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Sample records for genome architecture derived

  1. Enhancer-derived lncRNAs regulate genome architecture: fact or fiction?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fanucchi, Stephanie

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available How does the non-coding portion of the genome contribute to the regulation of genome architecture? A recent paper by Tan et al. focuses on the relationship between cis-acting complex-trait-associated lincRNAs and the formation of chromosomal...

  2. Chloroplast DNA sequence of the green alga Oedogonium cardiacum (Chlorophyceae: Unique genome architecture, derived characters shared with the Chaetophorales and novel genes acquired through horizontal transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux Claude

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To gain insight into the branching order of the five main lineages currently recognized in the green algal class Chlorophyceae and to expand our understanding of chloroplast genome evolution, we have undertaken the sequencing of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA from representative taxa. The complete cpDNA sequences previously reported for Chlamydomonas (Chlamydomonadales, Scenedesmus (Sphaeropleales, and Stigeoclonium (Chaetophorales revealed tremendous variability in their architecture, the retention of only few ancestral gene clusters, and derived clusters shared by Chlamydomonas and Scenedesmus. Unexpectedly, our recent phylogenies inferred from these cpDNAs and the partial sequences of three other chlorophycean cpDNAs disclosed two major clades, one uniting the Chlamydomonadales and Sphaeropleales (CS clade and the other uniting the Oedogoniales, Chaetophorales and Chaetopeltidales (OCC clade. Although molecular signatures provided strong support for this dichotomy and for the branching of the Oedogoniales as the earliest-diverging lineage of the OCC clade, more data are required to validate these phylogenies. We describe here the complete cpDNA sequence of Oedogonium cardiacum (Oedogoniales. Results Like its three chlorophycean homologues, the 196,547-bp Oedogonium chloroplast genome displays a distinctive architecture. This genome is one of the most compact among photosynthetic chlorophytes. It has an atypical quadripartite structure, is intron-rich (17 group I and 4 group II introns, and displays 99 different conserved genes and four long open reading frames (ORFs, three of which are clustered in the spacious inverted repeat of 35,493 bp. Intriguingly, two of these ORFs (int and dpoB revealed high similarities to genes not usually found in cpDNA. At the gene content and gene order levels, the Oedogonium genome most closely resembles its Stigeoclonium counterpart. Characters shared by these chlorophyceans but missing in members

  3. Genome Architecture and Its Roles in Human Copy Number Variation

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    Lu Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Besides single-nucleotide variants in the human genome, large-scale genomic variants, such as copy number variations (CNVs, are being increasingly discovered as a genetic source of human diversity and the pathogenic factors of diseases. Recent experimental findings have shed light on the links between different genome architectures and CNV mutagenesis. In this review, we summarize various genomic features and discuss their contributions to CNV formation. Genomic repeats, including both low-copy and high-copy repeats, play important roles in CNV instability, which was initially known as DNA recombination events. Furthermore, it has been found that human genomic repeats can also induce DNA replication errors and consequently result in CNV mutations. Some recent studies showed that DNA replication timing, which reflects the high-order information of genomic organization, is involved in human CNV mutations. Our review highlights that genome architecture, from DNA sequence to high-order genomic organization, is an important molecular factor in CNV mutagenesis and human genomic instability.

  4. Evolution and genome architecture in fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Mareike; Stukenbrock, Eva H

    2017-12-01

    The fungal kingdom comprises some of the most devastating plant pathogens. Sequencing the genomes of fungal pathogens has shown a remarkable variability in genome size and architecture. Population genomic data enable us to understand the mechanisms and the history of changes in genome size and adaptive evolution in plant pathogens. Although transposable elements predominantly have negative effects on their host, fungal pathogens provide prominent examples of advantageous associations between rapidly evolving transposable elements and virulence genes that cause variation in virulence phenotypes. By providing homogeneous environments at large regional scales, managed ecosystems, such as modern agriculture, can be conducive for the rapid evolution and dispersal of pathogens. In this Review, we summarize key examples from fungal plant pathogen genomics and discuss evolutionary processes in pathogenic fungi in the context of molecular evolution, population genomics and agriculture.

  5. GREAT: a web portal for Genome Regulatory Architecture Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyioukos, Costas; Bucchini, François; Elati, Mohamed; Képès, François

    2016-07-08

    GREAT (Genome REgulatory Architecture Tools) is a novel web portal for tools designed to generate user-friendly and biologically useful analysis of genome architecture and regulation. The online tools of GREAT are freely accessible and compatible with essentially any operating system which runs a modern browser. GREAT is based on the analysis of genome layout -defined as the respective positioning of co-functional genes- and its relation with chromosome architecture and gene expression. GREAT tools allow users to systematically detect regular patterns along co-functional genomic features in an automatic way consisting of three individual steps and respective interactive visualizations. In addition to the complete analysis of regularities, GREAT tools enable the use of periodicity and position information for improving the prediction of transcription factor binding sites using a multi-view machine learning approach. The outcome of this integrative approach features a multivariate analysis of the interplay between the location of a gene and its regulatory sequence. GREAT results are plotted in web interactive graphs and are available for download either as individual plots, self-contained interactive pages or as machine readable tables for downstream analysis. The GREAT portal can be reached at the following URL https://absynth.issb.genopole.fr/GREAT and each individual GREAT tool is available for downloading. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Genomic architecture of biomass heterosis inArabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Wang, Xuncheng; Ren, Diqiu; Huang, Hao; Xu, Miqi; He, Guangming; Deng, Xing Wang

    2017-07-25

    Heterosis is most frequently manifested by the substantially increased vigorous growth of hybrids compared with their parents. Investigating genomic variations in natural populations is essential to understand the initial molecular mechanisms underlying heterosis in plants. Here, we characterized the genomic architecture associated with biomass heterosis in 200 Arabidopsis hybrids. The genome-wide heterozygosity of hybrids makes a limited contribution to biomass heterosis, and no locus shows an obvious overdominance effect in hybrids. However, the accumulation of significant genetic loci identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in hybrids strongly correlates with better-parent heterosis (BPH). Candidate genes for biomass BPH fall into diverse biological functions, including cellular, metabolic, and developmental processes and stimulus-responsive pathways. Important heterosis candidates include WUSCHEL , ARGOS , and some genes that encode key factors involved in cell cycle regulation. Interestingly, transcriptomic analyses in representative Arabidopsis hybrid combinations reveal that heterosis candidate genes are functionally enriched in stimulus-responsive pathways, including responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli and immune responses. In addition, stimulus-responsive genes are repressed to low-parent levels in hybrids with high BPH, whereas middle-parent expression patterns are exhibited in hybrids with no BPH. Our study reveals a genomic architecture for understanding the molecular mechanisms of biomass heterosis in Arabidopsis , in which the accumulation of the superior alleles of genes involved in metabolic and cellular processes improve the development and growth of hybrids, whereas the overall repressed expression of stimulus-responsive genes prioritizes growth over responding to environmental stimuli in hybrids under normal conditions.

  7. Phase Variation and Genomic Architecture Changes in Azospirillum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Ludovic; Lavire, Céline; Mavingui, Patrick; Blaha, Didier; Haurat, Jacqueline; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Bally, René; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence

    2006-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Azospirillum lipoferum 4B generates in vitro at high frequency a stable nonswimming phase variant designated 4VI, which is distinguishable from the wild type by the differential absorption of dyes. The frequency of variants generated by a recA mutant of A. lipoferum 4B was increased up to 10-fold. The pleiotropic modifications characteristic of the phase variant are well documented, but the molecular processes involved are unknown. Here, the objective was to assess whether genomic rearrangements take place during phase variation of strain 4B. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles of strains 4B and 4VI differed. RAPD fragments observed only with the wild type were cloned, and three cosmids carrying the corresponding fragments were isolated. The three cosmids hybridized with a 750-kb plasmid and pulse-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that this replicon was missing in the 4VI genome. The same rearrangements took place during phase variation of 4BrecA. Large-scale genomic rearrangements during phase variation were demonstrated for two additional strains. In Azospirillum brasilense WN1, generation of stable variants was correlated with the disappearance of a replicon of 260 kb. For Azospirillum irakense KBC1, the variant was not stable and coincided with the formation of a new replicon, whereas the revertant recovered the parental genomic architecture. This study shows large-scale genomic rearrangements in Azospirillum strains and correlates them with phase variation. PMID:16855225

  8. A single-chain TALEN architecture for genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-03-04

    Transcription-activator like effector nucleases (TALENs) are tailor-made DNA endonucleases and serve as a powerful tool for genome engineering. Site-specific DNA cleavage can be made by the dimerization of FokI nuclease domains at custom-targeted genomic loci, where a pair of TALENs must be positioned in close proximity with an appropriate orientation. However, the simultaneous delivery and coordinated expression of two bulky TALEN monomers (>100 kDa) in cells may be problematic to implement for certain applications. Here, we report the development of a single-chain TALEN (scTALEN) architecture, in which two FokI nuclease domains are fused on a single polypeptide. The scTALEN was created by connecting two FokI nuclease domains with a 95 amino acid polypeptide linker, which was isolated from a linker library by high-throughput screening. We demonstrated that scTALENs were catalytically active as monomers in yeast and human cells. The use of this novel scTALEN architecture should reduce protein payload, simplify design and decrease production cost.

  9. De novo prediction of human chromosome structures: Epigenetic marking patterns encode genome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R.; Lieberman Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G.; Onuchic, José N.

    2017-01-01

    Inside the cell nucleus, genomes fold into organized structures that are characteristic of cell type. Here, we show that this chromatin architecture can be predicted de novo using epigenetic data derived from chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We exploit the idea that chromosomes encode a 1D sequence of chromatin structural types. Interactions between these chromatin types determine the 3D structural ensemble of chromosomes through a process similar to phase separation. First, a neural network is used to infer the relation between the epigenetic marks present at a locus, as assayed by ChIP-Seq, and the genomic compartment in which those loci reside, as measured by DNA-DNA proximity ligation (Hi-C). Next, types inferred from this neural network are used as an input to an energy landscape model for chromatin organization [Minimal Chromatin Model (MiChroM)] to generate an ensemble of 3D chromosome conformations at a resolution of 50 kilobases (kb). After training the model, dubbed Maximum Entropy Genomic Annotation from Biomarkers Associated to Structural Ensembles (MEGABASE), on odd-numbered chromosomes, we predict the sequences of chromatin types and the subsequent 3D conformational ensembles for the even chromosomes. We validate these structural ensembles by using ChIP-Seq tracks alone to predict Hi-C maps, as well as distances measured using 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. Both sets of experiments support the hypothesis of phase separation being the driving process behind compartmentalization. These findings strongly suggest that epigenetic marking patterns encode sufficient information to determine the global architecture of chromosomes and that de novo structure prediction for whole genomes may be increasingly possible. PMID:29087948

  10. De novo prediction of human chromosome structures: Epigenetic marking patterns encode genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R; Lieberman Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G; Onuchic, José N

    2017-11-14

    Inside the cell nucleus, genomes fold into organized structures that are characteristic of cell type. Here, we show that this chromatin architecture can be predicted de novo using epigenetic data derived from chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We exploit the idea that chromosomes encode a 1D sequence of chromatin structural types. Interactions between these chromatin types determine the 3D structural ensemble of chromosomes through a process similar to phase separation. First, a neural network is used to infer the relation between the epigenetic marks present at a locus, as assayed by ChIP-Seq, and the genomic compartment in which those loci reside, as measured by DNA-DNA proximity ligation (Hi-C). Next, types inferred from this neural network are used as an input to an energy landscape model for chromatin organization [Minimal Chromatin Model (MiChroM)] to generate an ensemble of 3D chromosome conformations at a resolution of 50 kilobases (kb). After training the model, dubbed Maximum Entropy Genomic Annotation from Biomarkers Associated to Structural Ensembles (MEGABASE), on odd-numbered chromosomes, we predict the sequences of chromatin types and the subsequent 3D conformational ensembles for the even chromosomes. We validate these structural ensembles by using ChIP-Seq tracks alone to predict Hi-C maps, as well as distances measured using 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. Both sets of experiments support the hypothesis of phase separation being the driving process behind compartmentalization. These findings strongly suggest that epigenetic marking patterns encode sufficient information to determine the global architecture of chromosomes and that de novo structure prediction for whole genomes may be increasingly possible. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  11. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Carol; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L; Mokashi, Vishwesh P; Chain, Patrick S G; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, ordered restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks.

  12. GenomeLandscaper: Landscape analysis of genome-fingerprints maps assessing chromosome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Hannan; Ai, Yuncan; Meng, Fanmei

    2018-01-18

    Assessing correctness of an assembled chromosome architecture is a central challenge. We create a geometric analysis method (called GenomeLandscaper) to conduct landscape analysis of genome-fingerprints maps (GFM), trace large-scale repetitive regions, and assess their impacts on the global architectures of assembled chromosomes. We develop an alignment-free method for phylogenetics analysis. The human Y chromosomes (GRCh.chrY, HuRef.chrY and YH.chrY) are analysed as a proof-of-concept study. We construct a galaxy of genome-fingerprints maps (GGFM) for them, and a landscape compatibility among relatives is observed. But a long sharp straight line on the GGFM breaks such a landscape compatibility, distinguishing GRCh38p1.chrY (and throughout GRCh38p7.chrY) from GRCh37p13.chrY, HuRef.chrY and YH.chrY. We delete a 1.30-Mbp target segment to rescue the landscape compatibility, matching the antecedent GRCh37p13.chrY. We re-locate it into the modelled centromeric and pericentromeric region of GRCh38p10.chrY, matching a gap placeholder of GRCh37p13.chrY. We decompose it into sub-constituents (such as BACs, interspersed repeats, and tandem repeats) and trace their homologues by phylogenetics analysis. We elucidate that most examined tandem repeats are of reasonable quality, but the BAC-sized repeats, 173U1020C (176.46 Kbp) and 5U41068C (205.34 Kbp), are likely over-repeated. These results offer unique insights into the centromeric and pericentromeric regions of the human Y chromosomes.

  13. The consequences of genomic architecture on ecological speciation in postglacial fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M. ROGERS, Jonathan A. MEE, Ella BOWLES

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The quest for the origin of species has entered the genomics era. Despite decades of evidence confirming the role of the environment in ecological speciation, an understanding of the genomics of ecological speciation is still in its infancy. In this review, we explore the role of genomic architecture in ecological speciation in postglacial fishes. Growing evidence for the number, location, effect size, and interactions among the genes underlying population persistence, adaptive trait divergence, and reproductive isolation in these fishes reinforces the importance of considering genomic architecture in studies of ecological speciation. Additionally, these populations likely adapt to new freshwater environments by selection on standing genetic variation, as de novo mutations are unlikely under such recent divergence times. We hypothesize that modular genomic architectures in postglacial fish taxa may be associated with the probability of population persistence. Empirical studies have confirmed the genic nature of ecological speciation, implicating surprisingly extensive linkage disequilibrium across the genome. An understanding of these genomic mosaics and how they contribute to reproductive barriers remains unclear, but migration rates and the strength of selection at these loci is predicted to influence the likelihood of population divergence. Altogether, understanding the role of genomic architecture is an important component of speciation research and postglacial fishes continue to provide excellent organisms to test these questions, both from the perspective of variation in architectures among taxa, and with respect to the distinct environments they have colonized. However, more empirical tests of ecological speciation predictions are needed [Current Zoo­logy 59 (1: 53–71, 2013].

  14. The architecture of ArgR-DNA complexes at the genome-scale in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Suhyung; Cho, Yoo-Bok; Kang, Taek Jin

    2015-01-01

    DNA-binding motifs that are recognized by transcription factors (TFs) have been well studied; however, challenges remain in determining the in vivo architecture of TF-DNA complexes on a genome-scale. Here, we determined the in vivo architecture of Escherichia coli arginine repressor (Arg...... facilitate the non-specific contacts between ArgR subunits and the residual sequences. Additionally, our approach may also reveal other fundamental structural features of TF-DNA interactions that have implications for studying genome-scale transcriptional regulatory networks....

  15. Wild emmer genome architecture and diversity elucidate wheat evolution and domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Raz; Nave, Moran; Barad, Omer; Baruch, Kobi; Twardziok, Sven O; Gundlach, Heidrun; Hale, Iago; Mascher, Martin; Spannagl, Manuel; Wiebe, Krystalee; Jordan, Katherine W; Golan, Guy; Deek, Jasline; Ben-Zvi, Batsheva; Ben-Zvi, Gil; Himmelbach, Axel; MacLachlan, Ron P; Sharpe, Andrew G; Fritz, Allan; Ben-David, Roi; Budak, Hikmet; Fahima, Tzion; Korol, Abraham; Faris, Justin D; Hernandez, Alvaro; Mikel, Mark A; Levy, Avraham A; Steffenson, Brian; Maccaferri, Marco; Tuberosa, Roberto; Cattivelli, Luigi; Faccioli, Primetta; Ceriotti, Aldo; Kashkush, Khalil; Pourkheirandish, Mohammad; Komatsuda, Takao; Eilam, Tamar; Sela, Hanan; Sharon, Amir; Ohad, Nir; Chamovitz, Daniel A; Mayer, Klaus F X; Stein, Nils; Ronen, Gil; Peleg, Zvi; Pozniak, Curtis J; Akhunov, Eduard D; Distelfeld, Assaf

    2017-07-07

    Wheat ( Triticum spp.) is one of the founder crops that likely drove the Neolithic transition to sedentary agrarian societies in the Fertile Crescent more than 10,000 years ago. Identifying genetic modifications underlying wheat's domestication requires knowledge about the genome of its allo-tetraploid progenitor, wild emmer ( T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides ). We report a 10.1-gigabase assembly of the 14 chromosomes of wild tetraploid wheat, as well as analyses of gene content, genome architecture, and genetic diversity. With this fully assembled polyploid wheat genome, we identified the causal mutations in Brittle Rachis 1 ( TtBtr1 ) genes controlling shattering, a key domestication trait. A study of genomic diversity among wild and domesticated accessions revealed genomic regions bearing the signature of selection under domestication. This reference assembly will serve as a resource for accelerating the genome-assisted improvement of modern wheat varieties. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Distinct genomic architecture of Plasmodium falciparum populations from South Asia.

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    Kumar, Shiva; Mudeppa, Devaraja G; Sharma, Ambika; Mascarenhas, Anjali; Dash, Rashmi; Pereira, Ligia; Shaik, Riaz Basha; Maki, Jennifer N; White, John; Zuo, Wenyun; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Duraisingh, Manoj T; Gomes, Edwin; Chery, Laura; Rathod, Pradipsinh K

    Previous whole genome comparisons of Plasmodium falciparum populations have not included collections from the Indian subcontinent, even though two million Indians contract malaria and about 50,000 die from the disease every year. Stratification of global parasites has revealed spatial relatedness of parasite genotypes on different continents. Here, genomic analysis was further improved to obtain country-level resolution by removing var genes and intergenic regions from distance calculations. P. falciparum genomes from India were found to be most closely related to each other. Their nearest neighbors were from Bangladesh and Myanmar, followed by Thailand. Samples from the rest of Southeast Asia, Africa and South America were increasingly more distant, demonstrating a high-resolution genomic-geographic continuum. Such genome stratification approaches will help monitor variations of malaria parasites within South Asia and future changes in parasite populations that may arise from in-country and cross-border migrations. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of B-genome derived simple sequence repeat (SSR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to investigate the genetic variability between 40 Musa genotypes maintained at the Musa germplasm collection of the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan using nine B-genome derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The nine primers produced reproducible and discrete ...

  18. The coding and noncoding architecture of the Caulobacter crescentus genome.

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    Jared M Schrader

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Caulobacter crescentus undergoes an asymmetric cell division controlled by a genetic circuit that cycles in space and time. We provide a universal strategy for defining the coding potential of bacterial genomes by applying ribosome profiling, RNA-seq, global 5'-RACE, and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS data to the 4-megabase C. crescentus genome. We mapped transcript units at single base-pair resolution using RNA-seq together with global 5'-RACE. Additionally, using ribosome profiling and LC-MS, we mapped translation start sites and coding regions with near complete coverage. We found most start codons lacked corresponding Shine-Dalgarno sites although ribosomes were observed to pause at internal Shine-Dalgarno sites within the coding DNA sequence (CDS. These data suggest a more prevalent use of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence for ribosome pausing rather than translation initiation in C. crescentus. Overall 19% of the transcribed and translated genomic elements were newly identified or significantly improved by this approach, providing a valuable genomic resource to elucidate the complete C. crescentus genetic circuitry that controls asymmetric cell division.

  19. Mosaic genome architecture of the Anopheles gambiae species complex.

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    Rui Wang-Sattler

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Attempts over the last three decades to reconstruct the phylogenetic history of the Anopheles gambiae species complex have been important for developing better strategies to control malaria transmission.We used fingerprint genotyping data from 414 field-collected female mosquitoes at 42 microsatellite loci to infer the evolutionary relationships of four species in the A. gambiae complex, the two major malaria vectors A. gambiae sensu stricto (A. gambiae s.s. and A. arabiensis, as well as two minor vectors, A. merus and A. melas.We identify six taxonomic units, including a clear separation of West and East Africa A. gambiae s.s. S molecular forms. We show that the phylogenetic relationships vary widely between different genomic regions, thus demonstrating the mosaic nature of the genome of these species. The two major malaria vectors are closely related and closer to A. merus than to A. melas at the genome-wide level, which is also true if only autosomes are considered. However, within the Xag inversion region of the X chromosome, the M and two S molecular forms are most similar to A. merus. Near the X centromere, outside the Xag region, the two S forms are highly dissimilar to the other taxa. Furthermore, our data suggest that the centromeric region of chromosome 3 is a strong discriminator between the major and minor malaria vectors.Although further studies are needed to elucidate the basis of the phylogenetic variation among the different regions of the genome, the preponderance of sympatric admixtures among taxa strongly favor introgression of different genomic regions between species, rather than lineage sorting of ancestral polymorphism, as a possible mechanism.

  20. Chromosomes in a genome-wise order: evidence for metaphase architecture.

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    Weise, Anja; Bhatt, Samarth; Piaszinski, Katja; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Fan, Xiaobo; Altendorf-Hofmann, Annelore; Tanomtong, Alongklod; Chaveerach, Arunrat; de Cioffi, Marcelo Bello; de Oliveira, Edivaldo; Walther, Joachim-U; Liehr, Thomas; Chaudhuri, Jyoti P

    2016-01-01

    One fundamental finding of the last decade is that, besides the primary DNA sequence information there are several epigenetic "information-layers" like DNA-and histone modifications, chromatin packaging and, last but not least, the position of genes in the nucleus. We postulate that the functional genomic architecture is not restricted to the interphase of the cell cycle but can also be observed in the metaphase stage, when chromosomes are most condensed and microscopically visible. If so, it offers the unique opportunity to directly analyze the functional aspects of genomic architecture in different cells, species and diseases. Another aspect not directly accessible by molecular techniques is the genome merged from two different haploid parental genomes represented by the homologous chromosome sets. Our results show that there is not only a well-known and defined nuclear architecture in interphase but also in metaphase leading to a bilateral organization of the two haploid sets of chromosomes. Moreover, evidence is provided for the parental origin of the haploid grouping. From our findings we postulate an additional epigenetic information layer within the genome including the organization of homologous chromosomes and their parental origin which may now substantially change the landscape of genetics.

  1. Telomere Length Dynamics and the Evolution of Cancer Genome Architecture

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    Kez Cleal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are progressively eroded during repeated rounds of cell division due to the end replication problem but also undergo additional more substantial stochastic shortening events. In most cases, shortened telomeres induce a cell-cycle arrest or trigger apoptosis, although for those cells that bypass such signals during tumour progression, a critical length threshold is reached at which telomere dysfunction may ensue. Dysfunction of the telomere nucleoprotein complex can expose free chromosome ends to the DNA double-strand break (DSB repair machinery, leading to telomere fusion with both telomeric and non-telomeric loci. The consequences of telomere fusions in promoting genome instability have long been appreciated through the breakage–fusion–bridge (BFB cycle mechanism, although recent studies using high-throughput sequencing technologies have uncovered evidence of involvement in a wider spectrum of genomic rearrangements including chromothripsis. A critical step in cancer progression is the transition of a clone to immortality, through the stabilisation of the telomere repeat array. This can be achieved via the reactivation of telomerase, or the induction of the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT pathway. Whilst telomere dysfunction may promote genome instability and tumour progression, by limiting the replicative potential of a cell and enforcing senescence, telomere shortening can act as a tumour suppressor mechanism. However, the burden of senescent cells has also been implicated as a driver of ageing and age-related pathology, and in the promotion of cancer through inflammatory signalling. Considering the critical role of telomere length in governing cancer biology, we review questions related to the prognostic value of studying the dynamics of telomere shortening and fusion, and discuss mechanisms and consequences of telomere-induced genome rearrangements.

  2. Genomic Architecture of Sickle Cell Disease in West African Children

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    Jacklyn eQuinlan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is a congenital blood disease, affecting predominantly children from sub-Saharan Africa, but also populations world-wide. Although the causal mutation of SCD is known, the sources of clinical variability of SCD remain poorly understood, with only a few highly heritable traits associated with SCD having been identified. Phenotypic heterogeneity in the clinical expression of SCD is problematic for follow-up, management, and treatment of patients. Here we used the joint analysis of gene expression and whole genome genotyping data to identify the genetic regulatory effects contributing to gene expression variation among groups of patients exhibiting clinical variability, as well as unaffected siblings, in Benin, West Africa. We characterized and replicated patterns of whole blood gene expression variation within and between SCD patients at entry to clinic, as well as in follow-up programs. We present a global map of genes involved in the disease through analysis of whole blood sampled from the cohort. Genome-wide association mapping of gene expression revealed 390 peak genome-wide significant expression SNPs (eSNPs and 6 significant eSNP-by-clinical status interaction effects. The strong modulation of the transcriptome implicates pathways affecting core circulating cell functions and shows how genotypic regulatory variation likely contributes to the clinical variation observed in SCD.

  3. Circuit architecture derivation starting from a formal requirements specification considering a DDS as example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, H.; Richter, R.; Jentschel, H.-J.

    2004-05-01

    Based on a formal specification of a direct digital synthesis (DDS) and assuming the availability of a set of possible circuit architectures we derive a customised system configuration. e calculate the design parameters that can be used for the specification to synthesise the circuit components. We show how the derived parameters and the selected IC technology influence the complexity of the circuit implementation.

  4. Inferring genetic architecture of complex traits using Bayesian integrative analysis of genome and transcriptiome data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehsani, Alireza; Sørensen, Peter; Pomp, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    -modal distribution of genomic values collapses, when gene expressions are added to the model Conclusions With increased availability of various -omics data, integrative approaches are promising tools for understanding the genetic architecture of complex traits. Partitioning of explained variances at the chromosome......Background To understand the genetic architecture of complex traits and bridge the genotype-phenotype gap, it is useful to study intermediate -omics data, e.g. the transcriptome. The present study introduces a method for simultaneous quantification of the contributions from single nucleotide...

  5. Genome-wide analysis of promoter architecture in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Landolin, Jane M.; Brown, James B.; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Takahashi, Hazuki; Lassmann, Timo; Yu, Charles; Booth, Benjamin W.; Zhang, Dayu; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Boley, Nathan; Andrews, Justen; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Bickel, Peter J.; Carninci, Piero; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-10-20

    Core promoters are critical regions for gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. However, the boundaries of promoter regions, the relative rates of initiation at the transcription start sites (TSSs) distributed within them, and the functional significance of promoter architecture remain poorly understood. We produced a high-resolution map of promoters active in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo by integrating data from three independent and complementary methods: 21 million cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) tags, 1.2 million RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLMRACE) reads, and 50,000 cap-trapped expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We defined 12,454 promoters of 8037 genes. Our analysis indicates that, due to non-promoter-associated RNA background signal, previous studies have likely overestimated the number of promoter-associated CAGE clusters by fivefold. We show that TSS distributions form a complex continuum of shapes, and that promoters active in the embryo and adult have highly similar shapes in 95% of cases. This suggests that these distributions are generally determined by static elements such as local DNA sequence and are not modulated by dynamic signals such as histone modifications. Transcription factor binding motifs are differentially enriched as a function of promoter shape, and peaked promoter shape is correlated with both temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression. Our results contribute to the emerging view that core promoters are functionally diverse and control patterning of gene expression in Drosophila and mammals.

  6. The emerging role of nuclear architecture in DNA repair and genome maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misteli, Tom; Soutoglou, Evi

    2009-04-01

    DNA repair and maintenance of genome stability are crucial to cellular and organismal function, and defects in these processes have been implicated in cancer and ageing. Detailed molecular, biochemical and genetic analyses have outlined the molecular framework involved in cellular DNA-repair pathways, but recent cell-biological approaches have revealed important roles for the spatial and temporal organization of the DNA-repair machinery during the recognition of DNA lesions and the assembly of repair complexes. It has also become clear that local higher-order chromatin structure, chromatin dynamics and non-random global genome organization are key factors in genome maintenance. These cell-biological features of DNA repair illustrate an emerging role for nuclear architecture in multiple aspects of genome maintenance.

  7. Accounting for genetic architecture improves sequence based genomic prediction for a Drosophila fitness trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, Ulrike; Huang, Wen; Magwire, Michael; Schlather, Martin; Simianer, Henner; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict quantitative trait phenotypes from molecular polymorphism data will revolutionize evolutionary biology, medicine and human biology, and animal and plant breeding. Efforts to map quantitative trait loci have yielded novel insights into the biology of quantitative traits, but the combination of individually significant quantitative trait loci typically has low predictive ability. Utilizing all segregating variants can give good predictive ability in plant and animal breeding populations, but gives little insight into trait biology. Here, we used the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel to perform both a genome wide association analysis and genomic prediction for the fitness-related trait chill coma recovery time. We found substantial total genetic variation for chill coma recovery time, with a genetic architecture that differs between males and females, a small number of molecular variants with large main effects, and evidence for epistasis. Although the top additive variants explained 36% (17%) of the genetic variance among lines in females (males), the predictive ability using genomic best linear unbiased prediction and a relationship matrix using all common segregating variants was very low for females and zero for males. We hypothesized that the low predictive ability was due to the mismatch between the infinitesimal genetic architecture assumed by the genomic best linear unbiased prediction model and the true genetic architecture of chill coma recovery time. Indeed, we found that the predictive ability of the genomic best linear unbiased prediction model is markedly improved when we combine quantitative trait locus mapping with genomic prediction by only including the top variants associated with main and epistatic effects in the relationship matrix. This trait-associated prediction approach has the advantage that it yields biologically interpretable prediction models.

  8. Accounting for genetic architecture improves sequence based genomic prediction for a Drosophila fitness trait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Ober

    Full Text Available The ability to predict quantitative trait phenotypes from molecular polymorphism data will revolutionize evolutionary biology, medicine and human biology, and animal and plant breeding. Efforts to map quantitative trait loci have yielded novel insights into the biology of quantitative traits, but the combination of individually significant quantitative trait loci typically has low predictive ability. Utilizing all segregating variants can give good predictive ability in plant and animal breeding populations, but gives little insight into trait biology. Here, we used the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel to perform both a genome wide association analysis and genomic prediction for the fitness-related trait chill coma recovery time. We found substantial total genetic variation for chill coma recovery time, with a genetic architecture that differs between males and females, a small number of molecular variants with large main effects, and evidence for epistasis. Although the top additive variants explained 36% (17% of the genetic variance among lines in females (males, the predictive ability using genomic best linear unbiased prediction and a relationship matrix using all common segregating variants was very low for females and zero for males. We hypothesized that the low predictive ability was due to the mismatch between the infinitesimal genetic architecture assumed by the genomic best linear unbiased prediction model and the true genetic architecture of chill coma recovery time. Indeed, we found that the predictive ability of the genomic best linear unbiased prediction model is markedly improved when we combine quantitative trait locus mapping with genomic prediction by only including the top variants associated with main and epistatic effects in the relationship matrix. This trait-associated prediction approach has the advantage that it yields biologically interpretable prediction models.

  9. Three-dimensional genome architecture influences partner selection for chromosomal translocations in human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Engreitz

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations are frequent features of cancer genomes that contribute to disease progression. These rearrangements result from formation and illegitimate repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, a process that requires spatial colocalization of chromosomal breakpoints. The "contact first" hypothesis suggests that translocation partners colocalize in the nuclei of normal cells, prior to rearrangement. It is unclear, however, the extent to which spatial interactions based on three-dimensional genome architecture contribute to chromosomal rearrangements in human disease. Here we intersect Hi-C maps of three-dimensional chromosome conformation with collections of 1,533 chromosomal translocations from cancer and germline genomes. We show that many translocation-prone pairs of regions genome-wide, including the cancer translocation partners BCR-ABL and MYC-IGH, display elevated Hi-C contact frequencies in normal human cells. Considering tissue specificity, we find that translocation breakpoints reported in human hematologic malignancies have higher Hi-C contact frequencies in lymphoid cells than those reported in sarcomas and epithelial tumors. However, translocations from multiple tissue types show significant correlation with Hi-C contact frequencies, suggesting that both tissue-specific and universal features of chromatin structure contribute to chromosomal alterations. Our results demonstrate that three-dimensional genome architecture shapes the landscape of rearrangements directly observed in human disease and establish Hi-C as a key method for dissecting these effects.

  10. megaTALs: a rare-cleaving nuclease architecture for therapeutic genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissel, Sandrine; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Adey, Andrew; Gouble, Agnès; Duchateau, Philippe; Shendure, Jay; Stoddard, Barry L; Certo, Michael T; Baker, David; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2014-02-01

    Rare-cleaving endonucleases have emerged as important tools for making targeted genome modifications. While multiple platforms are now available to generate reagents for research applications, each existing platform has significant limitations in one or more of three key properties necessary for therapeutic application: efficiency of cleavage at the desired target site, specificity of cleavage (i.e. rate of cleavage at 'off-target' sites), and efficient/facile means for delivery to desired target cells. Here, we describe the development of a single-chain rare-cleaving nuclease architecture, which we designate 'megaTAL', in which the DNA binding region of a transcription activator-like (TAL) effector is used to 'address' a site-specific meganuclease adjacent to a single desired genomic target site. This architecture allows the generation of extremely active and hyper-specific compact nucleases that are compatible with all current viral and nonviral cell delivery methods.

  11. Parametric and nonparametric statistical methods for genomic selection of traits with additive and epistatic genetic architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Réka; Carriquiry, Alicia L; Beavis, William D

    2014-04-11

    Parametric and nonparametric methods have been developed for purposes of predicting phenotypes. These methods are based on retrospective analyses of empirical data consisting of genotypic and phenotypic scores. Recent reports have indicated that parametric methods are unable to predict phenotypes of traits with known epistatic genetic architectures. Herein, we review parametric methods including least squares regression, ridge regression, Bayesian ridge regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), Bayesian LASSO, best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP), Bayes A, Bayes B, Bayes C, and Bayes Cπ. We also review nonparametric methods including Nadaraya-Watson estimator, reproducing kernel Hilbert space, support vector machine regression, and neural networks. We assess the relative merits of these 14 methods in terms of accuracy and mean squared error (MSE) using simulated genetic architectures consisting of completely additive or two-way epistatic interactions in an F2 population derived from crosses of inbred lines. Each simulated genetic architecture explained either 30% or 70% of the phenotypic variability. The greatest impact on estimates of accuracy and MSE was due to genetic architecture. Parametric methods were unable to predict phenotypic values when the underlying genetic architecture was based entirely on epistasis. Parametric methods were slightly better than nonparametric methods for additive genetic architectures. Distinctions among parametric methods for additive genetic architectures were incremental. Heritability, i.e., proportion of phenotypic variability, had the second greatest impact on estimates of accuracy and MSE. Copyright © 2014 Howard et al.

  12. Architectural protein subclasses shape 3-D organization of genomes during lineage commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips-Cremins, Jennifer E.; Sauria, Michael E. G.; Sanyal, Amartya; Gerasimova, Tatiana I.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Bell, Joshua S. K.; Ong, Chin-Tong; Hookway, Tracy A.; Guo, Changying; Sun, Yuhua; Bland, Michael J.; Wagstaff, William; Dalton, Stephen; McDevitt, Todd C.; Sen, Ranjan; Dekker, Job; Taylor, James; Corces, Victor G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Understanding the topological configurations of chromatin may reveal valuable insights into how the genome and epigenome act in concert to control cell fate during development. Here we generate high-resolution architecture maps across seven genomic loci in embryonic stem cells and neural progenitor cells. We observe a hierarchy of 3-D interactions that undergo marked reorganization at the sub-Mb scale during differentiation. Distinct combinations of CTCF, Mediator, and cohesin show widespread enrichment in looping interactions at different length scales. CTCF/cohesin anchor long-range constitutive interactions that form the topological basis for invariant sub-domains. Conversely, Mediator/cohesin together with pioneer factors bridge shortrange enhancer-promoter interactions within and between larger sub-domains. Knockdown of Smc1 or Med12 in ES cells results in disruption of spatial architecture and down-regulation of genes found in cohesin-mediated interactions. We conclude that cell type-specific chromatin organization occurs at the sub-Mb scale and that architectural proteins shape the genome in hierarchical length scales. PMID:23706625

  13. How computer science can help in understanding the 3D genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, Yoli; Merelli, Ivan; Milanesi, Luciano; Lio', Pietro

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome conformation capture techniques are producing a huge amount of data about the architecture of our genome. These data can provide us with a better understanding of the events that induce critical regulations of the cellular function from small changes in the three-dimensional genome architecture. Generating a unified view of spatial, temporal, genetic and epigenetic properties poses various challenges of data analysis, visualization, integration and mining, as well as of high performance computing and big data management. Here, we describe the critical issues of this new branch of bioinformatics, oriented at the comprehension of the three-dimensional genome architecture, which we call 'Nucleome Bioinformatics', looking beyond the currently available tools and methods, and highlight yet unaddressed challenges and the potential approaches that could be applied for tackling them. Our review provides a map for researchers interested in using computer science for studying 'Nucleome Bioinformatics', to achieve a better understanding of the biological processes that occur inside the nucleus. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Generation of Low-Dimensional Architectures through the Self-Assembly of Pyromellitic Diimide Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Chiara; Wałe Sa-Chorab, Monika; Gorczyński, Adam; Markiewicz, Grzegorz; Bogucki, Andrzej; Świetlik, Roman; Hnatejko, Zbigniew; Jankowski, Wojciech; Hoffmann, Marcin; Orgiu, Emanuele; Stefankiewicz, Artur R; Patroniak, Violetta; Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2017-04-30

    Small π-conjugated molecules can be designed and synthesized to undergo controlled self-assembly forming low-dimensional architectures, with programmed order at the supramolecular level. Such order is of paramount importance because it defines the property of the obtained material. Here, we have focused our attention to four pyromellitic diimide derivatives exposing different types of side chains. The joint effect of different noncovalent interactions including π-π stacking, H-bonding, and van der Waals forces on the four derivatives yielded different self-assembled architectures. Atomic force microscopy studies, corroborated with infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurements, provided complementary multiscale insight into these assemblies.

  15. 3D Chromatin Architecture of Large Plant Genomes Determined by Local A/B Compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Pengfei; Tu, Xiaoyu; Chu, Po-Yu; Lü, Peitao; Zhu, Ning; Grierson, Donald; Du, Baijuan; Li, Pinghua; Zhong, Silin

    2017-12-04

    The spatial organization of the genome plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. However, the core structural features of animal genomes, such as topologically associated domains (TADs) and chromatin loops, are not prominent in the extremely compact Arabidopsis genome. In this study, we examine the chromatin architecture, as well as their DNA methylation, histone modifications, accessible chromatin, and gene expression, of maize, tomato, sorghum, foxtail millet, and rice with genome sizes ranging from 0.4 to 2.4 Gb. We found that these plant genomes can be divided into mammalian-like A/B compartments. At higher resolution, the chromosomes of these plants can be further partitioned to local A/B compartments that reflect their euchromatin, heterochromatin, and polycomb status. Chromatins in all these plants are organized into domains that are not conserved across species. They show similarity to the Drosophila compartment domains, and are clustered into active, polycomb, repressive, and intermediate types based on their transcriptional activities and epigenetic signatures, with domain border overlaps with the local A/B compartment junctions. In the large maize and tomato genomes, we observed extensive chromatin loops. However, unlike the mammalian chromatin loops that are enriched at the TAD border, plant chromatin loops are often formed between gene islands outside the repressive domains and are closely associated with active compartments. Our study indicates that plants have complex and unique 3D chromatin architectures, which require further study to elucidate their biological functions. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The nuclear matrix protein HNRNPU maintains 3D genome architecture globally in mouse hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hui; Lv, Pin; Huo, Xiangru; Wu, Jicheng; Wang, Qianfeng; Cheng, Lu; Liu, Yun; Tang, Qi-Qun; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Wu, Hao; Wen, Bo

    2018-02-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomes are folded into higher-order conformations to coordinate genome functions. In addition to long-range chromatin loops, recent chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based studies have indicated higher levels of chromatin structures including compartments and topologically associating domains (TADs), which may serve as units of genome organization and functions. However, the molecular machinery underlying these hierarchically three-dimensional (3D) chromatin architectures remains poorly understood. Via high-throughput assays, including in situ Hi-C, DamID, ChIP-seq, and RNA-seq, we investigated roles of the Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein U (HNRNPU), a nuclear matrix (NM)-associated protein, in 3D genome organization. Upon the depletion of HNRNPU in mouse hepatocytes, the coverage of lamina-associated domains (LADs) in the genome increases from 53.1% to 68.6%, and a global condensation of chromatin was observed. Furthermore, disruption of HNRNPU leads to compartment switching on 7.5% of the genome, decreases TAD boundary strengths at borders between A (active) and B (inactive) compartments, and reduces chromatin loop intensities. Long-range chromatin interactions between and within compartments or TADs are also significantly remodeled upon HNRNPU depletion. Intriguingly, HNRNPU mainly associates with active chromatin, and 80% of HNRNPU peaks coincide with the binding of CTCF or RAD21. Collectively, we demonstrated that HNRNPU functions as a major factor maintaining 3D chromatin architecture, suggesting important roles of NM-associated proteins in genome organization. © 2018 Fan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Clear, Nic

    2014-01-01

    When discussing science fiction’s relationship with architecture, the usual practice is to look at the architecture “in” science fiction—in particular, the architecture in SF films (see Kuhn 75-143) since the spaces of literary SF present obvious difficulties as they have to be imagined. In this essay, that relationship will be reversed: I will instead discuss science fiction “in” architecture, mapping out a number of architectural movements and projects that can be viewed explicitly as scien...

  18. Three-dimensional modeling of the P. falciparum genome during the erythrocytic cycle reveals a strong connection between genome architecture and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Ferhat; Bunnik, Evelien M.; Varoquaux, Nelle; Bol, Sebastiaan M.; Prudhomme, Jacques; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Noble, William Stafford; Le Roch, Karine G.

    2014-01-01

    The development of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is controlled by coordinated changes in gene expression throughout its complex life cycle, but the corresponding regulatory mechanisms are incompletely understood. To study the relationship between genome architecture and gene regulation in Plasmodium, we assayed the genome architecture of P. falciparum at three time points during its erythrocytic (asexual) cycle. Using chromosome conformation capture coupled with next-generation sequencing technology (Hi-C), we obtained high-resolution chromosomal contact maps, which we then used to construct a consensus three-dimensional genome structure for each time point. We observed strong clustering of centromeres, telomeres, ribosomal DNA, and virulence genes, resulting in a complex architecture that cannot be explained by a simple volume exclusion model. Internal virulence gene clusters exhibit domain-like structures in contact maps, suggesting that they play an important role in the genome architecture. Midway during the erythrocytic cycle, at the highly transcriptionally active trophozoite stage, the genome adopts a more open chromatin structure with increased chromosomal intermingling. In addition, we observed reduced expression of genes located in spatial proximity to the repressive subtelomeric center, and colocalization of distinct groups of parasite-specific genes with coordinated expression profiles. Overall, our results are indicative of a strong association between the P. falciparum spatial genome organization and gene expression. Understanding the molecular processes involved in genome conformation dynamics could contribute to the discovery of novel antimalarial strategies. PMID:24671853

  19. Three-dimensional modeling of the P. falciparum genome during the erythrocytic cycle reveals a strong connection between genome architecture and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Ferhat; Bunnik, Evelien M; Varoquaux, Nelle; Bol, Sebastiaan M; Prudhomme, Jacques; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Noble, William Stafford; Le Roch, Karine G

    2014-06-01

    The development of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is controlled by coordinated changes in gene expression throughout its complex life cycle, but the corresponding regulatory mechanisms are incompletely understood. To study the relationship between genome architecture and gene regulation in Plasmodium, we assayed the genome architecture of P. falciparum at three time points during its erythrocytic (asexual) cycle. Using chromosome conformation capture coupled with next-generation sequencing technology (Hi-C), we obtained high-resolution chromosomal contact maps, which we then used to construct a consensus three-dimensional genome structure for each time point. We observed strong clustering of centromeres, telomeres, ribosomal DNA, and virulence genes, resulting in a complex architecture that cannot be explained by a simple volume exclusion model. Internal virulence gene clusters exhibit domain-like structures in contact maps, suggesting that they play an important role in the genome architecture. Midway during the erythrocytic cycle, at the highly transcriptionally active trophozoite stage, the genome adopts a more open chromatin structure with increased chromosomal intermingling. In addition, we observed reduced expression of genes located in spatial proximity to the repressive subtelomeric center, and colocalization of distinct groups of parasite-specific genes with coordinated expression profiles. Overall, our results are indicative of a strong association between the P. falciparum spatial genome organization and gene expression. Understanding the molecular processes involved in genome conformation dynamics could contribute to the discovery of novel antimalarial strategies. © 2014 Ay et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Multiple novel promoter-architectures revealed by decoding the hidden heterogeneity within the genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlikar, Leelavati

    2014-01-01

    An important question in biology is how different promoter-architectures contribute to the diversity in regulation of transcription initiation. A step forward has been the production of genome-wide maps of transcription start sites (TSSs) using high-throughput sequencing. However, the subsequent step of characterizing promoters and their functions is still largely done on the basis of previously established promoter-elements like the TATA-box in eukaryotes or the -10 box in bacteria. Unfortunately, a majority of promoters and their activities cannot be explained by these few elements. Traditional motif discovery methods that identify novel elements also fail here, because TSS neighborhoods are often highly heterogeneous containing no overrepresented motif. We present a new, organism-independent method that explicitly models this heterogeneity while unraveling different promoter-architectures. For example, in five bacteria, we detect the presence of a pyrimidine preceding the TSS under very specific circumstances. In tuberculosis, we show for the first time that the spacing between the bacterial 10-motif and TSS is utilized by the pathogen for dynamic gene-regulation. In eukaryotes, we identify several new elements that are important for development. Identified promoter-architectures show differential patterns of evolution, chromatin structure and TSS spread, suggesting distinct regulatory functions. This work highlights the importance of characterizing heterogeneity within high-throughput genomic data rather than analyzing average patterns of nucleotide composition. PMID:25326324

  1. The complete chloroplast DNA sequence of the green alga Nephroselmis olivacea: insights into the architecture of ancestral chloroplast genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmel, M; Otis, C; Lemieux, C

    1999-08-31

    Green plants seem to form two sister lineages: Chlorophyta, comprising the green algal classes Prasinophyceae, Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, and Chlorophyceae, and Streptophyta, comprising the Charophyceae and land plants. We have determined the complete chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequence (200,799 bp) of Nephroselmis olivacea, a member of the class (Prasinophyceae) thought to include descendants of the earliest-diverging green algae. The 127 genes identified in this genome represent the largest gene repertoire among the green algal and land plant cpDNAs completely sequenced to date. Of the Nephroselmis genes, 2 (ycf81 and ftsI, a gene involved in peptidoglycan synthesis) have not been identified in any previously investigated cpDNA; 5 genes [ftsW, rnE, ycf62, rnpB, and trnS(cga)] have been found only in cpDNAs of nongreen algae; and 10 others (ndh genes) have been described only in land plant cpDNAs. Nephroselmis and land plant cpDNAs share the same quadripartite structure-which is characterized by the presence of a large rRNA-encoding inverted repeat and two unequal single-copy regions-and very similar sets of genes in corresponding genomic regions. Given that our phylogenetic analyses place Nephroselmis within the Chlorophyta, these structural characteristics were most likely present in the cpDNA of the common ancestor of chlorophytes and streptophytes. Comparative analyses of chloroplast genomes indicate that the typical quadripartite architecture and gene-partitioning pattern of land plant cpDNAs are ancient features that may have been derived from the genome of the cyanobacterial progenitor of chloroplasts. Our phylogenetic data also offer insight into the chlorophyte ancestor of euglenophyte chloroplasts.

  2. Genome-Wide Association Study for Nine Plant Architecture Traits in Sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum [ (L Moench], an important grain and forage crop, is receiving significant attention as a lignocellulosic feedstock because of its water-use efficiency and high biomass yield potential. Because of the advancement of genotyping and sequencing technologies, genome-wide association study (GWAS has become a routinely used method to investigate the genetic mechanisms underlying natural phenotypic variation. In this study, we performed a GWAS for nine grain and biomass-related plant architecture traits to determine their overall genetic architecture and the specific association of allelic variants in gibberellin (GA biosynthesis and signaling genes with these phenotypes. A total of 101 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP representative regions were associated with at least one of the nine traits, and two of the significant markers correspond to GA candidate genes, ( and (, affecting plant height and seed number, respectively. The resolution of a previously reported quantitative trait loci (QTL for leaf angle on chromosome 7 was increased to a 1.67 Mb region containing seven candidate genes with good prospects for further investigation. This study provides new knowledge of the association of GA genes with plant architecture traits and the genomic regions controlling variation in leaf angle, stem circumference, internode number, tiller number, seed number, panicle exsertion, and panicle length. The GA gene affecting seed number variation ( and the genomic region on chromosome 7 associated with variation in leaf angle are also important outcomes of this study and represent the foundation of future validation studies needed to apply this knowledge in breeding programs.

  3. Genome-wide study of an elite rice pedigree reveals a complex history of genetic architecture for breeding improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoxia; Lin, Zechuan; Zhou, Degui; Wang, Chongrong; Li, Hong; Yu, Renbo; Deng, Hanchao; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Shaochuan; Wang Deng, Xing; He, Hang

    2017-04-04

    Improving breeding has been widely utilized in crop breeding and contributed to yield and quality improvement, yet few researches have been done to analyze genetic architecture underlying breeding improvement comprehensively. Here, we collected genotype and phenotype data of 99 cultivars from the complete pedigree including Huanghuazhan, an elite, high-quality, conventional indica rice that has been grown over 4.5 million hectares in southern China and from which more than 20 excellent cultivars have been derived. We identified 1,313 selective sweeps (SSWs) revealing four stage-specific selection patterns corresponding to improvement preference during 65 years, and 1113 conserved Huanghuazhan traceable blocks (cHTBs) introduced from different donors and conserved in >3 breeding generations were the core genomic regions for superior performance of Huanghuazhan. Based on 151 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) identified for 13 improved traits in the pedigree, we reproduced their improvement process in silico, highlighting improving breeding works well for traits controlled by major/major + minor effect QTLs, but was inefficient for traits controlled by QTLs with complex interactions or explaining low levels of phenotypic variation. These results indicate long-term breeding improvement is efficient to construct superior genetic architecture for elite performance, yet molecular breeding with designed genotype of QTLs can facilitate complex traits improvement.

  4. Genome architecture enables local adaptation of Atlantic cod despite high connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barth, Julia M I; Berg, Paul R; Jonsson, Per R.

    2017-01-01

    characterized by strong levels of gene flow. As one example, populations of the marine fish Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are highly connected due to immense dispersal capabilities but nevertheless show local adaptation in several key traits. By combining population genomic analyses based on 12K single......-nucleotide polymorphisms with larval dispersal patterns inferred using a biophysical ocean model, we show that Atlantic cod individuals residing in sheltered estuarine habitats of Scandinavian fjords mainly belong to offshore oceanic populations with considerable connectivity between these diverse ecosystems. Nevertheless......, we also find evidence for discrete fjord populations that are genetically differentiated from offshore populations, indicative of local adaptation, the degree of which appears to be influenced by connectivity. Analyses of the genomic architecture reveal a significant overrepresentation of a large ~5...

  5. A comparative study and a phylogenetic exploration of the compositional architectures of mammalian nuclear genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Elhaik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For the past four decades the compositional organization of the mammalian genome posed a formidable challenge to molecular evolutionists attempting to explain it from an evolutionary perspective. Unfortunately, most of the explanations adhered to the "isochore theory," which has long been rebutted. Recently, an alternative compositional domain model was proposed depicting the human and cow genomes as composed mostly of short compositionally homogeneous and nonhomogeneous domains and a few long ones. We test the validity of this model through a rigorous sequence-based analysis of eleven completely sequenced mammalian and avian genomes. Seven attributes of compositional domains are used in the analyses: (1 the number of compositional domains, (2 compositional domain-length distribution, (3 density of compositional domains, (4 genome coverage by the different domain types, (5 degree of fit to a power-law distribution, (6 compositional domain GC content, and (7 the joint distribution of GC content and length of the different domain types. We discuss the evolution of these attributes in light of two competing phylogenetic hypotheses that differ from each other in the validity of clade Euarchontoglires. If valid, the murid genome compositional organization would be a derived state and exhibit a high similarity to that of other mammals. If invalid, the murid genome compositional organization would be closer to an ancestral state. We demonstrate that the compositional organization of the murid genome differs from those of primates and laurasiatherians, a phenomenon previously termed the "murid shift," and in many ways resembles the genome of opossum. We find no support to the "isochore theory." Instead, our findings depict the mammalian genome as a tapestry of mostly short homogeneous and nonhomogeneous domains and few long ones thus providing strong evidence in favor of the compositional domain model and seem to invalidate clade Euarchontoglires.

  6. Whole genome sequencing of 35 individuals provides insights into the genetic architecture of Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenqian; Meehan, Joe; Su, Zhenqiang; Ng, Hui Wen; Shu, Mao; Luo, Heng; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2014-01-01

    Due to a significant decline in the costs associated with next-generation sequencing, it has become possible to decipher the genetic architecture of a population by sequencing a large number of individuals to a deep coverage. The Korean Personal Genomes Project (KPGP) recently sequenced 35 Korean genomes at high coverage using the Illumina Hiseq platform and made the deep sequencing data publicly available, providing the scientific community opportunities to decipher the genetic architecture of the Korean population. In this study, we used two single nucleotide variant (SNV) calling pipelines: mapping the raw reads obtained from whole genome sequencing of 35 Korean individuals in KPGP using BWA and SOAP2 followed by SNV calling using SAMtools and SOAPsnp, respectively. The consensus SNVs obtained from the two SNV pipelines were used to represent the SNVs of the Korean population. We compared these SNVs to those from 17 other populations provided by the HapMap consortium and the 1000 Genomes Project (1KGP) and identified SNVs that were only present in the Korean population. We studied the mutation spectrum and analyzed the genes of non-synonymous SNVs only detected in the Korean population. We detected a total of 8,555,726 SNVs in the 35 Korean individuals and identified 1,213,613 SNVs detected in at least one Korean individual (SNV-1) and 12,640 in all of 35 Korean individuals (SNV-35) but not in 17 other populations. In contrast with the SNVs common to other populations in HapMap and 1KGP, the Korean only SNVs had high percentages of non-silent variants, emphasizing the unique roles of these Korean only SNVs in the Korean population. Specifically, we identified 8,361 non-synonymous Korean only SNVs, of which 58 SNVs existed in all 35 Korean individuals. The 5,754 genes of non-synonymous Korean only SNVs were highly enriched in some metabolic pathways. We found adhesion is the top disease term associated with SNV-1 and Nelson syndrome is the only disease term

  7. Genome-wide binding analysis of the transcription activator ideal plant architecture1 reveals a complex network regulating rice plant architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zefu; Yu, Hong; Xiong, Guosheng; Wang, Jing; Jiao, Yongqing; Liu, Guifu; Jing, Yanhui; Meng, Xiangbing; Hu, Xingming; Qian, Qian; Fu, Xiangdong; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-10-01

    Ideal plant architecture1 (IPA1) is critical in regulating rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture and substantially enhances grain yield. To elucidate its molecular basis, we first confirmed IPA1 as a functional transcription activator and then identified 1067 and 2185 genes associated with IPA1 binding sites in shoot apices and young panicles, respectively, through chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing assays. The Squamosa promoter binding protein-box direct binding core motif GTAC was highly enriched in IPA1 binding peaks; interestingly, a previously uncharacterized indirect binding motif TGGGCC/T was found to be significantly enriched through the interaction of IPA1 with proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter binding factor1 or promoter binding factor2. Genome-wide expression profiling by RNA sequencing revealed IPA1 roles in diverse pathways. Moreover, our results demonstrated that IPA1 could directly bind to the promoter of rice teosinte branched1, a negative regulator of tiller bud outgrowth, to suppress rice tillering, and directly and positively regulate dense and erect panicle1, an important gene regulating panicle architecture, to influence plant height and panicle length. The elucidation of target genes of IPA1 genome-wide will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant architecture and to facilitating the breeding of elite varieties with ideal plant architecture.

  8. Genome-Wide Binding Analysis of the Transcription Activator IDEAL PLANT ARCHITECTURE1 Reveals a Complex Network Regulating Rice Plant Architecture[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zefu; Yu, Hong; Xiong, Guosheng; Wang, Jing; Jiao, Yongqing; Liu, Guifu; Jing, Yanhui; Meng, Xiangbing; Hu, Xingming; Qian, Qian; Fu, Xiangdong; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-01-01

    IDEAL PLANT ARCHITECTURE1 (IPA1) is critical in regulating rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture and substantially enhances grain yield. To elucidate its molecular basis, we first confirmed IPA1 as a functional transcription activator and then identified 1067 and 2185 genes associated with IPA1 binding sites in shoot apices and young panicles, respectively, through chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing assays. The SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-box direct binding core motif GTAC was highly enriched in IPA1 binding peaks; interestingly, a previously uncharacterized indirect binding motif TGGGCC/T was found to be significantly enriched through the interaction of IPA1 with proliferating cell nuclear antigen PROMOTER BINDING FACTOR1 or PROMOTER BINDING FACTOR2. Genome-wide expression profiling by RNA sequencing revealed IPA1 roles in diverse pathways. Moreover, our results demonstrated that IPA1 could directly bind to the promoter of rice TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, a negative regulator of tiller bud outgrowth, to suppress rice tillering, and directly and positively regulate DENSE AND ERECT PANICLE1, an important gene regulating panicle architecture, to influence plant height and panicle length. The elucidation of target genes of IPA1 genome-wide will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant architecture and to facilitating the breeding of elite varieties with ideal plant architecture. PMID:24170127

  9. Genomic prediction of complex human traits: relatedness, trait architecture and predictive meta-models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliopoulou, Athina; Nagy, Reka; Bermingham, Mairead L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hayward, Caroline; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Agakov, Felix; Navarro, Pau; Haley, Chris S.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the prediction of individuals' phenotypes for complex traits using genomic data. We compare several widely used prediction models, including Ridge Regression, LASSO and Elastic Nets estimated from cohort data, and polygenic risk scores constructed using published summary statistics from genome-wide association meta-analyses (GWAMA). We evaluate the interplay between relatedness, trait architecture and optimal marker density, by predicting height, body mass index (BMI) and high-density lipoprotein level (HDL) in two data cohorts, originating from Croatia and Scotland. We empirically demonstrate that dense models are better when all genetic effects are small (height and BMI) and target individuals are related to the training samples, while sparse models predict better in unrelated individuals and when some effects have moderate size (HDL). For HDL sparse models achieved good across-cohort prediction, performing similarly to the GWAMA risk score and to models trained within the same cohort, which indicates that, for predicting traits with moderately sized effects, large sample sizes and familial structure become less important, though still potentially useful. Finally, we propose a novel ensemble of whole-genome predictors with GWAMA risk scores and demonstrate that the resulting meta-model achieves higher prediction accuracy than either model on its own. We conclude that although current genomic predictors are not accurate enough for diagnostic purposes, performance can be improved without requiring access to large-scale individual-level data. Our methodologically simple meta-model is a means of performing predictive meta-analysis for optimizing genomic predictions and can be easily extended to incorporate multiple population-level summary statistics or other domain knowledge. PMID:25918167

  10. Into the Fourth Dimension: Dysregulation of Genome Architecture in Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winick-Ng, Warren; Rylett, R. Jane

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by synapse dysfunction and cognitive impairment. Understanding the development and progression of AD is challenging, as the disease is highly complex and multifactorial. Both environmental and genetic factors play a role in AD pathogenesis, highlighted by observations of complex DNA modifications at the single gene level, and by new evidence that also implicates changes in genome architecture in AD patients. The four-dimensional structure of chromatin in space and time is essential for context-dependent regulation of gene expression in post-mitotic neurons. Dysregulation of epigenetic processes have been observed in the aging brain and in patients with AD, though there is not yet agreement on the impact of these changes on transcription. New evidence shows that proteins involved in genome organization have altered expression and localization in the AD brain, suggesting that the genomic landscape may play a critical role in the development of AD. This review discusses the role of the chromatin organizers and epigenetic modifiers in post-mitotic cells, the aging brain, and in the development and progression of AD. How these new insights can be used to help determine disease risk and inform treatment strategies will also be discussed. PMID:29541020

  11. The variable genomic architecture of isolation between hybridizing species of house mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeter, Katherine C; Thibodeau, Lisa M; Gompert, Zachariah; Buerkle, C Alex; Nachman, Michael W; Tucker, Priscilla K

    2010-02-01

    Studies of the genetics of hybrid zones can provide insight into the genomic architecture of species boundaries. By examining patterns of introgression of multiple loci across a hybrid zone, it may be possible to identify regions of the genome that have experienced selection. Here, we present a comparison of introgression in two replicate transects through the house mouse hybrid zone through central Europe, using data from 41 single nucleotide markers. Using both genomic and geographic clines, we found many differences in patterns of introgression between the two transects, as well as some similarities. We found that many loci may have experienced the effects of selection at linked sites, including selection against hybrid genotypes, as well as positive selection in the form of genotypes introgressed into a foreign genetic background. We also found many positive associations of conspecific alleles among unlinked markers, which could be caused by epistatic interactions. Different patterns of introgression in the two transects highlight the challenge of using hybrid zones to identify genes underlying isolation and raise the possibility that the genetic basis of isolation between these species may be dependent on the local population genetic make-up or the local ecological setting.

  12. Variability in Chromatin Architecture and Associated DNA Repair at Genomic Positions Containing Somatic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byungho; Mun, Jihyeob; Kim, Yong Sung; Kim, Seon-Young

    2017-06-01

    Dynamic chromatin structures result in differential chemical reactivity to mutational processes throughout the genome. To identify chromatin features responsible for mutagenesis, we compared chromatin architecture around single-nucleotide variants (SNV), insertion/deletions (indels), and their context-matched, nonmutated positions. We found epigenetic differences between genomic regions containing missense SNVs and those containing frameshift indels across multiple cancer types. Levels of active histone marks were higher around frameshift indels than around missense SNV, whereas repressive histone marks exhibited the reverse trend. Accumulation of repressive histone marks and nucleosomes distinguished mutated positions (both SNV and indels) from the context-matched, nonmutated positions, whereas active marks were associated with substitution- and cancer type-specific mutagenesis. We also explained mutagenesis based on genome maintenance mechanisms, including nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), and DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE). Regional NER variation correlated strongly with chromatin features; NER machineries exhibited shifted or depleted binding around SNV, resulting in decreased NER at mutation positions, especially at sites of recurrent mutations. MMR-deficient tumors selectively acquired SNV in regions with high active histone marks, especially H3K36me3, whereas POLE-deficient tumors selectively acquired indels and SNV in regions with low active histone marks. These findings demonstrate the importance of fine-scaled chromatin structures and associated DNA repair mechanisms in mutagenesis. Cancer Res; 77(11); 2822-33. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Evolution of domain promiscuity in eukaryotic genomes--a perspective from the inferred ancestral domain architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Gihon, Inbar; Fong, Jessica H; Sharan, Roded; Nussinov, Ruth; Przytycka, Teresa M; Panchenko, Anna R

    2011-03-01

    Most eukaryotic proteins are composed of two or more domains. These assemble in a modular manner to create new proteins usually by the acquisition of one or more domains to an existing protein. Promiscuous domains which are found embedded in a variety of proteins and co-exist with many other domains are of particular interest and were shown to have roles in signaling pathways and mediating network communication. The evolution of domain promiscuity is still an open problem, mostly due to the lack of sequenced ancestral genomes. Here we use inferred domain architectures of ancestral genomes to trace the evolution of domain promiscuity in eukaryotic genomes. We find an increase in average promiscuity along many branches of the eukaryotic tree. Moreover, domain promiscuity can proceed at almost a steady rate over long evolutionary time or exhibit lineage-specific acceleration. We also observe that many signaling and regulatory domains gained domain promiscuity around the Bilateria divergence. In addition we show that those domains that played a role in the creation of two body axes and existed before the divergence of the bilaterians from fungi/metazoan achieve a boost in their promiscuities during the bilaterian evolution.

  14. Analyzing dynamic fault trees derived from model-based system architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehlinger, Josh; Dugan, Joanne Bechta

    2008-01-01

    Dependability-critical systems, such as digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants, necessitate engineering techniques and tools to provide assurances of their safety and reliability. Determining system reliability at the architectural design phase is important since it may guide design decisions and provide crucial information for trade-off analysis and estimating system cost. Despite this, reliability and system engineering remain separate disciplines and engineering processes by which the dependability analysis results may not represent the designed system. In this article we provide an overview and application of our approach to build architecture-based, dynamic system models for dependability-critical systems and then automatically generate Dynamic Fault Trees (DFT) for comprehensive, toolsupported reliability analysis. Specifically, we use the Architectural Analysis and Design Language (AADL) to model the structural, behavioral and failure aspects of the system in a composite architecture model. From the AADL model, we seek to derive the DFT(s) and use Galileo's automated reliability analyses to estimate system reliability. This approach alleviates the dependability engineering - systems engineering knowledge expertise gap, integrates the dependability and system engineering design and development processes and enables a more formal, automated and consistent DFT construction. We illustrate this work using an example based on a dynamic digital feed-water control system for a nuclear reactor

  15. Genomic architecture of MHC-linked odorant receptor gene repertoires among 16 vertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Pablo Sandro Carvalho; Kellermann, Thomas; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    The recent sequencing and assembly of the genomes of different organisms have shown that almost all vertebrates studied in detail so far have one or more clusters of genes encoding odorant receptors (OR) in close physical linkage to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). It has been postulated that MHC-linked OR genes could be involved in MHC-influenced mate choice, comprising both pre- as well as post-copulatory mechanisms. We have therefore carried out a systematic comparison of protein sequences of these receptors from the genomes of man, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, mouse, rat, dog, cat, cow, pig, horse, elephant, opossum, frog and zebra fish (amounting to a total of 559 protein sequences) in order to identify OR families exhibiting evolutionarily conserved MHC linkage. In addition, we compared the genomic structure of this region within these 16 species, accounting for presence or absence of OR gene families, gene order, transcriptional orientation and linkage to the MHC or framework genes. The results are presented in the form of gene maps and phylogenetic analyses that reveal largely concordant repertoires of gene families, at least among tetrapods, although each of the eight taxa studied (primates, rodents, ungulates, carnivores, proboscids, marsupials, amphibians and teleosts) exhibits a typical architecture of MHC (or MHC framework loci)-linked OR genes. Furthermore, the comparison of the genomic organization of this region has implications for phylogenetic relationships between closely related taxa, especially in disputed cases such as the evolutionary history of even- and odd-toed ungulates and carnivores. Finally, the largely conserved linkage between distinct OR genes and the MHC supports the concept that particular alleles within a given haplotype function in a concerted fashion during self-/non-self-discrimination processes in reproduction.

  16. Evolution of eukaryotic genome architecture: Insights from the study of a rapidly evolving metazoan, Oikopleura dioica: Non-adaptive forces such as elevated mutation rates may influence the evolution of genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavali, Sreenivas; Morais, David A de Lima; Gough, Julian; Babu, M Madan

    2011-08-01

    Recent sequencing of the metazoan Oikopleura dioica genome has provided important insights, which challenges the current understanding of eukaryotic genome evolution. Many genomic features of O. dioica show deviation from the commonly observed trends in other eukaryotic genomes. For instance, O. dioica has a rapidly evolving, highly compact genome with a divergent intron-exon organization. Additionally, O. dioica lacks the minor spliceosome and key DNA repair pathway genes. Even with a compact genome, O. dioica contains tandem repeats, comparable to other eukaryotes, and shows lineage-specific expansion of certain protein domains. Here, we review its genomic features in the context of current knowledge, discuss implications for contemporary biology and identify areas for further research. Analysis of the O. dioica genome suggests that non-adaptive forces such as elevated mutation rates might influence the evolution of genome architecture. The knowledge of unique genomic features and splicing mechanisms in O. dioica may be exploited for synthetic biology applications, such as generation of orthogonal splicing systems. Copyright © 2011 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  17. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao-Ling Lo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP. This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS, were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50% of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284 and intronic regions (169 with the least in exon's (4, suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a, excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1, neurotransmitters (Pomc, and synapses (Snap29. This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits.

  18. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits.

  19. Representation and processing of complex DNA spatial architecture and its annotated genomic content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherbi, Rachid; Herisson, Joan

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new general approach for the spatial representation and visualization of DNA molecule and its annotated information. This approach is based on a biological 3D model that predicts the complex spatial trajectory of huge naked DNA. With such modeling, a global vision of the sequence is possible, which is different and complementary to other representations as textual, linguistics or syntactic ones. The DNA is well known as a three-dimensional structure. Whereas, the spatial information plays a great part during its evolution and its interaction with the other biological elements This work will motivate investigations in order to launch new bioinformatics studies for the analysis of the spatial architecture of the genome. Besides, in order to obtain a friendly interactive visualization, a powerful graphic modeling is proposed including DNA complex trajectory management and its annotated-based content structuring. The paper describes spatial architecture modeling, with consideration of both biological and computational constraints. This work is implemented through a powerful graphic software tool, named ADN-Viewer. Several examples of visualization are shown for various organisms and biological elements.

  20. Evaluation of relational and NoSQL database architectures to manage genomic annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Wade L; Nelson, Brent G; Felker, Donn K; Durant, Thomas J S; Torres, Richard

    2016-12-01

    While the adoption of next generation sequencing has rapidly expanded, the informatics infrastructure used to manage the data generated by this technology has not kept pace. Historically, relational databases have provided much of the framework for data storage and retrieval. Newer technologies based on NoSQL architectures may provide significant advantages in storage and query efficiency, thereby reducing the cost of data management. But their relative advantage when applied to biomedical data sets, such as genetic data, has not been characterized. To this end, we compared the storage, indexing, and query efficiency of a common relational database (MySQL), a document-oriented NoSQL database (MongoDB), and a relational database with NoSQL support (PostgreSQL). When used to store genomic annotations from the dbSNP database, we found the NoSQL architectures to outperform traditional, relational models for speed of data storage, indexing, and query retrieval in nearly every operation. These findings strongly support the use of novel database technologies to improve the efficiency of data management within the biological sciences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Deciphering the genomic architecture of the stickleback brain with a novel multilocus gene-mapping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zitong; Guo, Baocheng; Yang, Jing; Herczeg, Gábor; Gonda, Abigél; Balázs, Gergely; Shikano, Takahito; Calboli, Federico C F; Merilä, Juha

    2017-03-01

    Quantitative traits important to organismal function and fitness, such as brain size, are presumably controlled by many small-effect loci. Deciphering the genetic architecture of such traits with traditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping methods is challenging. Here, we investigated the genetic architecture of brain size (and the size of five different brain parts) in nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius) with the aid of novel multilocus QTL-mapping approaches based on a de-biased LASSO method. Apart from having more statistical power to detect QTL and reduced rate of false positives than conventional QTL-mapping approaches, the developed methods can handle large marker panels and provide estimates of genomic heritability. Single-locus analyses of an F 2 interpopulation cross with 239 individuals and 15 198, fully informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) uncovered 79 QTL associated with variation in stickleback brain size traits. Many of these loci were in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with each other, and consequently, a multilocus mapping of individual SNPs, accounting for LD structure in the data, recovered only four significant QTL. However, a multilocus mapping of SNPs grouped by linkage group (LG) identified 14 LGs (1-6 depending on the trait) that influence variation in brain traits. For instance, 17.6% of the variation in relative brain size was explainable by cumulative effects of SNPs distributed over six LGs, whereas 42% of the variation was accounted for by all 21 LGs. Hence, the results suggest that variation in stickleback brain traits is influenced by many small-effect loci. Apart from suggesting moderately heritable (h 2  ≈ 0.15-0.42) multifactorial genetic architecture of brain traits, the results highlight the challenges in identifying the loci contributing to variation in quantitative traits. Nevertheless, the results demonstrate that the novel QTL-mapping approach developed here has distinctive advantages

  2. Genome-wide association analyses identify new risk variants and the genetic architecture of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rheenen, Wouter; Shatunov, Aleksey; Dekker, Annelot M.; McLaughlin, Russell L.; Diekstra, Frank P.; Pulit, Sara L.; van der Spek, Rick A. A.; Vosa, Urmo; de Jong, Simone; Robinson, Matthew R.; Yang, Jian; Fogh, Isabella; van Doormaal, Perry T. C.; Tazelaar, Gijs H. P.; Koppers, Max; Blokhuis, Anna M.; Sproviero, William; Jones, Ashley R.; Kenna, Kevin P.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Harschnitz, Oliver; Schellevis, Raymond D.; Brands, William J.; Medic, Jelena; Menelaou, Androniki; Vajda, Alice; Ticozzi, Nicola; Lin, Kuang; Rogelj, Boris; Vrabec, Katarina; Ravnik-Glavac, Metka; Koritnik, Blazi; Zidar, Janez; Leonardis, Lea; Groselj, Leja Dolenc; Millecamps, Stephanie; Salachas, Francois; Meininger, Vincent; de Carvalho, Mamede; Pinto, Susana; Mora, Jesus S.; Rojas-Garcia, Ricardo; Polak, Meraida; Chandran, Siddharthan; Colville, Shuna; Swingler, Robert; Morrison, Karen E.; Shaw, Pamela J.; Hardy, John; Orrell, Richard W.; Pittman, Alan; Sidle, Katie; Fratta, Pietro; Malaspina, Andrea; Topp, Simon; Petri, Susanne; Abdulla, Susanne; Drepper, Carsten; Sendtner, Michael; Meyer, Thomas; Ophoff, Roel A.; Staats, Kim A.; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Basak, A. Nazli; Tunca, Ceren; Hamzeiy, Hamid; Parman, Yesim; Meitinger, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Andres, Christian R.; Maurel, Cindy; Bensimon, Gilbert; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Brice, Alexis; Payan, Christine A. M.; Saker-Delye, Safaa; Duerr, Alexandra; Wood, Nicholas W.; Tittmann, Lukas; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Rietschel, Marcella; Cichon, Sven; Noethen, Markus M.; Amouyel, Philippe; Tzourio, Christophe; Dartigues, Jean-Francois; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Hofman, Albert; Curtis, Charles; Blauw, Hylke M.; van der Kooi, Anneke J.; de Visser, Marianne; Goris, An; Weber, Markus; Shaw, Christopher E.; Smith, Bradley N.; Pansarasa, Orietta; Cereda, Cristina; Del Bo, Roberto; Comi, Giacomo P.; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Bertolin, Cinzia; Soraru, Gianni; Mazzini, Letizia; Pensato, Viviana; Gellera, Cinzia; Tiloca, Cinzia; Ratti, Antonia; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Brunetti, Maura; Arcuti, Simona; Capozzo, Rosa; Zecca, Chiara; Lunetta, Christian; Penco, Silvana; Riva, Nilo; Padovani, Alessandro; Filosto, Massimiliano; Muller, Bernard; Stuit, Robbert Jan; Blair, Ian; Zhang, Katharine; McCann, Emily P.; Fifita, Jennifer A.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Rowe, Dominic B.; Pamphlett, Roger; Kiernan, Matthew C.; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witte, Otto W.; Ringer, Thomas; Prell, Tino; Stubendorff, Beatrice; Kurth, Ingo; Huebner, Christian A.; Leigh, P. Nigel; Casale, Federico; Chio, Adrian; Beghi, Ettore; Pupillo, Elisabetta; Tortelli, Rosanna; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Powell, John; Ludolph, Albert C.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Robberecht, Wim; Van Damme, Philip; Franke, Lude; Pers, Tune H.; Brown, Robert H.; Glass, Jonathan D.; Landers, John E.; Hardiman, Orla; Andersen, Peter M.; Corcia, Philippe; Vourc'h, Patrick; Silani, Vincenzo; Wray, Naomi R.; Visscher, Peter M.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; van Es, Michael A.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Breen, Gerome; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Veldink, Jan H.

    To elucidate the genetic architecture of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and find associated loci, we assembled a custom imputation reference panel from whole-genome-sequenced patients with ALS and matched controls (n = 1,861). Through imputation and mixed-model association analysis in 12,577

  3. Genome-wide association analyses identify new risk variants and the genetic architecture of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rheenen, Wouter; Shatunov, Aleksey; Dekker, Annelot M.; McLaughlin, Russell L.; Diekstra, Frank P.; Pulit, Sara L.; van der Spek, Rick A. A.; Võsa, Urmo; de Jong, Simone; Robinson, Matthew R.; Yang, Jian; Fogh, Isabella; van Doormaal, Perry Tc; Tazelaar, Gijs H. P.; Koppers, Max; Blokhuis, Anna M.; Sproviero, William; Jones, Ashley R.; Kenna, Kevin P.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Harschnitz, Oliver; Schellevis, Raymond D.; Brands, William J.; Medic, Jelena; Menelaou, Androniki; Vajda, Alice; Ticozzi, Nicola; Lin, Kuang; Rogelj, Boris; Vrabec, Katarina; Ravnik-Glavač, Metka; Koritnik, Blaž; Zidar, Janez; Leonardis, Lea; Grošelj, Leja Dolenc; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Salachas, François; Meininger, Vincent; de Carvalho, Mamede; Pinto, Susana; Mora, Jesus S.; Rojas-García, Ricardo; Polak, Meraida; Chandran, Siddharthan; Colville, Shuna; Swingler, Robert; Morrison, Karen E.; Shaw, Pamela J.; Hardy, John; Orrell, Richard W.; Pittman, Alan; Sidle, Katie; Fratta, Pietro; Malaspina, Andrea; Topp, Simon; Petri, Susanne; Abdulla, Susanne; Drepper, Carsten; Sendtner, Michael; Meyer, Thomas; Ophoff, Roel A.; Staats, Kim A.; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Basak, A. Nazli; Tunca, Ceren; Hamzeiy, Hamid; Parman, Yesim; Meitinger, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Andres, Christian R.; Maurel, Cindy; Bensimon, Gilbert; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Brice, Alexis; Payan, Christine A. M.; Saker-Delye, Safaa; Dürr, Alexandra; Wood, Nicholas W.; Tittmann, Lukas; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Rietschel, Marcella; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M.; Amouyel, Philippe; Tzourio, Christophe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Hofman, Albert; Curtis, Charles; Blauw, Hylke M.; van der Kooi, Anneke J.; de Visser, Marianne; Goris, An; Weber, Markus; Shaw, Christopher E.; Smith, Bradley N.; Pansarasa, Orietta; Cereda, Cristina; del Bo, Roberto; Comi, Giacomo P.; D'alfonso, Sandra; Bertolin, Cinzia; Sorarù, Gianni; Mazzini, Letizia; Pensato, Viviana; Gellera, Cinzia; Tiloca, Cinzia; Ratti, Antonia; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Brunetti, Maura; Arcuti, Simona; Capozzo, Rosa; Zecca, Chiara; Lunetta, Christian; Penco, Silvana; Riva, Nilo; Padovani, Alessandro; Filosto, Massimiliano; Muller, Bernard; Stuit, Robbert Jan; Blair, Ian; Zhang, Katharine; McCann, Emily P.; Fifita, Jennifer A.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Rowe, Dominic B.; Pamphlett, Roger; Kiernan, Matthew C.; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witte, Otto W.; Ringer, Thomas; Prell, Tino; Stubendorff, Beatrice; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A.; Leigh, P. Nigel; Casale, Federico; Chio, Adriano; Beghi, Ettore; Pupillo, Elisabetta; Tortelli, Rosanna; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Powell, John; Ludolph, Albert C.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Robberecht, Wim; van Damme, Philip; Franke, Lude; Pers, Tune H.; Brown, Robert H.; Glass, Jonathan D.; Landers, John E.; Hardiman, Orla; Andersen, Peter M.; Corcia, Philippe; Vourc'h, Patrick; Silani, Vincenzo; Wray, Naomi R.; Visscher, Peter M.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; van Es, Michael A.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Breen, Gerome; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Veldink, Jan H.

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the genetic architecture of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and find associated loci, we assembled a custom imputation reference panel from whole-genome-sequenced patients with ALS and matched controls (n = 1,861). Through imputation and mixed-model association analysis in 12,577

  4. Characterization of the Genomic Architecture and Mutational Spectrum of a Small Cell Prostate Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan F. Scott

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the use of a series of laboratory, analytical and interpretation methods to investigate personalized cancer care for a case of small cell prostate carcinoma (SCPC, a rare and aggressive tumor with poor prognosis, for which the underlying genomic architecture and mutational spectrum has not been well characterized. We performed both SNP genotyping and exome sequencing of a Virchow node metastasis from a patient with SCPC. A variety of methods were used to analyze and interpret the tumor genome for copy number variation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH, somatic mosaicism and mutations in genes from known cancer pathways. The combination of genotyping and exome sequencing approaches provided more information than either technique alone. The results showed widespread evidence of copy number changes involving most chromosomes including the possible loss of both alleles of CDKN1B (p27/Kip1. LOH was observed for the regions encompassing the tumor suppressors TP53, RB1, and CHD1. Predicted damaging somatic mutations were observed in the retained TP53 and RB1 alleles. Mutations in other genes that may be functionally relevant were noted, especially the recently reported high confidence cancer drivers FOXA1 and CCAR1. The disruption of multiple cancer drivers underscores why SCPC may be such a difficult cancer to manage.

  5. Characterization of the genomic architecture and mutational spectrum of a small cell prostate carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alan F; Mohr, David W; Ling, Hua; Scharpf, Robert B; Zhang, Peng; Liptak, Gregory S

    2014-05-12

    We present the use of a series of laboratory, analytical and interpretation methods to investigate personalized cancer care for a case of small cell prostate carcinoma (SCPC), a rare and aggressive tumor with poor prognosis, for which the underlying genomic architecture and mutational spectrum has not been well characterized. We performed both SNP genotyping and exome sequencing of a Virchow node metastasis from a patient with SCPC. A variety of methods were used to analyze and interpret the tumor genome for copy number variation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), somatic mosaicism and mutations in genes from known cancer pathways. The combination of genotyping and exome sequencing approaches provided more information than either technique alone. The results showed widespread evidence of copy number changes involving most chromosomes including the possible loss of both alleles of CDKN1B (p27/Kip1). LOH was observed for the regions encompassing the tumor suppressors TP53, RB1, and CHD1. Predicted damaging somatic mutations were observed in the retained TP53 and RB1 alleles. Mutations in other genes that may be functionally relevant were noted, especially the recently reported high confidence cancer drivers FOXA1 and CCAR1. The disruption of multiple cancer drivers underscores why SCPC may be such a difficult cancer to manage.

  6. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Audrey Y; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian’an; Kutalik, Zoltán; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vinkhuyzen, Anna AE; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C; Mangino, Massimo; Leach, Irene Mateo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A; Nyholt, Dale R; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L; Böttcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E Warwick; De Jong, Pim A; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex SF; Dörr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grönberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M.; Groves, Christopher J; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K; Hillege, Hans L; Hlatky, Mark A; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Berit; Johansson, Åsa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L; McKenzie, Colin A; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Morken, Mario A; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M; Nöthen, Markus M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shi, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor VA; Vermeulen, Sita H; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan JL; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gejman, Pablo V; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W; Hall, Alistair S; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hindorff, Lucia A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John JP; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela AF; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Andrew D; Morris, Andrew P; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, DC; Rice, Treva K; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter EH; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Chambers, John C; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooper, Richard S; de Bakker, Paul IW; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin NA; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Inês; Fox, Caroline S; North, Kari E; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; McCarthy, Mark I; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J; Price, Alkes L.; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth JF; Weedon, Michael N; Ingelsson, Erik; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Chasman, Daniel I; Goddard, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explain one-fifth of heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated ~2,000, ~3,700 and ~9,500 SNPs explained ~21%, ~24% and ~29% of phenotypic variance. Furthermore, all common variants together captured the majority (60%) of heritability. The 697 variants clustered in 423 loci enriched for genes, pathways, and tissue-types known to be involved in growth and together implicated genes and pathways not highlighted in earlier efforts, such as signaling by fibroblast growth factors, WNT/beta-catenin, and chondroitin sulfate-related genes. We identified several genes and pathways not previously connected with human skeletal growth, including mTOR, osteoglycin and binding of hyaluronic acid. Our results indicate a genetic architecture for human height that is characterized by a very large but finite number (thousands) of causal variants. PMID:25282103

  7. Analytical Derivation of Traffic Patterns in Shared Memory Architectures from Task Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuart, Matthias Bo; Sparsø, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Task Graphs is a commonly used application model in research in computer-aided design tools for design space exploration of embedded systems, including system synthesis, scheduling and application mapping. These design tools need an estimate of the actual communication in the target system caused...... by the application modelled by the task graph. In this paper, we present a method for analytically deriving the worst-case traffic pattern when a task graph is mapped to a multiprocessor system-on-chip with a shared memory architecture. We describe the additionally needed information besides the dependencies...

  8. Investigations on Genetic Architecture of Hairy Loci in Dairy Cattle by Using Single and Whole Genome Regression Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Karacaören

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of body hair is an important physiological and cellular process that leads to better adaption in tropical environments for dairy cattle. Various studies suggested a major gene and, more recently, associated genes for hairy locus in dairy cattle. Main aim of this study was to i employ a variant of the discordant sib pair model, in which half sibs from the same sires are randomly sampled using their affection statues, ii use various single marker regression approaches, and iii use whole genome regression approaches to dissect genetic architecture of the hairy gene in the cattle. Whole and single genome regression approaches detected strong genomic signals from Chromosome 23. Although there is a major gene effect on hairy phenotype sourced from chromosome 23: whole genome regression approach also suggested polygenic component related with other parts of the genome. Such a result could not be obtained by any of the single marker approaches.

  9. Genome-wide prediction of traits with different genetic architecture through efficient variable selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Valentin; Lehermeier, Christina; Albrecht, Theresa; Auinger, Hans-Jürgen; Wang, Yu; Schön, Chris-Carolin

    2013-10-01

    In genome-based prediction there is considerable uncertainty about the statistical model and method required to maximize prediction accuracy. For traits influenced by a small number of quantitative trait loci (QTL), predictions are expected to benefit from methods performing variable selection [e.g., BayesB or the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO)] compared to methods distributing effects across the genome [ridge regression best linear unbiased prediction (RR-BLUP)]. We investigate the assumptions underlying successful variable selection by combining computer simulations with large-scale experimental data sets from rice (Oryza sativa L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and Arabidopsis thaliana (L.). We demonstrate that variable selection can be successful when the number of phenotyped individuals is much larger than the number of causal mutations contributing to the trait. We show that the sample size required for efficient variable selection increases dramatically with decreasing trait heritabilities and increasing extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD). We contrast and discuss contradictory results from simulation and experimental studies with respect to superiority of variable selection methods over RR-BLUP. Our results demonstrate that due to long-range LD, medium heritabilities, and small sample sizes, superiority of variable selection methods cannot be expected in plant breeding populations even for traits like FRIGIDA gene expression in Arabidopsis and flowering time in rice, assumed to be influenced by a few major QTL. We extend our conclusions to the analysis of whole-genome sequence data and infer upper bounds for the number of causal mutations which can be identified by LASSO. Our results have major impact on the choice of statistical method needed to make credible inferences about genetic architecture and prediction accuracy of complex traits.

  10. Comparative Genome-Wide-Association Mapping Identifies Common Loci Controlling Root System Architecture and Resistance toAphanomyces euteichesin Pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgroux, Aurore; Baudais, Valentin N; Aubert, Véronique; Le Roy, Gwenola; de Larambergue, Henri; Miteul, Henri; Aubert, Grégoire; Boutet, Gilles; Duc, Gérard; Baranger, Alain; Burstin, Judith; Manzanares-Dauleux, Maria; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Bourion, Virginie

    2017-01-01

    Combining plant genetic resistance with architectural traits that are unfavorable to disease development is a promising strategy for reducing epidemics. However, few studies have identified root system architecture (RSA) traits with the potential to limit root disease development. Pea is a major cultivated legume worldwide and has a wide level of natural genetic variability for plant architecture. The root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches is a major limiting factor of pea crop yield. This study aimed to increase the knowledge on the diversity of loci and candidate genes controlling RSA traits in pea and identify RSA genetic loci associated with resistance to A. euteiches which could be combined with resistance QTL in breeding. A comparative genome wide association (GWA) study of plant architecture and resistance to A. euteiches was conducted at the young plant stage in a collection of 266 pea lines contrasted for both traits. The collection was genotyped using 14,157 SNP markers from recent pea genomic resources. It was phenotyped for ten root, shoot and overall plant architecture traits, as well as three disease resistance traits in controlled conditions, using image analysis. We identified a total of 75 short-size genomic intervals significantly associated with plant architecture and overlapping with 46 previously detected QTL. The major consistent intervals included plant shoot architecture or flowering genes ( PsLE, PsTFL1 ) with putative pleiotropic effects on root architecture. A total of 11 genomic intervals were significantly associated with resistance to A. euteiches confirming several consistent previously identified major QTL. One significant SNP, mapped to the major QTL Ae-Ps7.6 , was associated with both resistance and RSA traits. At this marker, the resistance-enhancing allele was associated with an increased total root projected area, in accordance with the correlation observed between resistance and larger root systems in the collection. Seven

  11. Comparative Genome-Wide-Association Mapping Identifies Common Loci Controlling Root System Architecture and Resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in Pea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Desgroux

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining plant genetic resistance with architectural traits that are unfavorable to disease development is a promising strategy for reducing epidemics. However, few studies have identified root system architecture (RSA traits with the potential to limit root disease development. Pea is a major cultivated legume worldwide and has a wide level of natural genetic variability for plant architecture. The root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches is a major limiting factor of pea crop yield. This study aimed to increase the knowledge on the diversity of loci and candidate genes controlling RSA traits in pea and identify RSA genetic loci associated with resistance to A. euteiches which could be combined with resistance QTL in breeding. A comparative genome wide association (GWA study of plant architecture and resistance to A. euteiches was conducted at the young plant stage in a collection of 266 pea lines contrasted for both traits. The collection was genotyped using 14,157 SNP markers from recent pea genomic resources. It was phenotyped for ten root, shoot and overall plant architecture traits, as well as three disease resistance traits in controlled conditions, using image analysis. We identified a total of 75 short-size genomic intervals significantly associated with plant architecture and overlapping with 46 previously detected QTL. The major consistent intervals included plant shoot architecture or flowering genes (PsLE, PsTFL1 with putative pleiotropic effects on root architecture. A total of 11 genomic intervals were significantly associated with resistance to A. euteiches confirming several consistent previously identified major QTL. One significant SNP, mapped to the major QTL Ae-Ps7.6, was associated with both resistance and RSA traits. At this marker, the resistance-enhancing allele was associated with an increased total root projected area, in accordance with the correlation observed between resistance and larger root systems in the collection

  12. Research progress of genome editing and derivative technologies in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Qi-wei; Gao, Cai-xia

    2015-10-01

    Genome editing technologies using engineered nucleases have been widely used in many model organisms. Genome editing with sequence-specific nuclease (SSN) creates DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the genomic target sites that are primarily repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways, which can be employed to achieve targeted genome modifications such as gene mutations, insertions, replacements or chromosome rearrangements. There are three major SSNs─zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system. In contrast to ZFN and TALEN, which require substantial protein engineering to each DNA target, the CRISPR/Cas9 system requires only a change in the guide RNA. For this reason, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple, inexpensive and versatile tool for genome engineering. Furthermore, a modified version of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been developed to recruit heterologous domains that can regulate endogenous gene expression, such as activation, depression and epigenetic regulation. In this review, we summarize the development and applications of genome editing technologies for basic research and biotechnology, as well as highlight challenges and future directions, with particular emphasis on plants.

  13. The detailed 3D multi-loop aggregate/rosette chromatin architecture and functional dynamic organization of the human and mouse genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Tobias A; Wachsmuth, Malte; Kepper, Nick; Lesnussa, Michael; Abuseiris, Anis; Ali Imam, A M; Kolovos, Petros; Zuin, Jessica; Kockx, Christel E M; Brouwer, Rutger W W; van de Werken, Harmen J G; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Wendt, Kerstin S; Grosveld, Frank G

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic three-dimensional chromatin architecture of genomes and its co-evolutionary connection to its function-the storage, expression, and replication of genetic information-is still one of the central issues in biology. Here, we describe the much debated 3D architecture of the human and mouse genomes from the nucleosomal to the megabase pair level by a novel approach combining selective high-throughput high-resolution chromosomal interaction capture ( T2C ), polymer simulations, and scaling analysis of the 3D architecture and the DNA sequence. The genome is compacted into a chromatin quasi-fibre with ~5 ± 1 nucleosomes/11 nm, folded into stable ~30-100 kbp loops forming stable loop aggregates/rosettes connected by similar sized linkers. Minor but significant variations in the architecture are seen between cell types and functional states. The architecture and the DNA sequence show very similar fine-structured multi-scaling behaviour confirming their co-evolution and the above. This architecture, its dynamics, and accessibility, balance stability and flexibility ensuring genome integrity and variation enabling gene expression/regulation by self-organization of (in)active units already in proximity. Our results agree with the heuristics of the field and allow "architectural sequencing" at a genome mechanics level to understand the inseparable systems genomic properties.

  14. Quantitative trait loci markers derived from whole genome sequence data increases the reliability of genomic prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum, Rasmus Froberg; Su, Guosheng; Janss, Luc

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect on the reliability of genomic prediction when a small number of significant variants from single marker analysis based on whole genome sequence data were added to the regular 54k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data. The extra markers were selected wi...

  15. Broad genomic and transcriptional analysis reveals a highly derived genome in dinoflagellate mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeling Patrick J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dinoflagellates comprise an ecologically significant and diverse eukaryotic phylum that is sister to the phylum containing apicomplexan endoparasites. The mitochondrial genome of apicomplexans is uniquely reduced in gene content and size, encoding only three proteins and two ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs within a highly compacted 6 kb DNA. Dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes have been comparatively poorly studied: limited available data suggest some similarities with apicomplexan mitochondrial genomes but an even more radical type of genomic organization. Here, we investigate structure, content and expression of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes. Results From two dinoflagellates, Crypthecodinium cohnii and Karlodinium micrum, we generated over 42 kb of mitochondrial genomic data that indicate a reduced gene content paralleling that of mitochondrial genomes in apicomplexans, i.e., only three protein-encoding genes and at least eight conserved components of the highly fragmented large and small subunit rRNAs. Unlike in apicomplexans, dinoflagellate mitochondrial genes occur in multiple copies, often as gene fragments, and in numerous genomic contexts. Analysis of cDNAs suggests several novel aspects of dinoflagellate mitochondrial gene expression. Polycistronic transcripts were found, standard start codons are absent, and oligoadenylation occurs upstream of stop codons, resulting in the absence of termination codons. Transcripts of at least one gene, cox3, are apparently trans-spliced to generate full-length mRNAs. RNA substitutional editing, a process previously identified for mRNAs in dinoflagellate mitochondria, is also implicated in rRNA expression. Conclusion The dinoflagellate mitochondrial genome shares the same gene complement and fragmentation of rRNA genes with its apicomplexan counterpart. However, it also exhibits several unique characteristics. Most notable are the expansion of gene copy numbers and their arrangements

  16. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100 is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases-about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual's susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles.

  17. Using DNase Hi-C techniques to map global and local three-dimensional genome architecture at high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenxiu; Ay, Ferhat; Lee, Choli; Gulsoy, Gunhan; Deng, Xinxian; Cook, Savannah; Hesson, Jennifer; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B; Krumm, Anton; Shendure, Jay; Blau, C Anthony; Disteche, Christine M; Noble, William S; Duan, ZhiJun

    2018-01-31

    The folding and three-dimensional (3D) organization of chromatin in the nucleus critically impacts genome function. The past decade has witnessed rapid advances in genomic tools for delineating 3D genome architecture. Among them, chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based methods such as Hi-C are the most widely used techniques for mapping chromatin interactions. However, traditional Hi-C protocols rely on restriction enzymes (REs) to fragment chromatin and are therefore limited in resolution. We recently developed DNase Hi-C for mapping 3D genome organization, which uses DNase I for chromatin fragmentation. DNase Hi-C overcomes RE-related limitations associated with traditional Hi-C methods, leading to improved methodological resolution. Furthermore, combining this method with DNA capture technology provides a high-throughput approach (targeted DNase Hi-C) that allows for mapping fine-scale chromatin architecture at exceptionally high resolution. Hence, targeted DNase Hi-C will be valuable for delineating the physical landscapes of cis-regulatory networks that control gene expression and for characterizing phenotype-associated chromatin 3D signatures. Here, we provide a detailed description of method design and step-by-step working protocols for these two methods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  19. The Genomic Architecture of Novel Simulium damnosum Wolbachia Prophage Sequence Elements and Implications for Onchocerciasis Epidemiology

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    James L. Crainey

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Research interest in Wolbachia is growing as new discoveries and technical advancements reveal the public health importance of both naturally occurring and artificial infections. Improved understanding of the Wolbachia bacteriophages (WOs WOcauB2 and WOcauB3 [belonging to a sub-group of four WOs encoding serine recombinases group 1 (sr1WOs], has enhanced the prospect of novel tools for the genetic manipulation of Wolbachia. The basic biology of sr1WOs, including host range and mode of genomic integration is, however, still poorly understood. Very few sr1WOs have been described, with two such elements putatively resulting from integrations at the same Wolbachia genome loci, about 2 kb downstream from the FtsZ cell-division gene. Here, we characterize the DNA sequence flanking the FtsZ gene of wDam, a genetically distinct line of Wolbachia isolated from the West African onchocerciasis vector Simulium squamosum E. Using Roche 454 shot-gun and Sanger sequencing, we have resolved >32 kb of WO prophage sequence into three contigs representing three distinct prophage elements. Spanning ≥36 distinct WO open reading frame gene sequences, these prophage elements correspond roughly to three different WO modules: a serine recombinase and replication module (sr1RRM, a head and base-plate module and a tail module. The sr1RRM module contains replication genes and a Holliday junction recombinase and is unique to the sr1 group WOs. In the extreme terminal of the tail module there is a SpvB protein homolog—believed to have insecticidal properties and proposed to have a role in how Wolbachia parasitize their insect hosts. We propose that these wDam prophage modules all derive from a single WO genome, which we have named here sr1WOdamA1. The best-match database sequence for all of our sr1WOdamA1-predicted gene sequences was annotated as of Wolbachia or Wolbachia phage sourced from an arthropod. Clear evidence of exchange between sr1WOdamA1 and other Wolbachia

  20. Long-term response to genomic selection: effects of estimation method and reference population structure for different genetic architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaansen, John W M; Coster, Albart; Calus, Mario P L; van Arendonk, Johan A M; Bovenhuis, Henk

    2012-01-24

    Genomic selection has become an important tool in the genetic improvement of animals and plants. The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of breeding value estimation method, reference population structure, and trait genetic architecture, on long-term response to genomic selection without updating marker effects. Three methods were used to estimate genomic breeding values: a BLUP method with relationships estimated from genome-wide markers (GBLUP), a Bayesian method, and a partial least squares regression method (PLSR). A shallow (individuals from one generation) or deep reference population (individuals from five generations) was used with each method. The effects of the different selection approaches were compared under four different genetic architectures for the trait under selection. Selection was based on one of the three genomic breeding values, on pedigree BLUP breeding values, or performed at random. Selection continued for ten generations. Differences in long-term selection response were small. For a genetic architecture with a very small number of three to four quantitative trait loci (QTL), the Bayesian method achieved a response that was 0.05 to 0.1 genetic standard deviation higher than other methods in generation 10. For genetic architectures with approximately 30 to 300 QTL, PLSR (shallow reference) or GBLUP (deep reference) had an average advantage of 0.2 genetic standard deviation over the Bayesian method in generation 10. GBLUP resulted in 0.6% and 0.9% less inbreeding than PLSR and BM and on average a one third smaller reduction of genetic variance. Responses in early generations were greater with the shallow reference population while long-term response was not affected by reference population structure. The ranking of estimation methods was different with than without selection. Under selection, applying GBLUP led to lower inbreeding and a smaller reduction of genetic variance while a similar response to selection was

  1. Parvovirus-derived endogenous viral elements in two South American rodent genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada, Gloria; Gifford, Robert J

    2014-10-01

    We describe endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from parvoviruses (family Parvoviridae) in the genomes of the long-tailed chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) and the degu (Octodon degus). The novel EVEs include dependovirus-related elements and representatives of a clearly distinct parvovirus lineage that also has endogenous representatives in marsupial genomes. In the degu, one dependovirus-derived EVE was found to carry an intact reading frame and was differentially expressed in vivo, with increased expression in the liver. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. The detailed 3D multi-loop aggregate/rosette chromatin architecture and functional dynamic organization of the human and mouse genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoch, Tobias A; Wachsmuth, Malte; Kepper, Nick

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dynamic three-dimensional chromatin architecture of genomes and its co-evolutionary connection to its function-the storage, expression, and replication of genetic information-is still one of the central issues in biology. Here, we describe the much debated 3D architecture...... into a chromatin quasi-fibre with ~5 ± 1 nucleosomes/11 nm, folded into stable ~30-100 kbp loops forming stable loop aggregates/rosettes connected by similar sized linkers. Minor but significant variations in the architecture are seen between cell types and functional states. The architecture and the DNA sequence...

  3. Identification and genomic comparison of temperate bacteriophages derived from emetic Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peiling; Tian, Shen; Yuan, Zhiming; Hu, Xiaomin

    2017-01-01

    Cereulide-producing Bacillus cereus isolates can cause serious emetic (vomiting) syndrome and even acute lethality. As mobile genetic elements, the exploration of prophages derived from emetic B. cereus isolates will help in our understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of these pathogens. In this study, five temperate phages derived from cereulide-producing B. cereus strains were induced, with four of them undergoing genomic sequencing. Sequencing revealed that they all belong to the Siphoviridae family, but presented in different forms in their hosts. PfNC7401 and PfIS075 have typical icosahedral heads, probably existing alone as phagemids in the host with self-replicating capability in the lysogenic state. PfEFR-4, PfEFR-5, and PfATCC7953 have elongated heads, with the genomes of the former two identified as linear dsDNA, which could be integrated into the host genome during the lysogenic state. Genomic comparison of the four phages with others also derived from emetic B. cereus isolates showed similar genome structures and core genes, thus displaying host spectrum specificity. In addition, phylogenic analysis based on the complete genome and conserved tail fiber proteins of 36 Bacillus species-derived phages confirmed that the phages derived from emetic B. cereus strains were highly similar. Furthermore, one endolysin LysPfEFR-4 was cloned and showed lytic activity against all tested emetic B. cereus strains and cross-lytic activity against some other pathogenic bacteria, implying a potential to control bacterial contamination in the food supply.

  4. Identification and genomic comparison of temperate bacteriophages derived from emetic Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiling Geng

    Full Text Available Cereulide-producing Bacillus cereus isolates can cause serious emetic (vomiting syndrome and even acute lethality. As mobile genetic elements, the exploration of prophages derived from emetic B. cereus isolates will help in our understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of these pathogens. In this study, five temperate phages derived from cereulide-producing B. cereus strains were induced, with four of them undergoing genomic sequencing. Sequencing revealed that they all belong to the Siphoviridae family, but presented in different forms in their hosts. PfNC7401 and PfIS075 have typical icosahedral heads, probably existing alone as phagemids in the host with self-replicating capability in the lysogenic state. PfEFR-4, PfEFR-5, and PfATCC7953 have elongated heads, with the genomes of the former two identified as linear dsDNA, which could be integrated into the host genome during the lysogenic state. Genomic comparison of the four phages with others also derived from emetic B. cereus isolates showed similar genome structures and core genes, thus displaying host spectrum specificity. In addition, phylogenic analysis based on the complete genome and conserved tail fiber proteins of 36 Bacillus species-derived phages confirmed that the phages derived from emetic B. cereus strains were highly similar. Furthermore, one endolysin LysPfEFR-4 was cloned and showed lytic activity against all tested emetic B. cereus strains and cross-lytic activity against some other pathogenic bacteria, implying a potential to control bacterial contamination in the food supply.

  5. The genomic architecture of resistance to Campylobacter jejuni intestinal colonisation in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psifidi, A; Fife, M; Howell, J; Matika, O; van Diemen, P M; Kuo, R; Smith, J; Hocking, P M; Salmon, N; Jones, M A; Hume, D A; Banos, G; Stevens, M P; Kaiser, P

    2016-04-18

    Campylobacter is the leading cause of foodborne diarrhoeal illness in humans and is mostly acquired from consumption or handling of contaminated poultry meat. In the absence of effective licensed vaccines and inhibitors, selection for chickens with increased resistance to Campylobacter could potentially reduce its subsequent entry into the food chain. Campylobacter intestinal colonisation levels are influenced by the host genetics of the chicken. In the present study, two chicken populations were used to investigate the genetic architecture of avian resistance to colonisation: (i) a back-cross of two White Leghorn derived inbred lines [(61 x N) x N] known to differ in resistance to Campylobacter colonisation and (ii) a 9(th) generation advanced intercross (61 x N) line. The level of colonisation with Campylobacter jejuni following experimental infection was found to be a quantitative trait. A back-cross experiment using 1,243 fully informative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers revealed quantitative trait loci (QTL) on chromosomes 7, 11 and 14. In the advanced intercross line study, the location of the QTL on chromosome 14 was confirmed and refined and two new QTLs were identified located on chromosomes 4 and 16. Pathway and re-sequencing data analysis of the genes located in the QTL candidate regions identified potential pathways, networks and candidate resistance genes. Finally, gene expression analyses were performed for some of the candidate resistance genes to support the results. Campylobacter resistance in chickens is a complex trait, possibly involving the Major Histocompatibility Complex, innate and adaptive immune responses, cadherins and other factors. Two of the QTLs for Campylobacter resistance are co-located with Salmonella resistance loci, indicating that it may be possible to breed simultaneously for enhanced resistance to both zoonoses.

  6. Reductions in complexity of mitochondrial genomes in lichen-forming fungi shed light on genome architecture of obligate symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogoda, Cloe S; Keepers, Kyle G; Lendemer, James C; Kane, Nolan C; Tripp, Erin A

    2018-03-01

    Symbioses among co-evolving taxa are often marked by genome reductions such as a loss of protein-coding genes in at least one of the partners as a means of reducing redundancy or intergenomic conflict. To explore this phenomenon in an iconic yet under-studied group of obligate symbiotic organisms, mitochondrial genomes of 22 newly sequenced and annotated species of lichenized fungi were compared to 167 mitochondrial genomes of nonlichenized fungi. Our results demonstrate the first broad-scale loss of atp9 from mitochondria of lichenized fungi. Despite key functions in mitochondrial energy production, we show that atp9 has been independently lost in three different lineages spanning 10 of the 22 studied species. A search for predicted, functional copies of atp9 among genomes of other symbionts involved in each lichen revealed the full-length, presumably functional copies of atp9 in either the photosynthetic algal partner or in other symbiotic fungi in all 10 instances. Together, these data yield evidence of an obligate symbiotic relationship in which core genomic processes have been streamlined, likely due to co-evolution. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Genome-wide association study identified genetic variations and candidate genes for plant architecture component traits in Chinese upland cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Junji; Li, Libei; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Caixiang; Gu, Lijiao; Wang, Hantao; Wei, Hengling; Liu, Qibao; Huang, Long; Yu, Shuxun

    2018-03-01

    Thirty significant associations between 22 SNPs and five plant architecture component traits in Chinese upland cotton were identified via GWAS. Four peak SNP loci located on chromosome D03 were simultaneously associated with more plant architecture component traits. A candidate gene, Gh_D03G0922, might be responsible for plant height in upland cotton. A compact plant architecture is increasingly required for mechanized harvesting processes in China. Therefore, cotton plant architecture is an important trait, and its components, such as plant height, fruit branch length and fruit branch angle, affect the suitability of a cultivar for mechanized harvesting. To determine the genetic basis of cotton plant architecture, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using a panel composed of 355 accessions and 93,250 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified using the specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing method. Thirty significant associations between 22 SNPs and five plant architecture component traits were identified via GWAS. Most importantly, four peak SNP loci located on chromosome D03 were simultaneously associated with more plant architecture component traits, and these SNPs were harbored in one linkage disequilibrium block. Furthermore, 21 candidate genes for plant architecture were predicted in a 0.95-Mb region including the four peak SNPs. One of these genes (Gh_D03G0922) was near the significant SNP D03_31584163 (8.40 kb), and its Arabidopsis homologs contain MADS-box domains that might be involved in plant growth and development. qRT-PCR showed that the expression of Gh_D03G0922 was upregulated in the apical buds and young leaves of the short and compact cotton varieties, and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) proved that the silenced plants exhibited increased PH. These results indicate that Gh_D03G0922 is likely the candidate gene for PH in cotton. The genetic variations and candidate genes identified in this study lay a foundation

  8. Cross-Genome Comparisons of Newly Identified Domains in Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Domain Architectures with Other Mycoplasma species

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    Chandra Sekhar Reddy Chilamakuri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate functional annotation of protein sequences is hampered by important factors such as the failure of sequence search methods to identify relationships and the inherent diversity in function of proteins related at low sequence similarities. Earlier, we had employed intermediate sequence search approach to establish new domain relationships in the unassigned regions of gene products at the whole genome level by taking Mycoplasma gallisepticum as a specific example and established new domain relationships. In this paper, we report a detailed comparison of the conservation status of the domain and domain architectures of the gene products that bear our newly predicted domains amongst 14 other Mycoplasma genomes and reported the probable implications for the organisms. Some of the domain associations, observed in Mycoplasma that afflict humans and other non-human primates, are involved in regulation of solute transport and DNA binding suggesting specific modes of host-pathogen interactions.

  9. A tool framework for deriving the application architecture for global software development projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildiz, Bugra Mehmet; Tekinerdogan, B.; Cetin, Semih

    In order to meet the communication, coordination and control requirements of distributed Global Software Development (GSD) teams, it is necessary to define a proper software architecture. Designing a GSD architecture, however, involves a multitude of design decisions that are related in different

  10. The Integrated Genomic Architecture and Evolution of Dental Divergence in East African Cichlid Fishes (Haplochromis chilotes x H. nyererei

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    C. Darrin Hulsey

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The independent evolution of the two toothed jaws of cichlid fishes is thought to have promoted their unparalleled ecological divergence and species richness. However, dental divergence in cichlids could exhibit substantial genetic covariance and this could dictate how traits like tooth numbers evolve in different African Lakes and on their two jaws. To test this hypothesis, we used a hybrid mapping cross of two trophically divergent Lake Victoria species (Haplochromis chilotes × Haplochromis nyererei to examine genomic regions associated with cichlid tooth diversity. Surprisingly, a similar genomic region was found to be associated with oral jaw tooth numbers in cichlids from both Lake Malawi and Lake Victoria. Likewise, this same genomic location was associated with variation in pharyngeal jaw tooth numbers. Similar relationships between tooth numbers on the two jaws in both our Victoria hybrid population and across the phylogenetic diversity of Malawi cichlids additionally suggests that tooth numbers on the two jaws of haplochromine cichlids might generally coevolve owing to shared genetic underpinnings. Integrated, rather than independent, genomic architectures could be key to the incomparable evolutionary divergence and convergence in cichlid tooth numbers.

  11. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, A.R.; Esko, T.; Yang, J.; Vedantam, S.; Pers, T.H.; Gustafsson, S.; Chu, A.Y.; Estrada, K.; Luan, J.; Kutalik, Z.; Amin, N.; Buchkovich, M.L.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Day, F.R.; Duan, Y.; Fall, T.; Fehrmann, R.; Ferreira, T.; Jackson, A.U.; Karjalainen, J.; Lo, K.S.; Locke, A.E.; Magi, R.; Mihailov, E.; Porcu, E.; Randall, J.C.; Scherag, A.; Vinkhuyzen, A.A.E.; Westra, H.J.; Winkler, T.W.; Workalemahu, T.; Zhao, J.H.; Absher, D.; Albrecht, E.; Anderson, D.; Baron, J.; Beekman, M.; Demirkan, A.; Ehret, G.B.; Feenstra, B.; Feitosa, M.F.; Fischer, K.; Fraser, R.M.; Goel, A.; Gong, J.; Justice, A.E.; Kanoni, S.; Kleber, M.E.; Kristiansson, K.; Lim, U.; Lotay, V.; Lui, J.C.; Mangino, M.; Leach, I.M.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Nalls, M.A.; Nyholt, D.R.; Palmer, C.D.; Pasko, D.; Pechlivanis, S.; Prokopenko, I.; Ried, J.S.; Ripke, S.; Shungin, D.; Stancakova, A.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Sung, Y.J.; Tanaka, T.; Teumer, A.; Trompet, S.; Laan, S.W. van der; Setten, J. van; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V. Van; Wang, Z.; Yengo, L.; Zhang, W.; Afzal, U.; Arnlov, J.; Arscott, G.M.; Bandinelli, S.; Barrett, A.; Bellis, C.; Bennett, A.J.; Berne, C.; Bluher, M.; Bolton, J.L.; Bottcher, Y.; Boyd, H.A.; Bruinenberg, M.; Buckley, B.M.; Buyske, S.; Caspersen, I.H.; Chines, P.S.; Clarke, R.; Claudi-Boehm, S.; Cooper, M.; Daw, E.W.; Jong, P.A. de; Deelen, J.; Delgado, G.; Vermeulen, S.; Kiemeney, L.A.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated approximately

  12. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, Andrew R.; Esko, Tonu; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Pers, Tune H.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Chun, Audrey Y.; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U.; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E.; Maegi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C.; Scherag, Andre; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F.; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M.; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C.; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S.; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancakova, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W.; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Arnloev, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J.; Berne, Christian; Blueher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Boettcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M.; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H.; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E. Warwick; De Jong, Pim A.; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S. F.; Doerr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E.; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S.; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Graessler, Juergen; Groenberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K.; Hillege, Hans L.; Hlatky, Mark A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L.; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Bent; Johansson, Asa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N.; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindstroem, Jaana; Lobbens, Stephane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L.; McKenzie, Colin A.; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J.; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L.; Morken, Mario A.; Mueller, Gabriele; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M.; Noethen, Markus M.; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W.; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R.; Rose, Lynda M.; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A.; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shin, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sundstrom, Johan; Swertz, Morris A.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor V. A.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J.; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrieres, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W.; Hall, Alistair S.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John J. P.; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Mannisto, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, Andre; Matise, Tara C.; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Andrew D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ong, Ken K.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rice, Treva K.; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Toenjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stephane; Chambers, John C.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cooper, Richard S.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G.; Maerz, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njolstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Perola, Markus; Perusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E.; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saaristo, Timo E.; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P. Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D.; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Voelzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Ines; Fox, Caroline S.; North, Kari E.; Strachan, David P.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J.; Price, Alkes L.; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Weedon, Michael N.; Ingelsson, Erik; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Goddard, Michael E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Frayling, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated similar to 2,000,

  13. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Wood (Andrew); T. Esko (Tõnu); J. Yang (Jian); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); T.H. Pers (Tune); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); A.Y. Chu (Audrey Y); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); J. Luan; Z. Kutalik; N. Amin (Najaf); M.L. Buchkovich (Martin); D.C. Croteau-Chonka (Damien); F.R. Day (Felix); Y. Duan (Yanan); M. Fall (Magnus); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); T. Ferreira (Teresa); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Karjalainen (Juha); K.S. Lo (Ken Sin); A. Locke (Adam); R. Mägi (Reedik); E. Mihailov (Evelin); E. Porcu (Eleonora); J.C. Randall (Joshua); A. Scherag (Andre); A.A.E. Vinkhuyzen (Anna A.); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); T.W. Winkler (Thomas W.); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); D. Absher (Devin); E. Albrecht (Eva); J. Baron (Jeffrey); M. Beekman (Marian); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); G.B. Ehret (Georg); B. Feenstra; M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); K. Fischer (Krista); R.M. Fraser (Ross); A. Goel (Anuj); J. Gong (Jian); A.E. Justice (Anne); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); K. Kristiansson (Kati); U. Lim (Unhee); V. Lotay (Vaneet); J.C. Lui (Julian C); M. Mangino (Massimo); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A.S. Dimas (Antigone); C. Palmer (Cameron); D. Pasko (Dorota); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); I. Prokopenko (Inga); J.S. Ried (Janina); S. Ripke (Stephan); D. Shungin (Dmitry); A. Stancáková (Alena); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); Y.J. Sung (Yun Ju); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); A. Teumer (Alexander); S. Trompet (Stella); S.W. Van Der Laan (Sander W.); J. van Setten (Jessica); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); L. Yengo (Loic); W. Zhang (Weihua); U. Afzal (Uzma); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); G.M. Arscott (Gillian M.); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A. Barrett (Angela); C. Bellis (Claire); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); C. Berne (Christian); M. Blüher (Matthias); J.L. Bolton (Jennifer); Y. Böttcher (Yvonne); H.A. Boyd; M. Bruinenberg (M.); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); S. Buyske (Steven); I.H. Caspersen (Ida H.); P.S. Chines (Peter); R. Clarke (Robert); S. Claudi-Boehm (Simone); M.N. Cooper (Matthew); E.W. Daw (E Warwick); P.A. De Jong (Pim A); J. Deelen (Joris); G. Delgado; J.C. Denny (Josh C); R.A.M. Dhonukshe-Rutten (Rosalie); M. Dimitriou (Maria); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); M. Dörr (Marcus); N. Eklund (Niina); E. Eury (Elodie); L. Folkersen (Lasse); M. Garcia (Melissa); F. Geller (Frank); V. Giedraitis (Vilmantas); A. Go (Attie); H. Grallert (Harald); T.B. Grammer (Tanja B); J. Gräßler (Jürgen); H. Grönberg (Henrik); L.C.P.G.M. de Groot (Lisette); C.J. Groves (Christopher J.); J. Haessler (Jeff); P. Hall (Per); T. Haller (Toomas); G. Hallmans (Göran); M. Hannemann (Mario); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); M. Hassinen (Maija); C. Hayward (Caroline); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); Q. Helmer (Quinta); G. Hemani; A.K. Henders (Anjali); H.L. Hillege (Hans); M.A. Hlatky (Mark); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); P. Hoffmann (Per); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); T. Illig (Thomas); A. Isaacs (Aaron); A.L. James (Alan); J. Jeff (Janina); B. Johansen (Berit); A. Johansson (Åsa); G.J. Jolley (Jason); T. Juliusdottir (Thorhildur); M.J. Junttila (Juhani); M.M.L. Kho (Marcia); L. Kinnunen (Leena); N. Klopp (Norman); T. Kocher; W. Kratzer (Wolfgang); P. Lichtner (Peter); L. Lind (Lars); J. Lindström (Jaana); S. Lobbens (Stéphane); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); Y. Lu (Yingchang); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); A. Mahajan (Anubha); M. Maillard (Marc); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); C.A. McKenzie (Colin A.); S. McLachlan (Stela); P.J. McLaren (Paul J); C. Menni (Cristina); S. Merger (Sigrun); L. Milani (Lili); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); K.L. Monda (Keri); M.A. Morken (Mario); G. Müller (Gabriele); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); A.W. Musk (Arthur); N. Narisu (Narisu); M. Nauck (Matthias); I.M. Nolte (Ilja M.); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); L. Oozageer (Laticia); S. Pilz (Stefan); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); F. Renström (Frida); N.R. Robertson (Neil R.); L.M. Rose (Lynda M.); R. Roussel (Ronan); S. Sanna (Serena); H. Scharnagl (Hubert); S. Scholtens (Salome); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick R); H. Schunkert (Heribert); R.A. Scott (Robert); J.S. Sehmi (Joban); T. Seufferlein (Thomas); J. Shi (Jianxin); K. Silventoinen (Karri); J.H. Smit (Johannes); G.D. Smith; J. Smolonska (Joanna); A. Stanton (Alice); K. Stirrups (Kathy); D.J. Stott (David J); H.M. Stringham (Heather); J. Sundstrom (Johan); M. Swertz (Morris); A.C. Syvanen; B. Tayo (Bamidele); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); S. Van Dijk (Suzanne); N.M. van Schoor (Natasja); N. van der Velde (Nathalie); D. van Heemst (Diana); F.V.A. Van Oort (Floor V A); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); N. Verweij (Niek); J.M. Vonk (Judith M); L. Waite (Lindsay); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); R. Wennauer (Roman); L.R. Wilkens (Lynne R.); C. Willenborg (Christina); T. Wilsgaard (Tom); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A. Wong (Andrew); A. Wright (Alan); Q. Zhang (Qunyuan); D. Arveiler (Dominique); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); J. Beilby (John); R.N. Bergman (Richard); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); R. Biffar; J. Blangero (John); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan R.); P. Bovet (Pascal); P. Brambilla (Paolo); M.J. Brown (Morris); H. Campbell (Harry); M. Caulfield (Mark); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); F.S. Collins (Francis); D.C. Crawford (Dana); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); J. Danesh (John); U. de Faire (Ulf); H.M. den Ruijter (Hester ); R. Erbel (Raimund); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); J. Eriksson; M. Farrall (Martin); E. Ferrannini (Ele); J. Ferrieres (Jean); I. Ford; N.G. Forouhi (Nita); T. Forrester (Terrence); R.T. Gansevoort (Ron); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); C. Gieger (Christian); A. Golay (Alain); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); D.W. Haas (David W); A.S. Hall (Alistair); T.B. Harris (Tamara); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); A.C. Heath (Andrew C); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); L.A. Hindorff (Lucia A); A. Hingorani (Aroon); A. Hofman (Albert); G.K. Hovingh (Kees); S.E. Humphries (Steve E.); S.C. Hunt (Steven); E. Hypponen (Elina); K.B. Jacobs (Kevin); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); A. Jula (Antti); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); J.J.P. Kastelein (John); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); F. Kee (Frank); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); C. Kooperberg (Charles); S. Koskinen (Seppo); P. Kovacs (Peter); A. Kraja (Aldi); M. Kumari (Meena); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); T.A. Lakka (Timo); C. Langenberg (Claudia); L. Le Marchand (Loic); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); S. Lupoli (Sara); P.A. Madden; S. Männistö (Satu); P. Manunta (Paolo); A. Marette (Andre'); T.C. Matise (Tara C.); B. McKnight (Barbara); T. Meitinger (Thomas); F.L. Moll (Frans); G.W. Montgomery (Grant W.); A.D. Morris (Andrew); A.P. Morris (Andrew); J.C. Murray (Jeffrey); M. Nelis (Mari); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); K.K. Ong (Ken K.); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard); A. Peters (Annette); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); J.F. Price (Jackie F.); L. Qi (Lu); O. Raitakari (Olli); T. Rankinen (Tuomo); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); T.K. Rice (Treva K.); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn D.); I. Rudan (Igor); V. Salomaa (Veikko); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); J. Saramies (Jouko); M.A. Sarzynski (Mark A.); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter E. H.); S. Sebert (Sylvain); P. Sever (Peter); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); J. Sinisalo (Juha); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); R.P. Stolk; J.-C. Tardif (Jean-Claude); A. Tönjes (Anke); A. Tremblay (Angelo); E. Tremoli (Elena); J. Virtamo (Jarmo); M.-C. Vohl (Marie-Claude); P. Amouyel (Philippe); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert W.); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); M. Bochud (Murielle); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin P.); C. Bouchard (Claude); S. Cauchi (Stéphane); J.C. Chambers (John C.); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); R.S. Cooper (Richard S.); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); G.V. Dedoussis (George); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); P.W. Franks; P. Froguel (Philippe); L. Groop (Leif); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); A. Hamsten (Anders); M.G. Hayes (M. Geoffrey); J. Hui (Jennie); D. Hunter (David); K. Hveem (Kristian); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); M. Kivimaki (Mika); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laakso (Markku); Y. Liu (YongMei); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); W. März (Winfried); M. Melbye (Mads); S. Moebus (Susanne); P. Munroe (Patricia); I. Njølstad (Inger); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); M. Perola (Markus); L. Perusse (Louis); U. Peters (Ulrike); J.E. Powell (Joseph); C. Power (Christine); T. Quertermous (Thomas); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); E. Reinmaa (Eva); P.M. Ridker (Paul); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); T. Saaristo (Timo); D. Saleheen; D. Schlessinger (David); P.E. Slagboom (P Eline); H. Snieder (Harold); T.D. Spector (Timothy); K. Strauch (Konstantin); M. Stumvoll (Michael); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); M. Uusitupa (Matti); P. van der Harst (Pim); H. Völzke (Henry); M. Walker (Mark); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); J.F. Wilson (James F); P. Zanen (Pieter); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); I.M. Heid (Iris); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); I. Barroso (Inês); C.S. Fox (Caroline S.); K.E. North (Kari); D.P. Strachan (David P.); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); A. Metspalu (Andres); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); L. Franke (Lude); C.J. Willer (Cristen); A. Price (Alkes); G. Lettre (Guillaume); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); M.N. Weedon (Michael); E. Ingelsson (Erik); J.R. O´Connell; G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); D. Anderson (Denise); M.E. Goddard (Michael); P.M. Visscher (Peter); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); T.M. Frayling (Timothy)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractUsing genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated

  14. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, Andrew R.; Esko, Tonu; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Pers, Tune H.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Chu, Audrey Y.; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltán; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U.; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E.; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C.; Scherag, André; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F.; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M.; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C.; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S.; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W.; van Setten, Jessica; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Arnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J.; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Böttcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M.; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H.; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E. Warwick; de Jong, Pim A.; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S. F.; Dörr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E.; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S.; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grönberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K.; Hillege, Hans L.; Hlatky, Mark A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L.; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Berit; Johansson, Åsa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N.; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L.; McKenzie, Colin A.; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J.; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L.; Morken, Mario A.; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W.; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R.; Rose, Lynda M.; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A.; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shi, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor V. A.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J.; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W.; Hall, Alistair S.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John J. P.; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C.; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Andrew D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ong, Ken K.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rice, Treva K.; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Chambers, John C.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cooper, Richard S.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E.; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saaristo, Timo E.; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P. Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D.; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Inês; Fox, Caroline S.; North, Kari E.; Strachan, David P.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J.; Price, Alkes L.; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Weedon, Michael N.; Ingelsson, Erik; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Goddard, Michael E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Frayling, Timothy M.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Starren, Justin; Peissig, Peggy; Berg, Richard; Rasmussen, Luke; Linneman, James; Miller, Aaron; Choudary, Vidhu; Chen, Lin; Waudby, Carol; Kitchner, Terrie; Reeser, Jonathan; Fost, Norman; Wilke, Russell A.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Avila, Pedro C.; Greenland, Philip; Hayes, M. Geoff; Kho, Abel; Kibbe, Warren A.; Lemke, Amy A.; Lowe, William L.; Smith, Maureen E.; Wolf, Wendy A.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Thompson, William K.; Humowiecki, Joel; Law, May; Chute, Christopher; Kullo, Iftikar; Koenig, Barbara; de Andrade, Mariza; Bielinski, Suzette; Pathak, Jyotishman; Savova, Guergana; Wu, Joel; Henriksen, Joan; Ding, Keyue; Hart, Lacey; Palbicki, Jeremy; Larson, Eric B.; Newton, Katherine; Ludman, Evette; Spangler, Leslie; Hart, Gene; Carrell, David; Jarvik, Gail; Crane, Paul; Burke, Wylie; Fullerton, Stephanie Malia; Trinidad, Susan Brown; Carlson, Chris; Hutchinson, Fred; McDavid, Andrew; Roden, Dan M.; Clayton, Ellen; Haines, Jonathan L.; Masys, Daniel R.; Churchill, Larry R.; Cornfield, Daniel; Crawford, Dana; Darbar, Dawood; Denny, Joshua C.; Malin, Bradley A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Xu, Hua; Ramirez, Andrea Havens; Basford, Melissa; Pulley, Jill; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Boezen, H. Marike; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Navis, Gerjan; Ormel, Johan; Postma, Dirkje S.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.; Slaets, Joris P.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kathiresan, Sekar; Voight, Benjamin F.; Purcell, Shaun; Musunuru, Kiran; Ardissino, Diego; Mannucci, Pier M.; Anand, Sonia; Engert, James C.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rader, Daniel J.; Morgan, Thomas; Spertus, John A.; Stoll, Monika; Girelli, Domenico; McKeown, Pascal P.; Patterson, Chris C.; Siscovick, David S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Elosua, Roberto; Peltonen, Leena; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Melander, Olle; Altshuler, David; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Berzuini, Carlo; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Peyvandi, Flora; Tubaro, Marco; Celli, Patrizia; Ferrario, Maurizio; Fetiveau, Raffaela; Marziliano, Nicola; Casari, Giorgio; Galli, Michele; Ribichini, Flavio; Rossi, Marco; Bernardi, Francesco; Zonzin, Pietro; Piazza, Alberto; Yee, Jean; Friedlander, Yechiel; Marrugat, Jaume; Lucas, Gavin; Subirana, Isaac; Sala, Joan; Ramos, Rafael; Meigs, James B.; Williams, Gordon; Nathan, David M.; MacRae, Calum A.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Berglund, Goran; Asselta, Rosanna; Duga, Stefano; Spreafico, Marta; Daly, Mark J.; Nemesh, James; Korn, Joshua M.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Surti, Aarti; Guiducci, Candace; Gianniny, Lauren; Mirel, Daniel; Parkin, Melissa; Burtt, Noel; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Thompson, John R.; Braund, Peter S.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Ball, Stephen G.; Schunkert, I. Heribert; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Lieb, Wolfgang; Ziegler, Andreas; König, Inke R.; Fischer, Marcus; Stark, Klaus; Grosshennig, Anika; Preuss, Michael; Schreiber, Stefan; Ouwehand, Willem; Scholz, Michael; Cambien, Francois; Goodall, Alison; Li, Mingyao; Chen, Zhen; Wilensky, Robert; Matthai, William; Qasim, Atif; Hakonarson, Hakon H.; Devaney, Joe; Burnett, Mary-Susan; Pichard, Augusto D.; Kent, Kenneth M.; Satler, Lowell; Lindsay, Joseph M.; Waksman, Ron; Knouff, Christopher W.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Walker, Max C.; Mooser, Vincent; Epstein, Stephen E.; Scheffold, Thomas; Berger, Klaus; Huge, Andreas; Martinelli, Nicola; Olivieri, Oliviero; Corrocher, Roberto; Hólm, Hilma; Do, Ron; Xie, Changchun; Siscovick, David; Matise, Tara; Buyske, Steve; Higashio, Julia; Williams, Rasheeda; Nato, Andrew; Ambite, Jose Luis; Deelman, Ewa; Manolio, Teri; Hindorff, Lucia; Heiss, Gerardo; Taylor, Kira; Franceschini, Nora; Avery, Christy; Graff, Misa; Lin, Danyu; Quibrera, Miguel; Cochran, Barbara; Kao, Linda; Umans, Jason; Cole, Shelley; MacCluer, Jean; Person, Sharina; Pankow, James; Gross, Myron; Fornage, Myriam; Durda, Peter; Jenny, Nancy; Patsy, Bruce; Arnold, Alice; Buzkova, Petra; Haines, Jonathan; Murdock, Deborah; Glenn, Kim; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Thornton-Wells, Tricia; Dumitrescu, Logan; Bush, William S.; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Goodloe, Robert; Wilson, Sarah; Boston, Jonathan; Malinowski, Jennifer; Restrepo, Nicole; Oetjens, Matthew; Fowke, Jay; Zheng, Wei; Spencer, Kylee; Pendergrass, Sarah; Le Marchand, Loïc; Wilkens, Lynne; Park, Lani; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Kolonel, Laurence; Cheng, Iona; Wang, Hansong; Shohet, Ralph; Haiman, Christopher; Stram, Daniel; Henderson, Brian; Monroe, Kristine; Schumacher, Fredrick; Anderson, Garnet; Prentice, Ross; LaCroix, Andrea; Wu, Chunyuan; Carty, Cara; Rosse, Stephanie; Young, Alicia; Haessler, Jeff; Kocarnik, Jonathan; Lin, Yi; Jackson, Rebecca; Duggan, David; Kuller, Lew

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated ∼2,000, ∼3,700

  15. Chromosomal mapping of canine-derived BAC clones to the red fox and American mink genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukekova, Anna V; Vorobieva, Nadegda V; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Johnson, Jennifer L; Temnykh, Svetlana V; Yudkin, Dmitry V; Trut, Lyudmila N; Andre, Catherine; Galibert, Francis; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2009-01-01

    High-quality sequencing of the dog (Canis lupus familiaris) genome has enabled enormous progress in genetic mapping of canine phenotypic variation. The red fox (Vulpes vulpes), another canid species, also exhibits a wide range of variation in coat color, morphology, and behavior. Although the fox genome has not yet been sequenced, canine genomic resources have been used to construct a meiotic linkage map of the red fox genome and begin genetic mapping in foxes. However, a more detailed gene-specific comparative map between the dog and fox genomes is required to establish gene order within homologous regions of dog and fox chromosomes and to refine breakpoints between homologous chromosomes of the 2 species. In the current study, we tested whether canine-derived gene-containing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones can be routinely used to build a gene-specific map of the red fox genome. Forty canine BAC clones were mapped to the red fox genome by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Each clone was uniquely assigned to a single fox chromosome, and the locations of 38 clones agreed with cytogenetic predictions. These results clearly demonstrate the utility of FISH mapping for construction of a whole-genome gene-specific map of the red fox. The further possibility of using canine BAC clones to map genes in the American mink (Mustela vison) genome was also explored. Much lower success was obtained for this more distantly related farm-bred species, although a few BAC clones were mapped to the predicted chromosomal locations.

  16. Combining Genome-Wide Information with a Functional Structural Plant Model to Simulate 1-Year-Old Apple Tree Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migault, Vincent; Pallas, Benoît; Costes, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    In crops, optimizing target traits in breeding programs can be fostered by selecting appropriate combinations of architectural traits which determine light interception and carbon acquisition. In apple tree, architectural traits were observed to be under genetic control. However, architectural traits also result from many organogenetic and morphological processes interacting with the environment. The present study aimed at combining a FSPM built for apple tree, MAppleT, with genetic determinisms of architectural traits, previously described in a bi-parental population. We focused on parameters related to organogenesis (phyllochron and immediate branching) and morphogenesis processes (internode length and leaf area) during the first year of tree growth. Two independent datasets collected in 2004 and 2007 on 116 genotypes, issued from a ‘Starkrimson’ × ‘Granny Smith’ cross, were used. The phyllochron was estimated as a function of thermal time and sylleptic branching was modeled subsequently depending on phyllochron. From a genetic map built with SNPs, marker effects were estimated on four MAppleT parameters with rrBLUP, using 2007 data. These effects were then considered in MAppleT to simulate tree development in the two climatic conditions. The genome wide prediction model gave consistent estimations of parameter values with correlation coefficients between observed values and estimated values from SNP markers ranging from 0.79 to 0.96. However, the accuracy of the prediction model following cross validation schemas was lower. Three integrative traits (the number of leaves, trunk length, and number of sylleptic laterals) were considered for validating MAppleT simulations. In 2007 climatic conditions, simulated values were close to observations, highlighting the correct simulation of genetic variability. However, in 2004 conditions which were not used for model calibration, the simulations differed from observations. This study demonstrates the possibility

  17. Use of biological priors enhances understanding of genetic architecture and genomic prediction of complex traits within and between dairy cattle breeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lingzhao; Sahana, Goutam; Ma, Peipei

    2017-01-01

    sequence variants in Holstein (HOL) and Jersey (JER) cattle were analysed. We first carried out a post-GWAS analysis in a HOL training population to assess the degree of enrichment of the association signals in the gene regions defined by each GO term. We then extended the genomic best linear unbiased......BACKGROUND: A better understanding of the genetic architecture underlying complex traits (e.g., the distribution of causal variants and their effects) may aid in the genomic prediction. Here, we hypothesized that the genomic variants of complex traits might be enriched in a subset of genomic...

  18. Genomic structure and marker-derived gene networks for growth and meat quality traits of Brazilian Nelore beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudadu, Maurício A; Porto-Neto, Laercio R; Mokry, Fabiana B; Tizioto, Polyana C; Oliveira, Priscila S N; Tullio, Rymer R; Nassu, Renata T; Niciura, Simone C M; Tholon, Patrícia; Alencar, Maurício M; Higa, Roberto H; Rosa, Antônio N; Feijó, Gélson L D; Ferraz, André L J; Silva, Luiz O C; Medeiros, Sérgio R; Lanna, Dante P; Nascimento, Michele L; Chaves, Amália S; Souza, Andrea R D L; Packer, Irineu U; Torres, Roberto A A; Siqueira, Fabiane; Mourão, Gerson B; Coutinho, Luiz L; Reverter, Antonio; Regitano, Luciana C A

    2016-03-15

    Nelore is the major beef cattle breed in Brazil with more than 130 million heads. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are often used to associate markers and genomic regions to growth and meat quality traits that can be used to assist selection programs. An alternative methodology to traditional GWAS that involves the construction of gene network interactions, derived from results of several GWAS is the AWM (Association Weight Matrices)/PCIT (Partial Correlation and Information Theory). With the aim of evaluating the genetic architecture of Brazilian Nelore cattle, we used high-density SNP genotyping data (~770,000 SNP) from 780 Nelore animals comprising 34 half-sibling families derived from highly disseminated and unrelated sires from across Brazil. The AWM/PCIT methodology was employed to evaluate the genes that participate in a series of eight phenotypes related to growth and meat quality obtained from this Nelore sample. Our results indicate a lack of structuring between the individuals studied since principal component analyses were not able to differentiate families by its sires or by its ancestral lineages. The application of the AWM/PCIT methodology revealed a trio of transcription factors (comprising VDR, LHX9 and ZEB1) which in combination connected 66 genes through 359 edges and whose biological functions were inspected, some revealing to participate in biological growth processes in literature searches. The diversity of the Nelore sample studied is not high enough to differentiate among families neither by sires nor by using the available ancestral lineage information. The gene networks constructed from the AWM/PCIT methodology were a useful alternative in characterizing genes and gene networks that were allegedly influential in growth and meat quality traits in Nelore cattle.

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study for Traits Related to Plant and Grain Morphology, and Root Architecture in Temperate Rice Accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscarini, Filippo; Cozzi, Paolo; Casella, Laura; Riccardi, Paolo; Vattari, Alessandra; Orasen, Gabriele; Perrini, Rosaria; Tacconi, Gianni; Tondelli, Alessandro; Biselli, Chiara; Cattivelli, Luigi; Spindel, Jennifer; McCouch, Susan; Abbruscato, Pamela; Valé, Giampiero; Piffanelli, Pietro; Greco, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    In this study we carried out a genome-wide association analysis for plant and grain morphology and root architecture in a unique panel of temperate rice accessions adapted to European pedo-climatic conditions. This is the first study to assess the association of selected phenotypic traits to specific genomic regions in the narrow genetic pool of temperate japonica. A set of 391 rice accessions were GBS-genotyped yielding-after data editing-57000 polymorphic and informative SNPS, among which 54% were in genic regions. In total, 42 significant genotype-phenotype associations were detected: 21 for plant morphology traits, 11 for grain quality traits, 10 for root architecture traits. The FDR of detected associations ranged from 3 · 10-7 to 0.92 (median: 0.25). In most cases, the significant detected associations co-localised with QTLs and candidate genes controlling the phenotypic variation of single or multiple traits. The most significant associations were those for flag leaf width on chromosome 4 (FDR = 3 · 10-7) and for plant height on chromosome 6 (FDR = 0.011). We demonstrate the effectiveness and resolution of the developed platform for high-throughput phenotyping, genotyping and GWAS in detecting major QTLs for relevant traits in rice. We identified strong associations that may be used for selection in temperate irrigated rice breeding: e.g. associations for flag leaf width, plant height, root volume and length, grain length, grain width and their ratio. Our findings pave the way to successfully exploit the narrow genetic pool of European temperate rice and to pinpoint the most relevant genetic components contributing to the adaptability and high yield of this germplasm. The generated data could be of direct use in genomic-assisted breeding strategies.

  20. Genome-Wide Association Study for Traits Related to Plant and Grain Morphology, and Root Architecture in Temperate Rice Accessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Biscarini

    Full Text Available In this study we carried out a genome-wide association analysis for plant and grain morphology and root architecture in a unique panel of temperate rice accessions adapted to European pedo-climatic conditions. This is the first study to assess the association of selected phenotypic traits to specific genomic regions in the narrow genetic pool of temperate japonica. A set of 391 rice accessions were GBS-genotyped yielding-after data editing-57000 polymorphic and informative SNPS, among which 54% were in genic regions.In total, 42 significant genotype-phenotype associations were detected: 21 for plant morphology traits, 11 for grain quality traits, 10 for root architecture traits. The FDR of detected associations ranged from 3 · 10-7 to 0.92 (median: 0.25. In most cases, the significant detected associations co-localised with QTLs and candidate genes controlling the phenotypic variation of single or multiple traits. The most significant associations were those for flag leaf width on chromosome 4 (FDR = 3 · 10-7 and for plant height on chromosome 6 (FDR = 0.011.We demonstrate the effectiveness and resolution of the developed platform for high-throughput phenotyping, genotyping and GWAS in detecting major QTLs for relevant traits in rice. We identified strong associations that may be used for selection in temperate irrigated rice breeding: e.g. associations for flag leaf width, plant height, root volume and length, grain length, grain width and their ratio. Our findings pave the way to successfully exploit the narrow genetic pool of European temperate rice and to pinpoint the most relevant genetic components contributing to the adaptability and high yield of this germplasm. The generated data could be of direct use in genomic-assisted breeding strategies.

  1. Digital database architecture and delineation methodology for deriving drainage basins, and a comparison of digitally and non-digitally derived numeric drainage areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, Jean A.; Crowfoot, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    The drainage basin is a fundamental hydrologic entity used for studies of surface-water resources and during planning of water-related projects. Numeric drainage areas published by the U.S. Geological Survey water science centers in Annual Water Data Reports and on the National Water Information Systems (NWIS) Web site are still primarily derived from hard-copy sources and by manual delineation of polygonal basin areas on paper topographic map sheets. To expedite numeric drainage area determinations, the Colorado Water Science Center developed a digital database structure and a delineation methodology based on the hydrologic unit boundaries in the National Watershed Boundary Dataset. This report describes the digital database architecture and delineation methodology and also presents the results of a comparison of the numeric drainage areas derived using this digital methodology with those derived using traditional, non-digital methods. (Please see report for full Abstract)

  2. Expanding the diversity of mycobacteriophages: insights into genome architecture and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welkin H Pope

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacteriophages are viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts such as Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. All mycobacteriophages characterized to date are dsDNA tailed phages, and have either siphoviral or myoviral morphotypes. However, their genetic diversity is considerable, and although sixty-two genomes have been sequenced and comparatively analyzed, these likely represent only a small portion of the diversity of the mycobacteriophage population at large. Here we report the isolation, sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of 18 new mycobacteriophages isolated from geographically distinct locations within the United States. Although no clear correlation between location and genome type can be discerned, these genomes expand our knowledge of mycobacteriophage diversity and enhance our understanding of the roles of mobile elements in viral evolution. Expansion of the number of mycobacteriophages grouped within Cluster A provides insights into the basis of immune specificity in these temperate phages, and we also describe a novel example of apparent immunity theft. The isolation and genomic analysis of bacteriophages by freshman college students provides an example of an authentic research experience for novice scientists.

  3. Assessing the presence of shared genetic architecture between Alzheimer's disease and major depressive disorder using genome-wide association data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J; Russ, T C; Adams, M J; Clarke, T-K; Howard, D M; Hall, L S; Fernandez-Pujals, A M; Wigmore, E M; Hayward, C; Davies, G; Murray, A D; Smith, B H; Porteous, D J; Deary, I J; McIntosh, A M

    2017-04-18

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are both common in older age and frequently co-occur. Numerous phenotypic studies based on clinical diagnoses suggest that a history of depression increases risk of subsequent AD, although the basis of this relationship is uncertain. Both illnesses are polygenic, and shared genetic risk factors could explain some of the observed association. We used genotype data to test whether MDD and AD have an overlapping polygenic architecture in two large population-based cohorts, Generation Scotland's Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS; N=19 889) and UK Biobank (N=25 118), and whether age of depression onset influences any relationship. Using two complementary techniques, we found no evidence that the disorders are influenced by common genetic variants. Using linkage disequilibrium score regression with genome-wide association study (GWAS) summary statistics from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project, we report no significant genetic correlation between AD and MDD (r G =-0.103, P=0.59). Polygenic risk scores (PRS) generated using summary data from International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP) and the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium were used to assess potential pleiotropy between the disorders. PRS for MDD were nominally associated with participant-recalled AD family history in GS:SFHS, although this association did not survive multiple comparison testing. AD PRS were not associated with depression status or late-onset depression, and a survival analysis showed no association between age of depression onset and genetic risk for AD. This study found no evidence to support a common polygenic structure for AD and MDD, suggesting that the comorbidity of these disorders is not explained by common genetic variants.

  4. Evolved Populations of Shigella flexneri Phage Sf6 Acquire Large Deletions, Altered Genomic Architecture, and Faster Life Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dover, John A; Burmeister, Alita R; Molineux, Ian J; Parent, Kristin N

    2016-09-19

    Genomic architecture is the framework within which genes and regulatory elements evolve and where specific constructs may constrain or potentiate particular adaptations. One such construct is evident in phages that use a headful packaging strategy that results in progeny phage heads packaged with DNA until full rather than encapsidating a simple unit-length genome. Here, we investigate the evolution of the headful packaging phage Sf6 in response to barriers that impede efficient phage adsorption to the host cell. Ten replicate populations evolved faster Sf6 life cycles by parallel mutations found in a phage lysis gene and/or by large, 1.2- to 4.0-kb deletions that remove a mobile genetic IS911 element present in the ancestral phage genome. The fastest life cycles were found in phages that acquired both mutations. No mutations were found in genes encoding phage structural proteins, which were a priori expected from the experimental design that imposed a challenge for phage adsorption by using a Shigella flexneri host lacking receptors preferred by Sf6. We used DNA sequencing, molecular approaches, and physiological experiments on 82 clonal isolates taken from all 10 populations to reveal the genetic basis of the faster Sf6 life cycle. The majority of our isolates acquired deletions in the phage genome. Our results suggest that deletions are adaptive and can influence the duration of the phage life cycle while acting in conjunction with other lysis time-determining point mutations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Assembly and diploid architecture of an individual human genome via single-molecule technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Matthew; Sebra, Robert; Pang, Andy Wing Chun; Ummat, Ajay; Franzen, Oscar; Rausch, Tobias; Stütz, Adrian M; Stedman, William; Anantharaman, Thomas; Hastie, Alex; Dai, Heng; Fritz, Markus Hsi-Yang; Cao, Han; Cohain, Ariella; Deikus, Gintaras; Durrett, Russell E; Blanchard, Scott C; Altman, Roger; Chin, Chen-Shan; Guo, Yan; Paxinos, Ellen E; Korbel, Jan O; Darnell, Robert B; McCombie, W Richard; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Mason, Christopher E; Schadt, Eric E; Bashir, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We present the first comprehensive analysis of a diploid human genome that combines single-molecule sequencing with single-molecule genome maps. Our hybrid assembly markedly improves upon the contiguity observed from traditional shotgun sequencing approaches, with scaffold N50 values approaching 30 Mb, and we identified complex structural variants (SVs) missed by other high-throughput approaches. Furthermore, by combining Illumina short-read data with long reads, we phased both single-nucleotide variants and SVs, generating haplotypes with over 99% consistency with previous trio-based studies. Our work shows that it is now possible to integrate single-molecule and high-throughput sequence data to generate de novo assembled genomes that approach reference quality.

  6. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Andrew; Esko, Tõnu; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Pers, Tune; Gustafsson, Stefan; Chu, Audrey Y; Estrada Gil, Karol; Luan, J.; Kutalik, Z.; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin; Croteau-Chonka, Damien; Day, Felix; Duan, Yanan

    2014-01-01

    textabstractUsing genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated 1/42,000, 1/43,700 and 1/49,500 SNPs explained 1/421%, 1/424% and 1/429% of phenotypic variance. Furthermore, all common variants together captured 60% of heritability. The 697 variants clustered in 423...

  7. Functional and evolutionary correlates of gene constellations in the Drosophila melanogaster genome that deviate from the stereotypical gene architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuwei; Shih, Ching-Hua; Kohn, Michael H

    2010-05-24

    The biological dimensions of genes are manifold. These include genomic properties, (e.g., X/autosomal linkage, recombination) and functional properties (e.g., expression level, tissue specificity). Multiple properties, each generally of subtle influence individually, may affect the evolution of genes or merely be (auto-)correlates. Results of multidimensional analyses may reveal the relative importance of these properties on the evolution of genes, and therefore help evaluate whether these properties should be considered during analyses. While numerous properties are now considered during studies, most work still assumes the stereotypical solitary gene as commonly depicted in textbooks. Here, we investigate the Drosophila melanogaster genome to determine whether deviations from the stereotypical gene architecture correlate with other properties of genes. Deviations from the stereotypical gene architecture were classified as the following gene constellations: Overlapping genes were defined as those that overlap in the 5-prime, exonic, or intronic regions. Chromatin co-clustering genes were defined as genes that co-clustered within 20 kb of transcriptional territories. If this scheme is applied the stereotypical gene emerges as a rare occurrence (7.5%), slightly varied schemes yielded between approximately 1%-50%. Moreover, when following our scheme, paired-overlapping genes and chromatin co-clustering genes accounted for 50.1 and 42.4% of the genes analyzed, respectively. Gene constellation was a correlate of a number of functional and evolutionary properties of genes, but its statistical effect was approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than the effects of recombination, chromosome linkage and protein function. Analysis of datasets on male reproductive proteins showed these were biased in their representation of gene constellations and evolutionary rate Ka/Ks estimates, but these biases did not overwhelm the biologically meaningful observation of high

  8. Functional and evolutionary correlates of gene constellations in the Drosophila melanogaster genome that deviate from the stereotypical gene architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohn Michael H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological dimensions of genes are manifold. These include genomic properties, (e.g., X/autosomal linkage, recombination and functional properties (e.g., expression level, tissue specificity. Multiple properties, each generally of subtle influence individually, may affect the evolution of genes or merely be (auto-correlates. Results of multidimensional analyses may reveal the relative importance of these properties on the evolution of genes, and therefore help evaluate whether these properties should be considered during analyses. While numerous properties are now considered during studies, most work still assumes the stereotypical solitary gene as commonly depicted in textbooks. Here, we investigate the Drosophila melanogaster genome to determine whether deviations from the stereotypical gene architecture correlate with other properties of genes. Results Deviations from the stereotypical gene architecture were classified as the following gene constellations: Overlapping genes were defined as those that overlap in the 5-prime, exonic, or intronic regions. Chromatin co-clustering genes were defined as genes that co-clustered within 20 kb of transcriptional territories. If this scheme is applied the stereotypical gene emerges as a rare occurrence (7.5%, slightly varied schemes yielded between ~1%-50%. Moreover, when following our scheme, paired-overlapping genes and chromatin co-clustering genes accounted for 50.1 and 42.4% of the genes analyzed, respectively. Gene constellation was a correlate of a number of functional and evolutionary properties of genes, but its statistical effect was ~1-2 orders of magnitude lower than the effects of recombination, chromosome linkage and protein function. Analysis of datasets on male reproductive proteins showed these were biased in their representation of gene constellations and evolutionary rate Ka/Ks estimates, but these biases did not overwhelm the biologically meaningful

  9. Exploring the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease by whole genome sequencing identifies association at ADCY7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jostins, Luke; Moutsianas, Loukas; Randall, Joshua; Kennedy, Nicholas A.; Lamb, Christopher A.; McCarthy, Shane; Ahmad, Tariq; Edwards, Cathryn; Serra, Eva Goncalves; Hart, Ailsa; Hawkey, Chris; Mansfield, John C.; Mowat, Craig; Newman, William G.; Nichols, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Satsangi, Jack; Simmons, Alison; Tremelling, Mark; Uhlig, Holm; Wilson, David C.; Lee, James C.; Prescott, Natalie J.; Lees, Charlie W.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Parkes, Miles; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, Carl A.

    2016-01-01

    To further resolve the genetic architecture of the inflammatory bowel diseases, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, we sequenced the whole genomes of 4,280 patients at low coverage, and compared them to 3,652 previously sequenced population controls across 73.5 million variants. We then imputed from these sequences into new and existing GWAS cohorts, and tested for association at ~12 million variants in a total of 16,432 cases and 18,843 controls. We discovered a 0.6% frequency missense variant in ADCY7 that doubles risk of ulcerative colitis. Despite good statistical power, we did not identify any other new low-frequency risk variants, and found that such variants explained little heritability. We detected a burden of very rare, damaging missense variants in known Crohn’s disease risk genes, suggesting that more comprehensive sequencing studies will continue to improve our understanding of the biology of complex diseases. PMID:28067910

  10. A fungal phylogeny based on 42 complete genomes derived from supertree and combined gene analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stajich Jason E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, most fungal phylogenies have been derived from single gene comparisons, or from concatenated alignments of a small number of genes. The increase in fungal genome sequencing presents an opportunity to reconstruct evolutionary events using entire genomes. As a tool for future comparative, phylogenomic and phylogenetic studies, we used both supertrees and concatenated alignments to infer relationships between 42 species of fungi for which complete genome sequences are available. Results A dataset of 345,829 genes was extracted from 42 publicly available fungal genomes. Supertree methods were employed to derive phylogenies from 4,805 single gene families. We found that the average consensus supertree method may suffer from long-branch attraction artifacts, while matrix representation with parsimony (MRP appears to be immune from these. A genome phylogeny was also reconstructed from a concatenated alignment of 153 universally distributed orthologs. Our MRP supertree and concatenated phylogeny are highly congruent. Within the Ascomycota, the sub-phyla Pezizomycotina and Saccharomycotina were resolved. Both phylogenies infer that the Leotiomycetes are the closest sister group to the Sordariomycetes. There is some ambiguity regarding the placement of Stagonospora nodurum, the sole member of the class Dothideomycetes present in the dataset. Within the Saccharomycotina, a monophyletic clade containing organisms that translate CTG as serine instead of leucine is evident. There is also strong support for two groups within the CTG clade, one containing the fully sexual species Candida lusitaniae, Candida guilliermondii and Debaryomyces hansenii, and the second group containing Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis and Lodderomyces elongisporus. The second major clade within the Saccharomycotina contains species whose genomes have undergone a whole genome duplication (WGD, and their close

  11. Evaluating a non-destructive method for calibrating tree biomass equations derived from tree branching architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacFarlane, D.W.; Kuyah, S.; Mulia, R.; Dietz, J.; Muthuri, C.; Noordwijk, van M.

    2014-01-01

    Functional branch analysis (FBA) is a promising non-destructive alternative to the standard destructive method of tree biomass equation development. In FBA, a theoretical model of tree branching architecture is calibrated with measurements of tree stems and branches to estimate the coefficients of

  12. Mini-Review 1 Genome 3D-architecture: its plasticity in relation to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    10

    Interestingly, this mechanism closely cross- talks with genome organizers such as CTCF and Cohesins that further regulate the organization of chromatin loops. These findings also implicate transcription factors such as GATA, and TCF in facilitating enhancer promoter associations in a phase separated complex (Isoda et al.

  13. Selection upon genome architecture: conservation of functional neighborhoods with changing genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Al-Shahrour

    Full Text Available An increasing number of evidences show that genes are not distributed randomly across eukaryotic chromosomes, but rather in functional neighborhoods. Nevertheless, the driving force that originated and maintains such neighborhoods is still a matter of controversy. We present the first detailed multispecies cartography of genome regions enriched in genes with related functions and study the evolutionary implications of such clustering. Our results indicate that the chromosomes of higher eukaryotic genomes contain up to 12% of genes arranged in functional neighborhoods, with a high level of gene co-expression, which are consistently distributed in phylogenies. Unexpectedly, neighborhoods with homologous functions are formed by different (non-orthologous genes in different species. Actually, instead of being conserved, functional neighborhoods present a higher degree of synteny breaks than the genome average. This scenario is compatible with the existence of selective pressures optimizing the coordinated transcription of blocks of functionally related genes. If these neighborhoods were broken by chromosomal rearrangements, selection would favor further rearrangements reconstructing other neighborhoods of similar function. The picture arising from this study is a dynamic genomic landscape with a high level of functional organization.

  14. Theoretical models of the influence of genomic architecture on the dynamics of speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaxman, Samuel M; Wacholder, Aaron C; Feder, Jeffrey L; Nosil, Patrik

    2014-08-01

    A long-standing problem in evolutionary biology has been determining whether and how gradual, incremental changes at the gene level can account for rapid speciation and bursts of adaptive radiation. Using genome-scale computer simulations, we extend previous theory showing how gradual adaptive change can generate nonlinear population transitions, resulting in the rapid formation of new, reproductively isolated species. We show that these transitions occur via a mechanism rooted in a basic property of biological heredity: the organization of genes in genomes. Genomic organization of genes facilitates two processes: (i) the build-up of statistical associations among large numbers of genes and (ii) the action of divergent selection on persistent combinations of alleles. When a population has accumulated a critical amount of standing, divergently selected variation, the combination of these two processes allows many mutations of small effect to act synergistically and precipitously split one population into two discontinuous, reproductively isolated groups. Periods of allopatry, chromosomal linkage among loci, and large-effect alleles can facilitate this process under some conditions, but are not required for it. Our results complement and extend existing theory on alternative stable states during population divergence, distinct phases of speciation and the rapid emergence of multilocus barriers to gene flow. The results are thus a step towards aligning population genomic theory with modern empirical studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Wild emmer genome architecture and diversity elucidate wheat evolution and domestication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat (Triticum spp.) is one of the founder crops that likely drove the Neolithic transition to sedentary agrarian societies in the Fertile Crescent over 10,000 years ago. Identifying genetic modifications underlying wheat's domestication requires knowledge of the genome of its allo-tetraploid proge...

  16. The detailed 3D multi-loop aggregate/rosette chromatin architecture and functional dynamic organization of the human and mouse genomes. - Epigenetics & Chromatin Version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Wachsmuth (Malte); F.N. Kepper (Nick); M. Lesnussa (Michael); A. Abuseiris (Anis); Ali Imam, A.M.; P. Kolovos (Petros); J. Zuin (Jessica); C. Kockx (Christel); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); H.J.G. van de Werken (Harmen); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); K.S. Wendt (Kerstin); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The dynamic three-dimensional chromatin architecture of genomes and its co-evolutionary connection to its function - the storage, expression, and replication of genetic information - is still one of the central issues in biology. Here, we describe the much debated 3D

  17. Packaging the fly genome: domains and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rob

    2012-09-01

    Two independent genomic approaches have recently converged to provide insight into the domain organization of the Drosophila genome. Genome-wide mapping of chromosomal proteins and histone modifications has generated detailed maps of the Drosophila chromatin landscape and has led to the identification of a number of different chromatin states and their distribution in domains across the genome. A remarkably similar domain organization is derived from whole genome mapping of chromatin interactions that reveals the segmentation of the genome into structural domains. This review focuses on our current understanding of this domain architecture which provides a foundation for our understanding of the link between chromatin organization and the dynamic activity of the genome.

  18. The emerging role of nuclear architecture in DNA repair and genome maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Misteli, Tom; Soutoglou, Evi

    2009-01-01

    DNA repair and maintenance of genome stability are crucial to cellular and organismal function, and defects in these processes have been implicated in cancer and ageing. Detailed molecular, biochemical and genetic analyses have outlined the molecular framework involved in cellular DNA-repair pathways, but recent cell-biological approaches have revealed important roles for the spatial and temporal organization of the DNA-repair machinery during the recognition of DNA lesions and the assembly o...

  19. Real-time algebraic derivative estimations using a novel low-cost architecture based on reconfigurable logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Rafael; Rincón, Fernando; Gazzano, Julio Dondo; López, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-23

    Time derivative estimation of signals plays a very important role in several fields, such as signal processing and control engineering, just to name a few of them. For that purpose, a non-asymptotic algebraic procedure for the approximate estimation of the system states is used in this work. The method is based on results from differential algebra and furnishes some general formulae for the time derivatives of a measurable signal in which two algebraic derivative estimators run simultaneously, but in an overlapping fashion. The algebraic derivative algorithm presented in this paper is computed online and in real-time, offering high robustness properties with regard to corrupting noises, versatility and ease of implementation. Besides, in this work, we introduce a novel architecture to accelerate this algebraic derivative estimator using reconfigurable logic. The core of the algorithm is implemented in an FPGA, improving the speed of the system and achieving real-time performance. Finally, this work proposes a low-cost platform for the integration of hardware in the loop in MATLAB.

  20. Real-Time Algebraic Derivative Estimations Using a Novel Low-Cost Architecture Based on Reconfigurable Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Morales

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Time derivative estimation of signals plays a very important role in several fields, such as signal processing and control engineering, just to name a few of them. For that purpose, a non-asymptotic algebraic procedure for the approximate estimation of the system states is used in this work. The method is based on results from differential algebra and furnishes some general formulae for the time derivatives of a measurable signal in which two algebraic derivative estimators run simultaneously, but in an overlapping fashion. The algebraic derivative algorithm presented in this paper is computed online and in real-time, offering high robustness properties with regard to corrupting noises, versatility and ease of implementation. Besides, in this work, we introduce a novel architecture to accelerate this algebraic derivative estimator using reconfigurable logic. The core of the algorithm is implemented in an FPGA, improving the speed of the system and achieving real-time performance. Finally, this work proposes a low-cost platform for the integration of hardware in the loop in MATLAB.

  1. Real-Time Algebraic Derivative Estimations Using a Novel Low-Cost Architecture Based on Reconfigurable Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Rafael; Rincón, Fernando; Gazzano, Julio Dondo; López, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Time derivative estimation of signals plays a very important role in several fields, such as signal processing and control engineering, just to name a few of them. For that purpose, a non-asymptotic algebraic procedure for the approximate estimation of the system states is used in this work. The method is based on results from differential algebra and furnishes some general formulae for the time derivatives of a measurable signal in which two algebraic derivative estimators run simultaneously, but in an overlapping fashion. The algebraic derivative algorithm presented in this paper is computed online and in real-time, offering high robustness properties with regard to corrupting noises, versatility and ease of implementation. Besides, in this work, we introduce a novel architecture to accelerate this algebraic derivative estimator using reconfigurable logic. The core of the algorithm is implemented in an FPGA, improving the speed of the system and achieving real-time performance. Finally, this work proposes a low-cost platform for the integration of hardware in the loop in MATLAB. PMID:24859033

  2. Genomic architecture of ecologically divergent body shape in a pair of sympatric crater lake cichlid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Paolo; Fruciano, Carmelo; Spreitzer, Maria L; Jones, Julia C; Elmer, Kathryn R; Henning, Frederico; Meyer, Axel

    2014-04-01

    Determining the genetic bases of adaptations and their roles in speciation is a prominent issue in evolutionary biology. Cichlid fish species flocks are a prime example of recent rapid radiations, often associated with adaptive phenotypic divergence from a common ancestor within a short period of time. In several radiations of freshwater fishes, divergence in ecomorphological traits - including body shape, colour, lips and jaws - is thought to underlie their ecological differentiation, specialization and, ultimately, speciation. The Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus spp.) of Nicaragua provides one of the few known examples of sympatric speciation where species have rapidly evolved different but parallel morphologies in young crater lakes. This study identified significant QTL for body shape using SNPs generated via ddRAD sequencing and geometric morphometric analyses of a cross between two ecologically and morphologically divergent, sympatric cichlid species endemic to crater Lake Apoyo: an elongated limnetic species (Amphilophus zaliosus) and a high-bodied benthic species (Amphilophus astorquii). A total of 453 genome-wide informative SNPs were identified in 240 F2 hybrids. These markers were used to construct a genetic map in which 25 linkage groups were resolved. Seventy-two segregating SNPs were linked to 11 QTL. By annotating the two most highly supported QTL-linked genomic regions, genes that might contribute to divergence in body shape along the benthic-limnetic axis in Midas cichlid sympatric adaptive radiations were identified. These results suggest that few genomic regions of large effect contribute to early stage divergence in Midas cichlids. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Genomic architecture and evolution of clear cell renal cell carcinomas defined by multiregion sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Ignacio; Fisher, Rosalie; McGranahan, Nicholas; Matthews, Nicholas; Santos, Claudio R; Martinez, Pierre; Phillimore, Benjamin; Begum, Sharmin; Rabinowitz, Adam; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Gulati, Sakshi; Bates, Paul A; Stamp, Gordon; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Hazell, Steven; Futreal, P Andrew; Stewart, Aengus; Swanton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal carcinomas (ccRCCs) can display intratumor heterogeneity (ITH). We applied multiregion exome sequencing (M-seq) to resolve the genetic architecture and evolutionary histories of ten ccRCCs. Ultra-deep sequencing identified ITH in all cases. We found that 73–75% of identified ccRCC driver aberrations were subclonal, confounding estimates of driver mutation prevalence. ITH increased with the number of biopsies analyzed, without evidence of saturation in most tumors. Chromosome 3p loss and VHL aberrations were the only ubiquitous events. The proportion of C>T transitions at CpG sites increased during tumor progression. M-seq permits the temporal resolution of ccRCC evolution and refines mutational signatures occurring during tumor development. PMID:24487277

  4. Diverse cellular architecture of atherosclerotic plaque derives from clonal expansion of a few medial SMCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kevin; Lund, Marie Bek; Shim, Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Fibrous cap smooth muscle cells (SMCs) protect atherosclerotic lesions from rupturing and causing thrombosis, while other plaque SMCs may have detrimental roles in plaque development. To gain insight into recruitment of different plaque SMCs, we mapped their clonal architecture in aggregation...... in the cap and heterogeneous ACTA2– SMCs in the plaque interior, including chondrocyte-like cells and cells with intracellular lipid and crystalline material. Fibrous cap SMCs were invariably arranged in endothelium-aligned clonal sheets, confirming results in the aggregation chimeras. Analysis of the clonal...

  5. Functional and Genomic Architecture of Borrelia burgdorferi-Induced Cytokine Responses in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosting, Marije; Kerstholt, Mariska; ter Horst, Rob; Li, Yang; Deelen, Patrick; Smeekens, Sanne; Jaeger, Martin; Lachmandas, Ekta; Vrijmoeth, Hedwig; Lupse, Mihaela; Flonta, Mirela; Cramer, Robert A.; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Kumar, Vinod; Xavier, Ramnik; Wijmenga, Cisca; Netea, Mihai G.; Joosten, Leo A. B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of immune variation for the symptoms and outcome of Lyme disease, the factors influencing cytokine production during infection with the causal pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi remain poorly understood. Borrelia infection-induced monocyte- and T cell-derived cytokines were

  6. Roles of brca2 (fancd1 in oocyte nuclear architecture, gametogenesis, gonad tumors, and genome stability in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Rodríguez-Marí

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild mutations in BRCA2 (FANCD1 cause Fanconi anemia (FA when homozygous, while severe mutations cause common cancers including breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers when heterozygous. Here we report a zebrafish brca2 insertional mutant that shares phenotypes with human patients and identifies a novel brca2 function in oogenesis. Experiments showed that mutant embryos and mutant cells in culture experienced genome instability, as do cells in FA patients. In wild-type zebrafish, meiotic cells expressed brca2; and, unexpectedly, transcripts in oocytes localized asymmetrically to the animal pole. In juvenile brca2 mutants, oocytes failed to progress through meiosis, leading to female-to-male sex reversal. Adult mutants became sterile males due to the meiotic arrest of spermatocytes, which then died by apoptosis, followed by neoplastic proliferation of gonad somatic cells that was similar to neoplasia observed in ageing dead end (dnd-knockdown males, which lack germ cells. The construction of animals doubly mutant for brca2 and the apoptotic gene tp53 (p53 rescued brca2-dependent sex reversal. Double mutants developed oocytes and became sterile females that produced only aberrant embryos and showed elevated risk for invasive ovarian tumors. Oocytes in double-mutant females showed normal localization of brca2 and pou5f1 transcripts to the animal pole and vasa transcripts to the vegetal pole, but had a polarized rather than symmetrical nucleus with the distribution of nucleoli and chromosomes to opposite nuclear poles; this result revealed a novel role for Brca2 in establishing or maintaining oocyte nuclear architecture. Mutating tp53 did not rescue the infertility phenotype in brca2 mutant males, suggesting that brca2 plays an essential role in zebrafish spermatogenesis. Overall, this work verified zebrafish as a model for the role of Brca2 in human disease and uncovered a novel function of Brca2 in vertebrate oocyte nuclear architecture.

  7. Genome-wide expression patterns and the genetic architecture of a fundamental social trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John; Ross, Kenneth G; Keller, Laurent

    2008-07-18

    Explaining how interactions between genes and the environment influence social behavior is a fundamental research goal, yet there is limited relevant information for species exhibiting natural variation in social organization. The fire ant Solenopsis invicta is characterized by a remarkable form of social polymorphism, with the presence of one or several queens per colony and the expression of other phenotypic and behavioral differences being completely associated with allelic variation at a single Mendelian factor marked by the gene Gp-9. Microarray analyses of adult workers revealed that differences in the Gp-9 genotype are associated with the differential expression of an unexpectedly small number of genes, many of which have predicted functions, implying a role in chemical communication relevant to the regulation of colony queen number. Even more surprisingly, worker gene expression profiles are more strongly influenced by indirect effects associated with the Gp-9 genotypic composition within their colony than by the direct effect of their own Gp-9 genotype. This constitutes an unusual example of an "extended phenotype" and suggests a complex genetic architecture with a single Mendelian factor, directly and indirectly influencing the individual behaviors that, in aggregate, produce an emergent colony-level phenotype.

  8. A genomic portrait of the genetic architecture and regulatory impact of microRNA expression in response to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddle, Katherine J; Deschamps, Matthieu; Tailleux, Ludovic; Nédélec, Yohann; Pothlichet, Julien; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Libri, Valentina; Gicquel, Brigitte; Neyrolles, Olivier; Laval, Guillaume; Patin, Etienne; Barreiro, Luis B; Quintana-Murci, Lluís

    2014-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of gene expression, and their role in a wide variety of biological processes, including host antimicrobial defense, is increasingly well described. Consistent with their diverse functional effects, miRNA expression is highly context dependent and shows marked changes upon cellular activation. However, the genetic control of miRNA expression in response to external stimuli and the impact of such perturbations on miRNA-mediated regulatory networks at the population level remain to be determined. Here we assessed changes in miRNA expression upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) in dendritic cells from a panel of healthy individuals. Genome-wide expression profiling revealed that ∼40% of miRNAs are differentially expressed upon infection. We find that the expression of 3% of miRNAs is controlled by proximate genetic factors, which are enriched in a promoter-specific histone modification associated with active transcription. Notably, we identify two infection-specific response eQTLs, for miR-326 and miR-1260, providing an initial assessment of the impact of genotype-environment interactions on miRNA molecular phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that infection coincides with a marked remodeling of the genome-wide relationships between miRNA and mRNA expression levels. This observation, supplemented by experimental data using the model of miR-29a, sheds light on the role of a set of miRNAs in cellular responses to infection. Collectively, this study increases our understanding of the genetic architecture of miRNA expression in response to infection, and highlights the wide-reaching impact of altering miRNA expression on the transcriptional landscape of a cell.

  9. DeF-GPU: Efficient and effective deletions finding in hepatitis B viral genomic DNA using a GPU architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun-Pei; Lan, Kuo-Lun; Liu, Wen-Chun; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Tseng, Vincent S

    2016-12-01

    Hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection is strongly associated with an increased risk of liver diseases like cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Many lines of evidence suggest that deletions occurring in HBV genomic DNA are highly associated with the activity of HBV via the interplay between aberrant viral proteins release and human immune system. Deletions finding on the HBV whole genome sequences is thus a very important issue though there exist underlying the challenges in mining such big and complex biological data. Although some next generation sequencing (NGS) tools are recently designed for identifying structural variations such as insertions or deletions, their validity is generally committed to human sequences study. This design may not be suitable for viruses due to different species. We propose a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based data mining method called DeF-GPU to efficiently and precisely identify HBV deletions from large NGS data, which generally contain millions of reads. To fit the single instruction multiple data instructions, sequencing reads are referred to as multiple data and the deletion finding procedure is referred to as a single instruction. We use Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) to parallelize the procedures, and further validate DeF-GPU on 5 synthetic and 1 real datasets. Our results suggest that DeF-GPU outperforms the existing commonly-used method Pindel and is able to exactly identify the deletions of our ground truth in few seconds. The source code and other related materials are available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/defgpu/. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome-wide association and epistasis studies unravel the genetic architecture of sudden death syndrome resistance in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaoping; Singh, Arti; Mueller, Daren S; Singh, Asheesh K

    2015-12-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is an economically important crop that is grown worldwide. Sudden death syndrome (SDS), caused by Fusarium virguliforme, is one of the top yield-limiting diseases in soybean. However, the genetic basis of SDS resistance, especially with respect to epistatic interactions, is still unclear. To better understand the genetic architecture of soybean SDS resistance, genome-wide association and epistasis studies were performed using a population of 214 germplasm accessions and 31,914 SNPs from the SoySNP50K Illumina Infinium BeadChip. Twelve loci and 12 SNP-SNP interactions associated with SDS resistance were identified at various time points after inoculation. These additive and epistatic loci together explained 24-52% of the phenotypic variance. Disease-resistant, pathogenesis-related and chitin- and wound-responsive genes were identified in the proximity of peak SNPs, including stress-induced receptor-like kinase gene 1 (SIK1), which is pinpointed by a trait-associated SNP and encodes a leucine-rich repeat-containing protein. We report that the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by identified loci may be considerably improved by taking epistatic effects into account. This study shows the necessity of considering epistatic effects in soybean SDS resistance breeding using marker-assisted and genomic selection approaches. Based on our findings, we propose a model for soybean root defense against the SDS pathogen. Our results facilitate identification of the molecular mechanism underlying SDS resistance in soybean, and provide a genetic basis for improvement of soybean SDS resistance through breeding strategies based on additive and epistatic effects. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Relative rates of evolution among the three genetic compartments of the red alga Porphyra differ from those of green plants and do not correlate with genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David R; Hua, Jimeng; Lee, Robert W; Keeling, Patrick J

    2012-10-01

    In photosynthetic eukaryotes, relative silent-site nucleotide substitution rates (which can be used to approximate relative mutation rates) among mitochondrial, plastid, and nuclear genomes (mtDNAs, ptDNAs, and nucDNAs) are estimated to be 1:3:10 respectively for seed plants and roughly equal for green algae. These estimates correlate with certain genome characteristics, such as size and coding density, and have therefore been taken to support a relationship between mutation rate and genome architecture. Plants and green algae, however, represent a small fraction of the major eukaryotic plastid-bearing lineages. Here, we investigate relative rates of mutation within the model red algal genus Porphyra. In contrast to plants, we find that the levels of silent-site divergence between the Porphyra purpurea and Porphyra umbilicalis mtDNAs are three times that of their ptDNAs and five times that of their nucDNAs. Moreover, relative mutation rates do not correlate with genome architecture: despite an estimated three-fold difference in their mutation rate, the mitochondrial and plastid genome coding densities are equivalent - an observation that extends to organisms with secondary red algal plastids. These findings are supported by within-species silent-site polymorphism data from P. purpurea. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M.; Huntley, Miriam H.; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K.; Durand, Neva C.; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P.; Lander, Eric S.; Chadwick, Brian P.; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-01-01

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the “Barr body.” Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called “superdomains,” such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called “superloops.” DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4. We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging. PMID:27432957

  13. Characterisation of the genomic architecture of human chromosome 17q and evaluation of different methods for haplotype block definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollier William

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of markers in association studies can be informed through the use of haplotype blocks. Recent reports have determined the genomic architecture of chromosomal segments through different haplotype block definitions based on linkage disequilibrium (LD measures or haplotype diversity criteria. The relative applicability of distinct block definitions to association studies, however, remains unclear. We compared different block definitions in 6.1 Mb of chromosome 17q in 189 unrelated healthy individuals. Using 137 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, at a median spacing of 15.5 kb, we constructed haplotype block maps using published methods and additional methods we have developed. Haplotype tagging SNPs (htSNPs were identified for each map. Results Blocks were found to be shorter and coverage of the region limited with methods based on LD measures, compared to the method based on haplotype diversity. Although the distribution of blocks was highly variable, the number of SNPs that needed to be typed in order to capture the maximum number of haplotypes was consistent. Conclusion For the marker spacing used in this study, choice of block definition is not important when used as an initial screen of the region to identify htSNPs. However, choice of block definition has consequences for the downstream interpretation of association study results.

  14. A Bow-Tie Genetic Architecture for Morphogenesis Suggested by a Genome-Wide RNAi Screen in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew D.; Zhou, Elinor; Kiontke, Karin; Fradin, Hélène; Maldonado, Grayson; Martin, Daniel; Shah, Khushbu; Fitch, David H. A.

    2011-01-01

    During animal development, cellular morphogenesis plays a fundamental role in determining the shape and function of tissues and organs. Identifying the components that regulate and drive morphogenesis is thus a major goal of developmental biology. The four-celled tip of the Caenorhabditis elegans male tail is a simple but powerful model for studying the mechanism of morphogenesis and its spatiotemporal regulation. Here, through a genome-wide post-embryonic RNAi-feeding screen, we identified 212 components that regulate or participate in male tail tip morphogenesis. We constructed a working hypothesis for a gene regulatory network of tail tip morphogenesis. We found regulatory roles for the posterior Hox genes nob-1 and php-3, the TGF-β pathway, nuclear hormone receptors (e.g. nhr-25), the heterochronic gene blmp-1, and the GATA transcription factors egl-18 and elt-6. The majority of the pathways converge at dmd-3 and mab-3. In addition, nhr-25 and dmd-3/mab-3 regulate each others' expression, thus placing these three genes at the center of a complex regulatory network. We also show that dmd-3 and mab-3 negatively regulate other signaling pathways and affect downstream cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking (e.g. arl-1, rme-8) and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton (e.g. cdc-42, nmy-1, and nmy-2). Based on these data, we suggest that male tail tip morphogenesis is governed by a gene regulatory network with a bow-tie architecture. PMID:21408209

  15. Copolymers of various architectures containing ethylene and 5-norbornen-2-yl derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti, Steve Jon

    Polyolefins are a class of materials with enormous economic impact. Tailoring of polyolefin bulk properties by synthetic control is a major focus of many industrial and academic research groups. Polar functionalities within the hydrophobic polyolefin backbone can change important properties, such as, toughness, adhesion, solvent resistance, blend compatibility with other functional polymers, and rheological properties. Functional polyolefin materials with block or graft architectures are the most desirable structures as the pure polyolefin block maintains its intrinsic properties. Our initial work elucidated a neutral nickel based catalyst system capable of catalyzing the "quasi-living" homopolymerization of ethylene and the "quasi-living" copolymerization of ethylene with 5-norbornen-2-yl acetate (NBA), a polar comonomer. Through testing the effect of several reaction variables on the copolymerization of ethylene with NBA it was found that changing ethylene pressure causes a large change in the content of NBA in the copolymer chain. This change in NBA content, in turn, drastically affects the physical and thermal properties of these polymers. Understanding the impact of such reaction variables on copolymer properties made it possible to design more sophisticated architectures. This catalytic system has since been used to synthesize block copolymers and tapered block copolymers of ethylene and NBA. Block copolymers of ethylene and NBA have been synthesized by a method utilizing ethylene pressure variation to create two distinct copolymeric blocks that are able to order into microphase-separated structures. The block structure of these materials has been proven by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, GPC, AFM, and TEM. The synthesis, characterization, and bulk and thermal properties of tapered block copolymers containing ethylene and NBA, has also been performed. The final structure of the tapered block polymer is a polar amorphous chain (rich in NBA) on one

  16. Bio-Derived Hierarchical 3D Architecture from Seeds for Supercapacitor Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intawin, Pratthana; Sayed, Farheen N.; Pengpat, Kamonpan; Joyner, Jarin; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2017-09-01

    The generation and storage of green energy (energy from abundant and nonfossil) is important for a sustainable and clean future. The electrode material in a supercapacitor is a major component. The properties of these materials depend on its inherent architecture and composition. Here, we have chosen sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds with a completely different structure to obtain a carbonaceous product. The product obtained from sunflower seed carbon is a three-dimensional hierarchical macroporous carbon (SSC) composed of many granular nanocrystals of potassium magnesium phosphate dispersed in a matrix. Contrary to this, carbon from pumpkin seeds (PSC) is revealed to be a more rigid structure, with no porous or ordered morphology. The electrochemical supercapacitive behavior was assessed by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. Electrochemical measurements showed that the SSC shows a high specific capacitance of 24.9 Fg-1 as compared with that obtained (2.46 Fg-1) for PSC with a cycling efficiency of 87% and 89%, respectively. On high-temperature cycling for 500 charge-discharge cycles at 0.1 Ag-1, an improved cycling efficiency of 100% and 98% for SSC and PSC, respectively, is observed.

  17. Diverse cellular architecture of atherosclerotic plaque derives from clonal expansion of a few medial SMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Kevin; Lund, Marie Bek; Shim, Jeong; Gunnersen, Stine; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Kjolby, Mads; Carramolino, Laura; Bentzon, Jacob Fog

    2017-10-05

    Fibrous cap smooth muscle cells (SMCs) protect atherosclerotic lesions from rupturing and causing thrombosis, while other plaque SMCs may have detrimental roles in plaque development. To gain insight into recruitment of different plaque SMCs, we mapped their clonal architecture in aggregation chimeras of eGFP+Apoe-/- and Apoe-/- mouse embryos and in mice with a mosaic expression of fluorescent proteins in medial SMCs that were rendered atherosclerotic by PCSK9-induced hypercholesterolemia. Fibrous caps in aggregation chimeras were found constructed from large, endothelial-aligned layers of either eGFP+ or nonfluorescent SMCs, indicating substantial clonal expansion of a few cells. Similarly, plaques in mice with SMC-restricted Confetti expression showed oligoclonal SMC populations with little intermixing between the progeny of different medial SMCs. Phenotypes comprised both ACTA2+ SMCs in the cap and heterogeneous ACTA2- SMCs in the plaque interior, including chondrocyte-like cells and cells with intracellular lipid and crystalline material. Fibrous cap SMCs were invariably arranged in endothelium-aligned clonal sheets, confirming results in the aggregation chimeras. Analysis of the clonal structure showed that a low number of local medial SMCs partake in atherosclerosis and that single medial SMCs can produce several different SMC phenotypes in plaque. The combined results show that few medial SMCs proliferate to form the entire phenotypically heterogeneous plaque SMC population in murine atherosclerosis.

  18. Systems Biological Determination of the Epi-Genomic Structure Function Relation: : Nucleosomal Association Changes, Intra/Inter Chromosomal Architecture, Transcriptional Structure Relationship, Simulations of Nucleosomal/Chromatin Fiber/Chromosome Architecture and Dynamics, System Biological/Medical Result Integration via the GLOBE 3D Genome Platform.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); P.R. Cook (Peter); K. Rippe (Karsten); Gernot Längst; G. Wedemann (Gero); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDespite our knowledge of the sequence of the human genome, the relation of its three-dimensional dynamic architecture with its function – the storage and expression of genetic information – remains one of the central unresolved issues of our age. It became very clear meanwhile that this

  19. Modern Atomic Force Microscopy and Its Application to the Study of Genome Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyasu, Kunio; Maruyama, Hugo; Suzuki, Yuki; Hizume, Kohji; Yoshimura, Shige H.

    , a chromatin packing model triggered by Topo II that clamps DNA strands can be proposed. AFM analyses have also shown the similarities and differences between the eukaryotic and prokaryotic genome organizations. In spite of the presence of different structural proteins, the higher-order stepwise hierarchies from 30 nm fiber to 80 nm beaded structure are shared in eukarya, bacteria, and archaea, but the fundamental structural units are very different, that is, nucleosomes in eukarya and some archaea, and nonnucleosome unit in bacteria.

  20. RAD-seq derived genome-wide nuclear markers resolve the phylogeny of tunas

    KAUST Repository

    Díaz-Arce, Natalia

    2016-06-07

    Although species from the genus Thunnus include some of the most commercially important and most severely overexploited fishes, the phylogeny of this genus is still unresolved, hampering evolutionary and traceability studies that could help improve conservation and management strategies for these species. Previous attempts based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers were unsuccessful in inferring a congruent and reliable phylogeny, probably due to mitochondrial introgression events and lack of enough phylogenetically informative markers. Here we infer the first genome-wide nuclear marker-based phylogeny of tunas using restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) data. Our results, derived from phylogenomic inferences obtained from 128 nucleotide matrices constructed using alternative data assembly procedures, support a single Thunnus evolutionary history that challenges previous assumptions based on morphological and molecular data.

  1. Extended three-dimensional supramolecular architectures derived from trinuclear (bis-beta-diketonato)copper(II) metallocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Jack K; Lindoy, Leonard F; McMurtrie, John C; Schilter, David

    2006-07-07

    Neutral trinuclear (triangular) copper(II) complexes of type [Cu3L3] incorporating the 1,4-aryl linked bis-beta-diketonato bridging ligands, 1,1-(1,4-phenylene)-bis(butane-1,3-dione) (H2L2), 1,1-(1,4-phenylene)-bis(pentane-1,3-dione) (H2L3) and 1,1-(1,4-phenylene)-bis(4,4-dimethylpentane-1,3-dione) (H2L4) have been demonstrated to react with selected heterocyclic nitrogen donor bases to generate extended supramolecular architectures whose structures have been confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Thus on reaction with 4,4'-bipyridine (bipy), [Cu3(L2)3] yields polymeric structures of type {[Cu3(L2)3(bipy)(THF)] x 2.75THF}n and {[Cu3(L2)3(bipy)(THF)] x bipy x 0.75THF}(n) while with pyrazine (pyz), {[Cu3(L2)3(pyz)] x 0.5THF}n was obtained. Each of these extended structures contain alternating triangle/linker units in a one-dimensional polymeric chain arrangement in which two of the three copper sites in each triangular 'platform' are formally five-coordinate through binding to a heterocyclic nitrogen atom. Interaction of the multifunctional linker unit hexamethylenetetramine (hmt) with [Cu3(L3)3] afforded an unusual, chiral, three-dimensional molecular framework of stoichiometry [Cu3(L3)3(hmt)]n. The latter incorporates the trinuclear units coordinated to three triply bridging hmt units. In marked contrast to the formation of the above structures incorporating bifunctional linker units and five-coordinate metal centres, the trinuclear platform [Cu3(L2)3] reacts with the stronger difunctional base 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]-octane (dabco) to yield a highly symmetric trigonal columnar species of type {[Cu3(L4)3(dabco)3] x 3H2O}n in which each copper centre is octahedrally coordinated.

  2. The Detailed 3D Multi-Loop Aggregate/Rosette Chromatin Architecture and Functional Dynamic Organization of the Human and Mouse Genomes. - BioRxiv Version : bioRxiv Preprint Version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Wachsmuth (Malte); F.N. Kepper (Nick); M. Lesnussa (Michael); A. Abuseiris (Anis); A.M.A. Imam (Ali); P. Kolovos (Petros); J. Zuin (Jessica); C. Kockx (Christel); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); H.J.G. van de Werken (Harmen); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); K.S. Wendt (Kerstin); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe dynamic three-dimensional chromatin architecture of genomes and its coevolutionary connection to its function – the storage, expression, and replication of genetic information – is still one of the central issues in biology. Here, we describe the much debated 3D-architecture of

  3. Genetic variation and reproductive timing: African American women from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylee L Spencer

    Full Text Available Age at menarche (AM and age at natural menopause (ANM define the boundaries of the reproductive lifespan in women. Their timing is associated with various diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. Genome-wide association studies have identified several genetic variants associated with either AM or ANM in populations of largely European or Asian descent women. The extent to which these associations generalize to diverse populations remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to replicate previously reported AM and ANM findings and to identify novel AM and ANM variants using the Metabochip (n = 161,098 SNPs in 4,159 and 1,860 African American women, respectively, in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI and Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC studies, as part of the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE Study. We replicated or generalized one previously identified variant for AM, rs1361108/CENPW, and two variants for ANM, rs897798/BRSK1 and rs769450/APOE, to our African American cohort. Overall, generalization of the majority of previously-identified variants for AM and ANM, including LIN28B and MCM8, was not observed in this African American sample. We identified three novel loci associated with ANM that reached significance after multiple testing correction (LDLR rs189596789, p = 5×10⁻⁰⁸; KCNQ1 rs79972789, p = 1.9×10⁻⁰⁷; COL4A3BP rs181686584, p = 2.9×10⁻⁰⁷. Our most significant AM association was upstream of RSF1, a gene implicated in ovarian and breast cancers (rs11604207, p = 1.6×10⁻⁰⁶. While most associations were identified in either AM or ANM, we did identify genes suggestively associated with both: PHACTR1 and ARHGAP42. The lack of generalization coupled with the potentially novel associations identified here emphasize the need for additional genetic discovery efforts for AM and ANM in diverse populations.

  4. Hydrophobic, Hydrophilic, and Amphiphilic Polyglycocarbonates with Linear and Macrocyclic Architectures from Bicyclic Glycocarbonates Derived from CO2 and Glucoside

    KAUST Repository

    Pati, Debasis

    2017-02-09

    Two bicyclic glycocarbonates were synthesized in five steps from α-methyl-d-glucoside without resorting to phosgene or to its derivatives for the first time. The 4- and 6-positions of glucose were modified to introduce a six-membered carbonate ring, using CO as the carbonylating reagent; the 2- and 3-positions of the same glucoside substrate were first transformed into either methyl or triethylene glycol monomethyl ether groups to protect these positions from undesirable reactions and also to impart hydrophobicity in the first case and hydrophilicity in the second. The polymerization behavior of these bicyclic glycocarbonates was then investigated under different conditions. On the one hand, through ring-opening polymerization of the above monomers, linear polyglycocarbonate homopolymers and diblock copolymers were obtained initiated by p-methylbenzyl alcohol using 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene (TBD) as catalyst; on the other hand, macrocyclic polyglycocarbonate homopolymers and diblock copolymers were grown using 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) which served as zwitterionic initiator. The various architectures derived were all thoroughly characterized by NMR, GPC, and MALDI-tof and shown to exhibit the expected structure. Finally, the self-assembly of linear and macrocyclic amphiphilic copolyglycocarbonates in water was investigated and characterized by cryo-TEM.

  5. Block-type architectures for poly(p-Phenylene Vinylene) derivatives: a reality or an illusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderzande, Dirk J. M.; Hontis, Lieve; Palmaerts, Arne; Van Den Berghe, David; Wouters, Jimmy; Lutsen, Laurence; Cleij, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    Poly(p-Phenylene Vinylene) derivatives are synthesized mostly making use of the polymerization behavior of p-quinodimethane systems. Over the last forty years different synthetic routes have been developed, e.g. Wessling, Gilch, Xanthate and Sulphinyl route. For all these routes mechanistic studies are rather scarce and lead to a controversy between two possible mechanisms: anionic and radical polymerization. In this contribution it becomes clear that high molecular weight materials are associated with a self-initiated radical chain polymerization and low molecular weight materials are obtained via an anionic mechanism. This will be demonstrated for the model system in which a sulphinyl pre-monomer is polymerized in N-Methyl-Pyrrolidone. In this model system both these mechanisms are competing with each other. The observed effects on the product distribution of concentration of reagents, temperature and order in which the reagents are added, are consistent with the conclusion above. The question whether living polymerization can occur will be addressed for the radical mechanism. An experiment with a set of sequential polymerizations gives rise to an evolution of molecular weight consistent with the effect of simple dilution of the reaction medium. The conclusion is that a termination reaction is active, which can be identified as related to traces of oxygen. In these conditions the synthesis of block-type copolymers can not be achieved. For the anionic mechanism an argumentation against such possibility will be presented on the basis of relative acidities.

  6. Quality control metrics improve repeatability and reproducibility of single-nucleotide variants derived from whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Soika, V; Meehan, J; Su, Z; Ge, W; Ng, H W; Perkins, R; Simonyan, V; Tong, W; Hong, H

    2015-08-01

    Although many quality control (QC) methods have been developed to improve the quality of single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in SNV-calling, QC methods for use subsequent to single-nucleotide polymorphism-calling have not been reported. We developed five QC metrics to improve the quality of SNVs using the whole-genome-sequencing data of a monozygotic twin pair from the Korean Personal Genome Project. The QC metrics improved both repeatability between the monozygotic twin pair and reproducibility between SNV-calling pipelines. We demonstrated the QC metrics improve reproducibility of SNVs derived from not only whole-genome-sequencing data but also whole-exome-sequencing data. The QC metrics are calculated based on the reference genome used in the alignment without accessing the raw and intermediate data or knowing the SNV-calling details. Therefore, the QC metrics can be easily adopted in downstream association analysis.

  7. Spontaneous and divergent hexaploid triticales derived from common wheat × rye by complete elimination of D-genome chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Guo, Xiaoxue; Wang, Changyou; Ji, Wanquan

    2015-01-01

    Hexaploid triticale could be either synthesized by crossing tetraploid wheat with rye, or developed by crossing hexaploid wheat with a hexaploid triticale or an octoploid triticale. Here two hexaploid triticales with great morphologic divergence derived from common wheat cultivar M8003 (Triticum aestivum L.) × Austrian rye (Secale cereale L.) were reported, exhibiting high resistance for powdery mildew and stripe rust and potential for wheat improvement. Sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) karyotyping revealed that D-genome chromosomes were completely eliminated and the whole A-genome, B-genome and R-genome chromosomes were retained in both lines. Furthermore, plentiful alterations of wheat chromosomes including 5A and 7B were detected in both triticales and additionally altered 5B, 7A chromosome and restructured chromosome 2A was assayed in N9116H and N9116M, respectively, even after selfing for several decades. Besides, meiotic asynchrony was displayed and a variety of storage protein variations were assayed, especially in the HMW/LMW-GS region and secalins region in both triticales. This study confirms that whole D-genome chromosomes could be preferentially eliminated in the hybrid of common wheat × rye, "genome shock" was accompanying the allopolyploidization of nascent triticales, and great morphologic divergence might result from the genetic variations. Moreover, new hexaploid triticale lines contributing potential resistance resources for wheat improvement were produced.

  8. Spontaneous and divergent hexaploid triticales derived from common wheat × rye by complete elimination of D-genome chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    Full Text Available Hexaploid triticale could be either synthesized by crossing tetraploid wheat with rye, or developed by crossing hexaploid wheat with a hexaploid triticale or an octoploid triticale.Here two hexaploid triticales with great morphologic divergence derived from common wheat cultivar M8003 (Triticum aestivum L. × Austrian rye (Secale cereale L. were reported, exhibiting high resistance for powdery mildew and stripe rust and potential for wheat improvement. Sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH karyotyping revealed that D-genome chromosomes were completely eliminated and the whole A-genome, B-genome and R-genome chromosomes were retained in both lines. Furthermore, plentiful alterations of wheat chromosomes including 5A and 7B were detected in both triticales and additionally altered 5B, 7A chromosome and restructured chromosome 2A was assayed in N9116H and N9116M, respectively, even after selfing for several decades. Besides, meiotic asynchrony was displayed and a variety of storage protein variations were assayed, especially in the HMW/LMW-GS region and secalins region in both triticales.This study confirms that whole D-genome chromosomes could be preferentially eliminated in the hybrid of common wheat × rye, "genome shock" was accompanying the allopolyploidization of nascent triticales, and great morphologic divergence might result from the genetic variations. Moreover, new hexaploid triticale lines contributing potential resistance resources for wheat improvement were produced.

  9. Protein domain architectures provide a fast, efficient and scalable alternative to sequence-based methods for comparative functional genomics [version 1; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper J. Koehorst

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A functional comparative genome analysis is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying bacterial evolution and adaptation. Detection of functional orthologs using standard global sequence similarity methods faces several problems; the need for defining arbitrary acceptance thresholds for similarity and alignment length, lateral gene acquisition and the high computational cost for finding bi-directional best matches at a large scale. We investigated the use of protein domain architectures for large scale functional comparative analysis as an alternative method. The performance of both approaches was assessed through functional comparison of 446 bacterial genomes sampled at different taxonomic levels. We show that protein domain architectures provide a fast and efficient alternative to methods based on sequence similarity to identify groups of functionally equivalent proteins within and across taxonomic bounderies. As the computational cost scales linearly, and not quadratically with the number of genomes, it is suitable for large scale comparative analysis. Running both methods in parallel pinpoints potential functional adaptations that may add to bacterial fitness.

  10. Genome Sequences of Industrially Relevant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain M3707, Isolated from a Sample of Distillers Yeast and Four Haploid Derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Courtney M.; Clum, Alicia; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Sharma, Aditi; Zane, Matthew; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Davison, Brian H.; Lynd, Lee R.; Gilna, Paul; Hau, Heidi; Hogsett, David A.; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2013-04-19

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain M3707 was isolated from a sample of commercial distillers yeast, and its genome sequence together with the genome sequences for the four derived haploid strains M3836, M3837, M3838, and M3839 has been determined. Yeasts have potential for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) for biofuel production, and access to these genome sequences will facilitate their development.

  11. Dynamic changes in clonal cytogenetic architecture during progression of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients and patient-derived murine xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Nicholas J; Kwok, Marwan; Gould, Clive; Oldreive, Ceri E; Mao, Jingwen; Parry, Helen; Smith, Edward; Agathanggelou, Angelo; Pratt, Guy; Taylor, Alexander Malcolm R; Moss, Paul; Griffiths, Mike; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2017-07-04

    Subclonal heterogeneity and clonal selection influences disease progression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It is therefore important that therapeutic decisions are made based on an understanding of the CLL clonal architecture and its dynamics in individual patients. Identification of cytogenetic abnormalities by FISH remains the cornerstone of contemporary clinical practice and provides a simple means for prognostic stratification. Here, we demonstrate that multiplexed-FISH can enhance recognition of CLL subclonal repertoire and its dynamics during disease progression, both in patients and CLL patient-derived xenografts (PDX). We applied a combination of patient-specific FISH probes to 24 CLL cases before treatment and at relapse, and determined putative ancestral relationships between subpopulations with different cytogenetic features. We subsequently established 7 CLL PDX models in NOD/Shi-SCID/IL-2Rγctm1sug/Jic (NOG) mice. Application of multiplexed-FISH to these models demonstrated that all of the identified cytogenetic subpopulations had leukemia propagating activity and that changes in their representation during disease progression could be spontaneous, accelerated by treatment or treatment-induced. We conclude that multiplexed-FISH in combination with PDX models have the potential to distinguish between spontaneous and treatment-induced clonal selection, and therefore provide a valuable tool for the pre-clinical evaluation of novel therapies.

  12. MHC class I-associated peptides derive from selective regions of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Hillary; Daouda, Tariq; Granados, Diana Paola; Durette, Chantal; Bonneil, Eric; Courcelles, Mathieu; Rodenbrock, Anja; Laverdure, Jean-Philippe; Côté, Caroline; Mader, Sylvie; Lemieux, Sébastien; Thibault, Pierre; Perreault, Claude

    2016-12-01

    MHC class I-associated peptides (MAPs) define the immune self for CD8+ T lymphocytes and are key targets of cancer immunosurveillance. Here, the goals of our work were to determine whether the entire set of protein-coding genes could generate MAPs and whether specific features influence the ability of discrete genes to generate MAPs. Using proteogenomics, we have identified 25,270 MAPs isolated from the B lymphocytes of 18 individuals who collectively expressed 27 high-frequency HLA-A,B allotypes. The entire MAP repertoire presented by these 27 allotypes covered only 10% of the exomic sequences expressed in B lymphocytes. Indeed, 41% of expressed protein-coding genes generated no MAPs, while 59% of genes generated up to 64 MAPs, often derived from adjacent regions and presented by different allotypes. We next identified several features of transcripts and proteins associated with efficient MAP production. From these data, we built a logistic regression model that predicts with good accuracy whether a gene generates MAPs. Our results show preferential selection of MAPs from a limited repertoire of proteins with distinctive features. The notion that the MHC class I immunopeptidome presents only a small fraction of the protein-coding genome for monitoring by the immune system has profound implications in autoimmunity and cancer immunology.

  13. The complete chloroplast DNA sequence of the green alga Oltmannsiellopsis viridis reveals a distinctive quadripartite architecture in the chloroplast genome of early diverging ulvophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux Claude

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylum Chlorophyta contains the majority of the green algae and is divided into four classes. The basal position of the Prasinophyceae has been well documented, but the divergence order of the Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Chlorophyceae is currently debated. The four complete chloroplast DNA (cpDNA sequences presently available for representatives of these classes have revealed extensive variability in overall structure, gene content, intron composition and gene order. The chloroplast genome of Pseudendoclonium (Ulvophyceae, in particular, is characterized by an atypical quadripartite architecture that deviates from the ancestral type by a large inverted repeat (IR featuring an inverted rRNA operon and a small single-copy (SSC region containing 14 genes normally found in the large single-copy (LSC region. To gain insights into the nature of the events that led to the reorganization of the chloroplast genome in the Ulvophyceae, we have determined the complete cpDNA sequence of Oltmannsiellopsis viridis, a representative of a distinct, early diverging lineage. Results The 151,933 bp IR-containing genome of Oltmannsiellopsis differs considerably from Pseudendoclonium and other chlorophyte cpDNAs in intron content and gene order, but shares close similarities with its ulvophyte homologue at the levels of quadripartite architecture, gene content and gene density. Oltmannsiellopsis cpDNA encodes 105 genes, contains five group I introns, and features many short dispersed repeats. As in Pseudendoclonium cpDNA, the rRNA genes in the IR are transcribed toward the single copy region featuring the genes typically found in the ancestral LSC region, and the opposite single copy region harbours genes characteristic of both the ancestral SSC and LSC regions. The 52 genes that were transferred from the ancestral LSC to SSC region include 12 of those observed in Pseudendoclonium cpDNA. Surprisingly, the overall gene organization of

  14. Genome-wide identification and characterization of tRNA-derived RNA fragments in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Cristiane S; Vicentini, Renato; Duarte, Gustavo T; Pinoti, Vitor F; Vincentz, Michel; Nogueira, Fabio T S

    2017-01-01

    The manuscript by Alves et al. entitled "Genome-wide identification and characterization of tRNA-derived RNA fragments in land plants" describes the identification and characterization of tRNAderived sRNA fragments in plants. By combining bioinformatic analysis and genetic and molecular approaches, we show that tRF biogenesis does not rely on canonical microRNA/siRNA processing machinery (i.e., independent of DICER-LIKE proteins). Moreover, we provide evidences that the Arabidopsis S-like Ribonuclease 1 (RNS1) might be involved in the biogenesis of tRFs. Detailed analyses showed that plant tRFs are sorted into different types of ARGONAUTE proteins and that they have potential target candidate genes. Our work advances the understanding of the tRF biology in plants by providing evidences that plant and animal tRFs shared common features and raising the hypothesis that an interplay between tRFs and other sRNAs might be important to fine-tune gene expression and protein biosynthesis in plant cells. Small RNA (sRNA) fragments derived from tRNAs (3'-loop, 5'-loop, anti-codon loop), named tRFs, have been reported in several organisms, including humans and plants. Although they may interfere with gene expression, their biogenesis and biological functions in plants remain poorly understood. Here, we capitalized on small RNA sequencing data from distinct species such as Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, and Physcomitrella patens to examine the diversity of plant tRFs and provide insight into their properties. In silico analyzes of 19 to 25-nt tRFs derived from 5' (tRF-5s) and 3'CCA (tRF-3s) tRNA loops in these three evolutionary distant species showed that they are conserved and their abundance did not correlate with the number of genomic copies of the parental tRNAs. Moreover, tRF-5 is the most abundant variant in all three species. In silico and in vivo expression analyses unraveled differential accumulation of tRFs in Arabidopsis tissues/organs, suggesting that they are

  15. Genome and Metagenome Sequencing: Using the Human Methyl-Binding Domain to Partition Genomic DNA Derived from Plant Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erbay Yigit

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Variation in the distribution of methylated CpG (methyl-CpG in genomic DNA (gDNA across the tree of life is biologically interesting and useful in genomic studies. We illustrate the use of human methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD2 to fractionate angiosperm DNA into eukaryotic nuclear (methyl-CpG-rich vs. organellar and prokaryotic (methyl-CpG-poor elements for genomic and metagenomic sequencing projects. Methods: MBD2 has been used to enrich prokaryotic DNA in animal systems. Using gDNA from five model angiosperm species, we apply a similar approach to identify whether MBD2 can fractionate plant gDNA into methyl-CpG-depleted vs. enriched methyl-CpG elements. For each sample, three gDNA libraries were sequenced: (1 untreated gDNA, (2 a methyl-CpG-depleted fraction, and (3 a methyl-CpG-enriched fraction. Results: Relative to untreated gDNA, the methyl-depleted libraries showed a 3.2–11.2-fold and 3.4–11.3-fold increase in chloroplast DNA (cpDNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, respectively. Methyl-enriched fractions showed a 1.8–31.3-fold and 1.3–29.0-fold decrease in cpDNA and mtDNA, respectively. Discussion: The application of MBD2 enabled fractionation of plant gDNA. The effectiveness was particularly striking for monocot gDNA (Poaceae. When sufficiently effective on a sample, this approach can increase the cost efficiency of sequencing plant genomes as well as prokaryotes living in or on plant tissues.

  16. In Silico Reconstruction of Viral Genomes from Small RNAs Improves Virus-Derived Small Interfering RNA Profiling ▿ † ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodovar, Nicolas; Goic, Bertsy; Blanc, Hervé; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the essential component of antiviral immunity in invertebrates and plants. One of the landmarks of the antiviral RNAi response is the production of virus-derived small interfering RNA (vsiRNA) from viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). vsiRNAs constitute a fragmented image of the viral genome sequence that results from Dicer cleavage. vsiRNA sequence profiling is used extensively as a surrogate to study the antiviral RNAi response by determining the nature of the viral dsRNA molecules exposed to and processed by the RNAi machinery. The accuracy of these profiles depends on the actual viral genome sequence used as a reference to align vsiRNA reads, and the interpretation of inaccurate profiles can be misleading. Using Flock house virus and Drosophila melanogaster as a model RNAi-competent organism, we show accurate reconstruction of full-length virus reference sequence from vsiRNAs and prediction of the structure of defective interfering particles (DIs). We developed a Perl script, named Paparazzi, that reconstitutes viral genomes through an iterative alignment/consensus call procedure using a related reference sequence as scaffold. As prevalent DI-derived reads introduce artifacts during reconstruction, Paparazzi eliminates DI-specific reads to improve the quality of the reconstructed genome. Paparazzi constitutes a promising alternative to Sanger sequencing in this context and an effective tool to study antiviral RNAi mechanisms by accurately quantifying vsiRNA along the replicating viral genome. We further discuss Paparazzi as a companion tool for virus discovery as it provides full-length genome sequences and corrects for potential artifacts of assembly. PMID:21880776

  17. Genomic signatures for paclitaxel and gemcitabine resistance in breast cancer derived by machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Stephanie N; Baranova, Katherina; Knoll, Joan H M; Urquhart, Brad L; Mariani, Gabriella; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy agents for breast cancer has been related to changes in the genomic profile of tumors. We investigated correspondence between growth inhibitory concentrations of paclitaxel and gemcitabine (GI50) and gene copy number, mutation, and expression first in breast cancer cell lines and then in patients. Genes encoding direct targets of these drugs, metabolizing enzymes, transporters, and those previously associated with chemoresistance to paclitaxel (n = 31 genes) or gemcitabine (n = 18) were analyzed. A multi-factorial, principal component analysis (MFA) indicated expression was the strongest indicator of sensitivity for paclitaxel, and copy number and expression were informative for gemcitabine. The factors were combined using support vector machines (SVM). Expression of 15 genes (ABCC10, BCL2, BCL2L1, BIRC5, BMF, FGF2, FN1, MAP4, MAPT, NFKB2, SLCO1B3, TLR6, TMEM243, TWIST1, and CSAG2) predicted cell line sensitivity to paclitaxel with 82% accuracy. Copy number profiles of 3 genes (ABCC10, NT5C, TYMS) together with expression of 7 genes (ABCB1, ABCC10, CMPK1, DCTD, NME1, RRM1, RRM2B), predicted gemcitabine response with 85% accuracy. Expression and copy number studies of two independent sets of patients with known responses were then analyzed with these models. These included tumor blocks from 21 patients that were treated with both paclitaxel and gemcitabine, and 319 patients on paclitaxel and anthracycline therapy. A new paclitaxel SVM was derived from an 11-gene subset since data for 4 of the original genes was unavailable. The accuracy of this SVM was similar in cell lines and tumor blocks (70-71%). The gemcitabine SVM exhibited 62% prediction accuracy for the tumor blocks due to the presence of samples with poor nucleic acid integrity. Nevertheless, the paclitaxel SVM predicted sensitivity in 84% of patients with no or minimal residual disease. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies

  18. Imaging-genomics reveals driving pathways of MRI derived volumetric tumor phenotype features in Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossmann, Patrick; Gutman, David A.; Dunn, William D. Jr; Holder, Chad A.; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) tumors exhibit strong phenotypic differences that can be quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the underlying biological drivers of these imaging phenotypes remain largely unknown. An Imaging-Genomics analysis was performed to reveal the mechanistic associations between MRI derived quantitative volumetric tumor phenotype features and molecular pathways. One hundred fourty one patients with presurgery MRI and survival data were included in our analysis. Volumetric features were defined, including the necrotic core (NE), contrast-enhancement (CE), abnormal tumor volume assessed by post-contrast T1w (tumor bulk or TB), tumor-associated edema based on T2-FLAIR (ED), and total tumor volume (TV), as well as ratios of these tumor components. Based on gene expression where available (n = 91), pathway associations were assessed using a preranked gene set enrichment analysis. These results were put into context of molecular subtypes in GBM and prognostication. Volumetric features were significantly associated with diverse sets of biological processes (FDR < 0.05). While NE and TB were enriched for immune response pathways and apoptosis, CE was associated with signal transduction and protein folding processes. ED was mainly enriched for homeostasis and cell cycling pathways. ED was also the strongest predictor of molecular GBM subtypes (AUC = 0.61). CE was the strongest predictor of overall survival (C-index = 0.6; Noether test, p = 4x10 −4 ). GBM volumetric features extracted from MRI are significantly enriched for information about the biological state of a tumor that impacts patient outcomes. Clinical decision-support systems could exploit this information to develop personalized treatment strategies on the basis of noninvasive imaging. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2659-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  19. Genomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, T. A. (Terence A.)

    2002-01-01

    ... of genome expression and replication processes, and transcriptomics and proteomics. This text is richly illustrated with clear, easy-to-follow, full color diagrams, which are downloadable from the book's website...

  20. The first complete organellar genomes of an Antarctic red alga, Pyropia endiviifolia: insights into its genome architecture and phylogenetic position within genus Pyropia (Bangiales, Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuipeng; Tang, Xianghai; Bi, Guiqi; Cao, Min; Wang, Lu; Mao, Yunxiang

    2017-08-01

    Pyropia species grow in the intertidal zone and are cold-water adapted. To date, most of the information about the whole plastid and mitochondrial genomes (ptDNA and mtDNA) of this genus is limited to Northern Hemisphere species. Here, we report the sequencing of the ptDNA and mtDNA of the Antarctic red alga Pyropia endiviifolia using the Illumina platform. The plastid genome (195 784 bp, 33.28% GC content) contains 210 protein-coding genes, 37 tRNA genes and 6 rRNA genes. The mitochondrial genome (34 603 bp, 30.5% GC content) contains 26 protein-coding genes, 25 tRNA genes and 2 rRNA genes. Our results suggest that the organellar genomes of Py. endiviifolia have a compact organization. Although the collinearity of these genomes is conserved compared with other Pyropia species, the genome sizes show significant differences, mainly because of the different copy numbers of rDNA operons in the ptDNA and group II introns in the mtDNA. The other Pyropia species have 2u20133 distinct intronic ORFs in their cox 1 genes, but Py. endiviifolia has no introns in its cox 1 gene. This has led to a smaller mtDNA than in other Pyropia species. The phylogenetic relationships within Pyropia were examined using concatenated gene sets from most of the available organellar genomes with both the maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. The analysis revealed a sister taxa affiliation between the Antarctic species Py. endiviifolia and the North American species Py. kanakaensis.

  1. Female-to-male sex reversal associated with unique Xp21.2 deletion disrupting genomic regulatory architecture of the dosage-sensitive sex reversal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangle, Pankaj; Touzon, María Sol; Reyes-Múgica, Miguel; Witchel, Selma F; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Schneck, Francis X; Yatsenko, Svetlana A

    2017-10-01

    The XX male disorder of sex development (DSD) is a rare condition that is most commonly associated with the presence of the SRY gene on one of the X chromosomes due to unequal crossing-over between sex chromosomes during spermatogenesis. However, in about 20% of the XX male individuals, SRY is missing, although these persons have at least some testis differentiation. The genetic basis of genital ambiguity and the mechanisms triggering testis development in such patients remain unknown. The proband with 46,XX SRY -negative testicular DSD was screened for point mutations by whole exome sequencing and CNVs using a high-resolution DSD gene-targeted and whole genome array comparative genomic hybridisation. The identified Xp21.2 genomic alteration was further characterised by direct sequencing of the breakpoint junctions and bioinformatics analysis. A unique, 80 kb microdeletion removing the regulatory sequences and the NR0B1 gene was detected by microarray analysis. This deletion disturbs the human-specific genomic architecture of the Xp21.2 dosage-sensitive sex (DSS) reversal region in the XX patient with male-appearing ambiguous genitalia and ovotestis. Duplication of the DSS region containing the MAGEB and NR0B1 genes has been implicated in testis repression and sex reversal. Identification of this microdeletion highlights the importance of genomic integrity in the regulation and interaction of sex determining genes during gonadal development. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Architecture and functions of a multipartite genome of the methylotrophic bacterium Paracoccus aminophilus JCM 7686, containing primary and secondary chromids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Czarnecki, Jakub; Wibberg, Daniel; Radlinska, Monika; Mrozek, Paulina; Szymczak, Michal; Schlüter, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2014-02-12

    Paracoccus aminophilus JCM 7686 is a methylotrophic α-Proteobacterium capable of utilizing reduced one-carbon compounds as sole carbon and energy source for growth, including toxic N,N-dimethylformamide, formamide, methanol, and methylamines, which are widely used in the industry. P. aminophilus JCM 7686, as many other Paracoccus spp., possesses a genome representing a multipartite structure, in which the genomic information is split between various replicons, including chromids, essential plasmid-like replicons, with properties of both chromosomes and plasmids. In this study, whole-genome sequencing and functional genomics approaches were applied to investigate P. aminophilus genome information. The P. aminophilus JCM 7686 genome has a multipartite structure, composed of a single circular chromosome and eight additional replicons ranging in size between 5.6 and 438.1 kb. Functional analyses revealed that two of the replicons, pAMI5 and pAMI6, are essential for host viability, therefore they should be considered as chromids. Both replicons carry housekeeping genes, e.g. responsible for de novo NAD biosynthesis and ammonium transport. Other mobile genetic elements have also been identified, including 20 insertion sequences, 4 transposons and 10 prophage regions, one of which represents a novel, functional serine recombinase-encoding bacteriophage, ϕPam-6. Moreover, in silico analyses allowed us to predict the transcription regulatory network of the JCM 7686 strain, as well as components of the stress response, recombination, repair and methylation machineries. Finally, comparative genomic analyses revealed that P. aminophilus JCM 7686 has a relatively distant relationship to other representatives of the genus Paracoccus. P. aminophilus genome exploration provided insights into the overall structure and functions of the genome, with a special focus on the chromids. Based on the obtained results we propose the classification of bacterial chromids into two types

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Genetic Architecture of Eating Behaviors in Pigs and its Implications for Humans Obesity by Comparative Genome Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Ostersen, Tage

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying genomic regions controlling feeding behaviors inDanish Duroc boars and its potential implications for eating behaviors in humans.Individual daily feed intake (DFI), total daily time spent in feeder (TPD), number of dailyvisits to feeder (NVD), time spent to eat...... for geneticimprovement of pig feed efficiency. The results of pig-human comparative genemapping revealed some important genomic regions and/or genes on the humangenome that may influence eating behavior in human and consequently affect thedevelopment of obesity and metabolic syndromes. This is the first...... such translationalgenomics study to report potential candidate genes for eating behavior in humans...

  4. Complementary Information Derived from CRISPR Cas9 Mediated Gene Deletion and Suppression. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRISPR-Cas9 provides the means to perform genome editing and facilitates loss-of-function screens. However, we and others demonstrated that expression of the Cas9 endonuclease induces a gene-independent response that correlates with the number of target sequences in the genome. An alternative approach to suppressing gene expression is to block transcription using a catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9). Here we directly compare genome editing by CRISPR-Cas9 (cutting, CRISPRc) and gene suppression using KRAB-dCas9 (CRISPRi) in loss-of-function screens to identify cell essential genes.

  5. Gene Expression Architecture of Mouse Dorsal and Tail Skin Reveals Functional Differences in Inflammation and Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inherited germline polymorphisms can cause gene expression levels in normal tissues to differ substantially between individuals. We present an analysis of the genetic architecture of normal adult skin from 470 genetically unique mice, demonstrating the effect of germline variants, skin tissue location, and perturbation by exogenous inflammation or tumorigenesis on gene signaling pathways.

  6. Linkage maps of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) genome derived from RAD sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Serap; Lowe, Natalie R; Cezard, Timothé; Gharbi, Karim; Bishop, Stephen C; Houston, Ross D

    2014-02-27

    Genetic linkage maps are useful tools for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing variation in traits of interest in a population. Genotyping-by-sequencing approaches such as Restriction-site Associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq) now enable the rapid discovery and genotyping of genome-wide SNP markers suitable for the development of dense SNP linkage maps, including in non-model organisms such as Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). This paper describes the development and characterisation of a high density SNP linkage map based on SbfI RAD-Seq SNP markers from two Atlantic salmon reference families. Approximately 6,000 SNPs were assigned to 29 linkage groups, utilising markers from known genomic locations as anchors. Linkage maps were then constructed for the four mapping parents separately. Overall map lengths were comparable between male and female parents, but the distribution of the SNPs showed sex-specific patterns with a greater degree of clustering of sire-segregating SNPs to single chromosome regions. The maps were integrated with the Atlantic salmon draft reference genome contigs, allowing the unique assignment of ~4,000 contigs to a linkage group. 112 genome contigs mapped to two or more linkage groups, highlighting regions of putative homeology within the salmon genome. A comparative genomics analysis with the stickleback reference genome identified putative genes closely linked to approximately half of the ordered SNPs and demonstrated blocks of orthology between the Atlantic salmon and stickleback genomes. A subset of 47 RAD-Seq SNPs were successfully validated using a high-throughput genotyping assay, with a correspondence of 97% between the two assays. This Atlantic salmon RAD-Seq linkage map is a resource for salmonid genomics research as genotyping-by-sequencing becomes increasingly common. This is aided by the integration of the SbfI RAD-Seq SNPs with existing reference maps and the draft reference genome, as well as the identification of

  7. Identification and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers Derived from the Whole Genome Analysis of Taenia solium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica J Pajuelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Infections with Taenia solium are the most common cause of adult acquired seizures worldwide, and are the leading cause of epilepsy in developing countries. A better understanding of the genetic diversity of T. solium will improve parasite diagnostics and transmission pathways in endemic areas thereby facilitating the design of future control measures and interventions. Microsatellite markers are useful genome features, which enable strain typing and identification in complex pathogen genomes. Here we describe microsatellite identification and characterization in T. solium, providing information that will assist in global efforts to control this important pathogen.For genome sequencing, T. solium cysts and proglottids were collected from Huancayo and Puno in Peru, respectively. Using next generation sequencing (NGS and de novo assembly, we assembled two draft genomes and one hybrid genome. Microsatellite sequences were identified and 36 of them were selected for further analysis. Twenty T. solium isolates were collected from Tumbes in the northern region, and twenty from Puno in the southern region of Peru. The size-polymorphism of the selected microsatellites was determined with multi-capillary electrophoresis. We analyzed the association between microsatellite polymorphism and the geographic origin of the samples.The predicted size of the hybrid (proglottid genome combined with cyst genome T. solium genome was 111 MB with a GC content of 42.54%. A total of 7,979 contigs (>1,000 nt were obtained. We identified 9,129 microsatellites in the Puno-proglottid genome and 9,936 in the Huancayo-cyst genome, with 5 or more repeats, ranging from mono- to hexa-nucleotide. Seven microsatellites were polymorphic and 29 were monomorphic within the analyzed isolates. T. solium tapeworms were classified into two genetic groups that correlated with the North/South geographic origin of the parasites.The availability of draft genomes for T. solium represents a

  8. The epigenetic landscape of Alu repeats delineates the structural and functional genomic architecture of colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordà, Mireia; Díez-Villanueva, Anna; Mallona, Izaskun; Martín, Berta; Lois, Sergi; Barrera, Víctor; Esteller, Manel; Vavouri, Tanya; Peinado, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit multiple epigenetic changes with prominent local DNA hypermethylation and widespread hypomethylation affecting large chromosomal domains. Epigenome studies often disregard the study of repeat elements owing to technical complexity and their undefined role in genome regulation. We have developed NSUMA (Next-generation Sequencing of UnMethylated Alu), a cost-effective approach allowing the unambiguous interrogation of DNA methylation in more than 130,000 individual Alu elements, the most abundant retrotransposon in the human genome. DNA methylation profiles of Alu repeats have been analyzed in colon cancers and normal tissues using NSUMA and whole-genome bisulfite sequencing. Normal cells show a low proportion of unmethylated Alu (1%-4%) that may increase up to 10-fold in cancer cells. In normal cells, unmethylated Alu elements tend to locate in the vicinity of functionally rich regions and display epigenetic features consistent with a direct impact on genome regulation. In cancer cells, Alu repeats are more resistant to hypomethylation than other retroelements. Genome segmentation based on high/low rates of Alu hypomethylation allows the identification of genomic compartments with differential genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptomic features. Alu hypomethylated regions show low transcriptional activity, late DNA replication, and its extent is associated with higher chromosomal instability. Our analysis demonstrates that Alu retroelements contribute to define the epigenetic landscape of normal and cancer cells and provides a unique resource on the epigenetic dynamics of a principal, but largely unexplored, component of the primate genome. © 2017 Jordà et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. Genomic predictors for recurrence patterns of hepatocellular carcinoma: model derivation and validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hoon Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Typically observed at 2 y after surgical resection, late recurrence is a major challenge in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. We aimed to develop a genomic predictor that can identify patients at high risk for late recurrence and assess its clinical implications. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Systematic analysis of gene expression data from human liver undergoing hepatic injury and regeneration revealed a 233-gene signature that was significantly associated with late recurrence of HCC. Using this signature, we developed a prognostic predictor that can identify patients at high risk of late recurrence, and tested and validated the robustness of the predictor in patients (n = 396 who underwent surgery between 1990 and 2011 at four centers (210 recurrences during a median of 3.7 y of follow-up. In multivariate analysis, this signature was the strongest risk factor for late recurrence (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.7; p = 0.002. In contrast, our previously developed tumor-derived 65-gene risk score was significantly associated with early recurrence (p = 0.005 but not with late recurrence (p = 0.7. In multivariate analysis, the 65-gene risk score was the strongest risk factor for very early recurrence (<1 y after surgical resection (hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.6; p = 0.01. The potential significance of STAT3 activation in late recurrence was predicted by gene network analysis and validated later. We also developed and validated 4- and 20-gene predictors from the full 233-gene predictor. The main limitation of the study is that most of the patients in our study were hepatitis B virus-positive. Further investigations are needed to test our prediction models in patients with different etiologies of HCC, such as hepatitis C virus. CONCLUSIONS: Two independently developed predictors reflected well the differences between early and late recurrence of HCC at the molecular level and provided new

  10. Genomic selection and association mapping in rice (Oryza sativa: effect of trait genetic architecture, training population composition, marker number and statistical model on accuracy of rice genomic selection in elite, tropical rice breeding lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Spindel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic Selection (GS is a new breeding method in which genome-wide markers are used to predict the breeding value of individuals in a breeding population. GS has been shown to improve breeding efficiency in dairy cattle and several crop plant species, and here we evaluate for the first time its efficacy for breeding inbred lines of rice. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS in conjunction with five-fold GS cross-validation on a population of 363 elite breeding lines from the International Rice Research Institute's (IRRI irrigated rice breeding program and herein report the GS results. The population was genotyped with 73,147 markers using genotyping-by-sequencing. The training population, statistical method used to build the GS model, number of markers, and trait were varied to determine their effect on prediction accuracy. For all three traits, genomic prediction models outperformed prediction based on pedigree records alone. Prediction accuracies ranged from 0.31 and 0.34 for grain yield and plant height to 0.63 for flowering time. Analyses using subsets of the full marker set suggest that using one marker every 0.2 cM is sufficient for genomic selection in this collection of rice breeding materials. RR-BLUP was the best performing statistical method for grain yield where no large effect QTL were detected by GWAS, while for flowering time, where a single very large effect QTL was detected, the non-GS multiple linear regression method outperformed GS models. For plant height, in which four mid-sized QTL were identified by GWAS, random forest produced the most consistently accurate GS models. Our results suggest that GS, informed by GWAS interpretations of genetic architecture and population structure, could become an effective tool for increasing the efficiency of rice breeding as the costs of genotyping continue to decline.

  11. Genomic selection and association mapping in rice (Oryza sativa): effect of trait genetic architecture, training population composition, marker number and statistical model on accuracy of rice genomic selection in elite, tropical rice breeding lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindel, Jennifer; Begum, Hasina; Akdemir, Deniz; Virk, Parminder; Collard, Bertrand; Redoña, Edilberto; Atlin, Gary; Jannink, Jean-Luc; McCouch, Susan R

    2015-02-01

    Genomic Selection (GS) is a new breeding method in which genome-wide markers are used to predict the breeding value of individuals in a breeding population. GS has been shown to improve breeding efficiency in dairy cattle and several crop plant species, and here we evaluate for the first time its efficacy for breeding inbred lines of rice. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in conjunction with five-fold GS cross-validation on a population of 363 elite breeding lines from the International Rice Research Institute's (IRRI) irrigated rice breeding program and herein report the GS results. The population was genotyped with 73,147 markers using genotyping-by-sequencing. The training population, statistical method used to build the GS model, number of markers, and trait were varied to determine their effect on prediction accuracy. For all three traits, genomic prediction models outperformed prediction based on pedigree records alone. Prediction accuracies ranged from 0.31 and 0.34 for grain yield and plant height to 0.63 for flowering time. Analyses using subsets of the full marker set suggest that using one marker every 0.2 cM is sufficient for genomic selection in this collection of rice breeding materials. RR-BLUP was the best performing statistical method for grain yield where no large effect QTL were detected by GWAS, while for flowering time, where a single very large effect QTL was detected, the non-GS multiple linear regression method outperformed GS models. For plant height, in which four mid-sized QTL were identified by GWAS, random forest produced the most consistently accurate GS models. Our results suggest that GS, informed by GWAS interpretations of genetic architecture and population structure, could become an effective tool for increasing the efficiency of rice breeding as the costs of genotyping continue to decline.

  12. Genomic Selection and Association Mapping in Rice (Oryza sativa): Effect of Trait Genetic Architecture, Training Population Composition, Marker Number and Statistical Model on Accuracy of Rice Genomic Selection in Elite, Tropical Rice Breeding Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindel, Jennifer; Begum, Hasina; Akdemir, Deniz; Virk, Parminder; Collard, Bertrand; Redoña, Edilberto; Atlin, Gary; Jannink, Jean-Luc; McCouch, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic Selection (GS) is a new breeding method in which genome-wide markers are used to predict the breeding value of individuals in a breeding population. GS has been shown to improve breeding efficiency in dairy cattle and several crop plant species, and here we evaluate for the first time its efficacy for breeding inbred lines of rice. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in conjunction with five-fold GS cross-validation on a population of 363 elite breeding lines from the International Rice Research Institute's (IRRI) irrigated rice breeding program and herein report the GS results. The population was genotyped with 73,147 markers using genotyping-by-sequencing. The training population, statistical method used to build the GS model, number of markers, and trait were varied to determine their effect on prediction accuracy. For all three traits, genomic prediction models outperformed prediction based on pedigree records alone. Prediction accuracies ranged from 0.31 and 0.34 for grain yield and plant height to 0.63 for flowering time. Analyses using subsets of the full marker set suggest that using one marker every 0.2 cM is sufficient for genomic selection in this collection of rice breeding materials. RR-BLUP was the best performing statistical method for grain yield where no large effect QTL were detected by GWAS, while for flowering time, where a single very large effect QTL was detected, the non-GS multiple linear regression method outperformed GS models. For plant height, in which four mid-sized QTL were identified by GWAS, random forest produced the most consistently accurate GS models. Our results suggest that GS, informed by GWAS interpretations of genetic architecture and population structure, could become an effective tool for increasing the efficiency of rice breeding as the costs of genotyping continue to decline. PMID:25689273

  13. Candidate genes and genetic architecture of symbiotic and agronomic traits revealed by whole-genome, sequence-based association genetics in Medicago truncatula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Stanton-Geddes

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association study (GWAS has revolutionized the search for the genetic basis of complex traits. To date, GWAS have generally relied on relatively sparse sampling of nucleotide diversity, which is likely to bias results by preferentially sampling high-frequency SNPs not in complete linkage disequilibrium (LD with causative SNPs. To avoid these limitations we conducted GWAS with >6 million SNPs identified by sequencing the genomes of 226 accessions of the model legume Medicago truncatula. We used these data to identify candidate genes and the genetic architecture underlying phenotypic variation in plant height, trichome density, flowering time, and nodulation. The characteristics of candidate SNPs differed among traits, with candidates for flowering time and trichome density in distinct clusters of high linkage disequilibrium (LD and the minor allele frequencies (MAF of candidates underlying variation in flowering time and height significantly greater than MAF of candidates underlying variation in other traits. Candidate SNPs tagged several characterized genes including nodulation related genes SERK2, MtnodGRP3, MtMMPL1, NFP, CaML3, MtnodGRP3A and flowering time gene MtFD as well as uncharacterized genes that become candidates for further molecular characterization. By comparing sequence-based candidates to candidates identified by in silico 250K SNP arrays, we provide an empirical example of how reliance on even high-density reduced representation genomic makers can bias GWAS results. Depending on the trait, only 30-70% of the top 20 in silico array candidates were within 1 kb of sequence-based candidates. Moreover, the sequence-based candidates tagged by array candidates were heavily biased towards common variants; these comparisons underscore the need for caution when interpreting results from GWAS conducted with sparsely covered genomes.

  14. Complete Genome Sequences of emm111 Type Streptococcus pyogenes Strain GUR, with Antitumor Activity, and Its Derivative Strain GURSA1 with an Inactivated emm Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suvorova, Maria A; Tsapieva, Anna N; Bak, Emilie Glad

    2017-01-01

    We present here the complete genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes type emm111 strain GUR, a throat isolate from a scarlet fever patient, which has been used to treat cancer patients in the former Soviet Union. We also present the complete genome sequence of its derivative strain GURSA1...

  15. Integration of cell line and clinical trial genome-wide analyses supports a polygenic architecture of Paclitaxel-induced sensory peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Heather E; Gamazon, Eric R; Wing, Claudia; Njiaju, Uchenna O; Njoku, Chidiamara; Baldwin, Robert Michael; Owzar, Kouros; Jiang, Chen; Watson, Dorothy; Shterev, Ivo; Kubo, Michiaki; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Winer, Eric P; Hudis, Clifford A; Shulman, Lawrence N; Nakamura, Yusuke; Ratain, Mark J; Kroetz, Deanna L; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, Mary Eileen

    2013-01-15

    We sought to show the relevance of a lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) model in the discovery of clinically relevant genetic variants affecting chemotherapeutic response by comparing LCL genome-wide association study (GWAS) results to clinical GWAS results. A GWAS of paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity was conducted in 247 LCLs from the HapMap Project and compared with a GWAS of sensory peripheral neuropathy in patients with breast cancer (n = 855) treated with paclitaxel in the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 40101 trial. Significant enrichment was assessed by permutation resampling analysis. We observed an enrichment of LCL cytotoxicity-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the sensory peripheral neuropathy-associated SNPs from the clinical trial with concordant allelic directions of effect (empirical P = 0.007). Of the 24 SNPs that overlap between the clinical trial (P architecture of related traits in patients. ©2012 AACR.

  16. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in African Americans provides insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Maggie C Y; Shriner, Daniel; Chen, Brian H

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is more prevalent in African Americans than in Europeans. However, little is known about the genetic risk in African Americans despite the recent identification of more than 70 T2D loci primarily by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry...... of 1.19, explaining 17.5% of the phenotypic variance of T2D on the liability scale in African Americans. Overall, this study identified two novel susceptibility loci for T2D in African Americans. A substantial number of previously reported loci are transferable to African Americans after accounting....... In order to investigate the genetic architecture of T2D in African Americans, the MEta-analysis of type 2 DIabetes in African Americans (MEDIA) Consortium examined 17 GWAS on T2D comprising 8,284 cases and 15,543 controls in African Americans in stage 1 analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs...

  17. Functional architecture and global properties of the Corynebacterium glutamicum regulatory network: Novel insights from a dataset with a high genomic coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyre-González, Julio A; Tauch, Andreas

    2017-09-10

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, rod-shaped soil bacterium able to grow on a diversity of carbon sources like sugars and organic acids. It is a biotechnological relevant organism because of its highly efficient ability to biosynthesize amino acids, such as l-glutamic acid and l-lysine. Here, we reconstructed the most complete C. glutamicum regulatory network to date and comprehensively analyzed its global organizational properties, systems-level features and functional architecture. Our analyses show the tremendous power of Abasy Atlas to study the functional organization of regulatory networks. We created two models of the C. glutamicum regulatory network: all-evidences (containing both weak and strong supported interactions, genomic coverage=73%) and strongly-supported (only accounting for strongly supported evidences, genomic coverage=71%). Using state-of-the-art methodologies, we prove that power-law behaviors truly govern the connectivity and clustering coefficient distributions. We found a non-previously reported circuit motif that we named complex feed-forward motif. We highlighted the importance of feedback loops for the functional architecture, beyond whether they are statistically over-represented or not in the network. We show that the previously reported top-down approach is inadequate to infer the hierarchy governing a regulatory network because feedback bridges different hierarchical layers, and the top-down approach disregards the presence of intermodular genes shaping the integration layer. Our findings all together further support a diamond-shaped, three-layered hierarchy exhibiting some feedback between processing and coordination layers, which is shaped by four classes of systems-level elements: global regulators, locally autonomous modules, basal machinery and intermodular genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genome-wide trans-ancestry meta-analysis provides insight into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahajan, Anubha; Go, Min Jin; Zhang, Weihua; Below, Jennifer E.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Ferreira, Teresa; Horikoshi, Momoko; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Prokopenko, Inga; Saleheen, Danish; Wang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Adair, Linda S.; Almgren, Peter; Atalay, Mustafa; Aung, Tin; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bao, Yuqian; Barnett, Anthony H.; Barroso, Ines; Basit, Abdul; Been, Latonya F.; Beilby, John; Bell, Graeme I.; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bergman, Richard N.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Burtt, Noël; Cai, Qiuyin; Campbell, Harry; Carey, Jason; Cauchi, Stephane; Caulfield, Mark; Chan, Juliana C. N.; Chang, Li-Ching; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Chen, Han; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Chia, Kee-Seng; Chidambaram, Manickam; Chines, Peter S.; Cho, Nam H.; Cho, Young Min; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Collins, Francis S.; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Couper, David J.; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; van Dam, Rob M.; Danesh, John; Das, Debashish; de Faire, Ulf; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Dimas, Antigone S.; Dina, Christian; Doney, Alex S. F.; Donnelly, Peter J.; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; van Duijn, Cornelia; Dupuis, Josée; Edkins, Sarah; Elliott, Paul; Emilsson, Valur; Erbel, Raimund; Eriksson, Johan G.; Escobedo, Jorge; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Florez, Jose C.; Fontanillas, Pierre; Forouhi, Nita G.; Forsen, Tom; Fox, Caroline; Fraser, Ross M.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Froguel, Philippe; Frossard, Philippe; Gao, Yutang; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Grallert, Harald; Grant, George B.; Groop, Leif C.; Groves, Christopher J.; Grundberg, Elin; Guiducci, Candace; Hamsten, Anders; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hara, Kazuo; Hassanali, Neelam; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hayward, Caroline; Hedman, Asa K.; Herder, Christian; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Oddgeir L.; Hovingh, Kees; Hreidarsson, Astradur B.; Hu, Cheng; Hu, Frank B.; Hui, Jennie; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Hydrie, Zafar I.; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Islam, Muhammed; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U.; Jafar, Tazeen; James, Alan; Jia, Weiping; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Jonsson, Anna; Jowett, Jeremy B. M.; Kadowaki, Takashi; Kang, Hyun Min; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kao, Wen Hong L.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kato, Norihiro; Katulanda, Prasad; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kelly, Ann M.; Khan, Hassan; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Young Jin; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Kowlessur, Sudhir; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Kristensen, Malene M.; Krithika, S.; Kumar, Ashish; Kumate, Jesus; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kwak, Soo Heon; Laakso, Markku; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Langford, Cordelia; Lawrence, Robert; Leander, Karin; Lee, Jen-Mai; Lee, Nanette R.; Li, Man; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Yun; Liang, Junbin; Liju, Samuel; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Lindholm, Eero; Liu, Ching-Ti; Liu, Jian Jun; Lobbens, Stéphane; Long, Jirong; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Lu, Wei; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Maeda, Shiro; Mägi, Reedik; Männistö, Satu; Matthews, David R.; Meigs, James B.; Melander, Olle; Metspalu, Andres; Meyer, Julia; Mirza, Ghazala; Mihailov, Evelin; Moebus, Susanne; Mohan, Viswanathan; Mohlke, Karen L.; Morris, Andrew D.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Bill; Nakamura, Jiro; Nakashima, Eitaro; Navarro, Pau; Ng, Peng-Keat; Nica, Alexandra C.; Nilsson, Peter M.; Njølstad, Inger; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohnaka, Keizo; Ong, Twee Hee; Owen, Katharine R.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pankow, James S.; Park, Kyong Soo; Parkin, Melissa; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Peltonen, Leena; Perry, John R. B.; Peters, Annette; Pinidiyapathirage, Janani M.; Platou, Carl G. P.; Potter, Simon; Price, Jackie F.; Qi, Lu; Radha, Venkatesan; Rallidis, Loukianos; Rasheed, Asif; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rauramaa, Rainer; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rayner, N. William; Rees, Simon D.; Rehnberg, Emil; Ripatti, Samuli; Robertson, Neil; Roden, Michael; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Rudan, Igor; Rybin, Denis; Saaristo, Timo E.; Salomaa, Veikko; Saltevo, Juha; Samuel, Maria; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Saramies, Jouko; Scott, James; Scott, Laura J.; Scott, Robert A.; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Sehmi, Joban; Sennblad, Bengt; Shah, Nabi; Shah, Sonia; Shera, A. Samad; Shu, Xiao Ou; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Sijbrands, Eric; Silveira, Angela; Sim, Xueling; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Small, Kerrin S.; So, Wing Yee; Stančáková, Alena; Stefansson, Kari; Steinbach, Gerald; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stirrups, Kathleen; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sun, Qi; Suo, Chen; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tay, Wan Ting; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thorand, Barbara; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tikkanen, Emmi; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Trip, Mieke D.; Tsai, Fuu Jen; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Valladares-Salgado, Adan; Vedantam, Sailaja; Veglia, Fabrizio; Voight, Benjamin F.; Wang, Congrong; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Wennauer, Roman; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R.; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Wiltshire, Steven; Winckler, Wendy; Wong, Tien Yin; Wood, Andrew R.; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Wu, Ying; Yamamoto, Ken; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Yang, Mingyu; Yengo, Loic; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Young, Robin; Zabaneh, Delilah; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Wei; Zimmet, Paul Z.; Altshuler, David; Bowden, Donald W.; Cho, Yoon Shin; Cox, Nancy J.; Cruz, Miguel; Hanis, Craig L.; Kooner, Jaspal; Lee, Jong-Young; Seielstad, Mark; teo, Yik Ying; Boehnke, Michael; Parra, Esteban J.; Chambers, John C.; Tai, E. Shyong; McCarthy, Mark I.; Morris, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    To further understanding of the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility, we aggregated published meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including 26,488 cases and 83,964 controls of European, east Asian, south Asian and Mexican and Mexican American ancestry. We

  19. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik

    2013-01-01

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass ...

  20. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berndt, S.I.; Gustafsson, S.; Magi, R.; Ganna, A.; Wheeler, E.; Feitosa, M.F.; Justice, A.E.; Monda, K.L.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Day, F.R.; Esko, T.; Fall, T.; Ferreira, T.; Gentilini, D.; Jackson, A.U.; Luan, J.; Randall, J.C.; Vedantam, S.; Willer, C.J.; Winkler, T.W.; Wood, A.R.; Workalemahu, T.; Hu, Y.J.; Lee, S.; Liang, L.; Lin, D.Y.; Min, J.L.; Neale, B.M.; Thorleifsson, G.; Yang, J.; Albrecht, E.; Amin, N.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Cadby, G.; Heijer, M. den; Eklund, N.; Fischer, K.; Goel, A.; Hottenga, J.J.; Huffman, J.E.; Jarick, I.; Johansson, A; Johnson, T.; Kanoni, S.; Kleber, M.E.; Konig, I.R.; Kristiansson, K.; Kutalik, Z.; Lamina, C.; Lecoeur, C.; Li, G.; Mangino, M.; McArdle, W.L.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Ngwa, J.S.; Nolte, I.M.; Paternoster, L.; Pechlivanis, S.; Perola, M.; Peters, M.J.; Preuss, M.; Rose, L.M.; Shi, J.; Shungin, D.; Smith, A.V.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Surakka, I.; Teumer, A.; Trip, M.D.; Tyrer, J.; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V. Van; Vandenput, L.; Waite, L.L.; Zhao, J.H.; Absher, D.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Atalay, M.; Attwood, A.P.; Balmforth, A.J.; Basart, H.; Beilby, J.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Brambilla, P.; Bruinenberg, M.; Campbell, H.; Chasman, D.I.; Chines, P.S.; Collins, F.S.; Connell, J.M.; Cookson, W.O.; Faire, U. de; Vegt, F. de; Dei, M.; Dimitriou, M.; Edkins, S.; Estrada, K.; Evans, D.M.; Farrall, M.; Ferrario, M.M.; Vermeulen, S.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass

  1. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.I. Berndt (Sonja); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); R. Mägi (Reedik); A. Ganna (Andrea); E. Wheeler (Eleanor); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); A.E. Justice (Anne); K.L. Monda (Keri); D.C. Croteau-Chonka (Damien); F.R. Day (Felix); T. Esko (Tõnu); M. Fall (Magnus); T. Ferreira (Teresa); D. Gentilini (Davide); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Luan; J.C. Randall (Joshua); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); C.J. Willer (Cristen); T.W. Winkler (Thomas); A.R. Wood (Andrew); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); Y.-J. Hu (Yi-Juan); S.H. Lee (Sang Hong); L. Liang (Liming); D.Y. Lin (Dan); J. Min (Josine); B.M. Neale (Benjamin); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); J. Yang (Jian); E. Albrecht (Eva); N. Amin (Najaf); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); G. Cadby (Gemma); M. den Heijer (Martin); N. Eklund (Niina); K. Fischer (Krista); A. Goel (Anuj); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); I. Jarick (Ivonne); A. Johansson (Åsa); T. Johnson (Toby); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); I.R. König (Inke); K. Kristiansson (Kati); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); C. Lamina (Claudia); C. Lecoeur (Cécile); G. Li (Guo); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); J.S. Ngwa; I.M. Nolte (Ilja); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); M. Perola (Markus); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); M. Preuss (Michael); L.M. Rose (Lynda); J. Shi (Jianxin); D. Shungin (Dmitry); G.D. Smith; R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); I. Surakka (Ida); A. Teumer (Alexander); M.D. Trip (Mieke); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); L. Waite (Lindsay); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); D. Absher (Devin); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); M. Atalay (Mustafa); A.P. Attwood (Antony); A.J. Balmforth (Anthony); D.C.G. Basart (Dick); J.P. Beilby (John); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); P. Brambilla (Paolo); M. Bruinenberg (M.); H. Campbell (Harry); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); P.S. Chines (Peter); F.S. Collins (Francis); J. Connell (John); W. O Cookson (William); U. de Faire (Ulf); F. de Vegt (Femmie); M. Dei (Mariano); M. Dimitriou (Maria); T. Edkins (Ted); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); D.M. Evans (David); M. Farrall (Martin); F. Ferrario (Franco); J. Ferrières (Jean); L. Franke (Lude); F. Frau (Francesca); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); H. Grallert (Harald); H. Grönberg (Henrik); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Hall (Anne); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.L. Hartikainen; C. Hayward (Caroline); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); A.C. Heath (Andrew); J. Hebebrand (Johannes); G. Homuth (Georg); F.B. Hu (Frank); S.E. Hunt (Sarah); E. Hyppönen (Elina); C. Iribarren (Carlos); K.B. Jacobs (Kevin); J.-O. Jansson (John-Olov); A. Jula (Antti); M. Kähönen (Mika); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); F. Kee (F.); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); M. Kivimaki (Mika); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); A. Kraja (Aldi); M. Kumari (Meena); K. Kuulasmaa (Kari); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); T.A. Lakka (Timo); C. Langenberg (Claudia); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L. Lind (Lars); J. Lindstrom (Jaana); J. Liu (Jianjun); A. Liuzzi (Antonio); M.L. Lokki; M. Lorentzon (Mattias); P.A. Madden (Pamela); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); P. Manunta (Paolo); D. Marek (Diana); W. März (Winfried); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); B. McKnight (Barbara); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); V. Mooser (Vincent); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); P. Munroe (Patricia); A.W. Musk (Arthur); N. Narisu (Narisu); G. Navis (Gerjan); G. Nicholson (Ggeorge); C. Nohr (Christian); K. Ong (Ken); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); A. Palotie (Aarno); J. Peden (John); N. Pedersen; A. Peters (Annette); O. Polasek (Ozren); A. Pouta (Anneli); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); I. Prokopenko (Inga); C. Pütter (Carolin); A. Radhakrishnan (Aparna); O. Raitakari (Olli); A. Rendon (Augusto); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); I. Rudan (Igor); T. Saaristo (Timo); J.G. Sambrook (Jennifer); A.R. Sanders (Alan); S. Sanna (Serena); J. Saramies (Jouko); S. Schipf (Sabine); S. Schreiber (Stefan); H. Schunkert (Heribert); S.-Y. Shin; S. Signorini (Stefano); J. Sinisalo (Juha); B. Skrobek (Boris); N. Soranzo (Nicole); A. Stancáková (Alena); K. Stark (Klaus); J. Stephens (Jonathan); K. Stirrups (Kathy); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); M. Stumvoll (Michael); A.J. Swift (Amy); E.V. Theodoraki (Eirini); B. Thorand (Barbara); D.-A. Tregouet (David-Alexandre); E. Tremoli (Elena); M.M. van der Klauw (Melanie); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); J. Viikari (Jorma); J. Virtamo (Jarmo); V. Vitart (Veronique); G. Waeber (Gérard); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); E. Widen (Elisabeth); S.H. Wild (Sarah); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); B. Winkelmann; J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce); A. Wong (Andrew); A.F. Wright (Alan); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); P. Amouyel (Philippe); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); M. Caulfield (Mark); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); D. Cusi (Daniele); G.V. Dedoussis (George); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); J.G. Eriksson (Johan); P.W. Franks (Paul); P. Froguel (Philippe); C. Gieger (Christian); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); A. Hamsten (Anders); T.B. Harris (Tamara); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A. Hingorani (Aroon); A. Hinney (Anke); A. Hofman (Albert); G.K. Hovingh (Kees); K. Hveem (Kristian); T. Illig (Thomas); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laakso (Markku); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); D.F. Levinson (Douglas); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A. Metspalu (Andres); A.D. Morris (Andrew); M.S. Nieminen (Markku); I. Njølstad (Inger); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); C. Palmer (Cameron); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); C. Power (Christopher); M.A. Province (Mike); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); L. Qi (Lu); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); P.M. Ridker (Paul); S. Ripatti (Samuli); V. Salomaa (Veikko); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); H. Snieder (Harold); H.G. Sorensen; T.D. Spector (Timothy); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A. Tönjes (Anke); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Uusitupa (Matti); P. van der Harst (Pim); P. Vollenweider (Peter); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); J.F. Wilson (James F); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); I. Barroso (Inês); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); C. Fox (Craig); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); L. Groop (Leif); T. Haritunian (Talin); I.M. Heid (Iris); D. Hunter (David); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); F. Karpe (Fredrik); M.F. Moffatt (Miriam); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); J.R. O´Connell; Y. Pawitan (Yudi); E.E. Schadt (Eric); D. Schlessinger (David); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); D.P. Strachan (David); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); P.M. Visscher (Peter); A.M. Di Blasio (Anna Maria); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); A.D. Morris (Andrew); D. Meyre (David); A. Scherag (Andre); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); K.E. North (Kari); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); E. Ingelsson (Erik)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractApproaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of

  2. Controller Architectures for Switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigate different controller architectures in connection with controller switching. The controller switching is derived by using the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization. A number of different architectures for the implementation of the YJBK parameterization...... are described and applied in connection with controller switching. An architecture that does not include inversion of the coprime factors is introduced. This architecture will make controller switching particular simple....

  3. Direct Mutagenesis of Thousands of Genomic Targets using Microarray-derived Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Kosuri, Sriram; Genee, Hans Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex Automated Genome Engineering (MAGE) allows simultaneous mutagenesis of multiple target sites in bacterial genomes using short oligonucleotides. However, large-scale mutagenesis requires hundreds to thousands of unique oligos, which are costly to synthesize and impossible to scale...... operons in E. coli using this method, which we call Microarray-Oligonucleotide (MO)-MAGE. The resulting mutant library was characterized by high-throughput sequencing to show that all attempted insertions were estimated to have occurred at an average frequency of 0.02 % per loci with 0.4 average...

  4. Best linear unbiased prediction of genomic breeding values using a trait-specific marker-derived relationship matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available With the availability of high density whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism chips, genomic selection has become a promising method to estimate genetic merit with potentially high accuracy for animal, plant and aquaculture species of economic importance. With markers covering the entire genome, genetic merit of genotyped individuals can be predicted directly within the framework of mixed model equations, by using a matrix of relationships among individuals that is derived from the markers. Here we extend that approach by deriving a marker-based relationship matrix specifically for the trait of interest.In the framework of mixed model equations, a new best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP method including a trait-specific relationship matrix (TA was presented and termed TABLUP. The TA matrix was constructed on the basis of marker genotypes and their weights in relation to the trait of interest. A simulation study with 1,000 individuals as the training population and five successive generations as candidate population was carried out to validate the proposed method. The proposed TABLUP method outperformed the ridge regression BLUP (RRBLUP and BLUP with realized relationship matrix (GBLUP. It performed slightly worse than BayesB with an accuracy of 0.79 in the standard scenario.The proposed TABLUP method is an improvement of the RRBLUP and GBLUP method. It might be equivalent to the BayesB method but it has additional benefits like the calculation of accuracies for individual breeding values. The results also showed that the TA-matrix performs better in predicting ability than the classical numerator relationship matrix and the realized relationship matrix which are derived solely from pedigree or markers without regard to the trait. This is because the TA-matrix not only accounts for the Mendelian sampling term, but also puts the greater emphasis on those markers that explain more of the genetic variance in the trait.

  5. Best linear unbiased prediction of genomic breeding values using a trait-specific marker-derived relationship matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Jianfeng; Ding, Xiangdong; Bijma, Piter; de Koning, Dirk-Jan; Zhang, Qin

    2010-09-09

    With the availability of high density whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism chips, genomic selection has become a promising method to estimate genetic merit with potentially high accuracy for animal, plant and aquaculture species of economic importance. With markers covering the entire genome, genetic merit of genotyped individuals can be predicted directly within the framework of mixed model equations, by using a matrix of relationships among individuals that is derived from the markers. Here we extend that approach by deriving a marker-based relationship matrix specifically for the trait of interest. In the framework of mixed model equations, a new best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) method including a trait-specific relationship matrix (TA) was presented and termed TABLUP. The TA matrix was constructed on the basis of marker genotypes and their weights in relation to the trait of interest. A simulation study with 1,000 individuals as the training population and five successive generations as candidate population was carried out to validate the proposed method. The proposed TABLUP method outperformed the ridge regression BLUP (RRBLUP) and BLUP with realized relationship matrix (GBLUP). It performed slightly worse than BayesB with an accuracy of 0.79 in the standard scenario. The proposed TABLUP method is an improvement of the RRBLUP and GBLUP method. It might be equivalent to the BayesB method but it has additional benefits like the calculation of accuracies for individual breeding values. The results also showed that the TA-matrix performs better in predicting ability than the classical numerator relationship matrix and the realized relationship matrix which are derived solely from pedigree or markers without regard to the trait. This is because the TA-matrix not only accounts for the Mendelian sampling term, but also puts the greater emphasis on those markers that explain more of the genetic variance in the trait.

  6. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus erythropolis Strain CCM2595, a Phenol Derivative-Degrading Bacterium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strnad, Hynek; Pátek, Miroslav; Fousek, Jan; Szököl, Juraj; Ulbrich, P.; Nešvera, Jan; Pačes, Václav; Vlček, Čestmír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2014) ISSN 2169-8287 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28283S; GA MŠk 2B08062 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : Rhodococcus erythropolis * genome sequence Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Features of 5'-splice-site efficiency derived from disease-causing mutations and comparative genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Xavier; Olson, Andrew J; Rao, Atmakuri R

    2008-01-01

    Many human diseases, including Fanconi anemia, hemophilia B, neurofibromatosis, and phenylketonuria, can be caused by 5'-splice-site (5'ss) mutations that are not predicted to disrupt splicing, according to position weight matrices. By using comparative genomics, we identify pairwise dependencies...

  8. Use of microsatellite markers derived from whole genome sequence data for identifying polymorphism in Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Ivors; Matteo Garbelotto; Ineke De Vries; Peter Bonants

    2006-01-01

    Investigating the population genetics of Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death (SOD), is critical to understanding the biology and epidemiology of this important phytopathogen. Raw sequence data (445,000 reads) of P. ramorum was provided by the Joint Genome Institute. Our objective was to develop and utilize...

  9. Chlorobium Tepidum: Insights into the Structure, Physiology, and Metabolism of a Green Sulfur Bacterium Derived from the Complete Genome Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Chew, Aline Gomez Maqueo; Li, Hui

    2003-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria are obligate, anaerobic photolithoautotrophs that synthesize unique bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) and a unique light-harvesting antenna structure, the chlorosome. One organism, Chlorobium tepidum, has emerged as a model for this group of bacteria primarily due to its relative...... ease of cultivation and natural transformability. This review focuses on insights into the physiology and biochemistry of the green sulfur bacteria that have been derived from the recently completed analysis of the 2.15-Mb genome of Chl. tepidum. About 40 mutants of Chl. tepidum have been generated...

  10. Nanoscale device architectures derived from biological assemblies: The case of tobacco mosaic virus and (apo)ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, Annalisa; Eiben, Sabine; Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2016-03-01

    Virus particles and proteins are excellent examples of naturally occurring structures with well-defined nanoscale architectures, for example, cages and tubes. These structures can be employed in a bottom-up assembly strategy to fabricate repetitive patterns of hybrid organic-inorganic materials. In this paper, we review methods of assembly that make use of protein and virus scaffolds to fabricate patterned nanostructures with very high spatial control. We chose (apo)ferritin and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as model examples that have already been applied successfully in nanobiotechnology. Their interior space and their exterior surfaces can be mineralized with inorganic layers or nanoparticles. Furthermore, their native assembly abilities can be exploited to generate periodic architectures for integration in electrical and magnetic devices. We introduce the state of the art and describe recent advances in biomineralization techniques, patterning and device production with (apo)ferritin and TMV.

  11. First Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence from a Box Jellyfish Reveals a Highly Fragmented Linear Architecture and Insights into Telomere Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David Roy; Kayal, Ehsan; Yanagihara, Angel A.; Collins, Allen G.; Pirro, Stacy; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Animal mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) are typically single circular chromosomes, with the exception of those from medusozoan cnidarians (jellyfish and hydroids), which are linear and sometimes fragmented. Most medusozoans have linear monomeric or linear bipartite mitochondrial genomes, but preliminary data have suggested that box jellyfish (cubozoans) have mtDNAs that consist of many linear chromosomes. Here, we present the complete mtDNA sequence from the winged box jellyfish Alatina moseri (the first from a cubozoan). This genome contains unprecedented levels of fragmentation: 18 unique genes distributed over eight 2.9- to 4.6-kb linear chromosomes. The telomeres are identical within and between chromosomes, and recombination between subtelomeric sequences has led to many genes initiating or terminating with sequences from other genes (the most extreme case being 150 nt of a ribosomal RNA containing the 5′ end of nad2), providing evidence for a gene conversion–based model of telomere evolution. The silent-site nucleotide variation within the A. moseri mtDNA is among the highest observed from a eukaryotic genome and may be associated with elevated rates of recombination. PMID:22117085

  12. Endocrine-Therapy-Resistant ESR1 Variants Revealed by Genomic Characterization of Breast-Cancer-Derived Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunqiang Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To characterize patient-derived xenografts (PDXs for functional studies, we made whole-genome comparisons with originating breast cancers representative of the major intrinsic subtypes. Structural and copy number aberrations were found to be retained with high fidelity. However, at the single-nucleotide level, variable numbers of PDX-specific somatic events were documented, although they were only rarely functionally significant. Variant allele frequencies were often preserved in the PDXs, demonstrating that clonal representation can be transplantable. Estrogen-receptor-positive PDXs were associated with ESR1 ligand-binding-domain mutations, gene amplification, or an ESR1/YAP1 translocation. These events produced different endocrine-therapy-response phenotypes in human, cell line, and PDX endocrine-response studies. Hence, deeply sequenced PDX models are an important resource for the search for genome-forward treatment options and capture endocrine-drug-resistance etiologies that are not observed in standard cell lines. The originating tumor genome provides a benchmark for assessing genetic drift and clonal representation after transplantation.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid-derived circulating tumour DNA better represents the genomic alterations of brain tumours than plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mattos-Arruda, Leticia; Mayor, Regina; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Weigelt, Britta; Martínez-Ricarte, Francisco; Torrejon, Davis; Oliveira, Mafalda; Arias, Alexandra; Raventos, Carolina; Tang, Jiabin; Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Martínez-Sáez, Elena; Lois, Sergio; Marín, Oscar; de la Cruz, Xavier; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Towers, Russel; Vivancos, Ana; Peg, Vicente; Cajal, Santiago Ramon y; Carles, Joan; Rodon, Jordi; González-Cao, María; Tabernero, Josep; Felip, Enriqueta; Sahuquillo, Joan; Berger, Michael F.; Cortes, Javier; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Seoane, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) in plasma has been shown to be informative of the genomic alterations present in tumours and has been used to monitor tumour progression and response to treatments. However, patients with brain tumours do not present with or present with low amounts of ctDNA in plasma precluding the genomic characterization of brain cancer through plasma ctDNA. Here we show that ctDNA derived from central nervous system tumours is more abundantly present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) than in plasma. Massively parallel sequencing of CSF ctDNA more comprehensively characterizes the genomic alterations of brain tumours than plasma, allowing the identification of actionable brain tumour somatic mutations. We show that CSF ctDNA levels longitudinally fluctuate in time and follow the changes in brain tumour burden providing biomarkers to monitor brain malignancies. Moreover, CSF ctDNA is shown to facilitate and complement the diagnosis of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. PMID:26554728

  14. Genome-wide identification and characterization of macrolide glycosyltransferases from a marine-derived Bacillus strain and their phylogenetic distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Qin, Wen; Liu, Quanquan; Zhang, Jun; Li, Huayue; Xu, Shanshan; Ren, Pengfei; Tian, Li; Li, Wenli

    2016-12-01

    Clarifying glycosyltrasferases (GTs) function is of significance for the development of GT inhibitors as drugs, and the use of GTs to glycodiversify small molecules in the search of drug leads. While many Actinomyces natural-product GTs had been functionally characterized, our understanding towards Bacillus natural-product GTs is so far very limited. Herein, genome-wide identification of macrolide GT genes from marine-derived Bacillus methylotrophicus B-9987 revealed the presence of three macrolide GT genes bmmGT1-3. While bmmGT1 was previously revealed to be involved in the biosynthesis of trans-acyltransferase (AT) polyketides compounds macrolactins (MLNs) and bacillaenes (BAEs), the functions of bmmGT2 and bmmGT3 were probed, demonstrating that they are capable to biochemically catalyze glycosylation of MLNs and BAEs as well but interestingly with different regioselectivity, affording four new MLNs analogs. Notably, further genome mining revealed that the orthologs of these three macrolide GT genes showed a regular distribution in the subtilis- and the cereus-clade Bacillus strains; interestingly, bmmGT1 orthologs only occurred in the subtilis-clade Bacillus, and they were also found in the genomes of Streptomyces strains, suggesting their close phylogenetic relationship. These results provide the first significant insight into the important roles of Bacillus macrolide GTs in the biology of the species. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Diverse and Abundant Secondary Metabolism Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in the Genomes of Marine Sponge Derived Streptomyces spp. Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Jackson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The genus Streptomyces produces secondary metabolic compounds that are rich in biological activity. Many of these compounds are genetically encoded by large secondary metabolism biosynthetic gene clusters (smBGCs such as polyketide synthases (PKS and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS which are modular and can be highly repetitive. Due to the repeats, these gene clusters can be difficult to resolve using short read next generation datasets and are often quite poorly predicted using standard approaches. We have sequenced the genomes of 13 Streptomyces spp. strains isolated from shallow water and deep-sea sponges that display antimicrobial activities against a number of clinically relevant bacterial and yeast species. Draft genomes have been assembled and smBGCs have been identified using the antiSMASH (antibiotics and Secondary Metabolite Analysis Shell web platform. We have compared the smBGCs amongst strains in the search for novel sequences conferring the potential to produce novel bioactive secondary metabolites. The strains in this study recruit to four distinct clades within the genus Streptomyces. The marine strains host abundant smBGCs which encode polyketides, NRPS, siderophores, bacteriocins and lantipeptides. The deep-sea strains appear to be enriched with gene clusters encoding NRPS. Marine adaptations are evident in the sponge-derived strains which are enriched for genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of compatible solutes and for heat-shock proteins. Streptomyces spp. from marine environments are a promising source of novel bioactive secondary metabolites as the abundance and diversity of smBGCs show high degrees of novelty. Sponge derived Streptomyces spp. isolates appear to display genomic adaptations to marine living when compared to terrestrial strains.

  16. Genomic characterization of non-mucus-adherent derivatives of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG reveals genes affecting pilus biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasinkangas, Pia; Reunanen, Justus; Douillard, François P; Ritari, Jarmo; Uotinen, Virva; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-11-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized lactic acid bacteria and can be considered a probiotic paradigm. Comparative and functional genome analysis showed that L. rhamnosus GG harbors a genomic island including the spaCBA-srtC1 gene cluster, encoding the cell surface-decorating host-interacting pili. Here, induced mutagenesis was used to study pilus biogenesis in L. rhamnosus GG. A combination of two powerful approaches, mutation selection and next-generation sequencing, was applied to L. rhamnosus GG for the selection of pilus-deficient mutants from an enriched population. The isolated mutants were first screened by immuno-dot blot analysis using antiserum against pilin proteins. Relevant mutants were selected, and the lack of pili was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. The pilosotype of 10 mutant strains was further characterized by analyzing pilin expression using Western blot, dot blot, and immunofluorescence methods. A mucus binding assay showed that the mutants did not adhere to porcine intestinal mucus. Comparative genome sequence analysis using the Illumina MiSeq platform allowed us to determine the nature of the mutations in the obtained pilus-deficient derivatives. Three major classes of mutants with unique genotypes were observed: class I, with mutations in the srtC1 gene; class II, with a deletion containing the spaCBA-srtC1 gene cluster; and class III, with mutations in the spaA gene. Only a limited number of collateral mutations were observed, and one of the pilus-deficient derivatives with a deficient srtC1 gene contained 24 other mutations. This strain, PB12, can be considered a candidate for human trials addressing the impact of the absence of pili. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Architecture of Burkholderia cepacia complex σ70 gene family: evidence of alternative primary and clade-specific factors, and genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menard Aymeric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc groups bacterial species with beneficial properties that can improve crop yields or remediate polluted sites but can also lead to dramatic human clinical outcomes among cystic fibrosis (CF or immuno-compromised individuals. Genome-wide regulatory processes of gene expression could explain parts of this bacterial duality. Transcriptional σ70 factors are components of these processes. They allow the reversible binding of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase to form the holoenzyme that will lead to mRNA synthesis from a DNA promoter region. Bcc genome-wide analyses were performed to investigate the major evolutionary trends taking place in the σ70 family of these bacteria. Results Twenty σ70 paralogous genes were detected in the Burkholderia cenocepacia strain J2315 (Bcen-J2315 genome, of which 14 were of the ECF (extracytoplasmic function group. Non-ECF paralogs were related to primary (rpoD, alternative primary, stationary phase (rpoS, flagellin biosynthesis (fliA, and heat shock (rpoH factors. The number of σ70 genetic determinants among this genome was of 2,86 per Mb. This number is lower than the one of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a species found in similar habitats including CF lungs. These two bacterial groups showed strikingly different σ70 family architectures, with only three ECF paralogs in common (fecI-like, pvdS and algU. Bcen-J2315 σ70 paralogs showed clade-specific distributions. Some paralogs appeared limited to the ET12 epidemic clone (ecfA2, particular Bcc species (sigI, the Burkholderia genus (ecfJ, ecfF, and sigJ, certain proteobacterial groups (ecfA1, ecfC, ecfD, ecfE, ecfG, ecfL, ecfM and rpoS, or were broadly distributed in the eubacteria (ecfI, ecfK, ecfH, ecfB, and rpoD-, rpoH-, fliA-like genes. Genomic instability of this gene family was driven by chromosomal inversion (ecfA2, recent duplication events (ecfA and RpoD, localized (ecfG and large scale deletions (sig

  18. Massive Changes in Genome Architecture Accompany the Transition to Self-Fertility in the filamentous Fungus Neurospora tetrasperma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, Christoper; Stajich, Jason; Jacobson, David; Nativ, Donald; Lapidus, Alla; Foster, Brian; Aerts, Andrea; Riley, Robert; Lindquist, Erika; Grigoriev, Igor; Taylor, John

    2011-05-16

    A large region of suppressed recombination surrounds the sex-determining locus of the self-fertile fungus Neurospora tetrasperma. This region encompasses nearly one-fifth of the N. tetrasperma genome and suppression of recombination is necessary for self-fertility. The similarity of the N. tetrasperma mating chromosome to plant and animal sex chromosomes and its recent origin (5 MYA), combined with a long history of genetic and cytological research, make this fungus an ideal model for studying the evolutionary consequences of suppressed recombination. Here we compare genome sequences from two N. tetrasperma strains of opposite mating type to determine whether structural rearrangements are associated with the nonrecombining region and to examine the effect of suppressed recombination for the evolution of the genes within it. We find a series of three inversions encompassing the majority of the region of suppressed recombination and provide evidence for two different types of rearrangement mechanisms: the recently proposed mechanism of inversion via staggered single-strand breaks as well as ectopic recombination between transposable elements. In addition, we show that the N. tetrasperma mat a mating-type region appears to be accumulating deleterious substitutions at a faster rate than the other mating type (mat A) and thus may be in the early stages of degeneration.

  19. Agrobacterium-mediated co-transformation of rice using two selectable marker genes derived from rice genome components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakasa, Yuhya; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2012-11-01

    A method for Agrobacterium-mediated co-transformation of rice (Oryza sativa L.) was developed using rice-derived selection markers. Two T-DNAs were efficiently introduced into separate loci using selectable marker gene cassettes consisting of the mutated acetolactate synthase gene (mALS) under the control of the callus-specific promoter (CSP) (CSP:mALS) and the ferredoxin nitrite reductase gene (NiR) under the control of its own promoter (NiR P:NiR). The CSP:mALS gene cassette confers sulfonylurea herbicide resistance to transgenic rice callus. The NiR P:NiR construct complements NiR-deficient mutant cultivars such as 'Koshihikari', which are defective in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism. In the present study, the CaMV35S:GUS and CaMV35S:GFP gene cassettes were co-introduced into the 'Koshihikari' genome using our system. Approximately 5-10 independent transgenic lines expressing both the GUS and GFP reporters were obtained from 100 Agrobacterium co-inoculated calli. Furthermore, transgenic 'Koshihikari' rice lines with reduced content of two major seed allergen proteins, the 33 and 14-16 kDa allergens, were generated by this co-transformation system. The present results indicate that the generation of selectable antibiotic resistance marker gene-free transgenic rice is possible using our rice-derived selection marker co-transformation system. Key message An improved rice transformation method was developed based on Agrobacterium-mediated co-transformation using two rice genome-derived selectable marker gene cassettes.

  20. Genomic Characterization of Interspecific Hybrids and an Admixture Population Derived from Panicum amarum × P. virgatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Heffelfinger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Switchgrass ( L. and its relatives are regarded as top bioenergy crop candidates; however, one critical barrier is the introduction of useful genetic diversity and the development of new cultivars and hybrids. Combining genomes from related cultivars and species provides an opportunity to introduce new traits. In switchgrass, a breeding advantage would be achieved by combining the genomes of intervarietal ecotypes or interspecific hybrids. The recovery of wide crosses, however, is often tedious and may involve complicated embryo rescue and numerous backcrosses. Here, we demonstrate a straightforward approach to wide crosses involving the use of a selectable transgene for recovery of interspecific [ cv. Alamo × Ell var or Atlantic Coastal Panicgrass (ACP] F hybrids followed by backcrossing to generate a nontransgenic admixture population. A nontransgenic herbicide-sensitive (HbS admixture population of 83 FBC progeny was analyzed by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS to characterize local ancestry, parental contribution, and patterns of recombination. These results demonstrate a widely applicable breeding strategy that makes use of transgenic selectable resistance to identify and recover true hybrids.

  1. A molecular scheme for Yersinia enterocolitica patho-serotyping derived from genome-wide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzetti, Debora; Susen, Rosa; Fruth, Angelika; Tietze, Erhard; Heesemann, Jürgen; Rakin, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a food-borne, gastro-intestinal pathogen with world-wide distribution. Only 11 serotypes have been isolated from patients, with O:3, O:9, O:8 and O:5,27 being the serotypes most commonly associated with human yersiniosis. Serotype is an important characteristic of Y. enterocolitica strains, allowing differentiation for epidemiology, diagnosis and phylogeny studies. Conventional serotyping, performed by slide agglutination, is a tedious and laborious procedure whose interpretation tends to be subjective, leading to poor reproducibility. Here we present a PCR-based typing scheme for molecular identification and patho-serotyping of Y. enterocolitica. Genome-wide comparison of Y. enterocolitica sequences allowed analysis of the O-antigen gene clusters of different serotypes, uncovering their formerly unknown genomic locations, and selection of targets for serotype-specific amplification. Two multiplex PCRs and one additional PCR were designed and tested on various reference strains and isolates from different origins. Our genotypic assay proved to be highly specific for identification of Y. enterocolitica species, discrimination between virulent and non-virulent strains, distinguishing the main human-related serotypes, and typing of conventionally untypeable strains. This genotyping scheme could be applied in microbiology laboratories as an alternative or complementary method to the traditional phenotypic assays, providing data for epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome-wide trans-ancestry meta-analysis provides insight into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahajan, Anubha; Go, Min Jin; Zhang, Weihua

    2014-01-01

    To further understanding of the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility, we aggregated published meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including 26,488 cases and 83,964 controls of European, east Asian, south Asian and Mexican and Mexican American ancestry. We...... observed a significant excess in the directional consistency of T2D risk alleles across ancestry groups, even at SNPs demonstrating only weak evidence of association. By following up the strongest signals of association from the trans-ethnic meta-analysis in an additional 21,491 cases and 55,647 controls...... of European ancestry, we identified seven new T2D susceptibility loci. Furthermore, we observed considerable improvements in the fine-mapping resolution of common variant association signals at several T2D susceptibility loci. These observations highlight the benefits of trans-ethnic GWAS for the discovery...

  3. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F.; Justice, Anne E.; Monda, Keri L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U.; Luan, Jian’an; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Wood, Andrew R.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; König, Inke R.; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M.; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Cookson, William; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M.; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V.; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S.; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimaki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H.; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J.; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Mateo Leach, Irene; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J.; Theodoraki, Eirini V.; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Amouyel, Philippe; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George V.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Gieger, Christian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Levinson, Douglas F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew D.; Nieminen, Markku S.; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Penninx, Brenda; Power, Chris; Province, Michael A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M.; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stefansson, Kari; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunian, Talin; Heid, Iris M.; Hunter, David; Kaplan, Robert C.; Karpe, Fredrik; Moffatt, Miriam; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Pawitan, Yudi; Schadt, Eric E.; Schlessinger, David; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strachan, David P.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Visscher, Peter M.; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Meyre, David; Scherag, André; McCarthy, Mark I.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; North, Kari E.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Ingelsson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Approaches exploiting extremes of the trait distribution may reveal novel loci for common traits, but it is unknown whether such loci are generalizable to the general population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with upper vs. lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity including up to 263,407 European individuals, we identified four new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1, PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the tails and seven new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3, ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we show that there is large overlap in terms of genetic structure and distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiologic heterogeneity between obesity subgroups. PMID:23563607

  4. Role of transposon-derived small RNAs in the interplay between genomes and parasitic DNA in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misuzu Nosaka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is a defense system against "genomic parasites" such as transposable elements (TE, which are potentially harmful to host genomes. In plants, transcripts from TEs induce production of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs and are processed into small RNAs (small interfering RNAs, siRNAs that suppress TEs by RNA-directed DNA methylation. Thus, the majority of TEs are epigenetically silenced. On the other hand, most of the eukaryotic genome is composed of TEs and their remnants, suggesting that TEs have evolved countermeasures against host-mediated silencing. Under some circumstances, TEs can become active and increase in copy number. Knowledge is accumulating on the mechanisms of TE silencing by the host; however, the mechanisms by which TEs counteract silencing are poorly understood. Here, we show that a class of TEs in rice produces a microRNA (miRNA to suppress host silencing. Members of the microRNA820 (miR820 gene family are located within CACTA DNA transposons in rice and target a de novo DNA methyltransferase gene, OsDRM2, one of the components of epigenetic silencing. We confirmed that miR820 negatively regulates the expression of OsDRM2. In addition, we found that expression levels of various TEs are increased quite sensitively in response to decreased OsDRM2 expression and DNA methylation at TE loci. Furthermore, we found that the nucleotide sequence of miR820 and its recognition site within the target gene in some Oryza species have co-evolved to maintain their base-pairing ability. The co-evolution of these sequences provides evidence for the functionality of this regulation. Our results demonstrate how parasitic elements in the genome escape the host's defense machinery. Furthermore, our analysis of the regulation of OsDRM2 by miR820 sheds light on the action of transposon-derived small RNAs, not only as a defense mechanism for host genomes but also as a regulator of interactions between hosts and their parasitic elements.

  5. Fit for genomic and proteomic purposes: Sampling the fitness of nucleic acid and protein derivatives from formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Yakovleva

    Full Text Available The demand for nucleic acid and protein derivatives from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue has greatly increased due to advances in extraction and purification methods, making these derivatives available for numerous genomic and proteomic platforms. Previously, DNA, RNA, microRNA (miRNA, or protein derived from FFPE tissue blocks were considered "unfit" for such platforms, as the process of tissue immobilization by FFPE resulted in cross-linked, fragmented, and chemically modified macromolecules. We conducted a systematic examination of nucleic acids and proteins co-extracted from 118 FFPE blocks sampled from the AIDS and Cancer Specimen Resource (ACSR at The George Washington University after stratification by storage duration and the three most common tumor tissue types at the ACSR (adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and papillary carcinoma. DNA, RNA, miRNA, and protein could be co-extracted from 98% of the FFPE blocks sampled, with DNA and miRNA "fit" for diverse genomic purposes including sequencing. While RNA was the most labile of the FFPE derivatives, especially when assessed by RNA integrity number (RIN, it was still "fit" for genomic methods that use smaller sequence lengths, e.g., quantitative PCR. While more than half of the protein derivatives were fit for proteomic purposes, our analyses indicated a significant interaction effect on the absorbance values for proteins derived from FFPE, implying that storage duration may affect protein derivatives differently by tumor tissue type. The mean absorbance value for proteins derived from more recently stored FFPE was greater than protein derived from older FFPE, with the exception of adenocarcinoma tissue. Finally, the fitness of one type of derivative was weakly associated with the fitness of derivatives co-extracted from the same FFPE block. The current study used several novel quality assurance approaches and metrics to show that archival FFPE tissue blocks are a

  6. Genomic, Transcriptomic and Metabolomic Studies of Two Well-Characterized, Laboratory-Derived Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Strains Derived from the Same Parent Strain

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    Dipti S. Hattangady

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complete genome comparisons, transcriptomic and metabolomic studies were performed on two laboratory-selected, well-characterized vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA derived from the same parent MRSA that have changes in cell wall composition and decreased autolysis. A variety of mutations were found in the VISA, with more in strain 13136p−m+V20 (vancomycin MIC = 16 µg/mL than strain 13136p−m+V5 (MIC = 8 µg/mL. Most of the mutations have not previously been associated with the VISA phenotype; some were associated with cell wall metabolism and many with stress responses, notably relating to DNA damage. The genomes and transcriptomes of the two VISA support the importance of gene expression regulation to the VISA phenotype. Similarities in overall transcriptomic and metabolomic data indicated that the VISA physiologic state includes elements of the stringent response, such as downregulation of protein and nucleotide synthesis, the pentose phosphate pathway and nutrient transport systems. Gene expression for secreted virulence determinants was generally downregulated, but was more variable for surface-associated virulence determinants, although capsule formation was clearly inhibited. The importance of activated stress response elements could be seen across all three analyses, as in the accumulation of osmoprotectant metabolites such as proline and glutamate. Concentrations of potential cell wall precursor amino acids and glucosamine were increased in the VISA strains. Polyamines were decreased in the VISA, which may facilitate the accrual of mutations. Overall, the studies confirm the wide variability in mutations and gene expression patterns that can lead to the VISA phenotype.

  7. Architecture of a corporate system to aid the scheduling of a oil derivatives transport in a pipeline network; Arquitetura de um sistema corporativo para auxilio a programacao do transporte de derivados de petroleo em redes dutoviarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Guilherme R.; Polli, Helton L.; Esser, Eduardo M.; Lueders, Ricardo; Neves Junior, Flavio; Magatao, Leandro; Stebel, Sergio L. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Ribas, Paulo C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    This paper addresses the development and the architecture of a corporative package to aid the operational decision-making of the scheduling activities in a real-world pipeline network for oil derivatives. The system was developed based on a service-oriented architecture, allowing the development of Web applications to define the network scheduling, as well as graphic display of the movements. The solution of the scheduling is generated by an optimization block as a service of this application. However, this paper emphasizes the description of the architecture and its functionalities, which was defined with the help of experienced programmers. (author)

  8. The unique architecture and function of cellulose-interacting proteins in oomycetes revealed by genomic and structural analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larroque Mathieu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oomycetes are fungal-like microorganisms evolutionary distinct from true fungi, belonging to the Stramenopile lineage and comprising major plant pathogens. Both oomycetes and fungi express proteins able to interact with cellulose, a major component of plant and oomycete cell walls, through the presence of carbohydrate-binding module belonging to the family 1 (CBM1. Fungal CBM1-containing proteins were implicated in cellulose degradation whereas in oomycetes, the Cellulose Binding Elicitor Lectin (CBEL, a well-characterized CBM1-protein from Phytophthora parasitica, was implicated in cell wall integrity, adhesion to cellulosic substrates and induction of plant immunity. Results To extend our knowledge on CBM1-containing proteins in oomycetes, we have conducted a comprehensive analysis on 60 fungi and 7 oomycetes genomes leading to the identification of 518 CBM1-containing proteins. In plant-interacting microorganisms, the larger number of CBM1-protein coding genes is expressed by necrotroph and hemibiotrophic pathogens, whereas a strong reduction of these genes is observed in symbionts and biotrophs. In fungi, more than 70% of CBM1-containing proteins correspond to enzymatic proteins in which CBM1 is associated with a catalytic unit involved in cellulose degradation. In oomycetes more than 90% of proteins are similar to CBEL in which CBM1 is associated with a non-catalytic PAN/Apple domain, known to interact with specific carbohydrates or proteins. Distinct Stramenopile genomes like diatoms and brown algae are devoid of CBM1 coding genes. A CBM1-PAN/Apple association 3D structural modeling was built allowing the identification of amino acid residues interacting with cellulose and suggesting the putative interaction of the PAN/Apple domain with another type of glucan. By Surface Plasmon Resonance experiments, we showed that CBEL binds to glycoproteins through galactose or N-acetyl-galactosamine motifs. Conclusions This study

  9. Genome-wide screens for in vivo Tinman binding sites identify cardiac enhancers with diverse functional architectures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jin

    Full Text Available The NK homeodomain factor Tinman is a crucial regulator of early mesoderm patterning and, together with the GATA factor Pannier and the Dorsocross T-box factors, serves as one of the key cardiogenic factors during specification and differentiation of heart cells. Although the basic framework of regulatory interactions driving heart development has been worked out, only about a dozen genes involved in heart development have been designated as direct Tinman target genes to date, and detailed information about the functional architectures of their cardiac enhancers is lacking. We have used immunoprecipitation of chromatin (ChIP from embryos at two different stages of early cardiogenesis to obtain a global overview of the sequences bound by Tinman in vivo and their linked genes. Our data from the analysis of ~50 sequences with high Tinman occupancy show that the majority of such sequences act as enhancers in various mesodermal tissues in which Tinman is active. All of the dorsal mesodermal and cardiac enhancers, but not some of the others, require tinman function. The cardiac enhancers feature diverse arrangements of binding motifs for Tinman, Pannier, and Dorsocross. By employing these cardiac and non-cardiac enhancers in machine learning approaches, we identify a novel motif, termed CEE, as a classifier for cardiac enhancers. In vivo assays for the requirement of the binding motifs of Tinman, Pannier, and Dorsocross, as well as the CEE motifs in a set of cardiac enhancers, show that the Tinman sites are essential in all but one of the tested enhancers; although on occasion they can be functionally redundant with Dorsocross sites. The enhancers differ widely with respect to their requirement for Pannier, Dorsocross, and CEE sites, which we ascribe to their different position in the regulatory circuitry, their distinct temporal and spatial activities during cardiogenesis, and functional redundancies among different factor binding sites.

  10. Appearance, flavor, and texture attributes of pig dry-cured hams have a complex polygenic genomic architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, R N; Gallardo, D; Guàrdia, M D; Reixach, J; Arnau, J; Amills, M; Quintanilla, R

    2013-03-01

    The influence that the genetics of species used as food sources has on the human perception of sensory attributes has been rarely addressed in previous studies. Dry-cured hams are high-quality highly appreciated pork products obtained by salting, curing, drying, and aging processes. We performed a QTL scan for 17 sensory attributes (including appearance, taste, flavor, and texture) and the overall liking evaluated by a panel of trained tasters in both semimembranosus (SM) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles of dry-cured hams from pigs raised in identical nutrition and management conditions. The QTL scan yielded a large array of chromosome- and genomewide QTL, reflecting the complex polygenic architecture of these traits. Among them, 6 QTL affecting SM flavor attributes (aged, matured, sweetness, and umami), 7 QTL associated to SM texture defects (adhesiveness and pastiness), and a single QTL for appearance (BF color intensity) reached the genomewide significant threshold. Discrepancies were observed between the BF and SM QTL maps, probably due to the differential drying and ripening rates determined by the external (SM) vs. internal (BF) location of each muscle. Within muscle, a certain degree of pleiotropy is supported by QTL co-localization for flavor (aged, matured, and sweet) or texture (such as pastiness and adhesiveness defects caused by excessive proteolysis) attributes. On the whole, QTL for overall sensory liking tended to co-localize with aged and matured QTL. Several functional candidate genes involved in the biochemical processes that shape flavor and texture attributes, such as ANPEP, LIPE, LIPA, MEP1B, and MMP28, co-localized with QTL hotspots. These results demonstrate that genetic factors of the pig influence the perception of the sensory attributes generated during dry-cured ham processing and represent a first contribution to elucidate which genetic factors may modulate the sensory properties of dry-cured hams.

  11. Integration event induced changes in recombinant protein productivity in Pichia pastoris discovered by whole genome sequencing and derived vector optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzhans, Jan-Philipp; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Luttermann, Tobias; Kalinowski, Jörn; Friehs, Karl

    2016-05-20

    The classic AOX1 replacement approach is still one of the most often used techniques for expression of recombinant proteins in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Although this approach is largely successful, it frequently delivers clones with unpredicted production characteristics and a work-intense screening process is required to find the strain with desired productivity. In this project 845 P. pastoris clones, transformed with a GFP expression cassette, were analyzed for their methanol-utilization (Mut)-phenotypes, GFP gene expression levels and gene copy numbers. Several groups of strains with irregular features were identified. Such features include GFP expression that is markedly higher or lower than expected based on gene copy number as well as strains that grew under selective conditions but where the GFP gene cassette and its expression could not be detected. From these classes of strains 31 characteristic clones were selected and their genomes sequenced. By correlating the assembled genome data with the experimental phenotypes novel insights were obtained. These comprise a clear connection between productivity and cassette-to-cassette orientation in the genome, the occurrence of false-positive clones due to a secondary recombination event, and lower total productivity due to the presence of untransformed cells within the isolates were discovered. To cope with some of these problems, the original vector was optimized by replacing the AOX1 terminator, preventing the occurrence of false-positive clones due to the secondary recombination event. Standard methods for transformation of P. pastoris led to a multitude of unintended and sometimes detrimental integration events, lowering total productivity. By documenting the connections between productivity and integration event we obtained a deeper understanding of the genetics of mutation in P. pastoris. These findings and the derived improved mutagenesis and transformation procedures and tools will help

  12. Architecture on Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This paper will discuss the challenges faced by architectural education today. It takes as its starting point the double commitment of any school of architecture: on the one hand the task of preserving the particular knowledge that belongs to the discipline of architecture, and on the other hand...... the obligation to prepare students to perform in a profession that is largely defined by forces outside that discipline. It will be proposed that the autonomy of architecture can be understood as a unique kind of information: as architecture’s self-reliance or knowledge-about itself. A knowledge...... that is not scientific or academic but is more like a latent body of data that we find embedded in existing works of architecture. This information, it is argued, is not limited by the historical context of the work. It can be thought of as a virtual capacity – a reservoir of spatial configurations that can...

  13. Genome-Scale Architecture of Small Molecule Regulatory Networks and the Fundamental Trade-Off between Regulation and Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Ed; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Goldford, Joshua E; Briars, Emma; Sauer, Uwe; Segrè, Daniel; Noor, Elad

    2017-09-12

    Metabolic flux is in part regulated by endogenous small molecules that modulate the catalytic activity of an enzyme, e.g., allosteric inhibition. In contrast to transcriptional regulation of enzymes, technical limitations have hindered the production of a genome-scale atlas of small molecule-enzyme regulatory interactions. Here, we develop a framework leveraging the vast, but fragmented, biochemical literature to reconstruct and analyze the small molecule regulatory network (SMRN) of the model organism Escherichia coli, including the primary metabolite regulators and enzyme targets. Using metabolic control analysis, we prove a fundamental trade-off between regulation and enzymatic activity, and we combine it with metabolomic measurements and the SMRN to make inferences on the sensitivity of enzymes to their regulators. Generalizing the analysis to other organisms, we identify highly conserved regulatory interactions across evolutionarily divergent species, further emphasizing a critical role for small molecule interactions in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of whole genome shotgun sequencing for detection and characterization of genetically modified organisms and derived products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst-Jensen, Arne; Spilsberg, Bjørn; Arulandhu, Alfred J; Kok, Esther; Shi, Jianxin; Zel, Jana

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of high-throughput, massive or next-generation sequencing technologies has created a completely new foundation for molecular analyses. Various selective enrichment processes are commonly applied to facilitate detection of predefined (known) targets. Such approaches, however, inevitably introduce a bias and are prone to miss unknown targets. Here we review the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies and the preparation of fit-for-purpose whole genome shotgun sequencing libraries for the detection and characterization of genetically modified and derived products. The potential impact of these new sequencing technologies for the characterization, breeding selection, risk assessment, and traceability of genetically modified organisms and genetically modified products is yet to be fully acknowledged. The published literature is reviewed, and the prospects for future developments and use of the new sequencing technologies for these purposes are discussed.

  15. Complete mitochondrial genomes of chimpanzee- and gibbon-derived Ascaris isolated from a zoological garden in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yue; Niu, Lili; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Qiang; Nong, Xiang; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Xuan; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2013-01-01

    Roundworms (Ascaridida: Nematoda), one of the most common soil-transmitted helminths (STHs), can cause ascariasis in various hosts worldwide, ranging from wild to domestic animals and humans. Despite the veterinary and health importance of the Ascaridida species, little or no attention has been paid to roundworms infecting wild animals including non-human primates due to the current taxon sampling and survey bias in this order. Importantly, there has been considerable controversy over the years as to whether Ascaris species infecting non-human primates are the same as or distinct from Ascaris lumbricoides infecting humans. Herein, we first characterized the complete mitochondrial genomes of two representative Ascaris isolates derived from two non-human primates, namely, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and gibbons (Hylobates hoolock), in a zoological garden of southwest China and compared them with those of A. lumbricoides and the congeneric Ascaris suum as well as other related species in the same order, and then used comparative mitogenomics, genome-wide nucleotide sequence identity analysis, and phylogeny to determine whether the parasites from chimpanzees and gibbons represent a single species and share genetic similarity with A. lumbricoides. Taken together, our results yielded strong statistical support for the hypothesis that the chimpanzee- and gibbon-derived Ascaris represent a single species that is genetically similar to A. lumbricoides, consistent with the results of previous morphological and molecular studies. Our finding should enhance public alertness to roundworms originating from chimpanzees and gibbons and the mtDNA data presented here also serves to enrich the resource of markers that can be used in molecular diagnostic, systematic, population genetic, and evolutionary biological studies of parasitic nematodes from either wild or domestic hosts.

  16. A new technique for dynamic load distribution when two manipulators mutually lift a rigid object. Part 2, Derivation of entire system model and control architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unseren, M.A.

    1994-04-01

    A rigid body model for the entire system which accounts for the load distribution scheme proposed in Part 1 as well as for the dynamics of the manipulators and the kinematic constraints is derived in the joint space. A technique is presented for expressing the object dynamics in terms of the joint variables of both manipulators which leads to a positive definite and symmetric inertia matrix. The model is then transformed to obtain reduced order equations of motion and a separate set of equations which govern the behavior of the internal contact forces. The control architecture is applied to the model which results in the explicit decoupling of the position and internal contact force-controlled degrees of freedom (DOF).

  17. Genomic selection of crossing partners on basis of the expected mean and variance of their derived lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osthushenrich, Tanja; Frisch, Matthias; Herzog, Eva

    2017-01-01

    In a line or a hybrid breeding program superior lines are selected from a breeding pool as parental lines for the next breeding cycle. From a cross of two parental lines, new lines are derived by single-seed descent (SSD) or doubled haploid (DH) technology. However, not all possible crosses between the parental lines can be carried out due to limited resources. Our objectives were to present formulas to characterize a cross by the mean and variance of the genotypic values of the lines derived from the cross, and to apply the formulas to predict means and variances of flowering time traits in recombinant inbred line families of a publicly available data set in maize. We derived formulas which are based on the expected linkage disequilibrium (LD) between two loci and which can be used for arbitrary mating systems. Results were worked out for SSD and DH lines derived from a cross after an arbitrary number of intermating generations. The means and variances were highly correlated with results obtained by the simulation software PopVar. Compared with these simulations, computation time for our closed formulas was about ten times faster. The means and variances for flowering time traits observed in the recombinant inbred line families of the investigated data set showed correlations of around 0.9 for the means and of 0.46 and 0.65 for the standard deviations with the estimated values. We conclude that our results provide a framework that can be exploited to increase the efficiency of hybrid and line breeding programs by extending genomic selection approaches to the selection of crossing partners.

  18. Genomic selection of crossing partners on basis of the expected mean and variance of their derived lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osthushenrich, Tanja; Frisch, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    In a line or a hybrid breeding program superior lines are selected from a breeding pool as parental lines for the next breeding cycle. From a cross of two parental lines, new lines are derived by single-seed descent (SSD) or doubled haploid (DH) technology. However, not all possible crosses between the parental lines can be carried out due to limited resources. Our objectives were to present formulas to characterize a cross by the mean and variance of the genotypic values of the lines derived from the cross, and to apply the formulas to predict means and variances of flowering time traits in recombinant inbred line families of a publicly available data set in maize. We derived formulas which are based on the expected linkage disequilibrium (LD) between two loci and which can be used for arbitrary mating systems. Results were worked out for SSD and DH lines derived from a cross after an arbitrary number of intermating generations. The means and variances were highly correlated with results obtained by the simulation software PopVar. Compared with these simulations, computation time for our closed formulas was about ten times faster. The means and variances for flowering time traits observed in the recombinant inbred line families of the investigated data set showed correlations of around 0.9 for the means and of 0.46 and 0.65 for the standard deviations with the estimated values. We conclude that our results provide a framework that can be exploited to increase the efficiency of hybrid and line breeding programs by extending genomic selection approaches to the selection of crossing partners. PMID:29200436

  19. Genetic architecture of aluminum tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa determined through genome-wide association analysis and QTL mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam N Famoso

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al toxicity is a primary limitation to crop productivity on acid soils, and rice has been demonstrated to be significantly more Al tolerant than other cereal crops. However, the mechanisms of rice Al tolerance are largely unknown, and no genes underlying natural variation have been reported. We screened 383 diverse rice accessions, conducted a genome-wide association (GWA study, and conducted QTL mapping in two bi-parental populations using three estimates of Al tolerance based on root growth. Subpopulation structure explained 57% of the phenotypic variation, and the mean Al tolerance in Japonica was twice that of Indica. Forty-eight regions associated with Al tolerance were identified by GWA analysis, most of which were subpopulation-specific. Four of these regions co-localized with a priori candidate genes, and two highly significant regions co-localized with previously identified QTLs. Three regions corresponding to induced Al-sensitive rice mutants (ART1, STAR2, Nrat1 were identified through bi-parental QTL mapping or GWA to be involved in natural variation for Al tolerance. Haplotype analysis around the Nrat1 gene identified susceptible and tolerant haplotypes explaining 40% of the Al tolerance variation within the aus subpopulation, and sequence analysis of Nrat1 identified a trio of non-synonymous mutations predictive of Al sensitivity in our diversity panel. GWA analysis discovered more phenotype-genotype associations and provided higher resolution, but QTL mapping identified critical rare and/or subpopulation-specific alleles not detected by GWA analysis. Mapping using Indica/Japonica populations identified QTLs associated with transgressive variation where alleles from a susceptible aus or indica parent enhanced Al tolerance in a tolerant Japonica background. This work supports the hypothesis that selectively introgressing alleles across subpopulations is an efficient approach for trait enhancement in plant breeding programs

  20. Genetic architecture of cold tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa) determined through high resolution genome-wide analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakiba, Ehsan; Edwards, Jeremy D.; Jodari, Farman; Duke, Sara E.; Baldo, Angela M.; Korniliev, Pavel; McCouch, Susan R.; Eizenga, Georgia C.

    2017-01-01

    Cold temperature is an important abiotic stress which negatively affects morphological development and seed production in rice (Oryza sativa L.). At the seedling stage, cold stress causes poor germination, seedling injury and poor stand establishment; and at the reproductive stage cold decreases seed yield. The Rice Diversity Panel 1 (RDP1) is a global collection of over 400 O. sativa accessions representing the five major subpopulations from the INDICA and JAPONICA varietal groups, with a genotypic dataset consisting of 700,000 SNP markers. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the RDP1 accessions for the complex, quantitatively inherited cold tolerance traits at the germination and reproductive stages, and to conduct genome-wide association (GWA) mapping to identify SNPs and candidate genes associated with cold stress at these stages. GWA mapping of the germination index (calculated as percent germination in cold divided by warm treatment) revealed 42 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with cold tolerance at the seedling stage, including 18 in the panel as a whole, seven in temperate japonica, six in tropical japonica, 14 in JAPONICA, and nine in INDICA, with five shared across all subpopulations. Twenty-two of these QTLs co-localized with 32 previously reported cold tolerance QTLs. GWA mapping of cold tolerance at the reproductive stage detected 29 QTLs, including seven associated with percent sterility, ten with seed weight per panicle, 14 with seed weight per plant and one region overlapping for two traits. Fifteen co-localized with previously reported QTLs for cold tolerance or yield components. Candidate gene ontology searches revealed these QTLs were associated with significant enrichment for genes related to with lipid metabolism, response to stimuli, response to biotic stimuli (suggesting cross-talk between biotic and abiotic stresses), and oxygen binding. Overall the JAPONICA accessions were more tolerant to cold stress than INDICA

  1. Chimaeric virus-like particles derived from consensus genome sequences of human rotavirus strains co-circulating in Africa.

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    Khuzwayo C Jere

    Full Text Available Rotavirus virus-like particles (RV-VLPs are potential alternative non-live vaccine candidates due to their high immunogenicity. They mimic the natural conformation of native viral proteins but cannot replicate because they do not contain genomic material which makes them safe. To date, most RV-VLPs have been derived from cell culture adapted strains or common G1 and G3 rotaviruses that have been circulating in communities for some time. In this study, chimaeric RV-VLPs were generated from the consensus sequences of African rotaviruses (G2, G8, G9 or G12 strains associated with either P[4], P[6] or P[8] genotypes characterised directly from human stool samples without prior adaptation of the wild type strains to cell culture. Codon-optimised sequences for insect cell expression of genome segments 2 (VP2, 4 (VP4, 6 (VP6 and 9 (VP7 were cloned into a modified pFASTBAC vector, which allowed simultaneous expression of up to four genes using the Bac-to-Bac Baculovirus Expression System (BEVS; Invitrogen. Several combinations of the genome segments originating from different field strains were cloned to produce double-layered RV-VLPs (dRV-VLP; VP2/6, triple-layered RV-VLPs (tRV-VLP; VP2/6/7 or VP2/6/7/4 and chimaeric tRV-VLPs. The RV-VLPs were produced by infecting Spodoptera frugiperda 9 and Trichoplusia ni cells with recombinant baculoviruses using multi-cistronic, dual co-infection and stepwise-infection expression strategies. The size and morphology of the RV-VLPs, as determined by transmission electron microscopy, revealed successful production of RV-VLPs. The novel approach of producing tRV-VLPs, by using the consensus insect cell codon-optimised nucleotide sequence derived from dsRNA extracted directly from clinical specimens, should speed-up vaccine research and development by by-passing the need to adapt rotaviruses to cell culture. Other problems associated with cell culture adaptation, such as possible changes in epitopes, can also be

  2. Chimaeric Virus-Like Particles Derived from Consensus Genome Sequences of Human Rotavirus Strains Co-Circulating in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jere, Khuzwayo C.; O'Neill, Hester G.; Potgieter, A. Christiaan; van Dijk, Alberdina A.

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus virus-like particles (RV-VLPs) are potential alternative non-live vaccine candidates due to their high immunogenicity. They mimic the natural conformation of native viral proteins but cannot replicate because they do not contain genomic material which makes them safe. To date, most RV-VLPs have been derived from cell culture adapted strains or common G1 and G3 rotaviruses that have been circulating in communities for some time. In this study, chimaeric RV-VLPs were generated from the consensus sequences of African rotaviruses (G2, G8, G9 or G12 strains associated with either P[4], P[6] or P[8] genotypes) characterised directly from human stool samples without prior adaptation of the wild type strains to cell culture. Codon-optimised sequences for insect cell expression of genome segments 2 (VP2), 4 (VP4), 6 (VP6) and 9 (VP7) were cloned into a modified pFASTBAC vector, which allowed simultaneous expression of up to four genes using the Bac-to-Bac Baculovirus Expression System (BEVS; Invitrogen). Several combinations of the genome segments originating from different field strains were cloned to produce double-layered RV-VLPs (dRV-VLP; VP2/6), triple-layered RV-VLPs (tRV-VLP; VP2/6/7 or VP2/6/7/4) and chimaeric tRV-VLPs. The RV-VLPs were produced by infecting Spodoptera frugiperda 9 and Trichoplusia ni cells with recombinant baculoviruses using multi-cistronic, dual co-infection and stepwise-infection expression strategies. The size and morphology of the RV-VLPs, as determined by transmission electron microscopy, revealed successful production of RV-VLPs. The novel approach of producing tRV-VLPs, by using the consensus insect cell codon-optimised nucleotide sequence derived from dsRNA extracted directly from clinical specimens, should speed-up vaccine research and development by by-passing the need to adapt rotaviruses to cell culture. Other problems associated with cell culture adaptation, such as possible changes in epitopes, can also be circumvented

  3. Bin mapping of genomic and EST-derived SSRs in melon (Cucumis melo L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Silva, I; Eduardo, I; Blanca, J; Esteras, C; Picó, B; Nuez, F; Arús, P; Garcia-Mas, J; Monforte, Antonio José

    2008-12-01

    We report the development of 158 primer pairs flanking SSR motifs in genomic (gSSR) and EST (EST-SSR) melon sequences, all yielding polymorphic bands in melon germplasm, except one that was polymorphic only in Cucurbita species. A similar polymorphism level was found among EST-SSRs and gSSRs, between dimeric and trimeric EST-SSRs, and between EST-SSRs placed in the open reading frame or any of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions. Correlation between SSR length and polymorphism was only found for dinucleotide EST-SSRs located within the untranslated regions, but not for trinucleotide EST-SSRs. Transferability of EST-SSRs to Cucurbita species was assayed and 12.7% of the primer pairs amplified at least in one species, although only 5.4% were polymorphic. A set of 14 double haploid lines from the cross between the cultivar "Piel de Sapo" and the accession PI161375 were selected for the bin mapping approach in melon. One hundred and twenty-one SSR markers were newly mapped. The position of 46 SSR loci was also verified by genotyping the complete population. A final bin-map was constructed including 80 RFLPs, 212 SSRs, 3 SNPs and the Nsv locus, distributed in 122 bins with an average bin length of 10.2 cM and a maximum bin length of 33 cM. Map density was 4.2 cM/marker or 5.9 cM/SSR.

  4. Chemical Architecture and Applications of Nucleic Acid Derivatives Containing 1,2,3-Triazole Functionalities Synthesized via Click Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable attention directed at chemically modifying nucleic acids with robust functional groups in order to alter their properties. Since the breakthrough of copper-assisted azide-alkyne cycloadditions (CuAAC, there have been several reports describing the synthesis and properties of novel triazole-modified nucleic acid derivatives for potential downstream DNA- and RNA-based applications. This review will focus on highlighting representative novel nucleic acid molecular structures that have been synthesized via the “click” azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Many of these derivatives show compatibility for various applications that involve enzymatic transformation, nucleic acid hybridization, molecular tagging and purification, and gene silencing. The details of these applications are discussed. In conclusion, the future of nucleic acid analogues functionalized with triazoles is promising.

  5. Plastid genomes of two brown algae, Ectocarpus siliculosus and Fucus vesiculosus: further insights on the evolution of red-algal derived plastids

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    Corre Erwan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterokont algae, together with cryptophytes, haptophytes and some alveolates, possess red-algal derived plastids. The chromalveolate hypothesis proposes that the red-algal derived plastids of all four groups have a monophyletic origin resulting from a single secondary endosymbiotic event. However, due to incongruence between nuclear and plastid phylogenies, this controversial hypothesis remains under debate. Large-scale genomic analyses have shown to be a powerful tool for phylogenetic reconstruction but insufficient sequence data have been available for red-algal derived plastid genomes. Results The chloroplast genomes of two brown algae, Ectocarpus siliculosus and Fucus vesiculosus, have been fully sequenced. These species represent two distinct orders of the Phaeophyceae, which is a major group within the heterokont lineage. The sizes of the circular plastid genomes are 139,954 and 124,986 base pairs, respectively, the size difference being due principally to the presence of longer inverted repeat and intergenic regions in E. siliculosus. Gene contents of the two plastids are similar with 139-148 protein-coding genes, 28-31 tRNA genes, and 3 ribosomal RNA genes. The two genomes also exhibit very similar rearrangements compared to other sequenced plastid genomes. The tRNA-Leu gene of E. siliculosus lacks an intron, in contrast to the F. vesiculosus and other heterokont plastid homologues, suggesting its recent loss in the Ectocarpales. Most of the brown algal plastid genes are shared with other red-algal derived plastid genomes, but a few are absent from raphidophyte or diatom plastid genomes. One of these regions is most similar to an apicomplexan nuclear sequence. The phylogenetic relationship between heterokonts, cryptophytes and haptophytes (collectively referred to as chromists plastids was investigated using several datasets of concatenated proteins from two cyanobacterial genomes and 18 plastid genomes, including

  6. Plastid genomes of two brown algae, Ectocarpus siliculosus and Fucus vesiculosus: further insights on the evolution of red-algal derived plastids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Heterokont algae, together with cryptophytes, haptophytes and some alveolates, possess red-algal derived plastids. The chromalveolate hypothesis proposes that the red-algal derived plastids of all four groups have a monophyletic origin resulting from a single secondary endosymbiotic event. However, due to incongruence between nuclear and plastid phylogenies, this controversial hypothesis remains under debate. Large-scale genomic analyses have shown to be a powerful tool for phylogenetic reconstruction but insufficient sequence data have been available for red-algal derived plastid genomes. Results The chloroplast genomes of two brown algae, Ectocarpus siliculosus and Fucus vesiculosus, have been fully sequenced. These species represent two distinct orders of the Phaeophyceae, which is a major group within the heterokont lineage. The sizes of the circular plastid genomes are 139,954 and 124,986 base pairs, respectively, the size difference being due principally to the presence of longer inverted repeat and intergenic regions in E. siliculosus. Gene contents of the two plastids are similar with 139-148 protein-coding genes, 28-31 tRNA genes, and 3 ribosomal RNA genes. The two genomes also exhibit very similar rearrangements compared to other sequenced plastid genomes. The tRNA-Leu gene of E. siliculosus lacks an intron, in contrast to the F. vesiculosus and other heterokont plastid homologues, suggesting its recent loss in the Ectocarpales. Most of the brown algal plastid genes are shared with other red-algal derived plastid genomes, but a few are absent from raphidophyte or diatom plastid genomes. One of these regions is most similar to an apicomplexan nuclear sequence. The phylogenetic relationship between heterokonts, cryptophytes and haptophytes (collectively referred to as chromists) plastids was investigated using several datasets of concatenated proteins from two cyanobacterial genomes and 18 plastid genomes, including most of the available red

  7. Evolutionary patterns of carbohydrate transport and metabolism in Halomonas boliviensis as derived from its genome sequence: influences on polyester production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Daniel; Balderrama-Subieta, Andrea; Cardona-Ortuño, Carla; Guevara-Martínez, Mónica; Callisaya-Quispe, Nataly; Quillaguamán, Jorge

    2012-04-17

    Halomonas boliviensis is a halophilic bacterium that is included in the γ-Proteobacteria sub-group, and is able to assimilate different types of carbohydrates. H. boliviensis is also able to produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) in high yields using glucose as the carbon precursor. Accumulation of PHB by microorganisms is induced by excess of intracellular NADH.The genome sequences and organization in microorganisms should be the result of evolution and adaptation influenced by mutation, gene duplication, horizontal gen transfer (HGT) and recombination. Furthermore, the nearly neutral theory of evolution sustains that genetic modification of DNA could be neutral or selected, albeit most mutations should be at the border between neutrality and selection, i.e. slightly deleterious base substitutions in DNA are followed by a slightly advantageous substitutions. This article reports the genome sequence of H. boliviensis. The chromosome size of H. boliviensis was 4 119 979 bp, and contained 3 863 genes. A total of 160 genes of H. boliviensis were related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism, and were organized as: 70 genes for metabolism of carbohydrates; 47 genes for ABC transport systems and 43 genes for TRAP-type C4-dicarboxylate transport systems. Protein sequences of H. boliviensis related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism were selected from clusters of orthologous proteins (COGs). Similar proteins derived from the genome sequences of other 41 archaea and 59 bacteria were used as reference. We found that most of the 160 genes in H. boliviensis, c.a. 44%, were obtained from other bacteria by horizontal gene transfer, while 13% of the genes were acquired from haloarchaea and thermophilic archaea, only 34% of the genes evolved among Proteobacteria and the remaining genes encoded proteins that did not cluster with any of the proteins obtained from the reference strains. Furthermore, the diversity of the enzymes derived from these genes led to polymorphism

  8. Evolutionary patterns of carbohydrate transport and metabolism in Halomonas boliviensis as derived from its genome sequence: influences on polyester production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Halomonas boliviensis is a halophilic bacterium that is included in the γ-Proteobacteria sub-group, and is able to assimilate different types of carbohydrates. H. boliviensis is also able to produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) in high yields using glucose as the carbon precursor. Accumulation of PHB by microorganisms is induced by excess of intracellular NADH. The genome sequences and organization in microorganisms should be the result of evolution and adaptation influenced by mutation, gene duplication, horizontal gen transfer (HGT) and recombination. Furthermore, the nearly neutral theory of evolution sustains that genetic modification of DNA could be neutral or selected, albeit most mutations should be at the border between neutrality and selection, i.e. slightly deleterious base substitutions in DNA are followed by a slightly advantageous substitutions. Results This article reports the genome sequence of H. boliviensis. The chromosome size of H. boliviensis was 4 119 979 bp, and contained 3 863 genes. A total of 160 genes of H. boliviensis were related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism, and were organized as: 70 genes for metabolism of carbohydrates; 47 genes for ABC transport systems and 43 genes for TRAP-type C4-dicarboxylate transport systems. Protein sequences of H. boliviensis related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism were selected from clusters of orthologous proteins (COGs). Similar proteins derived from the genome sequences of other 41 archaea and 59 bacteria were used as reference. We found that most of the 160 genes in H. boliviensis, c.a. 44%, were obtained from other bacteria by horizontal gene transfer, while 13% of the genes were acquired from haloarchaea and thermophilic archaea, only 34% of the genes evolved among Proteobacteria and the remaining genes encoded proteins that did not cluster with any of the proteins obtained from the reference strains. Furthermore, the diversity of the enzymes derived from these genes

  9. QTL analysis reveals the genetic architecture of domestication traits in Crisphead lettuce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Y.; Hooftman, D.A.P.; Schranz, M.E.; van Tienderen, P.H.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic architecture of crop domestication is generally characterized by three trends: relatively few genomic regions with major QTL effects are involved, QTL are often clustered, and alleles derived from the crop do not always contribute to the crop phenotype. We have investigated the genetic

  10. Genetic and Genomic Characterization of 462 Melanoma Patient-Derived Xenografts, Tumor Biopsies, and Cell Lines

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    Bradley Garman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Tumor-sequencing studies have revealed the widespread genetic diversity of melanoma. Sequencing of 108 genes previously implicated in melanomagenesis was performed on 462 patient-derived xenografts (PDXs, cell lines, and tumors to identify mutational and copy number aberrations. Samples came from 371 unique individuals: 263 were naive to treatment, and 108 were previously treated with targeted therapy (34, immunotherapy (54, or both (20. Models of all previously reported major melanoma subtypes (BRAF, NRAS, NF1, KIT, and WT/WT/WT were identified. Multiple minor melanoma subtypes were also recapitulated, including melanomas with multiple activating mutations in the MAPK-signaling pathway and chromatin-remodeling gene mutations. These well-characterized melanoma PDXs and cell lines can be used not only as reagents for a large array of biological studies but also as pre-clinical models to facilitate drug development. : Garman et al. have characterized melanoma PDXs and cell lines described in Krepler et al. (see the related paper in this issue of Cell Reports, identifying major and minor subtypes, some of which were previously not well defined, targeted and immunotherapy resistance, and tumor heterogeneity, creating a set of reagents for future drug discovery and biological studies. Keywords: melanoma, patient-derived xenografts, massively parallel sequencing, cell lines

  11. Fast non-genomic effects of progesterone-derived neurosteroids on nociceptive thresholds and pain symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Alexandre; Lasbennes, François; Darbon, Pascal; Poisbeau, Pierrick

    2008-10-31

    Fast Inhibitory controls mediated by glycine (GlyRs) and GABAA receptors (GABAARs) play an important role to prevent the apparition of pathological pain symptoms of allodynia and hyperalgesia. The use of positive allosteric modulators of these receptors, specifically expressed in the spinal cord, may represent an interesting strategy to limit or block pain expression. In this study, we have used stereoisomers of progesterone metabolites, acting only via non-genomic effects, in order to evaluate the contribution of GlyRs and GABAARs for the reduction of mechanical and thermal heat hypernociception. We show that 3alpha neurosteroids were particularly efficient to elevate nociceptive thresholds in naive animal. It also reduced mechanical allodynia and thermal heat hyperalgesia in the carrageenan model of inflammatory pain. This effect is likely to be mediated by GABAA receptors since 3beta isomer was inefficient. More interestingly, 3alpha5beta neurosteroid was only efficient on mechanical allodynia while having no effect on thermal heat hyperalgesia. We characterized these paradoxical effects of 3alpha5beta neurosteroid using the strychnine and bicuculline models of allodynia. We clearly show that 3alpha5beta neurosteroid exerts an antinociceptive effect via a positive allosteric modulation of GABAARs but, at the same time, is pronociceptive by reducing GlyR function. This illustrates the importance of the inhibitory amino acid receptor channels and their allosteric modulators in spinal pain processing. Moreover, our results indicate that neurosteroids, which are synthesized in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and have limited side effects, may be of significant interest in order to treat pathological pain symptoms.

  12. Shared activity patterns arising at genetic susceptibility loci reveal underlying genomic and cellular architecture of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, J Kenneth; Bretherick, Andrew; Haley, Christopher S; Clohisey, Sara; Gray, Alan; Neyton, Lucile P A; Barrett, Jeffrey; Stahl, Eli A; Tenesa, Albert; Andersson, Robin; Brown, J Ben; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Lizio, Marina; Schaefer, Ulf; Daub, Carsten; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kondo, Naoto; Lassmann, Timo; Kawai, Jun; Mole, Damian; Bajic, Vladimir B; Heutink, Peter; Rehli, Michael; Kawaji, Hideya; Sandelin, Albin; Suzuki, Harukazu; Satsangi, Jack; Wells, Christine A; Hacohen, Nir; Freeman, Thomas C; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Hume, David A

    2018-03-01

    Genetic variants underlying complex traits, including disease susceptibility, are enriched within the transcriptional regulatory elements, promoters and enhancers. There is emerging evidence that regulatory elements associated with particular traits or diseases share similar patterns of transcriptional activity. Accordingly, shared transcriptional activity (coexpression) may help prioritise loci associated with a given trait, and help to identify underlying biological processes. Using cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) profiles of promoter- and enhancer-derived RNAs across 1824 human samples, we have analysed coexpression of RNAs originating from trait-associated regulatory regions using a novel quantitative method (network density analysis; NDA). For most traits studied, phenotype-associated variants in regulatory regions were linked to tightly-coexpressed networks that are likely to share important functional characteristics. Coexpression provides a new signal, independent of phenotype association, to enable fine mapping of causative variants. The NDA coexpression approach identifies new genetic variants associated with specific traits, including an association between the regulation of the OCT1 cation transporter and genetic variants underlying circulating cholesterol levels. NDA strongly implicates particular cell types and tissues in disease pathogenesis. For example, distinct groupings of disease-associated regulatory regions implicate two distinct biological processes in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis; a further two separate processes are implicated in Crohn's disease. Thus, our functional analysis of genetic predisposition to disease defines new distinct disease endotypes. We predict that patients with a preponderance of susceptibility variants in each group are likely to respond differently to pharmacological therapy. Together, these findings enable a deeper biological understanding of the causal basis of complex traits.

  13. Construction of an integrated genetic linkage map for the A genome of Brassica napus using SSR markers derived from sequenced BACs in B. rapa

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    King Graham J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Multinational Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project (BrGSP has developed valuable genomic resources, including BAC libraries, BAC-end sequences, genetic and physical maps, and seed BAC sequences for Brassica rapa. An integrated linkage map between the amphidiploid B. napus and diploid B. rapa will facilitate the rapid transfer of these valuable resources from B. rapa to B. napus (Oilseed rape, Canola. Results In this study, we identified over 23,000 simple sequence repeats (SSRs from 536 sequenced BACs. 890 SSR markers (designated as BrGMS were developed and used for the construction of an integrated linkage map for the A genome in B. rapa and B. napus. Two hundred and nineteen BrGMS markers were integrated to an existing B. napus linkage map (BnaNZDH. Among these mapped BrGMS markers, 168 were only distributed on the A genome linkage groups (LGs, 18 distrubuted both on the A and C genome LGs, and 33 only distributed on the C genome LGs. Most of the A genome LGs in B. napus were collinear with the homoeologous LGs in B. rapa, although minor inversions or rearrangements occurred on A2 and A9. The mapping of these BAC-specific SSR markers enabled assignment of 161 sequenced B. rapa BACs, as well as the associated BAC contigs to the A genome LGs of B. napus. Conclusion The genetic mapping of SSR markers derived from sequenced BACs in B. rapa enabled direct links to be established between the B. napus linkage map and a B. rapa physical map, and thus the assignment of B. rapa BACs and the associated BAC contigs to the B. napus linkage map. This integrated genetic linkage map will facilitate exploitation of the B. rapa annotated genomic resources for gene tagging and map-based cloning in B. napus, and for comparative analysis of the A genome within Brassica species.

  14. Characterization of Camptothecin-induced Genomic Changes in the Camptothecin-resistant T-ALL-derived Cell Line CPT-K5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Eigil; Nielsen, Christine J F; Roy, Amit

    2018-01-01

    -K5 and its parental cell line. We identified copy number alterations affecting genes important for maintaining genome integrity and reducing CPT-induced DNA damage. We show for the first time that short tandem repeats are targets for TOP1 cleavage, that can be differentially stimulated by CPT.......Acquisition of resistance to topoisomerase I (TOP1)-targeting camptothecin (CPT) derivatives is a major clinical problem. Little is known about the underlying chromosomal and genomic mechanisms. We characterized the CPT-K5 cell line expressing mutant CPT-resistant TOP1 and its parental T......-cell derived acute lymphoblastic leukemia CPT-sensitive RPMI-8402 cell line by karyotyping and molecular genetic methods, including subtractive oligo-based array comparative genomic hybridization (soaCGH) analysis. Karyotyping revealed that CPT-K5 cells had acquired additional structural aberrations...

  15. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in African Americans provides insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie C Y Ng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is more prevalent in African Americans than in Europeans. However, little is known about the genetic risk in African Americans despite the recent identification of more than 70 T2D loci primarily by genome-wide association studies (GWAS in individuals of European ancestry. In order to investigate the genetic architecture of T2D in African Americans, the MEta-analysis of type 2 DIabetes in African Americans (MEDIA Consortium examined 17 GWAS on T2D comprising 8,284 cases and 15,543 controls in African Americans in stage 1 analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs association analysis was conducted in each study under the additive model after adjustment for age, sex, study site, and principal components. Meta-analysis of approximately 2.6 million genotyped and imputed SNPs in all studies was conducted using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effect model. Replications were performed to follow up 21 loci in up to 6,061 cases and 5,483 controls in African Americans, and 8,130 cases and 38,987 controls of European ancestry. We identified three known loci (TCF7L2, HMGA2 and KCNQ1 and two novel loci (HLA-B and INS-IGF2 at genome-wide significance (4.15 × 10(-94

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of DNA derived from the West Nile virus genome using magnetic capture of Raman-active gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model paramagnetic nanoparticle (MNP) assay is demonstrated for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of DNA oligonucleotides derived from the West Nile virus (WNV) genome. Detection is based on the capture of WNV target sequences by hybridization with complementary oligonucleotide pr...

  17. Architectural slicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2013-01-01

    Architectural prototyping is a widely used practice, con- cerned with taking architectural decisions through experiments with light- weight implementations. However, many architectural decisions are only taken when systems are already (partially) implemented. This is prob- lematic in the context...

  18. Best Linear Unbiased Prediction of Genomic Breeding Values Using a Trait-Specific Marker-Derived Relationship Matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhe Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.F.; Ding, Z.; Bijma, P.; Koning, de D.J.

    2010-01-01

    With the availability of high density whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism chips, genomic selection has become a promising method to estimate genetic merit with potentially high accuracy for animal, plant and aquaculture species of economic importance. With markers covering the entire genome,

  19. Molecular Characterization of Sec2 Loci in Wheat—Secale africanum Derivatives Demonstrates Genomic Divergence of Secale Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangrong Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The unique 75 K γ-secalins encoded by Sec2 loci in Secale species is composed of almost half rye storage proteins. The chromosomal location of Sec2 loci in wild Secale species, Secale africanum, was carried out by the wheat—S. africanum derivatives, which were identified by genomic in situ hybridization and multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization. The Sec2 gene-specific PCR analysis indicated that the S. cereale Sec2 was located on chromosome 2R, while the S. africanum Sec2 was localized on chromosome 6Rafr of S. africanum. A total of 38 Sec2 gene sequences were isolated from S. africanum, S. cereale and S. sylvestre by PCR-based cloning. Phylogenetic analysis showed that S. africanum Sec2 diverged from S. cereale Sec2 approximately 2–3 million years ago. The illegitimate recombination of chromosome 2R–6R involving the Sec2 loci region may accelerate sequence variation during evolutionary process from wild to cultivated Secale species.

  20. On the Sequence-Directed Nature of Human Gene Mutation: The Role of Genomic Architecture and the Local DNA Sequence Environment in Mediating Gene Mutations Underlying Human Inherited Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David N.; Bacolla, Albino; Férec, Claude; Vasquez, Karen M.; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Chen, Jian-Min

    2011-01-01

    Different types of human gene mutation may vary in size, from structural variants (SVs) to single base-pair substitutions, but what they all have in common is that their nature, size and location are often determined either by specific characteristics of the local DNA sequence environment or by higher-order features of the genomic architecture. The human genome is now recognized to contain ‘pervasive architectural flaws’ in that certain DNA sequences are inherently mutation-prone by virtue of their base composition, sequence repetitivity and/or epigenetic modification. Here we explore how the nature, location and frequency of different types of mutation causing inherited disease are shaped in large part, and often in remarkably predictable ways, by the local DNA sequence environment. The mutability of a given gene or genomic region may also be influenced indirectly by a variety of non-canonical (non-B) secondary structures whose formation is facilitated by the underlying DNA sequence. Since these non-B DNA structures can interfere with subsequent DNA replication and repair, and may serve to increase mutation frequencies in generalized fashion (i.e. both in the context of subtle mutations and SVs), they have the potential to serve as a unifying concept in studies of mutational mechanisms underlying human inherited disease. PMID:21853507

  1. Architectural prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2004-01-01

    A major part of software architecture design is learning how specific architectural designs balance the concerns of stakeholders. We explore the notion of "architectural prototypes", correspondingly architectural prototyping, as a means of using executable prototypes to investigate stakeholders......' concerns with respect to a system under development. An architectural prototype is primarily a learning and communication vehicle used to explore and experiment with alternative architectural styles, features, and patterns in order to balance different architectural qualities. The use of architectural...... prototypes in the development process is discussed, and we argue that such prototypes can play a role throughout the entire process. The use of architectural prototypes is illustrated by three distinct cases of creating software systems. We argue that architectural prototyping can provide key insights...

  2. Architectural Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2004-01-01

    A major part of software architecture design is learning how specific architectural designs balance the concerns of stakeholders. We explore the notion of "architectural prototypes", correspondingly architectural prototyping, as a means of using executable prototypes to investigate stakeholders......' concerns with respect to a system under development. An architectural prototype is primarily a learning and communication vehicle used to explore and experiment with alternative architectural styles, features, and patterns in order to balance different architectural qualities. The use of architectural...... prototypes in the development process is discussed, and we argue that such prototypes can play a role throughout the entire process. The use of architectural prototypes is illustrated by three distinct cases of creating software systems. We argue that architectural prototyping can provide key insights...

  3. Insights into the genetic architecture of early stage age-related macular degeneration: a genome-wide association study meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth G Holliday

    Full Text Available Genetic factors explain a majority of risk variance for age-related macular degeneration (AMD. While genome-wide association studies (GWAS for late AMD implicate genes in complement, inflammatory and lipid pathways, the genetic architecture of early AMD has been relatively under studied. We conducted a GWAS meta-analysis of early AMD, including 4,089 individuals with prevalent signs of early AMD (soft drusen and/or retinal pigment epithelial changes and 20,453 individuals without these signs. For various published late AMD risk loci, we also compared effect sizes between early and late AMD using an additional 484 individuals with prevalent late AMD. GWAS meta-analysis confirmed previously reported association of variants at the complement factor H (CFH (peak P = 1.5×10(-31 and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2 (P = 4.3×10(-24 loci, and suggested Apolipoprotein E (ApoE polymorphisms (rs2075650; P = 1.1×10(-6 associated with early AMD. Other possible loci that did not reach GWAS significance included variants in the zinc finger protein gene GLI3 (rs2049622; P = 8.9×10(-6 and upstream of GLI2 (rs6721654; P = 6.5×10(-6, encoding retinal Sonic hedgehog signalling regulators, and in the tyrosinase (TYR gene (rs621313; P = 3.5×10(-6, involved in melanin biosynthesis. For a range of published, late AMD risk loci, estimated effect sizes were significantly lower for early than late AMD. This study confirms the involvement of multiple established AMD risk variants in early AMD, but suggests weaker genetic effects on the risk of early AMD relative to late AMD. Several biological processes were suggested to be potentially specific for early AMD, including pathways regulating RPE cell melanin content and signalling pathways potentially involved in retinal regeneration, generating hypotheses for further investigation.

  4. Genome-wide identification of Bcl11b gene targets reveals role in brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Tang

    Full Text Available B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 11B (Bcl11b is a transcription factor showing predominant expression in the striatum. To date, there are no known gene targets of Bcl11b in the nervous system. Here, we define targets for Bcl11b in striatal cells by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq in combination with genome-wide expression profiling. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed that 694 genes were significantly altered in striatal cells over-expressing Bcl11b, including genes showing striatal-enriched expression similar to Bcl11b. ChIP-seq analysis demonstrated that Bcl11b bound a mixture of coding and non-coding sequences that were within 10 kb of the transcription start site of an annotated gene. Integrating all ChIP-seq hits with the microarray expression data, 248 direct targets of Bcl11b were identified. Functional analysis on the integrated gene target list identified several zinc-finger encoding genes as Bcl11b targets, and further revealed a significant association of Bcl11b to brain-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrophin signaling. Analysis of ChIP-seq binding regions revealed significant consensus DNA binding motifs for Bcl11b. These data implicate Bcl11b as a novel regulator of the BDNF signaling pathway, which is disrupted in many neurological disorders. Specific targeting of the Bcl11b-DNA interaction could represent a novel therapeutic approach to lowering BDNF signaling specifically in striatal cells.

  5. Genomic Characterization of Non-Mucus Adherent Derivatives of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Reveals Genes Affecting Pilus Biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasinkangas, P.; Reunanen, J.; Douillard, F.P.; Ritari, J.; Uotinen, V.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized lactic acid bacteria and can be considered a probiotic paradigm. Comparative and functional genome analysis showed that L. rhamnosus GG harbors a genomic island including the spaCBA-srtC1 gene cluster, encoding the cell surface-decorating

  6. Genetic Analysis of Serum-Derived Defective Hepatitis C Virus Genomes Revealed Novel ViralcisElements for Virus Replication and Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingchao; Tong, Yimin; Xu, Yongfen; Niu, Junqi; Zhong, Jin

    2018-04-01

    Defective viral genomes (DVGs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) exist, but their biological significances have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we analyzed HCV DVGs circulating in patient sera that possess deletions in the structural protein-encoding region. About 30% of 41 HCV clinical isolates possess DVGs that originated from the full-length genome in the same patients. No correlation between DVGs, viremia, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels was found. Sequencing analysis of DVGs revealed the existence of deletion hot spots, with upstream sites in E1 and downstream sites in E2 and NS2. Interestingly, the coding sequences for the core protein and the C-terminal protease domain of NS2 were always intact in DVGs despite the fact that both proteins are dispensable for HCV genome replication. Mechanistic studies showed that transmembrane segment 3 (TMS3) of NS2, located immediately upstream of its protease domain, was required for the cleavage of NS2-NS3 and the replication of DVGs. Moreover, we identified a highly conserved secondary structure (SL750) within the core domain 2-coding region that is critical for HCV genome packaging. In summary, our analysis of serum-derived HCV DVGs revealed novel viral cis elements that play important roles in virus replication and assembly. IMPORTANCE HCV DVGs have been identified in vivo and in vitro , but their biogenesis and physiological significances remain elusive. In addition, a conventional packaging signal has not yet been identified on the HCV RNA genome, and mechanisms underlying the specificity in the encapsidation of the HCV genome into infectious particles remain to be uncovered. Here, we identified new viral cis elements critical for the HCV life cycle by determining genetic constraints that define the boundary of serum-derived HCV DVGs. We found that transmembrane segment 3 of NS2, located immediately upstream of its protease domain, was required for the cleavage of NS2-NS3 and the replication of DVGs. We

  7. Robotic architectures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mtshali, M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the development of mobile robotic systems, a robotic architecture plays a crucial role in interconnecting all the sub-systems and controlling the system. The design of robotic architectures for mobile autonomous robots is a challenging...

  8. An assessment of computational methods for estimating purity and clonality using genomic data derived from heterogeneous tumor tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; De, Subhajyoti

    2015-03-01

    Solid tumor samples typically contain multiple distinct clonal populations of cancer cells, and also stromal and immune cell contamination. A majority of the cancer genomics and transcriptomics studies do not explicitly consider genetic heterogeneity and impurity, and draw inferences based on mixed populations of cells. Deconvolution of genomic data from heterogeneous samples provides a powerful tool to address this limitation. We discuss several computational tools, which enable deconvolution of genomic and transcriptomic data from heterogeneous samples. We also performed a systematic comparative assessment of these tools. If properly used, these tools have potentials to complement single-cell genomics and immunoFISH analyses, and provide novel insights into tumor heterogeneity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. VLSI architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randell, B.; Treleaven, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    This book is a collection of course papers which discusses the latest (1982) milestone of electronic building blocks and its effect on computer architecture. Contributions range from selecting a VLSI process technology to Japan's Fifth Generation Computer Architecture. Contents, abridged: VLSI and machine architecture. Graphic design aids: HED and FATFREDDY. On the LUCIFER system. Clocking of VLSI circuits. Decentralised computer architectures for VLSI. Index.

  10. A genomics investigation of partitioning into and among flavonoid-derived condensed tannins for carbon sequestration in Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, Scott, A; Tsai, Chung-jui; Lindroth, Richard, L

    2013-03-24

    The project set out to use comparative (genotype and treatment) and transgenic approaches to investigate the determinants of condensed tannin (CT) accrual and chemical variability in Populus. CT type and amount are thought to effect the decomposition of plant detritus in the soil, and thereby the sequestering of carbon in the soil. The stated objectives were: 1. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling (microarrays) to analyze structural gene, transcription factor and metabolite control of CT partitioning; 2. Transcriptomic (microarray) and chemical analysis of ontogenetic effects on CT and PG partitioning; and 3. Transgenic manipulation of flavonoid biosynthetic pathway genes to modify the control of CT composition. Objective 1: A number of approaches for perturbing CT content and chemistry were tested in Objective 1, and those included nitrogen deficit, leaf wounding, drought, and salicylic acid spraying. Drought had little effect on CTs in the genotypes we used. Plants exhibited unpredictability in their response to salicylic acid spraying, leading us to abandon its use. Reduced plant nitrogen status and leaf wounding caused reproducible and magnitudinally striking increases in leaf CT content. Microarray submissions to NCBI from those experiments are the following: GSE ID 14515: Comparative transcriptomics analysis of Populus leaves under nitrogen limitation: clone 1979. Public on Jan 04, 2010; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C GSE ID 14893: Comparative transcriptomics analysis of Populus leaves under nitrogen limitation: clone 3200. Public on Feb 19, 2009; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C GSE ID 16783 Wound-induced gene expression changes in Populus: 1 week; clone RM5. Status Public on Dec 01, 2009; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C GSE ID 16785 Wound-induced gene expression changes in Populus: 90 hours; clone RM5 Status Public on Dec 01, 2009; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C Although CT amount changed in response to treatments, CT composition was essentially

  11. Positive selection and multiple losses of the LINE-1-derived L1TD1 gene in mammals suggest a dual role in genome defense and pluripotency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N McLaughlin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes comprise many active and fossilized retroelements. The obligate requirement for retroelement integration affords host genomes an opportunity to 'domesticate' retroelement genes for their own purpose, leading to important innovations in genome defense and placentation. While many such exaptations involve retroviruses, the L1TD1 gene is the only known domesticated gene whose protein-coding sequence is almost entirely derived from a LINE-1 (L1 retroelement. Human L1TD1 has been shown to play an important role in pluripotency maintenance. To investigate how this role was acquired, we traced the origin and evolution of L1TD1. We find that L1TD1 originated in the common ancestor of eutherian mammals, but was lost or pseudogenized multiple times during mammalian evolution. We also find that L1TD1 has evolved under positive selection during primate and mouse evolution, and that one prosimian L1TD1 has 'replenished' itself with a more recent L1 ORF1 from the prosimian genome. These data suggest that L1TD1 has been recurrently selected for functional novelty, perhaps for a role in genome defense. L1TD1 loss is associated with L1 extinction in several megabat lineages, but not in sigmodontine rodents. We hypothesize that L1TD1 could have originally evolved for genome defense against L1 elements. Later, L1TD1 may have become incorporated into pluripotency maintenance in some lineages. Our study highlights the role of retroelement gene domestication in fundamental aspects of mammalian biology, and that such domesticated genes can adopt different functions in different lineages.

  12. Tracking the progression of speciation: variable patterns of introgression across the genome provide insights on the species delimitation between progenitor-derivative spruces (Picea mariana × P. rubens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lafontaine, Guillaume; Prunier, Julien; Gérardi, Sébastien; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-10-01

    The genic species concept implies that while most of the genome can be exchanged somewhat freely between species through introgression, some genomic regions remain impermeable to interspecific gene flow. Hence, interspecific differences can be maintained despite ongoing gene exchange within contact zones. This study assessed the heterogeneous patterns of introgression at gene loci across the hybrid zone of an incipient progenitor-derivative species pair, Picea mariana (black spruce) and Picea rubens (red spruce). The spruce taxa likely diverged in geographic isolation during the Pleistocene and came into secondary contact during late Holocene. A total of 300 SNPs distributed across the 12 linkage groups (LG) of black spruce were genotyped for 385 individual trees from 33 populations distributed across the allopatric zone of each species and within the zone of sympatry. An integrative framework combining three population genomic approaches was used to scan the genomes, revealing heterogeneous patterns of introgression. A total of 23 SNPs scattered over 10 LG were considered impermeable to introgression and putatively under diverging selection. These loci revealed the existence of impermeable genomic regions forming the species boundary and are thus indicative of ongoing speciation between these two genetic lineages. Another 238 SNPs reflected selectively neutral diffusion across the porous species barrier. Finally, 39 highly permeable SNPs suggested ancestral polymorphism along with balancing selection. The heterogeneous patterns of introgression across the genome indicated that the speciation process between black spruce and red spruce is young and incomplete, albeit some interspecific differences are maintained, allowing ongoing species divergence even in sympatry. The approach developed in this study can be used to track the progression of ongoing speciation processes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Architecture & Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  14. Obtaining retrotransposon sequences, analysis of their genomic distribution and use of retrotransposon-derived genetic markers in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Rey-Baños

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons with long terminal repeats (LTR-RTs are widespread mobile elements in eukaryotic genomes. We obtained a total of 81 partial LTR-RT sequences from lentil corresponding to internal retrotransposon components and LTRs. Sequences were obtained by PCR from genomic DNA. Approximately 37% of the LTR-RT internal sequences presented premature stop codons, pointing out that these elements must be non-autonomous. LTR sequences were obtained using the iPBS technique which amplifies sequences between LTR-RTs. A total of 193 retrotransposon-derived genetic markers, mainly iPBS, were used to obtain a genetic linkage map from 94 F7 inbred recombinant lines derived from the cross between the cultivar Lupa and the wild ancestor L. culinaris subsp. orientalis. The genetic map included 136 markers located in eight linkage groups. Clusters of tightly linked retrotransposon-derived markers were detected in linkage groups LG1, LG2, and LG6, hence denoting a non-random genomic distribution. Phylogenetic analyses identified the LTR-RT families in which internal and LTR sequences are included. Ty3-gypsy elements were more frequent than Ty1-copia, mainly due to the high Ogre element frequency in lentil, as also occurs in other species of the tribe Vicieae. LTR and internal sequences were used to analyze in silico their distribution among the contigs of the lentil draft genome. Up to 8.8% of the lentil contigs evidenced the presence of at least one LTR-RT similar sequence. A statistical analysis suggested a non-random distribution of these elements within of the lentil genome. In most cases (between 97% and 72%, depending on the LTR-RT type none of the internal sequences flanked by the LTR sequence pair was detected, suggesting that defective and non-autonomous LTR-RTs are very frequent in lentil. Results support that LTR-RTs are abundant and widespread throughout of the lentil genome and that they are a suitable source of genetic markers useful to carry

  15. Characterization of Camptothecin-induced Genomic Changes in the Camptothecin-resistant T-ALL-derived Cell Line CPT-K5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Eigil; Nielsen, Christine J F; Roy, Amit; Tesauro, Cinzia; Jakobsen, Ann-Katrine; Stougaard, Magnus; Knudsen, Birgitta R

    2018-01-01

    Acquisition of resistance to topoisomerase I (TOP1)-targeting camptothecin (CPT) derivatives is a major clinical problem. Little is known about the underlying chromosomal and genomic mechanisms. We characterized the CPT-K5 cell line expressing mutant CPT-resistant TOP1 and its parental T-cell derived acute lymphoblastic leukemia CPT-sensitive RPMI-8402 cell line by karyotyping and molecular genetic methods, including subtractive oligo-based array comparative genomic hybridization (soaCGH) analysis. Karyotyping revealed that CPT-K5 cells had acquired additional structural aberrations and a reduced modal chromosomal number compared to RPMI-8402. soaCGH analysis identified vast copy number alterations and >200 unbalanced DNA breakpoints distributed unevenly across the chromosomal complement in CPT-K5. In addition, the short tandem repeat alleles were found to be highly different between CPT-K5 and its parental cell line. We identified copy number alterations affecting genes important for maintaining genome integrity and reducing CPT-induced DNA damage. We show for the first time that short tandem repeats are targets for TOP1 cleavage, that can be differentially stimulated by CPT. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. Interactions of Neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 (RS218 and Its Derivatives Lacking Genomic Islands with Phagocytic Acanthamoeba castellanii and Nonphagocytic Brain Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Abubakar Yousuf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we determined the role of various genomic islands in E. coli K1 interactions with phagocytic A. castellanii and nonphagocytic brain microvascular endothelial cells. The findings revealed that the genomic islands deletion mutants of RS218 related to toxins (peptide toxin, α-hemolysin, adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin, protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin, invasins (IbeA, CNF1, metabolism (D-serine catabolism, dihydroxyacetone, glycerol, and glyoxylate metabolism showed reduced interactions with both A. castellanii and brain microvascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, the deletion of RS218-derived genomic island 21 containing adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin, protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin, invasins (CNF1, metabolism (D-serine catabolism abolished E. coli K1-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity in a CNF1-independent manner. Therefore, the characterization of these genomic islands should reveal mechanisms of evolutionary gain for E. coli K1 pathogenicity.

  17. Genome-derived insights into the biology of the hepatotoxic bloom-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 90

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria can form massive toxic blooms in fresh and brackish bodies of water and are frequently responsible for the poisoning of animals and pose a health risk for humans. Anabaena is a genus of filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria commonly implicated as a toxin producer in blooms in aquatic ecosystems throughout the world. The biology of bloom-forming cyanobacteria is poorly understood at the genome level. Results Here, we report the complete sequence and comprehensive annotation of the bloom-forming Anabaena sp. strain 90 genome. It comprises two circular chromosomes and three plasmids with a total size of 5.3 Mb, encoding a total of 4,738 genes. The genome is replete with mobile genetic elements. Detailed manual annotation demonstrated that almost 5% of the gene repertoire consists of pseudogenes. A further 5% of the genome is dedicated to the synthesis of small peptides that are the products of both ribosomal and nonribosomal biosynthetic pathways. Inactivation of the hassallidin (an antifungal cyclic peptide biosynthetic gene cluster through a deletion event and a natural mutation of the buoyancy-permitting gvpG gas vesicle gene were documented. The genome contains a large number of genes encoding restriction-modification systems. Two novel excision elements were found in the nifH gene that is required for nitrogen fixation. Conclusions Genome analysis demonstrated that this strain invests heavily in the production of bioactive compounds and restriction-modification systems. This well-annotated genome provides a platform for future studies on the ecology and biology of these important bloom-forming cyanobacteria.

  18. Relational Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    The present study of PhD education and its impact on architectural research singles out three layers of relational architecture. A first layer of relationality appears in a graphic model in which an intimate link between PhD education and architectural research is outlined. The model reflects...... in a scholarly institution (element #3), as well as the certified PhD scholar (element #4) and the architectural profession, notably its labour market (element #5). This first layer outlines the contemporary context which allows architectural research to take place in a dynamic relationship to doctoral education....... A second layer of relational architecture is revealed when one examines the conception of architecture generated in selected PhD dissertations. Focusing on six dissertations with which the author of the present article was involved as a supervisor, the analysis lays bare a series of dynamic...

  19. Assessment of the contribution of cocoa-derived strains of Acetobacter ghanensis and Acetobacter senegalensis to the cocoa bean fermentation process through a genomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illeghems, Koen; Pelicaen, Rudy; De Vuyst, Luc; Weckx, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Acetobacter ghanensis LMG 23848(T) and Acetobacter senegalensis 108B are acetic acid bacteria that originate from a spontaneous cocoa bean heap fermentation process and that have been characterised as strains with interesting functionalities through metabolic and kinetic studies. As there is currently little genetic information available for these species, whole-genome sequencing of A. ghanensis LMG 23848(T) and A. senegalensis 108B and subsequent data analysis was performed. This approach not only revealed characteristics such as the metabolic potential and genomic architecture, but also allowed to indicate the genetic adaptations related to the cocoa bean fermentation process. Indeed, evidence was found that both species possessed the genetic ability to be involved in citrate assimilation and displayed adaptations in their respiratory chain that might improve their competitiveness during the cocoa bean fermentation process. In contrast, other properties such as the dependence on glycerol or mannitol and lactate as energy sources or a less efficient acid stress response may explain their low competitiveness. The presence of a gene coding for a proton-translocating transhydrogenase in A. ghanensis LMG 23848(T) and the genes involved in two aromatic compound degradation pathways in A. senegalensis 108B indicate that these strains have an extended functionality compared to Acetobacter species isolated from other ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigating the Role of Surface Materials and Three Dimensional Architecture on In Vitro Differentiation of Porcine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Bruun Hartmann

    Full Text Available In vitro generation of dendritic-like cells through differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes is typically done using two-dimensional polystyrene culture plates. In the process of optimising cell culture techniques, engineers have developed fluidic micro-devises usually manufactured in materials other than polystyrene and applying three-dimensional structures more similar to the in vivo environment. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS is an often used polymer for lab-on-a-chip devices but not much is known about the effect of changing the culture surface material from polystyrene to PDMS. In the present study the differentiation of porcine monocytes to monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs was investigated using CD172apos pig blood monocytes stimulated with GM-CSF and IL-4. Monocytes were cultured on surfaces made of two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS and carbonised three-dimensional PDMS. Cells cultured conventionally (on two-dimensional polystyrene differentiated into moDCs as expected. Interestingly, gene expression of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines, and pattern recognition receptors was influenced by culture surface material and architecture. Distinct clustering of cells, based on similar expression patterns of 46 genes of interest, was seen for cells isolated from two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS. Changing the material from polystyrene to PDMS resulted in cells with expression patterns usually associated with macrophage expression (upregulation of CD163 and downregulation of CD1a, FLT3, LAMP3 and BATF3. However, this was purely based on gene expression level, and no functional assays were included in this study which would be necessary in order to classify the cells as being macrophages. When changing to three-dimensional culture the cells became increasingly activated in terms of IL6, IL8, IL10 and CCR5 gene expression. Further stimulation

  1. 3D Architecture, dynamics as well as functional implications of genome organization of the Prader-Willi/Angelmann syndrome region & the Immunoglobin Heavy-Chain locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe general 3D architecture of the immunoglobin heavy-chain (Igh) locus was determined by a novel interdisciplinary combination of high-resolution FISH and high-resolution epifluorescence spectral distance microscopy with analytical analysis, computer simulations, as well as

  2. Whole Genome Sequence of Two Wild-Derived Mus musculus domesticus Inbred Strains, LEWES/EiJ and ZALENDE/EiJ, with Different Diploid Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Morgan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wild-derived mouse inbred strains are becoming increasingly popular for complex traits analysis, evolutionary studies, and systems genetics. Here, we report the whole-genome sequencing of two wild-derived mouse inbred strains, LEWES/EiJ and ZALENDE/EiJ, of Mus musculus domesticus origin. These two inbred strains were selected based on their geographic origin, karyotype, and use in ongoing research. We generated 14× and 18× coverage sequence, respectively, and discovered over 1.1 million novel variants, most of which are private to one of these strains. This report expands the number of wild-derived inbred genomes in the Mus genus from six to eight. The sequence variation can be accessed via an online query tool; variant calls (VCF format and alignments (BAM format are available for download from a dedicated ftp site. Finally, the sequencing data have also been stored in a lossless, compressed, and indexed format using the multi-string Burrows-Wheeler transform. All data can be used without restriction.

  3. Erasure of DNA methylation, genomic imprints, and epimutations in a primordial germ-cell model derived from mouse pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Stel, Jente M; Shioda, Keiko; Qu, Na; Odajima, Junko; Mitsunaga, Shino; Zhang, Xiangfan; Nagano, Makoto; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Isselbacher, Kurt J; Shioda, Toshi

    2016-08-23

    The genome-wide depletion of 5-methylcytosines (5meCs) caused by passive dilution through DNA synthesis without daughter strand methylation and active enzymatic processes resulting in replacement of 5meCs with unmethylated cytosines is a hallmark of primordial germ cells (PGCs). Although recent studies have shown that in vitro differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to PGC-like cells (PGCLCs) mimics the in vivo differentiation of epiblast cells to PGCs, how DNA methylation status of PGCLCs resembles the dynamics of 5meC erasure in embryonic PGCs remains controversial. Here, by differential detection of genome-wide 5meC and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmeC) distributions by deep sequencing, we show that PGCLCs derived from mouse PSCs recapitulated the process of genome-wide DNA demethylation in embryonic PGCs, including significant demethylation of imprint control regions (ICRs) associated with increased mRNA expression of the corresponding imprinted genes. Although 5hmeCs were also significantly diminished in PGCLCs, they retained greater amounts of 5hmeCs than intragonadal PGCs. The genomes of both PGCLCs and PGCs selectively retained both 5meCs and 5hmeCs at a small number of repeat sequences such as GSAT_MM, of which the significant retention of bisulfite-resistant cytosines was corroborated by reanalysis of previously published whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data for intragonadal PGCs. PSCs harboring abnormal hypermethylation at ICRs of the Dlk1-Gtl2-Dio3 imprinting cluster diminished these 5meCs upon differentiation to PGCLCs, resulting in transcriptional reactivation of the Gtl2 gene. These observations support the usefulness of PGCLCs in studying the germline epigenetic erasure including imprinted genes, epimutations, and erasure-resistant loci, which may be involved in transgenerational epigenetic inheritance.

  4. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  5. Untangling the hybrid nature of modern pig genomes: a mosaic derived from biogeographically distinct and highly divergent Sus scrofa populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, M.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Madsen, O.; Frantz, L.A.F.; Paudel, Y.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.

    2014-01-01

    The merging of populations after an extended period of isolation and divergence is a common phenomenon, in natural settings as well as due to human interference. Individuals with such hybrid origins contain genomes that essentially form a mosaic of different histories and demographies. Pigs are an

  6. Evaluation and validation of de novo and hybrid assembly techniques to derive high-quality genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utturkar, Sagar M; Klingeman, Dawn M; Land, Miriam L; Schadt, Christopher W; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Pelletier, Dale A; Brown, Steven D

    2014-10-01

    To assess the potential of different types of sequence data combined with de novo and hybrid assembly approaches to improve existing draft genome sequences. Illumina, 454 and PacBio sequencing technologies were used to generate de novo and hybrid genome assemblies for four different bacteria, which were assessed for quality using summary statistics (e.g. number of contigs, N50) and in silico evaluation tools. Differences in predictions of multiple copies of rDNA operons for each respective bacterium were evaluated by PCR and Sanger sequencing, and then the validated results were applied as an additional criterion to rank assemblies. In general, assemblies using longer PacBio reads were better able to resolve repetitive regions. In this study, the combination of Illumina and PacBio sequence data assembled through the ALLPATHS-LG algorithm gave the best summary statistics and most accurate rDNA operon number predictions. This study will aid others looking to improve existing draft genome assemblies. All assembly tools except CLC Genomics Workbench are freely available under GNU General Public License. brownsd@ornl.gov Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Next generation sequencing reveals genome downsizing in allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum, predominantly through the elimination of paternally derived repetitive DNAs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Renny-Byfield, S.; Chester, M.; Kovařík, Aleš; Le Comber, S.C.; Grandbastien, M.-A.; Deloger, M.; Nichols, R.A.; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Chase, M.W.; Leitch, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 10 (2011), s. 2843-2854 ISSN 0737-4038 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : allopolyploidy * evolution * genome structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.550, year: 2011

  8. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ’Catalyst Architecture’ takes its point of departure in a broadened understanding of the role of architecture in relation to developmental problems in large cities. Architectural projects frame particular functions and via their form language, they can provide the user with an aesthetic experience....... The broadened understanding of architecture consists in that an architectural project, by virtue of its placement in the context and of its composition of programs, can have a mediating role in a positive or cultural development of the district in question. In this sense, we talk about architecture as catalyst...... cities on the planet have growing pains and social cohesiveness is under pressure from an increased difference between rich and poor, social segregation, ghettoes, immigration of guest workers and refugees, commercial mass tourism etc. In this context, it is important to ask which role architecture...

  9. Genomic Variation in IbA10G2 and Other Patient-Derived Cryptosporidium hominis Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Per; Andersson, Sofia; Winiecka-Krusnell, Jadwiga; Hallström, Björn; Alsmark, Cecilia; Troell, Karin; Beser, Jessica; Arrighi, Romanico B G

    2017-03-01

    In order to improve genotyping and epidemiological analysis of Cryptosporidium spp., genomic data need to be generated directly from a broad range of clinical specimens. Utilizing a robust method that we developed for the purification and generation of amplified target DNA, we present its application for the successful isolation and whole-genome sequencing of 14 different Cryptosporidium hominis patient specimens. Six isolates of subtype IbA10G2 were analyzed together with a single representative each of 8 other subtypes: IaA20R3, IaA23R3, IbA9G3, IbA13G3, IdA14, IeA11G3T3, IfA12G1, and IkA18G1. Parasite burden was measured over a range of more than 2 orders of magnitude for all samples, while the genomes were sequenced to mean depths of between 17× and 490× coverage. Sequence homology-based functional annotation identified several genes of interest, including the gene encoding Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein 9 (COWP9), which presented a predicted loss-of-function mutation in all the sequence subtypes, except for that seen with IbA10G2, which has a sequence identical to the Cryptosporidium parvum reference Iowa II sequence. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis showed that all the IbA10G2 genomes form a monophyletic clade in the C. hominis tree as expected and yet display some heterogeneity within the IbA10G2 subtype. The current report validates the aforementioned method for isolating and sequencing Cryptosporidium directly from clinical stool samples. In addition, the analysis demonstrates the potential in mining data generated from sequencing multiple whole genomes of Cryptosporidium from human fecal samples, while alluding to the potential for a higher degree of genotyping within Cryptosporidium epidemiology. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    How can architecture promote the enriching experiences of the tolerant, the democratic, and the learning city - a city worth living in, worth supporting and worth investing in? Catalyst Architecture comprises architectural projects, which, by virtue of their location, context and their combination...... of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for: sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructure appropriate renovation of dilapidated urban districts strengthening of social cohesiveness in the city development...

  11. Genome-wide association study reveals genetic architecture of eating behavior in pigs and its implications for humans obesity by comparative mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Ostersen, Tage

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying genomic regions controlling feeding behavior in Danish Duroc boars and its potential implications for eating behavior in humans. Data regarding individual daily feed intake (DFI), total daily time spent in feeder (TPD), number of daily visits to feeder (NVD......1, PTPN4, MTMR4 and RNGTT) and positive regulation of peptide secretion genes (GHRH, NNAT and TCF7L2) were highly significantly associated with feeding behavior traits. This is the first GWAS to identify genetic variants and biological mechanisms for eating behavior in pigs and these results...... are important for genetic improvement of pig feed efficiency. We have also conducted pig-human comparative gene mapping to reveal key genomic regions and/or genes on the human genome that may influence eating behavior in human beings and consequently affect the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome...

  12. Genomic analysis of HIV type 1 strains derived from a mother and child pair of long-term nonprogressors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reiniš, Milan; Weiser, B.; Kuiken, C.; Dong, T.; Lang, D.; Nachman, S.; Zhang, Y.; Rowland-Jones, S.; Burger, H.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2007), s. 309-315 ISSN 0889-2229 Grant - others:U.S. National Institue of Allergy and Infectious Disease(US) RO1-AI-42555; Fogarty International Center, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute(US) D43 TW000233 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HIV-1 * genomic analysis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.022, year: 2007

  13. Genome-wide association study in 79,366 European-ancestry individuals informs the genetic architecture of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin D is a steroid hormone precursor that is associated with a range of human traits and diseases. Previous GWAS of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations have identified four genome-wide significant loci (GC, NADSYN1/DHCR7, CYP2R1, CYP24A1). In this study, we expand the previous SUNLIGHT Cons...

  14. Genome-wide association study in 79,366 European-ancestry individuals informs the genetic architecture of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Xia; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Aschard, Hugues; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Richards, J. Brent; Dupuis, Josée; Ingelsson, Erik; Karasik, David; Pilz, Stefan; Berry, Diane; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Zheng, Jusheng; Luan, Jianan; Sofianopoulou, Eleni; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Albanes, Demetrius; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Yao, Lu; Tang, Weihong; Econs, Michael J.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Zhou, Ang; Power, Chris; McCarthy, Mark I.; Michos, Erin D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Freedman, Neal D.; Huang, Wen-Yi; van Schoor, Natasja M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Enneman, Anke; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Booth, Sarah L.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Zhou, Yanhua; Ripatti, Samuli; Ohlsson, Claes; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Lorentzon, Mattias; Eriksson, Johan G.; Shea, M. Kyla; Houston, Denise K.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt K.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Peacock, Munro; Gieger, Christian; Beekman, Marian; Slagboom, Eline; Deelen, Joris; van Heemst, Diana; Kleber, Marcus E.; März, Winfried; de Boer, Ian H.; Wood, Alexis C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rich, Stephen S.; Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; den Heijer, Martin; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Cavadino, Alana; Joshi, Peter K.; Wilson, James F.; Hayward, Caroline; Lind, Lars; Michaëlsson, Karl; Trompet, Stella; Zillikens, M. Carola; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Broer, Linda; Zgaga, Lina; Campbell, Harry; Theodoratou, Evropi; Farrington, Susan M.; Timofeeva, Maria; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Valdes, Ana M.; Tikkanen, Emmi; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T.; Mikkilä, Vera; Ikram, M. Arfan; Sattar, Naveed; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gundersen, Thomas E.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Butterworth, Adam S.; Danesh, John; Spector, Timothy; Wang, Thomas J.; Hyppönen, Elina; Kraft, Peter; Kiel, Douglas P.

    2018-01-01

    Vitamin D is a steroid hormone precursor that is associated with a range of human traits and diseases. Previous GWAS of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations have identified four genome-wide significant loci (GC, NADSYN1/DHCR7, CYP2R1, CYP24A1). In this study, we expand the previous SUNLIGHT

  15. Genome-wide association study in 79,366 European-ancestry individuals informs the genetic architecture of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, X. (Xia); P.F. O'Reilly (Paul); H. Aschard (Hugues); Hsu, Y.-H. (Yi-Hsiang); Richards, J.B. (J. Brent); J. Dupuis (Josée); Ingelsson, E. (Erik); D. Karasik (David); D.T. Pilz (Daniela); D. Berry (Diane); B. Kestenbaum (Bryan); Zheng, J. (Jusheng); Luan, J. (Jianan); Sofianopoulou, E. (Eleni); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); D. Albanes (Demetrius); P.L. Lutsey (Pamela); Yao, L. (Lu); W. Tang (Weihong); M.J. Econs (Michael); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); H. Völzke (Henry); Zhou, A. (Ang); C. Power (Christopher); McCarthy, M.I. (Mark I.); Michos, E.D. (Erin D.); Boerwinkle, E. (Eric); Weinstein, S.J. (Stephanie J.); Freedman, N.D. (Neal D.); Huang, W.-Y. (Wen-Yi); N.M. van Schoor (Natasja); N. van der Velde (Nathalie); Groot, L.C.P.G.M.D. (Lisette C.P.G.M. De); A.W. Enneman (Anke); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); Booth, S.L. (Sarah L.); R. Vasan (Ramachandran); C.-T. Liu (Ching-Ti); Y. Zhou (Yanhua); S. Ripatti (Samuli); Ohlsson, C. (Claes); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); K. Hagen (Knut); Shea, M.K. (M. Kyla); Houston, D.K. (Denise K.); Kritchevsky, S.B. (Stephen B.); Y. Liu (YongMei); Lohman, K.K. (Kurt K.); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); Peacock, M. (Munro); C. Gieger (Christian); M. Beekman (Marian); E. Slagboom (Eline); J. Deelen (Joris); Heemst, D.V. (DIana Van); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); W. März (Winfried); I.H. de Boer (Ian); Wood, A.C. (Alexis C.); Rotter, J.I. (Jerome I.); S.S. Rich (Stephen); C. Robinson-Cohen (Cassianne); M. den Heijer (Martin); Jarvelin, M.-R. (Marjo-Riitta); A. Cavadino (Alana); P.K. Joshi (Peter); Wilson, J.F. (James F.); C. Hayward (Caroline); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); K. Michaëlsson (Karl); S. Trompet (Stella); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); Uitterlinden, A.G. (Andre G.); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); L. Broer (Linda); Zgaga, L. (Lina); H. Campbell (Harry); E. Theodoratou (Evropi); S.M. Farrington (Susan M.); M.N. Timofeeva (Maria N.); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); A.M. Valdes; E. Tikkanen (Emmi); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); M. Kähönen (Mika); Raitakari, O.T. (Olli T.); V. Mikkilä (Vera); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); N. Sattar (Naveed); Jukema, J.W. (J. Wouter); N.J. Wareham (Nick); C. Langenberg (Claudia); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); Gundersen, T.E. (Thomas E.); Khaw, K.-T. (Kay-Tee); Butterworth, A.S. (Adam S.); Danesh, J. (John); T.D. Spector (Timothy); Wang, T.J. (Thomas J.); E. Hypponen (Elina); P. Kraft (Peter); D.P. Kiel (Douglas P.)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractVitamin D is a steroid hormone precursor that is associated with a range of human traits and diseases. Previous GWAS of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations have identified four genome-wide significant loci (GC, NADSYN1/DHCR7, CYP2R1, CYP24A1). In this study, we expand the previous

  16. Genome-wide architecture of reproductive isolation in a naturally occurring hybrid zone between Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janoušek, V.; Wang, L.; Luzynski, K.; Dufková, Petra; Mrkvicová Vyskočilová, Martina; Nachman, M. W.; Munclinger, P.; Macholán, Miloš; Piálek, Jaroslav; Tucker, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 12 (2012), s. 3032-3047 ISSN 0962-1083 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/0640 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : genomics * proteomics * hybridization * mammals * speciation Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 6.275, year: 2012

  17. Architectural Contestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merle, J.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the reductive reading of Georges Bataille's work done within the field of architectural criticism and theory which tends to set aside the fundamental ‘broken’ totality of Bataille's oeuvre and also to narrowly interpret it as a mere critique of architectural form,

  18. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra ePesko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wildtype gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense nonsegmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales have specific genome architecture: 3′ UTR – core protein genes – envelope protein genes – RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene – 5′ UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV variants with the nucleocapsid (N gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N-gene translocation towards the 5’ end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function, especially on PC3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective

  19. Genome-edited human stem cell-derived beta cells: a powerful tool for drilling down on type 2 diabetes GWAS biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Nicola L; Gloyn, Anna L

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease of pandemic proportions, one defined by a complex aetiological mix of genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and lifestyle risk factors. Whilst the last decade of T2D genetic research has identified more than 100 loci showing strong statistical association with disease susceptibility, our inability to capitalise upon these signals reflects, in part, a lack of appropriate human cell models for study. This review discusses the impact of two complementary, state-of-the-art technologies on T2D genetic research: the generation of stem cell-derived, endocrine pancreas-lineage cells and the editing of their genomes. Such models facilitate investigation of diabetes-associated genomic perturbations in a physiologically representative cell context and allow the role of both developmental and adult islet dysfunction in T2D pathogenesis to be investigated. Accordingly, we interrogate the role that patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell models are playing in understanding cellular dysfunction in monogenic diabetes, and how site-specific nucleases such as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system are helping to confirm genes crucial to human endocrine pancreas development. We also highlight the novel biology gleaned in the absence of patient lines, including an ability to model the whole phenotypic spectrum of diabetes phenotypes occurring both in utero and in adult cells, interrogating the non-coding 'islet regulome' for disease-causing perturbations, and understanding the role of other islet cell types in aberrant glycaemia. This article aims to reinforce the importance of investigating T2D signals in cell models reflecting appropriate species, genomic context, developmental time point, and tissue type.

  20. Genome-edited human stem cell-derived beta cells: a powerful tool for drilling down on type 2 diabetes GWAS biology [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola L. Beer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is a disease of pandemic proportions, one defined by a complex aetiological mix of genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and lifestyle risk factors. Whilst the last decade of T2D genetic research has identified more than 100 loci showing strong statistical association with disease susceptibility, our inability to capitalise upon these signals reflects, in part, a lack of appropriate human cell models for study. This review discusses the impact of two complementary, state-of-the-art technologies on T2D genetic research: the generation of stem cell-derived, endocrine pancreas-lineage cells and the editing of their genomes. Such models facilitate investigation of diabetes-associated genomic perturbations in a physiologically representative cell context and allow the role of both developmental and adult islet dysfunction in T2D pathogenesis to be investigated. Accordingly, we interrogate the role that patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell models are playing in understanding cellular dysfunction in monogenic diabetes, and how site-specific nucleases such as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas9 system are helping to confirm genes crucial to human endocrine pancreas development. We also highlight the novel biology gleaned in the absence of patient lines, including an ability to model the whole phenotypic spectrum of diabetes phenotypes occurring both in utero and in adult cells, interrogating the non-coding ‘islet regulome’ for disease-causing perturbations, and understanding the role of other islet cell types in aberrant glycaemia. This article aims to reinforce the importance of investigating T2D signals in cell models reflecting appropriate species, genomic context, developmental time point, and tissue type.

  1. Systemic Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poletto, Marco; Pasquero, Claudia

    This is a manual investigating the subject of urban ecology and systemic development from the perspective of architectural design. It sets out to explore two main goals: to discuss the contemporary relevance of a systemic practice to architectural design, and to share a toolbox of informational...... design protocols developed to describe the city as a territory of self-organization. Collecting together nearly a decade of design experiments by the authors and their practice, ecoLogicStudio, the book discusses key disciplinary definitions such as ecologic urbanism, algorithmic architecture, bottom......-up or tactical design, behavioural space and the boundary of the natural and the artificial realms within the city and architecture. A new kind of "real-time world-city" is illustrated in the form of an operational design manual for the assemblage of proto-architectures, the incubation of proto...

  2. Co3O4 based non-enzymatic glucose sensor with high sensitivity and reliable stability derived from hollow hierarchical architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liangliang; He, Gege; Cai, Yanhua; Wu, Shenping; Su, Yongyao; Yan, Hengqing; Yang, Cong; Chen, Yanling; Li, Lu

    2018-02-01

    Inspired by kinetics, the design of hollow hierarchical electrocatalysts through large-scale integration of building blocks is recognized as an effective approach to the achievement of superior electrocatalytic performance. In this work, a hollow, hierarchical Co3O4 architecture (Co3O4 HHA) was constructed using a coordinated etching and precipitation (CEP) method followed by calcination. The resulting Co3O4 HHA electrode exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity in terms of high sensitivity (839.3 μA mM-1 cm-2) and reliable stability in glucose detection. The high sensitivity could be attributed to the large specific surface area (SSA), ample unimpeded penetration diffusion paths and high electron transfer rate originating from the unique two-dimensional (2D) sheet-like character and hollow porous architecture. The hollow hierarchical structure also affords sufficient interspace for accommodation of volume change and structural strain, resulting in enhanced stability. The results indicate that Co3O4 HHA could have potential for application in the design of non-enzymatic glucose sensors, and that the construction of hollow hierarchical architecture provides an efficient way to design highly active, stable electrocatalysts.

  3. Architectural Theatricality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    This PhD thesis is motived by a personal interest in the theoretical, practical and creative qualities of architecture. But also a wonder and curiosity about the cultural and social relations architecture represents through its occupation with both the sciences and the arts. Inspired by present i...... with the material appearance of objects, but also the imaginary world of dreams and memories which are concealed with the communicative significance of intentions when designing the future super hospitals....... initiatives in Aalborg Hospital to overcome patient undernutrition by refurbishing eating environments, this thesis engages in an investigation of the interior architectural qualities of patient eating environments. The relevance for this holistic perspective, synthesizing health, food and architecture......, is the current building of a series of Danish ‘super hospitals’ and an increased focus among architectural practices on research-based knowledge produced with the architectural sub-disciplines Healing Architecture and Evidence-Based Design. The problem is that this research does not focus on patient eating...

  4. Furfural-tolerant Zymomonas mobilis derived from error-prone PCR-based whole genome shuffling and their tolerant mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Suzhen; Xue, Tingli; Wang, Zhiquan; Ma, Yuanyuan; He, Xueting; Hong, Jiefang; Zou, Shaolan; Song, Hao; Zhang, Minhua

    2018-04-01

    Furfural-tolerant strain is essential for the fermentative production of biofuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, Zymomonas mobilis CP4 was for the first time subjected to error-prone PCR-based whole genome shuffling, and the resulting mutants F211 and F27 that could tolerate 3 g/L furfural were obtained. The mutant F211 under various furfural stress conditions could rapidly grow when the furfural concentration reduced to 1 g/L. Meanwhile, the two mutants also showed higher tolerance to high concentration of glucose than the control strain CP4. Genome resequencing revealed that the F211 and F27 had 12 and 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The activity assay demonstrated that the activity of NADH-dependent furfural reductase in mutant F211 and CP4 was all increased under furfural stress, and the activity peaked earlier in mutant than in control. Also, furfural level in the culture of F211 was also more rapidly decreased. These indicate that the increase in furfural tolerance of the mutants may be resulted from the enhanced NADH-dependent furfural reductase activity during early log phase, which could lead to an accelerated furfural detoxification process in mutants. In all, we obtained Z. mobilis mutants with enhanced furfural and high concentration of glucose tolerance, and provided valuable clues for the mechanism of furfural tolerance and strain development.

  5. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  6. Healing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folmer, Mette Blicher; Mullins, Michael; Frandsen, Anne Kathrine

    2012-01-01

    The project examines how architecture and design of space in the intensive unit promotes or hinders interaction between relatives and patients. The primary starting point is the relatives. Relatives’ support and interaction with their loved ones is important in order to promote the patients healing...... process. Therefore knowledge on how space can support interaction is fundamental for the architect, in order to make the best design solutions. Several scientific studies document that the hospital's architecture and design are important for human healing processes, including how the physical environment...... architectural and design solutions in order to improve quality of interaction between relative and patient in the hospital's intensive unit....

  7. Architectural technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    The booklet offers an overall introduction to the Institute of Architectural Technology and its projects and activities, and an invitation to the reader to contact the institute or the individual researcher for further information. The research, which takes place at the Institute of Architectural...... Technology at the Roayl Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, reflects a spread between strategic, goal-oriented pilot projects, commissioned by a ministry, a fund or a private company, and on the other hand projects which originate from strong personal interests and enthusiasm of individual...

  8. SNUGB: a versatile genome browser supporting comparative and functional fungal genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seungill

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the full genome sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were released in 1996, genome sequences of over 90 fungal species have become publicly available. The heterogeneous formats of genome sequences archived in different sequencing centers hampered the integration of the data for efficient and comprehensive comparative analyses. The Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform (CFGP was developed to archive these data via a single standardized format that can support multifaceted and integrated analyses of the data. To facilitate efficient data visualization and utilization within and across species based on the architecture of CFGP and associated databases, a new genome browser was needed. Results The Seoul National University Genome Browser (SNUGB integrates various types of genomic information derived from 98 fungal/oomycete (137 datasets and 34 plant and animal (38 datasets species, graphically presents germane features and properties of each genome, and supports comparison between genomes. The SNUGB provides three different forms of the data presentation interface, including diagram, table, and text, and six different display options to support visualization and utilization of the stored information. Information for individual species can be quickly accessed via a new tool named the taxonomy browser. In addition, SNUGB offers four useful data annotation/analysis functions, including 'BLAST annotation.' The modular design of SNUGB makes its adoption to support other comparative genomic platforms easy and facilitates continuous expansion. Conclusion The SNUGB serves as a powerful platform supporting comparative and functional genomics within the fungal kingdom and also across other kingdoms. All data and functions are available at the web site http://genomebrowser.snu.ac.kr/.

  9. Rapid RT-PCR amplification of full-length poliovirus genomes allows rapid discrimination between wild-type and recombinant vaccine-derived polioviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Hein J; Schepp, Rutger M; van Nunen, Femke J H B; Kimman, Tjeerd G

    2004-03-01

    Poliomyelitis outbreaks in areas that were free for a long time of wild-type polioviruses have been reported. Characterization at nucleotide level of the causative agents showed that the isolated viruses were recombinant oral polio vaccine (OPV)-derived polioviruses. To allow rapid identification and detailed analysis of such recombinant polioviruses, a robust full-length reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) was developed using SuperScript II (RT) and expand (PCR). Without extensive purification, it was possible to amplify and characterize the full-length genomes of all selected vaccine, wild-type, and recombinant vaccine-derived polioviruses within a week. Endonuclease nuclease analysis (SpeI) of the full-length amplicons allowed easy discrimination between recombinant and non-recombinant polioviruses. Furthermore, sequence analysis of cloned full-length amplicons of a recombinant vaccine-derived poliovirus strain showed that the quasi-species nature of a viral stock is preserved during the RT-PCR procedure. This robust and rapid RT-PCR method will allow rapid characterization of (recombinant) poliovirus strains in case of a local poliomyelitis outbreak, and will help to assess the risk of the appearance of such strains after wild-type poliovirus has been eradicated globally.

  10. Architectured Nanomembranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturgeon, Matthew R. [Former ORNL postdoc; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL

    2017-07-01

    This paper has reviewed the frontier field of “architectured membranes” that contains anisotropic oriented porous nanostructures of inorganic materials. Three example types of architectured membranes were discussed with some relevant results from our own research: (1) anodized thin-layer titania membranes on porous anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates of different pore sizes, (2) porous glass membranes on alumina substrate, and (3) guest-host membranes based on infiltration of yttrium-stabilized zirconia inside the pore channels of AAO matrices.

  11. Colonization and diversification of aquatic insects on three Macaronesian archipelagos using 59 nuclear loci derived from a draft genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutschmann, Sereina; Detering, Harald; Simon, Sabrina; Funk, David H; Gattolliat, Jean-Luc; Hughes, Samantha J; Raposeiro, Pedro M; DeSalle, Rob; Sartori, Michel; Monaghan, Michael T

    2017-02-01

    The study of processes driving diversification requires a fully sampled and well resolved phylogeny, although a lack of phylogenetic markers remains a limitation for many non-model groups. Multilocus approaches to the study of recent diversification provide a powerful means to study the evolutionary process, but their application remains restricted because multiple unlinked loci with suitable variation for phylogenetic or coalescent analysis are not available for most non-model taxa. Here we identify novel, putative single-copy nuclear DNA (nDNA) phylogenetic markers to study the colonization and diversification of an aquatic insect species complex, Cloeon dipterum L. 1761 (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae), in Macaronesia. Whole-genome sequencing data from one member of the species complex were used to identify 59 nDNA loci (32,213 base pairs), followed by Sanger sequencing of 29 individuals sampled from 13 islands of three Macaronesian archipelagos. Multispecies coalescent analyses established six putative species. Three island species formed a monophyletic clade, with one species occurring on the Azores, Europe and North America. Ancestral state reconstruction indicated at least two colonization events from the mainland (to the Canaries, respectively Azores) and one within the archipelago (between Madeira and the Canaries). Random subsets of the 59 loci showed a positive linear relationship between number of loci and node support. In contrast, node support in the multispecies coalescent tree was negatively correlated with mean number of phylogenetically informative sites per locus, suggesting a complex relationship between tree resolution and marker variability. Our approach highlights the value of combining genomics, coalescent-based phylogeography, species delimitation, and phylogenetic reconstruction to resolve recent diversification events in an archipelago species complex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolutionary pathway to increased virulence and epidemic group A Streptococcus disease derived from 3,615 genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Waleed; Beres, Stephen B; Olsen, Randall J; Dean, Melissa A; Rice, Kelsey A; Long, S Wesley; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Vuopio, Jaana; Raisanen, Kati; Caugant, Dominique A; Steinbakk, Martin; Low, Donald E; McGeer, Allison; Darenberg, Jessica; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Van Beneden, Chris A; Hoffmann, Steen; Musser, James M

    2014-04-29

    We sequenced the genomes of 3,615 strains of serotype Emm protein 1 (M1) group A Streptococcus to unravel the nature and timing of molecular events contributing to the emergence, dissemination, and genetic diversification of an unusually virulent clone that now causes epidemic human infections worldwide. We discovered that the contemporary epidemic clone emerged in stepwise fashion from a precursor cell that first contained the phage encoding an extracellular DNase virulence factor (streptococcal DNase D2, SdaD2) and subsequently acquired the phage encoding the SpeA1 variant of the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A superantigen. The SpeA2 toxin variant evolved from SpeA1 by a single-nucleotide change in the M1 progenitor strain before acquisition by horizontal gene transfer of a large chromosomal region encoding secreted toxins NAD(+)-glycohydrolase and streptolysin O. Acquisition of this 36-kb region in the early 1980s into just one cell containing the phage-encoded sdaD2 and speA2 genes was the final major molecular event preceding the emergence and rapid intercontinental spread of the contemporary epidemic clone. Thus, we resolve a decades-old controversy about the type and sequence of genomic alterations that produced this explosive epidemic. Analysis of comprehensive, population-based contemporary invasive strains from seven countries identified strong patterns of temporal population structure. Compared with a preepidemic reference strain, the contemporary clone is significantly more virulent in nonhuman primate models of pharyngitis and necrotizing fasciitis. A key finding is that the molecular evolutionary events transpiring in just one bacterial cell ultimately have produced millions of human infections worldwide.

  13. From Allergens to Battery Anodes: Nature-Inspired, Pollen Derived Carbon Architectures for Room- and Elevated-Temperature Li-ion Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jialiang; Pol, Vilas G

    2016-02-05

    The conversion of allergic pollen grains into carbon microstructures was carried out through a facile, one-step, solid-state pyrolysis process in an inert atmosphere. The as-prepared carbonaceous particles were further air activated at 300 °C and then evaluated as lithium ion battery anodes at room (25 °C) and elevated (50 °C) temperatures. The distinct morphologies of bee pollens and cattail pollens are resembled on the final architecture of produced carbons. Scanning Electron Microscopy images shows that activated bee pollen carbon (ABP) is comprised of spiky, brain-like, and tiny spheres; while activated cattail pollen carbon (ACP) resembles deflated spheres. Structural analysis through X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed their amorphous nature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of ABP and ACP confirmed that both samples contain high levels of oxygen and small amount of nitrogen contents. At C/10 rate, ACP electrode delivered high specific lithium storage reversible capacities (590 mAh/g at 50 °C and 382 mAh/g at 25 °C) and also exhibited excellent high rate capabilities. Through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies, improved performance of ACP is attributed to its lower charge transfer resistance than ABP. Current studies demonstrate that morphologically distinct renewable pollens could produce carbon architectures for anode applications in energy storage devices.

  14. Architectural freedom and industrialized architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    to explain that architecture can be thought as a complex and diverse design through customization, telling exactly the revitalized storey about the change to a contemporary sustainable and better performing expression in direct relation to the given context. Through the last couple of years we have...... expression in the specific housing area. It is the aim of this article to expand the different design strategies which architects can use – to give the individual project attitudes and designs with architectural quality. Through the customized component production it is possible to choose different...... for retrofit design. If we add the question of the installations e.g. ventilation to this systematic thinking of building technique we get a diverse and functional architecture, thereby creating a new and clearer story telling about new and smart system based thinking behind architectural expression....

  15. Architectural freedom and industrialised architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Architectural freedom and industrialized architecture. Inge Vestergaard, Associate Professor, Cand. Arch. Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark Noerreport 20, 8000 Aarhus C Telephone +45 89 36 0000 E-mai l inge.vestergaard@aarch.dk Based on the repetitive architecture from the "building boom" 1960...... customization, telling exactly the revitalized storey about the change to a contemporary sustainable and better performed expression in direct relation to the given context. Through the last couple of years we have in Denmark been focusing a more sustainable and low energy building technique, which also include...... to the building physic problems a new industrialized period has started based on light weight elements basically made of wooden structures, faced with different suitable materials meant for individual expression for the specific housing area. It is the purpose of this article to widen up the different design...

  16. Architectural freedom and industrialized architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Based on the repetitive architecture from the “building boom” from 1960 to 1973, it is discussed how architects can handle these Danish element and montage buildings through the transformation to upgraded aesthetical, functional and energy efficient architecture. The method used is analysis...... of cases, parallels to literature studies and client and producer interviews. The analysis compares best practice in Denmark and best practice in Austria. Modern architects accepted the fact that industrialized architecture told the storey of repetition and monotony as basic condition. This article aims...... to explain that architecture can be thought as a complex and diverse design through customization, telling exactly the revitalized storey about the change to a contemporary sustainable and better performing expression in direct relation to the given context. Through the last couple of years we have...

  17. PICNIC Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranummi, Niilo

    2005-01-01

    The PICNIC architecture aims at supporting inter-enterprise integration and the facilitation of collaboration between healthcare organisations. The concept of a Regional Health Economy (RHE) is introduced to illustrate the varying nature of inter-enterprise collaboration between healthcare organisations collaborating in providing health services to citizens and patients in a regional setting. The PICNIC architecture comprises a number of PICNIC IT Services, the interfaces between them and presents a way to assemble these into a functioning Regional Health Care Network meeting the needs and concerns of its stakeholders. The PICNIC architecture is presented through a number of views relevant to different stakeholder groups. The stakeholders of the first view are national and regional health authorities and policy makers. The view describes how the architecture enables the implementation of national and regional health policies, strategies and organisational structures. The stakeholders of the second view, the service viewpoint, are the care providers, health professionals, patients and citizens. The view describes how the architecture supports and enables regional care delivery and process management including continuity of care (shared care) and citizen-centred health services. The stakeholders of the third view, the engineering view, are those that design, build and implement the RHCN. The view comprises four sub views: software engineering, IT services engineering, security and data. The proposed architecture is founded into the main stream of how distributed computing environments are evolving. The architecture is realised using the web services approach. A number of well established technology platforms and generic standards exist that can be used to implement the software components. The software components that are specified in PICNIC are implemented in Open Source.

  18. Architectural freedom and industrialised architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    to the building physic problems a new industrialized period has started based on light weight elements basically made of wooden structures, faced with different suitable materials meant for individual expression for the specific housing area. It is the purpose of this article to widen up the different design...... to this systematic thinking of the building technique we get a diverse and functional architecture. Creating a new and clearer story telling about new and smart system based thinking behind the architectural expression....

  19. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2014-11-26

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  20. Genome-wide association mapping reveals a rich genetic architecture of stripe rust resistance loci in emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weizhen; Maccaferri, Marco; Chen, Xianming; Laghetti, Gaetano; Pignone, Domenico; Pumphrey, Michael; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    SNP-based genome scanning in worldwide domesticated emmer germplasm showed high genetic diversity, rapid linkage disequilibrium decay and 51 loci for stripe rust resistance, a large proportion of which were novel. Cultivated emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccum), one of the oldest domesticated crops in the world, is a potentially rich reservoir of variation for improvement of resistance/tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in wheat. Resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in emmer wheat has been under-investigated. Here, we employed genome-wide association (GWAS) mapping with a mixed linear model to dissect effective stripe rust resistance loci in a worldwide collection of 176 cultivated emmer wheat accessions. Adult plants were tested in six environments and seedlings were evaluated with five races from the United States and one from Italy under greenhouse conditions. Five accessions were resistant across all experiments. The panel was genotyped with the wheat 90,000 Illumina iSelect single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and 5106 polymorphic SNP markers with mapped positions were obtained. A high level of genetic diversity and fast linkage disequilibrium decay were observed. In total, we identified 14 loci associated with field resistance in multiple environments. Thirty-seven loci were significantly associated with all-stage (seedling) resistance and six of them were effective against multiple races. Of the 51 total loci, 29 were mapped distantly from previously reported stripe rust resistance genes or quantitative trait loci and represent newly discovered resistance loci. Our results suggest that GWAS is an effective method for characterizing genes in cultivated emmer wheat and confirm that emmer wheat is a rich source of stripe rust resistance loci that can be used for wheat improvement.

  1. Investigating the Role of Surface Materials and Three Dimensional Architecture on In Vitro Differentiation of Porcine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    in materials other than polystyrene and applying three-dimensional structures more similar to the in vivo environment. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is an often used polymer for lab-on-a-chip devices but not much is known about the effect of changing the culture surface material from polystyrene to PDMS......-dimensional PDMS and carbonised three-dimensional PDMS. Cells cultured conventionally (on two-dimensional polystyrene) differentiated into moDCs as expected. Interestingly, gene expression of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines, and pattern recognition receptors was influenced by culture surface material...... and architecture. Distinct clustering of cells, based on similar expression patterns of 46 genes of interest, was seen for cells isolated from two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS. Changing the material from polystyrene to PDMS resulted in cells with expression patterns...

  2. RAD-QTL Mapping Reveals Both Genome-Level Parallelism and Different Genetic Architecture Underlying the Evolution of Body Shape in Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Species Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, Martin; Rogers, Sean M; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie; Normandeau, Eric; Gagnaire, Pierre-Alexandre; Dalziel, Anne C; Chebib, Jobran; Bernatchez, Louis

    2015-05-21

    Parallel changes in body shape may evolve in response to similar environmental conditions, but whether such parallel phenotypic changes share a common genetic basis is still debated. The goal of this study was to assess whether parallel phenotypic changes could be explained by genetic parallelism, multiple genetic routes, or both. We first provide evidence for parallelism in fish shape by using geometric morphometrics among 300 fish representing five species pairs of Lake Whitefish. Using a genetic map comprising 3438 restriction site-associated DNA sequencing single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we then identified quantitative trait loci underlying body shape traits in a backcross family reared in the laboratory. A total of 138 body shape quantitative trait loci were identified in this cross, thus revealing a highly polygenic architecture of body shape in Lake Whitefish. Third, we tested for evidence of genetic parallelism among independent wild populations using both a single-locus method (outlier analysis) and a polygenic approach (analysis of covariation among markers). The single-locus approach provided limited evidence for genetic parallelism. However, the polygenic analysis revealed genetic parallelism for three of the five lakes, which differed from the two other lakes. These results provide evidence for both genetic parallelism and multiple genetic routes underlying parallel phenotypic evolution in fish shape among populations occupying similar ecological niches. Copyright © 2015 Laporte et al.

  3. Architectural Engineers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rikke Premer

    engineering is addresses from two perspectives – as an educational response and an occupational constellation. Architecture and engineering are two of the traditional design professions and they frequently meet in the occupational setting, but at educational institutions they remain largely estranged....... The paper builds on a multi-sited study of an architectural engineering program at the Technical University of Denmark and an architectural engineering team within an international engineering consultancy based on Denmark. They are both responding to new tendencies within the building industry where...... the role of engineers and architects increasingly overlap during the design process, but their approaches reflect different perceptions of the consequences. The paper discusses some of the challenges that design education, not only within engineering, is facing today: young designers must be equipped...

  4. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    collaboration: How can qualitative anthropological approaches contribute to contemporary architecture? And just as importantly: What can anthropologists learn from architects’ understanding of spatial and material surroundings? Recent theoretical developments in anthropology stress the role of materials......Architecture and anthropology have always had a common focus on dwelling, housing, urban life and spatial organisation. Current developments in both disciplines make it even more relevant to explore their boundaries and overlaps. Architects are inspired by anthropological insights and methods......, while recent material and spatial turns in anthropology have also brought an increasing interest in design, architecture and the built environment. Understanding the relationship between the social and the physical is at the heart of both disciplines, and they can obviously benefit from further...

  5. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    Architecture and anthropology have always had a common focus on dwelling, housing, urban life and spatial organisation. Current developments in both disciplines make it even more relevant to explore their boundaries and overlaps. Architects are inspired by anthropological insights and methods......, while recent material and spatial turns in anthropology have also brought an increasing interest in design, architecture and the built environment. Understanding the relationship between the social and the physical is at the heart of both disciplines, and they can obviously benefit from further...... collaboration: How can qualitative anthropological approaches contribute to contemporary architecture? And just as importantly: What can anthropologists learn from architects’ understanding of spatial and material surroundings? Recent theoretical developments in anthropology stress the role of materials...

  6. Architectural Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans

    2010-01-01

    a functional framework for these concepts, but tries increasingly to endow the main idea of the cultural project with a spatially aesthetic expression - a shift towards “experience architecture.” A great number of these projects typically recycle and reinterpret narratives related to historical buildings......In this essay, I focus on the combination of programs and the architecture of cultural projects that have emerged within the last few years. These projects are characterized as “hybrid cultural projects,” because they intend to combine experience with entertainment, play, and learning. This essay...... identifies new rationales related to this development, and it argues that “cultural planning” has increasingly shifted its focus from a cultural institutional approach to a more market-oriented strategy that integrates art and business. The role of architecture has changed, too. It not only provides...

  7. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    anthropology. On the one hand, there are obviously good reasons for developing architecture based on anthropological insights in local contexts and anthropologically inspired techniques for ‘collaborative formation of issues’. Houses and built environments are huge investments, their life expectancy...... and other spaces that architects are preoccupied with. On the other hand, the distinction between architecture and design is not merely one of scale. Design and architecture represent – at least in Denmark – also quite different disciplinary traditions and methods. Where designers develop prototypes......, architects tend to work with models and plans that are not easily understood by lay people. Further, many architects are themselves sceptical towards notions of user-involvement and collaborative design. They fear that the imagination of citizens and users is restricted to what they are already familiar with...

  8. Reframing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren

    2013-01-01

    I would like to thank Prof. Stephen Read (2011) and Prof. Andrew Benjamin (2011) for both giving inspiring and elaborate comments on my article “Dwelling in-between walls: the architectural surround”. As I will try to demonstrate below, their two different responses not only supplement my article...... focuses on how the absence of an initial distinction might threaten the endeavour of my paper. In my reply to Read and Benjamin, I will discuss their suggestions and arguments, while at the same time hopefully clarifying the postphenomenological approach to architecture....

  9. Effects of dietary plant-derived phytonutrients on the genome-wide profiles and coccidiosis resistance in the broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillehoj Hyun S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary plant-derived phytonutrients, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde and Capsicum oleoresin, on the translational regulation of genes associated with immunology, physiology and metabolism using high-throughput microarray analysis and in vivo disease challenge model of avian coccidiosis. Methods In this study, we used nutrigenomics technology to investigate the molecular and genetic mechanisms of dietary modulation of host innate immunity and metabolism by three phytonutrients. To validate their immunomodulatory effects in a disease model, young broiler chickens fed a standard diet supplemented with three phytochemicals (carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and Capsicum oleoresin from one day post-hatch were orally challenged with E. acervulina. The body weight gain and fecal oocyst production were used to evaluate coccidiosis disease parameters. Results Analysis of global gene expression profiles of intestinal tissues from phytonutrient-fed birds indicated that Capsicum oleoresin induced the most gene changes compared to the control group where many of these genes were associated with those of metabolism and immunity. The most reliable network induced by dietary cinnamaldehyde treatment was related with the functions of antigen presentation, humoral immune response, and inflammatory disease. Furthermore, dietary supplementation with these phytonutrients significantly protected broiler chickens against live coccidiosis challenge infection based on body weight and parasite fecundity. Conclusions The results of this study provide clear evidence to support the idea that plant-derived phytochemicals possess immune-enhancing properties in chickens and these new findings create a new possibility to develop effective drug-free alternative strategies for disease control for poultry infectious diseases.

  10. From green architecture to architectural green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    of green architecture. The paper argues that this greenification of facades is insufficient. The green is only a skin cladding the exterior envelope without having a spatial significance. Through the paper it is proposed to flip the order of words from green architecture to architectural green...... that describes the architectural exclusivity of this particular architecture genre. The adjective green expresses architectural qualities differentiating green architecture from none-green architecture. Currently, adding trees and vegetation to the building’s facade is the main architectural characteristics...

  11. Architecture Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacob, Maria-Eugenia; Jonkers, Henk; van der Torre, Leon; de Boer, Frank S.; Bonsangue, Marcello; Stam, Andries W.; Lankhorst, Marc M.; Quartel, Dick A.C.; Aldea, Adina; Lankhorst, Marc

    2017-01-01

    This chapter also explains what the added value of enterprise architecture analysis techniques is in addition to existing, more detailed, and domain-specific ones for business processes or software, for example. Analogous to the idea of using the ArchiMate enterprise modelling language to integrate

  12. Metabolistic Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Textile Spaces presents different approaches to using textile as a spatial definer and artistic medium. The publication collages images and text, art and architecture, science, philosophy and literature, process and product, past, present and future. It forms an insight into soft materials...

  13. Textile Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen

    2010-01-01

    Textiles can be used as building skins, adding new aesthetic and functional qualities to architecture. Just like we as humans can put on a coat, buildings can also get dressed. Depending on our mood, or on the weather, we can change coat, and so can the building. But the idea of using textiles...

  14. Sauropod dinosaurs evolved moderately sized genomes unrelated to body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, Chris L; Brusatte, Stephen L; Stein, Koen

    2009-12-22

    Sauropodomorph dinosaurs include the largest land animals to have ever lived, some reaching up to 10 times the mass of an African elephant. Despite their status defining the upper range for body size in land animals, it remains unknown whether sauropodomorphs evolved larger-sized genomes than non-avian theropods, their sister taxon, or whether a relationship exists between genome size and body size in dinosaurs, two questions critical for understanding broad patterns of genome evolution in dinosaurs. Here we report inferences of genome size for 10 sauropodomorph taxa. The estimates are derived from a Bayesian phylogenetic generalized least squares approach that generates posterior distributions of regression models relating genome size to osteocyte lacunae volume in extant tetrapods. We estimate that the average genome size of sauropodomorphs was 2.02 pg (range of species means: 1.77-2.21 pg), a value in the upper range of extant birds (mean = 1.42 pg, range: 0.97-2.16 pg) and near the average for extant non-avian reptiles (mean = 2.24 pg, range: 1.05-5.44 pg). The results suggest that the variation in size and architecture of genomes in extinct dinosaurs was lower than the variation found in mammals. A substantial difference in genome size separates the two major clades within dinosaurs, Ornithischia (large genomes) and Saurischia (moderate to small genomes). We find no relationship between body size and estimated genome size in extinct dinosaurs, which suggests that neutral forces did not dominate the evolution of genome size in this group.

  15. Architectural freedom and industrialized architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    the retrofitting of the existing concrete element blocks from the period. Related to the actual demands to the building physic problems a new industrialized period has started based on light-weight elements basically made of wooden structures and faced with different suitable materials meant for individual...... for retrofit design. If we add the question of the installations e.g. ventilation to this systematic thinking of building technique we get a diverse and functional architecture, thereby creating a new and clearer story telling about new and smart system based thinking behind architectural expression....

  16. A metagenome-derived thermostable β-glucanase with an unusual module architecture which defines the new glycoside hydrolase family GH148.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelov, Angel; Pham, Vu Thuy Trang; Übelacker, Maria; Brady, Silja; Leis, Benedikt; Pill, Nicole; Brolle, Judith; Mechelke, Matthias; Moerch, Matthias; Henrissat, Bernard; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2017-12-11

    The discovery of novel and robust enzymes for the breakdown of plant biomass bears tremendous potential for the development of sustainable production processes in the rapidly evolving new bioeconomy. By functional screening of a metagenomic library from a volcano soil sample a novel thermostable endo-β-glucanase (EngU) which is unusual with regard to its module architecture and cleavage specificity was identified. Various recombinant EngU variants were characterized. Assignment of EngU to an existing glycoside hydrolase (GH) family was not possible. Two regions of EngU showed weak sequence similarity to proteins of the GH clan GH-A, and acidic residues crucial for catalytic activity of EngU were identified by mutation. Unusual, a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM4) which displayed binding affinity for β-glucan, lichenin and carboxymethyl-cellulose was found as an insertion between these two regions. EngU hydrolyzed β-1,4 linkages in carboxymethyl-cellulose, but displayed its highest activity with mixed linkage (β-1,3-/β-1,4-) glucans such as barley β-glucan and lichenin, where in contrast to characterized lichenases cleavage occurred predominantly at the β-1,3 linkages of C4-substituted glucose residues. EngU and numerous related enzymes with previously unknown function represent a new GH family of biomass-degrading enzymes within the GH-A clan. The name assigned to the new GH family is GH148.

  17. MUF architecture /art London

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen Kajita, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Om MUF architecture samt interview med Liza Fior og Katherine Clarke, partnere i muf architecture/art......Om MUF architecture samt interview med Liza Fior og Katherine Clarke, partnere i muf architecture/art...

  18. God Save Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pnina Avidar; Beatriz Ramo; dr. Marc Glaudemans

    2011-01-01

    First year students of architecture studied contemporary architectural discourse and develop critical standpoints against the macho-style heroic interpretation of architecture's power to transform the world. The disproportionate focus on iconographic architecture is being criticized. The book is a

  19. Architectural Drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinø, Nicolai

    2018-01-01

    without being able to visualize it in drawing. Architectural design, in other words, to a large extent happens through drawing. Hence, to neglect drawing skills is to neglect an important capacity to create architectural design. While the current-day argument for the depreciation of drawing skills...... is that computers can represent graphic ideas both faster and better than most medium-skilled draftsmen, drawing in design is not only about representing final designs. In fact, several steps involving the capacity to draw lie before the representation of a final design. Not only is drawing skills an important...... prerequisite for learning about the nature of existing objects and spaces, and thus to build a vocabulary of design. It is also a prerequisite for both reflecting and communicating about design ideas. In this paper, a taxonomy of notation, reflection, communication and presentation drawing is presented...

  20. Kosmos = architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Kurent

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available The old Greek word "kosmos" means not only "cosmos", but also "the beautiful order", "the way of building", "building", "scenography", "mankind", and, in the time of the New Testament, also "pagans". The word "arhitekton", meaning first the "master of theatrical scenography", acquired the meaning of "builder", when the words "kosmos" and ~kosmetes" became pejorative. The fear that architecture was not considered one of the arts before Renaissance, since none of the Muses supervised the art of building, results from the misunderstanding of the word "kosmos". Urania was the Goddes of the activity implied in the verb "kosmein", meaning "to put in the beautiful order" - everything, from the universe to the man-made space, i. e. the architecture.

  1. Genomic characterisation of small cell lung cancer patient-derived xenografts generated from endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy L Leong

    Full Text Available Patient-derived xenograft (PDX models generated from surgical specimens are gaining popularity as preclinical models of cancer. However, establishment of PDX lines from small cell lung cancer (SCLC patients is difficult due to very limited amount of available biopsy material. We asked whether SCLC cells obtained from endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA could generate PDX lines that maintained the phenotypic and genetic characteristics of the primary tumor. Following successful EBUS-TBNA sampling for diagnostic purposes, we obtained an extra sample for cytologic analysis and implantation into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. Animals were monitored for engraftment for up to 6 months. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis, and targeted next-generation re-sequencing, were then performed in both the primary sample and the derivative PDX line. A total of 12 patients were enrolled in the study. EBUS-TBNA aspirates yielded large numbers of viable tumor cells sufficient to inject between 18,750 and 1,487,000 cells per flank, and to yield microgram quantities of high-quality DNA. Of these, samples from 10 patients generated xenografts (engraftment rate 83% with a mean latency of 104 days (range 63-188. All but one maintained a typical SCLC phenotype that closely matched the original sample. Identical mutations that are characteristic of SCLC were identified in both the primary sample and xenograft line. EBUS-TBNA has the potential to be a powerful tool in the development of new targeting strategies for SCLC patients by providing large numbers of viable tumor cells suitable for both xenografting and complex genomic analysis.

  2. Genomic Characterisation of Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts Generated from Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Tracy L.; Marini, Kieren D.; Rossello, Fernando J.; Jayasekara, Samantha N.; Russell, Prudence A.; Prodanovic, Zdenka; Kumar, Beena; Ganju, Vinod; Alamgeer, Muhammad; Irving, Louis B.; Steinfort, Daniel P.; Peacock, Craig D.; Cain, Jason E.; Szczepny, Anette; Watkins, D. Neil

    2014-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models generated from surgical specimens are gaining popularity as preclinical models of cancer. However, establishment of PDX lines from small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients is difficult due to very limited amount of available biopsy material. We asked whether SCLC cells obtained from endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) could generate PDX lines that maintained the phenotypic and genetic characteristics of the primary tumor. Following successful EBUS-TBNA sampling for diagnostic purposes, we obtained an extra sample for cytologic analysis and implantation into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. Animals were monitored for engraftment for up to 6 months. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis, and targeted next-generation re-sequencing, were then performed in both the primary sample and the derivative PDX line. A total of 12 patients were enrolled in the study. EBUS-TBNA aspirates yielded large numbers of viable tumor cells sufficient to inject between 18,750 and 1,487,000 cells per flank, and to yield microgram quantities of high-quality DNA. Of these, samples from 10 patients generated xenografts (engraftment rate 83%) with a mean latency of 104 days (range 63–188). All but one maintained a typical SCLC phenotype that closely matched the original sample. Identical mutations that are characteristic of SCLC were identified in both the primary sample and xenograft line. EBUS-TBNA has the potential to be a powerful tool in the development of new targeting strategies for SCLC patients by providing large numbers of viable tumor cells suitable for both xenografting and complex genomic analysis. PMID:25191746

  3. Radiology Architecture Project Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Raymond W; Hogan, Laurie; Teshima, Satoshi; Davidson, Scott

    2017-12-19

    The rapid pace of technologic advancement and increasing expectations for patient- and family-friendly environments make it common for radiology leaders to be involved in imaging remodel and construction projects. Most radiologists and business directors lack formal training in architectural and construction processes but are expected to play significant and often leading roles in all phases of an imaging construction project. Avoidable mistakes can result in significant increased costs and scheduling delays; knowledgeable participation and communication can result in a final product that enhances staff workflow and morale and improves patient care and experience. This article presents practical guidelines for preparing for and leading a new imaging architectural and construction project. We share principles derived from the radiology and nonradiology literature and our own experience over the past decade completely remodeling a large pediatric radiology department and building a full-service outpatient imaging center. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Urban Sustainability through Public Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soomi Kim

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available As the sustainability of contemporary cities has gained emphasis, interest in architecture has increased, due to its social and public responsibility. Since sustainability is linked to public values, research on sustainable public spaces is an important way to secure sustainability in cities. Based on this, we analyzed the sustainability of European cities by examining the design methods of public architecture according to the region. The aim of the study is to derive architectural methodology corresponding to local characteristics, and to suggest issues to consider in public architecture design to promote urban sustainability based on this. First, regarding the environmental aspect, it can be observed that there is an effort to secure sustainability. Second, in terms of social sustainability, historical value remains as a trace of architectural place, so that it continues in people’s memory. In addition, public architecture provides public places where citizens can gather and enjoy programs, while the architectural methods showed differences influenced by cultural conditions. Third, in economic sustainability, it was shown that energy saving was achieved through cost reduction through recycling of materials, facilities, or environmental factors. In conclusion, the issues to be considered in public architectural design are the voiding of urban space through architectural devices in the construction method. In other words, the intention is to form “ground” that attempts to be part of the city, and thereby create better places. Since skin and material have a deep relationship with the environment, they should have the durability and an outer skin that are suitable for the regional environment. Finally, sustainability is to be utilized through the influx of programs that meet local and environmental characteristics. Design research into public architecture that is oriented towards urban sustainability will be a task to be carried out by the

  5. De Novo Assembly and Genome Analyses of the Marine-Derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis Strain LF580 Unravels Life-Style Traits and Anticancerous Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Henrissat, Bernard; Arvas, Mikko; Syed, Muhammad Fahad; Thieme, Nils; Benz, J Philipp; Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Record, Eric; Pöggeler, Stefanie; Kempken, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The marine-derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain LF580 produces scopularides A and B, which have anticancerous properties. We carried out genome sequencing using three next-generation DNA sequencing methods. De novo hybrid assembly yielded 621 scaffolds with a total size of 32.2 Mb and 16298 putative gene models. We identified a large non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene (nrps1) and supporting pks2 gene in the same biosynthetic gene cluster. This cluster and the genes within the cluster are functionally active as confirmed by RNA-Seq. Characterization of carbohydrate-active enzymes and major facilitator superfamily (MFS)-type transporters lead to postulate S. brevicaulis originated from a soil fungus, which came into contact with the marine sponge Tethya aurantium. This marine sponge seems to provide shelter to this fungus and micro-environment suitable for its survival in the ocean. This study also builds the platform for further investigations of the role of life-style and secondary metabolites from S. brevicaulis.

  6. Distribution of ancestral proto-Actinopterygian chromosome arms within the genomes of 4R-derivative salmonid fishes (Rainbow trout and Atlantic salmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubieniecki Krzysztof P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomic studies suggest that the modern day assemblage of ray-finned fishes have descended from an ancestral grouping of fishes that possessed 12–13 linkage groups. All jawed vertebrates are postulated to have experienced two whole genome duplications (WGD in their ancestry (2R duplication. Salmonids have experienced one additional WGD (4R duplication event compared to most extant teleosts which underwent a further 3R WGD compared to other vertebrates. We describe the organization of the 4R chromosomal segments of the proto-ray-finned fish karyotype in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout based upon their comparative syntenies with two model species of 3R ray-finned fishes. Results Evidence is presented for the retention of large whole-arm affinities between the ancestral linkage groups of the ray-finned fishes, and the 50 homeologous chromosomal segments in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout. In the comparisons between the two salmonid species, there is also evidence for the retention of large whole-arm homeologous affinities that are associated with the retention of duplicated markers. Five of the 7 pairs of chromosomal arm regions expressing the highest level of duplicate gene expression in rainbow trout share homologous synteny to the 5 pairs of homeologs with the greatest duplicate gene expression in Atlantic salmon. These regions are derived from proto-Actinopterygian linkage groups B, C, E, J and K. Conclusion Two chromosome arms in Danio rerio and Oryzias latipes (descendants of the 3R duplication can, in most instances be related to at least 4 whole or partial chromosomal arms in the salmonid species. Multiple arm assignments in the two salmonid species do not clearly support a 13 proto-linkage group model, and suggest that a 12 proto-linkage group arrangement (i.e., a separate single chromosome duplication and ancestral fusion/fissions/recombination within the putative G/H/I groupings may have occurred in

  7. Architectural fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jacob Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    the photographs as a starting point for a series of paintings. This way of creating representations of something that already exists is for me to see a way forward in the "decoding" of my own models into other depictions. The models are analyzed through a series of representations in different types of drawings....... I try to invent the ways of drawing the models - that decode and unfold them into architectural fragments- into future buildings or constructions in the landscape. [1] Luigi Moretti: Italian architect, 1907 - 1973 [2] Man Ray: American artist, 1890 - 1976. in 2015, I saw the wonderful exhibition...

  8. 3D architecture constructed via the confined growth of MoS2 nanosheets in nanoporous carbon derived from metal-organic frameworks for efficient hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Zhou, Xiaoli; Ding, Tao; Wang, Chunde; Yang, Qing

    2015-11-21

    The design and synthesis of robust, high-performance and low-cost three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical structured materials for the electrochemical reduction of water to generate hydrogen is of great significance for practical water splitting applications. In this study, we develop an in situ space-confined method to synthesize an MoS2-based 3D hierarchical structure, in which the MoS2 nanosheets grow in the confined nanopores of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-derived 3D carbons as electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production. Benefiting from its unique structure, which has more exposed active sites and enhanced conductivity, the as-prepared MoS2/3D nanoporous carbon (3D-NPC) composite exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with a small onset overpotential of ∼0.16 V, large cathodic currents, small Tafel slope of 51 mV per decade and good durability. We anticipate that this in situ confined growth provides new insights into the construction of high performance catalysts for energy storage and conversion.

  9. Connecting Architecture and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchgeher, Georg; Weinreich, Rainer

    Software architectures are still typically defined and described independently from implementation. To avoid architectural erosion and drift, architectural representation needs to be continuously updated and synchronized with system implementation. Existing approaches for architecture representation like informal architecture documentation, UML diagrams, and Architecture Description Languages (ADLs) provide only limited support for connecting architecture descriptions and implementations. Architecture management tools like Lattix, SonarJ, and Sotoarc and UML-tools tackle this problem by extracting architecture information directly from code. This approach works for low-level architectural abstractions like classes and interfaces in object-oriented systems but fails to support architectural abstractions not found in programming languages. In this paper we present an approach for linking and continuously synchronizing a formalized architecture representation to an implementation. The approach is a synthesis of functionality provided by code-centric architecture management and UML tools and higher-level architecture analysis approaches like ADLs.

  10. Discrete optimization in architecture architectural & urban layout

    CERN Document Server

    Zawidzki, Machi

    2016-01-01

    This book presents three projects that demonstrate the fundamental problems of architectural design and urban composition – the layout design, evaluation and optimization. Part I describes the functional layout design of a residential building, and an evaluation of the quality of a town square (plaza). The algorithm for the functional layout design is based on backtracking using a constraint satisfaction approach combined with coarse grid discretization. The algorithm for the town square evaluation is based on geometrical properties derived directly from its plan. Part II introduces a crowd-simulation application for the analysis of escape routes on floor plans, and optimization of a floor plan for smooth crowd flow. The algorithms presented employ agent-based modeling and cellular automata.

  11. Depletion of cellular brassinolide decreases embryo production and disrupts the architecture of the apical meristems in Brassica napus microspore-derived embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Mark; Elhiti, Mohamed; Waldner, Blaine; Stasolla, Claudio

    2010-06-01

    Exogenous applications of brassinolide (BL) increased the number and quality of microspore-derived embryos (MDEs) whereas treatments with brassinazole (BrZ), a BL biosynthetic inhibitor, had the opposite effect. At the optimal concentration (4x10(-6) M) BrZ decreased both embryo yield and conversion to less than half the value of control embryos. Metabolic studies revealed that BL levels had profound effects on glutathione and ascorbate metabolism by altering the amounts of their reduced forms (ASC and GSH) and oxidized forms [dehydroascorbate (DHA), ascorbate free radicals (AFRs), and GSSG]. Applications of BL switched the glutathione and ascorbate pools towards the oxidized forms, thereby lowering the ASC/ASC+DHA+AFR and GSH/GSH+GSSG ratios. These changes were ascribed to the ability of BL to increase the activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and decrease that of glutathione reductase (GR). This trend was reversed in a BL-depleted environment, effected by BrZ applications. These metabolic alterations were associated with changes in embryo structure and performance. BL-treated MDEs developed zygotic-like shoot apical meristems (SAMs) whereas embryos treated with BrZ developed abnormal meristems. In the presence of BrZ, embryos either lacked a visible SAM, or formed SAMs in which the meristematic cells showed signs of differentiation, such as vacuolation and storage product accumulation. These abnormalities were accompanied by the lack or misexpression of three meristem marker genes isolated from Brassica napus (denoted as BnSTM, BnCLV1, and BnZLL-1) homologous to the Arabidopsis SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM), CLAVATA 1 (CLV1), and ZWILLE (ZLL). The expression of BnSTM and BnCLV1 increased after a few days in cultures in embryos treated with BL whereas an opposite tendency was observed with applications of BrZ. Compared with control embryos where these two genes exhibited abnormal localization patterns, BnSTM and BnCLV1 always localized throughout the subapical domains

  12. Pan-genomic analysis of bovine monocyte-derived macrophage gene expression in response to in vitro infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacHugh David E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, an intestinal disease of ruminants with major economic consequences. Infectious bacilli are phagocytosed by host macrophages upon exposure where they persist, resulting in lengthy subclinical phases of infection that can lead to immunopathology and disease dissemination. Consequently, analysis of the macrophage transcriptome in response to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection can provide valuable insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie Johne’s disease. Here, we investigate pan-genomic gene expression in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM purified from seven age-matched females, in response to in vitro infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (multiplicity of infection 2:1 at intervals of 2 hours, 6 hours and 24 hours post-infection (hpi. Differentially expressed genes were identified by comparing the transcriptomes of the infected MDM to the non-infected control MDM at each time point (adjusted P-value threshold ≤ 0.10. 1050 differentially expressed unique genes were identified 2 hpi, with 974 and 78 differentially expressed unique genes detected 6 and 24 hpi, respectively. Furthermore, in the infected MDM the number of upregulated genes exceeded the number of downregulated genes at each time point, with the fold-change in expression for the upregulated genes markedly higher than that for the downregulated genes. Inspection and systems biology analysis of the differentially expressed genes revealed an enrichment of genes involved in the inflammatory response, cell signalling pathways and apoptosis. The transcriptional changes associated with cellular signalling and the inflammatory response may reflect different immuno-modulatory mechanisms that underlie host-pathogen interactions during infection.

  13. Whole-Genome DNA Methylation Analyses Revealed Epigenetic Instability in Tumorigenic Human iPS Cell-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Tsuyoshi; Iwanami, Akio; Sanosaka, Tsukasa; Kohyama, Jun; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Nagoshi, Narihito; Kashiwagi, Rei; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-05-01

    Although human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derivatives are considered promising cellular resources for regenerative medicine, their tumorigenicity potentially limits their clinical application in hiPSC technologies. We previously demonstrated that oncogenic hiPSC-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (hiPSC-NS/PCs) produced tumor-like tissues that were distinct from teratomas. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the regulation of tumorigenicity in hiPSC-NS/PCs, we performed an integrated analysis using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array and the HumanHT-12 v4.0 Expression BeadChip array to compare the comprehensive DNA methylation and gene expression profiles of tumorigenic hiPSC-NS/PCs (253G1-NS/PCs) and non-tumorigenic cells (201B7-NS/PCs). Although the DNA methylation profiles of 253G1-hiPSCs and 201B7-hiPSCs were similar regardless of passage number, the methylation status of the global DNA methylation profiles of 253G1-NS/PCs and 201B7-NS/PCs differed; the genomic regions surrounding the transcriptional start site of the CAT and PSMD5 genes were hypermethylated in 253G1-NS/PCs but not in 201B7-NS/PCs. Interestingly, the aberrant DNA methylation profile was more pronounced in 253G1-NS/PCs that had been passaged more than 15 times. In addition, we identified aberrations in DNA methylation at the RBP1 gene locus; the DNA methylation frequency in RBP1 changed as 253G1-NS/PCs were sequentially passaged. These results indicate that different NS/PC clones have different DNA methylomes and that DNA methylation patterns are unstable as cells are passaged. Therefore, DNA methylation profiles should be included in the criteria used to evaluate the tumorigenicity of hiPSC-NS/PCs in the clinical setting. Stem Cells 2017;35:1316-1327. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  14. Architectural freedom and industrialised architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    strategies which architects can use - to give the individual project attitudes and designs with architectural quality. Through the customized component production it is possible to choose many different proportions, to organize the process at site choosing either one room components or several rooms...... customization, telling exactly the revitalized storey about the change to a contemporary sustainable and better performed expression in direct relation to the given context. Through the last couple of years we have in Denmark been focusing a more sustainable and low energy building technique, which also include...

  15. From green architecture to architectural green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    of green architecture. The paper argues that this greenification of facades is insufficient. The green is only a skin cladding the exterior envelope without having a spatial significance. Through the paper it is proposed to flip the order of words from green architecture to architectural green....... Architectural green could signify green architecture with inclusive interrelations between green and space, built and unbuilt, inside and outside. The aim of the term is to reflect a new focus in green architecture – its architectural performance. Ecological issues are not underestimated or ignored, but so far...... they have overshadowed the architectural potential of green architecture. The paper questions how a green space should perform, look like and function. Two examples are chosen to demonstrate thorough integrations between green and space. The examples are public buildings categorized as pavilions. One...

  16. Architectural Theatricality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen; Fisker, Anna Marie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    In the attempt to improve patient treatment and recovery, researchers focus on applying concepts of hospitality to hospitals. Often these concepts are dominated by hotel-metaphors focusing on host–guest relationships or concierge services. Motivated by a project trying to improve patient treatment...... is known for his writings on theatricality, understood as a holistic design approach emphasizing the contextual, cultural, ritual and social meanings rooted in architecture. Relative hereto, the International Food Design Society recently argued, in a similar holistic manner, that the methodology used...... to provide an aesthetic eating experience includes knowledge on both food and design. Based on a hermeneutic reading of Semper’s theory, our thesis is that this holistic design approach is important when debating concepts of hospitality in hospitals. We use this approach to argue for how ‘food design...

  17. Genome Editing Tools in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Kumar Mohanta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing tools have the potential to change the genomic architecture of a genome at precise locations, with desired accuracy. These tools have been efficiently used for trait discovery and for the generation of plants with high crop yields and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Due to complex genomic architecture, it is challenging to edit all of the genes/genomes using a particular genome editing tool. Therefore, to overcome this challenging task, several genome editing tools have been developed to facilitate efficient genome editing. Some of the major genome editing tools used to edit plant genomes are: Homologous recombination (HR, zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRs, the CRISPR/Cas9 system, RNA interference (RNAi, cisgenesis, and intragenesis. In addition, site-directed sequence editing and oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis have the potential to edit the genome at the single-nucleotide level. Recently, adenine base editors (ABEs have been developed to mutate A-T base pairs to G-C base pairs. ABEs use deoxyadeninedeaminase (TadA with catalytically impaired Cas9 nickase to mutate A-T base pairs to G-C base pairs.

  18. SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE : WHAT ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS THINK

    OpenAIRE

    SATWIKO, PRASASTO

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable architecture has become a hot issue lately as the impacts of climate change become more intense. Architecture educations have responded by integrating knowledge of sustainable design in their curriculum. However, in the real life, new buildings keep coming with designs that completely ignore sustainable principles. This paper discusses the results of two national competitions on sustainable architecture targeted for architecture students (conducted in 2012 and 2013). The results a...

  19. Future Architectures for NREN infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessing, Henrik; Bozorgebrahimi, Kurosh; Belter, Bartosz

    This study identifies key requirements for NRENs towards future network architectures that become apparent as users become moremobile and have increased expectations in terms of availability of data. In addition, cost saving requirements call for federated use of, inparticular, the optical spectral...... resources. In this work, the key findings from related projects are integrated to provide the building blocks forefficient use and sharing of spectrum. A new network architecture is derived to support exactly the service orchestration and the federated useof resources. It comprises four layers from...

  20. Lightweight enterprise architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Theuerkorn, Fenix

    2004-01-01

    STATE OF ARCHITECTUREArchitectural ChaosRelation of Technology and Architecture The Many Faces of Architecture The Scope of Enterprise Architecture The Need for Enterprise ArchitectureThe History of Architecture The Current Environment Standardization Barriers The Need for Lightweight Architecture in the EnterpriseThe Cost of TechnologyThe Benefits of Enterprise Architecture The Domains of Architecture The Gap between Business and ITWhere Does LEA Fit? LEA's FrameworkFrameworks, Methodologies, and Approaches The Framework of LEATypes of Methodologies Types of ApproachesActual System Environmen

  1. Software architecture 1

    CERN Document Server

    Oussalah , Mourad Chabane

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, software architectures have significantly contributed to the development of complex and distributed systems. Nowadays, it is recognized that one of the critical problems in the design and development of any complex software system is its architecture, i.e. the organization of its architectural elements. Software Architecture presents the software architecture paradigms based on objects, components, services and models, as well as the various architectural techniques and methods, the analysis of architectural qualities, models of representation of architectural template

  2. Software architecture 2

    CERN Document Server

    Oussalah, Mourad Chabanne

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, software architectures have significantly contributed to the development of complex and distributed systems. Nowadays, it is recognized that one of the critical problems in the design and development of any complex software system is its architecture, i.e. the organization of its architectural elements. Software Architecture presents the software architecture paradigms based on objects, components, services and models, as well as the various architectural techniques and methods, the analysis of architectural qualities, models of representation of architectural templa

  3. Modeling Architectural Patterns Using Architectural Primitives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zdun, Uwe; Avgeriou, Paris

    2005-01-01

    Architectural patterns are a key point in architectural documentation. Regrettably, there is poor support for modeling architectural patterns, because the pattern elements are not directly matched by elements in modeling languages, and, at the same time, patterns support an inherent variability that

  4. Genome-wide methylation profiling of ovarian cancer patient-derived xenografts treated with the demethylating agent decitabine identifies novel epigenetically regulated genes and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Tomar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC, intrinsic and/or acquired resistance against platinum-containing chemotherapy is a major obstacle for successful treatment. A low frequency of somatic mutations but frequent epigenetic alterations, including DNA methylation in HGSOC tumors, presents the cancer epigenome as a relevant target for innovative therapy. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs supposedly are good preclinical models for identifying novel drug targets. However, the representativeness of global methylation status of HGSOC PDXs compared to their original tumors has not been evaluated so far. Aims of this study were to explore how representative HGSOC PDXs are of their corresponding patient tumor methylome and to evaluate the effect of epigenetic therapy and cisplatin on putative epigenetically regulated genes and their related pathways in PDXs. Methods Genome-wide analysis of the DNA methylome of HGSOC patients with their corresponding PDXs, from different generations, was performed using Infinium 450 K methylation arrays. Furthermore, we analyzed global methylome changes after treatment of HGSOC PDXs with the FDA approved demethylating agent decitabine and cisplatin. Findings were validated by bisulfite pyrosequencing with subsequent pathway analysis. Publicly available datasets comprising HGSOC patients were used to analyze the prognostic value of the identified genes. Results Only 0.6–1.0 % of all analyzed CpGs (388,696 CpGs changed significantly (p < 0.01 during propagation, showing that HGSOC PDXs were epigenetically stable. Treatment of F3 PDXs with decitabine caused a significant reduction in methylation in 10.6 % of CpG sites in comparison to untreated PDXs (p < 0.01, false discovery rate <10 %. Cisplatin treatment had a marginal effect on the PDX methylome. Pathway analysis of decitabine-treated PDX tumors revealed several putative epigenetically regulated pathways (e.g., the Src family kinase

  5. The Genetic Basis of Plant Architecture in 10 Maize Recombinant Inbred Line Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qingchun; Xu, Yuancheng; Li, Kun; Peng, Yong; Zhan, Wei; Li, Wenqiang; Li, Lin; Yan, Jianbing

    2017-10-01

    Plant architecture is a key factor affecting planting density and grain yield in maize ( Zea mays ). However, the genetic mechanisms underlying plant architecture in diverse genetic backgrounds have not been fully addressed. Here, we performed a large-scale phenotyping of 10 plant architecture-related traits and dissected the genetic loci controlling these traits in 10 recombinant inbred line populations derived from 14 diverse genetic backgrounds. Nearly 800 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with major and minor effects were identified as contributing to the phenotypic variation of plant architecture-related traits. Ninety-two percent of these QTLs were detected in only one population, confirming the diverse genetic backgrounds of the mapping populations and the prevalence of rare alleles in maize. The numbers and effects of QTLs are positively associated with the phenotypic variation in the population, which, in turn, correlates positively with parental phenotypic and genetic variations. A large proportion (38.5%) of QTLs was associated with at least two traits, suggestive of the frequent occurrence of pleiotropic loci or closely linked loci. Key developmental genes, which previously were shown to affect plant architecture in mutant studies, were found to colocalize with many QTLs. Five QTLs were further validated using the segregating populations developed from residual heterozygous lines present in the recombinant inbred line populations. Additionally, one new plant height QTL, qPH3 , has been fine-mapped to a 600-kb genomic region where three candidate genes are located. These results provide insights into the genetic mechanisms controlling plant architecture and will benefit the selection of ideal plant architecture in maize breeding. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Mahajan, Anubha; Agarwala, Vineeta; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Ma, Clement; Fontanillas, Pierre; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Perry, John R. B.; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W.; Robertson, Neil R.; Rayner, N. William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E.; Fernandez Tajes, Juan; Highland, Heather M.; Dupuis, Josee; Chines, Peter S.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Hartl, Christopher; Jackson, Anne U.; Chen, Han; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; van de Bunt, Martijn; Pearson, Richard D.; Kumar, Ashish; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Grarup, Niels; Stringham, Heather M.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Lee, Jaehoon; Chen, Yuhui; Scott, Robert A.; Below, Jennifer E.; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jinyan; Go, Min Jin; Stitzel, Michael L.; Pasko, Dorota; Parker, Stephen C. J.; Varga, Tibor V.; Green, Todd; Beer, Nicola L.; Day-Williams, Aaron G.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fingerlin, Tasha; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hu, Cheng; Huh, Iksoo; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Min-Seok; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Selyeong; Lin, Keng-Han; Maxwell, Taylor J.; Nagai, Yoshihiko; Wang, Xu; Welch, Ryan P.; Yoon, Joon; Zhang, Weihua; Barzilai, Nir; Voight, Benjamin F.; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jenkinson, Christopher P.; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Manning, Alisa; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Balkau, Beverley; Stancáková, Alena; Abboud, Hanna E.; Boeing, Heiner; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, James; Carey, Jason; Kwan, Phoenix; Grant, George; Smith, Joshua D.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Purcell, Shaun; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Lee, Heung Man; Lu, Yingchang; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Zhao, Wei; Danesh, John; Lam, Vincent K. L.; Park, Kyong Soo; Saleheen, Danish; So, Wing Yee; Tam, Claudia H. T.; Afzal, Uzma; Aguilar, David; Arya, Rector; Aung, Tin; Chan, Edmund; Navarro, Carmen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Palli, Domenico; Correa, Adolfo; Curran, Joanne E.; Rybin, Denis; Farook, Vidya S.; Fowler, Sharon P.; Freedman, Barry I.; Griswold, Michael; Hale, Daniel Esten; Hicks, Pamela J.; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kumar, Satish; Lehne, Benjamin; Thuillier, Dorothée; Lim, Wei Yen; Liu, Jianjun; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Loh, Marie; Musani, Solomon K.; Puppala, Sobha; Scott, William R.; Yengo, Loïc; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Taylor, Herman A.; Thameem, Farook; Wilson, Gregory; Wong, Tien Yin; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Levy, Jonathan C.; Mangino, Massimo; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Fadista, João; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; Herder, Christian; Groves, Christopher J.; Wieland, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Kinnunen, Leena; Esko, Tõnu; Farmer, Andrew J.; Hakaste, Liisa; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Kravic, Jasmina; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Hollensted, Mette; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Ladenvall, Claes; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kriebel, Jennifer; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lannfelt, Lars; Lauritzen, Torsten; Narisu, Narisu; Linneberg, Allan; Melander, Olle; Milani, Lili; Neville, Matt; Orho-Melander, Marju; Qi, Lu; Qi, Qibin; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Swift, Amy; Rosengren, Anders H.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Wood, Andrew R.; Mihailov, Evelin; Blancher, Christine; Carneiro, Mauricio O.; Maguire, Jared; Poplin, Ryan; Shakir, Khalid; Fennell, Timothy; DePristo, Mark; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Deloukas, Panos; Gjesing, Anette P.; Jun, Goo; Nilsson, Peter; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Onofrio, Robert; Thorand, Barbara; Hansen, Torben; Meisinger, Christa; Hu, Frank B.; Isomaa, Bo; Karpe, Fredrik; Liang, Liming; Peters, Annette; Huth, Cornelia; O'Rahilly, Stephen P.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pedersen, Oluf; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Watanabe, Richard M.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bergman, Richard N.; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Chan, Juliana C. N.; Chia, Kee Seng; Daly, Mark J.; Ebrahim, Shah B.; Langenberg, Claudia; Elliott, Paul; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Lehman, Donna M.; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Pollin, Toni I.; Sandhu, Manjinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Froguel, Philippe; Barroso, Inês; teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Small, Kerrin S.; Ried, Janina S.; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Grallert, Harald; Glaser, Benjamin; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Walker, Mark; Banks, Eric; Gieger, Christian; Ingelsson, Erik; Im, Hae Kyung; Illig, Thomas; Franks, Paul W.; Buck, Gemma; Trakalo, Joseph; Buck, David; Prokopenko, Inga; Mägi, Reedik; Lind, Lars; Farjoun, Yossi; Owen, Katharine R.; Gloyn, Anna L.; Strauch, Konstantin; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lee, Jong-Young; Park, Taesung; Donnelly, Peter; Morris, Andrew D.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Bowden, Donald W.; Collins, Francis S.; Atzmon, Gil; Chambers, John C.; Spector, Timothy D.; Laakso, Markku; Strom, Tim M.; Bell, Graeme I.; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Tai, E. Shyong; McVean, Gilean; Hanis, Craig L.; Wilson, James G.; Seielstad, Mark; Frayling, Timothy M.; Meigs, James B.; Cox, Nancy J.; Sladek, Rob; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey; Burtt, Noël P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Groop, Leif; Abecasis, Goncalo; Florez, Jose C.; Scott, Laura J.; Morris, Andrew P.; Kang, Hyun Min; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate,

  7. Genome engineering in Vibrio cholerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Val, Marie-Eve; Skovgaard, Ole; Ducos-Galand, Magaly

    2012-01-01

    Although bacteria with multipartite genomes are prevalent, our knowledge of the mechanisms maintaining their genome is very limited, and much remains to be learned about the structural and functional interrelationships of multiple chromosomes. Owing to its bi-chromosomal genome architecture and its....... This difficulty was surmounted using a unique and powerful strategy based on massive rearrangement of prokaryotic genomes. We developed a site-specific recombination-based engineering tool, which allows targeted, oriented, and reciprocal DNA exchanges. Using this genetic tool, we obtained a panel of V. cholerae...

  8. The genome sequence of the highly acetic acid-tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii-derived interspecies hybrid strain ISA1307, isolated from a sparkling wine plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Nuno P; Münsterkötter, Martin; Dias-Valada, Filipa; Santos, Júlia; Palma, Margarida; Roque, Filipa C; Guerreiro, Joana F; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sousa, Maria João; Leão, Cecília; Güldener, Ulrich; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2014-06-01

    In this work, it is described the sequencing and annotation of the genome of the yeast strain ISA1307, isolated from a sparkling wine continuous production plant. This strain, formerly considered of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii species, has been used to study Z. bailii physiology, in particular, its extreme tolerance to acetic acid stress at low pH. The analysis of the genome sequence described in this work indicates that strain ISA1307 is an interspecies hybrid between Z. bailii and a closely related species. The genome sequence of ISA1307 is distributed through 154 scaffolds and has a size of around 21.2 Mb, corresponding to 96% of the genome size estimated by flow cytometry. Annotation of ISA1307 genome includes 4385 duplicated genes (∼ 90% of the total number of predicted genes) and 1155 predicted single-copy genes. The functional categories including a higher number of genes are 'Metabolism and generation of energy', 'Protein folding, modification and targeting' and 'Biogenesis of cellular components'. The knowledge of the genome sequence of the ISA1307 strain is expected to contribute to accelerate systems-level understanding of stress resistance mechanisms in Z. bailii and to inspire and guide novel biotechnological applications of this yeast species/strain in fermentation processes, given its high resilience to acidic stress. The availability of the ISA1307 genome sequence also paves the way to a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the generation and selection of more robust hybrid yeast strains in the stressful environment of wine fermentations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  9. The Genome Sequence of the Highly Acetic Acid-Tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii-Derived Interspecies Hybrid Strain ISA1307, Isolated From a Sparkling Wine Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Nuno P.; Münsterkötter, Martin; Dias-Valada, Filipa; Santos, Júlia; Palma, Margarida; Roque, Filipa C.; Guerreiro, Joana F.; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sousa, Maria João; Leão, Cecília; Güldener, Ulrich; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, it is described the sequencing and annotation of the genome of the yeast strain ISA1307, isolated from a sparkling wine continuous production plant. This strain, formerly considered of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii species, has been used to study Z. bailii physiology, in particular, its extreme tolerance to acetic acid stress at low pH. The analysis of the genome sequence described in this work indicates that strain ISA1307 is an interspecies hybrid between Z. bailii and a closely related species. The genome sequence of ISA1307 is distributed through 154 scaffolds and has a size of around 21.2 Mb, corresponding to 96% of the genome size estimated by flow cytometry. Annotation of ISA1307 genome includes 4385 duplicated genes (∼90% of the total number of predicted genes) and 1155 predicted single-copy genes. The functional categories including a higher number of genes are ‘Metabolism and generation of energy’, ‘Protein folding, modification and targeting’ and ‘Biogenesis of cellular components’. The knowledge of the genome sequence of the ISA1307 strain is expected to contribute to accelerate systems-level understanding of stress resistance mechanisms in Z. bailii and to inspire and guide novel biotechnological applications of this yeast species/strain in fermentation processes, given its high resilience to acidic stress. The availability of the ISA1307 genome sequence also paves the way to a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the generation and selection of more robust hybrid yeast strains in the stressful environment of wine fermentations. PMID:24453040

  10. Evolution of linear chromosomes and multipartite genomes in yeast mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valach, Matus; Farkas, Zoltan; Fricova, Dominika; Kovac, Jakub; Brejova, Brona; Vinar, Tomas; Pfeiffer, Ilona; Kucsera, Judit; Tomaska, Lubomir; Lang, B. Franz; Nosek, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome diversity in closely related species provides an excellent platform for investigation of chromosome architecture and its evolution by means of comparative genomics. In this study, we determined the complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of eight Candida species and analyzed their molecular architectures. Our survey revealed a puzzling variability of genome architecture, including circular- and linear-mapping and multipartite linear forms. We propose that the arrangement of large inverted repeats identified in these genomes plays a crucial role in alterations of their molecular architectures. In specific arrangements, the inverted repeats appear to function as resolution elements, allowing genome conversion among different topologies, eventually leading to genome fragmentation into multiple linear DNA molecules. We suggest that molecular transactions generating linear mitochondrial DNA molecules with defined telomeric structures may parallel the evolutionary emergence of linear chromosomes and multipartite genomes in general and may provide clues for the origin of telomeres and pathways implicated in their maintenance. PMID:21266473

  11. Genomic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events and Multimedia Implementation Genetics 101 Family Health History Genomics and Diseases Genetic Counseling Genomic Testing Epidemiology Pathogen Genomics Resources Genomic Testing Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fact Sheet: Identifying Opportunities to ...

  12. Architecture as Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Heta

    1989-01-01

    Explores the use of analogies in architectural design, the importance of Gestalt theory and aesthetic cannons in understanding and being sensitive to architecture. Emphasizes the variation between public and professional appreciation of architecture. Notes that an understanding of architectural process enables students to improve the aesthetic…

  13. Architectural design decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Antonius Gradus Johannes

    2008-01-01

    A software architecture can be considered as the collection of key decisions concerning the design of the software of a system. Knowledge about this design, i.e. architectural knowledge, is key for understanding a software architecture and thus the software itself. Architectural knowledge is mostly

  14. Fragments of Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jacob Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Topic 3: “Case studies dealing with the artistic and architectural work of architects worldwide, and the ties between specific artistic and architectural projects, methodologies and products”......Topic 3: “Case studies dealing with the artistic and architectural work of architects worldwide, and the ties between specific artistic and architectural projects, methodologies and products”...

  15. Can You Hear Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryhl, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Taking an off set in the understanding of architectural quality being based on multisensory architecture, the paper aims to discuss the current acoustic discourse in inclusive design and its implications to the integration of inclusive design in architectural discourse and practice as well...... design and architectural quality for people with a hearing disability and a newly conducted qualitative evaluation research in Denmark as well as architectural theories on multisensory aspects of architectural experiences, the paper uses examples of existing Nordic building cases to discuss the role...... of acoustics in both inclusive design and multisensory architecture....

  16. Data management for genomic mapping applications: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, V.M.; Lewis, S.; McCarthy, J.; Olken, F.; Zorn, M.

    1992-05-01

    In this paper we describe a new approach to the construction of data management systems for genomic mapping applications in molecular biology, genetics, and plant breeding. We discuss the architecture of such systems and propose an incremental approach to the development of such systems. We illustrate the proposed approach and architecture with a case study of a prototype data management system for genomic maps.

  17. ESA: Enterprise Service Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The Service oriented perspective is emerging as an important view both for business architecture and IT architecture in the overall context of enterprise architectures. Many existing enterprise architecture frameworks like DODAF, MODAF and NAF have lately been extended with service-oriented views. The UPDM UML Profile and Metamodel for DODAF and MODAF has thus included various service-oriented views. This thesis proposes a new enterprise architecture framework ESA Enterprise Service Arch...

  18. Deconstruction as concept of architectural practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimović Milan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper inquires into the relationship between philosophical concept of deconstruction and its practical application in the interpretation of the concept of architectural creativity. Deconstruction is not only understood as a formal metaphor, but as a critical process that examines common approaches to architectural design and approach to the treatment of architectural space. Through a comparison with philosophy, this procedure highlights the architectural approach seen as a decomposition of normal and usual way of thinking about architecture and therefore associated treatment of the architectural concept in creative practice. By case study method, analyzed the formal concept of building 'Zepter Palace' in Belgrade, which is interpreted as a deconstruction of the concept of architectural practice. In this example, in comparison with the well-known interpretation of deconstruction on project of La Villette Park in Paris, derived a key contribution of the philosophical deconstruction to the concept of architectural practice - approach that establishes and promotes a method for creating and widening of architectural diversity, seen as a new space sensuality of aesthetic experience of space.

  19. Herbarium genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, Freek T.; Lei, Di; Yu, Jiaying

    2016-01-01

    Herbarium genomics is proving promising as next-generation sequencing approaches are well suited to deal with the usually fragmented nature of archival DNA. We show that routine assembly of partial plastome sequences from herbarium specimens is feasible, from total DNA extracts and with specimens...... Angiosperm families, 73 of which were from herbarium material with ages up to 146 years old. For 84 specimens, a sufficient number of paired-end reads were generated (in total 9.4 × 1012 nucleotides), yielding successful plastome assemblies for 74 specimens. Those derived from herbarium specimens have lower...... fractions of plastome-derived reads compared with those from fresh and silica-gel-dried specimens, but total herbarium assembly lengths are only slightly shorter. Specimens from wet-tropical conditions appear to have a higher number of contigs per assembly and lower N50 values. We find no significant...

  20. Marshall Application Realignment System (MARS) Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belshe, Andrea; Sutton, Mandy

    2010-01-01

    The Marshall Application Realignment System (MARS) Architecture project was established to meet the certification requirements of the Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DoDAF) V2.0 Federal Enterprise Architecture Certification (FEAC) Institute program and to provide added value to the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Application Portfolio Management process. The MARS Architecture aims to: (1) address the NASA MSFC Chief Information Officer (CIO) strategic initiative to improve Application Portfolio Management (APM) by optimizing investments and improving portfolio performance, and (2) develop a decision-aiding capability by which applications registered within the MSFC application portfolio can be analyzed and considered for retirement or decommission. The MARS Architecture describes a to-be target capability that supports application portfolio analysis against scoring measures (based on value) and overall portfolio performance objectives (based on enterprise needs and policies). This scoring and decision-aiding capability supports the process by which MSFC application investments are realigned or retired from the application portfolio. The MARS Architecture is a multi-phase effort to: (1) conduct strategic architecture planning and knowledge development based on the DoDAF V2.0 six-step methodology, (2) describe one architecture through multiple viewpoints, (3) conduct portfolio analyses based on a defined operational concept, and (4) enable a new capability to support the MSFC enterprise IT management mission, vision, and goals. This report documents Phase 1 (Strategy and Design), which includes discovery, planning, and development of initial architecture viewpoints. Phase 2 will move forward the process of building the architecture, widening the scope to include application realignment (in addition to application retirement), and validating the underlying architecture logic before moving into Phase 3. The MARS Architecture key stakeholders are most

  1. Analyses of methylomes derived from Meso-American common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. using MeDIP-seq and whole genome sodium bisulfite-sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollee eCrampton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is economically important for its high protein, fiber, and micronutrient contents, with a relatively small genome size of ~587 Mb. Common bean is genetically diverse with two major gene pools, Meso-American and Andean. The phenotypic variability within the genotypes is partly attributed to the genetic diversity and epigenetic changes that are largely influenced by environmental factors. It is well established that an important epigenetic regulator of gene expression is DNA methylation. Here, we present results generated from two high-throughput sequencing technologies, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-seq and whole genome bisulfite-sequencing (BS-Seq. Our analyses revealed that common bean displays similar methylation patterns as other previously published plant methylomes, with CG ~50%, CHG ~30%, and CHH ~2.7% methylation, however, these differ from the common bean reference methylome of Andean origin. We identified higher CG methylation levels in both promoter and genic regions than CHG and CHH contexts. Moreover, we found relatively higher CG methylation levels in genes than in promoters. Conversely, the CHG and CHH methylation levels were highest in promoters than in genes. This is the first genome-wide DNA methylation profiling study in a Meso-American common bean cultivar (Sierra using NGS approaches. Our long-term goal is to generate genome-wide epigenomic maps in common bean focusing on chromatin accessibility, histone modifications, and DNA methylation.

  2. Genomic mechanisms of stress tolerance for the industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae against the major chemical classes of inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at ARS developed tolerant industrial yeast that is able to reduce major chemical classes of inhibitors into less toxic or none toxic compounds while producing ethanol. Using genomic studies, we defined mechanisms of in situ detoxification involved in novel gene functions, vital cofactor r...

  3. Molecular phylogeny and SNP variation of polar bears (Ursus maritimus), brown bears (U. arctos), and black bears (U. americanus) derived from genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Matthew A; Rincon, Gonzalo; Meredith, Robert W; MacNeil, Michael D; Islas-Trejo, Alma; Cánovas, Angela; Medrano, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the relationships of polar bears (Ursus maritimus), brown bears (U. arctos), and black bears (U. americanus) with high throughput genomic sequencing data with an average coverage of 25× for each species. A total of 1.4 billion 100-bp paired-end reads were assembled using the polar bear and annotated giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) genome sequences as references. We identified 13.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the 3 species aligned to the polar bear genome. These data indicate that polar bears and brown bears share more SNP with each other than either does with black bears. Concatenation and coalescence-based analysis of consensus sequences of approximately 1 million base pairs of ultraconserved elements in the nuclear genome resulted in a phylogeny with black bears as the sister group to brown and polar bears, and all brown bears are in a separate clade from polar bears. Genotypes for 162 SNP loci of 336 bears from Alaska and Montana showed that the species are genetically differentiated and there is geographic population structure of brown and black bears but not polar bears.

  4. Data from: Untangling the hybrid nature of modern pig genomes: a mosaic derived from biogeographically distinct and highly divergent Sus scrofa populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, M.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Madsen, O.; Frantz, L.A.F.; Paudel, Y.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.

    2014-01-01

    The merging of populations after an extended period of isolation and divergence is a common phenomenon, in natural settings as well as due to human interference. Individuals with such hybrid origins contain genomes that essentially form a mosaic of different histories and demographies. Pigs are an

  5. Exploring repetitive DNA landscapes using REPCLASS, a tool that automates the classification of transposable elements in eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feschotte, Cédric; Keswani, Umeshkumar; Ranganathan, Nirmal; Guibotsy, Marcel L; Levine, David

    2009-07-23

    Eukaryotic genomes contain large amount of repetitive DNA, most of which is derived from transposable elements (TEs). Progress has been made to develop computational tools for ab initio identification of repeat families, but there is an urgent need to develop tools to automate the annotation of TEs in genome sequences. Here we introduce REPCLASS, a tool that automates the classification of TE sequences. Using control repeat libraries, we show that the program can classify accurately virtually any known TE types. Combining REPCLASS to ab initio repeat finding in the genomes of Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster allowed us to recover the contrasting TE landscape characteristic of these species. Unexpectedly, REPCLASS also uncovered several novel TE families in both genomes, augmenting the TE repertoire of these model species. When applied to the genomes of distant Caenorhabditis and Drosophila species, the approach revealed a remarkable conservation of TE composition profile within each genus, despite substantial interspecific covariations in genome size and in the number of TEs and TE families. Lastly, we applied REPCLASS to analyze 10 fungal genomes from a wide taxonomic range, most of which have not been analyzed for TE content previously. The results showed that TE diversity varies widely across the fungi "kingdom" and appears to positively correlate with genome size, in particular for DNA transposons. Together, these data validate REPCLASS as a powerful tool to explore the repetitive DNA landscapes of eukaryotes and to shed light onto the evolutionary forces shaping TE diversity and genome architecture.

  6. Software architecture evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barais, Olivier; Le Meur, Anne-Francoise; Duchien, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    Software architectures must frequently evolve to cope with changing requirements, and this evolution often implies integrating new concerns. Unfortunately, when the new concerns are crosscutting, existing architecture description languages provide little or no support for this kind of evolution...... one particular framework named Tran SAT, which addresses the above problems of software architecture evolution. Tran SAT provides a new element in the software architecture descriptions language, called an architectural aspect, for describing new concerns and their integration into an existing...... architecture. Following the early aspect paradigm, Tran SAT allows the software architect to design a software architecture stepwise in terms of aspects at the design stage. It realises the evolution as the weaving of new architectural aspects into an existing software architecture....

  7. Mitochondrial genome evolution in Ophiuroidea, Echinoidea, and Holothuroidea: insights in phylogenetic relationships of Echinodermata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perseke, Marleen; Bernhard, Detlef; Fritzsch, Guido; Brümmer, Franz; Stadler, Peter F; Schlegel, Martin

    2010-07-01

    The genome architecture and amino acid sequences of six new complete mitochondrial genomes were determined from representatives of Hemichordata (1), Ophiuroidea (3), Echinoidea (1) and Holothuroidea (1) and were analysed together with previously known sequences. Phylogenetic analyses recovered three lineages within echinoderms, Crinoidea, Ophiuroidea and a group comprising Holothuroidea, Echinoidea, and Asteroidea. In contrast to previous analyses of mitochondrial genomes the increased data set recovered the classical echinoderm phylogeny of Eleutherozoa and Echinozoa in Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian analyses using hemichordate out-group representatives. However, an inconsistent ramification appeared with vertebrate out-groups and in Maximum Parsimony and Neighbour Joining reconstructions. The basal (consensus) gene orders of all three lineages could be derived from a hypothetical ancestral crinoid gene order by one single rearrangement in each lineage. The genome architecture was highly conserved in Echinoidea, whereas the highest gene order differences and large amounts of unassigned sequences (UAS) were detected in Ophiuroidea, supporting a higher evolutionary rate than in any other echinoderm lineage. The variability in gene order and UAS regions in ophiuroid genomes suggest dominating rearrangement mechanisms by duplication events. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. New discrete and polymeric supramolecular architectures derived from dinuclear Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of aryl-linked bis-beta-diketonato ligands and nitrogen bases: synthetic, structural and high pressure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Jack K; Hayter, Michael J; Jolliffe, Katrina A; Lindoy, Leonard F; McMurtrie, John C; Meehan, George V; Neville, Suzanne M; Parsons, Simon; Tasker, Peter A; Turner, Peter; White, Fraser J

    2010-03-21

    New examples of nitrogen base adducts of dinuclear Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of the doubly deprotonated forms of 1,3-aryl linked bis-beta-diketones of type [RC(=O)CH(2)C(=O)C(6)H(4)C(=O)CH(2)C(=O)R] (L(1)H(2)) incorporating the mono- and difunctional amine bases pyridine (Py), 4-ethylpyridine (EtPy), piperidine (pipi), 1,4-piperazine (pip), N-methylmorpholine (mmorph), 1,4-dimethylpiperazine (dmpip) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (tmen) have been synthesised by reaction of the previously reported [Cu(2)(L(1))(2)].2.5THF (R = Me), [Cu(2)(L(1))(2)(THF)(2)] (R = t-Bu), [Ni(2)(L(1))(2)(Py)(4)] (R = t-Bu) and [Co(2)(L(1))(2)(Py)(4)] (R = t-Bu) complexes with individual bases of the above type. Comparative X-ray structural studies involving all ten base adduct derivatives have been obtained and reveal a range of interesting discrete and polymeric molecular architectures. The respective products have the following stoichiometries: [Cu(2)(L(1))(2)(Py)(2)].Py (R = Me), [Cu(2)(L(1))(2)(EtPy)(2)].2EtPy (R = t-Bu), [Cu(2)(L(1))(2)(pipi)(2)].2pipi (R = t-Bu), [Cu(2)(L(1))(2)(mmorph)(2)] (R = t-Bu), [Cu(2)(L(1))(2)(tmen)(2)] (R = t-Bu) and {[Cu(2)(L(1))(2)(pip)].pip.2THF}(n), [Co(2)(L(1))(2)(tmen)(2)] (R = t-Bu), [Ni(2)(L(1))(2)(Py)(4)].dmpip (R = t-Bu), [Ni(2)(L(1))(2)(pipi)(4)].pipi (R = t-Bu) and [Ni(2)(L(1))(2)(tmen)(2)] (R = t-Bu). The effect of pressure on the X-ray structure of [Cu(2)(L(1))(2)(mmorph)(2)] has been investigated. An increase in pressure from ambient to 9.1 kbar resulted in modest changes to the unit cell parameters as well as a corresponding decrease of 6.7 percent in the unit cell volume. While a small 'shearing' motion occurs between adjacent molecular units throughout the lattice, no existing bonds are broken or new bonds formed.

  9. Web Service Architecture for e-Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Qiu

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Message-based Web Service architecture provides a unified approach to applications and Web Services that incorporates the flexibility of messaging and distributed components. We propose SMMV and MMMV collaboration as the general architecture of collaboration based on a Web service model, which accommodates both instructor-led learning and participatory learning. This approach derives from our message-based Model-View-Controller (M-MVC architecture of Web applications, comprises an event-driven Publish/Subscribe scheme, and provides effective collaboration with high interactivity of rich Web content for diverse clients over heterogeneous network environments.

  10. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  11. In the search for the low-complexity sequences in prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes: how to derive a coherent picture from global and local entropy measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acquisti, Claudia; Allegrini, Paolo E-mail: allegrip@ilc.cnr.it; Bogani, Patrizia; Buiatti, Marcello; Catanese, Elena; Fronzoni, Leone; Grigolini, Paolo; Mersi, Giuseppe; Palatella, Luigi

    2004-04-01

    We investigate on a possible way to connect the presence of low-complexity sequences (LCS) in DNA genomes and the non-stationary properties of base correlations. Under the hypothesis that these variations signal a change in the DNA function, we use a new technique, called non-stationarity entropic index (NSEI) method, and we prove that this technique is an efficient way to detect functional changes with respect to a random baseline. The remarkable aspect is that NSEI does not imply any training data or fitting parameter, the only arbitrarity being the choice of a marker in the sequence. We make this choice on the basis of biological information about LCS distributions in genomes. We show that there exists a correlation between changing the amount in LCS and the ratio of long- to short-range correlation.

  12. Modeling Architectural Patterns’ Behavior Using Architectural Primitives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waqas Kamal, Ahmad; Avgeriou, Paris

    2008-01-01

    Architectural patterns have an impact on both the structure and the behavior of a system at the architecture design level. However, it is challenging to model patterns’ behavior in a systematic way because modeling languages do not provide the appropriate abstractions and because each pattern

  13. Modeling Architectural Patterns' Behavior Using Architectural Primitives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamal, Ahmad Waqas; Avgeriou, Paris; Morrison, R; Balasubramaniam, D; Falkner, K

    2008-01-01

    Architectural patterns have an impact on both the structure and the behavior of a system at the architecture design level. However, it is challenging to model patterns' behavior in a systematic way because modeling languages do not provide the appropriate abstractions and because each pattern

  14. Genetic Architecture of Conspicuous Red Ornaments in Female Threespine Stickleback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lengxob Yong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Explaining the presence of conspicuous female ornaments that take the form of male-typical traits has been a longstanding challenge in evolutionary biology. Such female ornaments have been proposed to evolve via both adaptive and nonadaptive evolutionary processes. Determining the genetic underpinnings of female ornaments is important for elucidating the mechanisms by which such female traits arise and persist in natural populations, but detailed information about their genetic basis is still scarce. In this study, we investigated the genetic architecture of two ornaments, the orange-red throat and pelvic spine, in the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus. Throat coloration is male-specific in ancestral marine populations but has evolved in females in some derived stream populations, whereas sexual dimorphism in pelvic spine coloration is variable among populations. We find that ornaments share a common genetic architecture between the sexes. At least three independent genomic regions contribute to red throat coloration, and harbor candidate genes related to pigment production and pigment cell differentiation. One of these regions is also associated with spine coloration, indicating that both ornaments might be mediated partly via pleiotropic genetic mechanisms.

  15. Verifying Architectural Design Rules of the Flight Software Product Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Dharmalingam; Lindvall, Mikael; Ackermann, Chris; McComas, David; Bartholomew, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experiences of verifying architectural design rules of the NASA Core Flight Software (CFS) product line implementation. The goal of the verification is to check whether the implementation is consistent with the CFS architectural rules derived from the developer's guide. The results indicate that consistency checking helps a) identifying architecturally significant deviations that were eluded during code reviews, b) clarifying the design rules to the team, and c) assessing the overall implementation quality. Furthermore, it helps connecting business goals to architectural principles, and to the implementation. This paper is the first step in the definition of a method for analyzing and evaluating product line implementations from an architecture-centric perspective.

  16. RATS: Reactive Architectures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christensen, Marc

    2004-01-01

    This project had two goals: To build an emulation prototype board for a tiled architecture and to demonstrate the utility of a global inter-chip free-space photonic interconnection fabric for polymorphous computer architectures (PCA...

  17. Avionics Architecture for Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the AES Avionics Architectures for Exploration (AAE) project is to develop a reference architecture that is based on standards and that can be scaled and...

  18. Religious architecture: anthropological perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaaik, O.

    2013-01-01

    Religious Architecture: Anthropological Perspectives develops an anthropological perspective on modern religious architecture, including mosques, churches and synagogues. Borrowing from a range of theoretical perspectives on space-making and material religion, this volume looks at how religious

  19. Rhein-Ruhr architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    katalog til udstillingen 'Rhein - Ruhr architecture' Meldahls smedie, 15. marts - 28. april 2002. 99 sider......katalog til udstillingen 'Rhein - Ruhr architecture' Meldahls smedie, 15. marts - 28. april 2002. 99 sider...

  20. Elements of Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elements of Architecture explores new ways of engaging architecture in archaeology. It conceives of architecture both as the physical evidence of past societies and as existing beyond the physical environment, considering how people in the past have not just dwelled in buildings but have existed...

  1. Knowledge and Architectural Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Johan

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the specific knowledge residing in architectural practice. It is based on the research of 35 PhD fellows in the ADAPT-r (Architecture, Design and Art Practice Training-research) project. The ADAPT-r project innovates architectural research in combining expertise from academi...

  2. Architecture faculty, Prague

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnídková, Vendula

    -, č. 40 (2011), s. 30-31 ISSN 1573-3815 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80330511 Keywords : Czech contemporary architecture * Alena Šrámková * Architecture faculty, Prague Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture , Cultural Heritage

  3. How the genome folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman Aiden, Erez

    2012-02-01

    I describe Hi-C, a novel technology for probing the three-dimensional architecture of whole genomes by coupling proximity-based ligation with massively parallel sequencing. Working with collaborators at the Broad Institute and UMass Medical School, we used Hi-C to construct spatial proximity maps of the human genome at a resolution of 1Mb. These maps confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes. We identified an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments. At the megabase scale, the chromatin conformation is consistent with a fractal globule, a knot-free conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus. The fractal globule is distinct from the more commonly used globular equilibrium model. Our results demonstrate the power of Hi-C to map the dynamic conformations of whole genomes.

  4. Exploring Hardware-Based Primitives to Enhance Parallel Security Monitoring in a Novel Computing Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mott, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    .... In doing this, we propose a novel computing architecture, derived from a contemporary shared memory architecture, that facilitates efficient security-related monitoring in real-time, while keeping...

  5. Development and Genetic Control of Plant Architecture and Biomass in the Panicoid Grass, Setaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Mauro-Herrera

    Full Text Available The architecture of a plant affects its ability to compete for light and to respond to environmental stresses, thus affecting overall fitness and productivity. Two components of architecture, branching and height, were studied in 182 F7 recombinant inbred lines (RILs at the vegetative, flowering and mature developmental stages in the panicoid C4 model grass system, Setaria. The RIL population was derived from a cross between domesticated S. italica (foxtail millet and its wild relative S. viridis (green foxtail. In both field and greenhouse trials the wild parent was taller initially, started branching earlier, and flowered earlier, while the domesticated parent was shorter initially, but flowered later, producing a robust tall plant architecture with more nodes and leaves on the main culm and few or no branches. Biomass was highly correlated with height of the plant and number of nodes on the main culm, and generally showed a negative relationship with branch number. However, several of the RILs with the highest biomass in both trials were significantly more branched than the domesticated parent of the cross. Quantitative trait loci (QTL analyses indicate that both height and branching are controlled by multiple genetic regions, often with QTL for both traits colocalizing in the same genomic regions. Genomic positions of several QTL colocalize with QTL in syntenic regions in other species and contain genes known to control branching and height in sorghum, maize, and switchgrass. Included in these is the ortholog of the rice SD-1 semi-dwarfing gene, which underlies one of the major Setaria height QTL. Understanding the relationships between height and branching patterns in Setaria, and their genetic control, is an important step to gaining a comprehensive knowledge of the development and genetic regulation of panicoid grass architecture.

  6. In-depth genome analyses of viruses from vaccine-derived rabies cases and corresponding live-attenuated oral rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Florian; Müller, Thomas; Freuling, Conrad M; Fehlner-Gardiner, Christine; Nadin-Davis, Susan; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Cliquet, Florence; Vuta, Vlad; Hostnik, Peter; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Beer, Martin; Höper, Dirk

    2018-02-10

    Live-attenuated rabies virus strains such as those derived from the field isolate Street Alabama Dufferin (SAD) have been used extensively and very effectively as oral rabies vaccines for the control of fox rabies in both Europe and Canada. Although these vaccines are safe, some cases of vaccine-derived rabies have been detected during rabies surveillance accompanying these campaigns. In recent analysis it was shown that some commercial SAD vaccines consist of diverse viral populations, rather than clonal genotypes. For cases of vaccine-derived rabies, only consensus sequence data have been available to date and information concerning their population diversity was thus lacking. In our study, we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze 11 cases of vaccine-derived rabies, and compared their viral population diversity to the related oral rabies vaccines using pairwise Manhattan distances. This extensive deep sequencing analysis of vaccine-derived rabies cases observed during oral vaccination programs provided deeper insights into the effect of accidental in vivo replication of genetically diverse vaccine strains in the central nervous system of target and non-target species under field conditions. The viral population in vaccine-derived cases appeared to be clonal in contrast to their parental vaccines. The change from a state of high population diversity present in the vaccine batches to a clonal genotype in the affected animal may indicate the presence of a strong bottleneck during infection. In conclusion, it is very likely that these few cases are the consequence of host factors and not the result of the selection of a more virulent genotype. Furthermore, this type of vaccine-derived rabies leads to the selection of clonal genotypes and the selected variants were genetically very similar to potent SAD vaccines that have undergone a history of in vitro selection. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The plastid genome of some eustigmatophyte algae harbours a bacteria-derived six-gene cluster for biosynthesis of a novel secondary metabolite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yurchenko, T.; Ševčíková, T.; Strnad, Hynek; Butenko, A.; Eliáš, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 11 (2016), č. článku 160249. ISSN 2046-2441 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-33039S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/19.0388; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1208 EU Projects: European Commission 642575 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Eustigmatophyceae * horizontal gene transfer * plastid genome * secondary metabolism * sugar phosphate cyclase superfamily * UbiA superfamily Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.481, year: 2016

  8. Architectures of prototypes and architectural prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Christensen, Michael; Sandvad, Elmer

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports from experience obtained through development of a prototype of a global customer service system in a project involving a large shipping company and a university research group. The research group had no previous knowledge of the complex business of shipping and had never worked...... sessions with users, - evolve over a long period of time to contain more functionality - allow for 6-7 developers working intensively in parallel. Explicit focus on the software architecture and letting the architecture evolve with the prototype played a major role in resolving these conflicting...... constraints. Specifically allowing explicit restructuring phases when the architecture became problematic showed to be crucial.  ...

  9. Software architecture evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barais, Olivier; Le Meur, Anne-Francoise; Duchien, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    Software architectures must frequently evolve to cope with changing requirements, and this evolution often implies integrating new concerns. Unfortunately, when the new concerns are crosscutting, existing architecture description languages provide little or no support for this kind of evolution....... The software architect must modify multiple elements of the architecture manually, which risks introducing inconsistencies. This chapter provides an overview, comparison and detailed treatment of the various state-of-the-art approaches to describing and evolving software architectures. Furthermore, we discuss...... one particular framework named Tran SAT, which addresses the above problems of software architecture evolution. Tran SAT provides a new element in the software architecture descriptions language, called an architectural aspect, for describing new concerns and their integration into an existing...

  10. The fractal dimension of architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Ostwald, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Fractal analysis is a method for measuring, analysing and comparing the formal or geometric properties of complex objects. In this book it is used to investigate eighty-five buildings that have been designed by some of the twentieth-century’s most respected and celebrated architects. Including designs by Le Corbusier, Eileen Gray, Frank Lloyd Wright, Robert Venturi, Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, Richard Meier and Kazuyo Sejima amongst others, this book uses mathematics to analyse arguments and theories about some of the world’s most famous designs. Starting with 625 reconstructed architectural plans and elevations, and including more than 200 specially prepared views of famous buildings, this book presents the results of the largest mathematical study ever undertaken into architectural design and the largest single application of fractal analysis presented in any field. The data derived from this study is used to test three overarching hypotheses about social, stylistic and personal trends in design, along...

  11. Proactive Modeling of Market, Product and Production Architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Hansen, Christian Lindschou; Hvam, Lars

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an operational model that allows description of market, products and production architectures. The main feature of this model is the ability to describe both structural and functional aspect of architectures. The structural aspect is an answer to the question: What constitutes...... the architecture, e.g. standard designs, design units and interfaces? The functional aspect is an answer to the question: What is the behaviour or the architecture, what is it able to do, i.e. which products at which performance levels can be derived from the architecture? Among the most important benefits...... of this model is the explicit ability to describe what the architecture is prepared for, and what it is not prepared for - concerning development of future derivative products. The model has been applied in a large scale global product development project. Among the most important benefits is contribution to...

  12. Using business critical design rules to frame new architecture introduction in multi-architecture portfolios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Martin; Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Hvam, Lars

    2018-01-01

    , architecture and module levels, including modelling of the most critical links between the product and manufacturing domains. The suggested modelling principle has been tested as a frame for new-architecture introduction, capturing critical modularisation principles in a large and global OEM. Application......When introducing new architectures to an industrial portfolio, counting multiple existing product and manufacturing solutions, time-to-market and investments in manufacturing equipment can be significantly reduced if new concepts are aligned with the existing portfolio. This can be done through......-product introduction based on several ‘game rules’, or Business Critical Design Rules (BCDRs), which denote the most critical features of the product and manufacturing architectures, and should be considered an obligatory reference for design when introducing new architectures. BCDRs are derived from the portfolio...

  13. Detail in architecture: Between arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulencin Juraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Architectural detail represents an important part of architecture. Not only can it be used as an identifier of a specific building but at the same time enhances the experience of the realized project. Within it lie the signs of a great architect and clues to understanding his or her way of thinking. It is therefore the central topic of a seminar offered to architecture students at the Brno University of Technology. During the course of the semester-long class the students acquaint themselves with atypical architectural details of domestic and international architects by learning to read them, understand them and subsequently draw them by creating architectural blueprints. In other words, by general analysis of a detail the students learn theoretical thinking of its architect who, depending on the nature of the design, had to incorporate a variety of techniques and crafts. Students apply this analytical part to their own architectural detail design. The methodology of the seminar consists of experiential learning by project management and is complemented by a series of lectures discussing a diversity of details as well as materials and technologies required to implement it. The architectural detail design is also part of students’ bachelors thesis, therefore, the realistic nature of their blueprints can be verified in the production process of its physical counterpart. Based on their own documentation the students choose the most suitable manufacturing process whether it is supplied by a specific technology or a craftsman. Students actively participate in the production and correct their design proposals in real scale with the actual material. A student, as a future architect, stands somewhere between a client and an artisan, materializes his or her idea and adjusts the manufacturing process so that the final detail fulfills aesthetic consistency and is in harmony with its initial concept. One of the very important aspects of the design is its

  14. Genome-wide profiling to analyze the effects of Ox-LDL induced THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Wei Hu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis has a high incidence and is harmful to human health. An elevated level of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL is one of the major risk factors for atherosclerosis. During atherogenesis progression, circulating monocytes adhere to the intima and differentiate into macrophages. After differentiation, intimal macrophages intake Ox-LDL via scavenger receptors, thereby transforming into foam cells. Foam cell formation due to excessive accumulation of cholesterol by macrophages is a pathological hallmark of atherosclerosis. To gain a molecular understanding of the effect of Ox-LDL in atherosclerosis development, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of the Ox-LDL-induced macrophage transformation by microarray gene expression profiling. Here we describe in details the contents and quality controls for the gene expression and related results associated with the data uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE54039.

  15. Genome-wide analyses of ChIP-Seq derived FOXA2 DNA occupancy in liver points to genetic networks underpinning multiple complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew E; Schug, Jonathan; Wells, Andrew D; Kaestner, Klaus H; Grant, Struan F A

    2014-08-01

    Forkhead Box A2 (FOXA2) exerts an influence on glucose homeostasis via activity in the liver. In addition, a key genome-wide association study (GWAS) recently demonstrated that genetic variation, namely rs6048205, at the FOXA2 locus is robustly associated with fasting glucose levels. Our hypothesis was that this DNA-binding protein regulates the expression of a set of molecular pathways critical to endocrine traits. Drawing on our laboratory and bioinformatic experience with chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel sequencing, we analyzed our existing FOXA2 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel sequencing data generated in human liver, using the algorithm hypergeometric optimization of motif enrichment, to gain insight into its global genomic binding pattern from a disease perspective. We performed a pathway analysis of the gene list using the gene set enrichment analysis algorithm, which yielded a number of significant annotations. Motivated by the fact that the FOXA2 locus has been implicated by GWAS, we cross-referenced the occupancy sites with the National Institutes of Health GWAS catalog and found strong evidence for the enrichment of loci implicated in endocrine, neuropsychiatric, cardiovascular, and cancer trait categories, but interestingly there was no evidence for enrichment for inflammation related traits. Intriguingly, a FOXA2 occupancy site coincided with rs6048205, suggesting that this variant confers its effect, at least partially, via a perturbation of a FOXA2 feedback mechanism. Our data strongly suggest that FOXA2 is acting as a master regulator of key pathways that are enriched for loci implicated by GWAS for most trait categories, with the clear exception of inflammation, suggesting that this factor exerts its effect in this context via noninflammatory processes.

  16. Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR Genetic Linkage Map of D Genome Diploid Cotton Derived from an Interspecific Cross between Gossypium davidsonii and Gossypium klotzschianum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Nyangasi Kirungu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The challenge in tetraploid cotton cultivars is the narrow genetic base and therefore, the bottleneck is how to obtain interspecific hybrids and introduce the germplasm directly from wild cotton to elite cultivars. Construction of genetic maps has provided insight into understanding the genome structure, interrelationships between organisms in relation to evolution, and discovery of genes that carry important agronomic traits in plants. In this study, we generated an interspecific hybrid between two wild diploid cottons, Gossypium davidsonii and Gossypium klotzschianum, and genotyped 188 F2:3 populations in order to develop a genetic map. We screened 12,560 SWU Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR primers and obtained 1000 polymorphic markers which accounted for only 8%. A total of 928 polymorphic primers were successfully scored and only 728 were effectively linked across the 13 chromosomes, but with an asymmetrical distribution. The map length was 1480.23 cM, with an average length of 2.182 cM between adjacent markers. A high percentage of the markers on the map developed, and for the physical map of G. raimondii, exhibited highly significant collinearity, with two types of duplication. High level of segregation distortion was observed. A total of 27 key genes were identified with diverse roles in plant hormone signaling, development, and defense reactions. The achievement of developing the F2:3 population and its genetic map constructions may be a landmark in establishing a new tool for the genetic improvement of cultivars from wild plants in cotton. Our map had an increased recombination length compared to other maps developed from other D genome cotton species.

  17. Module Architecture for in Situ Space Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Brent

    2010-01-01

    The paper analyzes internal outfitting architectures for space exploration laboratory modules. ISS laboratory architecture is examined as a baseline for comparison; applicable insights are derived. Laboratory functional programs are defined for seven planet-surface knowledge domains. Necessary and value-added departures from the ISS architecture standard are defined, and three sectional interior architecture options are assessed for practicality and potential performance. Contemporary guidelines for terrestrial analytical laboratory design are found to be applicable to the in-space functional program. Densepacked racks of system equipment, and high module volume packing ratios, should not be assumed as the default solution for exploration laboratories whose primary activities include un-scriptable investigations and experimentation on the system equipment itself.

  18. Project Integration Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William Henry

    2008-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) is a distributed, object-oriented, conceptual, software framework for the generation, organization, publication, integration, and consumption of all information involved in any complex technological process in a manner that is intelligible to both computers and humans. In the development of PIA, it was recognized that in order to provide a single computational environment in which all information associated with any given complex technological process could be viewed, reviewed, manipulated, and shared, it is necessary to formulate all the elements of such a process on the most fundamental level. In this formulation, any such element is regarded as being composed of any or all of three parts: input information, some transformation of that input information, and some useful output information. Another fundamental principle of PIA is the assumption that no consumer of information, whether human or computer, can be assumed to have any useful foreknowledge of an element presented to it. Consequently, a PIA-compliant computing system is required to be ready to respond to any questions, posed by the consumer, concerning the nature of the proffered element. In colloquial terms, a PIA-compliant system must be prepared to provide all the information needed to place the element in context. To satisfy this requirement, PIA extends the previously established object-oriented- programming concept of self-revelation and applies it on a grand scale. To enable pervasive use of self-revelation, PIA exploits another previously established object-oriented-programming concept - that of semantic infusion through class derivation. By means of self-revelation and semantic infusion through class derivation, a consumer of information can inquire about the contents of all information entities (e.g., databases and software) and can interact appropriately with those entities. Other key features of PIA are listed.

  19. Enterprise architecture management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Fatemeh; Gøtze, John; Møller, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Despite the growing interest in enterprise architecture management, researchers and practitioners lack a shared understanding of its applications in organizations. Building on findings from a literature review and eight case studies, we develop a taxonomy that categorizes applications of enterprise...... architecture management based on three classes of enterprise architecture scope. Organizations may adopt enterprise architecture management to help form, plan, and implement IT strategies; help plan and implement business strategies; or to further complement the business strategy-formation process....... The findings challenge the traditional IT-centric view of enterprise architecture management application and suggest enterprise architecture management as an approach that could support the consistent design and evolution of an organization as a whole....

  20. Enterprise architecture management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Fatemeh; Gøtze, John; Møller, Charles

    2017-01-01

    architecture management based on three classes of enterprise architecture scope. Organizations may adopt enterprise architecture management to help form, plan, and implement IT strategies; help plan and implement business strategies; or to further complement the business strategy-formation process....... The findings challenge the traditional IT-centric view of enterprise architecture management application and suggest enterprise architecture management as an approach that could support the consistent design and evolution of an organization as a whole.......Despite the growing interest in enterprise architecture management, researchers and practitioners lack a shared understanding of its applications in organizations. Building on findings from a literature review and eight case studies, we develop a taxonomy that categorizes applications of enterprise...

  1. Architectural Masterpieces Of Humayun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimov Laziz Abduazizovich

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available this report illustrates about Humayun architecture. Since Baburid style architecture has started in 1526 in India he had put so much effort to change to his own Baburid style which was adopted from Timurid Tradition. However Baburs sudden death did not allow him to develop as he has planned. Therefore his architecture style was not developed in India. Furthermore Humayun was inspired from Baburid architecture from what he has done during for four years although Humayun is sightseeing was very different compare to Babur. He has brought in architectural sphere extraordinary philosophy. He has ruled over India for some years during those years he has developed many new styles and he has put so much effort to change past architectural style. Unfortunately Afghans ruler Sher Shah has attacked India for the reason Humayun had to escape to Persia. The purpose of this report is to identify to which of this rulers belongs misconceptions of those buildings in India.

  2. Knowledge and Architectural Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Johan

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the specific knowledge residing in architectural practice. It is based on the research of 35 PhD fellows in the ADAPT-r (Architecture, Design and Art Practice Training-research) project. The ADAPT-r project innovates architectural research in combining expertise from academia...... and from practice in order to highlight and extract the specific kind of knowledge which resides and is developed in architectural practice (creative practice research). The paper will discuss three ongoing and completed PhD projects and focusses on the outcomes and their contribution to the field....... Specific to these research projects is that the researcher is within academia but stays emerged in architectural practice. The projects contribute to a better understanding of architectural practice, how it develops and what kind of knowledge is crucial. Furthermore, the paper will develop a reflection...

  3. Architecture and Stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Architecture and Art as Fuel New development zones for shopping and entertainment and space for festivals inside the city CAN be coupled with art and architecture and become ‘open minded' public domains based on cultural exchange and mutual learning. This type of space could be labelled...... as "experiencescape" - a space between tourism, culture, learning and economy. Strategies related to these challenges involve new architectural concepts and art as ‘engines' for a change. New expressive architecture and old industrial buildings are often combined into hybrid narratives, linking the past...... with the future. But this is not enough. The agenda is to develop architectural spaces, where social interaction and learning are enhanced by art and fun. How can we develop new architectural designs in our inner cities and waterfronts where eventscapes, learning labs and temporal use are merged with everyday...

  4. Architecture humanitarian emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Guillamon, Maria; Eskemose Andersen, Jørgen; Contreras, Jorge Lobos

    2013-01-01

    Introduced by scientific articles conserning architecture and human rights in light of cultures, emergencies, social equality and sustainability, democracy, economy, artistic development and science into architecture. Concluding in definition of needs for new roles, processes and education of arc......, Architettura di Alghero in Italy, Architecture and Design of Kocaeli University in Turkey, University of Aguascalientes in Mexico, Architectura y Urbanismo of University of Chile and Escuela de Architectura of Universidad Austral in Chile....

  5. The ATLAS Analysis Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranmer, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of the ATLAS analysis architecture including the relevant aspects of the computing model and the major architectural aspects of the Athena framework. Emphasis will be given to the interplay between the analysis use cases and the technical aspects of the architecture including the design of the event data model, transient-persistent separation, data reduction strategies, analysis tools, and ROOT interoperability

  6. Fabricating architectural volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feringa, Jelle; Søndergaard, Asbjørn

    2015-01-01

    The 2011 edition of Fabricate inspired a number of collaborations, this article seeks to highlight three of these. There is a common thread amongst the projects presented: sharing the ambition to close the rift between design and fabrication while incorporating structural design aspects early on....... The development of fabrication techniques in the work presented is considered an inherent part of architectural design and shares the aspiration of developing approaches to manufacturing architecture that are scalable to architectural proportions1 and of practical relevance....

  7. Prison, Architecture and Humans

    OpenAIRE

    2018-01-01

    "What is prison architecture and how can it be studied? How are concepts such as humanism, dignity and solidarity translated into prison architecture? What kind of ideologies and ideas are expressed in various prison buildings from different eras and locations? What is the outside and the inside of a prison, and what is the significance of movement within the prison space? What does a lunch table have to do with prison architecture? How do prisoners experience materiality in serving a prison ...

  8. Architecture for Data Management

    OpenAIRE

    Vukolic, Marko

    2015-01-01

    In this document we present the preliminary architecture of the SUPERCLOUD data management and storage. We start by defining the design requirements of the architecture, motivated by use cases and then review the state-of-the-art. We survey security and dependability technologies and discuss designs for the overall unifying architecture for data management that serves as an umbrella for different security and dependability data management features. Specifically the document lays out the archi...

  9. Grid Architecture 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taft, Jeffrey D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The report describes work done on Grid Architecture under the auspices of the Department of Electricity Office of Electricity Delivery and Reliability in 2015. As described in the first Grid Architecture report, the primary purpose of this work is to provide stakeholder insight about grid issues so as to enable superior decision making on their part. Doing this requires the creation of various work products, including oft-times complex diagrams, analyses, and explanations. This report provides architectural insights into several important grid topics and also describes work done to advance the science of Grid Architecture as well.

  10. Product Architecture Modularity Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkola, Juliana Hsuan

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to integrate various perspectives on product architecture modularity into a general framework, and also to propose a way to measure the degree of modularization embedded in product architectures. Various trade-offs between modular and integral product architectures...... and how components and interfaces influence the degree of modularization are considered. In order to gain a better understanding of product architecture modularity as a strategy, a theoretical framework and propositions are drawn from various academic literature sources. Based on the literature review...

  11. Elements of Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elements of Architecture explores new ways of engaging architecture in archaeology. It conceives of architecture both as the physical evidence of past societies and as existing beyond the physical environment, considering how people in the past have not just dwelled in buildings but have existed...... and affective impacts, of these material remains. The contributions in this volume investigate the way time, performance and movement, both physically and emotionally, are central aspects of understanding architectural assemblages. It is a book about the constellations of people, places and things that emerge...

  12. Exporting Humanist Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    values and ethical stands involved in the export of Danish Architecture. Abstract: Danish architecture has, in a sense, been driven by an unwritten contract between the architects and the democratic state and its institutions. This contract may be viewed as an ethos – an architectural tradition......The article is a chapter in the catalogue for the Danish exhibition at the 2016 Architecture Biennale in Venice. The catalogue is conceived at an independent book exploring the theme Art of Many - The Right to Space. The chapter is an essay in this anthology tracing and discussing the different...

  13. Decentralized Software Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khare, Rohit

    2002-01-01

    .... While the term "decentralization" is familiar from political and economic contexts, it has been applied extensively, if indiscriminately, to describe recent trends in software architecture towards...

  14. An architectural model for network interconnection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sinderen, Marten J.; Vissers, C.A.; Kalin, T.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a technique of successive decomposition of a common users' activity to illustrate the problems of network interconnection. The criteria derived from this approach offer a structuring principle which is used to develop an architectural model that embeds heterogeneous subnetworks

  15. [Detection of a fetus with paternally derived 2q37.3 microdeletion and 20p13p12.2 microduplication using whole genome microarray technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Ren, Meihong; Song, Guining; Liu, Xuexia; Wang, Jianliu; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2016-12-10

    To perform prenatal diagnosis for a fetus with multiple malformations. The fetus was subjected to routine karyotyping and whole genome microarray analysis. The parents were subjected to high-resolution chromosome analysis. Fetal ultrasound at 28+4 weeks has indicated intrauterine growth restriction, left kidney agenesis, right kidney dysplasia, ventricular septal defect, and polyhydramnios. Chromosomal analysis showed that the fetus has a karyotype of 46,XY,der(2),der(20), t(2;20)(q37.3;p12.2), t(5;15) (q12.2;q25) pat. SNP array analysis confirmed that the fetus has a 5.283 Mb deletion at 2q37.3 and a 11.641 Mb duplication at 20p13p12.2. High-resolution chromosome analysis suggested that the father has a karyotype of 46,XY,t(2;20)(q37.3;p12.2),t(5;15)(q12.2;q25), while the mother has a normal karyotype. The abnormal phenotype of the fetus may be attributed to a 2q37.3 microdeletion and a 20p13p12.2 microduplication. The father has carried a complex translocation involving four chromosomes. To increase the chance for successful pregnancy, genetic diagnosis and/or assisted reproductive technology are warranted.

  16. Genome Trees from Conservation Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the genome tree depends on the potential evolutionary significance in the clustering of species according to similarities in the gene content of their genomes. In this respect, genome trees have often been identified with species trees. With the rapid expansion of genome sequence data it becomes of increasing importance to develop accurate methods for grasping global trends for the phylogenetic signals that mutually link the various genomes. We therefore derive here the methodological concept of genome trees based on protein conservation profiles in multiple species. The basic idea in this derivation is that the multi-component "presence-absence" protein conservation profiles permit tracking of common evolutionary histories of genes across multiple genomes. We show that a significant reduction in informational redundancy is achieved by considering only the subset of distinct conservation profiles. Beyond these basic ideas, we point out various pitfalls and limitations associated with the data handling, paving the way for further improvements. As an illustration for the methods, we analyze a genome tree based on the above principles, along with a series of other trees derived from the same data and based on pair-wise comparisons (ancestral duplication-conservation and shared orthologs. In all trees we observe a sharp discrimination between the three primary domains of life: Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. The new genome tree, based on conservation profiles, displays a significant correspondence with classically recognized taxonomical groupings, along with a series of departures from such conventional clusterings.

  17. Reversible dual inhibitor against G9a and DNMT1 improves human iPSC derivation enhancing MET and facilitating transcription factor engagement to the genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Roberto Rodriguez-Madoz

    Full Text Available The combination of defined factors with small molecules targeting epigenetic factors is a strategy that has been shown to enhance optimal derivation of iPSCs and could be used for disease modelling, high throughput screenings and/or regenerative medicine applications. In this study, we showed that a new first-in-class reversible dual G9a/DNMT1 inhibitor compound (CM272 improves the efficiency of human cell reprogramming and iPSC generation from primary cells of healthy donors and patient samples, using both integrative and non-integrative methods. Moreover, CM272 facilitates the generation of human iPSC with only two factors allowing the removal of the most potent oncogenic factor cMYC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mechanistically, treatment with CM272 induces heterochromatin relaxation, facilitates the engagement of OCT4 and SOX2 transcription factors to OSKM refractory binding regions that are required for iPSC establishment, and enhances mesenchymal to epithelial transition during the early phase of cell reprogramming. Thus, the use of this new G9a/DNMT reversible dual inhibitor compound may represent an interesting alternative for improving cell reprogramming and human iPSC derivation for many different applications while providing interesting insights into reprogramming mechanisms.

  18. Reversible dual inhibitor against G9a and DNMT1 improves human iPSC derivation enhancing MET and facilitating transcription factor engagement to the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Madoz, Juan Roberto; San Jose-Eneriz, Edurne; Rabal, Obdulia; Zapata-Linares, Natalia; Miranda, Estibaliz; Rodriguez, Saray; Porciuncula, Angelo; Vilas-Zornoza, Amaia; Garate, Leire; Segura, Victor; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Agirre, Xabier; Oyarzabal, Julen; Prosper, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    The combination of defined factors with small molecules targeting epigenetic factors is a strategy that has been shown to enhance optimal derivation of iPSCs and could be used for disease modelling, high throughput screenings and/or regenerative medicine applications. In this study, we showed that a new first-in-class reversible dual G9a/DNMT1 inhibitor compound (CM272) improves the efficiency of human cell reprogramming and iPSC generation from primary cells of healthy donors and patient samples, using both integrative and non-integrative methods. Moreover, CM272 facilitates the generation of human iPSC with only two factors allowing the removal of the most potent oncogenic factor cMYC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mechanistically, treatment with CM272 induces heterochromatin relaxation, facilitates the engagement of OCT4 and SOX2 transcription factors to OSKM refractory binding regions that are required for iPSC establishment, and enhances mesenchymal to epithelial transition during the early phase of cell reprogramming. Thus, the use of this new G9a/DNMT reversible dual inhibitor compound may represent an interesting alternative for improving cell reprogramming and human iPSC derivation for many different applications while providing interesting insights into reprogramming mechanisms.

  19. World Ships - Architectures & Feasibility Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, A. M.; Pak, M.; Putz, D.; Buhler, C.; Reiss, P.

    A world ship is a concept for manned interstellar flight. It is a huge, self-contained and self-sustained interstellar vehicle. It travels at a fraction of a per cent of the speed of light and needs several centuries to reach its target star system. The well- known world ship concept by Alan Bond and Anthony Martin was intended to show its principal feasibility. However, several important issues haven't been addressed so far: the relationship between crew size and robustness of knowledge transfer, reliability, and alternative mission architectures. This paper addresses these gaps. Furthermore, it gives an update on target star system choice, and develops possible mission architectures. The derived conclusions are: a large population size leads to robust knowledge transfer and cultural adaptation. These processes can be improved by new technologies. World ship reliability depends on the availability of an automatic repair system, as in the case of the Daedalus probe. Star systems with habitable planets are probably farther away than systems with enough resources to construct space colonies. Therefore, missions to habitable planets have longer trip times and have a higher risk of mission failure. On the other hand, the risk of constructing colonies is higher than to establish an initial settlement on a habitable planet. Mission architectures with precursor probes have the potential to significantly reduce trip and colonization risk without being significantly more costly than architectures without. In summary world ships remain an interesting concept, although they require a space colony-based civilization within our own solar system before becoming feasible.

  20. A catalog of architectural primitives for modeling architectural patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zdun, Uwe; Avgeriou, Paris

    Architectural patterns are a fundamental aspect of the architecting process and subsequently the architectural documentation. Unfortunately, there is only poor support for modeling architectural patterns for two reasons. First, patterns describe recurring design solutions and hence do not directly

  1. Machine Conscious Architecture for State Exploitation and Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    result from extending the mimicry from the neuronal level to the cognitive architecture level of the brain. Conscious architecture refers to how...1. Subjective Aspects of Qualia: Qualia are the subjective qualities evoked by a stimulus. They only exist in the mind of the animal sensing the...stimuli. 2. Not Derivable: The qualia are not derivable from the stimulus by any other animal . Qualia are so distinct that the same stimulus

  2. weHelp: A Reference Architecture for Social Recommender Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Swapneel; Arora, Nipun; Murphy, Christian; Kaiser, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Recommender systems have become increasingly popular. Most of the research on recommender systems has focused on recommendation algorithms. There has been relatively little research, however, in the area of generalized system architectures for recommendation systems. In this paper, we introduce weHelp : a reference architecture for social recommender systems - systems where recommendations are derived automatically from the aggregate of logged activities conducted by the system's users. Our architecture is designed to be application and domain agnostic. We feel that a good reference architecture will make designing a recommendation system easier; in particular, weHelp aims to provide a practical design template to help developers design their own well-modularized systems.

  3. Towards a Media Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebsen, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    This text explores the concept of media architecture as a phenomenon of visual culture that describes the use of screen-technology in new spatial configurations in practices of architecture and art. I shall argue that this phenomenon is not necessarily a revolutionary new approach, but rather...

  4. Emerging supercomputer architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messina, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper will examine the current and near future trends for commercially available high-performance computers with architectures that differ from the mainstream ''supercomputer'' systems in use for the last few years. These emerging supercomputer architectures are just beginning to have an impact on the field of high performance computing. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Architecture, Drawing, Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book presents contributions of drawing and text along with their many relationalities from ontology to history and vice versa in a range of reflections on architecture, drawing and topology. We hope to thereby indicate the potential of the theme in understanding not only the architecture...

  6. Enterprise architecture intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veneberg, R.K.M.; Iacob, Maria Eugenia; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Bodenstaff, L.; Reichert, M.U.; Rinderle-Ma, S.; Grossmann, G.

    2014-01-01

    Combining enterprise architecture and operational data is complex (especially when considering the actual ‘matching’ of data with enterprise architecture objects), and little has been written on how to do this. Therefore, in this paper we aim to fill this gap and propose a method to combine

  7. FTS2000 network architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenart, John

    1991-01-01

    The network architecture of FTS2000 is graphically depicted. A map of network A topology is provided, with interservice nodes. Next, the four basic element of the architecture is laid out. Then, the FTS2000 time line is reproduced. A list of equipment supporting FTS2000 dedicated transmissions is given. Finally, access alternatives are shown.

  8. Digitally-Driven Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriette Bier

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The shift from mechanical to digital forces architects to reposition themselves: Architects generate digital information, which can be used not only in designing and fabricating building components but also in embedding behaviours into buildings. This implies that, similar to the way that industrial design and fabrication with its concepts of standardisation and serial production influenced modernist architecture, digital design and fabrication influences contemporary architecture. While standardisa­tion focused on processes of rationalisation of form, mass-customisation as a new paradigm that replaces mass-production, addresses non-standard, complex, and flexible designs. Furthermore, knowledge about the designed object can be encoded in digital data pertaining not just to the geometry of a design but also to its physical or other behaviours within an environment. Digitally-driven architecture implies, therefore, not only digitally-designed and fabricated architecture, it also implies architecture – built form – that can be controlled, actuated, and animated by digital means. In this context, this sixth Footprint issue examines the influence of digital means as prag­matic and conceptual instruments for actuating architecture. The focus is not so much on computer-based systems for the development of architectural designs, but on architecture incorporating digital control, sens­ing, actuating, or other mechanisms that enable buildings to inter­act with their users and surroundings in real time in the real world through physical or sensory change and variation.

  9. Digitally-Driven Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriette Bier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The shift from mechanical to digital forces architects to reposition themselves: Architects generate digital information, which can be used not only in designing and fabricating building components but also in embedding behaviours into buildings. This implies that, similar to the way that industrial design and fabrication with its concepts of standardisation and serial production influenced modernist architecture, digital design and fabrication influences contemporary architecture. While standardisation focused on processes of rationalisation of form, mass-customisation as a new paradigm that replaces mass-production, addresses non-standard, complex, and flexible designs. Furthermore, knowledge about the designed object can be encoded in digital data pertaining not just to the geometry of a design but also to its physical or other behaviours within an environment. Digitally-driven architecture implies, therefore, not only digitally-designed and fabricated architecture, it also implies architecture – built form – that can be controlled, actuated, and animated by digital means.In this context, this sixth Footprint issue examines the influence of digital means as pragmatic and conceptual instruments for actuating architecture. The focus is not so much on computer-based systems for the development of architectural designs, but on architecture incorporating digital control, sens­ing, actuating, or other mechanisms that enable buildings to inter­act with their users and surroundings in real time in the real world through physical or sensory change and variation.

  10. Globalization and Landscape Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Robert R. Hewitt

    2014-01-01

    The literature review examines globalization and landscape architecture as discourse, samples its various meanings, and proposes methods to identify and contextualize its specific literature. Methodologically, the review surveys published articles and books by leading authors and within the WorldCat.org Database associated with landscape architecture and globalization, analyzing survey results for comprehensive concept...

  11. Architecture and Intelligentsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Rappaport

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article observes intellectual and cultural level of architecture and its important functions in social process. Historical analysis shows constant decline of intellectual level of profession, as a reaction on radical changes in its social functions and mass scale, leading to degrading of individual critical reflection and growing dependence of architecture to political and economical bureaucracy.

  12. Architecture and Intelligentsia

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Rappaport

    2015-01-01

    The article observes intellectual and cultural level of architecture and its important functions in social process. Historical analysis shows constant decline of intellectual level of profession, as a reaction on radical changes in its social functions and mass scale, leading to degrading of individual critical reflection and growing dependence of architecture to political and economical bureaucracy.

  13. Towards an Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    2017-01-01

    their overlaps and collaboration. However, there are also challenging differences to take into account regarding disciplinary traditions of, for example, communication, temporality, and normativity. This article explores the potentials and challenges of architectural anthropology as a distinct sub...... architecture, but also in the contemporary urban environments in which most architects work....

  14. Aesthetics of sustainable architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.; Hill, G.; Sauerbruch, M.; Hutton, L.; Knowles, R.; Bothwell, K.; Brennan, J.; Jauslin, D.; Holzheu, H.; AlSayyad, N.; Arboleda, G.; Bharne, V.; Røstvik, H.; Kuma, K.; Sunikka-Blank, M.; Glaser, M.; Pero, E.; Sjkonsberg, M.; Teuffel, P.; Mangone, G.; Finocchiaro, L.; Hestnes, A.; Briggs, D.; Frampton, K.; Lee, S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to reveal, explore and further the debate on the aesthetic potentials of sustainable architecture and its practice. This book opens a new area of scholarship and discourse in the design and production of sustainable architecture, one that is based in aesthetics. The

  15. Research Through Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peder Pedersen, Claus

    2018-01-01

    Presentation of the PhD research at the Aarhus School of Architecture and selected PhD projects in relation to PhD exhibition at Godsbanen.......Presentation of the PhD research at the Aarhus School of Architecture and selected PhD projects in relation to PhD exhibition at Godsbanen....

  16. Architecture and energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Rob; Lauring, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Traditional low-energy architecture has not necessarily led to reduced energy consumption. A paradigm shift is proposed promoting pluralistic energy-saving strategies.......Traditional low-energy architecture has not necessarily led to reduced energy consumption. A paradigm shift is proposed promoting pluralistic energy-saving strategies....

  17. Software Architecture Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  18. Teaching American Indian Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "Native American Architecture," by Nabokov and Easton, an encyclopedic work that examines technology, climate, social structure, economics, religion, and history in relation to house design and the "meaning" of space among tribes of nine regions. Describes this book's use in a college course on Native American architecture. (SV)

  19. Studies in prolong architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tick, E.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the problem of how logic programs can be made to execute at high speeds. Prolog, chosen as a representative logic programming language, differs from procedural languages in that it is applicative, nondeterminate and uses unification as its primary operation. Program performance is directly related to memory performance because high-speed processors are ultimately limited by memory bandwidth, and architectures that require less bandwidth have greater potential for high performance. This dissertation reports the dynamic data and instruction referencing characteristics of both sequential and parallel Prolog architectures and corresponding uniprocessor and multiprocessor memory-hierarchy performance tradeoffs. Initially, a family of canonical architectures, corresponding closely to Prolog, is defined from the principles of ideal machine architectures of Flynn, and is then refined into the realizable Warren Abstract Machine (WAM) architecture. The memory-referencing behavior of these architecture sis examined by tracing memory references during emulation of a set of Prolog benchmarks. Two-level memory hierarchies for both sequential (WAM) and parallel (PWAM) Prolog architectures are modeled. PWAM is the Restricted-AND Parallel architecture of Hermenegildo.

  20. Product Architecture Modularity Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkola, Juliana Hsuan

    2003-01-01

    and how components and interfaces influence the degree of modularization are considered. In order to gain a better understanding of product architecture modularity as a strategy, a theoretical framework and propositions are drawn from various academic literature sources. Based on the literature review......The focus of this paper is to integrate various perspectives on product architecture modularity into a general framework, and also to propose a way to measure the degree of modularization embedded in product architectures. Various trade-offs between modular and integral product architectures......, the following key elements of product architecture are identified: components (standard and new-to-the-firm), interfaces (standardization and specification), degree of coupling, and substitutability. A mathematical function, termed modularization function, is introduced to measure the degree of modularization...

  1. Can architecture be barbaric?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hürol, Yonca

    2009-06-01

    The title of this article is adapted from Theodor W. Adorno's famous dictum: 'To write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric.' After the catastrophic earthquake in Kocaeli, Turkey on the 17th of August 1999, in which more than 40,000 people died or were lost, Necdet Teymur, who was then the dean of the Faculty of Architecture of the Middle East Technical University, referred to Adorno in one of his 'earthquake poems' and asked: 'Is architecture possible after 17th of August?' The main objective of this article is to interpret Teymur's question in respect of its connection to Adorno's philosophy with a view to make a contribution to the politics and ethics of architecture in Turkey. Teymur's question helps in providing a new interpretation of a critical approach to architecture and architectural technology through Adorno's philosophy. The paper also presents a discussion of Adorno's dictum, which serves for a better understanding of its universality/particularity.

  2. Minimalism in architecture: Abstract conceptualization of architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilski Dragana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimalism in architecture contains the idea of the minimum as a leading creative tend to be considered and interpreted in working through phenomena of empathy and abstraction. In the Western culture, the root of this idea is found in empathy of Wilhelm Worringer and abstraction of Kasimir Malevich. In his dissertation, 'Abstraction and Empathy' Worringer presented his thesis on the psychology of style through which he explained the two opposing basic forms: abstraction and empathy. His conclusion on empathy as a psychological basis of observation expression is significant due to the verbal congruence with contemporary minimalist expression. His intuition was enhenced furthermore by figure of Malevich. Abstraction, as an expression of inner unfettered inspiration, has played a crucial role in the development of modern art and architecture of the twentieth century. Abstraction, which is one of the basic methods of learning in psychology (separating relevant from irrelevant features, Carl Jung is used to discover ideas. Minimalism in architecture emphasizes the level of abstraction to which the individual functions are reduced. Different types of abstraction are present: in the form as well as function of the basic elements: walls and windows. The case study is an example of Sou Fujimoto who is unequivocal in its commitment to the autonomy of abstract conceptualization of architecture.

  3. Cancer genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Bodil; Guldberg, Per; Ralfkiær, Elisabeth Methner

    2007-01-01

    Almost all cells in the human body contain a complete copy of the genome with an estimated number of 25,000 genes. The sequences of these genes make up about three percent of the genome and comprise the inherited set of genetic information. The genome also contains information that determines when...

  4. Cancer genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Bodil; Guldberg, Per; Ralfkiær, Elisabeth Methner

    2007-01-01

    Almost all cells in the human body contain a complete copy of the genome with an estimated number of 25,000 genes. The sequences of these genes make up about three percent of the genome and comprise the inherited set of genetic information. The genome also contains information that determines whe...

  5. Evolution of contemporary museum architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Bilous, Yulia

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with the development of museum architecture from the formation of the classic building architecture to the establishment of the contemporary museum architecture. Changes in the museum building architecture and displaying principles have been analysed. The 19th century was defined by the emergence of a vast number of museums serving through present as examples of the contemporary museum architecture. New styles are tried in the museum architecture alo...

  6. The Oxytricha trifallax macronuclear genome: a complex eukaryotic genome with 16,000 tiny chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estienne C Swart

    Full Text Available The macronuclear genome of the ciliate Oxytricha trifallax displays an extreme and unique eukaryotic genome architecture with extensive genomic variation. During sexual genome development, the expressed, somatic macronuclear genome is whittled down to the genic portion of a small fraction (∼5% of its precursor "silent" germline micronuclear genome by a process of "unscrambling" and fragmentation. The tiny macronuclear "nanochromosomes" typically encode single, protein-coding genes (a small portion, 10%, encode 2-8 genes, have minimal noncoding regions, and are differentially amplified to an average of ∼2,000 copies. We report the high-quality genome assembly of ∼16,000 complete nanochromosomes (∼50 Mb haploid genome size that vary from 469 bp to 66 kb long (mean ∼3.2 kb and encode ∼18,500 genes. Alternative DNA fragmentation processes ∼10% of the nanochromosomes into multiple isoforms that usually encode complete genes. Nucleotide diversity in the macronucleus is very high (SNP heterozygosity is ∼4.0%, suggesting that Oxytricha trifallax may have one of the largest known effective population sizes of eukaryotes. Comparison to other ciliates with nonscrambled genomes and long macronuclear chromosomes (on the order of 100 kb suggests several candidate proteins that could be involved in genome rearrangement, including domesticated MULE and IS1595-like DDE transposases. The assembly of the highly fragmented Oxytricha macronuclear genome is the first completed genome with such an unusual architecture. This genome sequence provides tantalizing glimpses into novel molecular biology and evolution. For example, Oxytricha maintains tens of millions of telomeres per cell and has also evolved an intriguing expansion of telomere end-binding proteins. In conjunction with the micronuclear genome in progress, the O. trifallax macronuclear genome will provide an invaluable resource for investigating programmed genome rearrangements, complementing

  7. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression during adipogenesis in human adipose-derived stromal cells reveals novel patterns of gene expression during adipocyte differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin Anyasi Ambele

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have undertaken an in-depth transcriptome analysis of adipogenesis in human adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs induced to differentiate into adipocytes in vitro. Gene expression was assessed on days 1, 7, 14 and 21 post-induction and genes differentially expressed numbered 128, 218, 253 and 240 respectively. Up-regulated genes were associated with blood vessel development, leukocyte migration, as well as tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. They also shared common pathways with certain obesity-related pathophysiological conditions. Down-regulated genes were enriched for immune response processes. KLF15, LMO3, FOXO1 and ZBTB16 transcription factors were up-regulated throughout the differentiation process. CEBPA, PPARG, ZNF117, MLXIPL, MMP3 and RORB were up-regulated only on days 14 and 21, which coincide with the maturation of adipocytes and could possibly serve as candidates for controlling fat accumulation and the size of mature adipocytes. In summary, we have identified genes that were up-regulated only on days 1 and 7 or days 14 and 21 that could serve as potential early and late-stage differentiation markers.

  8. Construction of a high-density DArTseq SNP-based genetic map and identification of genomic regions with segregation distortion in a genetic population derived from a cross between feral and cultivated-type watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Runsheng; Ray, Rumiana; Li, Pingfang; Xu, Jinhua; Zhang, Man; Liu, Guang; Yao, Xiefeng; Kilian, Andrzej; Yang, Xingping

    2015-08-01

    Watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] is an economically important vegetable crop grown extensively worldwide. To facilitate the identification of agronomically important traits and provide new information for genetic and genomic research on this species, a high-density genetic linkage map of watermelon was constructed using an F2 population derived from a cross between elite watermelon cultivar K3 and wild watermelon germplasm PI 189225. Based on a sliding window approach, a total of 1,161 bin markers representing 3,465 SNP markers were mapped onto 11 linkage groups corresponding to the chromosome pair number of watermelon. The total length of the genetic map is 1,099.2 cM, with an average distance between bins of 1.0 cM. The number of markers in each chromosome varies from 62 in chromosome 07 to 160 in chromosome 05. The length of individual chromosomes ranged between 61.8 cM for chromosome 07 and 140.2 cM for chromosome 05. A total of 616 SNP bin markers showed significant (P watermelon cultivar K3 allele and 103 were skewed toward PI 189225. The number of SNPs and InDels per Mb varied considerably across the segregation distorted regions (SDRs) on each chromosome, and a mixture of dense and sparse SNPs and InDel SDRs coexisted on some chromosomes suggesting that SDRs were randomly distributed throughout the genome. Recombination rates varied greatly among each chromosome, from 2.0 to 4.2 centimorgans per megabase (cM/Mb). An inconsistency was found between the genetic and physical positions on the map for a segment on chromosome 11. The high-density genetic map described in the present study will facilitate fine mapping of quantitative trait loci, the identification of candidate genes, map-based cloning, as well as marker-assisted selection (MAS) in watermelon breeding programs.

  9. Fractal Geometry of Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Wolfgang E.

    In Fractals smaller parts and the whole are linked together. Fractals are self-similar, as those parts are, at least approximately, scaled-down copies of the rough whole. In architecture, such a concept has also been known for a long time. Not only architects of the twentieth century called for an overall idea that is mirrored in every single detail, but also Gothic cathedrals and Indian temples offer self-similarity. This study mainly focuses upon the question whether this concept of self-similarity makes architecture with fractal properties more diverse and interesting than Euclidean Modern architecture. The first part gives an introduction and explains Fractal properties in various natural and architectural objects, presenting the underlying structure by computer programmed renderings. In this connection, differences between the fractal, architectural concept and true, mathematical Fractals are worked out to become aware of limits. This is the basis for dealing with the problem whether fractal-like architecture, particularly facades, can be measured so that different designs can be compared with each other under the aspect of fractal properties. Finally the usability of the Box-Counting Method, an easy-to-use measurement method of Fractal Dimension is analyzed with regard to architecture.

  10. Travels in Architectural History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Deriu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Travel is a powerful force in shaping the perception of the modern world and plays an ever-growing role within architectural and urban cultures. Inextricably linked to political and ideological issues, travel redefines places and landscapes through new transport infrastructures and buildings. Architecture, in turn, is reconstructed through visual and textual narratives produced by scores of modern travellers — including writers and artists along with architects themselves. In the age of the camera, travel is bound up with new kinds of imaginaries; private records and recollections often mingle with official, stereotyped views, as the value of architectural heritage increasingly rests on the mechanical reproduction of its images. Whilst students often learn about architectural history through image collections, the place of the journey in the formation of the architect itself shifts. No longer a lone and passionate antiquarian or an itinerant designer, the modern architect eagerly hops on buses, trains, and planes in pursuit of personal as well as professional interests. Increasingly built on a presumption of mobility, architectural culture integrates travel into cultural debates and design experiments. By addressing such issues from a variety of perspectives, this collection, a special 'Architectural Histories' issue on travel, prompts us to rethink the mobile conditions in which architecture has historically been produced and received.

  11. Avionics Architecture for Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Avionics Architectures for Exploration Project team will develop a system level environment and architecture that will accommodate equipment from multiple...

  12. On Detailing in Contemporary Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Claus; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2010-01-01

    Details in architecture have a significant influence on how architecture is experienced. One can touch the materials and analyse the detailing - thus details give valuable information about the architectural scheme as a whole. The absence of perceptual stimulation like details and materiality...... / tactility can blur the meaning of the architecture and turn it into an empty statement. The present paper will outline detailing in contemporary architecture and discuss the issue with respect to architectural quality. Architectural cases considered as sublime piece of architecture will be presented...

  13. Complete Sequence and Analysis of the Mitochondrial Genome of Hemiselmis andersenii CCMP644 (Cryptophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowman Sharen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptophytes are an enigmatic group of unicellular eukaryotes with plastids derived by secondary (i.e., eukaryote-eukaryote endosymbiosis. Cryptophytes are unusual in that they possess four genomes–a host cell-derived nuclear and mitochondrial genome and an endosymbiont-derived plastid and 'nucleomorph' genome. The evolutionary origins of the host and endosymbiont components of cryptophyte algae are at present poorly understood. Thus far, a single complete mitochondrial genome sequence has been determined for the cryptophyte Rhodomonas salina. Here, the second complete mitochondrial genome of the cryptophyte alga Hemiselmis andersenii CCMP644 is presented. Results The H. andersenii mtDNA is 60,553 bp in size and encodes 30 structural RNAs and 36 protein-coding genes, all located on the same strand. A prominent feature of the genome is the presence of a ~20 Kbp long intergenic region comprised of numerous tandem and dispersed repeat units of between 22–336 bp. Adjacent to these repeats are 27 copies of palindromic sequences predicted to form stable DNA stem-loop structures. One such stem-loop is located near a GC-rich and GC-poor region and may have a regulatory function in replication or transcription. The H. andersenii mtDNA shares a number of features in common with the genome of the cryptophyte Rhodomonas salina, including general architecture, gene content, and the presence of a large repeat region. However, the H. andersenii mtDNA is devoid of inverted repeats and introns, which are present in R. salina. Comparative analyses of the suite of tRNAs encoded in the two genomes reveal that the H. andersenii mtDNA has lost or converted its original trnK(uuu gene and possesses a trnS-derived 'trnK(uuu', which appears unable to produce a functional tRNA. Mitochondrial protein coding gene phylogenies strongly support a variety of previously established eukaryotic groups, but fail to resolve the relationships among higher

  14. Computer architecture technology trends

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This year's edition of Computer Architecture Technology Trends analyses the trends which are taking place in the architecture of computing systems today. Due to the sheer number of different applications to which computers are being applied, there seems no end to the different adoptions which proliferate. There are, however, some underlying trends which appear. Decision makers should be aware of these trends when specifying architectures, particularly for future applications. This report is fully revised and updated and provides insight in

  15. Architectural Knitted Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossé, Aurélie

    2010-01-01

    WGSN reports from the Architectural Knitted Surfaces workshop recently held at ShenkarCollege of Engineering and Design, Tel Aviv, which offered a cutting-edge insight into interactive knitted surfaces. With the increasing role of smart textiles in architecture, the Architectural Knitted Surfaces...... workshop brought together architects and interior and textile designers to highlight recent developments in intelligent knitting. The five-day workshop was led by architects Ayelet Karmon and Mette Ramsgaard Thomsen, together with Amir Cang and Eyal Sheffer from the Knitting Laboratory, in collaboration...

  16. Architecture, Drawing, Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meldgaard, Morten

    This book presents contributions of drawing and text along with their many relationalities from ontology to history and vice versa in a range of reflections on architecture, drawing and topology. We hope to thereby indicate the potential of the theme in understanding not only the architecture...... of today, but – perhaps most importantly – also creating and producing architecture that is contemporaneous and reacts to the radical changes of the physical world which surrounds us in the increasingly artificial measures of new materialities and understandings thereof. The contributions range from...

  17. The development of the architectural form of a tower derived from a traditional and philosophical symbol, realized by solutions of high-class technologies. The case of the Bitexco Financial Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Khai, Tran

    2018-03-01

    The Bitexco Financial Tower, majestically standing tall in the heart of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, rejects the box-shaped, abstract forms of modernism, incorporating an innovative idea of contemporary architecture. Based on the inspiration from the Bitexco Group, a renowned architect designedthe tower that became an iconic landmark of the city in the form of a lotus bud, one of the most iconic symbols of Vietnamese culture since ancient times. High class structural system solution designed by top international professional teams enable the building to rise high with its graceful, statuesque design of the lotus flower shape. CNNGo recently ranked the Bitexco Financial Tower fifth in their listing of the world's 20 most-iconic skyscrapers.

  18. Epigenetic architecture and miRNA: reciprocal regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, Erik D; Kjems, Jørgen; Clark, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    and crucial for maintaining correct local and global genomic architecture and gene expression patterns, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms and their widespread effects remain poorly understood. Due to the tissue specificity, versatility and relative stability of miRNAs, these small non-coding RNAs (nc...

  19. Runs of homozygosity: windows into population history and trait architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Francisco C; Joshi, Peter K; Clark, David W; Ramsay, Michèle; Wilson, James F

    2018-04-01

    Long runs of homozygosity (ROH) arise when identical haplotypes are inherited from each parent and thus a long tract of genotypes is homozygous. Cousin marriage or inbreeding gives rise to such autozygosity; however, genome-wide data reveal that ROH are universally common in human genomes even among outbred individuals. The number and length of ROH reflect individual demographic history, while the homozygosity burden can be used to investigate the genetic architecture of complex disease. We discuss how to identify ROH in genome-wide microarray and sequence data, their distribution in human populations and their application to the understanding of inbreeding depression and disease risk.

  20. Nuclear architecture and gene silencing in olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armelin-Correa, Lucia M; Nagai, Maíra H; Leme Silva, Artur G; Malnic, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Odorants are discriminated by hundreds of odorant receptor (OR) genes, which are dispersed throughout the mammalian genome. The OR genes are expressed in a highly specialized type of cell, the olfactory sensory neuron. Each one of these neurons expresses one of the 2 alleles from one single OR gene type. The mechanisms underlying OR gene expression are unclear. Here we describe recent work demonstrating that the olfactory sensory neuron shows a particular nuclear architecture, and that the genomic OR loci are colocalized in silencing heterochromatin compartments within the nucleus. These discoveries highlight the important role played by epigenetic modifications and nuclear genome organization in the regulation of OR gene expression.

  1. Analysis of Architecture Pattern Usage in Legacy System Architecture Documentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, Neil B.; Avgeriou, Paris

    2008-01-01

    Architecture patterns are an important tool in architectural design. However, while many architecture patterns have been identified, there is little in-depth understanding of their actual use in software architectures. For instance, there is no overview of how many patterns are used per system or

  2. Alternative Fleet Architecture Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Stuart E; Cebrowski, Arthur K

    2005-01-01

    .... Indeed, designing a fleet architecture composed of large numbers of manned and unmanned systems, networked together, provides coherence between building the force and operating the force against both challenges...

  3. Agility: Agent - Ility Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Craig

    2002-01-01

    ...., object and web technologies). The objective of the Agility project is to develop an open agent grid architecture populated with scalable, deployable, industrial strength agent grid components, targeting the theme 'agents for the masses...

  4. Greek architecture now

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skousbøll, Karin Merete

    2006-01-01

    With the author's Scandinavian viewpoint the aim of this book has been an investigation into contemporary Greek architecture and at the same time providing an understanding for its essential characteristics based on the historic, cultural heritage of Hellas....

  5. Flexible weapons architecture design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyant, William C., III

    Present day air-delivered weapons are of a closed architecture, with little to no ability to tailor the weapon for the individual engagement. The closed architectures require weaponeers to make the target fit the weapon instead of fitting the individual weapons to a target. The concept of a flexible weapons aims to modularize weapons design using an open architecture shell into which different modules are inserted to achieve the desired target fractional damage while reducing cost and civilian casualties. This thesis shows that the architecture design factors of damage mechanism, fusing, weapons weight, guidance, and propulsion are significant in enhancing weapon performance objectives, and would benefit from modularization. Additionally, this thesis constructs an algorithm that can be used to design a weapon set for a particular target class based on these modular components.

  6. Performative Urban Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bo Stjerne; Jensen, Ole B.

    The paper explores how performative urban architecture can enhance community-making and public domain using socio-technical systems and digital technologies to constitute an urban reality. Digital medias developed for the web are now increasingly occupying the urban realm as a tool for navigating...... using sensor technologies opening up for new access considerations in architecture as well as the ability for a local environment to act as real-time sources of information and facilities. Starting from the NoRA pavilion for the 10th International Architecture Biennale in Venice the paper discusses...... couple relationships between architecture, humans and society. These performative relationships between digital and physical environments are seen as illustrative of the social production of space by performance and the creative production of identity. The paper reflects on the perspectives...

  7. Layered Fault Management Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sztipanovits, Janos

    2004-01-01

    ... UAVs or Organic Air Vehicles. The approach of this effort was to analyze fault management requirements of formation flight for fleets of UAVs, and develop a layered fault management architecture which demonstrates significant...

  8. DSP Architecture Design Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Marković, Dejan

    2012-01-01

    In DSP Architecture Design Essentials, authors Dejan Marković and Robert W. Brodersen cover a key subject for the successful realization of DSP algorithms for communications, multimedia, and healthcare applications. The book addresses the need for DSP architecture design that maps advanced DSP algorithms to hardware in the most power- and area-efficient way. The key feature of this text is a design methodology based on a high-level design model that leads to hardware implementation with minimum power and area. The methodology includes algorithm-level considerations such as automated word-length reduction and intrinsic data properties that can be leveraged to reduce hardware complexity. From a high-level data-flow graph model, an architecture exploration methodology based on linear programming is used to create an array of architectural solutions tailored to the underlying hardware technology. The book is supplemented with online material: bibliography, design examples, CAD tutorials and custom software.

  9. Bionics in architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugár Viktória

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The adaptation of the forms and phenomena