerful lever for the advancement of the institutional performance when contributing to the emergency of stimulating working environments, where the activities acquire growing effectivity and progressive reach.

  6. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of testicular carcinoma in situ progression into overt tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, K; Hoei-Hansen, C E; Nielsen, J E

    2005-01-01

    into CIS occurs early during foetal life. Progression into an overt tumour, however, typically first happens after puberty, where CIS cells transform into either a seminoma (SEM) or a nonseminoma (N-SEM). Here, we have compared the genome-wide gene expression of CIS cells to that of testicular SEM...

  7. Genomic aberrations of myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms in chronic phase and during disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, C; Huh, H J; Mun, Y C; Seong, C M; Chung, W S; Huh, J

    2015-04-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) may transform into secondary myelofibrosis (MF) or evolve into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The genetic mechanisms underlying disease progression in MPN and MDS/MPN patients remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate sequential genomic aberrations identified by single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A)-based karyotyping that can detect cryptic aberrations or copy neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) in the chronic phase and during disease progression of MPN and MDS/MPN patients. The study group included 13 MPN and four MDS/MPN patients (seven polycythemia vera (PV); four essential thrombocythemia (ET); two MPN-unclassifiable (MPN-U); one chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML); one atypical chronic myeloid leukemia, BCR-ABL1 negative (aCML); and two MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN-U)). Among them, five patients (two PV, two MPN-U, and one MDS/MPN-U) progressed to MF and three patients (one CMML, one aCML, and one MDS/MPN-U) transformed to AML. The median follow-up period was 70 months (range, 7-152). Whole-genome SNP-A (SNP 6.0; Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA)-based karyotyping and JAK2 mutation analysis were performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. SNP-A showed 19 kinds of genomic aberrations, including seven gains, eight deletions, and four CN-LOH. CN-LOH of 9p involving JAK2 was the most common aberration, followed by 5q deletion and 9p gain. The incidence of genomic changes identified by SNP was not different in patients with disease progression (75%), compared with those without disease progression (56%) (P = 0.4). However, when excluding 9p CN-LOH, the incidence of genomic changes was significantly higher in patients with disease progression than in patients without disease progression (63% and 0%, respectively, P = 0.01). Among eight patients with disease progression, two patients (two MPN-U) showed abnormal SNP-A results

  8. MaPSeq, A Service-Oriented Architecture for Genomics Research within an Academic Biomedical Research Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Reilly

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Genomics research presents technical, computational, and analytical challenges that are well recognized. Less recognized are the complex sociological, psychological, cultural, and political challenges that arise when genomics research takes place within a large, decentralized academic institution. In this paper, we describe a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA—MaPSeq—that was conceptualized and designed to meet the diverse and evolving computational workflow needs of genomics researchers at our large, hospital-affiliated, academic research institution. We present the institutional challenges that motivated the design of MaPSeq before describing the architecture and functionality of MaPSeq. We then discuss SOA solutions and conclude that approaches such as MaPSeq enable efficient and effective computational workflow execution for genomics research and for any type of academic biomedical research that requires complex, computationally-intense workflows.

  9. Tensions and Challenges: Interrelationships between Social Movements and Progressive Institutional Politics in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro M. Bacallao-Pino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Latin America is the scenario of both significant counterhegemonic social movements and allegedly progressive (or even anti-capitalist governments. The article aims to analyse the interrelationships between those collective agents and institutional politics in that scenario. Based on a general approach to some relevant social movements from the region, the positions of some particular Latin American governments and its leaders, as well as the examination of secondary sources, the text examines three main aspects that mediate the interrelationships between social movements and progressive institutional politics: the singular way in which social movements understand the sense of “politics”, the postures with respect to those collective agents assumed by those governments and the importance of autonomy for social movements. Social movements understand politics not as a separate dimension, but as a process of accumulation from sociability, in a continuity between social and political dimensions based on everyday experience of life, including this way social practices traditionally located outside established political institutions. Autonomy is a central value for those social actors, defining their position with regard to political parties, labour unions, churches and other traditional organisations. It is a value that crosses all their practices and the possibility of articulation to projects developed from governments, from the local level to the Latin American one. Against this, the vision on social movements of allegedly progressive (or even anti-capitalist governments is mediated by the purpose of understanding them from the point of view of traditional political rules, and two significant attitudes towards those social agents are some purposes of criminalisation and co-optation.

  10. Multi-platform genome-wide analysis of melanoma progression to brain metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego M. Marzese

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma has a high tendency to metastasize to brain tissue. The understanding about the molecular alterations of early-stage melanoma progression to brain metastasis (MBM is very limited. Identifying MBM-specific genomic and epigenomic alterations is a key initial step in understanding its aggressive nature and identifying specific novel druggable targets. Here, we describe a multi-platform dataset generated with different stages of melanoma progression to MBM. This data includes genome-wide DNA methylation (Illumina HM450K BeadChip, gene expression (Affymetrix HuEx 1.0 ST array, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and copy number variation (CNV; Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array analyses of melanocyte cells (MNCs, primary melanoma tumors (PRMs, lymph node metastases (LNMs and MBMs. The analysis of this data has been reported in our recently published study (Marzese et al., 2014.

  11. Guidelines for collecting vouchers and tissues intended for genomic work (Smithsonian Institution: Botany Best Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki Funk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of Next Generation Sequencing into the disciplines of plant systematics, ecology, and metagenomics, among others, has resulted in a phenomenal increase in the collecting and storing of tissue samples and their respective vouchers. This manual suggests standard practices that will insure the quality and preservation of the tissue and vouchers and their respective data. Although written for use by the Smithsonian Institution botanists it suggests a framework for collecting tissues and vouchers that other research programs can adapt to their own needs. It includes information on collecting voucher specimens, collecting plant tissue intended for genomic analysis, how to manage these collections, and how to incorporate the data into a database management system. It also includes many useful references for collecting and processing collections. We hope it will be useful for a variety of botanists but especially those who know how to collect plants and want to collect tissue samples that will be useful for genomic research, and those who are skilled in lab work and want to know how to properly voucher and record their tissue collections.

  12. The Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute: reflections on an ongoing experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Jean E; Boyer, Joy T; Sun, Kathie Y; Rothenberg, Karen H; Lockhart, Nicole C; Guyer, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute has supported empirical and conceptual research to anticipate and address the ethical, legal, and social implications of genomics. As a component of the agency that funds much of the underlying science, the program has always been an experiment. The ever-expanding number of issues the program addresses and the relatively low level of commitment on the part of other funding agencies to support such research make setting priorities especially challenging. Program-supported studies have had a significant impact on the conduct of genomics research, the implementation of genomic medicine, and broader public policies. The program's influence is likely to grow as ELSI research, genomics research, and policy development activities become increasingly integrated. Achieving the benefits of increased integration while preserving the autonomy, objectivity, and intellectual independence of ELSI investigators presents ongoing challenges and new opportunities.

  13. Phosphorylation of EB2 by Aurora B and CDK1 ensures mitotic progression and genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimori, Makoto; Watanabe, Sugiko; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Sakasai, Ryo; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-03-31

    Temporal regulation of microtubule dynamics is essential for proper progression of mitosis and control of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins by phosphorylation is an essential component of this regulation. Here we show that Aurora B and CDK1 phosphorylate microtubule end-binding protein 2 (EB2) at multiple sites within the amino terminus and a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the calponin homology and end-binding homology domains. EB2 phosphorylation, which is strictly associated with mitotic entry and progression, reduces the binding affinity of EB2 for microtubules. Expression of non-phosphorylatable EB2 induces stable kinetochore microtubule dynamics and delays formation of bipolar metaphase plates in a microtubule binding-dependent manner, and leads to aneuploidy even in unperturbed mitosis. We propose that Aurora B and CDK1 temporally regulate the binding affinity of EB2 for microtubules, thereby ensuring kinetochore microtubule dynamics, proper mitotic progression and genome stability.

  14. Prediction of acute stroke progression by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vinh Phuong; Tran Van Huy

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the occurrence of neurological changes during the first 48 hours after acute stroke as it relates to the initial stroke severity assessment. Methods The assessment with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was performed serially for the first 48 hours on 68 consecutive ischemic stroke patients admitted to the Department of Geriatric Cardiology at the Khanh Hoa Hospital, Nha Trang, Vietnam. Incidence of stroke progression (a ≥ 3-point increase on the NIHSS) was recorded and analysis performed to determine its association with initial stroke severity and other demographic and physiological variables. Deficit resolution by 48 hours, defined as an NIHSS score of 0 or 1, measured the frequency of functional recovery predicted by the initial deficit.Results Overall progression was noted in 28% of events (19/68). Applying Bayes' solution to the observed frequency of worsening, the greatest likelihood of predicting future patient progression occurred with NIHSS score of =7 and >7. Patients with an initial NIHSS score of =7 experienced a 13% (6/47) worsening rate versus those of an initial score of>7 with a 62% (13/21) worsening rate (P<0.01). 42.5%(20/47) of those with an initial score of =7 were functionally normal at 48 hours, whereas only 4.7% (1/21) of those with scores of >7 retnrned to a normal examination within this period (x2, P<0.05). Conclusions This study suggests that the early clinical course of neurological deficit after acute stroke be dependent on the initial stroke severity and that a dichotomy in early outcome exist surrounding an initial NIHSS score of 7. These findings may have significant implications for the design and patient stratification in treatment protocols with respect to primary clinical outcome.

  15. Progress in TILLING as a tool for functional genomics and improvement of crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Chen; Liugen Hao; Martin A.J.Parry; Andrew L. Phillips; Yin-Gang Hu

    2014-01-01

    Food security is a global concern and substantial yield increases in crops are required to feed the growing world population. Mutagenesis is an important tool in crop improve-ment and is free of the regulatory restrictions imposed on genetical y modified organisms. Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING), which combines traditional chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput genome-wide screening for point mutations in desired genes, offers a powerful way to create novel mutant al eles for both functional genomics and improvement of crops. TILLING is general y applicable to genomes whether smal or large, diploid or even al ohexaploid, and shows great potential to address the major chal enge of linking sequence information to the function of genes and to modulate key traits for plant breeding. TILLING has been successful y applied in many crop species and recent progress in TILLING is summarized below, especial y on the developments in mutation detection technology, application of TILLING in gene functional studies and crop breeding. The potential of TILLING/EcoTILLING for functional genetics and crop improvement is also discussed. Furthermore, a smal-scale forward strategy including backcross and selfing was con-ducted to release the potential mutant phenotypes masked in M2 (or M3) plants.

  16. Genome-wide association and linkage analyses localize a progressive retinal atrophy locus in Persian cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaddad, Hasan; Gandolfi, Barbara; Grahn, Robert A; Rah, Hyung-Chul; Peterson, Carlyn B; Maggs, David J; Good, Kathryn L; Pedersen, Niels C; Lyons, Leslie A

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary eye diseases of animals serve as excellent models of human ocular disorders and assist in the development of gene and drug therapies for inherited forms of blindness. Several primary hereditary eye conditions affecting various ocular tissues and having different rates of progression have been documented in domestic cats. Gene therapy for canine retinopathies has been successful, thus the cat could be a gene therapy candidate for other forms of retinal degenerations. The current study investigates a hereditary, autosomal recessive, retinal degeneration specific to Persian cats. A multi-generational pedigree segregating for this progressive retinal atrophy was genotyped using a 63 K SNP array and analyzed via genome-wide linkage and association methods. A multi-point parametric linkage analysis localized the blindness phenotype to a ~1.75 Mb region with significant LOD scores (Z ≈ 14, θ = 0.00) on cat chromosome E1. Genome-wide TDT, sib-TDT, and case-control analyses also consistently supported significant association within the same region on chromosome E1, which is homologous to human chromosome 17. Using haplotype analysis, a ~1.3 Mb region was identified as highly associated for progressive retinal atrophy in Persian cats. Several candidate genes within the region are reasonable candidates as a potential causative gene and should be considered for molecular analyses.

  17. Research on treatment and disposal of RI and Research Institute Waste. Progress in Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, JAERI, has been carrying out research on safe and rational disposal systems of radioactive wastes arising from medical activities and research institutes (RI and Research Institute Waste). The research area includes a study on molten solidified waste form, a geological survey on Japan, a proposal on integrated disposal systems, data acquisition for safety evaluation, and a safety analysis of disposal systems. This report introduces progress and future works for the treatment and disposal of RI and Research Institute Waste. (author)

  18. Progress in research April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    The period 1 April 1993--31 March 1994 has seen a number of significant developments of the research program as will be noted by the large increase in individual projects reviewed in this annual report. Among the highlights of the K500 experimental program in Sections 1, 2, and 4 are the investigations of excitation energy deposition and of fission dynamics employing both GDR and particle emission probes, measurements of isospin equilibration, studies of (d, {sup 2}He) reactions with the proton spectrometer and of the {beta} decay of {sup 57}Cu with MARS, and the precise studies of ionic charge state distributions using x-ray measurements. Progress in theoretical studies of the nuclear spectral function and the decay of many body systems, on the properties of mesons in hot hadronic matter and on the determination of astrophysical S-factors from experimental studies of very peripheral reactions are presented in Section 3. The status of the LAMPF based MEGA experiment and of the CERN based NA66 experiment, both of which involve institute scientists, is also briefly presented in this report. The shift to a seven day a week operation coupled with installation of cryopanels and more careful temperature control of the cooling water system have resulted in significant improvements in the operational efficiency and beam capabilities. Operating statistics are presented in Section 5.

  19. Clonal expansion and linear genome evolution through breast cancer progression from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Lænkholm, Anne Vibeke

    step. Our data, contrary to the proposed model of early dissemination of metastatic cells and parallel progression of primary tumors and metastases, provide evidence of linear progression of breast cancer with relatively late dissemination from the primary tumor. The genomic discordance between......Evolution of the breast cancer genome from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis is complex and mostly unexplored, but highly demanded as it may provide novel markers for and mechanistic insights in cancer progression. The increasing use of personalized therapy of breast cancer...... necessitates knowledge of the degree of genomic concordance between different steps of malignant progression as primary tumors often are used as surrogates of systemic disease. Based on exome sequencing we performed copy number profiling and point mutation detection on successive steps of breast cancer...

  20. Recurrent genomic alterations in sequential progressive leukoplakia and oral cancer: drivers of oral tumorigenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervigne, Nilva K; Machado, Jerry; Goswami, Rashmi S; Sadikovic, Bekim; Bradley, Grace; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Galloni, Natalie Naranjo; Gilbert, Ralph; Gullane, Patrick; Irish, Jonathan C; Jurisica, Igor; Reis, Patricia P; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne

    2014-05-15

    A significant proportion (up to 62%) of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) may arise from oral potential malignant lesions (OPMLs), such as leukoplakia. Patient outcomes may thus be improved through detection of lesions at a risk for malignant transformation, by identifying and categorizing genetic changes in sequential, progressive OPMLs. We conducted array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of 25 sequential, progressive OPMLs and same-site OSCCs from five patients. Recurrent DNA copy number gains were identified on 1p in 20/25 cases (80%) with minimal, high-level amplification regions on 1p35 and 1p36. Other regions of gains were frequently observed: 11q13.4 (68%), 9q34.13 (64%), 21q22.3 (60%), 6p21 and 6q25 (56%) and 10q24, 19q13.2, 22q12, 5q31.2, 7p13, 10q24 and 14q22 (48%). DNA losses were observed in >20% of samples and mainly detected on 5q31.2 (35%), 16p13.2 (30%), 9q33.1 and 9q33.29 (25%) and 17q11.2, 3p26.2, 18q21.1, 4q34.1 and 8p23.2 (20%). Such copy number alterations (CNAs) were mapped in all grades of dysplasia that progressed, and their corresponding OSCCs, in 70% of patients, indicating that these CNAs may be associated with disease progression. Amplified genes mapping within recurrent CNAs (KHDRBS1, PARP1, RAB1A, HBEGF, PAIP2, BTBD7) were selected for validation, by quantitative real-time PCR, in an independent set of 32 progressive leukoplakia, 32 OSSCs and 21 non-progressive leukoplakia samples. Amplification of BTBD7, KHDRBS1, PARP1 and RAB1A was exclusively detected in progressive leukoplakia and corresponding OSCC. BTBD7, KHDRBS1, PARP1 and RAB1A may be associated with OSCC progression. Protein-protein interaction networks were created to identify possible pathways associated with OSCC progression.

  1. Implementing a genomic data management system using iRODS in the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sale Kevin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly large amounts of DNA sequencing data are being generated within the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI. The traditional file system struggles to handle these increasing amounts of sequence data. A good data management system therefore needs to be implemented and integrated into the current WTSI infrastructure. Such a system enables good management of the IT infrastructure of the sequencing pipeline and allows biologists to track their data. Results We have chosen a data grid system, iRODS (Rule-Oriented Data management systems, to act as the data management system for the WTSI. iRODS provides a rule-based system management approach which makes data replication much easier and provides extra data protection. Unlike the metadata provided by traditional file systems, the metadata system of iRODS is comprehensive and allows users to customize their own application level metadata. Users and IT experts in the WTSI can then query the metadata to find and track data. The aim of this paper is to describe how we designed and used (from both system and user viewpoints iRODS as a data management system. Details are given about the problems faced and the solutions found when iRODS was implemented. A simple use case describing how users within the WTSI use iRODS is also introduced. Conclusions iRODS has been implemented and works as the production system for the sequencing pipeline of the WTSI. Both biologists and IT experts can now track and manage data, which could not previously be achieved. This novel approach allows biologists to define their own metadata and query the genomic data using those metadata.

  2. AASCU Institutions and Industry: Partners in Progress. AASCU Studies 1984/1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Lawrence B.

    The relationships between industry and state colleges and universities were investigated, with attention to member institutions of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. A survey was conducted of 236 public institutions that offered degrees in the liberal arts and at least two professional fields. Of the 66 institutions that…

  3. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Identification of Therapeutic Targets in KRAS Driven Lung Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Dana Farber Cancer Institute focuses on the use of high-throughput genetic and bioinformatic approaches to identify and credential oncogenes and co-dependencies in cancers. This Center aims to provide the cancer research community with information that will facilitate the prioritization of targets based on both genomic and functional evidence, inform the most appropriate genetic context for downstream mechanistic and validation studies, and enable the translation of this information into therapeutics and diagnostics.

  4. Comparative genomics of Bordetella pertussis reveals progressive gene loss in Finnish strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriikka Heikkinen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bordetella pertussis is a gram-negative bacterium that infects the human respiratory tract and causes pertussis or whooping cough. The disease has resurged in many countries including Finland where the whole-cell pertussis vaccine has been used for more than 50 years. Antigenic divergence has been observed between vaccine strains and clinical isolates in Finland. To better understand genome evolution in B. pertussis circulating in the immunized population, we developed an oligonucleotide-based microarray for comparative genomic analysis of Finnish strains isolated during the period of 50 years. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The microarray consisted of 3,582 oligonucleotides (70-mer and covered 94% of 3,816 ORFs of Tohama I, the strain of which the genome has been sequenced. Twenty isolates from 1953 to 2004 were studied together with two Finnish vaccine strains and two international reference strains. The isolates were selected according to their characteristics, e.g. the year and place of isolation and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. Genomic DNA of the tested strains, along with reference DNA of Tohama I strain, was labelled and hybridized. The absence of genes as established with microarrays, was confirmed by PCR. Compared with the Tohama I strain, Finnish isolates lost 7 (8.6 kb to 49 (55.3 kb genes, clustered in one to four distinct loci. The number of lost genes increased with time, and one third of lost genes had functions related to inorganic ion transport and metabolism, or energy production and conversion. All four loci of lost genes were flanked by the insertion sequence element IS481. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that the progressive gene loss occurred in Finnish B. pertussis strains isolated during a period of 50 years and confirmed that B. pertussis is dynamic and is continuously evolving, suggesting that the bacterium may use gene loss as one strategy to adapt to highly immunized populations.

  5. Illumina GA IIx& HiSeq 2000 Production Sequenccing and QC Analysis Pipelines at the DOE Joint Genome Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, Christopher; Zane, Matthew; Han, James; Kennedy, Megan; San Diego, Matthew; Copeland, Alex; Li, Mingkun; Lucas, Susan

    2011-01-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute's (JGI) Production Sequencing group is committed to the generation of high-quality genomic DNA sequence to support the mission areas of renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental characterization and clean-up. Within the JGI's Production Sequencing group, a robust Illumina Genome Analyzer and HiSeq pipeline has been established. Optimization of the sesequencer pipelines has been ongoing with the aim of continual process improvement of the laboratory workflow, reducing operational costs and project cycle times to increases ample throughput, and improving the overall quality of the sequence generated. A sequence QC analysis pipeline has been implemented to automatically generate read and assembly level quality metrics. The foremost of these optimization projects, along with sequencing and operational strategies, throughput numbers, and sequencing quality results will be presented.

  6. Progress in research, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-06-01

    Reports on research activities, facility operation, and facility development of the Texas A and M Cyclotron Institute for the period 1 April 1991--31 March 1992 are presented in this document. During the report period, the ECR-K500 Cyclotron Combination operated 4,377 hours. Of this time, 832 hours was used for beam development, 942 hours was used for tuning and optics, and the beam was available for experiments 2,603 hours. This time was used in a variety of studies including elastic and inelastic scattering, projectile break-up, the production and decay of giant resonances, fusion and fission dynamics, intermediate mass fragment emission, e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} production and molecular dissociation. In addition, studies of surfaces and metastable states in highly charged ions were carried out using the ECR source. Completion of two 19-element BaF{sub 2} arrays, of the focal plane detector for the proton spectrometer and installation of the HiLi multidetector have provided significant new experimental capabilities which have been further enhanced by major additions to the computer network. Progress on the Mass Achromat Recoil Spectrometer (MARS) is such that first operation of that device should occur this summer. Funding for installation of the MDM spectrometer was obtained at the beginning of this year. As this report is being completed, the Enge Split Pole Spectrometer is being disassembled and removed to make room for the MDM spectrometer. The split-pole will be shipped to CEBAF for use in experiments there. Installation of the MDM should be completed within the next year. Also expected in the next year is a 92 element plastic-CsI ball.

  7. Digging Up the Human Genome: Current Progress in Deciphering Adverse Drug Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chi Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are a major clinical problem. In addition to their clinical impact on human health, there is an enormous cost associated with ADRs in health care and pharmaceutical industry. Increasing studies revealed that genetic variants can determine the susceptibility of individuals to ADRs. The development of modern genomic technologies has led to a tremendous advancement of improving the drug safety and efficacy and minimizing the ADRs. This review will discuss the pharmacogenomic techniques used to unveil the determinants of ADRs and summarize the current progresses concerning the identification of biomarkers for ADRs, with a focus on genetic variants for genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes, drug-transporter proteins, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA. The knowledge gained from these cutting-edge findings will form the basis for better prediction and management for ADRs, ultimately making the medicine personalized.

  8. Advanced Cancer Genomics Institute: Genetic Signatures and Therapeutic Targets in Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    capabil ptome (RNA eq: exon us mber variati q and FAIR A-seq: miR me: bacteri terials from ic mice and ard operati apture micr A/RNA, link...entification D) and CR- isolate tumo nd quality c ple platform ression) optimize ervised sets aims in the number var ges, micr ll lines and xt-gen seq e...a ers will pe P-seq, micr ncluding the cancer pre signatures abilities of t The long-te researchers ft tumors in bioinformat . 1) ladder can

  9. Advanced Cancer Genomics Institute: Genetic Signatures and Therapeutic Targets in Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    the Mcm3 gene locus in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) by David Goodrich. This analysis shows novel Mcm3 promoter sites that bind Rb. Fig. 3-5...4. Develop transplantable castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CR-CaP) models of human and mouse prostate cancer lines in which androgen receptor

  10. Clonal expansion and linear genome evolution through breast cancer progression from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Lænkholm, Anne Vibeke;

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of the breast cancer genome from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis is complex and mostly unexplored, but highly demanded as it may provide novel markers for and mechanistic insights in cancer progression. The increasing use of personalized therapy of breast cancer necessita......Evolution of the breast cancer genome from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis is complex and mostly unexplored, but highly demanded as it may provide novel markers for and mechanistic insights in cancer progression. The increasing use of personalized therapy of breast cancer...... progression from one breast cancer patient, including two different regions of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS), primary tumor and an asynchronous metastasis. We identify a remarkable landscape of somatic mutations, retained throughout breast cancer progression and with new mutational events emerging at each...

  11. Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: Progress and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittaranjan eKole

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Climate change affects agricultural productivity worldwide. Increased prices of food commodities are the initial indication of drastic edible yield loss, which is expected to surge further due to global warming. This situation has compelled plant scientists to develop climate change-resilient crops, which can withstand broad-spectrum stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salinity, flood and submergence, and pests along with increased productivity. Genomics appears to be a promising tool for deciphering the stress responsiveness of crop species with adaptation traits or in wild relatives towards identifying underlying genes, alleles or quantitative trait loci. Molecular breeding approaches have been proven helpful in enhancing the stress adaptation of crop plants, and recent advancement in next-generation sequencing along with high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping platforms have transformed molecular breeding to genomics-assisted breeding (GAB. In view of this, the present review elaborates the progress and prospects of GAB in improving climate change resilience in crop plants towards circumventing global food insecurity.

  12. Genomics of Ovarian Cancer Progression Reveals Diverse Metastatic Trajectories Including Intraepithelial Metastasis to the Fallopian Tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Mark A; Pan, Shawn; Hernandez, Kyle M; Loth, Rachel M; Andrade, Jorge; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Faber, Pieter; Montag, Anthony; Lastra, Ricardo; Peter, Marcus E; Yamada, S Diane; Lengyel, Ernst

    2016-12-01

    Accumulating evidence has supported the fallopian tube rather than the ovary as the origin for high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). To understand the relationship between putative precursor lesions and metastatic tumors, we performed whole-exome sequencing on specimens from eight HGSOC patient progression series consisting of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STIC), invasive fallopian tube lesions, invasive ovarian lesions, and omental metastases. Integration of copy number and somatic mutations revealed patient-specific patterns with similar mutational signatures and copy-number variation profiles across all anatomic sites, suggesting that genomic instability is an early event in HGSOC. Phylogenetic analyses supported STIC as precursor lesions in half of our patient cohort, but also identified STIC as metastases in 2 patients. Ex vivo assays revealed that HGSOC spheroids can implant in the fallopian tube epithelium and mimic STIC lesions. That STIC may represent metastases calls into question the assumption that STIC are always indicative of primary fallopian tube cancers. We find that the putative precursor lesions for HGSOC, STIC, possess most of the genomic aberrations present in advanced cancers. In addition, a proportion of STIC represent intraepithelial metastases to the fallopian tube rather than the origin of HGSOC. Cancer Discov; 6(12); 1342-51. ©2016 AACR.See related commentary by Swisher et al., p. 1309This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1293. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. 材料基因组技术前沿进展%Progress on Materials Genome Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向勇; 闫宗楷; 朱焱麟; 张晓琨

    2016-01-01

    Materials genome is an emerging technology to accelerate materials discovery, development, and deployment. In the past two decades, high-throughput materials experimentation tools have been developed and applied successfully to the discovery of a number of materials, ranging from advanced catalysts, dielectrics, electrodes, to high-temperature alloys. Materials computation and database technologies have also made remarkable progresses, particularly represented by the integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) developed in the past decade. Materials genome research integrates high-throughput computation and simulation, high-throughput experimentation, and materials database, throughout the materials discovery-to-deployment process, targeting to cut the materials development time and cost significantly. This review, is trying to give a brief and comprehensive introduction to materials genome technologies, with emphasis on high-throughput materials experimentation, as well as applications of materials computation and database. University of Electronics Science and Technology of China is one of the most active institutes in China in the filed of materials genome research, and some progresses are also highlighted in this review.%材料基因组技术是近年来兴起的材料研究新理念和新方法,是当今世界材料科学与工程领域的最前沿。材料基因组技术的实质是通过融合高通量材料计算设计、高通量材料实验和材料数据库三大组成要素,构建材料设计研发的协同创新网络,加速新材料从发现到应用的全过程。其中,高通量材料实验经过20多年的发展,目前已面向多种形态材料和多种服役性能形成了一系列成功案例,高通量材料计算模拟和材料数据库近几年也取得了较大进展。该文简要回顾了材料基因组技术的主要内容和发展历程,总结了具有代表性的高通量实验技术,以及高通

  14. Genome-Wide Association of CKD Progression: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Afshin; Kanetsky, Peter A; Xiao, Rui; Gupta, Jayanta; Mitra, Nandita; Limou, Sophie; Xie, Dawei; Xu, Huichun; Anderson, Amanda Hyre; Ojo, Akinlolu; Kusek, John W; Lora, Claudia M; Hamm, L Lee; He, Jiang; Sandholm, Niina; Jeff, Janina; Raj, Dominic E; Böger, Carsten A; Bottinger, Erwin; Salimi, Shabnam; Parekh, Rulan S; Adler, Sharon G; Langefeld, Carl D; Bowden, Donald W; Groop, Per-Henrik; Forsblom, Carol; Freedman, Barry I; Lipkowitz, Michael; Fox, Caroline S; Winkler, Cheryl A; Feldman, Harold I

    2017-03-01

    The rate of decline of renal function varies significantly among individuals with CKD. To understand better the contribution of genetics to CKD progression, we performed a genome-wide association study among participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Our outcome of interest was CKD progression measured as change in eGFR over time among 1331 blacks and 1476 whites with CKD. We stratified all analyses by race and subsequently, diabetes status. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that surpassed a significance threshold of P<1×10(-6) for association with eGFR slope were selected as candidates for follow-up and secondarily tested for association with proteinuria and time to ESRD. We identified 12 such SNPs among black patients and six such SNPs among white patients. We were able to conduct follow-up analyses of three candidate SNPs in similar (replication) cohorts and eight candidate SNPs in phenotype-related (validation) cohorts. Among blacks without diabetes, rs653747 in LINC00923 replicated in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension cohort (discovery P=5.42×10(-7); replication P=0.039; combined P=7.42×10(-9)). This SNP also associated with ESRD (hazard ratio, 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 2.7); P=4.90×10(-6)). Similarly, rs931891 in LINC00923 associated with eGFR decline (P=1.44×10(-4)) in white patients without diabetes. In summary, SNPs in LINC00923, an RNA gene expressed in the kidney, significantly associated with CKD progression in individuals with nondiabetic CKD. However, the lack of equivalent cohorts hampered replication for most discovery loci. Further replication of our findings in comparable study populations is warranted.

  15. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Propionibacterium acnes Strains Isolated from Progressive Macular Hypomelanosis Lesions of Human Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rolf; Lomholt, Hans B.; Scholz, Christian F. P.;

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that is prevalent on human skin. It has been associated with skin disorders such as acne vulgaris and progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH). Here, we report draft genome sequences of two type III P. acnes strains, PMH5 and PMH7, isolated from...

  16. Clonal expansion and linear genome evolution through breast cancer progression from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of the breast cancer genome from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis is complex and mostly unexplored, but highly demanded as it may provide novel markers for and mechanistic insights in cancer progression. The increasing use of personalized therapy of breast cancer necessita...

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Propionibacterium acnes Strains Isolated from Progressive Macular Hypomelanosis Lesions of Human Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rolf; Lomholt, Hans B.; Scholz, Christian F. P.

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that is prevalent on human skin. It has been associated with skin disorders such as acne vulgaris and progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH). Here, we report draft genome sequences of two type III P. acnes strains, PMH5 and PMH7, isolated from...

  18. Research in progress at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April 1, 1987 through October 1, 1987.

  19. National Institute for Rocket Propulsion Systems 2012 Annual Report: A Year of Progress and Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Doreswamy, Rajiv; Fry, Emma Kiele

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute for Rocket Propulsion Systems (NIRPS) maintains and advances U.S. leadership in all aspects of rocket propulsion for defense, civil, and commercial uses. The Institute's creation is in response to widely acknowledged concerns about the U.S. rocket propulsion base dating back more than a decade. U.S. leadership in rocket and missile propulsion is threatened by long-term industry downsizing, a shortage of new solid and liquid propulsion programs, limited ability to attract and retain fresh talent, and discretionary federal budget pressures. Numerous trade and independent studies cite erosion of this capability as a threat to national security and the U.S. economy resulting in a loss of global competitiveness for the U.S. propulsion industry. This report covers the period between May 2011 and December 2012, which includes the creation and transition to operations of NIRPS. All subsequent reports will be annual. The year 2012 has been an eventful one for NIRPS. In its first full year, the new team overcame many obstacles and explored opportunities to ensure the institute has a firm foundation for the future. NIRPS is now an active organization making contributions to the development, sustainment, and strategy of the rocket propulsion industry in the United States. This report describes the actions taken by the NIRPS team to determine the strategy, organizational structure, and goals of the Institute. It also highlights key accomplishments, collaborations with other organizations, and the strategic framework for the Institute.

  20. Institute of Nuclear Solid State Physics (INFP). Progress report on research and development in 1994; Institut fuer Nukleare Festkoerperphysik. Ergebnisbericht ueber Forschung und Entwicklung 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    About 90 percent of the research activities of the INFP in 1994 were devoted to superconductivity as the priority research field of the Institute. In the domain of fundamental research, the work on oxidic HT superconductors was continued, concentrating on the electronic structure and details of the lattice dynamics. New tasks were opened up with studies on the recently discovered boron nitrides of the type LnNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C (Ln=Y,Lu,..) with superconducting transition temperatures of up to T{sub c}{approx}23K. Good progress was achieved in the preparation of MPMG superconducting bulk specimens intended for use in self-stabilising magnetic bearings. A prototype flywheel power storage system was developed for demonstrating the technological feasibility. Application-oriented studies were concerned with the growth of epitactic thin films on application-relevant substrates and including suitable buffer layers, and with the examination of the high-frequency performance of these films. Fullerene research continued with studies into the solid-state physics of crystalline fullerenes or fullerene compounds, and the preparation and characterisation of endofullerenes such as La C{sub 82}. The remaining approximately 10 percent of the Institute`s research activities covered experimental and theoretical work on the physics of surfaces and boundary surfaces, and the physics of mesoscopic systems. (orig./MM) [Deutsch] Das Institut fuer Nukleare Festkoerperphysik lag im Berichtsjahr mit etwa 90% seiner Aktivitaeten im Arbeitsschwerpunkt Supraleitung. Bei oxidischen Hochtemperatursupraleitern wurden im Bereich der Grundlagenforschung vor allem die elektronische Struktur und gitterdynamische Details untersucht. Neu aufgegriffen wurden die juengst entdeckten Boronitride vom Typ LnNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C (Ln=Y, Lu,...) mit supraleitenden Uebergangstemperaturen bis T{sub c}{approx}23 K. Grosse Fortschritte gab es auch bei der Herstellung schmelztexturierter HTSL-Volumenproben, wie sie in

  1. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are to (1) conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) serve as a national and international center for information exchange by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; and (3) train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. During FY 1995, a number of significant scientific advances were achieved at the IFS, both in long-range fundamental problems as well as in near-term strategic issues, consistent with the Institute`s mandate. Examples of these achievements include, for example, tokamak edge physics, analytical and computational studies of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulent transport, alpha-particle-excited toroidal Alfven eigenmode nonlinear behavior, sophisticated simulations for the Numerical Tokamak Project, and a variety of non-tokamak and non-fusion basic plasma physics applications. Many of these projects were done in collaboration with scientists from other institutions. Research discoveries are briefly described in this report.

  2. National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research monthly progress report for December 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-22

    Research programs from the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) are briefly described. Topics include enhanced recovery, studies on reservoir rock, microbial EOR, development of analytical techniques for petroleum analysis, and imaging techniques applied to fluids study in porous media. (CBS)

  3. Genome-wide association study of corticobasal degeneration identifies risk variants shared with progressive supranuclear palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Naomi; Ross, Owen A.; Dombroski, Beth; Younkin, Curtis S.; Serie, Daniel J.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Baker, Matthew; Finch, Ni Cole A.; Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Jungsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; McLean, Catriona A.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spina, Salvatore; Cantwell, Laura B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Grafman, Jordan; Huey, Edward D.; Ryung Han, Mi; Beecher, Sherry; Geller, Evan T.; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Roeber, Sigrun; Gearing, Marla; Juncos, Jorge L.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Grossman, Murray; Hurtig, Howard I.; Gross, Rachel G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.; Wenning, Gregor K.; White, Charles L.; Höglinger, Günter U.; Müller, Ulrich; Devlin, Bernie; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Crook, Julia; Parisi, Joseph E.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Josephs, Keith A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Litvan, Irene; Younkin, Steven G.; Wang, Li-San; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Rademakers, Rosa; Hakonarsen, Hakon; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting movement and cognition, definitively diagnosed only at autopsy. Here, we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in CBD cases (n=152) and 3,311 controls, and 67 CBD cases and 439 controls in a replication stage. Associations with meta-analysis were 17q21 at MAPT (P=1.42 × 10−12), 8p12 at lnc-KIF13B-1, a long non-coding RNA (rs643472; P=3.41 × 10−8), and 2p22 at SOS1 (rs963731; P=1.76 × 10−7). Testing for association of CBD with top progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) GWAS single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified associations at MOBP (3p22; rs1768208; P=2.07 × 10−7) and MAPT H1c (17q21; rs242557; P=7.91 × 10−6). We previously reported SNP/transcript level associations with rs8070723/MAPT, rs242557/MAPT, and rs1768208/MOBP and herein identified association with rs963731/SOS1. We identify new CBD susceptibility loci and show that CBD and PSP share a genetic risk factor other than MAPT at 3p22 MOBP (myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic protein). PMID:26077951

  4. Genome-Wide Search for Host Association Factors during Ovine Progressive Pneumonia Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Thompson

    Full Text Available Ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV is an important virus that causes serious diseases in sheep and goats with a prevalence of 36% in the USA. Although OPPV was discovered more than half of a century ago, little is known about the infection and pathogenesis of this virus. In this report, we used RNA-seq technology to conduct a genome-wide probe for cellular factors that are associated with OPPV infection. A total of approximately 22,000 goat host genes were detected of which 657 were found to have been significantly up-regulated and 889 down-regulated at 12 hours post-infection. In addition to previously known restriction factors from other viral infections, a number of factors which may be specific for OPPV infection were uncovered. The data from this RNA-seq study will be helpful in our understanding of OPPV infection, and also for further study in the prevention and intervention of this viral disease.

  5. Institutional applications of solar total energy systems. First quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-07-01

    The meteorology followed to develop a data base for assessing market potential in the eight institutional subsectors is described. The subsectors are: elementary and high schools, colleges and universities, hospitals, military installations, public administration buildings, post offices, airports, and prisons. The market characteristics to be studied in detail are defined, and the methodology to be followed in assessing the relative economic performance of representative STE systems is given. The generic STE conceptual system design is introduced. (MHR)

  6. Identification of novel genomic markers related to progression to glioblastoma through genomic profiling of 25 primary glioma cell lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roversi, G.; Pfundt, R.; Moroni, R.F.; Magnani, I.; Reijmersdal, S.V. van; Pollo, B.; Straatman, H.M.P.M.; Larizza, L.; Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Identification of genetic copy number changes in glial tumors is of importance in the context of improved/refined diagnostic, prognostic procedures and therapeutic decision-making. In order to detect recurrent genomic copy number changes that might play a role in glioma pathogenesis and/or progressi

  7. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases Annual Progress Report, Fiscal Year 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    APPROACH 25. PROGRESS (Precede text of each with Security Cl"aufication Code) 23. (U) To study the basic mechanisms of action and the physiological ...neural cell system, the PC-12 rat pheochromocytoma cell, was adopted, its culture requirements were established, and assays for catecholamine uptake...M.D. BACKGROUND Small molecular weight endogenous peptides, such as neuropeptides and monokines, have major effects on the physiological control of

  8. Appearance traits in fish farming: progress from classical genetics to genomics, providing insight into current and potential genetic improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colihueque, Nelson; Araneda, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Appearance traits in fish, those external body characteristics that influence consumer acceptance at point of sale, have come to the forefront of commercial fish farming, as culture profitability is closely linked to management of these traits. Appearance traits comprise mainly body shape and skin pigmentation. Analysis of the genetic basis of these traits in different fish reveals significant genetic variation within populations, indicating potential for their genetic improvement. Work into ascertaining the minor or major genes underlying appearance traits for commercial fish is emerging, with substantial progress in model fish in terms of identifying genes that control body shape and skin colors. In this review, we describe research progress to date, especially with regard to commercial fish, and discuss genomic findings in model fish in order to better address the genetic basis of the traits. Given that appearance traits are important in commercial fish, the genomic information related to this issue promises to accelerate the selection process in coming years. PMID:25140172

  9. Research in progress and other activities of the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics and computer science during the period April 1, 1993 through September 30, 1993. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustic and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  10. Progress on Transferring Elite Genes from Non-AA Genome Wild Rice into Oryza sativa through Interspecific Hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The progress of research on transferring elite genes from non-AA genome wild rice into Oryza sativa through interspecific hybridization are in three respects,that is,breeding monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs),constructing introgression lines (ILs) and analyzing the heredity of the characters and mapping the related genes.There are serious reproductive barriers,mainly incrossability and hybrid sterility,in the interspecific hybridization of O.sativa with non-AA genome wild rice.These are the 'bottleneck' for transferring elite genes from wild rice to O.sativa.Combining traditional crossing method with biotechnique is a reliable way to overcome the reproductive barriers and to improve the utilizing efficiency of non-AA genome wild rice.

  11. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Discovery of Novel Oncogenes | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread recurrent copy number alterations are observed across the majority of human cancers, yet the specific targets of such amplified or deleted regions remain undefined. Here, the CTD2 Center at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute took a systematic approach using cDNA overexpression screening to identify and validate oncogenes residing in such amplified regions. In representative examples, these experiments have identified the adaptor proteins CRKL, GAB2, FRS2 and the TLOC and SKIL proteins as novel amplified oncogenes.

  12. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, 1 November 1993--31 October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a national and international center for information exchange by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results obtained by the Institute contribute to the progress of nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power as a basic energy source. Close collaborative relationships have been developed with other university and national laboratory fusion groups, both in the US and abroad. In addition to its primary focus on mainstream fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in fusion-sidestream fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, space plasmas and astrophysics, statistical mechanics, fluid dynamics, and accelerator physics. Important research discoveries are briefly described.

  13. [Research progress in developing reporter systems for the enrichment of positive cells with targeted genome modification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yichun; Xu, Kun; Wei, Zehui; Ma, Zheng; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Targeted genome editing technology plays an important role in studies of gene function, gene therapy and transgenic breeding. Moreover, the efficiency of targeted genome editing is increased dramatically with the application of recently developed artificial nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9. However, obtaining positive cells with targeted genome modification is restricted to some extent by nucleases expression plasmid transfection efficiency, nucleases expression and activity, and repair efficiency after genome editing. Thus, the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification remains a problem that need to be solved. Surrogate reporter systems could be used to reflect the efficiency of nucleases indirectly and enrich genetically modified positive cells effectively, which may increase the efficiency of the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification. In this review, we mainly summarized principles and applications of reporter systems based on NHEJ and SSA repair mechanisms, which may provide references for related studies in future.

  14. Research progress at the Slow Positron Facility in the Institute of Materials Structure Science, KEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, T.; Wada, K.; Mochizuki, I.; Kimura, M.; Toge, N.; Shidara, T.; Fukaya, Y.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Iida, S.; Michishio, K.; Nagashima, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Recent results at the Slow Positron Facility (SPF), Institute of Materials Structure Science (IMSS), KEK are reported. Studies using the total-reflection high-energy positron diffraction (TRHEPD) station revealed the structures of rutile-TiO2(110) (1×2), graphene on Cu (111) and Co (0001), and germanene on Al (111). First observations of the shape resonance in the Ps- photodetachment process were made using the positronium negative ion (Ps-) station. Experiments using the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) station showed significant enhancement of the Ps formation efficiency and the energy loss in the Ps formation-emission process. A pulse-stretching section has been implemented, which stretches the positron pulse width from 1.2 μs up to almost 20 ms.

  15. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Discovery of Resistance Mechanisms | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance to targeted therapy is emerging as a bottleneck to achieving durable drug responses in cancer. The goal of the CTD2 Center at Dana Farber Cancer Institute is to identify mechanisms of resistance for both existing therapeutics as well as for emerging targets even prior to the identification of lead compounds. They aim to use this information to inform combinatorial treatments. In representative examples they have found that YAP1 leads to resistance after KRAS targeting and that PRKACA mediates resistance to HER2 therapy.

  16. Progress in research, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    This Institute annual report for the period 1 April 1992--31 March 1993 covers a period which has seen the initial runs of three new spectrometers which constitute a major portion of the new detection capabilities developed for this facility. These devices are the Proton Spectrometer (PSP), the Mass Achromat Recoil Mass Spectrometer (MARS), and the Multipole dipole Multipole (MDM) Particle Spectrometer. These devices are now available to pursue the studies of Gamow Teller states, reactions of astrophysical interest, and giant resonance studies for which they were constructed, as well as for other experiments. A beam analysis system which will deliver high resolution beams to the MDM spectrometer is currently under construction. With the completion of these spectrometer projects, the facility emphasis is now focused on the development of the full capabilities of the K500 cyclotron and on the research program. During the report period, the ECR-K500 cyclotron combination operated 5,849 hours. Theoretical work reported in this document ranges from nuclear structure calculations using the IBM-2 model to calculations of kaon production and the in-medium properties of the rho and phi mesons, the latter as a probe of the QCD phase transition. Nuclear dynamics and exotic shapes and fragmentation modes of hot nuclei are also addressed. In atomic physics, new measurements of x-ray emission from highly ionized ions, of molecular dissociation and of surface interactions are reported.

  17. Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC)-Producing K. pneumoniae at a Single Institution: Insights into Endemicity from Whole-Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoesser, Nicole; Sheppard, Anna E.; Pankhurst, Louise; Giess, Adam; Yeh, Anthony J.; Didelot, Xavier; Turner, Stephen D.; Sebra, Robert; Kasarskis, Andrew; Peto, Tim; Crook, Derrick; Sifri, Costi D.

    2015-01-01

    The global emergence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) multilocus sequence type ST258 is widely recognized. Less is known about the molecular and epidemiological details of non-ST258 K. pneumoniae in the setting of an outbreak mediated by an endemic plasmid. We describe the interplay of blaKPC plasmids and K. pneumoniae strains and their relationship to the location of acquisition in a U.S. health care institution. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis was applied to KPC-Kp clinical isolates collected from a single institution over 5 years following the introduction of blaKPC in August 2007, as well as two plasmid transformants. KPC-Kp from 37 patients yielded 16 distinct sequence types (STs). Two novel conjugative blaKPC plasmids (pKPC_UVA01 and pKPC_UVA02), carried by the hospital index case, accounted for the presence of blaKPC in 21/37 (57%) subsequent cases. Thirteen (35%) isolates represented an emergent lineage, ST941, which contained pKPC_UVA01 in 5/13 (38%) and pKPC_UVA02 in 6/13 (46%) cases. Seven (19%) isolates were the epidemic KPC-Kp strain, ST258, mostly imported from elsewhere and not carrying pKPC_UVA01 or pKPC_UVA02. Using WGS-based analysis of clinical isolates and plasmid transformants, we demonstrate the unexpected dispersal of blaKPC to many non-ST258 lineages in a hospital through spread of at least two novel blaKPC plasmids. In contrast, ST258 KPC-Kp was imported into the institution on numerous occasions, with other blaKPC plasmid vectors and without sustained transmission. Instead, a newly recognized KPC-Kp strain, ST941, became associated with both novel blaKPC plasmids and spread locally, making it a future candidate for clinical persistence and dissemination. PMID:25561339

  18. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research] monthly progress report for July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    Brief progress reports are presented under the following tasks: energy production research; fuels research; and supplemental Government programs. Energy production research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; development of improved chemical flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Fuels research covers; development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteroatom-containing compounds. Supplemental Government program includes: microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region: Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project; process-engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade PBO crude oil database; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; DOE education initiative project; technology transfer to independent producers; compilation and analysis of outcrop data from the Muddy and Almond formations; implementation of oil and gas technology transfer initiative; horizontal well production from fractured reservoirs; chemical EOR workshop; and organization of UNITAR 6th International conference of Heavy Crude and Tar Sands.

  19. National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research monthly progress report for August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Brief progress reports are presented under the following tasks: energy production research; fuels research; and supplemental Government programs. Energy production research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; development of improved chemical flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Fuels research covers; development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteroatom-containing compounds. Supplemental Government program includes: feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region: Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project; process-engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade PBO crude oil database; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; DOE education initiative project; technology transfer to independent producers; compilation and analysis of outcrop data from the Muddy and Almond formations; implementation of oil and gas technology transfer initiative; horizontal well production from fractured reservoirs; chemical EOR workshop; and organization of UNITAR 6th International conference of Heavy Crude and Tar Sands.

  20. Reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, and error-prone repair: a model for genomic instability with progression in myeloid leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassool, Feyruz V; Gaymes, Terry J; Omidvar, Nader; Brady, Nicola; Beurlet, Stephanie; Pla, Marika; Reboul, Murielle; Lea, Nicholas; Chomienne, Christine; Thomas, Nicholas S B; Mufti, Ghulam J; Padua, Rose Ann

    2007-09-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, with an increased propensity to develop acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The molecular basis for MDS progression is unknown, but a key element in MDS disease progression is loss of chromosomal material (genomic instability). Using our two-step mouse model for myeloid leukemic disease progression involving overexpression of human mutant NRAS and BCL2 genes, we show that there is a stepwise increase in the frequency of DNA damage leading to an increased frequency of error-prone repair of double-strand breaks (DSB) by nonhomologous end-joining. There is a concomitant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these transgenic mice with disease progression. Importantly, RAC1, an essential component of the ROS-producing NADPH oxidase, is downstream of RAS, and we show that ROS production in NRAS/BCL2 mice is in part dependent on RAC1 activity. DNA damage and error-prone repair can be decreased or reversed in vivo by N-acetyl cysteine antioxidant treatment. Our data link gene abnormalities to constitutive DNA damage and increased DSB repair errors in vivo and provide a mechanism for an increase in the error rate of DNA repair with MDS disease progression. These data suggest treatment strategies that target RAS/RAC pathways and ROS production in human MDS/AML.

  1. The use of whole genome amplification to study chromosomal changes in prostate cancer: insights into genome-wide signature of preneoplasia associated with cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Squire Jeremy A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer (CaP is a disease with multifactorial etiology that includes both genetic and environmental components. The knowledge of the genetic basis of CaP has increased over the past years, mainly in the pathways that underlie tumourigenesis, progression and drug resistance. The vast majority of cases of CaP are adenocarcinomas that likely develop through a pre-malignant lesion and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HPIN. Histologically, CaP is a heterogeneous disease consisting of multiple, discrete foci of invasive carcinoma and HPIN that are commonly interspersed with benign glands and stroma. This admixture with benign tissue can complicate genomic analyses in CaP. Specifically, when DNA is bulk-extracted the genetic information obtained represents an average for all of the cells within the sample. Results To minimize this problem, we obtained DNA from individual foci of HPIN and CaP by laser capture microdissection (LCM. The small quantities of DNA thus obtained were then amplified by means of multiple-displacement amplification (MDA, for use in genomic DNA array comparative genomic hybridisation (gaCGH. Recurrent chromosome copy number abnormalities (CNAs were observed in both HPIN and CaP. In HPIN, chromosomal imbalances involving chromosome 8 where common, whilst in CaP additional chromosomal changes involving chromosomes 6, 10, 13 and 16 where also frequently observed. Conclusion An overall increase in chromosomal changes was seen in CaP compared to HPIN, suggesting a universal breakdown in chromosomal stability. The accumulation of CNAs, which occurs during this process is non-random and may indicate chromosomal regions important in tumourigenesis. It is therefore likely that the alterations in copy number are part of a programmed cycle of events that promote tumour development, progression and survival. The combination of LCM, MDA and gaCGH is ideally suited for the identification of CNAs from

  2. Genome-wide alterations of the DNA replication program during tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, A.; Goldar, A.; Argoul, F.; Hyrien, O.; Audit, B.

    2016-08-01

    Oncogenic stress is a major driving force in the early stages of cancer development. Recent experimental findings reveal that, in precancerous lesions and cancers, activated oncogenes may induce stalling and dissociation of DNA replication forks resulting in DNA damage. Replication timing is emerging as an important epigenetic feature that recapitulates several genomic, epigenetic and functional specificities of even closely related cell types. There is increasing evidence that chromosome rearrangements, the hallmark of many cancer genomes, are intimately associated with the DNA replication program and that epigenetic replication timing changes often precede chromosomic rearrangements. The recent development of a novel methodology to map replication fork polarity using deep sequencing of Okazaki fragments has provided new and complementary genome-wide replication profiling data. We review the results of a wavelet-based multi-scale analysis of genomic and epigenetic data including replication profiles along human chromosomes. These results provide new insight into the spatio-temporal replication program and its dynamics during differentiation. Here our goal is to bring to cancer research, the experimental protocols and computational methodologies for replication program profiling, and also the modeling of the spatio-temporal replication program. To illustrate our purpose, we report very preliminary results obtained for the chronic myelogeneous leukemia, the archetype model of cancer. Finally, we discuss promising perspectives on using genome-wide DNA replication profiling as a novel efficient tool for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized treatment.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9 for genome editing: progress, implications and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Wen, Yan; Guo, Xiong

    2014-09-15

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) protein 9 system provides a robust and multiplexable genome editing tool, enabling researchers to precisely manipulate specific genomic elements, and facilitating the elucidation of target gene function in biology and diseases. CRISPR/Cas9 comprises of a nonspecific Cas9 nuclease and a set of programmable sequence-specific CRISPR RNA (crRNA), which can guide Cas9 to cleave DNA and generate double-strand breaks at target sites. Subsequent cellular DNA repair process leads to desired insertions, deletions or substitutions at target sites. The specificity of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated DNA cleavage requires target sequences matching crRNA and a protospacer adjacent motif locating at downstream of target sequences. Here, we review the molecular mechanism, applications and challenges of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing and clinical therapeutic potential of CRISPR/Cas9 in future.

  4. Human genome libraries. Final progress report, February 1, 1994--August 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this program is to use a novel technology of chromosome microdissection and microcloning to construct chromosome region-specific libraries as resources for various human genome program studies. Region specific libraries have been constructed for the entire human chromosomes 2 and 18.

  5. Progress report for 94/95; Institut des Sciences Nucleaires - Rapport d`activite 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    We find here the progress report for the two years 1994 and 1995 for institute of nuclear sciences at Grenoble. In the field of quarks and leptons, three teams are invested in CERN programmes: A.T.L.A.S. near the L.H.C., D.E.L.P.H.I; the neutrino team has achieved the building of the detector in the M.U.N.U. collaboration. In the theme Hadrons physics we have G.R.A.A.L. at E.S.R.F., C.E.B.A.F. and W.A.89. Physicists are implied in the project E.L.F.E at D.E.S.Y. The study of superdeformed states go on with E.U.R.O.G.R.A.M. New techniques have been used near the programme S.A.R.A. The programme P.I.A.F.E. saw the resolution of the difficult problem of the transformation 1+ gives N+ ions of 30 KeV and their transport on long distances. The team of hybrid reactors have shown that it was possible to amplify energy by a sub critical accelerator-reactor hybrid system, experience initiated by C. Rubbia at C.E.R.N. (N.C.).

  6. The Genomics Education Partnership: Successful Integration of Research into Laboratory Classes at a Diverse Group of Undergraduate Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Christopher D.; Alvarez, Consuelo; Bailey, Cheryl; Barnard, Daron; Bhalla, Satish; Chandrasekaran, Chitra; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Chung, Hui-Min; Dorer, Douglas R.; Du, Chunguang; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Poet, Jeff L.; Frohlich, Donald; Goodman, Anya L.; Gosser, Yuying; Hauser, Charles; Hoopes, Laura L. M.; Johnson, Diana; Jones, Christopher J.; Kaehler, Marian; Kokan, Nighat; Kopp, Olga R.; Kuleck, Gary A.; McNeil, Gerard; Moss, Robert; Myka, Jennifer L.; Nagengast, Alexis; Morris, Robert; Overvoorde, Paul J.; Shoop, Elizabeth; Parrish, Susan; Reed, Kelynne; Regisford, E. Gloria; Revie, Dennis; Rosenwald, Anne G.; Saville, Ken; Schroeder, Stephanie; Shaw, Mary; Skuse, Gary; Smith, Christopher; Smith, Mary; Spana, Eric P.; Spratt, Mary; Stamm, Joyce; Thompson, Jeff S.; Wawersik, Matthew; Wilson, Barbara A.; Youngblom, Jim; Leung, Wilson; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R.; Lopatto, David; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Genomics is not only essential for students to understand biology but also provides unprecedented opportunities for undergraduate research. The goal of the Genomics Education Partnership (GEP), a collaboration between a growing number of colleges and universities around the country and the Department of Biology and Genome Center of Washington…

  7. Progress and knowledge gaps in Culicoides genetics, genomics and population modelling: 2003 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Simon

    2016-09-30

    In the 10 years, since the last international meeting on Bluetongue virus (BTV) and related Orbiviruses in Sicily, there have been huge advances in explorations of the genetics and genomics of Culicoides, culminating in the imminent release of the rst full genome de novo assembly for the genus. In parallel, mathematical models used to predict Culicoides adult distribution, seasonality, and dispersal have also increased in sophistication, re ecting advances in available computational power and expertise. While these advances have focused upon the outbreaks of BTV in Europe, there is an opportunity to extend these techniques to other regions as part of global studies of the genus. This review takes a selective approach to examining the past decade of research in these areas and provides a personal viewpoint of future directions of research that may prove productive.

  8. Progress in unraveling the genetic etiology of Parkinson disease in a genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Aline; Theuns, Jessie; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) and Parkinson-plus syndromes are genetically heterogeneous neurological diseases. Initial studies into the genetic causes of PD relied on classical molecular genetic approaches in well-documented case families. More recently, these approaches have been combined with exome sequencing and together have identified 15 causal genes. Additionally, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered over 25 genetic risk factors. Elucidation of the genetic architecture of sporadic and familial parkinsonism, however, has lagged behind that of simple Mendelian conditions, suggesting the existence of features confounding genetic data interpretation. Here we discuss the successes and potential pitfalls of gene discovery in PD and related disorders in the post-genomic era. With an estimated 30% of trait variance currently unexplained, tackling current limitations will further expedite gene discovery and lead to increased application of these genetic insights in molecular diagnostics using gene panel and exome sequencing strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Progress of genome engineering technology via clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2013-10-04

    In survival competition with phage, bacteria and archaea gradually evolved the acquired immune system--Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), presenting the trait of transcribing the crRNA and the CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) to silence or cleaving the foreign double-stranded DNA specifically. In recent years, strong interest arises in prokaryotes primitive immune system and many in-depth researches are going on. Recently, researchers successfully repurposed CRISPR as an RNA-guided platform for sequence-specific gene expression, which provides a simple approach for selectively perturbing gene expression on a genome-wide scale. It will undoubtedly bring genome engineering into a more convenient and accurate new era.

  10. Genomic Diversity and the Microenvironment as Drivers of Progression in DCIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    microenvironment, mammographic biomarkers 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS What were the major goals of the project? Aim 1. Determine whether genetic diversity...of genetic diversity, microenvironmental diversity, and/or mammographic biomarkers can be used to predict which DCIS tumors are most likely to...series of pilot experiments to determine the best resource (Washington University) that we will use to perform the genomic sequencing of our tumors. We

  11. The Scientific Foundation for personal genomics: recommendations from a National Institutes of Health-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention multidisciplinary workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Muin J; McBride, Colleen M; Schully, Sheri D; Ioannidis, John P A; Feero, W Gregory; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Gwinn, Marta; Simons-Morton, Denise G; Bernhardt, Jay M; Cargill, Michele; Chanock, Stephen J; Church, George M; Coates, Ralph J; Collins, Francis S; Croyle, Robert T; Davis, Barry R; Downing, Gregory J; Duross, Amy; Friedman, Susan; Gail, Mitchell H; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Green, Robert C; Greene, Mark H; Greenland, Philip; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Hsu, Andro; Hudson, Kathy L; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kimmel, Paul L; Lauer, Michael S; Miller, Amy M; Offit, Kenneth; Ransohoff, David F; Roberts, J Scott; Rasooly, Rebekah S; Stefansson, Kari; Terry, Sharon F; Teutsch, Steven M; Trepanier, Angela; Wanke, Kay L; Witte, John S; Xu, Jianfeng

    2009-08-01

    The increasing availability of personal genomic tests has led to discussions about the validity and utility of such tests and the balance of benefits and harms. A multidisciplinary workshop was convened by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to review the scientific foundation for using personal genomics in risk assessment and disease prevention and to develop recommendations for targeted research. The clinical validity and utility of personal genomics is a moving target with rapidly developing discoveries but little translation research to close the gap between discoveries and health impact. Workshop participants made recommendations in five domains: (1) developing and applying scientific standards for assessing personal genomic tests; (2) developing and applying a multidisciplinary research agenda, including observational studies and clinical trials to fill knowledge gaps in clinical validity and utility; (3) enhancing credible knowledge synthesis and information dissemination to clinicians and consumers; (4) linking scientific findings to evidence-based recommendations for use of personal genomics; and (5) assessing how the concept of personal utility can affect health benefits, costs, and risks by developing appropriate metrics for evaluation. To fulfill the promise of personal genomics, a rigorous multidisciplinary research agenda is needed.

  12. The Scientific Foundation for Personal Genomics: Recommendations from a National Institutes of Health–Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Multidisciplinary Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Muin J.; McBride, Colleen M.; Schully, Sheri D.; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Feero, W. Gregory; Janssens, A. Cecile J. W.; Gwinn, Marta; Simons-Morton, Denise G.; Bernhardt, Jay M.; Cargill, Michele; Chanock, Stephen J.; Church, George M.; Coates, Ralph J.; Collins, Francis S.; Croyle, Robert T.; Davis, Barry R.; Downing, Gregory J.; DuRoss, Amy; Friedman, Susan; Gail, Mitchell H.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Green, Robert C.; Greene, Mark H.; Greenland, Philip; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Hsu, Andro; Hudson, Kathy L.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Lauer, Michael S.; Miller, Amy M.; Offit, Kenneth; Ransohoff, David F.; Roberts, J. Scott; Rasooly, Rebekah S.; Stefansson, Kari; Terry, Sharon F.; Teutsch, Steven M.; Trepanier, Angela; Wanke, Kay L.; Witte, John S.; Xu, Jianfeng

    2010-01-01

    The increasing availability of personal genomic tests has led to discussions about the validity and utility of such tests and the balance of benefits and harms. A multidisciplinary workshop was convened by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to review the scientific foundation for using personal genomics in risk assessment and disease prevention and to develop recommendations for targeted research. The clinical validity and utility of personal genomics is a moving target with rapidly developing discoveries but little translation research to close the gap between discoveries and health impact. Workshop participants made recommendations in five domains: (1) developing and applying scientific standards for assessing personal genomic tests; (2) developing and applying a multidisciplinary research agenda, including observational studies and clinical trials to fill knowledge gaps in clinical validity and utility; (3) enhancing credible knowledge synthesis and information dissemination to clinicians and consumers; (4) linking scientific findings to evidence-based recommendations for use of personal genomics; and (5) assessing how the concept of personal utility can affect health benefits, costs, and risks by developing appropriate metrics for evaluation. To fulfill the promise of personal genomics, a rigorous multidisciplinary research agenda is needed. PMID:19617843

  13. Dual Roles of RNF2 in Melanoma Progression | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epigenetic regulators have emerged as critical factors governing the biology of cancer. Here, in the context of melanoma, we show that RNF2 is prognostic, exhibiting progression-correlated expression in human melanocytic neoplasms. Through a series of complementary gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in mouse and human systems, we establish that RNF2 is oncogenic and prometastatic.

  14. Genomic Diversity and the Microenvironment as Drivers of Progression in DCIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    communication. This multi-disciplinary progress puts our group into an ideal position to fully implement the aims of the project and reach our year 3 and 4...were upstaged to invasive disease at definitive surgery. The other half of 99 testing subjects have been set aside for aim 3b work. For the first

  15. Genomically amplified Akt3 activates DNA repair pathway and promotes glioma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kristen M; Sun, Youting; Ji, Ping; Granberg, Kirsi J; Bernard, Brady; Hu, Limei; Cogdell, David E; Zhou, Xinhui; Yli-Harja, Olli; Nykter, Matti; Shmulevich, Ilya; Yung, W K Alfred; Fuller, Gregory N; Zhang, Wei

    2015-03-17

    Akt is a robust oncogene that plays key roles in the development and progression of many cancers, including glioma. We evaluated the differential propensities of the Akt isoforms toward progression in the well-characterized RCAS/Ntv-a mouse model of PDGFB-driven low grade glioma. A constitutively active myristoylated form of Akt1 did not induce high-grade glioma (HGG). In stark contrast, Akt2 and Akt3 showed strong progression potential with 78% and 97% of tumors diagnosed as HGG, respectively. We further revealed that significant variations in polarity and hydropathy values among the Akt isoforms in both the pleckstrin homology domain (P domain) and regulatory domain (R domain) were critical in mediating glioma progression. Gene expression profiles from representative Akt-derived tumors indicated dominant and distinct roles for Akt3, consisting primarily of DNA repair pathways. TCGA data from human GBM closely reflected the DNA repair function, as Akt3 was significantly correlated with a 76-gene signature DNA repair panel. Consistently, compared with Akt1 and Akt2 overexpression models, Akt3-expressing human GBM cells had enhanced activation of DNA repair proteins, leading to increased DNA repair and subsequent resistance to radiation and temozolomide. Given the wide range of Akt3-amplified cancers, Akt3 may represent a key resistance factor.

  16. The Human Genome Project and Mental Retardation: An Educational Program. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Sharon

    1999-05-03

    The Arc, a national organization on mental retardation, conducted an educational program for members, many of whom have a family member with a genetic condition causing mental retardation. The project informed members about the Human Genome scientific efforts, conducted training regarding ethical, legal and social implications and involved members in issue discussions. Short reports and fact sheets on genetic and ELSI topics were disseminated to 2,200 of the Arc's leaders across the country and to other interested individuals. Materials produced by the project can e found on the Arc's web site, TheArc.org.

  17. Current progress in the biology of members of the Sporothrix schenckii complex following the genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Montes, Héctor M; Dantas, Alessandra da Silva; Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; de Souza Baptista, Andrea R; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M

    2015-09-01

    Sporotrichosis has been attributed for more than a century to one single etiological agent, Sporothrix schencki. Only eight years ago, it was described that, in fact, the disease is caused by several pathogenic cryptic species. The present review will focus on recent advances to understand the biology and virulence of epidemiologically relevant pathogenic species of the S. schenckii complex. The main subjects covered are the new clinical and epidemiological aspects including diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, the development of molecular tools, the genome database and the perspectives for study of virulence of emerging Sporothrix species.

  18. Pfh1 Is an Accessory Replicative Helicase that Interacts with the Replisome to Facilitate Fork Progression and Preserve Genome Integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin R McDonald

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Replicative DNA helicases expose the two strands of the double helix to the replication apparatus, but accessory helicases are often needed to help forks move past naturally occurring hard-to-replicate sites, such as tightly bound proteins, RNA/DNA hybrids, and DNA secondary structures. Although the Schizosaccharomyces pombe 5'-to-3' DNA helicase Pfh1 is known to promote fork progression, its genomic targets, dynamics, and mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we address these questions by integrating genome-wide identification of Pfh1 binding sites, comprehensive analysis of the effects of Pfh1 depletion on replication and DNA damage, and proteomic analysis of Pfh1 interaction partners by immunoaffinity purification mass spectrometry. Of the 621 high confidence Pfh1-binding sites in wild type cells, about 40% were sites of fork slowing (as marked by high DNA polymerase occupancy and/or DNA damage (as marked by high levels of phosphorylated H2A. The replication and integrity of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes, and nucleosome depleted regions were particularly Pfh1-dependent. The association of Pfh1 with genomic integrity at highly transcribed genes was S phase dependent, and thus unlikely to be an artifact of high transcription rates. Although Pfh1 affected replication and suppressed DNA damage at discrete sites throughout the genome, Pfh1 and the replicative DNA polymerase bound to similar extents to both Pfh1-dependent and independent sites, suggesting that Pfh1 is proximal to the replication machinery during S phase. Consistent with this interpretation, Pfh1 co-purified with many key replisome components, including the hexameric MCM helicase, replicative DNA polymerases, RPA, and the processivity clamp PCNA in an S phase dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that Pfh1 is an accessory DNA helicase that interacts with the replisome and promotes replication and suppresses DNA damage at hard

  19. Research Progress of Sugarcane Chloroplast Genome%甘蔗叶绿体基因组研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杨; 周会

    2013-01-01

    Along with the development of modern molecular biology technologies, complete chloroplast genomes have been sequenced in various plant species to date, and the structure, function and expression of these genes have been deter-mined. The chloroplast genome structure in most higher plants is stable, since the gene number, arrangement and composition are conservative. The determination of sugarcane chloroplast genome sequence laid a good foundation for sugarcane chloroplast related research. This article gives a review on the research progress of sugarcane chloroplast genome through the chloroplast genome map, gene structure, function, chloroplast RNA editing, and phylogenetic analysis in Saccharum and relat-ed genera. This study held great potential to clarify more directions in researches, including sugarcane chloroplast genetic transformation, complete chloroplast nu-cleotide sequence determination in Saccharum and closely related genera, cpSSRs development and application.%随着现代分子生物学技术的发展,目前已经完成了多种植物叶绿体基因组的全序列测定,并研究了这些基因的结构、功能与表达。大部分高等植物的叶绿体基因组结构稳定,基因数量、排列顺序及组成上具有保守性。甘蔗叶绿体基因组测序工作的完成为甘蔗叶绿体相关研究奠定了良好基础。文章从甘蔗叶绿体基因组图谱、结构和功能基因、叶绿体RNA编辑以及甘蔗属叶绿体系统进化等方面综合概述了甘蔗叶绿体基因组研究取得的成果,并从甘蔗叶绿体遗传转化、甘蔗及近缘属叶绿体基因组测序和叶绿体基因组 cpSSRs开发利用等方面指出甘蔗叶绿体基因组今后的研究方向。

  20. Genomic changes defining the progression of human colorectal and cervical tumors

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Defining changes during the carcinogenesis and progression of tumors is a major way to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms of cancer development. We therefore investigated the cacinogenesis process in the colon-rectum and in the uterine cervix by different cellchemical, immunohistochemical and cytogenetic methods. Cell proliferation, assessed by immunohistochemical detection of the Ki-67 antigen (MIB 1 antibody), DNA ploify, determined by image cytometry, e...

  1. Improving livestock for agriculture - technological progress from random transgenesis to precision genome editing heralds a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Götz; Wei, Jingwei; Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Humans have a long history in shaping the genetic makeup of livestock to optimize production and meet growing human demands for food and other animal products. Until recently, this has only been possible through traditional breeding and selection, which is a painstakingly slow process of accumulating incremental gains over a long period. The development of transgenic livestock technology offers a more direct approach with the possibility for making genetic improvements with greater impact and within a single generation. However, initially the technology was hampered by technical difficulties and limitations, which have now largely been overcome by progressive improvements over the past 30 years. Particularly, the advent of genome editing in combination with homologous recombination has added a new level of efficiency and precision that holds much promise for the genetic improvement of livestock using the increasing knowledge of the phenotypic impact of genetic sequence variants. So far not a single line of transgenic livestock has gained approval for commercialization. The step change to genome-edited livestock with precise sequence changes may accelerate the path to market, provided applications of this new technology for agriculture can deliver, in addition to economic incentives for producers, also compelling benefits for animals, consumers, and the environment.

  2. CSCAPES Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alex Pothen

    2008-10-26

    We report on the progress made by researchers of the CSCAPES Institute at Old Dominion University for the years 2007 and 2008 in the areas of research, software creation, education and training, and outreach activities.

  3. Employee Perceptions of Progress with Implementing a Student-Centered Model of Institutional Improvement: An Achieving the Dream Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Annesa LeShawn

    2011-01-01

    Achieving the Dream is a national initiative focused on helping more community college students succeed, particularly students of color and low-income students. Achieving the Dream's student-centered model of institutional improvement focuses on eliminating gaps and raising student achievement by helping institutions build a culture of evidence…

  4. High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization of chromosome 8q: evaluation of putative progression markers for gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duin, M; van Marion, R; Vissers, K J; Hop, W C J; Dinjens, W N M; Tilanus, H W; Siersema, P D; van Dekken, H

    2007-01-01

    Amplification of 8q is frequently found in gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. It is usually detected in high-grade, high-stage GEJ adenocarcinomas. Moreover, it has been implicated in tumor progression in other cancer types. In this study, a detailed genomic analysis of 8q was performed on a series of GEJ adenocarcinomas, including 22 primary adenocarcinomas, 13 cell lines and two xenografts, by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) with a whole chromosome 8q contig array. Of the 37 specimens, 21 originated from the esophagus and 16 were derived from the gastric cardia. Commonly overrepresented regions were identified at distal 8q, i.e. 124-125 Mb (8q24.13), at 127-128 Mb (8q24.21), and at 141-142 Mb (8q24.3). From these regions six genes were selected with putative relevance to cancer: ANXA13, MTSS1, FAM84B (alias NSE2), MYC, C8orf17 (alias MOST-1) and PTK2 (alias FAK). In addition, the gene EXT1 was selected since it was found in a specific amplification in cell line SK-GT-5. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of these seven genes was subsequently performed on a panel of 24 gastroesophageal samples, including 13 cell lines, two xenografts and nine normal stomach controls. Significant overexpression was found for MYC and EXT1 in GEJ adenocarcinoma cell lines and xenografts compared to normal controls. Expression of the genes MTSS1, FAM84B and C8orf17 was found to be significantly decreased in this set of cell lines and xenografts. We conclude that, firstly, there are other genes than MYC involved in the 8q amplification in GEJ cancer. Secondly, the differential expression of these genes contributes to unravel the biology of GEJ adenocarcinomas.

  5. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1994. Annex IV: PSI nuclear energy and safety research progress report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, T.; Kallfelz, J.M.; Mathews, D. [eds.] [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear energy research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI. It is explicitly mentioned in the Institute`s official charter and commands about one fifth of the Institute`s federal resources. Presently, PSI invests approx. 200 py/a in nuclear energy research, one third of this being externally funded; the share of external funding in investment costs totals approx. 50%. This funding is provided by the Swiss utilities and the NAGRA, the Safety Authority (HSK) and the former National Fund for Energy Research (NEFF). PSI`s activities in nuclear research concentrate on three main areas: safety of operating plants, safety features of future reactor concepts and waste management. 7% of personnel are invested in addressing global aspects of energy. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  6. Canine tumor cross-species genomics uncovers targets linked to osteosarcoma progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triche Timothy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary metastasis continues to be the most common cause of death in osteosarcoma. Indeed, the 5-year survival for newly diagnosed osteosarcoma patients has not significantly changed in over 20 years. Further understanding of the mechanisms of metastasis and resistance for this aggressive pediatric cancer is necessary. Pet dogs naturally develop osteosarcoma providing a novel opportunity to model metastasis development and progression. Given the accelerated biology of canine osteosarcoma, we hypothesized that a direct comparison of canine and pediatric osteosarcoma expression profiles may help identify novel metastasis-associated tumor targets that have been missed through the study of the human cancer alone. Results Using parallel oligonucleotide array platforms, shared orthologues between species were identified and normalized. The osteosarcoma expression signatures could not distinguish the canine and human diseases by hierarchical clustering. Cross-species target mining identified two genes, interleukin-8 (IL-8 and solute carrier family 1 (glial high affinity glutamate transporter, member 3 (SLC1A3, which were uniformly expressed in dog but not in all pediatric osteosarcoma patient samples. Expression of these genes in an independent population of pediatric osteosarcoma patients was associated with poor outcome (p = 0.020 and p = 0.026, respectively. Validation of IL-8 and SLC1A3 protein expression in pediatric osteosarcoma tissues further supported the potential value of these novel targets. Ongoing evaluation will validate the biological significance of these targets and their associated pathways. Conclusions Collectively, these data support the strong similarities between human and canine osteosarcoma and underline the opportunities provided by a comparative oncology approach as a means to improve our understanding of cancer biology and therapies.

  7. Frontiers in cancer epidemiology: a challenge to the research community from the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program at the National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Muin J; Freedman, Andrew N; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harvey, Chinonye E; Kaefer, Christie; Reid, Britt C; Rogers, Scott; Schully, Sheri D; Seminara, Daniela; Verma, Mukesh

    2012-07-01

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is developing scientific priorities for cancer epidemiology research in the next decade. We would like to engage the research community and other stakeholders in a planning effort that will include a workshop in December 2012 to help shape new foci for cancer epidemiology research. To facilitate the process of defining the future of cancer epidemiology, we invite the research community to join in an ongoing web-based conversation at http://blog-epi.grants.cancer.gov/ to develop priorities and the next generation of high-impact studies.

  8. The study of multi-institutional collaborations in high-energy physics. Progress report, January 1989--March 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    Since World War II, the organizational framework for scientific research is increasingly the multi-institutional collaboration, especially in high-energy physics. A broad preliminary survey, into the functioning of research collaborations involving three or more institutions is described. The study is designed to identify patterns of collaborations, define the scope of the documentation problems, field-test possible solutions, recommend future actions, and build an archives of oral history interviews and other resources for scholarly use. Once the study is completed, its findings will be used to promote systems to document significant collaborative research.

  9. Efforts to Address the Aging Academic Workforce: Assessing Progress through a Three-Stage Model of Institutional Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskie, Brian; Walker, Mark; Andersson, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The aging of the academic workforce is becoming more relevant to policy discussions in higher education. Yet there has been no formal, large-scale analysis of institutional efforts to develop policies and programs for aging employees. We fielded a representative survey of human resource specialists at 187 colleges and universities across the…

  10. The Broad Institute: Screening for Dependencies in Cancer Cell Lines Using Small Molecules | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using cancer cell-line profiling, we established an ongoing resource to identify, as comprehensively as possible, the drug-targetable dependencies that specific genomic alterations impart on human cancers. We measured the sensitivity of hundreds of genetically characterized cancer cell lines to hundreds of small-molecule probes and drugs that have highly selective interactions with their targets, and that collectively modulate many distinct nodes in cancer cell circuitry.

  11. An Examination of the Demographic and Career Progression of Air Force Institute of Technology Cost Analysis Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    program include the ACEIT software training and the combination of Department of Defense (DOD) application, regression, and statistics. The weaknesses...and Integrated Tools ( ACEIT ) software and training could not be praised enough. AFIT vs. Civilian Institutions. The GCA program provides a Department...very useful to the graduates and beneficial to their careers. The main strengths of the program include the ACEIT software training and the combination

  12. The tumor suppressor SirT2 regulates cell cycle progression and genome stability by modulating the mitotic deposition of H4K20 methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The establishment of the epigenetic mark H4K20me1 (monomethylation of H4K20) by PR-Set7 during G2/M directly impacts S-phase progression and genome stability. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of this event are not well understood. Here we show that SirT2 regulates H4K20me1 depositi...

  13. Co-expression module analysis reveals biological processes, genomic gain, and regulatory mechanisms associated with breast cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derow Catherine K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression signatures are typically identified by correlating gene expression patterns to a disease phenotype of interest. However, individual gene-based signatures usually suffer from low reproducibility and interpretability. Results We have developed a novel algorithm Iterative Clique Enumeration (ICE for identifying relatively independent maximal cliques as co-expression modules and a module-based approach to the analysis of gene expression data. Applying this approach on a public breast cancer dataset identified 19 modules whose expression levels were significantly correlated with tumor grade. The correlations were reproducible for 17 modules in an independent breast cancer dataset, and the reproducibility was considerably higher than that based on individual genes or modules identified by other algorithms. Sixteen out of the 17 modules showed significant enrichment in certain Gene Ontology (GO categories. Specifically, modules related to cell proliferation and immune response were up-regulated in high-grade tumors while those related to cell adhesion was down-regulated. Further analyses showed that transcription factors NYFB, E2F1/E2F3, NRF1, and ELK1 were responsible for the up-regulation of the cell proliferation modules. IRF family and ETS family proteins were responsible for the up-regulation of the immune response modules. Moreover, inhibition of the PPARA signaling pathway may also play an important role in tumor progression. The module without GO enrichment was found to be associated with a potential genomic gain in 8q21-23 in high-grade tumors. The 17-module signature of breast tumor progression clustered patients into subgroups with significantly different relapse-free survival times. Namely, patients with lower cell proliferation and higher cell adhesion levels had significantly lower risk of recurrence, both for all patients (p = 0.004 and for those with grade 2 tumors (p = 0.017. Conclusions The ICE

  14. Construction of a genome-wide human BAC-Unigene resource. Final progress report, 1989--1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, C.S.; Xu, R.X.; Wang, M. [and others

    1996-12-31

    Currently, over 30,000 mapped STSs and 27,000 mapped Unigenes (non-redundant, unigene sets of cDNA representing EST clusters) are available for human alone. A total of 44,000 Unigene cDNA clones have been supplied by Research Genetics. Unigenes, or cDNAs are excellent resource for map building for two reasons. Firstly, they exist in two alternative forms -- as both sequence information for PCR primer pairs, and cDNA clones -- thus making library screening by colony hybridization as well as pooled library PCR possible. The authors have developed an efficient and robust procedure to screen genomic libraries with large number of DNA probes. Secondly, the linkage and order of expressed sequences, or genes are highly conserved among human, mouse and other mammalian species. Therefore, mapping with cDNA markers rather than random anonymous STSs will greatly facilitate comparative, evolutionary studies as well as physical map building. They have currently deconvoluted over 10,000 Unigene probes against a 4X coverage human BAC clones from the approved library D by high density colony hybridization method. 10,000 batches of Unigenes are arrayed in an imaginary 100 X 100 matrix from which 100 row pools and 100 column pools are obtained. Library filters are hybridized with pooled probes, thus reducing the number of hybridization required for addressing the positives for each Unigene from 10,000 to 200. Details on the experimental scheme as well as daily progress report is posted on the Web site (http://www.tree.caltech.edu).

  15. Central Nervous System Functional Condition In Interns With Different Progress Levels At Military Medical Institution Of Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Bochkarjova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of CNS functional condition and cognitive functions of interns with different progress levels at Military Medical School have been analyzed. According to the research results, the rate of excitement, noiseroof feature, functional mobility of nervous processes, development of verbal and logical thinking, verbal and operative memory as well as distribution and shifting of attention are the most important suppositions for successful military-professional training.

  16. Respirator studies for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Progress report, July 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, D.D.; Revoir, W.; Lowry, P.L.

    1976-08-01

    Respirator studies carried out in FY 1975 for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health were concentrated in two major areas: (1) the development of respirator test equipment and methods to improve the means of evaluating the performance of respirators, (2) the testing of respirators to obtain quantitative data to permit recommendations to be made to upgrade respirator performance criteria. Major accomplishments included obtaining man-test results on several different respirators using an anthropometrically selected test panel, determination of respirator exhalation valve leakages under static and dynamic conditions, and determination of the effects of respirator strap tension on facepiece leakage.

  17. Recent progress in Open Data production and consumption - examples from a Governmental institute (SMHI) and a collaborative EU research project (SWITCH-ON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arheimer, Berit; Falkenroth, Esa

    2014-05-01

    The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) has a long tradition both in producing and consuming open data on a national, European and global scale. It is also promoting community building among water scientists in Europe by participating in and initiating collaborative projects. This presentation will exemplify the contemporary European movement imposed by the INSPIRE directive and the Open Data Strategy, by showing the progress in openness and shift in attitudes during the last decade when handling Research Data and Public Sector Information at a national European institute. Moreover, the presentation will inform about a recently started collaborative project (EU FP7 project No 603587) coordinated by SMHI and called SWITCH-ON http://water-switch-on.eu/. The project addresses water concerns and currently untapped potential of open data for improved water management across the EU. The overall goal of the project is to make use of open data, and add value to society by repurposing and refining data from various sources. SWITCH-ON will establish new forms of water research and facilitate the development of new products and services based on principles of sharing and community building in the water society. The SWITCH-ON objectives are to use open data for implementing: 1) an innovative spatial information platform with open data tailored for direct water assessments, 2) an entirely new form of collaborative research for water-related sciences, 3) fourteen new operational products and services dedicated to appointed end-users, 4) new business and knowledge to inform individual and collective decisions in line with the Europe's smart growth and environmental objectives. The presentation will discuss challenges, progress and opportunities with the open data strategy, based on the experiences from working both at a Governmental institute and being part of the global research community.

  18. Research Progress in Genomic Imprinting in Mammals%哺乳动物基因组印记的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈秀莉; 马利兵

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a genetic phenomenon because of the different parents resulted from the allelic gene expression differences. The causes and the process of genomic imprinting is a hot issue of modern genetics. Mammals many genomic imprinting characteristic makes it become a focus biology problems in the post genome era. The evolution of genomic imprinting has played a special role in mammalian reproduction and development. This paper reviewed the characteristics of genomic imprinting、imprinting mechanism of gene imprinting, gene imprinting and the development of cloned animals, the research progress of the imprinting genes and the disease.%基因组印记是由亲本来源不同而导致等位基因表达差异的一种遗传现象。基因组印记产生的原因及过程是现代遗传学的一个热点问题。哺乳动物的许多基因组印记特征都使其成为后基因组时代的一个热点生物学问题。进化的基因组印记在哺乳动物生殖、发育中起到了特定的作用。综述了基因组印记的特点、印记基因的印记机理、基因印记与克隆动物的发育、印记基因与疾病的研究进展。

  19. Progress of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source using evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, W., E-mail: luwang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 73000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Cao, R.; Ruan, L. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, X. Z.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 73000 (China)

    2014-02-15

    A new room temperature ECR ion source, Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4 (LECR4, previously named DRAGON), is under intense construction at Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 is designed to operate with 18 GHz microwave frequency. The maximum axial magnetic fields are 2.3 T at injection and 1.3 T at extraction, and the radial field at the plasma chamber wall of 76 mm inner diameter is 1.0–1.2 T. One of the unique features for LECR4 is that its axial solenoids are winded with solid square copper wires which are immersed in a kind of special evaporative cooling medium for cooling purpose. Till now, a prototype of the cooling system has been successfully constructed and tested, which has demonstrated that the cooling efficiency of the designed system could meet the requirements of LECR4 under the routine operation conditions. All the main components of the ion source have been completed. Assembly and commissioning is ongoing. The latest developments and test results will be presented in this paper.

  20. Progress of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source using evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W; Xiong, B; Zhang, X Z; Sun, L T; Feng, Y C; Ma, B H; Guo, S Q; Cao, R; Ruan, L; Zhao, H W

    2014-02-01

    A new room temperature ECR ion source, Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4 (LECR4, previously named DRAGON), is under intense construction at Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 is designed to operate with 18 GHz microwave frequency. The maximum axial magnetic fields are 2.3 T at injection and 1.3 T at extraction, and the radial field at the plasma chamber wall of 76 mm inner diameter is 1.0-1.2 T. One of the unique features for LECR4 is that its axial solenoids are winded with solid square copper wires which are immersed in a kind of special evaporative cooling medium for cooling purpose. Till now, a prototype of the cooling system has been successfully constructed and tested, which has demonstrated that the cooling efficiency of the designed system could meet the requirements of LECR4 under the routine operation conditions. All the main components of the ion source have been completed. Assembly and commissioning is ongoing. The latest developments and test results will be presented in this paper.

  1. 猪链球菌的比较基因组学研究进展%Progress on research of comparative genomics of Streptococcus suis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑霄

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important zoonotic agent and could cause outbreaks of the infections among pigs and humans. Over the past five years, great progress had been achieved in the field of S. suis genomics. By now six S. suis genomes have been sequenced and publicly available. Furthermore, the application of new comparative genomics technologies on such genomes had led to the identification of new pathogenicity islands and pathogenesis-related genes,which greatly boosted the research on pathogenic mechanisms of S. suis.%猪链球菌是一种重要的人兽共患病病原菌,可以引起人猪链球菌病暴发流行.近几年来,猪链球菌的基因组学研究发展迅速:共有6株猪链球菌的基因组全序列公布;采用多种比较基因组技术发现了高致病性猪链球菌相关的毒力岛和特异基因,为研究猪链球菌的致病机制提供了重要线索.

  2. Progress on Functional Genomics of Some Important Zoonotic Parasites%重要人兽共患寄生虫功能基因组学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾琳; 陈韶红; 陈家旭

    2011-01-01

    随着分子生物学技术的迅速发展,基因组学的研究已从结构基因组学转向功能基因组学,对于基因功能的研究也由单一基因转向大规模、批量分析.为促进我国寄生虫功能基因组学的研究,本文介绍几种重要的功能基因组学研究技术方法,并对近几年来一些重要寄生虫功能基因组学的最新研究进展作一综述.%With the development of molecular biology, genomics research has been expanded from structural genomics to functional genomics, and from single gene to massive batch. This paper summarizes the progress of structural genomics of some zoonotic parasites and major technical methods.

  3. The human genome project: Information management, access, and regulation. Technical progress report, 1 April--31 August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, J.D.; Micikas, L.B.

    1993-09-10

    Efforts are described to prepare educational materials including computer based as well as conventional type teaching materials for training interested high school and elementary students in aspects of Human Genome Project.

  4. Progresses in research on the functional genomics on Tribolium castaneum%赤拟谷盗功能基因组学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李承军; 王艳允; 刘幸; 桑明; 李斌

    2011-01-01

    赤拟谷盗Tribolium castaneum是一种重要的模式生物,在遗传、发育、生化与免疫等研究领域均取得了重要的研究进展.同时它也是一种危害极大的鞘翅目类储粮害虫,在世界各地都有分布,每年给储藏物造成了数十亿美元的经济损失.其全基因组测序的完成、遗传操作体系的构建及系统RNAi方法的应用都极大地促进了其功能基因组学的研究.本文综述了近年来赤拟谷盗基因组计划及功能基因组学的研究进展,拟为赤拟谷盗的生物学研究和防治奠定基础.%Tribolium castaneum is a powerful model organism for research in such fields as insect genetics, biology development, biochemistry and immunity, and rapid and useful progress has been made in these fields in recent years. T. Castaneum is also an important coleopteran pest of stored agricultural products. This globally distributed pest causes billions of dollars of damage to such stored products each year. Recently, the sequencing of the entire genome of T. Castaneum, the construction of their genetics operation systems, and the utilization of the systemic RNA interference, have greatly facilitated and accelerated research on their functional genomics and the related fields. In order to facilitate research on both the fundamental biology and control of T. Castaneum, we here review progresses and achievements in research on T. Castaneum genome projects and functional genomics over the past few years.

  5. Progression from Sustained BK Viruria to Sustained BK Viremia with Immunosuppression Reduction Is Not Associated with Changes in the Noncoding Control Region of the BK Virus Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran A. Memon

    2012-01-01

    We performed PCR amplification and sequencing of (1 stored urine and (2 plasma samples from the time of peak viremia from 11 patients with sustained viremia who participated in a 200-patient clinical trial. The antimetabolite was withdrawn for BK viremia and reduction of the calcineurin inhibitor for sustained BK viremia. DNA sequencing from the 11 patients with sustained viremia revealed 8 insertions, 16 transversions, 3 deletions, and 17 transitions. None were deemed significant. No patient developed clinically evident BKVAN. Our data support, at a genomic level, the effectiveness of reduction of immunosuppression for prevention of progression from viremia to BKVAN.

  6. Rat Genome Database (RGD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research to collect, consolidate,...

  7. The KRAB Zinc Finger Protein Roma/Zfp157 Is a Critical Regulator of Cell-Cycle Progression and Genomic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L.F. Ho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of DNA replication and cell division is essential for tissue growth and maintenance of genomic integrity and is particularly important in tissues that undergo continuous regeneration such as mammary glands. We have previously shown that disruption of the KRAB-domain zinc finger protein Roma/Zfp157 results in hyperproliferation of mammary epithelial cells (MECs during pregnancy. Here, we delineate the mechanism by which Roma engenders this phenotype. Ablation of Roma in MECs leads to unscheduled proliferation, replication stress, DNA damage, and genomic instability. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs depleted for Roma exhibit downregulation of p21Cip1 and geminin and have accelerated replication fork velocities, which is accompanied by a high rate of mitotic errors and polyploidy. In contrast, overexpression of Roma in MECs halts cell-cycle progression, whereas siRNA-mediated p21Cip1 knockdown ameliorates, in part, this phenotype. Thus, Roma is an essential regulator of the cell cycle and is required to maintain genomic stability.

  8. 新型基因组编辑技术研究进展%Progress on Novel Genome Editing Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩勇; 杨杰; 李子彬; 董宋鹏; 高凤山

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing is a new technology which can modifiy the targeted biological genome accurately so as to knock out some genes site-directly and integrate some exogenous genes site-directly.Recently,sev-eral effective tools were developed quickly,including engineered nuclease mediated zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN),transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN)and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats along with cas9 protein (CRISPRs/Cas9),and they all can site-directly edit genomes by recognizing the target sites according to the specific structure followed by nuclease cleavage.The three no-vel genome editing technologies have been applied broadly in life science because of their advantages of higher efficiency,making easily and timesaving.Here the characteristics,principles,construction methods of the three novel genome editing technologies and their application in conventional biology model,functional genome screening,and gene therapy for human inherited diseases were reviewed.%基因组编辑技术是一种能精确靶向修饰生物基因组,实现对基因定点敲除和外源基因定点整合的技术。新出现的锌指核酸酶(ZFN)、转录激活子样效应因子核酸酶(TALEN)和规律性重复短回文序列簇与 Cas9蛋白(CRISPRs/Cas9)系统3种新型的基因组编辑技术通过特异性结构识别靶位点,核酸酶发挥切割作用对靶位点进行定点编辑。3种新型基因编辑技术因具有高效准确、制作简单、耗时短等特点而在生命科学研究中得到广泛应用。论文对目前三种新型的基因组定点编辑技术的特点、结构原理、构建方法以及在传统生物模型、功能基因筛选、人类遗传病基因治疗等方面中的应用做一综述。

  9. Progressive genomic convergence of two Helicobacter pylori strains during mixed infection of a patient with chronic gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qizhi; Didelot, Xavier; Wu, Zhongbiao; Li, Zongwei; He, Lihua; Li, Yunsheng; Ni, Ming; You, Yuanhai; Lin, Xi; Li, Zhen; Gong, Yanan; Zheng, Minqiao; Zhang, Minli; Liu, Jie; Wang, Weijun; Bo, Xiaochen; Falush, Daniel; Wang, Shengqi; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the detailed nature of genomic microevolution during mixed infection with multiple Helicobacter pylori strains in an individual. Design We sampled 18 isolates from a single biopsy from a patient with chronic gastritis and nephritis. Whole-genome sequencing was applied to these isolates, and statistical genetic tools were used to investigate their evolutionary history. Results The genomes fall into two clades, reflecting colonisation of the stomach by two distinct strains, and these lineages have accumulated diversity during an estimated 2.8 and 4.2 years of evolution. We detected about 150 clear recombination events between the two clades. Recombination between the lineages is a continuous ongoing process and was detected on both clades, but the effect of recombination in one clade was nearly an order of magnitude higher than in the other. Imputed ancestral sequences also showed evidence of recombination between the two strains prior to their diversification, and we estimate that they have both been infecting the same host for at least 12 years. Recombination tracts between the lineages were, on average, 895 bp in length, and showed evidence for the interspersion of recipient sequences that has been observed in in vitro experiments. The complex evolutionary history of a phage-related protein provided evidence for frequent reinfection of both clades by a single phage lineage during the past 4 years. Conclusions Whole genome sequencing can be used to make detailed conclusions about the mechanisms of genetic change of H. pylori based on sampling bacteria from a single gastric biopsy. PMID:25007814

  10. Accuracy of the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke/Society for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and neuroprotection and natural history in Parkinson plus syndromes criteria for the diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respondek, Gesine; Roeber, Sigrun; Kretzschmar, Hans; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Gelpi, Ellen; Gaig, Carles; Chiu, Wang Zheng; van Swieten, John C; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Höglinger, Günter U

    2013-04-01

    Autopsy is the diagnostic gold standard for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and Society for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (NINDS-SPSP) criteria for the clinical diagnosis of "probable" PSP are thought to possess high specificity and low sensitivity. The NINDS-SPSP criteria for "possible" PSP are considered to increase sensitivity at the expense of specificity. The Neuroprotection and Natural History in Parkinson Plus Syndromes (NNIPPS) criteria are intended to improve sensitivity while maintaining high specificity. The aim of this study was to conduct a clinicopathological evaluation of the NINDS-SPSP and NNIPPS criteria in tertiary neurological centers. Defined clinical features and their year of onset were recorded by chart review in neuropathologically diagnosed patients with PSP, Parkinsons's disease (PD), MSA parkinsonism and corticobasal degeneration from four European brain banks. Fulfillment of the clinical diagnostic criteria was verified for each year after disease onset and for the final antemortem record. We analyzed 98 PSP patients and 46 disease controls. The NINDS-SPSP "probable" criteria yielded shorter time to diagnosis, slightly higher specificity and positive predictive value (PPV), and similar sensitivity, compared with the NNIPPS criteria. Unexpectedly, the NINDS-SPSP "possible" criteria yielded the lowest sensitivity, specificity, and PPV. A combination of NINDS-SPSP possible and probable criteria yielded the highest sensitivity. We suggest that the NINDS-SPSP probable criteria might be preferred for recruitment of patients for clinical trials, where an early and specific diagnosis is important. For routine clinical care, where high sensitivity is crucial, a combination of NINDS possible and probable criteria might be preferred.

  11. [Application progress of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology in the treatment of HIV-1 infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yinglun; Li, Qingwei

    2016-01-01

    The goal of gene therapy is to introduce foreign genes into human target cells in a certain way to correct or compensate diseases caused by defective or abnormal genes. Therefore, gene therapy has great practical significance in studying the treatment of persistent or latent HIV-1 infection. At present, the existing methods of gene therapy have some major defects such as limited target site recognition and high frequency of off-targets. The latest research showed that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) /CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) system from bacteria and archaea has been successfully reformed to a targeted genome editing tool. Thus, how to achieve the goal of treating HIV-1 infection by modifying targeted HIV-1 virus genome effectively using the CRISPR/Cas9 system has become a current research focus. Here we review the latest achievements worldwide and briefly introduce applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, including CCR5 gene editing, removal of HIV-1 virus and activation of HIV-1 virus, in order to provide reference for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  12. Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Progress is reported on the following: electrical uses, direct-heat uses, drilling activities, leases, geothermal loan guarantee program, general activities, and legal, institutional, and regulatory activites. (MHR)

  13. Bio-informatics Research Progress in the Post-genome Era Based on the Quantitative Analysis of SCIE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongqin; ZHAN; Min; YU

    2013-01-01

    SCIE paper output can reflect the status quo and trend of discipline research and 7 038 scientific articles concerning bioinformatics are retrieved in SCIE database during the years between 2008 and 2012. Quantitative analysis of paper output and citation frequency are conducted according to nations, institutions, publications, research direction as well as hot articles, which provides assistance for bioinformatics researchers to understand the present situation of this subject, carry out cooperative studies and display scientific research achievements.

  14. 吸虫线粒体基因研究进展%Research progress on trematode mitochodrial genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王曼; 王光西; 张锡林

    2011-01-01

    Trematode belongs to Platyhelminthes' s trematoda,it' s an important class of parasitic zoonosis,not only seriously threatening human health,but also affecting the production of aquaculture and livestock industry.The study on mitochondrial genome is one of the most essential part in molecular biology.This article focused on the composition of trematode mitochondrial genome,structure and significance of mitochondrial DNA research and the applications of the trematode mitochondrial DNA research.%吸虫属于扁形动物门吸虫纲,是一类重要的人兽共患蠕虫病病原,对人体危害很大,也严重影响水产业和畜牧业的发展.分子生物学方法是研究吸虫的重要工具.该文对吸虫线粒体分子生物学的研究进行总结,重点介绍吸虫线粒体基因的组成和结构特点、吸虫线粒体基因的研究意义及吸虫线粒体基因组研究的应用前景.

  15. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  16. Progression from Sustained BK Viruria to Sustained BK Viremia with Immunosuppression Reduction Is Not Associated with Changes in the Noncoding Control Region of the BK Virus Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Imran A.; Parikh, Bijal A.; Gaudreault-Keener, Monique; Skelton, Rebecca; Storch, Gregory A.; Brennan, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the BK virus archetypal noncoding control region (NCCR) have been associated with BK-virus-associated nephropathy (BKVAN). Whether sustained viremia, a surrogate for BKVAN, is associated with significant changes in the BK-NCCR is unknown. We performed PCR amplification and sequencing of (1) stored urine and (2) plasma samples from the time of peak viremia from 11 patients with sustained viremia who participated in a 200-patient clinical trial. The antimetabolite was withdrawn for BK viremia and reduction of the calcineurin inhibitor for sustained BK viremia. DNA sequencing from the 11 patients with sustained viremia revealed 8 insertions, 16 transversions, 3 deletions, and 17 transitions. None were deemed significant. No patient developed clinically evident BKVAN. Our data support, at a genomic level, the effectiveness of reduction of immunosuppression for prevention of progression from viremia to BKVAN. PMID:22701777

  17. Recent progress in the understanding of tissue culture-induced genome level changes in plants and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakandan, Anjanasree K; Wang, Kan

    2012-04-01

    In vitro cell and tissue-based systems have tremendous potential in fundamental research and for commercial applications such as clonal propagation, genetic engineering and production of valuable metabolites. Since the invention of plant cell and tissue culture techniques more than half a century ago, scientists have been trying to understand the morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular changes associated with tissue culture responses. Establishment of de novo developmental cell fate in vitro is governed by factors such as genetic make-up, stress and plant growth regulators. In vitro culture is believed to destabilize the genetic and epigenetic program of intact plant tissue and can lead to chromosomal and DNA sequence variations, methylation changes, transposon activation, and generation of somaclonal variants. In this review, we discuss the current status of understanding the genomic and epigenomic changes that take place under in vitro conditions. It is hoped that a precise and comprehensive knowledge of the molecular basis of these variations and acquisition of developmental cell fate would help to devise strategies to improve the totipotency and embryogenic capability in recalcitrant species and genotypes, and to address bottlenecks associated with clonal propagation.

  18. Progress and Prospect of Genomics Technologies in Horticultural Crops%园艺作物基因组技术研究及展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓武

    2013-01-01

    China is the largest growing and consuming country of horticultural crops in the world. The second generation of sequencing technologies achieved significant breakthrough and greatly influenced improvement of horticultural crops. A number of important horticultural crops, including Chinese cabbage, cucumber, tomato, melon and water melon et al. have recently being sequenced. After analyzing the progress of the genomics technology and policies adopted by the major contrived in the world, the paper listed some major tasks for promoting genomics of horticultural crops in China and proposed some policy recommendations.%  我国是世界上园艺作物种植和消费大国。第二代基因组测序技术取得了重大突破,并对园艺作物改良产生了重大影响。近年来,完成了白菜、黄瓜、番茄、甜瓜和西瓜等一系列重要园艺作物的基因组测序。在分析了世界基因组前沿技术发展现状与方向和主要国家园艺作物基因组研究采取的主要政策的基础上,围绕园艺作物的发展,提出了我国发展园艺作物基因组技术重点任务和需要采取的政策措施。

  19. Chicken's Genome Decoded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ After completing the work on mapping chicken genome sequence and chicken genome variation in early March, 2004, two international research consortiums have made significant progress in reading the maps, shedding new light on the studies into the first bird as well as the first agricultural animal that has its genome sequenced and analyzed in the world.

  20. Research progress on the targeted genome modification%基因组靶向修饰技术研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周阳; 袁少飞; 蒋廷亚; 韩邦兴; 高力; 陈乃富

    2015-01-01

    Targeted genome modification technology is one of the important methods to study genes′function, which also can be used for the treatment of human diseases at the same time.It is becoming a hot field of biology research in recent years.Because of its low efficiency and toxicity, traditional targeted modification technology will be replaced by a more efficient and safer technology.Thus three generations of targeted genome modification technologies have been developed.It includes ZFN, TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9.These three techniques overcome the defects of traditional technology.Here, we discuss the research progress in the structure, mechanism and application of these three technologies, especially newly developed CRISPR/Cas9.Finally, the three generations of genome modifi-cation techniques are compared.%基因组靶向修饰技术是研究基因功能的重要方法之一,该技术也被用于人类疾病的治疗上,从而成为近来生物学研究的热点。传统的靶向修饰技术由于其效率低、有毒性等缺点注定其将要被更高效、安全的技术所取代,因此产生了后来的三代基因组靶向修饰技术:锌指核酸酶( Zinc finger nuclease, ZFN)、类转录激活因子效应物核酸酶( Transcription activator-like effector nuclease, TALEN)和常间回文重复序列丛集关联蛋白系统( Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins 9, CRISPR/Cas9)。这3种技术在克服传统技术缺陷的基础上,也针对其上一代技术的缺陷进行了自身的改善。对三代基因组靶向修饰技术,尤其最近发展起来的CRISPR/Cas9的结构组成、作用原理和基因定点修饰中的应用进行阐述,最后对三代基因组靶向修饰技术进行比较。

  1. MIPS plant genome information resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spannagl, Manuel; Haberer, Georg; Ernst, Rebecca; Schoof, Heiko; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2007-01-01

    The Munich Institute for Protein Sequences (MIPS) has been involved in maintaining plant genome databases since the Arabidopsis thaliana genome project. Genome databases and analysis resources have focused on individual genomes and aim to provide flexible and maintainable data sets for model plant genomes as a backbone against which experimental data, for example from high-throughput functional genomics, can be organized and evaluated. In addition, model genomes also form a scaffold for comparative genomics, and much can be learned from genome-wide evolutionary studies.

  2. Genomic amplification of the human telomerase gene (hTERC associated with human papillomavirus is related to the progression of uterine cervical dysplasia to invasive cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hongqian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV infection plays an etiological role in the development of cervical dysplasia and cancer. Amplification of human telomerase gene (hTERC and over expression of telomerase were found to be associated with cervical tumorigenesis. This study was performed to analyze genomic amplification of hTERC gene, telomerase activity in association with HPV infection in different stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and cervical cancer. We were studying the role of hTERC in the progression of uterine cervical dysplasia to invasive cancer, and proposed an adjunct method for cervical cancer screening. Methods Exfoliated cervical cells were collected from 114 patients with non neoplastic lesion (NNL, n=27, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN1, n=26, CIN2, n=16, CIN3, n=24 and cervical carcinoma (CA, n=21, and analyzed for amplification of hTERC with two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH probe and HPV-DNA with Hybrid Capture 2. From these patients, 53 were taken biopsy to analyze telomerase activity by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, with immunohistochemistry (IHC. All biopsies were clinically confirmed by phathologists. Results Amplification of hTERC was significantly associated with the histologic diagnoses (p Conclusions hTERC ampliffication can be detected with FISH technique on exfoliated cervical cells. Amplification of hTERC and HPV infection are associated with more progressive CIN3 and CA. The testing of hTERC amplification might be a supplementary to cytology screening and HPV test, especially high-risk patients. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1857134686755648.

  3. Center for Cancer Genomics | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) was established to unify the National Cancer Institute's activities in cancer genomics, with the goal of advancing genomics research and translating findings into the clinic to improve the precise diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In addition to promoting genomic sequencing approach

  4. KfK Institute of Nuclear Solid State Physics. Progress report on research and development activities in 1991; KfK Institut fuer Nukleare Festkoerperphysik. Ergebnisbericht ueber Forschungs- und Entwicklungsarbeiten 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The INFP is primarily occupied with basic research work in the field of solid state physics and materials science, with preference being given to subjects and problems of interest from the point of view of potential applications. This is particularly true for research work devoted to the high-temperature superconductors, which currently are the area of main effort of the Institute, but also for work performed in the fields of interface and microstructure research. In 1991, about 80% of the activities were superconductivity research. (orig./MM). [Deutsch] Das Institut fuer Nukleare Festkoerperphysik verfolgt ueberwiegend grundlagenorientierte Arbeiten auf dem Gebiet der Festkoerper- und Materialforschung, und zwar vorzugsweise zu solchen Themen, die auch eine stark anwendungsorientierte Seite besitzen. Das gilt vor allem fuer die Arbeiten zu den neuentdeckten Hochtemperatursupraleitern (HTSL), die gegenwaertig Arbeitsschwerpunkt des Instituts sind, aber auch fuer Arbeiten aus dem Bereich der Grenzflaechen- und Mikrostrukturforschung. Im Jahr 1991 lagen etwa 80% der Aktivitaeten im Bereich der Supraleitung. (orig./MM).

  5. From genome-wide arrays to tailor-made biomarker readout - Progress towards routine analysis of skin sensitizing chemicals with GARD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forreryd, Andy; Zeller, Kathrin S; Lindberg, Tim; Johansson, Henrik; Lindstedt, Malin

    2016-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) initiated by chemical sensitizers is an important public health concern. To prevent ACD, it is important to identify chemical allergens to limit the use of such compounds in various products. EU legislations, as well as increased mechanistic knowledge of skin sensitization have promoted development of non-animal based approaches for hazard classification of chemicals. GARD is an in vitro testing strategy based on measurements of a genomic biomarker signature. However, current GARD protocols are optimized for identification of predictive biomarker signatures, and not suitable for standardized screening. This study describes improvements to GARD to progress from biomarker discovery into a reliable and cost-effective assay for routine testing. Gene expression measurements were transferred to NanoString nCounter platform, normalization strategy was adjusted to fit serial arrival of testing substances, and a novel strategy to correct batch variations was presented. When challenging GARD with 29 compounds, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy could be estimated to 94%, 83% and 90%, respectively. In conclusion, we present a GARD workflow with improved sample capacity, retained predictive performance, and in a format adapted to standardized screening. We propose that GARD is ready to be considered as part of an integrated testing strategy for skin sensitization.

  6. Genomic variation in myeloma: design, content, and initial application of the Bank On A Cure SNP Panel to detect associations with progression-free survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Gang

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have engaged in an international program designated the Bank On A Cure, which has established DNA banks from multiple cooperative and institutional clinical trials, and a platform for examining the association of genetic variations with disease risk and outcomes in multiple myeloma. We describe the development and content of a novel custom SNP panel that contains 3404 SNPs in 983 genes, representing cellular functions and pathways that may influence disease severity at diagnosis, toxicity, progression or other treatment outcomes. A systematic search of national databases was used to identify non-synonymous coding SNPs and SNPs within transcriptional regulatory regions. To explore SNP associations with PFS we compared SNP profiles of short term (less than 1 year, n = 70 versus long term progression-free survivors (greater than 3 years, n = 73 in two phase III clinical trials. Results Quality controls were established, demonstrating an accurate and robust screening panel for genetic variations, and some initial racial comparisons of allelic variation were done. A variety of analytical approaches, including machine learning tools for data mining and recursive partitioning analyses, demonstrated predictive value of the SNP panel in survival. While the entire SNP panel showed genotype predictive association with PFS, some SNP subsets were identified within drug response, cellular signaling and cell cycle genes. Conclusion A targeted gene approach was undertaken to develop an SNP panel that can test for associations with clinical outcomes in myeloma. The initial analysis provided some predictive power, demonstrating that genetic variations in the myeloma patient population may influence PFS.

  7. Genomics of Sorghum

    OpenAIRE

    PATERSON, ANDREW H

    2008-01-01

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is a subject of plant genomics research based on its importance as one of the world's leading cereal crops, a biofuels crop of high and growing importance, a progenitor of one of the world's most noxious weeds, and a botanical model for many tropical grasses with complex genomes. A rich history of genome analysis, culminating in the recent complete sequencing of the genome of a leading inbred, provides a foundation for invigorating progress toward relatin...

  8. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  9. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  10. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  11. Progress in the Past Decade: An Examination of the Precision of Cluster Randomized Trials Funded by the U.S. Institute of Education Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Shi, Ran; Kelcey, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the statistical precision of cluster randomized trials (CRTs) funded by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES). Specifically, it compares the total number of clusters randomized and the minimum detectable effect size (MDES) of two sets of studies, those funded in the early years of IES (2002-2004) and those funded in the…

  12. Infrastructure support for the Waste Management Institute at North Carolina A&T State University. Progress report, September 1994--January 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzochukwu, G.A.

    1995-01-25

    The mission of the Waste Management Institute is two-fold: (1) to enhance awareness and understanding of waste problems and their management in our society and, (2) to provide leadership in research, instruction and outreach to improve the quality of life on a global scale and protect the environment.

  13. Public Progress, Data Management and the Land Grant Mission: A Survey of Agriculture Researchers' Practices and Attitudes at Two Land-Grant Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Peter; Eaker, Christopher; Swauger, Shea; Davis, Miriam L. E. Steiner

    2016-01-01

    This article reports results from a survey about data management practices and attitudes sent to agriculture researchers and extension personnel at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) and the College of Agricultural Sciences and Warner College of Natural Resources at Colorado State University. Results confirm agriculture…

  14. Infrastructure support for the Waste Management Institute at North Carolina A&T State University. Progress report, September 1994--January 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzochukwu, G.A.

    1995-01-25

    The mission of the Waste Management Institute is two-fold: (1) to enhance awareness and understanding of waste problems and their management in our society and, (2) to provide leadership in research, instruction and outreach to improve the quality of life on a global scale and protect the environment.

  15. Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on Minor Progressive High-Grade Osteosarcoma of the Extremities Metastatic to the Lung: Results of 39 Patients Treated in a Single Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients who mildly progressed after first-line chemotherapy were administered arsenic trioxide (ATO 5–10 mg intravenously daily. Thirty-nine patients were finally enrolled in the study, of whom 19 patients received first-line chemotherapy with ATO infusion while 20 patients did not. Progression-free survival at 4 months was 89.2 and 62.7% (p = 0.043 for the ATO group and the control group, respectively, while the 2-year overall survival was 61 and 16.4% (p = 0.032.

  16. Listeria Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  17. Epidemiology & Genomics Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, funds research in human populations to understand the determinants of cancer occurrence and outcomes.

  18. 综合评价卡:审核评估的新探索%Comprehensive Progress Report Card as a New Tool for Institutional Quality Audit in Jiangsu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁益民

    2015-01-01

    Jiangsu Agency for Educational Evaluation adopts a comprehensive progress report card as an assessment tool in its recent institutional quality audit of two institutions of the Province. The report card consists of 10 dimen⁃sions of internal quality assurance plus 5 levels of attainment for each dimension. The status of the internal quality assurance of an audited institution is interpreted by a certain attainment level of each dimension, and it can also be expressed by a coordinates curve. In the two cases of institutional quality audit, the comprehensive progress report card has served as a useful tool for helping the auditors to make their judgments about the status of the internal quality assurance system of an audited institution. It can also be used as a framework for guiding institutions in data mining and conducting follow⁃up activities of continuous improvement.%根据国家评估改革方案,地方院校的审核评估下放至省级组织实施。某省在审核评估中试用了综合评价卡,作为写实性评估结论意见的一种标识和呈现方式。通过对院校内部质量保障状态的十个维度和各维度的五个达标程度的定性描述,并以坐标和曲线的形式直观表达院校所处的位置。这一创新实践既避免了以往教学水平评估的“优良中差”分等评估的弊端,也规避了新一轮教学工作审核评估结论出现过于大而化之、无法全面客观反映院校的整体实情的风险,受到专家的普遍肯定。未来拟帮助院校更加深入地理解和使用好综合评价卡,为其强化内部质量保障机制打造一个切实可行的专业工具。

  19. A progress report on progress files

    OpenAIRE

    East, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Abstract In order to facilitate personal development planning (PDP), the UK higher education sector is committed to introducing progress files. This article explores the experience of one institution in seeking to establish a system of progress files. It identifies the main practical problems in doing this, highlighting the lack of agreement on the skills that higher education students are expected to acqui...

  20. Genetics and Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good progress is being made on genetics and genomics of sugar beet, however it is in process and the tools are now being generated and some results are being analyzed. The GABI BeetSeq project released a first draft of the sugar beet genome of KWS2320, a dihaploid (see http://bvseq.molgen.mpg.de/Gen...

  1. Progress in Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Candida spp. by Use of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Broth Microdilution Methods, 2010 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida has been standardized and refined and now may play a useful role in managing Candida infections. Important new developments include validation of 24-h reading times for all antifungal agents and the establishment of species-specific epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) for the systemically active antifungal agents and both common and uncommon species of Candida. The clinical breakpoints (CBPs) for fluconazole, voriconazole, and the echinocandins have been revised to provide species-specific interpretive criteria for the six most common species. The revised CBPs not only are predictive of clinical outcome but also provide a more sensitive means of identifying those strains with acquired or mutational resistance mechanisms. This brief review serves as an update on the new developments in the antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida spp. using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution (BMD) methods. PMID:22740712

  2. Genomic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceño Balcázar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Until the twilight of the 20th century, genetics was a branch of medicine applied to diseases of rare occurrence.  The advent of the human genome sequence and the possibility of studying it at affordable costs for patients and healthcare institutions, has permitted its application in high-priority diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s, among others. There is great potential in predictive and preventive medicine, through studying polymorphic genetic variants associated to risks for different diseases. Currently, clinical laboratories offer studies of over 30,000 variants associated with susceptibilities, to which individuals can access without much difficulty because a medical prescription is not required. These exams permit conducting a specific plan of preventive medicine.  For example, upon the possibility of finding a deleterious mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the patient can prevent the breast cancer by mastectomy or chemoprophylaxis and in the presence of polymorphisms associated to cardiovascular risk preventive action may be undertaken through changes in life style (diet, exercise, etc.. Legal aspects are also present in this new conception of medicine.  For example, currently there is legislation for medications to indicate on their labels the different responses such medication can offer regarding the genetic variants of the patients, given that similar doses may provoke adverse reactions in an individual, while for another such dosage may be insufficient. This scenario would allow verifying the polymorphisms of drug response prior to administering medications like anticoagulants, hyperlipidemia treatments, or chemotherapy, among others. We must specially mention recessive diseases, produced by the presence of two alleles of a mutated gene, which are inherited from the mother, as well as the father. By studying the mutations, we may learn if a couple is at risk of bearing children with the

  3. GENOMIC MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceño Balcázar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Until the twilight of the 20th century, genetics was a branch of medicine applied to diseases of rare occurrence. The advent of the human genome sequence and the possibility of studying it at affordable costs for patients and healthcare institutions, has permitted its application in high-priority diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s, among others.There is great potential in predictive and preventive medicine, through studying polymorphic genetic variants associated to risks for different diseases. Currently, clinical laboratories offer studies of over 30,000 variants associated with susceptibilities, to which individuals can access without much difficulty because a medical prescription is not required. These exams permit conducting a specific plan of preventive medicine. For example, upon the possibility of finding a deleterious mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the patient can prevent the breast cancer by mastectomy or chemoprophylaxis and in the presence of polymorphisms associated to cardiovascular risk preventive action may be undertaken through changes in life style (diet, exercise, etc..Legal aspects are also present in this new conception of medicine. For example, currently there is legislation for medications to indicate on their labels the different responses such medication can offer regarding the genetic variants of the patients, given that similar doses may provoke adverse reactions in an individual, while for another such dosage may be insufficient. This scenario would allow verifying the polymorphisms of drug response prior to administering medications like anticoagulants, hyperlipidemia treatments, or chemotherapy, among others.We must specially mention recessive diseases, produced by the presence of two alleles of a mutated gene, which are inherited from the mother, as well as the father. By studying the mutations, we may learn if a couple is at risk of bearing children with the disease

  4. Comparative Genomics of Listeria Sensu Lato: Genus-Wide Differences in Evolutionary Dynamics and the Progressive Gain of Complex, Potentially Pathogenicity-Related Traits through Lateral Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Matteo; Caruso, Marta; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Manzari, Caterina; Fraccalvieri, Rosa; Goffredo, Elisa; Latorre, Laura; Miccolupo, Angela; Padalino, Iolanda; Santagada, Gianfranco; Chiocco, Doriano; Pesole, Graziano; Horner, David S; Parisi, Antonio

    2015-07-15

    Historically, genome-wide and molecular characterization of the genus Listeria has concentrated on the important human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and a small number of closely related species, together termed Listeria sensu strictu. More recently, a number of genome sequences for more basal, and nonpathogenic, members of the Listeria genus have become available, facilitating a wider perspective on the evolution of pathogenicity and genome level evolutionary dynamics within the entire genus (termed Listeria sensu lato). Here, we have sequenced the genomes of additional Listeria fleischmannii and Listeria newyorkensis isolates and explored the dynamics of genome evolution in Listeria sensu lato. Our analyses suggest that acquisition of genetic material through gene duplication and divergence as well as through lateral gene transfer (mostly from outside Listeria) is widespread throughout the genus. Novel genetic material is apparently subject to rapid turnover. Multiple lines of evidence point to significant differences in evolutionary dynamics between the most basal Listeria subclade and all other congeners, including both sensu strictu and other sensu lato isolates. Strikingly, these differences are likely attributable to stochastic, population-level processes and contribute to observed variation in genome size across the genus. Notably, our analyses indicate that the common ancestor of Listeria sensu lato lacked flagella, which were acquired by lateral gene transfer by a common ancestor of Listeria grayi and Listeria sensu strictu, whereas a recently functionally characterized pathogenicity island, responsible for the capacity to produce cobalamin and utilize ethanolamine/propane-2-diol, was acquired in an ancestor of Listeria sensu strictu.

  5. Research Progress of Genome Editing in Plants%基因组编辑技术在植物中的研究进展与应用前景

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢科; 饶力群; 李红伟; 安学丽; 方才臣; 万向元

    2013-01-01

    外源DNA导入细胞并与基因组靶基因发生同源重组可以精确修饰或替换靶基因,但在植物中产生自发同源重组的概率很低.近几年出现的人工改造核酸酶可以大幅提高同源重组的效率,实现基因组的精确、定向改造.其中,归巢核酸酶、锌指核酸酶和TALE核酸酶已在植物基因工程中得到成功应用,最近开发出来的基于CRISPR/Cas系统的基因组编辑技术则更具有高效方便等特点.这些人工核酸酶的应用为植物基因工程的发展呈现了更加美好的前景.首先介绍了基因组编辑技术及其发展历程,随后详细阐述了提高植物基因组定点编辑效率的策略,最后对基因组编辑技术在农业和植物基因工程上的应用进行了展望.%The precise insertion of a foreign DNA molecule at genome through homologous recombination remains low efficiency in plants.Genome editing is an important tool to precisely integrate DNA molecules at a defined genomic location.Extensive efforts have been made to understand the mechanisms governing gene targeting and to establish efficient systems to achieve precise and efficient targeting.A set of genome editing techniques,engineered meganucleases,zinc finger nucleases,and transcription activator-like effector nucleases,have recently emerged that enable targeted editing of genomes in plants.The recent development of genome editing technique based on the CRISPR/Cas system demonstrate that it is efficient and specific for wide application.The rapid progress in the field of genome editing was summarized,and then the potential perspective of the genome editing technology to be used in agriculture and plant engineering was discussed.

  6. TCGA Workshop: Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) - TCGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) held a workshop entitled, “Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM),” to review the initial GBM data from the TCGA pilot project.

  7. Progress in Seawater Desalination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Scientists from the CAS Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry have made significant progress in developing advanced expertise of seawater desalination. Their work was recently appraised and confirmed by a panel of experts in northeast China's Jilin Province.

  8. The integrated microbial genome resource of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checcucci, Alice; Mengoni, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Microbial Genomes and Metagenomes (IMG) is a biocomputational system that allows to provide information and support for annotation and comparative analysis of microbial genomes and metagenomes. IMG has been developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE)-Joint Genome Institute (JGI). IMG platform contains both draft and complete genomes, sequenced by Joint Genome Institute and other public and available genomes. Genomes of strains belonging to Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya domains are present as well as those of viruses and plasmids. Here, we provide some essential features of IMG system and case study for pangenome analysis.

  9. Research Progress on Allocation of Clinical Engineering Stafifng in Medical Institutes%医疗机构临床工程人员配置研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴智军; 高关心

    2015-01-01

    The concept of clinical engineering staff and the necessity of reasonable allocation of clinical engineering staffing were given firstly. Then this paper reviewed the methods of allocating clinical engineering staff at home and abroad, including staff allocation based on the number of health technicians, operating beds and medical device, the total acquisition cost of medical devices and workload calculation. Several suggestions for allocation of clinical engineering staff were put forward based on the summarization of all the methods, which provided references for formulation of accurate, reliable and feasible methods to allocate clinical engineering staff in medical institutes.%本文介绍了临床工程人员的概念与合理配置临床工程人员的必要性,综述了国内外临床工程人员配置方法,包括以卫生技术人员数量按比例配置、以开放床位数量按比例配置、以医疗设备数量或总值金额按比例配置、以临床工程部门工作量测算配置,并在各类方法总结比较的基础上,提出对临床工程人员现状和配置标准进行系统和深入研究的相关建议,以期为医疗机构制定科学、合理、可操作性强的临床工程人员编配办法提供参考。

  10. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first

  11. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first i

  12. Confucius Institute

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Confucius Institute(simplified Chinese:孔子学院;traditional Chinese:孔子學院;pinyin:kǒngzǐ xuéyuàn)is a non-profit public institute which aims at promoting Chinese language and culture and supporting local Chinese teaching internationally through affiliated Confucius Institutes.

  13. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first i

  14. 我国科研机构开放获取实践进展研究%Research on Practice Progress of Open Access for Research Institutions in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麻思蓓

    2013-01-01

    This paper takes research institutions as survey samples, investigates and analyzes the practice progress of OA resources description, OA policy of journal and institutional repository. The investigation data exposes some problems such as lag of informatization. It suggests to put forward countermeasures so as to increase the rate of return on research funding and efficiency as soon as possible, and accelerate the pace of science&technology innovation.%文章以科研机构为调查对象,从图书馆对OA资源揭示、学术期刊实施开放获取及自建机构知识库三个不同角度,调查分析了科研机构开放获取实践进展现状。调查结果暴露出我国科研机构信息化建设滞后等问题,提出了解决对策,以尽快提升政府科研经费投入回报率和使用效率,加快科技创新步伐。

  15. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  16. Progress in functional genomics of drug-producing microorganisms%微生物药物产生菌功能基因组学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杭; 白林泉; 周秀芬; 邓子新

    2013-01-01

    Microbial drugs are secondary metabolites with diverse structures and bioactivities. In recent years, considerable genomes of the drug-producing microorganisms have been completely sequenced. Subsequently, functional genomic studies have been performed, which shed new lights on anibiotic biosynthesis, morphological differentiation, regulation, phylogeny and evolution, and genome mining of secondary metabolism. Herein, functional genomics for four important antibiotic producers is discussed, focusing on the genetic basis for penicillin overproduction, genomic and transcriptomic analysis of erythromycin-producing Saccharopolyspora erythraea, A-factor regulatory networks of streptomycin-producing Streptomyces griseus, construction of surrogate host for the heterologous expression of secondary metabolites and high-yielding strain of Streptomyces avermitilis, and genome mining for novel natural products. Moreover, current status on genomics of drug-producing microorganisms in China is summarized, and the perspective of genomic studies is predicted at both the basic research and the applied science aspects.%微生物药物是一类化学结构和生物活性多样的次级代谢产物,近年来其多个产生菌基因组序列已经被测定完成,在此基础上开展的功能基因组研究方兴未艾,并在抗生素生物合成、形态分化、调控、系统发育与进化以及次级代谢产物挖掘等方面有着新的发现,展现出广阔的研究前景.本文重点阐述了四种重要抗生素产生菌功能基因组学的研究现状,集中于青霉素高产的遗传机制、红霉素产生菌红色糖多孢菌基因组与转录组分析、链霉素产生菌灰色链霉菌中A因子调控网络、阿维菌素产生菌作为次级代谢物异源表达的通用宿主与超高产菌株构建以及新型天然产物的挖掘等研究内容,同时简要介绍了当前我国微生物药物产生菌基因组学的研究概况,并从基础与应用两个角度对

  17. Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance mechanisms among Lepidoptera: progress on genomic approaches to uncover causal mutations in the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic plants that expressed Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystalline (Cry) protein toxins can suffer feeding damage from a small number of lepidopteran insect species under field conditions, which has heightened concerns about the durability of pest control tactics. Genomics research has provid...

  18. Progress in research on functional genes in the Drosophila genome%果蝇基因组与功能基因研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘素宁; 沈杰

    2011-01-01

    黑腹果蝇Drosophila melanogaster是生物科学研究中重要的模式动物之一.2000年,黑腹果蝇全基因组测序完成,随后基因组序列质量不断完善,对其功能基因进行深入研究,为其他高等动物基因组和功能基因的研究提供了巨大帮助.本文综述了近年来基因组功能元件、比较基因组学等方面的最新研究成果,着重介绍了功能基因在Hh信号通路、细胞凋亡方面的研究进展,并对最新的功能基因研究技术进行了简要概述.%Drosophila is one of the most important model organisms in the life sciences. The sequencing of the Drosophila melanogaster genome, completed in 2000, has provided a number of important contributions to research on the genome and functional genes. In this review, we summarize historical landmarks in the Drosophila genome with a focus on functional elements and comparative genomics. Recent findings regarding the Hh signaling pathway and apoptosis are highlighted and the most widely used advanced experimental techniques are briefly introduced.

  19. Application of bioinformatics in cardiovascular genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tragante Do O, V.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research made a remarkable progress in the past 20 years, with the Human Genome Project, which sequenced an entire genome; the HapMap project, that identified common genetic variation in hundreds of genomes from different populations; and the 1000 Genomes project, which identified common and

  20. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  1. A Review on Genomics APIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeswari Swaminathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement and falling prices of whole human genome Next Generation Sequencing (NGS has resulted in rapid adoption of genomic information at both clinics and research institutions. Considered together, the complexity of genomics data, due to its large volume and diversity along with the need for genomic data sharing, has resulted in the creation of Application Programming Interface (API for secure, modular, interoperable access to genomic data from different applications, platforms, and even organizations. The Genomics APIs are a set of special protocols that assist software developers in dealing with multiple genomic data sources for building seamless, interoperable applications leading to the advancement of both genomic and clinical research. These APIs help define a standard for retrieval of genomic data from multiple sources as well as to better package genomic information for integration with Electronic Health Records. This review covers three currently available Genomics APIs: a Google Genomics, b SMART Genomics, and c 23andMe. The functionalities, reference implementations (if available and authentication protocols of each API are reviewed. A comparative analysis of the different features across the three APIs is provided in the Discussion section. Though Genomics APIs are still under active development and have yet to reach widespread adoption, they hold the promise to make building of complicated genomics applications easier with downstream constructive effects on healthcare.

  2. Institutional ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rebecca; Tienari, Janne

    2016-01-01

    . In institutional ethnography the notion of objectification is applied to describe research processes like those that have been found to dominate in scholarly work on M&As. In this chapter, we offer an outline of Smiths critique of objectification, elucidate how institutional ethnography seeks to address it...

  3. Colonial Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAtackney, Laura; Palmer, Russell

    2016-01-01

    and the USA which reveal that the study of colonial institutions should not be limited to the functional life of these institutions—or solely those that take the form of monumental architecture—but should include the long shadow of “imperial debris” (Stoler 2008) and immaterial institutions....

  4. Institutional actorhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Uhrenholdt

    In this paper I describe the changing role of intra-organizational experts in the face of institutional complexity of their field. I do this through a qualitative investigation of the institutional and organizational roles of actors in Danish organizations who are responsible for the efforts to c...... to comply with the Danish work environment regulation. And by doing so I also describe how institutional complexity and organizational responses to this complexity are particular important for the changing modes of governance that characterizes contemporary welfare states.......In this paper I describe the changing role of intra-organizational experts in the face of institutional complexity of their field. I do this through a qualitative investigation of the institutional and organizational roles of actors in Danish organizations who are responsible for the efforts...

  5. Institutional upbringing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva

    2008-01-01

    In the chapter, I discuss the role day care institutions play in the construction of the idea of proper childhood in Denmark. Drawing on findings from research on ethnic minority children in two Danish day care institutions, I begin with a discussion of how childcare institutions act as civilising...... agents, empowered with the legitimate right to define and control normality and proper ways of behaving oneself. I aim to show how institutions come to define the normal child and proper childhood in accordance with current efforts toward reinventing national culture, exemplified by legislation requiring...... current testing of Danish language fluency levels among pre-school minority children. Testing language skills marks and defines distinctions that reinforce images of deviance that, in turn, legitimize initiatives to enrol children, specifically minority children, in child care institutions....

  6. Current Status and Progresses in Chinese Cotton Genomic Research%中国棉花基因组研究的现状及展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-xian ZHU; Sheng-jian JI; Ying-chun LU; Gang WEI; Jun LI

    2002-01-01

    @@ Cotton fiber, a single-celled trichome, 30-40mm in length and 15m in cell-wall-thickness, is a differentiated epidermal cell originated from the outer integument of the ovule. There are several groups in China that work on cotton gene cloning or fiber improvement using biotechnological approaches. Dr. Xiaoya Chen's group from the Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Academia Sinica, obtained transgenic cottons that express a rabbit keratin gene, a silkworm fibroin gene, IAAM and PAT gene.

  7. Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Fortson, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Joyce, G. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Kimble, H. J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Max, C. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Prince, T. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, P. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Woodin, W. H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  8. Genomic Datasets for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variety of datasets from genome-wide association studies of cancer and other genotype-phenotype studies, including sequencing and molecular diagnostic assays, are available to approved investigators through the Extramural National Cancer Institute Data Access Committee.

  9. Collaborators | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The TARGET initiative is jointly managed within the National Cancer Institute (NCI) by the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG)Opens in a New Tab and the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP)Opens in a New Tab.

  10. Transparent Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fombona

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project is to create sets of media-based imagery that illustrate the internal workings of public institutions to the common citizen. This is an important need in countries that are seeking to open up their public and private institutions and bring them closer to their users. Method: There is a clear need to carry out proposals that tackle organizational lack of transparency; to this end, through an interdisciplinary approach, we propose the creation of a freeaccess Web-based portal that shows the interior of the institutions at hand, learning institutions to start with, this scope will be broadened later to institutions of health and public safety. The project chooses and shows a core selection of features capable of becoming international models for each kind of institutions, elementary schools in this phase. These features are shown in short videos, depicting every core element found: installations, governing bodies, documentation, samples of learning and teaching methodologies in use, etc. Results: the propossed project succeeds in getting institutions closer to their users. It has been developed in Spain, and translated to other Latin-American countries and the United States.

  11. Transparent Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fombona

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project is to create sets of media-based imagery that illustrate the internal workings of public institutions to the common citizen. This is an important need in countries that are seeking to open up their public and private institutions and bring them closer to their users. Method: There is a clear need to carry out proposals that tackle organizational lack of transparency; to this end, through an interdisciplinary approach, we propose the creation of a freeaccess Web-based portal that shows the interior of the institutions at hand, learning institutions to start with, this scope will be broadened later to institutions of health and public safety. The project chooses and shows a core selection of features capable of becoming international models for each kind of institutions, elementary schools in this phase. These features are shown in short videos, depicting every core element found: installations, governing bodies, documentation, samples of learning and teaching methodologies in use, etc. Results: the propossed project succeeds in getting institutions closer to their users. It has been developed in Spain, and translated to other Latin-American countries and the United States.

  12. Expression of lactate/H⁺ symporters MCT1 and MCT4 and their chaperone CD147 predicts tumor progression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma: immunohistochemical and The Cancer Genome Atlas data analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghye; Choi, Jung-Woo; Lee, Ju-Han; Kim, Young-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) have inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau protein, leading to the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α). HIF-1α induces aerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, whereas HIF-2α functions as an oncoprotein. Lactate transport through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and the chaperone CD147 is essential for high glycolytic cancer cell survival. To elucidate the clinical significance of MCT1, MCT4, and CD147 expression, we investigated their expressions by immunohistochemistry in ccRCC specimens and validated the results by an open-access The Cancer Genome Atlas data analysis. Overexpression of MCT1, MCT4, and CD147 was observed in 49.4% (89/180), 39.4% (71/180), and 79.4% (143/180) of ccRCC patients, respectively. High MCT1 expression was associated with older age (P = .017), larger tumor size (P = .015), and advanced TNM stage (P = .012). However, MCT4 overexpression was not related to any variables. CD147 overexpression correlated with high grade (P = .005), tumor necrosis (P = .016), and larger tumor size (P = .038). In univariate analysis, high expression of MCT1 (P CD147 (P = .02) was linked to short progression-free survival. In multivariate analysis, high MCT1 expression was associated with worse progression-free survival (P = .001). In conclusion, high expression of MCT1 and CD147 is associated with poor prognostic factors. Overexpression of MCT1, MCT4, and CD147 predicts tumor progression. Reversing the Warburg effect by targeting the lactate transporters may be a useful strategy to prevent ccRCC progression.

  13. Optimizing the creation of base populations for aquaculture breeding programs using phenotypic and genomic data and its consequences on genetic progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Jesús; Toro, Miguel Á; Sonesson, Anna K; Villanueva, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The success of an aquaculture breeding program critically depends on the way in which the base population of breeders is constructed since all the genetic variability for the traits included originally in the breeding goal as well as those to be included in the future is contained in the initial founders. Traditionally, base populations were created from a number of wild strains by sampling equal numbers from each strain. However, for some aquaculture species improved strains are already available and, therefore, mean phenotypic values for economically important traits can be used as a criterion to optimize the sampling when creating base populations. Also, the increasing availability of genome-wide genotype information in aquaculture species could help to refine the estimation of relationships within and between candidate strains and, thus, to optimize the percentage of individuals to be sampled from each strain. This study explores the advantages of using phenotypic and genome-wide information when constructing base populations for aquaculture breeding programs in terms of initial and subsequent trait performance and genetic diversity level. Results show that a compromise solution between diversity and performance can be found when creating base populations. Up to 6% higher levels of phenotypic performance can be achieved at the same level of global diversity in the base population by optimizing the selection of breeders instead of sampling equal numbers from each strain. The higher performance observed in the base population persisted during 10 generations of phenotypic selection applied in the subsequent breeding program.

  14. Optimizing the creation of base populations for aquaculture breeding programs using phenotypic and genomic data and its consequences on genetic progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús eFernández

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The success of an aquaculture breeding program critically depends on the way in which the base population of breeders is constructed since all the genetic variability for the traits included originally in the breeding goal as well as those to be included in the future is contained in those initial founders. Traditionally base populations were created from a number of wild strains by sampling equal numbers from each strain. However, for some aquaculture species improved strains are already available and therefore, mean phenotypic values for economically important traits can be used as a criterion to optimize the sampling when creating base populations. Also, the increasing availability of genome-wide genotype information in aquaculture species could help to refine the estimation of relationships within and between candidate strains and, thus, to optimize the percentage of individuals to be sampled from each strain. This study explores the advantages of using phenotypic and genome-wide information when constructing base populations for aquaculture breeding programs in terms of initial and subsequent trait performance and genetic diversity level. Results show that a compromise solution between diversity and performance can be found when creating base populations. Up to 6% higher levels of phenotypic performance can be achieved at the same level of global diversity in the base population by optimizing the selection of breeders instead of sampling equal numbers from each strain. The higher performance observed in the base population persisted during ten generations of phenotypic selection applied in the subsequent breeding program.

  15. 鹦鹉热嗜衣原体基因组学的研究进展%Research progress on genomics of Chlamydophila psittaci

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎知青

    2012-01-01

    目前,7株鹦鹉热嗜衣原体全基因组己测序完整,揭示了不同株之间的相同性与差异性.主要外膜蛋白基因、多形态膜蛋白多基因家族、Ⅲ型分泌系统基因和包涵体膜蛋白基因是鹦鹉热嗜表原体(Chlamydophila psittaci,Cps)研究的重点.对多个种株Cps基因组完整核苷酸序列测定的研究,将有助于进一步了解Cps的致病机制,寻找更好的诊断方法和防治措施,预防和控制Cps的流行.%At present, the whole genomes of seven strains Chlamydophila psittaci (Cp) have been completely se-quenced and it reveals the similarities and differences among each other. Major outer membrane protein genes, the polymorphic membrane protein multiple genes family, the type Ⅲ secretion system genes, and the inclusion membrane protein genes are the focuses of study on Chlamydophila psittaci. The studies on genome integrity nucleotide sequencing among multiple strains of Cps will help for further understanding of the pathogenesis of Cps, searching for better diagnostic methods and prevention measures, and preventing and controlling the prevalence of Cps.

  16. Iron and genome stability: An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pra, Daniel, E-mail: daniel_pra@yahoo.com [PPG em Promocao da Saude, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); PPG em Saude e Comportamento, Universidade Catolica de Pelotas, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Franke, Silvia Isabel Rech [PPG em Promocao da Saude, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Henriques, Joao Antonio Pegas [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Fenech, Michael [CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2012-05-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient which is required in a relatively narrow range for maintaining metabolic homeostasis and genome stability. Iron participates in oxygen transport and mitochondrial respiration as well as in antioxidant and nucleic acid metabolism. Iron deficiency impairs these biological pathways, leading to oxidative stress and possibly carcinogenesis. Iron overload has been linked to genome instability as well as to cancer risk increase, as seen in hereditary hemochromatosis. Iron is an extremely reactive transition metal that can interact with hydrogen peroxide to generate hydroxyl radicals that form the 8-hydroxy-guanine adduct, cause point mutations as well as DNA single and double strand breaks. Iron overload also induces DNA hypermethylation and can reduce telomere length. The current Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for iron, according with Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intake (DRI), is based in the concept of preventing anemia, and ranges from 7 mg/day to 18 mg/day depending on life stage and gender. Pregnant women need 27 mg/day. The maximum safety level for iron intake, the Upper Level (UL), is 40-45 mg/day, based on the prevention of gastrointestinal distress associated to high iron intakes. Preliminary evidence indicates that 20 mg/day iron, an intake slightly higher than the RDA, may reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer in the elderly as well as increasing genome stability in lymphocytes of children and adolescents. Current dietary recommendations do not consider the concept of genome stability which is of concern because damage to the genome has been linked to the origin and progression of many diseases and is the most fundamental pathology. Given the importance of iron for homeostasis and its potential influence over genome stability and cancer it is recommended to conduct further studies that conclusively define these relationships.

  17. 肠道病毒71型的功能基因组学研究进展%Progress in the functional genomics researches on human enterovirus 71

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高爽; 龙健儿

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in infant, also has been associated with neurological diseases including asepic meningitis, brain stem encephalitis and poliomyelitis-like paralysis. Here we focus on the progress in the research on EV71 genomic structure and function. Knowledge on EV71 functional genomics would be great helpful to development of antiviral drugs and vaccines.%肠道病毒71型(enterovirus type 71,EV71)感染通常引起婴幼儿手足口病(hand,foot and mouth disease,HFMD),但少数可引起无菌性脑膜炎(asepic meningitis)、脑炎(encephalitis)和类脊髓灰质炎的麻痹性疾病(poliomyelitis-like paralysis)等严重的神经系统疾病.功能基因组学研究对于探讨EV71的感染及复制过程、药物及疫苗的研制具有重大意义.该文就EV71的基因组结构及其功能的研究进展作简要的概述.

  18. CRISPR/Cas9介导基因组编辑技术在植物基因中的研究进展%The Progress of Genomic Editing Technology Mediated by CRISPR/Cas9 in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡颂平; 吴云花; 邹国兴; 聂元元; 杜鹃; 毛伟伟; 余霞; 张琳

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic editing could generate double stranded breaks in special sites,which could be repaired by homologous recombination or non-homologous end joining,and it resulted in base deletion or insertion in genome.The advantages of the CRISPR/Cas9 are simple operation and high effi-ciency of mutation.The article describes the basic structure and classification of the CRISPR/Cas9 and its de-velopment and progress in plants.%CRISPR/Cas9介导的基因组编辑技术是在DNA双链的特定位置形成双链断裂,然后通过同源重组或非同源末端连接方式进行修复,造成基因组碱基局部缺失或插入而引起基因突变,它具有操作简单、突变效率高等优势.笔者归纳了CRISPR/Cas9系统的基本结构、分类及其在植物基因中的研究进展和未来的发展方向.

  19. Burn Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Now Help keep local seniors safe from fire! Burn Survivor Support If you are reading this, chances ... year – a burn injury. Learn more Fire and Burn Prevention Each year, the Burn Institute provides fire ...

  20. Institutional Controls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of institutional control data from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different...

  1. A Research Progress on Salmonella Multi-drug Resistance Genomic Island 1%沙门菌多重耐药基因岛研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳

    2011-01-01

    多药耐药基因组岛是指细菌染色体上一段具有典型特征的基因簇,携带有多种耐药基因,决定细菌的多药耐药性;多药耐药基因组岛具有移动元件的特征,如 G+C百分比和密码子使用与宿主菌不同,常含移动基因,可以在同种甚至于不同种菌株间水平转移,加速了临床上多药耐药菌株的产生.目前已发现在沙门菌属和其他菌属的细菌中携带沙门菌多重耐药基因岛.由于沙门菌多重耐药基因岛1上的耐药基因具有可移动性,使其在细菌多重耐药获得与传播机制的研究中具有重要意义.%A multi-drug resistance genomic island of bacteria refers to the gene clusters section of hacterial chromosome with typical characteristics, on which there are many drug resistant genes determining the multi-drug resistance of bacteria. Multi-drug resistance genomic island has characteristics of mobile genetic elements such as different (G+ C contents and codon usage. It usually contains mobile genes and can be transferred between homologous and even heterologous hacteria,which promotes the production of clinical multi-drug resistant strains. At present , salmonella multidrug resistant genomic island 1 ( SGI1 )and the variants of it have been found in salmonella and other bacteria. The mohile characteristic of SGI1 made it very important in studying development and dissemination of the multi-drug resistance among bacteria.

  2. Between two fern genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Emily B; Banks, Jo Ann; Barker, Michael S; Der, Joshua P; Duffy, Aaron M; Graham, Sean W; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Langdale, Jane; Li, Fay-Wei; Marchant, D Blaine; Pryer, Kathleen M; Rothfels, Carl J; Roux, Stanley J; Salmi, Mari L; Sigel, Erin M; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Stevenson, Dennis W; Wolf, Paul G

    2014-01-01

    Ferns are the only major lineage of vascular plants not represented by a sequenced nuclear genome. This lack of genome sequence information significantly impedes our ability to understand and reconstruct genome evolution not only in ferns, but across all land plants. Azolla and Ceratopteris are ideal and complementary candidates to be the first ferns to have their nuclear genomes sequenced. They differ dramatically in genome size, life history, and habit, and thus represent the immense diversity of extant ferns. Together, this pair of genomes will facilitate myriad large-scale comparative analyses across ferns and all land plants. Here we review the unique biological characteristics of ferns and describe a number of outstanding questions in plant biology that will benefit from the addition of ferns to the set of taxa with sequenced nuclear genomes. We explain why the fern clade is pivotal for understanding genome evolution across land plants, and we provide a rationale for how knowledge of fern genomes will enable progress in research beyond the ferns themselves.

  3. Genomics and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipkin, Matthew E; Monticelli, Silvia

    2008-05-01

    While the hereditary information encoded in the Watson-Crick base pairing of genomes is largely static within a given individual, access to this information is controlled by dynamic mechanisms. The human genome is pervasively transcribed, but the roles played by the majority of the non-protein-coding genome sequences are still largely unknown. In this review we focus on insights to gene transcriptional regulation by placing special emphasis on genome-wide approaches, and on how non-coding RNAs, which derive from global transcription of the genome, in turn control gene expression. We review recent progress in the field with highlights on the immune system.

  4. Social implications of the Human Genome Project: Policy roundtable series and journals. Final progress report, March 15, 2001 - March 15, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiguer, Erica

    2002-12-30

    This report reflects the activities of the Harvard Health Caucus at Harvard Medical School that were supported, in part, by the Department of Energy. The following policy roundtables and panels were held: Spring 2001 Policy Roundtable Series: The social implications of the Human Genome Project; Spring 2002 Policy Roundtable Series: Managing globalization to improve health; 13 February 2002 Keynote Address: The globalization of health; 25 February 2002 Healthier or Wealthier: Which comes first in the new global era?; 28 February 2002 The crisis of neglected diseases: Creating R&D incentives for diseases of developing countries; 7 March 2002 Health care education in the developing world: Bridging global and local health care practices; 20 March 2002 Building a legal framework for global health: How can the US and UN work to reduce global disparities?; 25 April 2002 The role of mass media and tobacco control efforts. Caucus organizational information is also included.

  5. Genomic medicine implementation: learning by example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marc S

    2014-03-01

    Genomic Medicine is beginning to emerge into clinical practice. The National Human Genome Research Institute's Genomic Medicine Working Group consists of organizations that have begun to implement some aspect of genomic medicine (e.g., family history, systematic implementation of Mendelian disease program, pharmacogenomics, whole exome/genome sequencing). This article concisely reviews the working group and provides a broader context for the articles in the special issue including an assessment of anticipated provider needs and ethical, legal, and social issues relevant to the implementation of genomic medicine. The challenges of implementation of innovation in clinical practice and the potential value of genomic medicine are discussed.

  6. Small genomes: New initiatives in mapping and sequencing. Workshop summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenney, K. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Biotechnology Div.; Robb, F. [Univ. of Maryland Biotechnology Inst., Baltimore, MD (United States). Center of Marine Biotechnology

    1993-12-31

    The workshop was held 5--7 July 1993 at the Center for Advanced Research in Biotechnology (CARB) and hosted by the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute (UMBI) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The objective of this workshop was to bring together individuals interested in DNA technologies and to determine the impact of these current and potential improvements of the speed and cost-effectiveness of mapping and sequencing on the planning of future small genome projects. A major goal of the workshop was to spur the collaboration of more diverse groups of scientists working on this topic, and to minimize competitiveness as an inhibitory factor to progress.

  7. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  8. Unimagined Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, Mikkel Bruun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper it is argued that war contains inherent and thus necessary aesthetic traits (ranging from sensory data to narrative features), but that existing research institutions throughout the West have failed to address this issue adequately, in terms of research policy, recruitment and metho......In this paper it is argued that war contains inherent and thus necessary aesthetic traits (ranging from sensory data to narrative features), but that existing research institutions throughout the West have failed to address this issue adequately, in terms of research policy, recruitment...... and methodology. Accordingly, it is suggested that scholars from the humanities in particular aggressively seek to develop new types of research institutions and methods in order to deal with the manifold forms of overlap between warfare and aesthetics. In empirical terms, focus is limited to the current...

  9. Institutional Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlvik, Carina; Boxenbaum, Eva

    Drawing on dual-process theory and mindfulness research this article sets out to shed light on the conditions that need to be met to create “a reflexive shift in consciousness” argued to be a key foundational mechanism for agency in institutional theory. Although past research has identified diff...... in consciousness to emerge and argue for how the varying levels of mindfulness in the form of internal and external awareness may manifest as distinct responses to the institutional environment the actor is embedded in....

  10. Genomic understanding of dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Senjie

    2011-01-01

    The phylum of dinoflagellates is characterized by many unusual and interesting genomic and physiological features, the imprint of which, in its immense genome, remains elusive. Much novel understanding has been achieved in the last decade on various aspects of dinoflagellate biology, but most remarkably about the structure, expression pattern and epigenetic modification of protein-coding genes in the nuclear and organellar genomes. Major findings include: 1) the great diversity of dinoflagellates, especially at the base of the dinoflagellate tree of life; 2) mini-circularization of the genomes of typical dinoflagellate plastids (with three membranes, chlorophylls a, c1 and c2, and carotenoid peridinin), the scrambled mitochondrial genome and the extensive mRNA editing occurring in both systems; 3) ubiquitous spliced leader trans-splicing of nuclear-encoded mRNA and demonstrated potential as a novel tool for studying dinoflagellate transcriptomes in mixed cultures and natural assemblages; 4) existence and expression of histones and other nucleosomal proteins; 5) a ribosomal protein set expected of typical eukaryotes; 6) genetic potential of non-photosynthetic solar energy utilization via proton-pump rhodopsin; 7) gene candidates in the toxin synthesis pathways; and 8) evidence of a highly redundant, high gene number and highly recombined genome. Despite this progress, much more work awaits genome-wide transcriptome and whole genome sequencing in order to unfold the molecular mechanisms underlying the numerous mysterious attributes of dinoflagellates.

  11. Genome size variation in the genus Avena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Honghai; Martin, Sara L; Bekele, Wubishet A; Latta, Robert G; Diederichsen, Axel; Peng, Yuanying; Tinker, Nicholas A

    2016-03-01

    Genome size is an indicator of evolutionary distance and a metric for genome characterization. Here, we report accurate estimates of genome size in 99 accessions from 26 species of Avena. We demonstrate that the average genome size of C genome diploid species (2C = 10.26 pg) is 15% larger than that of A genome species (2C = 8.95 pg), and that this difference likely accounts for a progression of size among tetraploid species, where AB genome configuration had similar genome sizes (average 2C = 25.74 pg). Genome size was mostly consistent within species and in general agreement with current information about evolutionary distance among species. Results also suggest that most of the polyploid species in Avena have experienced genome downsizing in relation to their diploid progenitors. Genome size measurements could provide additional quality control for species identification in germplasm collections, especially in cases where diploid and polyploid species have similar morphology.

  12. European Institutions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meacham, Darian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to sketch a phenomenological theory of political institutions and to apply it to some objections and questions raised by Pierre Manent about the project of the European Union and more specifically the question of “European Construction”, i.e. what is the aim of the Europea

  13. Institution Morphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Joseph; Rosu, Grigore; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Institutions formalize the intuitive notion of logical system, including both syntax and semantics. A surprising number of different notions of morphisim have been suggested for forming categories with institutions as objects, and a surprising variety of names have been proposed for them. One goal of this paper is to suggest a terminology that is both uniform and informative to replace the current rather chaotic nomenclature. Another goal is to investigate the properties and interrelations of these notions. Following brief expositions of indexed categories, twisted relations, and Kan extensions, we demonstrate and then exploit the duality between institution morphisms in the original sense of Goguen and Burstall, and the 'plain maps' of Meseguer, obtaining simple uniform proofs of completeness and cocompleteness for both resulting categories; because of this duality, we prefer the name 'comorphism' over 'plain map.' We next consider 'theoroidal' morphisms and comorphisims, which generalize signatures to theories, finding that the 'maps' of Meseguer are theoroidal comorphisms, while theoroidal morphisms are a new concept. We then introduce 'forward' and 'semi-natural' morphisms, and appendices discuss institutions for hidden algebra, universal algebra, partial equational logic, and a variant of order sorted algebra supporting partiality.

  14. Institutional Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmolinsky, Adam

    1975-01-01

    Institutional paralysis of higher education is the result of the disjunction between faculty and administration; the disjunction between substantive planning and bugetary decision-making; the disjunction between departmental structures and functional areas of university concern; and the disjunction between the theory of direct democracy and its…

  15. Personalized genomic medicine with a patchwork, partially owned genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Christopher E; Seringhaus, Michael R; Sattler de Sousa e Brito, Clara

    2007-12-01

    "His book was known as the Book of Sand, because neither the book nor the sand have any beginning or end." - Jorge Luis BorgesThe human genome is a three billion-letter recipe for the genesis of a human being, directing development from a single-celled embryo to the trillions of adult cells. Since the sequencing of the human genome was announced in 2001, researchers have an increased ability to discern the genetic basis for diseases. This reference genome has opened the door to genomic medicine, aimed at detecting and understanding all genetic variations of the human genome that contribute to the manifestation and progression of disease. The overarching vision of genomic (or "personalized") medicine is to custom-tailor each treatment for maximum effectiveness in an individual patient. Detecting the variation in a patient's deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), and protein structures is no longer an insurmountable hurdle. Today, the challenge for genomic medicine lies in contextualizing those myriad genetic variations in terms of their functional consequences for a person's health and development throughout life and in terms of that patient's susceptibility to disease and differential clinical responses to medication. Additionally, several recent developments have complicated our understanding of the nominal human genome and, thereby, altered the progression of genomic medicine. In this brief review, we shall focus on these developments and examine how they are changing our understanding of our genome.

  16. Personalized Genomic Medicine with a Patchwork, Partially Owned Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Christopher E.; Seringhaus, Michael R.; Sattler de Sousa e Brito, Clara

    2008-01-01

    “His book was known as the Book of Sand, because neither the book nor the sand have any beginning or end.” — Jorge Luis Borges The human genome is a three billion-letter recipe for the genesis of a human being, directing development from a single-celled embryo to the trillions of adult cells. Since the sequencing of the human genome was announced in 2001, researchers have an increased ability to discern the genetic basis for diseases. This reference genome has opened the door to genomic medicine, aimed at detecting and understanding all genetic variations of the human genome that contribute to the manifestation and progression of disease. The overarching vision of genomic (or “personalized”) medicine is to custom-tailor each treatment for maximum effectiveness in an individual patient. Detecting the variation in a patient’s deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), and protein structures is no longer an insurmountable hurdle. Today, the challenge for genomic medicine lies in contextualizing those myriad genetic variations in terms of their functional consequences for a person’s health and development throughout life and in terms of that patient’s susceptibility to disease and differential clinical responses to medication. Additionally, several recent developments have complicated our understanding of the nominal human genome and, thereby, altered the progression of genomic medicine. In this brief review, we shall focus on these developments and examine how they are changing our understanding of our genome. PMID:18449389

  17. Domestication and plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haibao; Sezen, Uzay; Paterson, Andrew H

    2010-04-01

    The techniques of plant improvement have been evolving with the advancement of technology, progressing from crop domestication by Neolithic humans to scientific plant breeding, and now including DNA-based genotyping and genetic engineering. Archeological findings have shown that early human ancestors often unintentionally selected for and finally fixed a few major domestication traits over time. Recent advancement of molecular and genomic tools has enabled scientists to pinpoint changes to specific chromosomal regions and genetic loci that are responsible for dramatic morphological and other transitions that distinguish crops from their wild progenitors. Extensive studies in a multitude of additional crop species, facilitated by rapid progress in sequencing and resequencing(s) of crop genomes, will further our understanding of the genomic impact from both the unusual population history of cultivated plants and millennia of human selection.

  18. Whole-exome/genome sequencing and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grody, Wayne W; Thompson, Barry H; Hudgins, Louanne

    2013-12-01

    As medical genetics has progressed from a descriptive entity to one focused on the functional relationship between genes and clinical disorders, emphasis has been placed on genomics. Genomics, a subelement of genetics, is the study of the genome, the sum total of all the genes of an organism. The human genome, which is contained in the 23 pairs of nuclear chromosomes and in the mitochondrial DNA of each cell, comprises >6 billion nucleotides of genetic code. There are some 23,000 protein-coding genes, a surprisingly small fraction of the total genetic material, with the remainder composed of noncoding DNA, regulatory sequences, and introns. The Human Genome Project, launched in 1990, produced a draft of the genome in 2001 and then a finished sequence in 2003, on the 50th anniversary of the initial publication of Watson and Crick's paper on the double-helical structure of DNA. Since then, this mass of genetic information has been translated at an ever-increasing pace into useable knowledge applicable to clinical medicine. The recent advent of massively parallel DNA sequencing (also known as shotgun, high-throughput, and next-generation sequencing) has brought whole-genome analysis into the clinic for the first time, and most of the current applications are directed at children with congenital conditions that are undiagnosable by using standard genetic tests for single-gene disorders. Thus, pediatricians must become familiar with this technology, what it can and cannot offer, and its technical and ethical challenges. Here, we address the concepts of human genomic analysis and its clinical applicability for primary care providers.

  19. The genomics of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-12-22

    The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technological advances in recent years should now allow us to answer many long-standing questions about the nature of adaptation. The data gathered so far are beginning to challenge some widespread views of the way in which natural selection operates at the genomic level. Papers in this Special Feature of Proceedings of the Royal Society B illustrate various aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a context and, on the basis of a few selected examples, discusses how genomic data can advance our understanding of the process of adaptation.

  20. Genomic overview and progression of Burkholderia pseudomallei%类鼻疽杆菌基因组学概述及进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方瑶; 顾江; 李倩; 于波; 王海光; 毛旭虎

    2012-01-01

    类鼻疽伯克霍尔德杆菌是一种人体机会致病菌,导致的疾病称类鼻疽,是一种典型的热带疾病,能感染机体几乎任何器官.类鼻疽杆菌分布广泛,主要存在于水及土壤中,其耐受性极强,能在土壤中存活几十年之久,被美国CDC列为B类生物恐怖剂.随着病原菌的扩散和人类活动的影响,全球范围内关于类鼻疽病例报道的增加,越来越多的证据表明类鼻疽是一种正在扩散的人兽共患病.海南、广东等地正是类鼻疽感染的重灾区,而国内类鼻疽杆菌的研究尚少,也没有类鼻疽杆菌研究的标准株和基因组学理论基础,获取国际标准菌株资源受到西方国家的限制,鉴于类鼻疽杆菌的特殊性、类鼻疽流行的严峻形势及科研壁垒,加强类鼻疽的研究有着重要的社会意义和军事价值.本文总结了类鼻疽杆菌(K96243标准株)的全基因组的特点,结合当今的DNA测序的发展现状,指出开展国内类鼻疽杆菌全基因测序的必要性和紧迫性.%Burkholderia pseudomallei is an opportunistic pathogen which can cause melioidosis, a typical tropical dis ease, referring to almost all organs. Burkholderia pseudomallei is found in widespread water and soil and can survive as long as decades, also classified as B category pathogen by the CDC of USA. With the diffusion of pathogen and the increasing nuni ber of victims, it is believed that melioidosis is unfolding. In China, Hainan and Guangdong is disaster area of melioidosis. However, study on melioidosis still could not receive enough attention with no international standard for bacteria or whole ge nome sequencing data. In view of the specificity of the pathogen, draconic prevalence of melioidosis and research barrier, it has significant benefit for public health and military use to further the research of Burkholderia pseudomallei in China. This review will point out the necessity of whole genome sequencing of Chinese standard bacteria

  1. [Progress in proteogenomics of prokaryotes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengpu; Xu, Ping; Zhu, Yunping

    2014-07-01

    With the rapid development of genome sequencing technologies, a large amount of prokaryote genomes have been sequenced in recent years. To further investigate the models and functions of genomes, the algorithms for genome annotations based on the sequence and homology features have been widely implemented to newly sequenced genomes. However, gene annotations only using the genomic information are prone to errors, such as the incorrect N-terminals and pseudogenes. It is even harder to provide reasonable annotating results in the case of the poor genome sequencing results. The transcriptomics based on the technologies such as microarray and RNA-seq and the proteomics based on the MS/MS have been used widely to identify the gene products with high throughput and high sensitivity, providing the powerful tools for the verification and correction of annotated genome. Compared with transcriptomics, proteomics can generate the protein list for the expressed genes in the samples or cells without any confusion of the non-coding RNA, leading the proteogenomics an important basis for the genome annotations in prokaryotes. In this paper, we first described the traditional genome annotation algorithms and pointed out the shortcomings. Then we summarized the advantages of proteomics in the genome annotations and reviewed the progress of proteogenomics in prokaryotes. Finally we discussed the challenges and strategies in the data analyses and potential solutions for the developments of proteogenomics.

  2. Institutional Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlvik, Carina; Boxenbaum, Eva

    Drawing on dual-process theory and mindfulness research this article sets out to shed light on the conditions that need to be met to create “a reflexive shift in consciousness” argued to be a key foundational mechanism for agency in institutional theory. Although past research has identified...... different exogenous triggers to evoke shifts in consciousness, such as conflicting logics or socio-economic shocks, we argue that a reflexive shift in consciousness can also be cultivated by developing mindfulness. We develop a typology to depict conditions that need to be met to enable a reflexive shift...

  3. Institutional Investors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkmose, Hanne Søndergaard; Strand, Therese

    Research Question/Issue: Institutional investors are facing increased pressure and threats of legislation from the European Union to abandon passive ownership strategies. This study investigates the prerequisites for – and potential dissimilarities in the practice of, active ownership among......, as such a setup transfers power from the board to the owners. Presumably, this reduces the impact of free rider and collective action problems, and increases the shareholders’ inclination to make proposals, which is also what we find. Theoretical/Academic Implications: We contribute to literature by investigating...

  4. Progress in Diffraction Enhanced Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ In cooperation with the Topography Station of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation under CAS Institute of High Energy Physics, a research group from the CAS Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM) has made encouraging progress in the diffraction enhanced imaging technology through phase-contrast microscope by hard X-rays.

  5. Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  6. eGenomics: Cataloguing Our Complete Genome Collection III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Field

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This meeting report summarizes the proceedings of the “eGenomics: Cataloguing our Complete Genome Collection III” workshop held September 11–13, 2006, at the National Institute for Environmental eScience (NIEeS, Cambridge, United Kingdom. This 3rd workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium was divided into two parts. The first half of the three-day workshop was dedicated to reviewing the genomic diversity of our current and future genome and metagenome collection, and exploring linkages to a series of existing projects through formal presentations. The second half was dedicated to strategic discussions. Outcomes of the workshop include a revised “Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence” (MIGS specification (v1.1, consensus on a variety of features to be added to the Genome Catalogue (GCat, agreement by several researchers to adopt MIGS for imminent genome publications, and an agreement by the EBI and NCBI to input their genome collections into GCat for the purpose of quantifying the amount of optional data already available (e.g., for geographic location coordinates and working towards a single, global list of all public genomes and metagenomes.

  7. How the genome folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman Aiden, Erez

    2012-02-01

    I describe Hi-C, a novel technology for probing the three-dimensional architecture of whole genomes by coupling proximity-based ligation with massively parallel sequencing. Working with collaborators at the Broad Institute and UMass Medical School, we used Hi-C to construct spatial proximity maps of the human genome at a resolution of 1Mb. These maps confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes. We identified an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments. At the megabase scale, the chromatin conformation is consistent with a fractal globule, a knot-free conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus. The fractal globule is distinct from the more commonly used globular equilibrium model. Our results demonstrate the power of Hi-C to map the dynamic conformations of whole genomes.

  8. National Institute for Global Environmental Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werth, G.C.

    1992-04-01

    This document is the Semi-Annual Report of the National Institute for Global Environmental Change for the reporting period July 1 to December 31, 1991. The report is in two parts. Part I presents the mission of the Institute, examples of progress toward that mission, a brief description of the revised management plan, and the financial report. Part II presents the statements of the Regional Center Directors along with progress reports of the projects written by the researchers themselves.

  9. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, July-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-03-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report also includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  10. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, January-June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-09-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  11. Cancer genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Bodil; Guldberg, Per; Ralfkiær, Elisabeth Methner

    2007-01-01

    Almost all cells in the human body contain a complete copy of the genome with an estimated number of 25,000 genes. The sequences of these genes make up about three percent of the genome and comprise the inherited set of genetic information. The genome also contains information that determines whe...

  12. Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

  13. Contact | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    For more information about the Office of Cancer Genomics, please contact: Office of Cancer Genomics National Cancer Institute 31 Center Drive, 10A07 Bethesda, Maryland 20892-2580 Phone: (301) 451-8027 Fax: (301) 480-4368 Email: ocg@mail.nih.gov *Please note that this site will not function properly in Internet Explorer unless you completely turn off the Compatibility View*

  14. Instituting Commoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . STEALTH.unlimited

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the origins of the notion of management, this paper explores how commons governance is constituted by the earlier influential research of Elinor Ostrom, and pursues this with reference to scholars such as Saki Bailey, who emphasises that the choice of regulatory frame is ultimately a political one. We then argue that commons have to be ‘instituted’ in an open manner in order to remain accessible. This demands a set of scripts, rules or agreements that keep the process of commoning in place, and, simultaneously, keep commoning in a constant process of reproduction. We examine this tension and look at the shift in understanding about what ‘institutions of the commons’ have entailed in practice over the course of the last century and a half. Finally, we return to the political dimension to touch upon the question of whether, with the disappearance of the welfare state, a coherent concept of society can emerge from the current upsurge of commons initiatives.

  15. Functional Genomics of Wood Quality and Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tang; Xiaoyan Luo; Aaron Nelson; Hilary Collver; Katherine Kinken

    2003-01-01

    Genomics promises to enrich the investigations of biology and biochemistry. Current advancements in genomics have major implications for genetic improvement in animals, plants, and microorganisms, and for our understanding of cell growth, development, differentiation, and communication. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of plant genomics in recent years, and the area continues to progress rapidly. Functional genomics offers enormous potential to tree improvement and the understanding of gene expression in this area of science worldwide.In this review we focus on functional genomics of wood quality and properties in trees, mainly based on progresses made in genomics study of Pinus and Populus.The aims of this review are to summarize the current status of functional genomics including: (1) Gene discovery; (2) EST and genomic sequencing; (3) From EST to functional genomics; (4) Approaches to functional analysis; (5) Engineering lignin biosynthesis; (6) Modification of cell wall biogenesis; and (7) Molecular modelling.Functional genomics has been greatly invested worldwide and will be important in identifying candidate genes whose function is critical to all aspects of plant growth, development, differentiation, and defense. Forest biotechnology industry will significantly benefit from the advent of functional genomics of wood quality and properties.

  16. INSTITUTIONAL CHANGES IN EMERGING EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Georgiana AMARANDEI

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent global economic crisis has created new conditions and situations for the economic environment and therefore, in this context the rethinking of the institutional system is mandatory. The present paper seeks to propose an empirical model and aims at capturing the interdependencies between the institutional changes and the economic progress in the European emerging countries, in order to emphasize that institutions are the key elements in the process of economic growth. After briefly reviewing the most relevant literatures that have documented the variety of the institutional changes, the paper focuses on the amplitude of the phenomena of institutional changes from the  European emerging countries. The research tries to establish a “stimulus – effect” relationship between the changing of the institutional environment and the rate of economic growth and human development. The conclusions for the methodological aspects illustrate that the level of social and economic development is a natural result of the quality of the institutional environment.

  17. Genomics of Salmonella Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Rocio; McClelland, Michael; Santiviago, Carlos A.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

    Progress in the study of Salmonella survival, colonization, and virulence has increased rapidly with the advent of complete genome sequencing and higher capacity assays for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. Although many of these techniques have yet to be used to directly assay Salmonella growth on foods, these assays are currently in use to determine Salmonella factors necessary for growth in animal models including livestock animals and in in vitro conditions that mimic many different environments. As sequencing of the Salmonella genome and microarray analysis have revolutionized genomics and transcriptomics of salmonellae over the last decade, so are new high-throughput sequencing technologies currently accelerating the pace of our studies and allowing us to approach complex problems that were not previously experimentally tractable.

  18. Parasite Genome Projects and the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Degrave

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the human genome project, a great number of genome projects on other "model" organism have been initiated, some of them already completed. Several initiatives have also been started on parasite genomes, mainly through support from WHO/TDR, involving North-South and South-South collaborations, and great hopes are vested in that these initiatives will lead to new tools for disease control and prevention, as well as to the establishment of genomic research technology in developing countries. The Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, using the clone CL-Brener as starting point, has made considerable progress through the concerted action of more than 20 laboratories, most of them in the South. A brief overview of the current state of the project is given

  19. Computational approaches to identify functional genetic variants in cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Mustonen, Ville; Reva, Boris

    2013-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) aims to catalog genomic abnormalities in tumors from 50 different cancer types. Genome sequencing reveals hundreds to thousands of somatic mutations in each tumor but only a minority of these drive tumor progression. We present the result of discu......The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) aims to catalog genomic abnormalities in tumors from 50 different cancer types. Genome sequencing reveals hundreds to thousands of somatic mutations in each tumor but only a minority of these drive tumor progression. We present the result...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: progressive osseous heteroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene's parent of origin are caused by a phenomenon called genomic imprinting. The GNAS gene has a ... Chan I, Hamada T, Hardman C, McGrath JA, Child FJ. Progressive osseous heteroplasia resulting from a new ...

  1. Human genome. 1993 Program report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

  2. Análise crítica do desempenho evolutivo da visão subnormal no Instituto Benjamin Constant Critical analysis of the progressive performance of low vision in Benjamin Constant Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Alves da Costa Filho

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a efetividade do setor de Visão Subnormal no Instituto Benjamin Constant (IBC e comprovar a real necessidade de um Instituto nos moldes do Instituto Benjamin Constant na atual política de inclusão. MÉTODOS: Estudo ecológico, realizado de 1º de outubro de 1990 a 20 de dezembro de 2002, analisando três períodos de atendimento no setor de Visão Subnormal no Instituto Benjamin Constant: a 1991 - início do atendimento; b 1995 - integração médico-pedagógica; c 2002 - estágio atual. Nesta análise foram estudados os seguintes indicadores: I - número de atendimentos no setor de Visão Subnormal; II - condições do setor de Visão Subnormal no Instituto Benjamin Constant e III - associados. RESULTADOS: Observou-se aumento do atendimento, que passou a ser mais abrangente após a integração médico-pedagógica. Outros indicadores, como a capacitação de profissionais médicos, a participação em cursos de capacitação no Instituto Benjamin Constant, o aumento do número de convênios e encaminhamentos para o Instituto Benjamin Constant, além da Reabilitação, também confirmam a efetividade do setor de Visão Subnormal no Instituto Benjamin Constant. CONCLUSÕES: O setor de Visão Subnormal mostrou ser a interface entre o serviço médico e o serviço pedagógico, passando a interagir posteriormente com a Reabilitação e a Coordenação de Educação Física. Isto acarretou mudança de postura de diferentes setores do Instituto Benjamin Constant com relação ao paciente portador de visão subnormal, desde o educando até o paciente da comunidade. Desse modo, o Instituto Benjamin Constant mostrou a sua utilidade no tocante à política de inclusão.PURPOSE: To evaluate effectiveness of the Low Vision the Benjamin Constant Institute (BCI and confirm the real necessity of an Institute like BCI in the present inclusion policy. METHODS: Ecological study, analyzing 3 periods of Low Vision Assistance at the Benjamin

  3. Microbial genomics: from sequence to function.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, I

    2000-01-01

    The era of genomics (the study of genes and their function) began a scant dozen years ago with a suggestion by James Watson that the complete DNA sequence of the human genome be determined. Since that time, the human genome project has attracted a great deal of attention in the scientific world and the general media; the scope of the sequencing effort, and the extraordinary value that it will provide, has served to mask the enormous progress in sequencing other genomes. Microbial genome seque...

  4. Recent advances in fruit crop genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang XU,Chaoyang LIU,Manosh Kumar BISWAS,Zhiyong PAN,Xiuxin DENG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, dramatic progress has been made in the genomics of fruit crops. The publication of a dozen fruit crop genomes represents a milestone for both functional genomics and breeding programs in fruit crops. Rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have revolutionized the manner and scale of genomics in fruit crops. Research on fruit crops is encompassing a wide range of biological questions which are unique and cannot be addressed in a model plant such as Arabidopsis. This review summarizes recent achievements of research on the genome, transcriptome, proteome, miRNAs and epigenome of fruit crops.

  5. Cancer Genome Anatomy Project | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the research community access to biological tissue characterization data. Request a free copy of the CGAP Website Virtual Tour CD from ocg@mail.nih.gov.

  6. The Chlamydomonas genome project: a decade on

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaby, Ian K.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten; Tourasse, Nicolas; Hom, Erik F. Y.; Lopez, David; Aksoy, Munevver; Grossman, Arthur; Umen, James; Dutcher, Susan; Porter, Mary; King, Stephen; Witman, George; Stanke, Mario; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Goodstein, David; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Vallon, Olivier; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Prochnik, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a popular unicellular organism for studying photosynthesis, cilia biogenesis and micronutrient homeostasis. Ten years since its genome project was initiated, an iterative process of improvements to the genome and gene predictions has propelled this organism to the forefront of the “omics” era. Housed at Phytozome, the Joint Genome Institute’s (JGI) plant genomics portal, the most up-to-date genomic data include a genome arranged on chromosomes and high-quality gene models with alternative splice forms supported by an abundance of RNA-Seq data. Here, we present the past, present and future of Chlamydomonas genomics. Specifically, we detail progress on genome assembly and gene model refinement, discuss resources for gene annotations, functional predictions and locus ID mapping between versions and, importantly, outline a standardized framework for naming genes. PMID:24950814

  7. Building International Genomics Collaboration for Global Health Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Helen H; Erkkila, Tracy; Chain, Patrick S G; Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2015-01-01

    Genome science and technologies are transforming life sciences globally in many ways and becoming a highly desirable area for international collaboration to strengthen global health. The Genome Science Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is leveraging a long history of expertise in genomics research to assist multiple partner nations in advancing their genomics and bioinformatics capabilities. The capability development objectives focus on providing a molecular genomics-based scientific approach for pathogen detection, characterization, and biosurveillance applications. The general approaches include introduction of basic principles in genomics technologies, training on laboratory methodologies and bioinformatic analysis of resulting data, procurement, and installation of next-generation sequencing instruments, establishing bioinformatics software capabilities, and exploring collaborative applications of the genomics capabilities in public health. Genome centers have been established with public health and research institutions in the Republic of Georgia, Kingdom of Jordan, Uganda, and Gabon; broader collaborations in genomics applications have also been developed with research institutions in many other countries.

  8. Building International Genomics Collaboration for Global Health Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen H Cui

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome science and technologies are transforming life sciences globally in many ways, and becoming a highly desirable area for international collaboration to strengthen global health. The Genome Science Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is leveraging a long history of expertise in genomics research to assist multiple partner nations in advancing their genomics and bioinformatics capabilities. The capability development objectives focus on providing a molecular genomics-based scientific approach for pathogen detection, characterization, and biosurveillance applications. The general approaches include introduction of basic principles in genomics technologies, training on laboratory methodologies and bioinformatic analysis of resulting data, procurement and installation of next generation sequencing instruments, establishing bioinformatics software capabilities, and exploring collaborative applications of the genomics capabilities in public health. Genome centers have been established with public health and research institutions in the Republic of Georgia, Kingdom of Jordan, Uganda, and Gabon; broader collaborations in genomics applications have also been developed with research institutions in many other countries.

  9. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-02

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine.

  10. Genomics: Implementatie, toepassing en toekomst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings JLA; Hoebee B; TOX

    2007-01-01

    Genomics - the large scale analysis of hereditary information encoded in the DNA - has been implemented at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) in the Netherlands. In the near future other large-scale technologies will become important for the RIVM, including proteomic

  11. Fueling Future with Algal Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-07-05

    Algae constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity, play profound roles in the carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world in algal genome sequencing (http://jgi.doe.gov/Algae) and contributes of the algal genome projects worldwide (GOLD database, 2012). The sequenced algal genomes offer catalogs of genes, networks, and pathways. The sequenced first of its kind genomes of a haptophyte E.huxleyii, chlorarachniophyte B.natans, and cryptophyte G.theta fill the gaps in the eukaryotic tree of life and carry unique genes and pathways as well as molecular fossils of secondary endosymbiosis. Natural adaptation to conditions critical for industrial production is encoded in algal genomes, for example, growth of A.anophagefferens at very high cell densities during the harmful algae blooms or a global distribution across diverse environments of E.huxleyii, able to live on sparse nutrients due to its expanded pan-genome. Communications and signaling pathways can be derived from simple symbiotic systems like lichens or complex marine algae metagenomes. Collectively these datasets derived from algal genomics contribute to building a comprehensive parts list essential for algal biofuel development.

  12. Genomes to Proteomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panisko, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Daly, Don S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Scott E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  13. Institutions, Institutional Change, Language, and Searle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Dolfsma (Wilfred); R. McMaster; J. Finch

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis paper endeavours to contribute to the growing institutionalist literature on the conception of the institution. We draw from John Davis’ (2003) analysis of the individual in posing the questions: what differentiates institutions, and how can changing institutions be identified thro

  14. (Post-)genomics approaches in fungal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar-Pontes, María Victoria; de Vries, Ronald P; Zhou, M.; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    To date, hundreds of fungal genomes have been sequenced and many more are in progress. This wealth of genomic information has provided new directions to study fungal biodiversity. However, to further dissect and understand the complicated biological mechanisms involved in fungal life styles, functio

  15. Research progress on complete mitochondrial genome sequences and their application for trematodes%吸虫线粒体基因组及其应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾万忠; 闫鸿斌; 史万贵; 郭爱疆; 詹芳

    2011-01-01

    Trematodiases such as schistosomiasis and fascioliasis,a kind of the major parasitic zoonoses caused by the adult stage of trematodes, are prevalent in the world including China and have a global socioeconomic impact with morbidity and mortality in humans and domestic livestock. In this review,current progress,application and future development in studies on complete mitochondrial genomes of trematodes were summarized. To date, 14 full-length mi-tochondrial sequences of trematodes have been published including 10 species from Digenea and 4 species from Mono-genea. Analyses on nucleotide composition, gene arrangement, gene structures, genetic variations, and other features of trematode mt genomes will aid in investigations of mt functional and comparative genomics,molecular taxonomy, origin of species, evolution, phylogenetic tree, diagnosis of diseases and so on. Taxonomic position of newly found Schistosoma sinensium and Pagumogonimus bangkokensis, based on partial mitochondrial sequences, has been resolved. Likewise, compared with mitochondrial sequences from Paragonimus iloktsuenensis and P. Sadoensis shows they are a synonym of P. Ohirai. The coxl gene sequence of Fasiciola sp. From Japan is the same as that of F. Gigan-tica suggesting that they should be the same species. Moreover, nadl sequences from different isolates have a divergence of 8. 3% , meaning that cryptic species might exist within them. It becomes clear that mtDNAs are playing an important role in taxonomy and identification of trematodes and provide implications for the molecular epidemiologi-cal investigations and control of trematode infections.%吸虫病(Trematodiasis)如血吸虫病、肝片形吸虫病等是一类重要的人兽共患寄生虫病,在我国和世界各地普遍流行,危害严重.本文将对吸虫线粒体基因组全序列分析的研究进展、应用和今后的发展方向作一综述.目前,已完成包括复殖亚纲10个种和单殖亚纲4个种总计14种吸虫线

  16. 77 FR 6812 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel Genomic Advances to Wound...: Tamizchelvi Thyagarajan, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research,...

  17. The Nostoc punctiforme Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John C. Meeks

    2001-12-31

    Nostoc punctiforme is a filamentous cyanobacterium with extensive phenotypic characteristics and a relatively large genome, approaching 10 Mb. The phenotypic characteristics include a photoautotrophic, diazotrophic mode of growth, but N. punctiforme is also facultatively heterotrophic; its vegetative cells have multiple development alternatives, including terminal differentiation into nitrogen-fixing heterocysts and transient differentiation into spore-like akinetes or motile filaments called hormogonia; and N. punctiforme has broad symbiotic competence with fungi and terrestrial plants, including bryophytes, gymnosperms and an angiosperm. The shotgun-sequencing phase of the N. punctiforme strain ATCC 29133 genome has been completed by the Joint Genome Institute. Annotation of an 8.9 Mb database yielded 7432 open reading frames, 45% of which encode proteins with known or probable known function and 29% of which are unique to N. punctiforme. Comparative analysis of the sequence indicates a genome that is highly plastic and in a state of flux, with numerous insertion sequences and multilocus repeats, as well as genes encoding transposases and DNA modification enzymes. The sequence also reveals the presence of genes encoding putative proteins that collectively define almost all characteristics of cyanobacteria as a group. N. punctiforme has an extensive potential to sense and respond to environmental signals as reflected by the presence of more than 400 genes encoding sensor protein kinases, response regulators and other transcriptional factors. The signal transduction systems and any of the large number of unique genes may play essential roles in the cell differentiation and symbiotic interaction properties of N. punctiforme.

  18. Antarctic Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D. Rogers

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of genomic science and its battery of technologies, polar biology stands on the threshold of a revolution, one that will enable the investigation of important questions of unprecedented scope and with extraordinary depth and precision. The exotic organisms of polar ecosystems are ideal candidates for genomic analysis. Through such analyses, it will be possible to learn not only the novel features that enable polar organisms to survive, and indeed thrive, in their extreme environments, but also fundamental biological principles that are common to most, if not all, organisms. This article aims to review recent developments in Antarctic genomics and to demonstrate the global context of such studies.

  19. Identity of Institution and Institutional Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bahar Ülker Kaya

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Corporate identity is planning and reşecting memorable, personal, characteristic pecularities of an institution and the ability that separates it from others. Corporate identity is in interaction with the corporate culture and corporate image. It is an entity formed by the philosophy of the institution, institutional communication, behavior and planning. Institutional planning formed by the planning of production and communication and architectural/ interior architectural planning, is the most significant element that constitutes the visual identity of an institution. While forming architectural and interior architectural planning of institutions, establishing places that will clearly reşect the corporate identity is gaining importance. In the perception of visual identity of institutions, planning elements such as; colour, texture, material and form are more significant than others.

  20. Progress Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999.......Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999....

  1. Herbarium genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, Freek T.; Lei, Di; Yu, Jiaying

    2016-01-01

    Herbarium genomics is proving promising as next-generation sequencing approaches are well suited to deal with the usually fragmented nature of archival DNA. We show that routine assembly of partial plastome sequences from herbarium specimens is feasible, from total DNA extracts and with specimens...... up to 146 years old. We use genome skimming and an automated assembly pipeline, Iterative Organelle Genome Assembly, that assembles paired-end reads into a series of candidate assemblies, the best one of which is selected based on likelihood estimation. We used 93 specimens from 12 different...... correlation between plastome coverage and nuclear genome size (C value) in our samples, but the range of C values included is limited. Finally, we conclude that routine plastome sequencing from herbarium specimens is feasible and cost-effective (compared with Sanger sequencing or plastome...

  2. Progress on Technology of the Air Disinfection and Purification in Medical Institutions%医疗机构空气消毒净化处理技术进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    米丽娟

    2011-01-01

    In view of the airborne disease has become the top transmitting disease in the world, the air disinfection and purification is more important and urgent.The indoor air disinfection and purification is an effective and important measure for interruption of spread of respiratory infectious diseases.In order to guide the daily work, this article summarizes the technology and methods of indoor air disinfection and purification from domestic and foreign medical institutions in recent years.The technology and methods are illustrated in two conditions, including circumstance with or without people.In circumstance with people, the medical institution could adopt the following methods: high-efficiency particulate air filtering sterilization, high-voltage electrostatic adsorption sterilization, plasma technology, dynamic air disinfecting machines, air purification by nano-photocatalyst materials, air purification by artificial anion and construction laminar flow cleaning sterilization, etc.In circumstance without people, the medical institution could adopt the methods of ultraviolet irradiation and ozone disinfector.%鉴于经空气传播的疾病已占世界传播疾病的首位,凸显出空气消毒净化处理的重要性和紧迫性,而室内空气消毒净化处理是有效阻断呼吸道传染病传播的重要措施.作者重点归纳了近年来国内外有关医疗机构室内空气消毒净化处理的技术方法,意义在于更好地指导日常工作,技术方法主要对有人状态和无人状态2种情况分别进行了阐述.在有人状态下,可采用高效颗粒空气过滤净化除菌、高压静电吸附除菌、等离子体技术、动态空气消毒机、纳米光催化材料的空气净化、人工负离子空气净化和建筑型层流洁净除菌等技术方法处理.在无人状态下,可采用紫外线照射法和臭氧消毒机等技术方法处理.

  3. AgBase: a functional genomics resource for agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Many agricultural species and their pathogens have sequenced genomes and more are in progress. Agricultural species provide food, fiber, xenotransplant tissues, biopharmaceuticals and biomedical models. Moreover, many agricultural microorganisms are human zoonoses. However, systems biology from functional genomics data is hindered in agricultural species because agricultural genome sequences have relatively poor structural and functional annotation and agricultural researc...

  4. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    procedures. One man who was well aware of the role of nanostructured catalysts in the progress of material science research was the late Ulrich Gösele, director at the Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik Halle, who passed away at the age of 60 on 8 November, 2009. Ulrich Gösele published over 750 papers of premium calibre research that have collectively been cited over 20,000 times. His research output includes a cornucopia of excellent work published in Nanotechnology, amongst which are a number of papers detailing the deft manipulation of nanocatalysts to control the quality and structure of nanomaterials [5-8]. Ulrich Gösele was a pioneer in nanoscience. In 1991, when the nanotechnology revolution was little more than a portentous rumble, he published a seminal report examining the effect of quantum confinement on the optical properties of silicon nanowires [9]. While we lament the loss to the community, we have much to celebrate in the insights his legacy has provided for the progress of materials science. It would be unwise to assume that science will or can ultimately advance in such a way as to allow ample means to indulge an unrestrained appetite for consumerism and energy consumption. As with most things, a balanced approach, considering solutions to the problem from many angles, seems sensible. Nonetheless, a browse through the latest literature leaves much cause for optimism for the positive role science can play in improving and sustaining our lifestyle. References [1] Mukherjee P, Roy M, Mandal B P, Dey G K, Mukherjee P K, Ghatak J, Tyagi A K and Kale S P 2008 Nanotechnology 19 075103 [2] Greenham N C and Grätzel M 2008 Nanotechnology 19 420201 [3] Vajo J, Pinkerton F and Stetson N 2009 Nanotechnology 20 200201 [4] Zhong C-J, Luo J, Fang B, Wanjala B N, Njoki P N, Loukrakpam R and Yin J 2010 Nanotechnology 21 062001 [5] Sivakov V A, Scholz A, Syrowatka F, Falk F, Gösele U and Christiansen S H 2009 Nanotechnology 20 405607 [6] Liu L, Lee W, Huang Z

  5. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops.

  6. What are Institutional Logics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg Johansen, Christina; Waldorff, Susanne Boch

    This study presents new insights into the explanatory power of the institutional logics perspective. With outset in a discussion of seminal theory texts, we identify two fundamental topics that frame institutional logics: overarching institutional orders guides by institutional logics, as well...

  7. Progressive Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian O.

    2016-01-01

    Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015.......Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015....

  8. PGSB/MIPS Plant Genome Information Resources and Concepts for the Analysis of Complex Grass Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spannagl, Manuel; Bader, Kai; Pfeifer, Matthias; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology; formerly MIPS-Munich Institute for Protein Sequences) has been involved in developing, implementing and maintaining plant genome databases for more than a decade. Genome databases and analysis resources have focused on individual genomes and aim to provide flexible and maintainable datasets for model plant genomes as a backbone against which experimental data, e.g., from high-throughput functional genomics, can be organized and analyzed. In addition, genomes from both model and crop plants form a scaffold for comparative genomics, assisted by specialized tools such as the CrowsNest viewer to explore conserved gene order (synteny) between related species on macro- and micro-levels.The genomes of many economically important Triticeae plants such as wheat, barley, and rye present a great challenge for sequence assembly and bioinformatic analysis due to their enormous complexity and large genome size. Novel concepts and strategies have been developed to deal with these difficulties and have been applied to the genomes of wheat, barley, rye, and other cereals. This includes the GenomeZipper concept, reference-guided exome assembly, and "chromosome genomics" based on flow cytometry sorted chromosomes.

  9. Joint energy program makes progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ "Clean Energies Facing the Future," a cooperative research program jointly organized by CAS and the BP Group, has made encouraging progress, say experts at an annual sum-up workshop held on 31 July and I August at Tsinghua University in Beijing. The CAS Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics(DICP) has been entrusted as coordinator of the cooperative program between the two sides.

  10. New progress in Organic FET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Co-funded by NSFC,MOST and CAS,researchers from the Key laboratory of Organic Solids,Institute of Chemistry,CAS,made new progress in organic field-effect transistors (FET).The results of the study were published recently in the journal of Advanced Materials (2008,20,1286-1290).

  11. [Ethical issues in genome-era].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Shinji

    2016-06-01

    Handling of personal genome information is one of the most important current ethical issues in the era of next generation sequencer which is technically progressing at a furious speed, making it 100,000 times faster in only in five years. The author picked up topics of(1) research and clinical guidelines of handling of human genome information, (2) incidental and secondary findings of next generation sequencer in clinical exome and genome sequencing, and (3) so-called direct-to-consumer genetic testing services. In the topic(2), ACMG (American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics) recommendations inreporting incidental findings proposed in 2013 and 2014 are focused.

  12. Institutional Logics in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lounsbury, Michael; Boxenbaum, Eva

    2013-01-01

    This double volume presents state-of-the-art research and thinking on the dynamics of actors and institutional logics. In the introduction, we briefly sketch the roots and branches of institutional logics scholarship before turning to the new buds of research on the topic of how actors engage ins...... prolific stream of research on institutional logics by deepening our insight into the active use of institutional logics in organizational action and interaction, including the institutional effects of such (inter)actions....

  13. Entrepreneurship as institutional change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Toke; Lauring, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    between and exploit the multiple, potentially contradictory institutional logics of the different spheres in which they operate. While much research has elucidated how institutional entrepreneurs effect change, this study illustrates how effective entrepreneurs managing and exploiting institutional...... contradictions engage simultaneously in practices of maintaining and changing institutions to establish a balance between the poles on which their ventures depend. We illustrate this by two cases of small-scale entrepreneurship bridging institutional contradictions from an ethnographic study conducted under...

  14. Genome databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courteau, J.

    1991-10-11

    Since the Genome Project began several years ago, a plethora of databases have been developed or are in the works. They range from the massive Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University, the central repository of all gene mapping information, to small databases focusing on single chromosomes or organisms. Some are publicly available, others are essentially private electronic lab notebooks. Still others limit access to a consortium of researchers working on, say, a single human chromosome. An increasing number incorporate sophisticated search and analytical software, while others operate as little more than data lists. In consultation with numerous experts in the field, a list has been compiled of some key genome-related databases. The list was not limited to map and sequence databases but also included the tools investigators use to interpret and elucidate genetic data, such as protein sequence and protein structure databases. Because a major goal of the Genome Project is to map and sequence the genomes of several experimental animals, including E. coli, yeast, fruit fly, nematode, and mouse, the available databases for those organisms are listed as well. The author also includes several databases that are still under development - including some ambitious efforts that go beyond data compilation to create what are being called electronic research communities, enabling many users, rather than just one or a few curators, to add or edit the data and tag it as raw or confirmed.

  15. Genome Improvement at JGI-HAGSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy J.; Myers, Richard M.

    2012-03-03

    Since the completion of the sequencing of the human genome, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has rapidly expanded its scientific goals in several DOE mission-relevant areas. At the JGI-HAGSC, we have kept pace with this rapid expansion of projects with our focus on assessing, assembling, improving and finishing eukaryotic whole genome shotgun (WGS) projects for which the shotgun sequence is generated at the Production Genomic Facility (JGI-PGF). We follow this by combining the draft WGS with genomic resources generated at JGI-HAGSC or in collaborator laboratories (including BAC end sequences, genetic maps and FLcDNA sequences) to produce an improved draft sequence. For eukaryotic genomes important to the DOE mission, we then add further information from directed experiments to produce reference genomic sequences that are publicly available for any scientific researcher. Also, we have continued our program for producing BAC-based finished sequence, both for adding information to JGI genome projects and for small BAC-based sequencing projects proposed through any of the JGI sequencing programs. We have now built our computational expertise in WGS assembly and analysis and have moved eukaryotic genome assembly from the JGI-PGF to JGI-HAGSC. We have concentrated our assembly development work on large plant genomes and complex fungal and algal genomes.

  16. Fungal Genomics for Energy and Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-11

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). One of its projects, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts) by means of genome sequencing and analysis. New chapters of the Encyclopedia can be opened with user proposals to the JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP). Another JGI project, the 1000 fungal genomes, explores fungal diversity on genome level at scale and is open for users to nominate new species for sequencing. Over 200 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  17. Marine genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Ribeiro, Ângela Maria; Foote, Andrew D.; Kupczok, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Marine ecosystems occupy 71% of the surface of our planet, yet we know little about their diversity. Although the inventory of species is continually increasing, as registered by the Census of Marine Life program, only about 10% of the estimated two million marine species are known. This lag......-throughput sequencing approaches have been helping to improve our knowledge of marine biodiversity, from the rich microbial biota that forms the base of the tree of life to a wealth of plant and animal species. In this review, we present an overview of the applications of genomics to the study of marine life, from...... evolutionary biology of non-model organisms to species of commercial relevance for fishing, aquaculture and biomedicine. Instead of providing an exhaustive list of available genomic data, we rather set to present contextualized examples that best represent the current status of the field of marine genomics....

  18. Cephalopod genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Bonnaud, Laure; Brown, C. Titus

    2012-01-01

    The Cephalopod Sequencing Consortium (CephSeq Consortium) was established at a NESCent Catalysis Group Meeting, ``Paths to Cephalopod Genomics-Strategies, Choices, Organization,'' held in Durham, North Carolina, USA on May 24-27, 2012. Twenty-eight participants representing nine countries (Austria......, Australia, China, Denmark, France, Italy, Japan, Spain and the USA) met to address the pressing need for genome sequencing of cephalopod mollusks. This group, drawn from cephalopod biologists, neuroscientists, developmental and evolutionary biologists, materials scientists, bioinformaticians and researchers...... active in sequencing, assembling and annotating genomes, agreed on a set of cephalopod species of particular importance for initial sequencing and developed strategies and an organization (CephSeq Consortium) to promote this sequencing. The conclusions and recommendations of this meeting are described...

  19. Mapping the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, Charles R.

    1989-06-01

    The following pages aim to lay a foundation for understanding the excitement surrounding the ''human genome project,'' as well as to convey a flavor of the ongoing efforts and plans at the Human Genome Center at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Our own work, of course, is only part of a broad international effort that will dramatically enhance our understanding of human molecular genetics before the end of this century. In this country, the bulk of the effort will be carried out under the auspices of the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health, but significant contributions have already been made both by nonprofit private foundations and by private corporation. The respective roles of the DOE and the NIH are being coordinated by an inter-agency committee, the aims of which are to emphasize the strengths of each agency, to facilitate cooperation, and to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort. The NIH, for example, will continue its crucial work in medical genetics and in mapping the genomes of nonhuman species. The DOE, on the other hand, has unique experience in managing large projects, and its national laboratories are repositories of expertise in physics, engineering, and computer science, as well as the life sciences. The tools and techniques the project will ultimately rely on are thus likely to be developed in multidisciplinary efforts at laboratories like LBL. Accordingly, we at LBL take great pride in this enterprise -- an enterprise that will eventually transform our understanding of ourselves.

  20. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based on transcr......The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...

  1. Path of Chinese institutional modernization

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Ganeswar

    2009-01-01

    We see the progress today that China has developed a treasure of modernity in terms of its World figure both in economic development and its strong military power with countless path of ups and downs in the past. We are more concerned with the historical study of its institutional modernization than a mere philosophical debate over its development and can discuss its various levels of struggle for ‘Substitute Modernity’2 since mid-19th century(the two opium wars) to till date.

  2. Genomic profiling of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anjita; Singh, Alok Kumar; Maurya, Sanjeev Kumar; Rai, Rajani; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2009-05-01

    Genome study provides significant changes in the advancement of molecular diagnosis and treatment in Breast cancer. Several recent critical advances and high-throughput techniques identified the genomic trouble and dramatically accelerated the pace of research in preventing and curing this malignancy. Tumor-suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes, DNA-repair genes, carcinogen-metabolism genes are critically involved in progression of breast cancer. We reviewed imperative finding in breast genetics, ongoing work to segregate further susceptible genes, and preliminary studies on molecular profiling.

  3. Engineering Relative Compression of Genomes

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowski, Szymon

    2011-01-01

    Technology progress in DNA sequencing boosts the genomic database growth at faster and faster rate. Compression, accompanied with random access capabilities, is the key to maintain those huge amounts of data. In this paper we present an LZ77-style compression scheme for relative compression of multiple genomes of the same species. While the solution bears similarity to known algorithms, it offers significantly higher compression ratios at compression speed over a order of magnitude greater. One of the new successful ideas is augmenting the reference sequence with phrases from the other sequences, making more LZ-matches available.

  4. Ancient genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten Erik; Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen;

    2015-01-01

    , archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when...

  5. Cephalopod genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Bonnaud, Laure; Brown, C. Titus

    2012-01-01

    The Cephalopod Sequencing Consortium (CephSeq Consortium) was established at a NESCent Catalysis Group Meeting, ``Paths to Cephalopod Genomics-Strategies, Choices, Organization,'' held in Durham, North Carolina, USA on May 24-27, 2012. Twenty-eight participants representing nine countries (Austri...

  6. Ancient genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten Erik; Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen

    2015-01-01

    by increasing the number of sequence reads to billions effectively means that contamination issues that have haunted aDNA research for decades, particularly in human studies, can now be efficiently and confidently quantified. At present, whole genomes have been sequenced from ancient anatomically modern humans...

  7. The genomic CDS sandbox: An assessment among domain experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Ayesha; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Eilbeck, Karen; Williams, Marc S; Freimuth, Robert R; Hoffman, Mark A; Rasmussen, Luke V; Overby, Casey L; Shirts, Brian H; Hoffman, James M; Welch, Brandon M

    2016-04-01

    Genomics is a promising tool that is becoming more widely available to improve the care and treatment of individuals. While there is much assertion, genomics will most certainly require the use of clinical decision support (CDS) to be fully realized in the routine clinical setting. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) of the National Institutes of Health recently convened an in-person, multi-day meeting on this topic. It was widely recognized that there is a need to promote the innovation and development of resources for genomic CDS such as a CDS sandbox. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a proposed approach for such a genomic CDS sandbox among domain experts and potential users. Survey results indicate a significant interest and desire for a genomic CDS sandbox environment among domain experts. These results will be used to guide the development of a genomic CDS sandbox.

  8. Prospects for the Chinese Human Genome Project (HGP)at the beginning of next century

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chinese Human Genome Project (CHGP) as part of the international human genome research has achieved significant progress and created a solid foundation for further development. While participating in the human genome sequencing and gene discovery, the emphasis of CHGP in the next century will be laid on functional genomics. The strategy, resources and some policy issues will be addressed.

  9. Patient privacy in the genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisaro, Jean Louis; Ayday, Erman; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2014-05-07

    According to many scientists and clinicians, genomics is taking on a key role in the field of medicine. Impressive advances in genome sequencing have opened the way to a variety of revolutionary applications in modern healthcare. In particular, the increasing understanding of the human genome, and of its relation to diseases and response to treatments brings promise of improvements in better preventive and personalized medicine. However, this progress raises important privacy and ethical concerns that need to be addressed. Indeed, each genome is the ultimate identifier of its owner and, due to its nature, it contains highly personal and privacy-sensitive data. In this article, after summarizing recent advances in genomics, we discuss some important privacy issues associated with human genomic information and methods put in place to address them.

  10. Ethnobotany genomics research: Status and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franky Varah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is an attempt to analyze the world publication of ethnobotany genomics by using "DNA barcoding" and "DNA barcoding plants" as keywords. Some of the parameters used for the analysis include the publication output, countries′ performance, the institutions involved, subject areas, authors, and journals distribution. The Scopus International Database is used for this purpose. An evaluating indicator, citations and h-index are applied to characterize the ethnobotany genomic publication output. It is interesting to note that over the past decade, there has been a notable growth in publication output. Moreover, there has been a significant increase in the participation from a number of countries as well as institutions, subject categories, journals, authors, and collaborations. The increasing significance of ethnobotany genomics was analyzed by ranking countries, institutions, subject categories, journals, authors and collaborations in terms the total number of publication, their citations and h-index.

  11. FPG Child Development Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development, Teaching, and Learning The Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute will partner with Zero to Three to ... 25 September 21, 2017 More Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute The University of North Carolina at Chapel ...

  12. 基因组改组技术及其在微生物育种中的应用研究进展%Genome Shuffling and Recent Progress of Its Applications in Microbial Strain Improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芦志龙; 吴冰; 袁尔东; 蔡俊鹏

    2008-01-01

    Genome shuffling(基因组改组)技术是借助递归式原生质体融合策略对微生物基因组进行遗传改良的一种新兴微生物育种方法.自2002年首次被用来培育tylosin高产菌株以来,目前已为育种工作者广泛采用.对Genome shuffling技术的原理及最近的应用研究进展进行了综述,探讨了其局限性,并展望了其发展的趋势.

  13. Progress in breast cancer: overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-12-01

    This edition of CCR Focus titled Research in Breast Cancer: Frontiers in Genomics, Biology, and Clinical Investigation reviews six topics that cover areas of translational research of high impact in breast cancer. These topics represent areas of breast cancer research where significant progress has occurred but also where very important challenges remain. The papers in this CCR Focus section are contributed by experts in the respective areas of investigation. Herein, key aspects of these contributions and the research directions they propose are reviewed.

  14. Research Progress of Trangsgenic Mice in Post-genomic Era in Life Science%后基因组时代转基因小鼠在生命科学中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马微; 赵伟; 李丹; 汪坤福

    2011-01-01

    Following arrival of the post-genomics era,transgenic animals have become the most effective novel experimental model, and the application field of Transgenic mice ( Tg mice ) is becoming more and more extensive. The study of the functional genomics using Tg mice is called post-genomics as well. The in vivo study of genome and it's regulatory role has overcome the limitations and one-sidedness in the field. The technical platform for preparation of genetically engineered mice has been formed scaled up and commercialized both at home and abroad. The article here is an overview of the application, development and the status and trend of Tg mice at home and oversea.%随着后基因组时代的到来,转基因动物已成为新兴的最有效的动物实验模型,转基因小鼠应用领域越来越广泛.利用转基因小鼠,从生物整体上研究基因组的功能学,又称为后基因组学.活体研究各基因及调控作用,克服了原来此领域研究的局限性和片面性.国内外基因工程小鼠的制备已经形成了技术平台,发展规模化、商业化.现就转基因小鼠的发展、应用及转基因小鼠国内外现状和发展趋势予以综述.

  15. Proteomics Data on UCSC Genome Browser - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium scientists are working together with the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genomics Institute to provide public access to cancer proteomics data.

  16. Canadian institute honours Hawking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Matin

    2009-11-01

    The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, has announced that a major new extension to its campus will be known as the Stephen Hawking Centre. The extension, which is currently being built, is due to open in 2011 and will double the size of the institute. It will also provide a home for the institute's Masters students, the first of whom joined the Perimeter Institute this autumn as part of its Perimeter Scholars international programme.

  17. Furthering critical institutionalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleaver, Frances; Koning, De Jessica

    2015-01-01

    This special issue furthers the study of natural resource management from a critical institutional perspective. Critical institutionalism (CI) is a contemporary body of thought that explores how institutions dynamically mediate relationships between people, natural resources and society. It focus

  18. Multinationals and Institutional Competitiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hull Kristensen, Peer; Morgan, Glenn

    This article discusses how institutional competitiveness and multinationals are mutually enriching concepts. Seen from the perspective of Multinationals, institutional competitiveness becomes expressed at two levels. At the level of corporate HQs institutional competitiveness proves itself...... competitiveness of Liberal Market Economies and Coordinated Markets Economies under the current competitive regime....

  19. Current development and application of soybean genomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingli HE; Jing ZHAO; Man ZHAO; Chaoying HE

    2011-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max),an important domesticated species originated in China,constitutes a major source of edible oils and high-quality plant proteins worldwide.In spite of its complex genome as a consequence of an ancient tetraploidilization,platforms for map-based genomics,sequence-based genomics,comparative genomics and functional genomics have been well developed in the last decade,thus rich repertoires of genomic tools and resources are available,which have been influencing the soybean genetic improvement.Here we mainly review the progresses of soybean (including its wild relative Glycine soja) genomics and its impetus for soybean breeding,and raise the major biological questions needing to be addressed.Genetic maps,physical maps,QTL and EST mapping have been so well achieved that the marker assisted selection and positional cloning in soybean is feasible and even routine.Whole genome sequencing and transcriptomic analyses provide a large collection of molecular markers and predicted genes,which are instrumental to comparative genomics and functional genomics.Comparative genomics has started to reveal the evolution of soybean genome and the molecular basis of soybean domestication process.Microarrays resources,mutagenesis and efficient transformation systems become essential components of soybean functional genomics.Furthermore,phenotypic functional genomics via both forward and reverse genetic approaches has inferred functions of many genes involved in plant and seed development,in response to abiotic stresses,functioning in plant-pathogenic microbe interactions,and controlling the oil and protein content of seed.These achievements have paved the way for generation of transgenic or genetically modified (GM) soybean crops.

  20. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaeuenstein, P.; Gschwend, B. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs.

  1. Teacher Enhancement Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Bradley, Tina

    1994-01-01

    During the 1980's, a period of intense concern over educational quality in the United States, few indicators of U.S. student achievement garnered the interest of policy makers and pundits as successfully as the results of international testing in mathematics and science. This concern was so great that as a part of the Goals 2000 initiative, President George Bush indicated that 'By the year 2000, U.S. students should be first in the world in mathematics and science.' The Clinton Administration is placing a major emphasis, not only on rigorous academic standards and creating a new system for assessing students' progress, but also including professional development as a major focus. The argument being that teachers need more sustained, intensive training to prepare them to teach to higher standards. Executive order 12821 mandates that national laboratories 'assist in the mathematics and science education of our Nation's students, teachers, parents and the public by establishing programs at their agency to provide for training elementary and secondary school teachers to improve their knowledge of mathematics and science'. These and other issues led to the development of ideas for a project that addresses the need for excellence in mathematics, science and technology instruction. In response to these initiatives the NASA/LaRC Teacher Enhancement Institute was proposed. The TEI incorporated systemic reform perspectives, enhanced content knowledge for teachers, and teacher preparation. Emphasis was also placed on recruiting those educators who teach in impoverished urban school districts with at-risk student populations who have been traditionally under represented in science, mathematics, technology and engineering. Participants in the Teacher Enhancement Institute were 37 teachers from grades K-8, teaching in Region 2 in the state of Virginia, as well as 2 preservice teachers from Norfolk State University and one teacher from Dublin, Virginia, where a Science

  2. The Oxytricha trifallax macronuclear genome: a complex eukaryotic genome with 16,000 tiny chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estienne C Swart

    Full Text Available The macronuclear genome of the ciliate Oxytricha trifallax displays an extreme and unique eukaryotic genome architecture with extensive genomic variation. During sexual genome development, the expressed, somatic macronuclear genome is whittled down to the genic portion of a small fraction (∼5% of its precursor "silent" germline micronuclear genome by a process of "unscrambling" and fragmentation. The tiny macronuclear "nanochromosomes" typically encode single, protein-coding genes (a small portion, 10%, encode 2-8 genes, have minimal noncoding regions, and are differentially amplified to an average of ∼2,000 copies. We report the high-quality genome assembly of ∼16,000 complete nanochromosomes (∼50 Mb haploid genome size that vary from 469 bp to 66 kb long (mean ∼3.2 kb and encode ∼18,500 genes. Alternative DNA fragmentation processes ∼10% of the nanochromosomes into multiple isoforms that usually encode complete genes. Nucleotide diversity in the macronucleus is very high (SNP heterozygosity is ∼4.0%, suggesting that Oxytricha trifallax may have one of the largest known effective population sizes of eukaryotes. Comparison to other ciliates with nonscrambled genomes and long macronuclear chromosomes (on the order of 100 kb suggests several candidate proteins that could be involved in genome rearrangement, including domesticated MULE and IS1595-like DDE transposases. The assembly of the highly fragmented Oxytricha macronuclear genome is the first completed genome with such an unusual architecture. This genome sequence provides tantalizing glimpses into novel molecular biology and evolution. For example, Oxytricha maintains tens of millions of telomeres per cell and has also evolved an intriguing expansion of telomere end-binding proteins. In conjunction with the micronuclear genome in progress, the O. trifallax macronuclear genome will provide an invaluable resource for investigating programmed genome rearrangements, complementing

  3. Ancient genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten E; Ávila-Arcos, María C; Barnett, Ross; Campos, Paula F; Cappellini, Enrico; Ermini, Luca; Fernández, Ruth; da Fonseca, Rute; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Hansen, Anders J; Jónsson, Hákon; Korneliussen, Thorfinn; Margaryan, Ashot; Martin, Michael D; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Raghavan, Maanasa; Rasmussen, Morten; Velasco, Marcela Sandoval; Schroeder, Hannes; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Wales, Nathan; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-01-19

    The past decade has witnessed a revolution in ancient DNA (aDNA) research. Although the field's focus was previously limited to mitochondrial DNA and a few nuclear markers, whole genome sequences from the deep past can now be retrieved. This breakthrough is tightly connected to the massive sequence throughput of next generation sequencing platforms and the ability to target short and degraded DNA molecules. Many ancient specimens previously unsuitable for DNA analyses because of extensive degradation can now successfully be used as source materials. Additionally, the analytical power obtained by increasing the number of sequence reads to billions effectively means that contamination issues that have haunted aDNA research for decades, particularly in human studies, can now be efficiently and confidently quantified. At present, whole genomes have been sequenced from ancient anatomically modern humans, archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when testing specific hypotheses related to the past.

  4. Furthering critical institutionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Dalton Cleaver

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This special issue furthers the study of natural resource management from a critical institutional perspective. Critical institutionalism (CI is a contemporary body of thought that explores how institutions dynamically mediate relationships between people, natural resources and society. It focuses on the complexity of institutions entwined in everyday social life, their historical formation, the interplay between formal and informal, traditional and modern arrangements, and the power relations that animate them. In such perspectives a social justice lens is often used to scrutinise the outcomes of institutional processes. We argue here that critical institutional approaches have potentially much to offer commons scholarship, particularly through the explanatory power of the concept of bricolage for better understanding institutional change.  Critical institutional approaches, gathering momentum over the past 15 years or so, have excited considerable interest but the insights generated from different disciplinary perspectives remain insufficiently synthesised. Analyses emphasising complexity can be relatively illegible to policy-makers, a fact which lessens their reach. This special issue therefore aims to synthesise critical institutional ideas and so to lay the foundation for moving beyond the emergent stage to make meaningful academic and policy impact. In bringing together papers here we define and synthesise key themes of critical institutionalism, outline the concept of institutional bricolage and identity some key challenges facing this school of thought.

  5. Project Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William F. Morgan, Ph.D., D.Sc.

    2006-09-11

    The proposed study investigates the effect of low dose and low dose rate radiation exposure (X-rays) on induced genomic instability and the adaptive response, including the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena. The proposed studies will utilize human cell lines containing a stably integrated plasmid that can be caused by certain kinds of mutational insults to recombine to express the green fluorescent proteins, GFP. The study will use this cell line with the fluorescent plasmid recombination reporter system in a direct study of the effects of 1, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 100 and 500 rads acute X-irradiation and the same doses delivered by protraction at 1 rad or 0.01 rad per minute. This system will be used to provide a quantitative measure of the kinetics of genomic instability in colonies of cells exposed to low dose/dose rate, as well as to examine the adaptive response. The study will also apply micro array technology to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying induced instability and adaptive effects.

  6. [Genomic medicine and infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellay, Jacques

    2014-05-07

    Relentless progress in our knowledge of the nature and functional consequences of human genetic variation allows for a better understanding of the protracted battle between pathogens and their human hosts. Multiple polymorphisms have been identified that impact our response to infections or to anti-infective drugs, and some of them are already used in the clinic. However, to make personalized medicine a reality in infectious diseases, a sustained effort is needed not only in research but also in genomic education.

  7. Visualization for genomics: the Microbial Genome Viewer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoven, R.; Enckevort, F.H.J. van; Boekhorst, J.; Molenaar, D.; Siezen, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    SUMMARY: A Web-based visualization tool, the Microbial Genome Viewer, is presented that allows the user to combine complex genomic data in a highly interactive way. This Web tool enables the interactive generation of chromosome wheels and linear genome maps from genome annotation data stored in a My

  8. Progress in prokaryotic transcriptomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiatrault, Melanie J

    2011-10-01

    Genome-wide expression studies transformed the field of transcriptomics and made it feasible to study global gene expression in extraordinary detail. These new methods have revealed an enhanced view of the transcriptional landscape and have yielded many biological insights. It is increasingly clear that the prokaryotic transcriptome is much more complex than once thought. Recent advances in microbial transcriptome analyses are highlighted in this review. Areas of progress include the development of optimized techniques that minimize the abundance of ribosomal RNAs in RNA samples as well as the development of novel methods to create transcriptome libraries. Advances such as these have led to a new emphasis in areas such as metatranscriptomics and single cell gene expression studies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The function genomics study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Genomics is a biology term appeared ten years ago, used to describe the researches of genomic mapping, sequencing, and structure analysis, etc. Genomics, the first journal for publishing papers on genomics research was born in 1986. In the past decade, the concept of genomics has been widely accepted by scientists who are engaging in biology research. Meanwhile, the research scope of genomics has been extended continuously, from simple gene mapping and sequencing to function genomics study. To reflect the change, genomics is divided into two parts now, the structure genomics and the function genomics.

  10. [Genomic approach to pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Ryo

    2012-11-01

    Genetic studies identified multiple genes and polymorphisms that increase risk to develop rheumatoid arthritis. Genomic approach is characterized with its integrative style using mathematical and statistical models. Its main targets include (1)combinatorial effect of multiple genetic and environmental factors, (2)heterogeneity of pathological states and its individuality, and (3)their chronological heterogeneity. Genomic approach will clarify pathophysiology of various diseases along with the progresses in molecular biology and other researches on individual molecules.

  11. From Institutional Change to Experimentalist Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hull Kristensen, Peer; Morgan, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Institutionalist theory has shown how work and employment relations are shaped by national contexts. Recent developments in these theories have been increasingly concerned with the issue of institutional change. This reflects a shift in the nature of the competitive environment of firms from...... lead firms to constant experimentation in work organization as they seek to position themselves within systems of production and innovation that are global in nature. This creates a pressure for institutional change to facilitate the process of firm-level experimentation; it also tends to create...... a pressure for new experimental forms of institutions that are themselves searching for ways to improve their relevance. This change calls for extending the study of industrial relations and employment systems in the current era to investigate how new dynamic complementarities among employees, managers...

  12. 基因组编辑技术TALENs研究进展及应用%Research progress and application of genome editing technique:transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔敬; 杜轩; 白雪源

    2014-01-01

    基因组编辑技术转录激活因子样效应物核酸酶(TALENs)成为多个不同生物体和细胞中基因修饰研究的重要工具。转录激活因子样效应物(TALEs)通过诱导DNA双链断裂激活在特定位点的易出错的非同源末端连接(NHEJ)或同源引导的修复(HDR),从而增加了基因修饰的效率。本文主要是总结TALENs的发展及今后的应用。%The genome editing technique,transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), has become an important tool for research on gene modification in many different organisms and cell types. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs ) can increase the efficiency of genetic modifications by induction of DNA double-strand breaks which in turn activate the error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ)or homology-directed repair (HDR)at specific genomic locations.Here,we have reviewed the development of TALENs and provided some perspectives on the future application of this technology.

  13. Progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhiraman, A.; Collard, D.; Cardelino, B.; Bhatia, S.; Desai, P.; Harruna, I.; Khan, I.; Mariam, Y.; Mensah, T.; Mitchell, M.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA funding allowed Clark Atlanta University (CAU) to establish a High Performance Polymers And Ceramics (HiPPAC) Research Center. The HiPPAC Center is consolidating and expanding the existing polymer and ceramic research capabilities at CAU through the development of interdepartmental and interinstitutional research in: (1) polymer synthesis; (2) polymer characterization and properties; (3) polymer processing; (4) polymer-based ceramic synthesis; and (5) ceramic characterization and properties. This Center has developed strong interactions between scientists and materials scientists of CAU and their counterparts from sister institutions in the Atlanta University Center (AUC) and the Georgia Institute of Technology. As a component of the center, we have started to develop strong collaborations with scientists from other universities and the HBCU's, national and federal agency laboratories, and the private sector during this first year. During this first year we have refined the focus of the research in the HiPPAC Center to three areas with seven working groups that will start programmatic activities on January 1, 1993, as follows: (1) nonlinear optical properties of chitosan derivatives; (2) polymeric electronic materials; (3) nondestructive characterization and prediction of polyimide performance; (4) solution processing of high-performance materials; (5) processable polyimides for composite applications; (6) sol-gel based ceramic materials processing; and (7) synthetic based processing of pre-ceramic polymers.

  14. Institutional capacity and climate actions. Summary paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems, S. [Global and Structural Policies Division, OECD Environment Directorate, Paris (France)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the role of institutional capacity in selecting the most appropriate climate actions. More specifically, it investigates why, for some countries, institutional capacity may need to be considered as an important criterion for selecting future climate actions, alongside environmental, economic and/or political considerations. This paper is a synthesis of results of an OECD/IEA project undertaken in 2003 for the Annex I Expert Group, which led to several publications, namely a framework paper on Institutional Capacity and Climate Actions, three national cases studies, respectively on Mexico, India and Bulgaria, as well as a paper assessing the status of national inventory preparation in Annex I and non-Annex I Parties (OECD/IEA, 2003). The paper argues that the very nature of a country's institutional development suggests a progressive approach to climate actions, which takes into account the specificity of a country's existing institutional setting. More specifically, substantial changes in a country's existing institutions are likely to be required when particular levels or types of institutional capacities need to be developed, for example when these changes affect public governance as a whole. Finally, particular forms of actions may require significant changes in a country's institutional setting. For example, legally-binding quantified national targets tend to require significant institutional development in all functions of climate policy. With other approaches, such as those based on non-binding targets, sectoral targets or policies and measures, institutional development may be more progressive and targeted. Thus, when considering particular forms of climate actions, countries might benefit from investigating what kind of institutions are likely to be needed and whether they will be able to develop sufficient capacity in time to implement these actions. Overall, this analysis suggests a step

  15. Institutions as Knowledge Capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Garzarelli, Giampaolo

    The paper revisits the socioeconomic theory of the Austrian School economist Ludwig M. Lachmann. By showing that the common claim that Lachmann's idiosyncratic (read: eclectic and multidisciplinary) approach to economics entails nihilism is unfounded, it reaches the following conclusions. (1...... theory without simultaneously denying the policy approach of comparative institutional analysis. (90 words.)KeywordsComparative institutional analysis, coordination, expectations, institutionalevolution, interpretative institutionalism.JEL CodesB31, B52, B53, D80....

  16. Modeling Inefficient Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Why do inefficient %uF818 non-growth enhancing %uF818 institutions emerge and persist? This paper develops a simple framework to provide some answers to this question. Political institutions determine the allocation of political power, and economic institutions determine the framework for policy-making and place constraints on various policies. Groups with political power, the elite, choose policies to increase their income and to directly or indirectly transfer resources from the rest of soc...

  17. Institutional pressures and HRM: developing institutional fit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, C.; Paauwe, J.; Boselie, J.P.P.E.F.; den Hartog, D.N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – Research in strategic human resource management (HRM) has focused mainly on the effects of HRM practices or systems on organizational effectiveness. However, institutional theory argues that besides being financially successful, organizations also need legitimacy to survive. Owing to the t

  18. [Ethical issues in personal genome research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kazuto; Minari, Jusaku

    2013-03-01

    The rapid expansion of techniques for studying human genomics has remarkably changed research and practice. It is expected that more progress will be made in the field of medical and biological research owing to the technological advances. Genomics researchers collect human genetic material, including DNA and cells, from a large number of individuals and carry out "personal genome analysis"; as a result, new types of ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) have arisen, including issues such as informed consent procedures, data sharing, protection of genetic information, and return of research results. To address these issues, many large research projects have established specialist groups that are devoted to manage ELSI of their research. The guidelines for genomics research set by the government are also expected to be revised accordingly. In this paper, we present an overview of ELSI of personal genome research and discuss necessary measures to tackle these issues.

  19. Genomics in Neurological Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangchun Han; Jiya Sun; Jiajia Wang; Zhouxian Bai; Fuhai Song; Hongxing Lei

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders comprise a variety of complex diseases in the central nervous system, which can be roughly classified as neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. The basic and translational research of neurological disorders has been hindered by the difficulty in accessing the pathological center (i.e., the brain) in live patients. The rapid advancement of sequencing and array technologies has made it possible to investigate the disease mechanism and biomarkers from a systems perspective. In this review, recent progresses in the discovery of novel risk genes, treatment targets and peripheral biomarkers employing genomic technologies will be dis-cussed. Our major focus will be on two of the most heavily investigated neurological disorders, namely Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorder.

  20. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project

    OpenAIRE

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D.; Debra J. H. Mathews

    2015-01-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) Project is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with...

  1. Meeting Report from the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Workshop 9

    OpenAIRE

    Davidsen, Tanja; Madupu, Ramana; Sterk, Peter; Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gilbert, Jack; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Kolker, Eugene; Kottmann, Renzo; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Morrison, Norman; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 9th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), held at the J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD, USA. It was the first GSC workshop to have open registration and attracted over 90 participants. This workshop featured sessions that provided overviews of the full range of ongoing GSC projects. It included sessions on Standards in Genomic Sciences, the open access journal of the GSC, building standards for genome annotation, the M5 platf...

  2. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative.

  3. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative. 34 refs.

  4. Research progress of genome editing and derivative technologies in plants%植物基因组编辑及衍生技术最新研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单奇伟; 高彩霞

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing technologies using engineered nucleases have been widely used in many model or-ganisms. Genome editing with sequence-specific nuclease (SSN) creates DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the genomic target sites that are primarily repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombi-nation (HR) pathways, which can be employed to achieve targeted genome modifications such as gene mutations, insertions, replacements or chromosome rearrangements. There are three major SSNs—zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic re-peats/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system. In contrast to ZFN and TALEN, which require substantial protein engineering to each DNA target, the CRISPR/Cas9 system requires only a change in the guide RNA. For this reason, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple, inexpensive and versatile tool for genome engineering. Furthermore, a modified version of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been developed to recruit heterologous domains that can regulate endogenous gene expression, such as activation, depression and epigenetic regulation. In this review, we summarize the develop-ment and applications of genome editing technologies for basic research and biotechnology, as well as highlight chal-lenges and future directions, with particular emphasis on plants.%基因组编辑技术已经在多个模式植物、动物以及其他生物中得到成功应用。基因组编辑是利用序列特异核酸酶(Sequence-specific nucleases, SSNs)在基因组特定位点产生DNA双链断裂(Double-strand breaks, DSBs),从而激活细胞自身修复机制——非同源末端连接(Non-homologous end joining, NHEJ)或同源重组(Homologous recombination, HR),实现基因敲除、染色体重组以及基因定点插入或替换等。锌指核酸酶(Zinc finger nuclease, ZFN)、TALEN(Transcription activator-like effector nuclease)和CRISPR/Cas9(Clustered

  5. Research in progress: the institution as e-textbook publisher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Ward

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The advent of e-book and open access publishing has not yet been as potent as some would hope (and others fear in its disruption of commercial textbook publishing. However, universities are under increasing pressure to provide students with all the resources they need for their courses, without further cost to the student. Jisc is funding four teams to produce eight e-textbooks to test the processes, expertise required and outcomes when universities take on the job of publishing course texts themselves. With five books now published, and two years since the start of the project, some of the differences in the strategies adopted by the teams are starting to emerge. Teams have reflected on what they have learned and might change if they published more titles, and offer some advice for others considering similar projects.

  6. Research in progress: the institution as e-textbook publisher

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vivien Ward

    2016-01-01

    ...) in its disruption of commercial textbook publishing. However, universities are under increasing pressure to provide students with all the resources they need for their courses, without further cost to the student...

  7. Notes on One Model for Inter-Institutional Collaboration in Institutional Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kenneth M.

    This paper briefly describes one model for interinstitutional cooperation in a continuing program of institutional research activities involving planned patterns of data collection and analysis (surveys, tests, follow-up data on student progress, etc.). Some of the advantages of continuing collaboration by several colleges with a central resource…

  8. Genomics of human longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagboom, P E; Beekman, M; Passtoors, W M; Deelen, J; Vaarhorst, A A M; Boer, J M; van den Akker, E B; van Heemst, D; de Craen, A J M; Maier, A B; Rozing, M; Mooijaart, S P; Heijmans, B T; Westendorp, R G J

    2011-01-12

    In animal models, single-gene mutations in genes involved in insulin/IGF and target of rapamycin signalling pathways extend lifespan to a considerable extent. The genetic, genomic and epigenetic influences on human longevity are expected to be much more complex. Strikingly however, beneficial metabolic and cellular features of long-lived families resemble those in animals for whom the lifespan is extended by applying genetic manipulation and, especially, dietary restriction. Candidate gene studies in humans support the notion that human orthologues from longevity genes identified in lower species do contribute to longevity but that the influence of the genetic variants involved is small. Here we discuss how an integration of novel study designs, labour-intensive biobanking, deep phenotyping and genomic research may provide insights into the mechanisms that drive human longevity and healthy ageing, beyond the associations usually provided by molecular and genetic epidemiology. Although prospective studies of humans from the cradle to the grave have never been performed, it is feasible to extract life histories from different cohorts jointly covering the molecular changes that occur with age from early development all the way up to the age at death. By the integration of research in different study cohorts, and with research in animal models, biological research into human longevity is thus making considerable progress.

  9. Genomics of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoi, Katerina; Cross, Nicholas C P

    2017-03-20

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a group of related clonal hematologic disorders characterized by excess accumulation of one or more myeloid cell lineages and a tendency to transform to acute myeloid leukemia. Deregulated JAK2 signaling has emerged as the central phenotypic driver of BCR -ABL1-negative MPNs and a unifying therapeutic target. In addition, MPNs show unexpected layers of genetic complexity, with multiple abnormalities associated with disease progression, interactions between inherited factors and phenotype driver mutations, and effects related to the order in which mutations are acquired. Although morphology and clinical laboratory analysis continue to play an important role in defining these conditions, genomic analysis is providing a platform for better disease definition, more accurate diagnosis, direction of therapy, and refined prognostication. There is an emerging consensus with regard to many prognostic factors, but there is a clear need to synthesize genomic findings into robust, clinically actionable and widely accepted scoring systems as well as the need to standardize the laboratory methodologies that are used.

  10. BRIF and CARIF progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) is currently constructing Beijing rare ion beam facility (BRIF) and is proposing China advanced rare ion beam facility (CARIF). This paper is aiming at introducing the progress of BRIF project and the con ceptual design CARIF. The ISOL type facility BRIF under construction is composed of a 100 MeV 300 ?A proton cyclotron, an ISOL with mass resolution of 20000, and a super-conducting LINAC of 2 MeV/q, and will be commissioned in 2013. CARIF facility proposed is planned to use both ISOL and PF techniques. It is based on a China advanced research reactor CARR that was critical, with ISOL separation of fission fragment, post acceleration to 150 MeV/u, and fragmentation of neu tron-rich fission fragment beam like 132Sn. Such unique combination will allow CARIF to deliver beam intensity better than the best world facilities by more than one order of magnitude.

  11. Institutional investor activism : Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mc Cahery, Joseph; Bratton, William; Bratton, William; McCahery, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The increase in institutional ownership of recent decades has been accompanied by an enhanced role played by institutions in monitoring companies’ corporate governance behaviour. Activist hedge funds and private equity firms have achieved a degree of success in actively shaping the business plans of

  12. Institutionalism "Old" and "New."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selznick, Philip

    1996-01-01

    Explores the new institutionalism's ethos and direction. Drawing a sharp line between old and new inhibits the contribution of institutional theory to major issues of bureaucracy and social policy. Problems of accountability and responsiveness, public and private bureaucracy, regulation and self-regulation, and management and governance will…

  13. Discipline as Institutional Maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Hommel, Ulrich; Cornuel, Eric

    Drawing on the case of business school rankings, we study how institutions are maintained and remain persistent despite their contested nature. We argue that rankings as institutions can be maintained through subtle disciplinary practices that freeze power relations in recipient organizations. Ou...

  14. Fundamentals and Optimal Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Eiras, Martin; Harmon, Nikolaj Arpe; Rossi, Martín

    2016-01-01

    of regulatory institutions such as revenue sharing, salary caps or luxury taxes. We show, theoretically and empirically, that these large differences in adopted institutions can be rationalized as optimal responses to differences in the fundamental characteristics of the sports being played. This provides...

  15. Progress in Research of CRISPR/Cas9 System in Genome Targeted Editing in Plants%CRISPR/Cas9系统在植物基因组定点编辑中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解莉楠; 宋凤艳; 张旸

    2015-01-01

    When exogenous DNA was imported into plant cell by transgenic technology, DNA fragment will integrate into the genome by homologous recombination or nonhomologous recombination. In addition, the plants seedling will achieve corresponding target traits. Homologous recombination occurred when the exogenous DNA and the same or similar sequences in receptor cells recombined and integrated to the receptor cell’s chromosomes, so the sequence will be possible to precisely modified and transformed. However, in some cases, to avoid the fracture caused by DNA or chromosomal DNA degradation or the impact on the vitality, the two double-stranded DNA break ends will be joined without considering the sequence similarity by error-prone nonhomologous end joining. As a result, precise mutations control is more difficult to achieve because insertion and/or deletion and other variety of mutations are high-frequently occurred in non-homologous recombination than in homologous recombination. Unfortunately, the frequency of homologous recombination is very low in plants which results the undesirable genome editing. Site-specific nucleases make genome editing more efficient and more precise by the great improvement of the efficiency in the homologous recombination. Such nucleases, zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), have been demonstrated to efficiently produce a DNA double-strand break at target site and to induce genome modification in a variety of organisms including plants. However, some defects found in the specific application, such as off-target effects, specific combined site with genome affected by chromosomal location and adjacent sequence, furthermore, technical complexity and time-consuming for assemble limit its application. The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats(CRISPR) system is a prokaryotic adaptive immune system which widely exists in bacteria and archaea. As the result of the long

  16. Genomic stuff: Governing the (immatter of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gísli Pálsson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Emphasizing the context of what has often been referred to as “scarce natural resources”, in particular forests, meadows, and fishing stocks, Elinor Ostrom’s important work Governing the commons (1990 presents an institutional framework for discussing the development and use of collective action with respect to environmental problems. In this article we discuss extensions of Ostrom’s approach to genes and genomes and explore its limits and usefulness. With the new genetics, we suggest, the biological gaze has not only been turned inward to the management and mining of the human body, also the very notion of the “biological” has been destabilized. This shift and destabilization, we argue, which is the result of human refashioning and appropriation of “life itself”, raises important questions about the relevance and applicability of Ostrom’s institutional framework in the context of what we call “genomic stuff”, genomic material, data, and information.

  17. 肿瘤细胞回文序列介导的基因扩增机制研究进展%Research progress on the mechanism of gene amplification mediated by palindromes in tumor genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳玮; 徐晖; 张海员; 白静; 傅松滨; 周春水

    2014-01-01

    基因组不稳定是肿瘤细胞的特征性标志,基因扩增是一种特殊的基因组不稳定性的表现形式,其在激活原癌基因引发癌症的过程中起着重要的作用.基因扩增将导致细胞加速生长增殖或耐药生长等表型.人们已经广泛注意到其在癌症的诊断和治疗等方面的重要临床意义.但是,人们对基因扩增的分子机制的认识仍然十分有限,本文综述了回文序列介导的基因扩增的分子机制,提出在DNA断点处以无模板形式、新合成小回文序列可能是一部分肿瘤细胞中基因扩增的关键机制,为进一步探索基因扩增的分子机制提供理论参考.%Gene amplification is a common chromosomal aberration which is often the result of tumor genome instability,and plays a crucial role in the process of activating oncogenes and leading to cancers.As gene amplification often is evident in advanced stages of cancer,its clinical importance in diagnosis and treatment has been popularly recognized.However,the underlying mechanisms governing gene amplification are still not fully understood.Herein,we reviewed one of the well-defined gene amplification mechanisms:DNA double-strand breaks-triggered,palindromes or short DNA inverted repeatsmediated gene amplification model,which was established and validated in a variety of research organisms including T.thermophila,fission yeast,budding yeast and rodent cells.Based on the recent published reports,we put forward a new model for the palindromes mediated gene amplification mechanism,that is de novo synthesis of small palindromic sequences (usually several hundred base pairs in length or shorter) at the DNA breakpoints in a template-free manner is the key determinant for gene amplification in certain tumor genomes.Elucidating the potential mechanism and involved enzymes for the regulation and creation of novel palindromic sequences should shed more light onto the palindromes mediated gene amplification and the

  18. Genome cartography: charting the apicomplexan genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Jessica C; DeBarry, Jeremy

    2011-08-01

    Genes reside in particular genomic contexts that can be mapped at many levels. Historically, 'genetic maps' were used primarily to locate genes. Recent technological advances in the determination of genome sequences have made the analysis and comparison of whole genomes possible and increasingly tractable. What do we see if we shift our focus from gene content (the 'inventory' of genes contained within a genome) to the composition and organization of a genome? This review examines what has been learned about the evolution of the apicomplexan genome as well as the significance and impact of genomic location on our understanding of the eukaryotic genome and parasite biology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. BAGEL2 : mining for bacteriocins in genomic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Anne; van Heel, Auke J.; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2010-01-01

    Mining bacterial genomes for bacteriocins is a challenging task due to the substantial structure and sequence diversity, and generally small sizes, of these antimicrobial peptides. Major progress in the research of antimicrobial peptides and the ever-increasing quantities of genomic data, varying fr

  20. Programming biological operating systems: genome design, assembly and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Daniel G

    2014-05-01

    The DNA technologies developed over the past 20 years for reading and writing the genetic code converged when the first synthetic cell was created 4 years ago. An outcome of this work has been an extraordinary set of tools for synthesizing, assembling, engineering and transplanting whole bacterial genomes. Technical progress, options and applications for bacterial genome design, assembly and activation are discussed.

  1. Progress Review on Land Science Research in 2014 and Prospects for 2015:Sub-report on Land Market and Land Institutions%2014年土地科学研究重点进展评述及2015年展望--土地市场和土地制度分报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    藏波; 张清勇; 丰雷; 王梅婷

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the research progress on land market and land institutions in 2014 and give prospect for 2015. Method of documentation was employed. The results indicate that scholars have proposed that the reasonable institutional arrangements can improve operating efficiency of the land market. Domestic scholars have mainly analyzed the price fluctuation and the participation’s behavior of land market, and the relationship between land market and macroeconomic environment. China’s rural land market issues have become important topics in the field of new institutional economics, especially the Property Theory. Foreign and domestic scholars concern about land ownership, land expropriation and government action, but the research angles are different. The conclusions show that the focuses of land market study in the future might be the governance structure of China’s rural land supply, the participation’s behavior in the process of rural land circulation from the perspective of behavioral economics, and the financial problems through the game theory, such as the principal-agent model. The focuses of land institution study might be the system design and policy evaluation of unified system for urban and rural construction land market, the reform of the land acquisition system, land legislation and enforcement, land right certification and other aspects.%研究目的:呈现目前国内外土地市场的研究进展,总结研究重点并进行国内外比较,把握国内外研究的方向和差异。研究方法:文献法。研究结果:(1)国外已有不少学者提出依靠国家理论和制度安排来提高土地市场运行效率,国内学者则较多分析市场中价格表现和参与主体行为,以及市场与宏观经济环境的关系;中国农村土地市场问题成为新制度经济学尤其是产权学派研究的一个重要领域。(2)国内外土地制度研究都关注土地产权、土地征

  2. 77 FR 43237 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Work Plan Review Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Work Plan Review Workshop.... SUMMARY: NIST announces the Genome in a Bottle Consortium meeting to be held on Thursday and Friday, August 16 and 17, 2012. The Genome in a Bottle Consortium is planning to develop the reference...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis OPF15T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, James G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Han, James [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lapidus, Alla [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Peters, Lin [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Walston Davenport, Karen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Detter, John C. [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Han, Cliff S. [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tapia, Roxanne [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Land, Miriam L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hauser, Loren [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kyrpides, Nikos C. [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Ivanova, Natalia N. [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Bruce, David [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Cottingham, Robert W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-04-11

    Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis OPF15T was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park and grows optimally at 83 oC. The OPF15T genome was finished at the Joint Genome Institute and the 1.6 Mb sequence has been annotated and deposited for future genomic studies aimed at understanding microbial processes and nutrient cycles in high-temperature environments.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Hyperthermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis OPF15T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, James G; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Mikhailova, Natalia; Davenport, Karen W; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff S; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, Natalia N; Pagani, Ioanna; Bruce, David; Woyke, Tanja; Cottingham, Robert W

    2013-04-11

    Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis OPF15(T) (ATCC BAA-2454, JCM 18567) was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, and grows optimally at 83°C. The 1.6-Mb genome sequence was finished at the Joint Genome Institute and has been deposited for future genomic studies pertaining to microbial processes and nutrient cycles in high-temperature environments.

  5. Plant Genome Duplication Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Junah; Robertson, Jon S; Paterson, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    Genome duplication, widespread in flowering plants, is a driving force in evolution. Genome alignments between/within genomes facilitate identification of homologous regions and individual genes to investigate evolutionary consequences of genome duplication. PGDD (the Plant Genome Duplication Database), a public web service database, provides intra- or interplant genome alignment information. At present, PGDD contains information for 47 plants whose genome sequences have been released. Here, we describe methods for identification and estimation of dates of genome duplication and speciation by functions of PGDD.The database is freely available at http://chibba.agtec.uga.edu/duplication/.

  6. 白念珠菌基因组结构与遗传、致病相关基因%Progresses in genomic constructure, heredity- and virulence-related genes of Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    米霞; 郑和义

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans, an important opportunistic pathogen, lives as a harmless commensal in multiple organs of human. It can cause oral and vaginal candidiasis, even life-threatening systemic infection in patients with hypoimmunity or malignancy. The mortality rate of candidia infection has been remaining high because of difficulty in early diagnosis of systemic candidiasis, increasing resistance to antifungals and lack of efficient antifungal agents. Therefore, studies on Candida albicans genome structure, sequence and gene function have become more and more important for the guidance on clinical diagnosis and treatment of candidiasis.%白念珠菌是一种重要的机会致病菌,在人的多个系统或器官与宿主共栖生存,可导致口腔和阴道念珠菌病,在免疫力低下或患严重疾病的患者,可引起系统疾病.由于早期准确诊断系统性念珠菌病存在困难,合适有效的抗真菌药物数量有限,病原体的耐药性增加,导致系统性念珠菌病病死率居高不下.因此,对白念珠菌基因组序列及结构、功能的研究对指导临床的诊断和治疗显得尤为重要.

  7. Rodent malaria parasites : genome organization & comparative genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the genome organization of rodent malaria parasites (RMPs) and compare the organization and gene content of the genomes of RMPs and the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. The release of the complete genome sequence of P. falciparu

  8. Rodent malaria parasites : genome organization & comparative genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the genome organization of rodent malaria parasites (RMPs) and compare the organization and gene content of the genomes of RMPs and the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. The release of the complete genome sequence of P.

  9. Bacterial genome reengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jindan; Rudd, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    The web application PrimerPair at ecogene.org generates large sets of paired DNA sequences surrounding- all protein and RNA genes of Escherichia coli K-12. Many DNA fragments, which these primers amplify, can be used to implement a genome reengineering strategy using complementary in vitro cloning and in vivo recombineering. The integration of a primer design tool with a model organism database increases the level of quality control. Computer-assisted design of gene primer pairs relies upon having highly accurate genomic DNA sequence information that exactly matches the DNA of the cells being used in the laboratory to ensure predictable DNA hybridizations. It is equally crucial to have confidence that the predicted start codons define the locations of genes accurately. Annotations in the EcoGene database are queried by PrimerPair to eliminate pseudogenes, IS elements, and other problematic genes before the design process starts. These projects progressively familiarize users with the EcoGene content, scope, and application interfaces that are useful for genome reengineering projects. The first protocol leads to the design of a pair of primer sequences that were used to clone and express a single gene. The N-terminal protein sequence was experimentally verified and the protein was detected in the periplasm. This is followed by instructions to design PCR primer pairs for cloning gene fragments encoding 50 periplasmic proteins without their signal peptides. The design process begins with the user simply designating one pair of forward and reverse primer endpoint positions relative to all start and stop codon positions. The gene name, genomic coordinates, and primer DNA sequences are reported to the user. When making chromosomal deletions, the integrity of the provisional primer design is checked to see whether it will generate any unwanted double deletions with adjacent genes. The bad designs are recalculated and replacement primers are provided alongside the

  10. A hybrid approach for de novo human genome sequence assembly and phasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Lam, Jessica; Lam, Ernest T; Hastie, Alex R; Marks, Patrick; Lee, Joyce; Chu, Catherine; Lin, Chin; Džakula, Željko; Cao, Han; Schlebusch, Stephen A; Giorda, Kristina; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Wall, Jeffrey D; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2016-07-01

    Despite tremendous progress in genome sequencing, the basic goal of producing a phased (haplotype-resolved) genome sequence with end-to-end contiguity for each chromosome at reasonable cost and effort is still unrealized. In this study, we describe an approach to performing de novo genome assembly and experimental phasing by integrating the data from Illumina short-read sequencing, 10X Genomics linked-read sequencing, and BioNano Genomics genome mapping to yield a high-quality, phased, de novo assembled human genome.

  11. INSTITUTIONS AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doru Botezat

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a non-comprehensive overview of social and economic theories regarding the contribution to the small communities’ economy and society of institutions, in all forms of expression. Institutions, first analyzed in terms of local culture together with elites and leadership, as well as formal institutions organized by state or NGO’s, generate a so-called spiritual infrastructure, intangible, but necessary for social progress on primary levels of aggregation. The study was accomplished using critical analysis of literature on which we grafted some examples from Romanian society. Finally, the article proposes some practical ideas for community development institutional interventionism.

  12. Genomic tumor evolution of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Fumiaki; Saji, Shigehira; Toi, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Owing to recent technical development of comprehensive genome-wide analysis such as next generation sequencing, deep biological insights of breast cancer have been revealed. Information of genomic mutations and rearrangements in patients' tumors is indispensable to understand the mechanism in carcinogenesis, progression, metastasis, and resistance to systemic treatment of breast cancer. To date, comprehensive genomic analyses illustrate not only base substitution patterns and lists of driver mutations and key rearrangements, but also a manner of tumor evolution. Breast cancer genome is dynamically changing and evolving during cancer development course from non-invasive disease via invasive primary tumor to metastatic tumor, and during treatment exposure. The accumulation pattern of base substitution and genomic rearrangement looks gradual and punctuated, respectively, in analogy with contrasting theories for evolution manner of species, Darwin's phyletic gradualism, and Eldredge and Gould's "punctuated equilibrium". Liquid biopsy is a non-invasive method to detect the genomic evolution of breast cancer. Genomic mutation patterns in circulating tumor cells and circulating cell-free tumor DNA represent those of tumors existing in patient body. Liquid biopsy methods are now under development for future application to clinical practice of cancer treatment. In this article, latest knowledge regarding breast cancer genome, especially in terms of 'tumor evolution', is summarized.

  13. International Institutions and GHG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Jiyong

    2008-01-01

    Globalization is pushing public health crises beyond traditional national boundaries. It has also transformed international health governance into global health governance. Health security is one aspect of global public welfare. International institutions, such as the WHO, the WTO, the World Bank, and the BWC, are main providers of global public welfare for health. However, those institutions' role in global health governance is not optimized. An analysis of the shortcomings of the international institutions concerned with global heath can contribute to better global health governance. Some tentative solutions to such problems are put forward in this paper.

  14. SMEs, Institutions and Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla; Low, Mei Peng

    2013-01-01

    This chapter addresses at the outset the topic of SMEs and economic development from an institutions perspective. The authors argue that the transaction cost theory is not helpful towards understanding the role that institutions play for SME performance for several reasons. Instead, they argue...... for combining the resource-based theory with an institutions-based approach towards constructing a more practical and empirical oriented analytical framework. After the preliminary discussion and introduction to the different theories used, the authors then take a focus on the analytical framework used to study...

  15. 10. international mouse genome conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  16. Study Of Museum Institutional Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Rohanda

    2016-11-01

    development of information and library science, particularly institution of information in addition to the library. Second, it provides an overview of the governance of the museum in government institutions. Third, the scope of study is limited to institutional management of museums in government institutions, thus there is a need for the development of studies on institutional management of museums for other types of museums, such as museums that are managed by private or personal institutions. Keywords: Gawitra, information institution, management, museum.

  17. Progression inference for somatic mutations in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif E. Peterson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods were employed to determine progression inference of genomic alterations in commonly occurring cancers. Using cross-sectional TCGA data, we computed evolutionary trajectories involving selectivity relationships among pairs of gene-specific genomic alterations such as somatic mutations, deletions, amplifications, downregulation, and upregulation among the top 20 driver genes associated with each cancer. Results indicate that the majority of hierarchies involved TP53, PIK3CA, ERBB2, APC, KRAS, EGFR, IDH1, VHL, etc. Research into the order and accumulation of genomic alterations among cancer driver genes will ever-increase as the costs of nextgen sequencing subside, and personalized/precision medicine incorporates whole-genome scans into the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  18. The hypoxic tumour microenvironment and metastatic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subarsky, Patrick; Hill, Richard P

    2003-01-01

    The microenvironment of solid tumours contains regions of poor oxygenation and high acidity. Growing evidence from clinical and experimental studies points to a fundamental role for hypoxia in metastatic progression. Prolonged hypoxia increases genomic instability, genomic heterogeneity, and may act as a selective pressure for tumour cell variants. Hypoxia can also act in an epigenetic fashion, altering the expression of genes. Hypoxia-induced changes in gene expression alter non-specific stress responses, anaerobic metabolism, angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and cell-cell contacts. Experimental studies have demonstrated that inhibition of proteins involved in these processes can modify metastasis formation, suggesting a causal role in metastatic progression. Recent advances in high-throughput screening techniques have allowed identification of many hypoxia-induced genes that are involved in the processes associated with metastasis. Here we review the epigenetic control of gene expression by the hypoxic microenvironment and its potential contribution to metastatic progression.

  19. Texas Heart Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine today with a keynote from Texas State Senator Paul Bettencourt Dr. Taylor received the ... in cardiovascular discovery is happening here at the Texas Heart Institute. Visit www.thenextfirst.org . Your Heart ...

  20. Joint Quantum Institute

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) is pursuing that goal through the work of leading quantum scientists from the Department of Physics of the University of Maryland...

  1. Novel patterns of cancer genome evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Zhang; Xiaodi Deng; Yu Zhang; Zhiguang Li

    2015-01-01

    Cells usually undergo a long journey of evolution during the progression from normal to precancerous cells and finally to full-fledged cancer cells. Multiple genomic aberrations are acquired during this journey that could either act as drivers to confer significant growth advantages or act as passengers with little effect on the tumor growth. Recent advances in sequencing technology have made it feasible to decipher the evolutionary course of a cancer cell on a genome-wide level by evaluating the relative number of mutated alleles. Novel terms such as chromothripsis and chromoplexy have been introduced to describe the newly identified patterns of cancer genome evolution. These new insights have greatly expanded our understanding of the initiation and progression of cancers, which should aid in improving the efficiency of cancer management and treatment.

  2. Institutions and Venture Capital

    OpenAIRE

    Lerner, Josh; Tåg, Joacim

    2012-01-01

    We survey the literature on venture capital and institutions and present a case study comparing the development of the venture capital market in the US to Sweden. Our literature survey underscores that the legal environment, financial market development, the tax system, labor market regulations, and public spending on research and development correlates with venture capital activities across countries. Our case study suggests these institutional differences led to the later development of an ...

  3. Changing institutions of knowing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor

    2014-01-01

    - and professional institutions, the paper presents a study of institutional work inside and across schools and craft disciplines working in SMEs involved in new building and renovation with an energy aspect. Collaboration between four education committees for carpenters, masons, electricians and plumbers....... In the future specialization will be supplemented by horizontal and vertical interdisciplinary and innovative competences integrating the complex process industrialized construction sector. Schools, teachers and digital teaching materials need be developed to support this change supported by front running...

  4. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, J. Iwan [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  5. Blogs in cultural institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Kaczyński

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses examples of three blogs of the National Library, both in terms of their structure and content as highlighting elements that impact on the promotion of both the blog and the institutions they lead. Discussed the advantages of one of Poland’s most popular blogging platforms WordPress. It also presents a short briefings to customize the look of your blog based on WordPress platform needs to actuate the institution.

  6. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  7. Genome Mapping in Plant Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Lindsay; Sharp, Aaron R; Evans, Carrie R; Udall, Joshua A

    2016-09-01

    Genome mapping produces fingerprints of DNA sequences to construct a physical map of the whole genome. It provides contiguous, long-range information that complements and, in some cases, replaces sequencing data. Recent advances in genome-mapping technology will better allow researchers to detect large (>1kbp) structural variations between plant genomes. Some molecular and informatics complications need to be overcome for this novel technology to achieve its full utility. This technology will be useful for understanding phenotype responses due to DNA rearrangements and will yield insights into genome evolution, particularly in polyploids. In this review, we outline recent advances in genome-mapping technology, including the processes required for data collection and analysis, and applications in plant comparative genomics.

  8. Ontology for Genome Comparison and Genomic Rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Wipat

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an ontology for describing genomes, genome comparisons, their evolution and biological function. This ontology will support the development of novel genome comparison algorithms and aid the community in discussing genomic evolution. It provides a framework for communication about comparative genomics, and a basis upon which further automated analysis can be built. The nomenclature defined by the ontology will foster clearer communication between biologists, and also standardize terms used by data publishers in the results of analysis programs. The overriding aim of this ontology is the facilitation of consistent annotation of genomes through computational methods, rather than human annotators. To this end, the ontology includes definitions that support computer analysis and automated transfer of annotations between genomes, rather than relying upon human mediation.

  9. Enabling functional genomics with genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Isaac B; Gersbach, Charles A

    2015-10-01

    Advances in genome engineering technologies have made the precise control over genome sequence and regulation possible across a variety of disciplines. These tools can expand our understanding of fundamental biological processes and create new opportunities for therapeutic designs. The rapid evolution of these methods has also catalyzed a new era of genomics that includes multiple approaches to functionally characterize and manipulate the regulation of genomic information. Here, we review the recent advances of the most widely adopted genome engineering platforms and their application to functional genomics. This includes engineered zinc finger proteins, TALEs/TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system as nucleases for genome editing, transcription factors for epigenome editing, and other emerging applications. We also present current and potential future applications of these tools, as well as their current limitations and areas for future advances.

  10. Development of Genomic and Genetic Tools for Foxtail Millet, and Use of These Tools in the Improvement of Biomass Production for Bioenergy Crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doust, Andrew, N.

    2011-11-11

    The overall aim of this research was to develop genomic and genetic tools in foxtail millet that will be useful in improving biomass production in bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napier grass, and pearl millet. A variety of approaches have been implemented, and our lab has been primarily involved in genome analysis and quantitative genetic analysis. Our progress in these activities has been substantially helped by the genomic sequence of foxtail millet produced by the Joint Genome Institute (Bennetzen et al., in prep). In particular, the annotation and analysis of candidate genes for architecture, biomass production and flowering has led to new insights into the control of branching and flowering time, and has shown how closely related flowering time is to vegetative architectural development and biomass accumulation. The differences in genetic control identified at high and low density plantings have direct relevance to the breeding of bioenergy grasses that are tolerant of high planting densities. The developmental analyses have shown how plant architecture changes over time and may indicate which genes may best be manipulated at various times during development to obtain required biomass characteristics. This data contributes to the overall aim of significantly improving genetic and genomic tools in foxtail millet that can be directed to improvement of bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass, where it is important to maximize vegetative growth for greatest biomass production.

  11. John Searle on Institutional Facts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    m Abdullahi

    2010-09-01

    Here we argue that the essence of institutional facts is status functions. Humans recognize these functions which contain a set of deontic powers through collective intentionality. Therefore, institutional facts are ontologically subjective and epistemologically objective. Nevertheless, objectivity of institutional facts totally depends on language which itself is a fundamental institution for other institutions.

  12. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports SUMMARY... Institutes of Health (NIH), has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request for...

  13. Genome interplay in the grain transcriptome of hexaploid bread wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Matthias; Kugler, Karl G; Sandve, Simen R; Zhan, Bujie; Rudi, Heidi; Hvidsten, Torgeir R; Mayer, Klaus F X; Olsen, Odd-Arne

    2014-07-18

    Allohexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) provides approximately 20% of calories consumed by humans. Lack of genome sequence for the three homeologous and highly similar bread wheat genomes (A, B, and D) has impeded expression analysis of the grain transcriptome. We used previously unknown genome information to analyze the cell type-specific expression of homeologous genes in the developing wheat grain and identified distinct co-expression clusters reflecting the spatiotemporal progression during endosperm development. We observed no global but cell type- and stage-dependent genome dominance, organization of the wheat genome into transcriptionally active chromosomal regions, and asymmetric expression in gene families related to baking quality. Our findings give insight into the transcriptional dynamics and genome interplay among individual grain cell types in a polyploid cereal genome. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Three-Dimensional Genome Organization and Function in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Yuri B; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how the metazoan genome is used during development and cell differentiation is one of the major challenges in the postgenomic era. Early studies in Drosophila suggested that three-dimensional (3D) chromosome organization plays important regulatory roles in this process and recent technological advances started to reveal connections at the molecular level. Here we will consider general features of the architectural organization of the Drosophila genome, providing historical perspective and insights from recent work. We will compare the linear and spatial segmentation of the fly genome and focus on the two key regulators of genome architecture: insulator components and Polycomb group proteins. With its unique set of genetic tools and a compact, well annotated genome, Drosophila is poised to remain a model system of choice for rapid progress in understanding principles of genome organization and to serve as a proving ground for development of 3D genome-engineering techniques. Copyright © 2017 Schwartz and Cavalli.

  15. Three-Dimensional Genome Organization and Function in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Yuri B.; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how the metazoan genome is used during development and cell differentiation is one of the major challenges in the postgenomic era. Early studies in Drosophila suggested that three-dimensional (3D) chromosome organization plays important regulatory roles in this process and recent technological advances started to reveal connections at the molecular level. Here we will consider general features of the architectural organization of the Drosophila genome, providing historical perspective and insights from recent work. We will compare the linear and spatial segmentation of the fly genome and focus on the two key regulators of genome architecture: insulator components and Polycomb group proteins. With its unique set of genetic tools and a compact, well annotated genome, Drosophila is poised to remain a model system of choice for rapid progress in understanding principles of genome organization and to serve as a proving ground for development of 3D genome-engineering techniques. PMID:28049701

  16. Exploring Other Genomes: Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the importance of genomes other than the human genome project and provides information on the identified bacterial genomes Pseudomonas aeuroginosa, Leprosy, Cholera, Meningitis, Tuberculosis, Bubonic Plague, and plant pathogens. Considers the computer's use in genome studies. (Contains 14 references.) (YDS)

  17. Financial institutions as an example of institutions of public trust

    OpenAIRE

    Agata Jakubowska

    2013-01-01

    Financial institutions are commonly known as institutions of public trust and they are fundamental for activities of other economic entities. The level of trust determines the competitive position of financial institutions. That is why care about the best standards is the most important task for these institutions. Financial institutions are called institutions of public trust and thus high professionalism and more responsibility is demanded from them. This article presents basic problems con...

  18. O desafio da malária: o caso brasileiro e o que se pode esperar dos progressos da era genômica The malaria challenge: the Brazilian case and what can be expected from progress in genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Hildebrando Pereira da Silva

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A área endêmica de malária no Brasil se estende atualmente à totalidade da região amazônica, com cerca de 500 mil casos anuais, em geral com situações de baixa e média endemicidade mas ainda apresentando focos de alto risco. Fatores demográficos e socioeconômicos são dominantes nos desafios que enfrentam os Serviços de Saúde Pública no controle da malária. No presente artigo são discutidos fatores determinantes da instabilidade da situação endêmica bem como a necessidade de ações permanentes de vigilância e de intervenção dos Serviços de Saúde para que se evitem surtos epidêmicos e alastramento das áreas endêmicas. No artigo, em seguida, apresenta-se uma síntese de progressos recentes nos estudos da era genômica e pós-genômica sobre o parasita, o vetor e o hospedeiro humano que podem favorecer, no futuro, o desenvolvimento e a melhoria dos métodos de controle da malária.Malaria endemic areas in Brazil are restricted to the Amazon Region, with an average of 500 thousand new cases every year. The situation can be defined as unstable hipoendemic with, however, foci of high endemicity. Demographic and socio economic factors are main determinants in the malaria challenge for the Public Health System. In the present paper, biological and social factors responsible for the unstable endemic situation are discussed. The need for a permanent surveillance and intervention of Public Health Services are stressed to avoid the occurrence of local epidemics and spreading of endemic areas. In the paper, are also summarised recent lines of research developed in the post genomic era in the studies of parasite, vector and human molecular genetics that would favour the development, in the future, of new tools and procedures for malaria control

  19. Research Progress on Functional Genomics of Nitrogen-fixing Microorganisms and Industrial Development of Bio-fertilizer%根际固氮微生物功能基因组及微生物肥料研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    燕永亮; 李力; 李俊

    2011-01-01

    固氮微生物为植物提供了大量的氮素来源,开展生物固氮的研究对缓解我国粮食短缺、能源消耗、环境污染等重大社会问题具有重要意义.综述了国际上关于固氮微生物功能基因组学以及微生物肥料产业的发展状况,并以巴西、阿根廷等国家在农业生产中的节肥增产的成功经验进行了案例分析.针对目前我国微生物肥料产业的发展状况以及行业前景提出了建设性意见,认为在功能基因组学平台上加强对固氮微生物基因表达调控及与宿主互作机制的研究将为后续开发性能优良的高效固氮、综合抗逆的固氮微生物工程菌株奠定重要理论基础.%Nitrogen-fixing microorganism provides large amount of nitrogen sources to crops. It is of great significance to carry out biological nitrogen fixation research in solving great social issues of grain shortage, energy consumption and environmental pollution in China. This paper reviews the current development status on nitrogen-fixing microorganism and bio-fertilizer industry in the world, and makes case analysis on successful cases in applying bio-fertilizer during agricultural production in Brazil, Argentina and other countries. The authors also put forward constructive suggestions for the development of industrial bio-fertilizer in China, such as studies on mechanisms of nif gene expression and regulation, together with interaction of microbe-plant at the functional genomic level must be strengthened. This will lay an important theoretical basis for developing comprehensive engineering strains with high nitrogen fixation and stress tolerance ability.

  20. Progress in the effect of vitamin B6 on human genome health%维生素B6与人类基因组健康研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴暇玉; 汪旭

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin B6 is a cofactor for the serine hydroxymethyltransferase ( SHMT ), cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and betaine hydroxymethyltransferase (BHMT) in folate metabolism. SHMT catalyzes the reversible interconversion of serine and tetrahydrofolate ( THF ) to glycine and 5,10- methylene THF. The metabolism of homocysteine to methionine and cysteine is initiated by the enzymes CBS and BHMT. So the evidence indicates that vitamin B6 plays an important role in the maintenance of genome,epigenetics stability and homocysteine metabolism, suggesting vitamin B6' s critical role in the prevention of tumour, cancer and cardiovascular disease. This article will review and discuss the metabolic functions of vitamin B6, some associated diseases due to vitamin B6 deficiency, and new insights from recently published studies regarding prevention and treatment potentials.%维生素B6作为叶酸代谢途径中丝氨酸羟甲基转移酶(serine hydroxymethyltransferase,SHMT)、胱硫醚β-合成酶(cystathionineβ-synthase,CBS)、甜菜碱羟甲基转移酶(betaine hydroxymethyltransferase,BHMT)等酶的辅酶,一方面涉及丝氨酸、四氢叶酸到甘氨酸、5,10-甲基四氢叶酸的可逆转化,另一方面协助完成同型半胱氨酸到甲硫氨酸和胱硫醚的代谢.因此维生素B6对于维持基因组、表基因组稳定性以及促进同型半胱氨酸代谢可能具有一定作用,从而在肿瘤、癌症、心脑血管疾病的防范上可能起到积极作用.本文综述了维生素B6代谢功能研究进展、维生素B6缺乏临床表征及引发的并发症和营养缺陷症,为人类基因组健康、公共卫生健康和饮食供给提供参考.