WorldWideScience

Sample records for genome browser supporting

  1. SNUGB: a versatile genome browser supporting comparative and functional fungal genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seungill

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the full genome sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were released in 1996, genome sequences of over 90 fungal species have become publicly available. The heterogeneous formats of genome sequences archived in different sequencing centers hampered the integration of the data for efficient and comprehensive comparative analyses. The Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform (CFGP was developed to archive these data via a single standardized format that can support multifaceted and integrated analyses of the data. To facilitate efficient data visualization and utilization within and across species based on the architecture of CFGP and associated databases, a new genome browser was needed. Results The Seoul National University Genome Browser (SNUGB integrates various types of genomic information derived from 98 fungal/oomycete (137 datasets and 34 plant and animal (38 datasets species, graphically presents germane features and properties of each genome, and supports comparison between genomes. The SNUGB provides three different forms of the data presentation interface, including diagram, table, and text, and six different display options to support visualization and utilization of the stored information. Information for individual species can be quickly accessed via a new tool named the taxonomy browser. In addition, SNUGB offers four useful data annotation/analysis functions, including 'BLAST annotation.' The modular design of SNUGB makes its adoption to support other comparative genomic platforms easy and facilitates continuous expansion. Conclusion The SNUGB serves as a powerful platform supporting comparative and functional genomics within the fungal kingdom and also across other kingdoms. All data and functions are available at the web site http://genomebrowser.snu.ac.kr/.

  2. UCSC genome browser tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Ann S; Karolchik, Donna; Kuhn, Robert M; Haussler, David; Kent, W James

    2008-08-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Bioinformatics website consists of a suite of free, open-source, on-line tools that can be used to browse, analyze, and query genomic data. These tools are available to anyone who has an Internet browser and an interest in genomics. The website provides a quick and easy-to-use visual display of genomic data. It places annotation tracks beneath genome coordinate positions, allowing rapid visual correlation of different types of information. Many of the annotation tracks are submitted by scientists worldwide; the others are computed by the UCSC Genome Bioinformatics group from publicly available sequence data. It also allows users to upload and display their own experimental results or annotation sets by creating a custom track. The suite of tools, downloadable data files, and links to documentation and other information can be found at http://genome.ucsc.edu/.

  3. The UCSC genome browser database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, R M; Karolchik, D; Zweig, A S

    2007-01-01

    The University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser Database contains, as of September 2006, sequence and annotation data for the genomes of 13 vertebrate and 19 invertebrate species. The Genome Browser displays a wide variety of annotations at all scales from the single nucleotide level up t...

  4. Integrated genome browser: visual analytics platform for genomics

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Genome browsers that support fast navigation through vast datasets and provide interactive visual analytics functions can help scientists achieve deeper insight into biological systems. Toward this end, we developed Integrated Genome Browser (IGB), a highly configurable, interactive and fast open source desktop genome browser. Results: Here we describe multiple updates to IGB, including all-new capabilities to display and interact with data from high-throughput sequencing experime...

  5. The UCSC Genome Browser Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichs, A S; Karolchik, D; Baertsch, R

    2006-01-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz Genome Browser Database (GBD) contains sequence and annotation data for the genomes of about a dozen vertebrate species and several major model organisms. Genome annotations typically include assembly data, sequence composition, genes and gene predictions, ...

  6. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2016 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speir, Matthew L; Zweig, Ann S; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Raney, Brian J; Paten, Benedict; Nejad, Parisa; Lee, Brian T; Learned, Katrina; Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S; Heitner, Steve; Harte, Rachel A; Haeussler, Maximilian; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Fujita, Pauline A; Eisenhart, Christopher; Diekhans, Mark; Clawson, Hiram; Casper, Jonathan; Barber, Galt P; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2016-01-01

    For the past 15 years, the UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) has served the international research community by offering an integrated platform for viewing and analyzing information from a large database of genome assemblies and their associated annotations. The UCSC Genome Browser has been under continuous development since its inception with new data sets and software features added frequently. Some release highlights of this year include new and updated genome browsers for various assemblies, including bonobo and zebrafish; new gene annotation sets; improvements to track and assembly hub support; and a new interactive tool, the "Data Integrator", for intersecting data from multiple tracks. We have greatly expanded the data sets available on the most recent human assembly, hg38/GRCh38, to include updated gene prediction sets from GENCODE, more phenotype- and disease-associated variants from ClinVar and ClinGen, more genomic regulatory data, and a new multiple genome alignment.

  7. Setting up the JBrowse genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Mitchell E; Holmes, Ian H

    2010-12-01

    JBrowse is a Web-based tool for visualizing genomic data. Unlike most other Web-base genome browsers, JBrowse exploits the capabilities of the user's Web browser to make scrolling and zooming fast and smooth. It supports the browsers used by almost all Internet users, and is relatively simple to install. JBrowse can utilize multiple types of data in a variety of common genomic data formats, including genomic feature data in bioperl databases, GFF files, BED files, and quantitative data in wiggle files. This unit describes how to obtain the JBrowse software, set it up on a Linux or Mac OS X computer running as a Web server, and incorporate genome annotation data from multiple sources into JBrowse. After completing the protocols described in this unit, the reader will have a Web site that other users can visit to browse the genomic data.

  8. The UCSC Genome Browser Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karolchik, D; Kuhn, R M; Baertsch, R

    2008-01-01

    The University of California, Santa Cruz, Genome Browser Database (GBD) provides integrated sequence and annotation data for a large collection of vertebrate and model organism genomes. Seventeen new assemblies have been added to the database in the past year, for a total coverage of 19 vertebrat...

  9. The UCSC Archaeal Genome Browser: 2012 update

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Patricia P.; Holmes, Andrew D.; Smith, Andrew M.; Tran, Danny; Lowe, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    The UCSC Archaeal Genome Browser (http://archaea.ucsc.edu) offers a graphical web-based resource for exploration and discovery within archaeal and other selected microbial genomes. By bringing together existing gene annotations, gene expression data, multiple-genome alignments, pre-computed sequence comparisons and other specialized analysis tracks, the genome browser is a powerful aggregator of varied genomic information. The genome browser environment maintains the current look-and-feel of ...

  10. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-07-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org.

  11. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org. PMID:23748955

  12. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2017 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyner, Cath; Barber, Galt P; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Diekhans, Mark; Eisenhart, Christopher; Fischer, Clayton M; Gibson, David; Gonzalez, Jairo Navarro; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Heitner, Steve; Hinrichs, Angie S; Karolchik, Donna; Lee, Brian T; Lee, Christopher M; Nejad, Parisa; Raney, Brian J; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Speir, Matthew L; Villarreal, Chris; Vivian, John; Zweig, Ann S; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2017-01-04

    Since its 2001 debut, the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) team has provided continuous support to the international genomics and biomedical communities through a web-based, open source platform designed for the fast, scalable display of sequence alignments and annotations landscaped against a vast collection of quality reference genome assemblies. The browser's publicly accessible databases are the backbone of a rich, integrated bioinformatics tool suite that includes a graphical interface for data queries and downloads, alignment programs, command-line utilities and more. This year's highlights include newly designed home and gateway pages; a new 'multi-region' track display configuration for exon-only, gene-only and custom regions visualization; new genome browsers for three species (brown kiwi, crab-eating macaque and Malayan flying lemur); eight updated genome assemblies; extended support for new data types such as CRAM, RNA-seq expression data and long-range chromatin interaction pairs; and the unveiling of a new supported mirror site in Japan.

  13. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2017 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyner, Cath; Barber, Galt P.; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Diekhans, Mark; Eisenhart, Christopher; Fischer, Clayton M.; Gibson, David; Gonzalez, Jairo Navarro; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Heitner, Steve; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Karolchik, Donna; Lee, Brian T.; Lee, Christopher M.; Nejad, Parisa; Raney, Brian J.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Speir, Matthew L.; Villarreal, Chris; Vivian, John; Zweig, Ann S.; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M.; Kent, W. James

    2017-01-01

    Since its 2001 debut, the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) team has provided continuous support to the international genomics and biomedical communities through a web-based, open source platform designed for the fast, scalable display of sequence alignments and annotations landscaped against a vast collection of quality reference genome assemblies. The browser's publicly accessible databases are the backbone of a rich, integrated bioinformatics tool suite that includes a graphical interface for data queries and downloads, alignment programs, command-line utilities and more. This year's highlights include newly designed home and gateway pages; a new ‘multi-region’ track display configuration for exon-only, gene-only and custom regions visualization; new genome browsers for three species (brown kiwi, crab-eating macaque and Malayan flying lemur); eight updated genome assemblies; extended support for new data types such as CRAM, RNA-seq expression data and long-range chromatin interaction pairs; and the unveiling of a new supported mirror site in Japan. PMID:27899642

  14. The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser: update 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, J Zachary; Benz, Stephen C; Craft, Brian; Szeto, Christopher; Kober, Kord M; Meyer, Laurence; Vaske, Charles J; Goldman, Mary; Smith, Kayla E; Kuhn, Robert M; Karolchik, Donna; Kent, W James; Stuart, Joshua M; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2011-01-01

    The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser (https://genome-cancer.ucsc.edu) comprises a suite of web-based tools to integrate, visualize and analyze cancer genomics and clinical data. The browser displays whole-genome views of genome-wide experimental measurements for multiple samples alongside their associated clinical information. Multiple data sets can be viewed simultaneously as coordinated 'heatmap tracks' to compare across studies or different data modalities. Users can order, filter, aggregate, classify and display data interactively based on any given feature set including clinical features, annotated biological pathways and user-contributed collections of genes. Integrated standard statistical tools provide dynamic quantitative analysis within all available data sets. The browser hosts a growing body of publicly available cancer genomics data from a variety of cancer types, including data generated from the Cancer Genome Atlas project. Multiple consortiums use the browser on confidential prepublication data enabled by private installations. Many new features have been added, including the hgMicroscope tumor image viewer, hgSignature for real-time genomic signature evaluation on any browser track, and 'PARADIGM' pathway tracks to display integrative pathway activities. The browser is integrated with the UCSC Genome Browser; thus inheriting and integrating the Genome Browser's rich set of human biology and genetics data that enhances the interpretability of the cancer genomics data.

  15. myGenomeBrowser: building and sharing your own genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrere, Sébastien; Gouzy, Jérôme

    2017-04-15

    myGenomeBrowser is a web-based environment that provides biologists with a way to build, query and share their genome browsers. This tool, that builds on JBrowse, is designed to give users more autonomy while simplifying and minimizing intervention from system administrators. We have extended genome browser basic features to allow users to query, analyze and share their data. myGenomeBrowser is freely available at https://bbric-pipelines.toulouse.inra.fr/myGenomeBrowser and includes tutorial screencasts. Source code and installation instructions can be found at https://framagit.org/BBRIC/myGenomeBrowser . myGenomeBrowser is open-source and mainly implemented in Perl, JavaScript, Apache and Docker. sebastien.carrere@inra.fr.

  16. The UCSC Archaeal Genome Browser: 2012 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patricia P; Holmes, Andrew D; Smith, Andrew M; Tran, Danny; Lowe, Todd M

    2012-01-01

    The UCSC Archaeal Genome Browser (http://archaea.ucsc.edu) offers a graphical web-based resource for exploration and discovery within archaeal and other selected microbial genomes. By bringing together existing gene annotations, gene expression data, multiple-genome alignments, pre-computed sequence comparisons and other specialized analysis tracks, the genome browser is a powerful aggregator of varied genomic information. The genome browser environment maintains the current look-and-feel of the vertebrate UCSC Genome Browser, but also integrates archaeal and bacterial-specific tracks with a few graphic display enhancements. The browser currently contains 115 archaeal genomes, plus 31 genomes of viruses known to infect archaea. Some of the recently developed or enhanced tracks visualize data from published high-throughput RNA-sequencing studies, the NCBI Conserved Domain Database, sequences from pre-genome sequencing studies, predicted gene boundaries from three different protein gene prediction algorithms, tRNAscan-SE gene predictions with RNA secondary structures and CRISPR locus predictions. We have also developed a companion resource, the Archaeal COG Browser, to provide better search and display of arCOG gene function classifications, including their phylogenetic distribution among available archaeal genomes.

  17. RNASeqBrowser: a genome browser for simultaneous visualization of raw strand specific RNAseq reads and UCSC genome browser custom tracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jiyuan; Lai, John; Wood, David L A; Sajjanhar, Atul; Wang, Chenwei; Tevz, Gregor; Lehman, Melanie L; Nelson, Colleen C

    2015-03-01

    Strand specific RNAseq data is now more common in RNAseq projects. Visualizing RNAseq data has become an important matter in Analysis of sequencing data. The most widely used visualization tool is the UCSC genome browser that introduced the custom track concept that enabled researchers to simultaneously visualize gene expression at a particular locus from multiple experiments. Our objective of the software tool is to provide friendly interface for visualization of RNAseq datasets. This paper introduces a visualization tool (RNASeqBrowser) that incorporates and extends the functionality of the UCSC genome browser. For example, RNASeqBrowser simultaneously displays read coverage, SNPs, InDels and raw read tracks with other BED and wiggle tracks -- all being dynamically built from the BAM file. Paired reads are also connected in the browser to enable easier identification of novel exon/intron borders and chimaeric transcripts. Strand specific RNAseq data is also supported by RNASeqBrowser that displays reads above (positive strand transcript) or below (negative strand transcripts) a central line. Finally, RNASeqBrowser was designed for ease of use for users with few bioinformatic skills, and incorporates the features of many genome browsers into one platform. The features of RNASeqBrowser: (1) RNASeqBrowser integrates UCSC genome browser and NGS visualization tools such as IGV. It extends the functionality of the UCSC genome browser by adding several new types of tracks to show NGS data such as individual raw reads, SNPs and InDels. (2) RNASeqBrowser can dynamically generate RNA secondary structure. It is useful for identifying non-coding RNA such as miRNA. (3) Overlaying NGS wiggle data is helpful in displaying differential expression and is simple to implement in RNASeqBrowser. (4) NGS data accumulates a lot of raw reads. Thus, RNASeqBrowser collapses exact duplicate reads to reduce visualization space. Normal PC's can show many windows of NGS individual raw reads

  18. The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser: update 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Mary; Craft, Brian; Swatloski, Teresa; Ellrott, Kyle; Cline, Melissa; Diekhans, Mark; Ma, Singer; Wilks, Chris; Stuart, Josh; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2013-01-01

    The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser (https://genome-cancer.ucsc.edu/) is a set of web-based tools to display, investigate and analyse cancer genomics data and its associated clinical information. The browser provides whole-genome to base-pair level views of several different types of genomics data, including some next-generation sequencing platforms. The ability to view multiple datasets together allows users to make comparisons across different data and cancer types. Biological pathways, collections of genes, genomic or clinical information can be used to sort, aggregate and zoom into a group of samples. We currently display an expanding set of data from various sources, including 201 datasets from 22 TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) cancers as well as data from Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia and Stand Up To Cancer. New features include a completely redesigned user interface with an interactive tutorial and updated documentation. We have also added data downloads, additional clinical heatmap features, and an updated Tumor Image Browser based on Google Maps. New security features allow authenticated users access to private datasets hosted by several different consortia through the public website.

  19. ABrowse - a customizable next-generation genome browser framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Lei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapid growth of genome sequencing projects, genome browser is becoming indispensable, not only as a visualization system but also as an interactive platform to support open data access and collaborative work. Thus a customizable genome browser framework with rich functions and flexible configuration is needed to facilitate various genome research projects. Results Based on next-generation web technologies, we have developed a general-purpose genome browser framework ABrowse which provides interactive browsing experience, open data access and collaborative work support. By supporting Google-map-like smooth navigation, ABrowse offers end users highly interactive browsing experience. To facilitate further data analysis, multiple data access approaches are supported for external platforms to retrieve data from ABrowse. To promote collaborative work, an online user-space is provided for end users to create, store and share comments, annotations and landmarks. For data providers, ABrowse is highly customizable and configurable. The framework provides a set of utilities to import annotation data conveniently. To build ABrowse on existing annotation databases, data providers could specify SQL statements according to database schema. And customized pages for detailed information display of annotation entries could be easily plugged in. For developers, new drawing strategies could be integrated into ABrowse for new types of annotation data. In addition, standard web service is provided for data retrieval remotely, providing underlying machine-oriented programming interface for open data access. Conclusions ABrowse framework is valuable for end users, data providers and developers by providing rich user functions and flexible customization approaches. The source code is published under GNU Lesser General Public License v3.0 and is accessible at http://www.abrowse.org/. To demonstrate all the features of ABrowse, a live demo for

  20. Rgb: a scriptable genome browser for R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareschal, Sylvain; Dubois, Sydney; Lecroq, Thierry; Jardin, Fabrice

    2014-08-01

    Thanks to its free licensing and the development of initiatives like Bioconductor, R has become an essential part of the bioinformatics toolbox in the past years and is more and more confronted with genomically located data. While separate solutions are available to manipulate and visualize such data, no R package currently offers the efficiency required for computationally intensive tasks such as interactive genome browsing. The package proposed here fulfills this specific need, providing a multilevel interface suitable for most needs, from a completely interfaced genome browser to low-level classes and methods. Its time and memory efficiency have been challenged in a human dataset, where it outperformed existing solutions by several orders of magnitude. R sources and packages are freely available at the CRAN repository and dedicated Web site: http://bioinformatics.ovsa.fr/Rgb. Distributed under the GPL 3 license, compatible with most operating systems (Windows, Linux, Mac OS) and architectures. maressyl@gmail.com or fabrice.jardin@chb.unicancer.fr Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. CompaGB: An open framework for genome browsers comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiapello Hélène

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tools to visualize and explore genomes hold a central place in genomics and the diversity of genome browsers has increased dramatically over the last few years. It often turns out to be a daunting task to compare and choose a well-adapted genome browser, as multidisciplinary knowledge is required to carry out this task and the number of tools, functionalities and features are overwhelming. Findings To assist in this task, we propose a community-based framework based on two cornerstones: (i the implementation of industry promoted software qualification method (QSOS adapted for genome browser evaluations, and (ii a web resource providing numerous facilities either for visualizing comparisons or performing new evaluations. We formulated 60 criteria specifically for genome browsers, and incorporated another 65 directly from QSOS's generic section. Those criteria aim to answer versatile needs, ranging from a biologist whose interest primarily lies into user-friendly and informative functionalities, a bioinformatician who wants to integrate the genome browser into a wider framework, or a computer scientist who might choose a software according to more technical features. We developed a dedicated web application to enrich the existing QSOS functionalities (weighting of criteria, user profile with features of interest to a community-based framework: easy management of evolving data, user comments... Conclusions The framework is available at http://genome.jouy.inra.fr/CompaGB. It is open to anyone who wishes to participate in the evaluations. It helps the scientific community to (1 choose a genome browser that would better fit their particular project, (2 visualize features comparatively with easily accessible formats, such as tables or radar plots and (3 perform their own evaluation against the defined criteria. To illustrate the CompaGB functionalities, we have evaluated seven genome browsers according to the implemented methodology

  2. Family genome browser: visualizing genomes with pedigree information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Liran; Liu, Yongzhuang; Wang, Yongtian; Teng, Mingxiang; Zang, Tianyi; Wang, Yadong

    2015-07-15

    Families with inherited diseases are widely used in Mendelian/complex disease studies. Owing to the advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies, family genome sequencing becomes more and more prevalent. Visualizing family genomes can greatly facilitate human genetics studies and personalized medicine. However, due to the complex genetic relationships and high similarities among genomes of consanguineous family members, family genomes are difficult to be visualized in traditional genome visualization framework. How to visualize the family genome variants and their functions with integrated pedigree information remains a critical challenge. We developed the Family Genome Browser (FGB) to provide comprehensive analysis and visualization for family genomes. The FGB can visualize family genomes in both individual level and variant level effectively, through integrating genome data with pedigree information. Family genome analysis, including determination of parental origin of the variants, detection of de novo mutations, identification of potential recombination events and identical-by-decent segments, etc., can be performed flexibly. Diverse annotations for the family genome variants, such as dbSNP memberships, linkage disequilibriums, genes, variant effects, potential phenotypes, etc., are illustrated as well. Moreover, the FGB can automatically search de novo mutations and compound heterozygous variants for a selected individual, and guide investigators to find high-risk genes with flexible navigation options. These features enable users to investigate and understand family genomes intuitively and systematically. The FGB is available at http://mlg.hit.edu.cn/FGB/. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The GLOBE 3D Genome Browser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert); M.J. Moorhouse (Michael)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe combination of genome sequence and structure, its annotation and experimental data in an accessible and comprehensible way is a major challenge. Increasingly, there are a large number of extremely divergent data sets: the sequence itself, genes, regulatory regions, various forms

  4. Introgression browser: high-throughput whole-genome SNP visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflitos, Saulo Alves; Sanchez-Perez, Gabino; de Ridder, Dick; Fransz, Paul; Schranz, Michael E; de Jong, Hans; Peters, Sander A

    2015-04-01

    Breeding by introgressive hybridization is a pivotal strategy to broaden the genetic basis of crops. Usually, the desired traits are monitored in consecutive crossing generations by marker-assisted selection, but their analyses fail in chromosome regions where crossover recombinants are rare or not viable. Here, we present the Introgression Browser (iBrowser), a bioinformatics tool aimed at visualizing introgressions at nucleotide or SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) accuracy. The software selects homozygous SNPs from Variant Call Format (VCF) information and filters out heterozygous SNPs, multi-nucleotide polymorphisms (MNPs) and insertion-deletions (InDels). For data analysis iBrowser makes use of sliding windows, but if needed it can generate any desired fragmentation pattern through General Feature Format (GFF) information. In an example of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) accessions we visualize SNP patterns and elucidate both position and boundaries of the introgressions. We also show that our tool is capable of identifying alien DNA in a panel of the closely related S. pimpinellifolium by examining phylogenetic relationships of the introgressed segments in tomato. In a third example, we demonstrate the power of the iBrowser in a panel of 597 Arabidopsis accessions, detecting the boundaries of a SNP-free region around a polymorphic 1.17 Mbp inverted segment on the short arm of chromosome 4. The architecture and functionality of iBrowser makes the software appropriate for a broad set of analyses including SNP mining, genome structure analysis, and pedigree analysis. Its functionality, together with the capability to process large data sets and efficient visualization of sequence variation, makes iBrowser a valuable breeding tool.

  5. Rice-Map: a new-generation rice genome browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Jingchu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concurrent release of rice genome sequences for two subspecies (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica and Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica facilitates rice studies at the whole genome level. Since the advent of high-throughput analysis, huge amounts of functional genomics data have been delivered rapidly, making an integrated online genome browser indispensable for scientists to visualize and analyze these data. Based on next-generation web technologies and high-throughput experimental data, we have developed Rice-Map, a novel genome browser for researchers to navigate, analyze and annotate rice genome interactively. Description More than one hundred annotation tracks (81 for japonica and 82 for indica have been compiled and loaded into Rice-Map. These pre-computed annotations cover gene models, transcript evidences, expression profiling, epigenetic modifications, inter-species and intra-species homologies, genetic markers and other genomic features. In addition to these pre-computed tracks, registered users can interactively add comments and research notes to Rice-Map as User-Defined Annotation entries. By smoothly scrolling, dragging and zooming, users can browse various genomic features simultaneously at multiple scales. On-the-fly analysis for selected entries could be performed through dedicated bioinformatic analysis platforms such as WebLab and Galaxy. Furthermore, a BioMart-powered data warehouse "Rice Mart" is offered for advanced users to fetch bulk datasets based on complex criteria. Conclusions Rice-Map delivers abundant up-to-date japonica and indica annotations, providing a valuable resource for both computational and bench biologists. Rice-Map is publicly accessible at http://www.ricemap.org/, with all data available for free downloading.

  6. Choosing a genome browser for a Model Organism Database: surveying the maize community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Taner Z; Harper, Lisa C; Schaeffer, Mary L; Andorf, Carson M; Seigfried, Trent E; Campbell, Darwin A; Lawrence, Carolyn J

    2010-01-01

    As the B73 maize genome sequencing project neared completion, MaizeGDB began to integrate a graphical genome browser with its existing web interface and database. To ensure that maize researchers would optimally benefit from the potential addition of a genome browser to the existing MaizeGDB resource, personnel at MaizeGDB surveyed researchers' needs. Collected data indicate that existing genome browsers for maize were inadequate and suggest implementation of a browser with quick interface and intuitive tools would meet most researchers' needs. Here, we document the survey's outcomes, review functionalities of available genome browser software platforms and offer our rationale for choosing the GBrowse software suite for MaizeGDB. Because the genome as represented within the MaizeGDB Genome Browser is tied to detailed phenotypic data, molecular marker information, available stocks, etc., the MaizeGDB Genome Browser represents a novel mechanism by which the researchers can leverage maize sequence information toward crop improvement directly. Database URL: http://gbrowse.maizegdb.org/

  7. ECR Browser: A Tool For Visualizing And Accessing Data From Comparisons Of Multiple Vertebrate Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Nobrega, M A

    2004-01-06

    The increasing number of vertebrate genomes being sequenced in draft or finished form provide a unique opportunity to study and decode the language of DNA sequence through comparative genome alignments. However, novel tools and strategies are required to accommodate this increasing volume of genomic information and to facilitate experimental annotation of genome function. Here we present the ECR Browser, a tool that provides an easy and dynamic access to whole genome alignments of human, mouse, rat and fish sequences. This web-based tool (http://ecrbrowser.dcode.org) provides the starting point for discovery of novel genes, identification of distant gene regulatory elements and prediction of transcription factor binding sites. The genome alignment portal of the ECR Browser also permits fast and automated alignment of any user-submitted sequence to the genome of choice. The interconnection of the ECR browser with other DNA sequence analysis tools creates a unique portal for studying and exploring vertebrate genomes.

  8. Savant Genome Browser 2: visualization and analysis for population-scale genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Marc; Smith, Eric J M; Brook, Andrew; Strbenac, Dario; Turner, Brian; Mezlini, Aziz M; Robinson, Mark D; Wodak, Shoshana J; Brudno, Michael

    2012-07-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies are providing an unprecedented capacity for data generation, and there is a corresponding need for efficient data exploration and analysis capabilities. Although most existing tools for HTS data analysis are developed for either automated (e.g. genotyping) or visualization (e.g. genome browsing) purposes, such tools are most powerful when combined. For example, integration of visualization and computation allows users to iteratively refine their analyses by updating computational parameters within the visual framework in real-time. Here we introduce the second version of the Savant Genome Browser, a standalone program for visual and computational analysis of HTS data. Savant substantially improves upon its predecessor and existing tools by introducing innovative visualization modes and navigation interfaces for several genomic datatypes, and synergizing visual and automated analyses in a way that is powerful yet easy even for non-expert users. We also present a number of plugins that were developed by the Savant Community, which demonstrate the power of integrating visual and automated analyses using Savant. The Savant Genome Browser is freely available (open source) at www.savantbrowser.com.

  9. The UCSC Proteome Browser

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Fan; Tom H Pringle; Kuhn, Robert M.; Karolchik, Donna; Diekhans, Mark; Haussler, David; Kent, W. James

    2004-01-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Proteome Browser provides a wealth of protein information presented in graphical images and with links to other protein-related Internet sites. The Proteome Browser is tightly integrated with the UCSC Genome Browser. For the first time, Genome Browser users have both the genome and proteome worlds at their fingertips simultaneously. The Proteome Browser displays tracks of protein and genomic sequences, exon structure, polarity, hydrophobicity, lo...

  10. The project browser: Supporting information access for a project team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, A.H.M.; Kuiper, I.; Groenewegen, P.; Post, W.M.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. The objective of our study was to design and evaluate a user interface concept for a so-called Project Browser, following a user-centered design method. Previous work has suggested that users prefer to access project-related information instrumental to the task they have to carry out. Firs

  11. The Project Browser : Supporting information access for a project team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, A.H.M.; Kuijper, I.; Groenewegen, P.L.M.; Post, W.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of our study was to design and evaluate a user interface concept for a so-called Project Browser, following a user-centered design method. Previous work has suggested that users prefer to access project-related information instrumental to the task they have to carry out. First, a domai

  12. Rice TOGO Browser: A platform to retrieve integrated information on rice functional and applied genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Antonio, Baltazar A; Sato, Yutaka; Miyao, Akio; Namiki, Nobukazu; Yonemaru, Jun-ichi; Minami, Hiroshi; Kamatsuki, Kaori; Shimura, Kan; Shimizu, Yuji; Hirochika, Hirohiko

    2011-02-01

    The Rice TOGO Browser is an online public resource designed to facilitate integration and visualization of mapping data of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)/P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC) clones, genes, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)/simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and phenotype data represented as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) onto the genome sequence, and to provide a platform for more efficient utilization of genome information from the point of view of applied genomics as well as functional genomics. Three search options, namely keyword search, region search and trait search, generate various types of data in a user-friendly interface with three distinct viewers, a chromosome viewer, an integrated map viewer and a sequence viewer, thereby providing the opportunity to view the position of genes and/or QTLs at the chromosomal level and to retrieve any sequence information in a user-defined genome region. Furthermore, the gene list, marker list and genome sequence in a specified region delineated by RFLP/SSR markers and any sequences designed as primers can be viewed and downloaded to support forward genetics approaches. An additional feature of this database is the graphical viewer for BLAST search to reveal information not only for regions with significant sequence similarity but also for regions adjacent to those with similarity but with no hits between sequences. An easy to use and intuitive user interface can help a wide range of users in retrieving integrated mapping information including agronomically important traits on the rice genome sequence. The database can be accessed at http://agri-trait.dna.affrc.go.jp/.

  13. TraV: a genome context sensitive transcriptome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Sascha; Wiegand, Sandra; Liesegang, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies like Illumina and ABI Solid enable the investigation of transcriptional activities of genomes. While read mapping tools have been continually improved to enable the processing of the increasing number of reads generated by NGS technologies, analysis and visualization tools are struggling with the amount of data they are presented with. Current tools are capable of handling at most two to three datasets simultaneously before they are limited by available memory or due to processing overhead. In order to process fifteen transcriptome sequencing experiments of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 obtained in a previous study, we developed TraV, a RNA-Seq analysis and visualization tool. The analytical methods are designed for prokaryotic RNA-seq experiments. TraV calculates single nucleotide activities from the mapping information to visualize and analyze multiple transcriptome sequencing experiments. The use of nucleotide activities instead of single read mapping information is highly memory efficient without incurring a processing overhead. TraV is available at http://appmibio.uni-goettingen.de/index.php?sec=serv.

  14. iPiG: integrating peptide spectrum matches into genome browser visualizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Kuhring

    Full Text Available Proteogenomic approaches have gained increasing popularity, however it is still difficult to integrate mass spectrometry identifications with genomic data due to differing data formats. To address this difficulty, we introduce iPiG as a tool for the integration of peptide identifications from mass spectrometry experiments into existing genome browser visualizations. Thereby, the concurrent analysis of proteomic and genomic data is simplified and proteomic results can directly be compared to genomic data. iPiG is freely available from https://sourceforge.net/projects/ipig/. It is implemented in Java and can be run as a stand-alone tool with a graphical user-interface or integrated into existing workflows. Supplementary data are available at PLOS ONE online.

  15. GSuite HyperBrowser: integrative analysis of dataset collections across the genome and epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovski, Boris; Vodák, Daniel; Gundersen, Sveinung; Domanska, Diana; Azab, Abdulrahman; Holden, Lars; Holden, Marit; Grytten, Ivar; Rand, Knut; Drabløs, Finn; Johansen, Morten; Mora, Antonio; Lund-Andersen, Christin; Fromm, Bastian; Eskeland, Ragnhild; Gabrielsen, Odd Stokke; Ferkingstad, Egil; Nakken, Sigve; Bengtsen, Mads; Nederbragt, Alexander Johan; Thorarensen, Hildur Sif; Akse, Johannes Andreas; Glad, Ingrid; Hovig, Eivind; Sandve, Geir Kjetil

    2017-07-01

    Recent large-scale undertakings such as ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics have generated experimental data mapped to the human reference genome (as genomic tracks) representing a variety of functional elements across a large number of cell types. Despite the high potential value of these publicly available data for a broad variety of investigations, little attention has been given to the analytical methodology necessary for their widespread utilisation. We here present a first principled treatment of the analysis of collections of genomic tracks. We have developed novel computational and statistical methodology to permit comparative and confirmatory analyses across multiple and disparate data sources. We delineate a set of generic questions that are useful across a broad range of investigations and discuss the implications of choosing different statistical measures and null models. Examples include contrasting analyses across different tissues or diseases. The methodology has been implemented in a comprehensive open-source software system, the GSuite HyperBrowser. To make the functionality accessible to biologists, and to facilitate reproducible analysis, we have also developed a web-based interface providing an expertly guided and customizable way of utilizing the methodology. With this system, many novel biological questions can flexibly be posed and rapidly answered. Through a combination of streamlined data acquisition, interoperable representation of dataset collections, and customizable statistical analysis with guided setup and interpretation, the GSuite HyperBrowser represents a first comprehensive solution for integrative analysis of track collections across the genome and epigenome. The software is available at: https://hyperbrowser.uio.no.

  16. SynTView — an interactive multi-view genome browser for next-generation comparative microorganism genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Dynamic visualisation interfaces are required to explore the multiple microbial genome data now available, especially those obtained by high-throughput sequencing — a.k.a. “Next-Generation Sequencing” (NGS) — technologies; they would also be useful for “standard” annotated genomes whose chromosome organizations may be compared. Although various software systems are available, few offer an optimal combination of feature-rich capabilities, non-static user interfaces and multi-genome data handling. Results We developed SynTView, a comparative and interactive viewer for microbial genomes, designed to run as either a web-based tool (Flash technology) or a desktop application (AIR environment). The basis of the program is a generic genome browser with sub-maps holding information about genomic objects (annotations). The software is characterised by the presentation of syntenic organisations of microbial genomes and the visualisation of polymorphism data (typically Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms — SNPs) along these genomes; these features are accessible to the user in an integrated way. A variety of specialised views are available and are all dynamically inter-connected (including linear and circular multi-genome representations, dot plots, phylogenetic profiles, SNP density maps, and more). SynTView is not linked to any particular database, allowing the user to plug his own data into the system seamlessly, and use external web services for added functionalities. SynTView has now been used in several genome sequencing projects to help biologists make sense out of huge data sets. Conclusions The most important assets of SynTView are: (i) the interactivity due to the Flash technology; (ii) the capabilities for dynamic interaction between many specialised views; and (iii) the flexibility allowing various user data sets to be integrated. It can thus be used to investigate massive amounts of information efficiently at the chromosome level. This

  17. PGen: large-scale genomic variations analysis workflow and browser in SoyKB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Khan, Saad M; Wang, Juexin; Rynge, Mats; Zhang, Yuanxun; Zeng, Shuai; Chen, Shiyuan; Maldonado Dos Santos, Joao V; Valliyodan, Babu; Calyam, Prasad P; Merchant, Nirav; Nguyen, Henry T; Xu, Dong; Joshi, Trupti

    2016-10-06

    With the advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and significant reductions in sequencing costs, it is now possible to sequence large collections of germplasm in crops for detecting genome-scale genetic variations and to apply the knowledge towards improvements in traits. To efficiently facilitate large-scale NGS resequencing data analysis of genomic variations, we have developed "PGen", an integrated and optimized workflow using the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) high-performance computing (HPC) virtual system, iPlant cloud data storage resources and Pegasus workflow management system (Pegasus-WMS). The workflow allows users to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion-deletions (indels), perform SNP annotations and conduct copy number variation analyses on multiple resequencing datasets in a user-friendly and seamless way. We have developed both a Linux version in GitHub ( https://github.com/pegasus-isi/PGen-GenomicVariations-Workflow ) and a web-based implementation of the PGen workflow integrated within the Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB), ( http://soykb.org/Pegasus/index.php ). Using PGen, we identified 10,218,140 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1,398,982 indels from analysis of 106 soybean lines sequenced at 15X coverage. 297,245 non-synonymous SNPs and 3330 copy number variation (CNV) regions were identified from this analysis. SNPs identified using PGen from additional soybean resequencing projects adding to 500+ soybean germplasm lines in total have been integrated. These SNPs are being utilized for trait improvement using genotype to phenotype prediction approaches developed in-house. In order to browse and access NGS data easily, we have also developed an NGS resequencing data browser ( http://soykb.org/NGS_Resequence/NGS_index.php ) within SoyKB to provide easy access to SNP and downstream analysis results for soybean researchers. PGen workflow has been optimized for the most

  18. A Browser-Server-Based Tele-audiology System That Supports Multiple Hearing Test Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianchu Jason; Yao, Daoyuan; Givens, Gregg

    2015-09-01

    Millions of global citizens suffering from hearing disorders have limited or no access to much needed hearing healthcare. Although tele-audiology presents a solution to alleviate this problem, existing remote hearing diagnosis systems support only pure-tone tests, leaving speech and other test procedures unsolved, due to the lack of software and hardware to enable communication required between audiologists and their remote patients. This article presents a comprehensive remote hearing test system that integrates the two most needed hearing test procedures: a pure-tone audiogram and a speech test. This enhanced system is composed of a Web application server, an embedded smart Internet-Bluetooth(®) (Bluetooth SIG, Kirkland, WA) gateway (or console device), and a Bluetooth-enabled audiometer. Several graphical user interfaces and a relational database are hosted on the application server. The console device has been designed to support the tests and auxiliary communication between the local site and the remote site. The study was conducted at an audiology laboratory. Pure-tone audiogram and speech test results from volunteers tested with this tele-audiology system are comparable with results from the traditional face-to-face approach. This browser-server-based comprehensive tele-audiology offers a flexible platform to expand hearing services to traditionally underserved groups.

  19. Webvise: Browser and Proxy support for open hypermedia structuring mechanisms on the WWW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Sloth, Lennard; Ørbæk, Peter

    1999-01-01

    is available on the Web via an ordinary URL. The best user interface for creating and manipulating the structures is currently provided for the Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.x browser through COM integration that utilizes the Explorer's DOM representation of Web-pages. But the structures can also...

  20. Statistical Viewer: a tool to upload and integrate linkage and association data as plots displayed within the Ensembl genome browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauser Elizabeth R

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To facilitate efficient selection and the prioritization of candidate complex disease susceptibility genes for association analysis, increasingly comprehensive annotation tools are essential to integrate, visualize and analyze vast quantities of disparate data generated by genomic screens, public human genome sequence annotation and ancillary biological databases. We have developed a plug-in package for Ensembl called "Statistical Viewer" that facilitates the analysis of genomic features and annotation in the regions of interest defined by linkage analysis. Results Statistical Viewer is an add-on package to the open-source Ensembl Genome Browser and Annotation System that displays disease study-specific linkage and/or association data as 2 dimensional plots in new panels in the context of Ensembl's Contig View and Cyto View pages. An enhanced upload server facilitates the upload of statistical data, as well as additional feature annotation to be displayed in DAS tracts, in the form of Excel Files. The Statistical View panel, drawn directly under the ideogram, illustrates lod score values for markers from a study of interest that are plotted against their position in base pairs. A module called "Get Map" easily converts the genetic locations of markers to genomic coordinates. The graph is placed under the corresponding ideogram features a synchronized vertical sliding selection box that is seamlessly integrated into Ensembl's Contig- and Cyto- View pages to choose the region to be displayed in Ensembl's "Overview" and "Detailed View" panels. To resolve Association and Fine mapping data plots, a "Detailed Statistic View" plot corresponding to the "Detailed View" may be displayed underneath. Conclusion Features mapping to regions of linkage are accentuated when Statistic View is used in conjunction with the Distributed Annotation System (DAS to display supplemental laboratory information such as differentially expressed disease

  1. ECR Browser: a tool for visualizing and accessing data from comparisons of multiple vertebrate genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ovcharenko, Ivan; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Stubbs, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    With an increasing number of vertebrate genomes being sequenced in draft or finished form, unique opportunities for decoding the language of DNA sequence through comparative genome alignments have arisen. However, novel tools and strategies are required to accommodate this large volume of genomic information and to facilitate the transfer of predictions generated by comparative sequence alignment to researchers focused on experimental annotation of genome function. Here, we present the ECR Br...

  2. The SeqWord Genome Browser: an online tool for the identification and visualization of atypical regions of bacterial genomes through oligonucleotide usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tümmler Burkhard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data mining in large DNA sequences is a major challenge in microbial genomics and bioinformatics. Oligonucleotide usage (OU patterns provide a wealth of information for large scale sequence analysis and visualization. The purpose of this research was to make OU statistical analysis available as a novel web-based tool for functional genomics and annotation. The tool is also available as a downloadable package. Results The SeqWord Genome Browser (SWGB was developed to visualize the natural compositional variation of DNA sequences. The applet is also used for identification of divergent genomic regions both in annotated sequences of bacterial chromosomes, plasmids, phages and viruses, and in raw DNA sequences prior to annotation by comparing local and global OU patterns. The applet allows fast and reliable identification of clusters of horizontally transferred genomic islands, large multi-domain genes and genes for ribosomal RNA. Within the majority of genomic fragments (also termed genomic core sequence, regions enriched with housekeeping genes, ribosomal proteins and the regions rich in pseudogenes or genetic vestiges may be contrasted. Conclusion The SWGB applet presents a range of comprehensive OU statistical parameters calculated for a range of bacterial species, plasmids and phages. It is available on the Internet at http://www.bi.up.ac.za/SeqWord/mhhapplet.php.

  3. G3DV: A new 3D genome browser and experimental data viewer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Moorhouse (Michael); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Lesnussa (Michael); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.E.M.M. de Klein (Annelies)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are tremendous co-evolutionary holistic systems for molecular storage, processing and fabrication of information. Their system-biological complexity remains, however, still largely mysterious, despite immense sequencing achievements and huge advances in the understanding of t

  4. Proteomics Data on UCSC Genome Browser - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium scientists are working together with the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genomics Institute to provide public access to cancer proteomics data.

  5. GSuite HyperBrowser: integrative analysis of dataset collections across the genome and epigenome

    OpenAIRE

    Simovski, Boris; Vodák, Daniel; Gundersen, Sveinung; Domanska, Diana; Azab, Abdulrahman; Holden, Lars; Holden, Marit; Grytten, Ivar; Rand, Knut; Drabløs, Finn; Johansen, Morten; Mora, Antonio; Lund-Andersen, Christin; Fromm, Bastian; Eskeland, Ragnhild

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Recent large-scale undertakings such as ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics have generated experimental data mapped to the human reference genome (as genomic tracks) representing a variety of functional elements across a large number of cell types. Despite the high potential value of these publicly available data for a broad variety of investigations, little attention has been given to the analytical methodology necessary for their widespread utilisation. Findings: We here pre...

  6. Web Browser Trends and Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin-Jones, Bob

    2000-01-01

    Discusses Web browsers and how their capabilities have been expanded, support for Web browsing on different devices (cell phones, palmtop computers, TV sets), and browser support for the next-generation Web authoring language, XML ("extensible markup language"). (Author/VWL)

  7. The dbGaP data browser: a new tool for browsing dbGaP controlled-access genomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kira M.; Langlais, Kristofor; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Fletcher-Hoppe, Colette; Krasnewich, Donna; Leeds, Hilary S.; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Godynskiy, Georgy; Schneider, Valerie A.; Ramos, Erin M.; Sherry, Stephen T.

    2017-01-01

    The database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) Data Browser (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gap/ddb/) was developed in response to requests from the scientific community for a resource that enable view-only access to summary-level information and individual-level genotype and sequence data associated with phenotypic features maintained in the controlled-access tier of dbGaP. Until now, the dbGaP controlled-access environment required investigators to submit a data access request, wait for Data Access Committee review, download each data set and locally examine them for potentially relevant information. Existing unrestricted-access genomic data browsing resources (e.g. http://evs.gs.washington.edu/EVS/, http://exac.broadinstitute.org/) provide only summary statistics or aggregate allele frequencies. The dbGaP Data Browser serves as a third solution, providing researchers with view-only access to a compilation of individual-level data from general research use (GRU) studies through a simplified controlled-access process. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) will continue to improve the Browser in response to user feedback and believes that this tool may decrease unnecessary download requests, while still facilitating responsible genomic data-sharing. PMID:27899644

  8. IMGD: an integrated platform supporting comparative genomics and phylogenetics of insect mitochondrial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Kyongyong

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequences and organization of the mitochondrial genome have been used as markers to investigate evolutionary history and relationships in many taxonomic groups. The rapidly increasing mitochondrial genome sequences from diverse insects provide ample opportunities to explore various global evolutionary questions in the superclass Hexapoda. To adequately support such questions, it is imperative to establish an informatics platform that facilitates the retrieval and utilization of available mitochondrial genome sequence data. Results The Insect Mitochondrial Genome Database (IMGD is a new integrated platform that archives the mitochondrial genome sequences from 25,747 hexapod species, including 112 completely sequenced and 20 nearly completed genomes and 113,985 partially sequenced mitochondrial genomes. The Species-driven User Interface (SUI of IMGD supports data retrieval and diverse analyses at multi-taxon levels. The Phyloviewer implemented in IMGD provides three methods for drawing phylogenetic trees and displays the resulting trees on the web. The SNP database incorporated to IMGD presents the distribution of SNPs and INDELs in the mitochondrial genomes of multiple isolates within eight species. A newly developed comparative SNU Genome Browser supports the graphical presentation and interactive interface for the identified SNPs/INDELs. Conclusion The IMGD provides a solid foundation for the comparative mitochondrial genomics and phylogenetics of insects. All data and functions described here are available at the web site http://www.imgd.org/.

  9. CFGP 2.0: a versatile web-based platform for supporting comparative and evolutionary genomics of fungi and Oomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Cheong, Kyeongchae; Jung, Kyongyong; Jeon, Jongbum; Lee, Gir-Won; Kang, Seogchan; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Yin-Won; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform (CFGP; http://cfgp.snu.ac.kr/) was publicly open with 65 genomes corresponding to 58 fungal and Oomycete species. The CFGP provided six bioinformatics tools, including a novel tool entitled BLASTMatrix that enables search homologous genes to queries in multiple species simultaneously. CFGP also introduced Favorite, a personalized virtual space for data storage and analysis with these six tools. Since 2007, CFGP has grown to archive 283 genomes corresponding to 152 fungal and Oomycete species as well as 201 genomes that correspond to seven bacteria, 39 plants and 105 animals. In addition, the number of tools in Favorite increased to 27. The Taxonomy Browser of CFGP 2.0 allows users to interactively navigate through a large number of genomes according to their taxonomic positions. The user interface of BLASTMatrix was also improved to facilitate subsequent analyses of retrieved data. A newly developed genome browser, Seoul National University Genome Browser (SNUGB), was integrated into CFGP 2.0 to support graphical presentation of diverse genomic contexts. Based on the standardized genome warehouse of CFGP 2.0, several systematic platforms designed to support studies on selected gene families have been developed. Most of them are connected through Favorite to allow of sharing data across the platforms.

  10. I-pot: a new approach utilising visual and contextual cues to support users in graphical web browser revisitation

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Siu-Tsen; Prior, Stephen D.; Chen, Kuen-Meau

    2010-01-01

    With a quarter of the world’s population now having access to the internet, the area of web efficiency and optimal use is of growing importance to all users. The function of revisitation, where a user wants to return to a website that they have visited in the recent past becomes more important. Current static and textual approaches developed within the latest versions of mainstream web browsers leave much to be desired. This paper suggests a new approach via the use of organic visual and cont...

  11. Bovine Genome Database: supporting community annotation and analysis of the Bos taurus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Childs Kevin L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A goal of the Bovine Genome Database (BGD; http://BovineGenome.org has been to support the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium (BGSAC in the annotation and analysis of the bovine genome. We were faced with several challenges, including the need to maintain consistent quality despite diversity in annotation expertise in the research community, the need to maintain consistent data formats, and the need to minimize the potential duplication of annotation effort. With new sequencing technologies allowing many more eukaryotic genomes to be sequenced, the demand for collaborative annotation is likely to increase. Here we present our approach, challenges and solutions facilitating a large distributed annotation project. Results and Discussion BGD has provided annotation tools that supported 147 members of the BGSAC in contributing 3,871 gene models over a fifteen-week period, and these annotations have been integrated into the bovine Official Gene Set. Our approach has been to provide an annotation system, which includes a BLAST site, multiple genome browsers, an annotation portal, and the Apollo Annotation Editor configured to connect directly to our Chado database. In addition to implementing and integrating components of the annotation system, we have performed computational analyses to create gene evidence tracks and a consensus gene set, which can be viewed on individual gene pages at BGD. Conclusions We have provided annotation tools that alleviate challenges associated with distributed annotation. Our system provides a consistent set of data to all annotators and eliminates the need for annotators to format data. Involving the bovine research community in genome annotation has allowed us to leverage expertise in various areas of bovine biology to provide biological insight into the genome sequence.

  12. SynMap2 and SynMap3D: web-based whole-genome synteny browsers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug-Baltzell, Asher; Stephens, Sean A; Davey, Sean; Scheidegger, Carlos E; Lyons, Eric

    2017-07-15

    Current synteny visualization tools either focus on small regions of sequence and do not illustrate genome-wide trends, or are complicated to use and create visualizations that are difficult to interpret. To address this challenge, The Comparative Genomics Platform (CoGe) has developed two web-based tools to visualize synteny across whole genomes. SynMap2 and SynMap3D allow researchers to explore whole genome synteny patterns (across two or three genomes, respectively) in responsive, web-based visualization and virtual reality environments. Both tools have access to the extensive CoGe genome database (containing over 30 000 genomes) as well as the option for users to upload their own data. By leveraging modern web technologies there is no installation required, making the tools widely accessible and easy to use. Both tools are open source (MIT license) and freely available for use online through CoGe ( https://genomevolution.org ). SynMap2 and SynMap3D can be accessed at http://genomevolution.org/coge/SynMap.pl and http://genomevolution.org/coge/SynMap3D.pl , respectively. Source code is available: https://github.com/LyonsLab/coge . ericlyons@email.arizona.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. The proteome browser web portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Robert J A; Yu, Simon; Kannan, Anitha; Christiansen, Jeffrey H; Beitz, Anthony; Hancock, William S; Nice, Edouard; Smith, A Ian

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the Human Proteome Organization launched the Human Proteome Project (HPP), aimed at identifying and characterizing the proteome of the human body. To support complete coverage, one arm of the project will take a gene- or chromosomal-centric strategy (C-HPP) aimed at identifying at least one protein product from each protein-coding gene. Despite multiple large international biological databases housing genomic and protein data, there is currently no single system that integrates updated pertinent information from each of these data repositories and assembles the information into a searchable format suitable for the type of global proteomics effort proposed by the C-HPP. We have undertaken the goal of producing a data integration and analysis software system and browser for the C-HPP effort and of making data collections from this resource discoverable through metadata repositories, such as Australian National Data Service's Research Data Australia. Here we present our vision and progress toward the goal of developing a comprehensive data integration and analysis software tool that provides a snapshot of currently available proteomic related knowledge around each gene product, which will ultimately assist in analyzing biological function and the study of human physiology in health and disease.

  14. The Pancreatic Islet Regulome Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mularoni, Loris; Ramos-Rodríguez, Mireia; Pasquali, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The pancreatic islet is a highly specialized tissue embedded in the exocrine pancreas whose primary function is that of controlling glucose homeostasis. Thus, understanding the transcriptional control of islet-cell may help to puzzle out the pathogenesis of glucose metabolism disorders. Integrative computational analyses of transcriptomic and epigenomic data allows predicting genomic coordinates of putative regulatory elements across the genome and, decipher tissue-specific functions of the non-coding genome. We herein present the Islet Regulome Browser, a tool that allows fast access and exploration of pancreatic islet epigenomic and transcriptomic data produced by different labs worldwide. The Islet Regulome Browser is now accessible on the internet or may be installed locally. It allows uploading custom tracks as well as providing interactive access to a wealth of information including Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) variants, different classes of regulatory elements, together with enhancer clusters, stretch-enhancers and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic progenitors and adult human pancreatic islets. Integration and visualization of such data may allow a deeper understanding of the regulatory networks driving tissue-specific transcription and guide the identification of regulatory variants. We believe that such tool will facilitate the access to pancreatic islet public genomic datasets providing a major boost to functional genomics studies in glucose metabolism related traits including diabetes. PMID:28261261

  15. The ExAC browser: displaying reference data information from over 60 000 exomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karczewski, Konrad J.; Weisburd, Ben; Thomas, Brett; Solomonson, Matthew; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Kavanagh, David; Hamamsy, Tymor; Lek, Monkol; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Cummings, Beryl B.; Birnbaum, Daniel; Daly, Mark J.; MacArthur, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, hundreds of thousands of humans have had their genomes or exomes sequenced, and access to the resulting data sets can provide valuable information for variant interpretation and understanding gene function. Here, we present a lightweight, flexible browser framework to display large population datasets of genetic variation. We demonstrate its use for exome sequence data from 60 706 individuals in the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC). The ExAC browser provides gene- and transcript-centric displays of variation, a critical view for clinical applications. Additionally, we provide a variant display, which includes population frequency and functional annotation data as well as short read support for the called variant. This browser is open-source, freely available at http://exac.broadinstitute.org, and has already been used extensively by clinical laboratories worldwide. PMID:27899611

  16. INTERNET: WEB BROWSER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainul Bakri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Web browser merupakan alat bagi pengguna untuk melakukan penelusuran di lingkungan Internet baik berupa teks (hypertext maupun gambar, suara atau video (hypermedia yang tersusun secara sistematis dalam suatu Web. Dokumen/teks tersebut sering terdiri dari beberapa halarnan atau bahkan hanya 1 halaman, saling berhubungan dengan dokumen lain melalui tanda tertentu (hyperlink yang biasanya berbentuk huruf-huruf yang berwama lain dan lebih bercahaya atau 'highlighted'. Pengguna yang tertarik untuk mengetahui informasi dari dunia hiburan sampai dengan ilmu pengetahuan, cukup menunjuk dan menekan tombol mouse pada bagian tersebut dalam Web browser, sehingga tampilan akan berpindah dari dokumen satu ke dokumen lain.

  17. An application of TOPSIS for ranking internet web browsers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Rostampour

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Web browser is one of the most important internet facilities for surfing the internet. A good web browser must incorporate literally tens of features such as integrated search engine, automatic updates, etc. Each year, ten web browsers are formally introduced as top best reviewers by some organizations. In this paper, we propose the implementation of TOPSIS technique to rank ten web browsers. The proposed model of this paper uses five criteria including speed, features, security, technical support and supported configurations. In terms of speed, Safari is the best web reviewer followed by Google Chrome and Internet Explorer while Opera is the best web reviewer when we look into 20 different features. We have also ranked these web browsers using all five categories together and the results indicate that Opera, Internet explorer, Firefox and Google Chrome are the best web browsers to be chosen.

  18. Decoding Technology: Web Browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tim; Donohue, Chip

    2007-01-01

    More than ever, early childhood administrators are relying on the Internet for information. A key to becoming an exceptional Web "surfer" is getting to know the ins and outs of the Web browser being used. There are several options available, and almost all can be downloaded for free. However, many of the functions and features they offer are very…

  19. Web Browser Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Luján Mora, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    Presentaciones del curso "Web Browser Programming" impartido en la Université M'Hamed Bougara (Bourmerdes, Argelia) en junio de 2006. Proyecto financiado por la Unión Europea: TEMPUS JEP-32102-2004, Licence Professionnelle Technologies des Applications Web (Professional License for Web Application Technologies).

  20. Recurring genomic breaks in independent lineages support genomic fragility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannenhalli Sridhar

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent findings indicate that evolutionary breaks in the genome are not randomly distributed, and that certain regions, so-called fragile regions, are predisposed to breakages. Previous approaches to the study of genomic fragility have examined the distribution of breaks, as well as the coincidence of breaks with segmental duplications and repeats, within a single species. In contrast, we investigate whether this regional fragility is an inherent genomic characteristic and is thus conserved over multiple independent lineages. Results We do this by quantifying the extent to which certain genomic regions are disrupted repeatedly in independent lineages. Our investigation, based on Human, Chimp, Mouse, Rat, Dog and Chicken, suggests that the propensity of a chromosomal region to break is significantly correlated among independent lineages, even when covariates are considered. Furthermore, the fragile regions are enriched for segmental duplications. Conclusion Based on a novel methodology, our work provides additional support for the existence of fragile regions.

  1. Engineering the ATLAS TAG Browser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    ELSSI is a web-based event metadata (TAG) browser and event-level selection service for ATLAS. TAGs from all ATLAS physics and Monte Carlo data sets are routinely loaded into Oracle databases as an integral part of event processing. As data volumes increase, more and more sites are joining the distributed TAG data hosting topology. Meanwhile, TAG content and database schemata continue to evolve as new user requirements and additional sources of metadata emerge. All of this has posed many challenges to the development of ELSSI, which must support vast amounts of TAG data while source, content, geographic locations, and user query patterns may change over time. In this paper, we describe some of the challenges encountered in the process of developing ELSSI, and the software engineering strategies adopted to address those challenges. Approaches to management of access to data, browsing, data rendering, query building, query validation, execution, connection management, and communication with auxiliary services a...

  2. Designing, Implementing, and Evaluating Secure Web Browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Christopher L.

    2009-01-01

    Web browsers are plagued with vulnerabilities, providing hackers with easy access to computer systems using browser-based attacks. Efforts that retrofit existing browsers have had limited success since modern browsers are not designed to withstand attack. To enable more secure web browsing, we design and implement new web browsers from the ground…

  3. Eco-Health Relationship Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Eco-Health Relationship Browser (Browser) is a web tool designed to portray, in an engaging and intuitive way, the linkages between ecosystems, their services, and potential health outcomes that have been associated with those services in the literature. It functions an inte...

  4. A Lead Provided by Bookmarks - Intelligent Browsers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Balanescu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Browsers are applications that allow Internet access. A defining characteristic is their unidirectionality: Navigator-> Internet. The purpose of this article is to support the idea of Intelligent Browsers that is defined by bidirectional: Navigator-> Internet and Internet-> Navigator. The fundamental idea is that the Internet contains huge resources of knowledge, but they are “passive”. The purpose of this article is to propose the “activation” of this knowledge so that they, through “Intelligent Browsers”, to become from Sitting Ducks to Active Mentors. Following this idea, the present article proposes changes to Bookmarks function, from the current status of Favorites to Recommendations. The article presents an analysis of the utility of this function (by presenting a research of web browsing behaviors and in particular finds that the significance of this utility has decreased lately (to the point of becoming almost useless, as will be shown, in terms data-information-knowledge. Finally, it presents the idea of a project which aims to be an applied approach that anticipates the findings of this study and the concept of Intelligent Browsers (or Active Browsers required in the context of the Big Data concept.

  5. JPL Small Body Database Browser

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The JPL Small-Body Database Browser provides data for all known asteroids and many comets. Newly discovered objects and their orbits are added on a daily basis....

  6. EVALUATING EFFECTIVENESS OF MOBILE BROWSER SECURITY WARNINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Shah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work precisely evaluates whether browser security warnings are as ineffective as proposed by popular sentiments and past writings. This research used different kinds of Android mobile browsers as well as desktop browsers to evaluate security warnings. Security experts and developers should give emphasis on making a user aware of security warnings and should not neglect aim of communicating this to users. Security experts and system architects should emphasis the goal of communicating security information to end users. In most of the browsers, security warnings are not emphasized, and browsers simply do not show warnings, or there are a number of ways to hide those warnings of malicious sites. This work precisely finds that how inconsistent browsers really are in prompting security warnings. In particular, majority of the modern mobile web browsers are vulnerable to these security threats. We find inconsistency in SSL warnings among web browsers. Based on this work, we make recommendations for warning designers and researchers.

  7. Enzyme kinetics informatics: from instrument to browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainston, Neil; Golebiewski, Martin; Messiha, Hanan L; Malys, Naglis; Kania, Renate; Kengne, Sylvestre; Krebs, Olga; Mir, Saqib; Sauer-Danzwith, Heidrun; Smallbone, Kieran; Weidemann, Andreas; Wittig, Ulrike; Kell, Douglas B; Mendes, Pedro; Müller, Wolfgang; Paton, Norman W; Rojas, Isabel

    2010-09-01

    A limited number of publicly available resources provide access to enzyme kinetic parameters. These have been compiled through manual data mining of published papers, not from the original, raw experimental data from which the parameters were calculated. This is largely due to the lack of software or standards to support the capture, analysis, storage and dissemination of such experimental data. Introduced here is an integrative system to manage experimental enzyme kinetics data from instrument to browser. The approach is based on two interrelated databases: the existing SABIO-RK database, containing kinetic data and corresponding metadata, and the newly introduced experimental raw data repository, MeMo-RK. Both systems are publicly available by web browser and web service interfaces and are configurable to ensure privacy of unpublished data. Users of this system are provided with the ability to view both kinetic parameters and the experimental raw data from which they are calculated, providing increased confidence in the data. A data analysis and submission tool, the kineticswizard, has been developed to allow the experimentalist to perform data collection, analysis and submission to both data resources. The system is designed to be extensible, allowing integration with other manufacturer instruments covering a range of analytical techniques.

  8. Jet browser model accelerated by GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forster Richárd

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last centuries the experimental particle physics began to develop thank to growing capacity of computers among others. It is allowed to know the structure of the matter to level of quark gluon. Plasma in the strong interaction. Experimental evidences supported the theory to measure the predicted results. Since its inception the researchers are interested in the track reconstruction. We studied the jet browser model, which was developed for 4π calorimeter. This method works on the measurement data set, which contain the components of interaction points in the detector space and it allows to examine the trajectory reconstruction of the final state particles. We keep the total energy in constant values and it satisfies the Gauss law. Using GPUs the evaluation of the model can be drastically accelerated, as we were able to achieve up to 223 fold speedup compared to a CPU based parallel implementation.

  9. Line-mode browser development days

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    Twelve talented web developers have travelled to CERN from all over the world to recreate a piece of web history: the line-mode browser. See the line-mode browser simulator that they created here. Read more about the birth of the web here.

  10. Web browser accessibility using open source software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obrenovic, Z.; Ossenbruggen, J.R. van

    2007-01-01

    A Web browser provides a uniform user interface to different types of information. Making this interface universally accessible and more interactive is a long term goal still far from being achieved. Universally accessible browsers require novel interaction modalities and additional functionalities,

  11. The Navigational Power of Web Browsers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielecki, M.; Hidders, J.; Paredaens, J.; Spielmann, M.; Tyszkiewicz, J.; Van den Bussche, J.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the computational capabilities of Web browsers, when equipped with a standard finite automaton. We observe that Web browsers are Turingcomplete. We introduce the notion of a navigational problem, and investigate the complexity of solving Web queries and navigational problems by Web br

  12. Distributed Computing on an Ensemble of Browsers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cushing, R.; Herawan, G.; Putra, H.; Belloum, A.; Bubak, M.; de Laat, C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose a new approach to distributed computing with Web browsers and introduce the WeevilScout prototype framework. The proliferation of Web browsers and the performance gains being achieved by current JavaScript virtual machines raises the question whether Internet bro

  13. Exploring the enjoyment of playing browser games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimmt, Christoph; Schmid, Hannah; Orthmann, Julia

    2009-04-01

    Browser games--mostly persistent game worlds that can be used without client software and monetary cost with a Web browser--belong to the understudied digital game types, although they attract large player communities and motivate sustained play. The present work reports findings from an online survey of 8,203 players of a German strategy browser game ("Travian"). Results suggest that multiplayer browser games are enjoyed primarily because of the social relationships involved in game play and the specific time and flexibility characteristics ("easy-in, easy-out"). Competition, in contrast, seems to be less important for browser gamers than for users of other game types. Findings are discussed in terms of video game enjoyment and game addiction.

  14. CauloBrowser: A systems biology resource for Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, Keren; Schrader, Jared M; Men, Yifei; Marshik, Tyler; Dill, David L; McAdams, Harley H; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-04

    Caulobacter crescentus is a premier model organism for studying the molecular basis of cellular asymmetry. The Caulobacter community has generated a wealth of high-throughput spatiotemporal databases including data from gene expression profiling experiments (microarrays, RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, ribosome profiling, LC-ms proteomics), gene essentiality studies (Tn-seq), genome wide protein localization studies, and global chromosome methylation analyses (SMRT sequencing). A major challenge involves the integration of these diverse data sets into one comprehensive community resource. To address this need, we have generated CauloBrowser (www.caulobrowser.org), an online resource for Caulobacter studies. This site provides a user-friendly interface for quickly searching genes of interest and downloading genome-wide results. Search results about individual genes are displayed as tables, graphs of time resolved expression profiles, and schematics of protein localization throughout the cell cycle. In addition, the site provides a genome viewer that enables customizable visualization of all published high-throughput genomic data. The depth and diversity of data sets collected by the Caulobacter community makes CauloBrowser a unique and valuable systems biology resource.

  15. CauloBrowser: A systems biology resource for Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, Keren; Schrader, Jared M.; Men, Yifei; Marshik, Tyler; Dill, David L.; McAdams, Harley H.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is a premier model organism for studying the molecular basis of cellular asymmetry. The Caulobacter community has generated a wealth of high-throughput spatiotemporal databases including data from gene expression profiling experiments (microarrays, RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, ribosome profiling, LC-ms proteomics), gene essentiality studies (Tn-seq), genome wide protein localization studies, and global chromosome methylation analyses (SMRT sequencing). A major challenge involves the integration of these diverse data sets into one comprehensive community resource. To address this need, we have generated CauloBrowser (www.caulobrowser.org), an online resource for Caulobacter studies. This site provides a user-friendly interface for quickly searching genes of interest and downloading genome-wide results. Search results about individual genes are displayed as tables, graphs of time resolved expression profiles, and schematics of protein localization throughout the cell cycle. In addition, the site provides a genome viewer that enables customizable visualization of all published high-throughput genomic data. The depth and diversity of data sets collected by the Caulobacter community makes CauloBrowser a unique and valuable systems biology resource. PMID:26476443

  16. 浏览器CSS兼容问题探究%Exploration on Browsers Compatibility of Cascading Style Sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玉梅

    2013-01-01

    The diversification of browser leads to CSS compatibility issues to browsers during the website design.This paper first introduces a mainstream browser usage situation; then some kinds of mainstream browser kernel; finally,aiming at the supporting comparison of various versions of CSS selector browser,uses CSS Hack to solve browsers CSS compatibility issues.%浏览器的多样化导致网站设计中出现CSS对浏览器的兼容问题.本文首先介绍主流浏览器使用情况;接着介绍几种主流浏览器内核;最后针对CSS各版本选择器的浏览器支持比较,运用CSS Hack方式解决浏览器的CSS兼容问题.

  17. GeneWiz browser: An Interactive Tool for Visualizing Sequenced Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Peter Fischer; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Rotenberg, Eva;

    2009-01-01

    We present an interactive web application for visualizing genomic data of prokaryotic chromosomes. The tool (GeneWiz browser) allows users to carry out various analyses such as mapping alignments of homologous genes to other genomes, mapping of short sequencing reads to a reference chromosome......, and calculating DNA properties such as curvature or stacking energy along the chromosome. The GeneWiz browser produces an interactive graphic that enables zooming from a global scale down to single nucleotides, without changing the size of the plot. Its ability to disproportionally zoom provides optimal...

  18. Multi-Sector Sustainability Browser (MSSB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A browser which lets the user navigate through text and graphics and understand the interrelationship among four key sectors of a community crucial to sustainability: Land Use, Buildings and Infrastructure, Transportation, and Materials Management.

  19. WebPlus: lxplus in your browser

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    This talk will cover the possibility of offering a lxplus like service directly on the browser. How we could rely on containers and schedulers to maintain long lived sessions, and how to offer integration with common CERN services.

  20. Security Survey of Internet Browsers Data Managers

    CERN Document Server

    Boja, Catalin

    2011-01-01

    The paper analyses current versions of top three used Internet browsers and compare their security levels to a research done in 2006. The security is measured by analyzing how user data is stored. Data recorded during different browsing sessions and by different password management functions it is considered sensitive data. The paper describes how the browser protects the sensitive data and how an attacker or a forensic analyst can access it.

  1. Security Survey of Internet Browsers Data Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Boja

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses current versions of top three used Internet browsers and compare their security levels to a research done in 2006. The security is measured by analyzing how user data is stored. Data recorded during different browsing sessions and by different password management functions it is considered sensitive data. The paper describes how the browser protects the sensitive data and how an attacker or a forensic analyst can access it.

  2. Chinese users’ preference for web browser icons.

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Siu-Tsen; Prior, Stephen D.; Chen, Kuen-Meau; Fang, Te-Hua

    2009-01-01

    This paper compares the perspicacity, appropriateness and preference of web browser icons from leading software providers with those of a culture-specific design. The history and future direction of web browsers is outlined, together with the implications for the future growth of Chinese internet users. China, with its rapidly expanding young netizens has now overtaken the USA in terms of the number of internet users (253 million) and we predict it will reach saturation (≈70% internet penetra...

  3. Loading Arbitrary Knowledge Bases in Matrix Browser

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the work done on Matrix Browser, which is a recently developed graphical user interface to explore and navigate complex networked information spaces. This approach presents a new way of navigating information nets in windows explorer like widget. The problem on hand was how to export arbitrary knowledge bases in Matrix Browser. This was achieved by identifying the relationships present in knowledge bases and then by forming the hierarchies from this data and these hierarc...

  4. An "Electronic Fluorescent Pictograph" browser for exploring and analyzing large-scale biological data sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Winter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exploration of microarray data and data from other high-throughput projects for hypothesis generation has become a vital aspect of post-genomic research. For the non-bioinformatics specialist, however, many of the currently available tools provide overwhelming amounts of data that are presented in a non-intuitive way. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of microarray data and data from other large-scale data sets, we have developed a tool, which we have dubbed the electronic Fluorescent Pictograph - or eFP - Browser, available at http://www.bar.utoronto.ca/, for exploring microarray and other data for hypothesis generation. This eFP Browser engine paints data from large-scale data sets onto pictographic representations of the experimental samples used to generate the data sets. We give examples of using the tool to present Arabidopsis gene expression data from the AtGenExpress Consortium (Arabidopsis eFP Browser, data for subcellular localization of Arabidopsis proteins (Cell eFP Browser, and mouse tissue atlas microarray data (Mouse eFP Browser. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The eFP Browser software is easily adaptable to microarray or other large-scale data sets from any organism and thus should prove useful to a wide community for visualizing and interpreting these data sets for hypothesis generation.

  5. Geant4 application in a Web browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Laurent; Geant4 Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Geant4 is a toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. The Geant4 visualization system supports many drivers including OpenGL[1], OpenInventor, HepRep[2], DAWN[3], VRML, RayTracer, gMocren[4] and ASCIITree, with diverse and complementary functionalities. Web applications have an increasing role in our work, and thanks to emerging frameworks such as Wt [5], building a web application on top of a C++ application without rewriting all the code can be done. Because the Geant4 toolkit's visualization and user interface modules are well decoupled from the rest of Geant4, it is straightforward to adapt these modules to render in a web application instead of a computer's native window manager. The API of the Wt framework closely matches that of Qt [6], our experience in building Qt driver will benefit for Wt driver. Porting a Geant4 application to a web application is easy, and with minimal effort, Geant4 users can replicate this process to share their own Geant4 applications in a web browser.

  6. Construction of an integrated database to support genomic sequence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, W.; Overbeek, R.

    1994-11-01

    The central goal of this project is to develop an integrated database to support comparative analysis of genomes including DNA sequence data, protein sequence data, gene expression data and metabolism data. In developing the logic-based system GenoBase, a broader integration of available data was achieved due to assistance from collaborators. Current goals are to easily include new forms of data as they become available and to easily navigate through the ensemble of objects described within the database. This report comments on progress made in these areas.

  7. Controlling EPICS from a web browser.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, K., Jr.

    1999-04-13

    An alternative to using a large graphical display manager like MEDM [1,2] to interface to a control system, is to use individual control objects, such as text boxes, meters, etc., running in a browser. This paper presents three implementations of this concept, one using ActiveX controls, one with Java applets, and another with Microsoft Agent. The ActiveX controls have performance nearing that of MEDM, but they only work on Windows platforms. The Java applets require a server to get around Web security restrictions and are not as fast, but they have the advantage of working on most platforms and with both of the leading Web browsers. The agent works on Windows platforms with and without a browser and allows voice recognition and speech synthesis, making it somewhat more innovative than MEDM.

  8. Browser-Based Covert Data Exfiltration

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Kenton

    2010-01-01

    Current best practices heavily control user permissions on network systems. This effectively mitigates many insider threats regarding the collection and exfiltration of data. Many methods of covert communication involve crafting custom packets, typically requiring both the necessary software and elevated privileges on the system. By exploiting the functionality of a browser, covert channels for data exfiltration may be created without additional software or user privileges. This paper explores novel methods of using a browser's JavaScript engine to exfiltrate documents over the Domain Name System (DNS) protocol without sending less covert Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) requests.

  9. EcoBrowser: a web-based tool for visualizing transcriptome data of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Peng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli has been extensively studied as a prokaryotic model organism whose whole genome was determined in 1997. However, it is difficult to identify all the gene products involved in diverse functions by using whole genome sequencesalone. The high-resolution transcriptome mapping using tiling arrays has proved effective to improve the annotation of transcript units and discover new transcripts of ncRNAs. While abundant tiling array data have been generated, the lack of appropriate visualization tools to accommodate and integrate multiple sources of data has emerged. Findings EcoBrowser is a web-based tool for visualizing genome annotations and transcriptome data of E. coli. Important tiling array data of E. coli from different experimental platforms are collected and processed for query. An AJAX based genome browser is embedded for visualization. Thus, genome annotations can be compared with transcript profiling and genome occupancy profiling from independent experiments, which will be helpful in discovering new transcripts including novel mRNAs and ncRNAs, generating a detailed description of the transcription unit architecture, further providing clues for investigation of prokaryotic transcriptional regulation that has proved to be far more complex than previously thought. Conclusions With the help of EcoBrowser, users can get a systemic view both from the vertical and parallel sides, as well as inspirations for the design of new experiments which will expand our understanding of the regulation mechanism.

  10. Plugin free remote visualization in the browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Georg; Slusallek, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Today, users access information and rich media from anywhere using the web browser on their desktop computers, tablets or smartphones. But the web evolves beyond media delivery. Interactive graphics applications like visualization or gaming become feasible as browsers advance in the functionality they provide. However, to deliver large-scale visualization to thin clients like mobile devices, a dedicated server component is necessary. Ideally, the client runs directly within the browser the user is accustomed to, requiring no installation of a plugin or native application. In this paper, we present the state-of-the-art of technologies which enable plugin free remote rendering in the browser. Further, we describe a remote visualization system unifying these technologies. The system transfers rendering results to the client as images or as a video stream. We utilize the upcoming World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) conform Web Real-Time Communication (WebRTC) standard, and the Native Client (NaCl) technology built into Chrome, to deliver video with low latency.

  11. DNA Data Visualization (DDV): Software for Generating Web-Based Interfaces Supporting Navigation and Analysis of DNA Sequence Data of Entire Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Tomasz; Bordeleau, Eric; Burrus, Vincent; Brzezinski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Data visualization methods are necessary during the exploration and analysis activities of an increasingly data-intensive scientific process. There are few existing visualization methods for raw nucleotide sequences of a whole genome or chromosome. Software for data visualization should allow the researchers to create accessible data visualization interfaces that can be exported and shared with others on the web. Herein, novel software developed for generating DNA data visualization interfaces is described. The software converts DNA data sets into images that are further processed as multi-scale images to be accessed through a web-based interface that supports zooming, panning and sequence fragment selection. Nucleotide composition frequencies and GC skew of a selected sequence segment can be obtained through the interface. The software was used to generate DNA data visualization of human and bacterial chromosomes. Examples of visually detectable features such as short and long direct repeats, long terminal repeats, mobile genetic elements, heterochromatic segments in microbial and human chromosomes, are presented. The software and its source code are available for download and further development. The visualization interfaces generated with the software allow for the immediate identification and observation of several types of sequence patterns in genomes of various sizes and origins. The visualization interfaces generated with the software are readily accessible through a web browser. This software is a useful research and teaching tool for genetics and structural genomics.

  12. A Comparative Performance Analysis of Popular Internet Browsers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the World Wide Web is a web browser, hence the development of various web browsers in the market today. .... computer services, resources and information. A set of network conventions .... game consoles and interactive televisions.

  13. Online Marketing Strategy for a browser games portal

    OpenAIRE

    Vinaixa Campos, Joan

    2008-01-01

    The Browser games industry: Introduction and description of browser games and browser games portals. Description of the main characteristics that define the browser games industry and its competitive environment. Analysis of all the factors that need to be considered in order to make a successful market entry. Online marketing techniques: Introduction and description to the main online marketing techniques that exist to market a product or service in internet: Search Engine Marketing...

  14. Online Marketing Strategy for a browser games portal

    OpenAIRE

    Vinaixa Campos, Joan

    2008-01-01

    The Browser games industry: Introduction and description of browser games and browser games portals. Description of the main characteristics that define the browser games industry and its competitive environment. Analysis of all the factors that need to be considered in order to make a successful market entry. Online marketing techniques: Introduction and description to the main online marketing techniques that exist to market a product or service in internet: Search Engine Marketing...

  15. 78 FR 30226 - Accessibility Requirements for Internet Browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ...] Accessibility Requirements for Internet Browsers AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule... and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (CVAA). Section 718 of the Act requires Internet browsers built..., the Commission also affirms that section 716 of the Act requires certain Internet browsers used...

  16. Zbrowse: an interactive GWAS results browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg R. Ziegler

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The growing number of genotyped populations, the advent of high-throughput phenotyping techniques and the development of GWAS analysis software has rapidly accelerated the number of GWAS experimental results. Candidate gene discovery from these results files is often tedious, involving many manual steps searching for genes in windows around a significant SNP. This problem rapidly becomes more complex when an analyst wishes to compare multiple GWAS studies for pleiotropic or environment specific effects. To this end, we have developed a fast and intuitive interactive browser for the viewing of GWAS results with a focus on an ability to compare results across multiple traits or experiments. The software can easily be run on a desktop computer with software that bioinformaticians are likely already familiar with. Additionally, the software can be hosted or embedded on a server for easy access by anyone with a modern web browser.

  17. Aladin Lite: Lightweight sky atlas for browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boch, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Aladin Lite is a lightweight version of the Aladin tool, running in the browser and geared towards simple visualization of a sky region. It allows visualization of image surveys (JPEG multi-resolution HEALPix all-sky surveys) and permits superimposing tabular (VOTable) and footprints (STC-S) data. Aladin Lite is powered by HTML5 canvas technology and is easily embeddable on any web page and can also be controlled through a Javacript API.

  18. A collaborative framework for browser games development

    OpenAIRE

    Pena, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Master in Open Source Software This dissertation describes a conceptual model and prototype for a collaborative framework for browser games development using open source and open content. There is an extensive literature review exploring several areas like game development, modding, open source software development, open content and creative commons. The most relevant ideas about game development and collaboration are then used in defining the conceptual model of the framewo...

  19. Aladin Lite: Embed your Sky in the Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boch, T.; Fernique, P.

    2014-05-01

    I will introduce and describe Aladin Lite1, a lightweight interactive sky viewer running natively in the browser. The past five years have seen the emergence of powerful and complex web applications, thanks to major improvements in JavaScript engines and the advent of HTML5. At the same time, browser plugins Java applets, Flash, Silverlight) that were commonly used to run rich Internet applications are declining and are not well suited for mobile devices. The Aladin team took this opportunity to develop Aladin Lite, a lightweight version of Aladin geared towards simple visualization of a sky region. Relying on the widely supported HTML5 canvas element, it provides an intuitive user interface running on desktops and tablets. This first version allows one to interactively visualize multi-resolution HEALPix image and superimpose tabular data and footprints. Aladin Lite is easily embeddable on any web page and may be of interest for data providers which will be able to use it as an interactive previewer for their own image surveys, previously pre-processed as explained in details in the poster "Create & publish your Hierarchical Progressive Survey". I will present the main features of Aladin Lite as well as the JavaScript API which gives the building blocks to create rich interactions between a web page and Aladin Lite.

  20. Genomic support for speciation and specificity of baculoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakubowska, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Keywords: baculovirus, insects, speciation, genomics, phylogeny, host specificity The Baculoviridae comprise a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses infecting arthropods. In this thesis two baculoviruses, Leucoma salicis nucleopolyhedrovirus (LesaNPV) and Agrotis segetum (Agse) NPV, were c

  1. Browser Wars : Kampen om webbläsarmarknaden

    OpenAIRE

    Högström, Andreas; Pettersson, Emil

    2010-01-01

    The first browser war took place during the second half the 1990s, and Internet Explorer cameout as the winner over Netscape Navigator. Today a new browser war is being fought withmany competitors and the future is uncertain. The purpose of the thesis is to find out how theweb browser market has developed since the start of the previous conflict, and we ask ourselveshow it will continue to develop in the future. This is accomplished with, among otherthings, interviews, tests and already exist...

  2. Experience Report: Developing the Servo Web Browser Engine using Rust

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Brian; Bergstrom, Lars; Herman,David; Matthews, Josh; McAllister, Keegan; Goregaokar, Manish; Moffitt, Jack; Sapin, Simon

    2015-01-01

    All modern web browsers - Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, and Safari - have a core rendering engine written in C++. This language choice was made because it affords the systems programmer complete control of the underlying hardware features and memory in use, and it provides a transparent compilation model. Servo is a project started at Mozilla Research to build a new web browser engine that preserves the capabilities of these other browser engines but also both takes advantage of ...

  3. Genomic comparison of closely related Giant Viruses supports an accordion-like model of evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eFilée

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome gigantism occurs so far in Phycodnaviridae and Mimiviridae (order Megavirales. Origin and evolution of these Giant Viruses (GVs remain open questions. Interestingly, availability of a collection of closely related GV genomes enabling genomic comparisons offer the opportunity to better understand the different evolutionary forces acting on these genomes. Whole genome alignment for 5 groups of viruses belonging to the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae families show that there is no trend of genome expansion or general tendency of genome contraction. Instead, GV genomes accumulated genomic mutations over the time with gene gains compensating the different losses. In addition, each lineage displays specific patterns of genome evolution. Mimiviridae (megaviruses and mimiviruses and Chlorella Phycodnaviruses evolved mainly by duplications and losses of genes belonging to large paralogous families (including movements of diverse mobiles genetic elements, whereas Micromonas and Ostreococcus Phycodnaviruses derive most of their genetic novelties thought lateral gene transfers. Taken together, these data support an accordion-like model of evolution in which GV genomes have undergone successive steps of gene gain and gene loss, accrediting the hypothesis that genome gigantism appears early, before the diversification of the different GV lineages.

  4. Pattern Analysis and Decision Support for Cancer through Clinico-Genomic Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarchos, Themis P.; Giannakeas, Nikolaos; Goletsis, Yorgos; Papaloukas, Costas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I.

    Advances in genome technology are playing a growing role in medicine and healthcare. With the development of new technologies and opportunities for large-scale analysis of the genome, genomic data have a clear impact on medicine. Cancer prognostics and therapeutics are among the first major test cases for genomic medicine, given that all types of cancer are related with genomic instability. In this paper we present a novel system for pattern analysis and decision support in cancer. The system integrates clinical data from electronic health records and genomic data. Pattern analysis and data mining methods are applied to these integrated data and the discovered knowledge is used for cancer decision support. Through this integration, conclusions can be drawn for early diagnosis, staging and cancer treatment.

  5. Pathway projector: web-based zoomable pathway browser using KEGG atlas and Google Maps API.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Kono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biochemical pathways provide an essential context for understanding comprehensive experimental data and the systematic workings of a cell. Therefore, the availability of online pathway browsers will facilitate post-genomic research, just as genome browsers have contributed to genomics. Many pathway maps have been provided online as part of public pathway databases. Most of these maps, however, function as the gateway interface to a specific database, and the comprehensiveness of their represented entities, data mapping capabilities, and user interfaces are not always sufficient for generic usage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified five central requirements for a pathway browser: (1 availability of large integrated maps showing genes, enzymes, and metabolites; (2 comprehensive search features and data access; (3 data mapping for transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic experiments, as well as the ability to edit and annotate pathway maps; (4 easy exchange of pathway data; and (5 intuitive user experience without the requirement for installation and regular maintenance. According to these requirements, we have evaluated existing pathway databases and tools and implemented a web-based pathway browser named Pathway Projector as a solution. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Pathway Projector provides integrated pathway maps that are based upon the KEGG Atlas, with the addition of nodes for genes and enzymes, and is implemented as a scalable, zoomable map utilizing the Google Maps API. Users can search pathway-related data using keywords, molecular weights, nucleotide sequences, and amino acid sequences, or as possible routes between compounds. In addition, experimental data from transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses can be readily mapped. Pathway Projector is freely available for academic users at (http://www.g-language.org/PathwayProjector/.

  6. Physician Attitudes toward Adopting Genome-Guided Prescribing through Clinical Decision Support

    OpenAIRE

    Casey Lynnette Overby; Angelika Ludtke Erwin; Abul-Husn, Noura S.; Ellis, Stephen B; Scott, Stuart A.; Aniwaa Owusu Obeng; Kannry, Joseph L.; George Hripcsak; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Omri Gottesman

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed physician attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through clinical decision support (CDS), prior to enlisting in the Clinical Implementation of Personalized Medicine through Electronic Health Records and Genomics pilot pharmacogenomics project (CLIPMERGE PGx). We developed a survey instrument that includes the Evidence Based Practice Attitude Scale, adapted to measure attitudes toward adopting genome-informed interventions (EBPAS-GII). The survey also includes ...

  7. An integrated computational pipeline and database to support whole-genome sequence annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungall, C J; Misra, S; Berman, B P; Carlson, J; Frise, E; Harris, N; Marshall, B; Shu, S; Kaminker, J S; Prochnik, S E; Smith, C D; Smith, E; Tupy, J L; Wiel, C; Rubin, G M; Lewis, S E

    2002-01-01

    We describe here our experience in annotating the Drosophila melanogaster genome sequence, in the course of which we developed several new open-source software tools and a database schema to support large-scale genome annotation. We have developed these into an integrated and reusable software system for whole-genome annotation. The key contributions to overall annotation quality are the marshalling of high-quality sequences for alignments and the design of a system with an adaptable and expandable flexible architecture.

  8. Gesture Interaction Browser-Based 3D Molecular Viewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virag, Ioan; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an open source system that allows the user to interact with a 3D molecular viewer using associated hand gestures for rotating, scaling and panning the rendered model. The novelty of this approach is that the entire application is browser-based and doesn't require installation of third party plug-ins or additional software components in order to visualize the supported chemical file formats. This kind of solution is suitable for instruction of users in less IT oriented environments, like medicine or chemistry. For rendering various molecular geometries our team used GLmol (a molecular viewer written in JavaScript). The interaction with the 3D models is made with Leap Motion controller that allows real-time tracking of the user's hand gestures. The first results confirmed that the resulting application leads to a better way of understanding various types of translational bioinformatics related problems in both biomedical research and education.

  9. "Harnessing genomics to improve health in India" - an executive course to support genomics policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Tara; Kumar, Nandini K; Muthuswamy, Vasantha; Daar, Abdallah S; Singer, Peter A

    2004-05-19

    BACKGROUND: The benefits of scientific medicine have eluded millions in developing countries and the genomics revolution threatens to increase health inequities between North and South. India, as a developing yet also industrialized country, is uniquely positioned to pioneer science policy innovations to narrow the genomics divide. Recognizing this, the Indian Council of Medical Research and the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics conducted a Genomics Policy Executive Course in January 2003 in Kerala, India. The course provided a forum for stakeholders to discuss the relevance of genomics for health in India. This article presents the course findings and recommendations formulated by the participants for genomics policy in India. METHODS: The course goals were to familiarize participants with the implications of genomics for health in India; analyze and debate policy and ethical issues; and develop a multi-sectoral opinion leaders' network to share perspectives. To achieve these goals, the course brought together representatives of academic research centres, biotechnology companies, regulatory bodies, media, voluntary, and legal organizations to engage in discussion. Topics included scientific advances in genomics, followed by innovations in business models, public sector perspectives, ethics, legal issues and national innovation systems. RESULTS: Seven main recommendations emerged: increase funding for healthcare research with appropriate emphasis on genomics; leverage India's assets such as traditional knowledge and genomic diversity in consultation with knowledge-holders; prioritize strategic entry points for India; improve industry-academic interface with appropriate incentives to improve public health and the nation's wealth; develop independent, accountable, transparent regulatory systems to ensure that ethical, legal and social issues are addressed for a single entry, smart and effective system; engage the public and ensure broad-based input

  10. "Harnessing genomics to improve health in India" – an executive course to support genomics policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya Tara

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefits of scientific medicine have eluded millions in developing countries and the genomics revolution threatens to increase health inequities between North and South. India, as a developing yet also industrialized country, is uniquely positioned to pioneer science policy innovations to narrow the genomics divide. Recognizing this, the Indian Council of Medical Research and the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics conducted a Genomics Policy Executive Course in January 2003 in Kerala, India. The course provided a forum for stakeholders to discuss the relevance of genomics for health in India. This article presents the course findings and recommendations formulated by the participants for genomics policy in India. Methods The course goals were to familiarize participants with the implications of genomics for health in India; analyze and debate policy and ethical issues; and develop a multi-sectoral opinion leaders' network to share perspectives. To achieve these goals, the course brought together representatives of academic research centres, biotechnology companies, regulatory bodies, media, voluntary, and legal organizations to engage in discussion. Topics included scientific advances in genomics, followed by innovations in business models, public sector perspectives, ethics, legal issues and national innovation systems. Results Seven main recommendations emerged: increase funding for healthcare research with appropriate emphasis on genomics; leverage India's assets such as traditional knowledge and genomic diversity in consultation with knowledge-holders; prioritize strategic entry points for India; improve industry-academic interface with appropriate incentives to improve public health and the nation's wealth; develop independent, accountable, transparent regulatory systems to ensure that ethical, legal and social issues are addressed for a single entry, smart and effective system; engage the public and

  11. Hardening the Browser: Protecting Patron Privacy on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Phetteplace, Eric; Kern, Mary Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    As more and more time is spent accessing and producing content online, libraries need to position themselves to offer Internet privacy to patrons as well. This column details how to secure the web browser, from choosing state-of-the-art software to strong default settings to using add-ons to extend the capabilities of the browser.

  12. YADBrowser: A Browser for Web-Based Educational Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaldivar, Vicente Arturo Romero; Arandia, Jon Ander Elorriaga; Brito, Mateo Lezcano

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the main characteristics of the educational browser YADBrowser are described. One of the main objectives of this project is to define new languages and object models which facilitate the creation of educational applications for the Internet. The fundamental characteristics of the object model of the browser are also described.…

  13. Rasmuson Library DVD Browser: Fun with Screen Scraping and Drupal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Morlino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The DVD Browser is a simple application that lets library patrons browse movie covers, titles, and reviews. It works by screen scraping the the Rasmuson Library catalog for DVD movies and dumps the data into a Drupal MySQL database. This paper describes the process of setting up the DVD Browser.

  14. Ajax and Firefox: New Web Applications and Browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin-Jones, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Alternative browsers are gaining significant market share, and both Apple and Microsoft are releasing OS upgrades which portend some interesting changes in Web development. Of particular interest for language learning professionals may be new developments in the area of Web browser based applications, particularly using an approach dubbed "Ajax."…

  15. Interactive metagenomic visualization in a Web browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillippy Adam M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical output of metagenomic studies is the estimation of abundances of taxonomical or functional groups. The inherent uncertainty in assignments to these groups makes it important to consider both their hierarchical contexts and their prediction confidence. The current tools for visualizing metagenomic data, however, omit or distort quantitative hierarchical relationships and lack the facility for displaying secondary variables. Results Here we present Krona, a new visualization tool that allows intuitive exploration of relative abundances and confidences within the complex hierarchies of metagenomic classifications. Krona combines a variant of radial, space-filling displays with parametric coloring and interactive polar-coordinate zooming. The HTML5 and JavaScript implementation enables fully interactive charts that can be explored with any modern Web browser, without the need for installed software or plug-ins. This Web-based architecture also allows each chart to be an independent document, making them easy to share via e-mail or post to a standard Web server. To illustrate Krona's utility, we describe its application to various metagenomic data sets and its compatibility with popular metagenomic analysis tools. Conclusions Krona is both a powerful metagenomic visualization tool and a demonstration of the potential of HTML5 for highly accessible bioinformatic visualizations. Its rich and interactive displays facilitate more informed interpretations of metagenomic analyses, while its implementation as a browser-based application makes it extremely portable and easily adopted into existing analysis packages. Both the Krona rendering code and conversion tools are freely available under a BSD open-source license, and available from: http://krona.sourceforge.net.

  16. Interactive metagenomic visualization in a Web browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondov, Brian D; Bergman, Nicholas H; Phillippy, Adam M

    2011-09-30

    A critical output of metagenomic studies is the estimation of abundances of taxonomical or functional groups. The inherent uncertainty in assignments to these groups makes it important to consider both their hierarchical contexts and their prediction confidence. The current tools for visualizing metagenomic data, however, omit or distort quantitative hierarchical relationships and lack the facility for displaying secondary variables. Here we present Krona, a new visualization tool that allows intuitive exploration of relative abundances and confidences within the complex hierarchies of metagenomic classifications. Krona combines a variant of radial, space-filling displays with parametric coloring and interactive polar-coordinate zooming. The HTML5 and JavaScript implementation enables fully interactive charts that can be explored with any modern Web browser, without the need for installed software or plug-ins. This Web-based architecture also allows each chart to be an independent document, making them easy to share via e-mail or post to a standard Web server. To illustrate Krona's utility, we describe its application to various metagenomic data sets and its compatibility with popular metagenomic analysis tools. Krona is both a powerful metagenomic visualization tool and a demonstration of the potential of HTML5 for highly accessible bioinformatic visualizations. Its rich and interactive displays facilitate more informed interpretations of metagenomic analyses, while its implementation as a browser-based application makes it extremely portable and easily adopted into existing analysis packages. Both the Krona rendering code and conversion tools are freely available under a BSD open-source license, and available from: http://krona.sourceforge.net.

  17. The coffee genome hub: a resource for coffee genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereeper, Alexis; Bocs, Stéphanie; Rouard, Mathieu; Guignon, Valentin; Ravel, Sébastien; Tranchant-Dubreuil, Christine; Poncet, Valérie; Garsmeur, Olivier; Lashermes, Philippe; Droc, Gaëtan

    2015-01-01

    The whole genome sequence of Coffea canephora, the perennial diploid species known as Robusta, has been recently released. In the context of the C. canephora genome sequencing project and to support post-genomics efforts, we developed the Coffee Genome Hub (http://coffee-genome.org/), an integrative genome information system that allows centralized access to genomics and genetics data and analysis tools to facilitate translational and applied research in coffee. We provide the complete genome sequence of C. canephora along with gene structure, gene product information, metabolism, gene families, transcriptomics, syntenic blocks, genetic markers and genetic maps. The hub relies on generic software (e.g. GMOD tools) for easy querying, visualizing and downloading research data. It includes a Genome Browser enhanced by a Community Annotation System, enabling the improvement of automatic gene annotation through an annotation editor. In addition, the hub aims at developing interoperability among other existing South Green tools managing coffee data (phylogenomics resources, SNPs) and/or supporting data analyses with the Galaxy workflow manager. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Selfrando: Securing the Tor Browser against De-anonymization Exploits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conti Mauro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tor is a well-known anonymous communication system used by millions of users, including journalists and civil rights activists all over the world. The Tor Browser gives non-technical users an easy way to access the Tor Network. However, many government organizations are actively trying to compromise Tor not only in regions with repressive regimes but also in the free world, as the recent FBI incidents clearly demonstrate. Exploiting software vulnerabilities in general, and browser vulnerabilities in particular, constitutes a clear and present threat to the Tor software. The Tor Browser shares a large part of its attack surface with the Firefox browser. Therefore, Firefox vulnerabilities (even patched ones are highly valuable to attackers trying to monitor users of the Tor Browser.

  19. SU-E-J-114: Web-Browser Medical Physics Applications Using HTML5 and Javascript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiari, M

    2012-06-01

    Since 2010, there has been a great attention about HTML5. Application developers and browser makers fully embrace and support the web of the future. Consumers have started to embrace HTML5, especially as more users understand the benefits and potential that HTML5 can mean for the future.Modern browsers such as Firefox, Google Chrome, and Safari are offering better and more robust support for HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript. The idea is to introduce the HTML5 to medical physics community for open source software developments. The benefit of using HTML5 is developing portable software systems. The HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript programming languages were used to develop several applications for Quality Assurance in radiation therapy. The canvas element of HTML5 was used for handling and displaying the images, and JavaScript was used to manipulate the data. Sample application were developed to: 1. analyze the flatness and symmetry of the radiotherapy fields in a web browser, 2.analyze the Dynalog files from Varian machines, 3. visualize the animated Dynamic MLC files, 4. Simulation via Monte Carlo, and 5. interactive image manipulation. The programs showed great performance and speed in uploading the data and displaying the results. The flatness and symmetry program and Dynalog file analyzer ran in a fraction of second. The reason behind this performance is using JavaScript language which is a lower level programming language in comparison to the most of the scientific programming packages such as Matlab. The second reason is that JavaScript runs locally on client side computers not on the web-servers. HTML5 and JavaScript can be used to develop useful applications that can be run online or offline on different modern web-browsers. The programming platform can be also one of the modern web-browsers which are mostly open source (such as Firefox). © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Clinical Decision Support for Whole Genome Sequence Information Leveraging a Service-Oriented Architecture: a Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time. PMID:25954430

  1. Introgression browser: high-throughput whole-genome SNP visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves Aflitos, S.; Sanchez-Perez, G.; de Ridder, D.; Fransz, P.; Schranz, M.E.; de Jong, H.; Peters, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Breeding by introgressive hybridization is a pivotal strategy to broaden the genetic basis of crops. Usually, the desired traits are monitored in consecutive crossing generations by marker-assisted selection, but their analyses fail in chromosome regions where crossover recombinants are rare or not

  2. Introgression Browser: High throughput whole-genome SNP visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aflitos, S.A.; Aflitos, S.A.; Sanchez Perez, G.F.; Ridder, de D.; Fransz, P.; Schranz, M.E.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Peters, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Breeding by introgressive hybridization is a pivotal strategy to broaden the genetic basis of crops. Usually, the desired traits are monitored in consecutive crossing generations by marker-assisted selection, but their analyses fail in chromosome regions where crossover recombinants are rare or not

  3. A genome browser database for rice (Oryza sativa) and Chinese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Northeast Asia. ... storage, integration, analysis and visualization of a wide ... integration of any biological data that can be mapped .... Screenshot of 'map view' showing the region of rice chromosomes for selection from the ...

  4. Introgression browser: high-throughput whole-genome SNP visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves Aflitos, S.; Sanchez-Perez, G.; de Ridder, D.; Fransz, P.; Schranz, M.E.; de Jong, H.; Peters, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Breeding by introgressive hybridization is a pivotal strategy to broaden the genetic basis of crops. Usually, the desired traits are monitored in consecutive crossing generations by marker-assisted selection, but their analyses fail in chromosome regions where crossover recombinants are rare or not

  5. Introgression Browser: High throughput whole-genome SNP visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aflitos, S.A.; Sanchez Perez, G.F.; Ridder, de D.; Fransz, P.; Schranz, M.E.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Peters, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Breeding by introgressive hybridization is a pivotal strategy to broaden the genetic basis of crops. Usually, the desired traits are monitored in consecutive crossing generations by marker-assisted selection, but their analyses fail in chromosome regions where crossover recombinants are rare or not

  6. "Harnessing genomics to improve health in Africa" – an executive course to support genomics policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer Peter A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Africa in the twenty-first century is faced with a heavy burden of disease, combined with ill-equipped medical systems and underdeveloped technological capacity. A major challenge for the international community is to bring scientific and technological advances like genomics to bear on the health priorities of poorer countries. The New Partnership for Africa's Development has identified science and technology as a key platform for Africa's renewal. Recognizing the timeliness of this issue, the African Centre for Technology Studies and the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics co-organized a course on Genomics and Public Health Policy in Nairobi, Kenya, the first of a series of similar courses to take place in the developing world. This article presents the findings and recommendations that emerged from this process, recommendations which suggest that a regional approach to developing sound science and technology policies is the key to harnessing genome-related biotechnology to improve health and contribute to human development in Africa. Methods The objectives of the course were to familiarize participants with the current status and implications of genomics for health in Africa; to provide frameworks for analyzing and debating the policy and ethical questions; and to begin developing a network across different sectors by sharing perspectives and building relationships. To achieve these goals the course brought together a diverse group of stakeholders from academic research centres, the media, non-governmental, voluntary and legal organizations to stimulate multi-sectoral debate around issues of policy. Topics included scientific advances in genomics innovation systems and business models, international regulatory frameworks, as well as ethical and legal issues. Results Seven main recommendations emerged: establish a network for sustained dialogue among participants; identify champions among politicians; use the

  7. BrainBrowser: distributed, web-based neurological data visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Tarek; Kassis, Nicolas; Rousseau, Marc-Étienne; Adalat, Reza; Evans, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen massive, distributed datasets become the norm in neuroimaging research, and the methodologies used to analyze them have, in response, become more collaborative and exploratory. Tools and infrastructure are continuously being developed and deployed to facilitate research in this context: grid computation platforms to process the data, distributed data stores to house and share them, high-speed networks to move them around and collaborative, often web-based, platforms to provide access to and sometimes manage the entire system. BrainBrowser is a lightweight, high-performance JavaScript visualization library built to provide easy-to-use, powerful, on-demand visualization of remote datasets in this new research environment. BrainBrowser leverages modern web technologies, such as WebGL, HTML5 and Web Workers, to visualize 3D surface and volumetric neuroimaging data in any modern web browser without requiring any browser plugins. It is thus trivial to integrate BrainBrowser into any web-based platform. BrainBrowser is simple enough to produce a basic web-based visualization in a few lines of code, while at the same time being robust enough to create full-featured visualization applications. BrainBrowser can dynamically load the data required for a given visualization, so no network bandwidth needs to be waisted on data that will not be used. BrainBrowser's integration into the standardized web platform also allows users to consider using 3D data visualization in novel ways, such as for data distribution, data sharing and dynamic online publications. BrainBrowser is already being used in two major online platforms, CBRAIN and LORIS, and has been used to make the 1TB MACACC dataset openly accessible.

  8. BrainBrowser: distributed, web-based neurological data visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek eSherif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen massive, distributed datasets become the norm in neuroimaging research, and the methodologies used analyze them have, in response, become more collaborative and exploratory. Tools and infrastructure are continuously being developed and deployed to facilitate research in this context: grid computation platforms to process the data, distributed data stores to house and share them, high-speed networks to move them around and collaborative, often web-based, platforms to provide access to and sometimes manage the entire system. BrainBrowser is a lightweight, high-performance JavaScript visualization library built to provide easy-to-use, powerful, on-demand visualization of remote datasets in this new research environment. BrainBrowser leverages modern Web technologies, such as WebGL, HTML5 and Web Workers, to visualize 3D surface and volumetric neuroimaging data in any modern web browser without requiring any browser plugins. It is thus trivial to integrate BrainBrowser into any web-based platform. BrainBrowser is simple enough to produce a basic web-based visualization in a few lines of code, while at the same time being robust enough to create full-featured visualization applications. BrainBrowser can dynamically load the data required for a given visualization, so no network bandwidth needs to be waisted on data that will not be used. BrainBrowser's integration into the standardized web platform also allows users to consider using 3D data visualization in novel ways, such as for data distribution, data sharing and dynamic online publications. BrainBrowser is already being used in two major online platforms, CBRAIN and LORIS, and has been used to make the 1TB MACACC dataset openly accessible.

  9. BrainBrowser: distributed, web-based neurological data visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Tarek; Kassis, Nicolas; Rousseau, Marc-Étienne; Adalat, Reza; Evans, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen massive, distributed datasets become the norm in neuroimaging research, and the methodologies used to analyze them have, in response, become more collaborative and exploratory. Tools and infrastructure are continuously being developed and deployed to facilitate research in this context: grid computation platforms to process the data, distributed data stores to house and share them, high-speed networks to move them around and collaborative, often web-based, platforms to provide access to and sometimes manage the entire system. BrainBrowser is a lightweight, high-performance JavaScript visualization library built to provide easy-to-use, powerful, on-demand visualization of remote datasets in this new research environment. BrainBrowser leverages modern web technologies, such as WebGL, HTML5 and Web Workers, to visualize 3D surface and volumetric neuroimaging data in any modern web browser without requiring any browser plugins. It is thus trivial to integrate BrainBrowser into any web-based platform. BrainBrowser is simple enough to produce a basic web-based visualization in a few lines of code, while at the same time being robust enough to create full-featured visualization applications. BrainBrowser can dynamically load the data required for a given visualization, so no network bandwidth needs to be waisted on data that will not be used. BrainBrowser's integration into the standardized web platform also allows users to consider using 3D data visualization in novel ways, such as for data distribution, data sharing and dynamic online publications. BrainBrowser is already being used in two major online platforms, CBRAIN and LORIS, and has been used to make the 1TB MACACC dataset openly accessible. PMID:25628562

  10. Physician Attitudes toward Adopting Genome-Guided Prescribing through Clinical Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Lynnette Overby

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed physician attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through clinical decision support (CDS, prior to enlisting in the Clinical Implementation of Personalized Medicine through Electronic Health Records and Genomics pilot pharmacogenomics project (CLIPMERGE PGx. We developed a survey instrument that includes the Evidence Based Practice Attitude Scale, adapted to measure attitudes toward adopting genome-informed interventions (EBPAS-GII. The survey also includes items to measure physicians’ characteristics (awareness, experience, and perceived usefulness, attitudes about personal genome testing (PGT services, and comfort using technology. We surveyed 101 General Internal Medicine physicians from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS. The majority were residency program trainees (~88%. Prior to enlisting into CLIPMERGE PGx, most physicians were aware of and had used decision support aids. Few physicians, however, were aware of and had used genome-guided prescribing. The majority of physicians viewed decision support aids and genotype data as being useful for making prescribing decisions. Most physicians had not heard of, but were willing to use, PGT services and felt comfortable interpreting PGT results. Most physicians were comfortable with technology. Physicians who perceived genotype data to be useful in making prescribing decisions, had more positive attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through CDS. Our findings suggest that internal medicine physicians have a deficit in their familiarity and comfort interpreting and using genomic information. This has reinforced the importance of gathering feedback and guidance from our enrolled physicians when designing genome-guided CDS and the importance of prioritizing genomic medicine education at our institutions.

  11. Physician Attitudes toward Adopting Genome-Guided Prescribing through Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overby, Casey Lynnette; Erwin, Angelika Ludtke; Abul-Husn, Noura S; Ellis, Stephen B; Scott, Stuart A; Obeng, Aniwaa Owusu; Kannry, Joseph L; Hripcsak, George; Bottinger, Erwin P; Gottesman, Omri

    2014-02-27

    This study assessed physician attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through clinical decision support (CDS), prior to enlisting in the Clinical Implementation of Personalized Medicine through Electronic Health Records and Genomics pilot pharmacogenomics project (CLIPMERGE PGx). We developed a survey instrument that includes the Evidence Based Practice Attitude Scale, adapted to measure attitudes toward adopting genome-informed interventions (EBPAS-GII). The survey also includes items to measure physicians' characteristics (awareness, experience, and perceived usefulness), attitudes about personal genome testing (PGT) services, and comfort using technology. We surveyed 101 General Internal Medicine physicians from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS). The majority were residency program trainees (~88%). Prior to enlisting into CLIPMERGE PGx, most physicians were aware of and had used decision support aids. Few physicians, however, were aware of and had used genome-guided prescribing. The majority of physicians viewed decision support aids and genotype data as being useful for making prescribing decisions. Most physicians had not heard of, but were willing to use, PGT services and felt comfortable interpreting PGT results. Most physicians were comfortable with technology. Physicians who perceived genotype data to be useful in making prescribing decisions, had more positive attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through CDS. Our findings suggest that internal medicine physicians have a deficit in their familiarity and comfort interpreting and using genomic information. This has reinforced the importance of gathering feedback and guidance from our enrolled physicians when designing genome-guided CDS and the importance of prioritizing genomic medicine education at our institutions.

  12. Implementing Genomic Clinical Decision Support for Drug‐Based Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formea, CM; Hoffman, JM; Matey, E; Peterson, JF; Boyce, RD

    2017-01-01

    The explosive growth of patient‐specific genomic information relevant to drug therapy will continue to be a defining characteristic of biomedical research. To implement drug‐based personalized medicine (PM) for patients, clinicians need actionable information incorporated into electronic health records (EHRs). New clinical decision support (CDS) methods and informatics infrastructure are required in order to comprehensively integrate, interpret, deliver, and apply the full range of genomic data for each patient.1 PMID:28109071

  13. Quality Search Content: A Reality With Next Generation Browsers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Lakshminarayana, S.

    =ISO-8859-1 Letter to the Editor Quality search content: A reality with next Generation Browsers Sir, Internet became destiny to get information or to transact a business need. Most of the works including the recent articles of Declan...

  14. A Telemetry Browser Built with Java Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupart, E.

    In the context of CNES balloon scientific campaigns and telemetry survey field, a generic telemetry processing product, called TelemetryBrowser in the following, was developed reusing COTS, Java Components for most of them. Connection between those components relies on a software architecture based on parameter producers and parameter consumers. The first one transmit parameter values to the second one which has registered to it. All of those producers and consumers can be spread over the network thanks to Corba, and over every kind of workstation thanks to Java. This gives a very powerful mean to adapt to constraints like network bandwidth, or workstations processing or memory. It's also very useful to display and correlate at the same time information coming from multiple and various sources. An important point of this architecture is that the coupling between parameter producers and parameter consumers is reduced to the minimum and that transmission of information on the network is made asynchronously. So, if a parameter consumer goes down or runs slowly, there is no consequence on the other consumers, because producers don't wait for their consumers to finish their data processing before sending it to other consumers. An other interesting point is that parameter producers, also called TelemetryServers in the following are generated nearly automatically starting from a telemetry description using Flavori component. Keywords Java components, Corba, distributed application, OpenORBii, software reuse, COTS, Internet, Flavor. i Flavor (Formal Language for Audio-Visual Object Representation) is an object-oriented media representation language being developed at Columbia University. It is designed as an extension of Java and C++ and simplifies the development of applications that involve a significant media processing component (encoding, decoding, editing, manipulation, etc.) by providing bitstream representation semantics. (flavor.sourceforge.net) ii Open

  15. Modeling the HTML DOM and Browser API in Static Analysis of JavaScript Web Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon Holm; Madsen, Magnus; Møller, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Developers of JavaScript web applications have little tool support for catching errors early in development. In comparison, an abundance of tools exist for statically typed languages, including sophisticated integrated development environments and specialized static analyses. Transferring...... such technologies to the domain of JavaScript web applications is challenging. In this paper, we discuss the challenges, which include the dynamic aspects of JavaScript and the complex interactions between JavaScript, HTML, and the browser. From this, we present the first static analysis that is capable...... of reasoning about the flow of control and data in modern JavaScript applications that interact with the HTML DOM and browser API. One application of such a static analysis is to detect type-related and dataflow-related programming errors. We report on experiments with a range of modern web applications...

  16. 简述Browser/Server的三层结构体系%On the Three- tier Structure System of Browser/ Server

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严伟; 黄红霞

    2007-01-01

    随着Internet广泛的应用,传统的二层Client/Server的结构暴露出了它的局限性,于是,一种新兴的体系结构Browser/Server应运而生,并获得飞速发展.它是一种由传统的二层Client/Server结构发展而来的三层Browser/Server结构在Web上应用的特例.

  17. Cyber infrastructure for Fusarium: three integrated platforms supporting strain identification, phylogenetics, comparative genomics and knowledge sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bongsoo; Park, Jongsun; Cheong, Kyeong-Chae; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jung, Kyongyong; Kim, Donghan; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Ward, Todd J; O'Donnell, Kerry; Geiser, David M; Kang, Seogchan

    2011-01-01

    The fungal genus Fusarium includes many plant and/or animal pathogenic species and produces diverse toxins. Although accurate species identification is critical for managing such threats, it is difficult to identify Fusarium morphologically. Fortunately, extensive molecular phylogenetic studies, founded on well-preserved culture collections, have established a robust foundation for Fusarium classification. Genomes of four Fusarium species have been published with more being currently sequenced. The Cyber infrastructure for Fusarium (CiF; http://www.fusariumdb.org/) was built to support archiving and utilization of rapidly increasing data and knowledge and consists of Fusarium-ID, Fusarium Comparative Genomics Platform (FCGP) and Fusarium Community Platform (FCP). The Fusarium-ID archives phylogenetic marker sequences from most known species along with information associated with characterized isolates and supports strain identification and phylogenetic analyses. The FCGP currently archives five genomes from four species. Besides supporting genome browsing and analysis, the FCGP presents computed characteristics of multiple gene families and functional groups. The Cart/Favorite function allows users to collect sequences from Fusarium-ID and the FCGP and analyze them later using multiple tools without requiring repeated copying-and-pasting of sequences. The FCP is designed to serve as an online community forum for sharing and preserving accumulated experience and knowledge to support future research and education.

  18. Cyber infrastructure for Fusarium: three integrated platforms supporting strain identification, phylogenetics, comparative genomics and knowledge sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bongsoo; Park, Jongsun; Cheong, Kyeong-Chae; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jung, Kyongyong; Kim, Donghan; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Ward, Todd J.; O'Donnell, Kerry; Geiser, David M.; Kang, Seogchan

    2011-01-01

    The fungal genus Fusarium includes many plant and/or animal pathogenic species and produces diverse toxins. Although accurate species identification is critical for managing such threats, it is difficult to identify Fusarium morphologically. Fortunately, extensive molecular phylogenetic studies, founded on well-preserved culture collections, have established a robust foundation for Fusarium classification. Genomes of four Fusarium species have been published with more being currently sequenced. The Cyber infrastructure for Fusarium (CiF; http://www.fusariumdb.org/) was built to support archiving and utilization of rapidly increasing data and knowledge and consists of Fusarium-ID, Fusarium Comparative Genomics Platform (FCGP) and Fusarium Community Platform (FCP). The Fusarium-ID archives phylogenetic marker sequences from most known species along with information associated with characterized isolates and supports strain identification and phylogenetic analyses. The FCGP currently archives five genomes from four species. Besides supporting genome browsing and analysis, the FCGP presents computed characteristics of multiple gene families and functional groups. The Cart/Favorite function allows users to collect sequences from Fusarium-ID and the FCGP and analyze them later using multiple tools without requiring repeated copying-and-pasting of sequences. The FCP is designed to serve as an online community forum for sharing and preserving accumulated experience and knowledge to support future research and education. PMID:21087991

  19. Hands Free Browser-‘An Interactive Speech Browser for Visually Handicapped’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Kapoor

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available These days the technology of browsing through voice is increasing rapidly. The paper concentrate on voice based approach of browsing rather than operating on textual mode, which uses speech recognition and speech synthesis methods or algorithms to implement speech technology. Now-a-days the learning over the web has become an important mode of education. However, the persons with no vision i.e. blind persons who represent a major population can’t access the content over the web efficiently in the current browsers, as they are unable to see the different links which are present in the web pages. This paper propose a system which allows these people to access the web, it comprises of various modules, such as: Speech Recognition, Speech Synthesis, Text to Braille and Braille to Text conversion. The paper also summarizes the algorithms used for above modules.

  20. A Lifelog Browser for Visualization and Search of Mobile Everyday-Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keum-Sung Hwang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices can now handle a great deal of information thanks to the convergence of diverse functionalities. Mobile environments have already shown great potential in terms of providing customized service to users because they can record meaningful and private information continually for long periods of time. The research for understanding, searching and summarizing the everyday-life of human has received increasing attention in recent years due to the digital convergence. In this paper, we propose a mobile life browser, which visualizes and searches human's mobile life based on the contents and context of lifelog data. The mobile life browser is for searching the personal information effectively collected on his/her mobile device and for supporting the concept-based searching method by using concept networks and Bayesian networks. In the experiments, we collected the real mobile log data from three users for a month and visualized the mobile lives of the users with the mobile life browser developed. Some tests on searching tasks confirmed that the result using the proposed concept-based searching method is promising.

  1. AUGMENTED REALITY BROWSERS: A PROPOSAL FOR ARCHITECTURAL STANDARDIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Sambinelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The technology evolution of smartphones, systems and the growing of telecommunications, allow the use of Augmented Reality in the exploration of geo-referenced information, complementing the real environment of the users with various types of content displayed on robust mobile cameras through applications called augmented reality browsers. Although this type of application is being in development and growing use by society, the technology, and especially its software architecture do not have any kind of standardization. This work presents concepts about augmented reality browsers for mobile devices. It shows the main aspects and applications of those types of reality. Besides that, the specific features of those types of architecture are discussed and compared, and new architecture, whose most relevant feature is the interoperability of applications in various platforms for mobile devices, are presented. This work has the objective to develop an architectural framework for the development of these browsers.

  2. Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the sister group to all other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-12-15

    Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the sister group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the sister group to the remaining animals (the "Ctenophora-sister" hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-sister, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-sister and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-sister hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data.

  3. A Clinical Service to Support the Return of Secondary Genomic Findings in Human Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Andrew J.; Austin, Howard; Bluemke, David A.; Cannon, Richard O.; Fischbeck, Kenneth; Gahl, William; Goldman, David; Grady, Christine; Greene, Mark H.; Holland, Steven M.; Hull, Sara Chandros; Porter, Forbes D.; Resnik, David; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2016-01-01

    Human genome and exome sequencing are powerful research tools that can generate secondary findings beyond the scope of the research. Most secondary genomic findings are of low importance, but some (for a current estimate of 1%–3% of individuals) confer high risk of a serious disease that could be mitigated by timely medical intervention. The impact and scope of secondary findings in genome and exome sequencing will only increase in the future. There is considerable agreement that high-impact findings should be returned to participants, but many researchers performing genomic research studies do not have the background, skills, or resources to identify, verify, interpret, and return such variants. Here, we introduce a proposal for the formation of a secondary-genomic-findings service (SGFS) that would support researchers by enabling the return of clinically actionable sequencing results to research participants in a standardized manner. We describe a proposed structure for such a centralized service and evaluate the advantages and challenges of the approach. We suggest that such a service would be of greater benefit to all parties involved than present practice, which is highly variable. We encourage research centers to consider the adoption of a centralized SGFS. PMID:26942283

  4. Autoplot: a Browser for Science Data on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faden, J.; Weigel, R. S.; West, E. E.; Merka, J.

    2008-12-01

    Autoplot (www.autoplot.org) is software for plotting data from many different sources and in many different file formats. Data from CDF, CEF, Fits, NetCDF, and OpenDAP can be plotted, along with many other sources such as ASCII tables and Excel spreadsheets. This is done by adapting these various data formats and APIs into a common data model that borrows from the netCDF and CDF data models. Autoplot uses a web browser metaphor to simplify use. The user specifies a parameter URL, for example a CDF file accessible via http with a parameter name appended, and the file resource is downloaded and the parameter is rendered in a scientifically meaningful way. When data span multiple files, the user can use a file name template in the URL to aggregate (combine) a set of remote files. So the problem of aggregating data across file boundaries is handled on the client side, allowing simple web servers to be used. The das2 graphics library provides rich controls for exploring the data. Scripting is supported through Python, providing not just programmatic control, but for calculating new parameters in a language that will look familiar to IDL and Matlab users. Autoplot is Java-based software, and will run on most computers without a burdensome installation process. It can also used as an applet or as a servlet that serves static images. Autoplot was developed as part of the Virtual Radiation Belt Observatory (ViRBO) project, and is also being used for the Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory (VMO). It is expected that this flexible, general-purpose plotting tool will be useful for allowing a data provider to add instant visualization capabilities to a directory of files or for general use in the Virtual Observatory environment.

  5. Towards an interoperable information infrastructure providing decision support for genomic medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Samwald, Matthias; Dumontier, Michel; Marshall, M Scott; Luciano, Joanne; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; 10.3233/978-1-60750-806-9-165

    2011-01-01

    Genetic dispositions play a major role in individual disease risk and treatment response. Genomic medicine, in which medical decisions are refined by genetic information of particular patients, is becoming increasingly important. Here we describe our work and future visions around the creation of a distributed infrastructure for pharmacogenetic data and medical decision support, based on industry standards such as the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and the Arden Syntax.

  6. Developing genomic knowledge bases and databases to support clinical management: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Sincan, Murat; Cimino, James J

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine, the ability to tailor diagnostic and treatment decisions for individual patients, is seen as the evolution of modern medicine. We characterize here the informatics resources available today or envisioned in the near future that can support clinical interpretation of genomic test results. We assume a clinical sequencing scenario (germline whole-exome sequencing) in which a clinical specialist, such as an endocrinologist, needs to tailor patient management decisions within his or her specialty (targeted findings) but relies on a genetic counselor to interpret off-target incidental findings. We characterize the genomic input data and list various types of knowledge bases that provide genomic knowledge for generating clinical decision support. We highlight the need for patient-level databases with detailed lifelong phenotype content in addition to genotype data and provide a list of recommendations for personalized medicine knowledge bases and databases. We conclude that no single knowledge base can currently support all aspects of personalized recommendations and that consolidation of several current resources into larger, more dynamic and collaborative knowledge bases may offer a future path forward.

  7. Context Aware Concurrent Execution Framework for Web Browsers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Aamir; Erbad, Aiman; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein

    2016-01-01

    Computing hungry multimedia web applications need to efficiently utilize all the resources of a device. HTML5 web workers is a non-sharing concurrency platform that enables multimedia web application to utilize the available multicore hardware. HTML5 web workers are implemented by major browser...

  8. /facet: A Generic Facet Browser Including Temporal and Spatial Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildebrand, M.

    2007-01-01

    A generic facet browser including temporal and spatial visualization. The existing MultimediaN Eculture demo is updated in two ways: improved visualization of the semantic timeline and added a natural language sentence generator for cluster headers. Relation search interface is also implemente

  9. Bovine Genome Database: new tools for gleaning function from the Bos taurus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsik, Christine G; Unni, Deepak R; Diesh, Colin M; Tayal, Aditi; Emery, Marianne L; Nguyen, Hung N; Hagen, Darren E

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Bovine Genome Database (BGD) (http://BovineGenome.org). The goal of BGD is to support bovine genomics research by providing genome annotation and data mining tools. We have developed new genome and annotation browsers using JBrowse and WebApollo for two Bos taurus genome assemblies, the reference genome assembly (UMD3.1.1) and the alternate genome assembly (Btau_4.6.1). Annotation tools have been customized to highlight priority genes for annotation, and to aid annotators in selecting gene evidence tracks from 91 tissue specific RNAseq datasets. We have also developed BovineMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, to integrate the bovine genome, annotation, QTL, SNP and expression data with external sources of orthology, gene ontology, gene interaction and pathway information. BovineMine provides powerful query building tools, as well as customized query templates, and allows users to analyze and download genome-wide datasets. With BovineMine, bovine researchers can use orthology to leverage the curated gene pathways of model organisms, such as human, mouse and rat. BovineMine will be especially useful for gene ontology and pathway analyses in conjunction with GWAS and QTL studies.

  10. Genomic Database Searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, James R A

    2017-01-01

    The availability of reference genome sequences for virtually all species under active research has revolutionized biology. Analyses of genomic variations in many organisms have provided insights into phenotypic traits, evolution and disease, and are transforming medicine. All genomic data from publicly funded projects are freely available in Internet-based databases, for download or searching via genome browsers such as Ensembl, Vega, NCBI's Map Viewer, and the UCSC Genome Browser. These online tools generate interactive graphical outputs of relevant chromosomal regions, showing genes, transcripts, and other genomic landmarks, and epigenetic features mapped by projects such as ENCODE.This chapter provides a broad overview of the major genomic databases and browsers, and describes various approaches and the latest resources for searching them. Methods are provided for identifying genomic locus and sequence information using gene names or codes, identifiers for DNA and RNA molecules and proteins; also from karyotype bands, chromosomal coordinates, sequences, motifs, and matrix-based patterns. Approaches are also described for batch retrieval of genomic information, performing more complex queries, and analyzing larger sets of experimental data, for example from next-generation sequencing projects.

  11. Systems genomics analysis centered on epigenetic inheritance supports development of a unified theory of biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhay

    2015-11-01

    New discoveries are increasingly demanding integration of epigenetics, molecular biology, genomic networks and physiology with evolution. This article provides a proof of concept for evolutionary transgenerational systems biology, proposed recently in the context of epigenetic inheritance in mammals. Gene set enrichment analysis of available genome-level mammalian data presented here seem consistent with the concept that: (1) heritable information about environmental effects in somatic cells is communicated to the germline by circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) or other RNAs released in physiological fluids; (2) epigenetic factors including miRNA-like small RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications are propagated across generations via gene networks; and (3) inherited epigenetic variations in the form of methylated cytosines are fixed in the population as thymines over the evolutionary time course. The analysis supports integration of physiology and epigenetics with inheritance and evolution. This may catalyze efforts to develop a unified theory of biology.

  12. HOME USERS SECURITY AND THE WEB BROWSER INBUILT SETTINGS, FRAMEWORK TO SETUP IT AUTOMATICALLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Serrhini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We are living in the electronic age where electronic transactions such as e-mail, e-banking, e-commerce and e-learning becoming more and more prominent. To access online for this services, the web browser is today’s almost unique software used. These days’ hackers know that browsers are installed into all computers and can be used to compromise a machine by distributing malware via malicious or hacked websites. Also these sites use JavaScript to manipulate browsers and can drive user system to failures. Each browser have inbuilt features setting that define his behavior, unfortunately most of end users are unwilling to enable or disable this features securely, because many of them still do not understand even basic security concepts nor variety of security technologies present in a browser. This study will deeply discuss specific modern browser inbuilt features settings and associated security risks and we present a framework developed to enhance user surfing safety by configuring automatically all installed browsers features settings securely, we call it Automatic Safe Browser Launcher, to solidify the claim, we check each browser before and after with free tool (browser_tests-1.03 which is a collection of test cases to test browser vulnerability. The more configured security features your browser has, the better protected you are from online threats.

  13. Genome-wide Gene Order Distances Support Clustering The Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher H House

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Initially using 143 genomes, we developed a method for calculating the pair-wise distance between prokaryotic genomes using a Monte Carlo method to estimate the conservation of gene order. The method was based on repeatedly selecting five or six non-adjacent random orthologs from each of two genomes and determining if the chosen orthologs were in the same order. The raw distances were then corrected for gene order convergence using an adaptation of the Jukes-Cantor model, as well as using the common distance correction D’ = -ln(1-D. First, we compared the distances found via the order of six orthologs to distances found based on ortholog gene content and small subunit rRNA sequences. The Jukes-Cantor gene order distances are reasonably well correlated with the divergence of rRNA (R2 = 0.24, especially at rRNA Jukes-Cantor distances of less than 0.2 (R2 = 0.52. Gene content is only weakly correlated with rRNA divergence (R2 = 0.04 over all distances, however, it is especially strongly correlated at rRNA Jukes-Cantor distances of less than 0.1 (R2 = 0.67. This initial work suggests that gene order may be useful in conjunction with other methods to help understand the relatedness of genomes. Using the gene order distances in 143 genomes, the relations of prokaryotes were studied using neighbor joining and agreement subtrees. We then repeated our study of the relations of prokaryotes using gene order in 172 complete genomes better representing a wider-diversity of prokaryotes. Consistently, our trees show the Actinobacteria as a sister group to the bulk of the Firmicutes. In fact, the robustness of gene order support was found to be considerably greater for uniting these two phyla than for uniting any of the proteobacterial classes together. The results are supportive of the idea that Actinobacteria and Firmicutes are closely related, which in turn implies a single origin for the gram-positive cell.

  14. A national clinical decision support infrastructure to enable the widespread and consistent practice of genomic and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Lobach, David F; Willard, Huntington F; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2009-03-23

    In recent years, the completion of the Human Genome Project and other rapid advances in genomics have led to increasing anticipation of an era of genomic and personalized medicine, in which an individual's health is optimized through the use of all available patient data, including data on the individual's genome and its downstream products. Genomic and personalized medicine could transform healthcare systems and catalyze significant reductions in morbidity, mortality, and overall healthcare costs. Critical to the achievement of more efficient and effective healthcare enabled by genomics is the establishment of a robust, nationwide clinical decision support infrastructure that assists clinicians in their use of genomic assays to guide disease prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. Requisite components of this infrastructure include the standardized representation of genomic and non-genomic patient data across health information systems; centrally managed repositories of computer-processable medical knowledge; and standardized approaches for applying these knowledge resources against patient data to generate and deliver patient-specific care recommendations. Here, we provide recommendations for establishing a national decision support infrastructure for genomic and personalized medicine that fulfills these needs, leverages existing resources, and is aligned with the Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support commissioned by the U.S. Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. Critical to the establishment of this infrastructure will be strong leadership and substantial funding from the federal government. A national clinical decision support infrastructure will be required for reaping the full benefits of genomic and personalized medicine. Essential components of this infrastructure include standards for data representation; centrally managed knowledge repositories; and standardized approaches for leveraging these knowledge

  15. A national clinical decision support infrastructure to enable the widespread and consistent practice of genomic and personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willard Huntington F

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the completion of the Human Genome Project and other rapid advances in genomics have led to increasing anticipation of an era of genomic and personalized medicine, in which an individual's health is optimized through the use of all available patient data, including data on the individual's genome and its downstream products. Genomic and personalized medicine could transform healthcare systems and catalyze significant reductions in morbidity, mortality, and overall healthcare costs. Discussion Critical to the achievement of more efficient and effective healthcare enabled by genomics is the establishment of a robust, nationwide clinical decision support infrastructure that assists clinicians in their use of genomic assays to guide disease prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. Requisite components of this infrastructure include the standardized representation of genomic and non-genomic patient data across health information systems; centrally managed repositories of computer-processable medical knowledge; and standardized approaches for applying these knowledge resources against patient data to generate and deliver patient-specific care recommendations. Here, we provide recommendations for establishing a national decision support infrastructure for genomic and personalized medicine that fulfills these needs, leverages existing resources, and is aligned with the Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support commissioned by the U.S. Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. Critical to the establishment of this infrastructure will be strong leadership and substantial funding from the federal government. Summary A national clinical decision support infrastructure will be required for reaping the full benefits of genomic and personalized medicine. Essential components of this infrastructure include standards for data representation; centrally managed knowledge repositories; and

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome sequences of three bats species and whole genome mitochondrial analyses reveal patterns of codon bias and lend support to a basal split in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meganathan, P R; Pagan, Heidi J T; McCulloch, Eve S; Stevens, Richard D; Ray, David A

    2012-01-15

    Order Chiroptera is a unique group of mammals whose members have attained self-powered flight as their main mode of locomotion. Much speculation persists regarding bat evolution; however, lack of sufficient molecular data hampers evolutionary and conservation studies. Of ~1200 species, complete mitochondrial genome sequences are available for only eleven. Additional sequences should be generated if we are to resolve many questions concerning these fascinating mammals. Herein, we describe the complete mitochondrial genomes of three bats: Corynorhinus rafinesquii, Lasiurus borealis and Artibeus lituratus. We also compare the currently available mitochondrial genomes and analyze codon usage in Chiroptera. C. rafinesquii, L. borealis and A. lituratus mitochondrial genomes are 16438 bp, 17048 bp and 16709 bp, respectively. Genome organization and gene arrangements are similar to other bats. Phylogenetic analyses using complete mitochondrial genome sequences support previously established phylogenetic relationships and suggest utility in future studies focusing on the evolutionary aspects of these species. Comprehensive analyses of available bat mitochondrial genomes reveal distinct nucleotide patterns and synonymous codon preferences corresponding to different chiropteran families. These patterns suggest that mutational and selection forces are acting to different extents within Chiroptera and shape their mitochondrial genomes.

  17. Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. Recent sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of Candida genomic data. We have developed the Candida Gene Order Browser (CGOB), an online tool that aids comparative syntenic analyses of Candida species. CGOB incorporates all available Candida clade genome sequences including two Candida albicans isolates (SC5314 and WO-1) and 8 closely related species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida lusitaniae). Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome. Results CGOB assignments of homology were manually curated based on sequence similarity and synteny. In total CGOB includes 65617 genes arranged into 13625 homology columns. We have also generated improved Candida gene sets by merging/removing partial genes in each genome. Interrogation of CGOB revealed that the majority of tandemly duplicated genes are under strong purifying selection in all Candida species. We identified clusters of adjacent genes involved in the same metabolic pathways (such as catabolism of biotin, galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine) and we showed that some clusters are species or lineage-specific. We also identified one example of intron gain in C. albicans. Conclusions Our analysis provides an important resource that is now available for the Candida community. CGOB is available at http://cgob.ucd.ie. PMID:20459735

  18. Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, David A

    2010-05-10

    Abstract Background Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. Recent sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of Candida genomic data. We have developed the Candida Gene Order Browser (CGOB), an online tool that aids comparative syntenic analyses of Candida species. CGOB incorporates all available Candida clade genome sequences including two Candida albicans isolates (SC5314 and WO-1) and 8 closely related species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida lusitaniae). Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome. Results CGOB assignments of homology were manually curated based on sequence similarity and synteny. In total CGOB includes 65617 genes arranged into 13625 homology columns. We have also generated improved Candida gene sets by merging\\/removing partial genes in each genome. Interrogation of CGOB revealed that the majority of tandemly duplicated genes are under strong purifying selection in all Candida species. We identified clusters of adjacent genes involved in the same metabolic pathways (such as catabolism of biotin, galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine) and we showed that some clusters are species or lineage-specific. We also identified one example of intron gain in C. albicans. Conclusions Our analysis provides an important resource that is now available for the Candida community. CGOB is available at http:\\/\\/cgob.ucd.ie.

  19. Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne Kevin P

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. Recent sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of Candida genomic data. We have developed the Candida Gene Order Browser (CGOB, an online tool that aids comparative syntenic analyses of Candida species. CGOB incorporates all available Candida clade genome sequences including two Candida albicans isolates (SC5314 and WO-1 and 8 closely related species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida lusitaniae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome. Results CGOB assignments of homology were manually curated based on sequence similarity and synteny. In total CGOB includes 65617 genes arranged into 13625 homology columns. We have also generated improved Candida gene sets by merging/removing partial genes in each genome. Interrogation of CGOB revealed that the majority of tandemly duplicated genes are under strong purifying selection in all Candida species. We identified clusters of adjacent genes involved in the same metabolic pathways (such as catabolism of biotin, galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine and we showed that some clusters are species or lineage-specific. We also identified one example of intron gain in C. albicans. Conclusions Our analysis provides an important resource that is now available for the Candida community. CGOB is available at http://cgob.ucd.ie.

  20. Baseline Practices for the Application of Genomic Data Supporting Regulatory Food Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Dominic; Pightling, Arthur; Griffiths, Emma; Van Domselaar, Gary; Evans, Peter; Berthelet, Sharon; Craig, Duncan; Chandry, P Scott; Stones, Robert; Brinkman, Fiona; Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Kreysa, Joachim; Tong, Weida; Blais, Burton

    2017-01-19

    The application of new data streams generated from next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been demonstrated for food microbiology, pathogen identification, and illness outbreak detection. The establishment of best practices for data integrity, reproducibility, and traceability will ensure reliable, auditable, and transparent processes underlying food microbiology risk management decisions. We outline general principles to guide the use of NGS data in support of microbiological food safety. Regulatory authorities across intra- and international jurisdictions can leverage this effort to promote the reliability, consistency, and transparency of processes used in the derivation of genomic information for regulatory food safety purposes, and to facilitate interactions and the transfer of information in the interest of public health.

  1. Cas-analyzer: an online tool for assessing genome editing results using NGS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongbin; Lim, Kayeong; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bae, Sangsu

    2017-01-15

    Genome editing with programmable nucleases has been widely adopted in research and medicine. Next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are now widely used for measuring the frequencies of mutations induced by CRISPR-Cas9 and other programmable nucleases. Here, we present an online tool, Cas-Analyzer, a JavaScript-based implementation for NGS data analysis. Because Cas-Analyzer is completely used at a client-side web browser on-the-fly, there is no need to upload very large NGS datasets to a server, a time-consuming step in genome editing analysis. Currently, Cas-Analyzer supports various programmable nucleases, including single nucleases and paired nucleases.

  2. Web Voice Browser Based on an ISLPC Text-to-Speech Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Rikun; JI Yuefeng; LI Hui

    2006-01-01

    A kind of Web voice browser based on improved synchronous linear predictive coding (ISLPC) and Text-to-Speech (TTS) algorithm and Internet application was proposed. The paper analyzes the features of TTS system with ISLPC speech synthesis and discusses the design and implementation of ISLPC TTS-based Web voice browser. The browser integrates Web technology, Chinese information processing, artificial intelligence and the key technology of Chinese ISLPC speech synthesis. It's a visual and audible web browser that can improve information precision for network users. The evaluation results show that ISLPC-based TTS model has a better performance than other browsers in voice quality and capability of identifying Chinese characters.

  3. A LITERATURE SURVEY ON ANTI-PHISHING BROWSER EXTENSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oinam Bhopen Singh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Phishing is the fraudulent acquisition of personal information like username, password, credit card information, etc. by tricking an individual into believing that the attacker is a trustworthy entity. It is affecting all the major sector of industry day by day with lots of misuse of user’s credentials. So in today online environment we need to protect the data from phishing and safeguard our information, which can be done through anti-phishing tools. Currently there are many freely available anti-phishing browser extensions tools that warns user when they are browsing a suspected phishing site. In this paper we did a literature survey of some of the commonly and popularly used anti-phishing browser extensions by reviewing the existing anti-phishing techniques along with their merits and demerits.

  4. PIXASTIC: STEGANOGRAPHY BASED ANTI-PHISHING BROWSER PLUG-IN

    OpenAIRE

    P.Thiyagarajan; G.Aghila; V. Prasanna Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    In spite of existence of many standard security mechanisms for ensuring secure e- Commerce business, users still fall prey for onlin e attacks. One such simple but powerful attack is ‘Phishing’. Phishing is the most alarming threat in the e-Commerce world and effective anti-phishing technique is the need of the hour. This paper focuses on a novel anti-phishing browser plug-in which uses information hiding technique - Steganography. A Robust Message based Im...

  5. Pixastic: Steganography based Anti-Phihsing Browser Plug-in

    OpenAIRE

    P.Thiyagarajan; G.Aghila; Venkatesan, V. Prasanna

    2012-01-01

    In spite of existence of many standard security mechanisms for ensuring secure e-Commerce business, users still fall prey for online attacks. One such simple but powerful attack is 'Phishing'. Phishing is the most alarming threat in the e-Commerce world and effective anti-phishing technique is the need of the hour. This paper focuses on a novel anti-phishing browser plug-in which uses information hiding technique - Steganography. A Robust Message based Image Steganography (RMIS) algorithm has...

  6. Figure summarizer browser extensions for PubMed Central

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Shashank; Yu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Figures in biomedical articles present visual evidence for research facts and help readers understand the article better. However, when figures are taken out of context, it is difficult to understand their content. We developed a summarization algorithm to summarize the content of figures and used it in our figure search engine (http://figuresearch.askhermes.org/). In this article, we report on the development of web browser extensions for Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome and Apple Saf...

  7. Genetic Segregation and Genomic Hybridization Patterns Support an Allotetraploid Structure and Disomic Inheritance for Salix Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Barcaccia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Salix alba L. (white willow—Salix fragilis L. (crack willow complex includes closely related polyploid species, mainly tetraploid (2n = 4x = 76, which are dioecious and hence obligate allogamous. Because little is known about the genome constitution and chromosome behavior of these pure willow trees, genetic analysis of their naturally occurring interspecific polyploid hybrids is still very difficult. A two-way pseudo-testcross strategy was exploited using single-dose AFLP markers in order to assess the main inheritance patterns of tetraploid biotypes (disomy vs. tetrasomy in segregating populations stemmed from S. alba × S. fragilis crosses and reciprocals. In addition, a genomic in situ hybridization (GISH technology was implemented in willow to shed some light on the genome structure of S. alba and S. fragilis species, and their hybrids (allopolyploidy vs. autopolyploidy. The frequency of S. alba-specific molecular markers was almost double compared to that of S. fragilis-specific ones, suggesting the phylogenetic hypothesis of S. fragilis as derivative species from S. alba-like progenitors. Cytogenetic observations at pro-metaphase revealed about half of the chromosome complements being less contracted than the remaining ones, supporting an allopolyploid origin of both S. alba and S. fragilis. Both genetic segregation and genomic hybridization data are consistent with an allotetraploid nature of the Salix species. In particular, the vast majority of the AFLP markers were inherited according to disomic patterns in S. alba × S. fragilis populations and reciprocals. Moreover, in all S. alba against S. fragilis hybridizations and reciprocals, GISH signals were observed only on the contracted chromosomes whereas the non-contracted chromosomes were never hybridized. In conclusion, half of the chromosomes of the pure species S. alba and S. fragilis are closely related and they could share a common diploid ancestor, while the rest of

  8. Detecting and Preventing Security Threats on Servers and Browsers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Nandish. U. G Dr. Balakrishna. R Mr. Naveen. L Mr. Anand Kumar K. S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Our reliance on web based services through browsers for everyday life activities has increased over the years. Everyday new vulnerabilities are found in what was previously believed to be secure applications, unlocking new risks and security hazards that can be exploited by malicious advertisers or intruders compromising the security of systems. Using cross site scripting techniques intruders can hijack web sessions and craft credible phishing sites. Similarly, intruders may harm the server by uploading malicious executables and batch files. On the other hand the java script code downloaded into browser can attack client machines to steal user’s credentials (XSS attacks and lure users into providing sensitive information to unauthorized parties (Phishing attacks. It is proposed here a model detecting and preventing malicious files and cross site scripting attacks based on monitoring JavaScript code execution and comparing the execution to high level policies, to detect malicious code behavior. The solution also protects the servers from dangerous DOS commands and executable files. The model follows an approach similar to hackers and security analyst to discover vulnerabilities in networkconnected web servers. It uses both manually and automatically generated rules to mitigate possible cross site scripting attacks. The work undertaken covers the solutions preventing client machines from stealing user’s credentials by using cookies hijacking as well as preventing the browsers from crash.

  9. Using a Web Browser for Environmental and Climate Change Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, T. Dale; Stackhouse, Paul; Mangosing, Daniel; Smith, G. Louis

    2005-01-01

    A new web browser for viewing and manipulating meteorological data sets is located on a web server at NASA, Langley Research Center. The browser uses a live access server (LAS) developed by the Thermal Modeling and Analysis Project at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory. LAS allows researchers to interact directly with the data to view, select, and subset the data in terms of location (latitude, longitude) and time such as day, month, or year. In addition, LAS can compare two data sets and can perform averages and variances, LAS is used here to show how it functions as an internet/web browser for use by the scientific and educational community. In particular its versatility in displaying and manipulating data sets of atmospheric measurements in the earth's radiation budget (ERB) or energy balance, which includes measurements of absorbed solar radiation, reflected shortwave radiation (RSW), thermal outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), and net radiation is demonstrated. These measurements are from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) experiment and the surface radiation budget (SRB) experiment.

  10. A multi-fingerprint browser for the ZINC database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awale, Mahendra; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2014-07-01

    To confirm the activity of an initial small molecule 'hit compound' from an activity screening, one needs to probe the structure-activity relationships by testing close analogs. The multi-fingerprint browser presented here (http://dcb-reymond23.unibe.ch:8080/MCSS/) enables one to rapidly identify such close analogs among commercially available compounds in the ZINC database (>13 million molecules). The browser retrieves nearest neighbors of any query molecule in multi-dimensional chemical spaces defined by four different fingerprints, each of which represents relevant structural and pharmacophoric features in a different way: sFP (substructure fingerprint), ECFP4 (extended connectivity fingerprint), MQNs (molecular quantum numbers) and SMIfp (SMILES fingerprint). Distances are calculated using the city-block distance, a similarity measure that performs as well as Tanimoto similarity but is much faster to compute. The list of up to 1000 nearest neighbors of any query molecule is retrieved by the browser and can be then clustered using the K-means clustering algorithm to produce a focused list of analogs with likely similar bioactivity to be considered for experimental evaluation.

  11. Isolation of genomic DNA using magnetic nanoparticles as a solid-phase support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiyed, Z. M.; Ramchand, C. N.; Telang, S. D.

    2008-05-01

    In recent years, techniques employing magnetizable solid-phase supports (MSPS) have found application in numerous biological fields. This magnetic separation procedure offers several advantages in terms of subjecting the analyte to very little mechanical stress compared to other methods. Secondly, these methods are non-laborious, cheap, and often highly scalable. The current paper details a genomic DNA isolation method optimized in our laboratory using magnetic nanoparticles as a solid-phase support. The quality and yields of the isolated DNA from all the samples using magnetic nanoparticles were higher or equivalent to the traditional DNA extraction procedures. Additionally, the magnetic method takes less than 15 min to extract polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ready genomic DNA as against several hours taken by traditional phenol-chloroform extraction protocols. Moreover, the isolated DNA was found to be compatible in PCR amplification and restriction endonuclease digestion. The developed procedure is quick, inexpensive, robust, and it does not require the use of organic solvents or sophisticated instruments, which makes it more amenable to automation and miniaturization.

  12. Pika and vole mitochondrial genomes increase support for both rodent monophyly and glires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hsin; Waddell, Peter J; Penny, David

    2002-07-10

    Complete mitochondrial genomes are reported for a pika (Ochotona collaris) and a vole (Volemys kikuchii) then analysed together with 35 other mitochondrial genomes from mammals. With standard phylogenetic methods the pika joins with the other lagomorph (rabbit) and the vole with the other murid rodents (rat and mouse). In addition, with hedgehog excluded, the seven rodent genomes consistently form a homogeneous group in the unrooted placental tree. Except for uncertainty of the position of tree shrew, the clade Glires (monophyletic rodents plus lagomorphs) is consistently found. The unrooted tree obtained by ProtML (Protein Maximum Likelihood, a program in MOLPHY) is compatible with a reclassification of mammals [Syst. Biol. 48, 1-5 (1999)] which is also supported by other recent studies. However, when this tree is rooted with marsupials plus platypus, the outgroup often joins the lineage leading to the three murid rodents, so the rodents are no longer monophyletic. Apart from misplacing the root, the presence of the outgroups also distorts other parts of the unrooted tree. Either constraining the tree to maintain rodents monophyletic, or omitting murids, maintains the ingroup tree and sees the outgroup join on the edge to Xenarthra, to Afrotheria, or to these two groups together. This emphasises the importance of carrying out both an unrooted and a rooted analysis. It is known from cancer research that murid rodents have reduced activity in some DNA repair mechanisms and this alters their substitution pattern - this may be the case for mitochnodrial DNA as well. Comparing nucleotide compositions may identify taxa that differ in aspects of their DNA repair mechanisms.

  13. An experimentally-supported genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction for Yersinia pestis CO92

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motin Vladimir L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative bacterium that causes plague, a disease linked historically to the Black Death in Europe during the Middle Ages and to several outbreaks during the modern era. Metabolism in Y. pestis displays remarkable flexibility and robustness, allowing the bacterium to proliferate in both warm-blooded mammalian hosts and cold-blooded insect vectors such as fleas. Results Here we report a genome-scale reconstruction and mathematical model of metabolism for Y. pestis CO92 and supporting experimental growth and metabolite measurements. The model contains 815 genes, 678 proteins, 963 unique metabolites and 1678 reactions, accurately simulates growth on a range of carbon sources both qualitatively and quantitatively, and identifies gaps in several key biosynthetic pathways and suggests how those gaps might be filled. Furthermore, our model presents hypotheses to explain certain known nutritional requirements characteristic of this strain. Conclusions Y. pestis continues to be a dangerous threat to human health during modern times. The Y. pestis genome-scale metabolic reconstruction presented here, which has been benchmarked against experimental data and correctly reproduces known phenotypes, provides an in silico platform with which to investigate the metabolism of this important human pathogen.

  14. An Experimentally-Supported Genome-Scale Metabolic Network Reconstruction for Yersinia pestis CO92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charusanti, Pep; Chauhan, Sadhana; Mcateer, Kathleen; Lerman, Joshua A.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Motin, Vladimir L.; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2011-10-13

    Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative bacterium that causes plague, a disease linked historically to the Black Death in Europe during the Middle Ages and to several outbreaks during the modern era. Metabolism in Y. pestis displays remarkable flexibility and robustness, allowing the bacterium to proliferate in both warm-blooded mammalian hosts and cold-blooded insect vectors such as fleas. Here we report a genome-scale reconstruction and mathematical model of metabolism for Y. pestis CO92 and supporting experimental growth and metabolite measurements. The model contains 815 genes, 678 proteins, 963 unique metabolites and 1678 reactions, accurately simulates growth on a range of carbon sources both qualitatively and quantitatively, and identifies gaps in several key biosynthetic pathways and suggests how those gaps might be filled. Furthermore, our model presents hypotheses to explain certain known nutritional requirements characteristic of this strain. Y. pestis continues to be a dangerous threat to human health during modern times. The Y. pestis genome-scale metabolic reconstruction presented here, which has been benchmarked against experimental data and correctly reproduces known phenotypes, thus provides an in silico platform with which to investigate the metabolism of this important human pathogen.

  15. Open source MySQL Browser for Open Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Bucea-Manea-Tonis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Our purpose is to cross-compile MySQL driver source code for Linux on Windows architecture using a tool chain in order to build a neutral valid graphic interface on 32 bits. Once achieving this goal we could say that every possible Open source application can be built and run on Windows with maximum efficiency concerning costs and resource. This browser is an example of open innovation because its source code is free for anybody willing to develop new software apps for business and uses only Open source tools.

  16. Pembuatan Web Browser D3 TI USU Menggunakan Aplikasi Microsoft Visual Studio 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Lingga, Dedy Firdani

    2014-01-01

    Web browser adalah suatu piranti lunak yang berfungsi mengakses dan menampilkan informasi dari jaringan internet atau World Wide Web. Web browser yang berjalan di system operasi Linux dan berbahasa Indonesia belum banyak dibuat oleh programmer. Untuk mengatasi masalah tersebut, dibuatlah browser berbahasa Indonesia dengan menggunakan bahasa pemrograman Kylix yang berjalan pada system operasi Linux, Kylix merupakan bahasa pemrograman yang mirip dengan bahasa pemrograman Delphi yang berjalan pa...

  17. Research and implementation of cross browser plug-in on video surveillance system%视频监控系统跨浏览器插件的研究与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    云吉; 杨铸; 姚严峰

    2015-01-01

    Based on the incompatibility problem of the current video surveillance system browser plug-ins and the browser without IE kernel, this paper introduces a cross-platform plug-in system based on the FireBreath development framework, which can works in different system platform browsers. The plug-in is not only supported IE browser by the architecture of the ActiveX, but also support NPAPI browser running on windows, MAC and Linux, such as Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari etc. Based on the above browser compatibility test, we find that the cross browser plug-in system improves the compatibility with all popular browsers to 100%.%针对目前视频监控系统的浏览器插件与非IE内核的浏览器不兼容的问题,本文采用基于FireBreath开发框架开发跨浏览器插件系统的方法,使浏览器插件可以运行在不同系统平台的多种浏览器上。该插件不仅支持由Ac-tiveX 架构的IE浏览器,同时也支持运行在windows、 mac和 linux上的NPAPI 浏览器,如Firefox,Chrome,Opera,Sa-fari等。通过对以上浏览器的兼容性测试,得出了该跨浏览器插件系统提高了与目前所有流行浏览器的兼容率到100%的结论。

  18. PIXASTIC: STEGANOGRAPHY BASED ANTI-PHISHING BROWSER PLUG-IN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Thiyagarajan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of existence of many standard security mechanisms for ensuring secure e- Commerce business, users still fall prey for onlin e attacks. One such simple but powerful attack is ‘Phishing’. Phishing is the most alarming threat in the e-Commerce world and effective anti-phishing technique is the need of the hour. This paper focuses on a novel anti-phishing browser plug-in which uses information hiding technique - Steganography. A Robust Message based Image Steganography (RMIS algorithm has been proposed. The same has been incorporated in the form of a browser plug-in (safari called Pixastic. Pixastic is tested in an online banking scenario and it is compared with other well-known anti-phishing plug-in methods in practice. Various parameters such as robustness, usability and its behavior on various attacks have been analysed. From experimental results, it is ev ident that our method Pixastic performs well compared to other anti-phishing plug-ins.

  19. Using geographical data browsers in a networked environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, H.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Bresnaham, P.J.; Cowen, D.J.; Ehler, G.D.; King, E.; Shirley, W.L.; White, T. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Humanities and Social Sciences Computing Lab.

    1994-09-01

    The rapid development of spatial information technology has promoted a large variety of applications. The use of diverse,datasets in these applications has often been limited to single-platform analysis and distribution. Recent improvements in networking capabilities have led to the possibility of cross-platform access to geographical information and improved interoperability. To promote access to various databases and limit unsecured use of datasets across networks, spatial data browsers have been developed to allow simple analysis of data void of permanent update. Furthermore, applicable network configurations have greatly improved dissemination of views of existing data and individual use of distributed heterogeneous databases. Various user interfaces and networking applications can be combined to maximize data flow between storage media and data browsing software. This paper reviews the use of such distributed data browsing systems and the characteristics of platform-specific access and performance. Distinct discussions will review both geographical browser interface and networking services components. The selection of networking and software solutions was based on the development of a data browsing system for a twenty-user environment of mixed platforms (Unix, DOS, and Macintosh). Seventy percent of the user environment, however, was Macintosh-based.

  20. MLitB: machine learning in the browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Meeds

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With few exceptions, the field of Machine Learning (ML research has largely ignored the browser as a computational engine. Beyond an educational resource for ML, the browser has vast potential to not only improve the state-of-the-art in ML research, but also, inexpensively and on a massive scale, to bring sophisticated ML learning and prediction to the public at large. This paper introduces MLitB, a prototype ML framework written entirely in Javascript, capable of performing large-scale distributed computing with heterogeneous classes of devices. The development of MLitB has been driven by several underlying objectives whose aim is to make ML learning and usage ubiquitous (by using ubiquitous compute devices, cheap and effortlessly distributed, and collaborative. This is achieved by allowing every internet capable device to run training algorithms and predictive models with no software installation and by saving models in universally readable formats. Our prototype library is capable of training deep neural networks with synchronized, distributed stochastic gradient descent. MLitB offers several important opportunities for novel ML research, including: development of distributed learning algorithms, advancement of web GPU algorithms, novel field and mobile applications, privacy preserving computing, and green grid-computing. MLitB is available as open source software.

  1. `SAMP'ling Your Browser for the Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derriere, S.; Boch, T.

    2010-12-01

    SAMP, the Simple Application Messaging Protocol, is one of the successes of the Virtual Observatory (VO). By allowing communication between various applications, it enables easy data sharing, and facilitates data exploration, taking advantage of each application’s functionalities. SAMP can also be used to allow web browsers to interact with the VO. We will show for instance how Firefox can be complemented with a plugin allowing the user to send messages from any web page to existing VO applications. But there is more to be done in the context of the Semantic Web. Semantic annotations can be included in web pages using microformats or RDFa (Resource Description Framework in attributes). We will demonstrate how to take advantage of this semantic markup using SAMP. Annotated web pages can be consumed by a browser plugin to build dedicated SAMP contextual messages (e.g. pointing an application to sky coordinates present in the web page). This mechanism provides a generic yet powerful way to interact between, for example, an astronomical web portal and other VO tools.

  2. Discovering functional modules across diverse maize transcriptomes using COB, the Co-expression Browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Robert J; Briskine, Roman; Springer, Nathan M; Myers, Chad L

    2014-01-01

    Tools that provide improved ability to relate genotype to phenotype have the potential to accelerate breeding for desired traits and to improve our understanding of the molecular variants that underlie phenotypes. The availability of large-scale gene expression profiles in maize provides an opportunity to advance our understanding of complex traits in this agronomically important species. We built co-expression networks based on genome-wide expression data from a variety of maize accessions as well as an atlas of different tissues and developmental stages. We demonstrate that these networks reveal clusters of genes that are enriched for known biological function and contain extensive structure which has yet to be characterized. Furthermore, we found that co-expression networks derived from developmental or tissue atlases as compared to expression variation across diverse accessions capture unique functions. To provide convenient access to these networks, we developed a public, web-based Co-expression Browser (COB), which enables interactive queries of the genome-wide networks. We illustrate the utility of this system through two specific use cases: one in which gene-centric queries are used to provide functional context for previously characterized metabolic pathways, and a second where lists of genes produced by mapping studies are further resolved and validated using co-expression networks.

  3. Discovering functional modules across diverse maize transcriptomes using COB, the Co-expression Browser.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Schaefer

    Full Text Available Tools that provide improved ability to relate genotype to phenotype have the potential to accelerate breeding for desired traits and to improve our understanding of the molecular variants that underlie phenotypes. The availability of large-scale gene expression profiles in maize provides an opportunity to advance our understanding of complex traits in this agronomically important species. We built co-expression networks based on genome-wide expression data from a variety of maize accessions as well as an atlas of different tissues and developmental stages. We demonstrate that these networks reveal clusters of genes that are enriched for known biological function and contain extensive structure which has yet to be characterized. Furthermore, we found that co-expression networks derived from developmental or tissue atlases as compared to expression variation across diverse accessions capture unique functions. To provide convenient access to these networks, we developed a public, web-based Co-expression Browser (COB, which enables interactive queries of the genome-wide networks. We illustrate the utility of this system through two specific use cases: one in which gene-centric queries are used to provide functional context for previously characterized metabolic pathways, and a second where lists of genes produced by mapping studies are further resolved and validated using co-expression networks.

  4. VISTA Enhancer Browser--A Database of Tissue-Specific HumanEnhancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visel, Axel; Minovitsky, Simon; Dubchak, Inna; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2006-08-01

    Despite the known existence of distant-acting cis-regulatoryelements in the human genome, only a small fraction of these elements hasbeen identified and experimentally characterized in vivo. This paucity ofenhancer collections with defined activities has thus hinderedcomputational approaches for the genome-wide prediction of enhancers andtheir functions. To fill this void, we utilize comparative genomeanalysis to identify candidate enhancer elements in the human genomecoupled with the experimental determination of their in vivo enhanceractivity in transgenic mice (1). These data are available through theVISTA Enhancer Browser (http://enhancer.lbl.gov). This growing databasecurrently contains over 250 experimentally tested DNA fragments, of whichmore than 100 have been validated as tissue-specific enhancers. For eachpositive enhancer, we provide digital images of whole-mount embryostaining at embryonic day 11.5 and an anatomical description of thereporter gene expression pattern. Users can retrieve elements near singlegenes of interest, search for enhancers that target reporter geneexpression to a particular tissue, or download entire collections ofenhancers with a defined tissue specificity or conservation depth. Theseexperimentally validated training sets are expected to provide a basisfor a wide range of downstream computational and functional studies ofenhancer function.

  5. Design and Implementation of MIS System Based on Browser/Server%基于Browser/Server的MIS系统的设计与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永会; 宋晓宇; 郭玢; 栾方军

    2001-01-01

    随着Internet技术的发展,计算机网络的应用越来越广泛,应用程序的开发也逐渐由Client/Server方式向Browser/Server方式转移.本文讨论了当前正在迅猛发展的Browser/Server模式的基本原理,并通过实例介绍了在Windows NT Web服务器上构造基于Browser/Server的数据库管理系统,以及利用ASP和ADO技术对数据库的访问方法.

  6. DemaDb: an integrated dematiaceous fungal genomes database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Yew, Su Mei; Chan, Chai Ling; Toh, Yue Fen; Lee, Kok Wei; Cheong, Wei-Hien; Yee, Wai-Yan; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yap, Soon-Joo; Ng, Kee Peng

    2016-01-01

    Many species of dematiaceous fungi are associated with allergic reactions and potentially fatal diseases in human, especially in tropical climates. Over the past 10 years, we have isolated more than 400 dematiaceous fungi from various clinical samples. In this study, DemaDb, an integrated database was designed to support the integration and analysis of dematiaceous fungal genomes. A total of 92 072 putative genes and 6527 pathways that identified in eight dematiaceous fungi (Bipolaris papendorfii UM 226, Daldinia eschscholtzii UM 1400, D. eschscholtzii UM 1020, Pyrenochaeta unguis-hominis UM 256, Ochroconis mirabilis UM 578, Cladosporium sphaerospermum UM 843, Herpotrichiellaceae sp. UM 238 and Pleosporales sp. UM 1110) were deposited in DemaDb. DemaDb includes functional annotations for all predicted gene models in all genomes, such as Gene Ontology, EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), Pfam and InterProScan. All predicted protein models were further functionally annotated to Carbohydrate-Active enzymes, peptidases, secondary metabolites and virulence factors. DemaDb Genome Browser enables users to browse and visualize entire genomes with annotation data including gene prediction, structure, orientation and custom feature tracks. The Pathway Browser based on the KEGG pathway database allows users to look into molecular interaction and reaction networks for all KEGG annotated genes. The availability of downloadable files containing assembly, nucleic acid, as well as protein data allows the direct retrieval for further downstream works. DemaDb is a useful resource for fungal research community especially those involved in genome-scale analysis, functional genomics, genetics and disease studies of dematiaceous fungi. Database URL: http://fungaldb.um.edu.my.

  7. nodeGame: Real-time, synchronous, online experiments in the browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balietti, Stefano

    2016-11-18

    nodeGame is a free, open-source JavaScript/ HTML5 framework for conducting synchronous experiments online and in the lab directly in the browser window. It is specifically designed to support behavioral research along three dimensions: (i) larger group sizes, (ii) real-time (but also discrete time) experiments, and (iii) batches of simultaneous experiments. nodeGame has a modular source code, and defines an API (application programming interface) through which experimenters can create new strategic environments and configure the platform. With zero-install, nodeGame can run on a great variety of devices, from desktop computers to laptops, smartphones, and tablets. The current version of the software is 3.0, and extensive documentation is available on the wiki pages at http://nodegame.org .

  8. ROOT I/O in Javascript - Reading ROOT files in a browser

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    A JavaScript version of the ROOT I/O subsystem is being developed, in order to be able to browse (inspect) ROOT files in a platform independent way. This allows the content of ROOT files to be displayed in most web browsers, without having to install ROOT or any other software on the server or on the client. This gives a direct access to ROOT files from new (e.g. portable) devices in a light way. It will be possible to display simple graphical objects such as histograms and graphs (TH1, TH2, TH3, TProfile, TGraph, ...). The rendering will first be done with an external JavaScript graphic library, before investigating a way to produce graphics closer to what ROOT supports on other platforms (X11, Windows).

  9. The Small Bodies Imager Browser --- finding asteroid and comet images without pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, E.; Sykes, M.; Davis, D.; Neese, C.

    2014-07-01

    To facilitate accessing and downloading spatially resolved imagery of asteroids and comets in the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS), we have created the Small Bodies Image Browser. It is a HTML5 webpage that runs inside a standard web browser needing no installation (http://sbn.psi.edu/sbib/). The volume of data returned by spacecraft missions has grown substantially over the last decade. While this wealth of data provides scientists with ample support for research, it has greatly increased the difficulty of managing, accessing and processing these data. Further, the complexity necessary for a long-term archive results in an architecture that is efficient for computers, but not user friendly. The Small Bodies Image Browser (SBIB) is tied into the PDS archive of the Small Bodies Asteroid Subnode hosted at the Planetary Science Institute [1]. Currently, the tool contains the entire repository of the Dawn mission's encounter with Vesta [2], and we will be adding other datasets in the future. For Vesta, this includes both the level 1A and 1B images for the Framing Camera (FC) and the level 1B spectral cubes from the Visual and Infrared (VIR) spectrometer, providing over 30,000 individual images. A key strength of the tool is providing quick and easy access of these data. The tool allows for searches based on clicking on a map or typing in coordinates. The SBIB can show an entire mission phase (such as cycle 7 of the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit) and the associated footprints, as well as search by image name. It can focus the search by mission phase, resolution or instrument. Imagery archived in the PDS are generally provided by missions in a single or narrow range of formats. To enhance the value and usability of this data to researchers, SBIB makes these available in these original formats as well as PNG, JPEG and ArcGIS compatible ISIS cubes [3]. Additionally, we provide header files for the VIR cubes so they can be read into ENVI without additional processing. Finally

  10. Diverse data supports the transition of filamentous fungal model organisms into the post-genomics era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCluskey, Kevin; Baker, Scott E.

    2017-02-17

    Filamentous fungi have been important as model organisms since the beginning of modern biological inquiry and have benefitted from open data since the earliest genetic maps were shared. From early origins in simple Mendelian genetics of mating types, parasexual genetics of colony colour, and the foundational demonstration of the segregation of a nutritional requirement, the contribution of research systems utilising filamentous fungi has spanned the biochemical genetics era, through the molecular genetics era, and now are at the very foundation of diverse omics approaches to research and development. Fungal model organisms have come from most major taxonomic groups although Ascomycete filamentous fungi have seen the most major sustained effort. In addition to the published material about filamentous fungi, shared molecular tools have found application in every area of fungal biology. Similarly, shared data has contributed to the success of model systems. The scale of data supporting research with filamentous fungi has grown by 10 to 12 orders of magnitude. From genetic to molecular maps, expression databases, and finally genome resources, the open and collaborative nature of the research communities has assured that the rising tide of data has lifted all of the research systems together.

  11. Browser-based Analysis of Web Framework Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kersten, Benjamin; 10.4204/EPTCS.35.5

    2010-01-01

    Although web applications evolved to mature solutions providing sophisticated user experience, they also became complex for the same reason. Complexity primarily affects the server-side generation of dynamic pages as they are aggregated from multiple sources and as there are lots of possible processing paths depending on parameters. Browser-based tests are an adequate instrument to detect errors within generated web pages considering the server-side process and path complexity a black box. However, these tests do not detect the cause of an error which has to be located manually instead. This paper proposes to generate metadata on the paths and parts involved during server-side processing to facilitate backtracking origins of detected errors at development time. While there are several possible points of interest to observe for backtracking, this paper focuses user interface components of web frameworks.

  12. Implementing a Web Browser with Phishing Detection Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Aanchal

    2011-01-01

    Phishing is the combination of social engineering and technical exploits designed to convince a victim to provide personal information, usually for the monetary gain of the attacker. Phishing has become the most popular practice among the criminals of the Web. Phishing attacks are becoming more frequent and sophisticated. The impact of phishing is drastic and significant since it can involve the risk of identity theft and financial losses. Phishing scams have become a problem for online banking and e-commerce users. In this paper we propose a novel approach to detect phishing attacks. We implemented a prototype web browser which can be used as an agent and processes each arriving email for phishing attacks. Using email data collected over a period time we demonstrate data that our approach is able to detect more phishing attacks than existing schemes.

  13. Browser-based Analysis of Web Framework Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Kersten

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Although web applications evolved to mature solutions providing sophisticated user experience, they also became complex for the same reason. Complexity primarily affects the server-side generation of dynamic pages as they are aggregated from multiple sources and as there are lots of possible processing paths depending on parameters. Browser-based tests are an adequate instrument to detect errors within generated web pages considering the server-side process and path complexity a black box. However, these tests do not detect the cause of an error which has to be located manually instead. This paper proposes to generate metadata on the paths and parts involved during server-side processing to facilitate backtracking origins of detected errors at development time. While there are several possible points of interest to observe for backtracking, this paper focuses user interface components of web frameworks.

  14. Web Pages Content Analysis Using Browser-Based Volunteer Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Turek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing solutions to the problem of finding valuable information on the Websuffers from several limitations like simplified query languages, out-of-date in-formation or arbitrary results sorting. In this paper a different approach to thisproblem is described. It is based on the idea of distributed processing of Webpages content. To provide sufficient performance, the idea of browser-basedvolunteer computing is utilized, which requires the implementation of text pro-cessing algorithms in JavaScript. In this paper the architecture of Web pagescontent analysis system is presented, details concerning the implementation ofthe system and the text processing algorithms are described and test resultsare provided.

  15. A Hybrid Web Browser Architecture for Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHO, J.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Web browsing on mobile networks is slow in comparison to wired or Wi-Fi networks. Particularly, the connection establishment phase including DNS lookups and TCP handshakes takes a long time on mobile networks due to its long round-trip latency. In this paper, we propose a novel web browser architecture that aims to improve mobile web browsing performance. Our approach delegates the connection establishment and HTTP header field delivery tasks to a dedicated proxy server located at the joint point between the WAN and mobile network. Since the traffic for the connection establishment and HTTP header fields delivery passes only through the WAN between the proxy and web servers, our approach significantly reduces both the number and size of packets on the mobile network. Our evaluation showed that the proposed scheme reduces the number of mobile network packets by up to 42% and, consequently, the average page loading time is shortened by up to 52%.

  16. Browser Wars: Netscape Communicator 4.01 vs. Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Irene E.

    1997-01-01

    Examines what searchers want in an Internet browser. Compares the old versions of two browsers (Netscape Navigator and Microsoft's Internet Explorer) with their new versions to see what they have to offer the professional searcher. Also looks at some of the larger issues invoked by the competition between the two products. (AEF)

  17. Integrating heterogeneous open-source software into web browsers using AMICO:WEB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obrenovic, Z.; Ossenbruggen, J.R. van

    2007-01-01

    A web browser provides a uniform user interface to different types of information. Making this interface universally accessible and more interactive is a long term goal still far from being achieved. Universally accessible browsers require novel interaction modalities and additional functionalities,

  18. Lexicon Sextant: Modeling a Mnemonic System for Customizable Browser Information Organization and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Siu-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ongoing study of the development of a customizable web browser information organization and management system, which the author has named Lexicon Sextant (LS). LS is a user friendly, graphical web based add-on to the latest generation of web browsers, such as Google Chrome, making it easier and more intuitive to store and…

  19. Lexicon Sextant: Modeling a Mnemonic System for Customizable Browser Information Organization and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Siu-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ongoing study of the development of a customizable web browser information organization and management system, which the author has named Lexicon Sextant (LS). LS is a user friendly, graphical web based add-on to the latest generation of web browsers, such as Google Chrome, making it easier and more intuitive to store and…

  20. A sensitive, support-vector-machine method for the detection of horizontal gene transfers in viral, archaeal and bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2005-01-01

    In earlier work, we introduced and discussed a generalized computational framework for identifying horizontal transfers. This framework relied on a gene's nucleotide composition, obviated the need for knowledge of codon boundaries and database searches, and was shown to perform very well across a wide range of archaeal and bacterial genomes when compared with previously published approaches, such as Codon Adaptation Index and C + G content. Nonetheless, two considerations remained outstanding: we wanted to further increase the sensitivity of detecting horizontal transfers and also to be able to apply the method to increasingly smaller genomes. In the discussion that follows, we present such a method, Wn-SVM, and show that it exhibits a very significant improvement in sensitivity compared with earlier approaches. Wn-SVM uses a one-class support-vector machine and can learn using rather small training sets. This property makes Wn-SVM particularly suitable for studying small-size genomes, similar to those of viruses, as well as the typically larger archaeal and bacterial genomes. We show experimentally that the new method results in a superior performance across a wide range of organisms and that it improves even upon our own earlier method by an average of 10% across all examined genomes. As a small-genome case study, we analyze the genome of the human cytomegalovirus and demonstrate that Wn-SVM correctly identifies regions that are known to be conserved and prototypical of all beta-herpesvirinae, regions that are known to have been acquired horizontally from the human host and, finally, regions that had not up to now been suspected to be horizontally transferred. Atypical region predictions for many eukaryotic viruses, including the alpha-, beta- and gamma-herpesvirinae, and 123 archaeal and bacterial genomes, have been made available online at http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/HGT_SVM/.

  1. The GLOBE-Consortium: The Next-Generation Genome Viewer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert); M.J. Moorhouse (Michael)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe GLOBE 3D Genome Viewer is the novel system-biology oriented genome browser necessary to access, present, annotate, and to simulate the holistic genome complexity in a unique gateway towards a real understanding, educative presentation and curative manipulation planning of this tr

  2. The battle of the sexes over seed size: support for both kinship genomic imprinting and interlocus contest evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willi, Yvonne

    2013-06-01

    Outcrossing creates a venue for parental conflict. When one sex provides parental care to offspring fertilized by several partners, the nonproviding sex is under selection to maximally exploit the caring sex. The caring sex may counteradapt, and a coevolutionary arms race ensues. Genetic models of this conflict include the kinship theory of genomic imprinting (parent-of-origin-specific expression of maternal-care effectors) and interlocus conflict evolution (interaction between male selfish signals and female abatement). Predictions were tested by measuring the sizes of seeds produced by within-population crosses (diallel design) and between-population crosses in outcrossing and selfing populations of Arabidopsis lyrata. Within-population diallel crosses revealed substantial maternal variance in seed size in most populations. The comparison of between- and within-population crosses showed that seeds were larger when pollen came from another outcrossing population than when pollen came from a selfing or the same population, supporting interlocus contest evolution between male selfish genes and female recognition genes. Evidence for kinship genomic imprinting came from complementary trait means of seed size in reciprocal between-population crosses independent of whether populations were predominantly selfing or outcrossing. Hence, both kinship genomic imprinting and interlocus contest are supported in outcrossing Arabidopsis, whereas only kinship genomic imprinting is important in selfing populations.

  3. A collection of plant-specific genomic data and resources at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatusova, Tatiana; Smith-White, Brian; Ostell, James

    2007-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides a data-rich environment in support of genomic research by collecting the biological data for genomes, genes, gene expressions, gene variation, gene families, proteins, and protein domains and integrating the data with analytical, search, and retrieval resources through the NCBI Web site. Entrez, an integrated search and retrieval system, enables text searches across various diverse biological databases maintained at NCBI. Map Viewer, the genome browser developed at NCBI, displays aligned genetic, physical, and sequence maps for eukaryotic genomes including those of many plants. A specialized plant query page allows maps from all plant genomes available in the Map Viewer to be searched to produce a display of aligned maps from several species. Customized Plant Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (PlantBLAST) allows the user to perform sequence similarity searches in a special collection of mapped plant sequence data and to view the resulting alignments within a genomic context using Map Viewer. In addition, pre-computed sequence similarities, such as those for proteins offered by BLAST Link (BLink), enable fluid navigation from un-annotated to annotated sequences, quickening the pace of discovery. Plant Genome Central (PGC) is a Web portal that provides centralized access to all NCBI plant genome resources. Also, there are links to plant-specific Web resources external to NCBI such as organism-specific databases, genome-sequencing project Web pages, and homepages of genomic bioinformatics organizations.

  4. Genomic and cranial phenotype data support multiple modern human dispersals from Africa and a southern route into Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes-Centeno, Hugo; Ghirotto, Silvia; Détroit, Florent; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique; Barbujani, Guido; Harvati, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    Current consensus indicates that modern humans originated from an ancestral African population between ∼100–200 ka. The ensuing dispersal pattern is controversial, yet has important implications for the demographic history and genetic/phenotypic structure of extant human populations. We test for the first time to our knowledge the spatiotemporal dimensions of competing out-of-Africa dispersal models, analyzing in parallel genomic and craniometric data. Our results support an initial dispersal...

  5. PileLineGUI: a desktop environment for handling genome position files in next-generation sequencing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, Hugo; Glez-Peña, Daniel; Reboiro-Jato, Miguel; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Pisano, David G; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino

    2011-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are making sequence data available on an unprecedented scale. In this context, new catalogs of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and mutations generated by resequencing studies are usually stored in genome position files (e.g. Variant Call Format, SAMTools pileup, BED, GFF) comprising of large lists of genomic positions, which are difficult to handle by researchers. Here, we present PileLineGUI, a novel desktop application primarily designed for manipulating, browsing and analysing genome position files (GPF), with specific support to somatic mutation finding studies. The developed tool also integrates a new genome browser module specially designed for inspecting GPFs. PileLineGUI is free, multiplatform and designed to be intuitively used by biomedical researchers. PileLineGUI is available at: http://sing.ei.uvigo.es/pileline/pilelinegui.html.

  6. A graphics pipeline for directtly rendering 3D scenes on web browsers

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Edgar Marchiel

    2009-01-01

    In this dissertation we propose a graphics pipeline, in the form of aWeb3D graphics library, for directly rendering 3D scenes on web browsers. This open sourceWeb3D graphics library is called Glypher3D. It is entirely written in JavaScript (together with the HTML5 canvas element) and aims at enabling the creation, manipulation and rendering of 3D contents within a browser, without the need of installing any type of web browser plug-ins or add-ons (i.e. it does not take advantag...

  7. HOME USERS SECURITY AND THE WEB BROWSER INBUILT SETTINGS, FRAMEWORK TO SETUP IT AUTOMATICALLY

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Serrhini; Abdelazziz Ait Moussa

    2013-01-01

    We are living in the electronic age where electronic transactions such as e-mail, e-banking, e-commerce and e-learning becoming more and more prominent. To access online for this services, the web browser is todayâs almost unique software used. These daysâ hackers know that browsers are installed into all computers and can be used to compromise a machine by distributing malware via malicious or hacked websites. Also these sites use JavaScript to manipulate browsers and can drive user system t...

  8. Tunicate mitogenomics and phylogenetics: peculiarities of the Herdmania momus mitochondrial genome and support for the new chordate phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loya Yossi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tunicates represent a key metazoan group as the sister-group of vertebrates within chordates. The six complete mitochondrial genomes available so far for tunicates have revealed distinctive features. Extensive gene rearrangements and particularly high evolutionary rates have been evidenced with regard to other chordates. This peculiar evolutionary dynamics has hampered the reconstruction of tunicate phylogenetic relationships within chordates based on mitogenomic data. Results In order to further understand the atypical evolutionary dynamics of the mitochondrial genome of tunicates, we determined the complete sequence of the solitary ascidian Herdmania momus. This genome from a stolidobranch ascidian presents the typical tunicate gene content with 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs and 24 tRNAs which are all encoded on the same strand. However, it also presents a novel gene arrangement, highlighting the extreme plasticity of gene order observed in tunicate mitochondrial genomes. Probabilistic phylogenetic inferences were conducted on the concatenation of the 13 mitochondrial protein-coding genes from representatives of major metazoan phyla. We show that whereas standard homogeneous amino acid models support an artefactual sister position of tunicates relative to all other bilaterians, the CAT and CAT+BP site- and time-heterogeneous mixture models place tunicates as the sister-group of vertebrates within monophyletic chordates. Moreover, the reference phylogeny indicates that tunicate mitochondrial genomes have experienced a drastic acceleration in their evolutionary rate that equally affects protein-coding and ribosomal-RNA genes. Conclusion This is the first mitogenomic study supporting the new chordate phylogeny revealed by recent phylogenomic analyses. It illustrates the beneficial effects of an increased taxon sampling coupled with the use of more realistic amino acid substitution models for the reconstruction of animal

  9. Dietary shifts: do grazers become browsers in the Thicket Biome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Landman

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The diet of buffalo (Syncerus coffer and Burchell's zebra (Equus burchelli was investigated in the Addo Elephant National Park to test the hypothesis that the shortage of grass associated with thicket vegetation results in grazers increasing the proportion of dicotyledonous plant species in their diet. Diet composition, estimated from faecal analysis, indicated that 19 and 21 plant species were identified in the faeces of zebra and buffalo, respectively. Buffalo proved to have a higher percentage dicotyledonous (28.1 vs. 8.5 and lower percentage monocotyledonous (71.9 vs. 91.5 species in their diet than zebra. The grass Eragrostis curvula was found to be the dominant food item for both buffalo (18 of diet and zebra (39 of diet during the period of study. The present study indicated that a great proportion of the buffalo diet does in fact consist of grass, thereby refuting the perception that the Addo buffalo are primarily browsers. Both buffalo and zebra are specialised grazers and unsuited to a diet of browse. The probability of dietary shift by these grazers in the grass limited thicket vegetation is therefore challenged.

  10. Web-browser encryption of personal health information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Electronic health records provide access to an unprecedented amount of clinical data for research that can accelerate the development of effective medical practices. However it is important to protect patient confidentiality, as many medical conditions are stigmatized and disclosure could result in personal and/or financial loss. Results We describe a system for remote data entry that allows the data that would identify the patient to be encrypted in the web browser of the person entering the data. These data cannot be decrypted on the server by the staff at the data center but can be decrypted by the person entering the data or their delegate. We developed this system to solve a problem that arose in the context of clinical research, but it is applicable in a range of situations where sensitive information is stored and updated in a database and it is necessary to ensure that it cannot be viewed by any except those intentionally given access. Conclusion By developing this system, we are able to centralize the collection of some patient data while minimizing the risk that protected health information be made available to study personnel who are not authorized to use it. PMID:22073940

  11. Dictyocaulus viviparus genome, variome and transcriptome elucidate lungworm biology and support future intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Samantha N; Strübe, Christina; Rosa, Bruce A; Martin, John C; Tyagi, Rahul; Choi, Young-Jun; Wang, Qi; Hallsworth Pepin, Kymberlie; Zhang, Xu; Ozersky, Philip; Wilson, Richard K; Sternberg, Paul W; Gasser, Robin B; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-02-09

    The bovine lungworm, Dictyocaulus viviparus (order Strongylida), is an important parasite of livestock that causes substantial economic and production losses worldwide. Here we report the draft genome, variome, and developmental transcriptome of D. viviparus. The genome (161 Mb) is smaller than those of related bursate nematodes and encodes fewer proteins (14,171 total). In the first genome-wide assessment of genomic variation in any parasitic nematode, we found a high degree of sequence variability in proteins predicted to be involved host-parasite interactions. Next, we used extensive RNA sequence data to track gene transcription across the life cycle of D. viviparus, and identified genes that might be important in nematode development and parasitism. Finally, we predicted genes that could be vital in host-parasite interactions, genes that could serve as drug targets, and putative RNAi effectors with a view to developing functional genomic tools. This extensive, well-curated dataset should provide a basis for developing new anthelmintics, vaccines, and improved diagnostic tests and serve as a platform for future investigations of drug resistance and epidemiology of the bovine lungworm and related nematodes.

  12. An SVD-based comparison of nine whole eukaryotic genomes supports a coelomate rather than ecdysozoan lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Gary W

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic whole genome sequences are accumulating at an impressive rate. Effective methods for comparing multiple whole eukaryotic genomes on a large scale are needed. Most attempted solutions involve the production of large scale alignments, and many of these require a high stringency pre-screen for putative orthologs in order to reduce the effective size of the dataset and provide a reasonably high but unknown fraction of correctly aligned homologous sites for comparison. As an alternative, highly efficient methods that do not require the pre-alignment of operationally defined orthologs are also being explored. Results A non-alignment method based on the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD was used to compare the predicted protein complement of nine whole eukaryotic genomes ranging from yeast to man. This analysis resulted in the simultaneous identification and definition of a large number of well conserved motifs and gene families, and produced a species tree supporting one of two conflicting hypotheses of metazoan relationships. Conclusions Our SVD-based analysis of the entire protein complement of nine whole eukaryotic genomes suggests that highly conserved motifs and gene families can be identified and effectively compared in a single coherent definition space for the easy extraction of gene and species trees. While this occurs without the explicit definition of orthologs or homologous sites, the analysis can provide a basis for these definitions.

  13. PSAT: A web tool to compare genomic neighborhoods of multiple prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasnick Michael

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conservation of gene order among prokaryotic genomes can provide valuable insight into gene function, protein interactions, or events by which genomes have evolved. Although some tools are available for visualizing and comparing the order of genes between genomes of study, few support an efficient and organized analysis between large numbers of genomes. The Prokaryotic Sequence homology Analysis Tool (PSAT is a web tool for comparing gene neighborhoods among multiple prokaryotic genomes. Results PSAT utilizes a database that is preloaded with gene annotation, BLAST hit results, and gene-clustering scores designed to help identify regions of conserved gene order. Researchers use the PSAT web interface to find a gene of interest in a reference genome and efficiently retrieve the sequence homologs found in other bacterial genomes. The tool generates a graphic of the genomic neighborhood surrounding the selected gene and the corresponding regions for its homologs in each comparison genome. Homologs in each region are color coded to assist users with analyzing gene order among various genomes. In contrast to common comparative analysis methods that filter sequence homolog data based on alignment score cutoffs, PSAT leverages gene context information for homologs, including those with weak alignment scores, enabling a more sensitive analysis. Features for constraining or ordering results are designed to help researchers browse results from large numbers of comparison genomes in an organized manner. PSAT has been demonstrated to be useful for helping to identify gene orthologs and potential functional gene clusters, and detecting genome modifications that may result in loss of function. Conclusion PSAT allows researchers to investigate the order of genes within local genomic neighborhoods of multiple genomes. A PSAT web server for public use is available for performing analyses on a growing set of reference genomes through any

  14. A Policy Based Approach for the Management of Web Browser Resources to Prevent Anonymity Attacks in Tor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Arribas, Guillermo; Garcia-Alfaro, Joaquin

    Web browsers are becoming the universal interface to reach applications and services related with these systems. Different browsing contexts may be required in order to reach them, e.g., use of VPN tunnels, corporate proxies, anonymisers, etc. By browsing context we mean how the user browsers the Web, including mainly the concrete configuration of its browser. When the context of the browser changes, its security requirements also change. In this work, we present the use of authorisation policies to automatise the process of controlling the resources of a Web browser when its context changes. The objective of our proposal is oriented towards easing the adaptation to the security requirements of the new context and enforce them in the browser without the need for user intervention. We present a concrete application of our work as a plug-in for the adaption of security requirements in Mozilla/Firefox browser when a context of anonymous navigation through the Tor network is enabled.

  15. 一个基干Browser/Server体系结构的旅游服务系统%Tour service system base on Browser/Server system architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵洁

    2002-01-01

    Internet的出现和发展对旅游行业带来了巨大的挑战和机遇.本文主要阐述了基于Browser/Server的旅游服务系统的主要实现技术,并以基于Browser/Server的旅游服务系统TSS为例,重点分析了系统功能、网络结构,软件结构和关键技术.

  16. CERESVis: A QC Tool for CERES that Leverages Browser Technology for Data Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C.; Sun-Mack, S.; Heckert, E.; Chen, Y.; Doelling, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this poster, we are going to present three user interfaces that CERES team uses to validate pixel-level data. Besides our home grown tools, we will aslo present the browser technology that we use to provide interactive interfaces, such as jquery, HighCharts and Google Earth. We pass data to the users' browsers and use the browsers to do some simple computations. The three user interfaces are: Thumbnails -- it displays hundrends images to allow users to browse 24-hour data files in few seconds. Multiple-synchronized cursors -- it allows users to compare multiple images side by side. Bounding Boxes and Histograms -- it allows users to draw multiple bounding boxes on an image and the browser computes/display the histograms.

  17. Comcutejs: A Web Browser Based Platform For Large-Scale Computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Debski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new, cost effective, volunteer computing based platform.It utilizes volunteers’ web browsers as computational nodes. The computationaltasks are delegated to the browsers and executed in the background (indepen-dently of any user interface scripts making use of the HTML5 web workerstechnology. The capabilities of the platform have been proved by experimentsperformed in a wide range of numbers of computational nodes (1–400.

  18. A browser-based tool for conversion between Fortran NAMELIST and XML/HTML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, O.

    A browser-based tool for conversion between Fortran NAMELIST and XML/HTML is presented. It runs on an HTML5 compliant browser and generates reusable XML files to aid interoperability. It also provides a graphical interface for editing and annotating variables in NAMELIST, hence serves as a primitive code documentation environment. Although the tool is not comprehensive, it could be viewed as a test bed for integrating legacy codes into modern systems.

  19. Testing of a novel web browser interface for the Chinese market

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Siu-Tsen; Prior, Stephen D.; Chen, Kuen-Meau

    2009-01-01

    This paper compares the perspicacity, appropriateness and preference of web browser icons from leading software providers with those of a culture-specific design. This online study was conducted in Taiwan and involved 103 participants, who were given three sets of web browser icons to review, namely Microsoft Internet Explorer, Macintosh Safari, and culturally specific icons created using the Culture-Centred Design methodology. The findings of the study show that all three sets have generally...

  20. 支持维、哈、柯文的Web浏览器的研究与实现∗%Development of the Web Browser with Uyghur、Kazak、Kirghiz Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李端端; 吾守尔·斯拉木; 艾尼宛尔·托乎提

    2014-01-01

    本文主要是针对网页浏览器在其界面和功能方面的不足,保留了现有Web浏览器所具备的所有功能的基础上,在Windows平台下,设计并开发出基于IE内核的具有维、哈、柯文特色的Web浏览器。主要内容包括了介绍向浏览器中嵌入维、哈、柯文字库及输入法技术,实现网页地址转换和文种转换等功能,在浏览器上实现汉、维、哈、柯四种语言来支持用户的使用需求。%This article is mainly aimed at the web browser in the deficiency of the interface and func-tion, retain existing browser with all the features based on the Windows platform, designed and developed based on IE kernel Uyghur, Kazak, Kirgiz featured Web browser.Main content included introduction to the browser in the embedding dimension Uyghur, Kazak, Kirgiz word stock and input method technology the implementation of the conversion of web page address and text type,the implementation of Han,Uyghur, Kazak, Kirgiz on the browser to support the users’ demand.

  1. An Asynchronous P300-Based Brain-Computer Interface Web Browser for Severely Disabled People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cagigal, Victor; Gomez-Pilar, Javier; Alvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto

    2016-10-31

    This paper presents an electroencephalographic (EEG) P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) Internet browser. The system uses the "odd-ball" row-col paradigm for generating the P300 evoked potentials on the scalp of the user, which are immediately processed and translated into web browser commands. There were previous approaches for controlling a BCI web browser. However, to the best of our knowledge, none of them was focused on an assistive context, failing to test their applications with a suitable number of end users. In addition, all of them were synchronous applications, where it was necessary to introduce a "read-mode" command in order to avoid a continuous command selection. Thus, the aim of this study is twofold: (i) to test our web browser with a population of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in order to assess the usefulness of our proposal to meet their daily communication needs; and (ii) to overcome the aforementioned limitation by adding a threshold that discerns between control and non-control states, allowing the user to calmly read the web page without undesirable selections. The browser was tested with sixteen MS patients and five healthy volunteers. Both quantitative and qualitative metrics were obtained. MS participants reached an average accuracy of 84.14%, whereas 95.75% was achieved by control subjects. Results show that MS patients can successfully control the BCI web browser, improving their personal autonomy.

  2. Performance Analysis of Most Common Encryption Algorithms on Different Web Browsers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Umarani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The hacking is the greatest problem in the wireless local area network (WLAN. Many algorithms like DES, 3DES, AES,UMARAM, RC6 and UR5 have been used to prevent the outside attacks to eavesdrop or prevent the data to be transferred to the end-user correctly. We have proposed a Web programming language to be analyzed with five Web browsers in term of their performances to process the encryption of the programming language’s script with the Web browsers. This is followed by conducting tests simulation in order to obtain the best encryption algorithm versus Web browser. The results of the experimental analysis are presented in the form of graphs. We finally conclude on the findings that different algorithms perform differently to different Web browsers like Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Opera and Netscape Navigator. Hence, we now determine which algorithm works best and most compatible with which Web browser.A comparison has been conducted for those encryption algorithms at different settings for each algorithm such as encryption/decryption speed in the different web Browsers. Experimental results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of each algorithm.

  3. Data in support of genome-wide identification of lineage-specific genes within Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Two sets of LSGs were identified using BLAST: Caenorhabditis elegans species-specific genes (SSGs, 1423, and Caenorhabditis genus-specific genes (GSGs, 4539. The data contained in this article show SSGs and GSGs have significant differences in evolution and that most of them were formed by gene duplication and integration of transposable elements (TEs. Subsequent observation of temporal expression and protein function presents that many SSGs and GSGs are expressed and that genes involved with sex determination, specific stress, immune response, and morphogenesis are most represented. The data are related to research article “Genome-wide identification of lineage-specific genes within Caenorhabditis elegans” in Journal of Genomics [1].

  4. Nicotiana small RNA sequences support a host genome origin of cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Kiran; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Smith, Neil A; Schumann, Ulrike; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Zhang, Ren; Guo, Hui-Shan; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Satellite RNAs (satRNAs) are small noncoding subviral RNA pathogens in plants that depend on helper viruses for replication and spread. Despite many decades of research, the origin of satRNAs remains unknown. In this study we show that a β-glucuronidase (GUS) transgene fused with a Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y satellite RNA (Y-Sat) sequence (35S-GUS:Sat) was transcriptionally repressed in N. tabacum in comparison to a 35S-GUS transgene that did not contain the Y-Sat sequence. This repression was not due to DNA methylation at the 35S promoter, but was associated with specific DNA methylation at the Y-Sat sequence. Both northern blot hybridization and small RNA deep sequencing detected 24-nt siRNAs in wild-type Nicotiana plants with sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that the N. tabacum genome contains Y-Sat-like sequences that give rise to 24-nt sRNAs capable of guiding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) to the Y-Sat sequence in the 35S-GUS:Sat transgene. Consistent with this, Southern blot hybridization detected multiple DNA bands in Nicotiana plants that had sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that Y-Sat-like sequences exist in the Nicotiana genome as repetitive DNA, a DNA feature associated with 24-nt sRNAs. Our results point to a host genome origin for CMV satRNAs, and suggest novel approach of using small RNA sequences for finding the origin of other satRNAs.

  5. Nicotiana small RNA sequences support a host genome origin of cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Zahid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite RNAs (satRNAs are small noncoding subviral RNA pathogens in plants that depend on helper viruses for replication and spread. Despite many decades of research, the origin of satRNAs remains unknown. In this study we show that a β-glucuronidase (GUS transgene fused with a Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV Y satellite RNA (Y-Sat sequence (35S-GUS:Sat was transcriptionally repressed in N. tabacum in comparison to a 35S-GUS transgene that did not contain the Y-Sat sequence. This repression was not due to DNA methylation at the 35S promoter, but was associated with specific DNA methylation at the Y-Sat sequence. Both northern blot hybridization and small RNA deep sequencing detected 24-nt siRNAs in wild-type Nicotiana plants with sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that the N. tabacum genome contains Y-Sat-like sequences that give rise to 24-nt sRNAs capable of guiding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM to the Y-Sat sequence in the 35S-GUS:Sat transgene. Consistent with this, Southern blot hybridization detected multiple DNA bands in Nicotiana plants that had sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that Y-Sat-like sequences exist in the Nicotiana genome as repetitive DNA, a DNA feature associated with 24-nt sRNAs. Our results point to a host genome origin for CMV satRNAs, and suggest novel approach of using small RNA sequences for finding the origin of other satRNAs.

  6. Genome sequence of Helicobacter suis supports its role in gastric pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter (H.) suis has been associated with chronic gastritis and ulcers of the pars oesophagea in pigs, and with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in humans. In order to obtain better insight into the genes involved in pathogenicity and in the specific adaptation to the gastric environment of H. suis, a genome analysis was performed of two H. suis strains isolated from the gastric mucosa of swine. Homologs of the vast majority of genes shown to be important for gastric colonization of the human pathogen H. pylori were detected in the H. suis genome. H. suis encodes several putative outer membrane proteins, of which two similar to the H. pylori adhesins HpaA and HorB. H. suis harbours an almost complete comB type IV secretion system and members of the type IV secretion system 3, but lacks most of the genes present in the cag pathogenicity island of H. pylori. Homologs of genes encoding the H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase were identified in H. suis. H. suis also possesses several other presumptive virulence-associated genes, including homologs for mviN, the H. pylori flavodoxin gene, and a homolog of the H. pylori vacuolating cytotoxin A gene. It was concluded that although genes coding for some important virulence factors in H. pylori, such as the cytotoxin-associated protein (CagA), are not detected in the H. suis genome, homologs of other genes associated with colonization and virulence of H. pylori and other bacteria are present. PMID:21414191

  7. Genome sequence of Helicobacter suis supports its role in gastric pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermoote Miet

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter (H. suis has been associated with chronic gastritis and ulcers of the pars oesophagea in pigs, and with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in humans. In order to obtain better insight into the genes involved in pathogenicity and in the specific adaptation to the gastric environment of H. suis, a genome analysis was performed of two H. suis strains isolated from the gastric mucosa of swine. Homologs of the vast majority of genes shown to be important for gastric colonization of the human pathogen H. pylori were detected in the H. suis genome. H. suis encodes several putative outer membrane proteins, of which two similar to the H. pylori adhesins HpaA and HorB. H. suis harbours an almost complete comB type IV secretion system and members of the type IV secretion system 3, but lacks most of the genes present in the cag pathogenicity island of H. pylori. Homologs of genes encoding the H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase were identified in H. suis. H. suis also possesses several other presumptive virulence-associated genes, including homologs for mviN, the H. pylori flavodoxin gene, and a homolog of the H. pylori vacuolating cytotoxin A gene. It was concluded that although genes coding for some important virulence factors in H. pylori, such as the cytotoxin-associated protein (CagA, are not detected in the H. suis genome, homologs of other genes associated with colonization and virulence of H. pylori and other bacteria are present.

  8. The mitochondrial genome of the sipunculid Phascolopsis gouldii supports its association with Annelida rather than Mollusca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Staton, Joseph

    2001-09-01

    We have determined the sequence of about half (7470 nts) of the mitochondrial genome of the sipunculid Phascolopsis gouldii, the first representative of this phylum to be so studied. All of the 19 identified genes are transcribed from the same DNA strand. The arrangement of these genes is remarkably similar to that of the oligochaete annelid Lumbricus terrestris. Comparison of both the inferred amino acid sequences and the gene arrangements of a variety of diverse metazoan taxa reveals that the phylum Sipuncula is more closely related to Annelida than to Mollusca. This requires reinterpretation of the homology of several embryological features and of patterns of animal body plan evolution.

  9. Mitochondrial genome data support the basal position of Acoelomorpha and the polyphyly of the Platyhelminthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Riutort, Marta; Fourcade, H Matthew; Baguñà, Jaume; Boore, Jeffrey L

    2004-11-01

    We determined 9.7, 5.2, and 6.8 kb, respectively, of the mitochondrial genomes of the acoel Paratomella rubra, the nemertodermatid Nemertoderma westbladi, and the free-living rhabditophoran platyhelminth Microstomum lineare. The identified gene arrangements are unique among metazoans, including each other, sharing no more than one or two single gene boundaries with a few distantly related taxa. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences inferred from the sequenced genes confirms that the acoelomorph flatworms (acoels+nemertodermatids) do not belong to the Platyhelminthes, but are, instead, the most basal extant bilaterian group. Therefore, the Platyhelminthes, as traditionally constituted, is a polyphyletic phylum.

  10. Mitochondrial genome data support the basal position of acoelomorpha and the polyphyly of the platyhelminthes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Trillo, Inaki; Riutort, Marta; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Baguna, Jaume; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-05-01

    We determined 9.7, 5.2, and 6.8 kb, respectively, of the mitochondrial genomes of the acoel Paratomella rubra, the nemertodermatid Nemertoderma westbladi and the free-living rhabditophoran platyhelminth Microstomum lineare. The identified gene arrangements are unique among metazoans, including each other, sharing no more than one or two single gene boundaries with a few distantly related taxa. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences inferred from the sequenced genes confirms that the acoelomorph flatworms (acoels + nemertodermatids) do not belong to the Platyhelminthes, but are, instead, the most basal extant bilaterian group. Therefore, the Platyhelminthes, as traditionally constituted, is a polyphyletic phylum.

  11. Mitochondrial genome sequence and gene order of Sipunculus nudus give additional support for an inclusion of Sipuncula into Annelida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomaeus Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial genomes are a valuable source of data for analysing phylogenetic relationships. Besides sequence information, mitochondrial gene order may add phylogenetically useful information, too. Sipuncula are unsegmented marine worms, traditionally placed in their own phylum. Recent molecular and morphological findings suggest a close affinity to the segmented Annelida. Results The first complete mitochondrial genome of a member of Sipuncula, Sipunculus nudus, is presented. All 37 genes characteristic for metazoan mtDNA were detected and are encoded on the same strand. The mitochondrial gene order (protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes resembles that of annelids, but shows several derivations so far found only in Sipuncula. Sequence based phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial protein-coding genes results in significant bootstrap support for Annelida sensu lato, combining Annelida together with Sipuncula, Echiura, Pogonophora and Myzostomida. Conclusion The mitochondrial sequence data support a close relationship of Annelida and Sipuncula. Also the most parsimonious explanation of changes in gene order favours a derivation from the annelid gene order. These results complement findings from recent phylogenetic analyses of nuclear encoded genes as well as a report of a segmental neural patterning in Sipuncula.

  12. PBrowse: a web-based platform for real-time collaborative exploration of genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szot, Peter S; Yang, Andrian; Wang, Xin; Parsania, Chirag; Röhm, Uwe; Wong, Koon Ho; Ho, Joshua W K

    2017-05-19

    Genome browsers are widely used for individually exploring various types of genomic data. A handful of genome browsers offer limited tools for collaboration among multiple users. Here, we describe PBrowse, an integrated real-time collaborative genome browser that enables multiple users to simultaneously view and access genomic data, thereby harnessing the wisdom of the crowd. PBrowse is based on the Dalliance genome browser and has a re-designed user and data management system with novel collaborative functionalities, including real-time collaborative view, track comment and an integrated group chat feature. Through the Distributed Annotation Server protocol, PBrowse can easily access a wide range of publicly available genomic data, such as the ENCODE data sets. We argue that PBrowse represents a paradigm shift from using a genome browser as a static data visualization tool to a platform that enables real-time human-human interaction and knowledge exchange in a collaborative setting. PBrowse is available at http://pbrowse.victorchang.edu.au, and its source code is available via an open source BSD 3 license at http://github.com/VCCRI/PBrowse. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Scribl: an HTML5 Canvas-based graphics library for visualizing genomic data over the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Chase A; Anthony, Jon; Meyer, Michelle M; Marth, Gabor

    2013-02-01

    High-throughput biological research requires simultaneous visualization as well as analysis of genomic data, e.g. read alignments, variant calls and genomic annotations. Traditionally, such integrative analysis required desktop applications operating on locally stored data. Many current terabyte-size datasets generated by large public consortia projects, however, are already only feasibly stored at specialist genome analysis centers. As even small laboratories can afford very large datasets, local storage and analysis are becoming increasingly limiting, and it is likely that most such datasets will soon be stored remotely, e.g. in the cloud. These developments will require web-based tools that enable users to access, analyze and view vast remotely stored data with a level of sophistication and interactivity that approximates desktop applications. As rapidly dropping cost enables researchers to collect data intended to answer questions in very specialized contexts, developers must also provide software libraries that empower users to implement customized data analyses and data views for their particular application. Such specialized, yet lightweight, applications would empower scientists to better answer specific biological questions than possible with general-purpose genome browsers currently available. Using recent advances in core web technologies (HTML5), we developed Scribl, a flexible genomic visualization library specifically targeting coordinate-based data such as genomic features, DNA sequence and genetic variants. Scribl simplifies the development of sophisticated web-based graphical tools that approach the dynamism and interactivity of desktop applications. Software is freely available online at http://chmille4.github.com/Scribl/ and is implemented in JavaScript with all modern browsers supported.

  14. A user-centred evaluation framework for the Sealife semantic web browsers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Helen; Diallo, Gayo; de Quincey, Ed; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Habermann, Bianca; Kostkova, Patty; Schroeder, Michael; Jupp, Simon; Khelif, Khaled; Stevens, Robert; Jawaheer, Gawesh; Madle, Gemma

    2009-10-01

    Semantically-enriched browsing has enhanced the browsing experience by providing contextualized dynamically generated Web content, and quicker access to searched-for information. However, adoption of Semantic Web technologies is limited and user perception from the non-IT domain sceptical. Furthermore, little attention has been given to evaluating semantic browsers with real users to demonstrate the enhancements and obtain valuable feedback. The Sealife project investigates semantic browsing and its application to the life science domain. Sealife's main objective is to develop the notion of context-based information integration by extending three existing Semantic Web browsers (SWBs) to link the existing Web to the eScience infrastructure. This paper describes a user-centred evaluation framework that was developed to evaluate the Sealife SWBs that elicited feedback on users' perceptions on ease of use and information findability. Three sources of data: i) web server logs; ii) user questionnaires; and iii) semi-structured interviews were analysed and comparisons made between each browser and a control system. It was found that the evaluation framework used successfully elicited users' perceptions of the three distinct SWBs. The results indicate that the browser with the most mature and polished interface was rated higher for usability, and semantic links were used by the users of all three browsers. Confirmation or contradiction of our original hypotheses with relation to SWBs is detailed along with observations of implementation issues.

  15. A genome scan conducted in a multigenerational pedigree with convergent strabismus supports a complex genetic determinism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk Georges

    Full Text Available A genome-wide linkage scan was conducted in a Northern-European multigenerational pedigree with nine of 40 related members affected with concomitant strabismus. Twenty-seven members of the pedigree including all affected individuals were genotyped using a SNP array interrogating > 300,000 common SNPs. We conducted parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses assuming segregation of an autosomal dominant mutation, yet allowing for incomplete penetrance and phenocopies. We detected two chromosome regions with near-suggestive evidence for linkage, respectively on chromosomes 8 and 18. The chromosome 8 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.80 and a rate of phenocopy of 0.11, while the chromosome 18 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.64 and a rate of phenocopy of 0. Our analysis excludes a simple genetic determinism of strabismus in this pedigree.

  16. A genome scan conducted in a multigenerational pedigree with convergent strabismus supports a complex genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Anouk; Cambisano, Nadine; Ahariz, Naïma; Karim, Latifa; Georges, Michel

    2013-01-01

    A genome-wide linkage scan was conducted in a Northern-European multigenerational pedigree with nine of 40 related members affected with concomitant strabismus. Twenty-seven members of the pedigree including all affected individuals were genotyped using a SNP array interrogating > 300,000 common SNPs. We conducted parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses assuming segregation of an autosomal dominant mutation, yet allowing for incomplete penetrance and phenocopies. We detected two chromosome regions with near-suggestive evidence for linkage, respectively on chromosomes 8 and 18. The chromosome 8 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.80 and a rate of phenocopy of 0.11, while the chromosome 18 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.64 and a rate of phenocopy of 0. Our analysis excludes a simple genetic determinism of strabismus in this pedigree.

  17. Impact of the genome wide supported NRGN gene on anterior cingulate morphology in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Ohi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rs12807809 single-nucleotide polymorphism in NRGN is a genetic risk variant with genome-wide significance for schizophrenia. The frequency of the T allele of rs12807809 is higher in individuals with schizophrenia than in those without the disorder. Reduced immunoreactivity of NRGN, which is expressed exclusively in the brain, has been observed in Brodmann areas (BA 9 and 32 of the prefrontal cortex in postmortem brains from patients with schizophrenia compared with those in controls. METHODS: Genotype effects of rs12807809 were investigated on gray matter (GM and white matter (WM volumes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with a voxel-based morphometry (VBM technique in a sample of 99 Japanese patients with schizophrenia and 263 healthy controls. RESULTS: Although significant genotype-diagnosis interaction either on GM or WM volume was not observed, there was a trend of genotype-diagnosis interaction on GM volume in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. Thus, the effects of NRGN genotype on GM volume of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls were separately investigated. In patients with schizophrenia, carriers of the risk T allele had a smaller GM volume in the left ACC (BA32 than did carriers of the non-risk C allele. Significant genotype effect on other regions of the GM or WM was not observed for either the patients or controls. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the genome-wide associated genetic risk variant in the NRGN gene may be related to a small GM volume in the ACC in the left hemisphere in patients with schizophrenia.

  18. Genomic ancestry of North Africans supports back-to-Africa migrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Brenna M; Botigué, Laura R; Gravel, Simon; Wang, Wei; Brisbin, Abra; Byrnes, Jake K; Fadhlaoui-Zid, Karima; Zalloua, Pierre A; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Bustamante, Carlos D; Comas, David

    2012-01-01

    North African populations are distinct from sub-Saharan Africans based on cultural, linguistic, and phenotypic attributes; however, the time and the extent of genetic divergence between populations north and south of the Sahara remain poorly understood. Here, we interrogate the multilayered history of North Africa by characterizing the effect of hypothesized migrations from the Near East, Europe, and sub-Saharan Africa on current genetic diversity. We present dense, genome-wide SNP genotyping array data (730,000 sites) from seven North African populations, spanning from Egypt to Morocco, and one Spanish population. We identify a gradient of likely autochthonous Maghrebi ancestry that increases from east to west across northern Africa; this ancestry is likely derived from "back-to-Africa" gene flow more than 12,000 years ago (ya), prior to the Holocene. The indigenous North African ancestry is more frequent in populations with historical Berber ethnicity. In most North African populations we also see substantial shared ancestry with the Near East, and to a lesser extent sub-Saharan Africa and Europe. To estimate the time of migration from sub-Saharan populations into North Africa, we implement a maximum likelihood dating method based on the distribution of migrant tracts. In order to first identify migrant tracts, we assign local ancestry to haplotypes using a novel, principal component-based analysis of three ancestral populations. We estimate that a migration of western African origin into Morocco began about 40 generations ago (approximately 1,200 ya); a migration of individuals with Nilotic ancestry into Egypt occurred about 25 generations ago (approximately 750 ya). Our genomic data reveal an extraordinarily complex history of migrations, involving at least five ancestral populations, into North Africa.

  19. pWeb: A High-Performance, Parallel-Computing Framework for Web-Browser-Based Medical Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halic, Tansel; Ahn, Woojin; De, Suvranu

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a pWeb - a new language and compiler for parallelization of client-side compute intensive web applications such as surgical simulations. The recently introduced HTML5 standard has enabled creating unprecedented applications on the web. Low performance of the web browser, however, remains the bottleneck of computationally intensive applications including visualization of complex scenes, real time physical simulations and image processing compared to native ones. The new proposed language is built upon web workers for multithreaded programming in HTML5. The language provides fundamental functionalities of parallel programming languages as well as the fork/join parallel model which is not supported by web workers. The language compiler automatically generates an equivalent parallel script that complies with the HTML5 standard. A case study on realistic rendering for surgical simulations demonstrates enhanced performance with a compact set of instructions.

  20. Mitigating Man-In-The-Browser Attacks with Hardware-based Authentication Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazli Bin Mat Nor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lack of security awareness amongst end users when dealing with online banking and electronic commerce leave many client side application vulnerabilities open. Thus, this is enables attackers to exploit the vulnerabilities and launch client-side attacks such as man-in-the-browser attack. The attack is designed to manipulate sensitive information via client’s application such as internet browser by taking advantage of the browser’s extension vulnerabilities. This attack exists due to lack of preventive measurement to detect any malicious changes on the client side platform. Therefore, in this paper we are proposing an enhanced remote authentication protocol with hardware based attestation and pseudonym identity enhancement to mitigate man-in-the-browser attacks as well as improving user identity privacy.

  1. The Event Browser: An Intuitive Approach to Browsing BaBar Object Databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adesanya, Adeyemi

    2002-05-01

    Providing efficient access to more than 300TB of experiment data is the responsibility of the BaBar{sup 1} Databases Group. Unlike generic tools, The Event Browser presents users with an abstraction of the BaBar data model. Multithreaded CORBA{sup 2} servers perform database operations using small transactions in an effort to avoid lock contention issues and provide adequate response times. The GUI client is implemented in Java and can be easily deployed throughout the community in the form of a web applet. The browser allows users to examine collections of related physics events and identify associations between the collections and the physical files in which they reside, helping administrators distribute data to other sites worldwide. This paper discusses the various aspects of the Event Browser including requirements, design challenges and key features of the current implementation.

  2. A framework for web browser-based medical simulation using WebGL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halic, Tansel; Ahn, Woojin; De, Suvranu

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a web browser-based software framework that provides accessibility, portability, and platform independence for medical simulation. Typical medical simulation systems are restricted to the underlying platform and device, which limits widespread use. Our framework allows realistic and efficient medical simulation using only the web browser for anytime anywhere access using a variety of platforms ranging from desktop PCs to tablets. The framework consists of visualization, simulation, and hardware integration modules that are fundamental components for multimodal interactive simulation. Benchmark tests are performed to validate the rendering and computing performance of our framework with latest web browsers including Chrome and Firefox. The results are quite promising opening up the possibility of developing web-based medical simulation technology.

  3. Genoviz Software Development Kit: Java tool kit for building genomics visualization applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chervitz Stephen A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visualization software can expose previously undiscovered patterns in genomic data and advance biological science. Results The Genoviz Software Development Kit (SDK is an open source, Java-based framework designed for rapid assembly of visualization software applications for genomics. The Genoviz SDK framework provides a mechanism for incorporating adaptive, dynamic zooming into applications, a desirable feature of genome viewers. Visualization capabilities of the Genoviz SDK include automated layout of features along genetic or genomic axes; support for user interactions with graphical elements (Glyphs in a map; a variety of Glyph sub-classes that promote experimentation with new ways of representing data in graphical formats; and support for adaptive, semantic zooming, whereby objects change their appearance depending on zoom level and zooming rate adapts to the current scale. Freely available demonstration and production quality applications, including the Integrated Genome Browser, illustrate Genoviz SDK capabilities. Conclusion Separation between graphics components and genomic data models makes it easy for developers to add visualization capability to pre-existing applications or build new applications using third-party data models. Source code, documentation, sample applications, and tutorials are available at http://genoviz.sourceforge.net/.

  4. Make Communication Between Browser and Server by Using Cookie Technology%巧妙运用Cookie技术进行Browser/Server通信

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘利军; 侯关士; 杨宗煦

    2001-01-01

    以一个在Browse/Seerver通信方式下对员工信息的处理为例,介绍了一种笔者在实际商业网站开发中经常用到的、以Cookie作为ASP和JavaScript技术的中介从而巧妙地在测览器和服务器间进行通信的应用技巧.%This paper takes a disposal of the workers information under the Browser/Server communication way as an example, and introduces a method that the writers often use in the development of business Web site .In this method, the Cookie technology is used skillfully as the agency between the ASP technology and the JavaScript technology, and makes the browser communicating with the Web server dynamically.

  5. Genome, transcriptome, and secretome analysis of wood decay fungus postia placenta supports unique mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Diego [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Challacombe, Jean F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brettin, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morgenstern, Ingo [CLARK UNIV; Hibbett, David [CLARK UNIV.; Schmoll, Monika [UNIV WIEN; Kubicek, Christian P [UNIV WIEN; Ferreira, Patricia [CIB, CSIC, MADRID; Ruiz - Duenase, Francisco J [CIB, CSIC, MADRID; Martinez, Angel T [CIB, CSIC, MADRID; Kersten, Phil [FOREST PRODUCTS LAB; Hammel, Kenneth E [FOREST PRODUCTS LAB; Vanden Wymelenberg, Amber [U. WISCONSIN; Gaskell, Jill [FOREST PRODUCTS LAB; Lindquist, Erika [DOE JGI; Sabati, Grzegorz [U. WISCONSIN; Bondurant, Sandra S [U. WISCONSIN; Larrondo, Luis F [U. CATHOLICA DE CHILE; Canessa, Paulo [U. CATHOLICA DE CHILE; Vicunna, Rafael [U. CATHOLICA DE CHILE; Yadavk, Jagiit [U. CINCINATTI; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan [U. CINCINATTI; Subramaniank, Venkataramanan [U. CINCINATTI; Pisabarro, Antonio G [PUBLIC U. NAVARRE; Lavin, Jose L [PUBLIC U. NAVARRE; Oguiza, Jose A [PUBLIC U. NAVARRE; Master, Emma [U. TORONTO; Henrissat, Bernard [CNRS, MARSEILLE; Coutinho, Pedro M [CNRS, MARSEILLE; Harris, Paul [NOVOZYMES, INC.; Magnuson, Jon K [PNNL; Baker, Scott [PNNL; Bruno, Kenneth [PNNL; Kenealy, William [MASCOMA, INC.; Hoegger, Patrik J [GEORG-AUGUST-U.; Kues, Ursula [GEORG-AUGUST-U; Ramaiva, Preethi [NOVOZYMES, INC.; Lucas, Susan [DOE JGI; Salamov, Asaf [DOE JGI; Shapiro, Harris [DOE JGI; Tuh, Hank [DOE JGI; Chee, Christine L [UNM; Teter, Sarah [NOVOZYMES, INC.; Yaver, Debbie [NOVOZYMES, INC.; James, Tim [MCMASTER U.; Mokrejs, Martin [CHARLES U.; Pospisek, Martin [CHARLES U.; Grigoriev, Igor [DOE JGI; Rokhsar, Dan [DOE JGI; Berka, Randy [NOVOZYMES; Cullen, Dan [FOREST PRODUCTS LAB

    2008-01-01

    Brown-rot fungi such as Postia placenta are common inhabitants of forest ecosystems and are also largely responsible for the destructive decay of wooden structures. Rapid depolymerization of cellulose is a distinguishing feature of brown-rot, but the biochemical mechanisms and underlying genetics are poorly understood. Systematic examination of the P. placenta genome, transcriptome and secretome revealed unique extracellular enzyme systems, including an unusual repertoire of extracellular glycoside hydrolases. Genes encoding exocellobiohydrolases and cellulose-binding domains, typical of cellulolytic microbes, are absent in this efficient cellulose-degrading fungus. When P. placenta was grown in medium containing cellulose as sole carbon source, transcripts corresponding to many hemicellulases and to a single putative {beta}-1-4 endoglucanase were expressed at high levels relative to glucose grown cultures. These transcript profiles were confirmed by direct identification of peptides by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC{center_dot}MSIMS). Also upregulated during growth on cellulose medium were putative iron reductases, quinone reductase, and structurally divergent oxidases potentially involved in extracellular generation of Fe(II) and H202. These observations are consistent with a biodegradative role for Fenton chemistry in which Fe(II) and H202 react to form hydroxyl radicals, highly reactive oxidants capable of depolymerizing cellulose. The P. placenta genome resources provide unparalleled opportunities for investigating such unusual mechanisms of cellulose conversion. More broadly, the genome offers insight into the diversification of lignocellulose degrading mechanisms in fungi. Comparisons to the closely related white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium support an evolutionary shift from white-rot to brown-rot during which the capacity for efficient depolymerization of lignin was lost.

  6. Comparative Study of Cross Browser Compatibility as Design Issue in Various Websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatinder Manhas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this current era of information technology websites are very important means of communication. Lot of efforts is required by different institutions / organizations to portray complete information on beautifully designed websites. Websites act as an online agent through which a user can get his work done without physically visiting the organizations. Website design is given with a very critical look by the designer so that it can provide users with all the facilities of the concerned institutions / organizations online. To make websites behavior similar in all the different browsers employed by the different categories of the users, the responsibility of the designer and the concerned institutions / organizations increases manifold. In this research paper author developed an online tool using .NET Framework using C# to study cross browser compatibility as Design issue in various categories of the websites like Job portals, Government, educational, Commercial and Social networking. The automated tool developed by author function on the basis of the different standards prescribed in W3C guidelines document UAAG 2.0 [7] and act like a parser and renders the complete code of the website and produces result on basis of the behavior of the websites in five most popular and widely used Browsers like parameters like Internet Explorer[7,8,9], Chrome, Safari, Fire fox. Each Browser is tested on the basis of the five parameters which are included in the parser are Blinking, Active X control, Website Resolution; image Formats, HTML Tag errors. The results obtained after testing five different categories of websites shows that educational and social networking sites shows least compatibility in multiple browsers where as job portals, commercial and government websites shows 100% compliance to the website design standards recommended by W3C w.r.t browser compatibility of different websites on different browsing platform.

  7. Sealife: a semantic grid browser for the life sciences applied to the study of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Michael; Burger, Albert; Kostkova, Patty; Stevens, Robert; Habermann, Bianca; Dieng-Kuntz, Rose

    2006-01-01

    The objective of Sealife is the conception and realisation of a semantic Grid browser for the life sciences, which will link the existing Web to the currently emerging eScience infrastructure. The SeaLife Browser will allow users to automatically link a host of Web servers and Web/Grid services to the Web content he/she is visiting. This will be accomplished using eScience's growing number of Web/Grid Services and its XML-based standards and ontologies. The browser will identify terms in the pages being browsed through the background knowledge held in ontologies. Through the use of Semantic Hyperlinks, which link identified ontology terms to servers and services, the SeaLife Browser will offer a new dimension of context-based information integration. In this paper, we give an overview over the different components of the browser and their interplay. This SeaLife Browser will be demonstrated within three application scenarios in evidence-based medicine, literature & patent mining, and molecular biology, all relating to the study of infectious diseases. The three applications vertically integrate the molecule/cell, the tissue/organ and the patient/population level by covering the analysis of high-throughput screening data for endocytosis (the molecular entry pathway into the cell), the expression of proteins in the spatial context of tissue and organs, and a high-level library on infectious diseases designed for clinicians and their patients. For more information see http://www.biote.ctu-dresden.de/sealife.

  8. To Create a Application Program of Browser/Server Structure With PB%用PB建立Browser/Server结构应用程序

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宗江

    2002-01-01

    本文主要论述用PowerBuilder建立Browser/Server结构的应用程序的方法,用以实现Internet/Intranet的工作方式,并对实现方式的几种重要模块的数据流程进行论述,同时给出了具体的编程实例.

  9. Evidence Supporting the Uptake and Genomic Incorporation of Environmental DNA in the “Ancient Asexual” Bdelloid Rotifer Philodina roseola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf R. P. Bininda-Emonds

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that bdelloid rotifers regularly undergo horizontal gene transfer, apparently as a surrogate mechanism of genetic exchange in the absence of true sexual reproduction, in part because of their ability to withstand desiccation. We provide empirical support for this latter hypothesis using the bdelloid Philodina roseola, which we demonstrate to readily internalize environmental DNA in contrast to a representative monogonont rotifer (Brachionus rubens, which, like other monogononts, is facultative sexual and cannot withstand desiccation. In addition, environmental DNA that was more similar to the host DNA was retained more often and for a longer period of time. Indirect evidence (increased variance in the reproductive output of the untreated F1 generation suggests that environmental DNA can be incorporated into the genome during desiccation and is thus heritable. Our observed fitness effects agree with sexual theory and also occurred when the animals were desiccated in groups (thereby acting as DNA donors, but not individually, indicating the mechanism could occur in nature. Thus, although DNA uptake and its genomic incorporation appears proximally related to anhydrobiosis in bdelloids, it might also facilitate accidental genetic exchange with closely related taxa, thereby maintaining higher levels of genetic diversity than is otherwise expected for this group of “ancient asexuals”.

  10. The chickpea genomic web resource: visualization and analysis of the desi-type Cicer arietinum nuclear genome for comparative exploration of legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Gopal; Priya, Piyush; Bandhiwal, Nitesh; Bareja, Neha; Jain, Mukesh; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Yadav, Gitanjali

    2014-12-18

    Availability of the draft nuclear genome sequences of small-seeded desi-type legume crop Cicer arietinum has provided an opportunity for investigating unique chickpea genomic features and evaluation of their biological significance. The increasing number of legume genome sequences also presents a challenge for developing reliable and information-driven bioinformatics applications suitable for comparative exploration of this important class of crop plants. The Chickpea Genomic Web Resource (CGWR) is an implementation of a suite of web-based applications dedicated to chickpea genome visualization and comparative analysis, based on next generation sequencing and assembly of Cicer arietinum desi-type genotype ICC4958. CGWR has been designed and configured for mapping, scanning and browsing the significant chickpea genomic features in view of the important existing and potential roles played by the various legume genome projects in mutant mapping and cloning. It also enables comparative informatics of ICC4958 DNA sequence analysis with other wild and cultivated genotypes of chickpea, various other leguminous species as well as several non-leguminous model plants, to enable investigations into evolutionary processes that shape legume genomes. CGWR is an online database offering a comprehensive visual and functional genomic analysis of the chickpea genome, along with customized maps and gene-clustering options. It is also the only plant based web resource supporting display and analysis of nucleosome positioning patterns in the genome. The usefulness of CGWR has been demonstrated with discoveries of biological significance made using this server. The CGWR is compatible with all available operating systems and browsers, and is available freely under the open source license at http://www.nipgr.res.in/CGWR/home.php.

  11. Research on Browsers Recognition%浏览器识别研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李周辉; 黄燕群; 唐屹

    2016-01-01

    近年来,随着互联网的高速发展,网络软件一直成为黑客攻击的主要目标。浏览器作为用户使用最频繁的网络软件,其安全和服务一直是广泛关注的焦点,也是用户选择使用的衡量标准。识别浏览器一方面能够根据浏览器对应的漏洞实现系统攻击,打开攻击的门户;另一方面能够利用浏览器识别技术进一步识别用户,带来更好的用户体验。先前的研究有通过植入服务器端脚本获取浏览器指纹信息,也有仅仅通过流量分析识别浏览器,但识别率比较低。文章通过截取加密传输的流量数据,获取13个浏览器的踪迹信息,用3种典型的机器学习方法处理浏览器踪迹信息,以此来识别浏览器。实验结果表明,浏览器可以被识别,而且识别的准确率最高为100%。这就意味着用户必须提高安全防范意识,及时更新浏览器版本和安装最新的补丁,以防止黑客利用原来浏览器的漏洞造成系统损害。%In recent years, with the high-speed development of Internet, network software has been the main target of the hacker. As the network software that users use most frequently, the safety and the service of the browser has always been the focus of attention, which is also a measure that users choose to use. On the one hand, recognizing the browsers can achieve system attacks according to corresponding loopholes of browsers and then open the gate for attackers. On the other hand, using the browsers recognition technology can further recognize the users, and then bring a better user experiences. Previous studies get browsers fingerprint information by implanting server-side scripts, and there are some people that use trafifc analysis technology to recognize the browsers, but the recognition rate is relatively low. This paper derives trace information of thirteen browsers from the encryption transmission trafifc, and processes trace information by

  12. Enhancing Independent Internet Access for Individuals with Mental Retardation through Use of a Specialized Web Browser: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Daniel K.; Stock, Steven E.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a prototype web browser, called Web Trek, that utilizes multimedia to provide access for individuals with cognitive disabilities was developed and pilot-tested with 12 adults with mental retardation. The Web Trek browser provided greater independence in accessing the Internet compared to Internet Explorer. (Contains references.)…

  13. Deco-video: video editing and viewing browser enables to playback movie contents reproduced by using scene scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kunio

    2008-03-01

    The authors developed a prototype video viewing browser. Our video viewer has a function to playback movies on the WWW according to the playing scenario. This scenario makes new scenes from original movies. Our video browser features this scene scenario where you can arrange movie's video clips, insert transition effects, apply colored backgrounds, or add captions and titles. The video movie contents on the WWW are copyrighted. The browser cannot alter web's movie contents owing to its copyright like that a conventional video editing software adds effects to the original. The editing software produces reproductions, but our browser doesn't. The browser adds effects according to the scenario and only shows us a new scene. The scene scenario is written in an XML-like script. The video browser has a function to give effect according to operations of the scenario. In addition, our video viewing browser can provide us with an interactive video art. For example, suppose that a small stream runs down among the rocks. On the browser, if you chose an icon which shows maple leafs and drop it into the stream, a maple leaf starts floating down along the stream.

  14. Dual roles of an algal farming damselfish as a cultivator and opportunistic browser of an invasive seaweed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Peyton

    Full Text Available Herbivory is a fundamental process determining reef resilience, and while algal farming damselfishes can help shape benthic assemblages, an understanding of their contribution to areas outside of defended territories is relatively unexplored. Here, we demonstrate how the farming damselfish Stegastes marginatus plays a dual role in benthic structuring by 1 contributing to persistence of the invasive macroalga Acanthophora spicifera within a Hawaiian marine protected area, where the macroalga occurred exclusively inside Stegastes territories, and 2 behaving as an opportunistic browser of the exotic alga outside their territorial borders. Greater than 50% of the biomass of tethered A. spicifera was consumed within one-hour when placed outside Stegastes territories, compared to <5% lost from tethers within territories or herbivore exclusion cages. In situ remote video revealed that tethered A. spicifera located outside territories was grazed primarily by the surgeonfish Acanthurus nigrofuscus (∼68% of total bites and, surprisingly, by S. marginatus (∼27% of total bites that left their territories to feed on this resource on 107 occasions during 400 min of filming. Further, for over half of those occurrences where S. marginatus grazed on the tethered macroalga outside of territories, they fed alongside conspecifics and other species, displaying little of the aggressiveness that characterizes this damselfish. These results show that S. marginatus plays a wider role in determining benthic assemblages than previously recognized, acting both as cultivators of a canopy-forming invasive macroalga within their territories, and as opportunistic browsers in neighboring sites. Consequently, S. marginatus can affect benthic species composition across their territory borders. These results provide a rare example of interspecific facilitation of an exotic alga by an indigenous marine fish. Accounting for fish behaviors more broadly is important to further our

  15. Design and implementation of a P300-based brain-computer interface for controlling an internet browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugler, Emily M; Ruf, Carolin A; Halder, Sebastian; Bensch, Michael; Kubler, Andrea

    2010-12-01

    An electroencephalographic (EEG) brain-computer interface (BCI) internet browser was designed and evaluated with 10 healthy volunteers and three individuals with advanced amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), all of whom were given tasks to execute on the internet using the browser. Participants with ALS achieved an average accuracy of 73% and a subsequent information transfer rate (ITR) of 8.6 bits/min and healthy participants with no prior BCI experience over 90% accuracy and an ITR of 14.4 bits/min. We define additional criteria for unrestricted internet access for evaluation of the presented and future internet browsers, and we provide a review of the existing browsers in the literature. The P300-based browser provides unrestricted access and enables free web surfing for individuals with paralysis.

  16. Web Browser History Detection as a Real-World Privacy Threat

    CERN Document Server

    Janc, A

    2010-01-01

    Web browser history detection using CSS $visited$ styles has long been dismissed as an issue of marginal impact. However, due to recent changes in Web usage patterns, coupled with browser performance improvements, the long-standing issue has now become a significant threat to the privacy of Internet users. In this paper we analyze the impact of CSS-based history detection and demonstrate the feasibility of conducting practical attacks with minimal resources. We analyze Web browser behavior and detectability of content loaded via standard protocols and with various HTTP response codes. We develop an algorithm for efficient examination of large link sets and evaluate its performance in modern browsers. Compared to existing methods our approach is up to 6 times faster, and is able to detect up to 30,000 visited links per second. We present a novel Web application capable of effectively detecting clients’ browsing histories and discuss real-world results obtained from 271,576 Internet users. Our results indicat...

  17. A browser-based event display for the CMS experiment at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategan, M.; McCauley, T.; Nguyen, P.

    2012-12-01

    The line between native and web applications is becoming increasingly blurred as modern web browsers are becoming powerful platforms on which applications can be run. Such applications are trivial to install and are readily extensible and easy to use. In an educational setting, web applications permit a way to deploy deploy tools in a highly-restrictive computing environment. The I2U2 collaboration has developed a browser-based event display for viewing events in data collected and released to the public by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The application itself reads a JSON event format and uses the JavaScript 3D rendering engine pre3d. The only requirement is a modern browser using HTML5 canvas. The event display has been used by thousands of high school students in the context of programs organized by I2U2, QuarkNet, and IPPOG. This browser-based approach to display of events can have broader usage and impact for experts and public alike.

  18. Piracy Versus Privacy: An Analysis of Values Encoded in the PirateBrowser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodó, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Piratebrowser is a web browser which utilizes the Privacy Enhancing Technology Tor to circumvent nationally implemented internet filters blocking the access to the Pirate Bay. The article analyzes the possible consequences of a mass influx of copyright pirates into the privacy domain. It address

  19. Linking ecosystem services and human health: the Eco-Health Relationship Browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Laura E; Daniel, Jessica; McCorkle, Betsy; Sears, Alexandra; Bush, Kathleen F

    2013-10-01

    Ecosystems provide multiple services, many of which are linked to positive health outcomes. Review objectives were to identify the set of literature related to this research topic, and to design an interactive, web-based tool highlighting the weight of evidence, thus making the information more accessible. A systematic review was conducted to create the Eco-Health Relationship Browser ( http://www.epa.gov/research/healthscience/browser/introduction.html ). The search was conducted in four stages utilizing Google Scholar, PubMed and Science Direct, targeted journals, and targeted keywords; search results were limited to peer-reviewed journal articles published in English from 1 January 1990 to 31 December 2012. The review identified 344 relevant articles; a subset of 169 articles was included in the Browser. Articles retrieved during the search focused on the buffering and health-promotional aspects of ecosystem services. Landscape and Urban Planning, Urban Forestry and Urban Greening, and Health and Place yielded the most articles relevant to this search. Results from the systematic review were used to populate the Browser, which organizes the diverse literature and allows users to visualize the numerous connections between ecosystem services and human health.

  20. New Perspectives on Popular Culture, Science and Technology: Web Browsers and the New Illiteracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charters, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Analysts predict that the knowledge economy of the near future will require people to be both computer literate and print literate. However, some of the reading and thinking habits of current college students suggest that electronic media such as web browsers may be limiting the new generation's ability to absorb and process what they read. Their…

  1. The HIV mutation browser: a resource for human immunodeficiency virus mutagenesis and polymorphism data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Norman E; Satagopam, Venkata P; Santiago-Mozos, Salvador; Villacorta-Martin, Carlos; Bharat, Tanmay A M; Schneider, Reinhard; Briggs, John A G

    2014-12-01

    Huge research effort has been invested over many years to determine the phenotypes of natural or artificial mutations in HIV proteins--interpretation of mutation phenotypes is an invaluable source of new knowledge. The results of this research effort are recorded in the scientific literature, but it is difficult for virologists to rapidly find it. Manually locating data on phenotypic variation within the approximately 270,000 available HIV-related research articles, or the further 1,500 articles that are published each month is a daunting task. Accordingly, the HIV research community would benefit from a resource cataloguing the available HIV mutation literature. We have applied computational text-mining techniques to parse and map mutagenesis and polymorphism information from the HIV literature, have enriched the data with ancillary information and have developed a public, web-based interface through which it can be intuitively explored: the HIV mutation browser. The current release of the HIV mutation browser describes the phenotypes of 7,608 unique mutations at 2,520 sites in the HIV proteome, resulting from the analysis of 120,899 papers. The mutation information for each protein is organised in a residue-centric manner and each residue is linked to the relevant experimental literature. The importance of HIV as a global health burden advocates extensive effort to maximise the efficiency of HIV research. The HIV mutation browser provides a valuable new resource for the research community. The HIV mutation browser is available at: http://hivmut.org.

  2. MediaMill: Fast and effective video search using the ForkBrowser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, O.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Worring, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this technical demonstration we showcase the MediaMill ForkBrowser for video retrieval. It embeds multiple query methods into a single browsing environment. We show that users can switch query methods on demand without the need to adapt to a different interface. This allows for fast and effective

  3. Overviewof Browser Forensics Technology%浏览器取证技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶姿邑; 毕善为

    2014-01-01

    随着信息时代的来临,一些不法分子在实施犯罪之前往往会上网查询信息,他们所用的浏览器便成了司法机关取证的关键。能否提取有效的犯罪线索或证据,取决于浏览器取证方法的好坏,本文介绍了目前主流的火狐浏览器、IE浏览器的取证技术,概述了IE缓存文件和基于SQLite数据库的火狐浏览器历史系统的日志文件结构,提出了信息恢复方法。通过对已删除日志文件或缓存文件信息提取,来达到获取证据的目的,分析用户的行为。%With the advent of the information age, some criminals always tend to query information from the Internet before they engaged in criminal activity. So the browser they used has become the key to the forensics of judicial authorities. Whether we can extract the effective evidence of crime depends on the forensics method of browser. This article introduces the forensics technology of Firefox and IE browser which are the current mainstream browsers, outlined the browser temporary file structure, such as the IE cache file and the SQLite database log files of the Firefox, proposed information recovery method. It can collect evidence and analyze the user’s behavior by extract the information of the deleted log files or cache files.

  4. A complete mitochondrial genome from Echinochasmus japonicus supports the elevation of Echinochasminae Odhner, 1910 to family rank (Trematoda: Platyhelminthes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thanh Hoa; Nguyen, Nga Thi Bich; Nguyen, Khue Thi; Doan, Huong Thi Thanh; Dung, Do Trung; Blair, David

    2016-11-01

    The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of the trematode Echinochasmus japonicus Tanabe, 1926 was fully determined and annotated. The circular mt molecule of this species is 15,865bp in length, containing 12 protein-coding genes (arranged in the following order: cox3-cob-nad4L-nad4-atp6-nad2-nad1-nad3-cox1-cox2-nad6-nad5), two ribosomal RNA genes (rrnL and rrnS) and 22 transfer RNA genes (trnH; trnQ; trnF; trnM; trnV; trnA; trnD; trnN; trnP; trnI; trnK; trnS1(AGN); trnW; trnT; trnC; trnL1(CUN); trnS2(UCN); trnL2(UUN); trnG; and trnE). The atp8 gene is absent. The 3' end of nad4L overlaps the 5' end of nad4 by 40bp. An array of eight identical tandem repeats (240bp each) was found between trnG and trnE in the long non-coding region of the individual worm sequenced. Numbers of these repeats varied among E. japonicus samples. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated mt protein sequences of 40 trematode species/strains supports the elevation of Echinochasminae Odhner, 1910 to family rank, close to the families Echinostomatidae and Fasciolidae. As echinochasmid and echinostomatid species can parasitize humans, the future characterization of additional mt genomes is needed for development of mt markers for identification and phylogenetic, population, epidemiological and hybridization studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. VectorBase: improvements to a bioinformatics resource for invertebrate vector genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megy, Karine; Emrich, Scott J; Lawson, Daniel; Campbell, David; Dialynas, Emmanuel; Hughes, Daniel S T; Koscielny, Gautier; Louis, Christos; Maccallum, Robert M; Redmond, Seth N; Sheehan, Andrew; Topalis, Pantelis; Wilson, Derek

    2012-01-01

    VectorBase (http://www.vectorbase.org) is a NIAID-supported bioinformatics resource for invertebrate vectors of human pathogens. It hosts data for nine genomes: mosquitoes (three Anopheles gambiae genomes, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus), tick (Ixodes scapularis), body louse (Pediculus humanus), kissing bug (Rhodnius prolixus) and tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans). Hosted data range from genomic features and expression data to population genetics and ontologies. We describe improvements and integration of new data that expand our taxonomic coverage. Releases are bi-monthly and include the delivery of preliminary data for emerging genomes. Frequent updates of the genome browser provide VectorBase users with increasing options for visualizing their own high-throughput data. One major development is a new population biology resource for storing genomic variations, insecticide resistance data and their associated metadata. It takes advantage of improved ontologies and controlled vocabularies. Combined, these new features ensure timely release of multiple types of data in the public domain while helping overcome the bottlenecks of bioinformatics and annotation by engaging with our user community.

  6. OryzaGenome: Genome Diversity Database of Wild Oryza Species

    KAUST Repository

    Ohyanagi, Hajime

    2015-11-18

    The species in the genus Oryza, encompassing nine genome types and 23 species, are a rich genetic resource and may have applications in deeper genomic analyses aiming to understand the evolution of plant genomes. With the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, a flood of Oryza species reference genomes and genomic variation information has become available in recent years. This genomic information, combined with the comprehensive phenotypic information that we are accumulating in our Oryzabase, can serve as an excellent genotype-phenotype association resource for analyzing rice functional and structural evolution, and the associated diversity of the Oryza genus. Here we integrate our previous and future phenotypic/habitat information and newly determined genotype information into a united repository, named OryzaGenome, providing the variant information with hyperlinks to Oryzabase. The current version of OryzaGenome includes genotype information of 446 O. rufipogon accessions derived by imputation and of 17 accessions derived by imputation-free deep sequencing. Two variant viewers are implemented: SNP Viewer as a conventional genome browser interface and Variant Table as a textbased browser for precise inspection of each variant one by one. Portable VCF (variant call format) file or tabdelimited file download is also available. Following these SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) data, reference pseudomolecules/ scaffolds/contigs and genome-wide variation information for almost all of the closely and distantly related wild Oryza species from the NIG Wild Rice Collection will be available in future releases. All of the resources can be accessed through http://viewer.shigen.info/oryzagenome/.

  7. OryzaGenome: Genome Diversity Database of Wild Oryza Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyanagi, Hajime; Ebata, Toshinobu; Huang, Xuehui; Gong, Hao; Fujita, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Takako; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Feng, Qi; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Han, Bin; Kurata, Nori

    2016-01-01

    The species in the genus Oryza, encompassing nine genome types and 23 species, are a rich genetic resource and may have applications in deeper genomic analyses aiming to understand the evolution of plant genomes. With the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, a flood of Oryza species reference genomes and genomic variation information has become available in recent years. This genomic information, combined with the comprehensive phenotypic information that we are accumulating in our Oryzabase, can serve as an excellent genotype-phenotype association resource for analyzing rice functional and structural evolution, and the associated diversity of the Oryza genus. Here we integrate our previous and future phenotypic/habitat information and newly determined genotype information into a united repository, named OryzaGenome, providing the variant information with hyperlinks to Oryzabase. The current version of OryzaGenome includes genotype information of 446 O. rufipogon accessions derived by imputation and of 17 accessions derived by imputation-free deep sequencing. Two variant viewers are implemented: SNP Viewer as a conventional genome browser interface and Variant Table as a text-based browser for precise inspection of each variant one by one. Portable VCF (variant call format) file or tab-delimited file download is also available. Following these SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) data, reference pseudomolecules/scaffolds/contigs and genome-wide variation information for almost all of the closely and distantly related wild Oryza species from the NIG Wild Rice Collection will be available in future releases. All of the resources can be accessed through http://viewer.shigen.info/oryzagenome/.

  8. MSeqDR: A Centralized Knowledge Repository and Bioinformatics Web Resource to Facilitate Genomic Investigations in Mitochondrial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lishuang; Diroma, Maria Angela; Gonzalez, Michael; Navarro-Gomez, Daniel; Leipzig, Jeremy; Lott, Marie T; van Oven, Mannis; Wallace, Douglas C; Muraresku, Colleen Clarke; Zolkipli-Cunningham, Zarazuela; Chinnery, Patrick F; Attimonelli, Marcella; Zuchner, Stephan; Falk, Marni J; Gai, Xiaowu

    2016-06-01

    MSeqDR is the Mitochondrial Disease Sequence Data Resource, a centralized and comprehensive genome and phenome bioinformatics resource built by the mitochondrial disease community to facilitate clinical diagnosis and research investigations of individual patient phenotypes, genomes, genes, and variants. A central Web portal (https://mseqdr.org) integrates community knowledge from expert-curated databases with genomic and phenotype data shared by clinicians and researchers. MSeqDR also functions as a centralized application server for Web-based tools to analyze data across both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, including investigator-driven whole exome or genome dataset analyses through MSeqDR-Genesis. MSeqDR-GBrowse genome browser supports interactive genomic data exploration and visualization with custom tracks relevant to mtDNA variation and mitochondrial disease. MSeqDR-LSDB is a locus-specific database that currently manages 178 mitochondrial diseases, 1,363 genes associated with mitochondrial biology or disease, and 3,711 pathogenic variants in those genes. MSeqDR Disease Portal allows hierarchical tree-style disease exploration to evaluate their unique descriptions, phenotypes, and causative variants. Automated genomic data submission tools are provided that capture ClinVar compliant variant annotations. PhenoTips will be used for phenotypic data submission on deidentified patients using human phenotype ontology terminology. The development of a dynamic informed patient consent process to guide data access is underway to realize the full potential of these resources.

  9. Integration and visualization of systems biology data in context of the genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenenbaum Dan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-density tiling arrays and new sequencing technologies are generating rapidly increasing volumes of transcriptome and protein-DNA interaction data. Visualization and exploration of this data is critical to understanding the regulatory logic encoded in the genome by which the cell dynamically affects its physiology and interacts with its environment. Results The Gaggle Genome Browser is a cross-platform desktop program for interactively visualizing high-throughput data in the context of the genome. Important features include dynamic panning and zooming, keyword search and open interoperability through the Gaggle framework. Users may bookmark locations on the genome with descriptive annotations and share these bookmarks with other users. The program handles large sets of user-generated data using an in-process database and leverages the facilities of SQL and the R environment for importing and manipulating data. A key aspect of the Gaggle Genome Browser is interoperability. By connecting to the Gaggle framework, the genome browser joins a suite of interconnected bioinformatics tools for analysis and visualization with connectivity to major public repositories of sequences, interactions and pathways. To this flexible environment for exploring and combining data, the Gaggle Genome Browser adds the ability to visualize diverse types of data in relation to its coordinates on the genome. Conclusions Genomic coordinates function as a common key by which disparate biological data types can be related to one another. In the Gaggle Genome Browser, heterogeneous data are joined by their location on the genome to create information-rich visualizations yielding insight into genome organization, transcription and its regulation and, ultimately, a better understanding of the mechanisms that enable the cell to dynamically respond to its environment.

  10. The Analysis of Near Full-Length Genome Sequences of HIV Type 1 Subtype A Viruses from Russia Supports the Monophyly of Major Intrasubtype Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, Aurora; Revilla, Ana; Vázquez-de Parga, Elena; Vinogradova, Anna; Rakhmanova, Aza; Karamov, Eduard; Carrera, Cristina; Delgado, Elena; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Nájera, Rafael; Osmanov, Saladin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The HIV-1 epidemic in Russia has been insufficiently studied, with only 11 complete genome sequences from this country currently available, only three of which are of the locally predominant genetic form, the former Soviet Union (FSU) subtype A variant (AFSU). Here we analyze 10 newly derived AFSU near full-length genome sequences from Russia. Samples were selected based on phylogenetic clustering in protease-reverse transcriptase in two of the major AFSU clusters, V77IPR (n=6), widely circulating in Russia and other FSU countries, and ASP1 (n=4), predominant in St. Petersburg. The phylogenetic analysis shows that the V77IPR genomes group in a monophyletic cluster together with 10 previously obtained AFSU genome sequences from Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Cyprus, all bearing the V77I substitution in protease. Similarly, the four ASP1 genomes group in a monophyletic cluster. These results therefore show that the monophyly of V77IPR and ASP1 AFSU clusters is supported in near complete genomes. PMID:22251084

  11. Mitochondrial population genomics supports a single pre-Clovis origin with a coastal route for the peopling of the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Nelson J R; Kanitz, Ricardo; Eckert, Roberta; Valls, Ana C S; Bogo, Mauricio R; Salzano, Francisco M; Smith, David Glenn; Silva, Wilson A; Zago, Marco A; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea K; Santos, Sidney E B; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Bonatto, Sandro L

    2008-03-01

    It is well accepted that the Americas were the last continents reached by modern humans, most likely through Beringia. However, the precise time and mode of the colonization of the New World remain hotly disputed issues. Native American populations exhibit almost exclusively five mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups (A-D and X). Haplogroups A-D are also frequent in Asia, suggesting a northeastern Asian origin of these lineages. However, the differential pattern of distribution and frequency of haplogroup X led some to suggest that it may represent an independent migration to the Americas. Here we show, by using 86 complete mitochondrial genomes, that all Native American haplogroups, including haplogroup X, were part of a single founding population, thereby refuting multiple-migration models. A detailed demographic history of the mtDNA sequences estimated with a Bayesian coalescent method indicates a complex model for the peopling of the Americas, in which the initial differentiation from Asian populations ended with a moderate bottleneck in Beringia during the last glacial maximum (LGM), around approximately 23,000 to approximately 19,000 years ago. Toward the end of the LGM, a strong population expansion started approximately 18,000 and finished approximately 15,000 years ago. These results support a pre-Clovis occupation of the New World, suggesting a rapid settlement of the continent along a Pacific coastal route.

  12. Ontology searching and browsing at the Rat Genome Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulederkind, Stanley J. F.; Tutaj, Marek; Shimoyama, Mary; Hayman, G. Thomas; Lowry, Timothy F.; Nigam, Rajni; Petri, Victoria; Smith, Jennifer R.; Wang, Shur-Jen; de Pons, Jeff; Dwinell, Melinda R.; Jacob, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is the premier repository of rat genomic and genetic data and currently houses over 40 000 rat gene records, as well as human and mouse orthologs, 1857 rat and 1912 human quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and 2347 rat strains. Biological information curated for these data objects includes disease associations, phenotypes, pathways, molecular functions, biological processes and cellular components. RGD uses more than a dozen different ontologies to standardize annotation information for genes, QTLs and strains. That means a lot of time can be spent searching and browsing ontologies for the appropriate terms needed both for curating and mining the data. RGD has upgraded its ontology term search to make it more versatile and more robust. A term search result is connected to a term browser so the user can fine-tune the search by viewing parent and children terms. Most publicly available term browsers display a hierarchical organization of terms in an expandable tree format. RGD has replaced its old tree browser format with a ‘driller’ type of browser that allows quicker drilling up and down through the term branches, which has been confirmed by testing. The RGD ontology report pages have also been upgraded. Expanded functionality allows more choice in how annotations are displayed and what subsets of annotations are displayed. The new ontology search, browser and report features have been designed to enhance both manual data curation and manual data extraction. Database URL: http://rgd.mcw.edu/rgdweb/ontology/search.html PMID:22434847

  13. A Human "eFP" Browser for Generating Gene Expression Anatograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rohan V; Hamanishi, Erin T; Provart, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptomic studies help to further our understanding of gene function. Human transcriptomic studies tend to focus on a particular subset of tissue types or a particular disease state; however, it is possible to collate into a compendium multiple studies that have been profiled using the same expression analysis platform to provide an overview of gene expression levels in many different tissues or under different conditions. In order to increase the knowledge and understanding we gain from such studies, intuitive visualization of gene expression data in such a compendium can be useful. The Human eFP ("electronic Fluorescent Pictograph") Browser presented here is a tool for intuitive visualization of large human gene expression data sets on pictographic representations of the human body as gene expression "anatograms". Pictographic representations for new data sets may be generated easily. The Human eFP Browser can also serve as a portal to other gene-specific information through link-outs to various online resources.

  14. jsPsych: a JavaScript library for creating behavioral experiments in a Web browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Joshua R

    2015-03-01

    Online experiments are growing in popularity, and the increasing sophistication of Web technology has made it possible to run complex behavioral experiments online using only a Web browser. Unlike with offline laboratory experiments, however, few tools exist to aid in the development of browser-based experiments. This makes the process of creating an experiment slow and challenging, particularly for researchers who lack a Web development background. This article introduces jsPsych, a JavaScript library for the development of Web-based experiments. jsPsych formalizes a way of describing experiments that is much simpler than writing the entire experiment from scratch. jsPsych then executes these descriptions automatically, handling the flow from one task to another. The jsPsych library is open-source and designed to be expanded by the research community. The project is available online at www.jspsych.org .

  15. The Open Anatomy Browser: A Collaborative Web-Based Viewer for Interoperable Anatomy Atlases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, Michael; Demeusy, Valentin; Kikinis, Ron

    2017-01-01

    The Open Anatomy Browser (OABrowser) is an open source, web-based, zero-installation anatomy atlas viewer based on current web browser technologies and evolving anatomy atlas interoperability standards. OABrowser displays three-dimensional anatomical models, image cross-sections of labeled structures and source radiological imaging, and a text-based hierarchy of structures. The viewer includes novel collaborative tools: users can save bookmarks of atlas views for later access and exchange those bookmarks with other users, and dynamic shared views allow groups of users can participate in a collaborative interactive atlas viewing session. We have published several anatomy atlases (an MRI-derived brain atlas and atlases of other parts of the anatomy) to demonstrate OABrowser’s functionality. The atlas source data, processing tools, and the source for OABrowser are freely available through GitHub and are distributed under a liberal open source license.

  16. Self-study program on HTML browser--application to Clinical Nursing General Remarks Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, N; Sota, Y; Ezumi, H

    1997-01-01

    We created a self-study program using HTML browser on the Clinical Nursing General Remarks Course, Eighty-three students each selected a published book on a personal history (written personal reflections from individuals who had undergone medical treatment and hospitalization), read it and submitted reports of their impressions of the histories. Their reports were arranged from a nursing perspective and entered on the home page of our college using HTML browser. We intended that the students would become more interested in reading of the personal histories, and that they would acquire new self-study skills and increase their interest in Internet through use of our program. In addition, we hoped that this program would encourage positive communication and mutual sharing of information. The students were able to easily refer to a personal history according to their interest from a nursing perspective. Therefore this program realized the mutual learning among students and other users.

  17. A Transliteration Algorithm for Adapting a Japanese Voice Controlled Browser to English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kuniko; Shinohara, Akio; Nagata, Masaaki; Ohara, Hisashi

    We propose a novel algorithm to transliterate English to Japanese and its application to a voice controlled browser, which enable ordinary Japanese people to browse English Web site by voice. Speech recognition software designed for native English speakers do not work for most Japanese because Japanese can't pronounce English as native English speakers do. Therefore, we combined Japanese speech recognition software with English-to-Japanese transliteration software. The accuracy of our transliteration algorithm is 80% recall for the top candidate, and 92% recall for the top three candidates. The browser using this transliteration algorithm makes it possible for Japanese to navigate English Web pages almost as accurate as Japanese pages by voice commands.

  18. Formats and Network Protocols for Browser Access to 2D Raster Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tiled web maps in browsers are a major success story, forming the foundation of many current web applications. Enabling tiled data access is the next logical step, and is likely to meet with similar success. Many ad-hoc approaches have already started to appear, and something similar is explored within the Open Geospatial Consortium. One of the main obstacles in making browser data access a reality is the lack of a well-known data format. This obstacle also represents an opportunity to analyze the requirements and possible candidates, applying lessons learned from web tiled image services and protocols. Similar to the image counterpart, a web tile raster data format needs to have good intrinsic compression and be able to handle high byte count data types including floating point. An overview of a possible solution to the format problem, a 2D data raster compression algorithm called Limited Error Raster Compression (LERC) will be presented. In addition to the format, best practices for high request rate HTTP services also need to be followed. In particular, content delivery network (CDN) caching suitability needs to be part of any design, not an after-thought. Last but not least, HTML 5 browsers will certainly be part of any solution since they provide improved access to binary data, as well as more powerful ways to view and interact with the data in the browser. In a simple but relevant application, digital elevation model (DEM) raster data is served as LERC compressed data tiles which are used to generate terrain by a HTML5 scene viewer.

  19. Pervasive interactions between ungulate browsers and disturbance regimes promote temperate forest herbaceous diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo, Alejandro A; Collins, Rachel; Adams, Mary Beth; Kirschbaum, Chad; Carson, Walter P

    2010-01-01

    Disruptions to historic disturbance and herbivory regimes have altered plant assemblages in forests worldwide. An emerging consensus suggests that these disruptions often result in impoverished forest biotas. This is particularly true for eastern U.S. deciduous forests where large gaps and understory fires were once relatively common and browsers were far less abundant. Although much research has focused on how disturbance and browsers affect tree diversity, far less attention has been devoted to forest understories where the vast majority (>75%) of the vascular species reside. Here we test the hypothesis that the reintroduction of disturbances resembling historic disturbance regimes and moderate levels of ungulate browsing enhance plant diversity. We explore whether once-common disturbances and their interaction with the top-down influence of browsers can create conditions favorable for the maintenance of a rich herbaceous layer in a region recognized as a temperate biodiversity hotspot in West Virginia, U.S.A. We tested this hypothesis via a factorial experiment whereby we manipulated canopy gaps (presence/absence) of a size typically found in old-growth stands, low-intensity understory fire (burned/unburned), and deer browsing (fenced/unfenced). We tracked the abundance and diversity of more than 140 herb species for six years. Interactions among our treatments were pervasive. The combination of canopy gaps and understory fire increased herbaceous layer richness, cover, and diversity well beyond either disturbance alone. Furthermore, we documented evidence that deer at moderate levels of abundance promote herbaceous richness and abundance by preferentially browsing fast-growing pioneer species that thrive following co-occurring disturbances (i.e., fire and gaps). This finding sharply contrasts with the negative impact browsers have when their populations reach levels well beyond those that occurred for centuries. Although speculative, our results suggest that

  20. MUTAGEN: Multi-user tool for annotating GENomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brugger, K.; Redder, P.; Skovgaard, Marie

    2003-01-01

    MUTAGEN is a free prokaryotic annotation system. It offers the advantages of genome comparison, graphical sequence browsers, search facilities and open-source for user-specific adjustments. The web-interface allows several users to access the system from standard desktop computers. The Sulfolobus...

  1. Nessi: An EEG-Controlled Web Browser for Severely Paralyzed Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bensch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that an EEG-controlled web browser based on self-regulation of slow cortical potentials (SCPs enables severely paralyzed patients to browse the internet independently of any voluntary muscle control. However, this system had several shortcomings, among them that patients could only browse within a limited number of web pages and had to select links from an alphabetical list, causing problems if the link names were identical or if they were unknown to the user (as in graphical links. Here we describe a new EEG-controlled web browser, called Nessi, which overcomes these shortcomings. In Nessi, the open source browser, Mozilla, was extended by graphical in-place markers, whereby different brain responses correspond to different frame colors placed around selectable items, enabling the user to select any link on a web page. Besides links, other interactive elements are accessible to the user, such as e-mail and virtual keyboards, opening up a wide range of hypertext-based applications.

  2. Experimental Analysis of Browser based Novel Anti-Phishing System Tool at Educational Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Gupta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the phishing attack, the user sends their confidential information on mimic websites and face the financial problem, so the user should be informed immediately about the visiting website. According to the Third Quarter Phishing Activity Trends Report, there are 55,282 new phishing websites have been detected in the month of July 2014. To solve the phishing problem, a browser based add-on system may be one of the best solution to aware the user about the website type. In this paper, a novel browser based add-on system is proposed and compared its performance with the existing antiphishing tools. The proposed anti-phishing tool ‘ePhish’ is compared with the existing browser based antiphishing toolbars. All the anti-phishing tools have been installed in computer systems at an autonomous college to check their performance. The obtained result shows that if the task is divided into a group of systems, it can give better results. For different phishing features, the add-on system tool show around 97 percentage successful results at different case conditions. The current study would be very helpful to countermeasure the phishing attach and the proposed system is able to protect the user by phishing attacks. Since the system tool is capable of handling and managing the phishing website details, so it would be helpful to identify the category of the websites.

  3. plas.io: Open Source, Browser-based WebGL Point Cloud Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, H.; Finnegan, D. C.; Gadomski, P. J.; Verma, U. K.

    2014-12-01

    Point cloud data, in the form of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), RADAR, or semi-global matching (SGM) image processing, are rapidly becoming a foundational data type to quantify and characterize geospatial processes. Visualization of these data, due to overall volume and irregular arrangement, is often difficult. Technological advancement in web browsers, in the form of WebGL and HTML5, have made interactivity and visualization capabilities ubiquitously available which once only existed in desktop software. plas.io is an open source JavaScript application that provides point cloud visualization, exploitation, and compression features in a web-browser platform, reducing the reliance for client-based desktop applications. The wide reach of WebGL and browser-based technologies mean plas.io's capabilities can be delivered to a diverse list of devices -- from phones and tablets to high-end workstations -- with very little custom software development. These properties make plas.io an ideal open platform for researchers and software developers to communicate visualizations of complex and rich point cloud data to devices to which everyone has easy access.

  4. Web-based visualization of gridded dataset usings OceanBrowser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Alexander; Watelet, Sylvain; Troupin, Charles; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2015-04-01

    OceanBrowser is a web-based visualization tool for gridded oceanographic data sets. Those data sets are typically four-dimensional (longitude, latitude, depth and time). OceanBrowser allows one to visualize horizontal sections at a given depth and time to examine the horizontal distribution of a given variable. It also offers the possibility to display the results on an arbitrary vertical section. To study the evolution of the variable in time, the horizontal and vertical sections can also be animated. Vertical section can be generated by using a fixed distance from coast or fixed ocean depth. The user can customize the plot by changing the color-map, the range of the color-bar, the type of the plot (linearly interpolated color, simple contours, filled contours) and download the current view as a simple image or as Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file for visualization in applications such as Google Earth. The data products can also be accessed as NetCDF files and through OPeNDAP. Third-party layers from a web map service can also be integrated. OceanBrowser is used in the frame of the SeaDataNet project (http://gher-diva.phys.ulg.ac.be/web-vis/) and EMODNET Chemistry (http://oceanbrowser.net/emodnet/) to distribute gridded data sets interpolated from in situ observation using DIVA (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis).

  5. The Ruby UCSC API: accessing the UCSC genome database using Ruby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishima Hiroyuki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC genome database is among the most used sources of genomic annotation in human and other organisms. The database offers an excellent web-based graphical user interface (the UCSC genome browser and several means for programmatic queries. A simple application programming interface (API in a scripting language aimed at the biologist was however not yet available. Here, we present the Ruby UCSC API, a library to access the UCSC genome database using Ruby. Results The API is designed as a BioRuby plug-in and built on the ActiveRecord 3 framework for the object-relational mapping, making writing SQL statements unnecessary. The current version of the API supports databases of all organisms in the UCSC genome database including human, mammals, vertebrates, deuterostomes, insects, nematodes, and yeast. The API uses the bin index—if available—when querying for genomic intervals. The API also supports genomic sequence queries using locally downloaded *.2bit files that are not stored in the official MySQL database. The API is implemented in pure Ruby and is therefore available in different environments and with different Ruby interpreters (including JRuby. Conclusions Assisted by the straightforward object-oriented design of Ruby and ActiveRecord, the Ruby UCSC API will facilitate biologists to query the UCSC genome database programmatically. The API is available through the RubyGem system. Source code and documentation are available at https://github.com/misshie/bioruby-ucsc-api/ under the Ruby license. Feedback and help is provided via the website at http://rubyucscapi.userecho.com/.

  6. arrayCGHbase: an analysis platform for comparative genomic hybridization microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Yves

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of the human genome sequence as well as the large number of physically accessible oligonucleotides, cDNA, and BAC clones across the entire genome has triggered and accelerated the use of several platforms for analysis of DNA copy number changes, amongst others microarray comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH. One of the challenges inherent to this new technology is the management and analysis of large numbers of data points generated in each individual experiment. Results We have developed arrayCGHbase, a comprehensive analysis platform for arrayCGH experiments consisting of a MIAME (Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment supportive database using MySQL underlying a data mining web tool, to store, analyze, interpret, compare, and visualize arrayCGH results in a uniform and user-friendly format. Following its flexible design, arrayCGHbase is compatible with all existing and forthcoming arrayCGH platforms. Data can be exported in a multitude of formats, including BED files to map copy number information on the genome using the Ensembl or UCSC genome browser. Conclusion ArrayCGHbase is a web based and platform independent arrayCGH data analysis tool, that allows users to access the analysis suite through the internet or a local intranet after installation on a private server. ArrayCGHbase is available at http://medgen.ugent.be/arrayCGHbase/.

  7. An SVD-based comparison of nine whole eukaryotic genomes supports a coelomate rather than ecdysozoan lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart Gary W; Berry Michael W

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Eukaryotic whole genome sequences are accumulating at an impressive rate. Effective methods for comparing multiple whole eukaryotic genomes on a large scale are needed. Most attempted solutions involve the production of large scale alignments, and many of these require a high stringency pre-screen for putative orthologs in order to reduce the effective size of the dataset and provide a reasonably high but unknown fraction of correctly aligned homologous sites for compariso...

  8. Under Dynamic HTML Browser Window In Visual C++ 6.0%在Visual C++6.0下实现动态HTML浏览视窗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司敬超

    2009-01-01

    动态的HTML(超文本标记语言)是一种用来创建Web页的脚本语言,现在IE浏览器和Netscape Navigator都支持的动态的HTML,动态的HTML也称之为DHTML.在Visual C++应用程序中也都支持HTML,在制作程序时可将一个动态的HTML脚本作为资源嵌入到应用程序中.%Dynamic HTML (HTML) is used to create a Web page scripting language, and now IE and Netscape Navigator browser will support dynamic HTML, Dynamic HTML, also known as DHTML. In Visual C++ applications also support HTML, in the production process can be a dynamic HTML scripts embedded as a resource applications.

  9. Visualizing Earthquakes in '3D' using the IRIS Earthquake Browser (IEB) Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welti, R.; McQuillan, P. J.; Weertman, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of earthquakes is often easier to interpret in 3D, but most 3D visualization tools require the installation of specialized software and some practice in their use. To reduce this barrier for students and the general public, a pseudo-3D seismicity viewer has been developed which runs in a web browser as part of the IRIS Earthquake Browser (IEB). IEB is an interactive map for viewing earthquake epicenters all over the world, and is composed of a Google map, HTML, JavaScript and a fast earthquake hypocenter web service. The web service accesses seismic data at IRIS from the early 1960s until present. Users can change the region, the number of events, and the depth and magnitude ranges to display. Earthquakes may also be viewed as a table, or exported to various formats. Predefined regions can be selected and zoomed to, and bookmarks generally preserve whatever region and settings are in effect when bookmarked, allowing the easy sharing of particular "scenarios" with other users. Plate boundaries can be added to the display. The 3DV viewer displays events for the currently-selected IEB region in a separate window. They can be rotated and zoomed, with a fast response for plots of up to several thousand events. Rotation can be done manually by dragging or automatically at a set rate, and tectonic plate boundaries turned on or off. 3DV uses a geographical projection algorithm provided by Gary Pavils and collaborators. It is written in HTML5, and is based on CanvasMol by Branislav Ulicny.; A region SE of Fiji, selected in IRIS Earthquake Browser. ; The same region as viewed in 3D Viewer.

  10. Web browsers forensic analysis reviewWeb tarayıcılarda adli analiz incelemesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Baran

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, web browser tools are seen ıntensıvely durıng the usage of web applıcatıons. Because of that, browsers provıdes ınfrastructure of a largo majorıty of crımes. Because guılty or suspect can use the browsers to collect ınformatıons, to hıde hıs crıme, learn new crımınal methods or to apply they have learned. In thıs study, ıt ıs also seeked answers of how a process can be monıtored on the computers whıch are used on browsers, ın whıch fıles whıch datas are looked and when and whıch sıtes are accessed. Accordıng to research of W3counter web stats tool, Chrome Web browser, whıch has %43 persentage of across the world ın usage, ıs proses as the most demanded browser ın thıs study by users, and ıt ıs scented out ın thıs browser's related fıles. In these days, ''hıdden mode'' whıch take part ın vast majorıty of browsers ıs also examıned. Thıs feature of the browser, whıch ıs receıved reference, ıs tracked by testıng and ıs sought data ın RAM memory and fıle systems. Thus, '' hıdden mode'' effects are dıscussed ın provıdıng studıes about suspect or crımınal posıtıon people, what kınd of data can be obtaıned ın usıng '' hıdden mode” ıs revealed.   Özet Günümüzde internet uygulamalarının kullanımı sırasında web tarayıcı araçlarının yoğun bir şekilde kullanımı görülmektedir. Bu nedenle tarayıcılar, işlenen suçların büyük bir çoğunluğuna altyapı sağlar. Çünkü suçlu ya da şüpheli, tarayıcıları bilgi toplamak, suçunu gizlemek, yeni suç metotları öğrenmek ya da öğrendiklerini uygulamak için kullanabilir.  Bu çalışmada da tarayıcıların kullanıldığı bilgisayarlar üzerinde bırakılan izlerin tespitinde nasıl bir süreç izlenebileceği, hangi dosyalarda hangi verilere bakılabileceği ve ne zaman hangi sitelere erişim sağlandığı gibi çeşitli sorulara cevaplar aranmaktadır. w3counter adlı internet istatistik

  11. A new plug-in software architecture applied for a portable molecular structure browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Y; Asai, K

    1997-01-01

    A new software configuration method using plug-in style components was established for the tool with the incremental development of software used in protein structural study. Our memory database provides the interface of data and functions among plug-in modules and its host program. A molecular structure browser program was developed together with several plug-in modules on our programming library that maintains graphics portability and user interfaces. This plug-in software architecture is generally useful for large-scale software development and for prototyping parts of the system.

  12. The Populus Genome Integrative Explorer (PopGenIE): a new resource for exploring the Populus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödin, Andreas; Street, Nathaniel Robert; Sandberg, Göran; Gustafsson, Petter; Jansson, Stefan

    2009-06-01

    Populus has become an important model plant system. However, utilization of the increasingly extensive collection of genetics and genomics data created by the community is currently hindered by the lack of a central resource, such as a model organism database (MOD). Such MODs offer a single entry point to the collection of resources available within a model system, typically including tools for exploring and querying those resources. As a starting point to overcoming the lack of such an MOD for Populus, we present the Populus Genome Integrative Explorer (PopGenIE), an integrated set of tools for exploring the Populus genome and transcriptome. The resource includes genome, synteny and quantitative trait locus (QTL) browsers for exploring genetic data. Expression tools include an electronic fluorescent pictograph (eFP) browser, expression profile plots, co-regulation within collated transcriptomics data sets, and identification of over-represented functional categories and genomic hotspot locations. A number of collated transcriptomics data sets are made available in the eFP browser to facilitate functional exploration of gene function. Additional homology and data extraction tools are provided. PopGenIE significantly increases accessibility to Populus genomics resources and allows exploration of transcriptomics data without the need to learn or understand complex statistical analysis methods. PopGenIE is available at www.popgenie.org or via www.populusgenome.info.

  13. Genome, transcriptome, and secretome analysis of wood decay fungus Postia placenta supports unique mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Martinez; Jean Challacombe; Ingo Morgenstern; David Hibbett; Monika Schmoll; Christian P. Kubicek; Patricia Ferreira; Francisco J. Ruiz-Duenas; Angel T. Martinez; Philip J. Kersten; Kenneth E. Hammel; Jill A. Gaskell; Daniel Cullen

    2009-01-01

    Brown-rot fungi such as Postia placenta are common inhabitants of forest ecosystems and are also largely responsible for the destructive decay of wooden structures. Rapid depolymerization of cellulose is a distinguishing feature of brown-rot, but the biochemical mechanisms and underlying genetics are poorly understood. Systematic examination of the P. placenta genome,...

  14. Sequencing an Ashkenazi reference panel supports population-targeted personal genomics and illuminates Jewish and European origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmi, Shai; Hui, Ken Y; Kochav, Ethan; Liu, Xinmin; Xue, James; Grady, Fillan; Guha, Saurav; Upadhyay, Kinnari; Ben-Avraham, Dan; Mukherjee, Semanti; Bowen, B Monica; Thomas, Tinu; Vijai, Joseph; Cruts, Marc; Froyen, Guy; Lambrechts, Diether; Plaisance, Stéphane; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Van Damme, Philip; Van Marck, Herwig; Barzilai, Nir; Darvasi, Ariel; Offit, Kenneth; Bressman, Susan; Ozelius, Laurie J; Peter, Inga; Cho, Judy H; Ostrer, Harry; Atzmon, Gil; Clark, Lorraine N; Lencz, Todd; Pe'er, Itsik

    2014-09-09

    The Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population is a genetic isolate close to European and Middle Eastern groups, with genetic diversity patterns conducive to disease mapping. Here we report high-depth sequencing of 128 complete genomes of AJ controls. Compared with European samples, our AJ panel has 47% more novel variants per genome and is eightfold more effective at filtering benign variants out of AJ clinical genomes. Our panel improves imputation accuracy for AJ SNP arrays by 28%, and covers at least one haplotype in ≈ 67% of any AJ genome with long, identical-by-descent segments. Reconstruction of recent AJ history from such segments confirms a recent bottleneck of merely ≈ 350 individuals. Modelling of ancient histories for AJ and European populations using their joint allele frequency spectrum determines AJ to be an even admixture of European and likely Middle Eastern origins. We date the split between the two ancestral populations to ≈ 12-25 Kyr, suggesting a predominantly Near Eastern source for the repopulation of Europe after the Last Glacial Maximum.

  15. Genome-wide DNA markers to support genetic management for domestication and commercial production in a large rodent, the Ghanaian grasscutter (Thryonomys swinderianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenyo, C; Ogden, R; Kayang, B; Onuma, M; Nakajima, N; Inoue-Murayama, M

    2017-02-01

    Domestication and commercial production of the grasscutter, Thryonomys swinderianus, a large rodent, represents an important opportunity to secure sustainable animal protein for local communities in West Africa. To support production, DNA markers are required for population diversity assessment, pedigree analysis and marker-assisted selection. This study reports the application of double-digest RAD sequencing to simultaneously discover and genotype SNP markers in 24 wild and recently domesticated grasscutters. An initial panel of 1209 SNP loci was characterised from a total of more than 21 000 candidate loci containing single SNPs. This genome-wide resource represents the first application of its type to commercial production of a large rodent for food and advances the use of agricultural genomics in Ghana.

  16. Mobilisation and remobilisation of a large archetypal pathogenicity island of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in vitro support the role of conjugation for horizontal transfer of genomic islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hochhut Bianca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial amount of data has been accumulated supporting the important role of genomic islands (GEIs - including pathogenicity islands (PAIs - in bacterial genome plasticity and the evolution of bacterial pathogens. Their instability and the high level sequence similarity of different (partial islands suggest an exchange of PAIs between strains of the same or even different bacterial species by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Transfer events of archetypal large genomic islands of enterobacteria which often lack genes required for mobilisation or transfer have been rarely investigated so far. Results To study mobilisation of such large genomic regions in prototypic uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC strain 536, PAI II536 was supplemented with the mobRP4 region, an origin of replication (oriVR6K, an origin of transfer (oriTRP4 and a chloramphenicol resistance selection marker. In the presence of helper plasmid RP4, conjugative transfer of the 107-kb PAI II536 construct occured from strain 536 into an E. coli K-12 recipient. In transconjugants, PAI II536 existed either as a cytoplasmic circular intermediate (CI or integrated site-specifically into the recipient's chromosome at the leuX tRNA gene. This locus is the chromosomal integration site of PAI II536 in UPEC strain 536. From the E. coli K-12 recipient, the chromosomal PAI II536 construct as well as the CIs could be successfully remobilised and inserted into leuX in a PAI II536 deletion mutant of E. coli 536. Conclusions Our results corroborate that mobilisation and conjugal transfer may contribute to evolution of bacterial pathogens through horizontal transfer of large chromosomal regions such as PAIs. Stabilisation of these mobile genetic elements in the bacterial chromosome result from selective loss of mobilisation and transfer functions of genomic islands.

  17. Development of a user-friendly system for image processing of electron microscopy by integrating a web browser and PIONE with Eos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Takafumi; Yasunaga, Takuo

    2014-11-01

    need to provide common workspace for analysis because the client is physically separated from a server. We solved the file format problem by extension of rules of OptionControlFile of Eos. Furthermore, to solve workspace problems, we have developed two type of system. The first system is to use only local environments. The user runs a web server provided by Eos, access to a web client through a web browser, and manipulate the local files with GUI on the web browser. The second system is employing PIONE (Process-rule for Input/Output Negotiation Environment), which is our developing platform that works under heterogenic distributed environment. The users can put their resources, such as microscopic images, text files and so on, into the server-side environment supported by PIONE, and so experts can write PIONE rule definition, which defines a workflow of image processing. PIONE run each image processing on suitable computers, following the defined rule. PIONE has the ability of interactive manipulation, and user is able to try a command with various setting values. In this situation, we contribute to auto-generation of GUI for a PIONE workflow.As advanced functions, we have developed a module to log user actions. The logs include information such as setting values in image processing, procedure of commands and so on. If we use the logs effectively, we can get a lot of advantages. For example, when an expert may discover some know-how of image processing, other users can also share logs including his know-hows and so we may obtain recommendation workflow of image analysis, if we analyze logs. To implement social platform of image processing for electron microscopists, we have developed system infrastructure, as well.

  18. A Human "eFP" Browser for Generating Gene Expression Anatograms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan V Patel

    Full Text Available Transcriptomic studies help to further our understanding of gene function. Human transcriptomic studies tend to focus on a particular subset of tissue types or a particular disease state; however, it is possible to collate into a compendium multiple studies that have been profiled using the same expression analysis platform to provide an overview of gene expression levels in many different tissues or under different conditions. In order to increase the knowledge and understanding we gain from such studies, intuitive visualization of gene expression data in such a compendium can be useful. The Human eFP ("electronic Fluorescent Pictograph" Browser presented here is a tool for intuitive visualization of large human gene expression data sets on pictographic representations of the human body as gene expression "anatograms". Pictographic representations for new data sets may be generated easily. The Human eFP Browser can also serve as a portal to other gene-specific information through link-outs to various online resources.

  19. Seed dispersers, seed predators, and browsers act synergistically as biotic filters in a mosaic landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regino Zamora

    Full Text Available In this study, we analize the functional influence of animals on the plants they interact with in a mediterranean mountain. We hypothesise that seed dispersers, seed predators, and browsers can act as biotic filters for plant communities. We analyse the combined effects of mutualistic (seed dispersal and antagonistic (seed predation, herbivory animal interactions in a mosaic landscape of Mediterranean mountains, basing our results on observational and experimental field. Most of the dispersed seeds came from tree species, whereas the population of saplings was composed predominantly of zoochorous shrub species. Seed predators preferentially consumed seeds from tree species, whereas seeds from the dominant fleshy-fruited shrubs had a higher probability of escaping these predators. The same pattern was repeated among the different landscape units by browsers, since they browsed selectively and far more intensely on tree-species saplings than on the surrounding shrubs. In synthesis, our work identifies the major biotic processes that appear to be favoring a community dominated by shrubs versus trees because seed dispersers, predators, and herbivores together favored shrub dispersal and establishment versus trees.

  20. JavaScript Access to DICOM Network and Objects in Web Browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drnasin, Ivan; Grgić, Mislav; Gogić, Goran

    2017-01-30

    Digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) 3.0 standard provides the baseline for the picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). The development of Internet and various communication media initiated demand for non-DICOM access to PACS systems. Ever-increasing utilization of the web browsers, laptops and handheld devices, as opposed to desktop applications and static organizational computers, lead to development of different web technologies. The DICOM standard officials accepted those subsequently as tools of alternative access. This paper provides an overview of the current state of development of the web access technology to the DICOM repositories. It presents a different approach of using HTML5 features of the web browsers through the JavaScript language and the WebSocket protocol by enabling real-time communication with DICOM repositories. JavaScript DICOM network library, DICOM to WebSocket proxy and a proof-of-concept web application that qualifies as a DICOM 3.0 device were developed.

  1. EntrezAJAX: direct web browser access to the Entrez Programming Utilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallen Mark J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Web applications for biology and medicine often need to integrate data from Entrez services provided by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. However, direct access to Entrez from a web browser is not possible due to 'same-origin' security restrictions. The use of "Asynchronous JavaScript and XML" (AJAX to create rich, interactive web applications is now commonplace. The ability to access Entrez via AJAX would be advantageous in the creation of integrated biomedical web resources. We describe EntrezAJAX, which provides access to Entrez eUtils and is able to circumvent same-origin browser restrictions. EntrezAJAX is easily implemented by JavaScript developers and provides identical functionality as Entrez eUtils as well as enhanced functionality to ease development. We provide easy-to-understand developer examples written in JavaScript to illustrate potential uses of this service. For the purposes of speed, reliability and scalability, EntrezAJAX has been deployed on Google App Engine, a freely available cloud service. The EntrezAJAX webpage is located at http://entrezajax.appspot.com/

  2. Seed dispersers, seed predators, and browsers act synergistically as biotic filters in a mosaic landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Regino; Matías, Luis

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analize the functional influence of animals on the plants they interact with in a mediterranean mountain. We hypothesise that seed dispersers, seed predators, and browsers can act as biotic filters for plant communities. We analyse the combined effects of mutualistic (seed dispersal) and antagonistic (seed predation, herbivory) animal interactions in a mosaic landscape of Mediterranean mountains, basing our results on observational and experimental field. Most of the dispersed seeds came from tree species, whereas the population of saplings was composed predominantly of zoochorous shrub species. Seed predators preferentially consumed seeds from tree species, whereas seeds from the dominant fleshy-fruited shrubs had a higher probability of escaping these predators. The same pattern was repeated among the different landscape units by browsers, since they browsed selectively and far more intensely on tree-species saplings than on the surrounding shrubs. In synthesis, our work identifies the major biotic processes that appear to be favoring a community dominated by shrubs versus trees because seed dispersers, predators, and herbivores together favored shrub dispersal and establishment versus trees.

  3. NemaCount: quantification of nematode chemotaxis behavior in a browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2016-06-01

    Nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans offer a very effective and tractable system to probe the underlying mechanisms of diverse sensory behaviors. Numerous platforms exist for quantifying nematode behavior and often require separate dependencies or software. Here I describe a novel and simple tool called NemaCount that provides a versatile solution for the quantification of nematode chemotaxis behavior. The ease of installation and user-friendly interface makes NemaCount a practical tool for measuring diverse behaviors and image features of nematodes such as C. elegans. The main advantage of NemaCount is that it operates from within a modern browser such as Google Chrome or Apple Safari. Any features that change in total number, size, shape, or angular distance between control and experimental preparations are suited to NemaCount for image analysis, while commonly used chemotaxis assays can be quantified, and statistically analyzed using a suite of functions from within NemaCount. NemaCount also offers image filtering options that allow the user to improve object detection and measurements. NemaCount was validated by examining nematode chemotaxis behavior; angular distances of locomotory tracks in C. elegans; and body lengths of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora nematodes. Apart from a modern browser, no additional software is required to operate NemaCount, making NemaCount a cheap, simple option for the analysis of nematode images and chemotaxis behavior.

  4. Rare genomic changes and mitochondrial sequences provide independent support for congruent relationships among the sea spiders (Arthropoda, Pycnogonida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masta, Susan E; McCall, Andrew; Longhorn, Stuart J

    2010-10-01

    Pycnogonids, or sea spiders, are an enigmatic group of arthropods. Their unique anatomical features have made them difficult to place within the broader group Arthropoda. Most attempts to classify members of Pycnogonida have focused on utilizing these anatomical features to infer relatedness. Using data from mitochondrial genomes, we show that pycnogonids are placed as derived chelicerates, challenging the hypothesis that they diverged early in arthropod history. Our increased taxon sampling of three new mitochondrial genomes also allows us to infer phylogenetic relatedness among major pycnogonid lineages. Phylogenetic analyses based on all 13 mitochondrial protein-coding genes yield well-resolved relationships among the sea spider lineages. Gene order and tRNA secondary structure characters provide independent lines of evidence for these inferred phylogenetic relationships among pycnogonids, and show a minimal amount of homoplasy. Additionally, rare changes in three tRNA genes unite pycnogonids as a clade; these include changes in anticodon identity in tRNA(Lys) and tRNA(Ser(AGN)) and the shared loss of D-arm sequence in the tRNA(Ala) gene. Using mitochondrial genome changes and tRNA structural changes is especially useful for resolving relationships among the major lineages of sea spiders in light of the fact that there have been multiple independent evolutionary changes in nucleotide strand bias among sea spiders. Such reversed nucleotide biases can mislead phylogeny reconstruction based on sequences, although the use of appropriate methods can overcome these effects. With pycnogonids, we find that applying methods to compensate for strand bias and that using genome-level characters yield congruent phylogenetic signals.

  5. A blow to the fly - Lucilia cuprina draft genome and transcriptome to support advances in biology and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstead, Clare A; Batterham, Philip; Korhonen, Pasi K; Young, Neil D; Hall, Ross S; Bowles, Vernon M; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Maxwell J; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-01-01

    The blow fly, Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann, 1830) is a parasitic insect of major global economic importance. Maggots of this fly parasitize the skin of animal hosts, feed on excretions and tissues, and cause severe disease (flystrike or myiasis). Although there has been considerable research on L. cuprina over the years, little is understood about the molecular biology, biochemistry and genetics of this parasitic fly, as well as its relationship with its hosts and the disease that it causes. This situation might change with the recent report of the draft genome and transcriptome of this blow fly, which has given new and global insights into its biology, interactions with the host animal and aspects of insecticide resistance at the molecular level. This genomic resource will likely enable many fundamental and applied research areas in the future. The present article gives a background on L. cuprina and myiasis, a brief account of past and current treatment, prevention and control approaches, and provides a perspective on the impact that the L. cuprina genome should have on future research of this and related parasitic flies, and the design of new and improved interventions for myiasis.

  6. Modeling and interoperability of heterogeneous genomic big data for integrative processing and querying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroli, Marco; Kaitoua, Abdulrahman; Pinoli, Pietro; Ceri, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    While a huge amount of (epi)genomic data of multiple types is becoming available by using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies, the most important emerging problem is the so-called tertiary analysis, concerned with sense making, e.g., discovering how different (epi)genomic regions and their products interact and cooperate with each other. We propose a paradigm shift in tertiary analysis, based on the use of the Genomic Data Model (GDM), a simple data model which links genomic feature data to their associated experimental, biological and clinical metadata. GDM encompasses all the data formats which have been produced for feature extraction from (epi)genomic datasets. We specifically describe the mapping to GDM of SAM (Sequence Alignment/Map), VCF (Variant Call Format), NARROWPEAK (for called peaks produced by NGS ChIP-seq or DNase-seq methods), and BED (Browser Extensible Data) formats, but GDM supports as well all the formats describing experimental datasets (e.g., including copy number variations, DNA somatic mutations, or gene expressions) and annotations (e.g., regarding transcription start sites, genes, enhancers or CpG islands). We downloaded and integrated samples of all the above-mentioned data types and formats from multiple sources. The GDM is able to homogeneously describe semantically heterogeneous data and makes the ground for providing data interoperability, e.g., achieved through the GenoMetric Query Language (GMQL), a high-level, declarative query language for genomic big data. The combined use of the data model and the query language allows comprehensive processing of multiple heterogeneous data, and supports the development of domain-specific data-driven computations and bio-molecular knowledge discovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of the onychophoran Epiperipatus biolleyi reveals a unique transfer RNA set and provides further support for the ecdysozoa hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podsiadlowski, Lars; Braband, Anke; Mayer, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Onychophora (velvet worms) play a crucial role in current discussions on position of arthropods. The ongoing Articulata/Ecdysozoa debate is in need of additional ground pattern characters for Panarthropoda (Arthropoda, Tardigrada, and Onychophora). Hence, Onychophora is an important outgroup taxon in resolving the relationships among arthropods, irrespective of whether morphological or molecular data are used. To date, there has been a noticeable lack of mitochondrial genome data from onychophorans. Here, we present the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence of an onychophoran, Epiperipatus biolleyi (Peripatidae), which shows several characteristic features. Specifically, the gene order is considerably different from that in other arthropods and other bilaterians. In addition, there is a lack of 9 tRNA genes usually present in bilaterian mitochondrial genomes. All these missing tRNAs have anticodon sequences corresponding to 4-fold degenerate codons, whereas the persisting 13 tRNAs all have anticodons pairing with 2-fold degenerate codons. Sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes provides a robust support for a clade consisting of Onychophora, Priapulida, and Arthropoda, which confirms the Ecdysozoa hypothesis. However, resolution of the internal ecdysozoan relationships suffers from a cluster of long-branching taxa (including Nematoda and Platyhelminthes) and a lack of data from Tardigrada and further nemathelminth taxa in addition to nematodes and priapulids.

  8. The enigmatic mitochondrial genome of Rhabdopleura compacta (Pterobranchia reveals insights into selection of an efficient tRNA system and supports monophyly of Ambulacraria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler Peter F

    2011-05-01

    Rhabdopleura compacta may have arisen by an inversion of the replication direction and adaptation to this bias in the protein sequences leading to an enigmatic mitochondrial genome. Although, phylogenetic analyses of protein coding sequences are hampered, features of the tRNA system of R. compacta support the monophyly of Ambulacraria. The identical reassignment of AGG to Lysine in two distinct groups may have occurred by convergent evolution in the anticodon sequence of the tRNALys.

  9. Desain prototipe aplikasi sistem monitoring browser ponsel anak untuk menerapkan internet sehat dengan kontrol orang tua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufik Hidayat

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakPenggunaan internet dikalangan anak-anak saat ini sudah menjadi trend, bahkan banyak orang tua sudah memberikan ponsel android kepada anak-anak dalam melakukan komunikasi sehari-hari. Hal tersebut sangat berdampak kepada anak dalam pemanfaatan teknologi internet yang kurang sehat seperti mendapatkan data dan informasi melalui browsing internet tanpa pemantauan orang tua sehingga anak dengan mudah mendapatkan kata-kata atau informasi yang tidak layak dikonsumsi oleh anak tersebut. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendesain aplikasi sistem monitoring browser ponsel anak untuk menerapkan internet sehat dengan kontrol orang tua menggunakan metode prototipe. Hasil penelitian tersebut berupa rancangan aplikasi monitoring broser anak yang dapat digunakan untuk memantau aktivitas browsing internet pada ponsel anak secara online pada platform android dengan otomatis mengirim pesan notifikasi kepada orang tua dan orang tua dapat memberikan respon atau balasan secara langsung ketika anak sedang mencoba melakukan aktivitas browsing internet yang tidak sehat. Kata kunci: Kontrol orang tua, penelusuran aman, sistem monitoring, aktivitas penelusuran harian  Abstract The use of the internet among children currently have become a trend, even many parents already gives android phones to children in doing everyday communication. It is so impacting to the child in the utilization of internet technologies that are less healthy as get data and information through browsing the internet without monitoring parents so children easily get words or information that is not feasible is consumed by the child. This research aims to design a monitoring system of the mobile browser app to implement a healthy internet parental control method using prototype. The results of such research in the form of a draft application monitoring these children which can be used to monitor the activities of internet browsing on mobile child online on the android platform with automatic

  10. Genome-wide scan in Portuguese Island families implicates multiple loci in bipolar disorder: fine mapping adds support on chromosomes 6 and 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pato, Carlos N; Pato, M T; Kirby, A; Petryshen, T L; Medeiros, H; Carvalho, C; Macedo, A; Dourado, A; Coelho, I; Valente, J; Soares, M J; Ferreira, C P; Lei, M; Verner, A; Hudson, T J; Morley, C P; Kennedy, J L; Azevedo, M H; Daly, M J; Sklar, P

    2004-05-15

    As part of an extensive study in the Portuguese Island population of families with multiple patients suffering from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, we performed an initial genome-wide scan of 16 extended families with bipolar disorder that identified three regions on chromosomes 2, 11, and 19 with genome-wide suggestive linkage and several other regions, including chromosome 6q, also approached suggestive levels of significance. Dick et al. [2003: Am J Hum Genet 73:107-114] recently reported in a study of 250 families with bipolar disorder a maxLOD score of 3.61 near marker D6S1021 on chromosome 6q. This study replicates this finding having detected a peak NPL = 2.02 (P = 0.025) with the same marker D6S1021(104.7 Mb). Higher-density mapping provided additional support for loci on chromosome 6 including marker D6S1021 with an NPL = 2.59 (P = 0.0068) and peaking at marker D6S1639 (125 Mb) with an NPL = 3.06 (P = 0.0019). A similar pattern was detected with higher-density mapping of chromosome 11 with an NPL = 3.15 (P = 0.0014) at marker D11S1883 (63.1 Mb). Simulations at the density of our fine mapping data indicate that less than 1 scan out of 10 would find two such scores genome-wide in the same scan by chance. Our findings provide additional support for a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder on 6q, as well as, suggesting the importance of denser scans. Published 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Design and Implementation of Browser based GPS/GPRS Vehicle Positioning and Tracking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly describes a vehicle positioning and tracking system which is based on browser, GPS and GPRS. And this system takes advantage of Baidu Map as basic material to show vehicle status, which enables drivers and supervisor to monitor the vehicle’s current and past positions. The vehicle’s location data is got from satellites, and these data is sent to the central server through GPRS, the central server will store formatted data into the database after the data is parsed; Later, these data stored in the database will be used by web application and displayed on the map as markers. This paper also involves the implementation on mobile side, and this system used Baidu map JavaScript interface, Ajax, JSP and JSON to implement the vehicle positioning and tracking system.

  12. Using Browser Notebooks to Analyse Big Atmospheric Data-sets in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, N.; Tomlinson, J.; Arribas, A.; Prudden, R.

    2016-12-01

    We are presenting an account of our experience building an ecosystem for the analysis of big atmospheric data-sets. By using modern technologies we have developed a prototype platform which is scaleable and capable of analysing very large atmospheric datasets. We tested different big-data ecosystems such as Hadoop MapReduce, Spark and Dask, in order to find the one which was best suited for analysis of multidimensional binary data such as NetCDF. We make extensive use of infrastructure-as-code and containerisation to provide a platform which is reusable, and which can scale to accommodate changes in demand. We make this platform readily accessible using browser based notebooks. As a result, analysts with minimal technology experience can, in tens of lines of Python, make interactive data-visualisation web pages, which can analyse very large amounts of data using cutting edge big-data technology

  13. Building a Better Book in the Browser (Using Semantic Web technologies and HTML5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Clark

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The library as place and service continues to be shaped by the legacy of the book. The book itself has evolved in recent years, with various technologies vying to become the next dominant book form. In this article, we discuss the design and development of our prototype software from Montana State University (MSU Library for presenting books inside of web browsers. The article outlines the contextual background and technological potential for publishing traditional book content through the web using open standards. Our prototype demonstrates the application of HTML5, structured data with RDFa and Schema.org markup, linked data components using JSON-LD, and an API-driven data model. We examine how this open web model impacts discovery, reading analytics, eBook production, and machine-readability for libraries considering how to unite software development and publishing.

  14. An innovative browser-based data exploration tool with simultaneous scrolling in time and wavelength domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Gregory L.; Schiff, David; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Freeland, Samuel L.

    2017-08-01

    We present Cruiser, a new web tool for the precision interactive blending of image series across time and wavelength domains. Scrolling in two dimensions enables discovery and investigation of similarities and differences in structure and evolution across multiple wavelengths. Cruiser works in the latest versions of standards compliant browsers on both desktop and IOS platforms. Co-aligned data cubes have been generated for AIA, IRIS, and Hinode SOT FG, and image data from additional instruments, both space-based and ground-based, can be data sources. The tool has several movie playing and image adjustment controls which will be described in the poster and demonstrated on a MacOS notebook and iPad.

  15. A Security Concern in MS-Windows: Stealing User Information From Internet Browsers Using Faked Windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior Shamir

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple method that might be used by malicious attackers for stealing usernames, passwords, credit card numbers or other valuable small pieces of information is described. Hidden processes running on Windows-based machines might create faked controls and place them on the browser exactly on top of the real controls of web pages such as on-line banking account login pages. Users might then type in their passwords or credit card numbers into the faked controls, allowing the malicious process to capture the data. Since spyware is a large and growing threat to internet users, it is not unlikely that such a technique will be used for stealing valuable information. An example based on Hotmail web-based email service is demonstrated, but this technique might be used for a variety of password-protected web services. The paper also discusses different approach of protection against the described attack.

  16. Interpolate with DIVA and view the products in OceanBrowser : what's up ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watelet, Sylvain; Barth, Alexander; Beckers, Jean-Marie; Troupin, Charles

    2017-04-01

    The Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis (DIVA) software is a statistical tool designed to reconstruct a continuous field from discrete measurements. This method is based on the numerical implementation of the Variational Inverse Model (VIM), which consists of a minimization of a cost function, allowing the choice of the analyzed field fitting at best the data sets without presenting unrealistic strong variations. The problem is solved efficiently using a finite-element method. This method, equivalent to the Optimal Interpolation, is particularly suited to deal with irregularly-spaced observations and produces outputs on a regular grid (2D, 3D or 4D). The results are stored in NetCDF files, the most widespread format in the earth sciences community. OceanBrowser is a web-service that allows one to visualize gridded fields on-line. Within the SeaDataNet and EMODNET (Chemical lot) projects, several national ocean data centers have created gridded climatologies of different ocean properties using the data analysis software DIVA. In order to give a common viewing service to those interpolated products, the GHER has developed OceanBrowser which is based on open standards from the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), in particular Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS). These standards define a protocol for describing, requesting and querying two-dimensional maps at a given depth and time. DIVA and OceanBrowser are both softwares tools which are continuously upgraded and distributed for free through frequent version releases. The development is funded by the EMODnet and SeaDataNet projects and include many discussions and feedback from the users community. Here, we present two recent major upgrades. First, we have implemented a "customization" of DIVA analyses following the sea bottom, using the bottom depth gradient as a new source of information. The weaker the slope of the bottom ocean, the higher the correlation length. This correlation length being

  17. Trajectory Browser: An Online Tool for Interplanetary Trajectory Analysis and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Cyrus James

    2013-01-01

    The trajectory browser is a web-based tool developed at the NASA Ames Research Center for finding preliminary trajectories to planetary bodies and for providing relevant launch date, time-of-flight and (Delta)V requirements. The site hosts a database of transfer trajectories from Earth to planets and small-bodies for various types of missions such as rendezvous, sample return or flybys. A search engine allows the user to find trajectories meeting desired constraints on the launch window, mission duration and (Delta)V capability, while a trajectory viewer tool allows the visualization of the heliocentric trajectory and the detailed mission itinerary. The anticipated user base of this tool consists primarily of scientists and engineers designing interplanetary missions in the context of pre-phase A studies, particularly for performing accessibility surveys to large populations of small-bodies.

  18. Analysing Power Consumption Of Different Browsers & Identity Management Systems In Mobile Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Sadek Ferdous

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently there are many different Identity Management Systems which differ in their architectures as well as use different protocols and serve different purposes and are extensively used by organisations to provide online services. With the remarkable growth of mobile phones in the last few years, both in number and computational power, more and more users are accessing an array of online services using their mobile phones. One of the major concerns for the user of mobile phones is the battery life which is limited and tends to run out quickly. Hence, efficiency in power consumption is a crucial factor for any system when it is accessed using a mobile phone. In this paper, we analyse the efficiency, in terms ofpower consumption, of different browsers in mobile phones and different Identity Management Systems when the mobile phones are used to access online services protected by those Identity Management Systems.

  19. GenColors-based comparative genome databases for small eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Marius; Romualdi, Alessandro; Petzold, Andreas; Platzer, Matthias; Sühnel, Jürgen; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    Many sequence data repositories can give a quick and easily accessible overview on genomes and their annotations. Less widespread is the possibility to compare related genomes with each other in a common database environment. We have previously described the GenColors database system (http://gencolors.fli-leibniz.de) and its applications to a number of bacterial genomes such as Borrelia, Legionella, Leptospira and Treponema. This system has an emphasis on genome comparison. It combines data from related genomes and provides the user with an extensive set of visualization and analysis tools. Eukaryote genomes are normally larger than prokaryote genomes and thus pose additional challenges for such a system. We have, therefore, adapted GenColors to also handle larger datasets of small eukaryotic genomes and to display eukaryotic gene structures. Further recent developments include whole genome views, genome list options and, for bacterial genome browsers, the display of horizontal gene transfer predictions. Two new GenColors-based databases for two fungal species (http://fgb.fli-leibniz.de) and for four social amoebas (http://sacgb.fli-leibniz.de) were set up. Both new resources open up a single entry point for related genomes for the amoebozoa and fungal research communities and other interested users. Comparative genomics approaches are greatly facilitated by these resources.

  20. Exploratory Visual Analytics of a Dynamically Built Network of Nodes in a WebGL-Enabled Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This report describes an extensible hypertext markup...analytics capability has been done in a WebGL-enabled browser. Gaming technology has been further strengthened by update of the hypertext markup language...Nodes 8 The following extensible hypertext markup language (XHTML) example builds a 26-node network. The code is

  1. Genetic education and the challenge of genomic medicine: development of core competences to support preparation of health professionals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skirton, Heather; Lewis, Celine; Kent, Alastair;

    2010-01-01

    in professional education and regulation between European countries, setting curricula may not be practical. Core competences are used as a basis for health professional education in many fields and settings. An Expert Group working under the auspices of the EuroGentest project and European Society of Human...... Genetics Education Committee agreed that a pragmatic solution to the need to establish common standards for education and practice in genetic health care was to agree to a set of core competences that could apply across Europe. These were agreed through an exhaustive process of consultation with relevant......The use of genetics and genomics within a wide range of health-care settings requires health professionals to develop expertise to practise appropriately. There is a need for a common minimum standard of competence in genetics for health professionals in Europe but because of differences...

  2. Extraction of Genomic DNA Using Magnetic Nanoparticles (Fe3O4 as a Solid-Phase Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. Saiyed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic separation technology, using magnetic particles, is quick and easy method for sensitive and reliable captures of specific proteins, genetic material and other biomolecules. The current paper describes a universal genomic DNA extraction method optimized in our laboratory using magnetic nanoparticles as a solid phase adsorbent. The yields of the isolated DNA with magnetic method were higher or equivalent to the conventional procedures in all the samples tested. Additionally, the magnetic method takes less than 15 minutes to extract DNA as against several hours taken by conventional protocols. Furthermore, the isolated DNA was found to function satisfactorily in PCR amplification and restriction endonuclease digestion. The developed procedure is simple, quick, cheap, robust and does not require the use of organic solvents or sophisticated equipments; thereby making it more amenable to automation.

  3. dbCRY: a Web-based comparative and evolutionary genomics platform for blue-light receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Min; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Hye-Young; Lee, Gir-Won; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Choi, Doil

    2014-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that play a central role in the circadian oscillations of all living organisms except archaea. Cryptochromes are clustered into three subfamilies: plant-type cryptochromes, animal-type cryptochromes and cryptochrome-DASH proteins. These subfamilies are composed of photolyase/cryptochrome superfamily with 6-4 photolyase and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase. Cryptochromes have conserved domain architectures with two distinct domains, an N-terminal photolyase-related domain and a C-terminal domain. Although the molecular function and domain architecture of cryptochromes are conserved, their molecular mechanisms differ between plants and animals. Thus, cryptochromes are one of the best candidates for comparative and evolutionary studies. Here, we have developed a Web-based platform for comparative and evolutionary studies of cryptochromes, dbCRY (http://www.dbcryptochrome.org/). A pipeline built upon the consensus domain profile was applied to 1438 genomes and identified 1309 genes. To support comparative and evolutionary genomics studies, the Web interface provides diverse functions such as (i) browsing by species, (ii) protein domain analysis, (iii) multiple sequence alignment, (iv) homology search and (v) extended analysis opportunities through the implementation of 'Favorite Browser' powered by the Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform 2.0 (CFGP 2.0; http://cfgp.snu.ac.kr/). dbCRY would serve as a standardized and systematic solution for cryptochrome genomics studies. Database URL: http://www.dbcryptochrome.org/

  4. Ontology for Genome Comparison and Genomic Rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Wipat

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an ontology for describing genomes, genome comparisons, their evolution and biological function. This ontology will support the development of novel genome comparison algorithms and aid the community in discussing genomic evolution. It provides a framework for communication about comparative genomics, and a basis upon which further automated analysis can be built. The nomenclature defined by the ontology will foster clearer communication between biologists, and also standardize terms used by data publishers in the results of analysis programs. The overriding aim of this ontology is the facilitation of consistent annotation of genomes through computational methods, rather than human annotators. To this end, the ontology includes definitions that support computer analysis and automated transfer of annotations between genomes, rather than relying upon human mediation.

  5. New genome sequence data and molecular tools promote the use of photosynthetic and edible cyanobacteria in bioregenerative systems to support human space exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leys, Natalie; Morin, Nicolas; Janssen, Paul; Mergeay, Max

    Cyanobacteria are daily used as nutritional supplements (e.g. Spirulina) and are considered for promising applications beyond Earth, in space, where they can play a crucial role in closed miniaturised biological waste recycling systems that are currently developed to support future long-term space missions. Cyanobacteria can be cultured with artificial light in controllable photobioreactors, and used for the efficient removal of CO2 from and production of O2 in the at-mosphere of the confined spacecraft, for removal of nitrate from waste water that is recycled to potable water, and as complementary food source. In this context, the filamentous cyanobac-terium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was selected as part of the bio-regenerative life-support system MELiSSA from the European Space Agency. For bioprocess control and optimisation, the access to its genetic information and the development of molecular tools is crucial. Here we report on our efforts to determine the full genome of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005. The obtained sequence data were analysed in detail to gain a better insight in the photosynthetic, nutritive, or potential toxic potential of this strain. In addition, the sensitivity of PCC 8005 to ionizing radiation was investigated because prolonged exposure of PCC 8005 to cosmic radiation in space might have a deleterious effect on its metabolism and oxygenic properties. To our knowledge, of the 6 different research groups across the globe trying to sequence Arthrospira strains, none of them, including us, were yet able to obtain a complete genome sequence. For Arthrospira sp. strain PCC 8005, we obtained 119 contigs (assembled in 16 scaffolds), representing 6,3 Mb, with 5,856 predicted protein-coding sequences (CDSs) and 176 genes encoding RNA. The PCC 8005 genome displays an unusual high number of large repeated sequences, covering around 8% of the genome, which likely hampered the sequenc-ing. The PCC 8005 genome is also ridden by mobile

  6. Meta-analysis of data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium and additional samples supports association of CACNA1C with risk for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Sakae; Glatt, Stephen J; Uchiyama, Makoto; Faraone, Stephen V; Tsuang, Ming T

    2015-10-01

    Recently, numerous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified numerous risk loci for schizophrenia, but follow-up studies are still essential to confirm those results. Therefore, we followed up on top GWAS hits by genotyping implicated loci in additional schizophrenia family samples from our own collection. Five-hundred thirty-six Asian families (comprising 1633 members including 698 schizophrenics) were genotyped in this study. We analyzed 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in strongly implicated candidate genes revealed by GWASs and their follow-up studies. We then used meta-analysis to combine our results with those of the Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). In our newly genotyped samples, there were no significant associations of any of the 12 candidate SNPs with schizophrenia; however, all genome-wide significant results from the schizophrenia PGC analysis were maintained after combination with our new data by meta-analysis. One SNP (rs4765905 in CACNA1C) showed a stronger effect and decreased p-value (5.14e-17) after meta-analysis relative to the original PGC results, with no significant between-study heterogeneity. The findings of this study support the significant results in the PGC, especially for CACNA1C. The sample size in our study was considerably smaller than that in the PGC-SCZ study; thus, the weights carried by our samples in the meta-analysis were small. Therefore, our data could not vastly reduce PGC association signals. However, we considered that the well replicated results from the PGC hold up in our new samples, and may suggest that the top hits from the PGC are generalizable, even to other ancestral groups.

  7. BioViews: Java-based tools for genomic data visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helt, G A; Lewis, S; Loraine, A E; Rubin, G M

    1998-03-01

    Visualization tools for bioinformatics ideally should provide universal access to the most current data in an interactive and intuitive graphical user interface. Since the introduction of Java, a language designed for distributed programming over the Web, the technology now exists to build a genomic data visualization tool that meets these requirements. Using Java we have developed a prototype genome browser applet (BioViews) that incorporates a three-level graphical view of genomic data: a physical map, an annotated sequence map, and a DNA sequence display. Annotated biological features are displayed on the physical and sequence-based maps, and the different views are interconnected. The applet is linked to several databases and can retrieve features and display hyperlinked textual data on selected features. In addition to browsing genomic data, different types of analyses can be performed interactively and the results of these analyses visualized alongside prior annotations. Our genome browser is built on top of extensible, reusable graphic components specifically designed for bioinformatics. Other groups can (and do) reuse this work in various ways. Genome centers can reuse large parts of the genome browser with minor modifications, bioinformatics groups working on sequence analysis can reuse components to build front ends for analysis programs, and biology laboratories can reuse components to publish results as dynamic Web documents.

  8. A survey of genomic studies supports association of circadian clock genes with bipolar disorder spectrum illnesses and lithium response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J McCarthy

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythm abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD have led to a search for genetic abnormalities in circadian "clock genes" associated with BD. However, no significant clock gene findings have emerged from genome-wide association studies (GWAS. At least three factors could account for this discrepancy: complex traits are polygenic, the organization of the clock is more complex than previously recognized, and/or genetic risk for BD may be shared across multiple illnesses. To investigate these issues, we considered the clock gene network at three levels: essential "core" clock genes, upstream circadian clock modulators, and downstream clock controlled genes. Using relaxed thresholds for GWAS statistical significance, we determined the rates of clock vs. control genetic associations with BD, and four additional illnesses that share clinical features and/or genetic risk with BD (major depression, schizophrenia, attention deficit/hyperactivity. Then we compared the results to a set of lithium-responsive genes. Associations with BD-spectrum illnesses and lithium-responsiveness were both enriched among core clock genes but not among upstream clock modulators. Associations with BD-spectrum illnesses and lithium-responsiveness were also enriched among pervasively rhythmic clock-controlled genes but not among genes that were less pervasively rhythmic or non-rhythmic. Our analysis reveals previously unrecognized associations between clock genes and BD-spectrum illnesses, partly reconciling previously discordant results from past GWAS and candidate gene studies.

  9. MHC-dependent mate choice in humans: why genomic patterns from the HapMap European American dataset support the hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Romain; Chaix, Raphaëlle

    2012-04-01

    The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in mate choice in humans is controversial. Nowadays, the availability of genetic variation data at genomic scales allows for a careful assessment of this question. In 2008, Chaix et al. reported evidence for MHC-dependent mate choice among European American spouses from the HapMap 2 dataset. Recently, Derti et al. suggested that this observation was not robust. Furthermore, when Derti et al. applied similar analyses to the HapMap 3 European American samples, they did not see a significant effect. Although some of the points raised by Derti et al. are relevant, we disagree with the reported absence of evidence for MHC-dependent mate choice within the HapMap samples. More precisely, we show here that the MHC dissimilarity among HapMap 3 European American spouses is still extreme in comparison to the rest of the genome, even after multiple testing correction. This finding supports the hypothesis of MHC-dependent mate choice in some human populations.

  10. Analysis of gene order data supports vertical inheritance of the leukotoxin operon and genome rearrangements in the 5' flanking region in genus Mannheimia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Kuhnert, Peter; Frey, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    , the supposed sister group, lives as a commensal in the ovine rumen. We have tested the hypothesis that vertical inheritance of the leukotoxin (lktCABD) operon has occurred from the last common ancestor of genus Mannheimia to any ancestor of the diverging subclades by exploring gene order data. RESULTS: We...... than the hslVU-lapB-artJ-lktC and xylAB-lktC gene strings. The presence of (remnants of) the ancient gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC among any subclades within genus Mannheimia supports that it has been vertically inherited from the last common ancestor of genus Mannheimia to any ancestor of the diverging...... subclades, thus reaffirming the hypothesis of vertical inheritance of the leukotoxin operon. The presence of individual 5' flanking regions in M. haemolytica + M. glucosida and M. granulomatis reflects later genome rearrangements within each subclade. The evolution of the novel 5' flanking region in M...

  11. CDAPubMed: a browser extension to retrieve EHR-based biomedical literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez-Rey David

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last few decades, the ever-increasing output of scientific publications has led to new challenges to keep up to date with the literature. In the biomedical area, this growth has introduced new requirements for professionals, e.g., physicians, who have to locate the exact papers that they need for their clinical and research work amongst a huge number of publications. Against this backdrop, novel information retrieval methods are even more necessary. While web search engines are widespread in many areas, facilitating access to all kinds of information, additional tools are required to automatically link information retrieved from these engines to specific biomedical applications. In the case of clinical environments, this also means considering aspects such as patient data security and confidentiality or structured contents, e.g., electronic health records (EHRs. In this scenario, we have developed a new tool to facilitate query building to retrieve scientific literature related to EHRs. Results We have developed CDAPubMed, an open-source web browser extension to integrate EHR features in biomedical literature retrieval approaches. Clinical users can use CDAPubMed to: (i load patient clinical documents, i.e., EHRs based on the Health Level 7-Clinical Document Architecture Standard (HL7-CDA, (ii identify relevant terms for scientific literature search in these documents, i.e., Medical Subject Headings (MeSH, automatically driven by the CDAPubMed configuration, which advanced users can optimize to adapt to each specific situation, and (iii generate and launch literature search queries to a major search engine, i.e., PubMed, to retrieve citations related to the EHR under examination. Conclusions CDAPubMed is a platform-independent tool designed to facilitate literature searching using keywords contained in specific EHRs. CDAPubMed is visually integrated, as an extension of a widespread web browser, within the standard

  12. CDAPubMed: a browser extension to retrieve EHR-based biomedical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rey, David; Jimenez-Castellanos, Ana; Garcia-Remesal, Miguel; Crespo, Jose; Maojo, Victor

    2012-04-05

    Over the last few decades, the ever-increasing output of scientific publications has led to new challenges to keep up to date with the literature. In the biomedical area, this growth has introduced new requirements for professionals, e.g., physicians, who have to locate the exact papers that they need for their clinical and research work amongst a huge number of publications. Against this backdrop, novel information retrieval methods are even more necessary. While web search engines are widespread in many areas, facilitating access to all kinds of information, additional tools are required to automatically link information retrieved from these engines to specific biomedical applications. In the case of clinical environments, this also means considering aspects such as patient data security and confidentiality or structured contents, e.g., electronic health records (EHRs). In this scenario, we have developed a new tool to facilitate query building to retrieve scientific literature related to EHRs. We have developed CDAPubMed, an open-source web browser extension to integrate EHR features in biomedical literature retrieval approaches. Clinical users can use CDAPubMed to: (i) load patient clinical documents, i.e., EHRs based on the Health Level 7-Clinical Document Architecture Standard (HL7-CDA), (ii) identify relevant terms for scientific literature search in these documents, i.e., Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), automatically driven by the CDAPubMed configuration, which advanced users can optimize to adapt to each specific situation, and (iii) generate and launch literature search queries to a major search engine, i.e., PubMed, to retrieve citations related to the EHR under examination. CDAPubMed is a platform-independent tool designed to facilitate literature searching using keywords contained in specific EHRs. CDAPubMed is visually integrated, as an extension of a widespread web browser, within the standard PubMed interface. It has been tested on a public dataset

  13. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  14. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  15. The Multimedia Information Inquiry System Based on Browser/Server Systematic Structure%基于Browser/Server体系结构的多媒体信息查询系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓国; 万金友; 张维东

    1998-01-01

    阐述了在Internet时代必须开发Internet上的多媒体信息查询系统的必要性,并详细地讨论了以Windows NT为Web Server、基于Browser/Server体系结构的Internet多媒体信息查询系统的一种实现方法.

  16. Trajectory Browser: An online tool for interplanetary trajectory analysis and visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C.

    The Trajectory Browser is a web-based tool developed at the NASA Ames Research Center for finding preliminary trajectories to planetary bodies and for providing relevant launch date, time-of-flight and Δ V requirements. The site hosts a database of transfer trajectories from Earth to planets and small-bodies for various types of missions such as rendezvous, sample return or flybys. A search engine allows the user to find trajectories meeting desired constraints on the launch window, mission duration and Δ V capability, while a trajectory viewer tool allows the visualization of the heliocentric trajectory and the detailed mission itinerary. The anticipated user base of this tool consists primarily of scientists and engineers designing interplanetary missions in the context of pre-phase A studies, particularly for performing accessibility surveys to large populations of small-bodies. The educational potential of the website is also recognized for academia and the public with regards to trajectory design, a field that has generally been poorly understood by the public. The website is currently hosted on NASA-internal URL http://trajbrowser.arc.nasa.gov/ with plans for a public release in early 2013.

  17. Feeding rates of a mammalian browser confirm the predictions of a 'foodscape' model of its habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Karen J; Moore, Ben D; Wallis, Ian R; Foley, William J

    2014-03-01

    Adequate nutrition is a fundamental requirement for the maintenance and growth of populations, but complex interactions between nutrients and plant toxins make it difficult to link variation in plant quality to the ecology of wild herbivores. We asked whether a 'foodscape' model of habitat that uses near-infrared spectroscopy to describe the palatability of individual trees in the landscape, predicted the foraging decisions of a mammalian browser, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). Specifically, we considered four behavioural decision points at which nutritional quality may influence an animal's decision. These were: which tree to enter, whether to feed from that tree, when to stop eating, and how long to remain in that tree. There were trends for koalas to feed in eucalypt trees that were more palatable than unvisited neighbouring conspecific trees, and than trees that they visited but did not eat. Koalas ate longer meals in more palatable trees, and stayed longer and spent more time feeding per visit to these trees. Using more traditional chemical analyses, we identified that an interaction between the concentrations of formylated phloroglucinol compounds (a group of plant secondary metabolites) and available N (an integrated measure of tannins, digestibility and N) influenced feeding. The study shows that foodscape models that combine spatial information with integrated measures of food quality are a powerful tool to predict the feeding behaviour of herbivores in a landscape.

  18. Elephant impact on shoot distribution on trees and on rebrowsing by smaller browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhabu, Shimane W.; Skarpe, Christina; Hytteborn, Håkan

    2006-09-01

    In order to determine the effects of a megaherbivore, the African elephant ( Loxodonta africana) on browse available for mesoherbivores, we assessed the vertical distribution of shoots (< 6 mm in diameter) on trees with different accumulated elephant impact. We also determined the foraging responses by a mixed feeder, impala ( Aepyceros melampus) and a browser, greater kudu ( Tragelaphus strepsiceros) which are mesoherbivores. The foraging responses by impala and kudu were in terms of preferences of trees with different accumulated elephant impact levels and whether animals browsed in different height sections in proportion to availability of shoots. We counted shoots in each 20 cm height section up to 2.6 m on trees in 25 m by 25 m plots and on trees observed to be browsed by impala and kudu. In most tree species, individuals with high accumulated elephant impact were shorter and had more shoots at low levels than tree individuals with either low or no accumulated elephant impact. Impala and kudu preferred to browse tree individuals with accumulated elephant impact over those without such impact. Impala and kudu browsed more than expected at height sections with many shoots and less than expected at height sections with fewer shoots indicating a non-linear overmatching foraging response. We suggest that increased shoot abundance at low levels in the canopy might explain part of the observed preferences. Elephants, therefore, seem to facilitate browsing by mesoherbivores by generating 'browsing lawns'. Such benefits need to be considered when making decisions on how to manage populations of megaherbivores like elephant.

  19. Ancillary Resistor leads to Sparse Glitches: an Extra Approach to Avert Hacker using Syndicate Browser Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaki Pendlimarri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available After the invention of internet most of the people all over the world have become a fan of it because of its vast exploitation for information exchange, e-mail, e-commerce etc. for their easy leading of life. On the other side, may be equally or less/more, many people are also using it for the purpose of hacking the information which is being communicated. Because, the data/information that is being communicated through the internet is via an unsecured networks. This gives breaches to the hacker who is known as the man-in-the-middle to hack the data/information. In this paper, we describe some novel methodologies to prevent the hacker in hacking the data/information. The web browser design is being  carried out in our R&D lab and we have found that the novel methodology has given solution to prevent the man-in-the-middle from several attacks.

  20. The changing nature of clinical decision support systems: a focus on consumers, genomics, public health and decision safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiera, E; Lau, A Y S; Tsafnat, G; Sintchenko, V; Magrabi, F

    2009-01-01

    To review the recent research literature in clinical decision support systems (CDSS). A review of recent literature was undertaken, focussing on CDSS evaluation, consumers and public health, the impact of translational bioinformatics on CDSS design, and CDSS safety. In recent years, researchers have concentrated much less on the development of decision technologies, and have focussed more on the impact of CDSS in the clinical world. Recent work highlights that traditional process measures of CDSS effectiveness, such as document relevance are poor proxy measures for decision outcomes. Measuring the dynamics of decision making, for example via decision velocity, may produce a more accurate picture of effectiveness. Another trend is the broadening of user base for CDSS beyond front line clinicians. Consumers are now a major focus for biomedical informatics, as are public health officials, tasked with detecting and managing disease outbreaks at a health system, rather than individual patient level. Bioinformatics is also changing the nature of CDSS. Apart from personalisation of therapy recommendations, translational bioinformatics is creating new challenges in the interpretation of the meaning of genetic data. Finally, there is much recent interest in the safety and effectiveness of computerised physician order entry (CPOE) systems, given that prescribing and administration errors are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Of note, there is still much controversy surrounding the contention that poorly designed, implemented or used CDSS may actually lead to harm. CDSS research remains an active and evolving area of research, as CDSS penetrate more widely beyond their traditional domain into consumer decision support, and as decisions become more complex, for example by involving sequence level genetic data.

  1. GrayStarServer: Server-side Spectrum Synthesis with a Browser-based Client-side User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, C. Ian

    2016-10-01

    We present GrayStarServer (GSS), a stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis code of pedagogical accuracy that is accessible in any web browser on commonplace computational devices and that runs on a timescale of a few seconds. The addition of spectrum synthesis annotated with line identifications extends the functionality and pedagogical applicability of GSS beyond that of its predecessor, GrayStar3 (GS3). The spectrum synthesis is based on a line list acquired from the NIST atomic spectra database, and the GSS post-processing and user interface client allows the user to inspect the plain text ASCII version of the line list, as well as to apply macroscopic broadening. Unlike GS3, GSS carries out the physical modeling on the server side in Java, and communicates with the JavaScript and HTML client via an asynchronous HTTP request. We also describe other improvements beyond GS3 such as a more physical treatment of background opacity and atmospheric physics, the comparison of key results with those of the Phoenix code, and the use of the HTML element for higher quality plotting and rendering of results. We also present LineListServer, a Java code for converting custom ASCII line lists in NIST format to the byte data type file format required by GSS so that users can prepare their own custom line lists. We propose a standard for marking up and packaging model atmosphere and spectrum synthesis output for data transmission and storage that will facilitate a web-based approach to stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis. We describe some pedagogical demonstrations and exercises enabled by easily accessible, on-demand, responsive spectrum synthesis. GSS may serve as a research support tool by providing quick spectroscopic reconnaissance. GSS may be found at www.ap.smu.ca/~ishort/OpenStars/GrayStarServer/grayStarServer.html, and source tarballs for local installations of both GSS and LineListServer may be found at www.ap.smu.ca/~ishort/OpenStars/.

  2. Genomic and cranial phenotype data support multiple modern human dispersals from Africa and a southern route into Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Centeno, Hugo; Ghirotto, Silvia; Détroit, Florent; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique; Barbujani, Guido; Harvati, Katerina

    2014-05-20

    Despite broad consensus on Africa as the main place of origin for anatomically modern humans, their dispersal pattern out of the continent continues to be intensely debated. In extant human populations, the observation of decreasing genetic and phenotypic diversity at increasing distances from sub-Saharan Africa has been interpreted as evidence for a single dispersal, accompanied by a series of founder effects. In such a scenario, modern human genetic and phenotypic variation was primarily generated through successive population bottlenecks and drift during a rapid worldwide expansion out of Africa in the Late Pleistocene. However, recent genetic studies, as well as accumulating archaeological and paleoanthropological evidence, challenge this parsimonious model. They suggest instead a "southern route" dispersal into Asia as early as the late Middle Pleistocene, followed by a separate dispersal into northern Eurasia. Here we test these competing out-of-Africa scenarios by modeling hypothetical geographical migration routes and assessing their correlation with neutral population differentiation, as measured by genetic polymorphisms and cranial shape variables of modern human populations from Africa and Asia. We show that both lines of evidence support a multiple-dispersals model in which Australo-Melanesian populations are relatively isolated descendants of an early dispersal, whereas other Asian populations are descended from, or highly admixed with, members of a subsequent migration event.

  3. Automated cell analysis tool for a genome-wide RNAi screen with support vector machine based supervised learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmele, Steffen; Ritzerfeld, Julia; Nickel, Walter; Hesser, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    RNAi-based high-throughput microscopy screens have become an important tool in biological sciences in order to decrypt mostly unknown biological functions of human genes. However, manual analysis is impossible for such screens since the amount of image data sets can often be in the hundred thousands. Reliable automated tools are thus required to analyse the fluorescence microscopy image data sets usually containing two or more reaction channels. The herein presented image analysis tool is designed to analyse an RNAi screen investigating the intracellular trafficking and targeting of acylated Src kinases. In this specific screen, a data set consists of three reaction channels and the investigated cells can appear in different phenotypes. The main issue of the image processing task is an automatic cell segmentation which has to be robust and accurate for all different phenotypes and a successive phenotype classification. The cell segmentation is done in two steps by segmenting the cell nuclei first and then using a classifier-enhanced region growing on basis of the cell nuclei to segment the cells. The classification of the cells is realized by a support vector machine which has to be trained manually using supervised learning. Furthermore, the tool is brightness invariant allowing different staining quality and it provides a quality control that copes with typical defects during preparation and acquisition. A first version of the tool has already been successfully applied for an RNAi-screen containing three hundred thousand image data sets and the SVM extended version is designed for additional screens.

  4. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  5. GeneBrowser 2: an application to explore and identify common biological traits in a set of genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira José

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of high-throughput laboratory techniques created a demand for computer-assisted result analysis tools. Many of these techniques return lists of genes whose interpretation requires finding relevant biological roles for the problem at hand. The required information is typically available in public databases, and usually, this information must be manually retrieved to complement the analysis. This process is a very time-consuming task that should be automated as much as possible. Results GeneBrowser is a web-based tool that, for a given list of genes, combines data from several public databases with visualisation and analysis methods to help identify the most relevant and common biological characteristics. The functionalities provided include the following: a central point with the most relevant biological information for each inserted gene; a list of the most related papers in PubMed and gene expression studies in ArrayExpress; and an extended approach to functional analysis applied to Gene Ontology, homologies, gene chromosomal localisation and pathways. Conclusions GeneBrowser provides a unique entry point to several visualisation and analysis methods, providing fast and easy analysis of a set of genes. GeneBrowser fills the gap between Web portals that analyse one gene at a time and functional analysis tools that are limited in scope and usually desktop-based.

  6. A Connection Model between the Positioning Mechanism and Ultrasonic Measurement System via a Web Browser to Assess Acoustic Target Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Ken; Imaizumi, Tomohito; Abe, Koki; Takao, Yoshimi; Tamura, Shuko

    This paper details a network-controlled measurement system for use in fisheries engineering. The target strength (TS) of fish is important in order to convert acoustic integration values obtained during acoustic surveys into estimates of fish abundance. The target strength pattern is measured with the combination of the rotation system for the aspect of the sample and the echo data acquisition system using the underwater supersonic wave. The user interface of the network architecture is designed for collaborative use with researchers in other organizations. The flexible network architecture is based on the web direct-access model for the rotation mechanism. The user interface is available for monitoring and controlling via a web browser that is installed in any terminal PC (personal computer). Previously the combination of two applications was performed not by a web browser but by the exclusive interface program. So a connection model is proposed between two applications by indirect communication via the DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model) server and added in the web direct-access model. A prompt report system in the TS measurement system and a positioning and measurement system using an electric flatcar via a web browser are developed. By a secure network architecture, DCOM communications via both Intranet and LAN are successfully certificated.

  7. Average nucleotide identity of genome sequences supports the description of Rhizobium lentis sp. nov., Rhizobium bangladeshense sp. nov. and Rhizobium binae sp. nov. from lentil (Lens culinaris) nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, M Harun-or; Young, J Peter W; Everall, Isobel; Clercx, Pia; Willems, Anne; Santhosh Braun, Markus; Wink, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Rhizobial strains isolated from effective root nodules of field-grown lentil (Lens culinaris) from different parts of Bangladesh were previously analysed using sequences of the 16S rRNA gene, three housekeeping genes (recA, atpD and glnII) and three nodulation genes (nodA, nodC and nodD), DNA fingerprinting and phenotypic characterization. Analysis of housekeeping gene sequences and DNA fingerprints indicated that the strains belonged to three novel clades in the genus Rhizobium. In present study, a representative strain from each clade was further characterized by determination of cellular fatty acid compositions, carbon substrate utilization patterns and DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity (ANI) analyses from whole-genome sequences. DNA-DNA hybridization showed 50-62% relatedness to their closest relatives (the type strains of Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium phaseoli) and 50-60% relatedness to each other. These results were further supported by ANI values, based on genome sequencing, which were 87-92% with their close relatives and 88-89% with each other. On the basis of these results, three novel species, Rhizobium lentis sp. nov. (type strain BLR27(T) = LMG 28441(T) = DSM 29286(T)), Rhizobium bangladeshense sp. nov. (type strain BLR175(T) = LMG 28442(T) = DSM 29287(T)) and Rhizobium binae sp. nov. (type strain BLR195(T) = LMG 28443(T) = DSM 29288(T)), are proposed. These species share common nodulation genes (nodA, nodC and nodD) that are similar to those of the symbiovar viciae.

  8. Genomic Data Commons | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI’s Center for Cancer Genomics launches the Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data sharing platform for the cancer research community. The mission of the GDC is to enable data sharing across the entire cancer research community, to ultimately support precision medicine in oncology.

  9. EumicrobeDBLite: a lightweight genomic resource and analytic platform for draft oomycete genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Arijit; Sen, Diya; Ghosh, Arup; Gupta, Akash; C, Mathu Malar; Prakash Mishra, Gyan; Singh, Deeksha; Ye, Wenwu; Tyler, Brett M; Tripathy, Sucheta

    2016-10-27

    We have developed EumicrobeDBLite-a lightweight comprehensive genome resource and sequence analysis platform for oomycete organisms. EumicrobeDBLite is a successor of the VBI Microbial Database (VMD) that was built using the Genome Unified Schema (GUS). In this version, GUS has been greatly simplified with the removal of many obsolete modules and the redesign of others to incorporate contemporary data. Several dependences, such as perl object layers used for data loading in VMD, have been replaced with independent lightweight scripts. EumicrobeDBLite now runs on a powerful annotation engine developed at our laboratory, called 'Genome Annotator Lite'. Currently, this database has 26 publicly available genomes and 10 expressed sequence tag (EST) datasets of oomycete organisms. The browser page has dynamic tracks presenting comparative genomics analyses, coding and non-coding data, tRNA genes, repeats and EST alignments. In addition, we have defined 44 777 core conserved proteins from 12 oomycete organisms which form 2974 clusters. Synteny viewing is enabled by the incorporation of the Genome Synteny Viewer (GSV) tool. The user interface has undergone major changes for ease of browsing. Queryable comparative genomics information, conserved orthologous genes and pathways are among the new key features updated in this database. The browser has been upgraded to enable user upload of GFF files for quick view of genome annotation comparisons. The toolkit page integrates the EMBOSS package and has a gene prediction tool. Annotations for the organisms are updated once every 6 months to ensure quality. The database resource is available at www.eumicrobedb.org.

  10. Next generation tools for genomic data generation, distribution, and visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nix David A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapidly falling cost and availability of high throughput sequencing and microarray technologies, the bottleneck for effectively using genomic analysis in the laboratory and clinic is shifting to one of effectively managing, analyzing, and sharing genomic data. Results Here we present three open-source, platform independent, software tools for generating, analyzing, distributing, and visualizing genomic data. These include a next generation sequencing/microarray LIMS and analysis project center (GNomEx; an application for annotating and programmatically distributing genomic data using the community vetted DAS/2 data exchange protocol (GenoPub; and a standalone Java Swing application (GWrap that makes cutting edge command line analysis tools available to those who prefer graphical user interfaces. Both GNomEx and GenoPub use the rich client Flex/Flash web browser interface to interact with Java classes and a relational database on a remote server. Both employ a public-private user-group security model enabling controlled distribution of patient and unpublished data alongside public resources. As such, they function as genomic data repositories that can be accessed manually or programmatically through DAS/2-enabled client applications such as the Integrated Genome Browser. Conclusions These tools have gained wide use in our core facilities, research laboratories and clinics and are freely available for non-profit use. See http://sourceforge.net/projects/gnomex/, http://sourceforge.net/projects/genoviz/, and http://sourceforge.net/projects/useq.

  11. Gbrowse Moby: a Web-based browser for BioMoby Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkinson Mark

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The BioMoby project aims to identify and deploy standards and conventions that aid in the discovery, execution, and pipelining of distributed bioinformatics Web Services. As of August, 2006, approximately 680 bioinformatics resources were available through the BioMoby interoperability platform. There are a variety of clients that can interact with BioMoby-style services. Here we describe a Web-based browser-style client – Gbrowse Moby – that allows users to discover and "surf" from one bioinformatics service to the next using a semantically-aided browsing interface. Results Gbrowse Moby is a low-throughput, exploratory tool specifically aimed at non-informaticians. It provides a straightforward, minimal interface that enables a researcher to query the BioMoby Central web service registry for data retrieval or analytical tools of interest, and then select and execute their chosen tool with a single mouse-click. The data is preserved at each step, thus allowing the researcher to manually "click" the data from one service to the next, with the Gbrowse Moby application managing all data formatting and interface interpretation on their behalf. The path of manual exploration is preserved and can be downloaded for import into automated, high-throughput tools such as Taverna. Gbrowse Moby also includes a robust data rendering system to ensure that all new data-types that appear in the BioMoby registry can be properly displayed in the Web interface. Conclusion Gbrowse Moby is a robust, yet facile entry point for both newcomers to the BioMoby interoperability project who wish to manually explore what is known about their data of interest, as well as experienced users who wish to observe the functionality of their analytical workflows prior to running them in a high-throughput environment.

  12. Socializing Young People to Ethics via Play Experience: Browser Games and Parental Concerns for Safety Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divina Meigs

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers an online game and its relation to safety and privacy, in order to examine social and ethical issues raised by parental concern over harmful content. To gain real insights on the responsibility of adults, it develops a hands-on approach that takes into account the major stakeholders, especially young people and the related circle of people around them. Therefore the research question that is raised is: how do browser games provide reassurance to parents about their children’s safety and privacy? The issue of safety online is explored in three parts, using an ethnographic research framework: it explores a specific online game, it provides a profile of participants, it analyses their types of actions in relation to safety and privacy, and discusses the results in terms of incidence of risk, peer-monitoring and community control. The findings show that there is a rather strong tendency to self-regulation, but that tendency is partly due to a strong presence of mediating adults and peers. The results are discussed in terms of incidence of risk, peer-monitoring and networked means of control on the one hand, and in terms of scientific contribution to socialization theory on the other hand. They lead to final considerations on the repertoire of ethical strategies set up online and its meaning for the concerns of adults towards online risk as well as the need for policies on regulation and self-regulation. They also lead to extensions on the socialization to norms and the appropriation of ethics by young people.

  13. Multiple Whole Genome Alignments Without a Reference Organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubchak, Inna; Poliakov, Alexander; Kislyuk, Andrey; Brudno, Michael

    2009-01-16

    Multiple sequence alignments have become one of the most commonly used resources in genomics research. Most algorithms for multiple alignment of whole genomes rely either on a reference genome, against which all of the other sequences are laid out, or require a one-to-one mapping between the nucleotides of the genomes, preventing the alignment of recently duplicated regions. Both approaches have drawbacks for whole-genome comparisons. In this paper we present a novel symmetric alignment algorithm. The resulting alignments not only represent all of the genomes equally well, but also include all relevant duplications that occurred since the divergence from the last common ancestor. Our algorithm, implemented as a part of the VISTA Genome Pipeline (VGP), was used to align seven vertebrate and sixDrosophila genomes. The resulting whole-genome alignments demonstrate a higher sensitivity and specificity than the pairwise alignments previously available through the VGP and have higher exon alignment accuracy than comparable public whole-genome alignments. Of the multiple alignment methods tested, ours performed the best at aligning genes from multigene families?perhaps the most challenging test for whole-genome alignments. Our whole-genome multiple alignments are available through the VISTA Browser at http://genome.lbl.gov/vista/index.shtml.

  14. MALINA: a web service for visual analytics of human gut microbiota whole-genome metagenomic reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyakht, Alexander V; Popenko, Anna S; Belenikin, Maxim S; Altukhov, Ilya A; Pavlenko, Alexander V; Kostryukova, Elena S; Selezneva, Oksana V; Larin, Andrei K; Karpova, Irina Y; Alexeev, Dmitry G

    2012-12-07

    MALINA is a web service for bioinformatic analysis of whole-genome metagenomic data obtained from human gut microbiota sequencing. As input data, it accepts metagenomic reads of various sequencing technologies, including long reads (such as Sanger and 454 sequencing) and next-generation (including SOLiD and Illumina). It is the first metagenomic web service that is capable of processing SOLiD color-space reads, to authors' knowledge. The web service allows phylogenetic and functional profiling of metagenomic samples using coverage depth resulting from the alignment of the reads to the catalogue of reference sequences which are built into the pipeline and contain prevalent microbial genomes and genes of human gut microbiota. The obtained metagenomic composition vectors are processed by the statistical analysis and visualization module containing methods for clustering, dimension reduction and group comparison. Additionally, the MALINA database includes vectors of bacterial and functional composition for human gut microbiota samples from a large number of existing studies allowing their comparative analysis together with user samples, namely datasets from Russian Metagenome project, MetaHIT and Human Microbiome Project (downloaded from http://hmpdacc.org). MALINA is made freely available on the web at http://malina.metagenome.ru. The website is implemented in JavaScript (using Ext JS), Microsoft .NET Framework, MS SQL, Python, with all major browsers supported.

  15. OMA 2011: orthology inference among 1000 complete genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenhoff, Adrian M; Schneider, Adrian; Gonnet, Gaston H; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    OMA (Orthologous MAtrix) is a database that identifies orthologs among publicly available, complete genomes. Initiated in 2004, the project is at its 11th release. It now includes 1000 genomes, making it one of the largest resources of its kind. Here, we describe recent developments in terms of species covered; the algorithmic pipeline--in particular regarding the treatment of alternative splicing, and new features of the web (OMA Browser) and programming interface (SOAP API). In the second part, we review the various representations provided by OMA and their typical applications. The database is publicly accessible at http://omabrowser.org.

  16. Prokaryotic Contig Annotation Pipeline Server: Web Application for a Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline Based on the Shiny App Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeonghyeok; Baek, Min-Jeong; Min, Byoungnam; Choi, In-Geol

    2017-09-01

    Genome annotation is a primary step in genomic research. To establish a light and portable prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline for use in individual laboratories, we developed a Shiny app package designated as "P-CAPS" (Prokaryotic Contig Annotation Pipeline Server). The package is composed of R and Python scripts that integrate publicly available annotation programs into a server application. P-CAPS is not only a browser-based interactive application but also a distributable Shiny app package that can be installed on any personal computer. The final annotation is provided in various standard formats and is summarized in an R markdown document. Annotation can be visualized and examined with a public genome browser. A benchmark test showed that the annotation quality and completeness of P-CAPS were reliable and compatible with those of currently available public pipelines.

  17. Discovery of flavivirus-derived endogenous viral elements in Anopheles mosquito genomes supports the existence of Anopheles-associated insect-specific flaviviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequime, Sebastian; Lambrechts, Louis

    2017-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus encompasses several arboviruses of public health significance such as dengue, yellow fever, and Zika viruses. It also includes insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) that are only capable of infecting insect hosts. The vast majority of mosquito-infecting flaviviruses have been associated with mosquito species of the Aedes and Culex genera in the Culicinae subfamily, which also includes most arbovirus vectors. Mosquitoes of the Anophelinae subfamily are not considered significant arbovirus vectors; however, flaviviruses have occasionally been detected in field-caught Anopheles specimens. Whether such observations reflect occasional spillover or laboratory contamination or whether Anopheles mosquitoes are natural hosts of flaviviruses is unknown. Here, we provide in silico and in vivo evidence of transcriptionally active, flavivirus-derived endogenous viral elements (EVEs) in the genome of Anopheles minimus and Anopheles sinensis. Such non-retroviral endogenization of RNA viruses is consistent with a shared evolutionary history between flaviviruses and Anopheles mosquitoes. Phylogenetic analyses of the two newly described EVEs support the existence of a distinct clade of Anopheles-associated ISFs.

  18. Phylogenetic Analyses of Shigella and Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli for the Identification of Molecular Epidemiological Markers: Whole-Genome Comparative Analysis Does Not Support Distinct Genera Designation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. Pettengill

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a leading cause of bacterial dysentery, Shigella represents a significant threat to public health and food safety. Related, but often overlooked, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC can also cause dysentery. Current typing methods have limited ability to identify and differentiate between these pathogens despite the need for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens for clinical treatment and outbreak response. We present a comprehensive phylogeny of Shigella and EIEC using whole genome sequencing (WGS of 169 samples, constituting unparalleled strain diversity, and observe a lack of monophyly between Shigella and EIEC and among Shigella taxonomic groups. The evolutionary relationships in the phylogeny are supported by analyses of population structure and hierarchical clustering patterns of translated gene homolog abundance. Lastly, we identified a panel of 404 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers specific to each phylogenetic cluster for more accurate identification of Shigella and EIEC. Our findings show that Shigella and EIEC are not distinct evolutionary groups within the E. coli genus and, thus, EIEC as a group is not the ancestor to Shigella. The multiple analyses presented provide evidence for reconsidering the taxonomic placement of Shigella. The SNP markers offer more discriminatory power to molecular epidemiological typing methods involving these bacterial pathogens.

  19. Phylogenetic Analyses of Shigella and Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli for the Identification of Molecular Epidemiological Markers: Whole-Genome Comparative Analysis Does Not Support Distinct Genera Designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettengill, Emily A; Pettengill, James B; Binet, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    As a leading cause of bacterial dysentery, Shigella represents a significant threat to public health and food safety. Related, but often overlooked, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) can also cause dysentery. Current typing methods have limited ability to identify and differentiate between these pathogens despite the need for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens for clinical treatment and outbreak response. We present a comprehensive phylogeny of Shigella and EIEC using whole genome sequencing of 169 samples, constituting unparalleled strain diversity, and observe a lack of monophyly between Shigella and EIEC and among Shigella taxonomic groups. The evolutionary relationships in the phylogeny are supported by analyses of population structure and hierarchical clustering patterns of translated gene homolog abundance. Lastly, we identified a panel of 404 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers specific to each phylogenetic cluster for more accurate identification of Shigella and EIEC. Our findings show that Shigella and EIEC are not distinct evolutionary groups within the E. coli genus and, thus, EIEC as a group is not the ancestor to Shigella. The multiple analyses presented provide evidence for reconsidering the taxonomic placement of Shigella. The SNP markers offer more discriminatory power to molecular epidemiological typing methods involving these bacterial pathogens.

  20. Genomic analyses identify hundreds of variants associated with age at menarche and support a role for puberty timing in cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Felix R; Thompson, Deborah J; Helgason, Hannes; Chasman, Daniel I; Finucane, Hilary; Sulem, Patrick; Ruth, Katherine S; Whalen, Sean; Sarkar, Abhishek K; Albrecht, Eva; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Amini, Marzyeh; Barbieri, Caterina M; Boutin, Thibaud; Campbell, Archie; Demerath, Ellen; Giri, Ayush; He, Chunyan; Hottenga, Jouke J; Karlsson, Robert; Kolcic, Ivana; Loh, Po-Ru; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Mangino, Massimo; Marco, Brumat; McMahon, George; Medland, Sarah E; Nolte, Ilja M; Noordam, Raymond; Nutile, Teresa; Paternoster, Lavinia; Perjakova, Natalia; Porcu, Eleonora; Rose, Lynda M; Schraut, Katharina E; Segrè, Ayellet V; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Andrulis, Irene L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Bergmann, Sven; Bochud, Murielle; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broer, Linda; Brüning, Thomas; Buring, Julie E; Campbell, Harry; Catamo, Eulalia; Chanock, Stephen; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Corre, Tanguy; Couch, Fergus J; Cousminer, Diana L; Cox, Angela; Crisponi, Laura; Czene, Kamila; Davey Smith, George; de Geus, Eco J C N; de Mutsert, Renée; De Vivo, Immaculata; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Fernández-Rhodes, Lindsay; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Franke, Lude; Gabrielson, Marike; Gandin, Ilaria; Giles, Graham G; Grallert, Harald; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Harris, Tamara B; Hartman, Catharina A; Heiss, Gerardo; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank; Hunter, David J; Ikram, M Arfan; Im, Hae Kyung; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Joshi, Peter K; Karasik, David; Kellis, Manolis; Kutalik, Zoltan; LaChance, Genevieve; Lambrechts, Diether; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J; Laven, Joop S E; Lenarduzzi, Stefania; Li, Jingmei; Lind, Penelope A; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, YongMei; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Mannermaa, Arto; Mbarek, Hamdi; McCarthy, Mark I; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Menni, Cristina; Metspalu, Andres; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Montgomery, Grant W; Mulligan, Anna M; Nalls, Mike A; Navarro, Pau; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nyholt, Dale R; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; O'Mara, Tracy A; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palotie, Aarno; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pouta, Anneli; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Iffat; Ring, Susan M; Robino, Antonietta; Rosendaal, Frits R; Rudan, Igor; Rueedi, Rico; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Scott, Robert A; Shah, Mitul; Sorice, Rossella; Southey, Melissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir; Steri, Maristella; Strauch, Konstantin; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tikkanen, Emmi; Timpson, Nicholas J; Traglia, Michela; Truong, Thérèse; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Uitterlinden, André G; Edwards, Digna R Velez; Vitart, Veronique; Völker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wang, Qin; Widen, Elisabeth; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Zygmunt, Marek; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Boomsma, Dorret I; Ciullo, Marina; Cucca, Francesco; Esko, Tõnu; Franceschini, Nora; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hayward, Caroline; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie A; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Nohr, Ellen A; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Price, Alkes L; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Stöckl, Doris; Toniolo, Daniela; Ulivi, Sheila; Visser, Jenny A; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J; Wilson, James F; Spurdle, Amanda B; Thorsteindottir, Unnur; Pollard, Katherine S; Easton, Douglas F; Tung, Joyce Y; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hinds, David; Murray, Anna; Murabito, Joanne M; Stefansson, Kari; Ong, Ken K; Perry, John R B

    2017-06-01

    The timing of puberty is a highly polygenic childhood trait that is epidemiologically associated with various adult diseases. Using 1000 Genomes Project-imputed genotype data in up to ∼370,000 women, we identify 389 independent signals (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for age at menarche, a milestone in female pubertal development. In Icelandic data, these signals explain ∼7.4% of the population variance in age at menarche, corresponding to ∼25% of the estimated heritability. We implicate ∼250 genes via coding variation or associated expression, demonstrating significant enrichment in neural tissues. Rare variants near the imprinted genes MKRN3 and DLK1 were identified, exhibiting large effects when paternally inherited. Mendelian randomization analyses suggest causal inverse associations, independent of body mass index (BMI), between puberty timing and risks for breast and endometrial cancers in women and prostate cancer in men. In aggregate, our findings highlight the complexity of the genetic regulation of puberty timing and support causal links with cancer susceptibility.

  1. Multi-locus genome-wide association analysis supports the role of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the etiology of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P H; Perlis, R H; Jung, J-Y; Byrne, E M; Rueckert, E; Siburian, R; Haddad, S; Mayerfeld, C E; Heath, A C; Pergadia, M L; Madden, P A F; Boomsma, D I; Penninx, B W; Sklar, P; Martin, N G; Wray, N R; Purcell, S M; Smoller, J W

    2012-11-13

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric illness characterized by low mood and loss of interest in pleasurable activities. Despite years of effort, recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified few susceptibility variants or genes that are robustly associated with MDD. Standard single-SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism)-based GWAS analysis typically has limited power to deal with the extensive heterogeneity and substantial polygenic contribution of individually weak genetic effects underlying the pathogenesis of MDD. Here, we report an alternative, gene-set-based association analysis of MDD in an effort to identify groups of biologically related genetic variants that are involved in the same molecular function or cellular processes and exhibit a significant level of aggregated association with MDD. In particular, we used a text-mining-based data analysis to prioritize candidate gene sets implicated in MDD and conducted a multi-locus association analysis to look for enriched signals of nominally associated MDD susceptibility loci within each of the gene sets. Our primary analysis is based on the meta-analysis of three large MDD GWAS data sets (total N=4346 cases and 4430 controls). After correction for multiple testing, we found that genes involved in glutamatergic synaptic neurotransmission were significantly associated with MDD (set-based association P=6.9 × 10(-4)). This result is consistent with previous studies that support a role of the glutamatergic system in synaptic plasticity and MDD and support the potential utility of targeting glutamatergic neurotransmission in the treatment of MDD.

  2. A Support System for Error Correction Questions in Programming Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachisu, Yoshinari; Yoshida, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    For supporting the education of debugging skills, we propose a system for generating error correction questions of programs and checking the correctness. The system generates HTML files for answering questions and CGI programs for checking answers. Learners read and answer questions on Web browsers. For management of error injection, we have…

  3. Web Browser/Server方式的GPS车辆管理系统的设计与实现%Design&Realization of GPS Vehicle Control&Supervision System with Web Browser/Server Liu Kaiyang Han Daofan Ma Aimin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳开洋; 韩道范; 马爱民

    2001-01-01

    文章介绍了在GSM移动通信网上实现的GPS车辆监控调度系统,用MapInfo公司最近推出的基于Internet/Intranet的地图应用服务器--MapXtreme 实现Web Browser/Server方式的系统运行机制,初步提出了当今比较新颖的Web GIS 思想及实际解决方案。

  4. WebViz: A web browser based application for collaborative analysis of 3D data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegg, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    In the age of high speed Internet where people can interact instantly, scientific tools have lacked technology which can incorporate this concept of communication using the web. To solve this issue a web application for geological studies has been created, tentatively titled WebViz. This web application utilizes tools provided by Google Web Toolkit to create an AJAX web application capable of features found in non web based software. Using these tools, a web application can be created to act as piece of software from anywhere in the globe with a reasonably speedy Internet connection. An application of this technology can be seen with data regarding the recent tsunami from the major japan earthquakes. After constructing the appropriate data to fit a computer render software called HVR, WebViz can request images of the tsunami data and display it to anyone who has access to the application. This convenience alone makes WebViz a viable solution, but the option to interact with this data with others around the world causes WebViz to be taken as a serious computational tool. WebViz also can be used on any javascript enabled browser such as those found on modern tablets and smart phones over a fast wireless connection. Due to the fact that WebViz's current state is built using Google Web Toolkit the portability of the application is in it's most efficient form. Though many developers have been involved with the project, each person has contributed to increase the usability and speed of the application. In the project's most recent form a dramatic speed increase has been designed as well as a more efficient user interface. The speed increase has been informally noticed in recent uses of the application in China and Australia with the hosting server being located at the University of Minnesota. The user interface has been improved to not only look better but the functionality has been improved. Major functions of the application are rotating the 3D object using buttons

  5. Grazers, browsers, and fire influence the extent and spatial pattern of tree cover in the Serengeti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdo, Ricardo M; Holt, Robert D; Fryxell, John M

    2009-01-01

    open migratory ecosystems such as the Serengeti, grazers can modulate the impact of fire and the strength of the interaction between fire and browsers by altering fuel loads and responding to the distribution of grass across the landscape, and thus exert strong effects on spatial patterns of tree cover.

  6. Browser Based Platform in Maintaining Clinical Activities - Use of The iPads in Head and Neck Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W. Y.; Moore, J.; Quon, H.; Evans, K.; Sharabi, A.; Herman, J.; Hacker-Prietz, A.; McNutt, T.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Incompatibility between documentation and clinical workflow causes physician resistance in organized data collection, which in turn complicates the use of data in patient care improvement. To resolve the gap, we developed an iPad compatible in situ browser-based platform that integrates clinical activity with data collection and analysis presentation. The ability to perform in-clinic activities and monitor decision making using the iPad was evaluated. Methods: A browser-based platform that can exchange and present analysed data from the MOSAIQ database was developed in situ, the iPads were distributed in head and neck clinics to present the browser for clinical activities, data collection and assessment monitoring. Performance of the iPads for in-clinic activities was observed. Results: All in-clinic documentation activities can be performed without workstation computers. Accessing patient record and previous assessments was significantly faster without having to open the MOSAIQ application. Patient assessments can be completed with the physician facing the patient. Graphical presentation of toxicity progression and patient radiation plans to the patient can be performed in single interface without patient leaving the seating area. Updates in patient treatment status and medical history were presented in real time without having to move paper charts around. Conclusions: The iPad can be used in clinical activities independent of computer workstations. Improvements in clinical workflow can be critical in reducing physician resistance in data maintenance. Using the iPad in providing real-time quality monitoring is intuitive to both providers and patients.

  7. Intelligent Web Browser and Related Key Techniques%智能Web浏览器及其关键技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应晓敏; 窦文华

    2001-01-01

    With the exponential growth of the Wold Wide Web ,there is also a growing demand in intelligent Web browser(IWB),which can provide users with personal services like guiding users while searching the Web,filtering the information that users aren't interested in,notifying users when there are valuable changes in the Web sites or pages that users care,and so on. In this paper,we introduce some former researches ,present the architecture of the IWB,describe its main functions ,and discuss key techniques in the resarch of IWB.

  8. Ensembl Genomes 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kersey, Paul Julian; Allen, James E; Christensen, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    genomes, and now includes the genomes of over 9000 bacteria. Specific extensions to the web and programmatic interfaces have been developed to support users in navigating these large data sets. Looking forward, analytic tools to allow targeted selection of data for visualization and download are likely...

  9. 移动浏览器的发展与技术分析%The Development of the Mobile Browser and Technical Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王江静

    2012-01-01

      浏览器是指能够呈现网页内容并与用户进行交互的一种软件,是网络用户连接到互联网的主要工具。该文介绍了浏览器的发展进程;分析了移动浏览器的特点和移动终端应用程序Native App的优势与不足;总结了HTML5技术优势以及对移动浏览器的深远影响;最后对浏览器的前景作了展望。%  The browser is a software that can present Web content and to interact with the user, which is the main tool for net⁃work users to connect to the Internet. This article describes the development process of the browser; The characteristics of the mobile browsers, as well as the advantages and shortcomings of mobile terminal applications are analyzed; The advantage of HT⁃ML5 technology and its far-reaching impact for the mobile browser are summarized; Finally the browser's prospects outlook is made.

  10. 电脑浏览器交互界面体验分析%Analysis of the Computer Browser Interface Experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊潇; 张敏言

    2015-01-01

    With the gradual perfection Of the PC browser's development and the enhancement of the market competition, more and more browsers expect to capture the market and seek more new opportunities. Through studying the user experience, this paper bears the people-oriented principle and analyzes interface as well as layout of the PC browser to discuss the distinguished features and advantages among different browsers. Based on the above analysis, this paper concludes some new interactive principles and theories which are beneficial to the PC browsers development.%随着PC浏览器的发展日趋完善和市场竞争的增强,越来越多的浏览器希望能够占领市场,寻求新的机会。通过研究用户体验,以人为本,分析PC浏览器的交互界面以及布局,探讨不同浏览器的优势特色,总结提出了一些有利于PC浏览器发展的新交互原则和理论。

  11. Mouse genome database 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.

  12. A rural worker infected with a bovine-prevalent genotype of Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus supports zoonotic transmission and inconsistency of MLST and whole-genome typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraola, G; Betancor, L; Calleros, L; Gadea, P; Algorta, G; Galeano, S; Muxi, P; Greif, G; Pérez, R

    2015-08-01

    Whole-genome characterisation in clinical microbiology enables to detect trends in infection dynamics and disease transmission. Here, we report a case of bacteraemia due to Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus in a rural worker under cancer treatment that was diagnosed with cellulitis; the patient was treated with antibiotics and recovered. The routine typing methods were not able to identify the microorganism causing the infection, so it was further analysed by molecular methods and whole-genome sequencing. The multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) revealed the presence of the bovine-associated ST-4 genotype. Whole-genome comparisons with other C. fetus strains revealed an inconsistent phylogenetic position based on the core genome, discordant with previous ST-4 strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first C. fetus subsp. fetus carrying the ST-4 isolated from humans and represents a probable case of zoonotic transmission from cattle.

  13. Open access to sequence: Browsing the Pichia pastoris genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graf Alexandra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The first genome sequences of the important yeast protein production host Pichia pastoris have been released into the public domain this spring. In order to provide the scientific community easy and versatile access to the sequence, two web-sites have been installed as a resource for genomic sequence, gene and protein information for P. pastoris: A GBrowse based genome browser was set up at http://www.pichiagenome.org and a genome portal with gene annotation and browsing functionality at http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/webtools/bogas. Both websites are offering information on gene annotation and function, regulation and structure. In addition, a WiKi based platform allows all users to create additional information on genes, proteins, physiology and other items of P. pastoris research, so that the Pichia community can benefit from exchange of knowledge, data and materials.

  14. Using Apollo to browse and edit genome annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sima; Harris, Nomi

    2006-01-01

    An annotation is any feature that can be tied to genomic sequence, such as an exon, transcript, promoter, or transposable element. As biological knowledge increases, annotations of different types need to be added and modified, and links to other sources of information need to be incorporated, to allow biologists to easily access all of the available sequence analysis data and design appropriate experiments. The Apollo genome browser and editor offers biologists these capabilities. Apollo can display many different types of computational evidence, such as alignments and similarities based on BLAST searches (UNITS 3.3 & 3.4), and enables biologists to utilize computational evidence to create and edit gene models and other genomic features, e.g., using experimental evidence to refine exon-intron structures predicted by gene prediction algorithms. This protocol describes simple ways to browse genome annotation data, as well as techniques for editing annotations and loading data from different sources.

  15. Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Fortson, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Joyce, G. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Kimble, H. J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Max, C. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Prince, T. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, P. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Woodin, W. H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  16. 移动互联网手机浏览器业务建设探讨%Construction of mobile internet mobile browser business

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶敏

    2012-01-01

      This article first analyzes the business necessity of the construction of China Mobile's mobile internet mobile browser, and describes the types and characteristics of the mobile browser business system. Combined with China Mobile’s business characteristics, and proposed the mobile browser business's strategic position and construction of ideas, and to explore the building program of the mobile browser, mobile browser business-building outlook. The construction of the new mobile browser business has far-reaching significance for the development of China Mobile's mobile Internet, and has a broad space for development and an extremely important strategic position.%  本文首先分析了中国移动发展移动互联网的手机浏览器业务建设的必要性,并描述了手机浏览器业务系统的种类和特征。结合中国移动的业务特色,提出了手机浏览器业务的战略地位和建设思路,并初步探讨了手机浏览器业务的建设方案,最后对手机浏览器业务建设提出了展望。手机浏览器业务的建设对于中国移动移动互联网的发展具有深远的意义,且其具有广阔的发展空间和极其重要的战略地位。

  17. 浏览器中拦截Web攻击的研究%The Research of Defending Web-based Attack in Browser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 钱文祥

    2015-01-01

    The browser is an important entrance of the Internet .Its vulnerability directly affects users ’ data and property safety .Three kinds of common attack methods via web browser were presented and analyzed , i.e.Cross Site Scripting attack , Cross Site Request Forgery attack and Click -jacking attack .According to the attacker's attack mode , three corresponding methods of defending attacks were proposed so as to strengthen safety of the browser .The self-made browser was achieved by using the WebBrower control .Webpage script prefiltering and other related module were installed and loaded , the defense function was realized .Through related experiments , the systems using the proposed method can block attacks .The method effectively improves the browser safety and reduces the risk of network .%浏览器是互联网的重要入口,其脆弱性直接影响到用户数据和财产的安全。本文在分析跨站脚本攻击、跨站请求攻击以及点击劫持的攻击方法和成因的基础上,提出相应的动态检测和拦截方式,从而加强浏览器的安全性。通过使用WebBrowser 控件实现自定义浏览器,载入网页脚本预过滤等相关模块,实现防御功能。相关实验证明,本方案将有效提升浏览器安全性,减少网络风险。

  18. The impact of the genome-wide supported variant in the cyclin M2 gene on gray matter morphology in schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Ohi, Kazutaka; Hashimoto, Ryota; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Yasuda, Yuka; Fujimoto, Michiko; Umeda-Yano, Satomi; Fukunaga, Masaki; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Iwase, Masao; Kazui, Hiroaki; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome-wide significant associations of schizophrenia with eight SNPs in the CNNM2, MIR137, PCGEM1, TRIM26, CSMD1, MMP16, NT5C2 and CCDC68 genes have been identified in a recent mega-analysis of genome-wide association studies. To date, the role of these SNPs on gray matter (GM) volumes remains unclear. Methods After performing quality control for minor-allele frequency > 5% using a JPT HapMap sample and our sample, a genotyping call rate > 95% and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium testin...

  19. Fish the ChIPs: a pipeline for automated genomic annotation of ChIP-Seq data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minucci Saverio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput sequencing is generating massive amounts of data at a pace that largely exceeds the throughput of data analysis routines. Here we introduce Fish the ChIPs (FC, a computational pipeline aimed at a broad public of users and designed to perform complete ChIP-Seq data analysis of an unlimited number of samples, thus increasing throughput, reproducibility and saving time. Results Starting from short read sequences, FC performs the following steps: 1 quality controls, 2 alignment to a reference genome, 3 peak calling, 4 genomic annotation, 5 generation of raw signal tracks for visualization on the UCSC and IGV genome browsers. FC exploits some of the fastest and most effective tools today available. Installation on a Mac platform requires very basic computational skills while configuration and usage are supported by a user-friendly graphic user interface. Alternatively, FC can be compiled from the source code on any Unix machine and then run with the possibility of customizing each single parameter through a simple configuration text file that can be generated using a dedicated user-friendly web-form. Considering the execution time, FC can be run on a desktop machine, even though the use of a computer cluster is recommended for analyses of large batches of data. FC is perfectly suited to work with data coming from Illumina Solexa Genome Analyzers or ABI SOLiD and its usage can potentially be extended to any sequencing platform. Conclusions Compared to existing tools, FC has two main advantages that make it suitable for a broad range of users. First of all, it can be installed and run by wet biologists on a Mac machine. Besides it can handle an unlimited number of samples, being convenient for large analyses. In this context, computational biologists can increase reproducibility of their ChIP-Seq data analyses while saving time for downstream analyses. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Gavin Huttley, George

  20. Dual roles of an algal farming damselfish as a cultivator and opportunistic browser of an invasive seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Kimberly A; Valentino, Lauren M; Maruska, Karen P

    2014-01-01

    Herbivory is a fundamental process determining reef resilience, and while algal farming damselfishes can help shape benthic assemblages, an understanding of their contribution to areas outside of defended territories is relatively unexplored. Here, we demonstrate how the farming damselfish Stegastes marginatus plays a dual role in benthic structuring by 1) contributing to persistence of the invasive macroalga Acanthophora spicifera within a Hawaiian marine protected area, where the macroalga occurred exclusively inside Stegastes territories, and 2) behaving as an opportunistic browser of the exotic alga outside their territorial borders. Greater than 50% of the biomass of tethered A. spicifera was consumed within one-hour when placed outside Stegastes territories, compared to extensive farming damselfish populations.

  1. Genomic analyses identify hundreds of variants associated with age at menarche and support a role for puberty timing in cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Felix R; Thompson, Deborah J; Helgason, Hannes

    2017-01-01

    The timing of puberty is a highly polygenic childhood trait that is epidemiologically associated with various adult diseases. Using 1000 Genomes Project-imputed genotype data in up to ∼370,000 women, we identify 389 independent signals (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for age at menarche, a milestone in female p...

  2. Genomic analyses identify hundreds of variants associated with age at menarche and support a role for puberty timing in cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Day, Felix R.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Helgason, Hannes; Chasman, Daniel I.; Finucane, Hilary; Sulem, Patrick; Ruth, Katherine S.; Whalen, Sean; Sarkar, Abhishek K.; Albrecht, Eva; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Amini, Marzyeh; Barbieri, Caterina M.; Boutin, Thibaud; Campbell, Archie; Demerath, Ellen; Giri, Ayush; He, Chunyan; Hottenga, Jouke J.; Karlsson, Robert; Kolcic, Ivana; Loh, Po-Ru; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Mangino, Massimo; Marco, Brumat; McMahon, George; Medland, Sarah E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Noordam, Raymond; Nutile, Teresa; Paternoster, Lavinia; Perjakova, Natalia; Porcu, Eleonora; Rose, Lynda M.; Schraut, Katharina E.; Segre, Ayellet V.; Smith, Albert V.; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Bergmann, Sven; Bochud, Murielle; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broer, Linda; Bruning, Thomas; Buring, Julie E.; Campbell, Harry; Catamo, Eulalia; Chanock, Stephen; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Corre, Tanguy; Couch, Fergus J.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Cox, Angela; Crisponi, Laura; Czene, Kamila; Smith, George Davey; de Geus, Eco J. C. N.; de Mutsert, Renee; De Vivo, Immaculata; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fernandez-Rhodes, Lindsay; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Franke, Lude; Gabrielson, Marike; Gandin, Ilaria; Giles, Graham G.; Grallert, Harald; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Guenel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Harris, Tamara B.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Heiss, Gerardo; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Frank; Hunter, David J.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Im, Hae Kyung; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Joshi, Peter K.; Karasik, David; Kellis, Manolis; Kutalik, Zoltan; LaChance, Genevieve; Lambrechts, Diether; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J.; Laven, Joop S. E.; Lenarduzzi, Stefania; Li, Jingmei; Lind, Penelope A.; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, YongMei; Luan, Jian'an; Magi, Reedik; Mannermaa, Arto; Mbarek, Hamdi; McCarthy, Mark I.; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Menni, Cristina; Metspalu, Andres; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mulligan, Anna M.; Nalls, Mike A.; Navarro, Pau; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nyholt, Dale R.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; O'Mara, Tracy A.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palotie, Aarno; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Pouta, Anneli; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Iffat; Ring, Susan M.; Robino, Antonietta; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Rudan, Igor; Rueedi, Rico; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Scott, Robert A.; Shah, Mitul; Sorice, Rossella; Southey, Melissa C.; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir; Steri, Maristella; Strauch, Konstantin; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tikkanen, Emmi; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Traglia, Michela; Truong, Therese; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Edwards, Digna R. Velez; Vitart, Veronique; Voelker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wang, Qin; Widen, Elisabeth; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Zygmunt, Marek; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Ciullo, Marina; Cucca, Francesco; Esko, Tonu; Franceschini, Nora; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hayward, Caroline; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Nohr, Ellen A.; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Price, Alkes L.; Ridker, Paul M.; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D.; Stoeckl, Doris; Toniolo, Daniela; Ulivi, Sheila; Visser, Jenny A.; Voelzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Wilson, James F.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Thorsteindottir, Unnur; Pollard, Katherine S.; Easton, Douglas F.; Tung, Joyce Y.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hinds, David; Murray, Anna; Murabito, Joanne M.; Stefansson, Kari; Ong, Ken K.; Perry, John R. B.; Study, LifeLines Cohort

    The timing of puberty is a highly polygenic childhood trait that is epidemiologically associated with various adult diseases. Using 1000 Genomes Project-imputed genotype data in up to similar to 370,000 women, we identify 389 independent signals (P <5 x 10(-8)) for age at menarche, a milestone in

  3. VISTA - computational tools for comparative genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Pachter, Lior; Poliakov, Alexander; Rubin,Edward M.; Dubchak, Inna

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of DNA sequences from different species is a fundamental method for identifying functional elements in genomes. Here we describe the VISTA family of tools created to assist biologists in carrying out this task. Our first VISTA server at http://www-gsd.lbl.gov/VISTA/ was launched in the summer of 2000 and was designed to align long genomic sequences and visualize these alignments with associated functional annotations. Currently the VISTA site includes multiple comparative genomics tools and provides users with rich capabilities to browse pre-computed whole-genome alignments of large vertebrate genomes and other groups of organisms with VISTA Browser, submit their own sequences of interest to several VISTA servers for various types of comparative analysis, and obtain detailed comparative analysis results for a set of cardiovascular genes. We illustrate capabilities of the VISTA site by the analysis of a 180 kilobase (kb) interval on human chromosome 5 that encodes for the kinesin family member3A (KIF3A) protein.

  4. Prototype of Multifunctional Full-text Library in the Architecture Web-browser / Web-server / SQL-server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapin, Sergey; Kukovyakin, Alexey

    Within the framework of the research program "Textaurus" an operational prototype of multifunctional library T-Libra v.4.1. has been created which makes it possible to carry out flexible parametrizable search within a full-text database. The information system is realized in the architecture Web-browser / Web-server / SQL-server. This allows to achieve an optimal combination of universality and efficiency of text processing, on the one hand, and convenience and minimization of expenses for an end user (due to applying of a standard Web-browser as a client application), on the other one. The following principles underlie the information system: a) multifunctionality, b) intelligence, c) multilingual primary texts and full-text searching, d) development of digital library (DL) by a user ("administrative client"), e) multi-platform working. A "library of concepts", i.e. a block of functional models of semantic (concept-oriented) searching, as well as a subsystem of parametrizable queries to a full-text database, which is closely connected with the "library", serve as a conceptual basis of multifunctionality and "intelligence" of the DL T-Libra v.4.1. An author's paragraph is a unit of full-text searching in the suggested technology. At that, the "logic" of an educational / scientific topic or a problem can be built in a multilevel flexible structure of a query and the "library of concepts", replenishable by the developers and experts. About 10 queries of various level of complexity and conceptuality are realized in the suggested version of the information system: from simple terminological searching (taking into account lexical and grammatical paradigms of Russian) to several kinds of explication of terminological fields and adjustable two-parameter thematic searching (a [set of terms] and a [distance between terms] within the limits of an author's paragraph are such parameters correspondingly).

  5. Global Intersection of Long Non-Coding RNAs with Processed and Unprocessed Pseudogenes in the Human Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael John Milligan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudogenes are abundant in the human genome and had long been thought of purely as nonfunctional gene fossils. Recent observations point to a role for pseudogenes in regulating genes transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally in human cells. To computationally interrogate the network space of integrated pseudogene and long non-coding RNA regulation in the human transcriptome, we developed and implemented an algorithm to identify all long non-coding RNA (lncRNA transcripts that overlap the genomic spans, and specifically the exons, of any human pseudogenes in either sense or antisense orientation. As inputs to our algorithm, we imported three public repositories of pseudogenes: GENCODE v17 (processed and unprocessed, Ensembl 72; Retroposed Pseudogenes V5 (processed only and Yale Pseudo60 (processed and unprocessed, Ensembl 60; two public lncRNA catalogs: Broad Institute, GENCODE v17; NCBI annotated piRNAs; and NHGRI clinical variants. The data sets were retrieved from the UCSC Genome Database using the UCSC Table Browser. We identified 2277 loci containing exon-to-exon overlaps between pseudogenes, both processed and unprocessed, and long non-coding RNA genes. Of these loci we identified 1167 with Genbank EST and full-length cDNA support providing direct evidence of transcription on one or both strands with exon-to-exon overlaps. The analysis converged on 313 pseudogene-lncRNA exon-to-exon overlaps that were bidirectionally supported by both full-length cDNAs and ESTs. In the process of identifying transcribed pseudogenes, we generated a comprehensive, positionally non-redundant encyclopedia of human pseudogenes, drawing upon multiple, and formerly disparate public pseudogene repositories. Collectively, these observations suggest that pseudogenes are pervasively transcribed on both strands and are common drivers of gene regulation.

  6. Spliceosomal intron insertions in genome compacted ray-finned fishes as evident from phylogeny of MC receptors, also supported by a few other GPCRs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insertions of spliceosomal introns are very rare events during evolution of vertebrates and the mechanisms governing creation of novel intron(s remain obscure. Largely, gene structures of melanocortin (MC receptors are characterized by intron-less architecture. However, recently a few exceptions have been reported in some fishes. This warrants a systematic survey of MC receptors for understanding intron insertion events during vertebrate evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have compiled an extended list of MC receptors from different vertebrate genomes with variations in fishes. Notably, the closely linked MC2Rs and MC5Rs from a group of ray-finned fishes have three and one intron insertion(s, respectively, with conserved positions and intron phase. In both genes, one novel insertion was in the highly conserved DRY motif at the end of helix TM3. Further, the proto-splice site MAG↑R is maintained at intron insertion sites in these two genes. However, the orthologs of these receptors from zebrafish and tetrapods are intron-less, suggesting these introns are simultaneously created in selected fishes. Surprisingly, these novel introns are traceable only in four fish genomes. We found that these fish genomes are severely compacted after the separation from zebrafish. Furthermore, we also report novel intron insertions in P2Y receptors and in CHRM3. Finally, we report ultrasmall introns in MC2R genes from selected fishes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The current repository of MC receptors illustrates that fishes have no MC3R ortholog. MC2R, MC5R, P2Y receptors and CHRM3 have novel intron insertions only in ray-finned fishes that underwent genome compaction. These receptors share one intron at an identical position suggestive of being inserted contemporaneously. In addition to repetitive elements, genome compaction is now believed to be a new hallmark that promotes intron insertions, as it requires rapid DNA breakage and subsequent

  7. Design and Implementation of an Embedded Browser Based on IPTV%一种基于IPTV的嵌入式浏览器的设计与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林俊男; 杨晨晖

    2011-01-01

    介绍嵌入式浏览器发展背景及现状,提出一种基于IPTV(交互式网络电视)的嵌入式浏览器的设计方法。利用Qt开放源代码中的Webkit模块,通过交叉编译和移植,设计和实现基于ST-9150板子上的嵌入式浏览器。并通过设计一些用户接口,能基本满足用户通过浏览器上网的需求。%Introduces the background and development of embedded browser, proposes a design method of IPTV-based embedded browser. Designs and realizes an embedded browser by means of crosscompiling and porting the webkit module in the Qt open source codes to ST-9150 board. To satisfy user's need of accessing to the Internet through the browser, designs some user interfaces.

  8. High-Throughput Sequencing, a VersatileWeapon to Support Genome-Based Diagnosis in Infectious Diseases: Applications to Clinical Bacteriology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ségolène Caboche

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent progresses of high-throughput sequencing (HTS technologies enable easy and cost-reduced access to whole genome sequencing (WGS or re-sequencing. HTS associated with adapted, automatic and fast bioinformatics solutions for sequencing applications promises an accurate and timely identification and characterization of pathogenic agents. Many studies have demonstrated that data obtained from HTS analysis have allowed genome-based diagnosis, which has been consistent with phenotypic observations. These proofs of concept are probably the first steps toward the future of clinical microbiology. From concept to routine use, many parameters need to be considered to promote HTS as a powerful tool to help physicians and clinicians in microbiological investigations. This review highlights the milestones to be completed toward this purpose.

  9. Evolutionary Analyses of Entire Genomes Do Not Support the Association of mtDNA Mutations with Ras/MAPK Pathway Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, María; Balboa, Emilia; Heredia, Claudia; Castro-Feijóo, Lidia; Rica, Itxaso; Barreiro, Jesús; Eirís, Jesús; Cabanas, Paloma; Martínez-Soto, Isabel; Fernández-Toral, Joaquín; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Pombo, Manuel; Carracedo, Ángel; Barros, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Background There are several known autosomal genes responsible for Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes, including Noonan syndrome (NS) and related disorders (such as LEOPARD, neurofibromatosis type 1), although mutations of these genes do not explain all cases. Due to the important role played by the mitochondrion in the energetic metabolism of cardiac muscle, it was recently proposed that variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome could be a risk factor in the Noonan phenotype and in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which is a common clinical feature in Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes. In order to test these hypotheses, we sequenced entire mtDNA genomes in the largest series of patients suffering from Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes analyzed to date (n = 45), most of them classified as NS patients (n = 42). Methods/Principal Findings The results indicate that the observed mtDNA lineages were mostly of European ancestry, reproducing in a nutshell the expected haplogroup (hg) patterns of a typical Iberian dataset (including hgs H, T, J, and U). Three new branches of the mtDNA phylogeny (H1j1, U5b1e, and L2a5) are described for the first time, but none of these are likely to be related to NS or Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes when observed under an evolutionary perspective. Patterns of variation in tRNA and protein genes, as well as redundant, private and heteroplasmic variants, in the mtDNA genomes of patients were as expected when compared with the patterns inferred from a worldwide mtDNA phylogeny based on more than 8700 entire genomes. Moreover, most of the mtDNA variants found in patients had already been reported in healthy individuals and constitute common polymorphisms in human population groups. Conclusions/Significance As a whole, the observed mtDNA genome variation in the NS patients was difficult to reconcile with previous findings that indicated a pathogenic role of mtDNA variants in NS. PMID:21526175

  10. Evolutionary analyses of entire genomes do not support the association of mtDNA mutations with Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Gómez-Carballa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are several known autosomal genes responsible for Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes, including Noonan syndrome (NS and related disorders (such as LEOPARD, neurofibromatosis type 1, although mutations of these genes do not explain all cases. Due to the important role played by the mitochondrion in the energetic metabolism of cardiac muscle, it was recently proposed that variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genome could be a risk factor in the Noonan phenotype and in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, which is a common clinical feature in Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes. In order to test these hypotheses, we sequenced entire mtDNA genomes in the largest series of patients suffering from Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes analyzed to date (n = 45, most of them classified as NS patients (n = 42. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results indicate that the observed mtDNA lineages were mostly of European ancestry, reproducing in a nutshell the expected haplogroup (hg patterns of a typical Iberian dataset (including hgs H, T, J, and U. Three new branches of the mtDNA phylogeny (H1j1, U5b1e, and L2a5 are described for the first time, but none of these are likely to be related to NS or Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes when observed under an evolutionary perspective. Patterns of variation in tRNA and protein genes, as well as redundant, private and heteroplasmic variants, in the mtDNA genomes of patients were as expected when compared with the patterns inferred from a worldwide mtDNA phylogeny based on more than 8700 entire genomes. Moreover, most of the mtDNA variants found in patients had already been reported in healthy individuals and constitute common polymorphisms in human population groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As a whole, the observed mtDNA genome variation in the NS patients was difficult to reconcile with previous findings that indicated a pathogenic role of mtDNA variants in NS.

  11. Human Genome Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  12. Human Genome Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  13. Exploration of plant genomes in the FLAGdb++ environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leplé Jean-Charles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the contexts of genomics, post-genomics and systems biology approaches, data integration presents a major concern. Databases provide crucial solutions: they store, organize and allow information to be queried, they enhance the visibility of newly produced data by comparing them with previously published results, and facilitate the exploration and development of both existing hypotheses and new ideas. Results The FLAGdb++ information system was developed with the aim of using whole plant genomes as physical references in order to gather and merge available genomic data from in silico or experimental approaches. Available through a JAVA application, original interfaces and tools assist the functional study of plant genes by considering them in their specific context: chromosome, gene family, orthology group, co-expression cluster and functional network. FLAGdb++ is mainly dedicated to the exploration of large gene groups in order to decipher functional connections, to highlight shared or specific structural or functional features, and to facilitate translational tasks between plant species (Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Populus trichocarpa and Vitis vinifera. Conclusion Combining original data with the output of experts and graphical displays that differ from classical plant genome browsers, FLAGdb++ presents a powerful complementary tool for exploring plant genomes and exploiting structural and functional resources, without the need for computer programming knowledge. First launched in 2002, a 15th version of FLAGdb++ is now available and comprises four model plant genomes and over eight million genomic features.

  14. Microbial Genomics Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Guo-ping

    2004-01-01

    @@ Microorganisms, including phage/virus, were initial targets and tools for developing DNA sequencing technology. Microbial genomic study was started as a model system for the Human Genome Project (HGP) and it did successfully supported the HGP, particularly with respect to BAC contig construction and large-scale shotgun sequencing and assembly. Microbial genomics study has become the fastest developed genomics discipline along with HGP, taking the advantage of the organisms' highly diversified physiology, extremely long history of evolution, close relationship with human/environment,as well as relatively small genome sizes and simple systems for functional analysis.

  15. Microbial Genomics Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOGuo-ping

    2004-01-01

    Microorganisms, including phage/virus, were initial targets and tools for developing DNA sequencing technology. Microbial genomic study was started as a model system for the Human Genome Project (HGP) and it did successfully supported the HGP, particularly with respect to BAC contig construction and large-scale shotgun sequencing and assembly. Microbial genomics study has become the fastest developed genomics discipline along with HGP, taking the advantage of the organisms' highly diversified physiology, extremely long history of evolution, close relationship with human/environment,as well as relatively small genome sizes and simple systems for functional analysis.

  16. Genome analysis of a simultaneously predatory and prey-independent, novel Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus from the River Tiber, supports in silico predictions of both ancient and recent lateral gene transfer from diverse bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hobley Laura

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution equipped Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus predatory bacteria to invade other bacteria, digesting and replicating, sealed within them thus preventing nutrient-sharing with organisms in the surrounding environment. Bdellovibrio were previously described as “obligate predators” because only by mutations, often in gene bd0108, are 1 in ~1x107 of predatory lab strains of Bdellovibrio converted to prey-independent growth. A previous genomic analysis of B. bacteriovorus strain HD100 suggested that predatory consumption of prey DNA by lytic enzymes made Bdellovibrio less likely than other bacteria to acquire DNA by lateral gene transfer (LGT. However the Doolittle and Pan groups predicted, in silico, both ancient and recent lateral gene transfer into the B. bacteriovorus HD100 genome. Results To test these predictions, we isolated a predatory bacterium from the River Tiber- a good potential source of LGT as it is rich in diverse bacteria and organic pollutants- by enrichment culturing with E. coli prey cells. The isolate was identified as B. bacteriovorus and named as strain Tiberius. Unusually, this Tiberius strain showed simultaneous prey-independent growth on organic nutrients and predatory growth on live prey. Despite the prey-independent growth, the homolog of bd0108 did not have typical prey-independent-type mutations. The dual growth mode may reflect the high carbon content of the river, and gives B. bacteriovorus Tiberius extended non-predatory contact with the other bacteria present. The HD100 and Tiberius genomes were extensively syntenic despite their different cultured-terrestrial/freshly-isolated aquatic histories; but there were significant differences in gene content indicative of genomic flux and LGT. Gene content comparisons support previously published in silico predictions for LGT in strain HD100 with substantial conservation of genes predicted to have ancient LGT origins but little conservation of AT

  17. Gramene database: navigating plant comparative genomics resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is an online, open source, curated resource for plant comparative genomics and pathway analysis designed to support researchers working in plant genomics, breeding, evolutionary biology, system biology, and metabolic engineering. It exploits phylogenetic relationship...

  18. The MI bundle: enabling network and structural biology in genome visualization tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céol, Arnaud; Müller, Heiko

    2015-11-15

    Prioritization of candidate genes emanating from large-scale screens requires integrated analyses at the genomics, molecular, network and structural biology levels. We have extended the Integrated Genome Browser (IGB) to facilitate these tasks. The graphical user interface greatly simplifies building disease networks and zooming in at atomic resolution to identify variations in molecular complexes that may affect molecular interactions in the context of genomic data. All results are summarized in genome tracks and can be visualized and analyzed at the transcript level. The MI Bundle is a plugin for the IGB. The plugin, help, video and tutorial are available at http://cru.genomics.iit.it/igbmibundle/ and https://github.com/CRUiit/igb-mi-bundle/wiki. The source code is released under the Apache License, Version 2. arnaud.ceol@iit.it Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-08-08

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. We have created a database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes entitled ECRbase that is constructed from a collection of pairwise vertebrate genome alignments produced by the ECR Browser database. ECRbase features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes presented in the database. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in all ECRs and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and two pufferfish genomes. It is freely accessible at http://ECRbase.dcode.org.

  20. Cancer genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Bodil; Guldberg, Per; Ralfkiær, Elisabeth Methner

    2007-01-01

    Almost all cells in the human body contain a complete copy of the genome with an estimated number of 25,000 genes. The sequences of these genes make up about three percent of the genome and comprise the inherited set of genetic information. The genome also contains information that determines whe...

  1. Remote Mobile Health Monitoring System Based on Smart Phone and Browser/Server Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunzhou; Liu, Huiyu; Su, Xiaolin; Jiang, Pei; Wei, Dongfei

    2015-01-01

    A remote mobile health monitoring system with mobile phone and web service capabilities is proposed in this paper. It provides an end-to-end solution; specifically, (1) physiologic parameters, including respiration rate and heart rate, are measured by wearable sensors and recorded by a mobile phone which presents the graphical interface for the user to observe his/her health status more easily; (2) it provides doctors and family members with necessary data through a web interface and enables authorized personnel to monitor the patient's condition and to facilitate remote diagnosis; and (3) it supports real-time alarming and positioning services during an urgent situation, such as a tumble or a heart attack, so that unexpected events can be handled in a timely manner. Experimental results show that the proposed system can reliably monitor the physiologic parameters and conveniently report the user's position.

  2. Remote Mobile Health Monitoring System Based on Smart Phone and Browser/Server Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhou Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A remote mobile health monitoring system with mobile phone and web service capabilities is proposed in this paper. It provides an end-to-end solution; specifically, (1 physiologic parameters, including respiration rate and heart rate, are measured by wearable sensors and recorded by a mobile phone which presents the graphical interface for the user to observe his/her health status more easily; (2 it provides doctors and family members with necessary data through a web interface and enables authorized personnel to monitor the patient’s condition and to facilitate remote diagnosis; and (3 it supports real-time alarming and positioning services during an urgent situation, such as a tumble or a heart attack, so that unexpected events can be handled in a timely manner. Experimental results show that the proposed system can reliably monitor the physiologic parameters and conveniently report the user’s position.

  3. The integrated microbial genome resource of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checcucci, Alice; Mengoni, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Microbial Genomes and Metagenomes (IMG) is a biocomputational system that allows to provide information and support for annotation and comparative analysis of microbial genomes and metagenomes. IMG has been developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE)-Joint Genome Institute (JGI). IMG platform contains both draft and complete genomes, sequenced by Joint Genome Institute and other public and available genomes. Genomes of strains belonging to Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya domains are present as well as those of viruses and plasmids. Here, we provide some essential features of IMG system and case study for pangenome analysis.

  4. Technology and Application of Internet Browser%Internet上浏览器技术及其发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张源

    2002-01-01

    伴随着互联网的迅猛发展,在互联网上应用的浏览器越来越多,最常用的是IE,NETSCAPE等Web浏览器.然而,人们最方便的交流方式就是对话,因此语音浏览器在网上的应用将会越来越多.本文介绍一种基于VoiceBrowser的语音界面框架,然后介绍了Multimodal Browser.它使人们可以用多种交互方式和网络进行交流,还可以将各种电子设备用多模态方式接入互联网.本文还讨论了它们的技术难点及解决方法.最后介绍了它们的优点和发展趋势.

  5. GrayStarServer: Server-side spectrum synthesis with a browser-based client-side user interface

    CERN Document Server

    Short, C Ian

    2016-01-01

    I present GrayStarServer (GSS), a stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis code of pedagogical accuracy that is accessible in any web browser on commonplace computational devices and that runs on a time-scale of a few seconds. The addition of spectrum synthesis annotated with line identifications extends the functionality and pedagogical applicability of GSS beyond that of its predecessor, GrayStar3 (GS3). The spectrum synthesis is based on a line list acquired from the NIST atomic spectra database, and the GSS post-processing and user interface (UI) client allows the user to inspect the plain text ASCII version of the line list, as well as to apply macroscopic broadening. Unlike GS3, GSS carries out the physical modeling on the server side in Java, and communicates with the JavaScript and HTML client via an asynchronous HTTP request. I also describe other improvements beyond GS3 such as more realistic modeling physics and use of the HTML element for higher quality plotting and rendering of result...

  6. LINCS Canvas Browser: interactive web app to query, browse and interrogate LINCS L1000 gene expression signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qiaonan; Flynn, Corey; Niepel, Mario; Hafner, Marc; Muhlich, Jeremy L; Fernandez, Nicolas F; Rouillard, Andrew D; Tan, Christopher M; Chen, Edward Y; Golub, Todd R; Sorger, Peter K; Subramanian, Aravind; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2014-07-01

    For the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) project many gene expression signatures using the L1000 technology have been produced. The L1000 technology is a cost-effective method to profile gene expression in large scale. LINCS Canvas Browser (LCB) is an interactive HTML5 web-based software application that facilitates querying, browsing and interrogating many of the currently available LINCS L1000 data. LCB implements two compacted layered canvases, one to visualize clustered L1000 expression data, and the other to display enrichment analysis results using 30 different gene set libraries. Clicking on an experimental condition highlights gene-sets enriched for the differentially expressed genes from the selected experiment. A search interface allows users to input gene lists and query them against over 100 000 conditions to find the top matching experiments. The tool integrates many resources for an unprecedented potential for new discoveries in systems biology and systems pharmacology. The LCB application is available at http://www.maayanlab.net/LINCS/LCB. Customized versions will be made part of the http://lincscloud.org and http://lincs.hms.harvard.edu websites.

  7. Singapore Genome Variation Project: a haplotype map of three Southeast Asian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Yik-Ying; Sim, Xueling; Ong, Rick T H; Tan, Adrian K S; Chen, Jieming; Tantoso, Erwin; Small, Kerrin S; Ku, Chee-Seng; Lee, Edmund J D; Seielstad, Mark; Chia, Kee-Seng

    2009-11-01

    The Singapore Genome Variation Project (SGVP) provides a publicly available resource of 1.6 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 268 individuals from the Chinese, Malay, and Indian population groups in Southeast Asia. This online database catalogs information and summaries on genotype and phased haplotype data, including allele frequencies, assessment of linkage disequilibrium (LD), and recombination rates in a format similar to the International HapMap Project. Here, we introduce this resource and describe the analysis of human genomic variation upon agglomerating data from the HapMap and the Human Genome Diversity Project, providing useful insights into the population structure of the three major population groups in Asia. In addition, this resource also surveyed across the genome for variation in regional patterns of LD between the HapMap and SGVP populations, and for signatures of positive natural selection using two well-established metrics: iHS and XP-EHH. The raw and processed genetic data, together with all population genetic summaries, are publicly available for download and browsing through a web browser modeled with the Generic Genome Browser.

  8. viruSITE—integrated database for viral genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Matej; Beke, Gabor; Klucar, Lubos

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities and the reservoir of most of the genetic diversity in the Earth's biosphere. Viral genomes are very diverse, generally short in length and compared to other organisms carry only few genes. viruSITE is a novel database which brings together high-value information compiled from various resources. viruSITE covers the whole universe of viruses and focuses on viral genomes, genes and proteins. The database contains information on virus taxonomy, host range, genome features, sequential relatedness as well as the properties and functions of viral genes and proteins. All entries in the database are linked to numerous information resources. The above-mentioned features make viruSITE a comprehensive knowledge hub in the field of viral genomics. The web interface of the database was designed so as to offer an easy-to-navigate, intuitive and user-friendly environment. It provides sophisticated text searching and a taxonomy-based browsing system. viruSITE also allows for an alternative approach based on sequence search. A proprietary genome browser generates a graphical representation of viral genomes. In addition to retrieving and visualising data, users can perform comparative genomics analyses using a variety of tools. Database URL: http://www.virusite.org/ PMID:28025349

  9. Conditioned genome reconstruction: how to avoid choosing the conditioning genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Matthew; Bryant, David; Susko, Edward

    2007-02-01

    Genome phylogenies can be inferred from data on the presence and absence of genes across taxa. Logdet distances may be a good method, because they allow expected genome size to vary across the tree. Recently, Lake and Rivera proposed conditioned genome reconstruction (calculation of logdet distances using only those genes present in a conditioning genome) to deal with unobservable genes that are absent from every taxon of interest. We prove that their method can consistently estimate the topology for almost any choice of conditioning genome. Nevertheless, the choice of conditioning genome is important for small samples. For real bacterial genome data, different choices of conditioning genome can result in strong bootstrap support for different tree topologies. To overcome this problem, we developed supertree methods that combine information from all choices of conditioning genome. One of these methods, based on the BIONJ algorithm, performs well on simulated data and may have applications to other supertree problems. However, an analysis of 40 bacterial genomes using this method supports an incorrect clade of parasites. This is a common feature of model-based gene content methods and is due to parallel gene loss.

  10. The ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colbourne, John K.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Gilbert, Donald; Thomas, W. Kelley; Tucker, Abraham; Oakley, Todd H.; Tokishita, Shinichi; Aerts, Andrea; Arnold, Georg J.; Basu, Malay Kumar; Bauer, Darren J.; Caceres, Carla E.; Carmel, Liran; Casola, Claudio; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Detter, John C.; Dong, Qunfeng; Dusheyko, Serge; Eads, Brian D.; Frohlich, Thomas; Geiler-Samerotte, Kerry A.; Gerlach, Daniel; Hatcher, Phil; Jogdeo, Sanjuro; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Kültz, Dietmar; Laforsch, Christian; Lindquist, Erika; Lopez, Jacqueline; Manak, Robert; Muller, Jean; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Patwardhan, Rupali P.; Pitluck, Samuel; Pritham, Ellen J.; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Rho, Mina; Rogozin, Igor B.; Sakarya, Onur; Salamov, Asaf; Schaack, Sarah; Shapiro, Harris; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Skalitzky, Courtney; Smith, Zachary; Souvorov, Alexander; Sung, Way; Tang, Zuojian; Tsuchiya, Dai; Tu, Hank; Vos, Harmjan; Wang, Mei; Wolf, Yuri I.; Yamagata, Hideo; Yamada, Takuji; Ye, Yuzhen; Shaw, Joseph R.; Andrews, Justen; Crease, Teresa J.; Tang, Haixu; Lucas, Susan M.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Bork, Peer; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lynch, Michael; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2011-02-04

    This document provides supporting material related to the sequencing of the ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex. This material includes information on materials and methods and supporting text, as well as supplemental figures, tables, and references. The coverage of materials and methods addresses genome sequence, assembly, and mapping to chromosomes, gene inventory, attributes of a compact genome, the origin and preservation of Daphnia pulex genes, implications of Daphnia's genome structure, evolutionary diversification of duplicated genes, functional significance of expanded gene families, and ecoresponsive genes. Supporting text covers chromosome studies, gene homology among Daphnia genomes, micro-RNA and transposable elements and the 46 Daphnia pulex opsins. 36 figures, 50 tables, 183 references.

  11. Browser Software Special Security Loophole Mining Technology Research%浏览器软件的异型安全漏洞挖掘技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王继刚; 张光; 张建辉

    2012-01-01

      面对日益复杂的网络应用,浏览器软件的功能变得越发复杂。浏览器软件额外的功能辅助了用户的使用,方便了用户的操作,但受制于软件开发者的安全认识水平,这些额外的功能也将新型的安全漏洞引入到了浏览器软件当中。新型的安全漏洞不同于以往的安全漏洞类型,其具有很强的隐蔽性,需要结合特定的功能才能得以实现。文章结合具体漏洞挖掘案例,给出了如何发现浏览器软件新型安全漏洞的方法。%  Will face increasingly complex web applications, web browser software function become more complex. Browser software additional auxiliary function for the user to use, convenient for users to operate, but is restricted to the software developer's safety awareness level, these additional features will also be new security holes into the browser software. New security holes is different from the previous security vulnerabilities, and has strong concealment, requires a combination of specific functions can be achieved. In this paper, combined with specific vulnerabilities mining case, given how to find browser software new methodological flaw.

  12. Applications of myeloid-specific promoters in transgenic mice support in vivo imaging and functional genomics but do not support the concept of distinct macrophage and dendritic cell lineages or roles in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A

    2011-04-01

    Myeloid lineage cells contribute to innate and acquired immunity, homeostasis, wound repair, and inflammation. There is considerable interest in manipulation of their function in transgenic mice using myeloid-specific promoters. This review considers the applications and specificity of some of the most widely studied transgenes, driven by promoter elements of the lysM, csf1r, CD11c, CD68, macrophage SRA, and CD11b genes, as well as several others. Transgenes have been used in mice to generate myeloid lineage-specific cell ablation, expression of genes of interest, including fluorescent reporters, or deletion via recombination. In general, the specificity of such transgenes has been overinterpreted, and none of them provide well-documented, reliable, differential expression in any specific myeloid cell subset, macrophages, granulocytes, or myeloid DCs. Nevertheless, they have proved valuable in cell isolation, functional genomics, and live imaging of myeloid cell behavior in many different pathologies.

  13. Genome wide association (GWA study for early onset extreme obesity supports the role of fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Hinney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is a major health problem. Although heritability is substantial, genetic mechanisms predisposing to obesity are not very well understood. We have performed a genome wide association study (GWA for early onset (extreme obesity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: a GWA (Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 5.0 comprising 440,794 single nucleotide polymorphisms for early onset extreme obesity based on 487 extremely obese young German individuals and 442 healthy lean German controls; b confirmatory analyses on 644 independent families with at least one obese offspring and both parents. We aimed to identify and subsequently confirm the 15 SNPs (minor allele frequency > or =10% with the lowest p-values of the GWA by four genetic models: additive, recessive, dominant and allelic. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in FTO (fat mass and obesity associated gene within one linkage disequilibrium (LD block including the GWA SNP rendering the lowest p-value (rs1121980; log-additive model: nominal p = 1.13 x 10(-7, corrected p = 0.0494; odds ratio (OR(CT 1.67, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.22-2.27; OR(TT 2.76, 95% CI 1.88-4.03 belonged to the 15 SNPs showing the strongest evidence for association with obesity. For confirmation we genotyped 11 of these in the 644 independent families (of the six FTO SNPs we chose only two representing the LD bock. For both FTO SNPs the initial association was confirmed (both Bonferroni corrected p<0.01. However, none of the nine non-FTO SNPs revealed significant transmission disequilibrium. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our GWA for extreme early onset obesity substantiates that variation in FTO strongly contributes to early onset obesity. This is a further proof of concept for GWA to detect genes relevant for highly complex phenotypes. We concurrently show that nine additional SNPs with initially low p-values in the GWA were not confirmed in our family study, thus suggesting that of the best 15 SNPs in the GWA only

  14. Browser Helper Object's Application in Secure B/S Model%浏览器帮助者对象在安全B/S结构中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍江宏; 梁满发; 李炯城; 关毅璋

    2001-01-01

    By Browser Helper Object, we try to solve security problem aboutBrowser/Server model. We provide a secure B/S model independent of a web server for the users and business application , such as E Business. To Internet/Intranet we add a transfer cryptic web page, then uncrypt at Web Browser in time , together with an implementation.%通过浏览器帮助者对象来解决Browser/Server结构中的安全性问题,为电子商务等商业应用提出一种与Web服务器无关、对用户透明的安全模式:在Internet/Intranet上传输加密的网页,并在浏览器端实时解密.同时给出了具体的实现方法.

  15. What is the impact of genome-wide supported risk variants for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder on brain structure and function? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, R; Prata, D P

    2015-01-01

    The powerful genome-wide association studies (GWAS) revealed common mutations that increase susceptibility for schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD), but the vast majority were not known to be functional or associated with these illnesses. To help fill this gap, their impact on human brain structure and function has been examined. We systematically discuss this output to facilitate its timely integration in the psychosis research field; and encourage reflection for future research. Irrespective of imaging modality, studies addressing the effect of SZ/BD GWAS risk genes (ANK3, CACNA1C, MHC, TCF4, NRGN, DGKH, PBRM1, NCAN and ZNF804A) were included. Most GWAS risk variations were reported to affect neuroimaging phenotypes implicated in SZ/BD: white-matter integrity (ANK3 and ZNF804A), volume (CACNA1C and ZNF804A) and density (ZNF804A); grey-matter (CACNA1C, NRGN, TCF4 and ZNF804A) and ventricular (TCF4) volume; cortical folding (NCAN) and thickness (ZNF804A); regional activation during executive tasks (ANK3, CACNA1C, DGKH, NRGN and ZNF804A) and functional connectivity during executive tasks (CACNA1C and ZNF804A), facial affect recognition (CACNA1C and ZNF804A) and theory-of-mind (ZNF804A); but inconsistencies and non-replications also exist. Further efforts such as standardizing reporting and exploring complementary designs, are warranted to test the reproducibility of these early findings.

  16. Genome-wide linkage and sequence analysis challenge CCDC66 as a human retinal dystrophy candidate gene and support a distinct NMNAT1-related fundus phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A O; Budde, B S; Nürnberg, P; Kawalia, A; Lenzner, S; Bolz, H J

    2017-03-30

    To uncover the genotype underlying early-onset cone-rod dystrophy and central nummular macular atrophic lesion in 2 siblings from an endogamous Arab family, we performed targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 44 retinal dystrophy genes, whole-exome sequencing (WES) and genome-wide linkage analysis. Targeted NGS and WES in the index patient highlighted 2 homozygous variants, a CCDC66 frameshift deletion and a novel missense NMNAT1 variant, c.500G>A (p.Asn167Ser). Linkage and segregation analysis excluded the CCDC66 variant and confirmed the NMNAT1 mutation. Biallelic NMNAT1 mutations cause Leber congenital amaurosis with a central nummular macular atrophic lesion (LCA9). The NMNAT1 mutation reported here underlied cone-rod dystrophy rather than LCA but the fundus lesion was compatible with that of LCA9 patients, highlighting that such a fundus appearance should raise suspicion for biallelic mutations in NMNAT1 when in the context of any retinal dystrophy. Although Ccdc66 mutations have been proposed to cause retinal disease in dogs, our results and public databases challenge CCDC66 as a candidate gene for human retinal dystrophy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. A data management system for structural genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Toole Nicholas

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural genomics (SG projects aim to determine thousands of protein structures by the development of high-throughput techniques for all steps of the experimental structure determination pipeline. Crucial to the success of such endeavours is the careful tracking and archiving of experimental and external data on protein targets. Results We have developed a sophisticated data management system for structural genomics. Central to the system is an Oracle-based, SQL-interfaced database. The database schema deals with all facets of the structure determination process, from target selection to data deposition. Users access the database via any web browser. Experimental data is input by users with pre-defined web forms. Data can be displayed according to numerous criteria. A list of all current target proteins can be viewed, with links for each target to associated entries in external databases. To avoid unnecessary work on targets, our data management system matches protein sequences weekly using BLAST to entries in the Protein Data Bank and to targets of other SG centers worldwide. Conclusion Our system is a working, effective and user-friendly data management tool for structural genomics projects. In this report we present a detailed summary of the various capabilities of the system, using real target data as examples, and indicate our plans for future enhancements.

  18. Empowering marine science through genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volckaert, F.A M J; Barbier, M.; Canario, A; Olsen, J.L.; Wesnigk, J; Clark, M; Boyen, C

    Marine scientists in Europe summarize their successes with genome technologies in the marine sciences and make a plea for a concerted international effort to raise greater public education for support. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Empowering marine science through genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volckaert, F.A M J; Barbier, M.; Canario, A; Olsen, J.L.; Wesnigk, J; Clark, M; Boyen, C

    2008-01-01

    Marine scientists in Europe summarize their successes with genome technologies in the marine sciences and make a plea for a concerted international effort to raise greater public education for support. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The GPlates Portal: Cloud-Based Interactive 3D Visualization of Global Geophysical and Geological Data in a Web Browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, R Dietmar; Qin, Xiaodong; Sandwell, David T; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Williams, Simon E; Flament, Nicolas; Maus, Stefan; Seton, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The pace of scientific discovery is being transformed by the availability of 'big data' and open access, open source software tools. These innovations open up new avenues for how scientists communicate and share data and ideas with each other and with the general public. Here, we describe our efforts to bring to life our studies of the Earth system, both at present day and through deep geological time. The GPlates Portal (portal.gplates.org) is a gateway to a series of virtual globes based on the Cesium Javascript library. The portal allows fast interactive visualization of global geophysical and geological data sets, draped over digital terrain models. The globes use WebGL for hardware-accelerated graphics and are cross-platform and cross-browser compatible with complete camera control. The globes include a visualization of a high-resolution global digital elevation model and the vertical gradient of the global gravity field, highlighting small-scale seafloor fabric such as abyssal hills, fracture zones and seamounts in unprecedented detail. The portal also features globes portraying seafloor geology and a global data set of marine magnetic anomaly identifications. The portal is specifically designed to visualize models of the Earth through geological time. These space-time globes include tectonic reconstructions of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, and several models of long-wavelength surface dynamic topography through time, including the interactive plotting of vertical motion histories at selected locations. The globes put the on-the-fly visualization of massive data sets at the fingertips of end-users to stimulate teaching and learning and novel avenues of inquiry.

  1. The GPlates Portal: Cloud-Based Interactive 3D Visualization of Global Geophysical and Geological Data in a Web Browser.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Dietmar Müller

    Full Text Available The pace of scientific discovery is being transformed by the availability of 'big data' and open access, open source software tools. These innovations open up new avenues for how scientists communicate and share data and ideas with each other and with the general public. Here, we describe our efforts to bring to life our studies of the Earth system, both at present day and through deep geological time. The GPlates Portal (portal.gplates.org is a gateway to a series of virtual globes based on the Cesium Javascript library. The portal allows fast interactive visualization of global geophysical and geological data sets, draped over digital terrain models. The globes use WebGL for hardware-accelerated graphics and are cross-platform and cross-browser compatible with complete camera control. The globes include a visualization of a high-resolution global digital elevation model and the vertical gradient of the global gravity field, highlighting small-scale seafloor fabric such as abyssal hills, fracture zones and seamounts in unprecedented detail. The portal also features globes portraying seafloor geology and a global data set of marine magnetic anomaly identifications. The portal is specifically designed to visualize models of the Earth through geological time. These space-time globes include tectonic reconstructions of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, and several models of long-wavelength surface dynamic topography through time, including the interactive plotting of vertical motion histories at selected locations. The globes put the on-the-fly visualization of massive data sets at the fingertips of end-users to stimulate teaching and learning and novel avenues of inquiry.

  2. DCODE.ORG Anthology of Comparative Genomic Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I

    2005-01-11

    Comparative genomics provides the means to demarcate functional regions in anonymous DNA sequences. The successful application of this method to identifying novel genes is currently shifting to deciphering the noncoding encryption of gene regulation across genomes. To facilitate the use of comparative genomics to practical applications in genetics and genomics we have developed several analytical and visualization tools for the analysis of arbitrary sequences and whole genomes. These tools include two alignment tools: zPicture and Mulan; a phylogenetic shadowing tool: eShadow for identifying lineage- and species-specific functional elements; two evolutionary conserved transcription factor analysis tools: rVista and multiTF; a tool for extracting cis-regulatory modules governing the expression of co-regulated genes, CREME; and a dynamic portal to multiple vertebrate and invertebrate genome alignments, the ECR Browser. Here we briefly describe each one of these tools and provide specific examples on their practical applications. All the tools are publicly available at the http://www.dcode.org/ web site.

  3. Revisiting the Iberian honey bee (Apis mellifera iberiensis) contact zone: maternal and genome-wide nuclear variations provide support for secondary contact from historical refugia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Galarza, Julio; Henriques, Dora; Johnston, J Spencer; Carneiro, Miguel; Rufino, José; Patton, John C; Pinto, M Alice

    2015-06-01

    Dissecting diversity patterns of organisms endemic to Iberia has been truly challenging for a variety of taxa, and the Iberian honey bee is no exception. Surveys of genetic variation in the Iberian honey bee are among the most extensive for any honey bee subspecies. From these, differential and complex patterns of diversity have emerged, which have yet to be fully resolved. Here, we used a genome-wide data set of 309 neutrally tested single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), scattered across the 16 honey bee chromosomes, which were genotyped in 711 haploid males. These SNPs were analysed along with an intergenic locus of the mtDNA, to reveal historical patterns of population structure across the entire range of the Iberian honey bee. Overall, patterns of population structure inferred from nuclear loci by multiple clustering approaches and geographic cline analysis were consistent with two major clusters forming a well-defined cline that bisects Iberia along a northeastern-southwestern axis, a pattern that remarkably parallels that of the mtDNA. While a mechanism of primary intergradation or isolation by distance could explain the observed clinal variation, our results are more consistent with an alternative model of secondary contact between divergent populations previously isolated in glacial refugia, as proposed for a growing list of other Iberian taxa. Despite current intense honey bee management, human-mediated processes have seemingly played a minor role in shaping Iberian honey bee genetic structure. This study highlights the complexity of the Iberian honey bee patterns and reinforces the importance of Iberia as a reservoir of Apis mellifera diversity.

  4. Comparative Genome Analysis in the Integrated Microbial Genomes(IMG) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Markowitz, Victor M.

    2006-03-01

    Comparative genome analysis is critical for the effectiveexploration of a rapidly growing number of complete and draft sequencesfor microbial genomes. The Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system(img.jgi.doe.gov) has been developed as a community resource thatprovides support for comparative analysis of microbial genomes in anintegrated context. IMG allows users to navigate the multidimensionalmicrobial genome data space and focus their analysis on a subset ofgenes, genomes, and functions of interest. IMG provides graphicalviewers, summaries and occurrence profile tools for comparing genes,pathways and functions (terms) across specific genomes. Genes can befurther examined using gene neighborhoods and compared with sequencealignment tools.

  5. Software for computing and annotating genomic ranges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lawrence

    Full Text Available We describe Bioconductor infrastructure for representing and computing on annotated genomic ranges and integrating genomic data with the statistical computing features of R and its extensions. At the core of the infrastructure are three packages: IRanges, GenomicRanges, and GenomicFeatures. These packages provide scalable data structures for representing annotated ranges on the genome, with special support for transcript structures, read alignments and coverage vectors. Computational facilities include efficient algorithms for overlap and nearest neighbor detection, coverage calculation and other range operations. This infrastructure directly supports more than 80 other Bioconductor packages, including those for sequence analysis, differential expression analysis and visualization.

  6. MTGD: The Medicago truncatula genome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Bidwell, Shelby L; Tang, Haibao; Town, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    Medicago truncatula, a close relative of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), is a model legume used for studying symbiotic nitrogen fixation, mycorrhizal interactions and legume genomics. J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI; formerly TIGR) has been involved in M. truncatula genome sequencing and annotation since 2002 and has maintained a web-based resource providing data to the community for this entire period. The website (http://www.MedicagoGenome.org) has seen major updates in the past year, where it currently hosts the latest version of the genome (Mt4.0), associated data and legacy project information, presented to users via a rich set of open-source tools. A JBrowse-based genome browser interface exposes tracks for visualization. Mutant gene symbols originally assembled and curated by the Frugoli lab are now hosted at JCVI and tie into our community annotation interface, Medicago EuCAP (to be integrated soon with our implementation of WebApollo). Literature pertinent to M. truncatula is indexed and made searchable via the Textpresso search engine. The site also implements MedicMine, an instance of InterMine that offers interconnectivity with other plant 'mines' such as ThaleMine and PhytoMine, and other model organism databases (MODs). In addition to these new features, we continue to provide keyword- and locus identifier-based searches served via a Chado-backed Tripal Instance, a BLAST search interface and bulk downloads of data sets from the iPlant Data Store (iDS). Finally, we maintain an E-mail helpdesk, facilitated by a JIRA issue tracking system, where we receive and respond to questions about the website and requests for specific data sets from the community.

  7. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard A; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony V; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  8. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Hurt

    Full Text Available Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap. The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  9. 基于Web RTC的浏览器端Web服务器的设计与实现%Design and Implementation of Web Server in Browser Based on WebRTC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪进; 何加铭

    2015-01-01

    WebRTC has the features of simplicity, easy expansibility, open standard and free & open source. The rapid development of Web applications by means of standard API in WebRTC was introduced and some problems in traditional Web server were researched. The bottleneck of these problems was analyzed and the Web server based on browser was implemented. WebRTC not only provides support to Web server, but brings more solutions to information distribution and sharing.%WebRTC具有简单易扩展、开放标准、开源免费的特点。通过介绍利用WebRTC提供的标准API快速开发Web应用,研究了传统We b服务器存在的问题,分析了其存在问题的瓶颈,并实现了基于浏览器的We b服务器。系统地实现We b RT C技术可以为We b服务器提供支持,并能为信息的传播和分享带来更多的解决方案。

  10. A New Browser-based, Ontology-driven Tool for Generating Standardized, Deep Descriptions of Geoscience Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, S. D.; Kelbert, A.; Rudan, S.; Stoica, M.

    2016-12-01

    Standardized metadata for models is the key to reliable and greatly simplified coupling in model coupling frameworks like CSDMS (Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System). This model metadata also helps model users to understand the important details that underpin computational models and to compare the capabilities of different models. These details include simplifying assumptions on the physics, governing equations and the numerical methods used to solve them, discretization of space (the grid) and time (the time-stepping scheme), state variables (input or output), model configuration parameters. This kind of metadata provides a "deep description" of a computational model that goes well beyond other types of metadata (e.g. author, purpose, scientific domain, programming language, digital rights, provenance, execution) and captures the science that underpins a model. While having this kind of standardized metadata for each model in a repository opens up a wide range of exciting possibilities, it is difficult to collect this information and a carefully conceived "data model" or schema is needed to store it. Automated harvesting and scraping methods can provide some useful information, but they often result in metadata that is inaccurate or incomplete, and this is not sufficient to enable the desired capabilities. In order to address this problem, we have developed a browser-based tool called the MCM Tool (Model Component Metadata) which runs on notebooks, tablets and smart phones. This tool was partially inspired by the TurboTax software, which greatly simplifies the necessary task of preparing tax documents. It allows a model developer or advanced user to provide a standardized, deep description of a computational geoscience model, including hydrologic models. Under the hood, the tool uses a new ontology for models built on the CSDMS Standard Names, expressed as a collection of RDF files (Resource Description Framework). This ontology is based on core concepts

  11. Score-based prediction of genomic islands in prokaryotic genomes using hidden Markov models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surovcik Katharina

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is considered a strong evolutionary force shaping the content of microbial genomes in a substantial manner. It is the difference in speed enabling the rapid adaptation to changing environmental demands that distinguishes HGT from gene genesis, duplications or mutations. For a precise characterization, algorithms are needed that identify transfer events with high reliability. Frequently, the transferred pieces of DNA have a considerable length, comprise several genes and are called genomic islands (GIs or more specifically pathogenicity or symbiotic islands. Results We have implemented the program SIGI-HMM that predicts GIs and the putative donor of each individual alien gene. It is based on the analysis of codon usage (CU of each individual gene of a genome under study. CU of each gene is compared against a carefully selected set of CU tables representing microbial donors or highly expressed genes. Multiple tests are used to identify putatively alien genes, to predict putative donors and to mask putatively highly expressed genes. Thus, we determine the states and emission probabilities of an inhomogeneous hidden Markov model working on gene level. For the transition probabilities, we draw upon classical test theory with the intention of integrating a sensitivity controller in a consistent manner. SIGI-HMM was written in JAVA and is publicly available. It accepts as input any file created according to the EMBL-format. It generates output in the common GFF format readable for genome browsers. Benchmark tests showed that the output of SIGI-HMM is in agreement with known findings. Its predictions were both consistent with annotated GIs and with predictions generated by different methods. Conclusion SIGI-HMM is a sensitive tool for the identification of GIs in microbial genomes. It allows to interactively analyze genomes in detail and to generate or to test hypotheses about the origin of acquired

  12. Methods for open innovation on a genome-design platform associating scientific, commercial, and educational communities in synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Tetsuro

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic biology requires both engineering efficiency and compliance with safety guidelines and ethics. Focusing on the rational construction of biological systems based on engineering principles, synthetic biology depends on a genome-design platform to explore the combinations of multiple biological components or BIO bricks for quickly producing innovative devices. This chapter explains the differences among various platform models and details a methodology for promoting open innovation within the scope of the statutory exemption of patent laws. The detailed platform adopts a centralized evaluation model (CEM), computer-aided design (CAD) bricks, and a freemium model. It is also important for the platform to support the legal aspects of copyrights as well as patent and safety guidelines because intellectual work including DNA sequences designed rationally by human intelligence is basically copyrightable. An informational platform with high traceability, transparency, auditability, and security is required for copyright proof, safety compliance, and incentive management for open innovation in synthetic biology. GenoCon, which we have organized and explained here, is a competition-styled, open-innovation method involving worldwide participants from scientific, commercial, and educational communities that aims to improve the designs of genomic sequences that confer a desired function on an organism. Using only a Web browser, a participating contributor proposes a design expressed with CAD bricks that generate a relevant DNA sequence, which is then experimentally and intensively evaluated by the GenoCon organizers. The CAD bricks that comprise programs and databases as a Semantic Web are developed, executed, shared, reused, and well stocked on the secure Semantic Web platform called the Scientists' Networking System or SciNetS/SciNeS, based on which a CEM research center for synthetic biology and open innovation should be established. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc

  13. Antarctic Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D. Rogers

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of genomic science and its battery of technologies, polar biology stands on the threshold of a revolution, one that will enable the investigation of important questions of unprecedented scope and with extraordinary depth and precision. The exotic organisms of polar ecosystems are ideal candidates for genomic analysis. Through such analyses, it will be possible to learn not only the novel features that enable polar organisms to survive, and indeed thrive, in their extreme environments, but also fundamental biological principles that are common to most, if not all, organisms. This article aims to review recent developments in Antarctic genomics and to demonstrate the global context of such studies.

  14. A unified gene catalog for the laboratory mouse reference genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Richardson, J E; Hale, P; Baldarelli, R M; Reed, D J; Recla, J M; Sinclair, R; Reddy, T B K; Bult, C J

    2015-08-01

    We report here a semi-automated process by which mouse genome feature predictions and curated annotations (i.e., genes, pseudogenes, functional RNAs, etc.) from Ensembl, NCBI and Vertebrate Genome Annotation database (Vega) are reconciled with the genome features in the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) database (http://www.informatics.jax.org) into a comprehensive and non-redundant catalog. Our gene unification method employs an algorithm (fjoin--feature join) for efficient detection of genome coordinate overlaps among features represented in two annotation data sets. Following the analysis with fjoin, genome features are binned into six possible categories (1:1, 1:0, 0:1, 1:n, n:1, n:m) based on coordinate overlaps. These categories are subsequently prioritized for assessment of annotation equivalencies and differences. The version of the unified catalog reported here contains more than 59,000 entries, including 22,599 protein-coding coding genes, 12,455 pseudogenes, and 24,007 other feature types (e.g., microRNAs, lincRNAs, etc.). More than 23,000 of the entries in the MGI gene catalog have equivalent gene models in the annotation files obtained from NCBI, Vega, and Ensembl. 12,719 of the features are unique to NCBI relative to Ensembl/Vega; 11,957 are unique to Ensembl/Vega relative to NCBI, and 3095 are unique to MGI. More than 4000 genome features fall into categories that require manual inspection to resolve structural differences in the gene models from different annotation sources. Using the MGI unified gene catalog, researchers can easily generate a comprehensive report of mouse genome features from a single source and compare the details of gene and transcript structure using MGI's mouse genome browser.

  15. Genomics of Preterm Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Muglia, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling human birth timing at term, or resulting in preterm birth, have been the focus of considerable investigation, but limited insights have been gained over the past 50 years. In part, these processes have remained elusive because of divergence in reproductive strategies and physiology shown by model organisms, making extrapolation to humans uncertain. Here, we summarize the evolution of progesterone signaling and variation in pregnancy maintenance and termination. We use this comparative physiology to support the hypothesis that selective pressure on genomic loci involved in the timing of parturition have shaped human birth timing, and that these loci can be identified with comparative genomic strategies. Previous limitations imposed by divergence of mechanisms provide an important new opportunity to elucidate fundamental pathways of parturition control through increasing availability of sequenced genomes and associated reproductive physiology characteristics across diverse organisms. PMID:25646385

  16. Analysis of gene order data supports vertical inheritance of the leukotoxin operon and genome rearrangements in the 5' flanking region in genus Mannheimia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Kuhnert, Peter; Frey, Joachim;

    2007-01-01

    examined the gene order in the 5' flanking region of the leukotoxin operon and found that the 5' flanking gene strings, hslVU-lapB-artJ-lktC and xylAB-lktC, are peculiar to M. haemolytica + M. glucosida and M. granulomatis, respectively, whereas the gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC is present in M. ruminalis......, the supposed sister group of M. haemolytica + M. glucosida, and in the most ancient subclade M. varigena. In M. granulomatis, we found remnants of the gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC in the xylB-lktC intergenic region. CONCLUSIONS: These observations indicate that the gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC is more ancient...... than the hslVU-lapB-artJ-lktC and xylAB-lktC gene strings. The presence of (remnants of) the ancient gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC among any subclades within genus Mannheimia supports that it has been vertically inherited from the last common ancestor of genus Mannheimia to any ancestor of the diverging...

  17. Taking advantage of HTML5 browsers to realize the concepts of session state and workflow sharing in web-tool applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suftin, I.; Read, J. S.; Walker, J.

    2013-12-01

    Scientists prefer not having to be tied down to a specific machine or operating system in order to analyze local and remote data sets or publish work. Increasingly, analysis has been migrating to decentralized web services and data sets, using web clients to provide the analysis interface. While simplifying workflow access, analysis, and publishing of data, the move does bring with it its own unique set of issues. Web clients used for analysis typically offer workflows geared towards a single user, with steps and results that are often difficult to recreate and share with others. Furthermore, workflow results often may not be easily used as input for further analysis. Older browsers further complicate things by having no way to maintain larger chunks of information, often offloading the job of storage to the back-end server or trying to squeeze it into a cookie. It has been difficult to provide a concept of "session storage" or "workflow sharing" without a complex orchestration of the back-end for storage depending on either a centralized file system or database. With the advent of HTML5, browsers gained the ability to store more information through the use of the Web Storage API (a browser-cookie holds a maximum of 4 kilobytes). Web Storage gives us the ability to store megabytes of arbitrary data in-browser either with an expiration date or just for a session. This allows scientists to create, update, persist and share their workflow without depending on the backend to store session information, providing the flexibility for new web-based workflows to emerge. In the DSASWeb portal ( http://cida.usgs.gov/DSASweb/ ), using these techniques, the representation of every step in the analyst's workflow is stored as plain-text serialized JSON, which we can generate as a text file and provide to the analyst as an upload. This file may then be shared with others and loaded back into the application, restoring the application to the state it was in when the session file

  18. Reefgenomics.Org - a repository for marine genomics data

    KAUST Repository

    Liew, Yi Jin

    2016-11-01

    Over the last decade, technological advancements have substantially decreased the cost and time of obtaining large amounts of sequencing data. Paired with the exponentially increased computing power, individual labs are now able to sequence genomes or transcriptomes to investigate biological questions of interest. This has led to a significant increase in available sequence data. Although the bulk of data published in articles are stored in public sequence databases, very often, only raw sequencing data are available; miscellaneous data such as assembled transcriptomes, genome annotations etc. are not easily obtainable through the same means. Here, we introduce our website (http://reefgenomics.org) that aims to centralize genomic and transcriptomic data from marine organisms. Besides providing convenient means to download sequences, we provide (where applicable) a genome browser to explore available genomic features, and a BLAST interface to search through the hosted sequences. Through the interface, multiple datasets can be queried simultaneously, allowing for the retrieval of matching sequences from organisms of interest. The minimalistic, no-frills interface reduces visual clutter, making it convenient for end-users to search and explore processed sequence data.

  19. Further Evidence for the Impact of a Genome-Wide-Supported Psychosis Risk Variant in ZNF804A on the Theory of Mind Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohnke, Sebastian; Erk, Susanne; Schnell, Knut; Schütz, Claudia; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Grimm, Oliver; Haddad, Leila; Pöhland, Lydia; Garbusow, Maria; Schmitgen, Mike M; Kirsch, Peter; Esslinger, Christine; Rietschel, Marcella; Witt, Stephanie H; Nöthen, Markus M; Cichon, Sven; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mühleisen, Thomas; Jensen, Jimmy; Schott, Björn H; Maier, Wolfgang; Heinz, Andreas; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Walter, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1344706 in ZNF804A is one of the best-supported risk variants for psychosis. We hypothesized that this SNP contributes to the development of schizophrenia by affecting the ability to understand other people's mental states. This skill, commonly referred to as Theory of Mind (ToM), has consistently been found to be impaired in schizophrenia. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we previously showed that in healthy individuals rs1344706 impacted on activity and connectivity of key areas of the ToM network, including the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, temporo-parietal junction, and the posterior cingulate cortex, which show aberrant activity in schizophrenia patients, too. We aimed to replicate these results in an independent sample of 188 healthy German volunteers. In order to assess the reliability of brain activity elicited by the ToM task, 25 participants performed the task twice with an interval of 14 days showing excellent accordance in recruitment of key ToM areas. Confirming our previous results, we observed decreasing activity of the left temporo-parietal junction, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, and the posterior cingulate cortex with increasing number of risk alleles during ToM. Complementing our replication sample with the discovery sample, analyzed in a previous report (total N=297), further revealed negative genotype effects in the left dorsomedial prefrontal cortex as well as in the temporal and parietal regions. In addition, as shown previously, rs1344706 risk allele dose positively predicted increased frontal–temporo-parietal connectivity. These findings confirm the effects of the psychosis risk variant in ZNF804A on the dysfunction of the ToM network. PMID:24247043

  20. Herbarium genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, Freek T.; Lei, Di; Yu, Jiaying

    2016-01-01

    Herbarium genomics is proving promising as next-generation sequencing approaches are well suited to deal with the usually fragmented nature of archival DNA. We show that routine assembly of partial plastome sequences from herbarium specimens is feasible, from total DNA extracts and with specimens...... up to 146 years old. We use genome skimming and an automated assembly pipeline, Iterative Organelle Genome Assembly, that assembles paired-end reads into a series of candidate assemblies, the best one of which is selected based on likelihood estimation. We used 93 specimens from 12 different...... correlation between plastome coverage and nuclear genome size (C value) in our samples, but the range of C values included is limited. Finally, we conclude that routine plastome sequencing from herbarium specimens is feasible and cost-effective (compared with Sanger sequencing or plastome...

  1. The Yak genome database: an integrative database for studying yak biology and high-altitude adaption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Quanjun; Ma, Tao; Wang, Kun; Xu, Ting; Liu, Jianquan; Qiu, Qiang

    2012-11-07

    The yak (Bos grunniens) is a long-haired bovine that lives at high altitudes and is an important source of milk, meat, fiber and fuel. The recent sequencing, assembly and annotation of its genome are expected to further our understanding of the means by which it has adapted to life at high altitudes and its ecologically important traits. The Yak Genome Database (YGD) is an internet-based resource that provides access to genomic sequence data and predicted functional information concerning the genes and proteins of Bos grunniens. The curated data stored in the YGD includes genome sequences, predicted genes and associated annotations, non-coding RNA sequences, transposable elements, single nucleotide variants, and three-way whole-genome alignments between human, cattle and yak. YGD offers useful searching and data mining tools, including the ability to search for genes by name or using function keywords as well as GBrowse genome browsers and/or BLAST servers, which can be used to visualize genome regions and identify similar sequences. Sequence data from the YGD can also be downloaded to perform local searches. A new yak genome database (YGD) has been developed to facilitate studies on high-altitude adaption and bovine genomics. The database will be continuously updated to incorporate new information such as transcriptome data and population resequencing data. The YGD can be accessed at http://me.lzu.edu.cn/yak.

  2. The Yak genome database: an integrative database for studying yak biology and high-altitude adaption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Quanjun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yak (Bos grunniens is a long-haired bovine that lives at high altitudes and is an important source of milk, meat, fiber and fuel. The recent sequencing, assembly and annotation of its genome are expected to further our understanding of the means by which it has adapted to life at high altitudes and its ecologically important traits. Description The Yak Genome Database (YGD is an internet-based resource that provides access to genomic sequence data and predicted functional information concerning the genes and proteins of Bos grunniens. The curated data stored in the YGD includes genome sequences, predicted genes and associated annotations, non-coding RNA sequences, transposable elements, single nucleotide variants, and three-way whole-genome alignments between human, cattle and yak. YGD offers useful searching and data mining tools, including the ability to search for genes by name or using function keywords as well as GBrowse genome browsers and/or BLAST servers, which can be used to visualize genome regions and identify similar sequences. Sequence data from the YGD can also be downloaded to perform local searches. Conclusions A new yak genome database (YGD has been developed to facilitate studies on high-altitude adaption and bovine genomics. The database will be continuously updated to incorporate new information such as transcriptome data and population resequencing data. The YGD can be accessed at http://me.lzu.edu.cn/yak.

  3. Genomic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceño Balcázar

    2011-04-01

    disease; thus, conducts may be undertaken like selection of embryos or opting for adoption. Although genetic studies of molecular profiles are promissory, there are questions on how these are requested and how the results are communicated to the patients, their clinical use, application of the pre-symptomatic diagnosis – especially in children, the bad intended use of this information by medical insurance companies considering pre-existing conditions, and finally, the great amount of information and its application in populations where prior studies of association have not been conducted may be cause for concern. In developed nations, these types of exams are requested without medical prescription in pharmacies that mail the results directly to the interested party.  It is worrisome what can happen to patients upon receiving this information; for example, if the report indicates susceptibility to Alzheimer’s or cancer, without medical support to identify the presentation risks and the possibility of transmitting the disease to their offspring.  This suggests the validity, more than ever, of genetic counseling when delivering analysis results. On the other hand, insurance companies must consider molecular genetic profiles as a preventive tool that permits improving service quality while lowering costs; for instance, in cancer cases where prophylaxis measures are notably less costly than treatment. Another aspect to bear in mind is that association studies of genetic polymorphism and disease need thousands of cases and controls, making them very costly for implementation in Colombia. For this reason, the exams include the ancestral report for the purpose of interpreting the results according to ethnic origin.  For now, this is the most adequate conduct considering that it will take a long time before validation studies can be conducted. As with all great progress in medicine, genomics opens a path that will bring enormous benefit inasmuch as the criteria for good

  4. GENOMIC MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceño Balcázar

    2011-03-01

    ; thus, conducts may be undertaken like selection of embryos or opting for adoption.Although genetic studies of molecular profiles are promissory, there are questions on how these are requested and how the results are communicated to the patients, their clinical use, application of the pre-symptomatic diagnosis – especially in children, the bad intended use of this information by medical insurance companies considering pre-existing conditions, and finally, the great amount of information and its application in populations where prior studies of association have not been conducted may be cause for concern.In developed nations, these types of exams are requested without medical prescription in pharmacies that mail the results directly to the interested party. It is worrisome what can happen to patients upon receiving this information; for example, if the report indicates susceptibility to Alzheimer’s or cancer, without medical support to identify the presentation risks and the possibility of transmitting the disease to their offspring. This suggests the validity, more than ever, of genetic counseling when delivering analysis results.On the other hand, insurance companies must consider molecular genetic profiles as a preventive tool that permits improving service quality while lowering costs; for instance, in cancer cases where prophylaxis measures are notably less costly than treatment.Another aspect to bear in mind is that association studies of genetic polymorphism and disease need thousands of cases and controls, making them very costly for implementation in Colombia. For this reason, the exams include the ancestral report for the purpose of interpreting the results according to ethnic origin. For now, this is the most adequate conduct considering that it will take a long time before validation studies can be conducted.As with all great progress in medicine, genomics opens a path that will bring enormous benefit inasmuch as the criteria for good medical practices

  5. Parasite Genome Projects and the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Degrave

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the human genome project, a great number of genome projects on other "model" organism have been initiated, some of them already completed. Several initiatives have also been started on parasite genomes, mainly through support from WHO/TDR, involving North-South and South-South collaborations, and great hopes are vested in that these initiatives will lead to new tools for disease control and prevention, as well as to the establishment of genomic research technology in developing countries. The Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, using the clone CL-Brener as starting point, has made considerable progress through the concerted action of more than 20 laboratories, most of them in the South. A brief overview of the current state of the project is given

  6. grayStar3 - gray no more: More physical realism and a more intuitive interface - all still in a WWW browser

    CERN Document Server

    Short, C Ian

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the openStar project is to turn any WWW browser, running on any platform, into a virtual star equipped with parameter knobs and instrumented with output displays that any user can experiment with using any device for which a browser is available. grayStar3 (gS3) is a major improvement upon GrayStar 2.0 (GS2), both in the physical realism of the modeling and the intuitiveness of the user interface. The code integrates scientific modeling in JavaScript with output visualization HTML. The user interface is adaptable so as to be appropriate for a large range of audiences from the high-school to the introductory graduate level. The modeling is physically based and all outputs are determined entirely and directly by the results of in situ modeling, giving the code significant generality and credibility for pedagogical applications. gS3 also models and displays the circumstellar habitable zone (CHZ) and allows the user to adjust the greenhouse effect and albedo of the planet. In its default mode the code...

  7. 基于iOS平台Safari浏览器的设计与实现%Design and Implementation of the iOS-based Safari Browser System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊

    2013-01-01

    随着移动互联网发展越来越快,iOS成为发展最为迅速的手机操作系统之一。基于IOS平台的safari浏览器的开发由此产生,该文使用Objective-C语言和Sqlite数据库技术,在Xcode环境下,实现基于iOS平台的Safari浏览器系统,为用户提供了一个快速上网浏览的入口,不仅满足了用户的需求,而且使用户的体验更加良好。%Along with mobile internet development more and more quickly, iOS has become one of the most rapid development mobile phone operating system. The Safari Browser iOS client development from this demand and produce. The paper integrates many techniques such as Objective-C and Sqlite to achive the Safari browser system under Xcode development environment. Provides customers with a entrance to surf the internet.Not only convenients to meet customers needs but also makes user experi-ence better.

  8. The Chlamydomonas genome project: a decade on

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaby, Ian K.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten; Tourasse, Nicolas; Hom, Erik F. Y.; Lopez, David; Aksoy, Munevver; Grossman, Arthur; Umen, James; Dutcher, Susan; Porter, Mary; King, Stephen; Witman, George; Stanke, Mario; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Goodstein, David; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Vallon, Olivier; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Prochnik, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a popular unicellular organism for studying photosynthesis, cilia biogenesis and micronutrient homeostasis. Ten years since its genome project was initiated, an iterative process of improvements to the genome and gene predictions has propelled this organism to the forefront of the “omics” era. Housed at Phytozome, the Joint Genome Institute’s (JGI) plant genomics portal, the most up-to-date genomic data include a genome arranged on chromosomes and high-quality gene models with alternative splice forms supported by an abundance of RNA-Seq data. Here, we present the past, present and future of Chlamydomonas genomics. Specifically, we detail progress on genome assembly and gene model refinement, discuss resources for gene annotations, functional predictions and locus ID mapping between versions and, importantly, outline a standardized framework for naming genes. PMID:24950814

  9. Genome databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courteau, J.

    1991-10-11

    Since the Genome Project began several years ago, a plethora of databases have been developed or are in the works. They range from the massive Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University, the central repository of all gene mapping information, to small databases focusing on single chromosomes or organisms. Some are publicly available, others are essentially private electronic lab notebooks. Still others limit access to a consortium of researchers working on, say, a single human chromosome. An increasing number incorporate sophisticated search and analytical software, while others operate as little more than data lists. In consultation with numerous experts in the field, a list has been compiled of some key genome-related databases. The list was not limited to map and sequence databases but also included the tools investigators use to interpret and elucidate genetic data, such as protein sequence and protein structure databases. Because a major goal of the Genome Project is to map and sequence the genomes of several experimental animals, including E. coli, yeast, fruit fly, nematode, and mouse, the available databases for those organisms are listed as well. The author also includes several databases that are still under development - including some ambitious efforts that go beyond data compilation to create what are being called electronic research communities, enabling many users, rather than just one or a few curators, to add or edit the data and tag it as raw or confirmed.

  10. Marine genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Ribeiro, Ângela Maria; Foote, Andrew D.; Kupczok, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Marine ecosystems occupy 71% of the surface of our planet, yet we know little about their diversity. Although the inventory of species is continually increasing, as registered by the Census of Marine Life program, only about 10% of the estimated two million marine species are known. This lag......-throughput sequencing approaches have been helping to improve our knowledge of marine biodiversity, from the rich microbial biota that forms the base of the tree of life to a wealth of plant and animal species. In this review, we present an overview of the applications of genomics to the study of marine life, from...... evolutionary biology of non-model organisms to species of commercial relevance for fishing, aquaculture and biomedicine. Instead of providing an exhaustive list of available genomic data, we rather set to present contextualized examples that best represent the current status of the field of marine genomics....

  11. Cephalopod genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Bonnaud, Laure; Brown, C. Titus

    2012-01-01

    The Cephalopod Sequencing Consortium (CephSeq Consortium) was established at a NESCent Catalysis Group Meeting, ``Paths to Cephalopod Genomics-Strategies, Choices, Organization,'' held in Durham, North Carolina, USA on May 24-27, 2012. Twenty-eight participants representing nine countries (Austria......, Australia, China, Denmark, France, Italy, Japan, Spain and the USA) met to address the pressing need for genome sequencing of cephalopod mollusks. This group, drawn from cephalopod biologists, neuroscientists, developmental and evolutionary biologists, materials scientists, bioinformaticians and researchers...... active in sequencing, assembling and annotating genomes, agreed on a set of cephalopod species of particular importance for initial sequencing and developed strategies and an organization (CephSeq Consortium) to promote this sequencing. The conclusions and recommendations of this meeting are described...

  12. Listeria Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  13. VibrioBase: A Model for Next-Generation Genome and Annotation Database Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Woh Choo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate the ongoing research of Vibrio spp., a dedicated platform for the Vibrio research community is needed to host the fast-growing amount of genomic data and facilitate the analysis of these data. We present VibrioBase, a useful resource platform, providing all basic features of a sequence database with the addition of unique analysis tools which could be valuable for the Vibrio research community. VibrioBase currently houses a total of 252 Vibrio genomes developed in a user-friendly manner and useful to enable the analysis of these genomic data, particularly in the field of comparative genomics. Besides general data browsing features, VibrioBase offers analysis tools such as BLAST interfaces and JBrowse genome browser. Other important features of this platform include our newly developed in-house tools, the pairwise genome comparison (PGC tool, and pathogenomics profiling tool (PathoProT. The PGC tool is useful in the identification and comparative analysis of two genomes, whereas PathoProT is designed for comparative pathogenomics analysis of Vibrio strains. Both of these tools will enable researchers with little experience in bioinformatics to get meaningful information from Vibrio genomes with ease. We have tested the validity and suitability of these tools and features for use in the next-generation database development.

  14. New bioinformatic tool for quick identification of functionally relevant endogenous retroviral inserts in human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Suntsova, Maria; Malakhova, Galina; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and LTR retrotransposons (LRs) occupy ∼8% of human genome. Deep sequencing technologies provide clues to understanding of functional relevance of individual ERVs/LRs by enabling direct identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and other landmarks of functional genomic elements. Here, we performed the genome-wide identification of human ERVs/LRs containing TFBS according to the ENCODE project. We created the first interactive ERV/LRs database that groups the individual inserts according to their familial nomenclature, number of mapped TFBS and divergence from their consensus sequence. Information on any particular element can be easily extracted by the user. We also created a genome browser tool, which enables quick mapping of any ERV/LR insert according to genomic coordinates, known human genes and TFBS. These tools can be used to easily explore functionally relevant individual ERV/LRs, and for studying their impact on the regulation of human genes. Overall, we identified ∼110,000 ERV/LR genomic elements having TFBS. We propose a hypothesis of "domestication" of ERV/LR TFBS by the genome milieu including subsequent stages of initial epigenetic repression, partial functional release, and further mutation-driven reshaping of TFBS in tight coevolution with the enclosing genomic loci.

  15. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based on transcr......The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...

  16. Reproduction-related genes in the pearl oyster genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshie; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yoji; Satoh, Nori; Awaji, Masahiko

    2013-10-01

    Molluscan reproduction has been a target of biological research because of the various reproductive strategies that have evolved in this phylum. It has also been studied for the development of fisheries technologies, particularly aquaculture. Although fundamental processes of reproduction in other phyla, such as vertebrates and arthropods, have been well studied, information on the molecular mechanisms of molluscan reproduction remains limited. The recently released draft genome of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata provides a novel and powerful platform for obtaining structural information on the genes and proteins involved in bivalve reproduction. In the present study, we analyzed the pearl oyster draft genome to screen reproduction-related genes. Analysis was mainly conducted for genes reported from other molluscs for encoding orthologs of reproduction-related proteins in other phyla. The gene search in the P. fucata gene models (version 1.1) and genome assembly (version 1.0) were performed using Genome Browser and BLAST software. The obtained gene models were then BLASTP searched against a public database to confirm the best-hit sequences. As a result, more than 40 gene models were identified with high accuracy to encode reproduction-related genes reported for P. fucata and other molluscs. These include vasa, nanos, doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors, vitellogenin, estrogen receptor, and others. The set of reproduction-related genes of P. fucata identified in the present study constitute a new tool for research on bivalve reproduction at the molecular level.

  17. GREAT: a web portal for Genome Regulatory Architecture Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyioukos, Costas; Bucchini, François; Elati, Mohamed; Képès, François

    2016-07-08

    GREAT (Genome REgulatory Architecture Tools) is a novel web portal for tools designed to generate user-friendly and biologically useful analysis of genome architecture and regulation. The online tools of GREAT are freely accessible and compatible with essentially any operating system which runs a modern browser. GREAT is based on the analysis of genome layout -defined as the respective positioning of co-functional genes- and its relation with chromosome architecture and gene expression. GREAT tools allow users to systematically detect regular patterns along co-functional genomic features in an automatic way consisting of three individual steps and respective interactive visualizations. In addition to the complete analysis of regularities, GREAT tools enable the use of periodicity and position information for improving the prediction of transcription factor binding sites using a multi-view machine learning approach. The outcome of this integrative approach features a multivariate analysis of the interplay between the location of a gene and its regulatory sequence. GREAT results are plotted in web interactive graphs and are available for download either as individual plots, self-contained interactive pages or as machine readable tables for downstream analysis. The GREAT portal can be reached at the following URL https://absynth.issb.genopole.fr/GREAT and each individual GREAT tool is available for downloading.

  18. EuPathDB: the eukaryotic pathogen genomics database resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurrecoechea, Cristina; Barreto, Ana; Basenko, Evelina Y.; Brestelli, John; Brunk, Brian P.; Cade, Shon; Crouch, Kathryn; Doherty, Ryan; Falke, Dave; Fischer, Steve; Gajria, Bindu; Harb, Omar S.; Heiges, Mark; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Hu, Sufen; Iodice, John; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Lawrence, Cris; Li, Wei; Pinney, Deborah F.; Pulman, Jane A.; Roos, David S.; Shanmugasundram, Achchuthan; Silva-Franco, Fatima; Steinbiss, Sascha; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Spruill, Drew; Wang, Haiming; Warrenfeltz, Susanne; Zheng, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The Eukaryotic Pathogen Genomics Database Resource (EuPathDB, http://eupathdb.org) is a collection of databases covering 170+ eukaryotic pathogens (protists & fungi), along with relevant free-living and non-pathogenic species, and select pathogen hosts. To facilitate the discovery of meaningful biological relationships, the databases couple preconfigured searches with visualization and analysis tools for comprehensive data mining via intuitive graphical interfaces and APIs. All data are analyzed with the same workflows, including creation of gene orthology profiles, so data are easily compared across data sets, data types and organisms. EuPathDB is updated with numerous new analysis tools, features, data sets and data types. New tools include GO, metabolic pathway and word enrichment analyses plus an online workspace for analysis of personal, non-public, large-scale data. Expanded data content is mostly genomic and functional genomic data while new data types include protein microarray, metabolic pathways, compounds, quantitative proteomics, copy number variation, and polysomal transcriptomics. New features include consistent categorization of searches, data sets and genome browser tracks; redesigned gene pages; effective integration of alternative transcripts; and a EuPathDB Galaxy instance for private analyses of a user's data. Forthcoming upgrades include user workspaces for private integration of data with existing EuPathDB data and improved integration and presentation of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:27903906

  19. Draft genomes of the corallimorpharians Amplexidiscus fenestrafer and Discosoma sp

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xin

    2017-04-13

    Corallimorpharia are the closest non-calcifying relatives of reef-building corals. Aside from their popularity among aquarium hobbyists, their evolutionary position between the Actiniaria (sea anemones) and the Scleractinia (hard corals) makes them ideal candidates for comparative studies aiming at understanding the evolution of hexacorallian orders in general and reef-building corals in particular. Here we have sequenced and assembled two draft genomes for the Corallimorpharia species Amplexidiscus fenestrafer and Discosoma sp.. The draft genomes encompass 370 Mbp and 445 Mbp respectively and encode for 21,372 and 23,199 genes. To facilitate future studies using these resources, we provide annotations for the predicted gene models-not only at gene level, by annotating gene models with the function of the best-matching homolog, and GO terms when available; but also at protein domain level, where gene function can be better verified through the conservation of the sequence and order of protein domains. Further, we provide an online platform (http://corallimorpharia.reefgenomics.org), which includes a BLAST interface as well as a genome browser to facilitate the use of these resources. We believe that these two genomes are important resources for future studies on hexacorallian systematics and the evolutionary basis of their specific traits such as the symbiotic relationship with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium or the evolution of calcification in reef-building corals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Sequencing and comparative analysis of the gorilla MHC genomic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilming, Laurens G; Hart, Elizabeth A; Coggill, Penny C; Horton, Roger; Gilbert, James G R; Clee, Chris; Jones, Matt; Lloyd, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Sims, Sarah; Whitehead, Siobhan; Wiley, David; Beck, Stephan; Harrow, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a critical role in vertebrate immune response and because the MHC is linked to a significant number of auto-immune and other diseases it is of great medical interest. Here we describe the clone-based sequencing and subsequent annotation of the MHC region of the gorilla genome. Because the MHC is subject to extensive variation, both structural and sequence-wise, it is not readily amenable to study in whole genome shotgun sequence such as the recently published gorilla genome. The variation of the MHC also makes it of evolutionary interest and therefore we analyse the sequence in the context of human and chimpanzee. In our comparisons with human and re-annotated chimpanzee MHC sequence we find that gorilla has a trimodular RCCX cluster, versus the reference human bimodular cluster, and additional copies of Class I (pseudo)genes between Gogo-K and Gogo-A (the orthologues of HLA-K and -A). We also find that Gogo-H (and Patr-H) is coding versus the HLA-H pseudogene and, conversely, there is a Gogo-DQB2 pseudogene versus the HLA-DQB2 coding gene. Our analysis, which is freely available through the VEGA genome browser, provides the research community with a comprehensive dataset for comparative and evolutionary research of the MHC.

  1. EuPathDB: the eukaryotic pathogen genomics database resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurrecoechea, Cristina; Barreto, Ana; Basenko, Evelina Y; Brestelli, John; Brunk, Brian P; Cade, Shon; Crouch, Kathryn; Doherty, Ryan; Falke, Dave; Fischer, Steve; Gajria, Bindu; Harb, Omar S; Heiges, Mark; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Hu, Sufen; Iodice, John; Kissinger, Jessica C; Lawrence, Cris; Li, Wei; Pinney, Deborah F; Pulman, Jane A; Roos, David S; Shanmugasundram, Achchuthan; Silva-Franco, Fatima; Steinbiss, Sascha; Stoeckert, Christian J; Spruill, Drew; Wang, Haiming; Warrenfeltz, Susanne; Zheng, Jie

    2017-01-04

    The Eukaryotic Pathogen Genomics Database Resource (EuPathDB, http://eupathdb.org) is a collection of databases covering 170+ eukaryotic pathogens (protists & fungi), along with relevant free-living and non-pathogenic species, and select pathogen hosts. To facilitate the discovery of meaningful biological relationships, the databases couple preconfigured searches with visualization and analysis tools for comprehensive data mining via intuitive graphical interfaces and APIs. All data are analyzed with the same workflows, including creation of gene orthology profiles, so data are easily compared across data sets, data types and organisms. EuPathDB is updated with numerous new analysis tools, features, data sets and data types. New tools include GO, metabolic pathway and word enrichment analyses plus an online workspace for analysis of personal, non-public, large-scale data. Expanded data content is mostly genomic and functional genomic data while new data types include protein microarray, metabolic pathways, compounds, quantitative proteomics, copy number variation, and polysomal transcriptomics. New features include consistent categorization of searches, data sets and genome browser tracks; redesigned gene pages; effective integration of alternative transcripts; and a EuPathDB Galaxy instance for private analyses of a user's data. Forthcoming upgrades include user workspaces for private integration of data with existing EuPathDB data and improved integration and presentation of host-pathogen interactions.

  2. Joint Genome Institute's Automation Approach and History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Simon

    2006-07-05

    Department of Energy/Joint Genome Institute (DOE/JGI) collaborates with DOE national laboratories and community users, to advance genome science in support of the DOE missions of clean bio-energy, carbon cycling, and bioremediation.

  3. Ancient genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten Erik; Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen;

    2015-01-01

    , archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when...

  4. Cephalopod genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Bonnaud, Laure; Brown, C. Titus

    2012-01-01

    The Cephalopod Sequencing Consortium (CephSeq Consortium) was established at a NESCent Catalysis Group Meeting, ``Paths to Cephalopod Genomics-Strategies, Choices, Organization,'' held in Durham, North Carolina, USA on May 24-27, 2012. Twenty-eight participants representing nine countries (Austri...

  5. Ancient genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten Erik; Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen

    2015-01-01

    by increasing the number of sequence reads to billions effectively means that contamination issues that have haunted aDNA research for decades, particularly in human studies, can now be efficiently and confidently quantified. At present, whole genomes have been sequenced from ancient anatomically modern humans...

  6. Molecular Assemblies, Genes and Genomics Integrated Efficiently (MAGGIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baliga, Nitin S

    2011-05-26

    supporting scientific efforts in ENIGMA with data management solutions and by integrating all of the algorithms, software and data into a Knowledgebase. For instance, we have developed the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov) which represents manually curated sets of regulons laying the basis for automatic annotation of regulatory interactions in closely related species. We are also in the midst of scaling up MicrobesOnline to handle the growing volume of sequence and functional genomics data. Over the last year our efforts have been focused on providing support for additional genomic and functional genomic data types. Similarly, we have developed several visualization tools to help with the exploration of complex systems biology datasets. A case in point is the Gaggle Genome Browser (GGB), which was enhanced with visualizations for plotting peptide detections and protein-DNA binding alongside transcriptome structure, plus the ability to interactively filter by signal intensity or p-value.

  7. A Compressed Self-Index for Genomic Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Gagie, Travis; Nekrich, Yakov; Puglisi, Simon J

    2011-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technology will soon result in databases of thousands of genomes. Within a species, individuals' genomes are almost exact copies of each other; e.g., any two human genomes are 99.9% the same. Relative Lempel-Ziv (RLZ) compression takes advantage of this property: it stores the first genome uncompressed or as an FM-index, then compresses the other genomes with a variant of LZ77 that copies phrases only from the first genome. RLZ achieves good compression and supports fast random access; in this paper we show how to support fast search as well, thus obtaining an efficient compressed self-index.

  8. The Small Nuclear Genomes of Selaginella Are Associated with a Low Rate of Genome Size Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniaga, Anthony E; Arrigo, Nils; Barker, Michael S

    2016-06-03

    The haploid nuclear genome size (1C DNA) of vascular land plants varies over several orders of magnitude. Much of this observed diversity in genome size is due to the proliferation and deletion of transposable elements. To date, all vascular land plant lineages with extremely small nuclear genomes represent recently derived states, having ancestors with much larger genome sizes. The Selaginellaceae represent an ancient lineage with extremely small genomes. It is unclear how small nuclear genomes evolved in Selaginella We compared the rates of nuclear genome size evolution in Selaginella and major vascular plant clades in a comparative phylogenetic framework. For the analyses, we collected 29 new flow cytometry estimates of haploid genome size in Selaginella to augment publicly available data. Selaginella possess some of the smallest known haploid nuclear genome sizes, as well as the lowest rate of genome size evolution observed across all vascular land plants included in our analyses. Additionally, our analyses provide strong support for a history of haploid nuclear genome size stasis in Selaginella Our results indicate that Selaginella, similar to other early diverging lineages of vascular land plants, has relatively low rates of genome size evolution. Further, our analyses highlight that a rapid transition to a small genome size is only one route to an extremely small genome.

  9. Privacy in the Genomic Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAVEED, MUHAMMAD; AYDAY, ERMAN; CLAYTON, ELLEN W.; FELLAY, JACQUES; GUNTER, CARL A.; HUBAUX, JEAN-PIERRE; MALIN, BRADLEY A.; WANG, XIAOFENG

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequencing technology has advanced at a rapid pace and it is now possible to generate highly-detailed genotypes inexpensively. The collection and analysis of such data has the potential to support various applications, including personalized medical services. While the benefits of the genomics revolution are trumpeted by the biomedical community, the increased availability of such data has major implications for personal privacy; notably because the genome has certain essential features, which include (but are not limited to) (i) an association with traits and certain diseases, (ii) identification capability (e.g., forensics), and (iii) revelation of family relationships. Moreover, direct-to-consumer DNA testing increases the likelihood that genome data will be made available in less regulated environments, such as the Internet and for-profit companies. The problem of genome data privacy thus resides at the crossroads of computer science, medicine, and public policy. While the computer scientists have addressed data privacy for various data types, there has been less attention dedicated to genomic data. Thus, the goal of this paper is to provide a systematization of knowledge for the computer science community. In doing so, we address some of the (sometimes erroneous) beliefs of this field and we report on a survey we conducted about genome data privacy with biomedical specialists. Then, after characterizing the genome privacy problem, we review the state-of-the-art regarding privacy attacks on genomic data and strategies for mitigating such attacks, as well as contextualizing these attacks from the perspective of medicine and public policy. This paper concludes with an enumeration of the challenges for genome data privacy and presents a framework to systematize the analysis of threats and the design of countermeasures as the field moves forward. PMID:26640318

  10. Recombination drives vertebrate genome contraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwoong Nam

    Full Text Available Selective and/or neutral processes may govern variation in DNA content and, ultimately, genome size. The observation in several organisms of a negative correlation between recombination rate and intron size could be compatible with a neutral model in which recombination is mutagenic for length changes. We used whole-genome data on small insertions and deletions within transposable elements from chicken and zebra finch to demonstrate clear links between recombination rate and a number of attributes of reduced DNA content. Recombination rate was negatively correlated with the length of introns, transposable elements, and intergenic spacer and with the rate of short insertions. Importantly, it was positively correlated with gene density, the rate of short deletions, the deletion bias, and the net change in sequence length. All these observations point at a pattern of more condensed genome structure in regions of high recombination. Based on the observed rates of small insertions and deletions and assuming that these rates are representative for the whole genome, we estimate that the genome of the most recent common ancestor of birds and lizards has lost nearly 20% of its DNA content up until the present. Expansion of transposable elements can counteract the effect of deletions in an equilibrium mutation model; however, since the activity of transposable elements has been low in the avian lineage, the deletion bias is likely to have had a significant effect on genome size evolution in dinosaurs and birds, contributing to the maintenance of a small genome. We also demonstrate that most of the observed correlations between recombination rate and genome contraction parameters are seen in the human genome, including for segregating indel polymorphisms. Our data are compatible with a neutral model in which recombination drives vertebrate genome size evolution and gives no direct support for a role of natural selection in this process.

  11. Implementation of Business Game Activity Support System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANABU Motonari

    2004-01-01

    Business game can be used not only as an educational tool for the development of decision making ability, but also can be used for supporting the knowledge creation activity in organizations. In this paper, some conceptual considerations to meanings of the business game in the knowledge creation activity by using the knowledge creation theory and other related theories are given,and business game activity concept which refers to game play and development is proposed. Then focusing on the business game activity as an instantiation of the knowledge creation activity, and a Web based gaming activity support system based on the former system called YBG that enables us to play and develop many business games through the standard web browser is proposed. This system also provides us a lot of opportunities to play and develop the business games over business game communities.

  12. Automated design of genomic Southern blot probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komiyama Noboru H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sothern blotting is a DNA analysis technique that has found widespread application in molecular biology. It has been used for gene discovery and mapping and has diagnostic and forensic applications, including mutation detection in patient samples and DNA fingerprinting in criminal investigations. Southern blotting has been employed as the definitive method for detecting transgene integration, and successful homologous recombination in gene targeting experiments. The technique employs a labeled DNA probe to detect a specific DNA sequence in a complex DNA sample that has been separated by restriction-digest and gel electrophoresis. Critically for the technique to succeed the probe must be unique to the target locus so as not to cross-hybridize to other endogenous DNA within the sample. Investigators routinely employ a manual approach to probe design. A genome browser is used to extract DNA sequence from the locus of interest, which is searched against the target genome using a BLAST-like tool. Ideally a single perfect match is obtained to the target, with little cross-reactivity caused by homologous DNA sequence present in the genome and/or repetitive and low-complexity elements in the candidate probe. This is a labor intensive process often requiring several attempts to find a suitable probe for laboratory testing. Results We have written an informatic pipeline to automatically design genomic Sothern blot probes that specifically attempts to optimize the resultant probe, employing a brute-force strategy of generating many candidate probes of acceptable length in the user-specified design window, searching all against the target genome, then scoring and ranking the candidates by uniqueness and repetitive DNA element content. Using these in silico measures we can automatically design probes that we predict to perform as well, or better, than our previous manual designs, while considerably reducing design time. We went on to

  13. The Arabidopsis lyrata genome sequence and the basis of rapid genome size change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Tina T.; Pattyn, Pedro; Bakker, Erica G.; Cao, Jun; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Clark, Richard M.; Fahlgren, Noah; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Haberer, Georg; Hollister, Jesse D.; Ossowski, Stephan; Ottilar, Robert P.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Spannagl, Manuel; Wang, Xi; Yang, Liang; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Bergelson, Joy; Carrington, James C.; Gaut, Brandon S.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef; Guo, Ya-Long

    2011-04-29

    In our manuscript, we present a high-quality genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana relative, Arabidopsis lyrata, produced by dideoxy sequencing. We have performed the usual types of genome analysis (gene annotation, dN/dS studies etc. etc.), but this is relegated to the Supporting Information. Instead, we focus on what was a major motivation for sequencing this genome, namely to understand how A. thaliana lost half its genome in a few million years and lived to tell the tale. The rather surprising conclusion is that there is not a single genomic feature that accounts for the reduced genome, but that every aspect centromeres, intergenic regions, transposable elements, gene family number is affected through hundreds of thousands of cuts. This strongly suggests that overall genome size in itself is what has been under selection, a suggestion that is strongly supported by our demonstration (using population genetics data from A. thaliana) that new deletions seem to be driven to fixation.

  14. The Alternaria genomes database: a comprehensive resource for a fungal genus comprised of saprophytes, plant pathogens, and allergenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Ha X; Pryor, Barry; Peever, Tobin; Lawrence, Christopher B

    2015-03-25

    Alternaria is considered one of the most common saprophytic fungal genera on the planet. It is comprised of many species that exhibit a necrotrophic phytopathogenic lifestyle. Several species are clinically associated with allergic respiratory disorders although rarely found to cause invasive infections in humans. Finally, Alternaria spp. are among the most well known producers of diverse fungal secondary metabolites, especially toxins. We have recently sequenced and annotated the genomes of 25 Alternaria spp. including but not limited to many necrotrophic plant pathogens such as A. brassicicola (a pathogen of Brassicaceous crops like cabbage and canola) and A. solani (a major pathogen of Solanaceous plants like potato and tomato), and several saprophytes that cause allergy in human such as A. alternata isolates. These genomes were annotated and compared. Multiple genetic differences were found in the context of plant and human pathogenicity, notably the pro-inflammatory potential of A. alternata. The Alternaria genomes database was built to provide a public platform to access the whole genome sequences, genome annotations, and comparative genomics data of these species. Genome annotation and comparison were performed using a pipeline that integrated multiple computational and comparative genomics tools. Alternaria genome sequences together with their annotation and comparison data were ported to Ensembl database schemas using a self-developed tool (EnsImport). Collectively, data are currently hosted using a customized installation of the Ensembl genome browser platform. Recent efforts in fungal genome sequencing have facilitated the studies of the molecular basis of fungal pathogenicity as a whole system. The Alternaria genomes database provides a comprehensive resource of genomics and comparative data of an important saprophytic and plant/human pathogenic fungal genus. The database will be updated regularly with new genomes when they become available. The

  15. Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB): an integrative and interactive database for rice genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiroaki; Lee, Sung Shin; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Numa, Hisataka; Kim, Jungsok; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Wakimoto, Hironobu; Yang, Ching-chia; Iwamoto, Masao; Abe, Takashi; Yamada, Yuko; Muto, Akira; Inokuchi, Hachiro; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Sasaki, Takuji; Itoh, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    The Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB, http://rapdb.dna.affrc.go.jp/) has been providing a comprehensive set of gene annotations for the genome sequence of rice, Oryza sativa (japonica group) cv. Nipponbare. Since the first release in 2005, RAP-DB has been updated several times along with the genome assembly updates. Here, we present our newest RAP-DB based on the latest genome assembly, Os-Nipponbare-Reference-IRGSP-1.0 (IRGSP-1.0), which was released in 2011. We detected 37,869 loci by mapping transcript and protein sequences of 150 monocot species. To provide plant researchers with highly reliable and up to date rice gene annotations, we have been incorporating literature-based manually curated data, and 1,626 loci currently incorporate literature-based annotation data, including commonly used gene names or gene symbols. Transcriptional activities are shown at the nucleotide level by mapping RNA-Seq reads derived from 27 samples. We also mapped the Illumina reads of a Japanese leading japonica cultivar, Koshihikari, and a Chinese indica cultivar, Guangluai-4, to the genome and show alignments together with the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and gene functional annotations through a newly developed browser, Short-Read Assembly Browser (S-RAB). We have developed two satellite databases, Plant Gene Family Database (PGFD) and Integrative Database of Cereal Gene Phylogeny (IDCGP), which display gene family and homologous gene relationships among diverse plant species. RAP-DB and the satellite databases offer simple and user-friendly web interfaces, enabling plant and genome researchers to access the data easily and facilitating a broad range of plant research topics.

  16. 基于网络的浏览器内容取证还原技术%Browser forensic and reconstruction based on network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文奇; 潘恒; 郑秋生; 关云云

    2015-01-01

    For network data properties,the integrity rule of network forensic was specified.Based on the principles of browser accessing server,a forensic framework was proposed which collected evidence during a browser accessing the networks.In that framework,Hash function was designed,and a keyword match algorithm based on the Windows multi-cores mechanism was de-signed,which were used to collected crime evidence.A network data restoring and Web page restructuring algorithm was imple-mented using the regular expression.Results of the test show the proposed algorithms can restore complex Web pages.%针对网络数据的特点,定义网络数据取证的完整性规则;在分析浏览器访问服务器原理的基础上,提出针对浏览器访问网络过程取证的系统框架;设计哈希函数,利用 Windows 系统的多核机制设计关键词取证高效分析算法;根据TCP/IP 协议将网络数据还原到应用层,采用正则表达式搜索技术实现网页重构的算法。实测结果表明,该算法能够有效获取并还原用户的访问内容。

  17. How Google Browser run Chinese Market-Why do People Prefer Baidu, UC, 360 and QQ Browser to Chrome%Google浏览器如何经营中国市场*--百度、UC、360、QQ浏览器为什么让人感觉比Chrome好

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    中国高技术产业发展促进会知识产权战略研究课题组

    2015-01-01

    Google browser technology is innovative which not only meets the development needs of enterprises, but also in line with the information requirements of majority of users. How to enter the Chinese market is a question worth pondering.%Google浏览器技术具有创新性,不仅满足了Google的企业的发展需求,也符合广大用户的信息要求,但是如何进入中国市场,是个值得深思的问题。

  18. Ancient genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten E; Ávila-Arcos, María C; Barnett, Ross; Campos, Paula F; Cappellini, Enrico; Ermini, Luca; Fernández, Ruth; da Fonseca, Rute; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Hansen, Anders J; Jónsson, Hákon; Korneliussen, Thorfinn; Margaryan, Ashot; Martin, Michael D; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Raghavan, Maanasa; Rasmussen, Morten; Velasco, Marcela Sandoval; Schroeder, Hannes; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Wales, Nathan; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-01-19

    The past decade has witnessed a revolution in ancient DNA (aDNA) research. Although the field's focus was previously limited to mitochondrial DNA and a few nuclear markers, whole genome sequences from the deep past can now be retrieved. This breakthrough is tightly connected to the massive sequence throughput of next generation sequencing platforms and the ability to target short and degraded DNA molecules. Many ancient specimens previously unsuitable for DNA analyses because of extensive degradation can now successfully be used as source materials. Additionally, the analytical power obtained by increasing the number of sequence reads to billions effectively means that contamination issues that have haunted aDNA research for decades, particularly in human studies, can now be efficiently and confidently quantified. At present, whole genomes have been sequenced from ancient anatomically modern humans, archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when testing specific hypotheses related to the past.

  19. The genome portal of the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute: 2014 updates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, Henrik [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Cantor, Michael [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Dusheyko, Serge [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Hua, Susan [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Poliakov, Alexander [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Shabalov, Igor [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Smirnova, Tatyana [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor V. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Dubchak, Inna [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    2013-11-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a national user facility, serves the diverse scientific community by providing integrated high-throughput sequencing and computational analysis to enable system-based scientific approaches in support of DOE missions related to clean energy generation and environmental characterization. The JGI Genome Portal (http://genome.jgi.doe.gov) provides unified access to all JGI genomic databases and analytical tools. The JGI maintains extensive data management systems and specialized analytical capabilities to manage and interpret complex genomic data. A user can search, download and explore multiple data sets available for all DOE JGI sequencing projects including their status, assemblies and annotations of sequenced genomes. In this paper, we describe major updates of the Genome Portal in the past 2 years with a specific emphasis on efficient handling of the rapidly growing amount of diverse genomic data accumulated in JGI.

  20. Visualization for genomics: the Microbial Genome Viewer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoven, R.; Enckevort, F.H.J. van; Boekhorst, J.; Molenaar, D.; Siezen, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    SUMMARY: A Web-based visualization tool, the Microbial Genome Viewer, is presented that allows the user to combine complex genomic data in a highly interactive way. This Web tool enables the interactive generation of chromosome wheels and linear genome maps from genome annotation data stored in a My

  1. The function genomics study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Genomics is a biology term appeared ten years ago, used to describe the researches of genomic mapping, sequencing, and structure analysis, etc. Genomics, the first journal for publishing papers on genomics research was born in 1986. In the past decade, the concept of genomics has been widely accepted by scientists who are engaging in biology research. Meanwhile, the research scope of genomics has been extended continuously, from simple gene mapping and sequencing to function genomics study. To reflect the change, genomics is divided into two parts now, the structure genomics and the function genomics.

  2. Erratum: Google Earth as Geoscience Data Browser Project: Development of a Tool to Convert JAMSTEC Research Vessel Navigation Data to KML [Data Science Journal, Volume 8, 30 March 2009. S85-S91

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Yamagishi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The following PDF indicates errata for the original article entitled "Google Earth as Geoscience Data Browser Project: Development of a Tool to Convert JAMSTEC Research Vessel Navigation Data to KML" by Y Yamagishi, H Nagao, K Suzuki, H Tamura, T Hatakeyama, H Yanaka and S Tsuboi.

  3. Surfing for Data: A Gathering Trend in Data Storage Is the Use of Web-Based Applications that Make It Easy for Authorized Users to Access Hosted Server Content with Just a Computing Device and Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, the widespread availability of networks and the flexibility of Web browsers have shifted the industry from a client-server model to a Web-based one. In the client-server model of computing, clients run applications locally, with the servers managing storage, printing functions, and network traffic. Because every client is…

  4. Comparative Reannotation of 21 Aspergillus Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamov, Asaf; Riley, Robert; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-03-08

    We used comparative gene modeling to reannotate 21 Aspergillus genomes. Initial automatic annotation of individual genomes may contain some errors of different nature, e.g. missing genes, incorrect exon-intron structures, 'chimeras', which fuse 2 or more real genes or alternatively splitting some real genes into 2 or more models. The main premise behind the comparative modeling approach is that for closely related genomes most orthologous families have the same conserved gene structure. The algorithm maps all gene models predicted in each individual Aspergillus genome to the other genomes and, for each locus, selects from potentially many competing models, the one which most closely resembles the orthologous genes from other genomes. This procedure is iterated until no further change in gene models is observed. For Aspergillus genomes we predicted in total 4503 new gene models ( ~;;2percent per genome), supported by comparative analysis, additionally correcting ~;;18percent of old gene models. This resulted in a total of 4065 more genes with annotated PFAM domains (~;;3percent increase per genome). Analysis of a few genomes with EST/transcriptomics data shows that the new annotation sets also have a higher number of EST-supported splice sites at exon-intron boundaries.

  5. Fungal Genomics for Energy and Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-11

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). One of its projects, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts) by means of genome sequencing and analysis. New chapters of the Encyclopedia can be opened with user proposals to the JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP). Another JGI project, the 1000 fungal genomes, explores fungal diversity on genome level at scale and is open for users to nominate new species for sequencing. Over 200 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  6. An epigenetic toolkit allows for diverse genome architectures in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer-Alcalá, Xyrus X; Katz, Laura A

    2015-12-01

    Genome architecture varies considerably among eukaryotes in terms of both size and structure (e.g. distribution of sequences within the genome, elimination of DNA during formation of somatic nuclei). The diversity in eukaryotic genome architectures and the dynamic processes are only possible due to the well-developed epigenetic toolkit, which probably existed in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA). This toolkit may have arisen as a means of navigating the genomic conflict that arose from the expansion of transposable elements within the ancestral eukaryotic genome. This toolkit has been coopted to support the dynamic nature of genomes in lineages across the eukaryotic tree of life. Here we highlight how the changes in genome architecture in diverse eukaryotes are regulated by epigenetic processes, such as DNA elimination, genome rearrangements, and adaptive changes to genome architecture. The ability to epigenetically modify and regulate genomes has contributed greatly to the diversity of eukaryotes observed today.

  7. InterStoreDB: A Generic Integration Resource for Genetic and Genomic Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher G.Love; Ambrose E.Andongabo; Jun Wang; Pierre W.C.Carion; Christopher J.Rawlings; Graham J.King

    2012-01-01

    Associating phenotypic traits and quantitative trait loci (QTL) to causative regions of the underlying genome is a key goal in agricultural research.InterStoreDB is a suite of integrated databases designed to assist in this process.The individual databases are species independent and generic in design,providing access to curated datasets relating to plant populations,phenotypic traits,genetic maps,marker loci and QTL,with links to functional gene annotation and genomic sequence data.Each component database provides access to associated metadata,including data provenance and parameters used in analyses,thus providing users with information to evaluate the relative worth of any associations identified.The databases include CropStoreDB,for management of population,genetic map,QTL and trait measurement data,SeqStoreDB for sequence-related data and AlignStoreDB,which stores sequence alignment information,and allows navigation between genetic and genomic datasets.Genetic maps are visualized and compared using the CMAP tool,and functional annotation from sequenced genomes is provided via an EnsEMBL-based genome browser.This framework facilitates navigation of the multiple biological domains involved in genetics and genomics research in a transparent manner within a single portal.We demonstrate the value of InterStoreDB as a tool for Brassica research.InterStoreDB is available from:http:llwww.interstoredb.org

  8. Pathway Tools version 19.0 update: software for pathway/genome informatics and systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Peter D; Latendresse, Mario; Paley, Suzanne M; Krummenacker, Markus; Ong, Quang D; Billington, Richard; Kothari, Anamika; Weaver, Daniel; Lee, Thomas; Subhraveti, Pallavi; Spaulding, Aaron; Fulcher, Carol; Keseler, Ingrid M; Caspi, Ron

    2016-09-01

    Pathway Tools is a bioinformatics software environment with a broad set of capabilities. The software provides genome-informatics tools such as a genome browser, sequence alignments, a genome-variant analyzer and comparative-genomics operations. It offers metabolic-informatics tools, such as metabolic reconstruction, quantitative metabolic modeling, prediction of reaction atom mappings and metabolic route search. Pathway Tools also provides regulatory-informatics tools, such as the ability to represent and visualize a wide range of regulatory interactions. This article outlines the advances in Pathway Tools in the past 5 years. Major additions include components for metabolic modeling, metabolic route search, computation of atom mappings and estimation of compound Gibbs free energies of formation; addition of editors for signaling pathways, for genome sequences and for cellular architecture; storage of gene essentiality data and phenotype data; display of multiple alignments, and of signaling and electron-transport pathways; and development of Python and web-services application programming interfaces. Scientists around the world have created more than 9800 Pathway/Genome Databases by using Pathway Tools, many of which are curated databases for important model organisms.

  9. WormBase ParaSite - a comprehensive resource for helminth genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kevin L; Bolt, Bruce J; Shafie, Myriam; Kersey, Paul; Berriman, Matthew

    2017-07-01

    The number of publicly available parasitic worm genome sequences has increased dramatically in the past three years, and research interest in helminth functional genomics is now quickly gathering pace in response to the foundation that has been laid by these collective efforts. A systematic approach to the organisation, curation, analysis and presentation of these data is clearly vital for maximising the utility of these data to researchers. We have developed a portal called WormBase ParaSite (http://parasite.wormbase.org) for interrogating helminth genomes on a large scale. Data from over 100 nematode and platyhelminth species are integrated, adding value by way of systematic and consistent functional annotation (e.g. protein domains and Gene Ontology terms), gene expression analysis (e.g. alignment of life-stage specific transcriptome data sets), and comparative analysis (e.g. orthologues and paralogues). We provide several ways of exploring the data, including genome browsers, genome and gene summary pages, text search, sequence search, a query wizard, bulk downloads, and programmatic interfaces. In this review, we provide an overview of the back-end infrastructure and analysis behind WormBase ParaSite, and the displays and tools available to users for interrogating helminth genomic data. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ensembl Plants: Integrating Tools for Visualizing, Mining, and Analyzing Plant Genomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolser, Dan; Staines, Daniel M; Pritchard, Emily; Kersey, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Ensembl Plants ( http://plants.ensembl.org ) is an integrative resource presenting genome-scale information for a growing number of sequenced plant species (currently 33). Data provided includes genome sequence, gene models, functional annotation, and polymorphic loci. Various additional information are provided for variation data, including population structure, individual genotypes, linkage, and phenotype data. In each release, comparative analyses are performed on whole genome and protein sequences, and genome alignments and gene trees are made available that show the implied evolutionary history of each gene family. Access to the data is provided through a genome browser incorporating many specialist interfaces for different data types, and through a variety of additional methods for programmatic access and data mining. These access routes are consistent with those offered through the Ensembl interface for the genomes of non-plant species, including those of plant pathogens, pests, and pollinators.Ensembl Plants is updated 4-5 times a year and is developed in collaboration with our international partners in the Gramene ( http://www.gramene.org ) and transPLANT projects ( http://www.transplantdb.org ).

  11. Identification of Sesame Genomic Variations from Genome Comparison of Landrace and Variety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Zhu, Xiaodong; Yu, Jingyin; Wang, Linhai; Zhang, Yanxin; Li, Donghua; Zhou, Rong; Zhang, Xiurong

    2016-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is one of the main oilseed crops, providing vegetable oil and protein to human. Landrace is the gene source of variety, carrying many desire alleles for genetic improvement. Despite the importance of sesame landrace, genome of sesame landrace remains unexplored and genomic variations between landrace and variety still is not clear. To identify the genomic variations between sesame landrace and variety, two representative sesame landrace accessions, "Baizhima" and "Mishuozhima," were selected and re-sequenced. The genome sequencing and de novo assembling of the two sesame landraces resulted in draft genomes of 267 Mb and 254 Mb, respectively, with the contig N50 more than 47 kb. Totally, 1,332,025 SNPs and 506,245 InDels were identified from the genome of "Baizhima" and "Mishuozhima" by comparison of the genome of a variety "Zhongzhi13." Among the genomic variations, 70,018 SNPs and 8311 InDels were located in the coding regions of genes. Genomic variations may contribute to variation of sesame agronomic traits such as flowering time, plant height, and oil content. The identified genomic variations were successfully used in the QTL mapping and the black pigment synthesis gene, PPO, was found to be the candidate gene of sesame seed coat color. The comprehensively compared genomes of sesame landrace and modern variety produced massive useful genomic information, constituting a powerful tool to support genetic research, and molecular breeding of sesame.

  12. Identification of Sesame Genomic Variations from Genome Comparison of Landrace and Variety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Zhu, Xiaodong; Yu, Jingyin; Wang, Linhai; Zhang, Yanxin; Li, Donghua; Zhou, Rong; Zhang, Xiurong

    2016-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is one of the main oilseed crops, providing vegetable oil and protein to human. Landrace is the gene source of variety, carrying many desire alleles for genetic improvement. Despite the importance of sesame landrace, genome of sesame landrace remains unexplored and genomic variations between landrace and variety still is not clear. To identify the genomic variations between sesame landrace and variety, two representative sesame landrace accessions, “Baizhima” and “Mishuozhima,” were selected and re-sequenced. The genome sequencing and de novo assembling of the two sesame landraces resulted in draft genomes of 267 Mb and 254 Mb, respectively, with the contig N50 more than 47 kb. Totally, 1,332,025 SNPs and 506,245 InDels were identified from the genome of “Baizhima” and “Mishuozhima” by comparison of the genome of a variety “Zhongzhi13.” Among the genomic variations, 70,018 SNPs and 8311 InDels were located in the coding regions of genes. Genomic variations may contribute to variation of sesame agronomic traits such as flowering time, plant height, and oil content. The identified genomic variations were successfully used in the QTL mapping and the black pigment synthesis gene, PPO, was found to be the candidate gene of sesame seed coat color. The comprehensively compared genomes of sesame landrace and modern variety produced massive useful genomic information, constituting a powerful tool to support genetic research, and molecular breeding of sesame. PMID:27536315

  13. Probability landscapes for integrative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benecke Arndt

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The comprehension of the gene regulatory code in eukaryotes is one of the major challenges of systems biology, and is a requirement for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for multifactorial diseases. Its bi-fold degeneration precludes brute force and statistical approaches based on the genomic sequence alone. Rather, recursive integration of systematic, whole-genome experimental data with advanced statistical regulatory sequence predictions needs to be developed. Such experimental approaches as well as the prediction tools are only starting to become available and increasing numbers of genome sequences and empirical sequence annotations are under continual discovery-driven change. Furthermore, given the complexity of the question, a decade(s long multi-laboratory effort needs to be envisioned. These constraints need to be considered in the creation of a framework that can pave a road to successful comprehension of the gene regulatory code. Results We introduce here a concept for such a framework, based entirely on systematic annotation in terms of probability profiles of genomic sequence using any type of relevant experimental and theoretical information and subsequent cross-correlation analysis in hypothesis-driven model building and testing. Conclusion Probability landscapes, which include as reference set the probabilistic representation of the genomic sequence, can be used efficiently to discover and analyze correlations amongst initially heterogeneous and un-relatable descriptions and genome-wide measurements. Furthermore, this structure is usable as a support for automatically generating and testing hypotheses for alternative gene regulatory grammars and the evaluation of those through statistical analysis of the high-dimensional correlations between genomic sequence, sequence annotations, and experimental data. Finally, this structure provides a concrete and tangible basis for attempting to formulate a

  14. The GPlates Portal: Cloud-based interactive 3D and 4D visualization of global geological and geophysical data and models in a browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Dietmar; Qin, Xiaodong; Sandwell, David; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Williams, Simon; Flament, Nicolas; Maus, Stefan; Seton, Maria

    2017-04-01

    The pace of scientific discovery is being transformed by the availability of 'big data' and open access, open source software tools. These innovations open up new avenues for how scientists communicate and share data and ideas with each other, and with the general public. Here, we describe our efforts to bring to life our studies of the Earth system, both at present day and through deep geological time. The GPlates Portal (portal.gplates.org) is a gateway to a series of virtual globes based on the Cesium Javascript library. The portal allows fast interactive visualization of global geophysical and geological data sets, draped over digital terrain models. The globes use WebGL for hardware-accelerated graphics and are cross-platform and cross-browser compatible with complete camera control. The globes include a visualization of a high-resolution global digital elevation model and the vertical gradient of the global gravity field, highlighting small-scale seafloor fabric such as abyssal hills, fracture zones and seamounts in unprecedented detail. The portal also features globes portraying seafloor geology and a global data set of marine magnetic anomaly identifications. The portal is specifically designed to visualize models of the Earth through geological time. These space-time globes include tectonic reconstructions of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, and several models of long-wavelength surface dynamic topography through time, including the interactive plotting of vertical motion histories at selected locations. The portal has been visited over half a million times since its inception in October 2015, as tracked by google analytics, and the globes have been featured in numerous media articles around the world. This demonstrates the high demand for fast visualization of global spatial big data, both for the present-day as well as through geological time. The globes put the on-the-fly visualization of massive data sets at the fingertips of end-users to

  15. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative.

  16. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative. 34 refs.

  17. SGR: an online genomic resource for the woodland strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Omar; Slovin, Janet P; Kang, Chunying; Hollender, Courtney A; Geretz, Aviva; Houston, Sam; Liu, Zhongchi; Alkharouf, Nadim W

    2013-12-23

    Fragaria vesca, a diploid strawberry species commonly known as the alpine or woodland strawberry, is a versatile experimental plant system and an emerging model for the Rosaceae family. An ancestral F. vesca genome contributed to the genome of the octoploid dessert strawberry (F. ×ananassa), and the extant genome exhibits synteny with other commercially important members of the Rosaceae family such as apple and peach. To provide a molecular description of floral organ and fruit development at the resolution of specific tissues and cell types, RNAs from flowers and early developmental stage fruit tissues of the inbred F. vesca line YW5AF7 were extracted and the resulting cDNA libraries sequenced using an Illumina HiSeq2000. To enable easy access as well as mining of this two-dimensional (stage and tissue) transcriptome dataset, a web-based database, the Strawberry Genomic Resource (SGR), was developed. SGR is a web accessible database that contains sample description, sample statistics, gene annotation, and gene expression analysis. This information can be accessed publicly from a web-based interface at http://bioinformatics.towson.edu/strawberry/Default.aspx. The SGR website provides user friendly search and browse capabilities for all the data stored in the database. Users are able to search for genes using a gene ID or description or obtain differentially expressed genes by entering different comparison parameters. Search results can be downloaded in a tabular format compatible with Microsoft excel application. Aligned reads to individual genes and exon/intron structures are displayed using the genome browser, facilitating gene re-annotation by individual users. The SGR database was developed to facilitate dissemination and data mining of extensive floral and fruit transcriptome data in the woodland strawberry. It enables users to mine the data in different ways to study different pathways or biological processes during reproductive development.

  18. Genephony: a knowledge management tool for genome-wide research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Angelo; Riva, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the consequences of the rapid and widespread adoption of high-throughput experimental technologies is an exponential increase of the amount of data produced by genome-wide experiments. Researchers increasingly need to handle very large volumes of heterogeneous data, including both the data generated by their own experiments and the data retrieved from publicly available repositories of genomic knowledge. Integration, exploration, manipulation and interpretation of data and information therefore need to become as automated as possible, since their scale and breadth are, in general, beyond the limits of what individual researchers and the basic data management tools in normal use can handle. This paper describes Genephony, a tool we are developing to address these challenges. Results We describe how Genephony can be used to manage large datesets of genomic information, integrating them with existing knowledge repositories. We illustrate its functionalities with an example of a complex annotation task, in which a set of SNPs coming from a genotyping experiment is annotated with genes known to be associated to a phenotype of interest. We show how, thanks to the modular architecture of Genephony and its user-friendly interface, this task can be performed in a few simple steps. Conclusion Genephony is an online tool for the manipulation of large datasets of genomic information. It can be used as a browser for genomic data, as a high-throughput annotation tool, and as a knowledge discovery tool. It is designed to be easy to use, flexible and extensible. Its knowledge management engine provides fine-grained control over individual data elements, as well as efficient operations on large datasets. PMID:19728881

  19. Fueling the Future with Fungal Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-10-27

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the JGI Fungal Genomic Program. One of its projects, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts and pathogens) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation and sugar fermentation) by means of genome sequencing and analysis. New chapters of the Encyclopedia can be opened with user proposals to the JGI Community Science Program (CSP). Another JGI project, the 1000 fungal genomes, explores fungal diversity on genome level at scale and is open for users to nominate new species for sequencing. Over 400 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics will lead to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such ‘parts’ suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  20. GeoNotebook: Browser based Interactive analysis and visualization workflow for very large climate and geospatial datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, D.; Chaudhary, A.; Votava, P.; Kotfila, C.

    2016-12-01

    Jointly developed by Kitware and NASA Ames, GeoNotebook is an open source tool designed to give the maximum amount of flexibility to analysts, while dramatically simplifying the process of exploring geospatially indexed datasets. Packages like Fiona (backed by GDAL), Shapely, Descartes, Geopandas, and PySAL provide a stack of technologies for reading, transforming, and analyzing geospatial data. Combined with the Jupyter notebook and libraries like matplotlib/Basemap it is possible to generate detailed geospatial visualizations. Unfortunately, visualizations generated is either static or does not perform well for very large datasets. Also, this setup requires a great deal of boilerplate code to create and maintain. Other extensions exist to remedy these problems, but they provide a separate map for each input cell and do not support map interactions that feed back into the python environment. To support interactive data exploration and visualization on large datasets we have developed an extension to the Jupyter notebook that provides a single dynamic map that can be managed from the Python environment, and that can communicate back with a server which can perform operations like data subsetting on a cloud-based cluster.