WorldWideScience

Sample records for genitalia male

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of the male genitalia of Sarcophagidae (Diptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo de Souza Lopes

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available The male genitalia of nine species of Sarcophagidae (Diptera - Goniophyto honsuensis Rohdendorf, 1962, Tricharaea brevicornis (Wiedemann, 1830, Chaetoravinia derelicta (Walker, 1852, Austrohartigia spinigena (Rondani, 1864, Chrysagria duodecimpunctata Townsend, 1935, Boettcheria bisetosa Parker, 1914, Lipoptilocnema lanei Townsend, 1934, L. crispina (Lopes, 1938 and Euboettcheria alvarengai Lopes & Tibana, 1982 - were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM and the main morphological features are descirbed.

  2. [Human papillomavirus infection in male genitalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano Garfias, R; Villarreal Peral, C; Juárez Azpilcueta, A

    1995-10-01

    A prospective and transversal study in 100 patients since January to December of 1994, was done, to know the human papiloma virus infection prevalence in male genitals. The patients were studied by a clinical history, genital area colposcopic revision after acetic acid 5% application, biopsy of the lesion and histopathology study. The patients age was among 16 to 71 years old, with a media of 38.8 years old. The sexual activity beginning was from 12 to 27 years old, with an average of 18 years old. Forty one percent of the patients have had sexual relations with prostitutes, 26% have had sexually transmitted diseases, 9% of the patients referred only 1 sexual mate and 82% had human papiloma virus infection.

  3. Experimental demonstration of possible cryptic female choice on male tsetse fly genitalia

    OpenAIRE

    Briceño-Lobo, Daniel; Eberhard-Chabtree, William

    2009-01-01

    artículo -- Universidad de Costa Rica. Escuela de Biología, 2009. Este documento es privado debido a restricciones de derechos de autor del publicador. A possible explanation for one of the most general trends in animal evolution – rapid divergent evolution of animal genitalia – is that male genitalia are used as courtship devices that influence cryptic female choice. But experimental demonstrations of stimulatory effects of male genitalia on female reproductive processes have gen...

  4. The function and evolution of male and female genitalia in Phyllophaga Harris scarab beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, M P; Park, J; Henry, C S

    2016-11-01

    Genitalia diversity in insects continues to fuel investigation of the function and evolution of these dynamic structures. Whereas most studies have focused on variation in male genitalia, an increasing number of studies on female genitalia have uncovered comparable diversity among females, but often at a much finer morphological scale. In this study, we analysed the function and evolution of male and female genitalia in Phyllophaga scarab beetles, a group in which both sexes exhibit genitalic diversity. To document the interaction between male and female structures during mating, we dissected flash-frozen mating pairs from three Phyllophaga species and investigated fine-scale morphology using SEM. We then reconstructed ancestral character states using a species tree inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear loci to elucidate and compare the evolutionary history of male and female genitalia. Our dissections revealed an interlocking mechanism of the female pubic process and male parameres that appears to improve the mechanical fit of the copulatory position. The comparative analyses, however, did not support coevolution of male and female structures and showed more erratic evolution of the female genitalia relative to males. By studying a group that exhibits obvious female genitalic diversity, we were able to demonstrate the relevance of female reproductive morphology in studies of male genital diversity.

  5. Variation in male and female genitalia among ten species of North American Anthocoris (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Anthocoridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We compared morphology of internal reproductive anatomy and genitalia among 10 species of North American Anthocoris (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Anthocoridae). Reproductive structures of males, including internal reproductive organs (testes, seminal vesicles, ejaculatory bulb, phallus), the left parame...

  6. Experimental demonstration of possible cryptic female choice on male tsetse fly genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, R D; Eberhard, W G

    2009-11-01

    A possible explanation for one of the most general trends in animal evolution - rapid divergent evolution of animal genitalia - is that male genitalia are used as courtship devices that influence cryptic female choice. But experimental demonstrations of stimulatory effects of male genitalia on female reproductive processes have generally been lacking. Previous studies of female reproductive physiology in the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans suggested that stimulation during copulation triggers ovulation and resistance to remating. In this study we altered the form of two male genital structures that squeeze the female's abdomen rhythmically in G. morsitans centralis and induced, as predicted, cryptic female choice against the male: sperm storage decreased, while female remating increased. Further experiments in which we altered the female sensory abilities at the site contacted by these male structures during copulation, and severely altered or eliminated the stimuli the male received from this portion of his genitalia, suggested that the effects of genital alteration on sperm storage were due to changes in tactile stimuli received by the female, rather than altered male behavior. These data support the hypothesis that sexual selection by cryptic female choice has been responsible for the rapid divergent evolution of male genitalia in Glossina; limitations of this support are discussed. It appears that a complex combination of stimuli trigger female ovulation, sperm storage, and remating, and different stimuli affect different processes in G. morsitans, and that the same processes are controlled differently in G. pallidipes. This puzzling diversity in female triggering mechanisms may be due to the action of sexual selection.

  7. Experimental modifications imply a stimulatory function for male tsetse fly genitalia, supporting cryptic female choice theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, R D; Eberhard, William G

    2009-07-01

    One of the most sweeping of all patterns in morphological evolution is that animal genitalia tend to diverge more rapidly than do other structures. Abundant indirect evidence supports the cryptic female choice (CFC) explanation of this pattern, which supposes that male genitalia often function to court females during copulation; but direct experimental demonstrations of a stimulatory function have been lacking. In this study, we altered the form of two male genital structures that squeeze the female's abdomen rhythmically in Glossina pallidipes flies. As predicted by theory, this induced CFC against the male: ovulation and sperm storage decreased, while female remating increased. Further experiments showed that these effects were due to changes in tactile stimuli received by the female from the male's altered genitalia, and were not due to other possible changes in the males due to alteration of their genital form. Stimulation from male genital structures also induces females to permit copulation to occur. Together with previous studies of tsetse reproductive physiology, these data constitute the most complete experimental confirmation that sexual selection (probably by CFC) acts on the stimulatory properties of male genitalia.

  8. Variations of the External Male Genitalia in Three Populations of Triatoma infestans Klug, 1834

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pires Herton Helder Rocha

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma infestans is the triatomine that presents the greatest dispersion area in South America. However, it is not known whether the original characteristics of this insect remained in its long dispersion process. The purpose of this work was to study comparatively the external male genitalia of insects from different populations of T. infestans, two from Brazil (Minas Gerais and Bahia and one from Bolivia (Cochabamba Valley, and to investigate the correlation between the morphological and behavioral variations. Differences were observed in one of the structures of the external genitalia (endosoma process that could be used to characterize the insects from the three populations studied.

  9. Anthropometric study of male external genitalia of 320 healthy Nigerian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, M L; Jain, S P; Saxena, S K

    1985-06-01

    Five basic measurements of the male external genitalia were studied in 320 healthy male medical students belonging to the various parts of Nigeria (West Africa). Their ages range from 17 to 23 years. The measurements were as follows: average length of the penis (81.6 +/- 0.94 mm); circumference of the penis (88.3 +/- 0.02 mm); circumference of the scrotum (212.6 +/- 2.48 mm); length of right testis (46.8 +/- 0.54 mm); width of right testis (32.4 +/- 0.37 mm); length of left testis (46.0 +/- 0.53 mm); and width of left testis (31.4 +/- 0.36 mm). The size of the genitalia increases with the increase in age in younger year groups. The adult stages of genitalia development are reached at the age of 21 years in 89.0% of the individuals. The growth of the genitalia is continued with the increasing height and weight, but this growth slows down after attaining a definite height and weight.

  10. Dog bite injuries of genitalia in male infant and children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Bothra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to highlight genital dog bites in male infant and children in developing countries and their management. We managed three cases (9 months, 5 years, and 8 years of genital dog bite between January 1997 and July 2008. Two had unprovoked stray dog bites and the third was bitten by his pet dog when disturbed during eating. Extent of injury varied from small-lacerated wound to near emasculation. Primary repair was done after thorough washing and debridement under antibiotic cover. In the 9-month-old male infant who was near emasculated, scrotum was closed with the available skin and a small penile stump was reconstructed after meatoplasty. Immunization against tetanus and rabies was done for all cases.Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and the wound healed primarily in all cases. Parents of the infant were asked for feminizing genitoplasty but they refused so they were advised for hormonal replacement and penile reconstruction at adolescence. Male children are the most common victims of genital dog bites. These injuries can be repaired primarily with good outcome provided strict cleaning, debridement, wound repair, antibiotic cover, and immunization is applied.

  11. Human-caused habitat fragmentation can drive rapid divergence of male genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen-Kay, Justa L; Noel, Holly G; Layman, Craig A; Langerhans, R Brian

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study rests on three premises: (i) humans are altering ecosystems worldwide, (ii) environmental variation often influences the strength and nature of sexual selection, and (iii) sexual selection is largely responsible for rapid and divergent evolution of male genitalia. While each of these assertions has strong empirical support, no study has yet investigated their logical conclusion that human impacts on the environment might commonly drive rapid diversification of male genital morphology. We tested whether anthropogenic habitat fragmentation has resulted in rapid changes in the size, allometry, shape, and meristics of male genitalia in three native species of livebearing fishes (genus: Gambusia) inhabiting tidal creeks across six Bahamian islands. We found that genital shape and allometry consistently and repeatedly diverged in fragmented systems across all species and islands. Using a model selection framework, we identified three ecological consequences of fragmentation that apparently underlie observed morphological patterns: decreased predatory fish density, increased conspecific density, and reduced salinity. Our results demonstrate that human modifications to the environment can drive rapid and predictable divergence in male genitalia. Given the ubiquity of anthropogenic impacts on the environment, future research should evaluate the generality of our findings and potential consequences for reproductive isolation.

  12. Quantitative genetic insights into the coevolutionary dynamics of male and female genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jonathan P; van Lieshout, Emile; Gasparini, Clelia

    2013-07-22

    The spectacular variability that typically characterizes male genital traits has largely been attributed to the role of sexual selection. Among the evolutionary mechanisms proposed to account for this diversity, two processes in particular have generated considerable interest. On the one hand, females may exploit postcopulatory mechanisms of selection to favour males with preferred genital traits (cryptic female choice; CFC), while on the other hand females may evolve structures or behaviours that mitigate the direct costs imposed by male genitalia (sexual conflict; SC). A critical but rarely explored assumption underlying both processes is that male and female reproductive traits coevolve, either via the classic Fisherian model of preference-trait coevolution (CFC) or through sexually antagonistic selection (SC). Here, we provide evidence for this prediction in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a polyandrous livebearing fish in which males transfer sperm internally to females via consensual and forced matings. Our results from a paternal half-sibling breeding design reveal substantial levels of additive genetic variation underlying male genital size and morphology-two traits known to predict mating success during non-consensual matings. Our subsequent finding that physically interacting female genital traits exhibit corresponding levels of genetic (co)variation reveals the potential intersexual coevolutionary dynamics of male and female genitalia, thereby fulfilling a fundamental assumption underlying CFC and SC theory.

  13. Female genitalia concealment promotes intimate male courtship in a water strider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chang S; Jablonski, Piotr G

    2009-06-10

    Violent coercive mating initiation is typical for animals with sexual conflict over mating. In these species, the coevolutionary arms-race between female defenses against coercive mating and male counter-adaptations for increased mating success leads to coevolutionary chases of male and female traits that influence the mating. It has been controversial whether one of the sexes can evolve traits that allow them to "win" this arms race. Here, we use morphological analysis (traditional and scanning electron micrographs), laboratory experiments and comparative methods to show how females of a species characterized by typical coercive mating initiation appear to "win" a particular stage of the sexual conflict by evolving morphology to hide their genitalia from direct, forceful access by males. In an apparent response to the female morphological adaptation, males of this species added to their typically violent coercive mounting of the female new post-mounting, pre-copulatory courtship signals produced by tapping the water's surface with the mid-legs. These courtship signals are intimate in the sense that they are aimed at the female, on whom the male is already mounted. Females respond to the signals by exposing their hidden genitalia for copulatory intromission. Our results indicate that the apparent victory of coevolutionary arms race by one sex in terms of morphology may trigger evolution of a behavioral phenotype in the opposite sex.

  14. Female genitalia concealment promotes intimate male courtship in a water strider.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang S Han

    Full Text Available Violent coercive mating initiation is typical for animals with sexual conflict over mating. In these species, the coevolutionary arms-race between female defenses against coercive mating and male counter-adaptations for increased mating success leads to coevolutionary chases of male and female traits that influence the mating. It has been controversial whether one of the sexes can evolve traits that allow them to "win" this arms race. Here, we use morphological analysis (traditional and scanning electron micrographs, laboratory experiments and comparative methods to show how females of a species characterized by typical coercive mating initiation appear to "win" a particular stage of the sexual conflict by evolving morphology to hide their genitalia from direct, forceful access by males. In an apparent response to the female morphological adaptation, males of this species added to their typically violent coercive mounting of the female new post-mounting, pre-copulatory courtship signals produced by tapping the water's surface with the mid-legs. These courtship signals are intimate in the sense that they are aimed at the female, on whom the male is already mounted. Females respond to the signals by exposing their hidden genitalia for copulatory intromission. Our results indicate that the apparent victory of coevolutionary arms race by one sex in terms of morphology may trigger evolution of a behavioral phenotype in the opposite sex.

  15. 46,XX Karyotype in a Male with Ambigious Genitalia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Balkan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available 40 days old case who were diagnosed with ambigious genitalia were sentto laboratory of cytogenetics. Mother was 26 years old and have to alivechildren and case were the second child and applied to Child SurgeryDepartment due to continiously vomiting and uneasy conditions. Sexualdevelopment were as male on physical examinations. Cell culture wasapplied for chromosomal analysis. Slides were stained with GiemsaBanding Staining (GTG and 100 cells were totaly counted and karyotypingwere done with 15 metaphase. Chromosome with 46,XX karyotype. Casewere taken under consideration of congenital adrenel hyperplasia afterevalution of karyotype. Case were discussed according to by information ofpresents literatures.

  16. Male-female conflict and genitalia: failure to confirm predictions in insects and spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, William G

    2004-02-01

    Some recent models suggest a new role for evolutionary arms races between males and females in sexual selection. Female resistance to males is proposed to be driven by the direct advantage to the female of avoiding male-imposed reductions in the number of offspring she can produce, rather than by the indirect advantage of selecting among possible sires for her offspring, as in some traditional models of sexual selection by female choice. This article uses the massive but hitherto under-utilized taxonomic literature on genitalic evolution to test, in a two-step process, whether such new models of arms races between males and females have been responsible for rapid divergent evolution of male genitalia. The test revolves around the prediction that 'new arms races' are less likely to occur in species in which females are largely or completely protected from unwanted sexual attentions from males (e.g. species which mate in leks or in male swarms, in which males attract females from a distance, or in which females initiate contact by attracting males from a distance). The multiple possible mechanical functions of male genitalia are summarized, and functions of male genitalic structures in 43 species in 21 families of Diptera are compiled. Functions associated with intromission and insemination (e.g. seizing and positioning the female appropriately, pushing past possible barriers within the female, orienting within the female to achieve sperm transfer), which are unlikely to be involved in new arms races when females are protected, are shown to be common (> 50 % of documented cases). This information is then used to generate the new arms race prediction: differences in genitalic form among congeneric species in which females are protected should be less common than differences among congeneric species in which females are vulnerable to harassment by males. This prediction was tested using a sample of 361 genera of insects and spiders. The prediction clearly failed, even

  17. Prenatal diethylstilbestrol induces malformation of the external genitalia of male and female mice and persistent second-generation developmental abnormalities of the external genitalia in two mouse strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawong, Phitsanu; Sinclair, Adriane; Li, Yi; Schlomer, Bruce; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Max, Ferretti M.; Liu, Baomei; Baskin, Laurence S.; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    Potential trans-generational influence of diethylstilbestrol (DES) exposure emerged with reports of effects in grandchildren of DES-treated pregnant women and of reproductive tract tumors in offspring of mice exposed in utero to DES. Accordingly, we examined the trans-generational influence of DES on development of external genitalia (ExG) and compared effects of in utero DES exposure in CD-1 and C57BL/6 mice injected with oil or DES every other day from gestational days 12 to 18. Mice were examined at birth, and on 5 to 120 days postnatal to evaluate ExG malformations. Of 23 adult (≥60 days) prenatally DES-exposed males, features indicative of urethral meatal hypospadias (see text for definitions) ranged from 18 to 100% in prenatally DES-exposed CD-1 males and 31 to 100% in prenatally DES-exposed C57BL/6 males. Thus, the strains differed in the incidence of male urethral hypospadias. Ninety-one percent of DES-exposed CD-1 females and 100% of DES-exposed C57BL/6 females had urethral-vaginal fistula. All DES-exposed CD-1 and C57BL/6 females lacked an os clitoris. None of the prenatally oil-treated CD-1 and C57BL/6 male and female mice had ExG malformations. For the second-generation study, 10 adult CD-1 males and females, from oil- and DES-exposed groups, respectively, were paired with untreated CD-1 mice for 30 days, and their offspring evaluated for ExG malformations. None of the F1 DES-treated females were fertile. Nine of 10 prenatally DES-exposed CD-1 males sired offspring with untreated females, producing 55 male and 42 female pups. Of the F2 DES-lineage adult males, 20% had exposed urethral flaps, a criterion of urethral meatal hypospadias. Five of 42 (11.9%) F2 DES lineage females had urethral-vaginal fistula. In contrast, all F2 oil-lineage males and all oil-lineage females were normal. Thus, prenatal DES exposure induces malformations of ExG in both sexes and strains of mice, and certain malformations are transmitted to the second-generation. PMID

  18. Variations in the male genitalia of Aedes (Stegomyia Albopictus (Skuse from Chandigarh and its surrounding areas (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagandeep Kaur

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus is the most dominant species of subgenus Stegomyia and is medically important from the standpoint of transmitting wide range of human pathogens of deadly diseases like dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya. During present investigations, it has been observed that IX tergum in the male genitalia of Aedes albopictus varies greatly. It shows variations with respect to the presence or absence of lateral projections on the IX tergum, as well as in the shape and size of median and lateral projections. The shape of IX tergum in the male genitalia of Aedes species is of great taxonomic importance as it is a diagnostic character of the species. These variations have been observed both in natural populations collected from various breeding sites as well as in the adults reared in laboratory. The observed differences have not been noticed by any of the previous workers.

  19. One-shot genitalia are not an evolutionary dead end - Regained male polygamy in a sperm limited spider species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalik Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monogynous mating systems with extremely low male mating rates have several independent evolutionary origins and are associated with drastic adaptations involving self-sacrifice, one-shot genitalia, genital damage, and termination of spermatogenesis immediately after maturation. The combination of such extreme traits likely restricts evolutionary potential perhaps up to the point of making low male mating rates irreversible and hence may constitute an evolutionary dead end. Here, we explore the case of a reversion to multiple mating from monogynous ancestry in golden orb-web spiders, Nephila senegalensis. Results Male multiple mating is regained by the loss of genital damage and sexual cannibalism but spermatogenesis is terminated with maturation, restricting males to a single loading of their secondary mating organs and a fixed supply of sperm. However, males re-use their mating organs and by experimentally mating males to many females, we show that the sperm supply is divided between copulations without reloading the pedipalps. Conclusion By portioning their precious sperm supply, males achieve an average mating rate of four females which effectively doubles the maximal mating rate of their ancestors. A heritage of one-shot genitalia does not completely restrict the potential to increase mating rates in Nephila although an upper limit is defined by the available sperm load. Future studies should now investigate how males use this potential in the field and identify selection pressures responsible for a reversal from monogynous to polygynous mating strategies.

  20. Rotation of the external genitalia in male Phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera, Psychodidae) in laboratory conditions and in captured specimens in Algarve, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrolho, J; Maia, C; Gomes, J; Alves-Pires, C; Cristóvão, J M; Campino, L; Afonso, M O

    2015-10-01

    Protozoal parasites are the causative agents of many insect-borne infectious diseases worldwide with impact on human and animal health. Leishmaniasis is caused by Leishmania spp. and transmitted by female Phlebotomine sand flies. In Portugal, two species of Phlebotomus (Larroussius), namely Phlebotomus perniciosus and Phlebotomus ariasi are the proven vectors of Leishmania infantum. Phlebotomine females and males rest and breed in the same sites; and these locations can be predicted according to the male external genitalia maturation. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the timing of complete rotation of the male external genitalia in laboratory conditions and to characterize the external genitalia rotation in field captured males to predict the male and female sand fly breeding and resting sites. This knowledge can be applied in the design and implementation of integrated sand fly control strategies targeting these sites.

  1. Ambiguous Genitalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetics, endocrinology (hormones), pediatric surgery or urology, and psychology. Questions to ask your doctor • What is my ... hyperplasia: www. hormone. org (search for CAH) • Mayo Clinic information about ambiguous genitalia: www. mayoclinic. com/ health/ ...

  2. Ambiguous Genitalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... influence fetal sex development and cause ambiguous genitalia. Chromosomal abnormalities, such as a missing sex chromosome or an ... family history of: Unexplained deaths in early infancy Infertility, absent menstrual periods or excess facial hair in ...

  3. Description of the male genitalia of Belminus rugulosus Stål and Belminus corredori Galvão & Angulo, and comments on the holotype of Parabelminus yurupucu Lent & Wygodzinsky (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae: Bolboderini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Santana, Hélcio R; Galvão, Cleber

    2013-12-13

    The male genitalia of Belminus rugulosus Stål and Belminus corredori Galvão & Angulo are described and illustrated for the first time. Comments on the holotype of Parabelminus yurupucu Lent & Wygodzinsky are presented (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae: Bolboderini). A discussion on previous data in the literature on male genitalia of species of Belminus Stål is provided.

  4. Morphology of the larvae, male genitalia and DNA sequences of Anopheles (Kerteszia pholidotus (Diptera: Culicidae from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Eduardo Escovar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since 1984, Anopheles (Kerteszia lepidotus has been considered a mosquito species that is involved in the transmission of malaria in Colombia, after having been incriminated as such with epidemiological evidence from a malaria outbreak in Cunday-Villarrica, Tolima. Subsequent morphological analyses of females captured in the same place and at the time of the outbreak showed that the species responsible for the transmission was not An. lepidotus, but rather Anopheles pholidotus. However, the associated morphological stages and DNA sequences of An. pholidotus from the foci of Cunday-Villarrica had not been analysed. Using samples that were caught recently from the outbreak region, the purpose of this study was to provide updated and additional information by analysing the morphology of female mosquitoes, the genitalia of male mosquitoes and fourth instar larvae of An. pholidotus, which was confirmed with DNA sequences of cytochrome oxidase I and rDNA internal transcribed spacer. A total of 1,596 adult females were collected in addition to 37 larval collections in bromeliads. Furthermore, 141 adult females, which were captured from the same area in the years 1981-1982, were analysed morphologically. Ninety-five DNA sequences were analysed for this study. Morphological and molecular analyses showed that the species present in this region corresponds to An. pholidotus. Given the absence of An. lepidotus, even in recent years, we consider that the species of mosquitoes that was previously incriminated as the malaria vector during the outbreak was indeed An. pholidotus, thus ending the controversy.

  5. Patients' Priorities Regarding Female-to-Male Gender Affirmation Surgery of the Genitalia-A Pilot Study of 47 Patients in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Josephine; Andréasson, My; Kölby, Lars; Elander, Anna; Selvaggi, Gennaro

    2017-06-01

    No surgical technique is reported to be the best option for gender-affirmation surgery (GAS) of the genitalia in transmen. Although patients' preferences are central when choosing a surgical technique, no studies have evaluated this factor. To investigate transmen's priorities and preferences regarding GAS of the genitalia. From November 2015 to March 2016, 54 transmen with the diagnosis of gender dysphoria who were referred to Sahlgrenska University Hospital for discussion of therapeutic steps (surgery and hormonal treatments) were asked to complete a questionnaire on different attributes achievable with GAS, such as sexual and urinary function and appearance. Forty-seven patients (87%) completed the questionnaire. Age ranged from 18 to 52 years (mean = 26 years, SD = 7.4 years). At the time of interview, no patient had undergone GAS of the genitalia. Answers to completed questionnaires. Seventy-six percent of patients identified themselves as male, and 24% wrote other terms such as "mostly male," "inter-gender" and "non-binary." Gender identity had a significant impact on patients' preferences for two questions: the importance of vaginal removal and the importance of having a penis that would be passable in places such as male dressing rooms. These items were more important to patients identifying themselves as male. The most important attributes requested were preserved orgasm ability and tactile sensation. The least important attribute was removal of the vagina, followed by having a penis of human material, minimal scarring, and size. The ability to urinate while standing was considered a high priority by some and a low priority by others. All answers ranged from "unimportant" to "imperative." This series of patients demonstrates a considerable heterogeneity among transmen in their gender identity and preferences regarding GAS of the genitalia, which supports the need for several techniques. Patients must be accurately informed on the different techniques and

  6. A time-sequence functional analysis of mating behaviour and genital coupling in Drosophila: role of cryptic female choice and male sex-drive in the evolution of male genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeeshan, S; Singh, R S

    2006-07-01

    Male genitalia in Drosophila exemplify strikingly rapid and divergent evolution, whereas female genitalia are relatively invariable. Whereas precopulatory and post-copulatory sexual selection has been invoked to explain this trend, the functional significance of genital structures during copulation remains obscure. We used time-sequence analysis to study the functional significance of external genitalic structures during the course of copulation, between D. melanogaster and D. simulans. This functional analysis has provided new information that reveals the importance of male-driven copulatory mechanics and strategies in the rapid diversification of genitalia. The posterior process, which is a recently evolved sexual character and present only in males of the melanogaster clade, plays a crucial role in mounting as well as in genital coupling. Whereas there is ample evidence for precopulatory and/or post-copulatory female choice, we show here that during copulation there is little or no physical female choice, consequently, males determine copulation duration. We also found subtle differences in copulatory mechanics between very closely related species. We propose that variation in male usage of novel genitalic structures and shifts in copulatory behaviour have played an important role in the diversification of genitalia in species of the Drosophila subgroup.

  7. Notes on Neotropical Proconiini (Insecta: Hemiptera: Cicadellidae. VIII: morphology of the male and female genitalia of Paraulacizes munda, revalidated from synonymy of P. confusa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Mejdalani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Paraulacizes munda (Fowler, 1899 has been considered a junior synonym of P. confusa (Signoret, 1855. These two species were described from Mexico. Here it is shown that P. munda can be distinguished from P. confusa by the color and size of the body. Hence, the former is revalidated from synonymy of the latter. Descriptions and illustrations of the male and female genitalia of P. munda, which are necessary for an accurate identification of leafhopper species in general, are provided for the first time. Paraulacizes munda can be distinguished from the other 11 species currently included in Paraulacizes by the following combination of features: ground color of anterior dorsum yellow or pale yellow; dorsal processes of male pygofer strongly inflated apically; style with apex transversely truncate, not projected inward; atrial processes of aedeagus, in lateral view, not distinctly curved apically; female sternite VII with small median lobe on posterior margin and pair of dark brown marks posteromedially. This is the first detailed description of the first and second ovipositor valvulae of a Paraulacizes species. The female genitalia of Paraulacizes are compared with those of the related genera Aulacizes Amyot & Serville, 1843 and Proconosama Young, 1968.

  8. Morphology of the external genitalia of the adult male and female mice as an endpoint of sex differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dana A.; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Cunha, Tristan; Menshenina, Julia; Barcellos, Dale; Chan, Lok Yun; Risbridger, Gail; Baskin, Laurence; Cunha, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Adult external genitalia (ExG) are the endpoints of normal sex differentiation. Detailed morphometric analysis and comparison of adult mouse ExG has revealed 10 homologous features distinguishing the penis and clitoris that define masculine vs. feminine sex differentiation. These features have enabled the construction of a simple metric to evaluate various intersex conditions in mutant or hormonally manipulated mice. This review focuses on the morphology of the adult mouse penis and clitoris through detailed analysis of histologic sections, scanning electron microscopy, and three-dimensional reconstruction. We also present previous results from evaluation of “non-traditional” mammals, such as the spotted hyena and wallaby to demonstrate the complex process of sex differentiation that involves not only androgen-dependent processes, but also estrogen-dependent and hormone-independent mechanisms. PMID:21893161

  9. Morfologia comparada da genitália masculina de Galerucini (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae Comparative morphology of male genitalia of Galerucini (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano de A. Moura

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A morfologia da genitália, especialmente a do macho, tem sido muito utilizada para elucidar problemas taxonômicos e evolutivos de crisomelídeos e paticularmente em Galerucini. Nesta contribuição, representantes de gêneros de Galerucini das subtribos que ocorrem nas Regiões Neotropical e Neártica foram selecionados para estudo. Descrições comparativas e ilustrações da genitália masculina são apresentadas para as espécies: Coelomera lanio (Dalman, 1823 e Dircema nigripenne (Fabricius, 1792 (Subtribo Galerucina; Exora encaustica (Germar, 1824 e Uaupesia amazona (Weise, 1921 (Subtribo Metacyclina; Paranapiacaba teinturieri (Allard, 1894 e Isotes eruptiva (Bechyné, 1955 (Subtribo Luperina. O spiculum gastrale está presente nas espécies estudadas de Metacyclina e Luperina. No lobo médio, as estruturas basais em forma de gancho direcionadas ventralmente só não ocorrem em P. teinturieri e em I. eruptiva, que possuem um processo em forma de capuz protegendo o orifício basal. A fenestra sub-basal é observada em C. lanio e em U. amazona; o flagellum, um esclerito do saco interno, ocorre somente em U. amazona. O conhecimento da morfologia da genitália masculina em Galerucini ainda é incipiente e deve ser ampliado, com a inclusão de inúmeros gêneros ainda não estudados.The morphology of the genitalia, especially of the male, has been used to elucidate taxonomical and evolutive questions in chrysomelids, particularly Galerucini. In this contribution, we selected genera representing the Nearctic and Neotropical subtribes of Galerucini. We provide comparative descriptions and illustrations of male genitalia of six species: Coelomera lanio (Dalman, 1823 and Dircema nigripenne (Fabricius, 1792 (Subtribe Galerucina; Exora encaustica (Germar, 1824 and Uaupesia amazona (Weise, 1921 (Subtribe Metacyclina; Paranapiacaba teinturieri (Allard, 1894 and Isotes eruptiva (Bechyné, 1955 (Subtribe Luperina. The spiculum gastrale is present in the

  10. Description of a New Species of the Andean Butterfly Genus Forsterinaria Gray (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) with Considerations on an Apparently New Structure in Male Genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubek, A; Pyrcz, T W; Boyer, P

    2014-02-01

    The butterfly genus Forsterinaria Gray is the only strictly montane representative of the diverse Neotropical subtribe Euptychiina (Nymphalidae, Satyrinae), with 24 described species. Recent research in some of the most isolated and highly diverse Andean regions, such as central Peru, show that its total species richness is still underestimated. An example is the new species described here, Forsterinaria emo n. sp., which is particularly interesting because of an unusual structure discovered in its male genitalia which consists of a bunch of bristle-like processes, composing a fringe-like formation on the dorsum of the tegumen. No similar, homologous structure was found in any congener, nor indeed, in any species of diurnal Lepidoptera. Scanning electron microscope studies revealed that the microstructure of the processes resembles a membrane lining the tegumen. Its function is unknown but two hypotheses are discussed based on a comparative study with other genital structures of butterflies. We argue that it may help stabilizing the partners in the process of mating or it may serve as a 'mating plug', preventing the female from multiple copulations.

  11. Kankuamo, a new theraphosid genus from Colombia (Araneae, Mygalomorphae), with a new type of urticating setae and divergent male genitalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perafán, Carlos; Galvis, William; Gutiérrez, Miguel; Pérez-Miles, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new monotypic Theraphosidae genus, Kankuamo Perafán, Galvis & Pérez-Miles, gen. n., is described from Colombia, with a new type of urticating setae. These setae differ from others principally by having a small distal oval patch of lanceolate reversed barbs. Males of Kankuamo gen. n. additionally differ by having a palpal bulb organ very divergent from all known species, with many conspicuous keels dispersed across the median tegulum to the tip, mostly with serrated edges. Females differ by having spermathecae with a single notched receptacle, with two granulated lobes and several irregular sclerotized longitudinal striations. The new urticating setae, type VII, is characterized, illustrated and its releasing mechanism is discussed. It is hypothesized that these setae are the first in Theraphosinae subfamily whose release mechanism is by direct contact. Kankuamo gen. n. is described and illustrated on the basis of the type species Kankuamo marquezi Perafán, Galvis & Gutiérrez, sp. n., and their remarkable characteristics, morphological affinities and cladistic relationship are analyzed. PMID:27551189

  12. Reproductive behaviour in the male cricket Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer. II. Neural control of the genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumashiro, M; Sakai, M

    2001-03-01

    To understand the neural mechanisms of reproductive behaviour in the male cricket, we identified motor neurones innervating the muscles in each genital organ by backfilling with cobalt/nickel and recording their extracellular spike activity from nerve bundles of the terminal abdominal ganglion during tethered copulation and spermatophore formation. During tethered copulation, at least two motor neurones innervating two ipsilateral muscles were activated during projection of the guiding rod of the phallic dorsal pouch. Only one motor neurone, innervating four ipsilateral muscles of the dorsal pouch, was responsible for spermatophore extrusion by deforming the dorsal pouch. For spermatophore transfer, three motor neurones, singly innervating three epiphallus muscles, played a major role in opening passages for haemolymph to enter the ventral lobes and median pouch by bending the epiphallus. Two ventral lobe and 3-5 median pouch motor neurones seemed to play a role in expanding or folding the two membranous structures by relaxing or contracting their muscle fibres. After spermatophore transfer, most of the genital motor neurones exhibited a rhythmic burst of action potentials causing movement of the phallic complex coupled with strong abdominal contractions. For spermatophore formation, the genital motor neurones began to accelerate their rhythmic bursts approximately 30 s prior to subgenital plate opening and then changed their activity to tonic bursting or silence. The results have allowed us to describe the timing of the onset and termination of genital muscle contraction more precisely than before, to examine the neural mechanisms of copulatory motor control and to speculate on the neural organization of the reproductive centre for spermatophore extrusion and protrusion.

  13. Studies on male genitalia of sarcophagidae (Diptera based on scanning electron microscope observations Estudos sobre a genitália masculina de Sarcophagidae (Diptera baseados em observações de microscópio de varredura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Cesar Rios Leite

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Male genitalia of Oxyvinia exicisa (Lopes, Oxysarcodexia thomax (Walker, O. fluminensis Lopes, Sarcodexia lambens (Wiedemann, Peckia chrysostoma (Wiedemann and Liopygia ruficornis (Fabricius were studied based on scanning electron microscope photography. Some important details were evidentiated with this method.As genitálias dos machos de Oxyvinia excisa (Lopes, Oxysarcodexia tornax (Walker, O. fluminensis Lopes, sarcodexia lambens (Wiedemann, Peckia chrysostoma (Wiedemann e Liopygia ruficornis (Fabricius foram estudadas com base em fotografias de microscópio de varredura. Alguns detalhes importantes foram evidenciados por este método.

  14. Anopheles (Kerteszia) lepidotus (Diptera: Culicidae), not the malaria vector we thought it was: Revised male and female morphology; larva, pupa, and male genitalia characters; and molecular verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARRISON, BRUCE A.; RUIZ-LOPEZ, FREDDY; FALERO, GUILLERMO CALDERON; SAVAGE, HARRY M.; PECOR, JAMES E.; WILKERSON, RICHARD C.

    2015-01-01

    The name Anopheles (Kerteszia) lepidotus Zavortink, commonly used for an important malaria vector in the eastern cordillera of the Andes, is here corrected to An. pholidotus Zavortink. We discovered that An. (Ker.) specimens from Peru, and reared-associated specimens from Ecuador, had unambiguous habitus characters that matched those on the male holotype of An. lepidotus. However, the specimens do not exhibit characters of the female allotype and female paratypes of An. lepidotus, which are actually An. pholidotus. Our specimens are the first correctly associated females of An. lepidotus, which allow us to provide a new morphological interpretation for the adult habitus of this species. This finding is also corroborated by molecular data from a portion of the Cytochrome Oxidase I (COI) gene and ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (rDNA ITS2). The pupal stage of An. lepidotus is described for the first time, and additional larval characters are also noted. Diagnostic morphological characters for the adult, pupal, and larval stages of An. pholidotus are provided to separate the two species. All stages of An. lepidotus are easily separated from other currently known species in subgenus Kerteszia and a new key to the females of An. (Kerteszia) is given. Previously published distribution, bionomics, and medical significance data are corrected and enhanced. PMID:26726290

  15. Alternative techniques to study characters of the genitalia in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Fernando M S; Casagrande, Mirna M; Mielke, Olaf H H

    2010-01-01

    The present note aims to describe two alternative methods for observing genitalia in Lepidoptera. The first one provides means to examine both male and female genitalia without spoiling the scales of the abdomen, preserving it attached to the thorax and aesthetically similar to an unexamined specimen. The second one provides ways of observing certain characters on the male genitalia in a non-destructive way, and does not depend on time-consuming removing and dissection of the abdomen. It is expected that the presented techniques will help on morphological studies and on identifying similar species which consistently differ in genitalic armatures.

  16. A remarkable new species of Euragallia from Peru (Insecta, Hemiptera, Cicadellidae, Agalliini, including the description of a peculiar structure of the male genitalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Rodrigues

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Euragallia Oman, 1938 from Peru (Pasco Department is described and illustrated. Euragallia batmani sp. n. can be distinguished from the other species of the genus by the very posteriorly pronounced male pygofer, with an apical hook-like projection, and by the well-developed dorsal area of the aedeagal base, resembling the open wings of a bat. With the addition of E. batmani sp. n., the number of Euragallia species is increased to 21. Only one additional species of the genus is recorded from Peru (E. prion Kramer, 1976. A comparison between the new species and E. prion is provided. A conspicuous structure, which connects the subgenital plates to the styles, is described in detail and named.

  17. Assignment of sex in neonates with ambiguous genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, W G

    1999-08-01

    Sex assignment in the newborn with ambiguous genitalia has been based on the adequacy of the phallus in the male, potential fertility in the female, and cosmetic appearance of the reconstructed genitalia. Recent data from both the neurosciences and from clinical research, however, casts doubt on the validity of such criteria for clinical decision making. Current knowledge suggests a need to shift away from the current clinical approach and to incorporate these new data into decisions based on a broader understanding of the etiology of gender identity. Recognition of the primacy of psychosocial and psychosexual developmental outcomes for children with ambiguous genitalia is lending direction to longitudinal outcomes research. New approaches to sex assignment have been suggested, and the paradigm for sex assignment in the newborn period is in transition.

  18. Gunshot wounds to the male external genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, R G; Castanheira, A C; McAninch, J W

    1993-10-01

    We report on 23 patients with genital gunshot wounds treated since 1977. Of these 23 patients 16 received 1 shot and 7 received multiple shots. The bullet affected the scrotum in 12 patients, the penis in 4, and the penis and scrotum in the remaining 7. The same missile also compromised the thigh in 15 patients, with major vascular damage in 2. Management was based on serial clinical evaluation and aggressive imaging, related to the missile trajectory. Staging studies were 100% accurate in the patients in whom they were done. Nine patients had damage to the testis (7, 1 bilaterally) and/or spermatic cord (2): 5 required orchiectomy, in 3 the testis was repaired and in 2 the bullet transected the vas, which was ligated with nonabsorbable suture for later repair. Six patients had damage to the corpora, which were repaired. Three patients had urethral rupture (bulbar in 2 and penile in 1): primary repair was feasible in 2 and in 1 (with extensive urethral loss after a shotgun blast) a suprapubic tube was placed for delayed reconstruction. Ten patients had skin penetration only, 5 of whom were managed nonoperatively. There were no major complications or mortality. Also, there were no delayed problems in the nonoperated patients. Erection and normal voiding were reportedly present in all who underwent reconstruction and returned for followup. Early surgical exploration with conservative debridement and primary repair of damaged structures is the preferred treatment for these injuries.

  19. The evolution of asymmetric genitalia in Coleoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Paulien; van Beek, Rick; Hoogenboom, Tamara; zu Schlochtern, Melanie Meijer

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of asymmetry in male genitalia is a pervasive and recurrent phenomenon across almost the entire animal kingdom. Although in some taxa the asymmetry may be a response to the evolution of one-sided, male-above copulation from a more ancestral female-above condition, in other taxa, such as Mammalia and Coleoptera, this explanation appears insufficient. We carried out an informal assessment of genital asymmetry across the Coleoptera and found that male genital asymmetry is present in 43% of all beetle families, and at all within-family taxonomic levels. In the most diverse group, Cucujiformia, however, genital asymmetry is comparatively rare. We also reconstructed the phylogeny of the leiodid tribe Cholevini, and mapped aspects of genital asymmetry on the tree, revealing that endophallus sclerites, endophallus, median lobe and parameres are, in a nested fashion, increasingly unlikely to have evolved asymmetry. We interpret these results in the light of cryptic female choice versus sexually antagonistic coevolution and advocate further ways in which the phenomenon may be better understood. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Provocative questions in left–right asymmetry’. PMID:27821530

  20. Development of the External Genitalia: Perspectives from the Spotted Hyena (Crocuta crocuta)

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This review/research paper summarizes data on development of the external genitalia of the spotted hyena, a fascinating mammal noted for extreme masculinization of the female external genitalia. The female spotted hyena is the only extant mammal that mates and gives birth through a pendulous penis-like clitoris. Our studies indicate that early formation of the phallus in both males and females is independent of androgens; indeed the phallus forms before the fetal testes or ovaries are capable...

  1. Especie nueva de Scybalocanthon (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae: Canthonini y descripción de la variación del órgano genital masculino A new species of Scybalocanthon (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae: Canthonini and description of the variation of the male genitalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredy Molano Rendón

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe Scybalocanthon arcabuquensis Molano y Medina, sp.nov. La distribución de esta especie se encuentra restringida a los bosques de roble del municipio de Arcabuco, Departamento de Boyacá, sobre la cordillera Oriental de los Andes en Colombia. El órgano genital del macho se describe e ilustra, se discute la variación de las estructuras del saco interno de varias especies del género, y se proponen algunas estructuras del órgano genital como posibles caracteres únicos que definen el género.Scybalocanthon arcabuquensis Molano y Medina, sp. nov. is described. The species is restricted to the oak forest at Arcabuco municipality, department of Boyacá, Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes. The male genitalia is described and illustrated, the variation of structures of the internal sac is discussed for various species of the genus and some structures from the internal male genitalia are proposed as possible unique characters useful for defining the genus.

  2. Radiological Evaluation of Ambiguous Genitalia with Various Imaging Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, N.; Bindushree, Kadakola

    2012-07-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are congenital conditions in which the development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sex is atypical. These can be classified broadly into four categories on the basis of gonadal histologic features: female pseudohermaphroditism (46,XX with two ovaries); male pseudohermaphroditism (46,XY with two testes); true hermaphroditism (ovotesticular DSD) (both ovarian and testicular tissues); and gonadal dysgenesis, either mixed (a testis and a streak gonad) or pure (bilateral streak gonads). Imaging plays an important role in demonstrating the anatomy and associated anomalies. Ultrasonography is the primary modality for demonstrating internal organs and magnetic resonance imaging is used as an adjunct modality to assess for internal gonads and genitalia. Early and appropriate gender assignment is necessary for healthy physical and psychologic development of children with ambiguous genitalia. Gender assignment can be facilitated with a team approach that involves a pediatric endocrinologist, geneticist, urologist, psychiatrist, social worker, neonatologist, nurse, and radiologist, allowing timely diagnosis and proper management. We describe case series on ambiguous genitalia presented to our department who were evaluated with multiple imaging modalities.

  3. Cryptic female exaggeration: the asymmetric female internal genitalia of Kaliana yuruani (Araneae: Pholcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bernhard A

    2006-06-01

    Males of the Venezuelan pholcid spider Kaliana yuruani have unique genitalia, with the procursi about six times as long as usual in the family. The present article describes the previously unknown female, searching for a morphological correlate in the female genitalia to the male's exaggeration. Reconstruction of histological serial sections reveals an internal female complexity that is unequalled in pholcid spiders. An intricate system of ducts and folds is arranged in an asymmetric way, making this the third known case of genital asymmetry in spiders. The term "cryptic female exaggeration" is used in analogy to cryptic female choice, pointing to the fact that from the outside, the female genitalia do not appear unusual. I propose that cryptic female exaggeration may be relatively common in copulatory structures if male exaggerations need to be evaluated according to the female choice by mechanical fit model. Finally, the evolution of genital asymmetry in spiders is contrasted with that in insects.

  4. Anatomy of mole external genitalia: Setting the record straight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Adriane Watkins; Glickman, Stephen; Baskin, Lawrence; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy of male and female external genitalia of adult mice (Mus musculus) and broad-footed moles (Scapanus latimanus) was re-examined to provide more meaningful anatomical terminology. In the past the perineal appendage of male broad-footed moles has been called the penis, while the female perineal appendage has been given several terms (e.g. clitoris, penile clitoris, peniform clitoris and others). Histological examination demonstrates that perineal appendages of male and female broad-footed moles are the prepuce, which in both sexes are covered externally with a hair-bearing epidermis and lacks erectile bodies. The inner preputial epithelium is non-hair-bearing and defines the preputial space in both sexes. The penis of broad-footed moles lies deep within the preputial space, is an “internal organ” in the resting state and contains the penile urethra, os penis, and erectile bodies. The clitoris of broad-footed moles is defined by a U-shaped clitoral epithelial lamina. Residing within clitoral stroma encompassed by the clitoral epithelial lamina is the corpus cavernosum, blood-filled spaces and the urethra. External genitalia of male and female mice are anatomically similar to that of broad-footed moles with the exception that in female mice the clitoris contains a small os clitoridis and lacks defined erectile bodies, while male mice have an os penis and a prominent distal cartilaginous structure within the male urogenital mating protuberance (MUMP). Clitori of female broad-footed moles lack an os clitoridis but contain defined erectile bodies, while male moles have an os penis similar to the mouse but lack the distal cartilaginous structure. PMID:26694958

  5. Evolution of genitalia: theories, evidence, and new directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, William G

    2010-01-01

    Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain why male intromittent genitalia consistently tend to diverge more rapidly than other body traits of the same individuals in a wide range of animal taxa. Currently the two most popular involve sexual selection: sexually antagonistic coevolution (SAC) and cryptic female choice (CFC). A review of the most extensive attempts to discriminate between these two hypotheses indicates that SAC is not likely to have played a major role in explaining this pattern of genital evolution. Promising lines for future, more direct tests of CFC include experimental modification of male genital form and female sensory abilities, analysis of possible male-female dialogues during copulation, and direct observations of genital behavior.

  6. Magnetic resonance neurographic confirmation of extensive Plexiform neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis-1 presenting as ambiguous genitalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genitourinary involvement of neurofibromatosis is uncommon and genital neurofibromatosis is even rarer. Involvement of clitoris by neurofibroma can lead to clitoromegaly masquerading as a male penis. We report such a case of ambiguous genitalia in a 7-year-old female child presenting with clitoromegaly since birth, in which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed the presence of extensive neurofibromatosis in the clitoris and lumbosacral regions. We emphasize the central role of MRI in evaluation of hormonal and non-hormonal causes of ambiguous genitalia. We further discuss the merits of including MR neurography in the imaging protocol for comprehensive delineation of neurofibromatosis.

  7. Remarkable morphological features of taxonomic interest in the female genitalia of five Erythrogonia species (Hemiptera: Cicadomorpha: Cicadellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Rachel A; Mejdalani, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    The female genitalia of the Cicadellidae (leafhoppers) are usually considered more morphologically conservative (i.e., less variable) than the male genitalia at the generic and specific levels. However, various recent publications on the Cicadellinae (sharpshooters) have demonstrated the existence of useful characters in the female genitalia for the recognition of genera and species. Here we describe, illustrate, compare, and discuss peculiar processes, sclerites, and other features of the first pair of valvifers, sternite VIII, and ovipositor valvulae I and II of five species of the sharpshooter genus Erythrogonia (E. calva (Taschenberg, 1884), E. hertha Medler, 1963, E. phoenicea (Signoret, 1853), E. proterva Melichar, 1926, and E. sexguttata (Fabricius, 1803)). This genus includes currently the highest species diversity among the New World Cicadellinae, an agriculturally important subfamily. Comparative notes on other genera of the Cicadellini are added. In agreement with other recent publications, our results challenge the view that the morphology of the female genitalia is almost always conservative in the Cicadellidae.

  8. Management of a 3-year-old child with ambiguous genitalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available True hermaphrodites have characteristics tissue both sex in the form of presence of vagina uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries as in female and presence of testis seminiferous tubules but penis as in penoscrotal hypospadias and bifid scrotal sac confuses as well developed labia majora. Determination of sex as per parents view in our social set up. The case was provisionally diagnosed as intersex. Total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salphingo-oophorectomy and colpectomy were conducted. A 3-year-old child referred by a pediatrician to Nalanda Medical College, child surgical department for investigation and management of his ambiguous genitalia having following features like, urine was not passing from the tip of penis; penis along with apparently looking female genitalia was taken under treatment. Examination under general anesthesia showed a presence of both male/female internal genitalia and gonads with features of external genitalia of both sexes. After total abdominal hysterectomy and human chorionic gonadotrophin treatment growth of phallus and testicle was noted. The child was made male after extirpation of female genitals. This case illustrates that gender correction can be made as per patients consent in adult but at this stage social customs and parents consent dictated the treatment.

  9. [Decision-making process about sex assignment in the neonate with ambiguous genitalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kenji; Matsumoto, Fumi; Tohda, Akira

    2004-02-01

    Although diagnoses and etiologies of underlying disorders of sexual differentiation can be carefully delineated through biochemical, imagine, and chromosomal analyses, the decision-making process about sex assignment in the newborn with ambiguous genitalia is in a state of controversy. The conventional way for the approach to these neonates consists of 4 principles; 1) Urgency of diagnosis and sex assignment, so that early surgical reconstruction could obviate the fear of the parents with each diaper change. 2) Adequacy of the phallus as a male. 3) Fertility, especially 46XX female are sex assigned female because of potential fertility. 4) Cosmetic appearance of the reconstructed genitalia based on the recognition that external female genitalia are generally easier to construct than male. Contrary to these conventional methods, some researchers insist on flexibility in the clinical approach to provide the best possible outcome. It is getting apparent that the quantity, timing, and duration of androgen exposure will play a role in determining the degree of masculinization of the brain, which may potentially decide gender identity before 18 months of age or even in utero, and may influence the psychosexual development of the child. Flexibility in decision-making will allow for options not to remove any tissues including gonads and internal sex organs, or to reconstruct the genitalia until he or she is sure of the gender. This new approach must be proved in the future.

  10. Differential diagnosis of ambiguous genitalia in Chines e patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田秦杰; 葛秦生

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the etiology and differential diagnos is of ambiguous genitalia.Methods: One hundred and five cases of ambiguous genitalia with disorders of sexual differentiation were analyzed based on clinical characterist ics and basic research. Results: Ambiguous genitalia are closely related to the functio n of androgen. It could be classified into 3 groups: androgen excess, androgen d eficiency and failure of gonadal differentiation. Differential diagnosis depends on clinical manifestations, chromosome examination, serum hormone determination s, final gonadal pathology, receptor study etc.Conclusion: Ambiguous genitalia are related to abnormal androgen ic effect and early correct etiological diagnosis is the key to its management.

  11. Rhigognostis senilella (Zetterstedt, 1839) and R. marmorosella (Wocke, 1849): two valid species distinguishable in genitalia (Lepidoptera, Plutellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraniak, Edward

    2016-02-26

    Rhigognostis senilella was described from Greenland over 150 years ago by Zetterstedt. Its historical range of distribution included also mountains in most of Europe. It was classified in Europe as a boreal-alpine zoogeographic element.  Analysis of the structure of the male and female genitalia over its historical range shows that two distinct species are present. The range of R. senilella (Zetterstedt, 1839) is limited to Greenland and Iceland, whereas the mountains of Europe are inhabited by R. marmorosella (Wocke, 1849). The paper includes keys to distinguish these two species, one based on external characters, another on male or female genitalia.

  12. Penetrating trauma to the external genitalia in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, S; Beekley, A; Morey, A; Soderdahl, D

    2009-01-01

    This report details the incidence and description of trauma to the external genitalia experienced during Operation Iraqi Freedom at a United States Army Combat Support Hospital, and demonstrates that acceptable rates of testicular salvage are possible in the combat setting. The operating room logs and the Joint Theater Trauma Registry were used to conduct a retrospective review of the patients who sustained genitourinary (GU) injuries at an US Army Combat Support Hospital (CSH) in Iraq from 27 February 2007 to 14 August 2007. Of the 3595 battle trauma injuries seen at the CSH during the time period, 168 (4.7%) had one or more GU injuries for a total of 172 GU injuries. Of these patients, 115 (68%) with GU injuries had one or more injuries to the external genitalia for a total of 119 external GU injuries. Penetrating trauma to the penis and scrotum accounted for 59 of the injuries. In total, 43 testicles were injured in 34 patients (9 had bilateral injuries). In total, 32 testes were repaired primarily and 11 were removed. Injuries to the external genitalia continue to account for the vast majority of GU trauma in a combat setting. Of patients who presented with penetrating testicular trauma, there was a 74.4% salvage rate, which is higher than previous reports of combat external genitalia injuries. Treatment of penetrating trauma to the external genitalia in a combat setting requires attention to tissue preservation while coordinating associated surgical procedures.

  13. Notes on Neotropical Proconiini (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Cicadellinae: VII: First detailed description of the female genitalia of a Diestostemma species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Mejdalani

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diestostemma Amyot & Serville, 1843 is a diverse sharpshooter genus with 32 species. A description and illustrations of Diestostemma nasutum Schmidt, 1910 are provided. The species, previously known from Ecuador, is newly recorded from Colombia. Both the male and female genitalia are described for the first time. This is the first detailed description of the female genitalia of a Diestostemma species. Diestostemma nasutum can be distinguished from the other species of the genus by the following features of the aedeagus: shaft with the distal third distinctly curved dorsally; base of basiventral aedeagal process with a lobe directed anteriorly; and basiventral aedeagal process bifurcated on its basal portion. The style of D. nasutum, whose apical portion is broad, distinctly curved inward, and with the apex subtruncate, is also quite distinctive. We compared the female genitalia of D. nasutum with those of other Proconiini genera. Our results confirm the perception that the female genitalia in this tribe can be a source of useful taxonomic characters.

  14. Rules for clinical diagnosis in babies with ambiguous genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Y; Hutson, J M

    2003-08-01

    Intersex disorders are rare and complex; yet, in each case of genital ambiguity, accurate and expeditious management is required of the clinician. This article reviews the embryology of sexual differentiation, from which some 'rules' of diagnosis are derived. A simplified approach to the interpretation of clinical signs in ambiguous genitalia is presented and discussed.

  15. The Functional Significance of Chiral Genitalia: Patterns of Asymmetry, Functional Morphology and Mating Success in the Praying Mantis Ciulfina baldersoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory I Holwell

    Full Text Available Genital asymmetry is relatively common and widespread throughout the animal kingdom. The functional significance of genital asymmetry is however, poorly understood for most species. Male praying mantids of the genus Ciulfina are remarkable in possessing complex and directionally asymmetric genital phallomeres in some species, and chirally dimorphic/antisymmetric genitalia in others. Here we explore the chiral dimorphism in male genitalia of Ciulfina baldersoni which appear to exhibit genital antisymmetry. We test whether genital orientation influences mating success, copulation duration and the attachment duration of spermatophores. Additionally we investigate genital interactions between male and females using x-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Lastly we assess whether genital asymmetry is associated with non-genital morphological asymmetry of a range of traits. Our results highlight the complex functional morphology of genitalia in this praying mantis species and yet demonstrate no functional difference between dextral and sinistral morphs other than the direction of attachment with both morphs enjoying equal levels of mating success. Chiral morphs also did not strongly associate with any other forms of asymmetry. We therefore conclude that genital chirality in Ciulfina baldersoni is a likely case of antisymmetry with no functional significance to genital orientation, and is likely to be selectively neutral.

  16. Brucella melitensis: a rarely suspected cause of infections of genitalia and the lower urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Stamatiou

    Full Text Available We examined the clinical presentation and outcome of Brucellar infections of genitalia and the lower urinary tract through a review of the medical records of 10 cases of male patients with brucellar infections of the genitalia and lower urinary tract. The mean age of the patients with brucellosis was 49.2, (median 52, range 15-77 years. Eleven out of 17 patients were rural residents, 15 reported that they might have consumed unpasteurized dairy products and four reported occupational exposure. Symptoms onset was acute in almost all cases. Scrotal pain, epidedimal swelling and fever were the most common symptoms. The Wright test was positive in 13 patients, while Brucella sp. was isolated from blood cultures in six cases. Only two patients were found with abnormal liver ultrasonography. All patients underwent treatment with doxycycline and aminoglycoside for seven days and doxycycline alone for two months. Most of them responded to antibiotic therapy with rapid regression of symptoms. One patient failed to respond to therapy and presented necrotizing orchitis, as well as abscesses, which required orchectomy. Brucellar infections of the genitalia and lower urinary tract have no specific clinical presentation; the usual laboratory examination is not sufficient to diagnose this kind of infection, therefore it could easily be misdiagnosed. An analytical medical history (including overall dietary habits and recent consumption of non-pasteurized dairy products could indicate Brucelosis as would the persistence of symptoms despite a one-week antibiotic treatment. In general, patients afflicted by brucellar epididymoorchitis respond to Brucellosis antibiotic therapy, except for some rare cases that present necrotizing orchitis and require surgical treatment.

  17. Brucella melitensis: a rarely suspected cause of infections of genitalia and the lower urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Stamatiou

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We examined the clinical presentation and outcome of Brucellar infections of genitalia and the lower urinary tract through a review of the medical records of 10 cases of male patients with brucellar infections of the genitalia and lower urinary tract. The mean age of the patients with brucellosis was 49.2, (median 52, range 15-77 years. Eleven out of 17 patients were rural residents, 15 reported that they might have consumed unpasteurized dairy products and four reported occupational exposure. Symptoms onset was acute in almost all cases. Scrotal pain, epidedimal swelling and fever were the most common symptoms. The Wright test was positive in 13 patients, while Brucella sp. was isolated from blood cultures in six cases. Only two patients were found with abnormal liver ultrasonography. All patients underwent treatment with doxycycline and aminoglycoside for seven days and doxycycline alone for two months. Most of them responded to antibiotic therapy with rapid regression of symptoms. One patient failed to respond to therapy and presented necrotizing orchitis, as well as abscesses, which required orchectomy. Brucellar infections of the genitalia and lower urinary tract have no specific clinical presentation; the usual laboratory examination is not sufficient to diagnose this kind of infection, therefore it could easily be misdiagnosed. An analytical medical history (including overall dietary habits and recent consumption of non-pasteurized dairy products could indicate Brucelosis as would the persistence of symptoms despite a one-week antibiotic treatment. In general, patients afflicted by brucellar epididymoorchitis respond to Brucellosis antibiotic therapy, except for some rare cases that present necrotizing orchitis and require surgical treatment.

  18. Genitalia-associated microbes in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otti, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    In sexual reproduction different types of symbiotic relationships between insects and microbes have become established. For example, some bacteria have evolved almost exclusive vertical transmission and even define the compatibility of insect mating partners. Many strictly sexually transmitted diseases have also been described in insects. Apart from such rather specific relationships the role of opportunistic infections in the reproductive process has been widely neglected. Opportunistic microbes transmitted passively during mating might impose an energetic cost, as the immune system will need to be alert and will use resources to fight potential intruders. Through mating wounds and contaminated reproductive organs opportunistic microbes might be transferred to mating partners and even enter the body cavity. Females as the "receiving" sex are particularly likely to have evolved adaptations to avoid or reduce opportunistic infections. Males of several species show highly complex seminal fluids, which as well as containing components that influence a males' fertilization success, also possess antimicrobial substances. The role of antimicrobials in the reproductive process is not well understood. Some evidence hints at the protection of sperm against microbes, indicating a role for natural selection in shaping the evolution of reproductive traits. By highlighting the potential importance of microbes in sexual selection and their role in reproduction in general I will make a case for studies in sexual selection, especially the ones investigating postcopulatory processes, that should incorporate environmental, as well as genotypic variation, in reproductive traits.

  19. Development of the External Genitalia: Perspectives from the Spotted Hyena (Crocuta crocuta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Gerald R.; Risbridger, Gail; Wang, Hong; Place, Ned J.; Grumbach, Mel; Cunha, Tristan J.; Weldele, Mary; Conley, Al J.; Barcellos, Dale; Agarwal, Sanjana; Bhargava, Argun; Drea, Christine; Hammond, Geoffrey L.; Siiteri, Penti; Coscia, Elizabeth M.; McPhaul, Michael J; Baskin, Laurence S.; Glickman, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    This review/research paper summarizes data on development of the external genitalia of the spotted hyena, a fascinating mammal noted for extreme masculinization of the female external genitalia. The female spotted hyena is the only extant mammal that mates and gives birth through a pendulous penis-like clitoris. Our studies indicate that early formation of the phallus in both males and females is independent of androgens; indeed the phallus forms before the fetal testes or ovaries are capable of synthesizing androgens. Likewise, pre- and postnatal growth in length of the penis and clitoris is minimally affected by “androgen status”. Nonetheless, several internal morphologies, as well as external surface features of the phallus, are androgen-dependent and thus account for dimorphism between the penis and clitoris. Finally, estrogens play a critical role in penile and clitoral development, specifying the position of the urethral orifice, determining elasticity of the urethral meatus, and facilitating epithelial-epithelial fusion events required for proper formation of the distal urethra/urogenital sinus and prepuce. Accordingly, prenatal inhibition of estrogen synthesis via administration of letrozole (an aromatase inhibitor) leads to malformations of the glans as well as the prepuce (hypospadias). The effects of prenatal androgens, anti-androgens and impaired estrogen synthesis correlated with the tissue expression of androgen and estrogen receptors. PMID:24582573

  20. Surgical management of ambiguous genitalia in infants and children: An SGPGI experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Kumar Das

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Assignment of a proper gender to a neonate born with ambiguous genitalia is a social emer-gency. Once a sex has been assigned the next critical step is performance, if needed, of a reconstructive procedure in a timely fashion. In an attempt to evaluate our experi-ence with this unique group of patients, we have retro-spectively reviewed the course of 31 children managed surgically at our institute between 1989 and 2000. Patients and Methods: This series consists of 16 geno-type females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH, 7 male pseudohermaphrodites, 5 children with mixed go-nadal dysgenesis (MGD, and 3 true hermaphrodites. All the 16 patients with CAH underwent vaginoplasty, and clitoral recession. Five of the male pseudohermaphrodites were raised as females. All of them underwent B/L gona-dectomy, and clitoral recession. Perineal vaginoplasty was done in 4 of these patients and I patient who was due for colo-vaginoplasty was lost to follow-up. 2 male pseudoher-maphrodites were raised as males. Both of them under-went B/L orchiopexy and hypospadias repair. Four of the 5 cases of MGD were given a female sex assignment and all 4 underwent gonadectomy due to high risk of gonado-blastoma. In the 5th patient a male gender assignment was given. There were 3 true hermaphrodites, 2 of whom were managed by clitoral recession and vaginoplasty. One pa-tient was diagnosed at the age of 15 years. This patient had been brought up as a male child and presented to us with the complaint of pain in the lower abdomen. Investigations revealed haematometra and haematocolpos and the patient had to undergo B/L salpingo-oophorectomy and hysterectomy. Results: The postoperative period in most of the pa-tients was uneventful except for 2 minor complications. The cosmetic results have been excellent. 2 patients were lost to follow-up. Follow-up in the rest of the patients ranged from 9 months to 6.3 years and all the patients were found well adjusted

  1. Female external genitalia on fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, S F; Nemec, U; Weber, M; Rotmensch, S; Brugger, P C; Kasprian, G; Krestan, C R; Rimoin, D L; Graham, J M; Prayer, D

    2011-12-01

    To characterize the normal development of the female external genitalia on fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study included MRI examinations of 191 female fetuses (20-36 gestational weeks) with normal anatomy or minor abnormalities, following suspicion of anomalies on prenatal ultrasound examination. Using a 1.5-Tesla unit, the bilabial diameter was measured on T2-weighted sequences. Statistical description, as well as correlation and regression analyses, was used to evaluate bilabial diameter in relation to gestational age. MRI measurements were compared with published ultrasound data. The morphological appearance and signal intensities of the external genitalia were also assessed. Mean bilabial diameters, with 95% CIs and percentiles, were defined. The bilabial diameter as a function of gestational age was expressed by the regression equation: bilabial diameter = - 11.336 + 0.836 × (gestational age in weeks). The correlation coefficient, r = 0.782, was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Bilabial diameter on MRI was not significantly different from that on ultrasound (P < 0.001). In addition, on MRI we observed changes in morphology of the external genitalia and in signal intensities with increasing gestational age. We have provided a reference range of fetal bilabial diameter on MRI, which, in addition to ultrasound findings, may be helpful in the identification of genital anomalies. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. SPECIES ISOLATION, GENITAL MECHANICS, AND THE EVOLUTION OF SPECIES-SPECIFIC GENITALIA IN THREE SPECIES OF MACRODACTYLUS BEETLES (COLEOPTERA, SCARABEIDAE, MELOLONTHINAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, William G

    1992-12-01

    The question asked was why male genitalic structures have diverged in three syntopic species of Macrodactylus beetles. Four hypotheses were evaluated: 1. The ways in which male genitalia mesh with internal female structures indicate that selection for species isolation via mechanical exclusion ("lock and key") is unlikely to explain the genitalic differences. 2. The specific mate recognition hypothesis also clearly fails to explain genitalic differences due to the implausibility of postulated environmental effects on genitalia, and lack of postulated coevolution of male and female morphologies. 3. Selection for species isolation via differences in genitalic stimulation (sensory lock and key) is unlikely due to relatively infrequent cross-specific pair formation and intromission in the field, and "excessive" numbers of species-specific genitalic structures and male courtship behavior patterns which nevertheless occasionally fail. It also fails to explain the frequent failure of intraspecific copulations to result in sperm transfer. This hypothesis cannot, however, be rejected as confidently as the previous hypotheses. 4. Conditions under which sexual selection by cryptic female choice could take place are common. Females frequently exercise their ability to prevent sperm transfer by conspecific males even after intromission has occurred, and females generally mate repeatedly, probably with different males. Males behave as if cryptic female choice is occurring, courting assiduously while their genitalia are within the female. Sexual selection by female choice could thus contribute to the divergence in genitalic structures. © 1992 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. Role of MRI in the evaluation of ambiguous genitalia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secaf, E. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States) Dept. de Radiologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil)); Hricak, H. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States) Dept. of Urology, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Gooding, C.A. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States) Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Ho, V.W. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Gorczyca, D.P. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States) Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Ringertz, H. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)); Conte, F.A. (Dept. of Pediatr

    1994-08-01

    Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) interpretation was assessed prospectively in patients with ambiguous genitalia or intersex problems. MRI depiction of the uterus was possible in 93 %, the vagina in 95 %, the penis in 100 %, the testis in 88 %, and the ovary in 74 % of patients. The strength of MRI lies in the multiplanar capability and tissue characterization by means of T1- and T2-weighted sequences. MRI contributes to accurate morphologic evaluation of muellerian duct structures, the gonads, and the development of the phallus, all of which are essential for appropriate gender assignment and planning of surgical reconstruction. (orig.)

  4. Dysgenetic male pseudohermaphroditism

    OpenAIRE

    Proença, E; Freitas, S.; Fonseca, M.; Figueiredo, S; Rodrigues, C.

    2001-01-01

    Acta Med Port. 2001 Sep-Dec;14(5-6):511-4. [Dysgenetic male pseudohermaphroditism] [Article in Portuguese] Proença E, Freitas S, Fonseca M, Figueiredo S, Rodrigues C. Serviço de Cirurgia Pediátrica, Hospital Maria Pia, Porto. Abstract Dysgenetic male pseudohermaphroditism is the result of a defect of testis development that encompasses a large clinical heterogeneity. It is characterized by bilateral dysgenetic testis, absence of mullerian regression, ambiguous genitalia and/...

  5. A del(X(p11 carrying SRY sequences in an infant with ambiguous genitalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El-Fatah S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SRY (sex-determining region, Y is the gene responsible of gonadal differentiation in the male and it is essential for the regular development of male genitalia. Translocations involving the human sex chromosomes are rarely reported, however here we are reporting a very rare translocation of SRY gene to the q -arm of a deleted X chromosome. This finding was confirmed by cytogenetic, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Case presentation A 7-month infant was clinically diagnosed as an intersex case, with a phallus, labia majora and minora, a blind vagina and a male urethra. Neither uterus nor testes was detected by Ultrasonography. G-banding of his chromosomes showed 46,X,del(X(p11 and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH analysis showed a very small piece from the Y chromosome translocated to the q-arm of the del(X. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis revealed the presence of material from the sex-determining region Y (SRY gene. Conclusion It is suggested that the phenotype of the patient was caused by activation of the deleted X chromosome with SRY translocation, which is responsible for gonadal differentiation.

  6. [Genitalia of three species of Heilipus Germar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) that damage avocado fruits (Persea americana Mill.) in Mexico and Costa Rica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Vildózola, Alvaro; Valdez-Carrasco, Jorge; Equihua-Martínez, Armando; González-Hernández, Héctor; Romero-Nápoles, Jesús; Solís-Aguilar, Juan F; Ramírez-Alarcón, Samuel

    2007-01-01

    The male and female genitaliae of three species of the genus Heilipus Germar (H. lauri Boheman, H. pittieri Barber and H. trifasciatus Fabricius) that damage avocado fruits (Persea americana Mill.) in Mexico and Costa Rica are described and illustrated. The aedeagus, spiculum gastrale, styli of 8th sternite are different in each one of the three species studied and can be used for specific identification.

  7. A practical approach to ambiguous genitalia in the newborn period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Sarah M; Vilain, Eric J N; Kolon, Thomas F

    2010-05-01

    The evaluation and management of neonates with ambiguous genitalia requires sensitivity, efficiency, and accuracy. The approach to these neonates is facilitated by a multidisciplinary team including urology, endocrinology, genetics, and psychiatry or psychology. Disorders of sex development (DSD) encompass chromosomal DSD, 46,XX DSD, and 46,XY DSD. The 46,XX DSD is the most common DSD and in the majority of these children congenital adrenal hyperplasia is the underlying etiology. The 46,XY DSD is a heterogeneous disorder that often results from a disruption in the production or response to testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, or Mullerian inhibitory substance. Chromosomal DSD includes conditions resulting from abnormal meiosis, including Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) and Turner syndrome. The evaluation of children with DSD demands a thorough physical examination, medical history, karyotype, metabolic panel, 17-OH progesterone, testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulation hormone, and urinalysis. A radiographic evaluation should begin with an abdominal and pelvic ultrasound but may include magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopy, or laparoscopy.

  8. 46,XX Male Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Uçan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 46, XX male syndrome – testicular disorder of sexual differentiation (DSD is a rare condition characterized by a spectrum of clinical presentations, ranging from ambiguous to normal male genitalia. These cases are diagnosed more easily in childhood. In adults, the diagnosis can be difficult due to the current normal gender development. Here, we report hormonal, molecular and cytogenetic results in an adult male patient with primary hypogonadism who was diagnosed with 46, XX male syndrome in our clinic. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 46-8

  9. A genitália externa dos machos de sete espécies de Triatoma Laporte, 1832 da região Neártica (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae Male external genitalia in seven species of Triatoma Laporte, 1832 from neartic region (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Lent

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Sete espécies da região neártica: Triatoma barberi Usinger, 1939; T. rubida (Uhler, 1894; T. gertaeckeri (Stal, 1859; T. lecticularia (Stal, 1859; T. protracta (Uhler, 1894; T. recurva (Stal, 1868 e T. sanguisuga (Leconte, 1855 foram analisadas comparativamente, tendo como enfoque as estruturas da genitália do macho: falosoma (Ph, suporte do falosoma (SPh, processo do endosoma (PrEn, vesica (V e aparelho articular (Apb. As estruturas fálicas se mostraram capazes de serem usadas como critério morfológico suplementar aos padrões atualmente usados, em taxonomia. Estas espécies silvestres são encontradas nos Estados Unidos e México, naturalmente infectadas pelo T. cruzi; algumas vivem no perdomicílio e outras eventualmente no domicílio, sem contudo colonizá-lo.Seven species from the neartic region, Triatoma barberi Usinger, 1939; T. rubida (Uhler, 1894; T. gerstaeckeri (Stal, 1859; T. lecticularia (Stal, 1859; T. protracta (Uhler, 1894; T. recurva (Stal, 1868 and T. sanguisuga (Leconte, 1855 were comparatively analysed with emphasis on the genital structures of the male bug: the phallosome (Ph, the phallosome struts (SPh, the endosoma process (PrEn, the vesica (V and the articulatory apparatus (Apb. The phallic structures were useful as a supplementary morphological criterion to the present taxonomical standards. These wild species are found naturally infected by Trypanosoma cruzi in the United States and Mexico. Some of them live outside human dwellings while other are occasionally domiciliary, although they do not colonize these homes.

  10. Left-handed sperm removal by male Calopteryx damselflies (Odonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Kaori; Hayashi, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    Male genitalia in several insect species are asymmetry in right and left shape. However, the function of such asymmetric male genitalia is still unclear. We found that the male genitalia of the damselfly Calopteryx cornelia (Odonata: Calopterygidae) are morphologically symmetric just after emergence but asymmetric after reproductive maturation. Males remove rival sperm stored in the female bursa copulatrix (single spherical sac) and the following spermatheca (Y-shaped tubular sac) prior to their own ejaculation to prevent sperm competition. Males possess the aedeagus with a recurved head to remove bursal sperm and a pair of spiny lateral processes to remove spermathecal sperm. The right lateral process is less developed than the left, and sperm stored in the right spermathecal tube are rarely removed. Experiments involving surgical cutting of each lateral process demonstrated that only the left process functions in spermathecal sperm removal. Thus, males of C. cornelia are left-handed in their sperm removal behaviour at copulation.

  11. Sex beyond the genitalia: The human brain mosaic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel, Daphna; Berman, Zohar; Tavor, Ido; Wexler, Nadav; Gaber, Olga; Stein, Yaniv; Shefi, Nisan; Pool, Jared; Urchs, Sebastian; Margulies, Daniel S; Liem, Franziskus; Hänggi, Jürgen; Jäncke, Lutz; Assaf, Yaniv

    2015-12-15

    Whereas a categorical difference in the genitals has always been acknowledged, the question of how far these categories extend into human biology is still not resolved. Documented sex/gender differences in the brain are often taken as support of a sexually dimorphic view of human brains ("female brain" or "male brain"). However, such a distinction would be possible only if sex/gender differences in brain features were highly dimorphic (i.e., little overlap between the forms of these features in males and females) and internally consistent (i.e., a brain has only "male" or only "female" features). Here, analysis of MRIs of more than 1,400 human brains from four datasets reveals extensive overlap between the distributions of females and males for all gray matter, white matter, and connections assessed. Moreover, analyses of internal consistency reveal that brains with features that are consistently at one end of the "maleness-femaleness" continuum are rare. Rather, most brains are comprised of unique "mosaics" of features, some more common in females compared with males, some more common in males compared with females, and some common in both females and males. Our findings are robust across sample, age, type of MRI, and method of analysis. These findings are corroborated by a similar analysis of personality traits, attitudes, interests, and behaviors of more than 5,500 individuals, which reveals that internal consistency is extremely rare. Our study demonstrates that, although there are sex/gender differences in the brain, human brains do not belong to one of two distinct categories: male brain/female brain.

  12. Uniparental Disomy in Somatic Mosaicism 45,X/46,XY/46,XX Associated with Ambiguous Genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Alexandre; Denzer, Friederike; Hiort, Olaf; Barth, Thomas F; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Barbi, Gotthold; Rettenberger, Günther; Wabitsch, Martin; Just, Walter; Leriche, Clothilde

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) affect the development of chromosomal, gonadal and/or anatomical sex. We analyzed a patient with ambiguous genitalia aiming to correlate the genetic findings with the phenotype. Blood and tissue samples from a male patient with penoscrotal hypospadias were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, karyotyping and FISH. DNA was sequenced for the AR, SRY and DHH genes, and further 26 loci in different sex chromosomes were analyzed by MLPA. The gonosomal origin was evaluated by simple tandem repeat (STR) analysis and SNP array. Histopathology revealed a streak gonad, a fallopian tube and a rudimentary uterus, positive for placental alkaline phosphatase, cytokeratin-7 and c-kit, and negative for estrogen, androgen and progesterone receptors, alpha-inhibin, alpha-1-fetoprotein, β-hCG, and oct-4. Karyotyping showed a 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, yet FISH showed both 46,XX/46,XY mosaicism (gonad and urethral plate), 46,XX (uterus and tube) and 46,XY karyotypes (rudimentary testicular tissue). DNA sequencing revealed intact sequences in SOX9, WNT4, NR0B1, NR5A1, CYP21A2, SRY, AR, and DHH. STR analysis showed only one maternal allele for all X chromosome markers (uniparental isodisomy, UPD), with a weaker SRY signal and a 4:1 ratio in the X:Y signal. Our findings suggest that the observed complex DSD phenotype is the result of somatic gonosomal mosaicism and UPD despite a normal blood karyotype. The presence of UPD warrants adequate genetic counseling for the family and frequent, lifelong, preventive follow-up controls in the patient.

  13. The management of dog bite injuries of genitalia in paediatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Bertozzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dog bite injuries are common in children and represent an important health-care problem. Most dog bite injuries involve the face or an extremity. Victims tend to seek medical care quickly. Dog bites to the external genitalia are rarely reported, but they potentially result in morbidity if improperly managed. Morbidity is also directly related to the severity of initial wound. Guidelines for the management of dog bites include irrigation, dιbridment, antibiotic therapy, consideration of tetanus and rabies immunisation and suture of wounds or surgical reconstruction. Literature review was conducted and focused to analyze the management of dog bite lesions involving external genitalia.

  14. Complex female genitalia indicate sperm dumping in armored goblin spiders (Arachnida, Araneae, Oonopidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    In promiscuous females, sperm ejection from the sperm storage site can be a strong mechanism to influence sperm priority patterns. Sperm dumping is reported from different animals including birds, insects, and humans. In spiders, it has been documented for four species including the oonopid Silhouettella loricatula. Oonopidae are a diverse spider family comprising many species with peculiar female genitalia. Especially in species where studies of mating behavior are difficult, morphological investigations of the genitalia help to understand their function and evolution. In the present study, the genitalia of the oonopids Myrmopopaea sp., Grymeus sp., and Lionneta sp. are investigated by means of histological serial sections and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results are compared with previous findings on S. loricatula. In Myrmopopaea sp. and Grymeus sp., the same morphological components are present that are involved in sperm dumping in S. loricatula. Inside the receptaculum, sperm are enclosed in a secretory sac which can be moved to the genital opening and dumped during copulation by muscle contractions. The female genitalia of Lionneta sp. are asymmetric. They show the same characteristics as S. loricatula but all the investigated females were unmated. The results strongly suggest that sperm dumping occurs in Myrmopopaea sp., Grymeus sp., and Lionneta sp. and happens by the same mechanism as in S. loricatula. Sperm dumping might even be common within a clade of oonopids. As in S. loricatula, the sperm transfer forms in the investigated species consist of several spermatozoa. Papillae with unknown function occur on the receptacula of all females.

  15. Limb defects and congenital anomalies of the genitalia in an infant with homozygous alpha-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, D N; Forman, E N; Rubin, L P

    1997-01-20

    We describe an infant with homozygous alpha-thalassemia, genital abnormalities, and terminal transverse limb defects, whose limbs demonstrate evidence of loss of tissue and abnormal morphogenesis. We propose these defects were due to either severe fetal anemia or to vascular occlusion by abnormal erythrocytes, resulting in hypoxia of the developing distal limbs and genitalia.

  16. Specific morphogenetic events in mouse external genitalia sex differentiation are responsive/dependent upon androgens and/or estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Esequiel; Weiss, Dana A; Ferretti, Max; Wang, Hong; Menshenia, Julia; Risbridger, Gail; Handelsman, David; Cunha, Gerald; Baskin, Laurence

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a comprehensive morphologic analysis of developing mouse external genitalia (ExG) and to determine specific sexual differentiation features that are responsive to androgens or estrogens. To eliminate sex steroid signaling postnatally, male and female mice were gonadectomized on the day of birth, and then injected intraperitoneally every other day with DES (200 ng/g), DHT (1 μg/g), or oil. On day-10 postnatal male and female ExG were dissected, fixed, embedded, serially sectioned and analyzed. We identified 10 sexually dimorphic anatomical features indicative of normal penile and clitoral differentiation in intact mice. Several (but not all) penile features were impaired or abolished as a result of neonatal castration. Those penile features remaining after neonatal castration were completely abolished with attendant clitoral development in androgen receptor (AR) mutant male mice (X(Tfm)/Y and X/Y AR-null) in which AR signaling is absent both pre- and postnatally. Administration of DHT to neonatally castrated males restored development of all 10 masculine features to almost normal levels. Neonatal ovariectomy of female mice had little effect on clitoral development, whereas treatment of ovariectomized female mice with DHT induced partial masculinization of the clitoris. Administration of DES to neonatally gonadectomized male and female mice elicited a spectrum of development abnormalities. These studies demonstrate that the presence or absence of androgen prenatally specifies penile versus clitoral identity. Differentiated penile features emerge postnatally and are sensitive to and dependent upon prenatal or pre- and postnatal androgen. Emergence of differentiated clitoral features occurs postnatally in either intact or ovariectomized females. It is likely that each penile and clitoral feature has a unique time-course of hormonal dependency/sensitivity.

  17. Sensory innervation of the external and internal genitalia of the female rat

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Lawrence C.; Kristal, Mark B.; Komisaruk, Barry R.

    1987-01-01

    Using a whole-nerve recording method, the genitalia of the female rat were found to receive afferent innervation as follows. Pelvic nerve: vagina, cervix, and perineal skin; hypogastric nerve: cervix and proximal three fifths of the uterus; pudendal nerve: skin of perineum, inner thigh, and clitoral sheath. It is probable that the pudendal and pelvic nerves are activated during copulation, and that all 3 nerves are activated during parturition.

  18. MEDICAL AUDIT OF CHILDREN WITH AMBIGUOUS GENITALIA- REVIEW OF CHILDREN TREATED OVER 18 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praburam P. M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The survival of a newborn or a child presenting with ambiguous genitalia depends upon the timely diagnosis and institution of appropriate medical care. We undertook this study with the aim to determine if appropriate clinical and confirmatory diagnosis was arrived on time and if the treatment instituted was relevant and satisfactory. Methods: All children who were evaluated for ambiguous genitalia under the Department of Pediatric Endocrinology over the preceding 18 years were invited for a review. Data including time taken to make a clinical diagnosis, time taken to confirm the diagnosis, reasons for delay if any, and appropriateness of the sex assigned for rearing and treatment instituted were collected from the charts. Patients were evaluated for adequacy of response to treatment, compliance, problems encountered if any and subjective parental satisfaction. Results: A total of 165 children were diagnosed to have conditions with ambiguous genitalia and were called for a review. 33 children attended the review. 15 were being raised as boys and 18 as girls. 12 children had virilising congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH, 6 had cryptorchidism, 6 had hypospadias, 3 had complete and 1 had partial testicular feminisation, 2 had mixed gonadal dysgenesis (MGD, 2 had hypogonadism and 1 was a true hermaphrodite. An appropriate clinical diagnosis was made in 30childrenon the day one and a final confirmatory diagnosis was made within a month in 23. Conclusion: In most conditions presenting with ambiguous genitalia, a clinical and confirmatory diagnosis can be made in a short duration. Initiation of appropriate treatment results in favourable outcomes in terms of growth sexual identity and adaptation.

  19. Diabetic fetopathy associated with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia and ambiguous genitalia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tantbirojn Patou

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Many fetal malformations can occur because of maternal diabetes. However, ambiguous genital organs have never been reported as an associated finding in the literature. This is the first report of associated ambiguous genital organ and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia in a case of diabetic fetopathy. Case presentation A 19-year-old Thai primigravida with familial history of diabetes mellitus (DM was diagnosed as having gestational DM type 2, based on 100 g oral glucose tolerance test, and was poorly controlled with insulin injections. Delayed targeted ultrasonography at 28 weeks gestation revealed multiple fetal anomalies. The woman underwent low transverse cesarean section at 30 weeks gestation due to preterm labor and transverse lie. The newborn with ambiguous genitalia was delivered but expired after birth. Autopsy findings revealed alobar holoprosencephaly, a prominent forehead, hypotelorism, an absent nose, absent bilateral ears, median cleft lip and palate, preaxial polydactyly of the right hand, accessory spleens, single umbilical artery, markedly enlarged adrenal glands and ambiguous external genitalia The subsequent fetal chromosomal study revealed 46,XX. Conclusion We describe a case of diabetic fetopathy with classic facial malformation and preaxial hallucal polydactyly which has been proposed as a marker of diabetic embryopathy. Bilateral adrenal hyperplasia with ambiguous genitalia, an uncommon associated anomaly, was also identified. It is controversial whether adrenal hyperplasia can be a novel feature of diabetic fetopathy or just a coincidental finding. Further observation and adequate investigation are needed in such cases.

  20. Ambiguous genitalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X chromosomes) has the following features: An enlarged clitoris that looks like a small penis . The urethral ... along, above, or below the surface of the clitoris. The labia may be fused and look like ...

  1. [Sex assignment in intersex children: a brief analysis of "ambiguous genitalia" cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Anibal; Barboza, Heloísa Helena

    2014-10-01

    This article takes an ethical approach to briefly analyze current therapeutic guidelines in Brazil for cases diagnosed as "ambiguous genitalia" (one of the "disorders of sexual development", DSD) in intersex children. Except when there is clear risk to the infant's life, there is no medical or institutional consensus on the definition of intersex, DSD, or recommended treatment. Parents or guardians of these minors have the legal right to provide consent for genital surgical interventions. The irreversibility of some procedures calls attention to reports by some intersex adults who underwent such interventions during their childhood or adolescence and now fail to acknowledge the physical or psychosocial benefits that were originally claimed to justify them.

  2. New Treatment on Bone Marrow Suppress after Chemotherapy of Female Genitalia Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yuepeng; MEI Zhuoxian; HE Ke; CHEN Wei

    2002-01-01

    Objective This study is to find valid medication to improve the condition of bone marrow suppress in a short period of time after chemotherapy of female genitalia cancer and to create a condition for second - time chemotherapy. Method Thirty- five cases using rhG- CSF were included in the experiment group while cases without rhG - CSF were set as control group. The wbc level in two groups are compared. Result The comparison shows that wbc resumes normal within 22 days in the experiment group while 35 days in the control group. The duration is 13 days less in the experiment group than the control group. From the 21st day after chemotherapy, patients in the experiment group need 2.5 days before another chemotherapy while 12 days for the control group. The average account of wbc in the experiment group is 9.5 × 109/L while 6.2 × 109/L in the control group. The variation in the comparison of 3 groups of data is statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion The above results show that rhG - CSF has positive efficacy on the treatment of bone marrow suppress after chemotherapy of female genitalia cancer and helps the regular chemotherapy proceed smoothly.

  3. The cortical sensory representation of genitalia in women and men: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadwa Cazala

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although genital sensations are an essential aspect of sexual behavior, the cortical somatosensory representation of genitalia in women and men remain poorly known and contradictory results have been reported. Objective: To conduct a systematic review of studies based on electrophysiological and functional neuroimaging studies, with the aim to identify insights brought by modern methods since the early descriptions of the sensory homunculus in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI. Results: The review supports the interpretation that there are two distinct representations of genital sensations in SI, one on the medial surface and the other on the lateral surface. In addition, the review suggests that the secondary somatosensory cortex and the posterior insula support a representation of the affective aspects of genital sensation. Conclusion: In view of the erogenous character of sensations originating in the genitalia, future studies on this topic should systematically assess qualitatively as well as quantitatively the sexually stimulating and/or sexually pleasurable characteristics of sensations felt by subjects in response to experimental stimuli.

  4. The cortical sensory representation of genitalia in women and men: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazala, Fadwa; Vienney, Nicolas; Stoléru, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Background : Although genital sensations are an essential aspect of sexual behavior, the cortical somatosensory representation of genitalia in women and men remain poorly known and contradictory results have been reported. Objective : To conduct a systematic review of studies based on electrophysiological and functional neuroimaging studies, with the aim to identify insights brought by modern methods since the early descriptions of the sensory homunculus in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI). Results : The review supports the interpretation that there are two distinct representations of genital sensations in SI, one on the medial surface and the other on the lateral surface. In addition, the review suggests that the secondary somatosensory cortex and the posterior insula support a representation of the affective aspects of genital sensation. Conclusion : In view of the erogenous character of sensations originating in the genitalia, future studies on this topic should systematically assess qualitatively as well as quantitatively the sexually stimulating and/or sexually pleasurable characteristics of sensations felt by subjects in response to experimental stimuli.

  5. Description of the male of Laneella perisi (Mariluis) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) n. comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, M; Ramos-Pastrana, Y; Pujol-Luz, J R

    2013-02-01

    The male Laneella perisi (Mariluis) n. comb. is described based on specimens collected in the Cordillera Oriental (1,370-1,450 m asl), Florencia-Suaza, Caquetá, Colombia. A key to separate the two species of the genus Laneella and illustrations of the male genitalia and female abdomen, terminalia, and spermatheca are also presented.

  6. Comparative anatomy of the female genitalia of generic-level taxa in tribe Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae). Part XXXIII. Genus Lewnielsenius Reinert, Harbach and Kitching

    Science.gov (United States)

    A morphological analysis of the female genitalia of the species included in genus Lewnielsenius Reinert, Harbach and Kitching was conducted. The genitalia of the type species of the genus, Ln. muelleri (Dyar), are illustrated. Treatment of the genital morphology of the genus includes a detailed de...

  7. Comparative anatomy of the female genitalia of generic-level taxa in tribe Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae). Part XXVIII. Genus Luius Reinert, Harbach and Kitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A morphological analysis of the female genitalia of the species included in genus Luius Reinert, Harbach and Kitching was conducted. The genitalia of the type species of the genus, Lu. fengi (Edwards), are illustrated for the first time. Treatment of the genital morphology of the genus includes a ...

  8. Comparative anatomy of the female genitalia of generic-level taxa in tribe Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae). Part XXX. Genus Gilesius Reinert, Harbach and Kitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A morphological analysis of the female genitalia of species included in genus Gilesius Reinert, Harbach and Kitching was conducted. The genitalia of the type species of the genus, Gi. pulchriventer (Giles), are illustrated for the first time. Treatment of the genital morphology of the genus includ...

  9. Differences in anxiety and depression between male and female caregivers of children with a disorder of sex development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe-Christensen, Cortney; Fedele, David A; Mullins, Larry L; Lakshmanan, Yegappan; Wisniewski, Amy B

    2014-07-01

    To examine whether male and female caregivers of children with a disorder of sex development (DSD) differ in levels of anxious and depressive symptoms. Participants included 80 caregivers (40 males, 40 females) of 40 children with a DSD. Children were categorized based on illness characteristics including ambiguous genitalia, life-threatening, and life-threatening with ambiguous genitalia. Caregivers completed measures of anxious and depressive symptoms. A significant caregiver × diagnosis interaction for anxious symptoms emerged, with male caregivers of children with both ambiguous genitalia and a life-threatening condition reporting significantly lower levels of anxious symptoms than female caregivers of the same children. The findings are surprising because of the low level of anxious symptoms reported by male caregivers of children with a complex DSD. It is possible that they have disengaged themselves from the child and/or diagnosis, causing their female counterparts to take on more responsibility.

  10. Legal, ethical, and human rights considerations for physicians treating children with atypical or ambiguous genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Julie A

    2017-06-01

    Some governments, human rights organizations, intersex organizations, and doctors have called for a moratorium on genital and gonadal surgeries for infants born with atypical or ambiguous genitalia. Moratorium supporters believe that the surgeries carry physical and emotional risks, the psychosocial benefits of these procedures have not been proven, and the surgeries violate the patients׳ fundamental human rights if they are performed before these patients can provide informed consent. Given these calls for a moratorium, treatment teams must determine how to treat their patients and how to counsel their patients׳ parents. This article examines the treatment teams׳ ethical and legal responsibilities and provides advice for treatment teams to follow that will protect their patients and their practices. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. [The serum copper/serum iron ratio in malignant tumors of the female genitalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, D H; Hinckers, H J

    1975-08-01

    Copper and iron in blood of 83 women with maligne tumors of the genitalia were regulary controled before, during and till 69 weeks after therapy. The relation between the copper/iron-ratio and the expansion and histology of the tumors, the success of the therapy and the incidence of a recurrence was checked for any significancy. Our results show the improtance of the ratio in the diagnosis and differentialdiagnosis of the ovarian-cancer and the corpus-uteri-cancer, and in the success-controll during tumor-therapy. In the group of the patients with collum-uteri-cancer we found a significant difference in the copper/iron-ratio of the patients with and without a recurrence during the controllperiod after therapy, which emphasizes the importance of this copper/iron-ratio.

  12. A new subgenus and species of Topomyia (Diptera: Culicidae: Sabethini) based on a remarkable male mosquito from Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbach, Ralph E; Culverwell, C Lorna

    2014-05-08

    Miyagiella Harbach, subgen. nov., is introduced as a new subgenus of Topomyia Leicester for a remarkable male mosquito, Topomyia discors Harbach, sp. nov., from Sabah, Malaysia. A diagnosis of the subgenus is provided that features unique anatomical characters of the genitalia of the holotype male. Miyagiella is very distinct from the two previously recognised subgenera of Topomyia, but is perhaps more closely related to the nominotypical subgenus than to subgenus Suaymyia Thurman. Salient differences that distinguish the three subgenera are contrasted; the holotype male of To. discors is described and its unique genitalia are illustrated.

  13. Morphology of Mouse External Genitalia: Implications for a Role of Estrogen in Sexual Dimorphism of the Mouse Genital Tubercle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jennifer H.; Menshenina, Julia; Cunha, Gerald R.; Place, Ned; Baskin, Laurence S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We examined the role of androgens and estrogens in mammalian sexual differentiation by morphological characterization of adult wt and mutant mouse external genitalia. We tested the hypothesis that external genitalia development depends on androgen and estrogen action. Materials and Methods We studied serial sections of the external genitalia of the CD-1 and C57BL6 wt strains of adult mice (Charles River Laboratories, Wilmington, Massachusetts). We recorded linear measurements of key structures in each specimen, including the urethra, erectile tissue, bone and cartilage. We used similar methodology to analyze mice mutant for estrogen receptor α (αERKO) and androgen receptor (XTfm/Y) (Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine). Results Morphology in XTfm/Y adult murine external genitalia was remarkably similar to that in wt females. Bone and clitoral length was similar in wt females and XTfm/Y mice. Conversely the αERKO clitoris was 59% longer and bone length in αERKO females was many-fold longer than that in female wt mice or XTfm/Y mutants. The αERKO clitoris contained cartilage, which is typical of the wt penis but never observed in the wt clitoris. Serum testosterone was not increased in female αERKO mice 10 days postnatally when sex differentiation occurs, suggesting that masculinization of the αERKO clitoris is not a function of androgen. Conclusions Masculinization of the αERKO clitoris suggests a role for estrogen in the development of female external genitalia. We propose that normal external genital development requires androgen and estrogen action. PMID:20728117

  14. Surgical options in disorders of sex development (dsd) with ambiguous genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Isabelle; Gorduza, Daniela Brindusa; Haraux, Elodie; Gay, Claire-Lise; Chatelain, Pierre; Nicolino, Marc; Mure, Pierre-Yves; Mouriquand, Pierre

    2010-04-01

    Disorders of sexual development (DSD) include three main groups of patients: (1) The virilised 46,XX DSD essentially represented by congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) ; (2) The undervirilised 46,XY DSD essentially represented by hypospadias; and (3) the chromosomic jigsaws essentially represented by mixed gonadal dysgenesis. It is in this last group that gender assignment remains a difficult decision involving various indicators, which can be split into four categories: (1) the inside sex (i.e., genes, hormones and target tissues); (2) the outside sex (i.e., anatomy of genitalia including size of the genital tubercle, mullerian cavity and potential adult height of the patient); (3) the functional sex (i.e., potential sexuality and fertility); and (4) and the social sex (i.e., the cultural medium in which the child is brought up). The challenge is to outline the future individual identity of the child in the postnatal period using these indicators. Current evolutions of surgical techniques of 'feminisation' and 'masculinisation' are described as well as their outcomes.

  15. Long term follow-up of a child with ambiguous genitalia, mixed gonadal dysgenesis, and unusual mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrow, Vlady; De Luca, Francesco

    2009-09-01

    Mixed gonadal dysgenesis (MGD) is a condition of abnormal and asymmetrical gonadal development. This disorder is typically associated with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism; however, other karyotypes have been rarely reported. The phenotype characterizing MGD is highly variable, although in most cases ambiguous genitalia are found. In addition, many individuals with MGD exhibit stigmata of Turner's syndrome. We describe a patient with MGD, found to have a 45,X/47,XYY karyotype, with the majority of the cell lines being 47,XYY. To our knowledge, our report is the first to describe the long-term follow-up of a patient with ambiguous genitalia diagnosed at birth with 45,X/47,XYY mosaicism.

  16. Comparative anatomy of the female genitalia of generic-level taxa in tribe Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae). Part XXXVIII. Genus Petermattinglyius Reinert, Harbach and Kitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comparative, morphological analysis of the female genitalia of species of the genus Petermattinglyius Reinert, Harbach and Kitching was conducted and a composite description is provided. Petermattinglyius is divided into two subgenera, Petermattinglyius and Aglaonotus Reinert, Harbach and Kitchin...

  17. Development and biological function of the female gonads and genitalia in IGF-I deficiency -- Laron syndrome as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2006-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) or primary GH insensitivity is a unique human model to study the effects of congenital IGF-I deficiency. Within our cohort of 63 patients with LS, 15 female patients were regularly followed since birth or infancy, throughout puberty. We observed that they were short at birth, with small genitalia and gonads -- during puberty, developed delayed puberty but eventually reached between 16 and 19 1/2 years full sexual development. Reproduction is unaffected at a young adult age. It is concluded that IGF-I in concert with the sex hormones has a modulatory but not essential function on female sexual development and maturation.

  18. Penis size interacts with body shape and height to influence male attractiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Mautz, Brian S.; Wong, Bob B. M.; Peters, Richard A; Jennions, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Compelling evidence from many animal taxa indicates that male genitalia are often under postcopulatory sexual selection for characteristics that increase a male’s relative fertilization success. There could, however, also be direct precopulatory female mate choice based on male genital traits. Before clothing, the nonretractable human penis would have been conspicuous to potential mates. This observation has generated suggestions that human penis size partly evolved because of female choice. ...

  19. Lissencephaly, abnormal genitalia and refractory epilepsy: case report of XLAG syndrome Lisencefalia, genitália ambígua e epilepsia refratária: relato de caso da síndrome XLAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Jaques Spinosa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: X-linked lissencephaly with ambiguous genitalia (XLAG is a recently described genetic disorder caused by mutation in the aristaless-related homeobox (ARX gene (Xp22.13. Patients present with lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, refractory epilepsy of neonatal onset, acquired microcephaly and male genotype with ambiguous genitalia. CASE REPORT: Second child born to healthy nonconsanguineous parents, presented with seizures within the first hour of life that remained refractory to phenobarbital, phenytoin and midazolam. Examination identified microcephaly, axial hypotonia, pyramidal signs and ambiguous genitalia. EEG showed disorganized background activity and seizures starting at the right midtemporal, central and occipital regions. MRI showed diffuse pachygyria, moderate thickening of the cortex, enlarged ventricles, agenesis of the corpus callosum and septum pellucidum. Karyotype showed a 46,XY genotype. Additional findings were hypercalciuria, vesicoureteral reflux, patent ductus arteriosus and chronic diarrhea.INTRODUÇÃO: Lisencefalia com genitália ambígua ligada ao X (XLAG é doença genética recentemente descrita, causada por mutação no gene aristaless-related homeobox (ARX (Xp22.13. Os pacientes apresentam lisencefalia, agenesia de corpo caloso, epilepsia refratária com início no período neonatal, microcefalia adquirida e genótipo masculino com genitália ambígua. RELATO DE CASO: Segundo filho de pais não-consangüíneos, apresentou crises na primeira hora de vida que permaneceram refratárias a fenobarbital, fenitoína e midazolam. Apresentava microcefalia, hipotonia axial, sinais de liberação piramidal e genitália ambígua. EEG demonstrou atividade de base desorganizada, crises convulsivas com início nas regiões temporal-média, central e occipital direitas. RNM demonstrou paquigiria difusa, moderado espessamento do córtex, ventrículos aumentados, agenesia de corpo caloso e septo pel

  20. Evulvalution: the portrayal of women's external genitalia and physique across time and the current barbie doll ideals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Vanessa R; Rima, Brandi N; Calabrese, Sarah K

    2011-01-01

    Media images of the female body commonly represent reigning appearance ideals of the era in which they are published. To date, limited documentation of the genital appearance ideals in mainstream media exists. Analysis 1 sought to describe genital appearance ideals (i.e., mons pubis and labia majora visibility, labia minora size and color, and pubic hair style) and general physique ideals (i.e., hip, waist, and bust size, height, weight, and body mass index [BMI]) across time based on 647 Playboy Magazine centerfolds published between 1953 and 2007. Analysis 2 focused exclusively on the genital appearance ideals embodied by models in 185 Playboy photographs published between 2007 and 2008. Taken together, results suggest the perpetuation of a "Barbie Doll" ideal characterized by a low BMI, narrow hips, a prominent bust, and hairless, undefined genitalia resembling those of a prepubescent female.

  1. Differential Growth of the Reproductive Organs during the Peripubertal Period in Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Seung Hee; Lee, Sung-Ho

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, puberty is a process of acquiring reproductive competence, triggering by activation of hypothalamic kisspeptin (KiSS)-gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal circuit. During peripubertal period, not only the external genitalia but the internal reproductive organs have to be matured in response to the hormonal signals from hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (H-P-G) axis. In the present study, we evaluated the maturation of male rat accessory sex organs during the peripubertal pe...

  2. Coevolution of male and female genital morphology in waterfowl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L R Brennan

    Full Text Available Most birds have simple genitalia; males lack external genitalia and females have simple vaginas. However, male waterfowl have a phallus whose length (1.5->40 cm and morphological elaborations vary among species and are positively correlated with the frequency of forced extra-pair copulations among waterfowl species. Here we report morphological complexity in female genital morphology in waterfowl and describe variation vaginal morphology that is unprecedented in birds. This variation comprises two anatomical novelties: (i dead end sacs, and (ii clockwise coils. These vaginal structures appear to function to exclude the intromission of the counter-clockwise spiralling male phallus without female cooperation. A phylogenetically controlled comparative analysis of 16 waterfowl species shows that the degree of vaginal elaboration is positively correlated with phallus length, demonstrating that female morphological complexity has co-evolved with male phallus length. Intersexual selection is most likely responsible for the observed coevolution, although identifying the specific mechanism is difficult. Our results suggest that females have evolved a cryptic anatomical mechanism of choice in response to forced extra-pair copulations.

  3. [The use of restorative medicine technologies for the rehabilitation of the patients presenting with endometriosis of external genitalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, L V; Krutova, V A; Gordon, K V

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results of analysis of the psycho-emotional status and pain syndrome in the women presenting with endometriosis of external genitalia treated with a combination of hormonal preparations and balneotherapy. A total of 216 infertile patients were involved in the study. The duration of the infertility period varied from 1.5 to 19 years. All the patients underwent surgical intervention. The influence of rehabilitative therapy on the quantitative vital indices (psycho-emotional adaptation to the social environment and pain intensity) was estimated before and after the treatment. The patients were divided into 3 groups. Those of group 1 received an oral contraceptive (30 mcg of ethinylestradiol plus 2 mg dienogest) as a continuous three-cycle course (63 tablets) followed by its discontinuation for the 7 day menstrual period and the final three-cycle course (total duration of therapy 6 months). The patients of group 2 were treated with injections of agonists of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) at a dose of 3.75 mg once every 4 weeks (total duration 6 months). In group 3, the injections of GnRH agonists (3.75 mg once every 4 weeks, total duration 6 months) were combined with a course of balneotherapy using radon. All the three rehabilitative modalities produced a well-apparent positive effect. Chronic pelvic pain before treatment was reported by 90,3% of the patients. After the treatment, the number of such women in groups 1, 2, and 3 decreased to 20,8%, 12,5%, and 30,6% respectively Dyspareunia in the pre-treatment period was diagnosed in 66,7% of the patients. After treatment, this pathology persisted only in 23,6%, 18,1%, and 31,9% of the patients in groups 1, 2, and 3 respectively. Psycho-emotional disorders before treatment were documented in 90,3% of the patients compared with 27,8%, 25%, and 30,6% after therapy. It is concluded that all the three therapeutic modalities markedly improved health conditions of the patients presenting with

  4. Should male gender assignment be considered in the markedly virilized patient With 46,XX and congenital adrenal hyperplasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter A; Houk, Christopher P; Husmann, Douglas A

    2010-10-01

    We assess the outcome in 46,XX men with congenital adrenal hyperplasia who were born with Prader 4 or 5 genitalia and assigned male gender at birth. After receiving institutional review board approval and subject consent we reviewed the medical records of 12 men 35 to 69 years old with 46,XX congenital adrenal hyperplasia, of whom 6 completed social and gender issue questionnaires. All subjects were assigned male gender at birth, were diagnosed with virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia at age greater than 3 years and indicated a male gender identity with sexual orientation to females. Ten of the 12 subjects had always lived as male and 2 who were reassigned to female gender in childhood subsequently self-reassigned as male. Nine of the 12 men had long-term female partners, including 7 married 12 years or more. The 3 subjects without a long-term female partner included 1 priest, 1 who was reassigned female gender, married, divorced and self-reassigned as male, and 1 with a girlfriend and sexual activity. All except the priest and the subject who was previously married when female indicated a strong libido and frequent orgasmic sexual activity. Responses to self-esteem, masculinity, body image, social adjustment and symptom questionnaires suggested adjustments related to the extent of familial and social support. Outcome data on severely masculinized 46,XX patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia who were assigned male gender at birth indicate male gender identity in adulthood with satisfactory male sexual function in those retaining male genitalia. In men who completed questionnaires results were poorer in those lacking familial/social support. Male gender of rearing may be a viable option for parents whose children are born with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, a 46,XX karyotype and male genitalia, although positive parental and other support, and counseling are needed for adjustment. Copyright © 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research

  5. Season effect on genitalia and epididymal sperm from Iberian red deer, roe deer and Cantabrian chamois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Pastor, Felipe; Guerra, Camino; Kaabi, Mohammed; Garcia-Macias, Vanesa; de Paz, Paulino; Alvarez, M; Herraez, Paz; Anel, Luis

    2005-04-15

    Seasonality deeply affects the physiology and behavior of many species, and must be taken into account when biological resource banks (BRBs) are established. We have studied the effect of seasonality on many reproductive parameters of free-ranging Iberian red deer, roe deer and Cantabrian chamois, living in Spain. Testicles from hunted animals were collected and sent to our laboratory at different times during the year. We recorded the weight and volume of testis, the weight of the epididymis and its separate parts (caput, corpus, and cauda), the weight of the sperm sample collected from the cauda epididymis, and several sperm parameters (sperm concentration, spermatozoa recovered, motility, HOS test reactivity, acrosomal status, and viability). We studied the data according to several periods, defined accordingly to each species. For red deer, we defined rut (mid-September to mid-October), post-rut (mid-October to mid-December), and non-breeding season (February). For roe deer, they were pre-rut (June), rut (July), post-rut (first fortnight of August), and non-breeding season (September). For chamois: non-breeding season (June to mid-September) and breeding season (October-November). The rut/breeding season yielded significantly higher numbers for almost all parameters. However, in the case of red deer, sperm quality was higher in the post-rut. For roe deer, testicular weight was similar in the pre-rut and in the rut, and sperm quality did not differ significantly between these two periods, although we noticed higher values in the rut. In the case of chamois, sperm quality did not differ significantly from the breeding season, but data distribution suggested that in the non-breeding season there are less males with sperm of good quality. On the whole, we find these results of interest for BRB planning. The best season to collect sperm in this species would be the breeding season. However, post-rut in red deer, pre-rut in roe deer, and non-breeding season in

  6. Effect of breeding activity on the microflora of the external genitalia and in the semen of stallions, and the relationship between micro-organisms on the skin and on the external genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, T; Miranda, C; Pinto, M; Silva, E; Damásio, L; Costa, A L; Correia, M J; Duarte, J C; Cosinha, C; Lopes, G; Thompson, G; Rocha, A

    2014-12-01

    A possible role of breeding activities in the composition of the microbial population in stallions' external genitalia (EG) and the relationship between micro-organisms colonizing the skin of the abdomen and the ones colonizing the EG have not been studied. In experiment 1, EG microbiological samples were collected from 41 stallions used for both natural cover and semen collection (BST) and from 18 non-breeding stallions (NBST). A higher (p micro-organisms isolated from the EG were present in semen, albeit with a numerically lower prevalence. In 7 stallions, six microbial species isolated from semen were absent from the EG cultures, suggesting contamination by the operator. In experiment 3, a numerically higher number of micro-organism species was isolated from the EG of 31 stallions, than from their skin of the ventral abdomen in contact with the penis or from the skin of the thorax. With the sole exception of Escherichia coli, potentially pathogenic bacteria were only isolated from the EG but not from the skin. Results suggest that breeding activity increased the number of species colonizing the EG; most species isolated from the EG were also found in semen even if with a lower frequency, and additional semen contamination seemed to occur during its manipulation. Many micro-organism species of the skin were also isolated from the penis, but independently of being or not in contact with the penis, skin did not seem to provide an adequate environment for the growth of potentially pathogenic bacteria that were isolated from EG, with the sole exception for E. coli.

  7. Two new species of Tribonium Saussure, 1862 (Blattodea, Blaberidae, Zetoborinae), with a key to males of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Leonardo de Oliveira Cardoso; Lopes, Sonia Maria

    2015-01-01

    This contribution describes and illustrates the male genitalia of two new species of Blaberidae collected in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil: Triboniumcaldensis sp. n. resembles Triboniumneospectrum Lopes, 1978, differing in the coloration, size and genitalia; and Triboniummorroferrensis sp. n., which resembles Triboniumguttulosum (Walker, 1868) but also differs in the size and coloration of specimen and genital pieces morphology. The genital plates were removed after dissection of the posterior part of the abdomen, and were stored in microvials containing glycerin, attached to the respective exemplar in the collection of the Museu Nacional of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A key to males of the species of the genus is also presented. Illustrations of Triboniumneospectrum and Triboniumguttulosum are provided to clarify the comparisons with the new species described here.

  8. The structure and musculature of male terminalia in the tribe Xanthorhoini Pierce and related tribes (Lepidoptera: Geometridae: Larentiinae), with particular reference to the Palaearctic and Australian regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The musculature of the male genitalia was reviewed for the tribe Xanthorhoini and related tribes (Lepidoptera, Geometridae, Larentiinae). The genitalia morphology of males of 11 species was discussed and illustrated, and nine paired and unpaired genital muscles identified. Muscles m1, m2(10), m5(7), m6(5), m7(6), m8(3) and m21 have similar position in all species considered in the paper. Comparative morphology of the male terminalia and position of extensors of the valvae m3(2) and flexors m4 confirmed the previously uncertain separation of Euphyiini and Scotopterygini. Cataclysmini share musculature characters with the tribe Xanthorhoini. The generic affiliation of Xanthorhoe biriviata (Borkhausen) is questionable considering an unusual location of muscles m4. Generally, the places of attachment of the muscles m3(2) and m4 to the sclerites afford valuable characters for the higher classification of this group.

  9. Male Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the urethra. Chromosome defects. Inherited disorders such as Klinefelter's syndrome — in which a male is born with ... or major abdominal or pelvic surgery Having a history of undescended testicles Being born with a fertility ...

  10. SEX DETERMINATION. A male-determining factor in the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Andrew Brantley; Basu, Sanjay; Jiang, Xiaofang; Qi, Yumin; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Biedler, James K; Sharakhova, Maria V; Elahi, Rubayet; Anderson, Michelle A E; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Sharakhov, Igor V; Adelman, Zach N; Tu, Zhijian

    2015-06-12

    Sex determination in the mosquito Aedes aegypti is governed by a dominant male-determining factor (M factor) located within a Y chromosome-like region called the M locus. Here, we show that an M-locus gene, Nix, functions as an M factor in A. aegypti. Nix exhibits persistent M linkage and early embryonic expression, two characteristics required of an M factor. Nix knockout with clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 resulted in largely feminized genetic males and the production of female isoforms of two key regulators of sexual differentiation: doublesex and fruitless. Ectopic expression of Nix resulted in genetic females with nearly complete male genitalia. Thus, Nix is both required and sufficient to initiate male development. This study provides a foundation for mosquito control strategies that convert female mosquitoes into harmless males.

  11. Male sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Terrie B

    2010-05-01

    It should be recognized that sexuality in the aging male is of such import that a complete sexual history must be performed. By taking a complete sexual history, facts can be obtained that will allow for appropriate focus relating to a holistic evaluation and will enable us to dispel antiquated sexual myths pertaining to the aging male. If initiated by the history taker, questions concerning sexuality may be discussed more comfortably by the patient. Erectile dysfunction, male sexual response cycle, testosterone, sexually transmitted diseases, human immunodeficiency virus, long-term illness, along with religion and culture are explored in this article with the aim of improving one's knowledge base, self reflection, and awareness of the importance of male sexuality. A complete understanding and appreciation of the aging male's medical history, surgical history, social history, and emotional history as well as his sexual, cultural, and religious concepts will allow the health care provider to better analyze information, and to recommend and provide appropriate advice and treatment to the aging male patient.

  12. Sexual conflict over mating in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis) as indicated by experimental manipulation of genitalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Christopher R.; Uhrig, Emily J.; Squire, Mattie K.; Mason, Robert T.; Brennan, Patricia L. R.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual conflict over mating can result in sex-specific morphologies and behaviours that allow each sex to exert control over the outcome of reproduction. Genital traits, in particular, are often directly involved in conflict interactions. Via genital manipulation, we experimentally investigated whether genital traits in red-sided garter snakes influence copulation duration and formation of a copulatory plug. The hemipenes of male red-sided garter snakes have a large basal spine that inserts into the female cloaca during mating. We ablated the spine and found that males were still capable of copulation but copulation duration was much shorter and copulatory plugs were smaller than those produced by intact males. We also anaesthetized the female cloacal region and found that anaesthetized females copulated longer than control females, suggesting that female cloacal and vaginal contractions play a role in controlling copulation duration. Both results, combined with known aspects of the breeding biology of red-sided garter snakes, strongly support the idea that sexual conflict is involved in mating interactions in this species. Our results demonstrate the complex interactions among male and female traits generated by coevolutionary processes in a wild population. Such complexity highlights the importance of simultaneous examination of male and female traits. PMID:24225467

  13. Male Hypogonadism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of male hypogonadism can be treated with testosterone replacement therapy. Symptoms Hypogonadism can begin during fetal development, before puberty or during adulthood. Signs and symptoms depend on when the condition ... enough testosterone during fetal development, the result may be impaired ...

  14. Sphincter-preserving RO total mesorectal excision with resection of internal genitalia combined with pre- or postoperative chemoradiation for T4 rectal cancer in females

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bartlomiej Szynglarewicz; Rafal Matkowski; Piotr Kasprzak; Daniel Sydor; Jozef Forgacz; Marek Pudelko; Jan Kornafel

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of chemoradiation administered pre- or postoperatively on prognosis in females following RO extended resection with sphincterpreserving total mesorectal excision (TME) for locally advanced rectal cancer and to assess the association between chemoradiation and intra- and postoperative variables.METHODS: Twenty-one females were treated for locally advanced but preoperatively assessed as primarily resectable rectal cancer involving reproductive organs. Anterior resection with TME and excision of internal genitalia was combined with neo- or adjuvant chemoradiation. Two-year disease-free survival analysis was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and logrank test. The association between chemoradiation and other variables was evaluated with the Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney test.RESULTS: Survival rate decreased in anaemic females (51.5% vs 57.4%), in patients older than 60 years (41.8% vs 66.7%) with poorly differentiated cancers (50.0% vs 55.6%) and tumors located ≤ 7 cm from the anal verge (42.9% vs 68.1%) but with the lack of importance. Patients with negative lymph nodes and women chemoradiated preoperatively had significantly favourable prognosis (85.7% vs 35.7%; P= 0.03 and 80.0% vs 27.3%; P = 0.01, respectively). Preoperative chemoradiation compared to adjuvant radiochemotherapy was not significantly associated with the duration of surgery, incidence of intraoperative bowel perforation and blood loss ≥ 1 L, rate of postoperative bladder and anorectal dysfunction, and minimal distal resection margin. It significantly influenced minimal radial margin (mean 4.2 mm vs 1.1 mm; P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Despite involving internal genitalia, long-term disease-free survival and sphincter preservation may be achieved with combined-modality therapy for females with T4 locally advanced rectal carcinoma. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation does not compromise functional results and may significantly improve oncological outcomes probably due to

  15. Shape--but not size--codivergence between male and female copulatory structures in Onthophagus beetles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L M Macagno

    Full Text Available Genitalia are among the fastest evolving morphological traits in arthropods. Among the many hypotheses aimed at explaining this observation, some explicitly or implicitly predict concomitant male and female changes of genital traits that interact during copulation (i.e., lock and key, sexual conflict, cryptic female choice and pleiotropy. Testing these hypotheses requires insights into whether male and female copulatory structures that physically interact during mating also affect each other's evolution and patterns of diversification. Here we compare and contrast size and shape evolution of male and female structures that are known to interact tightly during copulation using two model systems: (a the sister species O. taurus (1 native, 3 recently established populations and O. illyricus, and (b the species-complex O. fracticornis-similis-opacicollis. Partial Least Squares analyses indicated very little to no correlation between size and shape of copulatory structures, both in males and females. Accordingly, comparing shape and size diversification patterns of genitalia within each sex showed that the two components diversify readily--though largely independently of each other--within and between species. Similarly, comparing patterns of divergence across sexes showed that relative sizes of male and female copulatory organs diversify largely independent of each other. However, performing this analysis for genital shape revealed a signature of parallel divergence. Our results therefore suggest that male and female copulatory structures that are linked mechanically during copulation may diverge in concert with respect to their shapes. Furthermore, our results suggest that genital divergence in general, and co-divergence of male and female genital shape in particular, can evolve over an extraordinarily short time frame. Results are discussed in the framework of the hypotheses that assume or predict concomitant evolutionary changes in male and

  16. Coevolution of female and male genital components to avoid genital size mismatches in sexually dimorphic spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupše, Nik; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2016-08-17

    In most animal groups, it is unclear how body size variation relates to genital size differences between the sexes. While most morphological features tend to scale with total somatic size, this does not necessarily hold for genitalia because divergent evolution in somatic size between the sexes would cause genital size mismatches. Theory predicts that the interplay of female-biased sexual size dimorphism (SSD) and sexual genital size dimorphism (SGD) should adhere to the 'positive genital divergence', the 'constant genital divergence', or the 'negative genital divergence' model, but these models remain largely untested. We test their validity in the spider family Nephilidae known for the highest degrees of SSD among terrestrial animals. Through comparative analyses of sex-specific somatic and genital sizes, we first demonstrate that 99 of the 351 pairs of traits are phylogenetically correlated. Through factor analyses we then group these traits for MCMCglmm analyses that test broader correlation patterns, and these reveal significant correlations in 10 out of the 36 pairwise comparisons. Both types of analyses agree that female somatic and internal genital sizes evolve independently. While sizes of non-intromittent male genital parts coevolve with male body size, the size of the intromittent male genital parts is independent of the male somatic size. Instead, male intromittent genital size coevolves with female (external and, in part, internal) genital size. All analyses also agree that SGD and SSD evolve independently. Internal dimensions of female genitalia evolve independently of female body size in nephilid spiders, and similarly, male intromittent genital size evolves independently of the male body size. The size of the male intromittent organ (the embolus) and the sizes of female internal and external genital components thus seem to respond to selection against genital size mismatches. In accord with these interpretations, we reject the validity of the

  17. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 10. Injuries of the Eye, Ear, Nose, Abdomen, Central Nervous System and Genitalia. Burns and Environmental Injuries. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This training manual for emergency medical technicians, one of 14 modules that comprise the Emergency Victim Care textbook, covers injuries of the eyes, ears, nose, abdomen, central nervous system (CNS), and genitalia; burns; and environmental injuries. Objectives stated for the two chapters are for the student to be able to describe procedures…

  18. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 10. Injuries of the Eye, Ear, Nose, Abdomen, Central Nervous System and Genitalia. Burns and Environmental Injuries. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This training manual for emergency medical technicians, one of 14 modules that comprise the Emergency Victim Care textbook, covers injuries of the eyes, ears, nose, abdomen, central nervous system (CNS), and genitalia; burns; and environmental injuries. Objectives stated for the two chapters are for the student to be able to describe procedures…

  19. Description of the males of Lincus singularis and Lincus incisus (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae: Discocephalinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline S. Maciel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Neotropical Lincus Stål, 1867 includes 35 species, thirteen of which are known only from females. Several species are vectors of Phytomonas staheli McGhee & McGhee, 1979, a trypanosomatid parasitic in palm-trees in South America that causes hart-rot, sudden and slow wilt diseases. The hitherto unknown males of L. singularis Rolston, 1983 ("swollen head" species group found in the oil palm Elaeis guineensis Jacq., and L. incisus Rolston, 1983 ("hatchet-lobed" species group; found in the coconut tree Cocos nucifera L., are described with emphasis on the morphology of the genitalia, and taxonomic remarks are provided. Males of L. singularis can be distinguished from other species included in "swollen head" group by their pronotal lobes with anterior and posterior margins subparallel and projected laterally from the eye margin, while males of L. incisus can be distinguished from the species of the "swollen head" group by an obtuse projection with a deepest incision and several additional diagnostic characters of the genitalia.

  20. Review of Outcome Information in 46,XX Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Assigned/Reared Male: What Does It Say about Gender Assignment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee PeterA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available There is ample historical verification of 46,XX congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH patients being born with essentially male genitaliawhile outcome information is scant. Prior to glucocorticoid therapy, most patients died very young from adrenal insufficiency. Most available reports from laterchildhood, contain little information concerning sexual identity. Reports on older individuals lack adequate information about sexual identity and quality of life. The difficulty in assessing the relative impact of multiple dynamic environmental factors on the development of sexual identity, self- and body esteem and overall adjustment to life is clear. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether those infants whose masculine genitalia at birth resulted in an initial male assignment would have enjoyed a better adult outcome had they been allowed to remain male rather than the female reassignment that most received. Further, one could ask whether a male sex of rearing should be considered in 46,XX CAH infants with male external genitalia. After reviewing available literature, we conclude that because those extremely virlized 46,XX CAH patients who were reared male with healthy social support demonstrated satisfactory levels of social and sexual function as adults a male sex assignment should be considered in these types of infants when social and cultural environment are supportive.

  1. Review of Outcome Information in 46,XX Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Assigned/Reared Male: What Does It Say about Gender Assignment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter A; Houk, Christopher P

    2010-01-01

    There is ample historical verification of 46,XX congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) patients being born with essentially male genitaliawhile outcome information is scant. Prior to glucocorticoid therapy, most patients died very young from adrenal insufficiency. Most available reports from laterchildhood, contain little information concerning sexual identity. Reports on older individuals lack adequate information about sexual identity and quality of life. The difficulty in assessing the relative impact of multiple dynamic environmental factors on the development of sexual identity, self- and body esteem and overall adjustment to life is clear. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether those infants whose masculine genitalia at birth resulted in an initial male assignment would have enjoyed a better adult outcome had they been allowed to remain male rather than the female reassignment that most received. Further, one could ask whether a male sex of rearing should be considered in 46,XX CAH infants with male external genitalia. After reviewing available literature, we conclude that because those extremely virlized 46,XX CAH patients who were reared male with healthy social support demonstrated satisfactory levels of social and sexual function as adults a male sex assignment should be considered in these types of infants when social and cultural environment are supportive.

  2. Male Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Esenyel

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis in men is now recognized as an increasingly important public health issue. About 30 % of hip fractures and 20 % of vertebral fractures occur in men. In the present study, we examined 19 men who did not have major risk factors that might affect bone mass. Parathormone(PTH, osteocalcin (marker of bone formation, OC and deoxypyridinoline (marker of bone resorption, DPD were measured. The bone mineral density (BMD measurements in 16 men were performed by dual-energy X-ray absorbtiometry (DXA from lumbar spine (L2-4, and left hip. Bone density at each site was categorized as osteoporosis or osteopenia according to World Health Organization (WHO criteria. In 19 patients with a mean age of 69 years, PTH levels were in the normal range except one patient. OC levels were elevated in %42.1 and DPD levels were elevated in 74 % of patients. L2-4 T score was osteoporotic (25% in 4 patients and osteopenic (25% in 4 patients. Femur Ward’s T score was osteoporotic (37.5% in 7 patients and osteopenic (37.5% in 7 patients. Osteoporosis is a significant problem in older men. Increased awareness for the risk factors of male osteoporosis is an important issue. Early diagnosis and treatment would help to reduce morbidity and mortality resulting from osteoporotic fractures.

  3. The function of female resistance behavior: Intromission by male coercion vs. female cooperation in sepsid flies (Diptera: Sepsidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Eberhard

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo intenta organizar algunas ideas teóricas sobre posibles conflictos entre machos y hembras en cuanto a la cópula. Las ideas se ilustran con datos nuevos de una familia de moscas (Sepsidae, y con otros datos ya publicados sobre otros insectos. El hecho de que una hembra opone resistencia a la penetración por el macho no implica en sí mismo que la cópula es forzada, ya que la resistencia de la hembra también puede funcionar como una prueba del macho, para así tamizar entre diferentes machos y conseguir hijos superiores. Se contrastan dos hipótesis para el macho, la de la cópula por coerción vs. la de la cópula por persuasión; también se contrastan, desde la perspectiva de la hembra, dos hipóteses relacionadas, la resistencia para evitar a todo macho en forma no selectiva vs. la resistencia para tamizar entre machos. Cuando la morfología de la genitalia de los dos sexos es tal que el macho no es físicamente capaz de forzar la intromisión, como es el caso en las moscas sépsidas y probablemente en muchos otros insectos (a pesar de algunas publicaciones que sugieren lo contrario, las hipótesis contrastantes para cada sexo pueden resolverse con datos sobre el contexto ecológico en el cual ocurre la interacción macho-hembra. Se realizó un análisis de esta clase con los sépsidos. Parece más probable que la resistencia energética que la hembra pone al macho sea un esfuerzo para tamizar entre machos que un esfuerzo para evitar la cópula en forma no selectivaFemale resistance behavior that occurs prior to intromission does not by itself imply forced copulation. Such behavior may function instead as a test of the male in order to favor some males over others, or to induce the male to desist. Thus, male persistence and forcefulness may sometimes be better described as persuasion rather than coercion. Under the persuasion hypothesis, the male only gains intromission due to an active response of the female. Under the

  4. Description of male, pupa and larva of Psorophora (Grabhamia) paulli and redescription of the female (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Marina; Carlos Rossi, Gustavo; Ricardo Almirón, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The female of Psorophora (Grabhamia) paulli Paterson & Shannon is redescribed, and the pupa, fourth-instar larva and male genitalia are described and illustrated for the first time. Information about the distribution, bionomics and taxonomy is also included. Adults of Ps. paulli can be separated from the other species of the genus and subgenus by its small size. The larva of Ps. paulli is similar to that of Ps. varinervis Edwards and Ps. discolor (Coquillett) but can be separated based on the development of setae 1-X and 5-VIII, the length of the anal papillae and the comb on a sclerotized area.

  5. Re- reconstructive surgery in failure of genitoplasty in male-to-female transsexuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamyar Tavakkoli Tabassi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various surgical procedures were described for the correction of the external genitalia in male-to-female transsexualism. In all these methods complications such as vaginal stenosis, unpleasant appearance of external genitalia and lack of consent are seen. This paper describes a method of surgery for repair of these complications and success rate of this surgery.Methods: Reconstructive surgery was performed by one surgeon in 16 patients from 2009 to 2011 in Imam Reza Hospital of Mashhad. Mean age 25.75 years of age from 21 to 31 years. Due to the condition of each patient appropriate reconstructive surgery was performed. These surgeries include: clitoroplasty, inverted U flap, labioplasty, urethroplasty, removal of excess skin and increasing depth of vagina. After the surgery, the patients admitted for complete bed rest up to 5 days. They received postoperative prophylaxis medication for anti-thromboembolic events.Results: Only 3 complications were seen in all 16 patients. One hematoma of surgery site, one infection of surgery site and a blood transfusion. Eleven patients had history of vaginoplasty using small intestine and 10 patients with penile and perineal skin. From 3 to 24 months follow up after discharge were done, no patient had a major complication in long-term follow up and were generally satisfied with their sexual intercourse.Conclusion: This study has some limitations. Follow-up of the patients was performed for about one year that longer follow-up for these patients is favorable. Also, evaluation of patients' satisfaction from their intercourse was not performed as systematically with using an standard questionnaire and by a person who is blind to the study. Using this method of restoring external genitalia in the hands of expert surgeon, aesthetic and functional result would be expected very well.

  6. [Male contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, A

    1984-04-01

    Among the reasons why male hormonal contraception has lagged behind female methods are the necessity of preserving virility, the fact that spermatogenesis is a continuous process, the need to control secondary effects and toxicity, and the requirement that modes of administration be acceptable to both partners. Among currently available reversible mehtods, withdrawal is undoubtedly the most ancient. It is still widespread but cannot be recommended because of its limited effectiveness. The condom is used by about 10% of couples worldwide as a principal or temporary method, but its inter-ference with sensation has limited its acceptance. Condoms are nevertheless highly effective when used with a spermicide. Various androgens are currently under investigation. High doses of testosterone can induce azoospermia without affecting libido but their side effects may be serious. The use of combinations of steroids permits doses to be reduced and offers promise for the future. The combination of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate and percutaneous testosterone is one of the better approaches; the combination is effective and nontoxic but has the disadvantage of percutaneous administration. Gossypol, a pigment extracted from the cotton plant, has been used as a contraceptive in China with a reported efficacy of 99.89%, recovery of fertility within 3 months, and no effect on future fertility. However, its toxicity appears to be significant in the animal and its reversibility is uncertain. A search is on for analogs which would preserve the contraceptive effects while eliminating toxic effects. Several gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs under investigation for their interference with spermatogenesis have given promising results. Several chemicals tested for contraceptive effects have had unacceptably high toxicity. Chinese investigators have reported good results with various physical methods of interfering with sperm production, but their reversibility and innocuity

  7. Repeated evolution of male sacrifice behavior in spiders correlated with genital mutilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeremy A

    2007-06-01

    According to sexual cannibalism theory, male complicity in terminal mating can be adaptive when the male's future reproductive value is low relative to the benefits of self sacrifice. Spiders and insects that exhibit male sacrifice behavior (either complicity in cannibalism or spontaneous death associated with copulation) often also have male genitalia that stereotypically become broken or disfigured the first time they are used for copulation, potentially lowering his future reproductive value. Theoretical work on monogamy has identified male bias in the effective sex ratio as a precursor to the evolution of monogamy (including male sacrifice) as an adaptive form of paternity protection. Using phylogeny-based statistics and drawing on several phylogenetic studies of araneoid spiders, I investigate relationships between male sacrifice behavior, genital mutilation, extreme sexual size dimorphism, and the accumulation of multiple males in the female web (as an indicator of a male-based effective sex ratio). This investigation focuses on araneoid spiders because several independent origins of sacrifice behavior are known for this group and the phylogenetic structure of the lineage is relatively well studied. I report that male genital mutilation is significantly correlated with sacrifice behavior and argue that this finding is consistent with sexual cannibalism theory. Male sacrifice behavior is also correlated with male accumulation, a result that is consistent with theoretical work on the evolution of monogamy. Male accumulation and extreme sexual size dimorphism are correlated suggesting that sex-based differences in maturation time can lead to a male biased effective sex ratio. Similar patterns of correlated characters may hold for some insect taxa. Studying traits that have appeared independently in multiple lineages is a powerful method for developing general theories about the evolution of biological phenomena.

  8. Male pattern baldness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alopecia in men; Baldness - male; Hair loss in men; Androgenetic alopecia ... Male pattern baldness is related to your genes and male sex hormones. It usually follows a pattern of receding hairline and ...

  9. Male genital mutilation (amputation) and its complications: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaggwa, Sam; Galukande, Moses

    2014-08-12

    Genital losses from ritual attacks are often reported in the media and often discussed in the social media but are hardly reported in medical literature. Male genital mutilation (MGM) refers to permanent modification of the external genitalia that involves ablation of genital tissues.When found, it is usually as a consequence of poor circumcision skills, auto mutilation/castration or genital injuries caused by attacks or accidents. Male circumcision on its own is widely regarded as a rather safe and acceptable practice which is known to have some health benefits and in keeping with several religious customs as rite of passage. Outside of professional performed circumcision, MGM is usually associated with dark arts and malicious intentions like witchcraft or as a consequence of torture of prisoners of war for information. In this case we describe a 5-year old Ugandan boy who had his genitals mutilated in bizarre circumstances within a ritual attack. He survived and a urethrostomy was fashioned. There is need to document more of these cases in order to gather enough information to inform prevention and treatment strategies. Issues of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) and possible sex change require much debate. These genital sex changing operations should preferably be avoided until a child can fully participate in decision making.

  10. Changes in Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) throughout the Life Span: A Population-Based Study of 1027 Healthy Males from Birth (Cord Blood) to the Age of 69 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglæde, Lise; Sørensen, K; Boas, Malene

    2010-01-01

    Context: Anti-Mu¨ llerian hormone (AMH), which is secreted by immature Sertoli cells, triggers the involution of the fetalMu¨ llerian ducts.AMHis a testis-specific marker used for diagnosis in infants with ambiguous genitalia or bilateral cryptorchidism. Aim: The aim of the study was to describe...... the ontogeny of AMH secretion through life in healthy males. Setting:This was a population-based study of healthy volunteers. Participants: Participants included 1027 healthy males from birth (cord blood) to 69 yr. A subgroup was followed up longitudinally through the infantile minipuberty [(in cord blood...

  11. Male genital morphology and its influence on female mating preferences and paternity success in guppies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clelia Gasparini

    Full Text Available In internally fertilizing species male genitalia often show a higher degree of elaboration than required for simply transferring sperm to females. Among the hypotheses proposed to explain such diversity, sexual selection has received the most empirical support, with studies revealing that genital morphology can be targeted by both pre-and postcopulatory sexual selection. Until now, most studies have focused on these two episodes of selection independently. Here, we take an alternative approach by considering both components simultaneously in the livebearing fish, Poecilia reticulata. We allowed females to mate successively (and cooperatively with two males and determined whether male genital length influenced the female's propensity to mate with a male (precopulatory selection, via female choice and whether male genital size and shape predicted the relative paternity share of subsequent broods (postcopulatory selection, via sperm competition/cryptic female choice. We found no evidence that either episode of sexual selection targets male genital size or shape. These findings, in conjunction with our recent work exposing a role of genital morphology in mediating unsolicited (forced matings in guppies, further supports our prior speculation that sexual conflict may be an important broker of genital evolution in this species.

  12. DNA barcoding and male genital morphology reveal five new cryptic species in the West Palearctic bee Seladonia smaragdula (Vachal, 1895) (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Halictidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Alain; Devalez, Jelle; Sonet, Gontran; Nagy, Zoltán Tamás; Boevé, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-29

    Several forms or variants have long been recognized in the West Palearctic sweat bee Seladonia smaragdula (Vachal, 1895). Using DNA barcoding and morphological characters, primarily of the male genitalia, these variants are here recognized and described as five new species: S. gemmella Pauly sp. nov., S. submediterranea Pauly sp. nov., S. orientana Pauly & Devalez sp. nov., S. phryganica Pauly & Devalez sp. nov., and S. cretella Pauly & Devalez sp. nov. Also, we designate a lectotype for Halictus smaragdulus Vachal, consider Seladonia butea (Warncke, 1975) and S. morinella (Warncke, 1975) as nomina dubia, and discuss the identity of the Seladonia specimens from Australia currently determined as S. smaragdula.

  13. Papular acantholytic dyskeratosis localized to the perineal and perianal area in a young male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam B Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Papular acantholytic dermatosis restricted to the perianal area is being reported in a 26 year old male without involvement of the genitalia, groin and upper thighs for the first time in English literature. The patient presented with long standing grayish white confluent papules with eroded areas in the perianal region which were asymptomatic for a long time before the area got macerated. He did not respond to many weeks of topical steroids but is now showing improvement with topical tacrolimus ointment 0.1% applied twice daily. This entity appears to be very uncommon and also underreported. It is also suggested that this entity be included in the long list of non venereal anogenital lesions as it may mimic perianal warts or molluscum contagiosum.

  14. Penis size interacts with body shape and height to influence male attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautz, Brian S; Wong, Bob B M; Peters, Richard A; Jennions, Michael D

    2013-04-23

    Compelling evidence from many animal taxa indicates that male genitalia are often under postcopulatory sexual selection for characteristics that increase a male's relative fertilization success. There could, however, also be direct precopulatory female mate choice based on male genital traits. Before clothing, the nonretractable human penis would have been conspicuous to potential mates. This observation has generated suggestions that human penis size partly evolved because of female choice. Here we show, based upon female assessment of digitally projected life-size, computer-generated images, that penis size interacts with body shape and height to determine male sexual attractiveness. Positive linear selection was detected for penis size, but the marginal increase in attractiveness eventually declined with greater penis size (i.e., quadratic selection). Penis size had a stronger effect on attractiveness in taller men than in shorter men. There was a similar increase in the positive effect of penis size on attractiveness with a more masculine body shape (i.e., greater shoulder-to-hip ratio). Surprisingly, larger penis size and greater height had almost equivalent positive effects on male attractiveness. Our results support the hypothesis that female mate choice could have driven the evolution of larger penises in humans. More broadly, our results show that precopulatory sexual selection can play a role in the evolution of genital traits.

  15. [Male urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, TA de; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2008-01-01

    *Urinary incontinence in males is gaining increasingly more attention. *Male urinary incontinence can be classified as storage incontinence due to overactive bladder syndrome or stress incontinence due to urethral sphincter dysfunction. *Most patients benefit from the currently available treatment o

  16. Male pattern baldness (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male pattern baldness is a sex-linked characteristic that is passed from mother to child. A man can more accurately predict his chances of developing male pattern baldness by observing his mother's father than by looking ...

  17. Integrated proteomics and metabolomics analysis of rat testis: Mechanism of arsenic-induced male reproductive toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingyu; Luo, Lianzhong; Alamdar, Ambreen; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Liangpo; Tian, Meiping; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Shen, Heqing

    2016-09-02

    Arsenic is a widespread metalloid in environment, whose exposure has been associated with a broad spectrum of toxic effects. However, a global view of arsenic-induced male reproductive toxicity is still lack, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Our results revealed that arsenic exposure decreased testosterone level and reduced sperm quality in rats. By conducting an integrated proteomics and metabolomics analysis, the present study aims to investigate the global influence of arsenic exposure on the proteome and metabolome in rat testis. The abundance of 70 proteins (36 up-regulated and 34 down-regulated) and 13 metabolites (8 increased and 5 decreased) were found to be significantly altered by arsenic treatment. Among these, 19 proteins and 2 metabolites were specifically related to male reproductive system development and function, including spermatogenesis, sperm function and fertilization, fertility, internal genitalia development, and mating behavior. It is further proposed that arsenic mainly impaired spermatogenesis and fertilization via aberrant modulation of these male reproduction-related proteins and metabolites, which may be mediated by the ERK/AKT/NF-κB-dependent signaling pathway. Overall, these findings will aid our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for arsenic-induced male reproductive toxicity, and from such studies useful biomarkers indicative of arsenic exposure could be discovered.

  18. Integrated proteomics and metabolomics analysis of rat testis: Mechanism of arsenic-induced male reproductive toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingyu; Luo, Lianzhong; Alamdar, Ambreen; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Liangpo; Tian, Meiping; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Shen, Heqing

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a widespread metalloid in environment, whose exposure has been associated with a broad spectrum of toxic effects. However, a global view of arsenic-induced male reproductive toxicity is still lack, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Our results revealed that arsenic exposure decreased testosterone level and reduced sperm quality in rats. By conducting an integrated proteomics and metabolomics analysis, the present study aims to investigate the global influence of arsenic exposure on the proteome and metabolome in rat testis. The abundance of 70 proteins (36 up-regulated and 34 down-regulated) and 13 metabolites (8 increased and 5 decreased) were found to be significantly altered by arsenic treatment. Among these, 19 proteins and 2 metabolites were specifically related to male reproductive system development and function, including spermatogenesis, sperm function and fertilization, fertility, internal genitalia development, and mating behavior. It is further proposed that arsenic mainly impaired spermatogenesis and fertilization via aberrant modulation of these male reproduction-related proteins and metabolites, which may be mediated by the ERK/AKT/NF-κB-dependent signaling pathway. Overall, these findings will aid our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for arsenic-induced male reproductive toxicity, and from such studies useful biomarkers indicative of arsenic exposure could be discovered.

  19. Imaging male breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, S., E-mail: sdoyle2@nhs.net [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Steel, J.; Porter, G. [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Male breast cancer is rare, with some pathological and radiological differences from female breast cancer. There is less familiarity with the imaging appearances of male breast cancer, due to its rarity and the more variable use of preoperative imaging. This review will illustrate the commonest imaging appearances of male breast cancer, with emphasis on differences from female breast cancer and potential pitfalls in diagnosis, based on a 10 year experience in our institution.

  20. Male Adolescent Contraceptive Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Madelon Lubin; Finkel, David J.

    1978-01-01

    The contraceptive utilization of a sample of sexually active, urban, high school males (Black, Hispanic, and White) was examined by anonymous questionnaire. Contraceptive use was haphazard, but White males tended to be more effective contraceptors than the other two groups. Reasons for nonuse were also studied. (Author/SJL)

  1. From testis to teratomas: a brief history of male germ cells in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felici, Massimo; Dolci, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    In antiquity, many theories were advanced on reproduction and the functions of the gonads. The male genitalia were called "testes" probably from the Latin word "testis" that originally meant "witnesses", because they provide evidence of virility. Through the first dissection of the seminipherous tubules by Renier de Graaf (1668), the discovery of spermatozoa by Antonj van Leeuwenhoek (1677) and in vitro fertilization by Spallanzani (1780) and later by George Newport and George Vines Ellis (1854), it was only in the early part of the XIX century when it was realized that testes produce spermatozoa and that they are essential for egg fertilization and subsequent embryo development. In the period between the end of the XIX and the beginning of the XX century, scientists such as Albert von Kölliker, Franz von Leydig, Enrico Sertoli and Gustaf Retzius (1842-1919) did microscopic observations of testis that marked the history of male germ cells and established the bases for the development of contemporary in vitro culture and molecular studies that are revealing the deeper secrets of male germ cells. Among these, those by Leroy Stevens on embryonal carcinoma cells in the early 1950s led to the present concepts that germ cells and cancer cells share several characteristics and that a close relationship exists between germ cells and stem cells, these being two pillars of modern developmental biology.

  2. Positive genetic correlation between brain size and sexual traits in male guppies artificially selected for brain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrschal, A; Corral-Lopez, A; Zajitschek, S; Immler, S; Maklakov, A A; Kolm, N

    2015-04-01

    Brain size is an energetically costly trait to develop and maintain. Investments into other costly aspects of an organism's biology may therefore place important constraints on brain size evolution. Sexual traits are often costly and could therefore be traded off against neural investment. However, brain size may itself be under sexual selection through mate choice on cognitive ability. Here, we use guppy (Poecilia reticulata) lines selected for large and small brain size relative to body size to investigate the relationship between brain size, a large suite of male primary and secondary sexual traits, and body condition index. We found no evidence for trade-offs between brain size and sexual traits. Instead, larger-brained males had higher expression of several primary and precopulatory sexual traits--they had longer genitalia, were more colourful and developed longer tails than smaller-brained males. Larger-brained males were also in better body condition when housed in single-sex groups. There was no difference in post-copulatory sexual traits between males from the large- and small-brained lines. Our data do not support the hypothesis that investment into sexual traits is an important limiting factor to brain size evolution, but instead suggest that brain size and several sexual traits are positively genetically correlated.

  3. NOTES ON THE DUVALIUS SPECIES OF THE TAYGETOS MASSIF (PELOPONNESE, SOUTHERN GREECE, WITH DESCRIPTION OF THE MALE FEATURES OF DUVALIUS (DUVALIUS MIREI DEUVE, 2001 (COLEOPTERA, CARABIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achille Casale

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Four species of genus Duvalius (sensu stricto are known so far from caves and upper hypogean zone (M.S.S. in the Taygetos massif (Peloponnese, Southern Greece: Duvalius (Duvalius taygetanus Casale, 1979, D. (D. genesti Casale & Vigna Taglianti, 1984, D. (D. diaphanus (Rottenberg, 1874, and D. (D. mirei Deuve, 2001. Two of them, D. diaphanus and D. mirei, are large sized, sibling species with reduced but still evident and pigmented eyes, syntopic at high altitude above 2000 m a.s.l.. The male features and characters of the male genitalia of D. mirei are here described for the first time, and compared with those of D. diaphanus. Furthermore, a key for identification of the four sympatric Duvalius species known so far from Taygetos Mt. is provided.

  4. Oxidative stress & male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-04-01

    The male factor is considered a major contributory factor to infertility. Apart from the conventional causes for male infertility such as varicocoele, cryptorchidism, infections, obstructive lesions, cystic fibrosis, trauma, and tumours, a new and important cause has been identified: oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants in the body. It is a powerful mechanism that can lead to sperm damage, deformity and eventually, male infertility. This review discusses the physiological need for ROS and their role in normal sperm function. It also highlights the mechanism of production and the pathophysiology of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system and enumerate the benefits of incorporating antioxidants in clinical and experimental settings.

  5. Cytogenetic of Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfiye Ozpak

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility by definition, is not to get pregnant within one year of regular sexual relationship without protection, affects 15-20% of reproductive age couples. Approximately 30% of infertility cases are male originated. Male infertility is caused by endocrine-related genetic defects affecting urogenital system function. These defects adversely affect subsequent spermatogenesis, sexual function, fertility, early embryonic stage of sexual maturation. Autosomal and gonosomal, numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities and related syndromes rank at the top causes of male infertility. Similar chromosome abnormalities are detected in male infertility and as the rate of these abnormalities increase, it was found to reduce sperm count especially in azospermic and oligozoospermic men. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(4.000: 230-245

  6. Males and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Males and Eating Disorders Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents For ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo: PhotoDisc Eating disorders primarily affect girls and women, but boys and ...

  7. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer include exposure to radiation, a family history of breast cancer, and having high estrogen levels, which can happen with diseases like cirrhosis or Klinefelter's syndrome. Treatment for male breast cancer is usually ...

  8. Thyroid and male reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Male reproduction is governed by the classical hypothalamo-hypophyseal testicular axis: Hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH, pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and the gonadal steroid, principally, testosterone. Thyroid hormones have been shown to exert a modulatory influence on this axis and consequently the sexual and spermatogenic function of man. This review will examine the modulatory influence of thyroid hormones on male reproduction.

  9. Male infertility microsurgical training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akanksha Mehta; Philip S Li

    2013-01-01

    Microsurgical training is imperative for urologists and clinical andrologists specializing in male infertility.Success in male infertility microsurgery is heavily dependent on the surgeon's microsurgical skills.Laboratory-based practice to enhance microsurgical skills improves the surgeon's confidence,and reduces stress and operating time,benefiting both the patient and the surgeon.This review provides guidelines for setting up a microsurgical laboratory to develop and enhance microsurgical skills using synthetic and animal models.The role of emerging techniques,such as robotic-assisted microsurgery,is also discussed.

  10. Lycopene and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam; Ashok Agarwal; Chloe Ong; Pallavi Prashast

    2014-01-01

    Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inlficted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneifcial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility-lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4-8 mg of lycopene daily for 3-12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility.

  11. Male Reproductive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... designed to produce, nourish, and transport either the egg or sperm. Unlike the female, whose sex organs are located ... zygote and contains 46 chromosomes — half from the egg and half from the sperm. The genetic material from the male and female ...

  12. Lycopene and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inflicted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneficial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility-lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4-8 mg of lycopene daily for 3-12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility.

  13. A tortoiseshell male cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A. S.; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Almstrup, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    . Immunostaining using anti-vimentin and anti-VASA (DDX4) showed that only Sertoli cells and no germ cells were observed in the testicular tubules. As no sign of spermatogenesis was detected, we conclude that this is a classic case of a sterile, male tortoiseshell cat with a 39,XXY chromosome complement. © 2013 S...

  14. Male rat sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmo, A

    1997-05-01

    The male rat's sexual behavior constitutes a highly ordered sequence of motor acts involving both striate and smooth muscles. It is spontaneously displayed by most adult made rats in the presence of a sexually receptive female. Although the behavior is important for the survival of the species it is not necessary for survival of the individual. In that way it is different from other spontaneous behaviors such as eating, drinking, avoidance of pain, respiration or thermoregulation. Among other things, this means that it is difficult to talk about sexual deprivation or need. Nevertheless, studies of male sex behavior distinguish sexual motivation (the ease by which behavior is activated, "libido") from the execution of copulatory acts (performance, "potency") (Meisel, R.L. and Sachs, B.D., The physiology of male sexual behavior. In: E. Knobil and J.D. Neill (Eds.), The Physiology of Reproduction, 2nd Edn., Vol. 2, Raven Press, New York, 1994, pp. 3-105 [13]). The hormonal control of male sexual behavior has been extensively studied. It is clear that steroid hormones, androgens and estrogens, act within the central nervous system, modifying neuronal excitability. The exact mechanism by which these hormones activate sex behavior remains largely unknown. However, there exists a considerable amount of knowledge concerning the brain structures important for sexual motivation and for the execution of sex behavior. The modulatory role of some non-steroid hormones is partly known, as well as the consequences of manipulations of several neurotransmitter systems.

  15. Predictors of male microchimerism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2012-01-01

    logistic regression and thereafter random forest modeling to evaluate the ability of a range of reproductive, lifestyle, hospital or clinic visit history, and other variables to predict whether women tested positive for male microchimerism. We found some indication that current use of contraceptive pills...

  16. Observations on a gynochromatic (? male of the dragonfly, Rhodothemis rufa (Rambur, 1842 (Odonata: Libellulidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond J. Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The dragonfly Rhodothemis rufa exhibits a conspicuous sexual dimorphism in its body colour.  The mature male is characterized by the homogenous striking brilliant red body while the mature female is dull brown with a prominent mid-dorsal light yellow streak running from the top of the head through the thorax and down to the fifth segment of the abdomen.  The sexes can easily be identified from quite a long distance.  On 7 November 2012, we observed the unusual sight of a female Rhodothemis rufa chasing another female and forming a tandem link which was followed by copulation.  This peculiar reproductive behavior instigated us to net the specimen.  On inspection we  found that although it appeared a female, it had well developed external male genitalia in the form of the secondary copulatory apparatus on the venter of the second and third abdomen, a pair of coxites on the ninth abdominal tergum and an additional infra anal appendage at the terminal tip of the abdomen.  The testes contained a large number of lobules filled with mature spermatozoa, and the vasa differentia also contained mature sperms.  The sperm sac was filled with sperms embedded in seminal fluid.  Observations indicate that this could be a rare case of a gynochromatic male of Rhodothemis rufa which has retained the colour patterning of the female even after sexual maturity and concomitantly exhibiting active sexual behaviour, although the case of it being a subadult male which has yet to attain its typical red coloration cannot be ruled out.  

  17. 45,X/46,XY mosaicism: a cause of short stature in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthymiadou, Alexandra; Stefanou, Eunice G; Chrysis, Dionisios

    2012-01-01

    45,X/46,XY mosaicism is associated with a broad spectrum of phenotypes ranging from apparently normal male development to individuals with incomplete sexual differentiation and clinical signs of Turner syndrome in both males and females. The most common presentation among individuals with a 45,X/46,XY karyotype is sexual ambiguity, accounting for approximately 60% of cases, while the least common category of 45,X/46,XY patients consists of those with bilaterally descended testes, found in 11-12%. We report on two patients with an apparently normal male phenotype and 45,X/46,XY mosaicism who were diagnosed postnatally because of short stature. Both of these boys presented at the age of 15 years with short stature, minor Turner-like stigmata, normal male external genitalia and spontaneous pubertal development. One of them had coarctaction of the aorta with bicuspid aortic valve, an uncommon clinical feature in boys with mosaicism. The same patient underwent a trial of GH replacement therapy with poor response and his sperm analysis revealed azoospermia. Like our patients, most mosaic 45,X/46,XY children with bilateral scrotal testes go unrecognised at birth and throughout childhood unless they have somatic features of Turner syndrome or significant growth retardation. We recommend that boys with otherwise unexplained short stature, being short for their families, should be karyotyped routinely as is recommended in short-stature girls. In addition, boys with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism require a thorough clinical evaluation similar to that performed in girls with Turner syndrome and must be routinely followed up for their potential to respond favorably to GH treatment and for late onset abnormalities, such as infertility and gonadal tumors.

  18. Observations on a gynochromatic (? male of the dragonfly, Rhodothemis rufa (Rambur, 1842 (Odonata: Libellulidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond J. Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The dragonfly Rhodothemis rufa exhibits a conspicuous sexual dimorphism in its body colour.  The mature male is characterized by the homogenous striking brilliant red body while the mature female is dull brown with a prominent mid-dorsal light yellow streak running from the top of the head through the thorax and down to the fifth segment of the abdomen.  The sexes can easily be identified from quite a long distance.  On 7 November 2012, we observed the unusual sight of a female Rhodothemis rufa chasing another female and forming a tandem link which was followed by copulation.  This peculiar reproductive behavior instigated us to net the specimen.  On inspection we  found that although it appeared a female, it had well developed external male genitalia in the form of the secondary copulatory apparatus on the venter of the second and third abdomen, a pair of coxites on the ninth abdominal tergum and an additional infra anal appendage at the terminal tip of the abdomen.  The testes contained a large number of lobules filled with mature spermatozoa, and the vasa differentia also contained mature sperms.  The sperm sac was filled with sperms embedded in seminal fluid.  Observations indicate that this could be a rare case of a gynochromatic male of Rhodothemis rufa which has retained the colour patterning of the female even after sexual maturity and concomitantly exhibiting active sexual behaviour, although the case of it being a subadult male which has yet to attain its typical red coloration cannot be ruled out.  

  19. Male Gender Role Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Daig, Isolde

    2010-01-01

    Background: Men have a higher alcohol and cigarette consumption than women, they use more drugs, they have twice as high a suicide rate and only a minority of men attend on preventive medical checkups. Hypotheses: The central questions of the present study pertained to the identification of dysfunctional aspects of a male self concept and the possible correlations with risk behaviour of men in different age stages. One possible explanation for this high risk behaviour may be higher mascul...

  20. Adolescent male health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Michael; Pinzon, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Although adolescent males have as many health issues and concerns as adolescent females, they are much less likely to be seen in a clinical setting. This is related to both individual factors and the health care system itself, which is not always encouraging and set up to provide comprehensive male health care. Working with adolescent boys involves gaining the knowledge and skills to address concerns such as puberty and sexuality, substance use, violence, risk-taking behaviours and mental health issues. The ability to engage the young male patient is critical, and the professional must be comfortable in initiating conversation about a wide array of topics with the teen boy, who may be reluctant to discuss his concerns. It is important to take every opportunity with adolescent boys to talk about issues beyond the presenting complain, and let them know about confidential care. The physician can educate teens about the importance of regular checkups, and that they are welcome to contact the physician if they are experiencing any concerns about their health or well-being. Parents of preadolescent and adolescent boys should be educated on the value of regular health maintenance visits for their sons beginning in their early teen years.

  1. Ambigüidade genital: a percepção da doença e os anseios dos pais Ambiguous genitalia: perception of the disease and parents anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Bruno da Silva

    2006-03-01

    anguish noted in the neonatal period are expressed by the fear of death, incurable disease and medication. During childhood, of the surgical procedure (ambiguous genitalia and sexuality (homosexuality. During puberty and adulthood there's the fear of marginalization, prejudice, homosexuality and infertility. There is anguish related to pointing at the guilty party, sexual definition (ambiguity and the need for secrecy. CONCLUSIONS: ambiguous genitalia is a highly complex condition affecting the family psychological balance. In situations of genital ambiguity determining and demystifying fears and expectations should be part of the therapeutic plan.

  2. Linfangite granulomatosa de genitália infantil: relato de caso e revisão da literatura Granulomatous lymphangitis of children's genitalia: report of a case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Camargo Martins

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Linfangite granulomatosa de genitália não-infecciosa é causa rara de linfedema genital autolimitado e idiopático em crianças(4, 6, 9. A maioria dos casos de linfedema com granuloma não-infeccioso de genitália em pacientes jovens ocorre em associação à doença de Crohn subseqüente ou concomitante(1, 3, 4, 9. O caso relatado é de um menino de 14 anos que apresentava história de linfedema genital principalmente em região dorsal do corpo do pênis, poupando prepúcio, parte distal do pênis e saco escrotal. Estudos laboratoriais não revelavam doenças sistêmicas. O exame anatomopatológico da peça revelou tratar-se de linfangite granulomatosa não-infecciosa.Non-infectious granulomatous lymphangitis of genitalia is a rare cause of self-limited and idiopathic genital lymphoedema in children(4, 6, 9. Most cases of lymphoedema with non-infectious genital granulomas in young patients occur subsequent to or concomitant with Crohn's disease(1, 3, 4, 9. The case described is of a 14-year-old boy with history of genital lymphoedema mainly on the dorsal region of the body of the penis, sparing the prepuce, the distal part of the penis and the scrotum. Laboratory studies did not reveal systemic diseases. The histopathological analysis showed it was non-infectious granulomatous lymphangitis.

  3. The enigmatic Otway odd-clawed spider (Progradungula otwayensis Milledge, 1997, Gradungulidae, Araneae: Natural history, first description of the female and micro-computed tomography of the male palpal organ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Michalik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The recently described cribellate gradungulid Progradungula otwayensis Milledge, 1997 is endemic to the Great Otway National Park (Victoria, Australia and known from only one male and a few juvenile specimens. In a recent survey we recorded 47 specimens at several localities across the western part of the Great Otway National park. Our field data suggest that this species is dependant on the microclimate in the hollows of old myrtle beech trees since other hollow trees were very much less inhabited. Furthermore, we describe the female for the first time and study the male palpal organ by using X-ray microtomography. The female genitalia are characterized by eight spermathecae which are grouped in two quartets. The spermophor resembles the general organization of gradungulids, but is similar to Kaiya Gray, 1987 by a convoluted appearance within the embolus. The muscle 30 is located in the cymbium and resembles the organization of other non-entelegyne Araneomorphae.

  4. Advanced Procedures in Male Incontinence: The Male Sling

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Advanced Procedures in Male Incontinence: The Virtue® Male Sling Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced Procedures in Male Incontinence: The Male Sling

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Advanced Procedures in Male Incontinence: The Virtue® Male Sling Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Projection of male fantasies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Hans

    2013-01-01

    -war period. Advocates of women's athletics interpreted competitive sports as perfect tools for women's conquest of male territory, whereas supporters of female gymnastics considered athletics to be an antidote to the health-promoting and graceful essence of femininity. Agnete Bertram was one of Lindhard......-1949) laid the foundation for the birth of exercise physiology in Scandinavia. In addition to his basic-level studies of physiology, Lindhard also became deeply involved in developing a theory of gymnastics that would bring a wide range of Danish gymnastics traditions onto a surer theoretical footing...

  7. [Urethrocele in males].

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Mrini, M; Bennani, S; Aboutaieb, R; Joual, A; Benjelloun, S

    1993-01-01

    Concerning one case of male urethral diverticulum, the characteristics of this rare affection are reviewed. Carriage for long time of urethral catheter and urethroplasty are the more frequent etiologies of this affection. The diagnosis is clinic, based on the discovery of tumefaction on the urethral track which pression makes spring up urine through urethral meatus. The urethrography confirms the diagnosis. Surgical approach consists on the resection of the diverticulum and urethrorrhaphy in one or two stages, based on diverticular neck size and sheet quality.

  8. [Prolactin and male fertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, G; Börner, A; Lauterbach, H; Thiel, W

    1983-03-01

    On 68 selected patients with disturbances of the potentia generandi et/sive coeundi (25 males with healthy metabolism and 43 males with diabetes) as well as 14 control persons PRL, LH, FSH, testosterone and oestradiol were determined radioimmunologically and the results were ascribed to sexological, clinical, spermatological and testo-histological findings. A statistically secure correlation was found between PRL values and disturbance of the libido as well as the presence of a gynaecomasty. PRL did not correlate with the spermatological variables volume of ejaculate, relative and absolute number of spermatozoa and motility. PRL did also not correlate with the testohistological findings. A relation between PRL and the peptide hormones LH and FSH as well as the steroid hormones testosterone and oestradiol could not be ascertained. Therefore the diagnostic values of a PRL determination is much limited; the pertinency of a hyperprolactinaemia may be increased by the proof of the symptoms reduction of libido and gynaecomasty with simultaneous disturbance of fertility. In our opinion the definition of hyperprolactinaemia needs revision, since at only determination of the basal value of more than 800 mU/l no more frequently pathologically andrological findings are to be observed than below 200 mU/l.

  9. Experiencing Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmée Hanna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the qualitative research literature that exists in relation to men’s experiences of male infertility. Since men have often been marginalized in the realm of reproduction, including academic research on infertility, it is important to focus on any qualitative research that gives voices to male perspectives and concerns. Given the distress documented by studies of infertile women, we focus in particular on the emotive responses and lived experiences of men in relation to infertility. In this article then, we present an analysis of the core themes across 19 qualitative articles, which include “infertility as crisis”; “emoting infertility- men as “being strong”’ “infertility as a source of stigma”; and the “desire for fatherhood.” In light of these insights, we identify key areas for future research and development including men’s emotional responses to infertility, how men seek support for infertility, the intersection between masculinity and infertility, the relationship between the desire to father and infertility, and the outcomes of infertility for men in terms of other aspects of their lives. We suggest that such research would facilitate making the experiences of men more central within our understandings of infertility within a field that has primarily been female focused.

  10. [Orchitis and male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppe, H-C; Pilatz, A; Hossain, H; Meinhardt, A; Bergmann, M; Haidl, G; Weidner, W

    2010-05-01

    Infections and inflammations of the genital tract are considered the most frequent causes of reduced male fertility, but conclusive epidemiological data are not available. In view of the exposure of germ cells to pathogenic components as well as the cells and mediators involved in the inflammatory processes, irreversible damage to spermatogenesis and corresponding decline of ejaculate quality are to be expected, particularly in cases of chronic orchitis. While the consequences of orchitis and epididymo-orchitis that exhibit clinical symptoms due to systemic or local infections are well known, including testicular atrophy and complete loss of fertility, those cases of inflammatory reactions of the testicles that manifest an asymptomatic or subclinical course, or are not even due to an infection, have received little attention until now. However, systematic histopathological analyses have shown a high prevalence of asymptomatic inflammatory reactions in testicular biopsies from infertile men. The mostly focal lymphocytic infiltrates correlate with the degree of damage to spermatogenesis and corresponding clinical and endocrinological parameters of testicular function. Noninvasive diagnostic techniques are not yet available so that chronic asymptomatic inflammations of the testicles as the primary cause or cofactor of male fertility disorders are underestimated. Except for administration of pathogen-specific antibiotics, treatment recommendations are to a large extent still lacking.

  11. Lisping and male homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borsel, John; Van de Putte, Anneleen

    2014-08-01

    The present study examined the popular stereotype that gay men lisp by evaluating to what extent listeners associated dental or frontal articulation/lisping with gayness. Fifteen heterosexual males and 15 heterosexual females listened to 275 samples of read speech and judged the sexual orientation of the speakers. A total of 175 of the samples were of homosexual men, 74 (42.3 %) of which had been identified with lisping in a previous study; 100 were of heterosexual men, 18 (18 %) of which had been identified with lisping previously. Based on the ratings of the listeners of the present study, lisping speakers were significantly more often judged to be homosexual. This was true for the group as a whole as well as for the subgroup of homosexual and heterosexual men separately. Furthermore, there was no significant gender difference with respect to associating lisping with gayness. Male and female judges associated lisping with gayness to a similar degree. Additional analysis showed that overall 56.2 % of the time the judges were correct in their judgment of the speakers' sexual orientation. The results of this study confirmed previous preliminary findings that suggested that frontal or dental articulation/lisping is a feature that listeners associate with gayness. The reason for this association remains to be clarified.

  12. Occupational causes of male infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens P E

    2013-01-01

    To highlight and discuss the new evidence on occupational and environmental risk to male reproductive function.......To highlight and discuss the new evidence on occupational and environmental risk to male reproductive function....

  13. Bilateral synchronous male breast cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nwashilli, Nnamdi J; Ugiagbe, Ezekiel E

    2015-01-01

    .... The importance of this case report is to create more awareness that breast cancer can occur in males just as in females, though the incidence is rare in males. Early presentation and compliance with treatment modality provide a better outcome.

  14. Male-male pheromone signalling in a lekking Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widemo, Fredrik; Johansson, Björn G

    2006-03-22

    Interest in sex pheromones has mainly been focused on mate finding, while relatively little attention has been given to the role of sex pheromones in mate choice and almost none to competition over mates. Here, we study male response to male pheromones in the lekking Drosophila grimshawi, where males deposit long-lasting pheromone streaks that attract males and females to the leks and influence mate assessment. We used two stocks of flies and both stocks adjusted their pheromone depositing behaviour in response to experimental manipulation, strongly indicating male ability to distinguish between competitors from qualitative differences in pheromone streaks alone. This is the first example of an insect distinguishing between individual odour signatures. Pheromone signalling influenced competition over mates, as males adjusted their investment in pheromone deposition in response to foreign pheromone streaks. Both sexes adapt their behaviour according to information from olfactory cues in D. grimshawi, but the relative benefits from male-female, as compared to male-male signalling, remain unknown. It seems likely that the pheromone signalling system originally evolved for attracting females to leks. The transition to a signalling system for conveying information about individuals may well, however, at least in part have been driven by benefits from male-male signalling.

  15. External Genital Abnormalities and Inguinal Hernia among Males of Children Nurseries, North West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Haratipour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Abnormalities of external genitalia in male children nurseries and inguinal hernia are the most common congenital disorders in children. We aimed to determine prevalence rate of inguinal hernia and other genital among children nurseries, in Shahrood-Iran. Materials and Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study, we examined 920 children nurseries boys. Physical examination of children was performed in presence of a parent in a warm room in supine and upright position with and without Valsalva maneuver. A written consent was obtained from parents before examination. Past medical history and history of surgery on inguinal and genital area was taken. Examination was performed 2 interns who were trained about genital system examination.   Results A total of 920 children nurseries boys aged 3 to 6 years were examined which were detected in 88 children and prevalence rate of these abnormalities were 9.6%. The prevalence of abnormalities in the children under study were as follows: Inguinal hernia (5.1%, cryptorchidism (2.1%, Hydrocele (1.5%, hypospadias (0.4%, Varicocele (0.1%, micropenis (0.4%. Conclusion Regarding to relatively high prevalence rate of these abnormalities and low level of people knowledge, seem screening systems for diagnosis and appropriate treatment of these abnormalities to be necessary.

  16. De morseir syndrome presenting as ambiguous genitalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhav Thukral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A 10-year-old boy presented with genital ambiguity, poor linear growth, and delayed milestones. The aim and to highlight that although rare but congenital, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism may rarely present as ambiguity. Materials and Methods: The patient was found to have bilateral cryptorchidism with proximal penile hypospadias, microphallus with a proportionate dwarfism with mildly delayed bone age, and karyotype 46XY. Euthyroid with normal steroid axis, growth hormone insufficient as suggested by auxology, low IGF1, and poor response to clonidine stimulation. MRI brain shows hypoplastic corpus callosum, hypoplastic anterior pituitary, and ectopic posterior pituitary bright spot. Results: The patient underwent laparoscopic removal of right intrabdominal testis and orchidoplexy was performed on the left one. Testicular biopsy revealed no malignancy and growth hormone replacement was initiated. The patient awaits definitive repair of hypospadias. Conclusion: As a provisional diagnosis of combined growth hormone and gonadotropin deficiency, most probable diagnosis is septo-optic dysplasia or de moseir syndrome leading to genital ambiguity.

  17. Molecular diagnosis of 5α-reductase-2 gene mutation in two Indian families with male pseudohermaphroditism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marumudi Eunice; Ariachery C. Ammini; Pascal Philibert; Bindu Kulshreshtha; Francoise Audran; Francoise Paris; Madan L. Khurana; Praveen E. Pulikkanath; Kiran Kucheria; Charles Sultan

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To identify the genotype of two Indians with male pseudohermaphroditism. Methods: Standard radioimmu- noassay procedure was used for estimating hormonal levels. Conventional cytogenetic analysis was carried out for diagnosing the genetic sex in these subjects with genital ambiguity. Molecular analysis was carried out by standard polymerase chain reaction procedure using different sets of primers and reaction conditions specific for the 5α- reductase type 2 gene (SRD5A2) gene. Direct sequencing was carried out using the ABI Prism dye terminator sequencing kit and the ABI 310 sequencing apparatus. Results: We found an SRD5A2 gene mutation in exon 5, where arginine is substituted with glutamine (R246Q), in two males with pseudohermaphroditism and ambiguous genitalia from unrelated families. This is the first time this mutation has been reported in individuals from India.Conclusion: Identification of the R246Q mutation of the SRD5A2 gene from two unrelated Indian families possibly extends the founder gene effect.

  18. Non-Venereal Dermatoses In Male Genital Region-Prevalence And Patterns In A Referral Centre In South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan K

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of 100 male patients with non-venereal dermatoses of external genitalia were screened amongst patients visiting Dermatology OPD of JIPMER, Pondicherry from Aug ’97 to March ’99. The overall prevalence was found to be 14.1 per 10,000. Non-venereal dermatoses were common in the 21-40 years age group. Most of the patients (74% belonged to labourer class. A total of 25 different non-venereal dermatoses were studied. Genital vitiligo was the most common disorder accounting for 16 cases. Sebaceous cyst of the scrotum was present 13 patients. Among infections and infestations, scabies was observed in 9 patients. Ariboflavinosis was seen in 9 cases. Other disorders encountered were calcinosis scrotum. Iymphangiectasia of the scrotum. Lichen simplex chronicus. Fixed drug eruption, angiokeratoma of Fordyce, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus etc. The study has been quite useful in understanding the clinical and aetiological characteristics of various types of non-veneral dermatoses in males in this subcontinen of Asia.

  19. Dermatoglyphic pattern in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontakke, B R; Talhar, S; Ingole, I V; Shende, M R; Pal, A K; Bhattacharaya, T

    2013-06-01

    Dermatoglyphics in infertile male patients were studied and compared with that of age matched controls to see whether any specific dermatoglyphic pattern exists in infertile male patients. Infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile were referred to Cytogenetic Laboratory for karyotyping. We selected twenty-four infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile. Out of twenty-four infertile male patients, nineteen were with normal Karyotype and five patients were with abnormal Karyotype. Loop was the commonest pattern observed in the infertile male patients. All these fingertip and palmar dermatoglyphic findings were compared with that of result on finger and palmar dermatoglyphics of equal number of age matched controls. Statistical evaluation was done with software "EPI- info, version-6.04 d". Infertile males had reduced number of loops as compared to that of controls which was statistically significant. Total whorls were increased in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant. Percentage of true palmar pattern in I 3 and I 4 areas was reduced in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant.

  20. The aging male project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Saad

    2001-06-01

    alpha estradiol have been synthesized some of which show selectivity for the central nervous system. CNS effects have been demonstrated in female and male animals. Cardiovascular protection by estrogens has been shown in animal and human studies. Atherosclerotic plaque size was reduced after estrogen injections in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Phytoestrogen-fed monkeys had lower total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol and higher HDL cholesterol. Apart from atherosclerotic lesions, coronary artery vascular reactivity was improved. Some of these experimental findings were confirmed in human studies in postmenopausal women with and without estrogen treatment. Whether all of the described estrogenic effects can be seen in men remains to be investigated. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 127-33Keywords : aging, andropause, testosterone, estrogens

  1. Male tolerance and male-male bonds in a multilevel primate society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Annika; Kopp, Gisela H; Ndao, Ibrahima; Kalbitzer, Urs; Zinner, Dietmar; Fischer, Julia

    2014-10-14

    Male relationships in most species of mammals generally are characterized by intense intrasexual competition, with little bonding among unrelated individuals. In contrast, human societies are characterized by high levels of cooperation and strong bonds among both related and unrelated males. The emergence of cooperative male-male relationships has been linked to the multilevel structure of traditional human societies. Based on an analysis of the patterns of spatial and social interaction in combination with genetic relatedness data of wild Guinea baboons (Papio papio), we show that this species exhibits a multilevel social organization in which males maintain strong bonds and are highly tolerant of each other. Several "units" of males with their associated females form "parties," which team up as "gangs." Several gangs of the same "community" use the same home range. Males formed strong bonds predominantly within parties; however, these bonds were not correlated with genetic relatedness. Agonistic interactions were relatively rare and were restricted to a few dyads. Although the social organization of Guinea baboons resembles that of hamadryas baboons, we found stronger male-male affiliation and more elaborate greeting rituals among male Guinea baboons and less aggression toward females. Thus, the social relationships of male Guinea baboons differ markedly from those of other members of the genus, adding valuable comparative data to test hypotheses regarding social evolution. We suggest that this species constitutes an intriguing model to study the predictors and fitness benefits of male bonds, thus contributing to a better understanding of the evolution of this important facet of human social behavior.

  2. Educating Black Males with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Shawn Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Much of the scholarship on Black males in the educational literature focuses on the achievement gap; their underrepresentation in gifted and advanced placement programs; their overrepresentation in special education programs and their high rates of school suspensions and expulsions. Although overrepresented in special education, Black males with…

  3. Latino Males in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This 2016 fact sheet profiles the status of Latino males in higher education, providing information on population, college enrollment, and educational attainment. While college enrollment among Latino males continues to increase, they still lag behind Latino females in college enrollment--a disparity that increases as the level of higher education…

  4. Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Ting-zhao; LI Wan-chen; CAO Mo-ju; HU Chang-yuan

    2002-01-01

    14 isoplasmic and allonuclear cytoplasmic male sterile lines were used as female parents, 8 tester lines as male parents, 101 F1 progenies were obtained. Fertility restoration response of 101 F1 progenies were investigated through field observation and pollen stainability examination under microscope. 14 isoplasmic and allonuclear cytoplasmic male sterile lines were developed by repeated backcross with recurrent male parent lines for more than 8 generations. The result shows: tester line Zifeng1 not only restored the isoplasmic and allonuclear sterile lines of group C backcrossed with Mo17, Yu30 and Heer, but also completely restored the isoplasmic and allonuclear cytoplasm male sterile lines of group T backcrossed with Mo17, HZS , 1792 ,292 and Yu30. Therefore, nuclear background limits the use of Zifeng1 as a tester for identification of cytoplasmic male sterility. Furthermore RFLPs of mitochondrial DNA of 6 isonuclear and alloplasmic cytoplasmic male sterile lines were analyzed with Bam H Ⅰ and Hind Ⅲ restriction endonuclease and mitochondrial DNA probes pBcmH3 and Cox Ⅱ. The same RFLPs were found within sterile cytoplasm of group C, including C,Chuan G, Lei 2 and Lei 3, but a different RFLP pattern was observed among sterile cytoplasm of group S, C,T and the normal cytoplasm. This result suggested that the RFLP markers tightly linked to sterile mitochondrial genes of different groups could be applied in the identifcation of cytoplasmic male sterility.

  5. Eating Disorders in Adolescent Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shannon L.

    2004-01-01

    Research indicates that the primary onset of eating disorders occurs in adolescence and that there is a growing prevalence of adolescent males with eating disorders. This article describes the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa as they relate to adolescent males. Diagnostic criteria, at-risk groups, and implications for…

  6. [Clinical characteristics of male osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Mika; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2016-07-01

    As men are less likely than women to develop osteoporosis, male osteoporosis remains poorly understood. However, elderly men have a clearly reduced bone mineral density and increased risk for fractures. In Japan, one in four patients with osteoporosis is male. Male osteoporosis is associated with not only reduction in androgen, but also estrogen, and differs from postmenopausal osteoporosis in that decreased bone formation is involved and that age-related changes in cortical bone structure and perforation of the trabeculae of cancellous bone are unlikely to occur. The proportion of secondary osteoporosis is higher for men than women;therefore, differential diagnosis is important in the diagnosis of male osteoporosis. In addition, it is recommended that bone mineral density be measured at the femoral neck or total hip in men. Men have a worse prognosis following fractures than women, and management of male osteoporosis is highly important for extending healthy life expectancy.

  7. Higher dopamine level enhances male-male courtship in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ On May 21 2008, Journal of Neuroscience published an online paper from the Institute of Neuroscience, the CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, entitled "Increased dopamine level enhances male-male courtship in Drosophila." This work was done by Mr. LIU Tong, a doctoral candidate, and colleagues under the supervision of Dr. GUO Aike, and in collaboration with Dr. Jean-Francois Ferveur from France.

  8. How Effective Is Male Contraception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How effective is male contraception? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Not all contraceptive methods are appropriate for all situations, and individuals ...

  9. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    Hypogonadal men share a variety of signs and symptoms such as decreased muscle mass, osteopoenia, increased fat mass, fatigue, decreased libido and cognitive dysfunctions. Controlled trials have demonstrated favourable effects of androgen substitution therapy on these signs and symptoms in men wi...... in some elderly males with low-normal testosterone levels. However, at this point in time, widespread use of testosterone in an elderly male population outside controlled clinical trials seems inappropriate....

  10. Male Genitoplasty for Intersex Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate surgical procedures adopted for male genitoplasty in intersex disorders. Patients and Methods. Case records of intersex patients undergoing male genitoplasty from Pediatric Intersex clinic were studied. Results. Of 356 intersex cases undergoing urethroplasty from 1989–2007, the hypospadias was penoscrotal (68%), scrotal (17%) and perineal (15%). 351 patients underwent chordee correction for mild: moderate: severe chordee in 24 : 136 : 191 cases. Byars...

  11. Male Breast Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Jin Yoo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC of the breast is a rare condition, and cases in male patients are even less common. Case: We describe a case of ACC of the breast with axillary lymph node metastasis, disseminated osteolytic bone metastasis and bone marrow involvement in a 41-year-old man. Conclusion: Male breast ACC is an extremely rare malignancy; there can be difficulty in obtaining a final diagnosis. We report this case because of its rarity.

  12. Adolescent Male Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian C. Nanagas MD, MSc

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine male vaccination rates with quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4 before and after the October 2011 national recommendation to routinely immunize adolescent males. Methods. We reviewed HPV4 dose 1 (HPV4-1 uptake in 292 adolescent males in our urban clinic prior to national recommendations and followed-up for HPV4 series completion rates. After national recommendation, 248 urban clinic and 247 suburban clinic males were reviewed for HPV4-1 uptake. Factors associated with HPV4-1 refusal were determined with multiple logistic regression. Results. Of the initial 292 males, 78% received HPV4-1 and 38% received the 3-dose series. After recommendation, HPV4-1 uptake was 59% and 7% in urban and suburban clinics, respectively. Variables associated with HPV4-1 uptake/refusal included time period, race, type of insurance, and receipt of concurrent vaccines. Conclusions. HPV4-1 vaccination rates in our urban clinic were high before and after routine HPV vaccine recommendations for adolescent males. Our vaccination rates were much higher than in a suburban practice.

  13. The role of the sex-determining region Y gene in the etiology of 46,XX maleness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fechner, P.Y.; Marcantonio, S.M.; Jaswaney, V.; Stetten, G.; Migeon, C.J.; Smith, K.D.; Berkovitz, G.D. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Goodfellow, P.N. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (United Kingdom)); Amrhein, J.A. (Forbes Regional Health Center, Monroeville, PA (United States)); Bard, P.A. (Kaiser Permanente, Sacramento, CA (United States)); Lee, P.A. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Reid, C. (Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Camden, NJ (United States)); Tsalikian, E. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)); Urban, M.D. (Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States))

    1993-03-01

    The condition of 46,XX maleness is characterized by testicular development in subjects who have two X chromosomes but who lack a normal Y chromosome. Several etiologies have been proposed to explain 46,XX maleness: (1) translocation of the testis-determining factor from the Y to the X chromosome, (2) mutation in an autosomal or X chromosome gene which permits testicular determination in the absence of TDF, and (3) undetected mosaicism with a Y-bearing cell line. The authors evaluated 10 affected subjects who were ascertained for different reasons and who had several distinct phenotypes. Six subjects had inherited sequences from the short arm of the Y chromosome including the sex-determining region Y gene (SRY). Five of the subjects were pubertal at the time of evaluation and had a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome with evidence of Sertoli cell and Leydig cell dysfunction. One subject had evidence from Southern blot analysis and in situ hybridization for the presence of an intact Y chromosome in approximately 1% of cells. Three subjects lacked Y sequences by Southern blot analysis and by polymerase chain reaction amplification of SRY. These subjects were ascertained in the newborn period because of congenital anomalies. One had multiple anomalies including cardiac abnormalities; one had cardiac anomalies alone; and one had ambiguous genitalia. The data confirm the genetic heterogeneity of 46,XX maleness, in which some subjects have SRY while other subjects lack it. In addition, there is phenotypic heterogeneity among subjects who lack SRY suggesting that there is also genetic heterogeneity within this subgroup. 43 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. THE IMPACT OF THE ENZYME STEROID 5α-REDUCTASE 2 DEFICIENCY ON UROGENITAL BIRTH DEFECT IN MALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia-Irina Olaru

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This research work on 5α-reductase 2 is aiming to put into evidence how a mutation of the gene codifying for this enzyme can affect the phenotype of different males, leading at a partial female phenotype.  This type of research focuses on offering a scientific explanation on different health problems affecting the normal lives of some people, even from early stages of their evolution.The experiment is focused on studying the impact of an enzyme called “steroid 5α-reductase” on the development of male urogenital components during the embryological life.  In order to study the steroid 5α-reductase 2 activity, the following procedures were used: isolation of a 5α-reductase 2 gene, genomicDNAisolation, and polymerase chain reactions.Biochemical analysis put into evidence two mutations representing opposite poles of disease manifestation, i.e. feminization of external genitalia versus predominantly male development. It suggested a correlation between clinical expression and severity of the impairment of enzyme function.  As mentioned by Imperato-McGinley, Guerrero, Gautier, & Peterson (1974, one of the mutations is called “G196S mutation.”  This mutation consists of a serine substitution for a glycine at position 196.  In this case, the level of 5α-reductase activity was sufficient to induce partial virilization.  The second type of mutation is called “G34R mutation.”  This mutation consists of an arginine substitution for glycine at position 34.  The G34R enzyme is essentially inactive, thus giving rise to the female phenotype.Mutations in the type 2 gene are responsible for autosomal recessive genetic disease of 5α-reductase deficiency.

  15. Bilateral male breast cancer with male potential hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurokawa Yasushi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male breast cancer is a comparatively rare disease, and simultaneous bilateral male breast cancer is considered to be an extremely rare event. Risk factors are said to be genetic factors and hormonal abnormalities due to obesity or testicular diseases. Case presentation The patient was a 47-year-old Japanese male. His family had no history of female breast cancer. This patient also had hypospadias and hormonal examination indicated the presence of primary testicular potential hypogonadism, and these hormonal abnormalities seemed to be present since childhood or the fetal period. The bilateral breast cancer developed in this man at a comparatively young age, and histopathological studies of multiple sections showed that there was almost no normal epithelial cell in the ducts, while the ducts were almost completely filled with breast cancer cells. Conclusion It is thought that male breast cancer is caused by an imbalance between estrogen and testosterone. We cannot rule out the possibility that the breast cancer developed due to the effect of the slight elevation of estrogen over a long period of time, but the actual causative factors in this patient were unable to be definitively identified. In the future, we hope to further elucidate the causes of male breast cancer.

  16. The Reproductive Tract of the Males of the Zoophytophagous Predator Brontocoris tabidus (Signoret (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae with Different Diets and Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walkymario P. Lemos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Brontocoris tabidus (Signoret (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae is a common and important species for the biological control of defoliating Lepidoptera caterpillars. Although it has a predatory feeding habit, this species make use of plant resources, which are essential for the maintenance of its population in laboratory colonies as well as in the field during periods of prey shortage. Thus B. tabidus has been considered an obligate zoophytophagous insect. However the impact of the age and herbivory on the morphology of the reproductive organs has been poorly studied in predatory Pentatomidae. The morphology of the reproductive tract of B. tabidus males with different ages and fed on different diets were analyzed. Approach: Nymphs of B. tabidus were maintained in the field with or without plants and fed on T. molitor pupae without plant (T1; T. molitor pupae and Eucalyptus cloeziana plants (T2; T. molitor pupae and Eucalyptus urophylla plants (T3 or T. molitor pupae and guava plants (Psidium guajava L. (T4. Adults of B. tabidus obtained from each treatment were sexed in the first day of their emergence and thirty-six pairs were formed per treatment. Ten males of B. tabidus 15 and 21 days old, obtained in each treatment were dissected and the reproductive tract submitted to histological analyses. The total area of the testes of B. tabidus was measured and the data were submitted to the variance analysis and means between treatments were compared by the test of Newman-Keuls (p = 0.05. Results: The inner genitalia of B. tabidus males had red color and the testes with six follicles. Males 15 days old presented larger testes when fed on E. cloeziana (0.94 mm2, E. urophylla (0.98 mm2 or only T. molitor pupae (0.99 mm2 than with guava plants (0.76 mm2. Twenty-one days old B. tabidus males presented testes with similar size, independent of the diet. The testes follicles of B. tabidus had larger amount of spermatozoa with

  17. Caracterização histopatológica e imuno-histoquímica de neoplasmas mesenquimais da genitália em 43 cadelas Histopathological and immunohistochemical characterization of mesenchymal neoplasms of the genitalia in 43 bitches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyene O. de Souza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Os arquivos de biópsia do período de 2000 a 2010 do SPV-UFRGS foram revisados e levantados os casos de neoplasias mesenquimais de genitália (útero, cérvix, vagina e vulva de cadelas. Realizou-se estudo retrospectivo de 43 casos, incluindo caracterização histológica, coloração tricrômico de Masson (TM e imuno-histoquímica (IHQ. As principais raças acometidas foram Cocker, Poodle e Pastor Alemão, porém o maior número de casos foi observado em cães sem raça definida (SRD. A idade média dessas cadelas foi de 10,6 anos (variação de 3 a 10 anos. Quanto à localização dos tumores, 44,2% estavam na vagina, 27,9% no útero, 23,3% na vulva e 4,6% na cérvix. Histologicamente, 46,5% eram leiomioma, 41,9% fibroleiomioma, 7,0% fibroma e 4,6% leiomiossarcoma. Na coloração de TM, os fibromas apresentaram todas as células neoplásicas coradas em azul (colágeno, os leiomiomas e os leiomiossarcomas apresentaram menos de 50% de colágeno em meio às células neoplásicas musculares e os fibroleiomiomas mais de 50%. Na IHQ, os fibromas apresentaram marcação positiva para vimentina e negativa para desmina. Todos os leiomiomas eram positivos para vimentina (em mais de 50% células e para desmina (75% dos casos em mais de 50% das células e 25% em menos de 50%. Em um dos casos de leiomiossarcoma houve imunomarcação para vimentina e ausente para desmina e, no outro, ocorreu o oposto. Os fibroleiomiomas apresentaram marcação para vimentina em 94,4% (em mais de 50% células e para desmina em 77,8% (64,3% em menos de 50% das células e 35,7% em mais de 50%.The biopsies archives from SPV-UFRGS (2000-2010 were retrieved, and cases of mesenchymal neoplasms of genitalia (uterus, cervix, vagina, and vulva of 43 bitches were revised. Also Masson's trichrome staining (MT and immunohistochemical characterization were evaluated. The main breeds affected were Cocker, Poodle and German Shepherd, but the greatest number of cases were observed in mixed

  18. On the type species of the genus Aetius O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896: The first description of male with notes on cymbial notch and mating plug (Araneae: Corinnidae: Castianeirinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhin, Puthoor Pattammal; Nafin, Karunnappilli Shamsudheen; Simmons, Zoë; Sudhikumar, Ambalaparambil Vasu

    2016-08-23

    The rare ant mimicking sac spider genus Aetius was erected by O. Pickard-Cambridge in 1896 based on an unspecified number of female specimen(s) collected from Sri Lanka. The type species of the genus, A. decollatus O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896, has been redescribed twice based on the holotype (Majumder & Tikader 1991; Deeleman-Reinhold 2001). Reimoser (1934) recorded the genus for the first time from India, who collected a male specimen from Mudumalai Tiger Reserve in Tamil Nadu State of southern India. This specimen was identified as A. decollatus, but it was never formally described and was later recognised to be a penultimate male (Dankittipakul & Singtripop 2013). Deeleman-Reinhold (2001) described the second representative of the genus, A. nocturnus, based on a single female specimen from Borneo, 105 years after the establishment of the genus. Dankittipakul & Singtripop (2013) described the male of A. nocturnus, thereby revealing the male genitalia of the genus, but the type species was still known only from the female sex.

  19. Focus Issue on Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Kobayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Male infertility problems can occur when sperms are limited in number or function. In this paper, we describe the clinical evaluation of male infertility. A detailed history, physical examination, and basic semen analysis are required. In addition, ultrasound, karyotyping, and hormonal studies are needed to determine specific causes of infertility. In addition, the World Health Organization (WHO, 2009 has developed a manual to provide guidance in performing a comprehensive semen analysis. Among the possible reasons for male infertility, nonobstructive azoospermia is the least treatable, because few or no mature sperm may be produced. In many cases, men with nonobstructive azoospermia typically have small-volume testes and elevated FSH. Although treatment may not completely restore the quality of semen from men with subnormal fertility, in some cases a successful pregnancy can still be achieved through assisted reproductive technology.

  20. XYY male and hematologic malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguma, N; Shigeta, C; Kamada, N

    1996-09-01

    Two cases of XYY male with refractory anemia with excess of blasts are reported, and previous reported XYY males with hematologic malignancy are reviewed. Altogether 26 cases were collected for analysis: acute myeloid leukemia (10), acute lymphocytic leukemia (seven), acute leukemia (two), chronic myelocytic leukemia (three), myelodysplastic syndrome (three), and essential thrombocythemia (one). The age at the time of diagnosis ranged in age from 7.5 to 81 years. In three of six XYY/XY mosaicism cases, XYY clone was associated with malignancy. However, in two cases XYY clone was not involved. The evidence presented here suggests that the event of an XYY male with hematologic malignancy is incidental rather than a genetic etiology.

  1. Management of male breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay V. Dimitro v

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The management of male breast cancer is still under discussion due to lack of information from prospective, randomized clinical trials and low incidence of this disease. Current management is based largely on extrapolation from data related to treatment of female breast cancer. Over the last two decades, several review articles have discussed mainly retrospective and anecdotal data related to hormonal and chemotherapy treatment modalities. In this review, we present the most recent information and future considerations related to the management of male breast cancer. In addition to the conventional treatment options we will discuss the possible role of targeted therapy. Establishing a national or global registry for male breast cancer will provide more precise information about the natural history of the disease and will facilitate the design and execution of prospective, randomized multicenter clinical trials.

  2. Familial aspects of male homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, K; Pillard, R C; Horvath, C; Revelle, W; Bailey, J M

    2000-04-01

    Research has generally supported the existence of familial-genetic factors for male sexual orientation, but has not shed much light on the specific nature of those influences. Gay men with gay brothers provide the opportunity to examine several hypotheses. Sixty-six men, representing 37 gay male sibling pairs, completed questionnaires assessing behavior on various measures including childhood and adult gender nonconformity, timing of awareness of homosexual feelings, self-acceptance, and the quality of family relationships. Consistent with prior findings using twins, gay brothers were similar in their degree of childhood gender non-conformity, suggesting that this variable may distinguish etiologically (e.g., genetically) heterogeneous subtypes. The large majority of gay men with brothers knew about their own homosexual feelings before they learned about their brothers' homosexual feelings, suggesting that discovery of brothers' homosexuality is not an important cause of male homosexuality.

  3. Genetic causes of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouffs, Katrien; Seneca, Sara; Lissens, Willy

    2014-05-01

    Male infertility, affecting around half of the couples with a problem to get pregnant, is a very heterogeneous condition. Part of patients are having a defect in spermatogenesis of which the underlying causes (including genetic ones) remain largely unknown. The only genetic tests routinely used in the diagnosis of male infertility are the analyses for the presence of Yq microdeletions and/or chromosomal abnormalities. Various other single gene or polygenic defects have been proposed to be involved in male fertility. Yet, their causative effect often remains to be proven. The recent evolution in the development of whole genome-based techniques may help in clarifying the role of genes and other genetic factors involved in spermatogenesis and spermatogenesis defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Male genital trauma in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Stanley R; Lishnak, Timothy S; Powers, Andria M; Lisle, David K

    2013-04-01

    Male genital trauma is a rare but potentially serious sports injury. Although such an injury can occur by many different mechanisms, including falls, collisions, straddle injuries, kicks, and equipment malfunction, the clinical presentation is typically homogeneous, characterized by pain and swelling. Almost all sports-related male genital injury comes from blunt force trauma, with involvement of scrotal structures far more common than penile structures. Most injuries can be treated conservatively, but catastrophic testicular injury must first be ruled out. Despite being relatively uncommon compared with other sports injuries, more than half of all testicular injuries are sustained during sports.

  5. [Genetic evaluation of male homosexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasztonyi, Z

    1998-02-01

    The family trees of 16 homosexual males are evaluated in the material of their Genetic Counselling Clinic. The familial cluster of three cases corresponded to the X-linked recessive inheritance. The results of family, twin and adoption studies are reviewed and the recent findings of molecular genetic and brain researches are summarised. Male homosexuality comprises of different subgroups, but one major entity is caused by X-linked recessive gene(s). This genetic background represent a predisposition which is triggered or suppressed by external factors.

  6. Novel concepts in male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro C. Esteves

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Extraordinary advances have been achieved in the field of male infertility in the last decades. There are new concepts in sperm physiology and several modern tools for the assessment of spermatogenesis kinetics in vivo. New tests using molecular biology and DNA damage assays allow the clinician to correctly diagnose men so far classified as having idiopathic male infertility. In the field of treatment, microsurgery has increased success rates either for reconstruction of the reproductive tract or the retrieval of spermatozoa for assisted conception. Emerging evidence suggests that life-style and environmental conditions are of utmost importance in male fertility and subfertility. This review discusses several concepts that have changed over the last years, such as the duration of the spermatogenic cycle in humans, Y-chromosome infertility, the reproductive potential of non-mosaic Klinefelter syndrome men, the impact of paternal age and sperm DNA in male infertility, the role of antioxidants in the treatment of infertile men, the predictive factors and techniques for sperm retrieval in non-obstructive azoospermia, and the microsurgical treatment of clinical varicoceles. Whenever possible, levels of evidence are provided as suggested by the Oxford Center of Evidence-based Medicine.

  7. Gay Male Fantasies and Realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehne, Gregory K.

    1978-01-01

    In this study of 47 gay men, it was found that early sexual fantasies preceded interpersonal sexual experience by an average of four years and functioned as a source of self-knowledge. Current affectional and fantasy themes were related to respondents' lifestyles or desire for a male affectional relationship. (Author/WI)

  8. Male Depression: Understanding the Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Depression (major depressive disorder) Male depression is a serious medical condition, but many men try to ignore it or refuse treatment. Learn the signs and symptoms — and what to do. By Mayo Clinic Staff Do you feel irritable, isolated or withdrawn? Do you find yourself working all ...

  9. Male parentage in army ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronauer, Daniel J C; Schöning, Caspar; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2006-01-01

    of active research in insect sociobiology. Here we present microsatellite data for 176 males from eight colonies of the African army ant Dorylus (Anomma) molestus. Comparison with worker genotypes and inferred queen genotypes from the same colonies show that workers do not or at best very rarely reproduce...

  10. Male Reproductive System (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... designed to produce, nourish, and transport either the egg or sperm. Unlike the female, whose sex organs are located ... goat) and contains 46 chromosomes — half from the egg and half from the sperm. The genetic material from the male and female ...

  11. Free radicals and male reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Allamaneni, Shyam S R

    2011-03-01

    Male factor accounts for almost 50% cases of infertility. The exact mechanism of sperm dysfunction is not known in many cases. Extensive research in the last decade has led to the identification of free radicals (reactive oxygen species) as mediators of sperm dysfunction in both specific diagnoses and idiopathic cases of male infertility. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species are seen in up to 30-80% of men with male infertility. The role of free radicals has been studied extensively in the process of human reproduction. We know now that a certain level of free radicals is necessary for normal sperm function, whereas an excessive level of free radicals can cause detrimental effect on sperm function and subsequent fertilisation and offspring health. Oxidative stress develops when there is an imbalance between generation of free radicals and scavenging capacity of anti-oxidants in reproductive tract. Oxidative stress has been shown to affect both standard semen parameters and fertilising capacity. In addition, high levels of free radicals have been associated with lack of or poor fertility outcome after natural conception or assisted reproduction. Diagnostic techniques to quantify free radicals in infertile patients can assist physicians treating patients with infertility to plan for proper treatment strategies. In vivo anti-oxidants can be used against oxidative stress in male reproductive tract. Supplementation of in vitro anti-oxidants can help prevent the oxidative stress during sperm preparation techniques in assisted reproduction.

  12. Cigarette smoking and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taymour Mostafa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have identified specific body systems affected by the hazardous effects of the cigarette smoking particularly the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The effect of smoking on male reproduction has also been studied where semen quality was investigated in different cross-sectional studies including infertile patients with conflicting results. This article aimed to assess the relationship between smoking and male infertility. A review of published articles was carried out, using PubMed, medical subject heading (MSH databases and Scopus engine excluding the effects of smoking outside male infertility. Key words used to assess exposure, outcome, and estimates for the concerned associations were: smoking, semen, male infertility, sperm, humans, and fertility. Most of the reports showed that smoking reduces sperm production, sperm motility, sperm normal forms and sperm fertilising capacity through increased seminal oxidative stress and DNA damage. Few papers reported nonsignificant differences in semen parameters between smokers or non-smokers. It is concluded that although some smokers may not experience reduced fertility, men with marginal semen quality can benefit from quitting smoking.

  13. Male fertility in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chotirmall, S H

    2011-04-05

    Infertility rates among males with cystic fibrosis (CF) approximate 97%. No information is currently available within Ireland determining an understanding of fertility issues and the best methods of information provision to this specialized group. This study aimed to determine understanding and preferred approaches to information provision on fertility issues to Irish CF males. A Descriptive Study utilizing prospective coded questionnaires was mailed to a male CF cohort (n=50). Sections included demographics, fertility knowledge & investigation. Response rate was 16\\/50 (32%). All were aware that CF affected their fertility. More than two-thirds (n=11) were able to provide explanations whilst only one-third (n=5) provided the correct explanation. Significant numbers stated thoughts of marriage and a future family. Half have discussed fertility with a healthcare professional (HCP). Mean age of discussion was 21.9 years. One third preferred an earlier discussion. The commonest first source for information was written material which was also the preferred source. Three-quarters requested further information preferring again, written material. Significant gaps in sex education of Irish CF males exist. Discussion should be initiated by HCPs and centre-directed written material devised to address deficiencies.

  14. Male Osteoporosis in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Patrizia D’Amelio; Giovanni Carlo Isaia

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is now recognized as an important public health problem in elderly men as fragility fractures are complicated by increased morbidity, mortality, and social costs. This review comprises an overview of recent findings in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of male osteoporosis, with particular regard to the old population.

  15. Immunophenotyping of male breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornegoor, Robert; Verschuur-Maes, Anoek H J; Buerger, Horst; Hogenes, Marieke C; de Bruin, Peter C; Oudejans, Joost J; Hinrichs, Bernd; van Diest, Paul J

    2012-12-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease, and knowledge of carcinogenesis is limited. Conflicting results, based on small series, have been reported for clinically relevant biomarkers. One hundred and thirty-four cases of male breast cancer were immunohistochemically stained on tissue microarrays for oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), androgen receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), BRST2, cyclin D1, bcl-2, p53, p16, p21, Ki67, cytokeratin (CK) 5/6, CK14, and epidermal growth factor receptor. Data were correlated with clinicopathological features and patient outcome. High mitotic count and high grade were correlated with high Ki67, HER2 amplification/overexpression, p53 accumulation, high p21 expression, low PR expression, and low bcl-2 expression. PR negativity (P=0.009) and p53 accumulation (P=0.042) were correlated with decreased 5-year survival and were independent markers for patient outcome in Cox regression. In unsupervised hierarchical clustering, four groups were identified that were correlated with distinctive clinicopathological features. The hormone negative/ER-positive/high-grade cluster was significantly associated with decreased survival (P=0.011) and was an independent prognostic factor in Cox regression. Several tissue biomarkers are associated with an aggressive phenotype in male breast cancer. PR and p53 are the most promising individual prognostic markers. On the basis of immunophenotype, four distinctive and prognostically relevant male breast cancer groups were identified, indicating that protein expression profiling may be clinically useful in male breast cancer. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  16. Coordinated chemoradiation therapy with genital preservation for the treatment of primary invasive carcinoma of the male urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael S; Triaca, Veronica; Billmeyer, Brian; Hanley, Robert S; Girshovich, Lyubov; Shuster, Todd; Oberfield, Richard A; Zinman, Leonard

    2008-02-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of a combined chemoradiation therapy protocol for the primary treatment of primary invasive carcinoma of the male urethra. From January 1991 to December 2006, 18 patients with invasive carcinoma of the male urethra referred to our institution were treated with a chemoradiation therapy protocol, consisting of 2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil (1,000 mg/m(2)) on days 1 to 4 and days 29 to 32, and mitomycin-C (10 mg/m(2)) on days 1 and 29 with concurrent external beam radiation therapy (45 to 55 Gy in 25 fractions during 5 weeks) to the genitalia, perineum, and inguinal and external iliac lymph nodes. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed to assess overall, disease specific and disease-free survival. The stage and node distribution was T2N0 in 2 patients (11%), T3N0 in 8 (44%), T4N0 in 2 (11%), TXN1 in 1(6%) and TXN2 in 5 (28%). The most prevalent histology was moderately (7 of 18 patients or 39%) or poorly (10 of 18 or 56%) differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (17 of 18 or 95%). Overall 83% (15 of 18) of the patients had a complete response to the primary chemoradiation therapy protocol, and the 5-year overall and disease specific survival rates were 60% and 83%, respectively. Five-year disease-free survival rates after chemoradiation therapy and after chemoradiation therapy with salvage surgery were 54% and 72%, respectively. The 3 nonresponders died of disease after undergoing salvage surgery and 5 of the 15 complete responders (30%) had recurrence. Complex urethral reconstruction was required in 3 of 10 patients (30%) who had prolonged disease-free survival. The chemoradiation therapy protocol is an alternative primary treatment modality for invasive urethral carcinoma. It enables an unprecedented potential for organ preservation.

  17. Angiogenesis in male breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanthan Rani

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male breast cancer is a rare but aggressive and devastating disease. This disease presents at a later stage and in a more advanced fashion than its female counterpart. The immunophenotype also appears to be distinct when compared to female breast cancer. Angiogenesis plays a permissive role in the development of a solid tumor and provides an avenue for nutrient exchange and waste removal. Recent scrutiny of angiogenesis in female breast cancer has shown it to be of significant prognostic value. It was hypothesized that this holds true in invasive ductal carcinoma of the male breast. In the context of male breast cancer, we investigated the relationship of survival and other clinico-pathological variables to the microvascular density of the tumor tissue. Methods Seventy-five cases of primary male breast cancer were identified using the records of the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency over a period of 26 years. Forty-seven cases of invasive ductal carcinoma of the male breast had formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks that were suitable for this study. All cases were reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for the angiogenic markers (cluster designations 31 (CD31, 34 (CD34 and 105 (CD105, von Willebrand factor (VWF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Microvascular density (MVD was determined using average, centre, and highest microvessel counts (AMC, CMC, and HMC, respectively. Statistical analyses compared differences in the distribution of survival times and times to relapse between levels of MVD, tumor size, node status and age at diagnosis. In addition, MVD values were compared within each marker, between each marker, and were also compared to clinico-pathological data. Results Advanced age and tumor size were related to shorter survival times. There were no statistically significant differences in distributions of survival times and times to relapse between levels of MVD variables. There was no

  18. Graduating Black Males: A Generic Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    Black males face a difficult educational battle. Across America, graduation statistics for Black males are sobering. The purpose of this study was to explore why Black males drop out of school and to examine the current employment status of the study participants. The research took place in rural North Carolina. Fifteen Black American male high…

  19. The physiology and timing of male puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinggaard, Jeanette; Mieritz, Mikkel Grunnet; Sørensen, Kaspar

    2012-01-01

    To describe available markers of male puberty, discuss associations between adiposity and pubertal timing and to review recent evidence of a possible secular trend in male pubertal timing.......To describe available markers of male puberty, discuss associations between adiposity and pubertal timing and to review recent evidence of a possible secular trend in male pubertal timing....

  20. Development of Japonica Male Sterile Lines Integrating Cytoplasmic Male Sterility and Photosensitive Genic Male Sterility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shou-hai; DU Shi-yun; WANG De-zheng; LI Cheng-quan

    2005-01-01

    It has been previously established that the BT type of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is induced by high temperatures,while photosensitive genic male sterility (PGMS) seed sets by low temperatures induce. In the current study, we have bred photosensitive cytoplasmic male sterility (PCMS) lines (2308SA and 2310SA) by crossing the CMS line with the PGMS japonica line with maintainer genes. The sterility of PCMS japonica was consequently controlled by two groups of male sterile genes resulting from the integration of PGMS and CMS genes. The results on plant fertility, at different sowing times, were as follows: (a) Under conditions of natural long-day photoperiod and at temperatures above 35℃, the PGMS gene regulated PCMS japonica sterility - the higher the temperature, the lower the pollen fertility. However, bagged seed sets of PCMS japonica, not exposed to high temperatures, induced the CMS seed set. (b) Exposure to long-day photoperiod and temperature conditions between 35℃ and the critical sterility inducing temperature of PGMS resulted in both PGMS and CMS gene controlled sterility of PCMS japonica, which exhibited stable characteristics. (c) When exposed to critical sterility inducing temperatures or short-day photoperiod and daily high temperatures below 32℃, the BT type of the CMS gene regulated PCMS sterility. Under these conditions, the PGMS gene rendered male sterility insusceptible to occasional cool summer days when this PCMS line, adopted for hybrid seed production, develops into panicle differentiation stage.The present study also investigated the fertility restoration, seed production and combining ability of PCMS japonica so as to optimize its use.

  1. Conspicuous Coloration in Males of the Damselfly Nehalennia irene (Zygoptera: Coenagrionidae: Do Males Signal Their Unprofitability to Other Males?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Beatty

    Full Text Available In damselflies, sexual colour dimorphism is commonly explained as a consequence of selection on traits that increase male attractiveness to females. However, while many species in the damselfly family Coenagrionidae (Insecta: Odonata are sexually dimorphic, the males do not engage in displays, and male competition for mates resembles a "scramble". An alternative explanation for the sexual differences in coloration within these species is that sexual dimorphism has evolved as a sex-related warning signal, with males signalling their uprofitability as mates to other males, thereby avoiding harassment from conspecifics. We evaluated an underlying assumption of the theory that male-male harassment rate is influenced by colour by comparing harassment of males of the species Nehalennia irene that had been painted to make them appear: (i similar to an unaltered male (blue, (ii different from a male (orange and (iii more similar to a female (black. When caged together we found that blue-painted males experienced significantly lower harassment than black-painted males. When unpainted males were caged with each type of painted male we found that blue-painted males and the unpainted males housed in the same cages experienced lower rates of harassment than males housed in cages where some males were painted black, suggesting that a single, reliable signal of unprofitability may benefit the individuals that carry it. While our results do not in themselves demonstrate that sexual colour dimorphism originally evolved as an intra-specific warning signal, they do show that harassment is influenced by coloration, and that such selection could conceivably maintain male coloration as a warning signal.

  2. Epigenetics, spermatogenesis and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajender, Singh; Avery, Kelsey; Agarwal, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications characterized by DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling are important regulators in a number of biological processes, including spermatogenesis. Several genes in the testes are regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, indicating a direct influence of epigenetic mechanisms on the process of spermatogenesis. In the present article, we have provided a comprehensive review of the epigenetic processes in the testes, correlation of epigenetic aberrations with male infertility, impact of environmental factors on the epigenome and male fertility, and significance of epigenetic changes/aberrations in assisted reproduction. The literature review suggested a significant impact of epigenetic aberrations (epimutations) on spermatogenesis, and this could lead to male infertility. Epimutations (often hypermethylation) in several genes, namely MTHFR, PAX8, NTF3, SFN, HRAS, JHM2DA, IGF2, H19, RASGRF1, GTL2, PLAG1, D1RAS3, MEST, KCNQ1, LIT1, and SNRPN, have been reported in association with poor semen parameters or male infertility. Environmental toxins/drugs may affect fertility via epigenetic modifications. For example, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, an anticancer agent, causes a decrease in global DNA methylation that leads to altered sperm morphology, decreased sperm motility, decreased fertilization capacity, and decreased embryo survival. Similarly, Endocrine disruptors, such as methoxychlor (an estrogenic pesticide) and vinclozolin (an anti-androgenic fungicide) have been found by experiments on animals to affect epigenetic modifications that may cause spermatogenic defects in subsequent generations. Assisted reproduction procedures that have been considered rather safe, are now being implicated in inducing epigenetic changes that could affect fertility in subsequent generations. Techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and round spermatid injection (ROSI) may increase the incidence of imprinting disorders and

  3. Measuring male infertility: epidemiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualotto Fábio Firmbach

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that human semen quality may have been deteriorating in recent years. Most of the evidence is retrospective, based on analysis of data sets collected for other purposes. Measures of male infertility are needed if we want to monitor the biological capacity for males to reproduce over time or between different populations. We also need these measures in analytical epidemiology if we want to identify risk indicators, risk factors, or even causes of an impaired male fecundity-that is, the male component in the biological ability to reproduce. The most direct evaluation of fecundity is to measure the time it takes to conceive. Since the time of conception may be missed in the case of an early abortion, time to get pregnant is often measured as the time it takes to obtain a conception that survives until a clinically recognized pregnancy or even a pregnancy that ends with a live born child occurs. A prolonged time required to produce pregnancy may therefore be due to a failure to conceive or a failure to maintain a pregnancy until clinical recognition. Studies that focus on quantitative changes in fecundity (that does not cause sterility should in principle be possible in a pregnancy sample. The most important limitation in fertility studies is that the design requires equal persistency in trying to become pregnant and rather similar fertility desires and family planning methods in the groups to be compared. This design is probably achievable in exposure studies that make comparisons with reasonable comparable groups concerning social conditions and use of contraceptive methods.

  4. PHYSIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF MALE ALCOHOLISM

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhury, S.; Das, S. K.; Mishra, B.S.; Ukil, B.; Bhardwaj, P.; Bhardwaj, R; Dinker, N.L.

    2002-01-01

    In 100 consecutive male inpatients with alcohol dependence and an equal number of age, sex, occupation and regional background matched controls, the value ofgamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and serum triglycerides were statistically significantly raised among alcoholics on admission as compared to controls. After five weeks of enforced abstinence in hospital the values...

  5. [Assisted procreation for male indication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royère, D

    1993-04-15

    Strategy for male infertility looks like a compromise between diagnosis methods with their efficacy and complexity and treatment with their own risks, cost, efficacy. Infertility duration as well as woman's fertility play a key role for such a strategy. Definitive infertility without any correction (secretory azoospermia) will be proposed for alternate projects. Some situations may benefit from specific therapy (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, anejaculations or retrograde ejaculation). More frequently male hypofertility is suspected with non specific sperm alterations, then assisted reproductive technologies will be discussed. Intra-cervical way artificial insemination with husband semen may be proposed in case of hypospadias, anejaculation, retrograde ejaculation, small volume ejaculate or self-cryostored semen, however negative post-coital test, positive crossed penetration test and positive post-insemination test need to be confirmed. Intrauterine way enhance fertilizing probability by discarding cervical step. It will be justified in case of negative post-coital test as well as crossed penetration test except that sperm preparation allowed to inseminate 500,000 to 1 million motile spermatozoa. Both rigorous monitoring and synchronism between insemination and ovulation enhance the efficacy of IU AIH which allowed a two to four fold increase in the pregnancy rate on a total of six cycles. In vitro fertilization for male factor represent around 15% of all IVF attempts. Both decrease in the fertilization rate and the increase in the pregnancy rate by transfer as compared with tubal factor are well accepted. The fertilization failure remain difficult to explain and need to be cautiously confirmed. Thus IVF represent an actual fertilization test but remain limited by the heterogeneity of parameters under "male factor".(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Male reproductive health and yoga

    OpenAIRE

    Pallav Sengupta; Prasenjit Chaudhuri; Koushik Bhattacharya

    2013-01-01

    Now-a-days reproductive health problems along with infertility in male is very often observed. Various Assisted Reproductive Technologies have been introduced to solve the problem, but common people cannot afford the cost of such procedures. Various ayurvedic and other alternative medicines, along with regular yoga practice are proven to be not only effective to enhance the reproductive health in men to produce a successful pregnancy, but also to regulate sexual desire in men who practice cel...

  7. Male Spine Motion During Coitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorkewicz, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Repeated measures design. Objective. To describe male spine movement and posture characteristics during coitus and compare these characteristics across 5 common coital positions. Summary of Background Data. Exacerbation of pain during coitus due to coital movements and positions is a prevalent issue reported by low back pain patients. A biomechanical analysis of spine movements and postures during coitus has never been conducted. Methods. Ten healthy males and females engaged in coitus in the following preselected positions and variations: QUADRUPED, MISSIONARY, and SIDELYING. An optoelectronic motion capture system was used to measure 3-dimensional lumbar spine angles that were normalized to upright standing. To determine whether each coital position had distinct spine kinematic profiles, separate univariate general linear models, followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference post hoc analysis were used. The presentation of coital positions was randomized. Results. Both variations of QUADRUPED, mQUAD1 and mQUAD2, were found to have a significantly higher cycle speed than mSIDE (P = 0.043 and P = 0.034, respectively), mMISS1 (P = 0.003 and P = 0.002, respectively), and mMISS2 (P = 0.001 and P spine movement varied depending on the coital position; however, across all positions, the majority of the range of motion used was in flexion. Based on range of motion, the least-to-most recommended positions for a male flexion-intolerant patient are mSIDE, mMISS2, mQUAD2, mMISS1, and mQUAD1. Conclusion. Initial recommendations—which include specific coital positions to avoid, movement strategies, and role of the partner—were developed for male patients whose low back pain is exacerbated by specific motions and postures. Level of Evidence: N/A PMID:25208042

  8. Genetic aspects of male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Witczak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, infertility affects up to 140 million people worldwide. It is considered that the male factor is responsible for nearly a half of problems in obtaining pregnancy. Increasingly, infertility treatment clinics, as well as standard examinations, also offer genetic tests in the diagnostics of the male infertility factor, such as: karyotype analysis, detection of Y chromosome microdeletions, and examination of the chromosome composition of sperm by the fluorescent in situ hybridisation method (FISH. Genetic factors, defined to date, which cover both chromosomal aberrations and monogenic disorders, are responsible for approximately 10–15% of cases of male infertility. Usually, their phenotypic manifestations are disorders in spermatogenesis, structural changes in the genital organs (e.g. reduced size of the testicles, or sperm dysfunction. Molecular studies intensively carried out in the area of diagnostics and treatment of infertility indicate an increasingly large number of relationships between genetic factors and fertility; however, many genes related with human fertility still remain unidentified.

  9. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary L Harton; Helen G Tempest

    2012-01-01

    infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family.Despite this,the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered.Nevertheless,more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified.This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically:chromosomal aneuploidy,structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions.Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans.Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin,but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts.Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm.Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed,as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases.Clinical recommendations where possible will be made,as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility.

  10. Male factor infertility and ART

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Herman Tournaye

    2012-01-01

    For years,the management and treatment of male factor infertility has been ‘experience’ and not ‘evidence’ based.Although not evidence-based,current clinical practice involves extensive use of assisted reproductive techniques (ART).Where specific treatments are not indicated or have failed,ART have become popular adjunctive treatments for alleviating male factor infertility.According to the limited evidence available,intrauterine insemination (IUI) may be considered as a first-line treatment in a couple in which the female partner has a normal fertility status and at least 1x 106 progressively motile spermatozoa are recovered after sperm preparation.If no pregnancy is achieved after 3-6 cycles of IUI,optimized in vitro fertilization (IVF) can be proposed.When less than 0.5x 106 progressively motile spermatozoa are obtained after seminal fluid processing or sperm are recovered surgically from the testis or epididymis,intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) should be performed.Although the outcome of no other ART has ever been scrutinized as much before,no large-scale ‘macroproblems’ have as yet been observed after ICSI.Yet,ICSI candidates should be rigorously screened before embarking on IVF or ICSI,and thoroughly informed of the limitations of our knowledge on the hereditary aspects of male infertility and the safety aspects of ART.

  11. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harton, Gary L; Tempest, Helen G

    2012-01-01

    Infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family. Despite this, the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered. Nevertheless, more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified. This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically: chromosomal aneuploidy, structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions. Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans. Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin, but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts. Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm. Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed, as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases. Clinical recommendations where possible will be made, as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility.

  12. Surgical treatment for male prolactinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi-Jun; Chen, Mei-Ting; Lian, Wei; Xing, Bing; Yao, Yong; Feng, Ming; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A total of 184 cases of surgically treated male prolactinoma were analyzed retrospectively to summarize the outcome of this surgical intervention. We analyzed the general characteristics, clinical manifestations, hormone levels, imaging features, preoperative treatments, surgical outcomes, pathology results, and follow-up records for all included patients. The most common clinical manifestations included sexual dysfunction (47.4%), headache (55.9%), and visual disturbance (46.7%). Serum prolactin levels ranged from 150 to 204,952 ng/mL. Tumor size varied from 6 to 70 mm. Pituitary adenomas grew in a parasellar pattern with visual deficits occurring 40.7% of the time. After surgical therapy, 88.6% of patients achieved symptom relief, and 98.4% experienced an immediate postoperative decline in prolactin level. Fifty-seven patients (31.0%) achieved initial remission, and 26 patients (45.6%) experienced recurrence. Hence, our results suggest that in male prolactinoma characterized by a large pituitary diameter and high serum prolactin level, tumor size predicts the degree of gross resection. The prognostic predictors included preoperative tumor growth pattern and Ki-67 index. Citation: Yi-jun S, Mei-ting C, Wei L, Bing X, Yong Y, Ming F, Ren-zhi W. (2016) Surgical treatment for male prolactinoma: a retrospective study of 184 cases PMID:28079813

  13. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  14. Effect of Soybean on Male Reproductive Physiology in Male Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Modaresi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Soybean (Soja hispida Moench is a member of Fabaceae family. It is a species of legume native to East Asia. Soy contains significant amount of all the essential amino acids for humans therefore, is a good source of protein .Soy has an important role in the improvement and treatment of some cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of soybeans on reproductive system in male mice. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Isfahan Payam e Noor University in 2009. In this research, 32 male mice were randomly grouped into four experimental groups. The control group was fed with soy-free basic diet. The experimental groups 1, 2, and 3 were fed with a diet containing 20%, 30% and 50% soy diet respectively.At the end of 9 weeks of treatment, blood samples were collected and serum levels of testosterone, LH and FSH were measured. The collected data was analyzed with SPSS software using one way ANOVA with Dunnett's post test and Duncan test. Results : In the experimental group which received 20% soy diet, the level of testosterone had a meaningful decrease in comparison with the control group (P<0.05, but in the experimental group which received a 50% soy diet, the level of testosterone had a meaningful increase (P<0.05 .The LH level in 30% and 50% groups had a meaningful increase but no significant differences were observed in FSH level & weight of testicles (P<0.05.The number of sperms in all of the treatment regimes had a meaningful decrease (P0.05 Conclusion: Results of this research indicated that the 20, 30, and 50 percent soy diet had a negative effect on the male reproductive system in mice.

  15. The dynamics of male-male competition in Cardiocondyla obscurior ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Sylvia; Suefuji, Masaki; Schrempf, Alexandra; Heinze, Jürgen

    2012-06-15

    The outcome of male-male competition can be predicted from the relative fighting qualities of the opponents, which often depend on their age. In insects, freshly emerged and still sexually inactive males are morphologically indistinct from older, sexually active males. These young inactive males may thus be easy targets for older males if they cannot conceal themselves from their attacks. The ant Cardiocondyla obscurior is characterised by lethal fighting between wingless ("ergatoid") males. Here, we analyse for how long young males are defenceless after eclosion, and how early adult males can detect the presence of rival males. We found that old ergatoid males consistently won fights against ergatoid males younger than two days. Old males did not differentiate between different types of unpigmented pupae several days before emergence, but had more frequent contact to ready-to-eclose pupae of female sexuals and winged males than of workers and ergatoid males. In rare cases, old ergatoid males displayed alleviated biting of pigmented ergatoid male pupae shortly before adult eclosion, as well as copulation attempts to dark pupae of female sexuals and winged males. Ergatoid male behaviour may be promoted by a closer similarity of the chemical profile of ready-to-eclose pupae to the profile of adults than that of young pupae several days prior to emergence. Young ergatoid males of C. obscurior would benefit greatly by hiding their identity from older, resident males, as they are highly vulnerable during the first two days of their adult lives. In contrast to the winged males of the same species, which are able to prevent ergatoid male attacks by chemical female mimicry, young ergatoids do not seem to be able to produce a protective chemical profile. Conflicts in male-male competition between ergatoid males of different age thus seem to be resolved in favour of the older males. This might represent selection at the colony level rather than the individual level.

  16. The dynamics of male-male competition in Cardiocondyla obscurior ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cremer Sylvia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The outcome of male-male competition can be predicted from the relative fighting qualities of the opponents, which often depend on their age. In insects, freshly emerged and still sexually inactive males are morphologically indistinct from older, sexually active males. These young inactive males may thus be easy targets for older males if they cannot conceal themselves from their attacks. The ant Cardiocondyla obscurior is characterised by lethal fighting between wingless (“ergatoid” males. Here, we analyse for how long young males are defenceless after eclosion, and how early adult males can detect the presence of rival males. Results We found that old ergatoid males consistently won fights against ergatoid males younger than two days. Old males did not differentiate between different types of unpigmented pupae several days before emergence, but had more frequent contact to ready-to-eclose pupae of female sexuals and winged males than of workers and ergatoid males. In rare cases, old ergatoid males displayed alleviated biting of pigmented ergatoid male pupae shortly before adult eclosion, as well as copulation attempts to dark pupae of female sexuals and winged males. Ergatoid male behaviour may be promoted by a closer similarity of the chemical profile of ready-to-eclose pupae to the profile of adults than that of young pupae several days prior to emergence. Conclusion Young ergatoid males of C. obscurior would benefit greatly by hiding their identity from older, resident males, as they are highly vulnerable during the first two days of their adult lives. In contrast to the winged males of the same species, which are able to prevent ergatoid male attacks by chemical female mimicry, young ergatoids do not seem to be able to produce a protective chemical profile. Conflicts in male-male competition between ergatoid males of different age thus seem to be resolved in favour of the older males. This might represent selection

  17. Male-male and male-female aggression may influence mating associations in wild octopuses (Abdopus aculeatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffard, Christine L; Caldwell, Roy L; Boneka, Farnis

    2010-02-01

    Abdopus aculeatus engages in frequent aggression and copulation, exhibits male mate-choice, and employs multiple mating tactics. Here we draw upon established hypotheses to compare male-male aggression (MMA) and male-female aggression (MFA), as they relate to their mating behavior in the wild. When contesting for females, males appear to balance mate preference (resource value) with perceived chances of winning contests (resource holding potential). Although males spent more time mating with and contesting for large "Adjacent Guarded" females (those occupying a den within arm's reach of a large "Adjacent Guarding" male), they exhibited higher rates of aggression over nonadjacent "Temporarily Guarded" females that may be more accessible. The major determinant of male-male aggressive success was size, and this factor may dictate the expression of conditional mating tactics in males. "Adjacent Guarding" males were the largest and most aggressively successful males, earning the most time copulating with females. They are considered to have the highest resource holding potential (RHP) in MMA. By contrast, in MFA, some larger individuals fled from smaller individuals, indicating that RHP appears to be a function of both size and sex in intersexual aggression. This result suggests variation in aggressiveness, or potential for severe injury-even sexual cannibalism during MFA. Male-female aggression may also be influenced by the sexual nonreceptivity of some individuals, or attempts by both sexes to increase foraging behavior by delaying mate-guarding activity.

  18. Performing/Representing Male Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Costambeys-Kempczynski, Raphael; Hélie, Claire; Pellerin, Pierre-Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Masculinity, Men, Male In 1993, Michael S. Kimmel published a ground-breaking article entitled “Invisible Masculinity,” which began with a particularly striking opening statement: “American men have no history.” Kimmel argues that even if history books are largely written by men and are about men, they do not deal with the experience of men as men. Thus, for Kimmel, men have no history as “gendered selves” and the effect is to render the multiplicity of masculine identities invisible. Thanks ...

  19. Finasteride-associated male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Sidney Glina; Paulo Augusto Neves; Ricardo Saade; Nelson Rodrigues Netto Jr; Jonathas Borges Soares; Andrea Giannotti Galuppo

    2004-01-01

    Finasteride is a potent and specific inhibitor of the 5alpha-reductase enzyme in men. Clinical studies have shown that finasteride 1mg/day is effective for promoting hair growth in men with male pattern hair loss. However, there is a concern about the use of finasteride, especially in young fertile patients, because of its action on testosterone metabolism. This paper describes 3 cases of young patients who had very poor seminal quality during finasteride treatment (1 mg/day), and their semin...

  20. Imaging of male pelvic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Laura L; Scheinfeld, Meir H

    2012-11-01

    Prompt imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of male pelvic soft tissue trauma. Using appropriate imaging modalities, with optimization of contrast administration when appropriate, is essential for accurate diagnosis. Traumatic bladder rupture, either extraperitoneal or intraperitoneal, is diagnosed with high accuracy using computed tomography cystography. Suspicion of urethral injury warrants evaluation with retrograde urethrography to evaluate for the presence of injury and injury location. Early identification of laceration of the testicular tunica albuginea is essential. Understanding both normal penile anatomy and the imaging appearance of corpus rupture (as opposed to a hematoma) is imperative for proper diagnosis and management.

  1. Turbinski regulator za male hidroelektrarne

    OpenAIRE

    Bergoč, Primož

    2015-01-01

    V pričujočem delu je predstavljen razvoj turbinskega regulatorja za male hidroelektrarne s sinhronskim generatorjem. Turbinski regulator je pomemben člen vsakega hidro agregata, saj je njegova naloga vzdrževati turbino v želeni delovni točki glede na izbran režim obratovanja z reguliranjem odprtja izvršnih členov. Izvršni členi so lahko vodilnik, gonilnik ali iglasti ventil in odrezač, odvisno od vrste turbine. Algoritem turbinskega regulatorja smo izvedli na programirljivem logičnem krmi...

  2. Androgen action during male sex differentiation includes suppression of cranial suspensory ligament development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. Emmen (Judith); A. McLuskey; J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe cranial suspensory ligament is located on the border of the cranial (mesonephric) mesentery in adult female mammals, which runs between the cranial pole of the internal genitalia and the dorsal abdominal wall. Absence of the cranial suspensory ligament i

  3. Male Genitoplasty for Intersex Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate surgical procedures adopted for male genitoplasty in intersex disorders. Patients and Methods. Case records of intersex patients undergoing male genitoplasty from Pediatric Intersex clinic were studied. Results. Of 356 intersex cases undergoing urethroplasty from 1989–2007, the hypospadias was penoscrotal (68%, scrotal (17% and perineal (15%. 351 patients underwent chordee correction for mild: moderate: severe chordee in 24 : 136 : 191 cases. Byars flaps were fixed upto the corona in 267 cases. Urethroplasty performed was Theirsch duplay in 335 cases, Snodgrass in 16 cases and Ducketts onlay graft in 5 cases that did not require chordee correction. Age at urethroplasty was 2.5 years—22 years (mean 11.5 years, median—5.6 years. Penoscrotal transposition correction and testicular prosthesis insertion were performed independently. Complications included fistula (45, recurrent fistula (11, stricture (12, baggy urethra (8 and recurrent infection due to persistent vaginal pouch (5. Additional distal urethroplasty was required in 15 patients for previous urethroplasty done upto the corona 5–15 years earlier. Conclusion. Hypospadias in intersex disorders is associated with severe chordee in most cases and requires an early chordee correction to allow phallic growth, staged urethroplasty and multiple surgeries to achieve good cosmetic and functional results.

  4. Male genitoplasty for intersex disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shilpa; K Gupta, Devendra

    2008-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate surgical procedures adopted for male genitoplasty in intersex disorders. Patients and Methods. Case records of intersex patients undergoing male genitoplasty from Pediatric Intersex clinic were studied. Results. Of 356 intersex cases undergoing urethroplasty from 1989-2007, the hypospadias was penoscrotal (68%), scrotal (17%) and perineal (15%). 351 patients underwent chordee correction for mild: moderate: severe chordee in 24 : 136 : 191 cases. Byars flaps were fixed upto the corona in 267 cases. Urethroplasty performed was Theirsch duplay in 335 cases, Snodgrass in 16 cases and Ducketts onlay graft in 5 cases that did not require chordee correction. Age at urethroplasty was 2.5 years-22 years (mean 11.5 years, median-5.6 years). Penoscrotal transposition correction and testicular prosthesis insertion were performed independently. Complications included fistula (45), recurrent fistula (11), stricture (12), baggy urethra (8) and recurrent infection due to persistent vaginal pouch (5). Additional distal urethroplasty was required in 15 patients for previous urethroplasty done upto the corona 5-15 years earlier. Conclusion. Hypospadias in intersex disorders is associated with severe chordee in most cases and requires an early chordee correction to allow phallic growth, staged urethroplasty and multiple surgeries to achieve good cosmetic and functional results.

  5. Genetics of human male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poongothai, J; Gopenath, T S; Manonayaki, S

    2009-04-01

    Infertility is defined as a failure to conceive in a couple trying to reproduce for a period of two years without conception. Approximately 15 percent of couples are infertile, and among these couples, male factor infertility accounts for approximately 50 percent of causes. Male infertility is a multifactorial syndrome encompassing a wide variety of disorders. In more than half of infertile men, the cause of their infertility is unknown (idiopathic) and could be congenital or acquired. Infertility in men can be diagnosed initially by semen analysis. Seminograms of infertile men may reveal many abnormal conditions, which include azoospermia, oligozoospermia, teratozoospermia, asthenozoospermia, necrospermia and pyospermia. The current estimate is that about 30 percent of men seeking help at the infertility clinic are found to have oligozoospermia or azoospermia of unknown aetiology. Therefore, there is a need to find the cause of infertility. The causes are known in less than half of these cases, out of which genetic or inherited disease and specific abnormalities in the Y chromosome are major factors. About 10-20 percent of males presenting without sperm in the ejaculate carry a deletion of the Y chromosome. This deleted region includes the Azoospermia Factor (AZF) locus, located in the Yq11, which is divided into four recurrently deleted non-overlapping subregions designated as AZFa, AZFb, AZFc and AZFd. Each of these regions may be associated with a particular testicular histology, and several candidate genes have been found within these regions. The Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ) gene family is reported to be the most frequently deleted AZF candidate gene and is located in the AZFc region. Recently, a partial, novel Y chromosome 1.6-Mb deletion, designated "gr/gr" deletion, has been described specifically in infertile men with varying degrees of spermatogenic failure. The DAZ gene has an autosomal homologue, DAZL (DAZ-Like), on the short arm of the chromosome 3 (3

  6. GETDB: 113798 [GETDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available quest - pepper. Some cells looks like those in 5G. oenocyte checked genitalia (ma...ks like those in 5G. Larval GFP oenocyte Larval X-gal checked Adult GFP genitalia (male, female). Lethality

  7. GETDB: 113421 [GETDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available st - muscle subset? AS tr fusion cell sg genitalia (male only). - - - - - - - Sho...ryonic Expression muscle subset? AS Larval GFP tr fusion cell Larval X-gal sg Adult GFP genitalia

  8. Complications of traditional circumcision amongst young Xhosa males seen at St Lucy's Hospital, Tsolo, Eastern Cape, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anike, Ugochukwu; Ndimande, John V.; Tumbo, John

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Traditional circumcision of males is common amongst many societies in sub-Saharan Africa. Circumcision amongst the Xhosa people of South Africa represents a rite of passage to manhood. Traditional male circumcision has an increased risk for complications that include sepsis, genital mutilation, gangrenous penis, excessive bleeding, dehydration, renal failure and death. The aim of this study was to describe the complications of traditional circumcisions amongst Xhosa men as seen at St. Lucy's Hospital in the Eastern Cape Province. Method A cross-sectional descriptive quantitative study was conducted in 2008. Records of 105 males admitted to St. Lucy's Hospital with complications following traditional circumcision were reviewed. Data collected included age, education level, race, reasons for circumcision, complications, the period of circumcision, duration of hospital stay and the outcomes. Descriptive data analysis was performed using statistical software SPSS 17.0. Results The ages ranged from 15–35 years with 68 (64.8%) between 15–19 years. 83 (79%) had a secondary level of education, 16 (15.2%) primary, 5 (4.8%) tertiary and 1% had no education. 60 (57%) were circumcised as initiation to manhood, 21 (20.0%) due to peer pressure, 20 (19.0%) for cultural reasons, and 1 (1.0%) was forced. The complications were sepsis (59 [56.2%]), genital mutilation (28 [26.7%]), dehydration (12 [11.4%]) and amputation of genitalia (6 [5.7%]).Fifty-nine (56.2%) patients were circumcised in winter. 79 (75.2%) were circumcised in the forest, and 25 (23.8%) in initiation centres. Fifty-eight (55.2%) were circumcised by traditionalists, and 47 (44.8%) by tribal elders (initiators). Hospital stays ranged from 8 to 28 days. 66% were healed and discharged, and 29 (27.6%) were referred to higher centres of care. Conclusion Genital sepsis was the most common complication of traditional male circumcision. Complications were related to the circumciser, advanced age of

  9. Hypersexual desire in males: are males with paraphilias different from males with paraphilia-related disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Martin P; Hennen, John

    2003-10-01

    The assessment of current sexual behavior (fantasies, urges, and activities) and sexual preoccupation (measured in min/day) associated with both conventional (i.e., adult relationship-associated) or unconventional (paraphilia and paraphilia-related) sexual behavior were ascertained from a sample of 120 consecutively evaluated males with paraphilias (PA; n = 88, including sex offender paraphiliacs; n = 60) and paraphilia-related disorders (PRD; n = 32). In addition, an assessment of hypersexual desire, defined as the highest sustained period (at least 6 months minimum duration) of persistently enacted sexual behavior (total sexual outlet/week [TSO] after age 15) was assessed. In almost all measures, the PA and PRD groups were not statistically significantly different. The average PA or PRD reported a mean hypersexual TSO of 11.7 +/- 7.3, a mean age of 21.6 +/- 7.1 years at onset of peak hypersexual behavior, and a mean duration of 6.2 +/- 7.6 years of hypersexual TSO. When the sample was stratified into three subgroups on the basis of the lifetime number of PAs + PRDs as a proxy measure of the severity of sexual impulsivity, the "high" group, with at least 5 lifetime PAs and PRDs, consisted of all paraphilic males, predominantly sex offenders, who self-reported the highest hypersexual desire (14.3 +/- 7.9), the highest current TSO/week (9.9 +/- 8.1), the most current sexual preoccupation (2-4 hr/day), and the highest likelihood of incarceration secondary to paraphilic sex-offending behavior. Although hypersexual desire, a quantitative measure of enacted sexual behaviours, may be a meaningful construct for clinically derived samples, the incidence and prevalence of hypersexual desire in community samples of males with paraphilias and paraphilia-related disorders is unknown.

  10. Aging changes in the male reproductive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004017.htm Aging changes in the male reproductive system To use ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Aging changes in the male reproductive system may include ...

  11. Suffering in Silence: The Male Incest Victim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasjleti, Maria

    1980-01-01

    The reasons why boys who are victims of incest remain silent are explored in terms of the special meaning of victimization to males. Males' inability to express helplessness and vulnerability is identified as a major contributing factor. (CM)

  12. Psychobiology of Male Homosexuality: Recent Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Annicchiarico Iseda, Ivan Darío; Universidad Nacional de Colombia

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, empirical and theoretical reports which question the causes of male homosexuality are examined. According to these reports, male homosexuality differs from female homosexuality in some respects. Additionally, evidence favouring the consideration of male homosexuality as a biological condition is shown: there are brain differences between gay men and heterosexual men, there are genetic and perinatal factors associated to male homosexuality, there are cognitive and behavioral dif...

  13. Sperm investment in male meadow voles is affected by the condition of the nearby male conspecifics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Ashlee A; Delbarco-Trillo, Javier; Ferkin, Michael H

    2008-11-01

    Sperm competition occurs when 2 or more males copulate with a particular female during the same reproductive cycle, and their sperm compete to fertilize the female's available eggs. One strategy that male voles use to assess the risk and intensity of sperm competition involves responding to the presence of scent marks of conspecific males found near a sexually receptive female. Previously, we have shown that if a male vole copulated with a female while he was in the presence of the odors of another male he increased his sperm investment relative to his investment if another male's odors were not present. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that males assess differences in the relative quality of competing males and adjust their sperm investment accordingly. We did so by allowing males to copulate when they were exposed to the scent mark of a 24-h food-deprived male (low-quality male) or the scent mark of a male that was not food deprived (high-quality male). The data indicate that male meadow voles did not increase their sperm investment during copulation when exposed to the scent mark of a food-deprived male but did so when they were exposed to the scent mark of a male that was not food deprived. The results support the hypothesis that male voles are able to adjust sperm investment when they encounter the scent marks of males that differ in quality.

  14. Male Osteoporosis in Our Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seher Kocaoğlu

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Male osteoporosis is encountered as an important problem in clinical medicine in the recent years. Our purpose was to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD of vertebrae (L2-L4 and femur (neck and Wards distributed according to age groups in males who applied to physical therapy and rehabilitation and osteoporosis units. Age, height, weight of the patients were measured. Patients with diseases causing secondary osteoporosis were excluded. Lomber vertebral and femoral scores of 110 patients between ages of 22-87 were measured with Lunar DPX 6956 (DEXA. They were classified as normal, osteopenic and osteoporotic based on WHO criteria. Rate of osteopenia and osteoporosis on the basis of lomber t scores were 55.6% and 11.1% in patients between 20-29 years, 40% and 10% in patients between 30-39 years, 18.2% and 27.3% in patients between 40-49 years, 26.3% and 36.8% in patients between 50-59 years, 40.9% and 27.3% in patients 60-69 years, 33.3% and 23.3% in patients 70-79 years, 14.3% and 14.3% in patients between 80-89 years respectively. Rate of osteopenia and osteoporosis on the basis of femur t scores were 11.1% and 11.1% in patients between 20-29 years, 30% and 10% in patients between 30-39 years, 36.4% and 18.2% in patients between 40-49 years, 63.2% and 15.8% in patients between 50-59 years, 54.5% and 31.8% in patients between 60-69 years, 46.9% and 25% in patients between 70-79 years, 28.6% and 28.6% in patients between 80-89 years. As a conclusion of our study we want to draw attention to age at which a decrease in the bone mineral density of male patients starts, and we suggest that neccessary precautions must be taken.

  15. 46,XY DSD with Female or Ambiguous External Genitalia at Birth due to Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome, 5-Reductase-2 Deficiency, or 17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A Review of Quality of Life Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazur Tom

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of sex development refer to a collection of congenital conditions in which atypical development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sex occurs. Studies of 46,XY DSD have focused largely on gender identity, gender role, and sexual orientation. Few studies have focused on other domains, such as physical and mental health, that may contribute to a person's quality of life. The current review focuses on information published since 1955 pertaining to psychological well-being, cognition, general health, fertility, and sexual function in people affected by androgen insensitivity syndromes, 5- reductase-2 deficiency, or 17-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-3 deficiency—reared male or female. The complete form of androgen insensitivity syndrome has been the focus of the largest number of investigations in domains other than gender. Despite this, all of the conditions included in the current review are under-studied. Realms identified for further study include psychological well-being, cognitive abilities, general health, fertility, and sexual function. Such investigations would not only improve the quality of life for those affected by DSD but may also provide information for improving physical and mental health in the general population.

  16. Value Profiles of Male and Female Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Lloyd W., Jr.; Solomon, George T.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of the values of 86 male and 74 female entrepreneurs found males' highest terminal values being pleasure and true friendship while females' highest terminal values were health and self-respect. High instrumental values for males were ambition and broadmindedness; while for females high instrumental values were honesty and…

  17. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:24319497

  18. Foreskin Morbidity in Uncircumcised Males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, Ida; Thorup, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: As a consequence of the discussion on whether the health benefits of newborn male circumcision outweigh the risks and the discrepancies in reported figures of complications, we evaluated the incidence and morbidity of foreskin surgery due to medical indications in boys from the Capital...... Region of Denmark in 2014. METHODS: Medical records from all boys operated on the foreskin due to medical reasons in the Capital Region in 2014 were reviewed. Patients with hypospadias, ritual circumcision, and redo-surgery because of complications to nontherapeutic circumcision were excluded. RESULTS......: A total of 181 patients were included. The cumulative risk of undergoing foreskin operation before 18 years of age was 1.7%. Forty patients had histologic verified balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO) corresponding to a total risk of 0.37% of developing BXO. Mean age at surgery was 10.1 years (range 1...

  19. Muscle dysfunction in male hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, A K; Katiyar, B C; Misra, S; Thacker, A K; Singh, N K

    1986-05-01

    Twenty-eight consecutive male patients with primary and secondary hypogonadism (14 each) were evaluated clinically and electrophysiologically for muscle dysfunction. Although generalised muscle weakness was initially reported by only 9 patients, on direct questioning, it was recorded in 19. Objective weakness was found in 13 patients and it involved both the proximal and distal limb muscles. Quantitative electromyography showed evidence of myopathy in the proximal muscle in 25 patients, i.e., reduced MUP duration and amplitude with increased polyphasia in the deltoid and the gluteus maximus. There were no denervation potentials. None of the patients showed clinical neuropathy or NCV abnormalities. Thus, the profile of muscle involvement in hypogonadism closely simulates limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and other endocrine myopathies. The incidence of muscle involvement was higher in secondary hypogonadism. Diminished androgens in primary hypogonadism and diminished growth hormone in the secondary hypogonadism are probably responsible for the myopathy.

  20. Male sexuality with advancing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Andreas; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard

    2004-04-15

    People aged 60 years or older are commonly given the image of grandparents who are sexually rather inactive. However, a high percentage of men over 60 years have sexual desires and are sexually active. Aging men need more time and more direct stimulation of the penis to achieve full erection. The risk of developing erectile dysfunction increases with age. Almost one man in 22 aged 60-69 years without previous erection problems develops erectile dysfunction within 1 year. Hormone replacement therapy is only indicated if testosterone deficiency is combined with the syndrome of the "aging male" and lack of other disorders that are possibly causative and could be treated. For hormone replacement therapy testosterone gel preparations are preferable because they have a short half-time and can be immediately discontinued in the event that a pre-existing occult prostate carcinoma is stimulated.

  1. Male reproductive health and yoga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Pallav; Chaudhuri, Prasenjit; Bhattacharya, Koushik

    2013-07-01

    Now-a-days reproductive health problems along with infertility in male is very often observed. Various Assisted Reproductive Technologies have been introduced to solve the problem, but common people cannot afford the cost of such procedures. Various ayurvedic and other alternative medicines, along with regular yoga practice are proven to be not only effective to enhance the reproductive health in men to produce a successful pregnancy, but also to regulate sexual desire in men who practice celibacy. Yoga is reported to reduce stress and anxiety, improve autonomic functions by triggering neurohormonal mechanisms by the suppression of sympathetic activity, and even, today, several reports suggested regular yoga practice from childhood is beneficial for reproductive health. In this regard the present review is aimed to provide all the necessary information regarding the effectiveness of yoga practice to have a better reproductive health and to prevent infertility.

  2. Male reproductive health and yoga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallav Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Now-a-days reproductive health problems along with infertility in male is very often observed. Various Assisted Reproductive Technologies have been introduced to solve the problem, but common people cannot afford the cost of such procedures. Various ayurvedic and other alternative medicines, along with regular yoga practice are proven to be not only effective to enhance the reproductive health in men to produce a successful pregnancy, but also to regulate sexual desire in men who practice celibacy. Yoga is reported to reduce stress and anxiety, improve autonomic functions by triggering neurohormonal mechanisms by the suppression of sympathetic activity, and even, today, several reports suggested regular yoga practice from childhood is beneficial for reproductive health. In this regard the present review is aimed to provide all the necessary information regarding the effectiveness of yoga practice to have a better reproductive health and to prevent infertility.

  3. Functional rare males in diploid parthenogenetic Artemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, M; Gómez, A; Hontoria, F; Amat, F

    2013-09-01

    Functional males that are produced occasionally in some asexual taxa - called 'rare males' - raise considerable evolutionary interest, as they might be involved in the origin of new parthenogenetic lineages. Diploid parthenogenetic Artemia produce rare males, which may retain the ability to mate with females of related sexual lineages. Here, we (i) describe the frequency of male progeny in populations of diploid parthenogenetic Artemia, (ii) characterize rare males morphologically, (iii) assess their reproductive role, using cross-mating experiments with sexual females of related species from Central Asia and characterize the F1 hybrid offspring viability and (iv) confirm genetically both the identity and functionality of rare males using DNA barcoding and microsatellite loci. Our result suggests that these males may have an evolutionary role through genetic exchange with related sexual species and that diploid parthenogenetic Artemia is a good model system to investigate the evolutionary transitions between sexual species and parthenogenetic strains.

  4. [Brain mechanisms of male sexual function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Dou, Xin; Li, Jun-Fa; Luo, Yan-Lin

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we reviewed the brain imaging studies of male sexual function in recent years from three aspects: the brain mechanism of normal sexual function, the brain mechanism of sexual dysfunction, and the mechanism of drug therapy for sexual dysfunction. Studies show that the development stages of male sexual activities, such as the excitement phase, plateau phase and orgasm phase, are controlled by different neural networks. The mesodiencephalic transition zone may play an important role in the start up of male ejaculation. There are significant differences between sexual dysfunction males and normal males in activation patterns of the brain in sexual arousal. The medial orbitofrontal cortex and inferior frontal gyrus in the abnormal activation pattern are correlated with sexual dysfunction males in sexual arousal. Serum testosterone and morphine are commonly used drugs for male sexual dysfunction, whose mechanisms are to alter the activating levels of the medial orbitofrontal cortex, insula, claustrum and inferior temporal gyrus.

  5. Cytokinesis in plant male meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Storme, Nico; Geelen, Danny

    2013-03-01

    In somatic cell division, cytokinesis is the final step of the cell cycle and physically divides the mother cytoplasm into two daughter cells. In the meiotic cell division, however, pollen mother cells (PMCs) undergo two successive nuclear divisions without an intervening S-phase and consequently generate four haploid daughter nuclei out of one parental cell. In line with this, the physical separation of meiotic nuclei does not follow the conventional cytokinesis pathway, but instead is mediated by alternative processes, including polar-based phragmoplast outgrowth and RMA-mediated cell wall positioning. In this review, we outline the different cytological mechanisms of cell plate formation operating in different types of PMCs and additionally focus on some important features associated with male meiotic cytokinesis, including cytoskeletal dynamics and callose deposition. We also provide an up-to-date overview of the main molecular actors involved in PMC wall formation and additionally highlight some recent advances on the effect of cold stress on meiotic cytokinesis in plants.

  6. Male hypogonadism: Symptoms and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Male hypogonadism is a condition in which the body does not produce enough of the testosterone hormone; the hormone that plays a key role in masculine growth and development during puberty. There is a clear need to increase the awareness of hypogonadism throughout the medical profession, especially in primary care physicians who are usually the first port of call for the patient. Hypogonadism can significantly reduce the quality of life and has resulted in the loss of livelihood and separation of couples, leading to divorce. It is also important for doctors to recognize that testosterone is not just a sex hormone. There is an important research being published to demonstrate that testosterone may have key actions on metabolism, on the vasculature, and on brain function, in addition to its well-known effects on bone and body composition. This article has been used as an introduction for the need to develop sensitive and reliable assays for sex hormones and for symptoms and treatment of hypogonadism.

  7. Apparel Buying Behaviors Of black Males and White Males When Purchasing Men's Business Suits

    OpenAIRE

    Gravely, Terry Maurice

    1999-01-01

    More information is needed to understand the Black male consumer. Although expanding in the past five years, research about the buying behaviors of consumers has tended to avoid males, particularly Black males. Retailers and marketers should understand the immense diversity among consumers if they are to market apparel accurately and successfully. The purpose of this research was to investigate Black males and Whites males to examine if differences in their buying behavior for appar...

  8. Apparel Buying Behaviors of Black Males and White Males When Purchasing Men's Business Suits

    OpenAIRE

    Gravely, Terry Maurice

    1999-01-01

    More information is needed to understand the Black male consumer. Although expanding in the past five years, research about the buying behaviors of consumers has tended to avoid males, particularly Black males. Retailers and marketers should understand the immense diversity among consumers if they are to market apparel accurately and successfully. The purpose of this research was to investigate Black males and Whites males to examine if differences in their buying behavior for appar...

  9. Grooming reciprocity in male Tibetan macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dong-Po; Li, Jin-Hua; Garber, Paul A; Matheson, Megan D; Sun, Bing-Hua; Zhu, Yong

    2013-10-01

    In several primate species, adult males are reported to compete for access to reproductive partners as well as forming affiliative and cohesive social bonds based on the exchange of goods or services. We hypothesized that among a broad set of fitness-maximizing strategies, grooming can be used by individual adult males to enhance social relationships through reciprocity and/or through the interchange of grooming for a different but equivalent good or service. We used focal animal sampling and continuously recorded dyadic grooming and agonistic interactions to test a series of predictions regarding male social interactions in a free-ranging group of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Huangshan, China. During the non-mating season or between males of similar rank throughout the year, grooming effort given was matched by grooming effort received. However, lower ranking males groomed higher ranking males at a greater rate and/or for a longer duration during both the mating and non-mating periods. We found that higher ranking males directed less aggression towards males with whom they formed a frequent grooming partnership, indicating that grooming received was interchanged for increased social tolerance. These data suggest that individual male Tibetan macaques employ alternative social strategies associated with grooming reciprocity or interchange depending on dominance rank and rates of aggression, and highlight the importance of both biological markets and grooming reciprocity as behavioral mechanisms used by resident adult males to form and maintain affiliative social bonds.

  10. Complications of traditional circumcision amongst young Xhosa males seen at St Lucy’s Hospital, Tsolo, Eastern Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugochukwu Anike

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditional circumcision of males is common amongst many societies in sub-Saharan Africa. Circumcision amongst the Xhosa people of South Africa represents a rite of passage to manhood. Traditional male circumcision has an increased risk for complications that include sepsis, genitalmutilation, gangrenous penis, excessive bleeding, dehydration, renal failure and death. The aim of this study was to describe the complications of traditional circumcisions amongst Xhosa men as seen at St. Lucy’s Hospital in the Eastern Cape Province.Method: A cross-sectional descriptive quantitative study was conducted in 2008. Records of 105 malesadmitted to St. Lucy’s Hospital with complications following traditional circumcision were reviewed. Data collected included age, education level, race, reasons for circumcision, complications, the period of circumcision, duration of hospital stay and the outcomes. Descriptive data analysis was performed using statistical software SPSS 17.0.Results: The ages ranged from 15–35 years with 68 (64.8% between 15–19 years. 83 (79% had a secondarylevel of education, 16 (15.2% primary, 5 (4.8% tertiary and 1% had no education. 60 (57% werecircumcised as initiation to manhood, 21 (20.0% due to peer pressure, 20 (19.0% for cultural reasons, and 1(1.0% was forced. The complications were sepsis (59 [56.2%], genital mutilation (28 [26.7%], dehydration(12 [11.4%] and amputation of genitalia (6 [5.7%].Fifty-nine (56.2% patients were circumcised in winter.79 (75.2% were circumcised in the forest, and 25 (23.8% in initiation centres. Fifty-eight (55.2% werecircumcised by traditionalists, and 47 (44.8% by tribal elders (initiators. Hospital stays ranged from 8 to28 days. 66% were healed and discharged, and 29 (27.6% were referred to higher centres of care.Conclusion: Genital sepsis was the most common complication of traditional male circumcision.Complications were related to the circumciser, advanced age of the patient

  11. Complications of traditional circumcision amongst young Xhosa males seen at St Lucy’s Hospital, Tsolo, Eastern Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugochukwu Anike

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditional circumcision of males is common amongst many societies in sub-Saharan Africa. Circumcision amongst the Xhosa people of South Africa represents a rite of passage to manhood. Traditional male circumcision has an increased risk for complications that include sepsis, genitalmutilation, gangrenous penis, excessive bleeding, dehydration, renal failure and death. The aim of this study was to describe the complications of traditional circumcisions amongst Xhosa men as seen at St. Lucy’s Hospital in the Eastern Cape Province.Method: A cross-sectional descriptive quantitative study was conducted in 2008. Records of 105 malesadmitted to St. Lucy’s Hospital with complications following traditional circumcision were reviewed. Data collected included age, education level, race, reasons for circumcision, complications, the period of circumcision, duration of hospital stay and the outcomes. Descriptive data analysis was performed using statistical software SPSS 17.0.Results: The ages ranged from 15–35 years with 68 (64.8% between 15–19 years. 83 (79% had a secondarylevel of education, 16 (15.2% primary, 5 (4.8% tertiary and 1% had no education. 60 (57% werecircumcised as initiation to manhood, 21 (20.0% due to peer pressure, 20 (19.0% for cultural reasons, and 1(1.0% was forced. The complications were sepsis (59 [56.2%], genital mutilation (28 [26.7%], dehydration(12 [11.4%] and amputation of genitalia (6 [5.7%].Fifty-nine (56.2% patients were circumcised in winter.79 (75.2% were circumcised in the forest, and 25 (23.8% in initiation centres. Fifty-eight (55.2% werecircumcised by traditionalists, and 47 (44.8% by tribal elders (initiators. Hospital stays ranged from 8 to28 days. 66% were healed and discharged, and 29 (27.6% were referred to higher centres of care.Conclusion: Genital sepsis was the most common complication of traditional male circumcision.Complications were related to the circumciser, advanced age of the patient

  12. Male Hypogonadism. A Case Report Hipogonadismo masculino. Presentación de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisandro Hernández Madrazo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The case of a 26 years old male patient who attended the Internal Medicine consultation at the La Fortaleza Integral Diagnostic Center in Maracaibo, Zulia State, Venezuela because of decreased external genitalia size, with poor development from childhood and swelling of the breasts is presented. Physical examination showed a trunk of feminoid configuration caused by adipose tissue accumulated in the lower abdomen, breast and pubic; wide pelvis; lower limb dominance over higher limbs; enucoid proportions; volume diffusely  increased in both breasts (gynecomastia; deposit of fatty tissue at the pelvic girdle, and absent or sparse facial, axillary and pubic hair. We observed decreased size, poor pigmentation, and soft consistency in penis and testicles. Exam was performed on plasma testosterone, luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone, thus concluding, by the Endocrinology Service at the Maracaibo University Hospital, to be the case of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism of improvable cause. The clinical diagnosis of hypogonadism in adults is unusual in medical practice, a fact that provides with relevance the case we present.Se presenta el caso de un paciente de 26 años, que acudió a consulta de Medicina Interna en el Centro de Diagnóstico Integral La Fortaleza, Maracaibo, Estado Zulia, Venezuela, por presentar disminución del tamaño de los genitales externos, con escaso desarrollo de estos desde su niñez, y aumento de volumen de las mamas. Al examen físico se constató un tronco de configuración feminoide por panículo adiposo acumulado en bajo vientre, mama y pubis; pelvis ancha; predominio de las extremidades inferiores sobre las superiores, proporciones eunucoides; aumento de volumen de forma difusa en ambas mamas (ginecomastia; depósito de tejido graso a nivel de la cintura pélvica; y ausente o escaso vello facial, axilar y pubiano. Se observó tamaño disminuido, escasa pigmentación, y consistencia blanda, en pene y test

  13. In vivo models for male reproductive toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyl, Rochelle W

    2002-05-01

    In Vivo Models for Male Reproductive Toxicology (Rochelle W. Tyl, Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina). Assessment of male reproductive function requires a specific set of evaluations of the various steps in successful mating from sperm production to copulation to fertilization to production of a viable litter. This unit outlines the measurements that are standard for determining the effects of treatment with toxicant on the reproductive capacity of male mice and rats.

  14. Paget disease of the male nipple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Harroudi T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer occurring in the mammary gland of men is infrequent. It accounts for 0.8% of all breast cancers, which is less than one per cent of all newly diagnosed male cancers and 0.2% of male cancer deaths. However, Paget disease of the male nipple is extremely rare. We report a single case of Paget disease with infiltrative ductal carcinoma of the breast in a 61-year-old man.

  15. The Epidemiology of Male Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferzoco, Raina M; Ruddy, Kathryn J

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease, accounting for only 1% of breast cancer diagnoses in the USA. The current literature suggests that genetic factors including BRCA2 mutations, family history, age, androgen/estrogen imbalance, and environmental exposures may predispose to male breast cancer. In this manuscript, we will review known and possible risk factors for male breast cancer, as well as describe the clinical patterns of the disease.

  16. Sexually Antagonistic Selection in Human Male Homosexuality

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Camperio Ciani; Paolo Cermelli; Giovanni Zanzotto

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of h...

  17. Codependency in male and female helping professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martsolf, D S; Hughes-Hammer, C; Estok, P; Zeller, R A

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine and compare the prevalence of codependency in a group of 77 female and a group of 72 male helping professionals. Relatively low rates of codependency were observed in this sample, and the five-factor structure of the Codependency Assessment Tool (CODAT) was replicated. Males showed slightly higher codependency than females on the total CODAT and on the Hiding Self and Family of Origin Issues subscales. The CODAT was shown to be relevant to both males and females. Further research is needed to determine if a general population of male and female subjects would yield similar results.

  18. A consumer study of entire male pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godt, Jannik; Kristensen, Kai; Poulsen, Carsten Stig;

    1996-01-01

    Former studies of the unpleasant odour of meat from certain uncastrated male pigs have been based mainly on evaluations made by trained sensory panellists. This study analyses the effect of the two dominating male pig odour components, skatole and androstenone, on the evaluation of eating quality...... made in-home by consumers, thus bringing the analysis out of the laboratory and into the market place. The vast majority of the population of uncastrated male pigs have low concentrations of skatole and androstenone. The cutlets that were evaluated in this study were selected from uncastrated male pigs...

  19. [Male breast cancer: a challenge for urologists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, C; Schmalfeldt, B; Gschwend, J E; Herkommer, K

    2010-09-01

    Male breast cancer (male BC) accounts for Klinefelter syndrome) and a positive family history for breast cancer. About 90% of male BC are invasive ductal carcinomas. Standard treatment for localized cancer is surgical removal. Adjuvant radiation and systemic therapy are the same as in women with breast cancer. Male BC expresses hormone receptors in about 90% of cases; therefore, tamoxifen is a therapeutic option. A future challenge for the urologist or andrologist is to diagnose the disease at an early stage to improve prognosis.

  20. Strategic male mating effort and cryptic male choice in a scorpionfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engqvist, L; Sauer, K P

    2001-04-07

    In animal species with high male mating effort, males often find themselves in a dilemma: by increasing their mating effort, the gain from each copulation increases but simultaneously reduces available resources and, thus, the opportunity for future copulations. Therefore, we expect males to spend less reproductive resources on matings that provide low reproductive potential, thereby saving resources for future copulations, possibly with high-quality females, a sort of cryptic male choice. However, the strength of the trade-off between investment in a current mating and resources available for future matings must not be the same for all males. Males with relatively high mating costs should allocate their limited resources more cautiously than males with more plentiful resources. Here, we examine this prediction in the scorpionfly Panorpa cognata. Prior to copulation, males produce a large salivary mass on which females feed during copulation. We show that the production of larger salivary masses leads to longer copulations. Moreover, the size of the salivary gland and salivary mass increases with increasing male condition. However, males in poor condition make a relatively higher mating investment than males in good condition. We therefore expect male condition to influence cryptic male choice. In accordance with our hypothesis, only males in poor condition choose cryptically, producing larger salivary masses in copulations with females of high fecundity.

  1. Epidemiology of Genitourinary Injuries among Male U.S. Service Members Deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan: Early Findings from the Trauma Outcomes and Urogenital Health (TOUGH) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janak, Judson C; Orman, Jean A; Soderdahl, Douglas W; Hudak, Steven J

    2017-02-01

    In this study we report the number, nature and severity of genitourinary injuries among male U.S. service members deployed to Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. This retrospective cross-sectional study of the Department of Defense Trauma Registry used ICD-9-CM codes to identify service members with genitourinary injuries, and used Abbreviated Injury Scale codes to determine injury severity, genitourinary organs injured and comorbid injuries. From October 2001 to August 2013, 1,367 male U.S. service members sustained 1 or more genitourinary injuries. The majority of injuries involved the external genitalia (1,000, 73.2%), including the scrotum (760, 55.6%), testes (451, 33.0%), penis (423, 31%) and/or urethra (125, 9.1%). Overall more than a third of service members with genitourinary injury sustained at least 1 severe genitourinary injury (502, 36.7%). Loss of 1 or both testes was documented in 146 men, including 129 (9.4%) unilateral orchiectomies and 17 (1.2%) bilateral orchiectomies. Common comorbid injuries included traumatic brain injury (549, 40.2%), pelvic fracture (341, 25.0%), colorectal injury (297, 21.7%) and lower extremity amputations (387, 28.7%). An unprecedented number of U.S. service members sustained genitourinary injury while deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Further study is needed to describe the long-term impact of genitourinary injury and determine the potential need for novel treatments to improve sexual, urinary and/or reproductive function among service members with severe genital injury. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The transvestite serpent: why do male garter snakes court (some) other males?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shine; Harlow; LeMaster; Moore; Mason

    2000-02-01

    In large mating aggregations of red-sided garter snakes, Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis, in Manitoba, male courtship is directed not only to females, but also to other males with female-like skin lipids ('she-males'). We show that 'she-maleness' is an intrinsic property of a male rather than an artefact of lipid transfer from females, and that male-male courtship is very common in the field. She-males were distinctive in terms of appearance (they were heavier than other males and more often covered with mud), behaviour (they were inactive and rarely courted females) and performance (they were slow crawlers, ineffective courters and easily outcompeted by other males in mating trials). 'She-maleness' was not a characteristic of a particular subset of males, as envisaged in previous work; instead, it was a transitory phase that most (perhaps all) male snakes passed through soon after they first emerged from the winter den. Recently emerged males spent their first day or two relatively inactive, while restoring physiological functions (including locomotor performance and courtship ability). Experimental application of female skin lipids on to males dramatically decreased courtship levels of the recipient snakes. Thus, recently emerged males may derive two kinds of benefit from mimicking female skin lipids. First, female mimicry 'switches off' the male's own (energetically expensive) courtship at a time when that courtship would be unproductive. Second, it may disadvantage his rivals by distracting them from females, and increasing their energy expenditure. Copyright 2000 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  3. Male-male competition leads to less abundant but more attractive sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizzari, Z Valentina; van Straalen, Nico M; Ellers, Jacintha

    2013-01-01

    Males employ complex strategies to optimize their reproductive success when faced with male-male competition; for instance, they can adjust the ejaculate characteristics. In copulating species, a male may also strategically adjust his ejaculate expenditure according to female quality. Quantifying the relative contribution of ejaculate plasticity in male reproductive success is often difficult, especially when females exert postcopulatory cryptic choice. One way to quantify the functional significance of ejaculate plasticity is offered by mating systems in which the reproductive partners do not meet each other during insemination. In the collembolan Orchesella cincta, males deposit their ejaculates (spermatophores) irrespective of the presence of females. We tested whether Orchesella males adjust spermatophore number when exposed to the presence of another male and whether changes in spermatophore production influence female choice. We found that Orchesella males display plasticity in spermatophore allocation. Males decreased the spermatophore number when exposed to a rival male. Moreover, females preferentially took up spermatophores of males that were exposed to a competitor. The reduction in spermatophore number suggests, besides an adaptive response to the risk of ejaculate removal by rival males, an optimization strategy owing to the costs of more attractive spermatophores.

  4. Both male and female identity influence variation in male signalling effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svensson P Andreas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male sexual displays play an important role in sexual selection by affecting reproductive success. However, for such displays to be useful for female mate choice, courtship should vary more among than within individual males. In this regard, a potentially important source of within male variation is adjustment of male courtship effort in response to female traits. Accordingly, we set out to dissect sources of variation in male courtship effort in a fish, the desert goby (Chlamydogobius eremius. We did so by designing an experiment that allowed simultaneous estimation of within and between male variation in courtship, while also assessing the importance of the males and females as sources of courtship variation. Results Although males adjusted their courtship depending on the identity of the female (a potentially important source of within-male variation, among-male differences were considerably greater. In addition, male courtship effort towards a pair of females was highly repeatable over a short time frame. Conclusion Despite the plasticity in male courtship effort, courtship displays had the potential to reliably convey information about the male to mate-searching females. Our experiment therefore underscores the importance of addressing the different sources contributing to variation in the expression of sexually-selected traits.

  5. Approaches to male hypogonadism in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Kristi L.; Stewart, Felicia; Larson, Brandi M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Evidence suggests that providers are not adhering to current testosterone replacement therapy guidelines when treating male hypogonadism. Understanding the diagnosis and management of this condition is further complicated by conflicting recommendations among available guidelines. NPs must select and follow the best guideline recommendations available to optimally treat male hypogonadism. PMID:28085783

  6. Male Anorexia Nervosa: A New Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosscope-Happel, Cindy; Hutchins, David E.; Getz, Hildy G.; Hayes, Gerald L.

    2000-01-01

    Although anorexia nervosa affects over one million males yearly, it is often misdiagnosed or overlooked by mental health and medical practitioners. This article brings the problem to the forefront and outlines features that are unique to these males. Greater recognition of the disorder can lead to more accurate diagnoses and, subsequently, better…

  7. A high aggression strategy for smaller males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Andreas Svensson

    Full Text Available Male-male conflict is common among animals, but questions remain as to when, how and by whom aggression should be initiated. Factors that affect agonistic strategies include residency, the value of the contested resource and the fighting ability of the two contestants. We quantified initiation of aggression in a fish, the desert goby, Chlamydogobius eremius, by exposing nest-holding males to a male intruder. The perceived value of the resource (the nest was manipulated by exposing half of the residents to sexually receptive females for two days before the trial. Resident male aggression, however, was unaffected by perceived mating opportunities. It was also unaffected by the absolute and relative size of the intruder. Instead resident aggression was negatively related to resident male size. In particular, smaller residents attacked sooner and with greater intensity compared to larger residents. These results suggest that resident desert goby males used set, rather than conditional, strategies for initiating aggression. If intruders are more likely to flee than retaliate, small males may benefit from attacking intruders before these have had an opportunity to assess the resident and/or the resource.

  8. A review of eating disorders in males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raevuori, Anu; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Hoek, Hans W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Research in eating disorders in males has been active lately compared to the past. This review aims to provide an overview of the recently published studies of eating disorders in males. Recent findings Publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th e

  9. Looking at the Male Librarian Stereotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Thad E.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of library profession stereotypes focuses on academic male librarians. Topics include the position of the early academic librarians and the environment in which they worked; the beginnings of reference service; women in academic libraries; men in a feminized profession; and current images of male librarians in motion pictures and…

  10. Looking at the Male Librarian Stereotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Thad E.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of library profession stereotypes focuses on academic male librarians. Topics include the position of the early academic librarians and the environment in which they worked; the beginnings of reference service; women in academic libraries; men in a feminized profession; and current images of male librarians in motion pictures and…

  11. A review of eating disorders in males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raevuori, Anu; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Hoek, Hans W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Research in eating disorders in males has been active lately compared to the past. This review aims to provide an overview of the recently published studies of eating disorders in males. Recent findings Publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th

  12. Male versus Female Attitudes toward Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The study investigated the extent to which differences existed between public attitudes of males versus females. Method: One hundred adults, 50 males and 50 females, were chosen at random from each of 50 study samples comprising a total of 3371 respondents in a database archive who had completed the "Public Opinion Survey of Human…

  13. Genotyping and Phenotyping of Male Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornegoor, R.

    2012-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease and most of the knowledge has been extrapolated from females, although these entities are likely different. A better understanding of male breast carcinogenesis is crucial for developing novel targets suitable for personalized treatment. A major problem in studyi

  14. Genotyping and Phenotyping of Male Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornegoor, R.

    2012-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease and most of the knowledge has been extrapolated from females, although these entities are likely different. A better understanding of male breast carcinogenesis is crucial for developing novel targets suitable for personalized treatment. A major problem in

  15. Male versus Female Attitudes toward Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The study investigated the extent to which differences existed between public attitudes of males versus females. Method: One hundred adults, 50 males and 50 females, were chosen at random from each of 50 study samples comprising a total of 3371 respondents in a database archive who had completed the "Public Opinion Survey of Human…

  16. Conditional monogyny: female quality predicts male faithfulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welke Klaas W

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Male monogyny in the absence of paternal investment is arguably one of the most puzzling mating systems. Recent evidence suggests that males of monogynous species adjust their life-history and their mating decision to shifting spatial and temporal selection regimes. In the cannibalistic wasp spider Argiope bruennichi males can be either monogynous or mate with a maximum of two females. We studied factors underlying male mating decisions in a natural population over a whole mating season. We documented all matings and categorized the males into single-mated and double-mated monogynous as well as bigynous males. Results We found that all categories were continuously present with relatively stable frequencies despite changes in the operational sex ratio. Males were more likely monogynous when copulating with relatively heavy and old females and otherwise bigynous. Conclusion Our results imply that males make conditional mating decisions based on the quality of the first female they encounter but do not adjust their mating tactic to the local selection regime.

  17. Characteristics Related to Female & Male Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Agnes M.

    2004-01-01

    The following research investigated gender and the leadership role and determined if there are differences in leadership styles, behaviors, traits, and characteristics between female leaders and male leaders. Literature suggests there are specific gender leadership differences between males and females in leadership styles, behaviors, traits, and…

  18. Characteristics of Male Homosexual College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromhart, Michael V.

    1971-01-01

    A limited comparative study of undergraduate homosexual males and control males were compared on referral source, therapy referral, academic interest and achievement, ordinal position, perceived relationship with parents, and personality adjustment as measured by the MMPI. Several differences were found and implications for treatment were…

  19. Career Development of Black Males: Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y. Barry; Baskin, Monica L.; Case, Andrew B.

    1999-01-01

    Case studies of six black males explored background, school and work experiences, and career issues. These themes emerged: fathers' financial support and role modeling influenced career development; other male role models affected aspirations; social, especially parental support for education and careers influenced decision making; and racism…

  20. Male reproductive health after childhood cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, P M; Arola, M; Suominen, J

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-five male patients were investigated to elucidate the correlation of semen parameters and other related parameters in the assessment of spermatogenesis after childhood cancer treatment.......Twenty-five male patients were investigated to elucidate the correlation of semen parameters and other related parameters in the assessment of spermatogenesis after childhood cancer treatment....

  1. Rogue Males: Sex Differences in Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Paul; Sanders, Lalage

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports a preliminary study into the commitment and academic confidence of male students in undergraduate psychology, prompted by our own observations of the performance of male students and the literature on sex differences in education. Method: Using an analytical survey, level 1 psychology students at a new university…

  2. Male skin care: shaving and moisturization needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblong, John E

    2012-01-01

    Historically, most cosmetic and medical cosmetic research has been focused on the female consumer. Advancements in the development of grooming instruments as well as changing consumer habits and attitudes toward male cosmetic skin care needs support the need to develop a deeper understanding of male skin biology and how that can be used to improve the quality of life relative to societal interactions. Male skin biology has been found to have unique properties that are distinct from females and have a significant impact on the way males groom and maintain their overall appearance. Research to date has found that male skin has a different response profile to such environmental insults as UV, heat, and stress that is based not on just differences in cosmetic or dermatological product usage but also on underlying biological differences. These differences are discussed with the implications to a broader understanding of male facial skin care needs that spans from daily grooming practices to overall health status that impacts higher incidence rate of skin cancer among males. This highlights that male skin care has a holistic need to ensure proper grooming and sunscreen moisturizer usage.

  3. Young Adult Literature for Young Adult Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sam D.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that young adult literature can play a significant role in the emotional and mental health of an adolescent as well as help young males become more literate. Offers a 19-item annotated list of young adult novels with male protagonists, sorted by themes: nature and adventure stories, sports stories, genre stories, historical stories, and…

  4. Male Teacher Shortage: Black Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Wayne; Rezai-Rashti, Goli M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the authors draw on the perspectives of black teachers to provide a more nuanced analysis of male teacher shortage. Interviews with two Caribbean teachers in Toronto, Canada, are employed to illuminate the limits of an explanatory framework that foregrounds the singularity of gender as a basis for advocating male teachers as role…

  5. Communities for and with Black Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, Christopher C.; Stinson, David W.; Williams, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    The social and educational status of black male youth in the United States has been receiving increasing attention. In February 2014, President Barack Obama announced a new national initiative--My Brother's Keeper--for helping black boys and male youth or, to speak more generally, boys and young men of color, to "stay on track; providing the…

  6. Why do Adolescent Girls Idolize Male Celebrities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Yuna; Kasser, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Girls often idolize male celebrities, but this phenomenon has been studied little. The authors therefore assessed celebrity idolization among 142 junior high school girls and found that girls who strongly idolized a male celebrity had more experience dating, reported secure and preoccupied attachments to same-age boys, and were rated higher in…

  7. [Mechanisms of electromagnetic radiation damaging male reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lei; Chen, Hao-Yu; Wang, Shui-Ming

    2012-08-01

    More and more evidence from over 50 years of researches on the effects of electromagnetic radiation on male reproduction show that a certain dose of electromagnetic radiation obviously damages male reproduction, particularly the structure and function of spermatogenic cells. The mechanisms of the injury may be associated with energy dysmetabolism, lipid peroxidation, abnormal expressions of apoptosis-related genes and proteins, and DNA damage.

  8. Influence of pesticides on male fertility.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bretveld, R.W.; Brouwers, M.; Ebisch, I.M.W.; Roeleveld, N.

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have shown a decline in human semen quality and increased risks of male subfertility. This paper provides an overview of the mechanisms of pesticide-induced reproductive toxicity and the effects on male fertility since exposure to pesticides may be one of the causes of these

  9. Ocean acidification changes the male fitness landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Anna L.; Levitan, Don R.; Hosken, David J.; Lewis, Ceri

    2016-01-01

    Sperm competition is extremely common in many ecologically important marine taxa. Ocean acidification (OA) is driving rapid changes to the marine environments in which freely spawned sperm operate, yet the consequences of OA on sperm performance are poorly understood in the context of sperm competition. Here, we investigated the impacts of OA (+1000 μatm pCO2) on sperm competitiveness for the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. Males with faster sperm had greater competitive fertilisation success in both seawater conditions. Similarly, males with more motile sperm had greater sperm competitiveness, but only under current pCO2 levels. Under OA the strength of this association was significantly reduced and there were male sperm performance rank changes under OA, such that the best males in current conditions are not necessarily best under OA. Therefore OA will likely change the male fitness landscape, providing a mechanism by which environmental change alters the genetic landscape of marine species. PMID:27531458

  10. Male Infertility and Its Causes in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu Miyamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent findings.

  11. Relevance of genetic investigation in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asero, P; Calogero, A E; Condorelli, R A; Mongioi', L; Vicari, E; Lanzafame, F; Crisci, R; La Vignera, S

    2014-05-01

    Genetic causes can be directly responsible for various clinical conditions of male infertility and spermatogenic impairment. With the increased use of assisted reproduction technologies our understanding of genetic basis of male infertility has large implications not only for understanding the causes of infertility but also in determining the prognosis and management of such couples. For these reasons, the genetic investigations represent today an essential and useful tool in the treatment of male infertility. Several evidences are available for the clinical practice regarding the diagnosis; however, there are less information relative to the treatment of the genetic causes of male infertility. Focus of this review is to discuss the main and more common genetic causes of male infertility to better direct the genetics investigation in the treatment of spermatogenic impairment.

  12. Ocean acidification changes the male fitness landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Anna L.; Levitan, Don R.; Hosken, David J.; Lewis, Ceri

    2016-08-01

    Sperm competition is extremely common in many ecologically important marine taxa. Ocean acidification (OA) is driving rapid changes to the marine environments in which freely spawned sperm operate, yet the consequences of OA on sperm performance are poorly understood in the context of sperm competition. Here, we investigated the impacts of OA (+1000 μatm pCO2) on sperm competitiveness for the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. Males with faster sperm had greater competitive fertilisation success in both seawater conditions. Similarly, males with more motile sperm had greater sperm competitiveness, but only under current pCO2 levels. Under OA the strength of this association was significantly reduced and there were male sperm performance rank changes under OA, such that the best males in current conditions are not necessarily best under OA. Therefore OA will likely change the male fitness landscape, providing a mechanism by which environmental change alters the genetic landscape of marine species.

  13. Mucinous carcinoma in a male breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopak Aggarwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Male breast cancer is rare as compared to female counterpart. Pure mucinous carcinoma is an extremely rare histological subtype representing less than 1% of male breast cancers. So far very few cases of pure mucinous carcinoma of male breast have been reported in the literature, most of which were diagnosed after surgical resection. Fine-needle aspiration cytology is a well-established procedure for the evaluation of female breast masses but the diagnosis of malignancy in aspirates from male breast masses is rare. We herein present one case of mucinous carcinoma of breast in a 75-year-old male diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration and confirmed by histopathology. After a follow-up of 12 months the patient is free of any recurrence or metastasis.

  14. Male-male competition, female mate choice and their interaction: determining total sexual selection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunt, John; Breuker, Casper J; Sadowski, Jennifer A; Moore, Allen J

    2009-01-01

    .... We first show how a quantitative partitioning and examination of sexual selection mechanisms can inform by identifying illustrative studies that describe both male-male competition and female mate...

  15. Sneaker Males Affect Fighter Male Body Size and Sexual Size Dimorphism in Salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Laura K; Kindsvater, Holly K; Young, Kyle A; Reynolds, John D

    2016-08-01

    Large male body size is typically favored by directional sexual selection through competition for mates. However, alternative male life-history phenotypes, such as "sneakers," should decrease the strength of sexual selection acting on body size of large "fighter" males. We tested this prediction with salmon species; in southern populations, where sneakers are common, fighter males should be smaller than in northern populations, where sneakers are rare, leading to geographical clines in sexual size dimorphism (SSD). Consistent with our prediction, fighter male body size and SSD (fighter male∶female size) increase with latitude in species with sneaker males (Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and masu salmon Oncorhynchus masou) but not in species without sneakers (chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta and pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). This is the first evidence that sneaker males affect SSD across populations and species, and it suggests that alternative male mating strategies may shape the evolution of body size.

  16. Male size composition affects male reproductive variance in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L. spawning aggregations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekkevold, Dorte

    2006-01-01

    Estimates of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua reproductive success, determined using experimental spawning groups and genetic paternity assignment of offspring, showed that within-group variance in male size correlated positively with the degree of male mating skew, predicting a decrease in male...... reproductive skew with decreasing size variation among males under natural conditions. (c) 2006 The Author Journal compilation (c) 2006 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles...

  17. [Male pseudohermaphroditism caused by enzymatic deficiency of 17-alpha-hydroxylase. 1st case reported in Puerto Rico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, A; Alegre, M; Colón, G

    1997-01-01

    A 36 year old white female came to our service after having been evaluated on repetitive occasions in the past for a workup of gigantism and acromegalic features. Since childhood she had developed tall stature, frontal bossing, prominence of zygomatic bones, separated teeth, large hands and size 14 shoes. Human growth hormone and somatomedin serum levels had been normal on all occasions tested. Her past history was significant for primary amenorrhea and a 12 year history of hypertension. On physical examination BP was 140/100, height 6' 2", weight 2571 bs. Her phenotype was truly acromegalic. There was absence of axillary and pubic hair with no breast development. External genitalia was of female appearance. Laboratory evaluation showed increased FSH of 88 mlU/ml, increase LH of 65.6 mlU/ml and decreased E2 of 12.6 pg/ml. Other findings were low serum cortisol of 0.2 mg/dl, high ACTH of 344 pg/ml, low 17-Ketosteroids, high pregnenolone levels of 595 mg/dl, low 17-hydroxypregnenolone less than 10 ng/dl, very high aldosterone of 31 ng/dl and suppressed PRA of less than 0.1 ng/ml. A pelvic sonogram showed a right ovoid structure which could represent a gonad and failed to identify the uterus and left gonad. A bone densitometry showed a decrease bone mineral density compatible with osteoporosis. Chromosome study showed a karyotype of 46-XY. A diagnosis was made of congenital adrenal hyperplasia secondary to 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency in a genotypic male. Our patient was referred to the department of gynecology for surgical removal of the gonads. It is amazing how a patient with severe adrenal insufficiency can withstand 36 years of her life undiagnosed without going into an adrenal crisis. Her tall stature and acromegalic features were the striking signs confusing all physicians and delaying the correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment. There has been reported worldwide, nearly 120 cases with documented severe 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency. To our knowledge

  18. Primate Socioecology: New Insights from Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappeler, Peter M.

    Primate males have only recently returned to the center stage of socioecological research. This review surveys new studies that examine variation in the behavior of adult males and their role in social evolution. It is shown that group size, composition, and social behavior are determined not only by resource distribution, predation risk, and other ecological factors, but that life history traits and social factors, especially those related to sexual coercion, can have equally profound consequences for social systems. This general point is illustrated by examining male behavior at three levels: the evolution of permanent associations between males and females, the causes and consequences of variation in the number of males between group-living species, and the determinants of social relationships within and between the sexes. Direct and indirect evidence reviewed in connection with all three questions indicates that the risk of infanticide has been a pervasive force in primate social evolution. Several areas are identified for future research on male life histories that should contribute to a better understanding of male reproductive strategies and corresponding female counterstrategies.

  19. Recognition of competitors by male golden hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrulis, Aras; Weidner, Molly; Johnston, Robert E

    2004-06-01

    Golden hamsters, like many animals, form dominant/subordinate relationships after aggressive encounters. We examined whether behavioral responses by males that won or lost fights would differ toward familiar and unfamiliar male stimulus animals. In Experiment 1, male winners or losers of fights explored an arena containing a confined stimulus animal that was either familiar or novel and had either won or lost a fight. Compared to dominant males, losers spent less time in proximity to stimulus males and investigated them less. Losers also displayed higher levels of stretch-attend postures (indicative of risk assessment) than winners, and they showed more escape and locomotion in response to familiar winners than to unfamiliar winners, indicating recognition of the male that they had lost to. In Experiment 2, losers scent marked less to the odors of a familiar winner than to those of an unfamiliar winner. Thus, male hamsters appear to use familiarity with a former opponent's odors to adaptively regulate their responses to variations in social threat.

  20. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Camperio Ciani

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness, accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  1. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-06-18

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  2. Male microchimerism in the human female brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F N Chan

    Full Text Available In humans, naturally acquired microchimerism has been observed in many tissues and organs. Fetal microchimerism, however, has not been investigated in the human brain. Microchimerism of fetal as well as maternal origin has recently been reported in the mouse brain. In this study, we quantified male DNA in the human female brain as a marker for microchimerism of fetal origin (i.e. acquisition of male DNA by a woman while bearing a male fetus. Targeting the Y-chromosome-specific DYS14 gene, we performed real-time quantitative PCR in autopsied brain from women without clinical or pathologic evidence of neurologic disease (n=26, or women who had Alzheimer's disease (n=33. We report that 63% of the females (37 of 59 tested harbored male microchimerism in the brain. Male microchimerism was present in multiple brain regions. Results also suggested lower prevalence (p=0.03 and concentration (p=0.06 of male microchimerism in the brains of women with Alzheimer's disease than the brains of women without neurologic disease. In conclusion, male microchimerism is frequent and widely distributed in the human female brain.

  3. Offspring loss after male change in wild siamangs: the importance of abrupt weaning and male care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Luca; Borries, Carola

    2017-01-01

    Infanticide by males is assumed to promote permanent male-female associations, although its importance for social monogamy is still debated. We examined the consequences of male membership change in the largest socially monogamous primate, the siamang (Symphalangus syndactylus), a species that also forms polyandrous groups and where males may provide offspring care. We examine (a) the potential risk of infanticide by documenting changes in female-offspring relationships following male change, expecting abrupt weaning; and (b) the potential importance of male care and polyandry for offspring survival. We witnessed four male changes at Way Canguk Field Station (Indonesia) in groups where the youngest offspring was estimated to be about 2 years of age. We quantified aspects of mother-offspring relationships (interindividual distance, body contact, and nipple contact) and estimated the proportion of time being carried during travel (August 2007-April 2009). In the two groups into which new males immigrated, offspring were weaned abruptly, suggesting infanticide by males as a potential risk. Even though no attacks on infants by males were witnessed, both infants disappeared shortly after the male change. Another infant disappeared after its main carrier (a male) emigrated. Conversely, in a group where the resident subordinate male replaced the dominant male, the offspring experienced no change in care and survived the transition. These findings suggest that male immigration in hylobatids increases mortality risk for infants, emphasize the importance of offspring care, and cast doubts on prior classifications of 2-year-old siamangs as independently traveling individuals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Solitary neurofibroma in the male breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Mark EF

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurofibroma of the male breast outside of neurofibromatosis is extremely rare with only one previous case having been reported. Case presentation A 48 year old male patient with a neurofibroma in the breast presenting with gynaecomastia is reported. Clinical and mammogram findings with fine needle aspiration cytology and full histology are presented. Conclusion To our knowledge this is only the second case of a neurofibroma in a male breast in the English literature and the first report to include the mammographic findings.

  5. Psychobiology of Male Homosexuality: Recent Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Annicchia rico

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, empirical and theoretical reports which question the causes ofmale homosexuality are examined. According to these reports, male homosexualitydiffers from female homosexuality in some respects. Additionally,evidence favouring the consideration of male homosexuality as a biologicalcondition is shown: there are brain differences between gay men and heterosexualmen, there are genetic and perinatal factors associated to malehomosexuality, there are cognitive and behavioral differences between gayand heterosexual men, there are animal models for studying homosexuality;finally, there are negative findings concerning the psychosocial factorsassociated to male homosexuality.

  6. Male contraception: prospects for the new millennium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.M.Hair; F.C.W.Wu

    2000-01-01

    Effective regulation of human fertility has global consequences in terms of resource depletion, pollution and poverty. Current family planning services predominantly target a female clientele with few significant developments in male fertility regulation for over a century. The last two decades have witnessed a gathering interest, initially from the scientific community, and laterally from industry, in the development of safe, reliable, reversible methods of contraception for men. This review summarises the methods of male fertility regulation which are currently available and critically examines the published data on novel developments in male hormonal contraception which offer the potential of improved contraceptive choice for all in new millennium. ( Asian J Androl 2000 ; 2 : 3 - 12 )

  7. Total Male Breast Reconstruction with Fat Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Al-Kalla, MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Cancer of a male breast represents less than 1% of all breast cancer. As with to female patients, mastectomy in men creates a substantial emotional burden. Breast reconstruction may improve the patient’s psychological well-being, compliance with adjuvant treatments, and overall outcome. However, due to the unique anatomy of the male breast, standard reconstructive strategies using anatomic or prosthetic modalities are not entirely applicable. We describe a case of a 68-year-old male patient who underwent successful unilateral breast reconstruction solely with fat grafting technique.

  8. Hybrid male sterility and genome-wide misexpression of male reproductive proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Suzanne; Civetta, Alberto

    2015-07-06

    Hybrid male sterility is a common barrier to gene flow between species. Previous studies have posited a link between misregulation of spermatogenesis genes in interspecies hybrids and sterility. However, in the absence of fully fertile control hybrids, it is impossible to differentiate between misregulation associated with sterility vs. fast male gene regulatory evolution. Here, we differentiate between these two possibilities using a D. pseudoobscura species pair that experiences unidirectional hybrid sterility. We identify genes uniquely misexpressed in sterile hybrid male reproductive tracts via RNA-seq. The sterile male hybrids had more misregulated and more over or under expressed genes relative to parental species than the fertile male hybrids. Proteases were the only gene ontology class overrepresented among uniquely misexpressed genes, with four located within a previously identified hybrid male sterility locus. This result highlights the potential role of a previously unexplored class of genes in interspecific hybrid male sterility and speciation.

  9. Reestablishment of male sexual function and appearance 23 years after alligator induced traumatic orchiectomy and penile lacerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katlowitz, N M; Fliescher, A; Benet, A E

    1995-06-01

    We report a case of traumatic sexual dysfunction and genitalia deformity successfully treated with dorsal vein excision, spongiolysis, rotational flaps, split thickness skin grafts, testicular prosthesis implantation and penile autologous fat augmentation 23 years after an alligator attack resulted in amputation of the testes and half of the scrotum, and denudation of the penis with corpus cavernosum to spongiosum fistula formations.

  10. Remote copulation: male adaptation to female cannibalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daiqin; Oh, Joelyn; Kralj-Fiser, Simona; Kuntner, Matjaz

    2012-08-23

    Sexual cannibalism by females and associated male behaviours may be driven by sexual conflict. One such male behaviour is the eunuch phenomenon in spiders, caused by total genital emasculation, which is a seemingly maladaptive behaviour. Here, we provide the first empirical testing of an adaptive hypothesis to explain this behaviour, the remote copulation, in a highly sexually cannibalistic orb-web spider Nephilengys malabarensis. We demonstrate that sperm transfer continues from the severed male organ into female genitals after the male has been detached from copula. Remote copulation increases the total amount of sperm transferred, and thus probably enhances paternity. We conclude that the mechanism may have evolved in response to sexual cannibalism and female-controlled short copulation duration.

  11. Unexplained male infertility: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Alaa; Esteves, Sandro C; Nizza, Mark; Agarwal, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Unexplained male infertility is a diagnosis reserved for men in whom routine semen analyses results are within normal values and physical as well as endocrine abnormalities were ruled out. In addition to erectile problems and coital factors, immunologic causes and sperm dysfunction may contribute to such condition. New etiologies of unexplained male infertility include low level leukocytospermia and mitochondrial DNA polymerase gene polymorphism. Contemporary andrology may reveal cellular and sub-cellular sperm dysfunctions which may explain subfertility in such cases, thus aiding the clinician to direct the further work-up, diagnosis and counseling of the infertile male. The objective of this article is to highlight the concept of unexplained male infertility and focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of this condition in the era of modern andrology and assisted reproductive techniques. Extensive literature review was performed using the search engines: Pubmed, Science-direct, Ovid and Scopus.

  12. Unexplained Male infertility: diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Hamada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Unexplained male infertility is a diagnosis reserved for men in whom routine semen analyses results are within normal values and physical as well as endocrine abnormalities were ruled out. In addition to erectile problems and coital factors, immunologic causes and sperm dysfunction may contribute to such condition. New etiologies of unexplained male infertility include low level leukocytospermia and mitochondrial DNA polymerase gene polymorphism. Contemporary andrology may reveal cellular and sub-cellular sperm dysfunctions which may explain subfertility in such cases, thus aiding the clinician to direct the further work-up, diagnosis and counseling of the infertile male. The objective of this article is to highlight the concept of unexplained male infertility and focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of this condition in the era of modern andrology and assisted reproductive techniques. Extensive literature review was performed using the search engines: Pubmed, Science-direct, Ovid and Scopus.

  13. Male breast cancer: is the scenario changing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Dhananjay M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The overall incidence of male breast cancer is around 1% of all breast cancers and is on the rise. In this review we aim to present various aspects of male breast cancer with particular emphasis on incidence, risk factors, patho-physiology, treatment, prognostic factors, and outcome. Methods Information on all aspects of male breast cancer was gathered from available relevant literature on male breast cancer from the MEDLINE database over the past 32 years from 1975 to 2007. Various reported studies were scrutinized for emerging evidence. Incidence data were also obtained from the IARC, Cancer Mondial database. Conclusion There is a scenario of rising incidence, particularly in urban US, Canada and UK. Even though more data on risk factors is emerging about this disease, more multi-institutional efforts to pool data with large randomized trials to show treatment and survival benefits are needed to support the existing vast emerging knowledge about the disease.

  14. Male teachers' experiences of own aggression

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    understanding of aggressive behaviour, Transformative Learning Theory ... Male teachers who are aggressive typically use verbal, sexual, or physical assault. ... regard of other individuals' human values and reduces criticism of one's own ...

  15. FEASIBILITY OF MEDICAL MALE CIRCUMCISION IN NYANZA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-05-05

    May 5, 2004 ... necessary resources and training to perform the procedure safely. ... of the district health management team. ..... and human immunodeficiency virus transmission in Kenya ... Weiss, H.A., Quigley, M.A., and Hayes, R. J., Male.

  16. Reproductive physiology of the male camelid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, P W; Johnson, L W

    1994-07-01

    The physiology of reproduction with emphasis on endocrinology of llamas and alpacas is addressed. Information regarding male anatomy, puberty, testicular function, semen description, and sexual behavior is also included.

  17. God as Father: The maleness of God

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Williams

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available It is fashionable today to try to avoid sexist language in theology, despite the Bible’s consistent use of the masculine pronoun when referring to God. Although such an attempt has largely been engendered by modem culture, the maleness of God is not simply a hangover from a patriarchal society, but reflects a fundamental maleness in God’s dealing with man. It emphasises the idea of redemption by grace alone over against creation, and such aspects as the adoption of Christians as sons. The maleness of Christ likewise has not simply been cultural, but is significant theologically. This is not to deny any femininity in God, but to assert that male features predominate. Such an idea does not reduce the status of women, but rather an emphasis on redemption raises it. Raising the status of women in society would in fact reduce the pressure to demasculinize God.

  18. Ambiguous genitalia in rural Africa and the complexities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    Human society has historically organized itself around the distinction .... further important determinants – gender of rearing, and brain sex. Correct diagnosis .... The size of the phallus only ... controversy-ridden evolution of sound management ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a lack of development (agenesis) of the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain ( ... Criteria for Links Data Files & API Site Map Customer Support USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & ...

  20. Genitalia burn: accident or violence? Concerns that transcend injury treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Ferreira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of genital burn which raised the suspicion of maltreatment (sexual abuse and neglect by lack of supervision.CASE DESCRIPTION: An infant was taken to the Emergency Room of a pediatric hospital with an extensive burn in the vulva and perineum. The mother claimed the burn had been caused by a sodium-hydroxide-based product. However, the injury severity led to the suspicion of sexual abuse, which was then ruled out by a multidisciplinary team, based on the consistent report by the mother. Besides, the lesion type matched those caused by the chemical agent involved in the accident and the family context was evaluated and considered adequate. The patient had a favorable outcome and was discharged after four days of hospitalization. Outpatient follow-up during six months after the accident enabled the team to rule out neglect by lack of supervision.COMMENTS: Accidents and violence are frequent causes of physical injuries in children, and the differential diagnosis between them can be a challenge for healthcare workers, especially in rare clinical conditions involving patients who cannot speak for themselves. The involvement of a multidisciplinary trained team helps to have an adequate approach, ensuring child protection and developing a bond with the family; the latter is essential for a continued patient follow-up.

  1. Male microchimerism and survival among women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2014-01-01

    During pregnancy, woman and fetus exchange small quantities of cells, and their persistence at later times is termed microchimerism. Microchimerism is known to substantially impact on women's later health. This study examined the survival of women according to male microchimerism status.......During pregnancy, woman and fetus exchange small quantities of cells, and their persistence at later times is termed microchimerism. Microchimerism is known to substantially impact on women's later health. This study examined the survival of women according to male microchimerism status....

  2. Water-flea males from the netherworld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    Simple treatments with hormones could unlock the expression of complex phenotypes not known to occur in nature. Using this method, Kim et al. recently obtained males from all-female populations of water fleas. The novel characters revealed by this work can be used in taxonomic identification and phylogenetic inference. Additionally, these "resurrected" males offer insights into the conservation of traits that are not exposed to natural selection.

  3. Role of Ultrasound in Male Infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    US evaluation is the mainstay of diagnostic imaging of infertile men. In this editorial, we review the spectrum of diseases responsible for male infertility, discuss the way in which US imaging studies can be used for evaluation of male infertility, and illustrate characteristic US imaging features that allow for specific diagnosis. The discussion will be divided into three main categories: obstruction in sperm passage, impairment of sperm function, and defect in sperm genesis.

  4. Psychobiology of Male Homosexuality: Recent Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Iván Annicchia rico

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, empirical and theoretical reports which question the causes ofmale homosexuality are examined. According to these reports, male homosexualitydiffers from female homosexuality in some respects. Additionally,evidence favouring the consideration of male homosexuality as a biologicalcondition is shown: there are brain differences between gay men and heterosexualmen, there are genetic and perinatal factors associated to malehomosexuality, there are cognitive and behavioral differenc...

  5. Male Anorexia Nervosa: an Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Crosscope-Happel, Cindy

    1999-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious problem that affects over one million males yearly. It is often misdiagnosed and overlooked completely in clinical, medical and school settings because of the misperception that it is a disorder exclusively present in females. The DSM-IV largely contributes to this misnomer due to the gender-biased criteria. The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify the etiology and clinical characteristics of male anorexia and devise a more comprehensive defi...

  6. Pharmacologic development of male hormonal contraceptive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M Y; Amory, J K

    2011-01-01

    The world population continues to increase dramatically despite the existence of contraceptive technology. The use of male hormonal contraception may help in preventing un intended pregnancies and managing future population growth. Male hormonal contraception relies on the administration of exogenous hormones to suppress spermatogenesis. Clinical trials have tested several regimens using testosterone, alone or in combination with a progestin. These regimens were shown to be >90% effective in preventing conception and were not associated with serious adverse events.

  7. LUNG CARCINOMA IN YOUNG ADULT MALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanasekar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we report three case of Lung Carcinoma in young adult males, non - smokers, no family history of malignancy and no other risk factors like occupational or environmental exposure, past history of tuberculosis or chronic obstructive bronchitis, who presented with variable chest radiographic and computerized tomog raphic findings, these cases warrants further analysis regarding the changing trend of higher incidents of lung carcinoma in young adult males.

  8. LUNG CARCINOMA IN YOUNG ADULT MALES

    OpenAIRE

    Dhanasekar; Anbumaran; Rajagopalan; Shanmugapriya

    2015-01-01

    Here we report three case of Lung Carcinoma in young adult males, non - smokers, no family history of malignancy and no other risk factors like occupational or environmental exposure, past history of tuberculosis or chronic obstructive bronchitis, who presented with variable chest radiographic and computerized tomog raphic findings, these cases warrants further analysis regarding the changing trend of higher incidents of lung carcinoma in young adult males.

  9. Vitamin D, men's health and male reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the literary review the modern data proving an important physiological role of vitamin D and its deficiency for man's health in whole and the male reproduction, in particular is presented. For today these proofs are based basically on experimental works with animals and on clinical observant researches which demonstrative base while is insufficient for a formulation of the general concept of vitamin D deficiency for modern medicine. However, there are some encouraging results deserving a complex estimation and the further basic researches. Considering high prevalence of male infertility, not diagnosed androgen deficiency and vitamin D at men, which have intime authentic pathophysiological communications, it is possible to assume that the further researches in area endocrinology of vitamin D can come to new methods of an estimation of men's reproductive function and working out of new pathogenetic therapeutic approaches in male infertility treatment. These prospects are especially important if to consider that infertility suffers not less than 10–20 % of married couples, and this figure constantly increases. In spite of the fact that vitamin D is not included yet into the list of preparations for treatment of male infertility, but its influence at male androgen status which is endocrinological basis of sexual and reproductive functions, and positive effects at spermatogenesis in experimental researches is necessary to consider proved. Besides, large-scale clinical randomized researches are necessary for definition of an optimal 25(OH-vitamin D level for prevention and treatment of male fertility's disorders.

  10. Vitamin D, men's health and male reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the literary review the modern data proving an important physiological role of vitamin D and its deficiency for man's health in whole and the male reproduction, in particular is presented. For today these proofs are based basically on experimental works with animals and on clinical observant researches which demonstrative base while is insufficient for a formulation of the general concept of vitamin D deficiency for modern medicine. However, there are some encouraging results deserving a complex estimation and the further basic researches. Considering high prevalence of male infertility, not diagnosed androgen deficiency and vitamin D at men, which have intime authentic pathophysiological communications, it is possible to assume that the further researches in area endocrinology of vitamin D can come to new methods of an estimation of men's reproductive function and working out of new pathogenetic therapeutic approaches in male infertility treatment. These prospects are especially important if to consider that infertility suffers not less than 10–20 % of married couples, and this figure constantly increases. In spite of the fact that vitamin D is not included yet into the list of preparations for treatment of male infertility, but its influence at male androgen status which is endocrinological basis of sexual and reproductive functions, and positive effects at spermatogenesis in experimental researches is necessary to consider proved. Besides, large-scale clinical randomized researches are necessary for definition of an optimal 25(OH-vitamin D level for prevention and treatment of male fertility's disorders.

  11. Non-therapeutic infant male circumcision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhenizan, Abdullah; Elabd, Kossay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To review the evidence of the benefits and harms of infant male circumcision, and the legal and ethical perspectives of infant male circumcision. Methods: We conducted a systematic search of the literature using PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane library up to June 2015. We searched the medical law literature using the Westlaw and Lexis Library law literature resources up to June 2015. Results: Male circumcision significantly reduced the risk of urinary tract infections by 87%. It also significantly reduced transmission of human immunodeficiency virus among circumcised men by 70%. Childhood and adolescent circumcision is associated with a 66% reduction in the risk of penile cancer. Circumcision was associated with 43% reduction of human papilloma virus infection, and 58% reduction in the risk of cervical cancer among women with circumcised partners compared with women with uncircumcised partners. Male infant circumcision reduced the risk of foreskin inflammation by 68%. Conclusion: Infant male circumcision should continue to be allowed all over the world, as long as it is approved by both parents, and performed in facilities that can provide appropriate sterilization, wound care, and anesthesia. Under these conditions, the benefits of infant male circumcision outweigh the rare and generally minor potential harms of the procedure. PMID:27570848

  12. Perceptions and opinions about male breast cancer and male breast self-examination: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed; Al-Naggar, Dhekra Hamoud

    2012-01-01

    While the relatively common nature of female breast cancer has resulted in a high level of general awareness, male breast cancer is still comparatively unknown to the general public and to healthcare professionals. The objective of this study is to explore the perceptions and opinions about male breast cancer and male breast self-examination among male university students. In-depth interviews were conducted among 36 male university students from the Management and Science University, Malaysia, selected by simple random sampling. The themes of the interview were: knowledge of male breast cancer and male breast self-examination, sources of knowledge and attitudes towards male BSE. The data obtained were classified into various categories and analyzed manually. The majority of participants mentioned that there is a low possibility for males to get breast cancer. They also believed that the cause of breast cancer among men is due to the carcinogens from cigarettes. The majority of participants mentioned that they know about breast self-examination from the mass media and that the presence of a lump in the breast is the main symptom of breast cancer in men. The majority of participants mentioned that they encourage their family members to practice breast self-examination but considered that BSE is not important for men because they have a low probability of getting breast cancer. Misconceptions regarding male breast cancer and breast self-examination among men still exist among male university students. Therefore special attention should be given to educate men about male breast cancer and male BSE.

  13. How does lead induce male infertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Chi Hsu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An important part of male infertility of unknown etiology may be attributed to various environmental and occupational exposures to toxic substances, such as lead. The reproductive effects of lead are complex and appear to involve multiple pathways, not all of which are fully understood. It is still unclear, for example, if male reproductive issues in lead-exposed persons are mostly related to the disruption of reproductive hormones, whether the problems are due to the lead’s direct effects on the gonads, or both? This question has been difficult to answer, because lead, especially at high levels, may adversely affect many human organs. Although lead can potentially reduce male fertility by decreasing sperm count and motility, inducing abnormal morphology and affecting functional parameters; not all studies have been able to clearly demonstrate such findings. In addition, research has shown that the blood-testis barrier can protect testicular cells from direct exposure to high levels of blood lead. For these reasons and considering the wide spectrum of lead toxicity on reproductive hormones, the present review suggests that lead’s main influence on male reproduction probably occurs by altering the reproductive hormonal axis and the hormonal control on spermatogenesis, rather than by a direct toxic effect on the seminiferous tubules of the testes. As blood lead concentrations below the currently accepted worker protection standard may still adversely affect male fertility, future studies should aim to establish more concrete links between lead exposure (especially at low levels and subsequent male infertility. Research should also pay more attention to lead’s effects on reducing male fertility rates based on not only hormonal axis alteration, but also on the changes in sperm characteristic among exposed subjects.

  14. Male breast cancer: clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotko, Y S

    2013-12-01

    Despite male breast cancer is rare in occurrence, it is a serious problem. In 2012, 130 men in Ukraine got breast cancer that constituted 0.74% from all patients with mentioned pathology detected in the course of year. Every year in Ukraine approximately 100 men die from breast cancer. Still many aspects of male breast cancer remain unstudied. It occurs since information about mentioned disease is mainly based on retrospective analysis of small groups. Treatment of men, who got breast cancer, is based on knowledge, which has been obtained in treatment of women with this pathology. This article is based on the results of analysis of 168 cases of breast cancer in men, who have been examined and treated in the period from 1956 to 2012. In paper the peculiarities of clinical manifestations of male breast cancer have been determined, the optimal volume of diagnostic procedures in men with suspicion of breast cancer has been established, the mammographic signs have been detected and the possible histological variants of disease have been determined, clinical course peculiarities of male breast cancer have been defined, the most essential factors of prognosis of the disease have been fixed. Furthermore, in article optimal volume of surgical treatment of male breast cancer has been substantiated, the role and place of radiotherapy in treatment of this pathology has been determined. It has been proved that adjuvant polychemotherapy should be applied to the patients with male breast cancer independently from stage of process. Also optimal schemes of this kind of treatment have been determined. The efficacy of hormonal therapy with antiestrogen in patients with positive receptors of steroid hormones and at presence of unfavorable prognostic factors of disease has been demonstrated. The inefficiency of orchiectomy as one of the widespread kinds of hormonal therapy of male breast cancer has been defined.

  15. Female sticklebacks use male coloration in mate choice and hence avoid parasitized males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinski, Manfred; Bakker, Theo C. M.

    1990-03-01

    AN important problem in evolutionary biology since the time of Darwin has been to understand why females preferentially mate with males handicapped by secondary sexual ornaments1-3. One hypothesis of sexual selection theory is that these ornaments reliably reveal the male's condition4-6, which can be affected for example by parasites4,7-13. Here we show that in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) the intensity of male red breeding coloration positively correlates with physical condition. Gravid females base their active mate choice on the intensity of the male's red coloration. Choice experiments under green light prevent the use of red colour cues by females, and males that were previously preferred are now chosen no more than randomly, although the courtship behaviour of the males remains unchanged. Parasitieation causes a deterioration in the males' condition and a decrease in the intensity of their red coloration. Tests under both lighting conditions reveal that the females recognize the formerly parasitized males by the lower intensity of their breeding coloration. Female sticklebacks possibly select a male with a good capacity for paternal care14 but if there is additive genetic variation for parasite resistance, then they might also select for resistance genes, as proposed by Hamilton and Zuk4.

  16. Differences in Nuclear DNA Between Male-Sterile and Male-Fertile Lines of Sorghum bicolor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Chang-fa; SUN Chun-yun; GUO Xiao-cai; NIU Tian-tang; ZHANG Fu-yao

    2003-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (cms) is determined by nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions. Up tonow, most studies are focused on the comparison of cytoplasmic DNAs of male-sterile lines and male-fertilelines, and analysis of nuclear DNA has not been documented yet. In order to find out the possible difference innuclear genome of male-sterile line A1 Tx623 and corresponding male-fertile line Tx623 of sorghum, randomamplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) approach was used to analyze their cytoplasmic and nuclear genomes.Total DNAs of them were amplified at first to screen primers, which were able to generate reproducible bandsspecific to male-sterile line or male-fertile line. Then the selected primers were used to amplify their mitochon-drial DNA (mtDNA) and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA). The origins of all the polymorphic fragments were ana-lyzed. After ruling out those amplified from cytoplasmic DNA, seventeen polymorphic fragments were deter-mined to be amplified from nuclear DNA. These fragments originated from nuclear DNA indicate that diffe-rences in sequence exist between the nuclear DNA of male-sterile line and male-fertile line of sorghum, whichdo not agree with the traditional standpoint that they have identical nucleus.

  17. Repeated Bout Effect Was More Expressed in Young Adult Males Than in Elderly Males and Boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giedrius Gorianovas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated possible differences using the same stretch-shortening exercise (SSE protocol on generally accepted monitoring markers (dependent variables: changes in creatine kinase, muscle soreness, and voluntary and electrically evoked torque in males across three lifespan stages (childhood versus adulthood versus old age. The protocol consisted of 100 intermittent (30 s interval between jumps drop jumps to determine the repeated bout effect (RBE (first and second bouts performed at a 2-week interval. The results showed that indirect symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage after SSE were more expressed in adult males than in boys and elderly males, suggesting that the muscles of boys and elderly males are more resistant to exercise-induced damage than those of adult males. RBE was more pronounced in adult males than in boys and elderly males, suggesting that the muscles of boys and elderly males are less adaptive to exercise-induced muscle damage than those of adult males.

  18. Mitochondria, maternal inheritance, and male aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, M Florencia; Clancy, David J; Dowling, Damian K

    2012-09-25

    The maternal transmission of mitochondrial genomes invokes a sex-specific selective sieve, whereby mutations in mitochondrial DNA can only respond to selection acting directly on females. In theory, this enables male-harming mutations to accumulate in mitochondrial genomes when these same mutations are neutral, beneficial, or only slightly deleterious in their effects on females. Ultimately, this evolutionary process could result in the evolution of male-specific mitochondrial mutation loads; an idea previously termed Mother's Curse. Here, we present evidence that the effects of this process are broader than hitherto realized, and that it has resulted in mutation loads affecting patterns of aging in male, but not female Drosophila melanogaster. Furthermore, our results indicate that the mitochondrial mutation loads affecting male aging generally comprise numerous mutations over multiple sites. Our findings thus suggest that males are subject to dramatic consequences that result from the maternal transmission of mitochondrial genomes. They implicate the diminutive mitochondrial genome as a hotspot for mutations that affect sex-specific patterns of aging, thus promoting the idea that a sex-specific selective sieve in mitochondrial genome evolution is a contributing factor to sexual dimorphism in aging, commonly observed across species.

  19. Mouse models in male fertility research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duangporn Jamsai; Moira K O'Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Limited knowledge of the genetic causes of male infertility has resulted in few treatment and targeted therapeutic options.Although the ideal approach to identify infertility causing mutations is to conduct studies in the human population,this approach has progressed slowly due to the limitations described herein.Given the complexity of male fertility,the entire process cannot be modeled in vitro.As such,animal models,in particular mouse models,provide a valuable alternative for gene identification and experimentation.Since the introduction of molecular biology and recent advances in animal model production,there has been a substantial acceleration in the identification and characterization of genes associated with many diseases,including infertility.Three major types of mouse models are commonly used in biomedical research,including knockout/knockin/gene-trapped,transgenic and chemical-induced point mutant mice.Using these mouse models,over 400 genes essential for male fertility have been revealed.It has,however,been estimated that thousands of genes are involved in the regulation of the complex process of male fertility,as many such genes remain to be characterized.The current review is by no means a comprehensive list of these mouse models,rather it contains examples of how mouse models have advanced our knowledge of post-natal germ cell development and male fertility regulation.

  20. Does Halitosis Effect Sexual Life in Males?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Soylu Ozler

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Halitosis is an unpleasant alteration of the halitus. The aim of the study is to assess the quality of sexual life of males with and without halitosis. Material and Method: Males between 20-50 years old; with a complaint of halitosis; married and able to complete the study were included in the study. The control group were healthy, adult, married males who have normal otorhinolaryngologic examination. The International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire(IIEF were used to assess the quality of sexual life  of males with halitosis and the results were compared with a similar group of healthy men. Results: A total of 80 adult subjects completed the study. When the groups were compared in terms of age, body mass index(BMI and duration of marriage, they were similar (p=0.65, p= 0.20, p= 0.08 respectively.The halitosis group had significantly lower scores for all function domains (p=0.0001.There was no correlation between degree of halitosis and the scores of IIEF (p< 0.05. Discussion: This is the first study investigating the sexual health of males with halitosis. Halitosis not only effects oral health status but also strongly declines quality of life. The otorhinolaryngologist must not only treat halitosis but also help the patient to stand up to social and sexual problems concomitting halitosis.

  1. Dispersal of Engineered Male Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winskill, Peter; Carvalho, Danilo O; Capurro, Margareth L; Alphey, Luke; Donnelly, Christl A; McKemey, Andrew R

    2015-11-01

    Aedes aegypti, the principal vector of dengue fever, have been genetically engineered for use in a sterile insect control programme. To improve our understanding of the dispersal ecology of mosquitoes and to inform appropriate release strategies of 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti detailed knowledge of the dispersal ability of the released insects is needed. The dispersal ability of released 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti at a field site in Brazil has been estimated. Dispersal kernels embedded within a generalized linear model framework were used to analyse data collected from three large scale mark release recapture studies. The methodology has been applied to previously published dispersal data to compare the dispersal ability of 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti in contrasting environments. We parameterised dispersal kernels and estimated the mean distance travelled for insects in Brazil: 52.8 m (95% CI: 49.9 m, 56.8 m) and Malaysia: 58.0 m (95% CI: 51.1 m, 71.0 m). Our results provide specific, detailed estimates of the dispersal characteristics of released 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti in the field. The comparative analysis indicates that despite differing environments and recapture rates, key features of the insects' dispersal kernels are conserved across the two studies. The results can be used to inform both risk assessments and release programmes using 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and male infertility (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The literary review is devoted to one of the most actual problems of modern andrology – pathogenetic communication of metabolic syndrome components and male infertility. Now a steady growth of metabolic syndrome frequency in world men population is observed, and that is accompanied by progressing deterioration of fertility parameters at them. Negative influence of key metabolic syndrome components – obesity and insulin resistance – at male reproductive function is shown on the basis of modern clinical, epidemiological and experimental data, and known pathophysiological mechanisms of this influence are described also. Induced by a metabolic syndrome oxidative stress of spermatozoas, neuropathy and androgen deficiency are the most significant mechanisms of neuro-endocrinological and reproductive consequences realization. The imperative necessity of early revealing and pharmacological correction of obesity and insulin resistance in all infertility men is shown, as well as they are curable reasons of male infertility . However, they seldom come to light and even less often corrected in routine clinical practice owing to insufficient knowledge of urologists and andrologists about these system hormonal-metabolic factors of male infertility, which role in male infertility pathogenesis will increase only in the conditions of world epidemic of a metabolic syndrome.

  3. Metabolic syndrome and male infertility (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The literary review is devoted to one of the most actual problems of modern andrology – pathogenetic communication of metabolic syndrome components and male infertility. Now a steady growth of metabolic syndrome frequency in world men population is observed, and that is accompanied by progressing deterioration of fertility parameters at them. Negative influence of key metabolic syndrome components – obesity and insulin resistance – at male reproductive function is shown on the basis of modern clinical, epidemiological and experimental data, and known pathophysiological mechanisms of this influence are described also. Induced by a metabolic syndrome oxidative stress of spermatozoas, neuropathy and androgen deficiency are the most significant mechanisms of neuro-endocrinological and reproductive consequences realization. The imperative necessity of early revealing and pharmacological correction of obesity and insulin resistance in all infertility men is shown, as well as they are curable reasons of male infertility . However, they seldom come to light and even less often corrected in routine clinical practice owing to insufficient knowledge of urologists and andrologists about these system hormonal-metabolic factors of male infertility, which role in male infertility pathogenesis will increase only in the conditions of world epidemic of a metabolic syndrome.

  4. Sexually Transmitted Disease and Male Infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Fusco, Ferdinando; Lipshultz, Larry

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Theoretically, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have the potential to disrupt male fertility; however, the topic remains controversial. OBJECTIVE: To describe the possible association between STDs and male infertility and to explore possible pathophysiologic mechanisms. EVIDENCE...... ACQUISITION: We performed a systematic literature review in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for articles published before January 1, 2016, using the MeSH terms for a variety of STDs and infertility. The search was restricted to human studies...... performed in men and published in English. Studies were included if they contained original data on a possible association or a cause-and-effect relationship between STD and male infertility. Studies were considered only if they included an appropriate control group and/or comprehensive laboratory data. Due...

  5. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iaccarino, Vittorio, E-mail: vittorio.iaccarino@unina.it; Venetucci, Pietro [University of Naples ' Federico II' , Diagnostic Imaging Department-Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  6. Unilateral galactocele in a male infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahović Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Galactocele, generally occuring in young women during or after lactation, is an extremely rare cause of breast enlargement in infants and children of exclusively male gender. Only 26 cases have been published so far, including two our cases. Case report. We described unilateral, cystic, breast enlargement, without any endocrinologic and other abnormalities in a 29-month-old boy. A typical clinical and histopathologic presentation of galactocele was followed with a complete excision. Conclusion. This was a 27th well documented case of galactocele in a male infant with typical clinical and histopathologic presentation. There are several hypotheses regarding etiology of the lesion, but it is likely to be multifactorial. Because of its extreme rarity, there are some difficulties in differential diagnosis and treatment options of galactocele in male infants.

  7. Three new methods for male contraception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AhmedShafik

    1999-01-01

    The methods devised for male contraception are meagre. In the current communication, we review 3 recently de-veloped methods applied for male contraception: testicular suspension, polyester-induced azoospermia and prolactin in-jection. The testicle was suspended in the superficial inguinal pouch close to the scrotal neck using 2 methods: stitchand ball. The azoospermic effect of the polyester sling seems to be due to 1) creation of electn~static field across theinWascrotal slructures, and 2) disordered thermoregulation. Pmlactin administration, as a contraceptive method is effi-cient and safe and has the potential to be developed as a male contraceptive. The effect of the above mentioned 3 methods is reversible. These methods, especially testicular suspension and polyester suspensors, are simple and easilyapplicable and were well acceptable by the subjects.( Asian J Androl 1999 Dec; 1:161-167)

  8. Alcohol references on undergraduate males' Facebook profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Katie G; Moreno, Megan A

    2011-09-01

    Perceived peer alcohol use is a predictor of consumption in college males; frequent references to alcohol on Facebook may encourage alcohol consumption. Content analysis of college males' Facebook profiles identified references to alcohol. The average age of 225 identified profiles was 19.9 years. Alcohol references were present on 85.3% of the profiles; the prevalence of alcohol was similar across each undergraduate grade. The average number of alcohol references per profile was 8.5 but increased with undergraduate year (p = .003; confidence interval = 1.5, 7.5). Students who were of legal drinking age referenced alcohol 4.5 times more than underage students, and an increase in number of Facebook friends was associated with an increase in displayed alcohol references (p < .001; confidence interval = 0.009, 0.02). Facebook is widely used in the college population; widespread alcohol displays on Facebook may influence social norms and cause increases in male college students' alcohol use.

  9. High male fertility in males of a subdioecious shrub in hand-pollinated crosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Matsushita, Michinari; Tomaru, Nobuhiro; Nakagawa, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Female reproductive success in females versus hermaphrodites has been well documented. However, documenting a potential advantage in male fertility of male versus hermaphrodite individuals in subdioecious species is also essential for understanding the evolutionary pathway toward dioecy from hermaphroditism via gynodioecy. Siring success in terms of fruit set, fruit mass, number of seeds and mean seed mass was compared by hand-pollinated crosses in the subdioecious shrub Eurya japonica. The pollen was from male and hermaphrodite individuals, and the pollen recipients were females and hermaphrodites. Seed quality was also evaluated in terms of seed germination rate, seed germination day and seedling survival. Overall, pollen from males sired more fruits of larger size and more seeds than did pollen from hermaphrodites. The male advantage was observed when pollen recipients were females, whereas no effect was found in hermaphrodite recipients. Pollen from males also produced better quality seeds with higher germination rate and sooner germination day. Although these results could also be explained by a higher pollen load for crosses with male pollen donors, we took care to saturate the stigma regardless of the pollen donor. Therefore, these results suggest that male individuals of E. japonica have advantages in male fertility in terms of both quantity and quality. Our previous studies indicated that females exhibit higher female reproductive success compared with hermaphrodites. Thus, both the female and male functions of hermaphrodites are outperformed by females and males, respectively, raising the possibility that the subdioecious E. japonica at this study site is entering the transitional phase to dioecy along the gynodioecy–dioecy pathway. PMID:27658818

  10. Self-Disclosure Patterns of Maladjusted Male Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Results indicate that maladjusted adolescent males lack significant relationships with a father figure. This extends to males in general. They disclose less about school-related topics and more about peer relationships than do adjusted male adolescents. (Author/BEF)

  11. Genetics Home Reference: CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related nonsyndromic male infertility CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description CATSPER1 -related nonsyndromic male infertility is a condition that affects the function of ...

  12. Vulnerable discipline: experiences of male competitive bodybuilders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnestad, Jone; Kandal, Øyvind; Anderssen, Norman

    2014-09-01

    The aim was to understand experiences of male competitive bodybuilders from a non-pathologizing perspective. Six male Norwegian competitive bodybuilders were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using a meaning condensation procedure resulting in five themes: being proud of capacity for discipline, seeing a perfectionist attitude as a necessary evil, experiencing recognition within the bodybuilding community, being stigmatized outside the bodybuilding community and going on stage to display a capacity for willpower and discipline. We suggest that bodybuilders may be stigmatized for breaking social norms: by their distinctive appearance, by the way they handle suspected drug use and by challenging gender norms.

  13. Predictors of dominance in male Betta splendens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstein, P M

    1985-03-01

    The formation of dominance/subordinancy relations in pairs of male Siamese fighting fish was examined in six experiments. Dominant animals typically were those fish that built the largest nests and that attacked an image of a live, displaying male most intensely prior to combat. However, pretest performance on an operant task and reaction to an animal's own mirror image were not useful predictors of subsequent dominance. These findings are consistent with the suggestion that domesticated Bettas have a territorial social strategy that includes both nest-building and fighting behaviors.

  14. Male and Female Differences in Nonconscious Mimicry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehane, Christine Marie

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on nonconscious mimicry suggests that females mimic their communication partners more often than males. Many studies have investigated the association between mimicry, emotion recognition, and empathy. However, there is a trend in this research area to recruit same-sex samples......, thus neglecting a discussion regarding the role of sex or gender as a moderator of nonconscious mimicry. This article reviews the research on nonconscious mimicry – facial, behavioural, and verbal, in order to identify whether or not there are male and female differences. The results indicate...

  15. Decline in male circumcision in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim DaiSik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the changing circumcision rate in South Korea in the last decade and to propose underlying causes for this change, in the context of the present fluctuating world-wide trends in circumcision. Methods From 2009 to 2011, 3,296 South Korean males (or their parents aged 0–64 years were asked about their circumcision status, their age at circumcision, and their information level regarding circumcision. We employed non-probability sampling considering the sensitive questions on the study theme. Results Currently the age-standardized circumcision rate for South Korean males aged 14–29 is found to be 75.8%. In an earlier study performed in 2002, the rate for the same age group was 86.3%. Of particular interest, males aged 14–16 show a circumcision rate of 56.4%, while the same age group 10 years ago displayed a much higher percentage, at 88.4%. In addition, the extraordinarily high circumcision rate of 95.2% found 10 years ago for the 17–19 age group is now reduced to 74.4%. Interestingly, of the circumcised males, the percentage circumcised in the last decade was only 25.2%; i.e., the majority of the currently circumcised males had undergone the operation prior to 2002, indicating that the actual change in the last decade is far greater. Consistent with this conjecture, the 2002 survey showed that the majority of circumcised males (75.7% had undergone the operation in the decade prior to that point. Focusing on the flagship age group of 14–16, this drop suggests that, considering the population structure of Korean males, approximately one million fewer circumcision operations have been performed in the last decade relative to the case of non-decline. This decline is strongly correlated with the information available through internet, newspapers, lectures, books, and television: within the circumcised population, both the patients and their parents had less prior knowledge regarding circumcision, other than

  16. Involvement of males in promoting reproductive health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M.M. Maja

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available At the international conference on Population and Development held in Cairo 1994, specific aspects of reproductive health addressed endorsed among others, were that unwanted pregnancies must always be given the highest priority and that every attempt should be made to eliminate the need for abortion. This paper focused on the involvement of males in promoting reproductive health through prevention of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies. A total of 71 males (48 adults and 23 adolescents were selected conveniently from two health care centres, North of Tshwane, Gauteng province. Structured questionnaires having open and closed questions were used for data collection.

  17. Clinical Trials in Male Hormonal Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieschlag E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has established the principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required of which progestins are favored. Clinical trials concentrate on testosterone combined with norethisterone, desogestrel, etonogestrel or depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of testosterone undecanoate and etonogestrel in suppressing spermatogenesis in volunteers.

  18. Integrative data analysis of male reproductive disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edsgard, Stefan Daniel

    During the last decades a decline in male reproductive health has been observed in Nordic countries, and particularly in Denmark. Testicular cancer is the most fatal form of male reproductive disorders, and despite high remission rates it is typically accompanied with infertility. The main topic...... superimposed with established phenomic information. We thereby identified a recurrent CNV at a locus with genes encoding for the relaxin peptide hormones, indicating their potential role in testis function. Paper III presents a genome-wide assocation study on testicular dysgenesis syndrome. We confirmed...

  19. What makes a nest-building male successful? Male behavior and female care in penduline tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szentirmai, [No Value; Komdeur, J; Szekely, T; Szentirmai, István

    2005-01-01

    Why do females increase parental effort when caring for the offspring of attractive males? First, attractive males may be poor fathers so that their females are compelled to increase their own contribution in order to fledge some young (the partner-compensation hypothesis). Second, females mated to

  20. Bodice Rippers without the Bodice: Ten Male-on-Male Romances for a Core Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Devon

    2011-01-01

    One of the hottest growing segments of the romance genre is male-on-male (M/M) romance--gay romantic fiction mostly written and read by straight women. Featuring traditional romance conventions, including mistaken identities, star-crossed lovers, and happy endings, these stories show both physical and emotional intimacy between men. M/M builds on…

  1. Self-Concept and Psychological Adjustment Differences Between Self-Identified Male Transexuals and Male Homosexuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roback, Howard B.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Self-concept and adjustment data from anatomical males seeking sexual reassignment surgery were compared with that from a male homosexual group. Findings indicated that the homosexual group had a better self-image and was better adjusted than the sex change group. (Author)

  2. Female qualities in males: vitellogenin synthesis induced by ovary transplants into the male silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Congwen; Lin, Ying; Shen, Guanwang; Chen, Enxiang; Wang, Yanxia; Luo, Juan; Zhang, Haiyan; Xing, Runmiao; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-10-10

    Female qualities in males are common in vertebrates but have not been extensively reported in insects. Vitellogenin (Vg) is highly expressed in the female fat body and is generally required for the formation of yolk proteins in the insect egg. Vg upregulation is generally regarded as a female quality in female oviparous animals. In this study, we found that Bombyx mori Vg (BmVg) is especially highly expressed in the female pupa. Downregulation of the BmVg gene in the female pupa by RNA interference (RNAi) interfered with egg formation and embryonic development, showing the importance of BmVg in these processes. So, we used BmVg as a biomarker for female qualities in the silkworm. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunofluorescence histochemistry showed that ovary transplants induced BmVg synthesis in the male pupa fat body. Ovaries transplanted into male silkworms produced only a few eggs with deformed yolk granules. These results suggested that the amount of BmVg in the male silkworm was insufficient for eggs to undergo complete embryonic development. After 17-beta-estradiol was used to treat male pupae and male pupal fat bodies, BmVg was upregulated in vivo and in vitro. These findings indicated that the male silkworm has innate female qualities that were induced by a transplanted ovary and 17β-estradiol. However, in silkworms, female qualities in males are not as complete as in females.

  3. Sexy males and choosy females on exploded leks: correlates of male attractiveness in the Little Bustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiguet, Frédéric; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2014-03-01

    In their choice of mates, females may use alternative tactics, including a comparative assessment of males in a population, using one or several relative preference criteria. Traits involved in female choice should presumably be variable between, but not within males, thus potentially providing reliable cues of male identity and quality for prospecting females. In lekking species, sexual selection is usually intense, and females can freely choose mates. Studying the Little Bustard Tetrax tetrax, a bird with an exploded lek mating system, we first identified male phenotypic traits that showed higher among, than within variation (plumage pattern, display rates and call structure). Among those and other traits (ornaments and their symmetry, body condition, lek spatial organization and territory quality), we identified phenotypic traits that correlated with male attractiveness toward females. At least four phenotypic male traits were correlated with female attraction, i.e. body condition, lek attendance, ornamental symmetry and display rates. Traits related to the initial female attraction on male territory seem to differ from traits related to the decision of females to stay in the territory of attractive males.

  4. Drosophila melanogaster males increase the number of sperm in their ejaculate when perceiving rival males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbaczewska, Martyna; Billeter, Jean-Christophe; Levine, Joel D.

    2013-01-01

    It is is common for females from many species to mate with multiple males within one reproductive cycle. As a result, sperm from different males come into contact in the female reproductive organs, where they compete for ova fertilization. This sperm competition appears to drive the ejaculation of a

  5. Empowering Young Black Males--III: A Systematic Modular Training Program for Black Male Children & Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Courtland C.

    This series of five interrelated modules is an update and revision of "Saving the Native Son: Empowerment Strategies for Young Black Males (1996)." It offers specific strategies for empowering young African American males to help them achieve optimal educational and social success. Empowerment is a developmental process by which people who are…

  6. Sperm competition games: A general model for precopulatory male-male competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parker, G.A.; Lessells, C.M.; Simmons, L.W.

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive males face a trade-off between expenditure on precopulatory male–male competition—increasing the number of females that they secure as mates—and sperm competition—increasing their fertilization success with those females. Previous sperm allocation models have focused on scramble competi

  7. Why Are Males Bad for Females? Models for the Evolution of Damaging Male Mating Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lessells, C.M.

    2005-01-01

    One explanation for the cost to mating for females caused by damaging male mating behavior is that this causes the females to adaptively modify their subsequent life histories in a way that also increases male fitness. This might occur because the reduction in residual reproductive value of the fema

  8. Negotiating the "White Male Math Myth": African American Male Students and Success in School Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, David W.

    2013-01-01

    This article shows how equity research in mathematics education can be decentered by reporting the "voices" of mathematically successful African American male students as they recount their experiences with school mathematics, illustrating, in essence, how they negotiated the White male math myth. Using post-structural theory, the…

  9. Negotiating the "White Male Math Myth": African American Male Students and Success in School Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, David W.

    2013-01-01

    This article shows how equity research in mathematics education can be decentered by reporting the "voices" of mathematically successful African American male students as they recount their experiences with school mathematics, illustrating, in essence, how they negotiated the White male math myth. Using post-structural theory, the…

  10. Bodice Rippers without the Bodice: Ten Male-on-Male Romances for a Core Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Devon

    2011-01-01

    One of the hottest growing segments of the romance genre is male-on-male (M/M) romance--gay romantic fiction mostly written and read by straight women. Featuring traditional romance conventions, including mistaken identities, star-crossed lovers, and happy endings, these stories show both physical and emotional intimacy between men. M/M builds on…

  11. Male circumcision does not result in inferior perceived male sexual function - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Düring, Signe; Frimodt-Møller, Cai

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The debate on non-medical male circumcision has gaining momentum during the past few years. The objective of this systematic review was to determine if circumcision, medical indication or age at circumcision had an impact on perceived sexual function in males. METHODS: Systematic...

  12. MMPI Profiles of Males with Abnormal Sex Chromosome Complements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, M.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Nine males with Klinefelter's syndrome (XXY) and seven XYY males, located primarily in prisons and psychiatric hospitals, were administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. (Author/KW)

  13. Male tolerance and male–male bonds in a multilevel primate society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Annika; Kopp, Gisela H.; Ndao, Ibrahima; Kalbitzer, Urs; Zinner, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Male relationships in most species of mammals generally are characterized by intense intrasexual competition, with little bonding among unrelated individuals. In contrast, human societies are characterized by high levels of cooperation and strong bonds among both related and unrelated males. The emergence of cooperative male–male relationships has been linked to the multilevel structure of traditional human societies. Based on an analysis of the patterns of spatial and social interaction in combination with genetic relatedness data of wild Guinea baboons (Papio papio), we show that this species exhibits a multilevel social organization in which males maintain strong bonds and are highly tolerant of each other. Several “units” of males with their associated females form “parties,” which team up as “gangs.” Several gangs of the same “community” use the same home range. Males formed strong bonds predominantly within parties; however, these bonds were not correlated with genetic relatedness. Agonistic interactions were relatively rare and were restricted to a few dyads. Although the social organization of Guinea baboons resembles that of hamadryas baboons, we found stronger male–male affiliation and more elaborate greeting rituals among male Guinea baboons and less aggression toward females. Thus, the social relationships of male Guinea baboons differ markedly from those of other members of the genus, adding valuable comparative data to test hypotheses regarding social evolution. We suggest that this species constitutes an intriguing model to study the predictors and fitness benefits of male bonds, thus contributing to a better understanding of the evolution of this important facet of human social behavior. PMID:25201960

  14. Food Supplement Usage by Adolescent Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Barbara; Read, Marsha

    1982-01-01

    Adolescent males (N=568) responded to a questionnaire examining their food supplement usage, types of food supplements consumed, reasons for use and non-use, relationship of use to concern for health, and demographic and external factors influencing supplement use. Presents factors related to food supplement usage. (RC)

  15. Crossing Uncertain Terrain: Messages from Male Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keamy, Ron Kim

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, comments made by a group of senior male academics in Australian universities about their leadership behaviours, are considered. Whereas the majority of the men in the study spoke about gender relations, and sometimes feminism in their workplaces, only two of the men engaged in discourses of gender and/or feminism, as well as…

  16. Epidemiologic methods for investigating male fecundity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørn Olsen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fertility is a couple concept that has been measured since the beginning of demography, and male fecundity (his biological capacity to reproduce is a component of the fertility rate. Unfortunately, we have no way of measuring the male component directly, although several indirect markers can be used. Population registers can be used to monitor the proportion of childless couples, couples who receive donor semen, trends in dizygotic twinning, and infertility diagnoses. Studies using time-to-pregnancy (TTP may identify couple subfecundity, and TTP data will correlate with sperm quality and quantity as well as sexual activity and a number of other conditions. Having exposure data available for couples with a fecund female partner would make TTP studies of interest in identifying exposures that may affect male fecundity. Biological indicators such as sperm quality and quantity isolate the male component of fertility, and semen data therefore remain an important source of information for research. Unfortunately, often over half of those invited to provide a sperm sample will refuse, and the study is then subject to a selection that may introduce bias. Because the most important time windows for exposures that impair semen production could be early fetal life, puberty, and the time of ejaculation; longitudinal data over decades of time are required. The ongoing monitoring of semen quality and quantity should continue, and surveys monitoring fertility and waiting TTP should also be designed.

  17. Crossing Uncertain Terrain: Messages from Male Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keamy, Ron Kim

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, comments made by a group of senior male academics in Australian universities about their leadership behaviours, are considered. Whereas the majority of the men in the study spoke about gender relations, and sometimes feminism in their workplaces, only two of the men engaged in discourses of gender and/or feminism, as well as…

  18. Subtyping Male Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Katherine A.; Westen, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence is a serious problem with far-reaching consequences. This study applies a new methodology to derive subtypes of male perpetrators of intimate partner violence. As part of a larger National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded study, a national sample of randomly selected psychologists and psychiatrists describe 188 adult male…

  19. Deterioration of male reproductive functions in hyperprolactinaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kooy (Adriaan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractSince the early seventies, chronic hyperPRLaemia due to hypothalamic-pituitary disorders, drug abuse, hypothyroidism or other causes, has been recognized as a cause of reproductive dysfunctions in both women and men. Possible mechanisms by which PRL exerts its effects on male reproductiv

  20. endogenous retrovirus sequences expressed in male mammalian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    79 No. 2 January 2002 ... cover a range of structural variations that have been detected in ... involves transcription of DNA into RNA, which is later translated to ... complete open reading frames for all viral genes (gag, pol, env) have been observed(26). ..... New Zealand black male mice: Possibility of a viral basis. Lab. Irrv.

  1. Male Psychopaths and Their Criminal Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Robert D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined criminal histories of male psychopaths and nonpsychopaths, exploring time in prison and conviction rates for five-year periods between ages of 16 and 45. Criminal activities of nonpsychopaths were relatively constant over years; activities of psychopaths remained high until around age 40, then declined dramatically. Results are consistent…

  2. School-Related Characteristics of Male Juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Gary L.; Abbott, Gypsy A.

    School-related characteristics of 256 male juveniles under the jurisdiction of a Family Court system were examined by perusing court records and conducting individual interviews with the juveniles. Results indicated that most juveniles last attended eighth grade, more than 81% had failed at least once, and more than half had fought frequently at…

  3. Management of male neurologic patients with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of fertility rely on intact neurologic function and thus neurologic diseases can result in infertility. While research into general female fertility and alterations in male semen quality is limited, we have an abundance of knowledge regarding ejaculatory dysfunction following nerve...

  4. Health Problems and Male Firearm Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempstead, Katherine; Nguyen, Tuan; David-Rus, Richard; Jacquemin, Bretta

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on constructs of masculinity as it relates to both gun ownership and men's health, we use a rich data set, the New Jersey Violent Death Reporting System as well as hospital discharge data, to analyze 3,413 completed male suicides between the years of 2003 and 2009. We test the hypotheses that the use of firearms is more common when…

  5. The evolution of humor from male aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuster S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sam ShusterNewcastle University, Newcastle Upon Type, NE1 7RU, UKAbstract: The response to seeing a man riding a unicycle was reported to be consistently related to the viewer's sex and stage of physical development. To see if this observation was universal, observations of responses were collected from 23 male and 9 female unicyclists aged 15–69 years, with 2–40 years cycling experience across four continents. With two exceptions among men, the findings were the same as those originally reported: children showed interest and curiosity, young girls showed little interest, while adult women showed a kindly, concerned, praising response. By contrast, boys showed physical aggression, which became more verbal, merging in the later teens to the snide, aggressive, stereotyped humorous response shown by adult males, which became less frequent in elderly men. The universality of the response across different individuals, environments, and dates of observation suggests an endogenous mechanism, and the association with masculine development relates this to androgen. The theoretical consequences are discussed. It is concluded that humor develops from aggression in males and is evolutionarily related to sexual selection.Keywords: humor evolution, male aggressive behavior

  6. The impact of pesticides on male fertility.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeleveld, N.; Bretveld, R.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Observations in several Western countries point toward a decline in semen quality which may be associated with exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors such as several frequently used pesticides. The scarce literature on the effects of pesticides on male fertility will be re

  7. Sexuality of male-to-female transsexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Jaimie F; Clarke, Dave E; Lomax, Terri C

    2008-08-01

    Blanchard's (J Nerv Ment Dis 177:616-623, 1989) theory of autogynephilia suggests that male-to-female transsexuals can be categorized into different types based on their sexuality. Little previous research has compared the sexuality of male-to-female transsexuals to biological females. The present study examined 15 aspects of sexuality among a non-clinical sample of 234 transsexuals and 127 biological females, using either an online or a paper questionnaire. The results showed that, overall, transsexuals tended to place more importance on partner's physical attractiveness and reported higher scores on Blanchard's Core Autogynephilia Scale than biological females. In addition, transsexuals classified as autogynephilic scored significantly higher on Attraction to Feminine Males, Core Autogynephilia, Autogynephilic Interpersonal Fantasy, Fetishism, Preference for Younger Partners, Interest in Uncommitted Sex, Importance of Partner Physical Attractiveness, and Attraction to Transgender Fiction than other transsexuals and biological females. In accordance with Blanchard's theory, autogynephilia measures were positively correlated to Sexual Attraction to Females among transsexuals. In contrast to Blanchard's theory, however, those transsexuals classified as autogynephilic scored higher on average on Sexual Attraction to Males than those classified as non-autogynephilic, and no transsexuals classified as autogynephilic reported asexuality.

  8. Estimation of temporary emigration in male toads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, E.; Scherer, R. D.; Corn, P.S.; Lambert, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    Male boreal toads (Bufo boreas) are thought to return to the breeding site every year but, if absent in a particular year, will be more likely to return the following year. Using Pollock's robust design we estimated temporary emigration (the probability a male toad is absent from a breeding site in a given year) at three locations in Colorado, USA: two in Rocky Mountain National Park and one in Chaffee County. We present data that suggest that not all male toads return to the breeding site every year. Our analyses indicate that temporary emigration varies by site and time (for example, from 1992 to 1998, the probability of temporary emigration ranged from 10% to 29% and from 3% to 95% at Lost Lake and Kettle Tarn, respectively). Although the results provide weak evidence that males are more likely to return after a year's hiatus, a general pattern of state-dependent temporary emigration was not supported. We also hypothesized relationships between temporary emigration and a number of weather variables. While some competitive models included weather covariates, imprecise and variable estimates of the effects of these covariates precluded fully defining their impact on temporary emigration. ?? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Reduced male births in major Italian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, P; Zonta, L A

    1999-12-01

    The downward trend in the sex ratio at birth that has occurred in several countries over the last 30 years was postulated to signal a deterioration in environmental conditions, particularly unfavourable for male conception and fetus survival. In Italy, in contrast, an upward trend has been observed. Assuming that exposure to reproductive hazards occurs mainly in the major cities, we contrasted the 1970-1995 sex ratio trend for the metropolitan area (defined as the four provinces containing the largest Italian cities) with that for the non-metropolitan area (defined as the rest of the country). In the metropolitan area, the proportion of live-born males showed a negative trend significantly different from the positive trend observed in the rest of the country. Moreover, the stillbirth rate among males was constantly and significantly higher in the metropolitan area. Our results suggest that the decrease in the sex ratio at birth observed in the metropolitan area might be interpreted as a signal of increasing exposure to hazardous environmental conditions for male conceptions and neonates.

  10. Selenium status of idiopathic infertile Nigerian males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinloye, Oluyemi; Arowojolu, A O; Shittu, O B; Adejuwon, C A; Osotimehin, Babatunde

    2005-04-01

    Selenium concentration in the sera and seminal plasma of 60 infertile males (40 oligospermia and 20 azoospermia) and 40 males with proven evidence of fertility (normospermia; control group) were estimated using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results were correlated with spermatogram and hormonal levels in order to determine their relationship and significance in male infertility. The mean serum concentrations of selenium was found to be significantly increased in oligospermic compared to azoospermic subjects and controls (p selenium to seminal plasma selenium was 1: 1 in controls, 4: 1 in oligospermia, and 1: 2 in azoospermic subject.A significant inverse correlation was observed between serum selenium level and sperm count (p selenium correlated with spermatozoa motility, viability, and morphology. Serum selenium level shows positive correlation with the serum testosterone level (p selenium in serum and seminal plasma compartment of control males. A disturbance in this balance has a significant influence on spermatogenesis. Selenium appears to have a positive influence on Leydig cells, thus influencing the secretion of testosterone.

  11. Brain activation during human male ejaculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holstege, Ger; Georgiadis, Janniko R.; Paans, Anne M.J.; Meiners, Linda C.; Graaf, Ferdinand H.C.E. van der; Reinders, A.A.T.Simone

    2003-01-01

    Brain mechanisms that control human sexual behavior in general, and ejaculation in particular, are poorly understood. We used positron emission tomography to measure increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during ejaculation compared with sexual stimulation in heterosexual male volunteers.

  12. Psychological characteristics of male university athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAJKUMAR SHARMA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate and compare the psychological characteristics of University maleathletes. A sample of 80 male athletes of Volleyball (n=15, Basketball (n=15, Football (n=25 and Cricket(n=25 filled out questionnaire measures assessing their psychological competencies at their different level ofparticipation.. The Athletic Coping Skills Inventory-28 prepared and developed by Smith et al. 1995 was used tomeasure the psychological characteristics in the form of personal coping resources of university athletes.. Toassess the psychological characteristics of University male athletes of different games, the means, standarddeviations, t-ratios and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA were computed. The level of significant was set at .05levels. The results of research study showed that University male athletes of different team games and levels aswhole had similarity on seven dimensions of psychological characteristics i.e. Coping with adversity, Peakingunder pressure, Goal setting and mental Preparation, Concentration, Freedom from worry, Confidence andachievement motivation, and Coach-ability. Inter-university and All India level male athletes expressedsignificance difference on Goal setting and mental Preparation only The results also showed that Basketballplayers apparently are not free from worry about disappointing a coach or parent and teammates in next time.Finally, the results highlight the importance of psychological competencies for the team games players at theirdifferent level of participation.

  13. Sex chromosome inactivation in the male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R

    2009-10-01

    Mammalian females have two X chromosomes, while males have only one X plus a Y chromosome. In order to balance X-linked gene dosage between the sexes, one X chromosome undergoes inactivation during development of female embryos. This process has been termed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Inactivation of the single X chromosome also occurs in the male, but is transient and is confined to the late stages of first meiotic prophase during spermatogenesis. This phenomenon has been termed meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). A substantial portion ( approximately 15-25%) of X-linked mRNA-encoding genes escapes XCI in female somatic cells. While no mRNA genes are known to escape MSCI in males, approximately 80% of X-linked miRNA genes have been shown to escape this process. Recent results have led to the proposal that the RNA interference mechanism may be involved in regulating XCI in female cells. We suggest that some MSCI-escaping miRNAs may play a similar role in regulating MSCI in male germ cells.

  14. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Vosters, S.; Merkx, G.F.M.; Hauwers, K.W.M. d'; Wansink, D.G.; Ramos, L.; Boer, P. de

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylate

  15. Health Problems and Male Firearm Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempstead, Katherine; Nguyen, Tuan; David-Rus, Richard; Jacquemin, Bretta

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on constructs of masculinity as it relates to both gun ownership and men's health, we use a rich data set, the New Jersey Violent Death Reporting System as well as hospital discharge data, to analyze 3,413 completed male suicides between the years of 2003 and 2009. We test the hypotheses that the use of firearms is more common when…

  16. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Vosters, S.; Merkx, G.F.M.; Hauwers, K.W.M. d'; Wansink, D.G.; Ramos, L.; Boer, P. de

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly

  17. Studying Adolescent Male Sexuality: Where Are We?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laureen H.; Guthrie, Barbara J.; Oakley, Deborah J.

    2005-01-01

    This article critically reviews the literature about adolescent males' sexuality in order to describe the state of the science and to identify promising concepts and research designs that have the potential to guide the next generation of research. A critique was conducted on 94 peer-reviewed studies of sexual behaviors that included a sample of…

  18. Bodily integrity and male and female circumcision.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, W.J.M.; Hoffer, C.; Wils, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the ambiguous notion of bodily integrity, focusing on male and female circumcision. In the empirical part of the study we describe and analyse the various meanings that are given to the notion of bodily integrity by people in their daily lives. In the philosophical part we distin

  19. Subtotal obstruction of the male reproductive tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, F.H.; Dohle, G.R.; Roijen, J.H. van; Vreeburg, J.T.M.; Weber, R.F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Bilateral obstruction of the male reproductive tract is suspected in men with azoospermia, normal testicular volume and normal FSH. A testicular biopsy is required to differentiate between an obstruction and a testicular insufficiency. Unilateral or subtotal bilateral obstructions and epididymal dys

  20. Update on the male hormonal contraceptive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Melanie; Anderson, Richard A

    2004-09-01

    There remains a need for new acceptable and effective male contraceptives to increase the choice for couples throughout the world. There have been no recent advances in available male contraceptive methods although a number of promising approaches have been identified, of which the hormonal approach is currently undergoing clinical investigation. In recent years the pace of research in this area has quickened significantly with increasing interest and now investment by the pharmaceutical industry. This is vital if the work undertaken so far by the public sector is to be transformed into a commercial reality. The hormonal approach is based on suppression of pituitary gonadotropin secretion resulting in a reversible reduction in spermatogenesis with azoospermia in all men being the ultimate aim. Without stimulation by luteinising hormone from the pituitary, testicular testosterone production also ceases. Therefore, androgen administration to restore physiological levels is an essential component of all male hormonal contraceptive regimes. Male hormonal contraceptives can consist of testosterone alone, or either a progestogen or gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist with 'add-back' testosterone. This article reviews the current state of progress in this field.

  1. MALE BREAST CANCER IN NORTH EASTERN NIGERIA,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Departments of *Surgery and '*Hz'st0path0l0gy, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, RM. ... Results: Male breast cancer constitutes 3.7% of all cases of breast cancers seen in this hospital during the study .... hormonal implications.

  2. Melatonin hormone profile in infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Hosni; Halawa, Fawzy; Mostafa, Taymour; Atta, Hazem

    2006-06-01

    Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland. There is much controversy about its relationship to the male reproductive process. In this study, seminal plasma as well as the serum melatonin levels were studied in different infertile male groups and were correlated with their semen parameters and hormonal levels. One hundred twenty male cases subdivided into six equal groups were consecutively included; fertile normozoospermic men, oligoasthenozoospermia (OA), OA with leucocytospermia, OA with varicocele, non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) with high serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and NOA with normal FSH. Semen analysis, estimation of melatonin, FSH, testosterone (T) and prolactin (PRL) hormone was carried out. Mean level of serum melatonin was higher than its corresponding seminal concentrations in all investigated groups with a positive correlation between their levels (r = 0.532, p = 0.01). Serum and seminal plasma melatonin levels in all infertile groups were reduced significantly compared with their levels in the fertile group. The lowest concentrations were in OA with leucocytospermia group. Melatonin in both serum and semen demonstrated significant correlation with sperm motility (r = 607, 0.623 respectively, p = 0.01). Serum melatonin correlated positively with serum PRL (r = 0.611, p = 0.01). It may be concluded that melatonin may be involved in the modulation of reproductive neuroendocrine axis in male infertility. Also, low levels of melatonin in semen were observed in infertile groups having reduced sperm motility, leucocytospermia, varicocele and NOA.

  3. Legalization of Employment Discrimination against White Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontham, Michael R.

    1978-01-01

    The intervention of government to require speeial treatment of designated groups on the basis of race, color, or sex is inconsistent with principles of equal treatment under American law. Regardless of past discrimination against certain classes, governmental determination to favor them at the expense of White males is not justified. (Author/WI)

  4. Causes of Male Dropout Rate in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ud Din, Muhammad Naseer; Dad, Hukam; Iqbal, Javid; Shah, Syed Shafqat Ali; Niazi, Muhammad Imran

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to seek the cause of male students' dropout rate at the primary level of F.R. Peshawar. The main objectives of the study were: 1) to study the teacher problems and attitudes of the dropouts, 2) to determine the factors that cause dropouts, 3) to study the government's strategy of dropouts, and 4) to provide suggestions to overcome…

  5. Restoring Self-Esteem in Adolescent Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendel, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    When presented with the words self-esteem, it is most common in our society to immediately think of girls. It is not often that people ponder the effects of body image, athleticism, success, or even friendships for boys. Unfortunately in overlooking these concepts, we are doing a disservice to our male youth. This article addresses the effects of…

  6. Male or female? Brains are intersex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphna eJoel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The underlying assumption in popular and scientific publications on sex differences in the brain is that human brains can take one of two forms male or female, and that the differences between these two forms underlie differences between men and women in personality, cognition, emotion and behavior. Documented sex differences in brain structure are typically taken to support this dimorphic view of the brain. However, neuroanatomical data reveal that sex interacts with other factors in utero and throughout life to determine the structure of the brain, and that because these interactions are complex, the result is a multi-morphic, rather than a dimorphic, brain. More specifically, here I argue that human brains are composed of an ever-changing heterogeneous mosaic of male and female brain characteristics (rather than being all male or all female that cannot be aligned on a continuum between a male brain and a female brain. I further suggest that sex differences in the direction of change in the brain mosaic following specific environmental events lead to sex differences in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  7. Incomplete urethral duplication in an adult male.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, N F

    2012-09-01

    Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly with less than 200 cases reported. It predominantly occurs in males and is nearly always diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. It is defined as a complete second passage from the bladder to the dorsum of the penis or as an accessory pathway that ends blindly on the dorsal or ventral surface.

  8. Possible fetal determinants of male infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Almstrup, Kristian; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Although common reproductive problems, such as male infertility and testicular cancer, present in adult life, strong evidence exists that these reproductive disorders might have a fetal origin. The evidence is derived not only from large epidemiological studies that show birth-cohort effects...

  9. Infertility in male aquatic invertebrates: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ceri; Ford, Alex T

    2012-09-15

    As a result of endocrine disruptor studies, there are numerous examples of male related reproductive abnormalities observed in vertebrates. Contrastingly, within the invertebrates there have been considerably less examples both from laboratory and field investigations. This has in part been due to a focus of female related endpoints, inadequate biomarkers and the low number of studies. Whether contaminant induced male infertility is an issue within aquatic invertebrates and their wider communities therefore remains largely unknown and represents a key knowledge gap in our understanding of pollutant impacts in aquatic wildlife. This paper reviews the current knowledge regarding pollutants impacting male infertility across several aquatic invertebrate phyla; which biomarkers are currently being used and where the science needs to be expanded. The limited studies conducted so far have revealed reductions in sperm numbers, examples of poor fertilisation success, DNA damage to spermatozoa and inhibition of sperm motility that can be induced by a range of environmental contaminants. This limited data is mainly comprised from laboratory studies with only a few studies of sperm toxicity in natural populations. Clearly, there is a need for further studies in this area, to include both laboratory and field studies from clean and reference sites, with a focus on broadcast spawners and those with direct fertilisation. Biomarkers developed for measuring sperm quantity and quality in vertebrates are easily transferable to invertebrates but require optimisation for particular species. We discuss how sperm tracking and techniques for measuring DNA strand breaks and sperm viability have been successfully transferred from human infertility clinics to aquatic invertebrate ecotoxicology. Linking sperm toxicity and male infertility effects to higher level impacts on the reproductive biology and dynamics of populations requires a much greater understanding of fertilisation dynamics and

  10. Meiotic recombination counteracts male-biased mutation (male-driven evolution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawaribuchi, Shuuji; Ito, Michihiko; Ogata, Mitsuaki; Oota, Hiroki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Miura, Ikuo

    2016-01-27

    Meiotic recombination is believed to produce greater genetic variation despite the fact that deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-replication errors are a major source of mutations. In some vertebrates, mutation rates are higher in males than in females, which developed the theory of male-driven evolution (male-biased mutation). However, there is little molecular evidence regarding the relationships between meiotic recombination and male-biased mutation. Here we tested the theory using the frog Rana rugosa, which has both XX/XY- and ZZ/ZW-type sex-determining systems within the species. The male-to-female mutation-rate ratio (α) was calculated from homologous sequences on the X/Y or Z/W sex chromosomes, which supported male-driven evolution. Surprisingly, each α value was notably higher in the XX/XY-type group than in the ZZ/ZW-type group, although α should have similar values within a species. Interestingly, meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes did not occur except at terminal regions in males of this species. Then, by subdividing α into two new factors, a replication-based male-to-female mutation-rate ratio (β) and a meiotic recombination-based XX-to-XY/ZZ-to-ZW mutation-rate ratio (γ), we constructed a formula describing the relationship among a nucleotide-substitution rate and the two factors, β and γ. Intriguingly, the β- and γ-values were larger and smaller than 1, respectively, indicating that meiotic recombination might reduce male-biased mutations.

  11. Responses of female rock lizards to multiple scent marks of males: effects of male age, male density and scent over-marking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, José; López, Pilar

    2013-03-01

    Scent-marked substrates may inform conspecifics on the characteristics of territorial males. Scent-marks of male Carpetan rock lizards (Iberolacerta cyreni) affect space use of females, which by selecting an area may increase the probability of mating with the male that has scent-marked that area. However, males do not hold exclusive territories, and scent-marks of different individual males are often together. This may provide complex information from multiple sources on the social structure. Here, we examined female preference in response to scent marks of various males and combinations in a laboratory experiment. Females preferred areas scent-marked by territorial old males against those scent-marked by young satellite-sneaker males. This reflected the known preference of females for mating with old males. In a second experiment, females preferred areas scent-marked by two males to areas of similar size marked by a single male. This may increase the probability of obtaining multiple copulations with different males, which may favour sperm competition and cryptic female choice, or may be a way to avoid infertile males. Finally, when we experimentally over-marked the scent-marks of an old male with scent-marks of a young male, females did not avoid, nor prefer, the over-marked area, suggesting that the quality of the old male may override the presence of a satellite male. We suggest that, irrespective of the causes underlying why a female selects a scent-marked area, this strategy may affect her reproductive success, which may have the same evolutionary consequences that "direct" mate choice decisions of other animals.

  12. Help-Seeking Behavior among Black Males. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Lawrence E.; And Others

    This study concerns the help-seeking behavior of black males as it relates to mental health and attempts to identify the day-to-day concerns and problems of black males, describe their help seeking patterns, and make suggestions for future research and policy development to improve black males' mental health. The sample was 142 black males, ages…

  13. Learned aggression biases in males of Lake Victoria cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Peter D.; Seehausen, O.; Fraterman, R. E.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2008-01-01

    Male-male competition for mating territories can exert negative frequency- dependent selection on a male secondary sexual trait, such as nuptial coloration. This can occur when males bias aggression towards owncoloured competitors, resulting in a fitness advantage for rare phenotypes, thereby promot

  14. Gifted Male Readers: Current Understandings and Suggestions for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnani, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Research literature concerning gifted male readers relies primarily on more extensive bodies of work regarding gifted males and male readers. Studied as a whole, the two halves portray a worrisome state of affairs for gifted male readers, who lag behind their female counterparts in the same patterns found across the ability spectrum. This literacy…

  15. Proteomic analyses of male-fertility restoration in CMS onion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The production of hybrid-onion seed is dependent on cytoplasmic-genic male sterility (CMS) systems. For the most commonly used CMS, male-sterile (S) cytoplasm interacts with a dominant allele at one nuclear male-fertility restoration locus (Ms) to condition male fertility. We are using a proteomics ...

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Male-Fertility Restoration in CMS Onion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The production of hybrid-onion seed is dependent on cytoplasmic-genic male sterility (CMS) systems. For the most commonly used CMS, male-sterile (S) cytoplasm interacts with a dominant allele at one nuclear male-fertility restoration locus (Ms) to condition male fertility. We are using proteomics ...

  17. Male silver eels mature by swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaink Herman P

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If European silver eels are prevented from reproductive migration, they remain in a prepubertal stage by dopaminergic inhibition of pituitary activity. Because this inhibition is likely a requirement for an extended female growth stage, we tested if it is sex-specific by subjecting both sexes to stimulation by GnRHa (Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone agonist – injection or 3-months swimming in seawater. Results In contrast to females, males showed a two- to three-fold higher LHβ (luteinising hormone β subunit – expression, a three- to five-fold higher GSI (Gonadosomatic index and induced spermatogenesis when compared with the untreated control group. Conclusion Dopaminergic inhibition is thus not effective in males and swimming results in natural maturation, probably via GnRH-release.

  18. Ethiology of urinary tract infections in male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Pirali

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study is based on data from 4317 positive urine cultures collected at S. Orsola, Fondazione Poliambulanza Hospital of Brescia (Italy from 2007 to 2009.The patient group was heterogeneous and included in- and outpatients of both gender, ranging in age from 1 to 99 years. E. coli was the most frequently pathogen isolated in all the urine cultures independently from age or sex. Our findings differ from those of a similar study made in the U.S.A., where Enterococcus (Group D Streptococcus was the most frequently isolated pathogen in the urine cultures of the male subjects. These results suggest to maintain an identical empirical therapy in male and female because the most frequently isolated bacteria responsible of urinary tract infections are Gram negative.

  19. Periductal mastitis in a male breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Suk; Jung, Jung Im; Kang, Bong Joo; Lee, Ah Won; Park, Woo Chan; Hahn, Seong Tai [College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    Periductal mastitis and mammary duct ectasia are now considered as separate disease entities in the female breast, and these two disease affect different age groups and have different etiologies and clinical symptoms. These two entities have very rarely been reported in the male breast and they have long been considered as the same disease as that in the female breast without any differentiation. We report here on the radiologic findings of a rare case of periductal mastitis that developed during the course of chemotherapy for lung cancer in a 50-year-old male. On ultrasonography, there was a partially defined mass with adjacent duct dilatation and intraductal hypoechogenicity, and this correlated with an immature abscess with a pus-filled, dilated duct and periductal inflammation on the pathologic examination.

  20. Communication of male quality in owl hoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardouin, Loïc A; Reby, David; Bavoux, Christian; Burneleau, Guy; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2007-04-01

    The evolution of communication through intrasexual selection is expected to lead signalers to transmit honest information on their fighting ability. Here we studied the information encoded in the acoustic structure of the territorial calls of a nocturnal raptor. During territorial contests, male scops owls give hoots composed of a downward frequency shift followed by a stable plateau. We found that the frequency of the hoot was negatively correlated with the body weight of the vocalizer. We shifted the frequency contour of natural hoots in order to create resynthesized calls corresponding to individuals of varying body weight and used these stimuli in playback experiments simulating an intrusion into the territory of established breeders. Territory owners responded less intensely when they heard hoots simulating heavier intruders, and males with heavier apparent weight tended to give hoots with a lower plateau in response to playbacks simulating heavier intruders.

  1. Male breast cancer: a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodabe Shahidsales

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies have devoted relatively scant attention to male breast cancer compared with female breast cancer. Nevertheless, the incidence of male breast cancer has increased considerably in parallel manner with women. There is not comprehensive knowledge regarding the etiology of breast cancer in men. The environmental agents and genetic factors are proposed as the influential parameters in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most frequent subtype of breast cancer in men and a palpable mass is the most common presentation. Breast masses might be identified at advanced stages of the disease, if undiagnosed, due to the lower prevalence and lack of awareness in men compared to women. There is not any large sample size trial or retrospective study regarding any specific treatment strategy; the routine treatments are based on existing data. In this review, we studied the risk factors, biological characteristics, and therapeutic strategies of breast cancer in men.

  2. Genetic prediction of male pattern baldness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Sarah E.; Ritchie, Stuart J.; Davies, Gail; Gale, Catharine R.; Porteous, David J.; Deary, Ian J.; Marioni, Riccardo E.

    2017-01-01

    Male pattern baldness can have substantial psychosocial effects, and it has been phenotypically linked to adverse health outcomes such as prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease. We explored the genetic architecture of the trait using data from over 52,000 male participants of UK Biobank, aged 40–69 years. We identified over 250 independent genetic loci associated with severe hair loss (P<5x10-8). By splitting the cohort into a discovery sample of 40,000 and target sample of 12,000, we developed a prediction algorithm based entirely on common genetic variants that discriminated (AUC = 0.78, sensitivity = 0.74, specificity = 0.69, PPV = 59%, NPV = 82%) those with no hair loss from those with severe hair loss. The results of this study might help identify those at greatest risk of hair loss, and also potential genetic targets for intervention. PMID:28196072

  3. Peritoneal carcinoma in a male patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermann, Monika; Vogt, Peter; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C

    2003-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinoma is a rare primary tumor, described in the literature almost exclusively in women. This report describes our clinicopathological findings in a 51-year-old male patient with peritoneal carcinoma and ascites. Pathologic studies included routine histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy on biopsy and autopsy tumor tissue. After chemotherapy, the patient achieved a complete remission twice, lasting for 14 months and 8 months, respectively, and died after 3 years. His clinical course was similar to that of female patients with peritoneal carcinoma or advanced ovarian cancer. Our case confirms the existence of primary peritoneal carcinoma in males. In addition, it shows that this entity responds to the same chemotherapy as used for ovarian cancer and primary peritoneal carcinoma in females.

  4. Male circumcision does not result in inferior perceived male sexual function - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Düring, Signe; Frimodt-Møller, Cai

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The debate on non-medical male circumcision has gaining momentum during the past few years. The objective of this systematic review was to determine if circumcision, medical indication or age at circumcision had an impact on perceived sexual function in males. METHODS: Systematic...... searches were performed in MEDLINE and Embase. The included studies compared long-term sexual function in circumcised and non-circumcised males, before and after circumcision, or compared different ages at circumcision. The quality of the studies was assessed according to the level of evidence (Grade A......-D). RESULTS: Database and hand searches yielded 3,677 records. Inclusion criteria were fulfilled in 38 studies including two randomised trials. Overall, the only identified differences in sexual function in circumcised males were decreased premature ejaculation and increased penile sensitivity (Grade A...

  5. Expensive egos: narcissistic males have higher cortisol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Reinhard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Narcissism is characterized by grandiosity, low empathy, and entitlement. There has been limited research regarding the hormonal correlates of narcissism, despite the potential health implications. This study examined the role of participant narcissism and sex on basal cortisol concentrations in an undergraduate population. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Participants were 106 undergraduate students (79 females, 27 males, mean age 20.1 years from one Midwestern and one Southwestern American university. Narcissism was assessed using the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, and basal cortisol concentrations were collected from saliva samples in a laboratory setting. Regression analyses examined the effect of narcissism and sex on cortisol (log. There were no sex differences in basal cortisol, F(1,97 = .20, p = .65, and narcissism scores, F(1,97 = .00, p = .99. Stepwise linear regression models of sex and narcissism and their interaction predicting cortisol concentrations showed no main effects when including covariates, but a significant interaction, β = .27, p = .04. Narcissism was not related to cortisol in females, but significantly predicted cortisol in males. Examining the effect of unhealthy versus healthy narcissism on cortisol found that unhealthy narcissism was marginally related to cortisol in females, β = .27, p = .06, but significantly predicted higher basal cortisol in males, β = .72, p = .01, even when controlling for potential confounds. No relationship was found between sex, narcissism, or their interaction on self-reported stress. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the HPA axis is chronically activated in males with unhealthy narcissism. This constant activation of the HPA axis may have important health implications.

  6. Obesity and male breast cancer: provocative parallels?

    OpenAIRE

    Humphries, MP; Jordan, VC; Speirs, V

    2015-01-01

    While rare compared to female breast cancer the incidence of male breast cancer (MBC) has increased in the last few decades. Without comprehensive epidemiological studies, the explanation for the increased incidence of MBC can only be speculated. Nevertheless, one of the most worrying global public health issues is the exponential rise in the number of overweight and obese people, especially in the developed world. Although obesity is not considered an established risk factor for MBC, studies...

  7. Mammary fibromatosis in a male breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, N; Amir, T; Shafi, I N

    2012-07-01

    Fibromatosis of the breast is a relatively benign, though locally invasive neoplasm. It is rare and difficult to diagnose. Risk of recurrence is there if it was inadequately excised. The best treatment is local wide excision with negative margins. We report a 46-year old gentleman with mammary fibromatosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are only few cases reported on male breast fibromatosis. The optimal management of it is unknown because of the rarity of the disease.

  8. Asymptomatic endoalveolar hemorrhage in a young male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Kafyeke

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a young male affected by granulomatosis with polyangiitis presenting with non-specific complaints and complicated by the occurrence of a diffuse endoalveolar hemorrhage characterized by atypical clinical and radiological features. The importance of a rapid and aggressive diagnostic and therapeutic approach has to be strongly underlined. Available data regarding prevalence, clinical and radiological characteristics and treatment of this uncommon manifestation have also been hereby reviewed.

  9. Expensive Egos: Narcissistic Males Have Higher Cortisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, David A.; Konrath, Sara H.; Lopez, William D.; Cameron, Heather G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Narcissism is characterized by grandiosity, low empathy, and entitlement. There has been limited research regarding the hormonal correlates of narcissism, despite the potential health implications. This study examined the role of participant narcissism and sex on basal cortisol concentrations in an undergraduate population. Methods and Findings Participants were 106 undergraduate students (79 females, 27 males, mean age 20.1 years) from one Midwestern and one Southwestern American university. Narcissism was assessed using the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, and basal cortisol concentrations were collected from saliva samples in a laboratory setting. Regression analyses examined the effect of narcissism and sex on cortisol (log). There were no sex differences in basal cortisol, F(1,97) = .20, p = .65, and narcissism scores, F(1,97) = .00, p = .99. Stepwise linear regression models of sex and narcissism and their interaction predicting cortisol concentrations showed no main effects when including covariates, but a significant interaction, β = .27, p = .04. Narcissism was not related to cortisol in females, but significantly predicted cortisol in males. Examining the effect of unhealthy versus healthy narcissism on cortisol found that unhealthy narcissism was marginally related to cortisol in females, β = .27, p = .06, but significantly predicted higher basal cortisol in males, β = .72, p = .01, even when controlling for potential confounds. No relationship was found between sex, narcissism, or their interaction on self-reported stress. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the HPA axis is chronically activated in males with unhealthy narcissism. This constant activation of the HPA axis may have important health implications. PMID:22292062

  10. Male reproductive health and environmental xenoestrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toppari, J.; Larsen, John Christian; Christiansen, Pia

    1996-01-01

    that the adverse changes may be inter-related and have a common origin in fetal life or childhood. Exposure of the male fetus to supranormal levels of estrogens, such as diethlylstilbestrol, can result in the above-mentioned reproductive defects. The growing number of reports demonstrating that common...... and childhood development. An extensive research program is needed to understand the extent of the problem, its underlying etiology, and the development of a strategy for prevention and intervention....

  11. Expensive Egos: Narcissistic Males Have Higher Cortisol

    OpenAIRE

    David A. Reinhard; Konrath, Sara H.; Lopez, William D.; Cameron, Heather G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Narcissism is characterized by grandiosity, low empathy, and entitlement. There has been limited research regarding the hormonal correlates of narcissism, despite the potential health implications. This study examined the role of participant narcissism and sex on basal cortisol concentrations in an undergraduate population. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Participants were 106 undergraduate students (79 females, 27 males, mean age 20.1 years) from one Midwestern and one Southwestern America...

  12. Competition for trophies triggers male generosity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Sophia Pan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cooperation is indispensable in human societies, and much progress has been made towards understanding human pro-social decisions. Formal incentives, such as punishment, are suggested as potential effective approaches despite the fact that punishment can crowd out intrinsic motives for cooperation and detrimentally impact efficiency. At the same time, evolutionary biologists have long recognized that cooperation, especially food sharing, is typically efficiently organized in groups living on wild foods, even absent formal economic incentives. Despite its evident importance, the source of this voluntary compliance remains largely uninformed. Drawing on costly signaling theory, and in light of the widely established competitive nature of males, we hypothesize that unique and displayable rewards (trophies out of competition may trigger male generosity in competitive social environments. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we use a controlled laboratory experiment to show that cooperation is sustained in a generosity competition with trophy rewards, but breaks down in the same environment with equally valuable but non-unique and non-displayable rewards. Further, we find that males' competition for trophies is the driving force behind treatment differences. In contrast, it appears that female competitiveness is not modulated by trophy rewards. SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest new approaches to promoting cooperation in human groups that, unlike punishment mechanisms, do not sacrifice efficiency. This could have important implications in any domain where voluntary compliance matters--including relations between spouses, employers and employees, market transactions, and conformity to legal standards.

  13. Male fertility, obesity, and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Dias, Fernando Goulart Fernandes

    2012-08-01

    Obesity has become a new worldwide health problem with significant impact not only on cardiovascular diseases but also on many other related disorders, highlighting infertility. Obesity may adversely affect male reproduction by endocrinologic, thermal, genetic, and sexual mechanisms. There is good evidence that obesity can be associated with reduced sperm concentrations, but studies about sperm motility, morphology, and DNA fragmentation have been less numerous and more conflicting. Although weight loss is the cornerstone of the treatment of obesity-related infertility, with promising results in restoring fertility and normal hormonal profiles, bariatric surgery impact on male fertility is still unclear and until now there is not enough data to support the informed consent in this scenario. Physicians are encouraged to highlight possible positive and/or negative impacts concerning male capacity of fertilization when informing patients. A balanced judgment and a personalized case-by-case management with patient involvement in decisions are fundamental in this setting and indication of cryopreservation of semen samples should be considered in selected circumstances. Well-structured trials controlled for confounders including female factors and based on solid outcomes (ie, birth rates) must urgently come up to clarify this emerging scenario.

  14. The Young Male Cigarette and Alcohol Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Vincke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many health risks of tobacco and alcohol use, high levels of smoking and drinking are being persisted. Moreover, young men engage more in these behaviors as compared to women. As male physical risk-taking behavior gains attractiveness in short-term mating contexts and given that smoking and drinking have considerable physical costs, this study explores the possibility that tobacco and alcohol use is part of a male short-term mating strategy. By means of a between-subjects experiment (N = 239, women’s perceptions of young male smoking and drinking were investigated. The experiment showed that women perceive men who smoke and drink as being more short-term oriented in their sexuality than nonusers. Moreover, both tobacco and (especially alcohol use brought some attractiveness benefits in short-term mating contexts. A follow-up study (N = 171 confirmed that men’s behavior corresponds with women’s perceptions. Overall, these findings show that cigarette and alcohol use can operate as a short-term mating strategy.

  15. Xenoesterogens and male infertility: myth or reality?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RoyaRozati; P.P.Reddy; P.Reddanna; RubinaMujtaba

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the role of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as a potential environmental hazard in the deterioration of male fertility. Methods: Fifty-three males were studied. After a thorough case history evaluation and relevant clinical and laboratory investigations, PCBs were estimated in the seminal plasma of 21 infertile men with “Unexplained Male Factor” and 32 fertile controls. Peak retention times of the eluants were compared with those of the commercially available standard PCB Mix, and the results confirmed spectrophotometrically. Seminal PCB concentrations were compared between i) fertile and infertile men and ii) men from different areas and diets. The relationship between PCB concentrations and measures of sperm quality such as the total motile sperm count, was assessed. Results: PCBs were detected in seminal plasma of infertile men but absent from controls. Sperm quantity and quality were significantly lower in infertile men compared to controls. The highest average PCB concentrations were found in fish-eating urban dwellers, and followed in succession by fish-eating rural dwellers, non fish-eating urban dwellers and non fish-eating rural dwellers. The total motile sperm counts were inversely proportional to the PCB concentrations and were significantly lower than those of the respective controls. Conclusion: PCBs may be instntmental in the deterioration of sperm quantity and quality, a contaminated fish diet being the main source of exposure.(Asian J Androl 2000 Dec;2:263-269)

  16. Searching for candidate genes for male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.N.Truong; E.K.Moses; J.E.Armes; D.J.Venter; H.W.G.Baker

    2003-01-01

    Aim: We describe an approach to search for candidate genes for male infertility using the two human genome databases: the public University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) and private Celera databases which list known and predicted gene sequences and provide related information such as gene function, tissue expression,known mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methods and Results: To demonstrate this in silico research, the following male infertility candidate genes were selected: (1) human BOULE, mutations of which may lead to germ cell arrest at the primary spermatocyte stage, (2) mutations of casein kinase 2 alpha genes which may cause globozoospermia, (3) DMR-N9 which is possibly involved in the spermatogenic defect of myotonic dystrophy and (4) several testes expressed genes at or near the breakpoints of a balanced translocation associated with hypospermatogenesis. We indicate how information derived from the human genome databases can be used to confirm these candidate genes may be pathogenic by studying RNA expression in tissue arrays using in situ hybridization and gene sequencing. Conclusion: The paper explains the new approach to discovering genetic causes of male infertility using information about the human genome. ( Asian J Andro1 2003 Jun; 5:137-147 )

  17. The male role in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellsagué Xavier

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental, clinical, and epidemiological evidence strongly suggests that genital Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs are predominantly sexually transmitted. Epidemiological studies in virginal and HPV-negative women clearly indicate that sexual intercourse is virtually a necessary step for acquiring HPV. As with any other sexually transmitted disease (STD men are implicated in the epidemiological chain of the infection. Penile HPVs are predominantly acquired through sexual contacts. Sexual contacts with women who are prostitutes play an important role in HPV transmission and in some populations sex workers may become an important reservoir of high-risk HPVs. Acting both as "carriers" and "vectors" of oncogenic HPVs male partners may markedly contribute to the risk of developing cervical cancer in their female partners. Thus, in the absence of screening programs, a woman's risk of cervical cancer may depend less on her own sexual behavior than on that of her husband or other male partners. Although more rarely than women, men may also become the "victims" of their own HPV infections as a fraction of infected men are at an increased risk of developing penile and anal cancers. Male circumcision status has been shown to reduce the risk not only of acquiring and transmitting genital HPVs but also of cervical cancer in their female partners. More research is needed to better understand the natural history and epidemiology of HPV infections in men.

  18. Ex-Corporation: On Male Birth Fantasies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Kanz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Between 1890 and 1933, male birth fantasies became a widespread phenomenon in European culture. One of the key examples of male birth fantasies is Filippo Tommaso Marinetti’s “African” novel Mafarka the Futurist. The novel’s protagonist, Mafarka, gives birth to a child by his will power and by drawing on diverse formations of knowledge, from alchemy to theories of evolution. In addition to the consideration given the psycho-historical, cultural, and scientific contexts of male birth fantasies in the avant-garde, the contribution reflects on sibling encryptment within the relationship to the mother as one more aspect of a span of genealogy one might term “Maternal Modernity.” Christine Kanz is Professor of German Literature at Ghent University in Belgium. Her contribution refers to her 2009 book Maternale Moderne. Männliche Gebärphantasien zwischen Kultur und Wissenschaft, 1890- 1933. In addition she edited several collections and authored another book on Ingeborg Bachmann, and numerous articles and reviews in the area of interdisciplinary studies. Before entering the Academy of Fine Arts Karlsruhe, class of Daniel Roth, in 2008, Adam Cmiel trained in various media in Bad Dürkheim, Hamburg, Mannheim, and Trier. He has participated in nine exhibitions since the onset of his studies in Karlsruhe.

  19. The psychology of male (non) involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The primary reason for male involvement in family planning is that the current approach of focusing all family planning attention on women is not working. Unwanted pregnancy continues to increase despite the advent of the oral contraceptive and the IUD and despite the great amount of money and effort that have been invested in making women better contraceptors. Whether or not a contraceptive is effectively used depends a lot on the attitude of the man. The great majority of the studies conducted on male attitudes toward ocntraception indicates that boys and men are interested in the subject. Despite the discrepancy between what people say and what they actually do, there is a vast population of men who are receptive to education and guidance. If the approach is right, the majority of men are willing to become involved. The men who are resistant to involvement in family planning are a minority, and probably nothing can be done about this group. Although the majority of men are not resistant, they see no reason for involvement. In the last 20 years men have been taught that contraception is none of their business. This teaching has been done by the media, family planning agencies, some feminist writers and by women themselves. Most of the resistance to male involvement comes from family planning agencies rather than from the men. How to get men involved in actually a small issues. If there is a change in thinking in the agencies and a willingness to involve men, many effective ways will be found.

  20. Postnatal Testosterone Concentrations and Male Social Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerianne M Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Converging evidence from over 40 years of behavioral research indicates that higher testicular androgens in prenatal life and at puberty contribute to the masculinization of human behavior. However, the behavioral significance of the transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis in early postnatal life remains largely unknown. Although early research on nonhuman primates indicated suppression of the postnatal surge in testicular androgens had no measurable effects on the later expression of the male behavioral phenotype, recent research from our laboratory suggests that postnatal testosterone concentrations influence male infant preferences for larger social groups and temperament characteristics associated with the later development of aggression. In later assessment of gender-linked behavior in the second year of life, concentrations of testosterone at 3-4 months of age were unrelated to toy choices and activity levels during toy play. However, higher concentrations of testosterone predicted less vocalization in toddlers and higher parental ratings on an established screening measure for autism spectrum disorder. These findings suggest a role of the transient activation of the HPG axis in the development of typical and atypical male social relations and suggest that it may be useful in future research on the exaggerated rise in testosterone secretion in preterm infants or exposure to hormone disruptors in early postnatal life to include assessment of gender-relevant behavioral outcomes, including childhood disorders with sex-biased prevalence rates.

  1. Male issues of the ileal pouch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kani, Haluk T; Shen, Bo

    2015-03-01

    : Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is the standard surgical treatment modality for patients with ulcerative colitis who require colectomy. There are special issues related to male gender. We performed systemic literature review on the topic, incorporating the experience in our specialized Center for Ileal Pouch Disorders, and provide recommendations for the identification and management for the gender-specific issues in male patients with ileal pouches. Chronic pouchitis, particularly ischemic pouchitis, anastomotic leak, and presacral sinus are more common in male patients than their female counterparts. Sexual dysfunction can occur after pouch surgery, particularly in those with pouch failure. Diagnosis and management of benign and malignant prostate diseases can be challenging due to the altered pelvic anatomy from the surgery. Digital rectal examination for prostate cancer screening is not reliable. Transpouch biopsy of prostate may lead to pouch fistula or abscess. Pelvic radiation therapy may have an adverse impact on the pouch function. In conclusion, sexual dysfunction and enlarged prostate can occur in patients with the ileal pouch. The measurement of serum prostate-specific antigen is a preferred method for the screening of prostate cancer. If biopsy of the prostate is needed, the perineal route is recommended. The risk for pouch dysfunction and the benefit for oncologic survival of pelvic radiation for prostate cancer should be carefully balanced.

  2. Effects of pyridoxine on male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, S; Tanaka, T; Gotoh, K; Akaike, M

    1995-08-01

    Pyridoxine (PN) was intraperitoneally given at 250 and 500 mg/kg to male rats for 2, 4, or 6 weeks, and its effects on male fertility evaluated in terms of the optimal treatment period and detection parameters. Animals of all PN groups showed depression of body weight gains from week I of treatment onwards, significant at all but the 250 mg/kg 2 week administration I week time point. After 2 weeks treatment, the testes demonstrated only very slight histopathological changes. The 4- and 6-week treatments caused decreased spermatozoal motility and some histopathological changes in the testes including degeneration of germinal epithelial cells with both doses and also decreases in the fertility index and mean velocity of sperm, reduction in the testes and epididymides weights, and changes in testicular proteins. In the animals undergoing a 4-week recovery period following 4 or 6 weeks exposure, changes disappeared with the 250 mg/kg dose, but still remained with 500 mg/kg. From these findings, it is concluded that a treatment period of 4 weeks is sufficient for evaluation of drug effects on male fertility and that histopathology can detect the slightest toxic effects on the testis.

  3. From pollen actin to crop male sterility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Actin plays an important role in the life activity of animal and plant cells. Pollen cells have plenty of actin whose structure and characteristics are very similar to the animal actin. The nucleotide sequence and amino acid sequence of plant actin gene are very similar to those of the animal gene. The content of pollen actin from male sterile plants is much more lower than that from its maintainer plants. The expression of actin gene is organ-specific during the plant development. The expression quantity of actin gene in pollen is much more higher than those from root, stem and leaf. The expression plasmid of the anti-sense actin gene was constructed, transferred to the protoplasts of wheat and tomato to inhibit the expression of actin gene in pollen and thus the male sterile plants of wheat and tomato were obtained. The actin in pollens from the transgenic plants was reduced significantly, whereas the pistil was not affected. This study might pave a new way to breeding male sterile lines for the application of hybrid vigor of wheat and tomato.

  4. Game Performance Evaluation in Male Goalball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molik Bartosz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Goalball is a Paralympic sport exclusively for athletes who are visually impaired and blind. The aims of this study were twofold: to describe game performance of elite male goalball players based upon the degree of visual impairment, and to determine if game performance was related to anthropometric characteristics of elite male goalball players. The study sample consisted of 44 male goalball athletes. A total of 38 games were recorded during the Summer Paralympic Games in London 2012. Observations were reported using the Game Efficiency Sheet for Goalball. Additional anthropometric measurements included body mass (kg, body height (cm, the arm span (cm and length of the body in the defensive position (cm. The results differentiating both groups showed that the players with total blindness obtained higher means than the players with visual impairment for game indicators such as the sum of defense (p = 0.03 and the sum of good defense (p = 0.04. The players with visual impairment obtained higher results than those with total blindness for attack efficiency (p = 0.04, the sum of penalty defenses (p = 0.01, and fouls (p = 0.01. The study showed that athletes with blindness demonstrated higher game performance in defence. However, athletes with visual impairment presented higher efficiency in offensive actions. The analyses confirmed that body mass, body height, the arm span and length of the body in the defensive position did not differentiate players’ performance at the elite level.

  5. Male genitoplasty for 46 XX congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients presenting late and reared as males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shilpa; Gupta, Devendra K.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical profile and management of 46 XX Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) patients presenting with severe virilization and assigned a male gender. Materials and Methods: Of 173 children diagnosed with CAH at the Pediatric Intersex Clinic since 1980, seven children with CAH presented late with severe virilization and were reared as males. All of them were assigned the male sex with removal of the female adnexa. Six were treated with male genitoplasty. Appropriate hormonal supplementation was offered after puberty. Results: The mean age at presentation was 14.2 years (7 – 21). Six patients had presented after puberty, only one at seven years of age. Staged male genitoplasty comprising of chordee correction, male urethroplasty, and bilateral testicular prosthesis was performed. The female adnexa (uterus, ovaries, most of the upper vagina, and the fallopian tubes) were removed. The mental makeup was masculine in six and bigender in one. Bilateral mastectomy was performed at puberty in all. Hormonal treatment comprised of glucocorticoids and testosterone. Six patients were comfortable with the outcome of the masculinizing genitoplasty. One had a short-sized phallus. One had repeated attacks of urinary tract infection arising from the retained lower vaginal pouch. Social adjustments were good in all, except in one who had a bigender mental makeup. Conclusion: CAH patients with severe virilization presenting late and reared as males are extremely rare. However, the assigned gender can be retained adequately as males, meeting the socioeconomic compulsions of the society. The results are satisfactory following appropriate surgical procedures and hormonal supplementation. PMID:23226638

  6. Male genitoplasty for 46 XX congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients presenting late and reared as males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the clinical profile and management of 46 XX Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH patients presenting with severe virilization and assigned a male gender. Materials and Methods: Of 173 children diagnosed with CAH at the Pediatric Intersex Clinic since 1980, seven children with CAH presented late with severe virilization and were reared as males. All of them were assigned the male sex with removal of the female adnexa. Six were treated with male genitoplasty. Appropriate hormonal supplementation was offered after puberty. Results: The mean age at presentation was 14.2 years (7 - 21. Six patients had presented after puberty, only one at seven years of age. Staged male genitoplasty comprising of chordee correction, male urethroplasty, and bilateral testicular prosthesis was performed. The female adnexa (uterus, ovaries, most of the upper vagina, and the fallopian tubes were removed. The mental makeup was masculine in six and bigender in one. Bilateral mastectomy was performed at puberty in all. Hormonal treatment comprised of glucocorticoids and testosterone. Six patients were comfortable with the outcome of the masculinizing genitoplasty. One had a short-sized phallus. One had repeated attacks of urinary tract infection arising from the retained lower vaginal pouch. Social adjustments were good in all, except in one who had a bigender mental makeup. Conclusion: CAH patients with severe virilization presenting late and reared as males are extremely rare. However, the assigned gender can be retained adequately as males, meeting the socioeconomic compulsions of the society. The results are satisfactory following appropriate surgical procedures and hormonal supplementation.

  7. Darcin: a male pheromone that stimulates female memory and sexual attraction to an individual male's odour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLean Lynn

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among invertebrates, specific pheromones elicit inherent (fixed behavioural responses to coordinate social behaviours such as sexual recognition and attraction. By contrast, the much more complex social odours of mammals provide a broad range of information about the individual owner and stimulate individual-specific responses that are modulated by learning. How do mammals use such odours to coordinate important social interactions such as sexual attraction while allowing for individual-specific choice? We hypothesized that male mouse urine contains a specific pheromonal component that invokes inherent sexual attraction to the scent and which also stimulates female memory and conditions sexual attraction to the airborne odours of an individual scent owner associated with this pheromone. Results Using wild-stock house mice to ensure natural responses that generalize across individual genomes, we identify a single atypical male-specific major urinary protein (MUP of mass 18893Da that invokes a female's inherent sexual attraction to male compared to female urinary scent. Attraction to this protein pheromone, which we named darcin, was as strong as the attraction to intact male urine. Importantly, contact with darcin also stimulated a strong learned attraction to the associated airborne urinary odour of an individual male, such that, subsequently, females were attracted to the airborne scent of that specific individual but not to that of other males. Conclusions This involatile protein is a mammalian male sex pheromone that stimulates a flexible response to individual-specific odours through associative learning and memory, allowing female sexual attraction to be inherent but selective towards particular males. This 'darcin effect' offers a new system to investigate the neural basis of individual-specific memories in the brain and give new insights into the regulation of behaviour in complex social mammals. See associated

  8. Cain and Abel reloaded? Kin recognition and male-male aggression in three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlis, M; Bakker, T C M; Langen, K; Frommen, J G

    2009-11-01

    The influence of relatedness on male-male aggression was tested in three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus. The intensity of aggression against brothers and non-kin males did not differ significantly, indicating that kin recognition plays at most a minor role in aggressive interactions between male G. aculeatus.

  9. The dynamics of gynodioecy in Plantago lanceolata L. .1. Frequencies of male-steriles and their cytoplasmic male sterility types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, A.A.; Luyten, R.M.J.M.; Bakx-Schotman, Tanja; Van Damme, J.M.M.

    1997-01-01

    The maintenance of a gynodioecious breeding system (hermaphrodites and male-steriles) was studied in Plantago lanceolata. Cytoplasmic-nuclear inheritance is important in the maintenance of male-steriles. The male-sterile trait is cytoplasmically based (CMS), and male fertility can be restored by nuc

  10. Will male advertisement be a reliable indicator of paternal care, if offspring survival depends on male care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Natasha B; Alonzo, Suzanne H

    2009-09-07

    Existing theory predicts that male signalling can be an unreliable indicator of paternal care, but assumes that males with high levels of mating success can have high current reproductive success, without providing any parental care. As a result, this theory does not hold for the many species where offspring survival depends on male parental care. We modelled male allocation of resources between advertisement and care for species with male care where males vary in quality, and the effect of care and advertisement on male fitness is multiplicative rather than additive. Our model predicts that males will allocate proportionally more of their resources to whichever trait (advertisement or paternal care) is more fitness limiting. In contrast to previous theory, we find that male advertisement is always a reliable indicator of paternal care and male phenotypic quality (e.g. males with higher levels of advertisement never allocate less to care than males with lower levels of advertisement). Our model shows that the predicted pattern of male allocation and the reliability of male signalling depend very strongly on whether paternal care is assumed to be necessary for offspring survival and how male care affects offspring survival and male fitness.

  11. Will male advertisement be a reliable indicator of paternal care, if offspring survival depends on male care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Natasha B.; Alonzo, Suzanne H.

    2009-01-01

    Existing theory predicts that male signalling can be an unreliable indicator of paternal care, but assumes that males with high levels of mating success can have high current reproductive success, without providing any parental care. As a result, this theory does not hold for the many species where offspring survival depends on male parental care. We modelled male allocation of resources between advertisement and care for species with male care where males vary in quality, and the effect of care and advertisement on male fitness is multiplicative rather than additive. Our model predicts that males will allocate proportionally more of their resources to whichever trait (advertisement or paternal care) is more fitness limiting. In contrast to previous theory, we find that male advertisement is always a reliable indicator of paternal care and male phenotypic quality (e.g. males with higher levels of advertisement never allocate less to care than males with lower levels of advertisement). Our model shows that the predicted pattern of male allocation and the reliability of male signalling depend very strongly on whether paternal care is assumed to be necessary for offspring survival and how male care affects offspring survival and male fitness. PMID:19520802

  12. Male homosexual behavior in a free-ranging all-male group of Japanese macaques at minoo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leca, Jean-Baptiste; Gunst, Noëlle; Vasey, Paul L

    2014-07-01

    We documented nine male homosexual consortships within three different male-male dyads in a free-ranging all-male group of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata), at Minoo, Japan. A total of 63 male-male mounts were observed during these consortships. Male homosexual interactions shared most of the behavioral components that have been reported to characterize heterosexual and female homosexual consortships in this species. Convergent behavioral data, including analysis of male-male solicitations, mounting postures, body orientations, inter-mount activities, and third-party male intrusions supported the conclusion that male-male consortships are a sexual phenomenon. We discussed a series of proximate and ultimate hypotheses that purport to account for the occurrence of male homosexual behavior in all-male groups of primates, including humans. This first report of male homosexual interactions in an all-male group of Japanese macaques contributes to the growing database used to provide insights into the developmental processes, causal mechanisms, adaptive significance, and phylogenetic pathways of same-sex sexual behavior.

  13. Heterosexual Men's Anger in Response to Male Homosexuality: Effects of Erotic and Non-Erotic Depictions of Male-Male Intimacy and Sexual Prejudice

    OpenAIRE

    Hudepohl, Adam D.; Parrott, Dominic J.; Zeichner, Amos

    2010-01-01

    The present study compared effects of erotic and non-erotic depictions of male-male intimacy on the experience of anger in heterosexual men. Data came from three independent laboratory studies designed to elicit anger in response to erotic or non-erotic depictions of male-male and male-female intimacy. All participants completed a measure of sexual prejudice and anger was assessed before and after viewing the erotic or non-erotic video. Among high-prejudiced men, viewing erotic and non-erotic...

  14. Re-feeding food-deprived male meadow voles affects the sperm allocation of their rival males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Ashlee A; Delbarco-Trillo, Javier; Ferkin, Michael H

    2012-12-01

    An individual's nutritional status affects the manner in which same- and opposite-sex conspecifics respond to that individual, which may affect their fitness. Male meadow voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus, increase their sperm allocation if they encounter the scent mark of an unfamiliar male that is not nutritionally challenged. If, however, the scent mark comes from a male that has been food deprived for 24 hours, stud male voles do not increase their sperm allocation. Food deprived males may be viewed as being lower quality and a reduced risk of sperm competition by rival males. We hypothesized that stud males in promiscuous mating systems tailor their sperm allocations depending on whether rival males have been food deprived and then re-fed. We predicted that newly re-fed males will be considered a strong risk of sperm competition because of the potentially high fitness and survival costs associated with food deprivation in males, and that they will cause stud males to increase their sperm allocation. Our results, however, showed that the recovery period from 24 hours of food deprivation was a relatively slow process. It took between 96 hours and 336 hours of re-feeding male scent donors that were food deprived for 24 hours to induce stud males to increase their sperm allocation to levels comparable to when scent donors were not food deprived. Stud male voles may be conserving the amount of sperm allocated until the male scent donors have recovered from food deprivation and subsequent re-feeding.

  15. Heterosexual men's anger in response to male homosexuality: effects of erotic and non-erotic depictions of male-male intimacy and sexual prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudepohl, Adam D; Parrott, Dominic J; Zeichner, Amos

    2010-01-01

    The present study compared effects of erotic and non-erotic depictions of male-male intimacy on the experience of anger in heterosexual men. Data came from three independent laboratory studies designed to elicit anger in response to erotic or non-erotic depictions of male-male and male-female intimacy. All participants completed a measure of sexual prejudice and anger was assessed before and after viewing the erotic or non-erotic video. Among high-prejudiced men, viewing erotic and non-erotic intimate behavior between two men elicited significant increases in anger relative to viewing comparable behavior between a male-female dyad. In contrast, among low-prejudiced men, viewing erotic, but not non-erotic, intimate behavior between two men elicited significant increases in anger relative to viewing comparable behavior between a male-female dyad. Implications for understanding heterosexual men's anger, and aggression, toward gay men were discussed.

  16. Persistent organic pollutants and male reproductive health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vested, Anne; Giwercman, Aleksander; Bonde, Jens Peter; Toft, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Environmental contaminants such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are man-made bioaccumulative compounds with long half-lives that are found throughout the world as a result of heavy use in a variety of consumer products during the twentieth century. Wildlife and animal studies have long suggested adverse effects of exposure to these compounds on human reproductive health, which, according to the endocrine disrupter hypothesis, are ascribed to the compounds’ potential to interfere with endocrine signaling, especially when exposure occurs during certain phases of fetal and childhood development. An extensive number of epidemiological studies have addressed the possible effects of exposure to POPs on male reproductive health, but the results are conflicting. Thus far, most studies have focused on investigating exposure and the different reproductive health outcomes during adulthood. Some studies have addressed the potential harmful effects of fetal exposure with respect to malformations at birth and/or reproductive development, whereas only a few studies have been able to evaluate whether intrauterine exposure to POPs has long-term consequences for male reproductive health with measurable effects on semen quality markers and reproductive hormone levels in adulthood. Humans are not exposed to a single compound at a time, but rather, to a variety of different substances with potential divergent hormonal effects. Hence, how to best analyze epidemiological data on combined exposures remains a significant challenge. This review on POPs will focus on current knowledge regarding the potential effects of exposure to POPs during fetal and childhood life and during adulthood on male reproductive health, including a critical revision of the endocrine disruption hypothesis, a comment on pubertal development as part of reproductive development and a comment on how to account for combined exposures in epidemiological research. PMID:24369135

  17. Persistent organic pollutants and male reproductive health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Vested

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contaminants such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs are man-made bioaccumulative compounds with long half-lives that are found throughout the world as a result of heavy use in a variety of consumer products during the twentieth century. Wildlife and animal studies have long suggested adverse effects of exposure to these compounds on human reproductive health, which, according to the endocrine disrupter hypothesis, are ascribed to the compounds' potential to interfere with endocrine signaling, especially when exposure occurs during certain phases of fetal and childhood development. An extensive number of epidemiological studies have addressed the possible effects of exposure to POPs on male reproductive health, but the results are conflicting. Thus far, most studies have focused on investigating exposure and the different reproductive health outcomes during adulthood. Some studies have addressed the potential harmful effects of fetal exposure with respect to malformations at birth and/or reproductive development, whereas only a few studies have been able to evaluate whether intrauterine exposure to POPs has long-term consequences for male reproductive health with measurable effects on semen quality markers and reproductive hormone levels in adulthood. Humans are not exposed to a single compound at a time, but rather, to a variety of different substances with potential divergent hormonal effects. Hence, how to best analyze epidemiological data on combined exposures remains a significant challenge. This review on POPs will focus on current knowledge regarding the potential effects of exposure to POPs during fetal and childhood life and during adulthood on male reproductive health, including a critical revision of the endocrine disruption hypothesis, a comment on pubertal development as part of reproductive development and a comment on how to account for combined exposures in epidemiological research.

  18. Delivery of confidential care to adolescent males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Susan E; McKee, M Diane; Campos, Giselle; O'Sullivan, Lucia F

    2010-01-01

    Primary care providers' (PCPs') provision of time alone with an adolescent without the parents present (henceforth referred to as "confidential care") has a significant impact on adolescents' disclosure of risk behavior. To inform the development of interventions to improve PCPs' delivery of confidential care, we obtained the perspectives of adolescent males and their mothers about the health care concerns of adolescent males and the provision of confidential care. This focus-group study (5 groups: 2 with adolescent males and 2 with mothers) used standard qualitative methods for analysis. We recruited mother/son dyads who had been seen at urban primary care practices. Adolescents' health concerns focused on pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections; mothers took a broader view. Many adolescents felt that PCPs often delivered safe sex counseling in a superficial, impersonal manner that did not add much value to what they already knew, and that their PCP's principal role was limited to performing sexually transmitted infection testing. Though adolescents cited a number of advantages of confidential care and disclosure, they expressed some general mistrust in PCPs and concerns about limits of confidentiality. Rapport and relationship building with their PCP are key elements to adolescents' comfort and increased disclosure. Overall, mothers viewed confidential care positively, especially in the context of continuity of care, but many felt excluded. To increase adolescents' perception of the relevance of primary care and to foster disclosure during health encounters, our participants described the critical nature of a strong doctor-patient relationship and positive physician demeanor and personalized messages, especially in the context of a continuity relationship. Regular, routine inclusion of confidential care time starting early in adolescence, as well as discussion of the purpose and limitations of confidentiality with parents and adolescents, could lead to

  19. Persistent organic pollutants and male reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vested, Anne; Giwercman, Aleksander; Bonde, Jens Peter; Toft, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Environmental contaminants such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are man-made bioaccumulative compounds with long half-lives that are found throughout the world as a result of heavy use in a variety of consumer products during the twentieth century. Wildlife and animal studies have long suggested adverse effects of exposure to these compounds on human reproductive health, which, according to the endocrine disrupter hypothesis, are ascribed to the compounds' potential to interfere with endocrine signaling, especially when exposure occurs during certain phases of fetal and childhood development. An extensive number of epidemiological studies have addressed the possible effects of exposure to POPs on male reproductive health, but the results are conflicting. Thus far, most studies have focused on investigating exposure and the different reproductive health outcomes during adulthood. Some studies have addressed the potential harmful effects of fetal exposure with respect to malformations at birth and/or reproductive development, whereas only a few studies have been able to evaluate whether intrauterine exposure to POPs has long-term consequences for male reproductive health with measurable effects on semen quality markers and reproductive hormone levels in adulthood. Humans are not exposed to a single compound at a time, but rather, to a variety of different substances with potential divergent hormonal effects. Hence, how to best analyze epidemiological data on combined exposures remains a significant challenge. This review on POPs will focus on current knowledge regarding the potential effects of exposure to POPs during fetal and childhood life and during adulthood on male reproductive health, including a critical revision of the endocrine disruption hypothesis, a comment on pubertal development as part of reproductive development and a comment on how to account for combined exposures in epidemiological research.

  20. Treatment results in males with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakisch, B. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Karl Franzens Univ. of Graz (Austria); Stoeger, H. [Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Karl Franzens Univ. of Graz (Austria); Poschauko, H. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Karl Franzens Univ. of Graz (Austria); Samonigg, H. [Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Karl Franzens Univ. of Graz (Austria); Bauernhofer, T. [Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Karl Franzens Univ. of Graz (Austria); Pojer, E. [Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Karl Franzens Univ. of Graz (Austria); Leitner, H. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Karl Franzens Univ. of Graz (Austria); Stuecklschweiger, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Karl Franzens Univ. of Graz (Austria); Peichl, K.H. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Karl Franzens Univ. of Graz (Austria); Quehenberger, F. [Dept. of Statistics and Documentation, Karl Franzens Univ. of Graz (Austria); Hackl, A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Karl Franzens Univ. of Graz (Austria)

    1995-08-01

    Because cancer of the male breast is rare knowledge about its biology and behavior is essentially due to a compilation of pooled experiences. Hence, a continued report of cases appears to be important. Therefore a retrospective review of patients suffering from male breast cancer was carried out. Twenty-four evaluable cases were analyzed. Eight patients (1 patient with bilateral Stage I carcinoma was included) were in Stage I, 7 in Stage II, 2 in Stage IIIa, 4 in Stage IIIb, and 3 in Stage IV. Of 23 patients who were treated with mastectomy, 22 had modified radical mastectomy and postoperative irradiation to the chest wall as well as to the peripheral lymphatic areas in most cases. One patient underwent radical mastectomy. Another patient had an excision biopsy only, followed by irradiation. One of 24 patients received tamoxifen; another received cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, prednisone (CMF) regimen in an adjuvant setting. Local recurrence developed in one of 23 (4%) patients treated with mastectomy and radiation therapy to the chest wall and peripheral lymphatics. Four (17%) patients developed distant metastases. The 5-year overall survival (Kaplan-Maier) was 90% for the entire group, 100% for patients in Stage I-III disease, and 60% in Stage IV disease (P = < 0.005). As observed in former reports the stage of disease at initial presentation seems to be a parameter that significantly contributes to survival in male breast cancer patients. To what extent improved local control by adequate local therapy, such as surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, may improve overall survival remains to be discussed. (orig.)

  1. Some cultural aspects of Greek male homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, R J

    1980-01-01

    A brief examination of Greek social structures, history, and cosmology reveals several points about the nature of, and attitudes towards, male homosexual practices in the classical period. First, due to the overwhelming importance of the Hellenic family, few men seem to have engaged exclusively in homosexual acts. Second, historical sources for Attica indicate that, although most men may have married, homosexual behavior was widespread among all levels of society and was considered no more opprobrious than heterosexual behavior. Third, the Greek cosmology, with its unbounded sexuality and constant blurring of sex roles, provided an atmosphere in which homosexuality was regarded by Athenians as neither irreligious nor unnatural.

  2. Male Sexual Dysfunction and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edey, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly in end-stage renal disease. Historically, this cause of considerable morbidity has been under-reported and under-recognized. The ideal approach to diagnosis and management remains unclear due to a paucity of good quality data, but an understanding of the pathophysiology is necessary in order to address the burden of this important complication of CKD. This paper will review the endocrine dysfunction that occurs in renal disease, particularly the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, discuss the causes of erectile dysfunction, infertility, and altered body image and libido in these patients and suggest appropriate treatment interventions. PMID:28382300

  3. Male Reproductive Disorders and Fertility Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakkebaek, Niels E; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Buck Louis, Germaine M

    2016-01-01

    . Caucasians have rates below replacement, while TFRs among African-Americans and Hispanics are higher. We review possible links between TFR and trends in a range of male reproductive problems, including testicular cancer, disorders of sex development, cryptorchidism, hypospadias, low testosterone levels, poor...... evidence suggests that it most often is related to environmental exposures of the fetal testis. However, environmental factors can also affect the adult endocrine system. Based on our review of genetic and environmental factors, we conclude that environmental exposures arising from modern lifestyle, rather...

  4. Female Versus Male Entrepreneurship within Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardelean Dorina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship is a topic much debated and analyzed by many research institutions and organizations. In recent years, the total number of entrepreneurs has been increasing significantly, female entrepreneurship being the one that has increased a lot. In this study, we are going to present and analyze the results of studies conducted at European level regarding the comparative evolution of male versus female entrepreneurship. The main conclusion that emerges from the analysis of the results obtained is that the number of women entrepreneurs is almost equal to that of men entrepreneurs in many European countries.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of male germ cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, N B

    1998-07-01

    During spermatogenesis, diploid stem cells differentiate, undergo meiosis, and transform into haploid spermatozoa. As this precisely timed series of events proceeds, chromosomal ploidy is reduced and the nucleosomes of the chromatin are replaced by a transcriptionally quiescent protamine-containing nucleus. The premature termination of transcription during the haploid phase of spermatogenesis necessitates an especially prominent role for posttranscriptional regulation in the temporal and spatial expression of many testis-specific proteins and isozymes. In this review article, discussion will focus on novel mechanisms regulating gene expression in mammalian male germ cells from genome to protein.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA mutations and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as difficulty in conceiving a child after 1 year of unprotected intercourse. Infertility can arise either because of the male factor or female factor or both. According to the current estimates, 15% of couples attempting their first pregnancy could not succeed. Infertility is either primary or secondary. Mitochondria have profound effect on all biochemical pathways, including the one that drivessperm motility. Sperm motility is heavily dependent on the ATP generated by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondrial sheath. In this review, the very positive role of mitochondrial genome′s association with infertility is discussed

  7. [Male Breast Cancer: What is Different?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederberger, Philipp; Bucher, Susanne; Aebi, Stefan

    2016-02-03

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease. Symptoms and signs resemble breast cancer in women: A palpable mass, enlarged lymph nodes or skin changes (ulceration, secretion, peau d'orange) mandate mammography, ultrasound to assess the regional lymph nodes. The definitive diagnosis is made by biopsy. Men with breast cancer are treated along the same principles as women: resection followed by systemic and radiation therapy. Tamoxifen, not aromatase inhibitors, is the adjuvant therapy of choice for estrogen receptor positive tumors. Therapy of men with metastatic breast cancer follows the same principles as therapy of women.

  8. Epigenetic regulation in male germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamudio, Natasha M; Chong, Suyinn; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2008-08-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that epigenetic regulation of gene expression is critical during spermatogenesis. In this review, the epigenetic regulation and the consequences of its aberrant regulation during mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis are described. The current knowledge on epigenetic modifications that occur during male meiosis is discussed, with special attention on events that define meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Finally, the recent studies focused on transgenerational and paternal effects in mice and humans are discussed. In many cases, these epigenetic effects resulted in impaired fertility and potentially long-ranging affects underlining the importance of research in this area.

  9. Male hypogonadism: Causes, genetics, diagnosis and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Jubiz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Male hypogonadism represents an altered testicular function with infertility and decreased testosterone production. It can be caused by an intrinsic testicular damage, hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction, or decreased end organ response to testosterone. Signs include hair loss, decreased sexual function, voice changes, eunuchoidal habitus and gynecomastia. The testes are small and osteoporosis may be present. The diagnosis is suspected clinically and is confirmed with decreased circulating testosterone concentrations. FSH and LH are increased in patients with testicular damage (primary hypogonadism and decreased in those with hypothalamic–pituitary dysfunction. Testosterone is available for intramuscular injection, transdermic patches, gel or pellets and by absorption by the oral mucosa.

  10. Cytogenetic report of a male breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, L R; Rogatto, S R; Rainho, C A

    1995-01-01

    The cytogenetic findings on G-banding in an infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma in a 69-year-old man are reported. The main abnormalities observed were trisomy of chromosomes 8 and 9 and structural rearrangement in the long arm of chromosome 17 (add(17)(q25)). Our results confirm the trisomy...... of chromosome 8 in the characterization of the subtype of ductal breast carcinomas and demonstrate that chromosome 17, which is frequently involved in female breast cancers, is also responsible for the development or progression of primary breast cancers in males....

  11. Intelligence, education, and myopia in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, M; Belkin, M

    1987-11-01

    We conducted a nationwide study of the relationship among refractive error, intelligence scores, and years of schooling in 157,748 males aged 17 to 19 years. We found a strong association of myopia with both intelligence and years of school attendance. The prevalence of myopia was found to be significantly higher in the more intelligent and more educated groups. By fitting models of logistic regressions, we worked out a formula expressing the relationship among the rate of myopia, years of schooling, and intelligence level. We found that years of schooling and intelligence weigh equally in the relationship with myopia.

  12. Drug treatment of male fertility disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GerhardHaidl; Frank-MichaelKoehn; Wolf-BernhardSchill

    2000-01-01

    Drug treatment remains an active domain in the therapy of male fertility disorders. Although there are only a few conditions that allow causal treatment, rational approaches are possible in many cases. Best results are obtained in cases requiring an anti-inflammatory treatment and in patients with an impaired sperm transport. High-dosage administration of FSH is a promising new development, aimed particularly at improving the disturbed sperm structures. A careful diagnostic work-up with elucidation of the underlying disease is essential to achieve a successful therapy.

  13. Testosterone replacement therapy in obese males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewa, Tomasz; Olszewska-Słonina, Dorota; Chlosta, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Controversy surrounds testosterone replacement therapy in obese ageing due to no generally accepted lower limits of normal testosterone level and high prevalence of hypogonadal symptoms in the ageing male population and the non-specific nature of these symptoms. Late onset hypogonadism is a clinical and biochemical syndrome associated with advancing age, often coexisting with obesity and metabolic syndrome. High fat and carbohydrates (fructose) consumption is responsible for development of obesity and metabolic syndrome which is one of risk factors for hypogonadism in older men. High fructose intake has been shown to cause dyslipidemia and to impair hepatic insulin sensitivity. Obesity and lack of physical activity negatively influence testosterone level. Low testosterone level should be regarded as an effect of obesity, but reverse relationship has not been proved yet. The management of late-onset hypogonadism symptoms has to be treated by a change of a life style and prevented with healthy nutrition and physical activity. The question related to rational indications for testosterone replacement therapy in obese males seems to be still actual.

  14. Prevalence of andropausal symptoms among Kuwaiti males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maha, Al-Sejari

    2013-11-01

    Andropause is a syndrome that usually occurs during men's midlife. It is associated with clinical short-term and long-term effects, as well as some physiological and psychological symptoms due to subnormal levels of testosterone serum. The objective of this study was to identify the factors that significantly contribute to the prevalence of symptoms that may be related to androgen deficiency. The study used a cross-sectional structured questionnaire and a sample of 214 Kuwaiti men aged 40 years and older. The questionnaire consisted of the sociodemographic characteristics of the participants and the Androgen Deficiency of the Aging Male Scale of Andropausal Symptoms. The results of the study indicate that Kuwaiti men who were 40 to 49 years old reported fewer symptoms than did Kuwaiti men aged 50 years and older, including deterioration in their ability to play sports, easily falling asleep after dinner, anger, and hot flushes (p sport performance, sweating, loss of height, decreased libido, as well as falling asleep after dinner. For those aged 40 to 49 years, lower education levels, marital status, and employment status were significantly associated with the men's symptoms (p < .05). On the other hand, in the case of respondents aged 50 years and older, only education level was significantly associated with their symptoms (p < .05). This is a preliminary study that reports the prevalence of aging male symptoms among Kuwaiti men. The findings will offer insight into the necessary health care provisions to educate, treat, and provide information related to andropause for the general public.

  15. Effects of polyandry on male phenotypic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, M; Dornelas, M; Magurran, A E

    2010-11-01

    Polyandry has the potential to affect the distribution of phenotypes and to shape the direction of sexual selection. Here, we explore this potential using Trinidadian guppies as a model system and ask whether polyandry leads to directional and/or diversifying selection of male phenotypic traits. In this study, we compare the phenotypic diversity of offspring from multiply and singly sired broods. To quantify phenotypic diversity, we first combine phenotypic traits using multivariate methods, and then take the dispersion of individuals in multivariate space as our measure of diversity. We show that, when each trait is examined separately, polyandry generates offspring with a higher proportion of bright coloration, indicating directional selection. However, our multivariate approach reveals that this directionality is accompanied by an increase in phenotypic diversity. These results suggest that polyandry (i) selects for the production of sons with the preferred brighter colour phenotypes whereas (ii) enhancing the diversity of male sexual traits. Promoting phenotypic diversity may be advantageous in coping with environmental and reproductive variability by increasing long-term fitness. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  16. Molecular analysis of cytoplasmic male sterility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The ultimate aims of the project are to understand the molecular mechanism of the disruption in pollen development which occurs in cytoplasmic male sterile plants and to understand the control of respiratory energy flow in the higher plant cell. A mitochondrial locus termed S-pcf segregates with sterility and with an alteration in respiration in Petunia. This cloned locus contains three genes, an abnormal fused gene termed pcf, a gene for a subunit of an NADH dehydrogenase complex, and a small ribosomal subunit protein. The pcf gene is comprised of partial sequences of ATPase subunit 9, cytochrome oxidase subunit II, and an unidentified reading frame. Components of the S-Pcf locus will be introduced into the nuclear of a fertile genotype under the control of appropriate regulatory signals, and polypeptide products of introduced genes will be directed to the mitochondrion with a transit peptide. By examining transgenic plants, we can determine what elements of the locus are critical for altered respiration or sterility. Such knowledge could explain how mitochondrial DNA affects pollen development in the large number of plant species which exhibit the agronomically important trait of male sterility. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Mental rotation performance in male soccer players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Jansen

    Full Text Available It is the main goal of this study to investigate the visual-spatial cognition in male soccer players. Forty males (20 soccer players and 20 non-athletes solved a chronometric mental rotation task with both cubed and embodied figures (human figures, body postures. The results confirm previous results that all participants had a lower mental rotation speed for cube figures compared to embodied figures and a higher error rate for cube figures, but only at angular disparities greater than 90°. It is a new finding that soccer-players showed a faster reaction time for embodied stimuli. Because rotation speed did not differ between soccer-players and non-athletes this finding cannot be attributed to the mental rotation process itself but instead to differences in one of the following processes which are involved in a mental rotation task: the encoding process, the maintanence of readiness, or the motor process. The results are discussed against the background of the influence on longterm physical activity on mental rotation and the context of embodied cognition.

  18. An update on male hypogonadism therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, Prasanth; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Wang, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Men who have symptoms associated with persistently low serum total testosterone level should be assessed for testosterone replacement therapy. Areas covered Acute and chronic illnesses are associated with low serum testosterone and these should be recognized and treated. Once the diagnosis of male hypogonadism is made, the benefits of testosterone treatment usually outweigh the risks. Without contraindications, the patient should be offered testosterone replacement therapy. The options of testosterone delivery systems (injections, transdermal patches/gels, buccal tablets, capsules and implants) have increased in the last decade. Testosterone improves symptoms and signs of hypogonadism such as sexual function and energy, increases bone density and lean mass and decreases visceral adiposity. In men who desire fertility and who have secondary hypogonadism, testosterone can be withdrawn and the patients can be placed on gonadotropins. New modified designer androgens and selective androgen receptor modulators have been in preclinical and clinical trials for some time. None of these have been assessed for the treatment of male hypogonadism. Expert opinion Despite the lack of prospective long-term data from randomized, controlled clinical trials of testosterone treatment on prostate health and cardiovascular disease risk, the available evidence suggests that testosterone therapy should be offered to symptomatic hypogonadal men. PMID:24758365

  19. Phylogeny of Courtship and Male-Male Combat Behavior in Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Phil; Harris, Shannon M.; Kent, Danielle L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Behaviors involved in courtship and male-male combat have been recorded in a taxonomically broad sample (76 species in five families) of snakes in the clade Boidae + Colubroidea, but before now no one has attempted to find phylogenetic patterns in such behaviors. Here, we present a study of phylogenetic patterns in such behaviors in snakes. Methodology/Principal Findings From the literature on courtship and male-male combat in snakes we chose 33 behaviors to analyze. We plotted the 33 behaviors onto a phylogenetic tree to determine whether phylogenetic patterns were discernible. We found that phylogenetic patterns are discernible for some behaviors but not for others. For behaviors with discernible phylogenetic patterns, we used the fossil record to determine minimum ages for the addition of each behavior to the courtship and combat behavioral repertoire of each snake clade. Conclusions/Significance The phylogenetic patterns of behavior reveal that male-male combat in the Late Cretaceous common ancestors of Boidae and Colubridae involved combatants raising the head and neck and attempting to topple each other. Poking with spurs was added in Boidae. In Lampropeltini the toppling behavior was replaced by coiling without neck-raising, and body-bridging was added. Phylogenetic patterns reveal that courtship ancestrally involved rubbing with spurs in Boidae. In Colubroidea, courtship ancestrally involved chin-rubbing and head- or body-jerking. Various colubroid clades subsequently added other behaviors, e.g. moving undulations in Natricinae and Lampropeltini, coital neck biting in the Eurasian ratsnake clade, and tail quivering in Pantherophis. The appearance of each group in the fossil record provides a minimum age of the addition of each behavior to combat and courtship repertoires. Although many gaps in the story of the evolution of courtship and combat in snakes remain, this study is an important first step in the reconstruction of the evolution of these

  20. Phylogeny of courtship and male-male combat behavior in snakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Senter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Behaviors involved in courtship and male-male combat have been recorded in a taxonomically broad sample (76 species in five families of snakes in the clade Boidae + Colubroidea, but before now no one has attempted to find phylogenetic patterns in such behaviors. Here, we present a study of phylogenetic patterns in such behaviors in snakes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From the literature on courtship and male-male combat in snakes we chose 33 behaviors to analyze. We plotted the 33 behaviors onto a phylogenetic tree to determine whether phylogenetic patterns were discernible. We found that phylogenetic patterns are discernible for some behaviors but not for others. For behaviors with discernible phylogenetic patterns, we used the fossil record to determine minimum ages for the addition of each behavior to the courtship and combat behavioral repertoire of each snake clade. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The phylogenetic patterns of behavior reveal that male-male combat in the Late Cretaceous common ancestors of Boidae and Colubridae involved combatants raising the head and neck and attempting to topple each other. Poking with spurs was added in Boidae. In Lampropeltini the toppling behavior was replaced by coiling without neck-raising, and body-bridging was added. Phylogenetic patterns reveal that courtship ancestrally involved rubbing with spurs in Boidae. In Colubroidea, courtship ancestrally involved chin-rubbing and head- or body-jerking. Various colubroid clades subsequently added other behaviors, e.g. moving undulations in Natricinae and Lampropeltini, coital neck biting in the Eurasian ratsnake clade, and tail quivering in Pantherophis. The appearance of each group in the fossil record provides a minimum age of the addition of each behavior to combat and courtship repertoires. Although many gaps in the story of the evolution of courtship and combat in snakes remain, this study is an important first step in the reconstruction of