WorldWideScience

Sample records for genetically defined mouse

  1. The YUMM lines: a series of congenic mouse melanoma cell lines with defined genetic alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeth, Katrina; Wang, Jake Xiao; Micevic, Goran; Damsky, William; Bosenberg, Marcus W

    2016-09-01

    The remarkable success of immune therapies emphasizes the need for immune-competent cancer models. Elegant genetically engineered mouse models of a variety of cancers have been established, but their effective use is limited by cost and difficulties in rapidly generating experimental data. Some mouse cancer cell lines are transplantable to immunocompetent host mice and have been utilized extensively to study cancer immunology. Here, we describe the Yale University Mouse Melanoma (YUMM) lines, a comprehensive system of mouse melanoma cell lines that are syngeneic to C57BL/6, have well-defined human-relevant driver mutations, and are genomically stable. This will be a useful tool for the study of tumor immunology and genotype-specific cancer biology.

  2. Recombinase-Dependent Mouse Lines for Chemogenetic Activation of Genetically Defined Cell Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natale R. Sciolino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemogenetic technologies, including the mutated human Gq-coupled M3 muscarinic receptor (hM3Dq, have greatly facilitated our ability to directly link changes in cellular activity to altered physiology and behavior. Here, we extend the hM3Dq toolkit with recombinase-responsive mouse lines that permit hM3Dq expression in virtually any cell type. These alleles encode a fusion protein designed to increase effective expression levels by concentrating hM3Dq to the cell body and dendrites. To illustrate their broad utility, we targeted three different genetically defined cell populations: noradrenergic neurons of the compact, bilateral locus coeruleus and two dispersed populations, Camk2a+ neurons and GFAP+ glia. In all three populations, we observed reproducible expression and confirmed that activation of hM3Dq is sufficient to dose-dependently evoke phenotypic changes, without extreme phenotypes associated with hM3Dq overexpression. These alleles offer the ability to non-invasively control activity of diverse cell types to uncover their function and dysfunction at any developmental stage.

  3. SKHIN/Sprd, a new genetically defined inbred hairless mouse strain for UV-induced skin carcinogenesis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Carlos; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Mikulec, Carol; Kusewitt, Donna F; Fischer, Susan M; Digiovanni, John; Conti, Claudio J; Benavides, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    Strains of mice vary in their susceptibility to ultra-violet (UV) radiation-induced skin tumors. Some strains of hairless mice (homozygous for the spontaneous Hr(hr) mutation) are particularly susceptible to these tumors. The skin tumors that develop in hairless mice resemble, both at the morphologic and molecular levels, UV-induced squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and their precursors in human. The most commonly employed hairless mice belong to the SKH1 stock. However, these mice are outbred and their genetic background is not characterized, which makes them a poor model for genetic studies. We have developed a new inbred strain from outbred SKH1 mice that we named SKHIN/Sprd (now at generation F31). In order to characterize the genetic background of this new strain, we genotyped a cohort of mice at F30 with 92 microsatellites and 140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) evenly distributed throughout the mouse genome. We also exposed SKHIN/Sprd mice to chronic UV irradiation and showed that they are as susceptible to UV-induced skin carcinogenesis as outbred SKH1 mice. In addition, we proved that, albeit with low efficiency, inbred SKHIN/Sprd mice are suitable for transgenic production by classical pronuclear microinjection. This new inbred strain will be useful for the development of transgenic and congenic strains on a hairless inbred background as well as the establishment of syngeneic tumor cell lines. These new tools can potentially help elucidate a number of features of the cutaneous response to UV irradiation in humans, including the effect of genetic background and modifier genes.

  4. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  5. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  6. The interfascicular trigeminal nucleus: a precerebellar nucleus in the mouse defined by retrograde neuronal tracing and genetic fate mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuhong; Tvrdik, Petr; Makki, Nadja; Machold, Robert; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2013-02-15

    We have found a previously unreported precerebellar nucleus located among the emerging fibers of the motor root of the trigeminal nerve in the mouse, which we have called the interfascicular trigeminal nucleus (IF5). This nucleus had previously been named the tensor tympani part of the motor trigeminal nucleus (5TT) in rodent brain atlases, because it was thought to be a subset of small motor neurons of the motor trigeminal nucleus innervating the tensor tympani muscle. However, following injection of retrograde tracer in the cerebellum, the labeled neurons in IF5 were found to be choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) negative, indicating that they are not motor neurons. The cells of IF5 are strongly labeled in mice from Wnt1Cre and Atoh1 CreER lineage fate mapping, in common with the major precerebellar nuclei that arise from the rhombic lip and that issue mossy fibers. Analysis of sections from mouse Hoxa3, Hoxb1, and Egr2 Cre labeled lineages shows that the neurons of IF5 arise from rhombomeres caudal to rhombomere 4, most likely from rhombomeres 6-8. We conclude that IF5 is a significant precerebellar nucleus in the mouse that shares developmental gene expression characteristics with mossy fiber precerebellar nuclei that arise from the caudal rhombic lip.

  7. Mouse genetics: Catalogue and scissors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Woong Lee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO mice hasrevolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. Asthe use of mouse embryonic stem (ES cells is inevitable forconventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout miceremains a very time-consuming and expensive process. Toaccelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses ofKO mice, international efforts have organized global consortiasuch as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMCand International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC, andthey are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that ispublicly available for the researches studying specific genes ofinterests in vivo. However, new technologies, adoptingzinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs or Transcription Activator-LikeEffector (TALE Nucleases (TALENs to edit the mouse genome,are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternativefor the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, weintroduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate thesignificance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  8. Mouse genetics: catalogue and scissors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-12-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  9. Precerebellar cell groups in the hindbrain of the mouse defined by retrograde tracing and correlated with cumulative Wnt1-cre genetic labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuhong; Tvrdik, Petr; Makki, Nadja; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2011-09-01

    The precerebellar nuclei are hindbrain and spinal cord centers that send fibers to the cerebellum. The neurons of the major hindbrain precerebellar nuclei are derived from the rhombic lip. Wnt1, a developmentally important gene involved in intercellular signaling, is expressed in the developing rhombic lip. We sought to investigate the relationship between the cell clusters expressing Wnt1 and the precerebellar nuclei in the hindbrain. We therefore defined the hindbrain precerebellar nuclei by retrograde tracing, following cerebellar injections of HRP, and compared these results with the cell clusters expressing Wnt1 in newborn mice. We found that 39 distinct hindbrain nuclei project to the cerebellum. Of these nuclei, all but three (namely the oral pontine reticular nucleus, the caudal pontine reticular nucleus, and the subcoeruleus nucleus) contain neurons expressing Wnt1. This shows a high degree of overlap between the precerebellar nuclei and the nuclei that express Wnt1. However, it should be noted that neurons expressing Wnt1 are also found in the superior olivary complex, which is a basal plate derivative lacking cerebellar projections.

  10. Mouse gestation length is genetically determined.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Murray

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preterm birth is an enormous public health problem, affecting over 12% of live births and costing over $26 billion in the United States alone. The causes are complex, but twin studies support the role of genetics in determining gestation length. Despite widespread use of the mouse in studies of the genetics of preterm birth, there have been few studies that actually address the precise natural gestation length of the mouse, and to what degree the timing of labor and birth is genetically determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further develop the mouse as a genetic model of preterm birth, we developed a high-throughput monitoring system and measured the gestation length in 15 inbred strains. Our results show an unexpectedly wide variation in overall gestation length between strains that approaches two full days, while intra-strain variation is quite low. Although litter size shows a strong inverse correlation with gestation length, genetic difference alone accounts for a significant portion of the variation. In addition, ovarian transplant experiments support a primary role of maternal genetics in the determination of gestation length. Preliminary analysis of gestation length in the C57BL/6J-Chr#(A/J/NaJ chromosome substitution strain (B.A CSS panel suggests complex genetic control of gestation length. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these data support the role of genetics in regulating gestation length and present the mouse as an important tool for the discovery of genes governing preterm birth.

  11. Defining the role of laboratory genetic counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Susan; Lilley, Margaret; Hume, Stacey; Scott, Patrick; Somerville, Martin

    2012-08-01

    An increasing number of genetic counselors are moving into non-clinical roles, where their primary duties do not involve direct patient contact. According to the National Society of Genetic Counselors Professional Status Survey in 2010, 23% of counselors working in non-clinical roles identified laboratory or genetic testing as their primary area of work. Using a survey, we identified 43 genetic counselors who work predominately in laboratory settings. The two primary tasks performed by participants, include acting as a customer liaison (95%) and calling out test results (88%). Nineteen participants (44.2%) also reported spending a considerable amount of time signing reports. The most prevalent areas of job satisfaction were support from laboratory directors (76.8%), autonomy (76.7%), interactions with clinicians (69.7%) and interaction with other genetics counselors (67.5%). This is the first study specifically looking at the roles of laboratory genetic counselors, which is an expanding area of genetic counseling.

  12. Genetically engineered mouse models of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nawijn, Martijn C.; Bergman, Andreas M.; van der Poel, Henk G.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Mouse models of prostate cancer are used to test the contribution of individual genes to the transformation process, evaluate the collaboration between multiple genetic lesions observed in a single tumour, and perform preclinical intervention studies in prostate cancer research. Methods:

  13. Defining the genetics of thrombotic microangiopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Martins, Paula; El Sissy, Carine; Bordereau, Pauline; Gruber, Aurelia; Rosain, Jeremie; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    The spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) encompasses a heterogeneous group of disorders with hereditary and acquired forms. Endothelial cell injury in the microvasculature is common to all TMAs, whatever the pathophysiological process. In this review we describe genetic mutations characteristic of certain TMAs and review their contributions to disease. Recent identification of novel pathologic mutations has been enabled by exome studies. The monogenic forms of TMA are more frequently caused by recessive alterations in von Willebrand factor cleaving protease ADAMST13, leading to congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, or cobalamine C and DGKE genes, leading to an atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS)-like TMA. aHUS, whether idiopathic or linked to a known complement amplifying condition, is a TMA that primarily affects kidney function. It often results from a combination of an underlying genetic susceptibility with environmental factors activating the alternative complement pathway. Pathogenic variants in at least five complement genes coding for complement factor H (CFH) complement factor I (CFI), MCP (CD46), C3 and complement factor B (CFB) have been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing aHUS, but several more genes have been implicated. A new challenge is to separate disease-associated genetic variants from the broader background of variants or polymorphisms present in all human genomes that are rare, potentially functional, but may or may not be pathogenic.

  14. Genetic Networks in Mouse Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix L Struebing

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs are the output neuron of the eye, transmitting visual information from the retina through the optic nerve to the brain. The importance of RGCs for vision is demonstrated in blinding diseases where RGCs are lost, such as in glaucoma or after optic nerve injury. In the present study, we hypothesize that normal RGC function is transcriptionally regulated. To test our hypothesis, we examine large retinal expression microarray datasets from recombinant inbred mouse strains in GeneNetwork and define transcriptional networks of RGCs and their subtypes. Two major and functionally distinct transcriptional networks centering around Thy1 and Tubb3 (Class III beta-tubulin were identified. Each network is independently regulated and modulated by unique genomic loci. Meta-analysis of publically available data confirms that RGC subtypes are differentially susceptible to death, with alpha-RGCs and intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs being less sensitive to cell death than other RGC subtypes in a mouse model of glaucoma.

  15. Molecular codes defining rostrocaudal domains in the embryonic mouse hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L E Ferran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The prosomeric model proposes that the hypothalamus is a rostral forebrain entity, placed ventral to the telencephalon and rostral to the diencephalon. Gene expression markers differentially label molecularly distinct dorsoventral progenitor domains, which represent continuous longitudinal bands across the hypothalamic alar and basal regions. There is also circumstantial support for a rostrocaudal subdivision of the hypothalamus into transverse peduncular (caudal and terminal (rostral territories (PHy, THy. In addition, there is evidence for a specialized acroterminal domain at the rostral midline of the terminal hypothalamus (ATD. The PHy and THy transverse structural units are presently held to form part of two hypothalamo-telencephalic prosomeres (hp1 and hp2, respectively, which end dorsally at the telencephalic septocommissural roof. PHy and THy have distinct adult nuclei, at all dorsoventral levels. Here we report the results of data mining from the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas database, looking for genes expressed differentially in the PHy, THy and ATD regions of the hypothalamus at several developmental stages. This search allowed us to identify additional molecular evidence supporting the postulated fundamental rostrocaudal bipartition of the mouse hypothalamus into the PHy and THy, and also corroborated molecularly the singularity of the ATD. A number of markers were expressed in Thy (Fgf15, Gsc, Nkx6.2, Otx1, Zic1/5, but were absent in PHy, while other genes showed the converse pattern (Erbb4, Irx1/3/5, Lmo4, Mfap4, Plagl1, Pmch. We also identified markers that selectively label the ATD (Fgf8/10/18, Otx2, Pomc, Rax, Six6. On the whole, these data help to explain why, irrespective of the observed continuity of all dorsoventral molecular hypothalamic subdivisions across PHy and THy, different nuclear structures originate within each of these two domains, and also why singular structures arise at the ATD, e.g., the suprachiasmatic

  16. Defining multiple-trait objectives for sustainable genetic improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J P; Wilton, J W

    1998-09-01

    Genetic improvement is inherently a long-term process in which progress in the future is built upon improvement in the past. Discounting of future returns is often used in deriving economic values of traits under selection, but this gives a short-term perspective that is in conflict with the long-term nature of genetic improvement. Changes in management, market environment, and genetic potential over time can negatively affect the attainment of breeding goals. Nonlinear optimization techniques can be used to find optimum economic weights each year over any time horizon. Nearly optimal solutions can be found by deriving economic weights for a single, specified future date. Uncertainty about future production and marketing environments creates risk that might be lessened by maintaining or selecting for diverse genetic stocks that could be used in the future. Such programs may need to be coordinated internationally because they may be too expensive for individual companies to undertake. Consideration of risk and careful analyses of future technical and environmental conditions are needed to define multiple trait objectives for long-term genetic change.

  17. Further Defining the Role of the Laboratory Genetic Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltman, Lindsey; Runke, Cassandra; Balcom, Jessica; Riley, Jacquelyn D; Lilley, Margaret; Christian, Susan; Zetzsche, Lindsay; Goodenberger, McKinsey L

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory genetic counseling is becoming increasingly common as a result of increased laboratory services and genetic testing menus, as well as growing job responsibilities. Christian et al. (2012) provided the first quantitative data regarding the roles of the laboratory-based genetic counselor (LBGC) finding that two of the most prevalent roles are as customer liaisons and communicators of test results. The goal of the present study was to further delineate the role of the LBGC by addressing specific tasks that LBGCs are involved with on a day-to-day basis. A survey was designed to expand upon themes identified in the Christian et al. (2012) study by querying specific tasks performed in several categories of potential LBGC job duties. An invitation for LBGCs to participate was distributed via email to the membership of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) and the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors (CAGC). We identified 121 genetic counselors who primarily work in the laboratory setting or whose job role includes a laboratory component. Almost all respondents performed customer liaison/case coordination (95 %), and interpretation and result reporting (88 %). The most frequently performed tasks within these categories involved addressing questions from clients, making phone calls with genetic testing results, obtaining clinical or family history information for results interpretation, and composing case-specific interpretations for unique results and/or obtaining literature references to support interpretations. The study results also point to trends of expanding roles in sales and marketing, variant interpretation and management responsibilities. Results of this study may be useful to further define the full scope of practice of LBGCs, aid in the development of new LBGC positions and expand current positions to include roles related to test development, research, and student supervision. It may also aid in curriculum updates for training

  18. Defining the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis using mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Ignatenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and diet are both considered important risk determinants for colorectal cancer, a leading cause of death in the US and worldwide. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM models have made a significant contribution to the characterization of colorectal cancer risk factors. Reliable, reproducible, and clinically relevant animal models help in the identification of the molecular events associated with disease progression and in the development of effictive treatment strategies. This review is focused on the use of mouse models for studying the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis. We describe how the available mouse models of colon cancer such as the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min mice and knockout genetic models facilitate understanding of the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis and help in the development of a rational strategy for colon cancer chemoprevention.

  19. Genetically modified mouse models addressing gonadotropin function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Laura D; Rulli, Susana B; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2014-03-01

    The development of genetically modified animals has been useful to understand the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the gonadotropin function. It is well known that alterations in the secretion of a single hormone is capable of producing profound reproductive abnormalities. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone normally secreted by the human placenta, and structurally and functionally it is related to pituitary LH. LH and hCG bind to the same LH/hCG receptor, and hCG is often used as an analog of LH to boost gonadotropin action. There are many physiological and pathological conditions where LH/hCG levels and actions are elevated. In order to understand how elevated LH/hCG levels may impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis we have developed a transgenic mouse model with chronic hCG hypersecretion. Female mice develop many gonadal and extragonadal phenotypes including obesity, infertility, hyperprolactinemia, and pituitary and mammary gland tumors. This article summarizes recent findings on the mechanisms involved in pituitary gland tumorigenesis and hyperprolactinemia in the female mice hypersecreting hCG, in particular the relationship of progesterone with the hyperprolactinemic condition of the model. In addition, we describe the role of hyperprolactinemia as the main cause of infertility and the phenotypic abnormalities in these mice, and the use of dopamine agonists bromocriptine and cabergoline to normalize these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic mouse models for otitis media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingyin Zheng; Ken R Johnson

    2003-01-01

    @@ Genetics of Otitis Media (OM): OM is affected by multiple factors including eustachian tube (ET) structure and function, immune status, innate mucosal defense, genetic susceptibility, and pathogens.

  1. Cellular and genetic analysis of mouse blastocyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, R A; Spindle, A I

    1979-01-01

    The development of mouse embryos was studied by both cellular and genetic approaches. In the cellular analysis, determination of cell fate in blastocysts and in cell populations derived from them was studied in an attempt to estimate the time that these cells become committed to their fate. In the genetic analysis, existing mutations that are lethal to mouse embryos were used to discern essential features of early development. In this review, the timing of cell determination in the inner cell mass and the primary ectoderm, and the manifestation of defects in mouse embryos that are homozygous for the A/sup y/ allele of the agouti locus were considered.

  2. Prevalence study of genetically defined skeletal muscle channelopathies in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horga, Alejandro; Raja Rayan, Dipa L; Matthews, Emma; Sud, Richa; Fialho, Doreen; Durran, Siobhan C M; Burge, James A; Portaro, Simona; Davis, Mary B; Haworth, Andrea; Hanna, Michael G

    2013-04-16

    To obtain minimum point prevalence rates for the skeletal muscle channelopathies and to evaluate the frequency distribution of mutations associated with these disorders. Analysis of demographic, clinical, electrophysiologic, and genetic data of all patients assessed at our national specialist channelopathy service. Only patients living in the United Kingdom with a genetically defined diagnosis of nondystrophic myotonia or periodic paralysis were eligible for the study. Prevalence rates were estimated for England, December 2011. A total of 665 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, of which 593 were living in England, giving a minimum point prevalence of 1.12/100,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.21). Disease-specific prevalence figures were as follows: myotonia congenita 0.52/100,000 (95% CI 0.46-0.59), paramyotonia congenita 0.17/100,000 (95% CI 0.13-0.20), sodium channel myotonias 0.06/100,000 (95% CI 0.04-0.08), hyperkalemic periodic paralysis 0.17/100,000 (95% CI 0.13-0.20), hypokalemic periodic paralysis 0.13/100,000 (95% CI 0.10-0.17), and Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) 0.08/100,000 (95% CI 0.05-0.10). In the whole sample (665 patients), 15 out of 104 different CLCN1 mutations accounted for 60% of all patients with myotonia congenita, 11 out of 22 SCN4A mutations for 86% of paramyotonia congenita/sodium channel myotonia pedigrees, and 3 out of 17 KCNJ2 mutations for 42% of ATS pedigrees. We describe for the first time the overall prevalence of genetically defined skeletal muscle channelopathies in England. Despite the large variety of mutations observed in patients with nondystrophic myotonia and ATS, a limited number accounted for a large proportion of cases.

  3. Effect of Duplicate Genes on Mouse Genetic Robustness: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixi Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to S. cerevisiae and C. elegans, analyses based on the current knockout (KO mouse phenotypes led to the conclusion that duplicate genes had almost no role in mouse genetic robustness. It has been suggested that the bias of mouse KO database toward ancient duplicates may possibly cause this knockout duplicate puzzle, that is, a very similar proportion of essential genes (PE between duplicate genes and singletons. In this paper, we conducted an extensive and careful analysis for the mouse KO phenotype data and corroborated a strong effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetics robustness. Moreover, the effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetic robustness is duplication-age dependent, which holds after ruling out the potential confounding effect from coding-sequence conservation, protein-protein connectivity, functional bias, or the bias of duplicates generated by whole genome duplication (WGD. Our findings suggest that two factors, the sampling bias toward ancient duplicates and very ancient duplicates with a proportion of essential genes higher than that of singletons, have caused the mouse knockout duplicate puzzle; meanwhile, the effect of genetic buffering may be correlated with sequence conservation as well as protein-protein interactivity.

  4. Defining the genetic architecture of human developmental language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Bartlett, Christopher W

    2012-04-09

    Language is a uniquely human trait, which poses limitations on animal models for discovering biological substrates and pathways. Despite this challenge, rapidly developing biotechnology in the field of genomics has made human genetics studies a viable alternative route for defining the molecular neuroscience of human language. This is accomplished by studying families that transmit both normal and disordered language across generations. The language disorder reviewed here is specific language impairment (SLI), a developmental deficiency in language acquisition despite adequate opportunity, normal intelligence, and without any apparent neurological etiology. Here, we describe disease gene discovery paradigms as applied to SLI families and review the progress this field has made. After review the evidence that genetic factors influence SLI, we discuss methods and findings from scans of the human chromosomes, including the main replicated regions on chromosomes 13, 16 and 19 and two identified genes, ATP2C2 and CMIP that appear to account for the language variation on chromosome 16. Additional work has been done on candidate genes, i.e., genes chosen a priori and not through a genome scanning studies, including several studies of CNTNAP2 and some recent work implicating BDNF as a gene x gene interaction partner of genetic variation on chromosome 13 that influences language. These recent developments may allow for better use of post-mortem human brain samples functional studies and animal models for circumscribed language subcomponents. In the future, the identification of genetic variation associated with language phenotypes will provide the molecular pathways to understanding human language. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Defining the molecular genetic basis of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, T M; Keating, M T

    1997-02-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a significant health care problem. The etiology is idiopathic in approximately half of the patients. Recognition that 20%-25% of idiopathic DCM cases are familial has advanced the hypothesis that single gene defects are important in the disease's pathogenesis. General linkage analyses in rare, large DCM families have determined the chromosome location of five idiopathic DCM genes. Candidate-gene mutational analyses in more typical, small pedigrees represent an alternative strategy for DCM gene identification. Human molecular genetics will play a fundamental role in defining pathogenic mechanisms for DCM with the prospect of new, molecular-based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:60-63). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  6. The art and design of genetic screens: mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kile, Benjamin T; Hilton, Douglas J

    2005-07-01

    Humans are mammals, not bacteria or plants, yeast or nematodes, insects or fish. Mice are also mammals, but unlike gorilla and goat, fox and ferret, giraffe and jackal, they are suited perfectly to the laboratory environment and genetic experimentation. In this review, we will summarize the tools, tricks and techniques for executing forward genetic screens in the mouse and argue that this approach is now accessible to most biologists, rather than being the sole domain of large national facilities and specialized genetics laboratories.

  7. Molecular and genetic profiles of radiographically defined de novo meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Yohei; Sasaki, Hikaru; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2012-05-01

    With the exception of radiation-induced tumors, benign meningiomas that are known to have developed within a defined time period are extremely rare. We have genetically characterized two cases of radiographically defined de novo, sporadic meningiomas--a 5-cm, left parasagittal tumor in a 61-year-old male and a 2.3-cm, right falx tumor in a 53-year-old female. Neither tumor was observed during MRIs performed for unrelated complaints 49 and 28 months before surgery, respectively. Both tumors were totally resected, and histopathological examination revealed WHO grade I meningiomas. In both cases, the MIB-1 staining indices were high for grade I meningioma (5.6% for case 1 and 9.1% for case 2), and abnormal accumulation of p53 were observed by immunohistochemistry. The two tumors shared losses of chromosome arms 1p and 7p by comparative genomic hybridization. The tumor suppressor merlin, product of the NF2 gene, was not detected in either tumor. These abnormalities found in common in both of the de novo meningiomas likely to play significant roles in the pathogenesis and/or rapid development of meningiomas. Moreover, taken together with previous studies, our findings indicate that the combined loss of 1p and 7p may play a critical role in the tumorigenesis of de novo, aggressive meningiomas.

  8. Comprehensive dissection of PDGF-PDGFR signaling pathways in PDGFR genetically defined cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erxi Wu

    Full Text Available Despite the growing understanding of pdgf signaling, studies of pdgf function have encountered two major obstacles: the functional redundancy of PDGFRalpha and PDGFRbeta in vitro and their distinct roles in vivo. Here we used wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF, MEF null for either PDGFRalpha, beta, or both to dissect PDGF-PDGFR signaling pathways. These four PDGFR genetically defined cells provided us a platform to study the relative contributions of the pathways triggered by the two PDGF receptors. They were treated with PDGF-BB and analyzed for differential gene expression, in vitro proliferation and differential response to pharmacological effects. No genes were differentially expressed in the double null cells, suggesting minimal receptor-independent signaling. Protean differentiation and proliferation pathways are commonly regulated by PDGFRalpha, PDGFRbeta and PDGFRalpha/beta while each receptor is also responsible for regulating unique signaling pathways. Furthermore, some signaling is solely modulated through heterodimeric PDGFRalpha/beta.

  9. Towards Transgenic Primates: What can we learn from mouse genetics?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Hui; WANG Phillip L.; TSIEN Joe Z.

    2009-01-01

    Considering the great physiological and behavioral similarities with humans, monkeys represent the ideal models not only for the study of complex cognitive behavior but also for the precUnical research and development of novel therapeutics for treating human diseases. Various powerful genetic tech-nologies initially developed for making mouse models are being explored for generating transgenic primate models. We review the latest genetic engineering technologies and discuss the potentials and limitations for systematic production of transgenic primates.

  10. Genetic mouse models for behavioral analysis through transgenic RNAi technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delic, S; Streif, S; Deussing, J M; Weber, P; Ueffing, M; Hölter, S M; Wurst, W; Kühn, R

    2008-10-01

    Pharmacological inhibitors and knockout mice have developed into routine tools to analyze the role of specific genes in behavior. Both strategies have limitations like the availability of inhibitors for only a subset of proteins and the large efforts required to construct specific mouse mutants. The recent emergence of RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing provides a fast alternative that can be applied to any coding gene. We established an approach for the efficient generation of transgenic knockdown mice by targeted insertion of short hairpin (sh) RNA vectors into a defined genomic locus and studied the efficiency of gene silencing in the adult brain and the utility of such mice for behavioral analysis. We generated shRNA knockdown mice for the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (Crhr1), the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (Lrkk2) and the purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 7 (P2rx7) genes and show the ubiquitous expression of shRNA and efficient suppression of the target mRNA and protein in the brain of young and 11-month-old knockdown mice. Knockdown mice for the Crhr1 gene exhibited decreased anxiety-related behavior, an impaired stress response, and thereby recapitulate the phenotype of CRHR1 knockout mice. Our results show the feasibility of gene silencing in the adult brain and validate knockdown mice as new genetic models suitable for behavioral analysis.

  11. Astonishing advances in mouse genetic tools for biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Jackson, Walker S

    2015-01-01

    The humble house mouse has long been a workhorse model system in biomedical research. The technology for introducing site-specific genome modifications led to Nobel Prizes for its pioneers and opened a new era of mouse genetics. However, this technology was very time-consuming and technically demanding. As a result, many investigators continued to employ easier genome manipulation methods, though resulting models can suffer from overlooked or underestimated consequences. Another breakthrough, invaluable for the molecular dissection of disease mechanisms, was the invention of high-throughput methods to measure the expression of a plethora of genes in parallel. However, the use of samples containing material from multiple cell types could obfuscate data, and thus interpretations. In this review we highlight some important issues in experimental approaches using mouse models for biomedical research. We then discuss recent technological advances in mouse genetics that are revolutionising human disease research. Mouse genomes are now easily manipulated at precise locations thanks to guided endonucleases, such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or the CRISPR/Cas9 system, both also having the potential to turn the dream of human gene therapy into reality. Newly developed methods of cell type-specific isolation of transcriptomes from crude tissue homogenates, followed by detection with next generation sequencing (NGS), are vastly improving gene regulation studies. Taken together, these amazing tools simplify the creation of much more accurate mouse models of human disease, and enable the extraction of hitherto unobtainable data.

  12. The Core Mouse Response to Infection by Neospora Caninum Defined by Gene Set Enrichment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John; Goodswen, Stephen; Kennedy, Paul J; Bush, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the BALB/c and Qs mouse responses to infection by the parasite Neospora caninum were investigated in order to identify host response mechanisms. Investigation was done using gene set (enrichment) analyses of microarray data. GSEA, MANOVA, Romer, subGSE and SAM-GS were used to study the contrasts Neospora strain type, Mouse type (BALB/c and Qs) and time post infection (6 hours post infection and 10 days post infection). The analyses show that the major signal in the core mouse response to infection is from time post infection and can be defined by gene ontology terms Protein Kinase Activity, Cell Proliferation and Transcription Initiation. Several terms linked to signaling, morphogenesis, response and fat metabolism were also identified. At 10 days post infection, genes associated with fatty acid metabolism were identified as up regulated in expression. The value of gene set (enrichment) analyses in the analysis of microarray data is discussed. PMID:23012496

  13. Somatic structural rearrangements in genetically engineered mouse mammary tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varela, I.; Klijn, C.N.; Stephens, P.J.; Mudie, L.J.; Stebbings, L.; Galappaththige, D.; Van der Gulden, H.; Schut, E.; Klarenbeek, S.; Campbell, P.J.; Wessels, L.F.A.; Stratton, M.R.; Jonkers, J.; Futreal, P.A.; Adams, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Here we present the first paired-end sequencing of tumors from genetically engineered mouse models of cancer to determine how faithfully these models recapitulate the landscape of somatic rearrangements found in human tumors. These were models of Trp53-mutated breast cancer, Brca1- and B

  14. Controlling complexity : the clinical relevance of mouse complex genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schughart, Klaus; Libert, Claude; Kas, Martien J

    2013-01-01

    Experimental animal models are essential to obtain basic knowledge of the underlying biological mechanisms in human diseases. Here, we review major contributions to biomedical research and discoveries that were obtained in the mouse model by using forward genetics approaches and that provided key in

  15. Genomic landscapes of endogenous retroviruses unveil intricate genetics of conventional and genetically-engineered laboratory mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Hoon; Lim, Debora; Chiu, Sophia; Greenhalgh, David; Cho, Kiho

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory strains of mice, both conventional and genetically engineered, have been introduced as critical components of a broad range of studies investigating normal and disease biology. Currently, the genetic identity of laboratory mice is primarily confirmed by surveying polymorphisms in selected sets of "conventional" genes and/or microsatellites in the absence of a single completely sequenced mouse genome. First, we examined variations in the genomic landscapes of transposable repetitive elements, named the TREome, in conventional and genetically engineered mouse strains using murine leukemia virus-type endogenous retroviruses (MLV-ERVs) as a probe. A survey of the genomes from 56 conventional strains revealed strain-specific TREome landscapes, and certain families (e.g., C57BL) of strains were discernible with defined patterns. Interestingly, the TREome landscapes of C3H/HeJ (toll-like receptor-4 [TLR4] mutant) inbred mice were different from its control C3H/HeOuJ (TLR4 wild-type) strain. In addition, a CD14 knock-out strain had a distinct TREome landscape compared to its control/backcross C57BL/6J strain. Second, an examination of superantigen (SAg, a "TREome gene") coding sequences of mouse mammary tumor virus-type ERVs in the genomes of the 46 conventional strains revealed a high diversity, suggesting a potential role of SAgs in strain-specific immune phenotypes. The findings from this study indicate that unexplored and intricate genomic variations exist in laboratory mouse strains, both conventional and genetically engineered. The TREome-based high-resolution genetics surveillance system for laboratory mice would contribute to efficient study design with quality control and accurate data interpretation. This genetics system can be easily adapted to other species ranging from plants to humans.

  16. Host genetic and environmental effects on mouse intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James H; Foster, Carmen M; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Campbell, Alisha G; Yang, Zamin K; Wymore, Ann; Palumbo, Anthony V; Chesler, Elissa J; Podar, Mircea

    2012-11-01

    The mammalian gut harbors complex and variable microbial communities, across both host phylogenetic space and conspecific individuals. A synergy of host genetic and environmental factors shape these communities and account for their variability, but their individual contributions and the selective pressures involved are still not well understood. We employed barcoded pyrosequencing of V1-2 and V4 regions of bacterial small subunit ribosomal RNA genes to characterize the effects of host genetics and environment on cecum assemblages in 10 genetically distinct, inbred mouse strains. Eight of these strains are the foundation of the Collaborative Cross (CC), a panel of mice derived from a genetically diverse set of inbred founder strains, designed specifically for complex trait analysis. Diversity of gut microbiota was characterized by complementing phylogenetic and distance-based, sequence-clustering approaches. Significant correlations were found between the mouse strains and their gut microbiota, reflected by distinct bacterial communities. Cohabitation and litter had a reduced, although detectable effect, and the microbiota response to these factors varied by strain. We identified bacterial phylotypes that appear to be discriminative and strain-specific to each mouse line used. Cohabitation of different strains of mice revealed an interaction of host genetic and environmental factors in shaping gut bacterial consortia, in which bacterial communities became more similar but retained strain specificity. This study provides a baseline analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in the eight CC progenitor strains and will be linked to integrated host genotype, phenotype and microbiota research on the resulting CC panel.

  17. Host Genetic and Environmental Effects on Mouse Cecum Microbiota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, James H [ORNL; Foster, Carmen M [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Campbell, Alisha G [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Wymore, Ann [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian gut harbors complex and variable microbial communities, across both host phylogenetic space and conspecific individuals. A synergy of host genetic and environmental factors shape these communities and account for their variability, but their individual contributions and the selective pressures involved are still not well understood. We employed barcoded pyrosequencing of V1-2 and V4 regions of bacterial small subunit ribosomal RNA genes to characterize the effects of host genetics and environment on cecum assemblages in 10 genetically distinct, inbred mouse strains. Eight of these strains are the foundation of the Collaborative Cross (CC), a panel of mice derived from a genetically diverse set of inbred founder strains, designed specifically for complex trait analysis. Diversity of gut microbiota was characterized by complementing phylogenetic and distance-based, sequence-clustering approaches. Significant correlations were found between the mouse strains and their gut microbiota, reflected by distinct bacterial communities. Cohabitation and litter had a reduced, although detectable effect, and the microbiota response to these factors varied by strain. We identified bacterial phylotypes that appear to be discriminative and strain-specific to each mouse line used. Cohabitation of different strains of mice revealed an interaction of host genetic and environmental factors in shaping gut bacterial consortia, in which bacterial communities became more similar but retained strain specificity. This study provides a baseline analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in the eight CC progenitor strains and will be linked to integrated host genotype, phenotype and microbiota research on the resulting CC panel.

  18. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism.

  19. Genetically engineered mouse models and human osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Alvin JM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common form of bone cancer. Pivotal insight into the genes involved in human osteosarcoma has been provided by the study of rare familial cancer predisposition syndromes. Three kindreds stand out as predisposing to the development of osteosarcoma: Li-Fraumeni syndrome, familial retinoblastoma and RecQ helicase disorders, which include Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome in particular. These disorders have highlighted the important roles of P53 and RB respectively, in the development of osteosarcoma. The association of OS with RECQL4 mutations is apparent but the relevance of this to OS is uncertain as mutations in RECQL4 are not found in sporadic OS. Application of the knowledge or mutations of P53 and RB in familial and sporadic OS has enabled the development of tractable, highly penetrant murine models of OS. These models share many of the cardinal features associated with human osteosarcoma including, importantly, a high incidence of spontaneous metastasis. The recent development of these models has been a significant advance for efforts to improve our understanding of the genetics of human OS and, more critically, to provide a high-throughput genetically modifiable platform for preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics.

  20. The Mouse House: A brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947–2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Liane B.

    2013-10-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Lab is often re-membered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-Chromosome s importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a valuable

  1. Mouse redox histology using genetically encoded probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Yuuta; Roma, Leticia P; Sobotta, Mirko C; Rose, Adam J; Diaz, Mauricio Berriel; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Breckwoldt, Michael O; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Herzig, Stephan; Müller-Decker, Karin; Dick, Tobias P

    2016-03-15

    Mapping the in vivo distribution of endogenous oxidants in animal tissues is of substantial biomedical interest. Numerous health-related factors, including diet, physical activity, infection, aging, toxins, or pharmacological intervention, may cause redox changes. Tools are needed to pinpoint redox state changes to particular organs, tissues, cell types, and subcellular organelles. We describe a procedure that preserves the in vivo redox state of genetically encoded redox biosensors within histological tissue sections, thus providing "redox maps" for any tissue and comparison of interest. We demonstrate the utility of the technique by visualizing endogenous redox differences and changes in the context of tumor growth, inflammation, embryonic development, and nutrient starvation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. A new region of conservation is defined between human and mouse X chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinulos, M.B.; Disteche, C.M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Bassi, M.T. [Univ. of Siena (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Comparative mapping of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals have revealed distinct regions of conservation as well as evolutionary rearrangements between human and mouse. Recently, we and others mapped the murine homologue of CLCN4 (Chloride channel 4) to band F4 of the X chromosome in Mus spretus but to chromosome 7 in laboratory strains. We now report the mapping of the murine homologues of APXL (Apical protein Xenopus laevis-like) and OA1 (Ocular albinism type I), two genes that are located on the human X chromosome at band p22.3 and in close proximity to CLCN4. Interestingly, Oa1 and Apxl map to bands F2-F3 in both M. spretus and the laboratory strain C57BL/6J, defining a new rearrangement between human and mouse X chromosomes. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Recent Advances in Defining the Genetic Basis of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Chikashi; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Gregersen, Peter K

    2016-08-31

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common inflammatory arthritis and exhibits genetic overlap with other autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Although predominant associations with the HLA-DRB1 locus have been known for decades, recent data have revealed additional insight into the likely causative variants within HLA-DRB1 as well as within other HLA loci that contribute to disease risk. In addition, more than 100 common variants in non-HLA loci have been implicated in disease susceptibility. Genetic factors are involved not only in the development of RA, but also with various disease subphenotypes, including production and circulating levels of autoantibodies and joint destruction. The major current challenge is to integrate these new data into a precise understanding of disease pathogenesis, including the critical cell types and molecular networks involved as well as interactions with environmental factors. We predict that delineating the functional effects of genetic variants is likely to drive new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to the disease.

  4. Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease: Focus on Electrophysiological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cepeda

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the HD (Huntington's disease gene in 1993 led to the creation of genetic mouse models of the disease and opened the doors for mechanistic studies. In particular, the early changes and progression of the disease could be followed and examined systematically. The present review focuses on the contribution of these genetic mouse models to the understanding of functional changes in neurons as the HD phenotype progresses, and concentrates on two brain areas: the striatum, the site of most conspicuous pathology in HD, and the cortex, a site that is becoming increasingly important in understanding the widespread behavioural abnormalities. Mounting evidence points to synaptic abnormalities in communication between the cortex and striatum and cell-cell interactions as major determinants of HD symptoms, even in the absence of severe neuronal degeneration and death.

  5. Granule proteinases define mast cell heterogeneity in the serosa and the gastrointestinal mucosa of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H R; Huntley, J F; Newlands, G F; Mackellar, A; Lammas, D A; Wakelin, D

    1988-12-01

    In order to define further mast cell heterogeneity in the mouse, affinity-purified antibodies against a 28,000 MW serine proteinase from mouse intestinal mast cells (IMCP) and against rat mast cell proteinase I (RMCPI) were used to characterize mast cell cytoplasmic granules immunohistochemically. On Western blot, anti-IMCP cross-reacted with RMCPI and with a 25,000 MW antigen from isolated mouse serosal mast cells (SMC). Anti-RMCPI did not react with IMCP, although it identified the same 25,000 MW antigen from SMC. Isolated SMC (85-90% pure) lacked the 28,000 MW IMCP on Western blot, even though, immunohistochemically, the cells were stained with both anti-RMCPI and anti-IMCP. Anti-IMCP stained the granules of more than 85% of all mast cells detected with toluidine blue in the tongue or gastrointestinal mucosa. The specificity of anti-RMCPI which, in the rat, detects very few mucosal mast cells was almost identical to that of anti-IMCP for murine tongue and gastric and large intestinal mucosae, but a significant proportion of cells in distal jejunal, ileal and caecal mucosae were not stained with this antibody. The immunohistochemistry of the large numbers of mast cells recruited to jejunum following infection 10 days previously with 300 Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae was similar to that of uninfected control mice. The results show that considerable mast cell heterogeneity exists within the gastrointestinal mucosa of the mouse and indicate that there are both similarities and differences between mouse and rat in the distribution of mast cells and of their granule proteinases.

  6. Obesity genetics in mouse and human: back and forth, and back again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Fereshteh T; Clee, Susanne M; Meyre, David

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern. This condition results from a constant and complex interplay between predisposing genes and environmental stimuli. Current attempts to manage obesity have been moderately effective and a better understanding of the etiology of obesity is required for the development of more successful and personalized prevention and treatment options. To that effect, mouse models have been an essential tool in expanding our understanding of obesity, due to the availability of their complete genome sequence, genetically identified and defined strains, various tools for genetic manipulation and the accessibility of target tissues for obesity that are not easily attainable from humans. Our knowledge of monogenic obesity in humans greatly benefited from the mouse obesity genetics field. Genes underlying highly penetrant forms of monogenic obesity are part of the leptin-melanocortin pathway in the hypothalamus. Recently, hypothesis-generating genome-wide association studies for polygenic obesity traits in humans have led to the identification of 119 common gene variants with modest effect, most of them having an unknown function. These discoveries have led to novel animal models and have illuminated new biologic pathways. Integrated mouse-human genetic approaches have firmly established new obesity candidate genes. Innovative strategies recently developed by scientists are described in this review to accelerate the identification of causal genes and deepen our understanding of obesity etiology. An exhaustive dissection of the molecular roots of obesity may ultimately help to tackle the growing obesity epidemic worldwide.

  7. Obesity genetics in mouse and human: back and forth, and back again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Fereshteh T.; Clee, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern. This condition results from a constant and complex interplay between predisposing genes and environmental stimuli. Current attempts to manage obesity have been moderately effective and a better understanding of the etiology of obesity is required for the development of more successful and personalized prevention and treatment options. To that effect, mouse models have been an essential tool in expanding our understanding of obesity, due to the availability of their complete genome sequence, genetically identified and defined strains, various tools for genetic manipulation and the accessibility of target tissues for obesity that are not easily attainable from humans. Our knowledge of monogenic obesity in humans greatly benefited from the mouse obesity genetics field. Genes underlying highly penetrant forms of monogenic obesity are part of the leptin-melanocortin pathway in the hypothalamus. Recently, hypothesis-generating genome-wide association studies for polygenic obesity traits in humans have led to the identification of 119 common gene variants with modest effect, most of them having an unknown function. These discoveries have led to novel animal models and have illuminated new biologic pathways. Integrated mouse-human genetic approaches have firmly established new obesity candidate genes. Innovative strategies recently developed by scientists are described in this review to accelerate the identification of causal genes and deepen our understanding of obesity etiology. An exhaustive dissection of the molecular roots of obesity may ultimately help to tackle the growing obesity epidemic worldwide. PMID:25825681

  8. Genetic mouse models of brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras

    2014-05-01

    Progression of brain ageing is influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Analysis of genetically modified animals with uniform genetic backgrounds in a standardised, controlled environment enables the dissection of critical determinants of brain ageing on a molecular level. Human and animal studies suggest that increased load of damaged macromolecules, efficacy of DNA maintenance, mitochondrial activity, and cellular stress defences are critical determinants of brain ageing. Surprisingly, mouse lines with genetic impairment of anti-oxidative capacity generally did not show enhanced cognitive ageing but rather an increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. Mouse lines with impaired mitochondrial activity had critically short life spans or severe and rapidly progressing neurodegeneration. Strains with impaired clearance in damaged macromolecules or defects in the regulation of cellular stress defences showed alterations in the onset and progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling generally increased life span but impaired cognitive functions revealing a complex interaction between ageing of the brain and of the body. Brain ageing is accompanied by an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Transgenic mouse models expressing high levels of mutant human amyloid precursor protein showed a number of symptoms and pathophysiological processes typical for early phase of Alzheimer's disease. Generally, therapeutic strategies effective against Alzheimer's disease in humans were also active in the Tg2576, APP23, APP/PS1 and 5xFAD lines, but a large number of false positive findings were also reported. The 3xtg AD model likely has the highest face and construct validity but further studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The mouse fidgetin gene defines a new role for AAA family proteins in mammalian development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G A; Mahaffey, C L; Nystuen, A; Letts, V A; Frankel, W N

    2000-10-01

    The mouse mutation fidget arose spontaneously in a heterogeneous albino stock. This mutant mouse is characterized by a side-to-side head-shaking and circling behaviour, due to reduced or absent semicircular canals. Fidget mice also have small eyes, associated with cell-cycle delay and insufficient growth of the retinal neural epithelium, and lower penetrance skeletal abnormalities, including pelvic girdle dysgenesis, skull bone fusions and polydactyly. By positional cloning, we found the gene mutated in fidget mice, fidgetin (Fign), which encodes a new member of the 'meiotic' or subfamily-7 (SF7; ref. 7) group of ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA proteins). We also discovered two closely related mammalian genes. AAA proteins are molecular chaperones that facilitate a variety of functions, including membrane fusion, proteolysis, peroxisome biogenesis, endosome sorting and meiotic spindle formation, but functions for the SF7 AAA proteins are largely unknown. Fidgetin is the first mutant AAA protein found in a mammalian developmental mutant, thus defining a new role for these proteins in embryonic development.

  10. Detected microsatellite polymorphisms in genetically altered inbred mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaoyan; Cui, Jing; Wang, Chao; Huo, Xueyun; Lu, Jing; Li, Yichen; Chen, Zhenwen

    2013-08-01

    Microsatellites are 50-200 repetitive DNA sequences composed of 1- to 6-base-pair-long reiterative motifs within the genome. They are vulnerable to DNA modifications, such as recombination and/or integration, and are recognized as "sentinel" DNA. Our previous report indicated that the genotypes of the microsatellite loci could change from mono- to poly-morphisms (CMP) in gene knockout (KO) mice, implying that genetic modification induces microsatellite mutation. However, it is still unclear whether the random insertion of DNA fragments into mice genomes produced via transgene (Tg) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) would also result in microsatellite mutations or microsatellite loci genotypes changes. This study was designed to find possible clues to answer this question. In brief, 198 microsatellite loci that were distributed among almost all of the chromosomes (except for the Y) were examined through polymerase chain reaction to screen possible CMPs in six Tg strains. First, for each strain, the microsatellite sequences of all loci were compared between Tg and the corresponding background strain to exclude genetic interference. Simultaneously, to exclude spontaneous mutation-related CMPs that might exist in the examined six strains, mice from five spontaneously mutated inbred strains were used as the negative controls. Additionally, the sequences of all loci in these spontaneous mutated mice were compared to corresponding genetic background controls. The results showed that 40 of the 198 (20.2%) loci were identified as having CMPs in the examined Tg mice strains. The CMP genotypes were either homozygous or heterozygous compared to the background controls. Next, we applied the 40 CMP positive loci in ENU-mutated mice and their corresponding background controls. After that, a general comparison of CMPs that exist among Tg, ENU-treated and KO mouse strains was performed. The results indicated that four (D11mit258, D13mit3, D14mit102 and DXmit172) of the 40 (10%) CMP

  11. Genetics of primary and timing effects in the mnd mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messer, A.; Plummer, J.; MacMillen, M.C. [New York State, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-05

    The mnd mouse shows a spontaneous adult-onset hereditary neurological disease, with motor abnormality by 6 months of age, progressing to severe spastic paralysis and premature death. The disease is autosomal recessive, with heterozygote effects seen under stress. It maps to mouse chromosome (chr) 8. Histopathology with Nissl stains documents substantial abnormalities of upper and lower motor neurons, and there is retinal degeneration beginning in the first month, even without light exposure. Increasing levels of autofluorescent lipopigment are found in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues as the mnd mice age. Recently, NCL-like inclusions and accumulating subunit c have also been described. When mnd is outcrossed to the AKR/J genetic background, ca. 40% of the mnd/mnd F2 progeny show early onset (onset by 4.5-5 months and death by 7 months). This accelerated timing effect seems to be strain-specific, and unlinked to the mnd gene itself. Our current working hypothesis is that the timing effect is due to 2 or 3 unlinked dominant genes with incomplete penetrance at any single locus. In a combined RFLP/PCR fragment genetic analysis, the strongest deviation from the expected ratio of AKR vs B6 alleles occurs with markers on proximal half of chr 1. Additional loci on chrs 5 and 10 may also be involved. The mechanism of interaction of these modifying genes with the primary mnd gene may offer new therapeutic avenues. 22 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Systematic analysis, comparison, and integration of disease based human genetic association data and mouse genetic phenotypic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S Alex

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic contributions to human common disorders and mouse genetic models of disease are complex and often overlapping. In common human diseases, unlike classical Mendelian disorders, genetic factors generally have small effect sizes, are multifactorial, and are highly pleiotropic. Likewise, mouse genetic models of disease often have pleiotropic and overlapping phenotypes. Moreover, phenotypic descriptions in the literature in both human and mouse are often poorly characterized and difficult to compare directly. Methods In this report, human genetic association results from the literature are summarized with regard to replication, disease phenotype, and gene specific results; and organized in the context of a systematic disease ontology. Similarly summarized mouse genetic disease models are organized within the Mammalian Phenotype ontology. Human and mouse disease and phenotype based gene sets are identified. These disease gene sets are then compared individually and in large groups through dendrogram analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Results Human disease and mouse phenotype gene sets are shown to group into disease and phenotypically relevant groups at both a coarse and fine level based on gene sharing. Conclusion This analysis provides a systematic and global perspective on the genetics of common human disease as compared to itself and in the context of mouse genetic models of disease.

  13. The precerebellar linear nucleus in the mouse defined by connections, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, YuHong; Tvrdik, Petr; Makki, Nadja; Palombi, Olivier; Machold, Robert; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2009-05-19

    The linear nucleus (Li) is a prominent cell group in the caudal hindbrain, which was first described in a study of cerebellar afferents in the rat by [Watson, C.R.R., Switzer, R.C. III, 1978. Trigeminal projections to cerebellar tactile areas in the rat origin mainly from N. interpolaris and N. principalis. Neurosci. Lett. 10, 77-82.]. It was named for its elongated appearance in transverse sections. Since this original description in the rat, reference to the nucleus seems to have been largely absent from experimental studies of mammalian precerebellar nuclei. We therefore set out to define the cytoarchitecture, cerebellar connections, and molecular characteristics of Li in the mouse. In coronal Nissl sections at the level of the rostral inferior olive, it consists of two parallel bands of cells joined at their dorsal apex by a further band of cells, making the shape of the Greek capital letter pi. Our three-dimensional reconstruction demonstrated that the nucleus is continuous with the lateral reticular nucleus (LRt) and that the ambiguus nucleus sits inside the arch of Li. Cerebellar horseradish peroxidase injections confirmed that the cells of Li project to cerebellum. We have shown that Li cells express Atoh1 and Wnt1 lineage markers that are known to label the rhombic lip derived precerebellar nuclei. We have examined the relationship of Li cells to a number of molecular markers, and have found that many of the cells express a nonphosphorylated epitope in neurofilament H (SMI 32), a feature they share with the LRt. The mouse Li therefore appears to be a rostrodorsal extension of the LRt.

  14. [The genetic control of mouse coat color and its applications in genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wanjin; Morigen, Morigen

    2014-10-01

    Mice are the most commonly used mammalian model. The coat colors of mice are typical Mendelian traits, which have various colors such as white, black, yellow and agouti. The inheritance of mouse coat color is usually stated as an example only in teaching the knowledge of recessive lethal alleles. After searched the related literatures and summarized the molecular mechanisms of mouse coat color inheritance, we further expanded the application of this example into the introduction of the basic concepts of alleles and Mendelian laws, demonstration of the gene structure and function, regulation of gene expression, gene interaction, epigenetic modification, quantitative genetics, as well as evolutionary genetics. By running this example through the whole genetics-teaching lectures, we help the student to form a systemic and developmental view of genetic analysis. At the same time, this teaching approach not only highlights the advancement and integrity of genetics, but also results in a good teaching effect on inspiring the students' interest and attracting students' attention.

  15. A quantitative method for defining high-arched palate using the Tcof1(+/-) mutant mouse as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Zachary R; Hague, Molly; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Dixon, Jill; Dixon, Michael J; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-07-15

    The palate functions as the roof of the mouth in mammals, separating the oral and nasal cavities. Its complex embryonic development and assembly poses unique susceptibilities to intrinsic and extrinsic disruptions. Such disruptions may cause failure of the developing palatal shelves to fuse along the midline resulting in a cleft. In other cases the palate may fuse at an arch, resulting in a vaulted oral cavity, termed high-arched palate. There are many models available for studying the pathogenesis of cleft palate but a relative paucity for high-arched palate. One condition exhibiting either cleft palate or high-arched palate is Treacher Collins syndrome, a congenital disorder characterized by numerous craniofacial anomalies. We quantitatively analyzed palatal perturbations in the Tcof1(+/-) mouse model of Treacher Collins syndrome, which phenocopies the condition in humans. We discovered that 46% of Tcof1(+/-) mutant embryos and new born pups exhibit either soft clefts or full clefts. In addition, 17% of Tcof1(+/-) mutants were found to exhibit high-arched palate, defined as two sigma above the corresponding wild-type population mean for height and angular based arch measurements. Furthermore, palatal shelf length and shelf width were decreased in all Tcof1(+/-) mutant embryos and pups compared to controls. Interestingly, these phenotypes were subsequently ameliorated through genetic inhibition of p53. The results of our study therefore provide a simple, reproducible and quantitative method for investigating models of high-arched palate.

  16. The Power of Mouse Genetics to Review Study Spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    YATSENKO, A. N.; IWAMORI, N.; IWAMORI, T.; MATZUK, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 80 million people worldwide are infertile, and nearly half of all infertility cases are attributed to a male factor. Therefore, progress in reproductive genetics becomes crucial for future diagnosis and treatment of infertility. In recent years, enormous progress has been made in this field. More than 400 mutant mouse models with specific reproductive abnormalities have been produced, and numerous human association studies have been discovered. However, the translation of basic science findings to clinical practice remains protracted, with only modest progress in the application of novel findings to clinical genetic testing and cures. To date, the most significant findings in male infertility remain numeric and structural chromosomal abnormalities and Y-chromosome microdeletions in infertile men. Thus, we anticipate that future genetic investigations will focus on infertile men with a normal somatic karyotype but with various spermatozoal defects, like insufficient production of spermatozoa (oligozoospermia), inadequate motility (asthenozoospermia), abnormal morphology (teratozoospermia), or combinations of these defects. Ultimately, basic advances in mammalian nonhuman reproduction will translate to clinical advances in human reproduction and testing for infertile humans, thereby helping to improve diagnostics and health care for infertile patients. PMID:19875488

  17. Methods in Molecular Biology Mouse Genetics: Methods and Protocols | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouse Genetics: Methods and Protocols provides selected mouse genetic techniques and their application in modeling varieties of human diseases. The chapters are mainly focused on the generation of different transgenic mice to accomplish the manipulation of genes of interest, tracing cell lineages, and modeling human diseases.

  18. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in a mouse medulloblastoma model defines networks that discriminate between human molecular subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovesi, Laura A.; Ng, Ching Ging; Davis, Melissa J.; Remke, Marc; Taylor, Michael D.; Adams, David J.; Rust, Alistair G.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Ban, Kenneth H.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Wainwright, Brandon J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screen is a powerful tool to facilitate the discovery of cancer genes that drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. In this study, we sought to identify genes that functionally cooperate with sonic hedgehog signaling to initiate medulloblastoma (MB), a tumor of the cerebellum. By combining SB mutagenesis with Patched1 heterozygous mice (Ptch1lacZ/+), we observed an increased frequency of MB and decreased tumor-free survival compared with Ptch1lacZ/+ controls. From an analysis of 85 tumors, we identified 77 common insertion sites that map to 56 genes potentially driving increased tumorigenesis. The common insertion site genes identified in the mutagenesis screen were mapped to human orthologs, which were used to select probes and corresponding expression data from an independent set of previously described human MB samples, and surprisingly were capable of accurately clustering known molecular subgroups of MB, thereby defining common regulatory networks underlying all forms of MB irrespective of subgroup. We performed a network analysis to discover the likely mechanisms of action of subnetworks and used an in vivo model to confirm a role for a highly ranked candidate gene, Nfia, in promoting MB formation. Our analysis implicates candidate cancer genes in the deregulation of apoptosis and translational elongation, and reveals a strong signature of transcriptional regulation that will have broad impact on expression programs in MB. These networks provide functional insights into the complex biology of human MB and identify potential avenues for intervention common to all clinical subgroups. PMID:24167280

  19. Defining the range of pathogens susceptible to Ifitm3 restriction using a knockout mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron R Everitt

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM family of proteins has been shown to restrict a broad range of viruses in vitro and in vivo by halting progress through the late endosomal pathway. Further, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in its sequence have been linked with risk of developing severe influenza virus infections in humans. The number of viruses restricted by this host protein has continued to grow since it was first demonstrated as playing an antiviral role; all of which enter cells via the endosomal pathway. We therefore sought to test the limits of antimicrobial restriction by Ifitm3 using a knockout mouse model. We showed that Ifitm3 does not impact on the restriction or pathogenesis of bacterial (Salmonella typhimurium, Citrobacter rodentium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis or protozoan (Plasmodium berghei pathogens, despite in vitro evidence. However, Ifitm3 is capable of restricting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in vivo either through directly restricting RSV cell infection, or by exerting a previously uncharacterised function controlling disease pathogenesis. This represents the first demonstration of a virus that enters directly through the plasma membrane, without the need for the endosomal pathway, being restricted by the IFITM family; therefore further defining the role of these antiviral proteins.

  20. Defining Developmental Potency and Cell Lineage Trajectories by Expression Profiling of Differentiating Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Kazuhiro; Nedorezov, Timur; Piao, Yulan; Nishiyama, Akira; Matoba, Ryo; Sharova, Lioudmila V.; Sharov, Alexei A.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Niwa, Hitoshi; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2009-01-01

    Biologists rely on morphology, function and specific markers to define the differentiation status of cells. Transcript profiling has expanded the repertoire of these markers by providing the snapshot of cellular status that reflects the activity of all genes. However, such data have been used only to assess relative similarities and differences of these cells. Here we show that principal component analysis of global gene expression profiles map cells in multidimensional transcript profile space and the positions of differentiating cells progress in a stepwise manner along trajectories starting from undifferentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells located in the apex. We present three ‘cell lineage trajectories’, which represent the differentiation of ES cells into the first three lineages in mammalian development: primitive endoderm, trophoblast and primitive ectoderm/neural ectoderm. The positions of the cells along these trajectories seem to reflect the developmental potency of cells and can be used as a scale for the potential of cells. Indeed, we show that embryonic germ cells and induced pluripotent cells are mapped near the origin of the trajectories, whereas mouse embryo fibroblast and fibroblast cell lines are mapped near the far end of the trajectories. We suggest that this method can be used as the non-operational semi-quantitative definition of cell differentiation status and developmental potency. Furthermore, the global expression profiles of cell lineages provide a framework for the future study of in vitro and in vivo cell differentiation. PMID:19112179

  1. Genetic variations strongly influence phenotypic outcome in the mouse retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin S Jelcick

    Full Text Available Variation in genetic background can significantly influence the phenotypic outcome of both disease and non-disease associated traits. Additionally, differences in temporal and strain specific gene expression can also contribute to phenotypes in the mammalian retina. This is the first report of microarray based cross-strain analysis of gene expression in the retina investigating genetic background effects. Microarray analyses were performed on retinas from the following mouse strains: C57BL6/J, AKR/J, CAST/EiJ, and NOD.NON-H2(-nb1 at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5 and postnatal day 30.5 (P30.5. Over 3000 differentially expressed genes were identified between strains and developmental stages. Differential gene expression was confirmed by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Three major gene networks were identified that function to regulate retinal or photoreceptor development, visual perception, cellular transport, and signal transduction. Many of the genes in these networks are implicated in retinal diseases such as bradyopsia, night-blindness, and cone-rod dystrophy. Our analysis revealed strain specific variations in cone photoreceptor cell patterning and retinal function. This study highlights the substantial impact of genetic background on both development and function of the retina and the level of gene expression differences tolerated for normal retinal function. These strain specific genetic variations may also be present in other tissues. In addition, this study will provide valuable insight for the development of more accurate models for human retinal diseases.

  2. Precise and in situ genetic humanization of 6 Mb of mouse immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Lynn E; Karow, Margaret; Stevens, Sean; Auerbach, Wojtek; Poueymirou, William T; Yasenchak, Jason; Frendewey, David; Valenzuela, David M; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Alt, Frederick W; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J

    2014-04-01

    Genetic humanization, which involves replacing mouse genes with their human counterparts, can create powerful animal models for the study of human genes and diseases. One important example of genetic humanization involves mice humanized for their Ig genes, allowing for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice) and also providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human antibodies as therapeutics. However, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which they were genetically humanized. Heretofore, most genetic humanizations have involved disruption of the endogenous mouse gene with simultaneous introduction of a human transgene at a new and random location (so-called KO-plus-transgenic humanization). More recent efforts have attempted to replace mouse genes with their human counterparts at the same genetic location (in situ humanization), but such efforts involved laborious procedures and were limited in size and precision. We describe a general and efficient method for very large, in situ, and precise genetic humanization using large compound bacterial artificial chromosome-based targeting vectors introduced into mouse ES cells. We applied this method to genetically humanize 3-Mb segments of both the mouse heavy and κ light chain Ig loci, by far the largest genetic humanizations ever described. This paper provides a detailed description of our genetic humanization approach, and the companion paper reports that the humoral immune systems of mice bearing these genetically humanized loci function as efficiently as those of WT mice.

  3. Rapid genetic algorithm optimization of a mouse computational model: Benefits for anthropomorphization of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Teodora Bot

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available While the mouse presents an invaluable experimental model organism in biology, its usefulness in cardiac arrhythmia research is limited in some aspects due to major electrophysiological differences between murine and human action potentials (APs. As previously described, these species-specific traits can be partly overcome by application of a cell-type transforming clamp (CTC to anthropomorphize the murine cardiac AP. CTC is a hybrid experimental-computational dynamic clamp technique, in which a computationally calculated time-dependent current is inserted into a cell in real time, to compensate for the differences between sarcolemmal currents of that cell (e.g., murine and the desired species (e.g., human. For effective CTC performance, mismatch between the measured cell and a mathematical model used to mimic the measured AP must be minimal. We have developed a genetic algorithm (GA approach that rapidly tunes a mathematical model to reproduce the AP of the murine cardiac myocyte under study. Compared to a prior implementation that used a template-based model selection approach, we show that GA optimization to a cell-specific model results in a much better recapitulation of the desired AP morphology with CTC. This improvement was more pronounced when anthropomorphizing neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes to human-like APs than to guinea pig APs. CTC may be useful for a wide range of applications, from screening effects of pharmaceutical compounds on ion channel activity, to exploring variations in the mouse or human genome. Rapid GA optimization of a cell-specific mathematical model improves CTC performance and may therefore expand the applicability and usage of the CTC technique.

  4. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  5. Genetic expression of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebert, D W; Robinson, J R; Niwa, A; Kumaki, K; Poland, A P

    1975-04-01

    Monooxygenases require NADPH and molecular oxygen during the metabolism of numerous endogenous hydrophobic substrates and carcinogenic and toxic exogenous chemicals. The complexity of these membrane-bound multicomponent drug-metabolizing enzyme systems is reviewed. What "aryl hydrocarbon (benzo[a]pyrene) hydroxylase activity" actually represents is reviewed and discussed. At least two forms of the hydroxylase activity exist and we suggest that they are associated with different molecular species of membrane-bound CO-binding hemoprotein (i.e., they are associated with different enzyme active-sties). At least two, and probably more than two, nonlinked loci are responsible for the genetic expression of new cytochrome P1450 formation and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase induction--and the stimulation of 10 other monooxygenase "activities"--in the mouse treated with certain aromatic hydrocarbons. The individual variability of hydroxylase activity in an inbred and in a random-bred strain of micr is illustrated. The basal hydroxylase activity appears to be inherited differently from the aromatic hydrocarbon-inducible hydroxylase activity. The potent inducer 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin can stimulate increases in these hepatic monooxygenase activities and p1450 formation in so-called "nonresponsive" mice, whereas inducers such as beta-naphthoflavone and 3-methylcholanthrene cannot. Thus, the genetically "nonresponsive" micr apparently possess the structural and regulatory genes necessary for expression of these inducible monooxygenase activities and associated new formation of cytochrome P1450. We suggest that a mutation has occurred in the "nonresponsive" inbred strains that results in production of an inducer-binding receptor having a diminished affinity for aromatic hydrocarbons.

  6. Overview of Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer Used in Translational Biology and Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenow, Kirsty R; Smalley, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous condition with no single standard of treatment and no definitive method for determining whether a tumor will respond to therapy. The development of murine models that faithfully mimic specific human breast cancer subtypes is critical for the development of patient-specific treatments. While the artificial nature of traditional in vivo xenograft models used to characterize novel anticancer treatments has limited clinical predictive value, the development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) makes it possible to study the therapeutic responses in an intact microenvironment. GEMMs have proven to be an experimentally tractable platform for evaluating the efficacy of novel therapeutic combinations and for defining the mechanisms of acquired resistance. Described in this overview are several of the more popular breast cancer GEMMs, including details on their value in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of this disorder.

  7. Genetic mouse models to study blood–brain barrier development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Sohet, Fabien; Daneman, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a complex physiological structure formed by the blood vessels of the central nervous system (CNS) that tightly regulates the movement of substances between the blood and the neural tissue. Recently, the generation and analysis of different genetic mouse models has allowed for greater understanding of BBB development, how the barrier is regulated during health, and its response to disease. Here we discuss: 1) Genetic mouse models that have been used to study th...

  8. Defining the molecular pathologies in cloaca malformation: similarities between mouse and human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Runck

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anorectal malformations are congenital anomalies that form a spectrum of disorders, from the most benign type with excellent functional prognosis, to very complex, such as cloaca malformation in females in which the rectum, vagina and urethra fail to develop separately and instead drain via a single common channel into the perineum. The severity of this phenotype suggests that the defect occurs in the early stages of embryonic development of the organs derived from the cloaca. Owing to the inability to directly investigate human embryonic cloaca development, current research has relied on the use of mouse models of anorectal malformations. However, even studies of mouse embryos lack analysis of the earliest stages of cloaca patterning and morphogenesis. Here we compared human and mouse cloaca development and retrospectively identified that early mis-patterning of the embryonic cloaca might underlie the most severe forms of anorectal malformation in humans. In mouse, we identified that defective sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling results in early dorsal-ventral epithelial abnormalities prior to the reported defects in septation. This is manifested by the absence of Sox2 and aberrant expression of keratins in the embryonic cloaca of Shh knockout mice. Shh knockout embryos additionally develop a hypervascular stroma, which is defective in BMP signaling. These epithelial and stromal defects persist later, creating an indeterminate epithelium with molecular alterations in the common channel. We then used these animals to perform a broad comparison with patients with mild-to-severe forms of anorectal malformations including cloaca malformation. We found striking parallels with the Shh mouse model, including nearly identical defective molecular identity of the epithelium and surrounding stroma. Our work strongly suggests that early embryonic cloacal epithelial differentiation defects might be the underlying cause of severe forms of anorectal malformations

  9. ART culture conditions change the probability of mouse embryo gestation through defined cellular and molecular responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarzer, Caroline; Esteves, Telma Cristina; Arau´zo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Le Gac, Séverine; Nordhoff, Verena; Schlatt, Stefan; Boiani, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Do different human ART culture protocols prepare embryos differently for post-implantation development? ... Our data promote awareness that human ART culture media affect embryo development. Effects reported here in the mouse may apply also in human, because no ART medium presently available on the

  10. Insights into granulosa cell tumors using spontaneous or genetically engineered mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Youn

    2016-03-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that have been studied for decades. However, their infrequency has delayed efforts to research their etiology. Recently, mutations in human GCTs have been discovered, which has led to further research aimed at determining the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Mouse models have been important tools for studying GCTs, and have provided means to develop and improve diagnostics and therapeutics. Thus far, several genetically modified mouse models, along with one spontaneous mouse model, have been reported. This review summarizes the phenotypes of these mouse models and their applicability in elucidating the mechanisms of granulosa cell tumor development.

  11. A Constrained Genetic Algorithm with Adaptively Defined Fitness Function in MRS Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakostas, G. A.; Karras, D. A.; Mertzios, B. G.; Graveron-Demilly, D.; van Ormondt, D.

    MRS Signal quantification is a rather involved procedure and has attracted the interest of the medical engineering community, regarding the development of computationally efficient methodologies. Significant contributions based on Computational Intelligence tools, such as Neural Networks (NNs), demonstrated a good performance but not without drawbacks already discussed by the authors. On the other hand preliminary application of Genetic Algorithms (GA) has already been reported in the literature by the authors regarding the peak detection problem encountered in MRS quantification using the Voigt line shape model. This paper investigates a novel constrained genetic algorithm involving a generic and adaptively defined fitness function which extends the simple genetic algorithm methodology in case of noisy signals. The applicability of this new algorithm is scrutinized through experimentation in artificial MRS signals interleaved with noise, regarding its signal fitting capabilities. Although extensive experiments with real world MRS signals are necessary, the herein shown performance illustrates the method's potential to be established as a generic MRS metabolites quantification procedure.

  12. Influence of early life exposure, host genetics and diet on the mouse gut microbiome and metabolome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snijders, Antoine M.; Langley, Sasha A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Brislawn, Colin J.; Noecker, Cecilia; Zink, Erika M.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Casey, Cameron P.; Miller, Darla; Huang, Yurong; Karpen , Gary H.; Celniker, Susan E.; Brown, James B.; Borenstein, Elhanan A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2016-11-28

    Although the gut microbiome plays important roles in host physiology, health and disease1, we lack understanding of the complex interplay between host genetics and early life environment on the microbial and metabolic composition of the gut.We used the genetically diverse Collaborative Cross mouse system2 to discover that early life history impacts themicrobiome composition, whereas dietary changes have only a moderate effect. By contrast, the gut metabolome was shaped mostly by diet, with specific non-dietary metabolites explained by microbial metabolism. Quantitative trait analysis identified mouse genetic trait loci (QTL) that impact the abundances of specific microbes. Human orthologues of genes in the mouse QTL are implicated in gastrointestinal cancer. Additionally, genes located in mouse QTL for Lactobacillales abundance are implicated in arthritis, rheumatic disease and diabetes. Furthermore, Lactobacillales abundance was predictive of higher host T-helper cell counts, suggesting an important link between Lactobacillales and host adaptive immunity.

  13. Influence of early life exposure, host genetics and diet on the mouse gut microbiome and metabolome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snijders, Antoine M.; Langley, Sasha A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Brislawn, Colin J.; Noecker, Cecilia; Zink, Erika M.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Casey, Cameron P.; Miller, Darla R.; Huang, Yurong; Karpen, Gary H.; Celniker, Susan E.; Brown, James B.; Borenstein, Elhanan; Jansson, Janet K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2016-11-28

    Although the gut microbiome plays important roles in host physiology, health and disease1, we lack understanding of the complex interplay between host genetics and early life environment on the microbial and metabolic composition of the gut.We used the genetically diverse Collaborative Cross mouse system2 to discover that early life history impacts themicrobiome composition, whereas dietary changes have only a moderate effect. By contrast, the gut metabolome was shaped mostly by diet, with specific non-dietary metabolites explained by microbial metabolism. Quantitative trait analysis identified mouse genetic trait loci (QTL) that impact the abundances of specific microbes. Human orthologues of genes in the mouse QTL are implicated in gastrointestinal cancer. Additionally, genes located in mouse QTL for Lactobacillales abundance are implicated in arthritis, rheumatic disease and diabetes. Furthermore, Lactobacillales abundance was predictive of higher host T-helper cell counts, suggesting an important link between Lactobacillales and host adaptive immunity.

  14. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and pro...

  15. Using genetic mouse models to gain insight into glaucoma: Past results and future possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Kimberly A; Harder, Jeffrey M; Williams, Pete A; Rausch, Rebecca L; Kiernan, Amy E; Nair, K Saidas; Anderson, Michael G; John, Simon W M; Howell, Gareth R; Libby, Richard T

    2015-12-01

    While all forms of glaucoma are characterized by a specific pattern of retinal ganglion cell death, they are clinically divided into several distinct subclasses, including normal tension glaucoma, primary open angle glaucoma, congenital glaucoma, and secondary glaucoma. For each type of glaucoma there are likely numerous molecular pathways that control susceptibility to the disease. Given this complexity, a single animal model will never precisely model all aspects of all the different types of human glaucoma. Therefore, multiple animal models have been utilized to study glaucoma but more are needed. Because of the powerful genetic tools available to use in the laboratory mouse, it has proven to be a highly useful mammalian system for studying the pathophysiology of human disease. The similarity between human and mouse eyes coupled with the ability to use a combination of advanced cell biological and genetic tools in mice have led to a large increase in the number of studies using mice to model specific glaucoma phenotypes. Over the last decade, numerous new mouse models and genetic tools have emerged, providing important insight into the cell biology and genetics of glaucoma. In this review, we describe available mouse genetic models that can be used to study glaucoma-relevant disease/pathobiology. Furthermore, we discuss how these models have been used to gain insights into ocular hypertension (a major risk factor for glaucoma) and glaucomatous retinal ganglion cell death. Finally, the potential for developing new mouse models and using advanced genetic tools and resources for studying glaucoma are discussed.

  16. The Collaborative Cross mouse genetic reference population designed for dissecting complex traits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanifa Abu Toamih Atamni; Mahmoud Egbaria; Yaser Salaymeh; Aysar Nashif; Fuad AIraqi

    2016-01-01

    [ Abstract] Complex traits are multifactorial traits controlled by polygenic host factors.These trait-related phenotypic characteristics and performance including body weight, blood chemistry, immune cell profiles, as well host susceptibility to infectious and chronic diseases.In recent years, tremendous efforts were invested aiming to map the host genetic factors attribute to these traits and subsequently clone the gene/s underlying these loci.In parallel to human studies, a number of mouse models and approaches were developed aimed to enhance the mapping process and the gene cloning.These include of using resources such as F2, backcross, advanced intercross lines, outbred populations, consomic, congenic and recombinant inbred lines (RIL).The constraints of these approaches were the limited resolution mapping of genomic regions of the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with the trait of interests, and the limited genetic diversity observed in the parental founders.To overcome these limitations, a new genetically highly diverse recombinant inbred lines of mouse population was established, namely the Collaborative Cross (CC), created from full reciprocal mating of 8 divergent strains of mice: A/J, C57BL/6J, 129S1 /SvImJ, NOD/LtJ, NZO/HiLtJ, CAST/Ei, PWK/PhJ, and WSB/EiJ.By intercrossing these eight founders to generate the different CC lines, the genetic makeup of the newly developed resource is completely different from the eight parental lines, and will show heterosis, which subsequently will response differently comparing with their original founders.Finally, our results suggest that it is not essential to defining the phenotypic response of the eight parental lines, prior of assessing the CC lines, because it is believed that genetic interaction of the new genetic makeup of the new lines will reveal new phenotypic response, which completely different from the parental lines.In this report, we present to the community the power of the CC for dissecting

  17. Genetic regulation of life span, metabolism, and body weight in Pohn, a new wild-derived mouse strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Rong; Flurkey, Kevin; Meng, Qingying; Astle, Mike C; Harrison, David E

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) of longevity identified in human and mouse are significantly colocalized, suggesting that common mechanisms are involved. However, the limited number of strains that have been used in mouse longevity studies undermines the ability to identify longevity genes. We crossed C57BL/6J mice with a new wild-derived strain, Pohn, and identified two life span QTL-Ls1 and Ls2. Interestingly, homologous human longevity QTL colocalize with Ls1. We also defined new QTL for metabolic heat production and body weight. Both phenotypes are significantly correlated with life span. We found that large clone ratio, an in vitro indicator for cellular senescence, is not correlated with life span, suggesting that cell senescence and intrinsic aging are not always associated. Overall, by using Pohn mice, we identified new QTL for longevity-related traits, thus facilitating the exploration of the genetic regulation of aging.

  18. Molecular genetic basis for the rhino mouse from Chinese KM subcolony

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Ming; XIONG Yuliang; WANG Wanyu; ZHANG Yaping

    2004-01-01

    Both the rhino mouse and hairless mouse resulted from hairless gene mutation, but they show different phenotypes of skin physiology. The rhino mouse has more similar histological characters to human papular alopecia. Therefore rhino mouse is a good experimental animal model for human papular alopecia. This study reports a hairless mouse named rhino KIZ, arose from KM colony in Kunming Institue of Zoology, by systematic studies on morphology, skin histopathology, gene sequence, pedigree and protein domain analysis. The results demonstrate that a C-to-T transition in exon 11 of hr gene (The mutant gene has been applied for a Chinese patent (patent No. 03135280)) results in the rhino KIZ. The rhino KIZ with clear genetic mechanism will be a useful animal model.

  19. Understanding mammalian genetic systems: the challenge of phenotyping in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve D M Brown

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding mammalian genetic systems is predicated on the determination of the relationship between genetic variation and phenotype. Several international programmes are under way to deliver mutations in every gene in the mouse genome. The challenge for mouse geneticists is to develop approaches that will provide comprehensive phenotype datasets for these mouse mutant libraries. Several factors are critical to success in this endeavour. It will be important to catalogue assay and environment and where possible to adopt standardised procedures for phenotyping tests along with common environmental conditions to ensure comparable datasets of phenotypes. Moreover, the scale of the task underlines the need to invest in technological development improving both the speed and cost of phenotyping platforms. In addition, it will be necessary to develop new informatics standards that capture the phenotype assay as well as other factors, genetic and environmental, that impinge upon phenotype outcome.

  20. Genetic effects of radiation. [Extrapolation of mouse data to man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, P.B.

    1976-01-01

    Data are reviewed from studies on the genetic effects of x radiation in mice and the extrapolation of the findings for estimating genetic hazards in man is discussed. Data are included on the frequency of mutation induction following acute or chronic irradiation of male or female mice at various doses and dose rates.

  1. Characterization of a genetically engineered mouse model of hemophilia A with complete deletion of the F8 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, B N; Baldwin, W H; Healey, J F; Parker, E T; Shafer-Weaver, K; Cox, C; Jiang, P; Kanellopoulou, C; Lollar, P; Meeks, S L; Lenardo, M J

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: Anti-factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitory antibody formation is a severe complication in hemophilia A therapy. We genetically engineered and characterized a mouse model with complete deletion of the F8 coding region. F8(TKO) mice exhibit severe hemophilia, express no detectable F8 mRNA, and produce FVIII inhibitors. The defined background and lack of FVIII in F8(TKO) mice will aid in studying FVIII inhibitor formation. The most important complication in hemophilia A treatment is the development of inhibitory anti-Factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies in patients after FVIII therapy. Patients with severe hemophilia who express no endogenous FVIII (i.e. cross-reacting material, CRM) have the greatest incidence of inhibitor formation. However, current mouse models of severe hemophilia A produce low levels of truncated FVIII. The lack of a corresponding mouse model hampers the study of inhibitor formation in the complete absence of FVIII protein. We aimed to generate and characterize a novel mouse model of severe hemophilia A (designated the F8(TKO) strain) lacking the complete coding sequence of F8 and any FVIII CRM. Mice were created on a C57BL/6 background using Cre-Lox recombination and characterized using in vivo bleeding assays, measurement of FVIII activity by coagulation and chromogenic assays, and anti-FVIII antibody production using ELISA. All F8 exonic coding regions were deleted from the genome and no F8 mRNA was detected in F8(TKO) mice. The bleeding phenotype of F8(TKO) mice was comparable to E16 mice by measurements of factor activity and tail snip assay. Similar levels of anti-FVIII antibody titers after recombinant FVIII injections were observed between F8(TKO) and E16 mice. We describe a new C57BL/6 mouse model for severe hemophilia A patients lacking CRM. These mice can be directly bred to the many C57BL/6 strains of genetically engineered mice, which is valuable for studying the impact of a wide variety of genes on FVIII inhibitor formation on a

  2. Genetically modified mouse models for premature ovarian failure (POF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagarlamudi, Krishna; Reddy, Pradeep; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Kui

    2010-02-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a complex disorder that affects approximately 1% of women. POF is characterized by the depletion of functional ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years, and clinically, patients may present with primary amenorrhea or secondary amenorrhea. Although some genes have been hypothesized to be candidates responsible for POF, the etiology of most of the cases is idiopathic, with the underlying causes still unidentified because of the heterogeneity of the disease. In this review, we consider some mutant mouse models that exhibit phenotypes which are comparable to human POF, and we suggest that the use of these mouse models may help us to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying POF in humans.

  3. Genetic Mouse Models: The Powerful Tools to Study Fat Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xingxing; Williams, Kevin W; Liu, Tiemin

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) are associated with a variety of comorbidities that contribute to mortality around the world. Although significant effort has been expended in understanding mechanisms that mitigate the consequences of this epidemic, the field has experienced limited success thus far. The potential ability of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to counteract obesity and metabolic disease in rodents (and potentially in humans) has been a topical realization. Recently, there is also another thermogenic fat cell called beige adipocytes, which are located among white adipocytes and share similar activated responses to cyclic AMP as classical BAT. In this chapter, we review contemporary molecular strategies to investigate the role of adipose tissue depots in metabolism. In particular, we will discuss the generation of adipose tissue-specific knockout and overexpression of target genes in various mouse models. We will also discuss how to use different Cre (cyclization recombination) mouse lines to investigate diverse types of adipocytes.

  4. Creatine uptake in mouse hearts with genetically altered creatine levels

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Creatine plays an important role in energy metabolism in the heart. Cardiomyocytes accumulate creatine via a specific creatine transporter (CrT), the capacity of which is reduced in the failing heart, resulting in lower myocardial creatine concentration. Therefore, to gain insight into how the CrT is regulated, we studied two mouse models of severely altered myocardial creatine levels. Cardiac creatine uptake levels were measured in isolated hearts from creatine-free guanidinoacetate-N-methyl...

  5. Genetically defining the mechanism of Puma- and Bim-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, S P; Phillips, D C; Jeffers, J R; Chipuk, J E; Parsons, M J; Rehg, J E; Opferman, J T; Green, D R; Zambetti, G P

    2012-04-01

    Using genetically modified mouse models, we report here that p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma) and Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim), two pro-apoptotic members of the B-cell lymphoma protein-2 (Bcl-2) family of proteins, cooperate in causing bone marrow and gastrointestinal tract toxicity in response to chemo and radiation therapy. Deletion of both Puma and Bim provides long-term survival without evidence of increased tumor susceptibility following a lethal challenge of carboplatin and ionizing radiation. Consistent with these in vivo findings, studies of primary mast cells demonstrated that the loss of Puma and Bim confers complete protection from cytokine starvation and DNA damage, similar to that observed for Bax/Bak double knockout cells. Biochemical analyses demonstrated an essential role for either Puma or Bim to activate Bax, thereby leading to mitochondrial outer membrane permeability, cytochrome c release and apoptosis. Treatment of cytokine-deprived cells with ABT-737, a BH3 mimetic, demonstrated that Puma is sufficient to activate Bax even in the absence of all other known direct activators, including Bim, Bid and p53. Collectively, our results identify Puma and Bim as key mediators of DNA damage-induced bone marrow failure and provide mechanistic insight into how BH3-only proteins trigger cell death.

  6. Genetically engineered mucin mouse models for inflammation and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Suhasini; Kumar, Sushil; Bafna, Sangeeta; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Jain, Maneesh

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins primarily produced by glandular and ductal epithelial cells, either in membrane-tethered or secretory forms, for providing lubrication and protection from various exogenous and endogenous insults. However, recent studies have linked their aberrant overexpression with infection, inflammation, and cancer that underscores their importance in tissue homeostasis. In this review, we present current status of the existing mouse models that have been developed to gain insights into the functional role(s) of mucins under physiological and pathological conditions. Knockout mouse models for membrane-associated (Muc1 and Muc16) and secretory mucins (Muc2) have helped us to elucidate the role of mucins in providing effective and protective barrier functions against pathological threats, participation in disease progression, and improved our understanding of mucin interaction with biotic and abiotic environmental components. Emphasis is also given to available transgenic mouse models (MUC1 and MUC7), which has been exploited to understand the context-dependent regulation and therapeutic potential of human mucins during inflammation and cancer. PMID:25634251

  7. Towards Transgenic Primates:What can we learn from mouse genetics?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Phillip; L.; TSIEN; Joe; Z.

    2009-01-01

    Considering the great physiological and behavioral similarities with humans,monkeys represent the ideal models not only for the study of complex cognitive behavior but also for the preclinical research and development of novel therapeutics for treating human diseases.Various powerful genetic tech-nologies initially developed for making mouse models are being explored for generating transgenic primate models.We review the latest genetic engineering technologies and discuss the potentials and limitations for systematic production of transgenic primates.

  8. Improving toxicity screening and drug development by using genetically defined strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festing, Michael F W

    2010-01-01

    According to the US Food and Drugs Administration (Food and Drug Administration (2004) Challenge and opportunity on the critical path to new medical products.) "The inability to better assess and predict product safety leads to failures during clinical development and, occasionally, after marketing". This increases the cost of new drugs as clinical trials are even more expensive than pre-clinical testing.One relatively easy way of improving toxicity testing is to improve the design of animal experiments. A fundamental principle when designing an experiment is to control all variables except the one of interest: the treatment. Toxicologist and pharmacologists have widely ignored this principle by using genetically heterogeneous "outbred" rats and mice, increasing the chance of false-negative results. By using isogenic (inbred or F1 hybrid, see Note 1) rats and mice instead of outbred stocks the signal/noise ratio and the power of the experiments can be increased at little extra cost whilst using no more animals. Moreover, the power of the experiment can be further increased by using more than one strain, as this reduces the chance of selecting one which is resistant to the test chemical. This can also be done without increasing the total number of animals by using a factorial experimental design, e.g. if the ten outbred animals per treatment group in a 28-day toxicity test were replaced by two animals of each of five strains (still ten animals per treatment group) selected to be as genetically diverse as possible, this would increase the signal/noise ratio and power of the experiment. This would allow safety to be assessed using the most sensitive strain.Toxicologists should also consider making more use of the mouse instead of the rat. They are less costly to maintain, use less test substance, there are many inbred and genetically modified strains, and it is easier to identify gene loci controlling variation in response to xenobiotics in this species.We demonstrate

  9. Olfaction in three genetic and two MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kurtenbach

    Full Text Available Various genetic or toxin-induced mouse models are frequently used for investigation of early PD pathology. Although olfactory impairment is known to precede motor symptoms by years, it is not known whether it is caused by impairments in the brain, the olfactory epithelium, or both. In this study, we investigated the olfactory function in three genetic Parkinson's disease (PD mouse models and mice treated with MPTP intraperitoneally and intranasally. To investigate olfactory function, we performed electro-olfactogram recordings (EOGs and an olfactory behavior test (cookie-finding test. We show that neither a parkin knockout mouse strain, nor intraperitoneal MPTP treated animals display any olfactory impairment in EOG recordings and the applied behavior test. We also found no difference in the responses of the olfactory epithelium to odorants in a mouse strain over-expressing doubly mutated α-synuclein, while this mouse strain was not suitable to test olfaction in a cookie-finding test as it displays a mobility impairment. A transgenic mouse expressing mutated α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons performed equal to control animals in the cookie-finding test. Further we show that intranasal MPTP application can cause functional damage of the olfactory epithelium.

  10. A defined zebrafish line for high-throughput genetics and genomics: NHGRI-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFave, Matthew C; Varshney, Gaurav K; Vemulapalli, Meghana; Mullikin, James C; Burgess, Shawn M

    2014-09-01

    Substantial intrastrain variation at the nucleotide level complicates molecular and genetic studies in zebrafish, such as the use of CRISPRs or morpholinos to inactivate genes. In the absence of robust inbred zebrafish lines, we generated NHGRI-1, a healthy and fecund strain derived from founder parents we sequenced to a depth of ∼50×. Within this strain, we have identified the majority of the genome that matches the reference sequence and documented most of the variants. This strain has utility for many reasons, but in particular it will be useful for any researcher who needs to know the exact sequence (with all variants) of a particular genomic region or who wants to be able to robustly map sequences back to a genome with all possible variants defined.

  11. Use of a genetically engineered mouse model as a preclinical tool for HER2 breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Creedon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-targeted therapies presents a major clinical problem. Although preclinical studies have identified a number of possible mechanisms, clinical validation has been difficult. This is most likely to reflect the reliance on cell-line models that do not recapitulate the complexity and heterogeneity seen in human tumours. Here, we show the utility of a genetically engineered mouse model of HER2-driven breast cancer (MMTV-NIC to define mechanisms of resistance to the pan-HER family inhibitor AZD8931. Genetic manipulation of MMTV-NIC mice demonstrated that loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN conferred de novo resistance to AZD8931, and a tumour fragment transplantation model was established to assess mechanisms of acquired resistance. Using this approach, 50% of tumours developed resistance to AZD8931. Analysis of the resistant tumours showed two distinct patterns of resistance: tumours in which reduced membranous HER2 expression was associated with an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and resistant tumours that retained HER2 expression and an epithelial morphology. The plasticity of the EMT phenotype was demonstrated upon re-implantation of resistant tumours that then showed a mixed epithelial and mesenchymal phenotype. Further AZD8931 treatment resulted in the generation of secondary resistant tumours that again had either undergone EMT or retained their original epithelial morphology. The data provide a strong rationale for basing therapeutic decisions on the biology of the individual resistant tumour, which can be very different from that of the primary tumour and will be specific to individual patients.

  12. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40-70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Correlated genetic effects on reproduction define a domestication syndrome in a forest tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Del-Blanco, Luis; Alía, Ricardo; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Sampedro, Luis; Lario, Francisco; Climent, José

    2015-04-01

    Compared to natural selection, domestication implies a dramatic change in traits linked to fitness. A number of traits conferring fitness in the wild might be detrimental under domestication, and domesticated species typically differ from their ancestors in a set of traits known as the domestication syndrome. Specifically, trade-offs between growth and reproduction are well established across the tree of life. According to allocation theory, selection for growth rate is expected to indirectly alter life-history reproductive traits, diverting resources from reproduction to growth. Here we tested this hypothesis by examining the genetic change and correlated responses of reproductive traits as a result of selection for timber yield in the tree Pinus pinaster. Phenotypic selection was carried out in a natural population, and progenies from selected trees were compared with those of control trees in a common garden experiment. According to expectations, we detected a genetic change in important life-history traits due to selection. Specifically, threshold sizes for reproduction were much higher and reproductive investment relative to size significantly lower in the selected progenies just after a single artificial selection event. Our study helps to define the domestication syndrome in exploited forest trees and shows that changes affecting developmental pathways are relevant in domestication processes of long-lived plants.

  14. Defining genes using "blueprint" versus "instruction" metaphors: effects for genetic determinism, response efficacy, and perceived control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne; Smith, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    Evidence supports mixed attributions aligned with personal and/or clinical control and gene expression for health in this era of genomic science and health care. We consider variance in these attributions and possible relationships to individual mind sets associated with essentialist beliefs that genes determine health versus threat beliefs that genes increase susceptibility for disease and severity linked to gene-environment interactions. Further, we contribute to theory and empirical research to evaluate the use of metaphors to define genes. Participants (N = 324) read a message that varied the introduction by providing a definition of genes that used either an "instruction" metaphor or a "blueprint" metaphor. The "instruction" metaphor compared to the "blueprint" metaphor promoted stronger threat perceptions, which aligned with both belief in the response efficacy of genetic research for health and perceived behavioral control linked to genes and health. The "blueprint" metaphor compared to the "instruction" metaphor promoted stronger essentialist beliefs, which aligned with more intense positive regard for the efficacy of genetic research and human health. Implications for health communicators include societal effects aligned with stigma and discrimination that such findings portend.

  15. Genetic context determines susceptibility to intraocular pressure elevation in a mouse pigmentary glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosma Ioan M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DBA/2J (D2 mice develop an age-related form of glaucoma. Their eyes progressively develop iris pigment dispersion and iris atrophy followed by increased intraocular pressure (IOP and glaucomatous optic nerve damage. Mutant alleles of the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 genes are necessary for the iris disease, but it is unknown whether alleles of other D2 gene(s are necessary for the distinct later stages of disease. We initiated a study of congenic strains to further define the genetic requirements and disease mechanisms of the D2 glaucoma. Results To further understand D2 glaucoma, we created congenic strains of mice on the C57BL/6J (B6 genetic background. B6 double-congenic mice carrying D2-derived Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop a D2-like iris disease. B6 single-congenics with only the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop milder forms of iris disease. Genetic epistasis experiments introducing a B6 tyrosinase mutation into the congenic strains demonstrated that both the single and double-congenic iris diseases are rescued by interruption of melanin synthesis. Importantly, our experiments analyzing mice at ages up to 27 months indicate that the B6 double-congenic mice are much less prone to IOP elevation and glaucoma than are D2 mice. Conclusion As demonstrated here, the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 iris phenotypes are both individually dependent on tyrosinase function. These results support involvement of abnormal melanosomal events in the diseases caused by each gene. In the context of the inbred D2 mouse strain, the glaucoma phenotype is clearly influenced by more genes than just Gpnmb and Tyrp1. Despite the outward similarity of pigment-dispersing iris disease between D2 and the B6 double-congenic mice, the congenic mice are much less susceptible to developing high IOP and glaucoma. These new congenic strains provide a valuable new resource for further studying the genetic and mechanistic complexity of this form of glaucoma.

  16. Genetic architecture of skewed X inactivation in the laboratory mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Calaway

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI is the mammalian mechanism of dosage compensation that balances X-linked gene expression between the sexes. Early during female development, each cell of the embryo proper independently inactivates one of its two parental X-chromosomes. In mice, the choice of which X chromosome is inactivated is affected by the genotype of a cis-acting locus, the X-chromosome controlling element (Xce. Xce has been localized to a 1.9 Mb interval within the X-inactivation center (Xic, yet its molecular identity and mechanism of action remain unknown. We combined genotype and sequence data for mouse stocks with detailed phenotyping of ten inbred strains and with the development of a statistical model that incorporates phenotyping data from multiple sources to disentangle sources of XCI phenotypic variance in natural female populations on X inactivation. We have reduced the Xce candidate 10-fold to a 176 kb region located approximately 500 kb proximal to Xist. We propose that structural variation in this interval explains the presence of multiple functional Xce alleles in the genus Mus. We have identified a new allele, Xce(e present in Mus musculus and a possible sixth functional allele in Mus spicilegus. We have also confirmed a parent-of-origin effect on X inactivation choice and provide evidence that maternal inheritance magnifies the skewing associated with strong Xce alleles. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of 155 laboratory strains and wild mice we conclude that Xce(a is either a derived allele that arose concurrently with the domestication of fancy mice but prior the derivation of most classical inbred strains or a rare allele in the wild. Furthermore, we have found that despite the presence of multiple haplotypes in the wild Mus musculus domesticus has only one functional Xce allele, Xce(b. Lastly, we conclude that each mouse taxa examined has a different functional Xce allele.

  17. Genetic dissection of GABAergic neural circuits in mouse neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki eTaniguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse and flexible cortical functions rely on the ability of neural circuits to perform multiple types of neuronal computations. GABAergic inhibitory interneurons significantly contribute to this task by regulating the balance of activity, synaptic integration, spiking, synchrony, and oscillation in a neural ensemble. GABAergic interneruons display a high degree of cellular diversity in morphology, physiology, connectivity, and gene expression. A considerable number of subtypes of GABAergic interneurons diversify modes of cortical inhibition, enabling various types of information processing in the cortex. Thus, comprehensively understanding fate specification, circuit assembly and physiological function of GABAergic interneurons is a key to elucidate the principles of cortical wiring and function. Recent advances in genetically encoded molecular tools have made a breakthrough to systematically study cortical circuitry at the molecular, cellular, circuit, and whole animal levels. However, the biggest obstacle to fully applying the power of these to analysis of GABAergic circuits was that there were no efficient and reliable methods to express them in subtypes of GABAergic interneurons. Here, I first summarize cortical interneuron diversity and current understanding of mechanisms, by which distinct classes of GABAergic interneurons are generated. I then review recent development in genetically encoded molecular tools for neural circuit research, and genetic targeting of GABAergic interneuron subtypes, particulary focusing on our recent effort to develop and characterize Cre/CreER knockin lines. Finally, I highlight recent success in genetic targeting of chandelier cells (ChCs, the most unique and distinct GABAergic interneuron subtype, and discuss what kind of questions need to be addressed to understand development and function of cortical inhibitory circuits.

  18. Identification of genes important for cutaneous function revealed by a large scale reverse genetic screen in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTommaso, Tia; Jones, Lynelle K; Cottle, Denny L; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Vancollie, Valerie E; Watt, Fiona M; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P; Sundberg, John P; White, Jacqueline K; Smyth, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP). A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1), while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1). The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation.

  19. Identification of genes important for cutaneous function revealed by a large scale reverse genetic screen in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tia DiTommaso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP. A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1, while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1. The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation.

  20. Alterations in Striatal Synaptic Transmission are Consistent across Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian M Cummings

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the gene responsible for HD (Huntington's disease, many genetic mouse models have been generated. Each employs a unique approach for delivery of the mutated gene and has a different CAG repeat length and background strain. The resultant diversity in the genetic context and phenotypes of these models has led to extensive debate regarding the relevance of each model to the human disorder. Here, we compare and contrast the striatal synaptic phenotypes of two models of HD, namely the YAC128 mouse, which carries the full-length huntingtin gene on a yeast artificial chromosome, and the CAG140 KI*** (knock-in mouse, which carries a human/mouse chimaeric gene that is expressed in the context of the mouse genome, with our previously published data obtained from the R6/2 mouse, which is transgenic for exon 1 mutant huntingtin. We show that striatal MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons in YAC128 and CAG140 KI mice have similar electrophysiological phenotypes to that of the R6/2 mouse. These include a progressive increase in membrane input resistance, a reduction in membrane capacitance, a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and a greater frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subpopulation of striatal neurons. Thus, despite differences in the context of the inserted gene between these three models of HD, the primary electrophysiological changes observed in striatal MSNs are consistent. The outcomes suggest that the changes are due to the expression of mutant huntingtin and such alterations can be extended to the human condition.

  1. Alterations in striatal synaptic transmission are consistent across genetic mouse models of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian M Cummings

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the gene responsible for HD (Huntington's disease, many genetic mouse models have been generated. Each employs a unique approach for delivery of the mutated gene and has a different CAG repeat length and background strain. The resultant diversity in the genetic context and phenotypes of these models has led to extensive debate regarding the relevance of each model to the human disorder. Here, we compare and contrast the striatal synaptic phenotypes of two models of HD, namely the YAC128 mouse, which carries the full-length huntingtin gene on a yeast artificial chromosome, and the CAG140 KI (knock-in mouse, which carries a human/mouse chimaeric gene that is expressed in the context of the mouse genome, with our previously published data obtained from the R6/2 mouse, which is transgenic for exon 1 mutant huntingtin. We show that striatal MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons in YAC128 and CAG140 KI mice have similar electrophysiological phenotypes to that of the R6/2 mouse. These include a progressive increase in membrane input resistance, a reduction in membrane capacitance, a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and a greater frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subpopulation of striatal neurons. Thus, despite differences in the context of the inserted gene between these three models of HD, the primary electrophysiological changes observed in striatal MSNs are consistent. The outcomes suggest that the changes are due to the expression of mutant huntingtin and such alterations can be extended to the human condition.

  2. Defining management units for cetaceans by combining genetics, morphology, acoustics and satellite tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Sveegaard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing animal units is essential in biological conservation and requires spatial and temporal identification of such units. Since even neighbouring populations often have different conservation status and face different levels of anthropogenic pressure, detailed knowledge of population structure, seasonal range and overlap with animals from neighbouring populations is required to manage each unit separately. Previous studies on genetic structure and morphologic separation suggests three distinct populations of harbour porpoises with limited geographic overlap in the North Sea (NS, the Belt Sea (BS and the Baltic Proper (BP region. In this study, we aim to identify a management unit for the BS population of harbour porpoises. We use Argos satellite data and genetics from biopsies of tagged harbour porpoises as well as acoustic data from 40 passive acoustic data loggers to determine management areas with the least overlap between populations and thus the least error when abundance and population status is estimated. Discriminant analysis of the satellite tracking data from the BS and NS populations showed that the best fit of the management unit border during the summer months was an east–west line from Denmark to Sweden at latitude 56.95°N. For the border between BS and BP, satellite tracking data indicate a sharp decline in population density at 13.5°E, with 90% of the locations being west of this line. This was supported by the acoustic data with the average daily detection rate being 27.5 times higher west of 13.5°E as compared to east of 13.5°E. By using this novel multidisciplinary approach, we defined a management unit for the BS harbour porpoise population. We recommend that these boundaries are used for future monitoring efforts of this population under the EU directives. The boundaries may also be used for conservation efforts during the summer months, while seasonal movements of harbour porpoises should be considered during

  3. Illuminating cancer systems with genetically engineered mouse models and coupled luciferase reporters in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Brandon; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2013-06-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) is a powerful noninvasive tool that has dramatically accelerated the in vivo interrogation of cancer systems and longitudinal analysis of mouse models of cancer over the past decade. Various luciferase enzymes have been genetically engineered into mouse models (GEMM) of cancer, which permit investigation of cellular and molecular events associated with oncogenic transcription, posttranslational processing, protein-protein interactions, transformation, and oncogene addiction in live cells and animals. Luciferase-coupled GEMMs ultimately serve as a noninvasive, repetitive, longitudinal, and physiologic means by which cancer systems and therapeutic responses can be investigated accurately within the autochthonous context of a living animal.

  4. Migraine pathophysiology: lessons from mouse models and human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michel D; Klever, Roselin R; Terwindt, Gisela M; Ayata, Cenk; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a common, disabling, and undertreated episodic brain disorder that is more common in women than in men. Unbiased genome-wide association studies have identified 13 migraine-associated variants pointing at genes that cluster in pathways for glutamatergic neurotransmission, synaptic function, pain sensing, metalloproteinases, and the vasculature. The individual pathogenetic contribution of each gene variant is difficult to assess because of small effect sizes and complex interactions. Six genes with large effect sizes were identified in patients with rare monogenic migraine syndromes, in which hemiplegic migraine and non-hemiplegic migraine with or without aura are part of a wider clinical spectrum. Transgenic mouse models with human monogenic-migraine-syndrome gene mutations showed migraine-like features, increased glutamatergic neurotransmission, cerebral hyperexcitability, and enhanced susceptibility to cortical spreading depression, which is the electrophysiological correlate of aura and a putative trigger for migraine. Enhanced susceptibility to cortical spreading depression increased sensitivity to focal cerebral ischaemia, and blocking of cortical spreading depression improved stroke outcome in these mice. Changes in female hormone levels in these mice modulated cortical spreading depression susceptibility in much the same way that hormonal fluctuations affect migraine activity in patients. These findings confirm the multifactorial basis of migraine and might allow new prophylactic options to be developed, not only for migraine but potentially also for migraine-comorbid disorders such as epilepsy, depression, and stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic fine-mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil; Scott, Robert A; Prokopenko, Inga; Scott, Laura J; Green, Todd; Sparso, Thomas; Thuillier, Dorothee; Yengo, Loic; Grallert, Harald; Wahl, Simone; Frånberg, Mattias; Strawbridge, Rona J; Kestler, Hans; Chheda, Himanshu; Eisele, Lewin; Gustafsson, Stefan; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Qi, Lu; Karssen, Lennart C; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Willems, Sara M; Li, Man; Chen, Han; Fuchsberger, Christian; Kwan, Phoenix; Ma, Clement; Linderman, Michael; Lu, Yingchang; Thomsen, Soren K; Rundle, Jana K; Beer, Nicola L; van de Bunt, Martijn; Chalisey, Anil; Kang, Hyun Min; Voight, Benjamin F; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Almgren, Peter; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Blüher, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borringer, Erwin P; Burtt, Noël P; Carey, Jason; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Doney, Alex SF; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Edkins, Sarah; Eriksson, Johan G; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Fadista, João; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fox, Caroline; Franks, Paul W; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Gottesman, Omri; Grant, George B; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Hassinen, Maija; Have, Christian T; Herder, Christian; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Humphries, Steve E; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Anne U; Jonsson, Anna; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kerrison, Nicola D; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Liang, Liming; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luan, Jian’an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; McLeod, Olga; Meyer, Julia; Mihailov, Evelin; Mirza, Ghazala; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Carmen; Nöthen, Markus M; Oskolkov, Nikolay N; Owen, Katharine R; Palli, Domenico; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perry, John RB; Platou, Carl GP; Roden, Michael; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rybin, Denis; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Sennblad, Bengt; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Stančáková, Alena; Steinbach, Gerald; Storm, Petter; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Thorand, Barbara; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tonjes, Anke; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wennauer, Roman; Wood, Andrew R; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Dunham, Ian; Birney, Ewan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Ferrer, Jorge; Loos, Ruth JF; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia; Sijbrands, Eric; Meigs, James B; Hu, Frank B; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Stumvoll, Michael; Pedersen, Nancy L; Lind, Lars; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Saaristo, Timo E; Saltevo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Metspalu, Andres; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ingelsson, Erik; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Koistinen, Heikki; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hveem, Kristian; Njølstad, Inger; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Donnelly, Peter J; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Illig, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Cauchi, Stephane; Sladek, Rob; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Collin NA; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Nilsson, Peter M; Groop, Leif C; Barroso, Inês; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; O’Callaghan, Christopher A; Gloyn, Anna L; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; Teslovich, Tanya M; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    We performed fine-mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in/near KCNQ1. “Credible sets” of variants most likely to drive each distinct signal mapped predominantly to non-coding sequence, implying that T2D association is mediated through gene regulation. Credible set variants were enriched for overlap with FOXA2 chromatin immunoprecipitation binding sites in human islet and liver cells, including at MTNR1B, where fine-mapping implicated rs10830963 as driving T2D association. We confirmed that this T2D-risk allele increases FOXA2-bound enhancer activity in islet- and liver-derived cells. We observed allele-specific differences in NEUROD1 binding in islet-derived cells, consistent with evidence that the T2D-risk allele increases islet MTNR1B expression. Our study demonstrates how integration of genetic and genomic information can define molecular mechanisms through which variants underlying association signals exert their effects on disease. PMID:26551672

  6. Genetic fine mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulton, Kyle J; Ferreira, Teresa; Lee, Yeji; Raimondo, Anne; Mägi, Reedik; Reschen, Michael E; Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil; Scott, Robert A; Prokopenko, Inga; Scott, Laura J; Green, Todd; Sparso, Thomas; Thuillier, Dorothee; Yengo, Loic; Grallert, Harald; Wahl, Simone; Frånberg, Mattias; Strawbridge, Rona J; Kestler, Hans; Chheda, Himanshu; Eisele, Lewin; Gustafsson, Stefan; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Qi, Lu; Karssen, Lennart C; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Willems, Sara M; Li, Man; Chen, Han; Fuchsberger, Christian; Kwan, Phoenix; Ma, Clement; Linderman, Michael; Lu, Yingchang; Thomsen, Soren K; Rundle, Jana K; Beer, Nicola L; van de Bunt, Martijn; Chalisey, Anil; Kang, Hyun Min; Voight, Benjamin F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Blüher, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bottinger, Erwin P; Burtt, Noël P; Carey, Jason; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Doney, Alex S F; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Edkins, Sarah; Eriksson, Johan G; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Fadista, João; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fox, Caroline; Franks, Paul W; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Gottesman, Omri; Grant, George B; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Hassinen, Maija; Have, Christian T; Herder, Christian; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Humphries, Steve E; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Anne U; Jonsson, Anna; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen-Hong L; Kerrison, Nicola D; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Liang, Liming; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; McLeod, Olga; Meyer, Julia; Mihailov, Evelin; Mirza, Ghazala; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Carmen; Nöthen, Markus M; Oskolkov, Nikolay N; Owen, Katharine R; Palli, Domenico; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peltonen, Leena; Perry, John R B; Platou, Carl G P; Roden, Michael; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rybin, Denis; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Sennblad, Bengt; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Stančáková, Alena; Steinbach, Gerald; Storm, Petter; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Thorand, Barbara; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tonjes, Anke; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wennauer, Roman; Wiltshire, Steven; Wood, Andrew R; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Dunham, Ian; Birney, Ewan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Ferrer, Jorge; Loos, Ruth J F; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia; Sijbrands, Eric; Meigs, James B; Hu, Frank B; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Stumvoll, Michael; Pedersen, Nancy L; Lind, Lars; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Saaristo, Timo E; Saltevo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Metspalu, Andres; Erbel, Raimund; Jöcke, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ingelsson, Erik; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Koistinen, Heikki; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hveem, Kristian; Njølstad, Inger; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Donnelly, Peter J; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Illig, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Cauchi, Stephane; Sladek, Rob; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Collin N A; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Nilsson, Peter M; Groop, Leif C; Barroso, Inês; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Gloyn, Anna L; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; Teslovich, Tanya M; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-12-01

    We performed fine mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in or near KCNQ1. 'Credible sets' of the variants most likely to drive each distinct signal mapped predominantly to noncoding sequence, implying that association with T2D is mediated through gene regulation. Credible set variants were enriched for overlap with FOXA2 chromatin immunoprecipitation binding sites in human islet and liver cells, including at MTNR1B, where fine mapping implicated rs10830963 as driving T2D association. We confirmed that the T2D risk allele for this SNP increases FOXA2-bound enhancer activity in islet- and liver-derived cells. We observed allele-specific differences in NEUROD1 binding in islet-derived cells, consistent with evidence that the T2D risk allele increases islet MTNR1B expression. Our study demonstrates how integration of genetic and genomic information can define molecular mechanisms through which variants underlying association signals exert their effects on disease.

  7. The functional and anatomical dissection of somatosensory subpopulations using mouse genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Le Pichon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The word somatosensation comes from joining the Greek word for body (soma with a word for perception (sensation. Somatosensory neurons comprise the largest sensory system in mammals and have nerve endings coursing throughout the skin, viscera, muscle, and bone. Their cell bodies reside in a chain of ganglia adjacent to the dorsal spinal cord (the dorsal root ganglia and at the base of the skull (the trigeminal ganglia. While the neuronal cell bodies are intermingled within the ganglia, the somatosensory system is in reality composed of numerous sub-systems, each specialized to detect distinct stimuli, such as temperature and touch. Historically, somatosensory neurons have been classified using a diverse host of anatomical and physiological parameters, such as the size of the cell body, degree of myelination, histological labeling with markers, specialization of the nerve endings, projection patterns in the spinal cord and brainstem, receptive tuning, and conduction velocity of their action potentials. While useful, the picture that emerged was one of heterogeneity, with many markers at least partially overlapping. More recently, by capitalizing on advances in molecular techniques, researchers have identified specific ion channels and sensory receptors expressed in subsets of sensory neurons. These studies have proved invaluable as they allow genetic access to small subsets of neurons for further molecular dissection. Data being generated from transgenic mice favor the model whereby an array of dedicated neurons is responsible for selectively encoding different modalities. Here we review the current knowledge of the different sensory neuron subtypes in the mouse, the markers used to study them, and the neurogenetic strategies used to define their anatomical projections and functional roles.

  8. The functional and anatomical dissection of somatosensory subpopulations using mouse genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pichon, Claire E; Chesler, Alexander T

    2014-01-01

    The word somatosensation comes from joining the Greek word for body (soma) with a word for perception (sensation). Somatosensory neurons comprise the largest sensory system in mammals and have nerve endings coursing throughout the skin, viscera, muscle, and bone. Their cell bodies reside in a chain of ganglia adjacent to the dorsal spinal cord (the dorsal root ganglia) and at the base of the skull (the trigeminal ganglia). While the neuronal cell bodies are intermingled within the ganglia, the somatosensory system is in reality composed of numerous sub-systems, each specialized to detect distinct stimuli, such as temperature and touch. Historically, somatosensory neurons have been classified using a diverse host of anatomical and physiological parameters, such as the size of the cell body, degree of myelination, histological labeling with markers, specialization of the nerve endings, projection patterns in the spinal cord and brainstem, receptive tuning, and conduction velocity of their action potentials. While useful, the picture that emerged was one of heterogeneity, with many markers at least partially overlapping. More recently, by capitalizing on advances in molecular techniques, researchers have identified specific ion channels and sensory receptors expressed in subsets of sensory neurons. These studies have proved invaluable as they allow genetic access to small subsets of neurons for further molecular dissection. Data being generated from transgenic mice favor a model whereby an array of dedicated neurons is responsible for selectively encoding different modalities. Here we review the current knowledge of the different sensory neuron subtypes in the mouse, the markers used to study them, and the neurogenetic strategies used to define their anatomical projections and functional roles.

  9. Reprogramming of sheep fibroblasts into pluripotency under a drug-inducible expression of mouse-derived defined factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Animal embryonic stem cells (ESCs provide powerful tool for studies of early embryonic development, gene targeting, cloning, and regenerative medicine. However, the majority of attempts to establish ESC lines from large animals, especially ungulate mammals have failed. Recently, another type of pluripotent stem cells, known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, have been successfully generated from mouse, human, monkey, rat and pig. In this study we show sheep fibroblasts can be reprogrammed to pluripotency by defined factors using a drug-inducible system. Sheep iPSCs derived in this fashion have a normal karyotype, exhibit morphological features similar to those of human ESCs and express AP, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and the cell surface marker SSEA-4. Pluripotency of these cells was further confirmed by embryoid body (EB and teratoma formation assays which generated derivatives of all three germ layers. Our results also show that the substitution of knockout serum replacement (KSR with fetal bovine serum in culture improves the reprogramming efficiency of sheep iPSCs. Generation of sheep iPSCs places sheep on the front lines of large animal preclinical trials and experiments involving modification of animal genomes.

  10. Understanding sex determination in the mouse: genetics, epigenetics and the story of mutual antagonisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andy Greenfield

    2015-12-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth in mouse genetics resources that support research into fundamental mechanisms in organogenesis, including those controlling mammalian sex determinations. Numerous mouse mutants have shed light on molecular pathways of cell fate specification during gonadogenesis and the `decision' as to whether testis or ovary development is achieved. These studies indicate substantial genetic complexity, characterized by redundancy, feedback loops, mutual antagonism between testis-determining and ovary-determining gene regulatory networks and a degree of plasticity in the fully differentiated state of the adult gonad that was not appreciated until conditional loss-of-function studies were performed. One challenge now is to understand how controlled epigenomic changes effect the now familiar sexually dimorphic transcriptomic profiles of the male and female gonads, firstly during primary sex determination, but also in the adult gonad, thereby regulating cellular behaviour during morphogenesis and maintaining the differentiated state.

  11. Mouse models for pseudoxanthoma elasticum: genetic and dietary modulation of the ectopic mineralization phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Li

    Full Text Available Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, a heritable ectopic mineralization disorder, is caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene. Null mice (Abcc6(-/- recapitulate the genetic, histopathologic and ultrastructural features of PXE, and they demonstrate early and progressive mineralization of vibrissae dermal sheath, which serves as a biomarker of the overall mineralization process. Recently, as part of a mouse aging study at The Jackson Laboratory, 31 inbred mouse strains were necropsied, and two of them, KK/HlJ and 129S1/SvImJ, were noted to have vibrissae dermal mineralization similar to Abcc6(-/- mice. These two strains were shown to harbor a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs32756904 in the Abcc6 gene, which resulted in out-of-frame splicing and marked reduction in ABCC6 protein expression in the liver of these mice. The same polymorphism is present in two additional mouse strains, DBA/2J and C3H/HeJ, with similar reduction in Abcc6 protein levels, yet these mice did not demonstrate tissue mineralization when kept on standard rodent diet. However, all four mouse strains, when placed on experimental diet enriched in phosphate and low in magnesium, developed extensive ectopic mineralization. These results indicate that the genetic background of mice and the mineral composition of their diet can profoundly modulate the ectopic mineralization process predicated on mutations in the Abcc6 gene. These mice provide novel model systems to study the pathomechanisms and the reasons for strain background on phenotypic variability of PXE.

  12. Genetic approaches to the molecular/neuronal mechanisms underlying learning and memory in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Akira; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2005-09-01

    Learning and memory is an essential component of human intelligence. To understand its underlying molecular and neuronal mechanisms is currently an extensive focus in the field of cognitive neuroscience. We have employed advanced mouse genetic approaches to analyze the molecular and neuronal bases for learning and memory, and our results showed that brain region-specific genetic manipulations (including transgenic and knockout), inducible/reversible knockout, genetic/chemical kinase inactivation, and neuronal-based genetic approach are very powerful tools for studying the involvements of various molecules or neuronal substrates in the processes of learning and memory. Studies using these techniques may eventually lead to the understanding of how new information is acquired and how learned information is memorized in the brain.

  13. Overview of KRAS-Driven Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Clare; Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    KRAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer, has been utilized extensively to model human lung adenocarcinomas. The results from such studies have enhanced considerably an understanding of the relationship between KRAS and the development of lung cancer. Detailed in this overview are the features of various KRAS-driven genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of non-small cell lung cancer, their utilization, and the potential of these models for the study of lung cancer biology.

  14. In-depth metabolic phenotyping of genetically engineered mouse models in obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hui-Young; Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2014-10-01

    The world-wide prevalence of obesity and diabetes has increased sharply during the last two decades. Accordingly, the metabolic phenotyping of genetically engineered mouse models is critical for evaluating the functional roles of target genes in obesity and diabetes, and for developing new therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the practical meaning of metabolic phenotyping, the strategy of choosing appropriate tests, and considerations when designing and performing metabolic phenotyping in mice.

  15. Insights into the genetic basis of systemic sclerosis: immunity in human disease and in mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Minghua Wu, Maureen D Mayes Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunogenetics, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by vasculopathy, fibrosis, and autoantibodies. In the past decade, great efforts have been made to investigate genetic susceptibility for SSc. To date, over 20 gene loci have been identified as risk factors for SSc in large genome-wide association studies and confirmed by independent replication studies. However, the biological relevance of these genetic associations is still largely unknown. Exploring the mechanism behind these risk loci is essential to better understand disease pathogenesis and to identify novel therapeutic targets. Mouse model studies including knockout, knockin and knockdown of these genes can advance our understanding of pathogenic cellular and molecular mechanisms in human disease. Although such mouse model systems do not exactly correspond to human disease, they can provide insight into pathological mechanisms that influence disease pathways. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding the genetic basis of SSc in the setting of genetic manipulation of these pathways in murine models. Keywords: GWAS, Immunochip study, type I interferon pathway, genetic mutation animal models

  16. Using autonomous replication to physically and genetically define human origins of replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krysan, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The author previously developed a system for studying autonomous replication in human cells involving the use of sequences from the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome to provide extrachromosomal plasmids with a nuclear retention function. Using this system, it was demonstrated that large fragments of human genomic DNA could be isolated which replicate autonomously in human cells. In this study the DNA sequences which function as origins of replication in human cells are defined physically and genetically. These experiments demonstrated that replication initiates at multiple locations distributed throughout the plasmid. Another line of experiments addressed the DNA sequence requirements for autonomous replication in human cells. These experiments demonstrated that human DNA fragments have a higher replication activity than bacterial fragments do. It was also found, however, that the bacterial DNA sequence could support efficient replication if enough copies of it were present on the plasmid. These findings suggested that autonomous replication in human cells does not depend on extensive, specific DNA sequences. The autonomous replication system which the author has employed for these experiments utilizes a cis-acting sequence from the EBV origin and the trans-acting EBNA-1 protein to provide plasmids with a nuclear retention function. It was therefore relevant to verify that the autonomous replication of human DNA fragments did not depend on the replication activity associated with the EBV sequences utilized for nuclear retention. To accomplish this goal, the author demonstrated that plasmids carrying the EBV sequences and large fragments of human DNA could support long-term autonomous replication in hamster cells, which are not permissive for EBV replication.

  17. Animal models of physiologic markers of male reproduction: genetically defined infertile mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubb, C.

    1987-10-01

    The present report focuses on novel animal models of male infertility: genetically defined mice bearing single-gene mutations that induce infertility. The primary goal of the investigations was to identify the reproductive defects in these mutant mice. The phenotypic effects of the gene mutations were deciphered by comparing the mutant mice to their normal siblings. Initially testicular steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis were investigated. The physiologic markers for testicular steroidogenesis were steroid secretion by testes perifused in vitro, seminal vesicle weight, and Leydig cell histology. Spermatogenesis was evaluated by the enumeration of homogenization-resistant sperm/spermatids in testes and by morphometric analyses of germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium. If testicular function appeared normal, the authors investigated the sexual behavior of the mice. The parameters of male sexual behavior that were quantified included mount patency, mount frequency, intromission latency, thrusts per intromission, ejaculation latency, and ejaculation duration. Females of pairs breeding under normal circumstances were monitored for the presence of vaginal plugs and pregnancies. The patency of the ejaculatory process was determined by quantifying sperm in the female reproductive tract after sexual behavior tests. Sperm function was studied by quantitatively determining sperm motility during videomicroscopic observation. Also, the ability of epididymal sperm to function within the uterine environment was analyzed by determining sperm capacity to initiate pregnancy after artificial insemination. Together, the experimental results permitted the grouping of the gene mutations into three general categories. They propose that the same biological markers used in the reported studies can be implemented in the assessment of the impact that environmental toxins may have on male reproduction.

  18. A Genetic Approach to Define the Importance of Rheb in Tuberous Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    investigate the consequences of the activation of the TSC/Rheb/mTOR signaling pathway on cell physiology . Our study makes significant contribution to...carcinoma cells and PC12 ( pheochromocytoma ) cells. To examine tissue expression of Rheb2, mouse tissue samples including brain, heart, kidney, liver

  19. Microsatellite analyses reveal fine-scale genetic structure in grey mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredsted, T; Pertoldi, C; Schierup, M H; Kappeler, P M

    2005-07-01

    Information on genetic structure can be used to complement direct inferences on social systems and behaviour. We studied the genetic structure of the solitary grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), a small, nocturnal primate endemic to western Madagascar, with the aim of getting further insight on its breeding structure. Tissue samples from 167 grey mouse lemurs in an area covering 12.3 km2 in Kirindy Forest were obtained from trapping. The capture data indicated a noncontinuous distribution of individuals in the study area. Using 10 microsatellite markers, significant genetic differentiation in the study area was demonstrated and dispersal was found to be significantly male biased. Furthermore, we observed an overall excess of homozygotes in the total population (F(IT) = 0.131), which we interpret as caused by fine-scale structure with breeding occurring in small units. Evidence for a clumped distribution of identical homozygotes was found, supporting the notion that dispersal distance for breeding was shorter than that for foraging, i.e. the breeding neighbourhood size is smaller than the foraging neighbourhood size. In conclusion, we found a more complex population structure than what has been previously reported in studies performed on smaller spatial scales. The noncontinuous distribution of individuals and the effects of social variables on the genetic structure have implications for the interpretation of social organization and the planning of conservation activities that may apply to other solitary and endangered mammals as well.

  20. Host genetics of severe influenza: from mouse Mx1 to human IRF7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancanelli, Michael J; Abel, Laurent; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Influenza viruses cause mild to moderate respiratory illness in most people, and only rarely devastating or fatal infections. The virulence factors encoded by viral genes can explain seasonal or geographic differences at the population level but are unlikely to account for inter-individual clinical variability. Inherited or acquired immunodeficiencies may thus underlie severe cases of influenza. The crucial role of host genes was first demonstrated by forward genetics in inbred mice, with the identification of interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible Mx1 as a canonical influenza susceptibility gene. Reverse genetics has subsequently characterized the in vivo role of other mouse genes involved in IFN-α/β and -λ immunity. A series of in vitro studies with mouse and human cells have also refined the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of protection against influenza viruses. Population-based human genetic studies have not yet uncovered variants with a significant impact. Interestingly, human primary immunodeficiencies affecting T and B cells were also not found to predispose to severe influenza. Recently however, human IRF7 was shown to be essential for IFN-α/β- and IFN-λ-dependent protective immunity against primary influenza in vivo, as inferred from a patient with life-threatening influenza revealed to be IRF7-deficient by whole exome sequencing. Next generation sequencing of human exomes and genomes will facilitate the analysis of the human genetic determinism of severe influenza.

  1. A recessive genetic screen for components of the RNA interference pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, Melanie I; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2010-01-01

    Several key components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway were identified in genetic screens performed in nonmammalian model organisms. To identify components of the mammalian RNAi pathway, we developed a recessive genetic screen in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Recessive genetic screens are feasible in ES cells that are Bloom-syndrome protein (Blm-) deficient. Therefore, we constructed a reporter cell line in Blm-deficient ES cells to isolate RNAi mutants through a simple drug-selection scheme. This chapter describes how we used retroviral gene traps to mutagenize the reporter cell line and select for RNAi mutants. Putative RNAi mutants were confirmed using a separate functional assay. The location of the gene trap was then identified using molecular techniques such as Splinkerette PCR. Our screening strategy successfully isolated several mutant clones of Argonaute2, a vital component of the RNAi pathway.

  2. Network statistics of genetically-driven gene co-expression modules in mouse crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pier eScott-Boyer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In biology, networks are used in different contexts as ways to represent relationships between entities, such as for instance interactions between genes, proteins or metabolites. Despite progress in the analysis of such networks and their potential to better understand the collective impact of genes on complex traits, one remaining challenge is to establish the biologic validity of gene co-expression networks and to determine what governs their organization. We used WGCNA to construct and analyze seven gene expression datasets from several tissues of mouse recombinant inbred strains (RIS. For six out of the 7 networks, we found that linkage to module QTLs (mQTLs could be established for 29.3% of gene co-expression modules detected in the several mouse RIS. For about 74.6% of such genetically-linked modules, the mQTL was on the same chromosome as the one contributing most genes to the module, with genes originating from that chromosome showing higher connectivity than other genes in the modules. Such modules (that we considered as genetically-driven had network statistic properties (density, centralization and heterogeneity that set them apart from other modules in the network. Altogether, a sizeable portion of gene co-expression modules detected in mouse RIS panels had genetic determinants as their main organizing principle. In addition to providing a biologic interpretation validation for these modules, these genetic determinants imparted on them particular properties that set them apart from other modules in the network, to the point that they can be predicted to a large extent on the basis of their network statistics.

  3. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1.

  4. NIG_MoG: a mouse genome navigator for exploring intersubspecific genetic polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Toyoyuki; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Obata, Yuichi; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2015-08-01

    The National Institute of Genetics Mouse Genome database (NIG_MoG; http://molossinus.lab.nig.ac.jp/msmdb/) primarily comprises the whole-genome sequence data of two inbred mouse strains, MSM/Ms and JF1/Ms. These strains were established at NIG and originated from the Japanese subspecies Mus musculus molossinus. NIG_MoG provides visualized genome polymorphism information, browsing single-nucleotide polymorphisms and short insertions and deletions in the genomes of MSM/Ms and JF1/Ms with respect to C57BL/6J (whose genome is predominantly derived from the West European subspecies M. m. domesticus). This allows users, especially wet-lab biologists, to intuitively recognize intersubspecific genome divergence in these mouse strains using visual data. The database also supports the in silico screening of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones that contain genomic DNA from MSM/Ms and the standard classical laboratory strain C57BL/6N. NIG_MoG is thus a valuable navigator for exploring mouse genome polymorphisms and BAC clones that are useful for studies of gene function and regulation based on intersubspecific genome divergence.

  5. Does epilepsy in multiplex autism pedigrees define a different subgroup in terms of clinical characteristics and genetic risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiet, Claire; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Laurent, Claudine; Bodeau, Nicolas; Génin, Bérengère; Leguern, Eric; Tordjman, Sylvie; Cohen, David

    2013-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and epilepsy frequently occur together. Prevalence rates are variable, and have been attributed to age, gender, comorbidity, subtype of pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) and risk factors. Recent studies have suggested disparate clinical and genetic settings depending on simplex or multiplex autism. The aim of this study was to assess: 1) the prevalence of epilepsy in multiplex autism and its association with genetic and non-genetic risk factors of major effect, intellectual disability and gender; and 2) whether autism and epilepsy cosegregate within multiplex autism families. We extracted from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) database (n = 3,818 children from 1,264 families) all families with relevant medical data (n = 664 children from 290 families). The sample included 478 children with ASD and 186 siblings without ASD. We analyzed the following variables: seizures, genetic and non-genetic risk factors, gender, and cognitive functioning as assessed by Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices (RCPM) and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS). The prevalence of epilepsy was 12.8% in cases with ASD and 2.2% in siblings without ASD (P VABS measure, the risk of epilepsy in multiplex autism was significantly associated with intellectual disability, but not with gender. Identified risk factors (genetic or non-genetic) of autism tended to be significantly associated with epilepsy (P = 0.052). When children with prematurity, pre- or perinatal insult, or cerebral palsy were excluded, a genetic risk factor was reported for 6/59 (10.2%) of children with epilepsy and 12/395 (3.0%) of children without epilepsy (P = 0.002). Finally, using a permutation test, there was significant evidence that the epilepsy phenotype co-segregated within families (P <10-4). Epilepsy in multiplex autism may define a different subgroup in terms of clinical characteristics and genetic risk.

  6. Non-motor symptoms in genetically defined dystonia : Homogenous groups require systematic assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peall, K. J.; Kuiper, A.; de Koning, T. J.; Tijssen, M. A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dystonia is a movement disorder involving sustained or intermittent muscle contractions resulting in abnormal movements and postures. Identification of disease causing genes has allowed examination of genetically homogenous groups. Unlike the motor symptoms, non-motor characteristics a

  7. Defining the genetic connection linking amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with frontotemporal dementia (FTD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattante, Serena; Ciura, Sorana; Rouleau, Guy A; Kabashi, Edor

    2015-05-01

    Several genetic causes have been recently described for neurological diseases, increasing our knowledge of the common pathological mechanisms involved in these disorders. Mutation analysis has shown common causative factors for two major neurodegenerative disorders, ALS and FTD. Shared pathological and genetic markers as well as common neurological signs between these diseases have given rise to the notion of an ALS/FTD spectrum. This overlap among genetic factors causing ALS/FTD and the coincidence of mutated alleles (including causative, risk and modifier variants) have given rise to the notion of an oligogenic model of disease. In this review we summarize major advances in the elucidation of novel genetic factors in these diseases which have led to a better understanding of the common pathogenic factors leading to neurodegeneration.

  8. PRTFDC1 is a genetic modifier of HPRT-deficiency in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaine C Keebaugh

    Full Text Available Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND is a severe X-linked neurological disorder caused by a deficiency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT. In contrast, HPRT-deficiency in the mouse does not result in the profound phenotypes such as self-injurious behavior observed in humans, and the genetic basis for this phenotypic disparity between HPRT-deficient humans and mice is unknown. To test the hypothesis that HPRT deficiency is modified by the presence/absence of phosphoribosyltransferase domain containing 1 (PRTFDC1, a paralog of HPRT that is a functional gene in humans but an inactivated pseudogene in mice, we created transgenic mice that express human PRTFDC1 in wild-type and HPRT-deficient backgrounds. Male mice expressing PRTFDC1 on either genetic background were viable and fertile. However, the presence of PRTFDC1 in the HPRT-deficient, but not wild-type mice, increased aggression as well as sensitivity to a specific amphetamine-induced stereotypy, both of which are reminiscent of the increased aggressive and self-injurious behavior exhibited by patients with LND. These results demonstrate that PRTFDC1 is a genetic modifier of HPRT-deficiency in the mouse and could therefore have important implications for unraveling the molecular etiology of LND.

  9. Relationship between obesity phenotypes and genetic determinants in a mouse model for juvenile obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Gudrun A; Schäfer, Nadine; Hesse, Claudia; Heise, Sebastian; Neuschl, Christina; Wagener, Asja; Churchill, Gary A; Li, Renhua

    2013-09-16

    Obesity, a state of imbalance between lean mass and fat mass, is important for the etiology of diseases affected by the interplay of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Although genome-wide association studies have repeatedly associated genes with obesity and body weight, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between the muscle and adipose tissues remain unknown. Using 351 mice (at 10 wk of age) of an intercross population between Berlin Fat Mouse Inbred (BFMI) and C57BL/6NCrl (B6N) mice, we examined the causal relationships between genetic variations and multiple traits: body lean mass and fat mass, adipokines, and bone mineral density. Furthermore, evidence from structural equation modeling suggests causality among these traits. In the BFMI model, juvenile obesity affects lean mass and impairs bone mineral density via adipokines secreted from the white adipose tissues. While previous studies have indicated that lean mass has a causative effect on adiposity, in the Berlin Fat Mouse model that has been selected for juvenile obesity (at 9 wk of age) for >90 generations, however, the causality is switched from fat mass to lean mass. In addition, linkage studies and statistical modeling have indicated that quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 5 and 6 affect both lean mass and fat mass. These lines of evidence indicate that the muscle and adipose tissues interact with one another and the interaction is modulated by genetic variations that are shaped by selections. Experimental examinations are necessary to verify the biological role of the inferred causalities.

  10. A genetic mouse model to investigate hyperoxic acute lung injury survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prows, Daniel R; Hafertepen, Amanda P; Gibbons, William J; Winterberg, Abby V; Nick, Todd G

    2007-08-20

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a devastating disease that maintains a high mortality rate, despite decades of research. Hyperoxia, a universal treatment for ALI and other critically ill patients, can itself cause pulmonary damage, which drastically restricts its therapeutic potential. We stipulate that having the ability to use higher levels of supplemental O2 for longer periods would improve recovery rates. Toward this goal, a mouse model was sought to identify genes contributing to hyperoxic ALI (HALI) mortality. Eighteen inbred mouse strains were screened in continuous >95% O2. A significant survival difference was identified between sensitive C57BL/6J and resistant 129X1/SvJ strains. Although resistant, only one-fourth of 129X1/SvJ mice survived longer than any C57BL/6J mouse, demonstrating decreased penetrance of resistance. A survival time difference between reciprocal F1 mice implicated a parent-of-origin (imprinting) effect. To further evaluate imprinting and begin to delineate the genetic components of HALI survival, we generated and phenotyped offspring from all four possible intercrosses. Segregation analysis supported maternal inheritance of one or more genes but paternal inheritance of one or more contributor genes. A significant sex effect was demonstrated, with males more resistant than females for all F2 crosses. Survival time ranges and sensitive-to-resistant ratios of the different F2 crosses also supported imprinting and predicted that increased survival is due to dominant resistance alleles contributed by both the resistant and sensitive parental strains. HALI survival is multigenic with a complex mode of inheritance, which should be amenable to genetic dissection with this mouse model.

  11. Population genetics of an ecosystem-defining reef coral Pocillopora damicornis in the Tropical Eastern Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Combosch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral reefs in the Tropical Eastern Pacific (TEP are amongst the most peripheral and geographically isolated in the world. This isolation has shaped the biology of TEP organisms and lead to the formation of numerous endemic species. For example, the coral Pocillopora damicornis is a minor reef-builder elsewhere in the Indo-West Pacific, but is the dominant reef-building coral in the TEP, where it forms large, mono-specific stands, covering many hectares of reef. Moreover, TEP P. damicornis reproduces by broadcast spawning, while it broods mostly parthenogenetic larvae throughout the rest of the Indo-West Pacific. Population genetic surveys for P. damicornis from across its Indo-Pacific range indicate that gene flow (i.e. larval dispersal is generally limited over hundreds of kilometers or less. Little is known about the population genetic structure and the dispersal potential of P. damicornis in the TEP. METHODOLOGY: Using multilocus microsatellite data, we analyzed the population structure of TEP P. damicornis among and within nine reefs and test for significant genetic structure across three geographically and ecologically distinct regions in Panama. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS/CONCLUSIONS: We detected significant levels of population genetic structure (global R(ST = 0.162, indicating restricted gene flow (i.e. larvae dispersal, both among the three regions (R(RT = 0.081 as well as within regions (R(SR = 0.089. Limited gene flow across a distinct environmental cline, like the regional upwelling gradient in Panama, indicates a significant potential for differential adaptation and population differentiation. Individual reefs were characterized by unexpectedly high genet diversity (avg. 94%, relatively high inbreeding coefficients (global F(IS = 0.183, and localized spatial genetic structure among individuals (i.e. unique genets over 10 m intervals. These findings suggest that gene flow is limited in TEP P. damicornis

  12. Wild gazelles of the southern Levant: genetic profiling defines new conservation priorities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Hadas

    Full Text Available The mountain gazelle (Gazella gazelle, Dorcas gazelle (Gazella Dorcas and acacia gazelle (Gazella arabica acacia were historically abundant in the southern Levant, and more specifically in Israel. Anthropogenic and natural changes have caused a rapid decline in gazelle populations, raising concerns about their conservation status and future survival. The genetic profile of 111 wild gazelles from Israel was determined based on three regions of mitochondrial DNA (control region, Cytochrome b and 12S ribosomal RNA and nine nuclear microsatellite markers. Genetic analysis of the mountain gazelle population, the largest known population of this rare species, revealed adequate diversity levels and gene flow between subpopulations. Nevertheless, ongoing habitat degradation and other human effects, such as poaching, suggest the need for drastic measures to prevent species extinction. Dorcas gazelles in Israel displayed inbreeding within subpopulations while still maintaining considerable genetic diversity overall. This stable population, represented by a distinctive genetic profile, is fragmented and isolated from its relatives in neighboring localities. Based on the genetic profile of a newly sampled subpopulation in Israel, we provide an alternative hypothesis for the historic dispersal of Dorcas gazelle, from the Southern Levant to northern Africa. The small acacia gazelle population was closest to gazelles from the Farasan Islands of Saudi Arabia, based on mitochondrial markers. The two populations did not share haplotypes, suggesting that these two populations may be the last remnant wild gazelles of this species worldwide. Only a dozen acacia gazelles survive in Israel, and urgent steps are needed to ensure the survival of this genetically distinctive lineage. The genetic assessments of our study recognize new conservation priorities for each gazelle species in the Southern Levant.

  13. Wild gazelles of the southern Levant: genetic profiling defines new conservation priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadas, Lia; Hermon, Dalia; Boldo, Amizor; Arieli, Gal; Gafny, Ron; King, Roni; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila

    2015-01-01

    The mountain gazelle (Gazella gazelle), Dorcas gazelle (Gazella Dorcas) and acacia gazelle (Gazella arabica acacia) were historically abundant in the southern Levant, and more specifically in Israel. Anthropogenic and natural changes have caused a rapid decline in gazelle populations, raising concerns about their conservation status and future survival. The genetic profile of 111 wild gazelles from Israel was determined based on three regions of mitochondrial DNA (control region, Cytochrome b and 12S ribosomal RNA) and nine nuclear microsatellite markers. Genetic analysis of the mountain gazelle population, the largest known population of this rare species, revealed adequate diversity levels and gene flow between subpopulations. Nevertheless, ongoing habitat degradation and other human effects, such as poaching, suggest the need for drastic measures to prevent species extinction. Dorcas gazelles in Israel displayed inbreeding within subpopulations while still maintaining considerable genetic diversity overall. This stable population, represented by a distinctive genetic profile, is fragmented and isolated from its relatives in neighboring localities. Based on the genetic profile of a newly sampled subpopulation in Israel, we provide an alternative hypothesis for the historic dispersal of Dorcas gazelle, from the Southern Levant to northern Africa. The small acacia gazelle population was closest to gazelles from the Farasan Islands of Saudi Arabia, based on mitochondrial markers. The two populations did not share haplotypes, suggesting that these two populations may be the last remnant wild gazelles of this species worldwide. Only a dozen acacia gazelles survive in Israel, and urgent steps are needed to ensure the survival of this genetically distinctive lineage. The genetic assessments of our study recognize new conservation priorities for each gazelle species in the Southern Levant.

  14. Generation of mouse anti-human urate anion exchanger antibody by genetic immunization and its identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guo-shuang; WU Di; CHEN Xiang-mei; SHI Suo-zhu; HONG Quan; ZHANG Ping; LU Yang

    2005-01-01

    Background Human urate anion exchanger (hURAT1) as a major urate transporter expressed on renal tubular epithelial cells regulates blood urate level by reabsorbing uric acid. Antibody is an important tool to study hURAT1. This study aimed, by genetic immunization, to produce mouse anti-hURAT1 polyclonal antibody with high throughput and high specificity and to detect the location of hURAT1 in human kidney.Methods Human renal total RNA was isolated and the entire cDNA of hURAT1 was amplified by RT-PCR. The sequence of intracellular high antigenicity fragment (A280 to R349) was chosen by prediction software of protein antigenicity, and its cDNA was amplified from cDNA of hURAT1, and then cloned into pBQAP-TT vector to construct recombinant plasmid pBQAP-TT-hURAT1-210 for genetic immunization. Mice were inoculated with this recombinant plasmid and two other adjuvant plasmids, pCMVi-GMCSF and pCMVi-Flt3L, which helped to enhance the antibody’s generation. After four weeks, the mice were sacrificed to obtain the anti-hURAT1 antibody from serum. The antibody was identified by western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. At the same time, rabbit anti-hURAT1 antibody was produced by protein immunization. The specificity and efficiency between the rabbit and mouse anti-hURAT1 antibody were compared by western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry.Results The entire cDNA of hURAT1 and cDNA of its intracellular high immunogenic fragment were amplified successfully. Recombinant plasmid pBQAP-TT-hURAT1-210 for genetic immunization was confirmed by restriction digestion and sequencing. Both the mouse anti-hURAT1 antibody and rabbit anti-hURAT1 antibody recognized 58kD hURAT1 and 64kD glycosylated hURAT1 protein bands in western blot. Immunohistochemically, hURAT1 was located at the brush border membrane of renal proximal tubular cells. In addition, the throughput and specificity of the mouse anti-hURAT1 antibody were higher than those of the rabbit anti-hURAT1 antibody

  15. Illuminating p53 function in cancer with genetically engineered mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The key role of the p53 protein in tumor suppression is highlighted by its frequent mutation in human cancers and by the completely penetrant cancer predisposition of p53 null mice. Beyond providing definitive evidence for the critical function of p53 in tumor suppression, genetically engineered mouse models have offered numerous additional insights into p53 function. p53 knock-in mice expressing tumor-derived p53 mutants have revealed that these mutants display gain-of-function activities th...

  16. A genetic screen for components of the mammalian RNA interference pathway in Bloom-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Genetic screens performed in model organisms have helped identify key components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Recessive genetic screens have recently become feasible through the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that are Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm) deficient. Here, we developed and performed a recessive genetic screen to identify components of the mammalian RNAi pathway in Blm-deficient ES cells. Genome-wide mutagenesis using a retroviral gene trap strategy resulted in the ...

  17. Elevation and connectivity define genetic refugia for mountain sheep as climate warms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epps, Clinton W.; Palsboll, Per J.; Wehausen, John D.; Roderick, George K.; McCullough, Dale R.

    2006-01-01

    Global warming is predicted to affect the evolutionary potential of natural populations. We assessed genetic diversity of 25 populations of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) in southeastern California, where temperatures have increased and precipitation has decreased during the 20th cen

  18. Elevation and connectivity define genetic refugia for mountain sheep as climate warms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epps, Clinton W.; Palsboll, Per J.; Wehausen, John D.; Roderick, George K.; McCullough, Dale R.

    2006-01-01

    Global warming is predicted to affect the evolutionary potential of natural populations. We assessed genetic diversity of 25 populations of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) in southeastern California, where temperatures have increased and precipitation has decreased during the 20th

  19. Murine Gut Microbiota Is Defined by Host Genetics and Modulates Variation of Metabolic Traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKnite, A.M.; Lu, L.; Williams, E.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract harbors a complex and diverse microbiota that has an important role in host metabolism. Microbial diversity is influenced by a combination of environmental and host genetic factors and is associated with several polygenic diseases. In this study we combined next-generation

  20. Elevation and connectivity define genetic refugia for mountain sheep as climate warms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epps, Clinton W.; Palsboll, Per J.; Wehausen, John D.; Roderick, George K.; McCullough, Dale R.

    2006-01-01

    Global warming is predicted to affect the evolutionary potential of natural populations. We assessed genetic diversity of 25 populations of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) in southeastern California, where temperatures have increased and precipitation has decreased during the 20th cen

  1. Emerging technologies to create inducible and genetically defined porcine cancer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence B Schook

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging need for new animal models that address unmet translational cancer research requirements. Transgenic porcine models provide an exceptional opportunity due to their genetic, anatomic and physiological similarities with humans. Due to recent advances in the sequencing of domestic animal genomes and the development of new organism cloning technologies, it is now very feasible to utilize pigs as a malleable species, with similar anatomic and physiological features with humans, in which to develop cancer models. In this review, we discuss genetic modification technologies successfully used to produce porcine biomedical models, in particular the Cre-loxP System as well as major advances and perspectives the CRISPR/Cas9 System. Recent advancements in porcine tumor modeling and genome editing will bring porcine models to the forefront of translational cancer research.

  2. Defining a new candidate gene for amelogenesis imperfecta: from molecular genetics to biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzúa, Blanca; Ortega-Pinto, Ana; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2011-02-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic conditions that affect the structure and clinical appearance of tooth enamel. The types (hypoplastic, hypocalcified, and hypomature) are correlated with defects in different stages of the process of enamel synthesis. Autosomal dominant, recessive, and X-linked types have been previously described. These disorders are considered clinically and genetically heterogeneous in etiology, involving a variety of genes, such as AMELX, ENAM, DLX3, FAM83H, MMP-20, KLK4, and WDR72. The mutations identified within these causal genes explain less than half of all cases of amelogenesis imperfecta. Most of the candidate and causal genes currently identified encode proteins involved in enamel synthesis. We think it is necessary to refocus the search for candidate genes using biochemical processes. This review provides theoretical evidence that the human SLC4A4 gene (sodium bicarbonate cotransporter) may be a new candidate gene.

  3. Defining desired genetic gains for rainbow trout breeding objective using analytic hierarchy process

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Distributing animals from a single breeding program to a global market may not satisfy all producers, as they may differ in market objectives and farming environments. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is used to estimate preferences, which can be aggregated to consensus preference values using weighted goal programming (WGP). The aim of this study was to use an AHP-WGP based approach to derive desired genetic gains for rainbow trout breeding, and to study whether breeding trait preferences va...

  4. Genetic signatures shared in embryonic liver development and liver cancer define prognostically relevant subgroups in HCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Diana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multiple activations of individual genes during embryonic liver and HCC development have repeatedly prompted speculations about conserved embryonic signatures driving cancer development. Recently, the emerging discussion on cancer stem cells and the appreciation that generally tumors may develop from progenitor cells of diverse stages of cellular differentiation has shed increasing light on the overlapping genetic signatures between embryonic liver development and HCC. However there is still a lack of systematic studies investigating this area. We therefore performed a comprehensive analysis of differentially regulated genetic signaling pathways in embryonic and liver cancer development and investigated their biological relevance. Genetic signaling pathways were investigated on several publically available genome wide microarray experiments on liver development and HCC. Differentially expressed genes were investigated for pathway enrichment or underrepresentation compared to KEGG annotated pathways by Fisher exact evaluation. The comparative analysis of enrichment and under representation of differentially regulated genes in liver development and HCC demonstrated a significant overlap between multiple pathways. Most strikingly we demonstrated a significant overlap not only in pathways expected to be relevant to both conditions such as cell cycle or apoptosis but also metabolic pathways associated with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, we demonstrated the clinical significance of these findings as unsupervised clustering of HCC patients on the basis of these metabolic pathways displayed significant differences in survival. These results indicate that liver development and liver cancer share similar alterations in multiple genetic signaling pathways. Several pathways with markedly similar patterns of enrichment or underrepresentation of various regulated genes between liver development and HCC are of prognostic relevance in

  5. Non-Standard Genetic Codes Define New Concepts for Protein Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Bezerra, Ana R; Guimarães, Ana R.; Santos, Manuel A. S.

    2015-01-01

    The essential feature of the genetic code is the strict one-to-one correspondence between codons and amino acids. The canonical code consists of three stop codons and 61 sense codons that encode 20% of the amino acid repertoire observed in nature. It was originally designated as immutable and universal due to its conservation in most organisms, but sequencing of genes from the human mitochondrial genomes revealed deviations in codon assignments. Since then, alternative codes have been reporte...

  6. Genetic contribution to aging: deleterious and helpful genes define life expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, J I; Montoriol, C; Morer, I; Beyer, K

    2005-12-01

    For the best understanding of aging, we must consider a genetic pool in which genes with negative effects (deleterious genes that shorten the life span) interact with genes with positive effects (helpful genes that promote longevity) in a constant epistatic relationship that results in a modulation of the final expression under particular environmental influences. Examples of deleterious genes affecting aging (predisposition to early-life pathology and disease) are those that confer risk for developing vascular disease in the heart, brain, or peripheral vessels (APOE, ACE, MTFHR, and mutation at factor II and factor V genes), a gene associated with sporadic late-onset Alzheimer's disease (APOE E4), a polymorphism (COLIA1 Sp1) associated with an increased fracture risk, and several genetic polymorphisms involved in hormonal metabolism that affect adverse reactions to estrogen replacement in postmenopausal women. In summary, the process of aging can be regarded as a multifactorial trait that results from an interaction between stochastic events and sets of epistatic alleles that have pleiotropic age-dependent effects. Lacking those alleles that predispose to disease and having the longevity-enabling genes (those beneficial genetic variants that confer disease resistance) are probably both important to such a remarkable survival advantage.

  7. Genetic Dissection of Cardiac Remodeling in an Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Jen-Chu Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to understand the genetic control of cardiac remodeling using an isoproterenol-induced heart failure model in mice, which allowed control of confounding factors in an experimental setting. We characterized the changes in cardiac structure and function in response to chronic isoproterenol infusion using echocardiography in a panel of 104 inbred mouse strains. We showed that cardiac structure and function, whether under normal or stress conditions, has a strong genetic component, with heritability estimates of left ventricular mass between 61% and 81%. Association analyses of cardiac remodeling traits, corrected for population structure, body size and heart rate, revealed 17 genome-wide significant loci, including several loci containing previously implicated genes. Cardiac tissue gene expression profiling, expression quantitative trait loci, expression-phenotype correlation, and coding sequence variation analyses were performed to prioritize candidate genes and to generate hypotheses for downstream mechanistic studies. Using this approach, we have validated a novel gene, Myh14, as a negative regulator of ISO-induced left ventricular mass hypertrophy in an in vivo mouse model and demonstrated the up-regulation of immediate early gene Myc, fetal gene Nppb, and fibrosis gene Lgals3 in ISO-treated Myh14 deficient hearts compared to controls.

  8. Mouse-human experimental epigenetic analysis unmasks dietary targets and genetic liability for diabetic phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multhaup, Michael L.; Seldin, Marcus; Jaffe, Andrew E.; Lei, Xia; Kirchner, Henriette; Mondal, Prosenjit; Li, Yuanyuan; Rodriguez, Varenka; Drong, Alexander; Hussain, Mehboob; Lindgren, Cecilia; McCarthy, Mark; Näslund, Erik; Zierath, Juleen R.; Wong, G. William; Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Using a functional approach to investigate the epigenetics of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), we combine three lines of evidence – diet-induced epigenetic dysregulation in mouse, epigenetic conservation in humans, and T2D clinical risk evidence – to identify genes implicated in T2D pathogenesis through epigenetic mechanisms related to obesity. Beginning with dietary manipulation of genetically homogeneous mice, we identify differentially DNA-methylated genomic regions. We then replicate these results in adipose samples from lean and obese patients pre- and post-Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, identifying regions where both the location and direction of methylation change is conserved. These regions overlap with 27 genetic T2D risk loci, only one of which was deemed significant by GWAS alone. Functional analysis of genes associated with these regions revealed four genes with roles in insulin resistance, demonstrating the potential general utility of this approach for complementing conventional human genetic studies by integrating cross-species epigenomics and clinical genetic risk. PMID:25565211

  9. Strains and stressors: an analysis of touchscreen learning in genetically diverse mouse strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Graybeal

    Full Text Available Touchscreen-based systems are growing in popularity as a tractable, translational approach for studying learning and cognition in rodents. However, while mouse strains are well known to differ in learning across various settings, performance variation between strains in touchscreen learning has not been well described. The selection of appropriate genetic strains and backgrounds is critical to the design of touchscreen-based studies and provides a basis for elucidating genetic factors moderating behavior. Here we provide a quantitative foundation for visual discrimination and reversal learning using touchscreen assays across a total of 35 genotypes. We found significant differences in operant performance and learning, including faster reversal learning in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice. We then assessed DBA/2J and C57BL/6J for differential sensitivity to an environmental insult by testing for alterations in reversal learning following exposure to repeated swim stress. Stress facilitated reversal learning (selectively during the late stage of reversal in C57BL/6J, but did not affect learning in DBA/2J. To dissect genetic factors underlying these differences, we phenotyped a family of 27 BXD strains generated by crossing C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. There was marked variation in discrimination, reversal and extinction learning across the BXD strains, suggesting this task may be useful for identifying underlying genetic differences. Moreover, different measures of touchscreen learning were only modestly correlated in the BXD strains, indicating that these processes are comparatively independent at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Finally, we examined the behavioral structure of learning via principal component analysis of the current data, plus an archival dataset, totaling 765 mice. This revealed 5 independent factors suggestive of "reversal learning," "motivation-related late reversal learning," "discrimination learning," "speed to respond," and

  10. Strains and stressors: an analysis of touchscreen learning in genetically diverse mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybeal, Carolyn; Bachu, Munisa; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Saksida, Lisa M; Bussey, Timothy J; Sagalyn, Erica; Williams, Robert W; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Touchscreen-based systems are growing in popularity as a tractable, translational approach for studying learning and cognition in rodents. However, while mouse strains are well known to differ in learning across various settings, performance variation between strains in touchscreen learning has not been well described. The selection of appropriate genetic strains and backgrounds is critical to the design of touchscreen-based studies and provides a basis for elucidating genetic factors moderating behavior. Here we provide a quantitative foundation for visual discrimination and reversal learning using touchscreen assays across a total of 35 genotypes. We found significant differences in operant performance and learning, including faster reversal learning in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice. We then assessed DBA/2J and C57BL/6J for differential sensitivity to an environmental insult by testing for alterations in reversal learning following exposure to repeated swim stress. Stress facilitated reversal learning (selectively during the late stage of reversal) in C57BL/6J, but did not affect learning in DBA/2J. To dissect genetic factors underlying these differences, we phenotyped a family of 27 BXD strains generated by crossing C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. There was marked variation in discrimination, reversal and extinction learning across the BXD strains, suggesting this task may be useful for identifying underlying genetic differences. Moreover, different measures of touchscreen learning were only modestly correlated in the BXD strains, indicating that these processes are comparatively independent at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Finally, we examined the behavioral structure of learning via principal component analysis of the current data, plus an archival dataset, totaling 765 mice. This revealed 5 independent factors suggestive of "reversal learning," "motivation-related late reversal learning," "discrimination learning," "speed to respond," and "motivation during

  11. Nasal bone shape is under complex epistatic genetic control in mouse interspecific recombinant congenic strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaétan Burgio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic determinism of cranial morphology in the mouse is still largely unknown, despite the localization of putative QTLs and the identification of genes associated with Mendelian skull malformations. To approach the dissection of this multigenic control, we have used a set of interspecific recombinant congenic strains (IRCS produced between C57BL/6 and mice of the distant species Mus spretus (SEG/Pas. Each strain has inherited 1.3% of its genome from SEG/Pas under the form of few, small-sized, chromosomal segments. RESULTS: The shape of the nasal bone was studied using outline analysis combined with Fourier descriptors, and differential features were identified between IRCS BcG-66H and C57BL/6. An F2 cross between BcG-66H and C57BL/6 revealed that, out of the three SEG/Pas-derived chromosomal regions present in BcG-66H, two were involved. Segments on chromosomes 1 (∼32 Mb and 18 (∼13 Mb showed additive effect on nasal bone shape. The three chromosomal regions present in BcG-66H were isolated in congenic strains to study their individual effect. Epistatic interactions were assessed in bicongenic strains. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that, besides a strong individual effect, the QTL on chromosome 1 interacts with genes on chromosomes 13 and 18. This study demonstrates that nasal bone shape is under complex genetic control but can be efficiently dissected in the mouse using appropriate genetic tools and shape descriptors.

  12. Defining desired genetic gains for rainbow trout breeding objective using analytic hierarchy process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Lim, P; Komen, H; Kause, A; van Arendonk, J A M; Barfoot, A J; Martin, K E; Parsons, J E

    2012-06-01

    Distributing animals from a single breeding program to a global market may not satisfy all producers, as they may differ in market objectives and farming environments. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is used to estimate preferences, which can be aggregated to consensus preference values using weighted goal programming (WGP). The aim of this study was to use an AHP-WGP based approach to derive desired genetic gains for rainbow trout breeding and to study whether breeding trait preferences vary depending on commercial products and farming environments. Two questionnaires were sent out. Questionnaire-A (Q-A) was distributed to 178 farmers from 5 continents and used to collect information on commercial products and farming environments. In this questionnaire, farmers were asked to rank the 6 most important traits for genetic improvement from a list of 13 traits. Questionnaire B (Q-B) was sent to all farmers who responded to Q-A (53 in total). For Q-B, preferences of the 6 traits were obtained using pairwise comparison. Preference intensity was given to quantify (in % of a trait mean; G%) the degree to which 1 trait is preferred over the other. Individual preferences, social preferences, and consensus preferences (Con-P) were estimated using AHP and WGP. Desired gains were constructed by multiplying Con-P by G%. The analysis revealed that the 6 most important traits were thermal growth coefficient (TGC), survival (Surv), feed conversion ratio (FCR), condition factor (CF), fillet percentage (FIL%), and late maturation (LMat). Ranking of traits based on average Con-P values were Surv (0.271), FCR (0.246), TGC (0.246), LMat (0.090), FIL% (0.081), and CF (0.067). Corresponding desired genetic gains (in % of trait mean) were 1.63, 1.87, 1.67, 1.29, 0.06, and 0.33%, respectively. The results from Con-P values show that trait preferences may vary for different types of commercial production or farming environments. This study demonstrated that combination of AHP and WGP can

  13. Heritability and coefficient of genetic variation analyses of phenotypic traits provide strong basis for high-resolution QTL mapping in the Collaborative Cross mouse genetic reference population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraqi, Fuad A; Athamni, Hanifa; Dorman, Alexandra; Salymah, Yasser; Tomlinson, Ian; Nashif, Aysar; Shusterman, Ariel; Weiss, Ervin; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Mott, Richard; Soller, Morris

    2014-04-01

    Most biological traits of human importance are complex in nature; their manifestation controlled by the cumulative effect of many genetic factors interacting with one another and with the individual's life history. Because of this, mouse genetic reference populations (GRPs) consisting of collections of inbred lines or recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from crosses between inbred lines are of particular value in analysis of complex traits, since massive amounts of data can be accumulated on the individual lines. However, existing mouse GRPs are derived from inbred lines that share a common history, resulting in limited genetic diversity, and reduced mapping precision due to long-range gametic disequilibrium. To overcome these limitations, the Collaborative Cross (CC) a genetically highly diverse collection of mouse RIL was established. The CC, now in advanced stages of development, will eventually consist of about 500 RIL derived from reciprocal crosses of eight divergent founder strains of mice, including three wild subspecies. Previous studies have shown that the CC indeed contains enormous diversity at the DNA level, that founder haplotypes are inherited in expected frequency, and that long-range gametic disequilibrium is not present. We here present data, primarily from our own laboratory, documenting extensive genetic variation among CC lines as expressed in broad-sense heritability (H(2)) and by the well-known "coefficient of genetic variation," demonstrating the ability of the CC resource to provide unprecedented mapping precision leading to identification of strong candidate genes.

  14. Multiple genetic loci within 11p15 defined by Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome rearrangement breakpoints and subchromosomal transferable fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoovers, J M; Kalikin, L M; Johnson, L A; Alders, M; Redeker, B; Law, D J; Bliek, J; Steenman, M; Benedict, M; Wiegant, J

    1995-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) involves fetal overgrowth and predisposition to a wide variety of embryonal tumors of childhood. We have previously found that BWS is genetically linked to 11p15 and that this same band shows loss of heterozygosity in the types of tumors to which children with BWS are susceptible. However, 11p15 contains > 20 megabases, and therefore, the BWS and tumor suppressor genes could be distinct. To determine the precise physical relationship between these loci, we isolated yeast artificial chromosomes, and cosmid libraries from them, within the region of loss of heterozygosity in embryonal tumors. Five germ-line balanced chromosomal rearrangement breakpoint sites from BWS patients, as well as a balanced chromosomal translocation breakpoint from a rhabdoid tumor, were isolated within a 295- to 320-kb cluster defined by a complete cosmid contig crossing these breakpoints. This breakpoint cluster terminated approximately 100 kb centromeric to the imprinted gene IGF2 and 100 kb telomeric to p57KIP2, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, and was located within subchromosomal transferable fragments that suppressed the growth of embryonal tumor cells in genetic complementation experiments. We have identified 11 transcribed sequences in this BWS/tumor suppressor coincident region, one of which corresponded to p57KIP2. However, three additional BWS breakpoints were > 4 megabases centromeric to the other five breakpoints and were excluded from the tumor suppressor region defined by subchromosomal transferable fragments. Thus, multiple genetic loci define BWS and tumor suppression on 11p15. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8618920

  15. Genetically modified mouse models for the study of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Perumal Nagarajan; M Jerald Mahesh Kumar; Ramasamy Venkatesan; Subeer S Majundar; Ramesh C Juyal

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with obesity,insulin resistance,and type 2 diabetes.NAFLD represents a large spectrum of diseases ranging from (1) fatty liver (hepatic steatosis); (2) steatosis with inflammation and necrosis; to (3) cirrhosis.The animal models to study NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are extremely useful,as there are still many events to be elucidated in the pathology of NASH.The study of the established animal models has provided many clues in the pathogenesis of steatosis and steatohepatitis,but these remain incompletely understood.The different mouse models can be classified in two large groups.The first one includes genetically modified (transgenic or knockout) mice that spontaneously develop liver disease,and the second one includes mice that acquire the disease after dietary or pharmacological manipulation.Although the molecular mechanism leading to the development of hepatic steatosis in the pathogenesis of NAFLD is complex,genetically modified animal models may be a key for the treatment of NAFLD.Ideal animal models for NASH should closely resemble the pathological characteristics observed in humans.To date,no single animal model has encompassed the full spectrum of human disease progression,but they can imitate particular characteristics of human disease.Therefore,it is important that the researchers choose the appropriate animal model.This review discusses various genetically modified animal models developed and used in research on NAFLD.

  16. Accelerating discovery for complex neurological and behavioral disorders through systems genetics and integrative genomics in the laboratory mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubier, Jason A; Chesler, Elissa J

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances in systems genetics and integrative functional genomics have greatly improved the study of complex neurological and behavioral traits. The methods developed for the integrated characterization of new, high-resolution mouse genetic reference populations and systems genetics enable behavioral geneticists an unprecedented opportunity to address questions of the molecular basis of neurological and psychiatric disorders and their comorbidities. Integrative genomics augment these strategies by enabling rapid informatics-assisted candidate gene prioritization, cross-species translation, and mechanistic comparison across related disorders from a wealth of existing data in mouse and other model organisms. Ultimately, through these complementary approaches, finding the mechanisms and sources of genetic variation underlying complex neurobehavioral disease related traits is becoming tractable. Furthermore, these methods enable categorization of neurobehavioral disorders through their underlying biological basis. Together, these model organism-based approaches can lead to a refinement of diagnostic categories and targeted treatment of neurological and psychiatric disease.

  17. Genetic susceptibility of the arterial wall is an important determinant of atherosclerosis in C57BL/6 and FVB/N mouse strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Jeong; Handberg, Aase; Östergren, Eva-Britt Caroline

    2011-01-01

    How genetic variations among inbred mouse strains translate into differences in atherosclerosis susceptibility is of significant interest for the development of new therapeutic strategies. The objective of the present study was to examine whether genetically controlled arterial wall properties in...... influence atherosclerosis susceptibility in FVB/N (FVB) and C57BL/6 (B6) apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE(-/-)) mouse strains....

  18. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary "myopathic" changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions.

  19. Using genetic algorithm to define the governor parameters of a hydraulic turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, J G P; Ribeiro, L C L J [School of Technology, UNICAMP Rua Paschoal Marmo, 1888, Limeira, Postal Code:13484-332 (Brazil); Junior, E L, E-mail: josegeraldo@ft.unicamp.b [School of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Urbanism, UNICAMP Avenida Albert Einstein, 951, Campinas, Postal Code: 13083-852 (Brazil)

    2010-08-15

    There are several governor architectures, but in general, all of them are designed to maintain the controlled variable fluctuations within acceptable range. The Proportional, Integral and Derivative (PID) governor is one of the types used to regulate a hydraulic turbine, in which the deviation of the variable controlled is corrected through earnings proportional, integral and derivative. For a definition of the governor parameters and its stability analysis there are several methods that in general can be classified into a time domain and frequency domain. The frequency domain method, based on the control theory, have ease application, expeditious manner of obtaining the parameters, but the physical phenomena involved are linearized. However the time domain methods are more difficult to be applied, but have the advantage of being able to take into account the non-linearities presents in physical phenomena. Despite the time-domain method offers advantages, it does not provides a structured way to optimize the parameters of the governor, since the parameters are obtained through simulations with adopted values. This paper presents a methodology to obtain the turbine governor appropriate parameters through a hybrid model (simulation and optimization model), based on method of characteristic to the hydraulic simulation (time domain) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) to obtain appropriate values. Examples are presented showing the application of the proposed methodology.

  20. A candidate region for Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome defined by genetic and physical mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wainwright, B.; Negus, K.; Berkman, J. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS, or Gorlin`s syndrome) is a cancer predisposition syndrome charcterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and diverse developmental defects. The gene responsible for NBCCS, which is most likely to be a tumor suppressor gene, has previously been mapped to 9q22.3-q31 in a 12 cM interval between the microsatellite marker loci D9S12 and D9S109. Combined multipoint and haplotype analyses of Australian pedigrees has further refined the localization to a 2 cM interval between markers D9S196 and D9S180. Our loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies from sporadic (n= 58) and familial (n=41) BCCs indicate that 50% have deletions within the NBCCS candidate region. All LOH is consistent with the genetic mapping of the NBCCS locus. Additionally, one sporadic tumor indicates that the smallest region of overlap in the deletions is within the interval D9S287 (proximal) and D9S180 (distal). A series of YAC clones from within this region has been mapped by FISH to examine chimerism. These clones, which have been mapped with respect to one another, form a contig which encompasses the candidate region from D9S196 to D9S180.

  1. Quantitative genetics model as the unifying model for defining genomic relationship and inbreeding coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunkao; Da, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The traditional quantitative genetics model was used as the unifying approach to derive six existing and new definitions of genomic additive and dominance relationships. The theoretical differences of these definitions were in the assumptions of equal SNP effects (equivalent to across-SNP standardization), equal SNP variances (equivalent to within-SNP standardization), and expected or sample SNP additive and dominance variances. The six definitions of genomic additive and dominance relationships on average were consistent with the pedigree relationships, but had individual genomic specificity and large variations not observed from pedigree relationships. These large variations may allow finding least related genomes even within the same family for minimizing genomic relatedness among breeding individuals. The six definitions of genomic relationships generally had similar numerical results in genomic best linear unbiased predictions of additive effects (GBLUP) and similar genomic REML (GREML) estimates of additive heritability. Predicted SNP dominance effects and GREML estimates of dominance heritability were similar within definitions assuming equal SNP effects or within definitions assuming equal SNP variance, but had differences between these two groups of definitions. We proposed a new measure of genomic inbreeding coefficient based on parental genomic co-ancestry coefficient and genomic additive correlation as a genomic approach for predicting offspring inbreeding level. This genomic inbreeding coefficient had the highest correlation with pedigree inbreeding coefficient among the four methods evaluated for calculating genomic inbreeding coefficient in a Holstein sample and a swine sample.

  2. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Jokela

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ, 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary "myopathic" changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions.

  3. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary “myopathic” changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions. PMID:26999347

  4. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes-Cendes, I. [Montreal General Hospital (Canada); Mulley, J.C. [Alelaide Children`s Hospital (Canada); Andermann, E. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  5. An acid phosphatase locus expressed in mouse kidney (Apk) and its genetic location on chromosome 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, J E; Auerbach, S B

    1978-04-01

    A genetic locus controlling the electrophoretic mobility of an acid phosphatase in mouse kidney is described. This locus, called acid phosphatase-kidney (Apk), is not expressed in erythrocytes, liver, spleen, heart, lung, brain, skeletal muscle, stomach, or testes. The product of Apk hydrolyzes the substrate naphthol AS-MX phosphoric acid but is not active on alpha-naphthylphosphate or 4-methylumbelliferylphosphate. It is not inactivated by 50 C for 1 hr, nor is its electrophoretic mobility altered by incubation with neuraminidase. The locus is invariant among 31 inbred strains (Apka), with a variant allele (Apkm) observed only in Mus musculus molossinus. Codominant expression was observed in F1 hybrids of M. m. molossinus and inbred strains. Apk was mapped on Chr 10, near the neurological mutant waltzer (v).

  6. Insights into obesity and diabetes at the intersection of mouse and human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Melkam A; Attie, Alan D

    2014-10-01

    Many of our insights into obesity and diabetes come from studies in mice carrying natural or induced mutations. In parallel, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in humans have identified numerous genes that are causally associated with obesity and diabetes, but discovering the underlying mechanisms required in-depth studies in mice. We discuss the advantages of studying natural variation in mice and summarize several examples where the combination of human and mouse genetics opened windows into fundamental physiological pathways. A noteworthy example is the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) and its role in energy balance. The pathway was delineated by discovering the gene responsible for the Agouti mutation in mice. With more targeted phenotyping, we predict that additional pathways relevant to human pathophysiology will be discovered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cyclooxygenase 2: understanding the pathophysiological role through genetically altered mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Sanz, Paloma; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Bosca, Lisardo; Casado, Marta

    2006-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) -1 and -2 catalyze the first step in the biosynthesis of prostanoids. COX-1 is constitutively expressed in many tissues and seems to be involved in the housekeeping function of prostanoids. COX-2, the inducible isoform, accounts for the elevated production of prostaglandins in response to various inflammatory stimuli, hormones and growth factors. COX-2 expression has been also associated with cell growth regulation, tissue remodelling and carcinogenesis. More of these characteristics have been elucidate through using COX selective inhibitors. Recent advances in transgenic and gene-targeting approaches allow a sophisticated manipulation of the mouse genome by gene addition, gene deletion or gene modifications. The development of COX-2 genetically altered mice has provided models to elucidate the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this enzyme.

  8. Translating human genetics into mouse: the impact of ultra-rapid in vivo genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Tomomi; Imahashi, Risa; Tanaka, Kohichi

    2014-01-01

    Gene-targeted mutant animals, such as knockout or knockin mice, have dramatically improved our understanding of the functions of genes in vivo and the genetic diversity that characterizes health and disease. However, the generation of targeted mice relies on gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells, which is a time-consuming, laborious, and expensive process. The recent groundbreaking development of several genome editing technologies has enabled the targeted alteration of almost any sequence in any cell or organism. These technologies have now been applied to mouse zygotes (in vivo genome editing), thereby providing new avenues for simple, convenient, and ultra-rapid production of knockout or knockin mice without the need for ES cells. Here, we review recent achievements in the production of gene-targeted mice by in vivo genome editing. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  9. Genetically engineered mouse models to evaluate the role of Wnt secretion in bone development and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bart O

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in components of the Wnt signaling pathway are associated with altered bone development and homeostasis in several human diseases. We created genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) that mimic the cellular defect associated with the Porcupine mutations in patients with Goltz Syndrome/Focal Dermal Hypoplasia. These GEMMs were established by utilizing mice containing a conditionally inactivatable allele of Wntless/GPR177 (a gene encoding a protein required for the transport of Porcupine-modified ligand to the plasma membrane for secretion). We crossed this strain to another which drives cre-mediated gene deletion in mature osteoblasts (Osteocalcin-cre) resulted in mice lacking the ability to secrete Wnt ligands in this cell type. These mice displayed severely reduced bone mass and provide a model to understand the effects of disrupting the ability to secrete Wnt ligands on the skeletal system.

  10. Analysis of mouse model pathology: a primer for studying the anatomic pathology of genetically engineered mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiff, Robert D; Miller, Claramae H; Munn, Robert J

    2014-06-02

    This primer of pathology is intended to introduce investigators to the structure (morphology) of cancer with an emphasis on genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models (GEMMs). We emphasize the necessity of using the entire biological context for the interpretation of anatomic pathology. Because the primary investigator is responsible for almost all of the information and procedures leading up to microscopic examination, they should also be responsible for documentation of experiments so that the microscopic interpretation can be rendered in context of the biology. The steps involved in this process are outlined, discussed, and illustrated. Because GEMMs are unique experimental subjects, some of the more common pitfalls are discussed. Many of these errors can be avoided with attention to detail and continuous quality assurance.

  11. A CRISPR Path to Engineering New Genetic Mouse Models for Cardiovascular Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Joseph M.; Zhu, Qiuyu Martin; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous efforts to target the mouse genome for the addition, subtraction, or substitution of biologically informative sequences required complex vector design and a series of arduous steps only a handful of labs could master. The facile and inexpensive clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) method has now superseded traditional means of genome modification such that virtually any lab can quickly assemble reagents for developing new mouse models for cardiovascular research. Here we briefly review the history of CRISPR in prokaryotes, highlighting major discoveries leading to its formulation for genome modification in the animal kingdom. Core components of CRISPR technology are reviewed and updated. Practical pointers for two-component and three-component CRISPR editing are summarized with a number of applications in mice including frameshift mutations, deletion of enhancers and non-coding genes, nucleotide substitution of protein-coding and gene regulatory sequences, incorporation of loxP sites for conditional gene inactivation, and epitope tag integration. Genotyping strategies are presented and topics of genetic mosaicism and inadvertent targeting discussed. Finally, clinical applications and ethical considerations are addressed as the biomedical community eagerly embraces this astonishing innovation in genome editing to tackle previously intractable questions. PMID:27102963

  12. The LEGSKO mouse: a mouse model of age-related nuclear cataract based on genetic suppression of lens glutathione synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjun Fan

    Full Text Available Age-related nuclear cataracts are associated with progressive post-synthetic modifications of crystallins from various physical chemical and metabolic insults, of which oxidative stress is a major factor. The latter is normally suppressed by high concentrations of glutathione (GSH, which however are very low in the nucleus of the old lens. Here we generated a mouse model of oxidant stress by knocking out glutathione synthesis in the mouse in the hope of recapitulating some of the changes observed in human age-related nuclear cataract (ARNC. A floxed Gclc mouse was generated and crossed with a transgenic mouse expressing Cre in the lens to generate the LEGSKO mouse in which de novo GSH synthesis was completely abolished in the lens. Lens GSH levels were reduced up to 60% in homozygous LEGSKO mice, and a decreasing GSH gradient was noticed from cortical to nuclear region at 4 months of age. Oxidation of crystallin methionine and sulfhydryls into sulfoxides was dramatically increased, but methylglyoxal hydroimidazolones levels that are GSH/glyoxalase dependent were surprisingly normal. Homozygous LEGSKO mice developed nuclear opacities starting at 4 months that progressed into severe nuclear cataract by 9 months. We conclude that the LEGSKO mouse lens mimics several features of human ARNC and is thus expected to be a useful model for the development of anti-cataract agents.

  13. Understanding the Basis of Auriculocondylar Syndrome: Insights From Human and Mouse Genetic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouthier, David E.; Passos Bueno, Maria Rita; Tavares, Andre L.P.; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne; Gordon, Christopher T.

    2014-01-01

    Among human birth defect syndromes, malformations affecting the face are perhaps the most striking due to cultural and psychological expectations of facial shape. One such syndrome is auriculocondylar syndrome (ACS), in which patients present with defects in ear and mandible development. Affected structures arise from cranial neural crest cells, a population of cells in the embryo that reside in the pharyngeal arches and give rise to most of the bone, cartilage and connective tissue of the face. Recent studies have found that most cases of ACS arise from defects in signaling molecules associated with the endothelin signaling pathway. Disruption of this signaling pathway in both mouse and zebrafish results in loss of identity of neural crest cells of the mandibular portion of the first pharyngeal arch and the subsequent repatterning of these cells, leading to homeosis of lower jaw structures into more maxillary-like structures. These findings illustrate the importance of endothelin signaling in normal human craniofacial development and illustrate how clinical and basic science approaches can coalesce to improve our understanding of the genetic basis of human birth syndromes. Further, understanding the genetic basis for ACS that lies outside of known endothelin signaling components may help elucidate unknown aspects critical to the establishment of neural crest cell patterning during facial morphogenesis. PMID:24123988

  14. Genetic analysis of X-linked hybrid sterility in the house mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storchová, Radka; Gregorová, Sona; Buckiová, Daniela; Kyselová, Vendula; Divina, Petr; Forejt, Jirí

    2004-07-01

    Hybrid sterility is a common postzygotic reproductive isolation mechanism that appears in the early stages of speciation of various organisms. Mus musculus musculus and Mus musculus domesticus represent two recently separated mouse subspecies particularly suitable for genetic studies of hybrid sterility. Here we show that the introgression of Chr X of M. m. musculus origin (PWD/Ph inbred strain, henceforth PWD) into the genetic background of the C57BL/6J (henceforth B6) inbred strain (predominantly of M. m. domesticus origin) causes male sterility. The X-linked hybrid sterility is associated with reduced testes weight, lower sperm count, and morphological abnormalities of sperm heads. The analysis of recombinant Chr Xs in sterile and fertile males as well as quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of several fertility parameters revealed an oligogenic nature of the X-linked hybrid sterility. The Hstx1 locus responsible for male sterility was mapped near DXMit119 in the central part of Chr X. To ensure full sterility, the PWD allele of Hstx1 has to be supported with the PWD allelic form of loci in at least one proximal and/or one distal region of Chr X. Mapping and cloning of Hstx1 and other genes responsible for sterility of B6-X PWD Y B6 males could help to elucidate the special role of Chr X in hybrid sterility and consequently in speciation.

  15. Handling, genetic and housing effects on the mouse stress system, dopamine function, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariépy, Jean-Louis; Rodriguiz, Ramona Marie; Jones, Byron C

    2002-08-01

    This research was designed to examine how early stimulation (i.e., handling), subsequent housing conditions and genetic factors interact to produce adult differences in stress regulation. High-aggressive (NC900) and low-aggressive (NC100) mice were handled for 3 weeks potspartum and were subsequently isolated or grouped until observed as adults in an open field or a dyadic test. In NC100, handling abolished the temporal variations seen in open-field activity among the nonhandled subjects and reduced corticosterone (CORT) activation. In NC900, these two measures were unaffected by handling. Only among handled NC100 did subsequent group rearing further reduce CORT activation. By contrast, handling caused an up-regulation of D1 dopamine receptors in both lines, and, in NC100, this effect was increased by group rearing. In a dyadic encounter with another male mouse, subjects of both lines showed handling effects. NC100 froze less rapidly and NC900 attacked more rapidly. This multifactorial design showed that the systemic effects of handling are modulated by genetic background, and that measures of these effects are affected by experience beyond infancy. Our findings also showed that the effects of handling vary when assessed across different physiological systems and across social and nonsocial testing conditions.

  16. Generation of Mouse Haploid Somatic Cells by Small Molecules for Genome-wide Genetic Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Quan He

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of derivation of mammalian haploid embryonic stem cells (haESCs has provided a powerful tool for large-scale functional analysis of the mammalian genome. However, haESCs rapidly become diploidized after differentiation, posing challenges for genetic analysis. Here, we show that the spontaneous diploidization of haESCs happens in metaphase due to mitotic slippage. Diploidization can be suppressed by small-molecule-mediated inhibition of CDK1 and ROCK. Through ROCK inhibition, we can generate haploid somatic cells of all three germ layers from haESCs, including terminally differentiated neurons. Using piggyBac transposon-based insertional mutagenesis, we generated a haploid neural cell library harboring genome-wide mutations for genetic screening. As a proof of concept, we screened for Mn2+-mediated toxicity and identified the Park2 gene. Our findings expand the applications of mouse haploid cell technology to somatic cell types and may also shed light on the mechanisms of ploidy maintenance.

  17. Genetic mapping of social interaction behavior in B6/MSM consomic mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Aki; Tomihara, Kazuya; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Koide, Tsuyoshi

    2010-05-01

    Genetic studies are indispensable for understanding the mechanisms by which individuals develop differences in social behavior. We report genetic mapping of social interaction behavior using inter-subspecific consomic strains established from MSM/Ms (MSM) and C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Two animals of the same strain and sex, aged 10 weeks, were introduced into a novel open-field for 10 min. Social contact was detected by an automated system when the distance between the centers of the two animals became less than approximately 12 cm. In addition, detailed behavioral observations were made of the males. The wild-derived mouse strain MSM showed significantly longer social contact as compared to B6. Analysis of the consomic panel identified two chromosomes (Chr 6 and Chr 17) with quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for lengthened social contact in MSM mice and two chromosomes (Chr 9 and Chr X) with QTL that inhibited social contact. Detailed behavioral analysis of males identified four additional chromosomes associated with social interaction behavior. B6 mice that contained Chr 13 from MSM showed more genital grooming and following than the parental B6 strain, whereas the presence of Chr 8 and Chr 12 from MSM resulted in a reduction of those behaviors. Longer social sniffing was observed in Chr 4 consomic strain than in B6 mice. Although the frequency was low, aggressive behavior was observed in a few pairs from consomic strains for Chrs 4, 13, 15 and 17, as well as from MSM. The social interaction test has been used as a model to measure anxiety, but genetic correlation analysis suggested that social interaction involves different aspects of anxiety than are measured by open-field test.

  18. Genetic dissection of the mouse brain using high-field magnetic resonance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, A; Johnson, G A; Williams, R W

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has demonstrated that variation in brain structure is associated with differences in behavior and disease state. However, it has rarely been practical to prospectively test causal models that link anatomical and functional differences in humans. In the present study we have combined classical mouse genetics with high-field MR to systematically explore and test such structure-functional relations across multiple brain regions. We segmented 33 regions in two parental strains-C57BL/6J (B) and DBA/2J (D)-and in nine BXD recombinant inbred strains. All strains have been studied extensively for more than 20 years using a battery of genetic, functional, anatomical, and behavioral assays. We compared levels of variation within and between strains and sexes, by region, and by system. Average within-strain variation had a coefficient of variation (CV) of 1.6% for the whole brain; while the CV ranged from 2.3 to 3.6% for olfactory bulbs, cortex and cerebellum, and up to approximately 18% for septum and laterodorsal thalamic nucleus. Variation among strain averages ranged from 6.7% for cerebellum, 7.6% for whole brain, 9.0% for cortex, up to approximately 26% for the ventricles, laterodorsal thalamic nucleus, and the interpeduncular nucleus. Heritabilities averaged 0.60+/-0.18. Sex differences were not significant with the possible (and unexpected) exception of the pons ( approximately 20% larger in males). A correlation matrix of regional volumes revealed high correlations among functionally related parts of the CNS (e.g., components of the limbic system), and several high correlations between regions that are not anatomically connected, but that may nonetheless be functionally or genetically coupled.

  19. Novel pancreatic cancer cell lines derived from genetically engineered mouse models of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma: applications in diagnosis and therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María P Torres

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC remains one of the most lethal human malignancies with poor prognosis. Despite all advances in preclinical research, there have not been significant translation of novel therapies into the clinics. The development of genetically engineered mouse (GEM models that produce spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC have increased our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. Although these PDAC mouse models are ideal for studying potential therapies and specific genetic mutations, there is a need for developing syngeneic cell lines from these models. In this study, we describe the successful establishment and characterization of three cell lines derived from two (PDAC mouse models. The cell line UN-KC-6141 was derived from a pancreatic tumor of a Kras(G12D;Pdx1-Cre (KC mouse at 50 weeks of age, whereas UN-KPC-960 and UN-KPC-961 cell lines were derived from pancreatic tumors of Kras(G12D;Trp53(R172H;Pdx1-Cre (KPC mice at 17 weeks of age. The cancer mutations of these parent mice carried over to the daughter cell lines (i.e. Kras(G12D mutation was observed in all three cell lines while Trp53 mutation was observed only in KPC cell lines. The cell lines showed typical cobblestone epithelial morphology in culture, and unlike the previously established mouse PDAC cell line Panc02, expressed the ductal marker CK19. Furthermore, these cell lines expressed the epithelial-mesenchymal markers E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and also, Muc1 and Muc4 mucins. In addition, these cell lines were resistant to the chemotherapeutic drug Gemcitabine. Their implantation in vivo produced subcutaneous as well as tumors in the pancreas (orthotopic. The genetic mutations in these cell lines mimic the genetic compendium of human PDAC, which make them valuable models with a high potential of translational relevance for examining diagnostic markers and therapeutic drugs.

  20. Generation of mouse models of myeloid malignancy with combinatorial genetic lesions using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

    OpenAIRE

    Heckl, Dirk; Kowalczyk, Monika S.; Yudovich, David; Belizaire, Roger; Puram, Rishi V.; McConkey, Marie E.; Thielke, Anne; Aster, Jon C.; Regev, Aviv; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing studies have shown that human malignancies often bear mutations in four or more driver genes[superscript 1], but it is difficult to recapitulate this degree of genetic complexity in mouse models using conventional breeding. Here we use the CRISPR-Cas9 system of genome editing[superscript 2, 3, 4] to overcome this limitation. By delivering combinations of small guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and Cas9 with a lentiviral vector, we modified up to five genes in a single mouse hematopoietic ...

  1. Culture and establishment of self-renewing human and mouse adult liver and pancreas 3D organoids and their genetic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broutier, Laura; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Hindley, Christopher J; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-09-01

    Adult somatic tissues have proven difficult to expand in vitro, largely because of the complexity of recreating appropriate environmental signals in culture. We have overcome this problem recently and developed culture conditions for adult stem cells that allow the long-term expansion of adult primary tissues from small intestine, stomach, liver and pancreas into self-assembling 3D structures that we have termed 'organoids'. We provide a detailed protocol that describes how to grow adult mouse and human liver and pancreas organoids, from cell isolation and long-term expansion to genetic manipulation in vitro. Liver and pancreas cells grow in a gel-based extracellular matrix (ECM) and a defined medium. The cells can self-organize into organoids that self-renew in vitro while retaining their tissue-of-origin commitment, genetic stability and potential to differentiate into functional cells in vitro (hepatocytes) and in vivo (hepatocytes and endocrine cells). Genetic modification of these organoids opens up avenues for the manipulation of adult stem cells in vitro, which could facilitate the study of human biology and allow gene correction for regenerative medicine purposes. The complete protocol takes 1-4 weeks to generate self-renewing 3D organoids and to perform genetic manipulation experiments. Personnel with basic scientific training can conduct this protocol.

  2. Dentate gyrus network dysfunctions precede the symptomatic phase in a genetic mouse model of seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana eToader

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal circuit disturbances that lead to hyperexcitability in the cortico-hippocampal network are one of the landmarks of temporal lobe epilepsy. The dentate gyrus (DG network plays an important role in regulating the excitability of the entire hippocampus by filtering and integrating information received via the perforant path. Here, we investigated possible epileptogenic abnormalities in the function of the DG neuronal network in the Synapsin II (Syn II knockout mouse (Syn II-/-, a genetic mouse model of epilepsy. Syn II is a presynaptic protein whose deletion in mice reproducibly leads to generalized seizures starting at the age of two months. We made use of a high-resolution microelectrode array (4096 electrodes and patch-clamp recordings, and found that in acute hippocampal slices of young pre-symptomatic (3-6 weeks-old Syn II-/- mice excitatory synaptic output of the mossy fibers is reduced. Moreover, we showed that the main excitatory neurons present in the polymorphic layer of the DG, hilar mossy cells, display a reduced excitability. We also provide evidence of a predominantly inhibitory regulatory output from mossy cells to granule cells, through feed-forward inhibition, and show that the excitatory-inhibitory ratio is increased in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic Syn II-/- mice. These results support the key role of the hilar mossy neurons in maintaining the normal excitability of the hippocampal network and show that the late epileptic phenotype of the Syn II-/- mice is preceded by neuronal circuitry dysfunctions. Our data provide new insights into the mechanisms of epileptogenesis in the Syn II-/- mice and open the possibility for early diagnosis and therapeutic interventions.

  3. A genetic basis for a postmeiotic X versus Y chromosome intragenomic conflict in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Cocquet

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Intragenomic conflicts arise when a genetic element favours its own transmission to the detriment of others. Conflicts over sex chromosome transmission are expected to have influenced genome structure, gene regulation, and speciation. In the mouse, the existence of an intragenomic conflict between X- and Y-linked multicopy genes has long been suggested but never demonstrated. The Y-encoded multicopy gene Sly has been shown to have a predominant role in the epigenetic repression of post meiotic sex chromatin (PMSC and, as such, represses X and Y genes, among which are its X-linked homologs Slx and Slxl1. Here, we produced mice that are deficient for both Sly and Slx/Slxl1 and observed that Slx/Slxl1 has an opposite role to that of Sly, in that it stimulates XY gene expression in spermatids. Slx/Slxl1 deficiency rescues the sperm differentiation defects and near sterility caused by Sly deficiency and vice versa. Slx/Slxl1 deficiency also causes a sex ratio distortion towards the production of male offspring that is corrected by Sly deficiency. All in all, our data show that Slx/Slxl1 and Sly have antagonistic effects during sperm differentiation and are involved in a postmeiotic intragenomic conflict that causes segregation distortion and male sterility. This is undoubtedly what drove the massive gene amplification on the mouse X and Y chromosomes. It may also be at the basis of cases of F1 male hybrid sterility where the balance between Slx/Slxl1 and Sly copy number, and therefore expression, is disrupted. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a competition occurring between X and Y related genes in mammals. It also provides a biological basis for the concept that intragenomic conflict is an important evolutionary force which impacts on gene expression, genome structure, and speciation.

  4. Genetic Enhancement of Limb Defects in a Mouse Model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOPEZ-BURKS, MARTHA E.; SANTOS, ROSAYSELA; KAWAUCHI, SHIMAKO; CALOF, ANNE L.; LANDER, ARTHUR D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by a wide variety of structural and functional abnormalities in almost every organ system of the body. CdLS is now known to be caused by mutations that disrupt the function of the cohesin complex or its regulators, and studies of animal models and cell lines tell us that the effect of these mutations is to produce subtle yet pervasive dysregulation of gene expression. With many hundreds of mostly small gene expression changes occurring in every cell type and tissue, identifying the etiology of any particular birth defect is very challenging. Here we focus on limb abnormalities, which are commonly seen in CdLS. In the limb buds of the Nipbl-haploinsufficient mouse (Nipbl+/− mouse), a model for the most common form of CdLS, modest gene expression changes are observed in several candidate pathways whose disruption is known to cause limb abnormalities, yet the limbs of Nipbl+/− mice develop relatively normally. We hypothesized that further impairment of candidate pathways might produce limb defects similar to those seen in CdLS, and performed genetic experiments to test this. Focusing on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp), and Hox gene pathways, we show that decreasing Bmp or Hox function (but not Shh function) enhances polydactyly in Nipbl+/− mice, and in some cases produces novel skeletal phenotypes. However, frank limb reductions, as are seen in a subset of individuals with CdLS, do not occur, suggesting that additional signaling and/or gene regulatory pathways are involved in producing such dramatic changes. PMID:27120109

  5. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Shi

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (MA and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1. TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2 mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6 mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD family of recombinant inbred (RI strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30-40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options.

  6. Novel subdomains of the mouse olfactory bulb defined by molecular heterogeneity in the nascent external plexiform and glomerular layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yona Golan

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mouse olfactory system, the role of the olfactory bulb in guiding olfactory sensory neuron (OSN axons to their targets is poorly understood. What cell types within the bulb are necessary for targeting is unknown. What genes are important for this process is also unknown. Although projection neurons are not required, other cell-types within the external plexiform and glomerular layers also form synapses with OSNs. We hypothesized that these cells are important for targeting, and express spatially differentially expressed guidance cues that act to guide OSN axons within the bulb. Results We used laser microdissection and microarray analysis to find genes that are differentially expressed along the dorsal-ventral, medial-lateral, and anterior-posterior axes of the bulb. The expression patterns of these genes divide the bulb into previously unrecognized subdomains. Interestingly, some genes are expressed in both the medial and lateral bulb, showing for the first time the existence of symmetric expression along this axis. We use a regeneration paradigm to show that several of these genes are altered in expression in response to deafferentation, consistent with the interpretation that they are expressed in cells that interact with OSNs. Conclusion We demonstrate that the nascent external plexiform and glomerular layers of the bulb can be divided into multiple domains based on the expression of these genes, several of which are known to function in axon guidance, synaptogenesis, and angiogenesis. These genes represent candidate guidance cues that may act to guide OSN axons within the bulb during targeting.

  7. Transcriptional profiling of mouse B cell terminal differentiation defines a signature for antibody-secreting plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Liao, Yang; Willis, Simon N; Taubenheim, Nadine; Inouye, Michael; Tarlinton, David M; Smyth, Gordon K; Hodgkin, Philip D; Nutt, Stephen L; Corcoran, Lynn M

    2015-06-01

    When B cells encounter an antigen, they alter their physiological state and anatomical localization and initiate a differentiation process that ultimately produces antibody-secreting cells (ASCs). We have defined the transcriptomes of many mature B cell populations and stages of plasma cell differentiation in mice. We provide a molecular signature of ASCs that highlights the stark transcriptional divide between B cells and plasma cells and enables the demarcation of ASCs on the basis of location and maturity. Changes in gene expression correlated with cell-division history and the acquisition of permissive histone modifications, and they included many regulators that had not been previously implicated in B cell differentiation. These findings both highlight and expand the core program that guides B cell terminal differentiation and the production of antibodies.

  8. Defining differential genetic signatures in CXCR4- and the CCR5-utilizing HIV-1 co-linear sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamas Aiamkitsumrit

    Full Text Available The adaptation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 to an array of physiologic niches is advantaged by the plasticity of the viral genome, encoded proteins, and promoter. CXCR4-utilizing (X4 viruses preferentially, but not universally, infect CD4+ T cells, generating high levels of virus within activated HIV-1-infected T cells that can be detected in regional lymph nodes and peripheral blood. By comparison, the CCR5-utilizing (R5 viruses have a greater preference for cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage; however, while R5 viruses also display a propensity to enter and replicate in T cells, they infect a smaller percentage of CD4+ T cells in comparison to X4 viruses. Additionally, R5 viruses have been associated with viral transmission and CNS disease and are also more prevalent during HIV-1 disease. Specific adaptive changes associated with X4 and R5 viruses were identified in co-linear viral sequences beyond the Env-V3. The in silico position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM algorithm was used to define distinct groups of X4 and R5 sequences based solely on sequences in Env-V3. Bioinformatic tools were used to identify genetic signatures involving specific protein domains or long terminal repeat (LTR transcription factor sites within co-linear viral protein R (Vpr, trans-activator of transcription (Tat, or LTR sequences that were preferentially associated with X4 or R5 Env-V3 sequences. A number of differential amino acid and nucleotide changes were identified across the co-linear Vpr, Tat, and LTR sequences, suggesting the presence of specific genetic signatures that preferentially associate with X4 or R5 viruses. Investigation of the genetic relatedness between X4 and R5 viruses utilizing phylogenetic analyses of complete sequences could not be used to definitively and uniquely identify groups of R5 or X4 sequences; in contrast, differences in the genetic diversities between X4 and R5 were readily identified within these co

  9. Defining differential genetic signatures in CXCR4- and the CCR5-utilizing HIV-1 co-linear sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Dampier, Will; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Pirrone, Vanessa; Ivanova, Tatyana; Zhong, Wen; Kilareski, Evelyn; Aldigun, Hazeez; Frantz, Brian; Rimbey, Matthew; Wojno, Adam; Passic, Shendra; Williams, Jean W; Shah, Sonia; Blakey, Brandon; Parikh, Nirzari; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Moldover, Brian; Wigdahl, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The adaptation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) to an array of physiologic niches is advantaged by the plasticity of the viral genome, encoded proteins, and promoter. CXCR4-utilizing (X4) viruses preferentially, but not universally, infect CD4+ T cells, generating high levels of virus within activated HIV-1-infected T cells that can be detected in regional lymph nodes and peripheral blood. By comparison, the CCR5-utilizing (R5) viruses have a greater preference for cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage; however, while R5 viruses also display a propensity to enter and replicate in T cells, they infect a smaller percentage of CD4+ T cells in comparison to X4 viruses. Additionally, R5 viruses have been associated with viral transmission and CNS disease and are also more prevalent during HIV-1 disease. Specific adaptive changes associated with X4 and R5 viruses were identified in co-linear viral sequences beyond the Env-V3. The in silico position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) algorithm was used to define distinct groups of X4 and R5 sequences based solely on sequences in Env-V3. Bioinformatic tools were used to identify genetic signatures involving specific protein domains or long terminal repeat (LTR) transcription factor sites within co-linear viral protein R (Vpr), trans-activator of transcription (Tat), or LTR sequences that were preferentially associated with X4 or R5 Env-V3 sequences. A number of differential amino acid and nucleotide changes were identified across the co-linear Vpr, Tat, and LTR sequences, suggesting the presence of specific genetic signatures that preferentially associate with X4 or R5 viruses. Investigation of the genetic relatedness between X4 and R5 viruses utilizing phylogenetic analyses of complete sequences could not be used to definitively and uniquely identify groups of R5 or X4 sequences; in contrast, differences in the genetic diversities between X4 and R5 were readily identified within these co-linear sequences in

  10. Cross-packaging of genetically distinct mouse and primate retroviral RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaballah Soumeya

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV is unique from other retroviruses in having multiple viral promoters, which can be regulated by hormones in a tissue specific manner. This unique property has lead to increased interest in studying MMTV replication with the hope of developing MMTV based vectors for human gene therapy. However, it has recently been reported that related as well as unrelated retroviruses can cross-package each other's genome raising safety concerns towards the use of candidate retroviral vectors for human gene therapy. Therefore, using a trans complementation assay, we looked at the ability of MMTV RNA to be cross-packaged and propagated by an unrelated primate Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV that has intracellular assembly process similar to that of MMTV. Results Our results revealed that MMTV and MPMV RNAs could be cross-packaged by the heterologous virus particles reciprocally suggesting that pseudotyping between two genetically distinct retroviruses can take place at the RNA level. However, the cross-packaged RNAs could not be propagated further indicating a block at post-packaging events in the retroviral life cycle. To further confirm that the specificity of cross-packaging was conferred by the packaging sequences (ψ, we cloned the packaging sequences of these viruses on expression plasmids that generated non-viral RNAs. Test of these non-viral RNAs confirmed that the reciprocal cross-packaging was primarily due to the recognition of ψ by the heterologous virus proteins. Conclusion The results presented in this study strongly argue that MPMV and MMTV are promiscuous in their ability to cross-package each other's genome suggesting potential RNA-protein interactions among divergent retroviral RNAs proposing that these interactions are more complicated than originally thought. Furthermore, these observations raise the possibility that MMTV and MPMV genomes could also co-package providing substrates for

  11. Genetic analysis reveals an unexpected role of BMP7 in initiation of ureteric bud outgrowth in mouse embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Gonçalves

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic analysis in the mouse revealed that GREMLIN1 (GREM1-mediated antagonism of BMP4 is essential for ureteric epithelial branching as the disruption of ureteric bud outgrowth and renal agenesis in Grem1-deficient embryos is restored by additional inactivation of one Bmp4 allele. Another BMP ligand, BMP7, was shown to control the proliferative expansion of nephrogenic progenitors and its requirement for nephrogenesis can be genetically substituted by Bmp4. Therefore, we investigated whether BMP7 in turn also participates in inhibiting ureteric bud outgrowth during the initiation of metanephric kidney development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genetic inactivation of one Bmp7 allele in Grem1-deficient mouse embryos does not alleviate the bilateral renal agenesis, while complete inactivation of Bmp7 restores ureteric bud outgrowth and branching. In mouse embryos lacking both Grem1 and Bmp7, GDNF/WNT11 feedback signaling and the expression of the Etv4 target gene, which regulates formation of the invading ureteric bud tip, are restored. In contrast to the restoration of ureteric bud outgrowth and branching, nephrogenesis remains aberrant as revealed by the premature loss of Six2 expressing nephrogenic progenitor cells. Therefore, very few nephrons develop in kidneys lacking both Grem1 and Bmp7 and the resulting dysplastic phenotype is indistinguishable from the one of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study reveals an unexpected inhibitory role of BMP7 during the onset of ureteric bud outgrowth. As BMP4, BMP7 and GREM1 are expressed in distinct mesenchymal and epithelial domains, the localized antagonistic interactions of GREM1 with BMPs could restrict and guide ureteric bud outgrowth and branching. The robustness and likely significant redundancy of the underlying signaling system is evidenced by the fact that global reduction of Bmp4 or inactivation of Bmp7 are both able to restore ureteric bud outgrowth

  12. Polarization in Raman spectroscopy helps explain bone brittleness in genetic mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Pence, Isaac J.; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Zein-Sabatto, Ahbid; Huszagh, Meredith C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been extensively used to characterize bone composition. However, the link between bone biomechanics and RS measures is not well established. Here, we leveraged the sensitivity of RS polarization to organization, thereby assessing whether RS can explain differences in bone toughness in genetic mouse models for which traditional RS peak ratios are not informative. In the selected mutant mice—activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) or matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) knock-outs—toughness is reduced but differences in bone strength do not exist between knock-out and corresponding wild-type controls. To incorporate differences in the RS of bone occurring at peak shoulders, a multivariate approach was used. Full spectrum principal components analysis of two paired, orthogonal bone orientations (relative to laser polarization) improved genotype classification and correlation to bone toughness when compared to traditional peak ratios. When applied to femurs from wild-type mice at 8 and 20 weeks of age, the principal components of orthogonal bone orientations improved age classification but not the explanation of the maturation-related increase in strength. Overall, increasing polarization information by collecting spectra from two bone orientations improves the ability of multivariate RS to explain variance in bone toughness, likely due to polarization sensitivity to organizational changes in both mineral and collagen. PMID:25402627

  13. Genetic dissection of Pax6 dosage requirements in the developing mouse eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Silberman, Noa; Kalich, Tomer; Oron-Karni, Varda; Marquardt, Till; Kroeber, Markus; Tamm, Ernst R; Ashery-Padan, Ruth

    2005-08-01

    Haploinsufficiency of the transcription factor Pax6/PAX6 has been implicated in a number of congenital eye disorders in humans and mice, such as aniridia and Small-eye, which affect the development and function of the lens, cornea, anterior eye segment and neuroretina. However, the widespread distribution of Pax6/PAX6 protein within the developing and adult eye preclude the identification and direct study of the ocular tissues affected by a reduction in Pax6/PAX6 dosage. Here, we employed Cre/loxP-mediated inactivation of a single Pax6 allele in either the lens/cornea or the distal optic cup to dissect the tissue-specific sensitivity to Pax6 haploinsufficiency. Exclusive inactivation of a single Pax6 allele in the lens recapitulates the Small-eye lens and corneal defects, while only mildly affects iris morphology in a non-cell-autonomous fashion. Conversely, selective inactivation of a single Pax6 allele in the distal optic cup revealed primarily cell-autonomous dosage requirements for proper iris differentiation, with no affects on either lens or corneal morphology. Pax6 dosage within the distal optic cup is found here to influence the number of progenitors destined for the anterior ocular structures, the timing of iris muscle-cell differentiation and iris stroma development. Taken together, we genetically dissected the complex mouse Small-eye phenotype, thereby pinpointing the underlying Pax6/PAX6 haploinsufficiency to autonomous dosage requirements within the developing iris and lens/cornea tissues.

  14. Genetic modifier loci of mouse Mfrp(rd6) identified by quantitative trait locus analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jungyeon; Charette, Jeremy R; Philip, Vivek M; Stearns, Timothy M; Zhang, Weidong; Naggert, Jürgen K; Krebs, Mark P; Nishina, Patsy M

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes that modify pathological ocular phenotypes in mouse models may improve our understanding of disease mechanisms and lead to new treatment strategies. Here, we identify modifier loci affecting photoreceptor cell loss in homozygous Mfrp(rd6) mice, which exhibit a slowly progressive photoreceptor degeneration. A cohort of 63 F2 homozygous Mfrp(rd6) mice from a (B6.C3Ga-Mfrp(rd6)/J × CAST/EiJ) F1 intercross exhibited a variable number of cell bodies in the retinal outer nuclear layer at 20 weeks of age. Mice were genotyped with a panel of single nucleotide polymorphism markers, and genotypes were correlated with phenotype by quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis to map modifier loci. A genome-wide scan revealed a statistically significant, protective candidate locus on CAST/EiJ Chromosome 1 and suggestive modifier loci on Chromosomes 6 and 11. Multiple regression analysis of a three-QTL model indicated that the modifier loci on Chromosomes 1 and 6 together account for 26% of the observed phenotypic variation, while the modifier locus on Chromosome 11 explains only an additional 4%. Our findings indicate that the severity of the Mfrp(rd6) retinal degenerative phenotype in mice depends on the strain genetic background and that a significant modifier locus on CAST/EiJ Chromosome 1 protects against Mfrp(rd6)-associated photoreceptor loss.

  15. Genetic and molecular analysis of chlorambucil-induced germ-line mutations in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinchik, E.M.; Bangham, J.W.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Russell, L.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Kwon, B.S. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (USA)); Jackson, I.J. (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (England))

    1990-02-01

    Eighteen variants recovered from specific locus mutation rate experiments involving the mutagen chlorambucil were subjected to several genetic and molecular analyses. Most mutations were found to be homozygous lethal. Because lethality is often presumptive evidence for multilocus-deletion events, 10 mutations were analyzed by Southern blot analysis with probes at, or closely linked to, several of the specific locus test markers, namely, albino (c), brown (b), and dilute (d). All eight mutations (two c; three b; two d; and one dilute-short ear (Df(d se))) that arose in post-spermatogonial germ cells were deleted for DNA sequences. No evidence for deletion of two d-se region probes was obtained for the remaining two d mutations that arose in stem-cell spermatogonia. Six of the primary mutants also produced low litter sizes (semisterility). Karyotypic analysis has, to date, confirmed the presence of reciprocal translocations in four of the six. The high frequency of deletions and translocations among the mutations induced in post-spermatogonial stages by chlorambucil, combined with its overall high efficiency in inducing mutations in these stages, should make chlorambucil mutagenesis useful for generating experimentally valuable germ-line deletions throughout the mouse genome.

  16. The storm and stress of adolescence: insights from human imaging and mouse genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, B J; Jones, Rebecca M; Levita, Liat; Libby, Victoria; Pattwell, Siobhan S; Ruberry, Erika J; Soliman, Fatima; Somerville, Leah H

    2010-04-01

    The characterization of adolescence as a time of "storm and stress" remains an open debate. Intense and frequent negative affect during this period has been hypothesized to explain the increased rates of affective disorders, suicide, and accidental death during this time of life. Yet some teens emerge from adolescence with minimal turmoil. We provide a neurobiological model of adolescence that proposes an imbalance in the development of subcortical limbic (e.g., amygdala) relative to prefrontal cortical regions as a potential mechanism for heightened emotionality during this period. Empirical support for this model is provided from recent behavioral and human imaging studies on the development of emotion regulation. We then provide examples of environmental factors that may exacerbate imbalances in amygdala-ventrofrontal function increasing risk for anxiety related behaviors. Finally we present data from human and mouse studies to illustrate how genetic factors may enhance or diminish this risk. Together, these studies provide a converging methods approach for understanding the highly variable stress and turmoil experienced in adolescence.

  17. Spatial Impairment and Memory in Genetic Disorders: Insights from Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Ah Lee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Research across the cognitive and brain sciences has begun to elucidate some of the processes that guide navigation and spatial memory. Boundary geometry and featural landmarks are two distinct classes of environmental cues that have dissociable neural correlates in spatial representation and follow different patterns of learning. Consequently, spatial navigation depends both on the type of cue available and on the type of learning provided. We investigated this interaction between spatial representation and memory by administering two different tasks (working memory, reference memory using two different environmental cues (rectangular geometry, striped landmark in mouse models of human genetic disorders: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWScrm+/p− mice, n = 12 and Beta-catenin mutation (Thr653Lys-substituted mice, n = 12. This exploratory study provides suggestive evidence that these models exhibit different abilities and impairments in navigating by boundary geometry and featural landmarks, depending on the type of memory task administered. We discuss these data in light of the specific deficits in cognitive and brain function in these human syndromes and their animal model counterparts.

  18. Polarization in Raman spectroscopy helps explain bone brittleness in genetic mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Pence, Isaac J.; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Zein-Sabatto, Ahbid; Huszagh, Meredith C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2014-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been extensively used to characterize bone composition. However, the link between bone biomechanics and RS measures is not well established. Here, we leveraged the sensitivity of RS polarization to organization, thereby assessing whether RS can explain differences in bone toughness in genetic mouse models for which traditional RS peak ratios are not informative. In the selected mutant mice-activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) or matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) knock-outs-toughness is reduced but differences in bone strength do not exist between knock-out and corresponding wild-type controls. To incorporate differences in the RS of bone occurring at peak shoulders, a multivariate approach was used. Full spectrum principal components analysis of two paired, orthogonal bone orientations (relative to laser polarization) improved genotype classification and correlation to bone toughness when compared to traditional peak ratios. When applied to femurs from wild-type mice at 8 and 20 weeks of age, the principal components of orthogonal bone orientations improved age classification but not the explanation of the maturation-related increase in strength. Overall, increasing polarization information by collecting spectra from two bone orientations improves the ability of multivariate RS to explain variance in bone toughness, likely due to polarization sensitivity to organizational changes in both mineral and collagen.

  19. Spatial Impairment and Memory in Genetic Disorders: Insights from Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ah; Tucci, Valter; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Research across the cognitive and brain sciences has begun to elucidate some of the processes that guide navigation and spatial memory. Boundary geometry and featural landmarks are two distinct classes of environmental cues that have dissociable neural correlates in spatial representation and follow different patterns of learning. Consequently, spatial navigation depends both on the type of cue available and on the type of learning provided. We investigated this interaction between spatial representation and memory by administering two different tasks (working memory, reference memory) using two different environmental cues (rectangular geometry, striped landmark) in mouse models of human genetic disorders: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWScrm+/p− mice, n = 12) and Beta-catenin mutation (Thr653Lys-substituted mice, n = 12). This exploratory study provides suggestive evidence that these models exhibit different abilities and impairments in navigating by boundary geometry and featural landmarks, depending on the type of memory task administered. We discuss these data in light of the specific deficits in cognitive and brain function in these human syndromes and their animal model counterparts. PMID:28208764

  20. Polyandry and the decrease of a selfish genetic element in a wild house mouse population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Andri; Lindholm, Anna K; König, Barbara; Bagheri, Homayoun C

    2011-09-01

    Despite deleterious effects on individuals, the t haplotype is a selfish genetic element present in many house mouse populations. By distorting the transmission ratio, +/t males transmit the t haplotype to up to 90% of their offspring. However, t/t individuals perish in utero. Theoretical models based on these properties predict a much higher t frequency than observed, leading to the t paradox. Here, we use empirical field data and theoretical approaches to investigate whether polyandry is a female counterstrategy against the negative fitness consequences of such distorters. We found a significant decrease of the t frequency over a period of 5.5 years that cannot be explained by the effect of transmission ratio distortion and recessive lethals, despite significantly higher life expectancy of +/t females compared to +/+ females. We quantified life-history data and homozygous and heterozygous fitness effects. Population subdivision and inbreeding were excluded as evolutionary forces influencing the t system. The possible influence of polyandry on the t system was then investigated by applying a stochastic model to this situation. Simulations show that polyandry can explain the observed t dynamics, making it a biologically plausible explanation for low t frequencies in natural populations in general. © 2011 The Author(s).

  1. PMP-22 expression in the central nervous system of the embryonic mouse defines potential transverse segments and longitudinal columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmantier, E; Braun, C; Thomas, J L; Peyron, F; Martinez, S; Zalc, B

    1997-02-10

    PMP-22, a major constituent of peripheral nervous system (PNS) myelin, is also present in the central nervous system (CNS), in motoneurons of the cranial nerve motor nuclei and spinal cord (Parmantier et al. [1995] Eur. J. Neurosci. 7:1080-1088). The expression of PMP-22 in the CNS during embryonic and early postnatal development was investigated and showed a biphasic spatio-temporal pattern. The expression of PMP-22 started at embryonic day (E)11.5, in restricted longitudinal and transverse domains, in the ventricular zone of the spinal cord, rhombencephalon, mesencephalon and prosencephalon. In the mid- and forebrain, the PMP-22 signal was detectable in a longitudinal domain that followed ventrally the basal/alar boundary but could no longer be detected dorsally at some distance from the roof plate. Along the caudo-rostral axis, the territory in which PMP-22 was detected spanned the mesencephalon and the prosencephalon, extending caudally from the limit between the isthmus and the mesencephalon, and rostrally to the boundary between prosomeres 4 and 5 (p4/p5). In agreement with the prosomeric model of forebrain organization proposed by Puelles and Rubenstein ([1993] TINS 16:472-479), differences in the level of PMP-22 expression in p2, p3, and p4 clearly defined the p2/p3 and p3/p4 neuromeric boundaries. By E17.5, PMP-22 was no longer detected in the ventricular zone, but at E18.5 it began to be expressed in motoneurons of cranial nerve motor nuclei and, after birth, following a rostro-caudal gradient, in the ventral spinal cord.

  2. Identification of the UBP1 locus as a critical blood pressure determinant using a combination of mouse and human genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutnikova, Hana; Laakso, Markku; Lu, Lu;

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a major health problem of largely unknown genetic origins. To identify new genes responsible for hypertension, genetic analysis of recombinant inbred strains of mice followed by human association studies might prove powerful and was exploited in our current study. Using a set of 2...... that UBP1 and its functional partners are components of a network controlling blood pressure....... recombinant BXD strains of mice we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for blood pressure (BP) on distal chromosome 9. The association analysis of markers encompassing the syntenic region on human chromosome 3 gave in an additive genetic model the strongest association for rs17030583 C/T and rs2291897...... complementarities of mouse and human genetic approaches, identifies the UBP1 locus as a critical blood pressure determinant. UBP1 plays a role in cholesterol and steroid metabolism via the transcriptional activation of CYP11A, the rate-limiting enzyme in pregnenolone and aldosterone biosynthesis. We suggest...

  3. Conservation priorities for Prunus africana defined with the aid of spatial analysis of genetic data and climatic variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Vinceti

    Full Text Available Conservation priorities for Prunus africana, a tree species found across Afromontane regions, which is of great commercial interest internationally and of local value for rural communities, were defined with the aid of spatial analyses applied to a set of georeferenced molecular marker data (chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites from 32 populations in 9 African countries. Two approaches for the selection of priority populations for conservation were used, differing in the way they optimize representation of intra-specific diversity of P. africana across a minimum number of populations. The first method (S1 was aimed at maximizing genetic diversity of the conservation units and their distinctiveness with regard to climatic conditions, the second method (S2 at optimizing representativeness of the genetic diversity found throughout the species' range. Populations in East African countries (especially Kenya and Tanzania were found to be of great conservation value, as suggested by previous findings. These populations are complemented by those in Madagascar and Cameroon. The combination of the two methods for prioritization led to the identification of a set of 6 priority populations. The potential distribution of P. africana was then modeled based on a dataset of 1,500 georeferenced observations. This enabled an assessment of whether the priority populations identified are exposed to threats from agricultural expansion and climate change, and whether they are located within the boundaries of protected areas. The range of the species has been affected by past climate change and the modeled distribution of P. africana indicates that the species is likely to be negatively affected in future, with an expected decrease in distribution by 2050. Based on these insights, further research at the regional and national scale is recommended, in order to strengthen P. africana conservation efforts.

  4. Conservation priorities for Prunus africana defined with the aid of spatial analysis of genetic data and climatic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinceti, Barbara; Loo, Judy; Gaisberger, Hannes; van Zonneveld, Maarten J; Schueler, Silvio; Konrad, Heino; Kadu, Caroline A C; Geburek, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Conservation priorities for Prunus africana, a tree species found across Afromontane regions, which is of great commercial interest internationally and of local value for rural communities, were defined with the aid of spatial analyses applied to a set of georeferenced molecular marker data (chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites) from 32 populations in 9 African countries. Two approaches for the selection of priority populations for conservation were used, differing in the way they optimize representation of intra-specific diversity of P. africana across a minimum number of populations. The first method (S1) was aimed at maximizing genetic diversity of the conservation units and their distinctiveness with regard to climatic conditions, the second method (S2) at optimizing representativeness of the genetic diversity found throughout the species' range. Populations in East African countries (especially Kenya and Tanzania) were found to be of great conservation value, as suggested by previous findings. These populations are complemented by those in Madagascar and Cameroon. The combination of the two methods for prioritization led to the identification of a set of 6 priority populations. The potential distribution of P. africana was then modeled based on a dataset of 1,500 georeferenced observations. This enabled an assessment of whether the priority populations identified are exposed to threats from agricultural expansion and climate change, and whether they are located within the boundaries of protected areas. The range of the species has been affected by past climate change and the modeled distribution of P. africana indicates that the species is likely to be negatively affected in future, with an expected decrease in distribution by 2050. Based on these insights, further research at the regional and national scale is recommended, in order to strengthen P. africana conservation efforts.

  5. Advancing the STMS genomic resources for defining new locations on the intraspecific genetic linkage map of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Rashmi; Sethy, Niroj K; Choudhary, Shalu; Shokeen, Bhumika; Gupta, Varsha; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2011-02-17

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an economically important cool season grain legume crop that is valued for its nutritive seeds having high protein content. However, several biotic and abiotic stresses and the low genetic variability in the chickpea genome have continuously hindered the chickpea molecular breeding programs. STMS (Sequence Tagged Microsatellite Sites) markers which are preferred for the construction of saturated linkage maps in several crop species, have also emerged as the most efficient and reliable source for detecting allelic diversity in chickpea. However, the number of STMS markers reported in chickpea is still limited and moreover exhibit low rates of both inter and intraspecific polymorphism, thereby limiting the positions of the SSR markers especially on the intraspecific linkage maps of chickpea. Hence, this study was undertaken with the aim of developing additional STMS markers and utilizing them for advancing the genetic linkage map of chickpea which would have applications in QTL identification, MAS and for de novo assembly of high throughput whole genome sequence data. A microsatellite enriched library of chickpea (enriched for (GT/CA)n and (GA/CT)n repeats) was constructed from which 387 putative microsatellite containing clones were identified. From these, 254 STMS primers were designed of which 181 were developed as functional markers. An intraspecific mapping population of chickpea, [ICCV-2 (single podded) × JG-62 (double podded)] and comprising of 126 RILs, was genotyped for mapping. Of the 522 chickpea STMS markers (including the double-podding trait, screened for parental polymorphism, 226 (43.3%) were polymorphic in the parents and were used to genotype the RILs. At a LOD score of 3.5, eight linkage groups defining the position of 138 markers were obtained that spanned 630.9 cM with an average marker density of 4.57 cM. Further, based on the common loci present between the current map and the previously published chickpea

  6. Association between genetic subgroups of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma defined by high density 500 K SNP-arrays and tumor histopathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available The specific genes and genetic pathways associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma are still largely unknown partially due to the low resolution of the techniques applied so far to their study. Here we used high-density 500 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-arrays to define those chromosomal regions which most commonly harbour copy number (CN alterations and loss of heterozygozity (LOH in a series of 20 PDAC tumors and we correlated the corresponding genetic profiles with the most relevant clinical and histopathological features of the disease. Overall our results showed that primary PDAC frequently display (>70% extensive gains of chromosomes 1q, 7q, 8q and 20q, together with losses of chromosomes 1p, 9p, 12q, 17p and 18q, such chromosomal regions harboring multiple cancer- and PDAC-associated genes. Interestingly, these alterations clustered into two distinct genetic profiles characterized by gains of the 2q14.2, 3q22.1, 5q32, 10q26.13, 10q26.3, 11q13.1, 11q13.3, 11q13.4, 16q24.1, 16q24.3, 22q13.1, 22q13.31 and 22q13.32 chromosomal regions (group 1; n = 9 versus gains at 1q21.1 and losses of the 1p36.11, 6q25.2, 9p22.1, 9p24.3, 17p13.3 and Xp22.33 chromosomal regions (group 2; n = 11. From the clinical and histopathological point of view, group 1 cases were associated with smaller and well/moderately-differentiated grade I/II PDAC tumors, whereas and group 2 PDAC displayed a larger size and they mainly consisted of poorly-differentiated grade III carcinomas. These findings confirm the cytogenetic complexity and heterozygozity of PDAC and provide evidence for the association between tumor cytogenetics and its histopathological features. In addition, we also show that the altered regions identified harbor multiple cancer associate genes that deserve further investigation to determine their relevance in the pathogenesis of PDAC.

  7. An estrogen-induced endometrial hyperplasia mouse model recapitulating human disease progression and genetic aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chieh-Hsiang; Almomen, Aliyah; Wee, Yin Shen; Jarboe, Elke A; Peterson, C Matthew; Janát-Amsbury, Margit M

    2015-07-01

    Endometrial hyperplasia (EH) is a condition originating from uterine endometrial glands undergoing disordered proliferation including the risk to progress to endometrial adenocarcinoma. In recent years, a steady increase in EH cases among younger women of reproductive age accentuates the demand of therapeutic alternatives, which emphasizes that an improved disease model for therapeutic agents evaluation is concurrently desired. Here, a new hormone-induced EH mouse model was developed using a subcutaneous estradiol (E2)-sustained releasing pellet, which elevates the serum E2 level in mice, closely mimicking the effect known as estrogen dominance with underlying, pathological E2 levels in patients. The onset and progression of EH generated within this model recapitulate a clinically relevant, pathological transformation, beginning with disordered proliferation developing to simple EH, advancing to atypical EH, and then progressing to precancerous stages, all following a chronologic manner. Although a general increase in nuclear progesterone receptor (PR) expression occurred after E2 expression, a total loss in PR was noted in some endometrial glands as disease advanced to simple EH. Furthermore, estrogen receptor (ER) expression in the nucleus of endometrial cells was reduced in disordered proliferation and increased when EH progressed to atypical EH and precancerous stages. This EH model also resembles other pathological patterns found in human disease such as leukocytic infiltration, genetic aberrations in β-catenin, and joint phosphatase and tensin homolog/paired box gene 2 (PTEN/PAX2) silencing. In summary, this new and comprehensively characterized EH model is cost-effective, easily reproducible, and may serve as a tool for preclinical testing of therapeutic agents and facilitate further investigation of EH.

  8. Novel Mouse Models of Methylmalonic Aciduria Recapitulate Phenotypic Traits with a Genetic Dosage Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forny, Patrick; Schumann, Anke; Mustedanagic, Merima; Mathis, Déborah; Wulf, Marie-Angela; Nägele, Nadine; Langhans, Claus-Dieter; Zhakupova, Assem; Heeren, Joerg; Scheja, Ludger; Fingerhut, Ralph; Peters, Heidi L; Hornemann, Thorsten; Thony, Beat; Kölker, Stefan; Burda, Patricie; Froese, D Sean; Devuyst, Olivier; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2016-09-23

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMAuria), caused by deficiency of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT), usually presents in the newborn period with failure to thrive and metabolic crisis leading to coma or even death. Survivors remain at risk of metabolic decompensations and severe long term complications, notably renal failure and neurological impairment. We generated clinically relevant mouse models of MMAuria using a constitutive Mut knock-in (KI) allele based on the p.Met700Lys patient mutation, used homozygously (KI/KI) or combined with a knockout allele (KO/KI), to study biochemical and clinical MMAuria disease aspects. Transgenic Mut(ki/ki) and Mut(ko/ki) mice survive post-weaning, show failure to thrive, and show increased methylmalonic acid, propionylcarnitine, odd chain fatty acids, and sphingoid bases, a new potential biomarker of MMAuria. Consistent with genetic dosage, Mut(ko/ki) mice have lower Mut activity, are smaller, and show higher metabolite levels than Mut(ki/ki) mice. Further, Mut(ko/ki) mice exhibit manifestations of kidney and brain damage, including increased plasma urea, impaired diuresis, elevated biomarkers, and changes in brain weight. On a high protein diet, mutant mice display disease exacerbation, including elevated blood ammonia, and catastrophic weight loss, which, in Mut(ki/ki) mice, is rescued by hydroxocobalamin treatment. This study expands knowledge of MMAuria, introduces the discovery of new biomarkers, and constitutes the first in vivo proof of principle of cobalamin treatment in mut-type MMAuria. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Evaluation of genetically inactivated alpha toxin for protection in multiple mouse models of Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Brady

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Development of a vaccine against this pathogen is an important goal. While S. aureus protective antigens have been identified in the literature, the majority have only been tested in a single animal model of disease. We wished to evaluate the ability of one S. aureus vaccine antigen to protect in multiple mouse models, thus assessing whether protection in one model translates to protection in other models encompassing the full breadth of infections the pathogen can cause. We chose to focus on genetically inactivated alpha toxin mutant HlaH35L. We evaluated the protection afforded by this antigen in three models of infection using the same vaccine dose, regimen, route of immunization, adjuvant, and challenge strain. When mice were immunized with HlaH35L and challenged via a skin and soft tissue infection model, HlaH35L immunization led to a less severe infection and decreased S. aureus levels at the challenge site when compared to controls. Challenge of HlaH35L-immunized mice using a systemic infection model resulted in a limited, but statistically significant decrease in bacterial colonization as compared to that observed with control mice. In contrast, in a prosthetic implant model of chronic biofilm infection, there was no significant difference in bacterial levels when compared to controls. These results demonstrate that vaccines may confer protection against one form of S. aureus disease without conferring protection against other disease presentations and thus underscore a significant challenge in S. aureus vaccine development.

  10. Development of genetically flexible mouse models of sarcoma using RCAS-TVA mediated gene delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Kabaroff

    Full Text Available Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal malignancies and unfortunately there are limited functional genomics platforms to assess the molecular pathways contributing to sarcomagenesis. Thus, novel model systems are needed to validate which genes should be targeted for therapeutic intervention. We hypothesized that delivery of oncogenes into mouse skeletal muscle using a retroviral (RCAS-TVA system would result in sarcomagenesis. We also sought to determine if the cell type transformed (mesenchymal progenitors vs. terminally differentiated tissues would influence sarcoma biology. Cells transduced with RCAS vectors directing the expression of oncoproteins KrasG12D, c-Myc and/or Igf2 were injected into the hindlimbs of mice that expressed the retroviral TVA receptor in neural/mesenchymal progenitors, skeletal/cardiac muscle or ubiquitously (N-tva, AKE and BKE strains respectively. Disrupting the G1 checkpoint CDKN2 (p16/p19-/- resulted in sarcoma in 30% of p16/p19-/- xN-tva mice with a median latency of 23 weeks (range 8-40 weeks. A similar incidence occurred in p16/p19-/- xBKE mice (32%, however, a shorter median latency (10.4 weeks was observed. p16/p19-/- xAKE mice also developed sarcomas (24% incidence; median 9 weeks yet 31% of mice also developed lung sarcomas. Gene-anchored PCR demonstrated retroviral DNA integration in 86% of N-tva, 93% of BKE and 88% of AKE tumors. KrasG12D was the most frequent oncogene isolated. Oncogene delivery by the RCAS-TVA system can generate sarcomas in mice with a defective cell cycle checkpoint. Sarcoma biology differed between the different RCAS models we created, likely due to the cell population being transformed. This genetically flexible system will be a valuable tool for sarcoma research.

  11. Hepatocellular carcinoma in a mouse model fed a choline-deficient, L-amino acid-defined, high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa-Yoshida, Ayae; Matsuo, Saori; Kato, Atsuhiko; Ohmori, Yusuke; Higashida, Atsuko; Kaneko, Eiji; Matsumoto, Masahiko

    2017-09-12

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer worldwide and represents the outcome of the natural history of chronic liver disease. The growing rates of HCC may be partially attributable to increased numbers of people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). However, details of the liver-specific molecular mechanisms responsible for the NAFLD-NASH-HCC progression remain unclear, and mouse models that can be used to explore the exact factors that influence the progression of NAFLD/NASH to the more chronic stages of liver disease and subsequent HCC are not yet fully established. We have previously reported a choline-deficient, L-amino acid-defined, high-fat diet (CDAHFD) as a dietary NASH model with rapidly progressive liver fibrosis in mice. The current study in C57BL/6J mice fed CDAHFD provided evidence for the chronic persistence of advanced hepatic fibrosis in NASH and disease progression towards HCC in a period of 36 weeks. When mice fed CDAHFD were switched back to a standard diet, hepatic steatosis was normalized and NAFLD activity score improved, but HCC incidence increased and the phenotype of fibrosis-associated HCC development was observed. Moreover, when mice continued to be fed CDAHFD for 60 weeks, HCC further developed without severe body weight loss or carcinogenesis in other organs. The autochthonous tumours showed a variety of histological features and architectural patterns including trabecular, pseudoglandular and solid growth. The CDAHFD mouse model might be a useful tool for studying the development of HCC from NAFLD/NASH, and potentially useful for better understanding pathological changes during hepatocarcinogenesis. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Company of the International Journal of Experimental Pathology (CIJEP).

  12. Development of a Novel Treatment for Food Allergy Using a New Genetically Defined Mouse Model of the Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    littermates were sensitized with 1mg peanut protein and 10ug of cholera toxin by oral gavage four times (one week apart), as preliminary experiments...interfering with absorption of the peanut protein and cholera toxin (compared to WT mice), which would affect our ability to sensitize the mice. We...at the time the dose of peanut/ cholera toxin was delivered. As shown in Figure 1, using this modified protocol, LDS mice appear to demonstrate more

  13. The consequence of natural selection on genetic variation in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuveni, Eli; Birney, Ewan; Gross, Cornelius T

    2010-04-01

    Laboratory mouse strains are known to have emerged from recent interbreeding between individuals of Mus musculus isolated populations. As a result of this breeding history, the collection of polymorphisms observed between laboratory mouse strains is likely to harbor the effects of natural selection between reproductively isolated populations. Until now no study has systematically investigated the consequences of this breeding history on gene evolution. Here we have used a novel, unbiased evolutionary approach to predict the founder origin of laboratory mouse strains and to assess the balance between ancient and newly emerged mutations in the founder subspecies. Our results confirm a contribution from at least four distinct subspecies. Additionally, our method allowed us to identify regions of relaxed selective constraint among laboratory mouse strains. This unique structure of variation is likely to have significant consequences on the use of mouse to find genes underlying phenotypic variation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic Ablation of Type III Adenylyl Cyclase Exerts Region-Specific Effects on Cilia Architecture in the Mouse Nose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary C Challis

    Full Text Available We recently reported that olfactory sensory neurons in the dorsal zone of the mouse olfactory epithelium exhibit drastic location-dependent differences in cilia length. Furthermore, genetic ablation of type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII, a key olfactory signaling protein and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, disrupts the cilia length pattern and results in considerably shorter cilia, independent of odor-induced activity. Given the significant impact of ACIII on cilia length in the dorsal zone, we sought to further investigate the relationship between cilia length and ACIII level in various regions throughout the mouse olfactory epithelium. We employed whole-mount immunohistochemical staining to examine olfactory cilia morphology in phosphodiesterase (PDE 1C-/-;PDE4A-/- (simplified as PDEs-/- hereafter and ACIII-/- mice in which ACIII levels are reduced and ablated, respectively. As expected, PDEs-/- animals exhibit dramatically shorter cilia in the dorsal zone (i.e., where the cilia pattern is found, similar to our previous observation in ACIII-/- mice. Remarkably, in a region not included in our previous study, ACIII-/- animals (but not PDEs-/- mice have dramatically elongated, comet-shaped cilia, as opposed to characteristic star-shaped olfactory cilia. Here, we reveal that genetic ablation of ACIII has drastic, location-dependent effects on cilia architecture in the mouse nose. These results add a new dimension to our current understanding of olfactory cilia structure and regional organization of the olfactory epithelium. Together, these findings have significant implications for both cilia and sensory biology.

  15. Effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor on behavior and key members of the brain serotonin system in mouse strains genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Bazovkina, Daria V; Semenova, Alina A; Tsybko, Anton S; Il'chibaeva, Tatyana V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Popova, Nina K

    2013-12-01

    The effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on behavior and on the serotonin (5-HT) system of a mouse strain predisposed to depressive-like behavior, ASC/Icg (Antidepressant Sensitive Cataleptics), in comparison with the parental "nondepressive" CBA/Lac mice was studied. Within 7 days after acute administration, GDNF (800 ng, i.c.v.) decreased cataleptic immobility but increased depressive-like behavioral traits in both investigated mouse strains and produced anxiolytic effects in ASC mice. The expression of the gene encoding the key enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis in the brain, tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph-2), and 5-HT1A receptor gene in the midbrain as well as 5-HT2A receptor gene in the frontal cortex were increased in GDNF-treated ASC mice. At the same time, GDNF decreased 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor gene expression in the hippocampus of ASC mice. GDNF failed to change Tph2, 5-HT1A , or 5-HT2A receptor mRNA levels in CBA mice as well as 5-HT transporter gene expression and 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor functional activity in both investigated mouse strains. The results show 1) a GDNF-induced increase in the expression of key genes of the brain 5-HT system, Tph2, 5-HT1A , and 5-HT2A receptors, and 2) significant genotype-dependent differences in the 5-HT system response to GDNF treatment. The data suggest that genetically defined cross-talk between neurotrophic factors and the brain 5-HT system underlies the variability in behavioral response to GDNF.

  16. Antagonistic signals between BMP4 and FGF8 define the expression of Pitx1 and Pitx2 in mouse tooth-forming anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Amand, T R; Zhang, Y; Semina, E V; Zhao, X; Hu, Y; Nguyen, L; Murray, J C; Chen, Y

    2000-01-15

    Members of the Pitx/RIEG family of homeodomain-containing transcription factors have been implicated in vertebrate organogenesis. In this study, we examined the expression and regulation of Pitx1 and Pitx2 during mouse tooth development. Pitx1 expression is detected in early development in a widespread pattern, in both epithelium and mesenchyme, covering the tooth-forming region in the mandible, and is then maintained in the dental epithelium from the bud stage to the late bell stage. Pitx2 expression, on the other hand, is restricted to the dental epithelium throughout odontogenesis. Interestingly, from E9.5 to E10.5, the expression domains of Pitx1 and Pitx2, in the developing mandible, overlap with that of Fgf8 but are exclusive to the zone of Bmp4 expression. Bead implantation experiments demonstrate that ectopic expression of Fgf8 can induce/maintain the expression of both Pitx1 and Pitx2 at E9.5. In contrast, Bmp4-expressing tissues and BMP4-soaked beads were able to repress Pitx1 expression in mandibular mesenchyme and Pitx2 expression in the presumptive dental epithelium, respectively. However, the effects of FGF8 and BMP4 are transient. It thus appears that the early expression patterns of Pitx1 and Pitx2 in the developing mandible are regulated by the antagonistic effects of FGF8 and BMP4 such that the Pitx1 and Pitx2 expression patterns are defined. These results indicate that the epithelial-derived signaling molecules are responsible not only for restricting specific gene expression in the dental mesenchyme, but also for defining gene expression in the dental epithelium.

  17. Generation of mouse models of myeloid malignancy with combinatorial genetic lesions using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckl, Dirk; Kowalczyk, Monika S; Yudovich, David; Belizaire, Roger; Puram, Rishi V; McConkey, Marie E; Thielke, Anne; Aster, Jon C; Regev, Aviv; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2014-09-01

    Genome sequencing studies have shown that human malignancies often bear mutations in four or more driver genes, but it is difficult to recapitulate this degree of genetic complexity in mouse models using conventional breeding. Here we use the CRISPR-Cas9 system of genome editing to overcome this limitation. By delivering combinations of small guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and Cas9 with a lentiviral vector, we modified up to five genes in a single mouse hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), leading to clonal outgrowth and myeloid malignancy. We thereby generated models of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with cooperating mutations in genes encoding epigenetic modifiers, transcription factors and mediators of cytokine signaling, recapitulating the combinations of mutations observed in patients. Our results suggest that lentivirus-delivered sgRNA:Cas9 genome editing should be useful to engineer a broad array of in vivo cancer models that better reflect the complexity of human disease.

  18. The Sustained Delivery of Resveratrol or a Defined Grape Powder Inhibits New Blood Vessel Formation in a Mouse Model of Choroidal Neovascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavi, Mozhgan Rezaie; Darjatmoko, Soesiawati; Wang, Shoujian; Azari, Amir A.; Farnoodian, Mitra; Kenealey, Jason D.; van Ginkel, Paul R.; Albert, Daniel M.; Sheibani, Nader; Polans, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether resveratrol or a defined, reconstituted grape powder can attenuate the formation of new blood vessels in a mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). To accomplish this objective, C57BL/6J mice were randomized into control or treatment groups which received either resveratrol or grape powder by daily oral gavage, resveratrol or grape powder delivered ad libitum through the drinking water, or resveratrol by slow release via implanted osmotic pumps. A laser was used to rupture Bruch’s membrane to induce CNV which was then detected in sclerochoroidal eyecups stained with antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-2. CNV area was measured using fluorescence microscopy and Image J software. Ad libitum delivery of both resveratrol and grape powder was shown to significantly reduce the extent of CNV by 68% and 57%, respectively. Parallel experiments conducted in vitro demonstrated that resveratrol activates p53 and inactivates Akt/protein kinase B in choroidal endothelial cells, contributing to its anti-proliferative and anti-migratory properties. In addition resveratrol was shown to inhibit the formation of endothelial cell networks, augmenting its overall anti-angiogenic effects. The non-toxic nature of resveratrol makes it an especially attractive candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of CNV. PMID:25361423

  19. The Sustained Delivery of Resveratrol or a Defined Grape Powder Inhibits New Blood Vessel Formation in a Mouse Model of Choroidal Neovascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Rezaie Kanavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine whether resveratrol or a defined, reconstituted grape powder can attenuate the formation of new blood vessels in a mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV. To accomplish this objective, C57BL/6J mice were randomized into control or treatment groups which received either resveratrol or grape powder by daily oral gavage, resveratrol or grape powder delivered ad libitum through the drinking water, or resveratrol by slow release via implanted osmotic pumps. A laser was used to rupture Bruch’s membrane to induce CNV which was then detected in sclerochoroidal eyecups stained with antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-2. CNV area was measured using fluorescence microscopy and Image J software. Ad libitum delivery of both resveratrol and grape powder was shown to significantly reduce the extent of CNV by 68% and 57%, respectively. Parallel experiments conducted in vitro demonstrated that resveratrol activates p53 and inactivates Akt/protein kinase B in choroidal endothelial cells, contributing to its anti-proliferative and anti-migratory properties. In addition resveratrol was shown to inhibit the formation of endothelial cell networks, augmenting its overall anti-angiogenic effects. The non-toxic nature of resveratrol makes it an especially attractive candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of CNV.

  20. IL-4-dependent effector phase in autoimmune exocrinopathy as defined by the NOD.IL-4-gene knockout mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayer, J B; Cha, S; Nagashima, H; Yasunari, U; Lindberg, A; Diggs, S; Martinez, J; Goa, J; Humphreys-Beher, M G; Peck, A B

    2001-01-01

    NOD mice manifest many features of autoimmune exocrinopathy (Sjögren's syndrome), a disease generally characterized by a chronic, progressive immunological attack against the exocrine tissues of the salivary and lacrimal glands. Previous studies using the NOD congenic partner strain, NOD.Igmu(null), defined an important role for B lymphocytes in the development of xerostomia, implicating autoantibodies reactive with the acetylcholine muscarinic receptor (M3R) as the possible effector mechanism. In the present study, we have examined the impact of the cytokine, interleukin (IL)-4, on autoimmune exocrinopathy by using the IL-4 gene knockout (KO) NOD mouse strain, NOD.IL-4-/-. Despite manifesting the physiological aberrations and marked leukocytic infiltration of the salivary glands characteristic of autoimmune xerostomia in NOD mice, the NOD.IL-4-/- mice do not develop xerostomia. However, NOD.IL-4-/- mice that received adoptively transferred T lymphocytes derived from NOD.Igmu-/- mice progress to xerostomia, thereby reversing the defect. While progression or lack of progression to xerostomia correlated with the ability of the NOD.IL-4-/- mice to express detectable anti-M3R autoantibodies, the precise mechanism of how IL-4 influences the development of autoimmune xerostomia remains speculative.

  1. Genetically modified neural stem cells for a local and sustained delivery of neuroprotective factors to the dystrophic mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gila; Sun, Jing; Petrowitz, Bettina; Riecken, Kristoffer; Kruszewski, Katharina; Jankowiak, Wanda; Kunst, Frank; Skevas, Christos; Richard, Gisbert; Fehse, Boris; Bartsch, Udo

    2013-12-01

    A continuous intraocular delivery of neurotrophic factors (NFs) is being explored as a strategy to rescue photoreceptor cells and visual functions in degenerative retinal disorders that are currently untreatable. To establish a cell-based intraocular delivery system for a sustained administration of NFs to the dystrophic mouse retina, we used a polycistronic lentiviral vector to genetically modify adherently cultivated murine neural stem (NS) cells. The vector concurrently encoded a gene of interest, a reporter gene, and a resistance gene and thus facilitated the selection, cloning, and in vivo tracking of the modified cells. To evaluate whether modified NS cells permit delivery of functionally relevant quantities of NFs to the dystrophic mouse retina, we expressed a secretable variant of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in NS cells and grafted the cells into the vitreous space of Pde6b(rd1) and Pde6b(rd10) mice, two animal models of retinitis pigmentosa. In both mouse lines, grafted cells attached to the retina and lens, where they differentiated into astrocytes and some neurons. Adverse effects of the transplanted cells on the morphology of host retinas were not observed. Importantly, the CNTF-secreting NS cells significantly attenuated photoreceptor degeneration in both mutant mouse lines. The neuroprotective effect was significantly more pronounced when clonally derived NS cell lines selected for high expression levels of CNTF were grafted into Pde6b(rd1) mice. Intravitreal transplantations of modified NS cells may thus represent a useful method for preclinical studies aimed at evaluating the therapeutic potential of a cell-based intraocular delivery of NFs in mouse models of photoreceptor degeneration.

  2. Tinkering with cusp patterning : Developmental Genetic Mechanisms in Mouse Molar Development

    OpenAIRE

    Harjunmaa, Enni

    2012-01-01

    Teeth display considerable morphological variability, which mammals have been able to use to their advantage. Consequently, mammal teeth provide a bountiful research subject that combines information on development, functional proper-ties, and thanks to their durable substance, evolutionary history. This thesis work is focused on the patterning of cusps, the peaks that form the shape of the tooth crown, in the mouse. Mouse tooth development has been studied extensively and offers a wide ...

  3. A genetic screen for components of the mammalian RNA interference pathway in Bloom-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, Melanie I; Su, Hong; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2009-03-01

    Genetic screens performed in model organisms have helped identify key components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Recessive genetic screens have recently become feasible through the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that are Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm) deficient. Here, we developed and performed a recessive genetic screen to identify components of the mammalian RNAi pathway in Blm-deficient ES cells. Genome-wide mutagenesis using a retroviral gene trap strategy resulted in the isolation of putative homozygous RNAi mutant cells. Candidate clones were confirmed by an independent RNAi-based reporter assay and the causative gene trap integration site was identified using molecular techniques. Our screen identified multiple mutant cell lines of Argonaute 2 (Ago2), a known essential component of the RNAi pathway. This result demonstrates that true RNAi components can be isolated by this screening strategy. Furthermore, Ago2 homozygous mutant ES cells provide a null genetic background to perform mutational analyses of the Ago2 protein. Using genetic rescue, we resolve an important controversy regarding the role of two phenylalanine residues in Ago2 activity.

  4. Genetic Architecture of Group A Streptococcal Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections in the Mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chella Krishnan, Karthickeyan; Mukundan, Santhosh; Alagarsamy, Jeyashree;

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variations play an important role in several pathogenic diseases, and we have previously provided strong evidences that these genetic variations contribute significantly to differences in susceptibility and clinical outcomes of invasive Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections, includi...

  5. Pathophysiology and genetics of obesity and diabetes in the New Zealand obese mouse: a model of the human metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Reinhart; Scherneck, Stephan; Schürmann, Annette; Joost, Hans-Georg

    2012-01-01

    The New Zealand Obese (NZO) mouse is one of the most thoroughly investigated polygenic models for the human metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. It presents the main characteristics of the disease complex, including early-onset obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. As a consequence of this syndrome, a combination of lipotoxicity and glucotoxicity produces beta-cell failure and apoptosis resulting in hypoinsulinemia and diabetic hyperglycemia. With NZO as a breeding partner, several adipogenic and diabetogenic gene variants have been identified by hypothesis-free positional cloning (Tbc1d1, Zfp69) or by combining genetic screens and candidate gene approaches (Pctp, Abcg1, Nmur2, Lepr). This chapter summarizes the present knowledge of the NZO strain and describes its pathophysiology as well as the known underlying genetic defects.

  6. Acoustically dimorphic advertisement calls separate morphologically and genetically homogenous populations of the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, T; Neveu, H; Rumpler, Y; Wilden, I; Zimmermann, E

    1998-01-01

    Sexual advertisement calls of male mouse lemurs from two neighbouring demes in a dry deciduous forest of western Madagascar were recorded during the breeding season. Demes were located about 1.5 km apart with no geographic barrier between them. They were characterised morphometrically and genotyped by RAPD fingerprinting. According to univariate and multivariate statistical analysis, demes differed neither in body measurements, nor in the banding patterns produced by RAPD fingerprinting. The acoustic pattern of the advertisement call, however, showed significant differences: Six variables of the frequency and time domain differed between the demes. Discriminant function analysis revealed that one variable, total call duration, was sufficient to classify more than 89% of the calls correctly to the corresponding deme. We postulate that these differences are comparable to dialects in birds, because demes were morphologically and genetically indistinguishable and no barrier prevented genetic exchange between them. Possible explanations for the emergence of dialects in a prosimian species are outlined.

  7. Radiation-induced intestinal neoplasia in a genetically-predisposed mouse (Min)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellender, M.; Larder, S.M.; Harrison, J.D.; Cox, R.; Silver, A.R.J. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    A mouse lineage with inherited predisposition to multiple intestinal neoplasia (min) has been proposed as a model to study human colorectal cancer. Min mice are heterozygous for the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene implicated in human familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). There is an increased risk of intestinal cancer in humans following radiation exposure and the min mouse model may be used to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved. The present study showed a 2 Gy dose of x-rays doubles the tumour numbers in the murine gastrointestinal tract of F1 min heterozygotes. The distribution of tumours through the gut was also recorded. (authors)

  8. Glucose metabolism, islet architecture, and genetic homogeneity in imprinting of [Ca2+](i and insulin rhythms in mouse islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig S Nunemaker

    Full Text Available We reported previously that islets isolated from individual, outbred Swiss-Webster mice displayed oscillations in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+](i that varied little between islets of a single mouse but considerably between mice, a phenomenon we termed "islet imprinting." We have now confirmed and extended these findings in several respects. First, imprinting occurs in both inbred (C57BL/6J as well as outbred mouse strains (Swiss-Webster; CD1. Second, imprinting was observed in NAD(PH oscillations, indicating a metabolic component. Further, short-term exposure to a glucose-free solution, which transiently silenced [Ca2+](i oscillations, reset the oscillatory patterns to a higher frequency. This suggests a key role for glucose metabolism in maintaining imprinting, as transiently suppressing the oscillations with diazoxide, a K(ATP-channel opener that blocks [Ca2+](i influx downstream of glucose metabolism, did not change the imprinted patterns. Third, imprinting was not as readily observed at the level of single beta cells, as the [Ca2+](i oscillations of single cells isolated from imprinted islets exhibited highly variable, and typically slower [Ca2+](i oscillations. Lastly, to test whether the imprinted [Ca2+](i patterns were of functional significance, a novel microchip platform was used to monitor insulin release from multiple islets in real time. Insulin release patterns correlated closely with [Ca2+](i oscillations and showed significant mouse-to-mouse differences, indicating imprinting. These results indicate that islet imprinting is a general feature of islets and is likely to be of physiological significance. While islet imprinting did not depend on the genetic background of the mice, glucose metabolism and intact islet architecture may be important for the imprinting phenomenon.

  9. Sheltering behavior and locomotor activity in 11 genetically diverse common inbred mouse strains using home-cage monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Loos

    Full Text Available Functional genetic analyses in mice rely on efficient and in-depth characterization of the behavioral spectrum. Automated home-cage observation can provide a systematic and efficient screening method to detect unexplored, novel behavioral phenotypes. Here, we analyzed high-throughput automated home-cage data using existing and novel concepts, to detect a plethora of genetic differences in spontaneous behavior in a panel of commonly used inbred strains (129S1/SvImJ, A/J, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, BALB/cJ, DBA/2J, NOD/LtJ, FVB/NJ, WSB/EiJ, PWK/PhJ and CAST/EiJ. Continuous video-tracking observations of sheltering behavior and locomotor activity were segmented into distinguishable behavioral elements, and studied at different time scales, yielding a set of 115 behavioral parameters of which 105 showed highly significant strain differences. This set of 115 parameters was highly dimensional; principal component analysis identified 26 orthogonal components with eigenvalues above one. Especially novel parameters of sheltering behavior and parameters describing aspects of motion of the mouse in the home-cage showed high genetic effect sizes. Multi-day habituation curves and patterns of behavior surrounding dark/light phase transitions showed striking strain differences, albeit with lower genetic effect sizes. This spontaneous home-cage behavior study demonstrates high dimensionality, with a strong genetic contribution to specific sets of behavioral measures. Importantly, spontaneous home-cage behavior analysis detects genetic effects that cannot be studied in conventional behavioral tests, showing that the inclusion of a few days of undisturbed, labor extensive home-cage assessment may greatly aid gene function analyses and drug target discovery.

  10. Identifying genetic markers of wheat (Triticum aestivum) associated with flavor preference using a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole wheat products provide critical nutrients for human health, though differences in wheat flavor are not well understood. Using the house mouse as a model system, flavor was examined using a two-choice feeding system and the Student’s t statistic. To eliminate the confounding effect of processin...

  11. Genetic markers of wheat (Triticum aestivum) associated with flavor preference using a mouse (Mus musculus) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole wheat products provide critical nutrients for human health, differences in wheat flavor are not well understood. Using the house mouse as a model system, flavor preference and discrimination were examined using a two-choice feeding system and 24-h trials and the Student’s t statistic. To elimi...

  12. A Quantitative Volumetric Micro-Computed Tomography Method to Analyze Lung Tumors in Genetically Engineered Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian B. Haines

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Two genetically engineered, conditional mouse models of lung tumor formation, K-rasLSL-G12D and K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H, are commonly used to model human lung cancer. Developed by Tyler Jacks and colleagues, these models have been invaluable to study in vivo lung cancer initiation and progression in a genetically and physiologically relevant context. However, heterogeneity, multiplicity and complexity of tumor formation in these models make it challenging to monitor tumor growth in vivo and have limited the application of these models in oncology drug discovery. Here, we describe a novel analytical method to quantitatively measure total lung tumor burden in live animals using micro-computed tomography imaging. Applying this methodology, we studied the kinetics of tumor development and response to targeted therapy in vivo in K-ras and K-ras/p53 mice. Consistent with previous reports, lung tumors in both models developed in a time- and dose (Cre recombinase-dependent manner. Furthermore, the compound K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H mice developed tumors faster and more robustly than mice harboring a single K-rasLSL-G12D oncogene, as expected. Erlotinib, a small molecule inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor, significantly inhibited tumor growth in K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H mice. These results demonstrate that this novel imaging technique can be used to monitor both tumor progression and response to treatment and therefore supports a broader application of these genetically engineered mouse models in oncology drug discovery and development.

  13. Influence of nociception and stress-induced antinociception on genetic variation in isoflurane anesthetic potency among mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogil, Jeffrey S; Smith, Shad B; O'Reilly, Meghan K; Plourde, Gilles

    2005-10-01

    Genetic background influences anesthetic potency to suppress motor response to noxious stimulation (minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]) as well as nociceptive sensitivity in unmedicated animals. However, the influence on MAC of baseline sensitivity to the noxious stimuli used to assess MAC has virtually never been studied. The authors assessed room air nociceptive sensitivity and isoflurane MAC in multiple mouse strains. Isoflurane requirement for loss of righting response (MACLORR) was also measured. One outbred and 10 inbred mouse strains were tested for latency to respond (in room air) to a tail clip (either 500 g or 2,000 g). Naive mice of the same 11 strains were tested for isoflurane MAC and MACLORR. To assess the role of opioid-mediated stress-induced antinociception, mice were also tested for nociceptive sensitivity after injection of naloxone (10 mg/kg) or saline. Robust strain differences were observed for all measures. The authors found that tail-clip latency (using a 500-g or 2,000-g clip, respectively) correlated significantly with MAC (r = -0.76 and -0.58, respectively) but not MACLORR (r = -0.10 and -0.26). Naloxone produced strain-dependent reductions in open air tail-clip latencies, and these reductions were also strongly correlated with MAC (r = -0.67 and -0.71). The authors suggest that genetic variability in isoflurane MAC (but not MACLORR) may reflect genetic variability in the underlying sensitivity to the noxious stimulus being used to measure MAC. This variable sensitivity to nociception in the awake state is at least partially mediated by endogenous antinociceptive mechanisms activated by the tail-clip stimulus itself.

  14. The perfect host: a mouse host embryo facilitating more efficient germ line transmission of genetically modified embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Taft

    Full Text Available There is a continual need to improve efficiency in creating precise genetic modifications in mice using embryonic stem cells (ESCs. We describe a novel approach resulting in 100% germline transmission from competent injected ESCs. We developed an F1 mouse host embryo (Perfect Host, PH that selectively ablates its own germ cells via tissue-specific induction of diphtheria toxin. This approach allows competent microinjected ESCs to fully dominate the germline, eliminating competition for this critical niche in the developing and adult animal. This is in contrast to conventional methods, where competition from host germ cells results in offspring derived from host cells and ESCs, necessitating extensive breeding of chimeras and genotyping to identify germline. The germline transmission process is also complicated by variability in the actual number of ESCs that colonize the germline niche and the proportion that are germline competent. To validate the PH approach we used ESC lines derived from 129 F1, BALB/cByJ, and BTBR backgrounds as well as an iPS line. Resulting chimeric males produced 194 offspring, all paternally derived from the introduced stem cells, with no offspring being derived from the host genome. We further tested this approach using eleven genetically modified C57BL/6N ESC lines (International Knockout Mouse Consortium. ESC germline transmission was observed in 9/11 (82% lines using PH blastocysts, compared to 6/11 (55% when conventional host blastocysts were used. Furthermore, less than 35% (83/240 of mice born in the first litters from conventional chimeras were confirmed to be of ESC-origin. By comparison, 100% (137/137 of the first litter offspring of PH chimeras were confirmed as ESC-derived. Together, these data demonstrate that the PH approach increases the probability of germline transmission and speeds the generation of ESC derived animals from chimeras. Collectively, this approach reduces the time and costs inherent in the

  15. Meiotic nondisjunction in the mouse: methodology for genetic testing and comparison with other methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L. B.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: genetic method for detecting sex-chromosome nondisjunction; events that can produce nondisjunction in mammals; biological parameters that may maximize induced meiotic ND; comparison with other measures of germline chromosomal damage in mammals; comparison with other methods for detecting meiotic nondisjunction in mammals; and application of the genetic method for detecting nondisjunction. (HLW)

  16. Genetic variation responsible for mouse strain differences in integrin {alpha}{sub 2} expression is associated with altered platelet responses to collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tong-Tong; Larrucea, Susana; Souza, Shiloe; Leal, Suzanne M.; Lopez, Jose A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Bray, Paul F.

    2003-11-01

    . We and others have previously studied how genetic changes exert quantitative and qualitative alterations in human platelet adhesive receptors. Polymorphisms of both integrin {alpha}{sub 2} and GPIb have been associated with quantitative differences in receptor levels in healthy individuals. The variation of integrin {alpha}{sub 2} in the normal population is 5-fold, and some portion of this variability has been associated with a C/T polymorphism at nucleotide 807. Individuals homozygous for the 807C or 807T alleles have an average 2-fold difference in platelet {alpha}{sub 2} {beta}{sub 1} levels, and this difference has been linked to increased adhesion to collagen and clinical thrombotic events. Comparable alterations in platelet adhesion receptor expression have not been assessed in different mouse strains. Assessing the functional consequences of subtle genetic variations in humans is challenged by numerous gene-gene and gene environment interactions, and studies in mice can greatly minimize these confounding variables. In addition, comparative sequence analyses between species and between nonhuman primates have proved useful for identifying sequences that affect function and expression. Thus, in the case of platelet adhesion receptors, knowing mouse strain differences in expression levels might be valuable for defining the responsible quantitative trait loci as well as affecting strain choice for particular functional experiments.

  17. The Breda Study: Search for genetic factors involved in type 2 diabetes mellitus in a defined Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilburg, Jonathan Hendrik Otto van

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about the nature of genetic variation underlying complex diseases in humans. The recognition that susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus has a strong inherited component provides a mechanism for developing the molecular understanding of the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes

  18. The Breda Study: Search for genetic factors involved in type 2 diabetes mellitus in a defined Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilburg, Jonathan Hendrik Otto van

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about the nature of genetic variation underlying complex diseases in humans. The recognition that susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus has a strong inherited component provides a mechanism for developing the molecular understanding of the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitu

  19. SymRK defines a common genetic basis for plant root endosymbioses with arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi, rhizobia, and Frankiabacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherbi, Hassen; Markmann, Katharina; Svistoonoff, Sergio; Estevan, Joan; Autran, Daphné; Giczey, Gabor; Auguy, Florence; Péret, Benjamin; Laplaze, Laurent; Franche, Claudine; Parniske, Martin; Bogusz, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Root endosymbioses vitally contribute to plant nutrition and fitness worldwide. Nitrogen-fixing root nodulation, confined to four plant orders, encompasses two distinct types of associations, the interaction of legumes (Fabales) with rhizobia bacteria and actinorhizal symbioses, where the bacterial symbionts are actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Although several genetic components of the host–symbiont interaction have been identified in legumes, the genetic basis of actinorhiza formation is unknown. Here, we show that the receptor-like kinase gene SymRK, which is required for nodulation in legumes, is also necessary for actinorhiza formation in the tree Casuarina glauca. This indicates that both types of nodulation symbiosis share genetic components. Like several other legume genes involved in the interaction with rhizobia, SymRK is also required for the interaction with arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi. We show that SymRK is involved in AM formation in C. glauca as well and can restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Lotus japonicus symrk mutant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SymRK functions as a vital component of the genetic basis for both plant–fungal and plant–bacterial endosymbioses and is conserved between legumes and actinorhiza-forming Fagales. PMID:18316735

  20. Conceptual Incongruence between Prion Disease and Genetic Diversity in Ovine Species within European Union defined by Informational Statistics Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Hrinca

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity and the studies of spongiform encephalopathies in the farm animals are highly topical concerns of the contemporary scientific world. Both themes are very interesting for the life sciences and very important for the application field of animal breeding. The implementation of these two concepts creates an antithetical paradigm: the achievement of genetic prophylaxis joins with the decrease of genetic diversity. The paper examines the genetic diversity and its evolution in sheep livestock from the European space in the context in which the European Community has developed very laborious and costly programs targeted both for conservation and enhancement of biodiversity and to eradicate the scrapie in small ruminants. This paper utilises a precise method to quantify the genetic biodiversity in all sheep populations in Europe by a modern concept derived from informational statistics - informational energy. In addition, the paper proposes concrete and viable solutions to achieve these two desiderata at optimal levels in connection with a perfect perspicacity of sheep breeder which consists in accuracy of the reproduction process and correct application of the selection criteria.

  1. Urban park characteristics, genetic variation, and historical demography of white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus populations in New York City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Munshi-South

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Severe fragmentation is a typical fate of native remnant habitats in cities, and urban wildlife with limited dispersal ability are predicted to lose genetic variation in isolated urban patches. However, little information exists on the characteristics of urban green spaces required to conserve genetic variation. In this study, we examine whether isolation in New York City (NYC parks results in genetic bottlenecks in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus, and test the hypotheses that park size and time since isolation are associated with genetic variability using nonlinear regression and information-theoretic model selection. White-footed mice have previously been documented to exhibit male-biased dispersal, which may create disparities in genetic variation between males and females in urban parks. We use genotypes of 18 neutral microsatellite data and four different statistical tests to assess this prediction. Given that sex-biased dispersal may create disparities between population genetic patterns inferred from bi- vs. uni-parentally inherited markers, we also sequenced a 324 bp segment of the mitochondrial D-loop for independent inferences of historical demography in urban P. leucopus. We report that isolation in urban parks does not necessarily result in genetic bottlenecks; only three out of 14 populations in NYC parks exhibited a signature of a recent bottleneck at 18 neutral microsatellite loci. Mouse populations in larger urban parks, or parks that have been isolated for shorter periods of time, also do not generally contain greater genetic variation than populations in smaller parks. These results suggest that even small networks of green spaces may be sufficient to maintain the evolutionary potential of native species with certain characteristics. We also found that isolation in urban parks results in weak to nonexistent sex-biased dispersal in a species known to exhibit male-biased dispersal in less fragmented environments. In

  2. Tumor development, growth characteristics and spectrum of genetic aberrations in the TH-MYCN mouse model of neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Rasmuson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The TH-MYCN transgenic neuroblastoma model, with targeted MYCN expression to the developing neural crest, has been used to study neuroblastoma development and evaluate novel targeted tumor therapies. METHODS: We followed tumor development in 395 TH-MYCN (129X1/SvJ mice (125 negative, 206 hemizygous and 64 homozygous mice by abdominal palpations up to 40 weeks of age. DNA sequencing of MYCN in the original plasmid construct and mouse genomic DNA was done to verify the accuracy. Copy number analysis with Affymetrix® Mouse Diversity Genotyping Arrays was used to characterize acquired genetic aberrations. RESULTS: DNA sequencing confirmed presence of human MYCN cDNA in genomic TH-MYCN DNA corresponding to the original plasmid construct. Tumor incidence and growth correlated significantly to transgene status with event-free survival for hemizygous mice at 50%, and 0% for homozygous mice. Hemizygous mice developed tumors at 5.6-19 weeks (median 9.1 and homozygous mice at 4.0-6.9 weeks (5.4. The mean treatment window, time from palpable tumor to sacrifice, for hemizygous and homozygous mice was 15 and 5.2 days, respectively. Hemizygous mice developing tumors as early as homozygous mice had a longer treatment window. Age at tumor development did not influence treatment window for hemizygous mice, whereas treatment window in homozygous mice decreased significantly with increasing age. Seven out of 10 analysed tumors had a flat DNA profile with neither segmental nor numerical chromosomal aberrations. Only three tumors from hemizygous mice showed acquired genetic features with one or more numerical aberrations. Of these, one event corresponded to gain on the mouse equivalent of human chromosome 17. CONCLUSION: Hemizygous and homozygous TH-MYCN mice have significantly different neuroblastoma incidence, tumor growth characteristics and treatment windows but overlap in age at tumor development making correct early genotyping essential to evaluate

  3. In vivo regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase in the genetic mutant hph-1 mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, Richard S; Hyland, Keith

    2009-11-01

    The hph-1 mouse has low liver activity of GTP cyclohydrolase 1, the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)). BH(4) is the cofactor for phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) and in the early stages of life the hph-1 mouse is hyperphenylalaninemic. At approximately 15 days after birth the blood phenylalanine levels normalize. During this period the animals provide an in vivo model which can be used to study the regulatory effects of phenylalanine on PAH, and for related pediatric metabolic disease in humans; from birth to youth. We therefore, examined; liver PAH activity using BH(4) and 6-methyltetrahydropterin (6MPH(4)) as cofactor; PAH total enzyme concentration by Western blotting using the PH8 antibody, and PAH state of phosphorylation using the PH7 antibody from 4 to 18 days after birth. The findings were compared to the wild type animals that are not hyperphenylalaninemic during this period. PAH (6MPH(4)) activity and total protein (PH8 antibody) rose steadily in the hph-1 mice. In control mice, both activity and total protein fluctuated. The degree of phosphorylation of PAH in the mutants and the state of activation (as measured by the 6MPH(4)/BH(4) activity ratio) increased as phenylalanine levels rose, and decreased when they fell. Similar patterns were not seen in the control animals. These studies provide in vivo evidence that phenylalanine concentration regulates the activity of PAH in the hph-1 mouse and that this acts via a mechanism that includes phosphorylation of the PAH molecule. The kinetic values (K(m) and V(max)) for mouse PAH are also reported.

  4. 1 + 1 = 3: Development and validation of a SNP-based algorithm to identify genetic contributions from three distinct inbred mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham, James D; Ranson, Matthew S; Smith, Janebeth C; Gorham, Beverly J; Muirhead, Kristen-Ashley

    2012-12-01

    State-of-the-art, genome-wide assessment of mouse genetic background uses single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) PCR. As SNP analysis can use multiplex testing, it is amenable to high-throughput analysis and is the preferred method for shared resource facilities that offer genetic background assessment of mouse genomes. However, a typical individual SNP query yields only two alleles (A vs. B), limiting the application of this methodology to distinguishing contributions from no more than two inbred mouse strains. By contrast, simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) analysis yields multiple alleles but is not amenable to high-throughput testing. We sought to devise a SNP-based technique to identify donor strain origins when three distinct mouse strains potentially contribute to the genetic makeup of an individual mouse. A computational approach was used to devise a three-strain analysis (3SA) algorithm that would permit identification of three genetic backgrounds while still using a binary-output SNP platform. A panel of 15 mosaic mice with contributions from BALB/c, C57Bl/6, and DBA/2 genetic backgrounds was bred and analyzed using a genome-wide SNP panel using 1449 markers. The 3SA algorithm was applied and then validated using SSLP. The 3SA algorithm assigned 85% of 1449 SNPs as informative for the C57Bl/6, BALB/c, or DBA/2 backgrounds, respectively. Testing the panel of 15 F2 mice, the 3SA algorithm predicted donor strain origins genome-wide. Donor strain origins predicted by the 3SA algorithm correlated perfectly with results from individual SSLP markers located on five different chromosomes (n=70 tests). We have established and validated an analysis algorithm based on binary SNP data that can successfully identify the donor strain origins of chromosomal regions in mice that are bred from three distinct inbred mouse strains.

  5. Cross-species genetics converge to TLL2 for mouse avoidance behavior and human bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mooij-van Malsen, J G; van Lith, H A; Laarakker, M C; Brandys, M K; Oppelaar, H; Collier, D A; Olivier, B; Breen, G; Kas, M J

    2013-01-01

    Interspecies genetic analysis of neurobehavioral traits is critical for identifying neurobiological mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders, and for developing models for translational research. Recently, after screening a chromosome substitution strain panel in an automated home cage environmen

  6. Xenograft and genetically engineered mouse model systems of osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma: tumor models for cancer drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Valerie B; Kamara, Davida F; Kolb, E Anders

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There are > 75 histological types of solid tumors that are classified into two major groups: bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. These diseases are more prevalent in children, and pediatric sarcomas tend to be highly aggressive and rapidly progressive. Sarcomas in adults may follow a more indolent course, but aggressive tumors are also common. Sarcomas that are metastatic at diagnosis, or recurrent following therapy, remain refractory to current treatment options with dismal overall survival rates. A major focus of clinical trials, for patients with sarcoma, is to identify novel and more effective therapeutic strategies targeted to genomic or proteomic aberrations specific to the malignant cells. Critical to the understanding of the potential for targeted therapies are models of disease that are representative of clinical disease and predictive of relevant clinical responses. Areas covered In this article, the authors discuss the use of mouse xenograft models and genetically engineered mice in cancer drug discovery. The authors provide a special focus on models for the two most common bone sarcomas: osteosarcoma (OS) and Ewing's sarcoma (ES). Expert opinion Predicting whether a new anticancer agent will have a positive therapeutic index in patients with OS and ES remains a challenge. The use of mouse sarcoma models for understanding the mechanisms involved in the response of tumors to new treatments is an important step in the process of drug discovery and the development of clinically relevant therapeutic strategies for these diseases. PMID:23844615

  7. ALTERED SENSITIVITY OF THE MOUSE FETUS TO IMPAIRED PROSTATIC BUD FORMATION BY DIOXIN: INFLUENCE OF GENETIC BACKGROUND AND NULL EXPRESSION OF TGF-ALFA AND EGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altered sensitivity of the mouse fetus to impaired prostatic bud formation by dioxin: Influence of genetic background and null expression of TGF and EGF. Rasmussen, N.T., Lin T-M., Fenton, S.E., Abbott, B.D. and R.E. Peterson. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)...

  8. Histochemical studies on genetical control of hormonal enzyme inducibility in the mouse. I. Non-specific esterase activity and regional histology of the epididymis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blecher, S R; Kirkeby, S

    1978-01-01

    As a base line for future cell genetical studies the authors record the distribution of non-specific esterase reaction in the various histologically distinguishable cell types of the mouse epididymis. The findings are correlated with previous descriptions of the lobar structure of the organ...

  9. Impaired fear extinction learning and cortico-amygdala circuit abnormalities in a common genetic mouse strain

    OpenAIRE

    Hefner, Kathryn; Whittle, Nigel; Juhasz, Jaynann; Norcross, Maxine; Karlsson, Rose-Marie; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Singewald, Nicolas; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Fear extinction is a form of new learning that results in the inhibition of conditioned fear. Trait deficits in fear extinction are a risk factor for anxiety disorders. There are few examples of naturally-occurring animal models of impaired extinction. The present study compared fear extinction in a panel of inbred mouse strains. This strain survey revealed an impairment in fear extinction in 129/SvImJ (129S1). The phenotypic specificity of this deficit was evaluated by comparing 129S1 and C5...

  10. Reverse genetic studies of mitochondrial DNA-based diseases using a mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Nakada, Kazuto; Sato, Akitsugu; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2008-01-01

    In the situation that it would not be able to produce model animals for mitochondrial diseases caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) with pathogenic mutations, we succeeded in generating mice with pathogenic deletion mutant mtDNA (ΔmtDNA), named “mito-mice”, by direct introduction of mitochondria with ΔmtDNA into mouse zygotes. In the mito-mice, accumulation of ΔmtDNA induced mitochondrial respiration defects in various tissues, resulting in mitochondrial disease phenotypes, such as low body we...

  11. How genetically engineered systems are helping to define, and in some cases redefine, the neurobiological basis of sleep and wake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Patrick M; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Lazarus, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The advent of genetically engineered systems, including transgenic animals and recombinant viral vectors, has facilitated a more detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular substrates regulating brain function. In this review we highlight some of the most recent molecular biology and genetic technologies in the experimental "systems neurosciences," many of which are rapidly becoming a methodological standard, and focus in particular on those tools and techniques that permit the reversible and cell-type specific manipulation of neurons in behaving animals. These newer techniques encompass a wide range of approaches including conditional deletion of genes based on Cre/loxP technology, gene silencing using RNA interference, cell-type specific mapping or ablation and reversible manipulation (silencing and activation) of neurons in vivo. Combining these approaches with viral vector delivery systems, in particular adeno-associated viruses (AAV), has extended, in some instances greatly, the utility of these tools. For example, the spatially- and/or temporally-restricted transduction of specific neuronal cell populations is now routinely achieved using the combination of Cre-driver mice and stereotaxic-based delivery of AAV expressing Cre-dependent cassettes. We predict that the experimental application of these tools, including creative combinatorial approaches and the development of even newer reagents, will prove necessary for a complete understanding of the neuronal circuits subserving most neurobiological functions, including the regulation of sleep and wake.

  12. Gene × Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia: Evidence from Genetic Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Julia; Bock, Gavin; Desbonnet, Lieve; Waddington, John

    2016-01-01

    The study of gene × environment, as well as epistatic interactions in schizophrenia, has provided important insight into the complex etiopathologic basis of schizophrenia. It has also increased our understanding of the role of susceptibility genes in the disorder and is an important consideration as we seek to translate genetic advances into novel antipsychotic treatment targets. This review summarises data arising from research involving the modelling of gene × environment interactions in schizophrenia using preclinical genetic models. Evidence for synergistic effects on the expression of schizophrenia-relevant endophenotypes will be discussed. It is proposed that valid and multifactorial preclinical models are important tools for identifying critical areas, as well as underlying mechanisms, of convergence of genetic and environmental risk factors, and their interaction in schizophrenia. PMID:27725886

  13. Fine genetic mapping of the Hyp mutation on mouse chromosome X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Lisheng; Desbarats, M.; Cornibert, S.; Malo, D.; Ecarot, B. [McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada)

    1996-03-01

    The hypophosphatemic (Hyp) mouse is the murine homolog of hypophosphatemic vitamin-D-resistant rickets (HYP) in human. Despite extensive investigations in the Hyp mouse, the pathophysiology of this X-linked dominant disorder remains unclear. As a first step toward cloning the Hyp gene, we have generated a high-resolution linkage map in the vicinity of the Hyp locus using two independent backcross panels segregating the Hyp mutation, one generated from an interspecific mating between C57BL/6J-Hyp/Hyp and Mus spretus and the other from an intrasubspecific mating between C57BL/6J-Hyp/Hyp and Mus musculus castaneus. Linkage analyses in 1101 backcross progeny using a total of 23 DNA markers favor the following gene order from the centromere: DXMit13-(DXMit11, DXMit34)-(DXMit36, Alas2)-(Hyp, DXMit80)-DXMit98-(DXMit28, DXMit33, DXMit70)-Pdhal-DXMit20. This study has localized Hyp to a region of approximately 1 cM flanked by the proximal markers DXMit36 and Alas2 and the distal marker DSMit98. One microsatellite marker, DXMit80, was found to be very tightly linked to Hyp, as it was nonrecombinant with Hyp among all the progeny of both backcrosses corresponding to 1101 meioses. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Mouse models for studying genetic influences on factors determining smoking cessation success in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, F. Scott; Markou, Athina; Levin, Edward D.; Uhl, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Humans differ in their ability to quit using addictive substances, including nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in tobacco. For tobacco smoking, a substantial body of evidence, largely derived from twin studies, indicates that approximately half of these individual differences in ability to quit are heritable [1, 2], genetic influences that likely overlap with those for other addictive substances [3]. Both twin and molecular genetic studies support overlapping influences on nicotine addiction vulnerability and smoking cessation success, although there is little formal analysis of the twin data that supports this important point [2, 3]. None of the current datasets provides clear data concerning which heritable factors might provide robust dimensions around which individuals differ in ability to quit smoking. One approach to this problem is to test mice with genetic variations in genes that contain human variants that alter quit-success. This review considers which features of quit success should be included in a comprehensive approach to elucidating the genetics of quit success, and how those features may be modeled in mice. PMID:22304675

  15. Genetic ablation of NMDA receptor subunit NR3B in mouse reveals motoneuronal and nonmotoneuronal phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Stephan; Kanki, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuyuki; Takao, Keizo; Fukaya, Masahiro; Hynynen, Meri N; Churchill, Michael J; Shefner, Jeremy M; Bronson, Roderick T; Brown, Robert H; Watanabe, Masahiko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Hayashi, Yasunori

    2007-09-01

    NR3B is a modulatory subunit of the NMDA receptor, abundantly expressed in both cranial and spinal somatic motoneurons and at lower levels in other regions of the brain as well. Recently, we found the human NR3B gene (GRIN3B) to be highly genetically heterogeneous, and that approximately 10% of the normal European-American population lacks NR3B due to homozygous occurrence of a null allele in the gene. Therefore, it is especially important to understand the phenotypic consequences of the genetic loss of NR3B in both humans and animal models. We here provide results of behavioral analysis of mice genetically lacking NR3B, which is an ideal animal model due to homogeneity in genetic and environmental background. The NR3B(-/-) mice are viable and fertile. Consistent with the expression of NR3B in somatic motoneurons, the NR3B(-/-) mice showed a moderate but significant impairment in motor learning or coordination, and decreased activity in their home cages. Remarkably, the NR3B(-/-) mice showed a highly increased social interaction with their familiar cage mates in their home cage but moderately increased anxiety-like behaviour and decreased social interaction in a novel environment, consistent with the inhibitory role of NR3B on the functions of NMDA receptors. This work is the first reporting of the functional significance of NR3B in vivo and may give insight into the contribution of genetic variability of NR3B in the phenotypic heterogeneity among human population.

  16. Genetic control of mammalian meiotic recombination. I. Variation in exchange frequencies among males from inbred mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Kara E; Cherry, Jonathan P; Lynn, Audrey; Hunt, Patricia A; Hassold, Terry J

    2002-09-01

    Genetic background effects on the frequency of meiotic recombination have long been suspected in mice but never demonstrated in a systematic manner, especially in inbred strains. We used a recently described immunostaining technique to assess meiotic exchange patterns in male mice. We found that among four different inbred strains--CAST/Ei, A/J, C57BL/6, and SPRET/Ei--the mean number of meiotic exchanges per cell and, thus, the recombination rates in these genetic backgrounds were significantly different. These frequencies ranged from a low of 21.5 exchanges in CAST/Ei to a high of 24.9 in SPRET/Ei. We also found that, as expected, these crossover events were nonrandomly distributed and displayed positive interference. However, we found no evidence for significant differences in the patterns of crossover positioning between strains with different exchange frequencies. From our observations of >10,000 autosomal synaptonemal complexes, we conclude that achiasmate bivalents arise in the male mouse at a frequency of 0.1%. Thus, special mechanisms that segregate achiasmate chromosomes are unlikely to be an important component of mammalian male meiosis.

  17. The role of Smad signaling in vascular and hematopoietic development revealed by studies using genetic mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Smads are intracellular mediators of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily signaling. In this review, we focus on the genetic mouse models for Smad pathways, which have provided functional evidence regarding the complex circuitry in angiogenesis and hematopoiesis during development. In the early stages of vascular development, TGF-β signaling is a contri buting factor in angiogenesis and vascular maturation. Whereas in the later embryogenesis, selected molecules of Smad pathways, such as TGF-β type II receptor (TbRII), ALK5, and Smad5, seem to be dispensable for vessel morphogenesis and integrity. TGF-β signaling is not required in the induction of hematopoietic precursors from mesoderm, but inhibits the subsequent expansion of committed hematopoietic precursors. By contrast, bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) has long been acknowledged pivotal in mesoderm induction and hematopoietic commitment during development. However, recent genetic evidence shows the BMP4-ALK3 axis is not crucial for the formation of hematopoietic cells from FLK1+ mesoderm. Because of the highly redundant mechanisms within the Smad pathways, the precise role of the Smad signaling involved in vascular and hematopoietic development remains nebulous. The generation of novel cell lineage restricted Cre transgenes would shed new light on the future relevant investigations.

  18. Mouse Aortic Ring Assay: A New Approach of the Molecular Genetics of Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masson Véronique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, a key step in many physiological and pathological processes, involves proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. To study the role of two enzymatic families, serine-proteases and matrix metalloproteases in angiogenesis, we have adapted to the mouse, the aortic ring assay initially developed in the rat. The use of deficient mice allowed us to demonstrate that PAI-1 is essential for angiogenesis while the absence of an MMP, MMP-11, did not affect vessel sprouting. We report here that this model is attractive to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of angiogenesis, to identify, characterise or screen "pro- or anti-angiogenic agents that could be used for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent diseases. Approaches include using recombinant proteins, synthetic molecules and adenovirus-mediated gene transfer.

  19. Comparative action spectrum for ultraviolet light killing of mouse melanocytes from different genetic coat color backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, H.Z.; Xin, P. [New Jersey Medical School, Newark (United States). Section of Cancer Biology; Hill, G.J. [New Jersey Medical School, Newark (United States). Division of Surgical Oncology; Cieszka, K.; Plonka, P.M. [Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland). Inst. of Molecular Biology; Mitchell, D.L. [University of Texas, Smithville (United States); Meyenhofer, M.F. [New Jersey Medical School, Newark (United States). Central EM Facility; Boissy, R.E. [University of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Dermatology

    1997-06-01

    The photobiology of mouse melanocyte lines with different pigment genotypes was studied by measuring colony-forming ability after irradiation. The cell lines were wild-type black (melan-a) and the mutants brown (melan-b) and albino (melan-c). Four lamps emitting various UV wavelengths were used. These were germicidal (UVC, 200-280 nm), 82.3% output at 254 nm, TL01 (UVB, 280-320 nm), 64.2% at 310-311 nm, FS20, broadband with peak output at 312 nm and Alisun-S (UVA, 320-400 nm), broadband with peak output at 350-354 nm. Appropriate filtration reduced the contaminating UVC to nonlethal levels for the longer waverange lamps. It is clear from these studies that, in pigment cells, monochromatic results cannot predict polychromatic responses and that cell death from solar irradiations is a complex phenomenon that depends on more than DNA damage. (author).

  20. Genetic effects of 1,3-butadiene on the mouse testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkworth, M H; Anderson, D; Hughes, J A; Jackson, L I; Yu, T W; Nieschlag, E

    1998-01-16

    1,3-Butadiene is a known male mouse germ-cell mutagen, to which humans may either be occupationally or environmentally exposed. Prolonged exposure to moderate or high doses in male mice can cause dominant lethal mutations and one report has indicated that 10 week inhalation administration of low doses can result in the production of malformed foetuses. The present study had dual purposes: (a) to attempt to clarify the suspected ability of sub-chronic (6 h/day, 5 days/wk, 10 weeks) low-dose exposure to 1,3-butadiene to induce heritable mutations in mouse male germ cells: (b) investigation of the relationships between testicular DNA damage, testicular DNA repair and foetal outcome. Adult male mice were exposed to low or moderate doses of 1,3-butadiene by inhalation sub-chronically or for a single 6 h period and either used for mating (sub-chronic exposure only) or for studies of DNA damage and repair. Litter size, dominant lethality and numbers of abnormal foetuses were determined the day preceding the normal day of parturition. Testicular DNA damage and repair were assessed by the Comet assay (for DNA damage) and the unscheduled DNA synthesis assay (for DNA repair). 1,3-Butadiene caused a statistically significant increase in dominant lethality at 125 ppm but not 12.5 ppm. No significant increase in DNA repair was found with either dose level or exposure period while only 6 h exposure to 125 ppm caused a small but significant increase in DNA damage as detected by the Comet assay. These effects demonstrate the reproductive genotoxicity of (125 ppm) 1,3-butadiene but do not confirm its ability to cause abnormalities in the offspring via the sperm. It is suggested that the relationship between 1,3-butadiene-induced DNA damage, DNA repair and heritable defects in the offspring may depend on the pattern of metabolites produced.

  1. A New Comparative-Genomics Approach for Defining Phenotype-Specific Indicators Reveals Specific Genetic Markers in Predatory Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Zohar; Ben Sasson, Tom; Cohen, Yossi; Segev, Elad; Jurkevitch, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Predatory bacteria seek and consume other live bacteria. Although belonging to taxonomically diverse groups, relatively few bacterial predator species are known. Consequently, it is difficult to assess the impact of predation within the bacterial realm. As no genetic signatures distinguishing them from non-predatory bacteria are known, genomic resources cannot be exploited to uncover novel predators. In order to identify genes specific to predatory bacteria, we developed a bioinformatic tool called DiffGene. This tool automatically identifies marker genes that are specific to phenotypic or taxonomic groups, by mapping the complete gene content of all available fully-sequenced genomes for the presence/absence of each gene in each genome. A putative 'predator region' of ~60 amino acids in the tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) protein was found to probably be a predator-specific marker. This region is found in all known obligate predator and a few facultative predator genomes, and is absent from most facultative predators and all non-predatory bacteria. We designed PCR primers that uniquely amplify a ~180bp-long sequence within the predators' TDO gene, and validated them in monocultures as well as in metagenetic analysis of environmental wastewater samples. This marker, in addition to its usage in predator identification and phylogenetics, may finally permit reliable enumeration and cataloguing of predatory bacteria from environmental samples, as well as uncovering novel predators.

  2. Somatic genetics empowers the mouse for modeling and interrogating developmental and disease processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrette, Sean F; Xu, Tian

    2011-07-01

    With recent advances in genomic technologies, candidate human disease genes are being mapped at an accelerated pace. There is a clear need to move forward with genetic tools that can efficiently validate these mutations in vivo. Murine somatic mutagenesis is evolving to fulfill these needs with tools such as somatic transgenesis, humanized rodents, and forward genetics. By combining these resources one is not only able to model disease for in vivo verification, but also to screen for mutations and pathways integral to disease progression and therapeutic intervention. In this review, we briefly outline the current advances in somatic mutagenesis and discuss how these new tools, especially the piggyBac transposon system, can be applied to decipher human biology and disease.

  3. Genetic Ablation of the ClC-2 Cl- Channel Disrupts Mouse Gastric Parietal Cell Acid Secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghali P Nighot

    Full Text Available The present studies were designed to examine the effects of ClC-2 ablation on cellular morphology, parietal cell abundance, H/K ATPase expression, parietal cell ultrastructure and acid secretion using WT and ClC-2-/- mouse stomachs. Cellular histology, morphology and proteins were examined using imaging techniques, electron microscopy and western blot. The effect of histamine on the pH of gastric contents was measured. Acid secretion was also measured using methods and secretagogues previously established to give maximal acid secretion and morphological change. Compared to WT, ClC-2-/- gastric mucosal histological organization appeared disrupted, including dilation of gastric glands, shortening of the gastric gland region and disorganization of all cell layers. Parietal cell numbers and H/K ATPase expression were significantly reduced by 34% (P<0.05 and 53% (P<0.001 respectively and cytoplasmic tubulovesicles appeared markedly reduced on electron microscopic evaluation without evidence of canalicular expansion. In WT parietal cells, ClC-2 was apparent in a similar cellular location as the H/K ATPase by immunofluorescence and appeared associated with tubulovesicles by immunogold electron microscopy. Histamine-stimulated [H+] of the gastric contents was significantly (P<0.025 lower by 9.4 fold (89% in the ClC-2-/- mouse compared to WT. Histamine/carbachol stimulated gastric acid secretion was significantly reduced (range 84-95%, P<0.005 in ClC-2-/- compared to WT, while pepsinogen secretion was unaffected. Genetic ablation of ClC-2 resulted in reduced gastric gland region, reduced parietal cell number, reduced H/K ATPase, reduced tubulovesicles and reduced stimulated acid secretion.

  4. Role of oxygen tension and genetic background during the epigenetic conversion of mouse fibroblasts into insulin secreting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Zenobi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic cell conversion overcomes the stability of a mature cell phenotype transforming a somatic cell in an unlimited source of autologous cells of a different type. It is based on the exposure to a demethylating agent followed by an induction protocol. In our work we exposed mouse dermal fibroblasts to the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. Cell differentiation was directed toward the endocrine pancreatic lineage with a sequential combination of Activin A, Retinoic Acid, B27 supplement, ITS and bFGF. The overall duration of the process was 10 days. Aim of this work was to evaluate the role of oxygen during differentiation of dermal fibroblasts derived from two different mouse strains, NOD and C57 BL/6J. During differentiation, both cell lines were cultured either in the standard in vitro culture 20% oxygen concentration or in the lower and more physiological 5% of oxygen. Our results show that C57 BL/6J cells are able to differentiate into insulin secreting cells in both oxygen tensions with a higher amount of insulin release in low oxygen conditions. On the other hand, cells of NOD mice, which are physiologically predisposed to the onset of diabetes, differentiate in 20% of oxygen but not in low oxygen and they died after three days of culture. However, if these cells are moved to 5% of oxygen after their differentiation in high oxygen they remain viable for up to four days. Furthermore, their capacity to release insulin remains unchanged for 24 hours. Results suggest that genetic background has a profound effect on the role of oxygen during the in vitro differentiation process, possibly reflecting the different susceptibility to the disease of the strains used in the experiment.Supported by EFSD and Carraresi Foundation

  5. Mouse and Human Genetic Analyses Associate Kalirin with Ventral Striatal Activation during Impulsivity and with Alcohol Misuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Oliver, Yolanda; Carvalho, Fabiana M.; Sanchez-Roige, Sandra; Quinlan, Erin B.; Jia, Tianye; Walker-Tilley, Tom; Rulten, Stuart L.; Pearl, Frances M. G.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia J.; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Heinz, Andreas; Gowland, Penny; Paillere Martinot, Marie-Laure; Paus, Tomáš; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael N.; Schumann, Gunter; Stephens, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with a spectrum of psychiatric disorders including drug addiction. To investigate genetic associations with impulsivity and initiation of drug taking, we took a two-step approach. First, we identified genes whose expression level in prefrontal cortex, striatum and accumbens were associated with impulsive behavior in the 5-choice serial reaction time task across 10 BXD recombinant inbred (BXD RI) mouse strains and their progenitor C57BL/6J and DBA2/J strains. Behavioral data were correlated with regional gene expression using GeneNetwork (www.genenetwork.org), to identify 44 genes whose probability of association with impulsivity exceeded a false discovery rate of < 0.05. We then interrogated the IMAGEN database of 1423 adolescents for potential associations of SNPs in human homologs of those genes identified in the mouse study, with brain activation during impulsive performance in the Monetary Incentive Delay task, and with novelty seeking scores from the Temperament and Character Inventory, as well as alcohol experience. There was a significant overall association between the human homologs of impulsivity-related genes and percentage of premature responses in the MID task and with fMRI BOLD-response in ventral striatum (VS) during reward anticipation. In contrast, no significant association was found between the polygenic scores and anterior cingulate cortex activation. Univariate association analyses revealed that the G allele (major) of the intronic SNP rs6438839 in the KALRN gene was significantly associated with increased VS activation. Additionally, the A-allele (minor) of KALRN intronic SNP rs4634050, belonging to the same haplotype block, was associated with increased frequency of binge drinking. PMID:27092175

  6. Analysis of the cartilage proteome from three different mouse models of genetic skeletal diseases reveals common and discrete disease signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Bell

    2013-06-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia are genetic skeletal diseases resulting from mutations in cartilage structural proteins. Electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry previously showed that the appearance of the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM in targeted mouse models of these diseases is disrupted; however, the precise changes in ECM organization and the pathological consequences remain unknown. Our aim was to determine the effects of matrilin-3 and COMP mutations on the composition and extractability of ECM components to inform how these detrimental changes might influence cartilage organization and degeneration. Cartilage was sequentially extracted using increasing denaturants and the extraction profiles of specific proteins determined using SDS-PAGE/Western blotting. Furthermore, the relative composition of protein pools was determined using mass spectrometry for a non-biased semi-quantitative analysis. Western blotting revealed changes in the extraction of matrilins, COMP and collagen IX in mutant cartilage. Mass spectrometry confirmed quantitative changes in the extraction of structural and non-structural ECM proteins, including proteins with roles in cellular processes such as protein folding and trafficking. In particular, genotype-specific differences in the extraction of collagens XII and XIV and tenascins C and X were identified; interestingly, increased expression of several of these genes has recently been implicated in susceptibility and/or progression of murine osteoarthritis. We demonstrated that mutation of matrilin-3 and COMP caused changes in the extractability of other cartilage proteins and that proteomic analyses of Matn3 V194D, Comp T585M and Comp DelD469 mouse models revealed both common and discrete disease signatures that provide novel insight into skeletal disease mechanisms and cartilage degradation.

  7. Mouse and human genetic analyses associate kalirin with ventral striatal activation during impulsivity and with alcohol misuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda ePeña-Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Impulsivity is associated with a spectrum of psychiatric disorders including drug addiction. To investigate genetic associations with impulsivity and initiation of drug taking, we took a two-step approach. First, we identified genes whose expression level in prefrontal cortex, striatum and accumbens were associated with impulsive behaviour in the 5-choice serial reaction time task across 10 BXD recombinant inbred (BXD RI mouse strains and their progenitor C57BL/6J and DBA2/J strains. Behavioural data were correlated with regional gene expression using GeneNetwork (www.genenetwork.org, to identify 44 genes whose probability of association with impulsivity exceeded a false discovery rate of <0.05. We then interrogated the IMAGEN database of 1423 adolescents for potential associations of SNPs in human homologues of those genes identified in the mouse study, with brain activation during impulsive performance in the Monetary Incentive Delay task, and with novelty seeking scores from the Temperament and Character Inventory, as well as alcohol-experience. There was a significant overall association between the human homologues of impulsivity-related genes and percentage of premature responses in the MID task and with fMRI BOLD-response in ventral striatum (VS during reward anticipation. In contrast, no significant association was found between the polygenic scores and anterior cingulate cortex activation. Univariate association analyses revealed that the G allele (major of the intronic SNP rs6438839 in the KALRN gene was significantly associated with increased VS activation. Additionally, the A-allele (minor of KALRN intronic SNP rs4634050, belonging to the same haplotype block, was associated with increased frequency of binge drinking.

  8. Dimethylaminoparthenolide and gemcitabine: a survival study using a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest cancers due to lack of early detection and absence of effective treatments. Gemcitabine, the current standard-of-care chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer, has limited clinical benefit. Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with gemcitabine has been shown to induce the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) which regulates the expression of genes involved in the inflammatory response and tumorigenesis. It has therefore been proposed that gemcitabine-induced NF-κB activation may result in chemoresistance. We hypothesize that NF-κB suppression by the novel inhibitor dimethylaminoparthenolide (DMAPT) may enhance the effect of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. Methods The efficacy of DMAPT and gemcitabine was evaluated in a chemoprevention trial using the mutant Kras and p53-expressing LSL-KrasG12D/+; LSL-Trp53R172H; Pdx-1-Cre mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Mice were randomized to treatment groups (placebo, DMAPT [40 mg/kg/day], gemcitabine [50 mg/kg twice weekly], and the combination DMAPT/gemcitabine). Treatment was continued until mice showed signs of ill health at which time they were sacrificed. Plasma cytokine levels were determined using a Bio-Plex immunoassay. Statistical tests used included log-rank test, ANOVA with Dunnett’s post-test, Student’s t-test, and Fisher exact test. Results Gemcitabine or the combination DMAPT/gemcitabine significantly increased median survival and decreased the incidence and multiplicity of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The DMAPT/gemcitabine combination also significantly decreased tumor size and the incidence of metastasis to the liver. No significant differences in the percentages of normal pancreatic ducts or premalignant pancreatic lesions were observed between the treatment groups. Pancreata in which no tumors formed were analyzed to determine the extent of pre-neoplasia; mostly normal ducts or low grade pancreatic lesions were

  9. The episode of genetic drift defining the migration of humans out of Africa is derived from a large east African population size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha Elhassan

    Full Text Available Human genetic variation particularly in Africa is still poorly understood. This is despite a consensus on the large African effective population size compared to populations from other continents. Based on sequencing of the mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase subunit II (MT-CO2, and genome wide microsatellite data we observe evidence suggesting the effective size (Ne of humans to be larger than the current estimates, with a foci of increased genetic diversity in east Africa, and a population size of east Africans being at least 2-6 fold larger than other populations. Both phylogenetic and network analysis indicate that east Africans possess more ancestral lineages in comparison to various continental populations placing them at the root of the human evolutionary tree. Our results also affirm east Africa as the likely spot from which migration towards Asia has taken place. The study reflects the spectacular level of sequence variation within east Africans in comparison to the global sample, and appeals for further studies that may contribute towards filling the existing gaps in the database. The implication of these data to current genomic research, as well as the need to carry out defined studies of human genetic variation that includes more African populations; particularly east Africans is paramount.

  10. Lights on for HIF-1α: genetically enhanced mouse cardiomyocytes for heart tissue imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Amke R; Levent, Elif; Zieseniss, Anke; Tiburcy, Malte; Zimmermann, Wolfram H; Katschinski, Dörthe M

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a suitable marker for tissue oxygenation. We intended to develop cardiomyocytes (CMs) expressing the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1α fused to the firefly luciferase (ODD-Luc) followed by proof-of-concept for its applicability in the assessment of heart muscle oxygenation. We first generated embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines (ODD-Luc ESCs) from a Tg ROSA26 ODD-Luc/+ mouse. Subsequent CMs selection was facilitated by stable integration of an antibiotic resistance expressed under the control of the αMHC promoter. ODD-Luc ESCs showed a strong Luc-signal within 1 h of hypoxia (1% oxygen), which coincided with endogenous HIF-1α. Engineered heart muscle (EHM) constructed with ODD-Luc CMs confirmed the utility of the model to sense hypoxia, and monitor reoxygenation also in a multicellular heart muscle model. Pharmacologically induced inotropy/chronotropy under isoprenaline resulted in enhanced Luc-signal suggesting enhanced oxygen consumption, leading to notable myocardial hypoxia. ODD-Luc-CMs can be used to monitor dynamic changes of cardiomyocyte oxygenation in living heart muscle samples. We provide proof-of-concept for pharmacologically induced myocardial interventions and envision applications of the developed model in drug screens and fundamental studies of ischemia/reperfusion injury. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Lights on for HIF-1α: Genetically Enhanced Mouse Cardiomyocytes for Heart Tissue Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amke R. Hesse

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is a suitable marker for tissue oxygenation. We intended to develop cardiomyocytes (CMs expressing the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1α fused to the firefly luciferase (ODD-Luc followed by proof-of-concept for its applicability in the assessment of heart muscle oxygenation. Methods and Results: We first generated embryonic stem cell (ESC lines (ODD-Luc ESCs from a Tg ROSA26 ODD-Luc/+ mouse. Subsequent CMs selection was facilitated by stable integration of an antibiotic resistance expressed under the control of the αMHC promoter. ODD-Luc ESCs showed a strong Luc-signal within 1 h of hypoxia (1% oxygen, which coincided with endogenous HIF-1α. Engineered heart muscle (EHM constructed with ODD-Luc CMs confirmed the utility of the model to sense hypoxia, and monitor reoxygenation also in a multicellular heart muscle model. Pharmacologically induced inotropy/chronotropy under isoprenaline resulted in enhanced Luc-signal suggesting enhanced oxygen consumption, leading to notable myocardial hypoxia. Conclusions: ODD-Luc-CMs can be used to monitor dynamic changes of cardiomyocyte oxygenation in living heart muscle samples. We provide proof-of-concept for pharmacologically induced myocardial interventions and envision applications of the developed model in drug screens and fundamental studies of ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  12. High-resolution genetic mapping in the diversity outbred mouse population identifies Apobec1 as a candidate gene for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Tangi L; Gatti, Daniel M; Quizon, Pamela; Weinstock, George M; Jung, Kuo-Chen; Zhao, Liyang; Hua, Kunjie; Pomp, Daniel; Bennett, Brian J

    2014-10-23

    Inbred mice exhibit strain-specific variation in susceptibility to atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia that renders them useful in dissecting the genetic architecture of these complex diseases. Traditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping studies using inbred strains often identify large genomic regions, containing many genes, due to limited recombination and/or sample size. This hampers candidate gene identification and translation of these results into possible risk factors and therapeutic targets. An alternative approach is the use of multiparental outbred lines for genetic mapping, such as the Diversity Outbred (DO) mouse panel, which can be more informative than traditional two-parent crosses and can aid in the identification of causal genes and variants associated with QTL. We fed 292 female DO mice either a high-fat, cholesterol-containing (HFCA) diet, to induce atherosclerosis, or a low-fat, high-protein diet for 18 wk and measured plasma lipid levels before and after diet treatment. We measured markers of atherosclerosis in the mice fed the HFCA diet. The mice were genotyped on a medium-density single-nucleotide polymorphism array and founder haplotypes were reconstructed using a hidden Markov model. The reconstructed haplotypes were then used to perform linkage mapping of atherosclerotic lesion size as well as plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and glucose. Among our highly significant QTL we detected a ~100 kb QTL interval for atherosclerosis on Chromosome 6, as well as a 1.4 Mb QTL interval on Chromosome 9 for triglyceride levels at baseline and a coincident 22.2 Mb QTL interval on Chromosome 9 for total cholesterol after dietary treatment. One candidate gene within the Chromosome 6 peak region associated with atherosclerosis is Apobec1, the apolipoprotein B (ApoB) mRNA-editing enzyme, which plays a role in the regulation of ApoB, a critical component of low-density lipoprotein, by editing ApoB mRNA. This study demonstrates the value

  13. Host genetics and environmental factors regulate ecological succession of the mouse colon tissue-associated microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The integration of host genetics, environmental triggers and the microbiota is a recognised factor in the pathogenesis of barrier function diseases such as IBD. In order to determine how these factors interact to regulate the host immune response and ecological succession of the colon tissue-associated microbiota, we investigated the temporal interaction between the microbiota and the host following disruption of the colonic epithelial barrier. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Oral administration of DSS was applied as a mechanistic model of environmental damage of the colon and the resulting inflammation characterized for various parameters over time in WT and Nod2 KO mice. RESULTS: In WT mice, DSS damage exposed the host to the commensal flora and led to a migration of the tissue-associated bacteria from the epithelium to mucosal and submucosal layers correlating with changes in proinflammatory cytokine profiles and a progressive transition from acute to chronic inflammation of the colon. Tissue-associated bacteria levels peaked at day 21 post-DSS and declined thereafter, correlating with recruitment of innate immune cells and development of the adaptive immune response. Histological parameters, immune cell infiltration and cytokine biomarkers of inflammation were indistinguishable between Nod2 and WT littermates following DSS, however, Nod2 KO mice demonstrated significantly higher tissue-associated bacterial levels in the colon. DSS damage and Nod2 genotype independently regulated the community structure of the colon microbiota. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of these experiments demonstrate the integration of environmental and genetic factors in the ecological succession of the commensal flora in mammalian tissue. The association of Nod2 genotype (and other host polymorphisms and environmental factors likely combine to influence the ecological succession of the tissue-associated microflora accounting in part for their

  14. Genetic and cellular dissection of the activation of AM14 rheumatoid factor B cells in a mouse model of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Allison; Zheng, Ying Yi; Choi, Seung-Chul; Zeumer, Leilani; Morel, Laurence

    2015-08-01

    The RF-specific AM14 tg BCR has been used as a model to dissect the mechanisms of B cell tolerance to ICs containing nucleic acids. We have shown previously that AM14 RF B cells break tolerance in the TC mouse model of lupus through the dual engagement of the AM14 BCR and TLR9. In this study, we showed that neither the expression of Sle1 or Sle2 susceptibility loci alone was sufficient to activate AM14 RF B cells, suggesting that the production of antichromatin IgG2a(a) autoAg mediated by Sle1 and an intrinsically higher B cell activation mediated by Sle2 were required. We also showed that the B6 genetic background enhanced the selection of AM14 RF B cells to the MZB cell compartment regardless of the expression of the Sle loci and therefore, of their activation into AFCs. Furthermore, some AM14 RF B cells were selected into the B-1a compartment, where they did not differentiate into AFCs. Therefore, it is unlikely that the selection of AM14 RF B cells to the MZB or B-1a cell compartments in TC.AM14(a) mice is responsible for their breach of tolerance. Finally, we showed that the presence of expression of Sle1 in non-tg cells, most likely T cells, is necessary for the activation of AM14 RF B cells into AFCs. Overall, these results suggest a threshold model of activation of AM14 RF B cells on the B6 background with additive genetic and cellular contribution of multiple sources. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  15. Genetic ablation of caspase-7 promotes solar-simulated light-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis: the involvement of keratin-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Sung-Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dong Joon; Jung, Sung Keun; Yao, Ke; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Cheol-Jung; Dickinson, Sally E; Alberts, David; Bowden, G Timothy; Stratton, Steven; Curiel, Clara; Einspahr, Janine; Bode, Ann M; Surh, Young-Joon; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Dong, Zigang

    2015-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet irradiation is an environmental carcinogen that causes skin cancer. Caspase-7 is reportedly expressed at reduced levels in many cancers. The present study was designed to examine the role of caspase-7 in solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin cancer and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our study revealed that mice with genetic deficiency of caspase-7 are highly susceptible to SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis. Epidermal hyperplasia, tumor volume and the average number of tumors were significantly increased in caspase-7 knockout (KO) mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice irradiated with SSL. The expression of cell proliferation markers, such as survivin and Ki-67, was elevated in SSL-irradiated skin of caspase-7 KO mice compared with those observed in SSL-exposed wild-type SKH1 mouse skin. Moreover, SSL-induced apoptosis was abolished in skin from caspase-7 KO mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight analysis of skin tissue lysates from SSL-irradiated SKH1 wild-type and caspase-7 KO mice revealed an aberrant induction of keratin-17 in caspase-7 KO mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin tumors also showed an increase of keratin-17 expression in caspase-7 KO mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice. The expression of keratin-17 was also elevated in SSL-irradiated caspase-7 KO keratinocytes as well as in human basal cell carcinomas. The in vitro caspase activity assay showed keratin-17 as a substrate of caspase-7, but not caspase-3. Overall, our study demonstrates that genetic loss of caspase-7 promotes SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis by blocking caspase-7-mediated cleavage of keratin-17.

  16. Genetic mapping of escalated aggression in wild-derived mouse strain MSM/Ms: association with serotonin-related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese wild-derived mouse strain MSM/Ms (MSM retains a wide range of traits related to behavioral wildness, including high levels of emotionality and avoidance of humans. In this study, we observed that MSM showed a markedly higher level of aggression than the standard laboratory strain C57BL/6J. Whereas almost all MSM males showed high frequencies of attack bites and pursuit in the resident-intruder test, only a few C57BL/6J males showed aggressive behaviors, with these behaviors observed at only a low frequency. Sexually mature MSM males in their home cages killed their littermates, or sometimes female pair-mates. To study the genetic and neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the escalated aggression observed in MSM mice, we analyzed reciprocal F1 crosses and five consomic strains of MSM (Chr 4, 13, 15, X and Y against the background of C57BL/6J. We identified two chromosomes, Chr 4 and Chr 15, which were involved in the heightened aggression observed in MSM. These chromosomes had different effects on aggression: whereas MSM Chr 15 increased agitation and initiation of aggressive events, MSM Chr 4 induced a maladaptive level of aggressive behavior. Expression analysis of mRNAs of serotonin receptors, serotonin transporter and Tph2, an enzyme involved in serotonin synthesis in seven brain areas, indicated several differences among MSM, C57BL/6J, and their consomic strains. We found that Tph2 expression in the midbrain was increased in the Chr 4 consomic strain, as well as in MSM, and that there was a strong positive genetic correlation between aggressive behavior and Tph2 expression at the mRNA level. Therefore, it is possible that increased expression of the Tph2 gene is related to escalated aggression observed in MSM.

  17. Genetic interactions between Shox2 and Hox genes during the regional growth and development of the mouse limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Stanley J; Wang, Fan; Cobb, John

    2014-11-01

    The growth and development of the vertebrate limb relies on homeobox genes of the Hox and Shox families, with their independent mutation often giving dose-dependent effects. Here we investigate whether Shox2 and Hox genes function together during mouse limb development by modulating their relative dosage and examining the limb for nonadditive effects on growth. Using double mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in single embryos, we first show that Shox2 and Hox genes have associated spatial expression dynamics, with Shox2 expression restricted to the proximal limb along with Hoxd9 and Hoxa11 expression, juxtaposing the distal expression of Hoxa13 and Hoxd13. By generating mice with all possible dosage combinations of mutant Shox2 alleles and HoxA/D cluster deletions, we then show that their coordinated proximal limb expression is critical to generate normally proportioned limb segments. These epistatic interactions tune limb length, where Shox2 underexpression enhances, and Shox2 overexpression suppresses, Hox-mutant phenotypes. Disruption of either Shox2 or Hox genes leads to a similar reduction in Runx2 expression in the developing humerus, suggesting their concerted action drives cartilage maturation during normal development. While we furthermore provide evidence that Hox gene function influences Shox2 expression, this regulation is limited in extent and is unlikely on its own to be a major explanation for their genetic interaction. Given the similar effect of human SHOX mutations on regional limb growth, Shox and Hox genes may generally function as genetic interaction partners during the growth and development of the proximal vertebrate limb.

  18. DBA/2J genetic background exacerbates spontaneous lethal seizures but lessens amyloid deposition in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet M Jackson

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a leading cause of dementia in the elderly and is characterized by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs and neuronal dysfunction. Early onset AD (EOAD is commonly caused by mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP or genes involved in the processing of APP including the presenilins (e.g. PSEN1 or PSEN2. In general, mouse models relevant to EOAD recapitulate amyloidosis, show only limited amounts of NFTs and neuronal cell dysfunction and low but significant levels of seizure susceptibility. To investigate the effect of genetic background on these phenotypes, we generated APPswe and PSEN1de9 transgenic mice on the seizure prone inbred strain background, DBA/2J. Previous studies show that the DBA/2J genetic background modifies plaque deposition in the presence of mutant APP but the impact of PSEN1de9 has not been tested. Our study shows that DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice are significantly more prone to premature lethality, likely to due to lethal seizures, compared to B6.APPswePSEN1de9 mice-70% of DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice die between 2-3 months of age. Of the DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice that survived to 6 months of age, plaque deposition was greatly reduced compared to age-matched B6.APPswePSEN1de9 mice. The reduction in plaque deposition appears to be independent of microglia numbers, reactive astrocytosis and complement C5 activity.

  19. Longitudinal measures of cognition in the Ts65Dn mouse: Refining windows and defining modalities for therapeutic intervention in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos-Serrano, J Luis; Tyler, William A; Cabral, Howard J; Haydar, Tarik F

    2016-05-01

    Mouse models have provided insights into adult changes in learning and memory in Down syndrome, but an in-depth assessment of how these abnormalities develop over time has never been conducted. To address this shortcoming, we conducted a longitudinal behavioral study from birth until late adulthood in the Ts65Dn mouse model to measure the emergence and continuity of learning and memory deficits in individuals with a broad array of tests. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the pace at which neonatal and perinatal milestones are acquired is correlated with later cognitive performance as an adult. In addition, we find that life-long behavioral indexing stratifies mice within each genotype. Our expanded assessment reveals that diminished cognitive flexibility, as measured by reversal learning, is the most robust learning and memory impairment in both young and old Ts65Dn mice. Moreover, we find that reversal learning degrades with age and is therefore a useful biomarker for studying age-related decline in cognitive ability. Altogether, our results indicate that preclinical studies aiming to restore cognitive function in Ts65Dn should target both neonatal milestones and reversal learning in adulthood. Here we provide the quantitative framework for this type of approach.

  20. Roles of interferon-gamma and its target genes in schizophrenia: Proteomics-based reverse genetics from mouse to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Jae; Eom, Chi-Yong; Kwon, Joseph; Joo, Jaesoon; Lee, Sujeong; Nah, Seong-Su; Kim, Il-Chul; Jang, Ik-Soon; Chung, Young-Ho; Kim, Seung Il; Chung, Joo-Ho; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2012-06-01

    A decreased production of interferon gamma (IFNG) has been observed in acute schizophrenia. In order to explore the possible relationship between IFNG and schizophrenia, we attempted to analyze the differentially expressed proteins in the brains of interferon-gamma knockout (Ifng-KO) mice. Five upregulated and five downregulated proteins were identified with 2D gels and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analyses in Ifng-KO mouse brain. Of the identified proteins, we focused on creatine kinase brain (CKB) and triose phosphate isomerase 1 (TPI1). Consistent with the proteomic data, reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry analyses confirmed that the levels of gene expressions of Ckb and Tpi1 were downregulated and upregulated, respectively. When we analyzed the genetic polymorphisms of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of their human orthologous genes in a Korean population, the promoter SNPs of CKB and TPI1 were weakly associated with schizophrenia. In addition, IFNG polymorphisms were associated with schizophrenia. These results suggest that IFNG and proteins affected by IFNG may play a role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  1. Genetic Elimination of GABAergic Neurotransmission Reveals Two Distinct Pacemakers for Spontaneous Waves of Activity in the Developing Mouse Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Curtis R.; Weir, Keiko; Scott, Adina; Moen, Samantha P.; Barger, Zeke; Folch, Albert; Hevner, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Many structures of the mammalian CNS generate propagating waves of electrical activity early in development. These waves are essential to CNS development, mediating a variety of developmental processes, such as axonal outgrowth and pathfinding, synaptogenesis, and the maturation of ion channel and receptor properties. In the mouse cerebral cortex, waves of activity occur between embryonic day 18 and postnatal day 8 and originate in pacemaker circuits in the septal nucleus and the piriform cortex. Here we show that genetic knock-out of the major synthetic enzyme for GABA, GAD67, selectively eliminates the picrotoxin-sensitive fraction of these waves. The waves that remain in the GAD67 knock-out have a much higher probability of propagating into the dorsal neocortex, as do the picrotoxin-resistant fraction of waves in controls. Field potential recordings at the point of wave initiation reveal different electrical signatures for GABAergic and glutamatergic waves. These data indicate that: (1) there are separate GABAergic and glutamatergic pacemaker circuits within the piriform cortex, each of which can initiate waves of activity; (2) the glutamatergic pacemaker initiates waves that preferentially propagate into the neocortex; and (3) the initial appearance of the glutamatergic pacemaker does not require preceding GABAergic waves. In the absence of GAD67, the electrical activity underlying glutamatergic waves shows greatly increased tendency to burst, indicating that GABAergic inputs inhibit the glutamatergic pacemaker, even at stages when GABAergic pacemaker circuitry can itself initiate waves. PMID:24623764

  2. Establishment of new murine embryonic stem cell lines for the generation of mouse models of human genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Sukoyan

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells are totipotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts. Recently, the development of appropriate culture conditions for the differentiation of these cells into specific cell types has permitted their use as potential therapeutic agents for several diseases. In addition, manipulation of their genome in vitro allows the creation of animal models of human genetic diseases and for the study of gene function in vivo. We report the establishment of new lines of murine embryonic stem cells from preimplantation stage embryos of 129/Sv mice. Most of these cells had a normal karyotype and an XY sex chromosome composition. The pluripotent properties of the cell lines obtained were analyzed on the basis of their alkaline phosphatase activity and their capacity to form complex embryoid bodies with rhythmically contracting cardiomyocytes. Two lines, USP-1 and USP-3, with the best in vitro characteristics of pluripotency were used in chimera-generating experiments. The capacity to contribute to the germ line was demonstrated by the USP-1 cell line. This cell line is currently being used to generate mouse models of human diseases.

  3. Genetically Modified Mouse Models Used for Studying the Role of the AT2 Receptor in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Avila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The actions of Angiotensin II have been implicated in many cardiovascular conditions. It is widely accepted that the cardiovascular effects of Angiotensin II are mediated by different subtypes of receptors: AT1 and AT2. These membrane-bound receptors share a part of their nucleic acid but seem to have different distribution and pathophysiological actions. AT1 mediates most of the Angiotensin II actions since it is ubiquitously expressed in the cardiovascular system of the normal adult. Moreover AT2 is highly expressed in the developing fetus but its expression in the cardiovascular system is low and declines after birth. However the expression of AT2 appears to be modulated by pathological states such as hypertension, myocardial infarction or any pathology associated to tissue remodeling or inflammation. The specific role of this receptor is still unclear and different studies involving in vivo and in vitro experiments have shown conflicting data. It is essential to clarify the role of the AT2 receptor in the different pathological states as it is a potential site for an effective therapeutic regimen that targets the Angiotensin II system. We will review the different genetically modified mouse models used to study the AT2 receptor and its association with cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

  4. Genetic deletion of transglutaminase 2 does not rescue the phenotypic deficits observed in R6/2 and zQ175 mouse models of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana B Menalled

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of CAG repeats in the huntingtin gene. Tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG2, a multi-functional enzyme, was found to be increased both in HD patients and in mouse models of the disease. Furthermore, beneficial effects have been reported from the genetic ablation of TG2 in R6/2 and R6/1 mouse lines. To further evaluate the validity of this target for the treatment of HD, we examined the effects of TG2 deletion in two genetic mouse models of HD: R6/2 CAG 240 and zQ175 knock in (KI. Contrary to previous reports, under rigorous experimental conditions we found that TG2 ablation had no effect on either motor or cognitive deficits, or on the weight loss. In addition, under optimal husbandry conditions, TG2 ablation did not extend R6/2 lifespan. Moreover, TG2 deletion did not change the huntingtin aggregate load in cortex or striatum and did not decrease the brain atrophy observed in either mouse line. Finally, no amelioration of the dysregulation of striatal and cortical gene markers was detected. We conclude that TG2 is not a valid therapeutic target for the treatment of HD.

  5. Histochemical studies on genetical control of hormonal enzyme inducibility in the mouse. V. Histochemical evidence for androgen inducibility of beta-glucuronidase in the epididymis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blecher, S R; Kirkeby, S

    1982-01-01

    The enzyme beta-glucuronidase (beta G) is shown, by histochemical methods, to be androgen inducible in the mouse epididymis. This trait has previously been believed to exist only in the kidney. Its presence in the genital tract constitutes a valuable tool in study of the developmental genetics of...... of the reproductive system. Data presented here and previously imply co-ordinated genetic control of heterogeneous lysosomal populations. The results reported also provide a system for study of X-chromosomal activation, and of the developmental androgen dependence of the epididymis....

  6. A novel anesthesia regime enables neurofunctional studies and imaging genetics across mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrinovic, Marija M; Hankov, Georges; Schroeter, Aileen; Bruns, Andreas; Rudin, Markus; von Kienlin, Markus; Künnecke, Basil; Mueggler, Thomas

    2016-04-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revolutionized neuroscience by opening a unique window that allows neurocircuitry function and pathological alterations to be probed non-invasively across brain disorders. Here we report a novel sustainable anesthesia procedure for small animal neuroimaging that overcomes shortcomings of anesthetics commonly used in rodent fMRI. The significantly improved preservation of cerebrovascular dynamics enhances sensitivity to neural activity changes for which it serves as a proxy in fMRI readouts. Excellent cross-species/strain applicability provides coherence among preclinical findings and is expected to improve translation to clinical fMRI investigations. The novel anesthesia procedure based on the GABAergic anesthetic etomidate was extensively validated in fMRI studies conducted in a range of genetically engineered rodent models of autism and strains commonly used for transgenic manipulations. Etomidate proved effective, yielded long-term stable physiology with basal cerebral blood flow of ~0.5 ml/g/min and full recovery. Cerebrovascular responsiveness of up to 180% was maintained as demonstrated with perfusion- and BOLD-based fMRI upon hypercapnic, pharmacological and sensory stimulation. Hence, etomidate lends itself as an anesthetic-of-choice for translational neuroimaging studies across rodent models of brain disorders.

  7. Defining an Analytic Framework to Evaluate Quantitative MRI Markers of Traumatic Axonal Injury: Preliminary Results in a Mouse Closed Head Injury Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, N.; Namjoshi, D.; Irfanoglu, M. O.; Wellington, C.; Diaz-Arrastia, R.

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a hallmark of traumatic brain injury (TBI) pathology. Recently, the Closed Head Injury Model of Engineered Rotational Acceleration (CHIMERA) was developed to generate an experimental model of DAI in a mouse. The characterization of DAI using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; diffusion tensor imaging, DTI) may provide a useful set of outcome measures for preclinical and clinical studies. The objective of this study was to identify the complex neurobiological underpinnings of DTI features following DAI using a comprehensive and quantitative evaluation of DTI and histopathology in the CHIMERA mouse model. A consistent neuroanatomical pattern of pathology in specific white matter tracts was identified across ex vivo DTI maps and photomicrographs of histology. These observations were confirmed by voxelwise and regional analysis of DTI maps, demonstrating reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in distinct regions such as the optic tract. Similar regions were identified by quantitative histology and exhibited axonal damage as well as robust gliosis. Additional analysis using a machine-learning algorithm was performed to identify regions and metrics important for injury classification in a manner free from potential user bias. This analysis found that diffusion metrics were able to identify injured brains almost with the same degree of accuracy as the histology metrics. Good agreement between regions detected as abnormal by histology and MRI was also found. The findings of this work elucidate the complexity of cellular changes that give rise to imaging abnormalities and provide a comprehensive and quantitative evaluation of the relative importance of DTI and histological measures to detect brain injury. PMID:28966972

  8. Ontogeny of mouse vestibulo-ocular reflex following genetic or environmental alteration of gravity sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Beraneck

    Full Text Available The vestibular organs consist of complementary sensors: the semicircular canals detect rotations while the otoliths detect linear accelerations, including the constant pull of gravity. Several fundamental questions remain on how the vestibular system would develop and/or adapt to prolonged changes in gravity such as during long-term space journey. How do vestibular reflexes develop if the appropriate assembly of otoliths and semi-circular canals is perturbed? The aim of present work was to evaluate the role of gravity sensing during ontogeny of the vestibular system. In otoconia-deficient mice (ied, gravity cannot be sensed and therefore maculo-ocular reflexes (MOR were absent. While canals-related reflexes were present, the ied deficit also led to the abnormal spatial tuning of the horizontal angular canal-related VOR. To identify putative otolith-related critical periods, normal C57Bl/6J mice were subjected to 2G hypergravity by chronic centrifugation during different periods of development or adulthood (Adult-HG and compared to non-centrifuged (control C57Bl/6J mice. Mice exposed to hypergravity during development had completely normal vestibulo-ocular reflexes 6 months after end of centrifugation. Adult-HG mice all displayed major abnormalities in maculo-ocular reflexe one month after return to normal gravity. During the next 5 months, adaptation to normal gravity occurred in half of the individuals. In summary, genetic suppression of gravity sensing indicated that otolith-related signals might be necessary to ensure proper functioning of canal-related vestibular reflexes. On the other hand, exposure to hypergravity during development was not sufficient to modify durably motor behaviour. Hence, 2G centrifugation during development revealed no otolith-specific critical period.

  9. Novel frem1-related mouse phenotypes and evidence of genetic interactions with gata4 and slit3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler F Beck

    Full Text Available The FRAS1-related extracellular matrix 1 (FREM1 gene encodes an extracellular matrix protein that plays a critical role in the development of multiple organ systems. In humans, recessive mutations in FREM1 cause eye defects, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, renal anomalies and anorectal malformations including anteriorly placed anus. A similar constellation of findings-microphthalmia, cryptophthalmos, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, renal agenesis and rectal prolapse-have been described in FREM1-deficient mice. In this paper, we identify a homozygous Frem1 missense mutation (c.1687A>T, p.Ile563Phe in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-derived mouse strain, crf11, with microphthalmia, cryptophthalmos, renal agenesis and rectal prolapse. This mutation affects a highly conserved residue in FREM1's third CSPG domain. The p.Ile563Phe change is predicted to be deleterious and to cause decreased FREM1 protein stability. The crf11 allele also fails to complement the previously described eyes2 allele of Frem1 (p.Lys826* providing further evidence that the crf11 phenotype is due to changes affecting Frem1 function. We then use mice bearing the crf11 and eyes2 alleles to identify lung lobulation defects and decreased anogenital distance in males as novel phenotypes associated with FREM1 deficiency in mice. Due to phenotypic overlaps between FREM1-deficient mice and mice that are deficient for the retinoic acid-responsive transcription factor GATA4 and the extracellular matrix protein SLIT3, we also perform experiments to look for in vivo genetic interactions between the genes that encode these proteins. These experiments reveal that Frem1 interacts genetically with Gata4 in the development of lung lobulation defects and with Slit3 in the development of renal agenesis. These results demonstrate that FREM1-deficient mice faithfully recapitulate many of the phenotypes seen in individuals with FREM1 deficiency and that variations in GATA4 and SLIT3 expression

  10. Functional crosstalk in culture between macrophages and trigeminal sensory neurons of a mouse genetic model of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franceschini Alessia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enhanced activity of trigeminal ganglion neurons is thought to underlie neuronal sensitization facilitating the onset of chronic pain attacks, including migraine. Recurrent headache attacks might establish a chronic neuroinflammatory ganglion profile contributing to the hypersensitive phenotype. Since it is difficult to study this process in vivo, we investigated functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons in primary cultures from trigeminal sensory ganglia of wild-type (WT or knock-in (KI mice expressing the Cacna1a gene mutation (R192Q found in familial hemiplegic migraine-type 1. After studying the number and morphology of resident macrophages in culture, the consequences of adding host macrophages on macrophage phagocytosis and membrane currents mediated by pain-transducing P2X3 receptors on sensory neurons were examined. Results KI ganglion cultures constitutively contained a larger number of active macrophages, although no difference in P2X3 receptor expression was found. Co-culturing WT or KI ganglia with host macrophages (active as much as resident cells strongly stimulated single cell phagocytosis. The same protocol had no effect on P2X3 receptor expression in WT or KI co-cultures, but it largely enhanced WT neuron currents that grew to the high amplitude constitutively seen for KI neurons. No further potentiation of KI neuronal currents was observed. Conclusions Trigeminal ganglion cultures from a genetic mouse model of migraine showed basal macrophage activation together with enhanced neuronal currents mediated by P2X3 receptors. This phenotype could be replicated in WT cultures by adding host macrophages, indicating an important functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons.

  11. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  12. Membrane-bound steel factor maintains a high local concentration for mouse primordial germ cell motility, and defines the region of their migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Gu

    Full Text Available Steel factor, the protein product of the Steel locus in the mouse, is a multifunctional signal for the primordial germ cell population. We have shown previously that its expression accompanies the germ cells during migration to the gonads, forming a "travelling niche" that controls their survival, motility, and proliferation. Here we show that these functions are distributed between the alternatively spliced membrane-bound and soluble forms of Steel factor. The germ cells normally migrate as individuals from E7.5 to E11.5, when they aggregate together in the embryonic gonads. Movie analysis of Steel-dickie mutant embryos, which make only the soluble form, at E7.5, showed that the germ cells fail to migrate normally, and undergo "premature aggregation" in the base of the allantois. Survival and directionality of movement is not affected. Addition of excess soluble Steel factor to Steel-dickie embryos rescued germ cell motility, and addition of Steel factor to germ cells in vitro showed that a fourfold higher dose was required to increase motility, compared to survival. These data show that soluble Steel factor is sufficient for germ cell survival, and suggest that the membrane-bound form provides a higher local concentration of Steel factor that controls the balance between germ cell motility and aggregation. This hypothesis was tested by addition of excess soluble Steel factor to slice cultures of E11.5 embryos, when migration usually ceases, and the germ cells aggregate. This reversed the aggregation process, and caused increased motility of the germ cells. We conclude that the two forms of Steel factor control different aspects of germ cell behavior, and that membrane-bound Steel factor controls germ cell motility within a "motility niche" that moves through the embryo with the germ cells. Escape from this niche causes cessation of motility and death by apoptosis of the ectopic germ cells.

  13. Molecular cloning of a highly conserved mouse and human integral membrane protein (Itm1) and genetic mapping to mouse chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Guizhu; Tylzanowski, P. [Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium); Deleersnijder, W. [N.V. Innogenetics, Ghent (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    We have isolated and characterized a novel cDNA coding for a highly hydrophobic protein (B5) from a fetal mouse mandibular condyle cDNA library. The full-length mouse B5 cDNA is 3095 nucleotides long and contains a potential open reading frame coding for a protein of 705 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 80.5 kDa. The B5 mRNA is differentially polyadenylated, with the most abundant transcript having a length of 2.7 kb. The human homolog of B5 was isolated from a cDNA testis library. The predicted amino acid sequence of the human B5 is 98.5% identical to that of mouse. The most striking feature of the B5 protein is the presence of numerous (10-14) potential transmembrane domains, characteristic of an integral membrane protein. Similarity searches in public databanks reveal that B5 is 58% similar to the T12A2.2 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans and 60% similar to the STT3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Futhermore, the report of an EST sequence (Accession No. Z13858) related to the human B5, but identical to the STT3 gene, indicates that B5 belongs to a larger gene family coding for novel putative transmembrane proteins. This family exhibits a remarkable degree of conservation in different species. The gene for B5, designated Itm1 (Integral membrane protein 1), is located on mouse chromosome 9. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Genetic Science Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mouse Party on Learn.Genetics.utah.edu Students doing the Tree of Genetic Traits activity Learn.Genetics is one of the most widely used science education websites in the world The Community Genetics ...

  15. Finding the most appropriate mouse model of juvenile CLN3 (Batten disease for therapeutic studies: the importance of genetic background and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila D. Kovács

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the CLN3 gene cause a fatal neurodegenerative disorder: juvenile CLN3 disease, also known as juvenile Batten disease. The two most commonly utilized mouse models of juvenile CLN3 disease are Cln3-knockout (Cln3−/− and Cln3Δex7/8-knock-in mice, the latter mimicking the most frequent disease-causing human mutation. To determine which mouse model has the most pronounced neurological phenotypes that can be used as outcome measures for therapeutic studies, we compared the exploratory activity, motor function and depressive-like behavior of 1-, 3- and 6-month-old Cln3−/− and Cln3Δex7/8-knock-in mice on two different genetic backgrounds (129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6J. Although, in many cases, the behavior of Cln3−/− and Cln3Δex7/8 mice was similar, we found genetic-background-, gender- and age-dependent differences between the two mouse models. We also observed large differences in the behavior of the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6J wild-type strains, which highlights the strong influence that genetic background can have on phenotype. Based on our results, Cln3−/− male mice on the 129S6/SvEv genetic background are the most appropriate candidates for therapeutic studies. They exhibit motor deficits at 1 and 6 months of age in the vertical pole test, and they were the only mice to show impaired motor coordination in the rotarod test at both 3 and 6 months. Cln3−/− males on the C57BL/6J background and Cln3Δex7/8 males on the 129S6/SvEv background also provide good outcome measures for therapeutic interventions. Cln3−/− (C57BL/6J males had serious difficulties in climbing down (at 1 and 6 months and turning downward on (at 1, 3 and 6 months the vertical pole, whereas Cln3Δex7/8 (129S6/SvEv males climbed down the vertical pole drastically slower than wild-type males at 3 and 6 months of age. Our study demonstrates the importance of testing mouse models on different genetic backgrounds and comparing males and females in order to

  16. MouseCyc: a curated biochemical pathways database for the laboratory mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Evsikov, Alexei V.; Dolan, Mary E.; Genrich, Michael P; Patek, Emily; Bult, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    Linking biochemical genetic data to the reference genome for the laboratory mouse is important for comparative physiology and for developing mouse models of human biology and disease. We describe here a new database of curated metabolic pathways for the laboratory mouse called MouseCyc . MouseCyc has been integrated with genetic and genomic data for the laboratory mouse available from the Mouse Genome Informatics database and with pathway data from other organisms, including human.

  17. Genetically-Defined Deficiency of Mannose-Binding Lectin Is Associated with Protection after Experimental Stroke in Mice and Outcome in Human Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Alvaro; Planas, Anna M.; Justicia, Carles; Urra, Xabier; Jensenius, Jens C.; Torres, Ferran; Lozano, Francisco; Chamorro, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Background The complement system is a major effector of innate immunity that has been involved in stroke brain damage. Complement activation occurs through the classical, alternative and lectin pathways. The latter is initiated by mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs). Here we investigated whether the lectin pathway contributes to stroke outcome in mice and humans. Methodology/Principal Findings Focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in MBL-null mice induced smaller infarctions, better functional outcome, and diminished C3 deposition and neutrophil infiltration than in wild-type mice. Accordingly, reconstitution of MBL-null mice with recombinant human MBL (rhMBL) enhanced brain damage. In order to investigate the clinical relevance of these experimental observations, a study of MBL2 and MASP-2 gene polymorphism rendering the lectin pathway dysfunctional was performed in 135 stroke patients. In logistic regression adjusted for age, gender and initial stroke severity, unfavourable outcome at 3 months was associated with MBL-sufficient genotype (OR 10.85, p = 0.008) and circulating MBL levels (OR 1.29, p = 0.04). Individuals carrying MBL-low genotypes (17.8%) had lower C3, C4, and CRP levels, and the proinflammatory cytokine profile was attenuated versus MBL-sufficient genotypes. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, genetically defined MBL-deficiency is associated with a better outcome after acute stroke in mice and humans. PMID:20140243

  18. Multifaceted role of nitric oxide in an in vitro mouse neuronal injury model: transcriptomic profiling defines the temporal recruitment of death signalling cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhao Feng; Chen, Minghui Jessica; Manikandan, Jayapal; Melendez, Alirio J; Shui, Guanghou; Russo-Marie, Françoise; Whiteman, Matthew; Beart, Philip M; Moore, Philip K; Cheung, Nam Sang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nitric oxide is implicated in the pathogenesis of various neuropathologies characterized by oxidative stress. Although nitric oxide has been reported to be involved in the exacerbation of oxidative stress observed in several neuropathologies, existent data fail to provide a holistic description of how nitrergic pathobiology elicits neuronal injury. Here we provide a comprehensive description of mechanisms contributing to nitric oxide induced neuronal injury by global transcriptomic profiling. Microarray analyses were undertaken on RNA from murine primary cortical neurons treated with the nitric oxide generator DETA-NONOate (NOC-18, 0.5 mM) for 8–24 hrs. Biological pathway analysis focused upon 3672 gene probes which demonstrated at least a ±1.5-fold expression in a minimum of one out of three time-points and passed statistical analysis (one-way anova, P < 0.05). Numerous enriched processes potentially determining nitric oxide mediated neuronal injury were identified from the transcriptomic profile: cell death, developmental growth and survival, cell cycle, calcium ion homeostasis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, mitochondrial homeostasis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and GSH and nitric oxide metabolism. Our detailed time-course study of nitric oxide induced neuronal injury allowed us to provide the first time a holistic description of the temporal sequence of cellular events contributing to nitrergic injury. These data form a foundation for the development of screening platforms and define targets for intervention in nitric oxide neuropathologies where nitric oxide mediated injury is causative. PMID:21352476

  19. Targeted deletion of the Nesp55 DMR defines another Gnas imprinting control region and provides a mouse model of autosomal dominant PHP-Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Leopold F; Mrakovcic, Maria; Steinborn, Ralf; Chung, Ung-Il; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2010-05-18

    Approximately 100 genes undergo genomic imprinting. Mutations in fewer than 10 imprinted genetic loci, including GNAS, are associated with complex human diseases that differ phenotypically based on the parent transmitting the mutation. Besides the ubiquitously expressed Gsalpha, which is of broad biological importance, GNAS gives rise to an antisense transcript and to several Gsalpha variants that are transcribed from the nonmethylated parental allele. We previously identified two almost identical GNAS microdeletions extending from exon NESP55 to antisense (AS) exon 3 (delNESP55/delAS3-4). When inherited maternally, both deletions are associated with erasure of all maternal GNAS methylation imprints and autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib, a disorder characterized by parathyroid hormone-resistant hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. As for other imprinting disorders, the mechanisms resulting in abnormal GNAS methylation are largely unknown, in part because of a paucity of suitable animal models. We now showed in mice that deletion of the region equivalent to delNESP55/delAS3-4 on the paternal allele (DeltaNesp55(p)) leads to healthy animals without Gnas methylation changes. In contrast, mice carrying the deletion on the maternal allele (DeltaNesp55(m)) showed loss of all maternal Gnas methylation imprints, leading in kidney to increased 1A transcription and decreased Gsalpha mRNA levels, and to associated hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Besides representing a murine autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib model and one of only few animal models for imprinted human disorders, our findings suggest that the Nesp55 differentially methylated region is an additional principal imprinting control region, which directs Gnas methylation and thereby affects expression of all maternal Gnas-derived transcripts.

  20. Infrared fluorescent protein 1.4 genetic labeling tracks engrafted cardiac progenitor cells in mouse ischemic hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Chen

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has a potential for regenerating damaged myocardium. However, a key obstacle to cell therapy's success is the loss of engrafted cells due to apoptosis or necrosis in the ischemic myocardium. While many strategies have been developed to improve engrafted cell survival, tools to evaluate cell efficacy within the body are limited. Traditional genetic labeling tools, such as GFP-like fluorescent proteins (eGFP, DsRed, mCherry, have limited penetration depths in vivo due to tissue scattering and absorption. To circumvent these limitations, a near-infrared fluorescent mutant of the DrBphP bacteriophytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans, IFP1.4, was developed for in vivo imaging, but it has yet to be used for in vivo stem/progenitor cell tracking. In this study, we incorporated IFP1.4 into mouse cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs by a lentiviral vector. Live IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were imaged by their near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF using an Odyssey scanner following overnight incubation with biliverdin. A significant linear correlation was observed between the amount of cells and NIRF signal intensity in in vitro studies. Lentiviral mediated IFP1.4 gene labeling is stable, and does not impact the apoptosis and cardiac differentiation of CPC. To assess efficacy of our model for engrafted cells in vivo, IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were intramyocardially injected into infarcted hearts. NIRF signals were collected at 1-day, 7-days, and 14-days post-injection using the Kodak in vivo multispectral imaging system. Strong NIRF signals from engrafted cells were imaged 1 day after injection. At 1 week after injection, 70% of the NIRF signal was lost when compared to the intensity of the day 1 signal. The data collected 2 weeks following transplantation showed an 88% decrease when compared to day 1. Our studies have shown that IFP1.4 gene labeling can be used to track the viability of transplanted cells in vivo.

  1. In vivo models of brain tumors: roles of genetically engineered mouse models in understanding tumor biology and use in preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonova, Iva; Huillard, Emmanuelle

    2014-10-01

    Although our knowledge of the biology of brain tumors has increased tremendously over the past decade, progress in treatment of these deadly diseases remains modest. Developing in vivo models that faithfully mirror human diseases is essential for the validation of new therapeutic approaches. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) provide elaborate temporally and genetically controlled systems to investigate the cellular origins of brain tumors and gene function in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, they can prove to be valuable tools for testing targeted therapies. In this review, we discuss GEMMs of brain tumors, focusing on gliomas and medulloblastomas. We describe how they provide critical insights into the molecular and cellular events involved in the initiation and maintenance of brain tumors, and illustrate their use in preclinical drug testing.

  2. Transgenic mouse models generated by hydrodynamic transfection for genetic studies of liver cancer and preclinical testing of anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hye-Lim; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Lee, Jong Doo; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide; however, the genetic mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are incompletely understood. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of HCC have been developed to elucidate the role of individual cancer-related genes in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the expensive and time-consuming processes related to generating a GEM model discourage the development of diverse genotype models. Recently, a simple and inexpensive liver-specific transgenic approach was developed, in which a hydrodynamics-based transfection (HT) method was coupled with the Sleeping Beauty transposase system. Various HT models in which different oncogenic pathways are activated and/or tumor-suppressing pathways inactivated have been developed in recent years. The applicability of HT models in liver cancer research is expected to broaden and ultimately elucidate the cooperation between oncogenic signaling pathways and aid in designing molecular therapy to target altered pathways.

  3. Genetic backgrounds and modifier genes of NTD mouse models: An opportunity for greater understanding of the multifactorial etiology of neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Renee Y M; Singh, Parmveer; McDermid, Heather E

    2016-10-21

    Neurulation, the early embryonic process of forming the presumptive brain and spinal cord, is highly complex and involves hundreds of genes in multiple genetic pathways. Mice have long served as a genetic model for studying human neurulation, and the resulting neural tube defects (NTDs) that arise when neurulation is disrupted. Because mice appear to show mostly single gene inheritance for NTDs and humans show multifactorial inheritance, mice sometimes have been characterized as a simpler model for the identification and study of NTD genes. But are they a simple model? When viewed on different genetic backgrounds, many genes show significant variation in the penetrance and expressivity of NTD phenotypes, suggesting the presence of modifier loci that interact with the target gene to affect the phenotypic expression. Looking at mutations on different genetic backgrounds provides us with an opportunity to explore these complex genetic interactions, which are likely to better emulate similar processes in human neurulation. Here, we review NTD genes known to show strain-specific phenotypic variation. We focus particularly on the gene Cecr2, which is studied using both a hypomorphic and a presumptive null mutation on two different backgrounds: one susceptible (BALB/c) and one resistant (FVB/N) to NTDs. This strain difference has led to a search for genetic modifiers within a region on murine chromosome 19. Understanding how genetic variants alter the phenotypic outcome in NTD mouse models will help to direct future studies in humans, particularly now that more genome wide sequencing approaches are being used. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A new mouse model for marfan syndrome presents phenotypic variability associated with the genetic background and overall levels of Fbn1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno L Lima

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease of connective tissue caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 encoding gene FBN1. Patients present cardiovascular, ocular and skeletal manifestations, and although being fully penetrant, MFS is characterized by a wide clinical variability both within and between families. Here we describe a new mouse model of MFS that recapitulates the clinical heterogeneity of the syndrome in humans. Heterozygotes for the mutant Fbn1 allele mgΔloxPneo, carrying the same internal deletion of exons 19-24 as the mgΔ mouse model, present defective microfibrillar deposition, emphysema, deterioration of aortic wall and kyphosis. However, the onset of a clinical phenotypes is earlier in the 129/Sv than in C57BL/6 background, indicating the existence of genetic modifiers of MFS between these two mouse strains. In addition, we characterized a wide clinical variability within the 129/Sv congenic heterozygotes, suggesting involvement of epigenetic factors in disease severity. Finally, we show a strong negative correlation between overall levels of Fbn1 expression and the severity of the phenotypes, corroborating the suggested protective role of normal fibrillin-1 in MFS pathogenesis, and supporting the development of therapies based on increasing Fbn1 expression.

  5. Anti-angiogenesis therapy based on the bone marrow-derived stromal cells genetically engineered to express sFlt-1 in mouse tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen X-C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs are important for development, tissue cell replenishment, and wound healing in physiological and pathological conditions. BMSCs were found to preferably reach sites undergoing the process of cell proliferation, such as wound and tumor, suggesting that BMSCs may be used as a vehicle for gene therapy of tumor. Methods Mouse BMSCs were loaded with recombinant adenoviruses which express soluble Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 (sFlt-1. The anti-angiogenesis of sFlt-1 in BMSCs was determined using endothelial cells proliferation inhibition assay and alginate encapsulation assay. The anti-tumor effects of BMSCs expressing sFlt-1 through tail-vein infusion were evaluated in two mouse tumor metastases models. Results BMSCs genetically modified with Adv-GFP-sFlt-1 could effectively express and secret sFlt-1. BMSCs loaded with sFlt-1 gene could preferentially home to tumor loci and decrease lung metastases and prolong lifespan in mouse tumor model through inducing anti-angiogenesis and apoptosis in tumors. Conclusion We demonstrated that BMSCs might be employed as a promising vehicle for tumor gene therapy which can effectively not only improve the concentration of anticancer therapeutics in tumors, but also modify the tumor microenvironment.

  6. Gene expression profiling in C57BL/6J and A/J mouse inbred strains reveals gene networks specific for brain regions independent of genetic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvath Steve

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed gene expression profiling of the amygdala and hippocampus taken from inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J and A/J. The selected brain areas are implicated in neurobehavioral traits while these mouse strains are known to differ widely in behavior. Consequently, we hypothesized that comparing gene expression profiles for specific brain regions in these strains might provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of human neuropsychiatric traits. We performed a whole-genome gene expression experiment and applied a systems biology approach using weighted gene co-expression network analysis. Results We were able to identify modules of co-expressed genes that distinguish a strain or brain region. Analysis of the networks that are most informative for hippocampus and amygdala revealed enrichment in neurologically, genetically and psychologically related pathways. Close examination of the strain-specific gene expression profiles, however, revealed no functional relevance but a significant enrichment of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the probe sequences used for array hybridization. This artifact was not observed for the modules of co-expressed genes that distinguish amygdala and hippocampus. Conclusions The brain-region specific modules were found to be independent of genetic background and are therefore likely to represent biologically relevant molecular networks that can be studied to complement our knowledge about pathways in neuropsychiatric disease.

  7. Define Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    "Project" is a key concept in IS management. The word is frequently used in textbooks and standards. Yet we seldom find a precise definition of the concept. This paper discusses how to define the concept of a project. The proposed definition covers both heavily formalized projects and informally...... organized, agile projects. Based on the proposed definition popular existing definitions are discussed....

  8. Genetic deletion of mouse platelet glycoprotein Ibbeta produces a Bernard-Soulier phenotype with increased alpha-granule size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kazunobu; Martinez, Constantino; Russell, Susan; Nurden, Paquita; Nurden, Alan; Fiering, Steven; Ware, Jerry

    2004-10-15

    Here we report the characterization of a mouse model of the Bernard-Soulier syndrome generated by a targeted disruption of the gene encoding the glycoprotein (GP) Ibbeta subunit of the GP Ib-IX complex. Similar to a Bernard-Soulier model generated by disruption of the mouse GP Ibalpha subunit, GP Ibbeta(Null) mice display macrothrombocytopenia and a severe bleeding phenotype. When examined by transmission electron microscopy, the large platelets produced by a GP Ibbeta(Null) genotype revealed alpha-granules with increased size as compared with the alpha-granules from control mouse platelets. Data are presented linking the overexpression of a septin protein, SEPT5, to the presence of larger alpha-granules in the GP Ibbeta(Null) platelet. The SEPT5 gene resides approximately 250 nucleotides 5' to the GP Ibbeta gene and has been associated with modulating exocytosis from neurons and platelets as part of a presynaptic protein complex. Fusion mRNA transcripts present in megakaryocytes can contain both the SEPT5 and GP Ibbeta coding sequences as a result in an imperfect polyadenylation signal within the 3' end of both the human and mouse SEPT5 genes. We observed a 2- to 3-fold increase in SEPT5 protein levels in platelets from GP Ibbeta(Null) mice. These results implicate SEPT5 levels in the maintenance of normal alpha-granule size and may explain the variant granules associated with human GP Ibbeta mutations and the Bernard-Soulier syndrome.

  9. Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human...

  10. Explant culture of mouse embryonic whole lung, isolated epithelium, or mesenchyme under chemically defined conditions as a system to evaluate the molecular mechanism of branching morphogenesis and cellular differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Moral, Pierre-Marie; Warburton, David

    2010-01-01

    Lung primordial specification as well as branching morphogenesis, and the formation of various pulmonary cell lineages, requires a specific interaction of the lung endoderm with its surrounding mesenchyme and mesothelium. Lung mesenchyme has been shown to be the source of inductive signals for lung branching morphogenesis. Epithelial-mesenchymal-mesothelial interactions are also critical to embryonic lung morphogenesis. Early embryonic lung organ culture is a very useful system to study epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Both epithelial and mesenchymal morphogenesis proceed under specific conditions that can be readily manipulated in this system (in the absence of maternal influence and blood flow). More importantly this technique can be readily done in a serumless, chemically defined culture media. Gain and loss of function can be achieved using expressed proteins, recombinant viral vectors, and/or analysis of transgenic mouse strains, antisense RNA, as well as RNA interference gene knockdown. Additionally, to further study epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, the relative roles of epithelium versus mesenchyme signaling can also be determined using tissue recombination (e.g., epithelial and mesenchymal separation) and microbead studies.

  11. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  12. Modifications to the Patient Rule-Induction Method that utilize non-additive combinations of genetic and environmental effects to define partitions that predict ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyson, Greg; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G;

    2009-01-01

    This article extends the Patient Rule-Induction Method (PRIM) for modeling cumulative incidence of disease developed by Dyson et al. (Genet Epidemiol 31:515-527) to include the simultaneous consideration of non-additive combinations of predictor variables, a significance test of each combination...... that assesses the utility of genetic variants in predicting the presence of ischemic heart disease beyond the established risk factors....

  13. Genetic Dissection of Ventral Folding Morphogenesis in Mouse: Embryonic Visceral Endoderm-supplied BMP2 Positions Head and Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Svetlana; Lacy, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Ventral folding morphogenesis, a vital morphogenetic process in amniotes, mediates gut endoderm internalization, linear heart tube formation, ventral body wall closure and encasement of the fetus in extraembryonic membranes. Aberrant ventral folding morphogenesis underlies a number of birth defects, such as gastroschisis and ectopia cordis in human and misplacement of head and heart in mouse. Recent cell lineage-specific mouse mutant analyses identified the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathway and Anterior Visceral Endoderm (AVE) as key regulators of anterior ventral folding morphogenesis. Loss of BMP2 expression solely from embryonic visceral endoderm (EmVE) and the AVE blocks formation of foregut invagination, and simultaneously, aberrantly positions the heart anterior/dorsal to the head, suggesting a mechanistic link between foregut and head/heart morphogenesis. PMID:23706163

  14. A forward genetic screen with a thalamocortical axon reporter mouse yields novel neurodevelopment mutants and a distinct emx2 mutant phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vock Vita M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dorsal thalamus acts as a gateway and modulator for information going to and from the cerebral cortex. This activity requires the formation of reciprocal topographic axon connections between thalamus and cortex. The axons grow along a complex multistep pathway, making sharp turns, crossing expression boundaries, and encountering intermediate targets. However, the cellular and molecular components mediating these steps remain poorly understood. Results To further elucidate the development of the thalamocortical system, we first created a thalamocortical axon reporter line to use as a genetic tool for sensitive analysis of mutant mouse phenotypes. The TCA-tau-lacZ reporter mouse shows specific, robust, and reproducible labeling of thalamocortical axons (TCAs, but not the overlapping corticothalamic axons, during development. Moreover, it readily reveals TCA pathfinding abnormalities in known cortical mutants such as reeler. Next, we performed an unbiased screen for genes involved in thalamocortical development using random mutagenesis with the TCA reporter. Six independent mutant lines show aberrant TCA phenotypes at different steps of the pathway. These include ventral misrouting, overfasciculation, stalling at the corticostriatal boundary, and invasion of ectopic cortical cell clusters. An outcross breeding strategy coupled with a genomic panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms facilitated genetic mapping with small numbers of mutant mice. We mapped a ventral misrouting mutant to the Emx2 gene, and discovered that some TCAs extend to the olfactory bulbs in this mutant. Mapping data suggest that other lines carry mutations in genes not previously known for roles in thalamocortical development. Conclusions These data demonstrate the feasibility of a forward genetic approach to understanding mammalian brain morphogenesis and wiring. A robust axonal reporter enabled sensitive analysis of a specific axon tract inside the

  15. Genetic variations regulate alternative splicing in the 5' untranslated regions of the mouse glioma-associated oncogene 1, Gli1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaphiropoulos Peter G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is one of the key mechanisms that generate biological diversity. Even though alternative splicing also occurs in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs of mRNAs, the understanding of the significance and the regulation of these variations is rather limited. Results We investigated 5' UTR mRNA variants of the mouse Gli1 oncogene, which is the terminal transcriptional effector of the Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway. In addition to identifying novel transcription start sites, we demonstrated that the expression ratio of the Gli1 splice variants in the 5' UTR is regulated by the genotype of the mouse strain analyzed. The GT allele, which contains the consensus intronic dinucleotides at the 5' splice site of intron 1B, favors exon 1B inclusion, while the GC allele, having a weaker 5' splice site sequence, promotes exon 1B skipping. Moreover, the alternative Gli1 5' UTRs had an impact on translational capacity, with the shorter and the exon 1B-skipped mRNA variants being most effective. Conclusions Our findings implicate novel, genome-based mechanisms as regulators of the terminal events in the mouse HH signaling cascade.

  16. Testing Current and Developing Novel Therapies for NF1-Mutant Sarcomas in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    1   AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0067 TITLE: Testing Current and Developing Novel Therapies for NF1 -Mutant Sarcomas in a Genetically Engineered...Mar 2014 - 14 Mar 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Testing Current and Developing Novel Therapies for NF1 - Mutant Sarcomas in a Genetically Engineered...Patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 ( NF1 ) are at increased risk for developing malignant tumors of the connective tissue called soft-tissue sarcomas

  17. Efficient genetic manipulation of the NOD-Rag1-/-IL2RgammaC-null mouse by combining in vitro fertilization and CRISPR/Cas9 technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Cowley, Dale O; Banner, Debra; Holle, Eric; Zhang, Liguo; Su, Lishan

    2014-06-17

    Humanized mouse models have become increasingly important and widely used in modeling human diseases in biomedical research. Immunodeficient mice such as NOD-Rag1-/-IL2RgammaC-null (NRG) or NOD-SCID-IL2RgammaC-null (NSG) mice are critical for efficient engraftment of human cells or tissues. However, their genetic modification remains challenging due to a lack of embryonic stem cells and difficulty in the collection of timed embryos after superovulation. Here, we report the generation of gene knockout NRG mice by combining in vitro fertilization (IVF) and CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Sufficient numbers of fertilized embryos were produced through IVF, and a high rate of Fah gene targeting was achieved with microinjection of Cas9 mRNA, gRNA and single strand oligonucleotide DNA (ssDNA) into the embryos. The technology paves the way to construct NRG or NSG mutant mice to facilitate new humanized mouse models. The technology can also be readily adapted to introduce mutations in other species such as swine and non-human primates.

  18. Mapping of the Pim-1 oncogene in mouse t-haplotypes and its use to define the relative map positions of the tcl loci t0(t6) and tw12 and the marker tf (tufted).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ark, B; Gummere, G; Bennett, D; Artzt, K

    1991-06-01

    Pim-1 is an oncogene activated in mouse T-cell lymphomas induced by Moloney and AKR mink cell focus (MCF) viruses. Pim-1 was previously mapped to chromosome 17 by somatic cell hybrids, and subsequently to the region between the hemoglobin alpha-chain pseudogene 4 (Hba-4ps) and the alpha-crystalline gene (Crya-1) by Southern blot analysis of DNA obtained from panels of recombinant inbred strains. We have now mapped Pim-1 more accurately in t-haplotypes by analysis of recombinant t-chromosomes. The recombinants were derived from Tts6tf/t12 parents backcrossed to + tf/ + tf, and scored for recombination between the loci of T and tf. For simplicity all t-complex lethal genes properly named tcl-tx are shortened to tx. The Pim-1 gene was localized 0.6 cM proximal to the tw12 lethal gene, thus placing the Pim-1 gene 5.2 cM distal to the H-2 region in t-haplotypes. Once mapped, the Pim-1 gene was used as a marker for further genetic analysis of t-haplotypes. tw12 is so close to tf that even with a large number of recombinants it was not possible to determine whether it is proximal or distal to tf. Southern blot analysis of DNA from T-tf recombinants with a separation of tw12 and tf indicated that tw12 is proximal to tf. The mapping of two allelic t-lethals, t0 and t6 with respect to tw12 and tf has also been a problem.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Two genetic determinants acquired late in Mus evolution regulate the inclusion of exon 5, which alters mouse APOBEC3 translation efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouse apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like editing complex 3 (mA3, an intracellular antiviral factor, has 2 allelic variations that are linked with different susceptibilities to beta- and gammaretrovirus infections among various mouse strains. In virus-resistant C57BL/6 (B6 mice, mA3 transcripts are more abundant than those in susceptible BALB/c mice both in the spleen and bone marrow. These strains of mice also express mA3 transcripts with different splicing patterns: B6 mice preferentially express exon 5-deficient (Δ5 mA3 mRNA, while BALB/c mice produce exon 5-containing full-length mA3 mRNA as the major transcript. Although the protein product of the Δ5 mRNA exerts stronger antiretroviral activities than the full-length protein, how exon 5 affects mA3 antiviral activity, as well as the genetic mechanisms regulating exon 5 inclusion into the mA3 transcripts, remains largely uncharacterized. Here we show that mA3 exon 5 is indeed a functional element that influences protein synthesis at a post-transcriptional level. We further employed in vitro splicing assays using genomic DNA clones to identify two critical polymorphisms affecting the inclusion of exon 5 into mA3 transcripts: the number of TCCT repeats upstream of exon 5 and the single nucleotide polymorphism within exon 5 located 12 bases upstream of the exon 5/intron 5 boundary. Distribution of the above polymorphisms among different Mus species indicates that the inclusion of exon 5 into mA3 mRNA is a relatively recent event in the evolution of mice. The widespread geographic distribution of this exon 5-including genetic variant suggests that in some Mus populations the cost of maintaining an effective but mutagenic enzyme may outweigh its antiviral function.

  20. Molecular Targeted Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging of Flk1 Reveals Diagnosis and Prognosis Potential in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Prostate Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim W. Xuan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging techniques used to detect the initiation of disease have the potential to provide the best opportunity for early treatment and cure. This report aimed at testing the possibility that Flk1+ (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, a crucial angiogenesis factor of most tumor cells, could be a molecular targeted imaging marker for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. We performed Flk1-targeted microbubble-enhanced ultrasound (US imaging of prostate cancer in a genetically engineered mouse model with normal-appearing intact US (negative prostates and with three different tumor sizes (small, medium, and large. Higher levels of Flk1+ molecular signals were identified in the intact US (negative prostate group by US-targeted imaging and immunohistochemical analysis. The increase in Flk1+ expression occurred prior to the angiogenesis switch-on phase and vascularity peak. After this peak accumulation stage of Flk1+ molecules, lower and stabilized levels of Flk1+ signals were maintained together with tumor growth from small, to medium, to large size. In a longitudinal observation in a subset (n = 5 of mice with established tumors, elevated Flk1+ signals were observed in tissues surrounding the prostate cancer, for example, the ipsilateral boundary zones between two developing tumor lobes, new tumor blood vessel recruits, the urethra border, and the pelvic node basin. The potential of Flk1-targeted US imaging as a predictive imaging tool was confirmed by correlation studies of three-dimensional US B-mode imaging, gross pathology, and histology analyses. The results of the application in a genetically engineered mouse model with prostate cancer of molecular Flk1-targeted US imaging support the contention that Flk1 can be used as a molecular imaging marker for small tumors undetectable by microimaging and as a molecular diagnostic and prognosis marker for tumor metastasis and progression.

  1. Genetic knock-down of HDAC3 does not modify disease-related phenotypes in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Moumné

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of a CAG/polyglutamine repeat for which there are no disease modifying treatments. In recent years, transcriptional dysregulation has emerged as a pathogenic process that appears early in disease progression and has been recapitulated across multiple HD models. Altered histone acetylation has been proposed to underlie this transcriptional dysregulation and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, have been shown to improve polyglutamine-dependent phenotypes in numerous HD models. However potent pan-HDAC inhibitors such as SAHA display toxic side-effects. To better understand the mechanism underlying this potential therapeutic benefit and to dissociate the beneficial and toxic effects of SAHA, we set out to identify the specific HDAC(s involved in this process. For this purpose, we are exploring the effect of the genetic reduction of specific HDACs on HD-related phenotypes in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. The study presented here focuses on HDAC3, which, as a class I HDAC, is one of the preferred targets of SAHA and is directly involved in histone deacetylation. To evaluate a potential benefit of Hdac3 genetic reduction in R6/2, we generated a mouse carrying a critical deletion in the Hdac3 gene. We confirmed that the complete knock-out of Hdac3 is embryonic lethal. To test the effects of HDAC3 inhibition, we used Hdac3(+/- heterozygotes to reduce nuclear HDAC3 levels in R6/2 mice. We found that Hdac3 knock-down does not ameliorate physiological or behavioural phenotypes and has no effect on molecular changes including dysregulated transcripts. We conclude that HDAC3 should not be considered as the major mediator of the beneficial effect induced by SAHA and other HDAC inhibitors in HD.

  2. Two genetic determinants acquired late in Mus evolution regulate the inclusion of exon 5, which alters mouse APOBEC3 translation efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouse apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like editing complex 3 (mA3, an intracellular antiviral factor, has 2 allelic variations that are linked with different susceptibilities to beta- and gammaretrovirus infections among various mouse strains. In virus-resistant C57BL/6 (B6 mice, mA3 transcripts are more abundant than those in susceptible BALB/c mice both in the spleen and bone marrow. These strains of mice also express mA3 transcripts with different splicing patterns: B6 mice preferentially express exon 5-deficient (Δ5 mA3 mRNA, while BALB/c mice produce exon 5-containing full-length mA3 mRNA as the major transcript. Although the protein product of the Δ5 mRNA exerts stronger antiretroviral activities than the full-length protein, how exon 5 affects mA3 antiviral activity, as well as the genetic mechanisms regulating exon 5 inclusion into the mA3 transcripts, remains largely uncharacterized. Here we show that mA3 exon 5 is indeed a functional element that influences protein synthesis at a post-transcriptional level. We further employed in vitro splicing assays using genomic DNA clones to identify two critical polymorphisms affecting the inclusion of exon 5 into mA3 transcripts: the number of TCCT repeats upstream of exon 5 and the single nucleotide polymorphism within exon 5 located 12 bases upstream of the exon 5/intron 5 boundary. Distribution of the above polymorphisms among different Mus species indicates that the inclusion of exon 5 into mA3 mRNA is a relatively recent event in the evolution of mice. The widespread geographic distribution of this exon 5-including genetic variant suggests that in some Mus populations the cost of maintaining an effective but mutagenic enzyme may outweigh its antiviral function.

  3. Histochemical studies on genetical control of hormonal enzyme inducibility in the mouse. VI. Effects of short term castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, K; Kirkeby, S; Blecher, S R

    1983-01-01

    The regional histology and esterase activity of the mouse epididymis after 24, 48, and 72 hr castration is reported. Differential sensitivity to androgen deprivation among the various epithelial cell types is described, allowing of positive identification of the cell types previously observed...... to survive long-term castration. The possibility of an androgen binding protein, as described in the rat and rabbit, is suggested on morphological grounds. The epididymal body appears to contain a class of highly androgen sensitive cells that degenerate rapidly following castration and a second class...

  4. Defining excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, B

    1993-05-01

    Excellence in the pharmacy profession, particularly pharmacy management, is defined. Several factors have a significant effect on the ability to reach a given level of excellence. The first is the economic and political climate in which pharmacists practice. Stricter controls, reduced resources, and the velocity of change all necessitate nurturing of values and a work ethic to maintain excellence. Excellence must be measured by the services provided with regard to the resources available; thus, the ability to achieve excellence is a true test of leadership and innovation. Excellence is also time dependent, and today's innovation becomes tomorrow's standard. Programs that raise the level of patient care, not those that aggrandize the profession, are the most important. In addition, basic services must be practiced at a level of excellence. Quality assessment is a way to improve care and bring medical treatment to a higher plane of excellence. For such assessment to be effective and not punitive, the philosophy of the program must be known, and the goal must be clear. Excellence in practice is dependent on factors such as political and social norms, standards of practice, available resources; perceptions, time, the motivation to progress to a higher level, and the continuous innovation required to reshape the profession to meet the needs of society.

  5. Identification of multiple genetic loci in the mouse controlling immobility time in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elnaga, Ahmed F; Torigoe, Daisuke; Fouda, Mohamed M; Darwish, Ragab A; Abou-Ismail, Usama A; Morimatsu, Masami; Agui, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Depression is one of the most famous psychiatric disorders in humans in all over the countries and considered a complex neurobehavioral trait and difficult to identify causal genes. Tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) are widely used for assessing depression-like behavior and antidepressant activity in mice. A variety of antidepressant agents are known to reduce immobility time in both TST and FST. To identify genetic determinants of immobility duration in both tests, we analyzed 101 F2 mice from an intercross between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping using 106 microsatellite markers revealed three loci (two significant and one suggestive) and five suggestive loci controlling immobility time in the TST and FST, respectively. Results of QTL analysis suggest a broad description of the genetic architecture underlying depression, providing underpinnings for identifying novel molecular targets for antidepressants to clear the complex genetic mechanisms of depressive disorders.

  6. Mouse Genetic Models Reveal Surprising Functions of IκB Kinase Alpha in Skin Development and Skin Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Xiaojun [The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Park, Eunmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fischer, Susan M. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78967 (United States); Hu, Yinling, E-mail: huy2@mail.nih.gov [Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Gene knockout studies unexpectedly reveal a pivotal role for IκB kinase alpha (IKKα) in mouse embryonic skin development. Skin carcinogenesis experiments show that Ikkα heterozygous mice are highly susceptible to chemical carcinogen or ultraviolet B light (UVB) induced benign and malignant skin tumors in comparison to wild-type mice. IKKα deletion mediated by keratin 5 (K5).Cre or K15.Cre in keratinocytes induces epidermal hyperplasia and spontaneous skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in Ikkα floxed mice. On the other hand, transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the epidermis, under the control of a truncated loricrin promoter or K5 promoter, develop normal skin and show no defects in the formation of the epidermis and other epithelial organs, and the transgenic IKKα represses chemical carcinogen or UVB induced skin carcinogenesis. Moreover, IKKα deletion mediated by a mutation, which generates a stop codon in the Ikkα gene, has been reported in a human autosomal recessive lethal syndrome. Downregulated IKKα and Ikkα mutations and deletions are found in human skin SCCs. The collective evidence not only highlights the importance of IKKα in skin development, maintaining skin homeostasis, and preventing skin carcinogenesis, but also demonstrates that mouse models are extremely valuable tools for revealing the mechanisms underlying these biological events, leading our studies from bench side to bedside.

  7. Pegylated liposomal formulation of doxorubicin overcomes drug resistance in a genetically engineered mouse model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füredi, András; Szebényi, Kornélia; Tóth, Szilárd; Cserepes, Mihály; Hámori, Lilla; Nagy, Veronika; Karai, Edina; Vajdovich, Péter; Imre, Tímea; Szabó, Pál; Szüts, Dávid; Tóvári, József; Szakács, Gergely

    2017-09-10

    Success of cancer treatment is often hampered by the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (ABCB1/Pgp). Doxorubicin (DOX) is recognized by Pgp and therefore it can induce therapy resistance in breast cancer patients. In this study our aim was to evaluate the susceptibility of the pegylated liposomal formulation of doxorubicin (PLD/Doxil®/Caelyx®) to MDR. We show that cells selected to be resistant to DOX are cross-resistant to PLD and PLD is also ineffective in an allograft model of doxorubicin-resistant mouse B-cell leukemia. In contrast, PLD was far more efficient than DOX as reflected by a significant increase of both relapse-free and overall survival of Brca1(-/-);p53(-/-) mammary tumor bearing mice. Increased survival could be explained by the delayed onset of drug resistance. Consistent with the higher Pgp levels needed to confer resistance, PLD administration was able to overcome doxorubicin insensitivity of the mouse mammary tumors. Our results indicate that the favorable pharmacokinetics achieved with PLD can effectively overcome Pgp-mediated resistance, suggesting that PLD therapy could be a promising strategy for the treatment of therapy-resistant breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic variation in hippocampal microRNA expression differences in C57BL/6 J X DBA/2 J (BXD recombinant inbred mouse strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Michael J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background miRNAs are short single-stranded non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation that play a major role in normal biological functions and diseases. Little is currently known about how expression of miRNAs is regulated. We surveyed variation in miRNA abundance in the hippocampus of mouse inbred strains, allowing us to take a genetic approach to the study of miRNA regulation, which is novel for miRNAs. The BXD recombinant inbred panel is a very well characterized genetic reference panel which allows quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis of miRNA abundance and detection of correlates in a large store of brain and behavioural phenotypes. Results We found five suggestive trans QTLs for the regulation of miRNAs investigated. Further analysis of these QTLs revealed two genes, Tnik and Phf17, under the miR-212 regulatory QTLs, whose expression levels were significantly correlated with miR-212 expression. We found that miR-212 expression is correlated with cocaine-related behaviour, consistent with a reported role for this miRNA in the control of cocaine consumption. miR-31 is correlated with anxiety and alcohol related behaviours. KEGG pathway analysis of each miRNA’s expression correlates revealed enrichment of pathways including MAP kinase, cancer, long-term potentiation, axonal guidance and WNT signalling. Conclusions The BXD reference panel allowed us to establish genetic regulation and characterize biological function of specific miRNAs. QTL analysis enabled detection of genetic loci that regulate the expression of these miRNAs. eQTLs that regulate miRNA abundance are a new mechanism by which genetic variation influences brain and behaviour. Analysis of one of these QTLs revealed a gene, Tnik, which may regulate the expression of a miRNA, a molecular pathway and a behavioural phenotype. Evidence of genetic covariation of miR-212 abundance and cocaine related behaviours is strongly supported by previous

  9. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  10. Lipidomic and metabolomic characterization of a genetically modified mouse model of the early stages of human type 1 diabetes pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Anne Julie; Weir, Jacquelyn M; De Souza, David Peter;

    2016-01-01

    The early mechanisms regulating progression towards beta cell failure in type 1 diabetes (T1D) are poorly understood, but it is generally acknowledged that genetic and environmental components are involved. The metabolomic phenotype is sensitive to minor variations in both, and accordingly reflec...

  11. Cross-species analysis of genetically engineered mouse models of MAPK-driven colorectal cancer identifies hallmarks of the human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Belmont

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Effective treatment options for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC are limited, survival rates are poor and this disease continues to be a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite being a highly heterogeneous disease, a large subset of individuals with sporadic CRC typically harbor relatively few established ‘driver’ lesions. Here, we describe a collection of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs of sporadic CRC that combine lesions frequently altered in human patients, including well-characterized tumor suppressors and activators of MAPK signaling. Primary tumors from these models were profiled, and individual GEMM tumors segregated into groups based on their genotypes. Unique allelic and genotypic expression signatures were generated from these GEMMs and applied to clinically annotated human CRC patient samples. We provide evidence that a Kras signature derived from these GEMMs is capable of distinguishing human tumors harboring KRAS mutation, and tracks with poor prognosis in two independent human patient cohorts. Furthermore, the analysis of a panel of human CRC cell lines suggests that high expression of the GEMM Kras signature correlates with sensitivity to targeted pathway inhibitors. Together, these findings implicate GEMMs as powerful preclinical tools with the capacity to recapitulate relevant human disease biology, and support the use of genetic signatures generated in these models to facilitate future drug discovery and validation efforts.

  12. Reversal of Senescence in Mouse Fibroblasts through Lentiviral Suppression of p53

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirac, A.M.G.; Bernards, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Senescence is generally defined as an irreversible state of G1 cell cycle arrest in which cells are refractory to growth factor stimulation. In mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), induction of senescence requires the presence of p19ARF and p53, as genetic ablation of either of these genes allows escape

  13. Body mass index bias in defining obesity of diverse young adults: The Training Intervention and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The BMI cut-score used to define overweight and obesity was derived primarily using data from Caucasian men and women. The present study evaluated the racial/ethnic bias of BMI to estimate the adiposity of young men and women (aged 17–35 years) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) determinat...

  14. Genetic evidence of enzootic leishmaniasis in a stray canine and Texas mouse from sites in west and central Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan J Kipp

    Full Text Available We detected Leishmania mexicana in skin biopsies taken from a stray canine (Canis familiaris and Texas mouse (Peromyscus attwateri at two ecologically disparate sites in west and central Texas using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. A single PCR-positive dog was identified from a sample of 96 stray canines and was collected in a peri-urban area in El Paso County, Texas. The PCR-positive P. attwateri was trapped at a wildlife reserve in Mason County, Texas, from a convenience sample of 20 sylvatic mammals of different species. To our knowledge, this represents the first description of L. mexicana in west Texas and extends the known geographic range of the parasite to an area that includes the arid Chihuahuan Desert. Our finding of L. mexicana in P. attwateri represents a new host record and is the first description of the parasite in a wild peromyscid rodent in the United States.

  15. Genetic evidence of enzootic leishmaniasis in a stray canine and Texas mouse from sites in west and central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Evan J; Mariscal, Jacqueline; Armijos, Rodrigo X; Weigel, Margaret; Waldrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We detected Leishmania mexicana in skin biopsies taken from a stray canine (Canis familiaris) and Texas mouse (Peromyscus attwateri) at two ecologically disparate sites in west and central Texas using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A single PCR-positive dog was identified from a sample of 96 stray canines and was collected in a peri-urban area in El Paso County, Texas. The PCR-positive P. attwateri was trapped at a wildlife reserve in Mason County, Texas, from a convenience sample of 20 sylvatic mammals of different species. To our knowledge, this represents the first description of L. mexicana in west Texas and extends the known geographic range of the parasite to an area that includes the arid Chihuahuan Desert. Our finding of L. mexicana in P. attwateri represents a new host record and is the first description of the parasite in a wild peromyscid rodent in the United States. PMID:27759765

  16. Analysis of tumor metabolism reveals mitochondrial glucose oxidation in genetically diverse, human glioblastomas in the mouse brain in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Yang, Chendong; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Cho, Steve; Baek, Hyeonman; Yang, Xiao-Li; Rajagopalan, Kartik N.; Maddie, Melissa; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Zhao, Zhenze; Cai, Ling; Good, Levi; Tu, Benjamin P.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Mickey, Bruce E.; Matés, José M.; Pascual, Juan M.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Malloy, Craig R.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer cell lines, but little is known about the fate of glucose and other nutrients in tumors growing in their native microenvironment. To study tumor metabolism in vivo, we used an orthotopic mouse model of primary human glioblastoma (GBM). We infused 13C-labeled nutrients into mice bearing three independent GBM lines, each with a distinct set of mutations. All three lines displayed glycolysis, as expected for aggressive tumors. They also displayed unexpected metabolic complexity, oxidizing glucose via pyruvate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle, and using glucose to supply anaplerosis and other biosynthetic activities. Comparing the tumors to surrounding brain revealed obvious metabolic differences, notably the accumulation of a large glutamine pool within the tumors. Many of these same activities were conserved in cells cultured ex vivo from the tumors. Thus GBM cells utilize mitochondrial glucose oxidation during aggressive tumor growth in vivo. PMID:22682223

  17. Genetically engineered Lactococcus lactis protect against house dust mite allergy in a BALB/c mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqing Ai

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccine based on lactic acid bacteria is an attractive concept for the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, but their mechanisms of action in vivo are poorly understood. Therefore, we sought to investigate how recombinant major dust mite allergen Der p2-expressing Lactococcus lactis as a mucosal vaccine induced the immune tolerance against house dust mite allergy in a mouse model.Three strains of recombinant L. lactis producing Der p2 in different cell components (extracellular, intracellular and cell wall were firstly constructed. Their prophylactic potential was evaluated in a Der p2-sensitised mouse model, and immunomodulation properties at the cellular level were determined by measuring cytokine production in vitro.Der p2 expressed in the different recombinant L. lactis strains was recognized by a polyclonal anti-Der p2 antibody. Oral treatment with the recombinant L. lactis prior sensitization significantly prevented the development of airway inflammation in the Der p2-sensitized mice, as determined by the attenuation of inflammatory cells infiltration in the lung tissues and decrease of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage. In addition, the serum allergen-specific IgE levels were significantly reduced, and the levels of IL-4 in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes cell cultures were also markedly decreased upon allergen stimulation in the mice fed with the recombinant L. lactis strains. These protective effects correlated with a significant up-regulation of regulatory T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes.Oral pretreatment with live recombinant L. lactis prevented the development of allergen-induced airway inflammation primarily by the induction of specific mucosal immune tolerance.

  18. The physiological effects of deleting the mouse SLC30A8 gene encoding zinc transporter-8 are influenced by gender and genetic background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynley D Pound

    Full Text Available The SLC30A8 gene encodes the islet-specific transporter ZnT-8, which is hypothesized to provide zinc for insulin-crystal formation. A polymorphic variant in SLC30A8 is associated with altered susceptibility to type 2 diabetes. Several groups have examined the effect of global Slc30a8 gene deletion but the results have been highly variable, perhaps due to the mixed 129SvEv/C57BL/6J genetic background of the mice studied. We therefore sought to remove the conflicting effect of 129SvEv-specific modifier genes.The impact of Slc30a8 deletion was examined in the context of the pure C57BL/6J genetic background.Male C57BL/6J Slc30a8 knockout (KO mice had normal fasting insulin levels and no change in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS from isolated islets in marked contrast to the ∼50% and ∼35% decrease, respectively, in both parameters observed in male mixed genetic background Slc30a8 KO mice. This observation suggests that 129SvEv-specific modifier genes modulate the impact of Slc30a8 deletion. In contrast, female C57BL/6J Slc30a8 KO mice had reduced (∼20% fasting insulin levels, though this was not associated with a change in fasting blood glucose (FBG, or GSIS from isolated islets. This observation indicates that gender also modulates the impact of Slc30a8 deletion, though the physiological explanation as to why impaired insulin secretion is not accompanied by elevated FBG is unclear. Neither male nor female C57BL/6J Slc30a8 KO mice showed impaired glucose tolerance.Our data suggest that, despite a marked reduction in islet zinc content, the absence of ZnT-8 does not have a substantial impact on mouse physiology.

  19. Genetic knock-down of HDAC7 does not ameliorate disease pathogenesis in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline L Benn

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an inherited, progressive neurological disorder caused by a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion, for which there is no effective disease modifying therapy. In recent years, transcriptional dysregulation has emerged as a pathogenic process that appears early in disease progression. Administration of histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA have consistently shown therapeutic potential in models of HD, at least partly through increasing the association of acetylated histones with down-regulated genes and by correcting mRNA abnormalities. The HDAC enzyme through which SAHA mediates its beneficial effects in the R6/2 mouse model of HD is not known. Therefore, we have embarked on a series of genetic studies to uncover the HDAC target that is relevant to therapeutic development for HD. HDAC7 is of interest in this context because SAHA has been shown to decrease HDAC7 expression in cell culture systems in addition to inhibiting enzyme activity. After confirming that expression levels of Hdac7 are decreased in the brains of wild type and R6/2 mice after SAHA administration, we performed a genetic cross to determine whether genetic reduction of Hdac7 would alleviate phenotypes in the R6/2 mice. We found no improvement in a number of physiological or behavioral phenotypes. Similarly, the dysregulated expression levels of a number of genes of interest were not improved suggesting that reduction in Hdac7 does not alleviate the R6/2 HD-related transcriptional dysregulation. Therefore, we conclude that the beneficial effects of HDAC inhibitors are not predominantly mediated through the inhibition of HDAC7.

  20. Mannan-binding lectin in diabetic kidney disease: the impact of mouse genetics in a type 1 diabetes model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jakob; Bjerre, Mette; RamachandraRao, Satish Posettihalli

    2012-01-01

    of diabetic kidney disease is observed in one animal strain. However, this involvement may differ among the animal strains. We thus examined the impact of the genetic background on the role of MBL in diabetic nephropathy. MATERIALS/METHODS: C57BL/6JBomTac and 129S6/SvEvTac mice were compared. In both strains......, experimental type 1 diabetes was induced in wild-type (WT) and MBL-knockout (MBL-KO) mice by streptozotocin. Nondiabetic WT and MBL-KO mice were used as controls. We tested if MBL modified the diabetes-induced kidney changes by two-way ANOVA allowing for interaction. RESULTS: MBL aggravated diabetes....... CONCLUSIONS: Strain-specific MBL effects were found on downstream diabetic kidney changes. This emphasizes the importance of genetic background in this model of diabetic complications....

  1. A new humanized ataxin-3 knock-in mouse model combines the genetic features, pathogenesis of neurons and glia and late disease onset of SCA3/MJD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switonski, Pawel M; Szlachcic, Wojciech J; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J; Figiel, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3/MJD) is a neurodegenerative disease triggered by the expansion of CAG repeats in the ATXN3 gene. Here, we report the generation of the first humanized ataxin-3 knock-in mouse model (Ki91), which provides insights into the neuronal and glial pathology of SCA3/MJD. First, mutant ataxin-3 accumulated in cell nuclei across the Ki91 brain, showing diffused immunostaining and forming intranuclear inclusions. The humanized allele revealed expansion and contraction of CAG repeats in intergenerational transmissions. CAG mutation also exhibited age-dependent tissue-specific expansion, which was most prominent in the cerebellum, pons and testes of Ki91 animals. Moreover, Ki91 mice displayed neuroinflammatory processes, showing astrogliosis in the cerebellar white matter and the substantia nigra that paralleled the transcriptional deregulation of Serpina3n, a molecular sign of neurodegeneration and brain damage. Simultaneously, the cerebellar Purkinje cells in Ki91 mice showed neurodegeneration, a pronounced decrease in Calbindin D-28k immunoreactivity and a mild decrease in cell number, thereby modeling the degeneration of the cerebellum observed in SCA3. Moreover, these molecular and cellular neuropathologies were accompanied by late behavioral deficits in motor coordination observed in rotarod and static rod tests in heterozygous Ki91 animals. In summary, we created an ataxin-3 knock-in mouse model that combines the molecular and behavioral disease phenotypes with the genetic features of SCA3. This model will be very useful for studying the pathogenesis and responses to therapy of SCA3/MJD and other polyQ disorders.

  2. The genetic basis of obesity and type 2 diabetes: lessons from the new zealand obese mouse, a polygenic model of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joost, Hans-Georg

    2010-01-01

    The New Zealand obese (NZO) mouse is a polygenic model of severe obesity and type 2 diabetes-like hyperglycaemia. Outcross experiments with lean strains have led to the identification of numerous susceptibility loci (quantitative trait loci (QTL)) for adiposity and/or hyperglycaemia. Several major QTL were successfully introgressed into lean strains, and two responsible genes, the RabGAP Tbc1d1 and the transcription factor Zfp69, were so far identified by a conventional strategy of positional cloning. Tbc1d1 controls substrate utilization in muscle; SJL mice carry a loss-of-function variant that shifts substrate oxidation from glucose to fat and suppresses adiposity as well as development of diabetes. The zinc finger domain transcription factor Zfp69 appears to regulate triglyceride storage in adipose tissue. Its normal allele Zfp69 causes a redistribution of triglycerides from gonadal stores to liver, and consequently enhances diabetes when introgressed from SJL into NZO, whereas the loss-of-function variant present in NZO and C57BL/6J reduces the prevalence of diabetes. Data from human patients suggest that the orthologs of both genes may play a role in the pathogenesis of the human metabolic syndrome. In addition to Tbc1d1 and Zfp69, variants of Lepr, Pctp, Abcg1, and Nmur2 located in other QTL were identified as potential candidates by sequencing and functional studies. These results indicate that dissection of the genetic basis of obesity and diabetes in mouse models can identify novel regulatory mechanisms that are relevant for the human disease.

  3. Preservation Analysis of Macrophage Gene Coexpression Between Human and Mouse Identifies PARK2 as a Genetically Controlled Master Regulator of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Codoni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are key players involved in numerous pathophysiological pathways and an in-depth characterization of their gene regulatory networks can help in better understanding how their dysfunction may impact on human diseases. We here conducted a cross-species network analysis of macrophage gene expression data between human and mouse to identify conserved networks across both species, and assessed whether such networks could reveal new disease-associated regulatory mechanisms. From a sample of 684 individuals processed for genome-wide macrophage gene expression profiling, we identified 27 groups of coexpressed genes (modules. Six modules were found preserved (P < 10−4 in macrophages from 86 mice of the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. One of these modules was significantly [false discovery rate (FDR = 8.9 × 10−11] enriched for genes belonging to the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS pathway. This pathway was also found significantly (FDR < 10−4 enriched in susceptibility genes for Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington diseases. We further conducted an expression quantitative trait loci analysis to identify SNP that could regulate macrophage OXPHOS gene expression in humans. This analysis identified the PARK2 rs192804963 as a trans-acting variant influencing (minimal P-value = 4.3 × 10−8 the expression of most OXPHOS genes in humans. Further experimental work demonstrated that PARK2 knockdown expression was associated with increased OXPHOS gene expression in THP1 human macrophages. This work provided strong new evidence that PARK2 participates to the regulatory networks associated with oxidative phosphorylation and suggested that PARK2 genetic variations could act as a trans regulator of OXPHOS gene macrophage expression in humans.

  4. Genetic expression of hexokinase and glucose phosphate isomerase in late-stage mouse preimplantation embryos: transcription activities in glucose/phosphate-containing HTF and glucose/phosphate-free P1 media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M D; Batey, D W; Behr, B; Barro, J

    1997-04-01

    In mouse and human preimplantation development, pyruvate is consumed preferentially during early embryogenesis; however, during the morula and blastocyst stages, glucose is the preferred energy substrate. Studies have suggested that the glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase and glucose phosphate isomerase, are important enzymes in glucose metabolism during these later stages of human and mouse preimplantation development. In order to investigate the genetic activities of these enzymes in late-stage mouse embryos developing in vitro, we analysed hexokinase and glucose phosphate isomerase transcription activities by qualitative RNA assays using reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction amplification of individual mouse morulae and early blastocysts incubated in glucose/phosphate-free preimplantation stage one (P1) medium and glucose/phosphate-containing human tubal fluid (HTF) medium. We observed an increased incidence of hexokinase transcripts in the population of blastocysts compared with morulae, and differences in transcript incidence between early blastocysts developing in HTF medium and in P1 medium. In contrast, glucose phosphate isomerase transcripts were consistantly present in all embryos analysed, and appear to be constitutively expressed during late-stage mouse embryogenesis. The different activity patterns of the two glycolytic genes may reflect different mechanisms of gene regulation or differential transcript stability during the later stages of mouse preimplantation development.

  5. Management of primary ciliary dyskinesia/Kartagener's syndrome in infertile male patients and current progress in defining the underlying genetic mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Wei Sha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Kartagener's syndrome (KS is an autosomal recessive genetic disease accounting for approximately 50% of the cases of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD. As it is accompanied by many complications, PCD/KS severely affects the patient's quality of life. Therapeutic approaches for PCD/KS aim to enhance prevention, facilitate rapid definitive diagnosis, avoid misdiagnosis, maintain active treatment, control infection and postpone the development of lesions. In male patients, sperm flagella may show impairment in or complete absence of the ability to swing, which ultimately results in male infertility. Assisted reproductive technology will certainly benefit such patients. For PCD/KS patients with completely immotile sperm, intracytoplasmic sperm injection may be very important and even indispensable. Considering the number of PCD/KS susceptibility genes and mutations that are being identified, more extensive genetic screening is indispensable in patients with these diseases. Moreover, further studies into the potential molecular mechanisms of these diseases are required. In this review, we summarize the available information on various aspects of this disease in order to delineate the therapeutic objectives more clearly, and clarify the efficacy of assisted reproductive technology as a means of treatment for patients with PCD/KS-associated infertility.

  6. Chromosomal mapping of the structural gene coding for the mouse cell adhesion molecule uvomorulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eistetter, H.R.; Adolph, S.; Ringwald, M.; Simon-Chazottes, D.; Schuh, R.; Guenet, J.L.; Kemler, R. (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Tuebingen (West Germany))

    1988-05-01

    The gene coding for the mouse cell adhesion molecule uvomorulin has been mapped to chromosome 8. Uvomorulin cDNA clone F5H3 identified restriction fragment length polymorphisms in Southern blots of genomic DNA from mouse species Mus musculus domesticus and Mus spretus. By analyzing the segregation pattern of the gene in 75 offspring from an interspecific backcross a single genetic locus, Um, was defined on chromosome 8. Recombination frequency between Um and the co-segregating loci serum esterase 1 (Es-1) and tyrosine aminotransferase (Tat) places Um about 14 centimorgan (cM) distal to Es-1, and 5 cM proximal to Tat. In situ hybridization of uvomorulin ({sup 3}H)cDNA to mouse metaphase chromosomes located the Um locus close to the distal end of chromosome 8 (bands C3-E1). Since uvomorulin is evolutionarily highly conserved, its chromosomal assignment adds an important marker to the mouse genetic map.

  7. Fine genetic map of mouse chromosome 10 around the polycystic kidney disease gene, jcpk, and ankyrin 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryda, E.C.; Ling, H.; Rathbun, D.E. [New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A chlorambucil (CHL)-induced mutation of the jcpk (juvenile congenital polycystic kidney disease) gene causes a severe early onset polycystic kidney disease. In an intercross involving Mus musculus castaneus, jcpk was precisely mapped 0.2 cM distal to D10Mit115 and 0.8 cM proximal to D10Mit173. In addition, five genes, Cdc2a, Col6al, Col6a2, Bcr, and Ank3 were mapped in both this jcpk intercross and a (BALB/c X CAST/Ei)F{sub 1} x BALB/c backcross. All five genes were eliminated as possible candidates for jcpk based on the mapping data. The jcpk intercross allowed the orientation of the Ank3 gene relative to the centromere to be determined. D10Mit115, D10Mit173, D10Mit199, and D10Mit200 were separated genetically in this cross. The order and genetic distances of all markers and gene loci mapped in the jcpk intercross were consistent with those derived from the BALB/c backcross, indicating that the CHL-induced lesion has not generated any gross chromosomal abnormalities detectable in these studies. 39 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Mannan-Binding Lectin in Diabetic Kidney Disease: The Impact of Mouse Genetics in a Type 1 Diabetes Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Appel Østergaard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL is involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. MBL is a part of the innate immune system where it can activate the complement system. Serum MBL level predicts later renal impairment in diabetes patients. Direct involvement of MBL in the development of diabetic kidney disease is observed in one animal strain. However, this involvement may differ among the animal strains. We thus examined the impact of the genetic background on the role of MBL in diabetic nephropathy. Materials/Methods. C57BL/6JBomTac and 129S6/SvEvTac mice were compared. In both strains, experimental type 1 diabetes was induced in wild-type (WT and MBL-knockout (MBL-KO mice by streptozotocin. Nondiabetic WT and MBL-KO mice were used as controls. We tested if MBL modified the diabetes-induced kidney changes by two-way ANOVA allowing for interaction. Results. MBL aggravated diabetes-induced kidney growth and glomerulus enlargement in C57BL/6JBomTac mice. MBL did not modify diabetes effects on glomerular basement membrane thickness or mesangial volume in any strain. Diabetes-induced changes in renal gene transcription of growth factors and matrix components were unaffected by MBL. Conclusions. Strain-specific MBL effects were found on downstream diabetic kidney changes. This emphasizes the importance of genetic background in this model of diabetic complications.

  9. Genetic interaction between Tmprss2-ERG gene fusion and Nkx3.1-loss does not enhance prostate tumorigenesis in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Douglas E; Bronson, Roderick T; Li, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Gene fusions involving ETS family transcription factors (mainly TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions) have been found in ~50% of human prostate cancer cases. Although expression of TMPRSS2-ERG or TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusion alone is insufficient to initiate prostate tumorigenesis, they appear to sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperation with additional oncogenic mutations to drive frank prostate adenocarcinoma. To search for such ETS-cooperating oncogenic events, we focused on a well-studied prostate tumor suppressor NKX3.1, as loss of NKX3.1 is another common genetic alteration in human prostate cancer. Previous studies have shown that deletions at 8p21 (harboring NKX3.1) and 21q22 (resulting in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion) were both present in a subtype of prostate cancer cases, and that ERG can lead to epigenetic silencing of NKX3.1 in prostate cancer cells, whereas NKX3.1 can in turn negatively regulate TMPRSS2-ERG fusion expression via suppression of the TMPRSS2 promoter activity. We recently generated knockin mouse models for TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions, utilizing the endogenous Tmprss2 promoter. We crossed these knockin models to an Nkx3.1 knockout mouse model. In Tmprss2-ERG;Nkx3.1+/- (or -/-) male mice, although we observed a slight but significant upregulation of Tmprss2-ERG fusion expression upon Nkx3.1 loss, we did not detect any significant cooperation between these two genetic events to enhance prostate tumorigenesis in vivo. Furthermore, retrospective analysis of a previously published human prostate cancer dataset revealed that within ERG-overexpressing prostate cancer cases, NKX3.1 loss or deletion did not predict biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy. Collectively, these data suggest that although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion and loss of NKX3.1 are among the most common mutational events found in prostate cancer, and although each of them can sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperating with other oncogenic events, these two events

  10. Genetic interaction between Tmprss2-ERG gene fusion and Nkx3.1-loss does not enhance prostate tumorigenesis in mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas E Linn

    Full Text Available Gene fusions involving ETS family transcription factors (mainly TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions have been found in ~50% of human prostate cancer cases. Although expression of TMPRSS2-ERG or TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusion alone is insufficient to initiate prostate tumorigenesis, they appear to sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperation with additional oncogenic mutations to drive frank prostate adenocarcinoma. To search for such ETS-cooperating oncogenic events, we focused on a well-studied prostate tumor suppressor NKX3.1, as loss of NKX3.1 is another common genetic alteration in human prostate cancer. Previous studies have shown that deletions at 8p21 (harboring NKX3.1 and 21q22 (resulting in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion were both present in a subtype of prostate cancer cases, and that ERG can lead to epigenetic silencing of NKX3.1 in prostate cancer cells, whereas NKX3.1 can in turn negatively regulate TMPRSS2-ERG fusion expression via suppression of the TMPRSS2 promoter activity. We recently generated knockin mouse models for TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions, utilizing the endogenous Tmprss2 promoter. We crossed these knockin models to an Nkx3.1 knockout mouse model. In Tmprss2-ERG;Nkx3.1+/- (or -/- male mice, although we observed a slight but significant upregulation of Tmprss2-ERG fusion expression upon Nkx3.1 loss, we did not detect any significant cooperation between these two genetic events to enhance prostate tumorigenesis in vivo. Furthermore, retrospective analysis of a previously published human prostate cancer dataset revealed that within ERG-overexpressing prostate cancer cases, NKX3.1 loss or deletion did not predict biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy. Collectively, these data suggest that although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion and loss of NKX3.1 are among the most common mutational events found in prostate cancer, and although each of them can sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperating with other oncogenic events, these

  11. Phylogeography of the South China field mouse (Apodemus draco on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau reveals high genetic diversity and glacial refugia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxin Fan

    Full Text Available The southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau (SEMTP is a particularly interesting region due to its topographic complexity and unique geologic history, but phylogeographic studies that focus on this region are rare. In this study, we investigated the phylogeography of the South China field mouse, Apodemus draco, in order to assess the role of geologic and climatic events on the Tibetan Plateau in shaping its genetic structure. We sequenced mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b sequences in 103 individuals from 47 sampling sites. In addition, 23 cyt b sequences were collected from GenBank for analyses. Phylogenetic, demographic and landscape genetic methods were conducted. Seventy-six cyt b haplotypes were found and the genetic diversity was extremely high (π = 0.0368; h = 0.989. Five major evolutionary clades, based on geographic locations, were identified. Demographic analyses implied subclade 1A and subclade 1B experienced population expansions at about 0.052-0.013 Mya and 0.014-0.004 Mya, respectively. The divergence time analysis showed that the split between clade 1 and clade 2 occurred 0.26 Mya, which fell into the extensive glacial period (EGP, 0.5-0.17 Mya. The divergence times of other main clades (2.20-0.55 Mya were congruent with the periods of the Qingzang Movement (3.6-1.7 Mya and the Kun-Huang Movement (1.2-0.6 Mya, which were known as the most intense uplift events in the Tibetan Plateau. Our study supported the hypothesis that the SEMTP was a large late Pleistocene refugium, and further inferred that the Gongga Mountain Region and Hongya County were glacial refugia for A. draco in clade 1. We hypothesize that the evolutionary history of A. draco in the SEMTP primarily occurred in two stages. First, an initial divergence would have been shaped by uplift events of the Tibetan Plateau. Then, major glaciations in the Pleistocene added complexity to its demographic history and genetic structure.

  12. A Single Neonatal Exposure to Aflatoxin B1 Induces Prolonged Genetic Damage in Two Loci of Mouse Liver

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Aflatoxin B 1 (AFB1) is a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma in humans. Infant, but not adult, mice are sensitive to AFB1-induced liver carcinogenesis; a single dose during the neonatal period leads to hepatocellular carcinoma in adulthood. Earlier work defined the mutational spectrum in the gpt gene of gpt delta B6C3F1 mice 3 weeks after exposure to aflatoxin. In the present study, we examined the gpt spectrum 10 weeks postdosing and expanded the study to examine, at 3 and 10 weeks,...

  13. Differential impact of cysteine cathepsins on genetic mouse models of de novo carcinogenesis: cathepsin B as emerging therapeutic target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eReinheckel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal cysteine cathepsins belong to a family of 11 human proteolytic enzymes. Some of them correlate with progression in a variety of cancers and therefore are considered as potential therapeutic targets. Until recently, the contribution of individual cathepsins to tumorigenesis and tumor progression remained unknown. By crossing various types of mouse cancer models with mice where specific cathepsins have been ablated, we contributed to this gap of knowledge and will summarize the results in this report. The employed models are the Rip1-Tag2 model for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, the K14-HPV16 model for squamous skin and cervical cancers, and the MMTV-PyMT model for metastasizing breast cancer, the KPC model for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and the APCmin mice developing early stages of intestinal neoplasia. All models harbor mutations in relevant tumor suppressors and/or cell-type specific expression of potent oncogenes, which initiate de novo carcinogenesis in the targeted tissues. In all these models deletion of cathepsin B led to suppression of the aggressiveness of the respective cancer phenotype. Cathepsin B may network with other proteases as it was shown for cathepsin X/Z. In contrast, deletion of cathepsin L was beneficial in the RiP1-Tag2 model, but enhanced tumorigenesis in the APCmin, and the K14-HPV16 mice. A logical consequence of these results would be to further pursue selective inhibition of cathepsin B. Moreover, it became clear that cathepsins B and S derived from cells of the tumor microenvironment support cancer growth. Strikingly, delivery of broad spectrum cysteine cathepsin inhibitors in the tumor microenvironment disrupts the permissive ecosystem of the cancer and results in impaired growth or even in regression of the tumor. In addition, combination of cysteine cathepsin inhibition and standard chemotherapy improves the therapeutic response of the latter.

  14. iPLA2• Knockout Mouse, a Genetic Model for Progressive Human Motor Disorders, Develops Age-Related Neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Helene; Taha, Ameer Y.; Cheon, Yewon; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Turk, John; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 group VIa (iPLA2β) preferentially releases docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from the sn-2 position of phospholipids. Mutations of its gene, PLA2G6, are found in patients with several progressive motor disorders, including Parkinson disease. At 4 months, PLA2G6 knockout mice (iPLA2β−/−) show minimal neuropathology but altered brain DHA metabolism. By 1 year, they develop motor disturbances, cerebellar neuronal loss, and striatal α-synuclein accumulation. We hypothesized that older iPLA2β−/− mice also would exhibit inflammatory and other neuropathological changes. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were performed on whole brain homogenate from 15 to 20-month old male iPLA2β−/− or wild-type (WT) mice. These older iPLA2β−/− mice compared with WT showed molecular evidence of microglial (CD-11b, iNOS) and astrocytic (glial fibrillary acidic protein) activation, disturbed expression of enzymes involved in arachidonic acid metabolism, loss of neuroprotective brain derived neurotrophic factor, and accumulation of cytokine TNF-α messenger ribonucleic acid, consistent with neuroinflammatory pathology. There was no evidence of synaptic loss, of reduced expression of dopamine active reuptake transporter, or of accumulation of the Parkinson disease markers Parkin or Pink1. iPLA2γ expression was unchanged. iPLA2β deficient mice show evidence of neuroinflammation and associated neuropathology with motor dysfunction in later life. These pathological biomarkers could be used to assess efficacy of dietary intervention, antioxidants or other therapies on disease progression in this mouse model of progressive human motor diseases associated with a PLA2G6 mutation. PMID:24919816

  15. The Mouse SAGE Site: database of public mouse SAGE libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divina, Petr; Forejt, Jirí

    2004-01-01

    The Mouse SAGE Site is a web-based database of all available public libraries generated by the Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) from various mouse tissues and cell lines. The database contains mouse SAGE libraries organized in a uniform way and provides web-based tools for browsing, comparing and searching SAGE data with reliable tag-to-gene identification. A modified approach based on the SAGEmap database is used for reliable tag identification. The Mouse SAGE Site is maintained on an ongoing basis at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and is accessible at the internet address http://mouse.biomed.cas.cz/sage/.

  16. Fine Mapping of a Deafness Mutation hml on Mouse Chromosome 10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Yin Zheng; Belinda S Harris; Patricia F Ward-Bailey; Heping Yu; Roderick T Bronson; Muriel T Davisson; Kenneth R Johnson

    2004-01-01

    Objective To map a mouse deafness gene, identify the underlying mutation and develop a mouse model for human deafness. Methods Genetic linkage cross and genome scan were used to map a novel mutation named hypoplasia of the membranous labyrinth (hml), which causes hearing loss in mutant mice. Results ① hml was mapped on mouse Chr 10 (~43 cM from the centromere) suggests that the homologous human gene is on 12q22-q24, which was defined on the basis of known mouse-human homologies (OMIM, 2004). ② This study has generated 25 polymorphic microsatellite markers, placed 3 known human genes in the correct order in a high-resolution mouse map and narrowed the hml candidate gene region to a 500 kb area.

  17. Mouse genome database 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.

  18. Preservation Analysis of Macrophage Gene Coexpression Between Human and Mouse Identifies PARK2 as a Genetically Controlled Master Regulator of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codoni, Veronica; Blum, Yuna; Civelek, Mete; Proust, Carole; Franzén, Oscar; Björkegren, Johan L. M.; Le Goff, Wilfried; Cambien, Francois; Lusis, Aldons J.; Trégouët, David-Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are key players involved in numerous pathophysiological pathways and an in-depth characterization of their gene regulatory networks can help in better understanding how their dysfunction may impact on human diseases. We here conducted a cross-species network analysis of macrophage gene expression data between human and mouse to identify conserved networks across both species, and assessed whether such networks could reveal new disease-associated regulatory mechanisms. From a sample of 684 individuals processed for genome-wide macrophage gene expression profiling, we identified 27 groups of coexpressed genes (modules). Six modules were found preserved (P Parkinson, and Huntington diseases. We further conducted an expression quantitative trait loci analysis to identify SNP that could regulate macrophage OXPHOS gene expression in humans. This analysis identified the PARK2 rs192804963 as a trans-acting variant influencing (minimal P-value = 4.3 × 10−8) the expression of most OXPHOS genes in humans. Further experimental work demonstrated that PARK2 knockdown expression was associated with increased OXPHOS gene expression in THP1 human macrophages. This work provided strong new evidence that PARK2 participates to the regulatory networks associated with oxidative phosphorylation and suggested that PARK2 genetic variations could act as a trans regulator of OXPHOS gene macrophage expression in humans. PMID:27558669

  19. Evaluation of Concurrent Radiation, Temozolomide and ABT-888 Treatment Followed by Maintenance Therapy with Temozolomide and ABT-888 in a Genetically Engineered Glioblastoma Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Lemasson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the use of ionizing radiation (IR and temozolomide (TMZ, outcome for glioblastoma (GBM patients remains dismal. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP is important in repair pathways for IR-induced DNA damage and TMZ-induced alkylation at N7-methylguanine and N3-methyldenine. However, optimized protocols for administration of PARP inhibitors have not been delineated. In this study, the PARP inhibitor ABT-888 was evaluated in combination with and compared to current standard-of-care in a genetically engineered mouse GBM model. Results demonstrated that concomitant TMZ/IR/ABT-888 with adjuvant TMZ/ABT-888 was more effective in inducing apoptosis and reducing proliferation with significant tumor growth delay and improved overall survival over concomitant TMZ/IR with adjuvant TMZ. Diffusion-weighted MRI, an early translatable response biomarker detected changes in tumors reflecting response at 1 day post TMZ/IR/ABT-888 treatment. This study provides strong scientific rationale for the development of an optimized dosing regimen for a PARP inhibitor with TMZ/IR for upfront treatment of GBM.

  20. Evaluation of Concurrent Radiation, Temozolomide and ABT-888 Treatment Followed by Maintenance Therapy with Temozolomide and ABT-888 in a Genetically Engineered Glioblastoma Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasson, Benjamin; Wang, Hanxiao; Galbán, Stefanie; Li, Yinghua; Zhu, Yuan; Heist, Kevin A; Tsein, Christina; Chenevert, Thomas L; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Galbán, Craig J; Holland, Eric C; Ross, Brian D

    2016-02-01

    Despite the use of ionizing radiation (IR) and temozolomide (TMZ), outcome for glioblastoma (GBM) patients remains dismal. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is important in repair pathways for IR-induced DNA damage and TMZ-induced alkylation at N7-methylguanine and N3-methyldenine. However, optimized protocols for administration of PARP inhibitors have not been delineated. In this study, the PARP inhibitor ABT-888 was evaluated in combination with and compared to current standard-of-care in a genetically engineered mouse GBM model. Results demonstrated that concomitant TMZ/IR/ABT-888 with adjuvant TMZ/ABT-888 was more effective in inducing apoptosis and reducing proliferation with significant tumor growth delay and improved overall survival over concomitant TMZ/IR with adjuvant TMZ. Diffusion-weighted MRI, an early translatable response biomarker detected changes in tumors reflecting response at 1 day post TMZ/IR/ABT-888 treatment. This study provides strong scientific rationale for the development of an optimized dosing regimen for a PARP inhibitor with TMZ/IR for upfront treatment of GBM.

  1. Neurochemical Changes in the Mouse Hippocampus Underlying the Antidepressant Effect of Genetic Deletion of P2X7 Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csölle, Cecilia; Baranyi, Mária; Zsilla, Gabriella; Kittel, Agnes; Gölöncsér, Flóra; Illes, Peter; Papp, Edit; Vizi, E Sylvester; Sperlágh, Beáta

    2013-01-01

    Recent investigations have revealed that the genetic deletion of P2X7 receptors (P2rx7) results in an antidepressant phenotype in mice. However, the link between the deficiency of P2rx7 and changes in behavior has not yet been explored. In the present study, we studied the effect of genetic deletion of P2rx7 on neurochemical changes in the hippocampus that might underlie the antidepressant phenotype. P2X7 receptor deficient mice (P2rx7-/-) displayed decreased immobility in the tail suspension test (TST) and an attenuated anhedonia response in the sucrose preference test (SPT) following bacterial endotoxin (LPS) challenge. The attenuated anhedonia was reproduced through systemic treatments with P2rx7 antagonists. The activation of P2rx7 resulted in the concentration-dependent release of [(3)H]glutamate in P2rx7+/+ but not P2rx7-/- mice, and the NR2B subunit mRNA and protein was upregulated in the hippocampus of P2rx7-/- mice. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression was higher in saline but not LPS-treated P2rx7-/- mice; the P2rx7 antagonist Brilliant blue G elevated and the P2rx7 agonist benzoylbenzoyl ATP (BzATP) reduced BDNF level. This effect was dependent on the activation of NMDA and non-NMDA receptors but not on Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1,5). An increased 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation was also observed in the dentate gyrus derived from P2rx7-/- mice. Basal level of 5-HT was increased, whereas the 5HIAA/5-HT ratio was lower in the hippocampus of P2rx7-/- mice, which accompanied the increased uptake of [(3)H]5-HT and an elevated number of [(3)H]citalopram binding sites. The LPS-induced elevation of 5-HT level was absent in P2rx7-/- mice. In conclusion there are several potential mechanisms for the antidepressant phenotype of P2rx7-/- mice, such as the absence of P2rx7-mediated glutamate release, elevated basal BDNF production, enhanced neurogenesis and increased 5-HT bioavailability in the hippocampus.

  2. Neurochemical Changes in the Mouse Hippocampus Underlying the Antidepressant Effect of Genetic Deletion of P2X7 Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Csölle

    Full Text Available Recent investigations have revealed that the genetic deletion of P2X7 receptors (P2rx7 results in an antidepressant phenotype in mice. However, the link between the deficiency of P2rx7 and changes in behavior has not yet been explored. In the present study, we studied the effect of genetic deletion of P2rx7 on neurochemical changes in the hippocampus that might underlie the antidepressant phenotype. P2X7 receptor deficient mice (P2rx7-/- displayed decreased immobility in the tail suspension test (TST and an attenuated anhedonia response in the sucrose preference test (SPT following bacterial endotoxin (LPS challenge. The attenuated anhedonia was reproduced through systemic treatments with P2rx7 antagonists. The activation of P2rx7 resulted in the concentration-dependent release of [(3H]glutamate in P2rx7+/+ but not P2rx7-/- mice, and the NR2B subunit mRNA and protein was upregulated in the hippocampus of P2rx7-/- mice. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression was higher in saline but not LPS-treated P2rx7-/- mice; the P2rx7 antagonist Brilliant blue G elevated and the P2rx7 agonist benzoylbenzoyl ATP (BzATP reduced BDNF level. This effect was dependent on the activation of NMDA and non-NMDA receptors but not on Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1,5. An increased 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation was also observed in the dentate gyrus derived from P2rx7-/- mice. Basal level of 5-HT was increased, whereas the 5HIAA/5-HT ratio was lower in the hippocampus of P2rx7-/- mice, which accompanied the increased uptake of [(3H]5-HT and an elevated number of [(3H]citalopram binding sites. The LPS-induced elevation of 5-HT level was absent in P2rx7-/- mice. In conclusion there are several potential mechanisms for the antidepressant phenotype of P2rx7-/- mice, such as the absence of P2rx7-mediated glutamate release, elevated basal BDNF production, enhanced neurogenesis and increased 5-HT bioavailability in the hippocampus.

  3. Role of mouse Wdr13 in placental growth; a genetic evidence for lifetime body weight determination by placenta during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay Pratap; Alex, Jomini Liza; Lakshmi, B Jyothi; Sailasree, S Purnima; Raj, T Avinash; Kumar, Satish

    2015-08-26

    Placental development is essential for implantation and growth of foetus in the uterus of eutherian mammals. Numerous growth factors are responsible for placental development and cell lineage differentiation. Gene knockout mice have shown role of various genes in the placenta. Here using Wdr13 knockout mice, we show that this gene is important for proper placental development. Wdr13, a X-linked gene, expresses in multiple trophoblast cell types of placenta and the mutant placenta had reduced size after 17.5 dpc due to reduction of junctional zone (JZ) and labyrinth zone (LZ). We observed reduction in levels of angiopoietin-2 and cd44 mRNA in Wdr13 mutant placenta as compared to that in the wild type. Our findings show that Wdr13 is required for normal placental development and cell differentiation. Wdr13 heterozygous female placenta when the mutant allele was of maternal origin showed similar defects as those in case of Wdr13 null placenta. Using two types of heterozygous females carrying either maternally and paternally derived mutant Wdr13 allele we provide genetic evidence that development of placenta determines body weight of mice for the entire life.

  4. Genetic removal of matrix metalloproteinase 9 rescues the symptoms of fragile X syndrome in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Harpreet; Dansie, Lorraine E; Hickmott, Peter W; Ethell, Douglas W; Ethell, Iryna M

    2014-07-23

    Fmr1 knock-out (ko) mice display key features of fragile X syndrome (FXS), including delayed dendritic spine maturation and FXS-associated behaviors, such as poor socialization, obsessive-compulsive behavior, and hyperactivity. Here we provide conclusive evidence that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is necessary to the development of FXS-associated defects in Fmr1 ko mice. Genetic disruption of Mmp-9 rescued key aspects of Fmr1 deficiency, including dendritic spine abnormalities, abnormal mGluR5-dependent LTD, as well as aberrant behaviors in open field and social novelty tests. Remarkably, MMP-9 deficiency also corrected non-neural features of Fmr1 deficiency-specifically macroorchidism-indicating that MMP-9 dysregulation contributes to FXS-associated abnormalities outside the CNS. Further, MMP-9 deficiency suppressed elevations of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E phosphorylation seen in Fmr1 ko mice, which are also associated with other autistic spectrum disorders. These findings establish that MMP-9 is critical to the mechanisms responsible for neural and non-neural aspects of the FXS phenotype.

  5. The mouse genome displays highly dynamic populations of KRAB-zinc finger protein genes and related genetic units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauzlaric, Annamaria; Ecco, Gabriela; Cassano, Marco; Duc, Julien; Imbeault, Michael; Trono, Didier

    2017-01-01

    KRAB-containing poly-zinc finger proteins (KZFPs) constitute the largest family of transcription factors encoded by mammalian genomes, and growing evidence indicates that they fulfill functions critical to both embryonic development and maintenance of adult homeostasis. KZFP genes underwent broad and independent waves of expansion in many higher vertebrates lineages, yet comprehensive studies of members harbored by a given species are scarce. Here we present a thorough analysis of KZFP genes and related units in the murine genome. We first identified about twice as many elements than previously annotated as either KZFP genes or pseudogenes, notably by assigning to this family an entity formerly considered as a large group of Satellite repeats. We then could delineate an organization in clusters distributed throughout the genome, with signs of recombination, translocation, duplication and seeding of new sites by retrotransposition of KZFP genes and related genetic units (KZFP/rGUs). Moreover, we harvested evidence indicating that closely related paralogs had evolved through both drifting and shifting of sequences encoding for zinc finger arrays. Finally, we could demonstrate that the KAP1-SETDB1 repressor complex tames the expression of KZFP/rGUs within clusters, yet that the primary targets of this regulation are not the KZFP/rGUs themselves but enhancers contained in neighboring endogenous retroelements and that, underneath, KZFPs conserve highly individualized patterns of expression.

  6. Monitoring perinatal gut microbiota in mouse models by mass spectrometry approaches: parental genetic background and breastfeeding effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Levi Mortera

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available At birth, contact with external stimuli, such as nutrients derived from food, is necessary to modulate the symbiotic balance between commensal and pathogenic bacteria, protect against bacterial dysbiosis, and initiate the development of the mucosal immune response. Among a variety of different feeding patterns, breastfeeding represents the best modality. In fact, the capacity of breast milk to modulate the composition of infants’ gut microbiota leads to beneficial effects on their health. In this study, we used newborn mice as a model to evaluate the effect of parental genetic background (i.e., IgA-producing mice and IgA-deficient mice and feeding modulation (i.e., maternal feeding and cross-feeding on the onset and shaping of gut microbiota after birth. To investigate these topics, we used either a culturomic approach that employed Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MS, or bottom-up Liquid Chromatography, with subsequent MSMS shotgun metaproteomic analysis that compared and assembled results of the two techniques. We found that the microbial community was enriched by lactic acid bacteria when pups were breastfed by wild-type (WT mothers, while IgA-deficient milk led to an increase in the opportunistic bacterial pathogen (OBP population. Cross-feeding results suggested that IgA supplementation promoted the exclusion of some OBPs and the temporary appearance of beneficial species in pups fed by WT foster mothers. Our results show that both techniques yield a picture of microbiota from different angles and with varying depths. In particular, our metaproteomic pipeline was found to be a reliable tool in the description of microbiota. Data from these studies are available via ProteomeXchange, with identifier PXD004033.

  7. Microbial, metabolomic, and immunologic dynamics in a relapsing genetic mouse model of colitis induced by T-synthase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jonathan P; Lin, Lin; Goudarzi, Maryam; Ruegger, Paul; McGovern, Dermot P B; Fornace, Albert J; Borneman, James; Xia, Lijun; Braun, Jonathan

    2017-01-02

    Intestinal dysbiosis is thought to confer susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is unknown whether dynamic changes in the microbiome contribute to fluctuations in disease activity. We explored this question using mice with intestine-specific deletion of C1galt1 (also known as T-synthase) (Tsyn mice). These mice develop spontaneous microbiota-dependent colitis with a remitting/relapsing course due to loss of mucin core-1 derived O-glycans. 16S rRNA sequencing and untargeted metabolomics demonstrated age-specific perturbations in the intestinal microbiome and metabolome of Tsyn mice compare with littermate controls at weeks 3 (disease onset), 5 (during remission), and 9 (after relapse). Colitis remission corresponded to increased levels of FoxP3+RORγt+CD4+ T cells in the colonic lamina propria that were positively correlated with operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the S24-7 family and negatively correlated with OTUs in the Clostridiales order. Relapse was characterized by marked expansion of FoxP3-RORγt+CD4+ T cells expressing IFNγ and IL17A, which were associated with Clostridiales OTUs distinct from those negatively correlated with FoxP3+RORγt+CD4+ T cells. Our findings suggest that colitis remission and relapse in the Tsyn model may reflect alterations in the microbiome due to reduced core-1 O-glycosylation that shift the balance of regulatory and pro-inflammatory T cell subsets. We investigated whether genetic variation in C1galt1 correlated with the microbiome in a cohort of 78 Crohn's disease patients and 101 healthy controls. Polymorphisms near C1galt1 (rs10486157) and its molecular chaperone, Cosmc (rs4825729), were associated with altered composition of the colonic mucosal microbiota, supporting the relevance of core-1 O-glycosylation to host regulation of the microbiome.

  8. Monitoring Perinatal Gut Microbiota in Mouse Models by Mass Spectrometry Approaches: Parental Genetic Background and Breastfeeding Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi Mortera, Stefano; Del Chierico, Federica; Vernocchi, Pamela; Rosado, Maria M.; Cavola, Agnese; Chierici, Marco; Pieroni, Luisa; Urbani, Andrea; Carsetti, Rita; Lante, Isabella; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Putignani, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    At birth, contact with external stimuli, such as nutrients derived from food, is necessary to modulate the symbiotic balance between commensal and pathogenic bacteria, protect against bacterial dysbiosis, and initiate the development of the mucosal immune response. Among a variety of different feeding patterns, breastfeeding represents the best modality. In fact, the capacity of breast milk to modulate the composition of infants’ gut microbiota leads to beneficial effects on their health. In this study, we used newborn mice as a model to evaluate the effect of parental genetic background (i.e., IgA-producing mice and IgA-deficient mice) and feeding modulation (i.e., maternal feeding and cross-feeding) on the onset and shaping of gut microbiota after birth. To investigate these topics, we used either a culturomic approach that employed Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MS), or bottom–up Liquid Chromatography, with subsequent MSMS shotgun metaproteomic analysis that compared and assembled results of the two techniques. We found that the microbial community was enriched by lactic acid bacteria when pups were breastfed by wild-type (WT) mothers, while IgA-deficient milk led to an increase in the opportunistic bacterial pathogen (OBP) population. Cross-feeding results suggested that IgA supplementation promoted the exclusion of some OBPs and the temporary appearance of beneficial species in pups fed by WT foster mothers. Our results show that both techniques yield a picture of microbiota from different angles and with varying depths. In particular, our metaproteomic pipeline was found to be a reliable tool in the description of microbiota. Data from these studies are available via ProteomeXchange, with identifier PXD004033. PMID:27725814

  9. Combined Pharmacological and Genetic Manipulations Unlock Unprecedented Temporal Elasticity and Reveal Phase-Specific Modulation of the Molecular Circadian Clock of the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Andrew P.; Chesham, Johanna E.

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian oscillator encoding time-of-day information. SCN timekeeping is sustained by a cell-autonomous transcriptional–translational feedback loop, whereby expression of the Period and Cryptochrome genes is negatively regulated by their protein products. This loop in turn drives circadian oscillations in gene expression that direct SCN electrical activity and thence behavior. The robustness of SCN timekeeping is further enhanced by interneuronal, circuit-level coupling. The aim of this study was to combine pharmacological and genetic manipulations to push the SCN clockwork toward its limits and, by doing so, probe cell-autonomous and emergent, circuit-level properties. Circadian oscillation of mouse SCN organotypic slice cultures was monitored as PER2::LUC bioluminescence. SCN of three genetic backgrounds—wild-type, short-period CK1εTau/Tau mutant, and long-period Fbxl3Afh/Afh mutant—all responded reversibly to pharmacological manipulation with period-altering compounds: picrotoxin, PF-670462 (4-[1-Cyclohexyl-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-imidazol-5-yl]-2-pyrimidinamine dihydrochloride), and KNK437 (N-Formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidine-gamma-butyrolactam). This revealed a remarkably wide operating range of sustained periods extending across 25 h, from ≤17 h to >42 h. Moreover, this range was maintained at network and single-cell levels. Development of a new technique for formal analysis of circadian waveform, first derivative analysis (FDA), revealed internal phase patterning to the circadian oscillation at these extreme periods and differential phase sensitivity of the SCN to genetic and pharmacological manipulations. For example, FDA of the CK1εTau/Tau mutant SCN treated with the CK1ε-specific inhibitor PF-4800567 (3-[(3-Chlorophenoxy)methyl]-1-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amine hydrochloride) revealed that period acceleration in the mutant is due to inappropriately phased

  10. High-resolution mapping of a genetic locus regulating preferential carbohydrate intake, total kilocalories, and food volume on mouse chromosome 17.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Gularte-Mérida

    Full Text Available The specific genes regulating the quantitative variation in macronutrient preference and food intake are virtually unknown. We fine mapped a previously identified mouse chromosome 17 region harboring quantitative trait loci (QTL with large effects on preferential macronutrient intake-carbohydrate (Mnic1, total kilcalories (Kcal2, and total food volume (Tfv1 using interval-specific strains. These loci were isolated in the [C57BL/6J.CAST/EiJ-17.1-(D17Mit19-D17Mit50; B6.CAST-17.1] strain, possessing a ∼ 40.1 Mb region of CAST DNA on the B6 genome. In a macronutrient selection paradigm, the B6.CAST-17.1 subcongenic mice eat 30% more calories from the carbohydrate-rich diet, ∼ 10% more total calories, and ∼ 9% more total food volume per body weight. In the current study, a cross between carbohydrate-preferring B6.CAST-17.1 and fat-preferring, inbred B6 mice was used to generate a subcongenic-derived F2 mapping population; genotypes were determined using a high-density, custom SNP panel. Genetic linkage analysis substantially reduced the 95% confidence interval for Mnic1 (encompassing Kcal2 and Tfv1 from 40.1 to 29.5 Mb and more precisely established its boundaries. Notably, no genetic linkage for self-selected fat intake was detected, underscoring the carbohydrate-specific effect of this locus. A second key finding was the separation of two energy balance QTLs: Mnic1/Kcal2/Tfv1 for food intake and a newly discovered locus regulating short term body weight gain. The Mnic1/Kcal2/Tfv1 QTL was further de-limited to 19.0 Mb, based on the absence of nutrient intake phenotypes in subcongenic HQ17IIa mice. Analyses of available sequence data and gene ontologies, along with comprehensive expression profiling in the hypothalamus of non-recombinant, cast/cast and b6/b6 F2 controls, focused our attention on candidates within the QTL interval. Zfp811, Zfp870, and Btnl6 showed differential expression and also contain stop codons, but have no known biology

  11. Prdm1 functions in the mesoderm of the second heart field, where it interacts genetically with Tbx1, during outflow tract morphogenesis in the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Stéphane D; Mayeuf-Louchart, Alicia; Watanabe, Yusuke; Brzezinski, Joseph A; Miyagawa-Tomita, Sachiko; Kelly, Robert G; Buckingham, Margaret

    2014-10-01

    Congenital heart defects affect at least 0.8% of newborn children and are a major cause of lethality prior to birth. Malformations of the arterial pole are particularly frequent. The myocardium at the base of the pulmonary trunk and aorta and the arterial tree associated with these great arteries are derived from splanchnic mesoderm of the second heart field (SHF), an important source of cardiac progenitor cells. These cells are controlled by a gene regulatory network that includes Fgf8, Fgf10 and Tbx1. Prdm1 encodes a transcriptional repressor that we show is also expressed in the SHF. In mouse embryos, mutation of Prdm1 affects branchial arch development and leads to persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA), indicative of neural crest dysfunction. Using conditional mutants, we show that this is not due to a direct function of Prdm1 in neural crest cells. Mutation of Prdm1 in the SHF does not result in PTA, but leads to arterial pole defects, characterized by mis-alignment or reduction of the aorta and pulmonary trunk, and abnormalities in the arterial tree, defects that are preceded by a reduction in outflow tract size and loss of caudal pharyngeal arch arteries. These defects are associated with a reduction in proliferation of progenitor cells in the SHF. We have investigated genetic interactions with Fgf8 and Tbx1, and show that on a Tbx1 heterozygote background, conditional Prdm1 mutants have more pronounced arterial pole defects, now including PTA. Our results identify PRDM1 as a potential modifier of phenotypic severity in TBX1 haploinsufficient DiGeorge syndrome patients.

  12. Gene expression profiling in C57BL/6J and A/J mouse inbred strains reveals gene networks specific for brain regions independent of genetic background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Simone; Fuller, Tova F; Janson, Esther; Strengman, Eric; Horvath, Steve; Kas, Martien J H; Ophoff, Roel A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We performed gene expression profiling of the amygdala and hippocampus taken from inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J and A/J. The selected brain areas are implicated in neurobehavioral traits while these mouse strains are known to differ widely in behavior. Consequently, we hypothesized that

  13. Research and Application of Union of Genetic Programming with Automatically Defined Function%遗传编程与自动定义函数结合的研究及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙波; 孙冬

    2012-01-01

    本文根据在标准遗传编程中由于种群多样性对算法收敛特性的影响,引入了结合自动定义函数的方法,对标准遗传编程进行改进,从而得到更优的收敛性能和缩短运行时间。文中结合求路径最优化的旅行商问题来进行实际验证,结论得出改进的算法具有更好的收敛性能。%This paper,according to the standard Genetic Programming as a result of the population multiplicity to the algorithm convergence characteristic influence,has introduced the Automatically Defined Function(ADF) into the GP.It makes the improvement to the standard Genetic Programming,thus obtains the more superior convergence performance and the reduction of runtime.In the paper,used the example of traveling salesman problem to carry on the actual confirmation.The conclusion obtains the improvement for the algorithm to have the better convergence performance.

  14. 苯对小鼠骨髓细胞遗传效应的研究%Study on genetic toxicity of gaseous benzene to mouse bone marrow cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于光艳; 陈强; 刘晓梅; 赵淑华; 孙志伟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism of genetic toxicity of gaseous benzene to mouse bone marrow cells and to provide an experimental basis for the discovery of early biomarkers among benzeneexposed population.Methods Male mice were randomly divided into control group and three benzene-exposed groups (6 mice per group).The control group was exposed to ambient air,and the three benzene-exposed groups were exposed to different concentrations of benzene (400,800,and 1 600 mg/m3) for 15 days,2 hours per day,in static inhalation chambers.At the end of the 15-day experimental period,the mice were killed.Bone marrow cells were separated from sacrificed mice,and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity,glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity,myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity,and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were determined by biochemical methods.DNA damage was evaluated by micronucleus assay and single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE).The expression of MPO protein was determined by immunocytochemistry.Results The SOD activities in different dose groups (88.67 ±13.58,73.64±4.50,and 67.63 ±5.42 U/mg prot) were significantly decreased as compared with the control group (119.98±9.42 U/mg prot) (P<0.01).Moreover,the SOD activities in medium-and high-dose groups were significantly lower than that of the low-dose group (P<0.05).The GSH-Px activities in medium-and high-dose groups (705.07±93.75 and 674.77±86.80 U/mg prot)were siguificantly decreased as compared with that of the control group (940.25±82.63 U/mg prot) (P<0.01),and the high-dose group had a significantly lower GSH-Px activity than the low-dose group (674.77±86.80 U/mg prot vs 833.98±130.64 U/mg prot,P<0.05).The MDA content of low-,medium-,and high-dose groups (22.42 ±2.67,22.38 ±3.02,and 27.66±2.89 nmol/mg prot) were significantly higher than that of the control group (12.35±1.58 nmol/mg prot) (P<0.01),and MDA content was significantly higher in the high-dose group than in the medium-and low

  15. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Pancreatic Cancer: The KPC Model (LSL-Kras(G12D/+) ;LSL-Trp53(R172H/+) ;Pdx-1-Cre), Its Variants, and Their Application in Immuno-oncology Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae W; Komar, Chad A; Bengsch, Fee; Graham, Kathleen; Beatty, Gregory L

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) ranks fourth among cancer-related deaths in the United States. For patients with unresectable disease, treatment options are limited and lack curative potential. Preclinical mouse models of PDAC that recapitulate the biology of human pancreatic cancer offer an opportunity for the rational development of novel treatment approaches that may improve patient outcomes. With the recent success of immunotherapy for subsets of patients with solid malignancies, interest is mounting in the possible use of immunotherapy for the treatment of PDAC. Considered in this unit is the value of genetic mouse models for characterizing the immunobiology of PDAC and for investigating novel immunotherapeutics. Several variants of these models are described, all of which may be used in drug development and for providing information on unique aspects of disease biology and therapeutic responsiveness. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. A provisional gene regulatory atlas for mouse heart development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailin Chen

    Full Text Available Congenital Heart Disease (CHD is one of the most common birth defects. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying normal cardiac development is an important step towards early identification of abnormalities during the developmental program and towards the creation of early intervention strategies. We developed a novel computational strategy for leveraging high-content data sets, including a large selection of microarray data associated with mouse cardiac development, mouse genome sequence, ChIP-seq data of selected mouse transcription factors and Y2H data of mouse protein-protein interactions, to infer the active transcriptional regulatory network of mouse cardiac development. We identified phase-specific expression activity for 765 overlapping gene co-expression modules that were defined for obtained cardiac lineage microarray data. For each co-expression module, we identified the phase of cardiac development where gene expression for that module was higher than other phases. Co-expression modules were found to be consistent with biological pathway knowledge in Wikipathways, and met expectations for enrichment of pathways involved in heart lineage development. Over 359,000 transcription factor-target relationships were inferred by analyzing the promoter sequences within each gene module for overrepresentation against the JASPAR database of Transcription Factor Binding Site (TFBS motifs. The provisional regulatory network will provide a framework of studying the genetic basis of CHD.

  17. Evaluation of the Genetic and Nutritional Control of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in a Novel Mouse Model on Chromosome 7: An Insight into Insulin Signaling and Glucose Homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.; Dhar, M.

    2003-01-01

    Obesity is the main cause of type 2 diabetes, accounting for 90-95% of all diabetes cases in the US. Human obesity is a complex trait and can be studied using appropriate mouse models. A novel polygenic mouse model for studying the genetic and environmental contributions to and the physiological ramifications of obesity and related phenotypes is found in specific lines of mice bred and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Heterozygous mice with a maternally inherited copy of two radiation-induced deletions in the p region of mouse chromosome 7, p23DFioD and p30PUb, have significantly greater body fat and show hyperinsulinemia compared to the wild-type. A single gene, Atp10c, maps to this critical region and codes for a putative aminophospholipid translocase. Biochemical and molecular studies were initiated to gain insight into obesity and glucose homeostasis in these animals and to study the biological role of Atp10c in creating these phenotypes. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were standardized for the heterozygous p23DFioD and control mice on a custom-made diet containing 20% protein, 70% carbohydrate, and 10% fat (kcal). Atp10c expression profiles were also generated using Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Heterozygous p23DFioD animals showed insulin resistance after receiving a dose of either 0.375 or 0.75 U/kg Illetin R insulin. RT-PCR data also shows differences in Atp10c expression in the mutants versus control mice. Using these standardized biochemical assays, future studies will further the understanding of genetic and nutritional controls of glucose homeostasis and obesity in animal models and subsequently in human populations.

  18. Toxicogenetics: population-based testing of drug and chemical safety in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Gatti, Daniel M; Wiltshire, Timothy; Wilshire, Timothy; Kleeberger, Steven R; Threadgill, David W

    2010-08-01

    The rapid decline in the cost of dense genotyping is paving the way for new DNA sequence-based laboratory tests to move quickly into clinical practice, and to ultimately help realize the promise of 'personalized' therapies. These advances are based on the growing appreciation of genetics as an important dimension in science and the practice of investigative pharmacology and toxicology. On the clinical side, both the regulators and the pharmaceutical industry hope that the early identification of individuals prone to adverse drug effects will keep advantageous medicines on the market for the benefit of the vast majority of prospective patients. On the environmental health protection side, there is a clear need for better science to define the range and causes of susceptibility to adverse effects of chemicals in the population, so that the appropriate regulatory limits are established. In both cases, most of the research effort is focused on genome-wide association studies in humans where de novo genotyping of each subject is required. At the same time, the power of population-based preclinical safety testing in rodent models (e.g., mouse) remains to be fully exploited. Here, we highlight the approaches available to utilize the knowledge of DNA sequence and genetic diversity of the mouse as a species in mechanistic toxicology research. We posit that appropriate genetically defined mouse models may be combined with the limited data from human studies to not only discover the genetic determinants of susceptibility, but to also understand the molecular underpinnings of toxicity.

  19. Histochemical studies on genetical control of hormonal enzyme inducibility in the mouse. III. Beta-glucuronidase distribution pattern of epididymis in different genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blecher, S R; Kirkeby, S

    1979-01-01

    This article reports the application of Hayashi's histochemical technique for beta-glucuronidase to mouse epididymis. A methodological study, which established optimal conditions for demonstrating the enzyme in this organ, is reported. The distribution pattern of beta-glucuronidase is described a...

  20. A Comparison Between House Mouse Lines Selected for Attack Latency or Nest-Building : Evidence for a Genetic Basis of Alternative Behavioral Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluyter, Frans; Bult, Abel; Lynch, Carol B.; Oortmerssen, Geert A. van; Koolhaas, Jaap M.

    1995-01-01

    House mouse lines bidirectionally selected for either nest-building behavior or attack latency were tested for both attack latency and nest-building behavior under identical conditions. Male mice selected for high nest-building behavior had shorter attack latencies, i.e., were more aggressive, than

  1. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  2. Behavioral genetics and taste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachmanov Alexander A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review focuses on behavioral genetic studies of sweet, umami, bitter and salt taste responses in mammals. Studies involving mouse inbred strain comparisons and genetic analyses, and their impact on elucidation of taste receptors and transduction mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the effect of genetic variation in taste responsiveness on complex traits such as drug intake is considered. Recent advances in development of genomic resources make behavioral genetics a powerful approach for understanding mechanisms of taste.

  3. Rescue of Impaired Fear Extinction and Normalization of Cortico-Amygdala Circuit Dysfunction in a Genetic Mouse Model by Dietary Zinc Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Whittle, Nigel; Hauschild, Markus; Lubec, Gert; Holmes, Andrew; Singewald, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Fear extinction is impaired in neuropsychiatric disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder. Identifying drugs that facilitate fear extinction in animal models provides leads for novel pharmacological treatments for these disorders. Zinc (Zn) is expressed in neurons in a cortico-amygdala circuit mediating fear extinction, and modulates neurotransmitter systems regulating extinction. We previously found that the 129S1/SvImJ mouse strain (S1) exhibited a profound impairment in fear extin...

  4. Definable deduction relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉平

    1999-01-01

    The nonmonotonic deduction relation in default reasoning is defined with fixed point style, which has the many-extension property that classical logic is not possessed of. These two kinds of deductions both have boolean definability property, that is, their extensions or deductive closures can be defined by boolean formulas. A generalized form of fixed point method is employed to define a class of deduction relations, which all have the above property. Theorems on definability and atomless boolean algebras in model theory are essential in dealing with this assertion.

  5. A Mouse Model for Conditional Secretion of Specific Single-Chain Antibodies Provides Genetic Evidence for Regulation of Cortical Plasticity by a Non-cell Autonomous Homeoprotein Transcription Factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During postnatal life the cerebral cortex passes through critical periods of plasticity allowing its physiological adaptation to the environment. In the visual cortex, critical period onset and closure are influenced by the non-cell autonomous activity of the Otx2 homeoprotein transcription factor, which regulates the maturation of parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons (PV cells. In adult mice, the maintenance of a non-plastic adult state requires continuous Otx2 import by PV cells. An important source of extra-cortical Otx2 is the choroid plexus, which secretes Otx2 into the cerebrospinal fluid. Otx2 secretion and internalization requires two small peptidic domains that are part of the DNA-binding domain. Thus, mutating these "transfer" sequences also modifies cell autonomous transcription, precluding this approach to obtain a cell autonomous-only mouse. Here, we develop a mouse model with inducible secretion of an anti-Otx2 single-chain antibody to trap Otx2 in the extracellular milieu. Postnatal secretion of this single-chain antibody by PV cells delays PV maturation and reduces plasticity gene expression. Induced adult expression of this single-chain antibody in cerebrospinal fluid decreases Otx2 internalization by PV cells, strongly induces plasticity gene expression and reopens physiological plasticity. We provide the first mammalian genetic evidence for a signaling mechanism involving intercellular transfer of a homeoprotein transcription factor. Our single-chain antibody mouse model is a valid strategy for extracellular neutralization that could be applied to other homeoproteins and signaling molecules within and beyond the nervous system.

  6. Delimiting species without nuclear monophyly in Madagascar's mouse lemurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Weisrock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Speciation begins when populations become genetically separated through a substantial reduction in gene flow, and it is at this point that a genetically cohesive set of populations attain the sole property of species: the independent evolution of a population-level lineage. The comprehensive delimitation of species within biodiversity hotspots, regardless of their level of divergence, is important for understanding the factors that drive the diversification of biota and for identifying them as targets for conservation. However, delimiting recently diverged species is challenging due to insufficient time for the differential evolution of characters--including morphological differences, reproductive isolation, and gene tree monophyly--that are typically used as evidence for separately evolving lineages. METHODOLOGY: In this study, we assembled multiple lines of evidence from the analysis of mtDNA and nDNA sequence data for the delimitation of a high diversity of cryptically diverged population-level mouse lemur lineages across the island of Madagascar. Our study uses a multi-faceted approach that applies phylogenetic, population genetic, and genealogical analysis for recognizing lineage diversity and presents the most thoroughly sampled species delimitation of mouse lemur ever performed. CONCLUSIONS: The resolution of a large number of geographically defined clades in the mtDNA gene tree provides strong initial evidence for recognizing a high diversity of population-level lineages in mouse lemurs. We find additional support for lineage recognition in the striking concordance between mtDNA clades and patterns of nuclear population structure. Lineages identified using these two sources of evidence also exhibit patterns of population divergence according to genealogical exclusivity estimates. Mouse lemur lineage diversity is reflected in both a geographically fine-scaled pattern of population divergence within established and

  7. Defining and Quantifying the Social Phenotype in Autism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klin, Ami; Jones, Warren; Schultz, Robert; Volkmar, Fred; Cohen, Donald

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genetic and neurofunctional research in autism has highlighted the need for improved characterization of the core social disorder defining the broad spectrum of syndrome manifestations. METHOD...

  8. The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor as a potential treatment target in alcohol use disorder: evidence from human genetic association studies and a mouse model of alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchankova, P; Yan, J; Schwandt, M L; Stangl, B L; Caparelli, E C; Momenan, R; Jerlhag, E; Engel, J A; Hodgkinson, C A; Egli, M; Lopez, M F; Becker, H C; Goldman, D; Heilig, M; Ramchandani, V A; Leggio, L

    2015-06-16

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) regulates appetite and food intake. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation also attenuates the reinforcing properties of alcohol in rodents. The present translational study is based on four human genetic association studies and one preclinical study providing data that support the hypothesis that GLP-1R may have a role in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Case-control analysis (N = 908) was performed on a sample of individuals enrolled in the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) intramural research program. The Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) sample (N = 3803) was used for confirmation purposes. Post hoc analyses were carried out on data from a human laboratory study of intravenous alcohol self-administration (IV-ASA; N = 81) in social drinkers and from a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in alcohol-dependent individuals (N = 22) subjected to a Monetary Incentive Delay task. In the preclinical study, a GLP-1R agonist was evaluated in a mouse model of alcohol dependence to demonstrate the role of GLP-1R for alcohol consumption. The previously reported functional allele 168Ser (rs6923761) was nominally associated with AUD (P = 0.004) in the NIAAA sample, which was partially replicated in males of the SAGE sample (P = 0.033). The 168 Ser/Ser genotype was further associated with increased alcohol administration and breath alcohol measures in the IV-ASA experiment and with higher BOLD response in the right globus pallidus when receiving notification of outcome for high monetary reward. Finally, GLP-1R agonism significantly reduced alcohol consumption in a mouse model of alcohol dependence. These convergent findings suggest that the GLP-1R may be an attractive target for personalized pharmacotherapy treatment of AUD.

  9. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha;

    2015-01-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laborato...

  10. Key Signaling Events for Committing Mouse Pluripotent Stem Cells to the Germline Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Qi; Cao, Wen-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The process of germline development carries genetic information and preparatory totipotency across generations. The last decade has witnessed remarkable successes in the generation of germline cells from mouse pluripotent stem cells, especially induced germline cells with the capacity for producing viable offspring, suggesting clinical applications of induced germline cells in humans. However, to date, the culture systems for germline induction with accurate sex-specific meiosis and epigenetic reprogramming have not been well-established. In this study, we primarily focus on the mouse model to discuss key signaling events for germline induction. We review mechanisms of competent regulators on primordial germ cell induction and discuss current achievements and difficulties in inducing sex-specific germline development. Furthermore, we review the developmental identities of mouse embryonic stem cells and epiblast stem cells under certain defined culture conditions as it relates to the differentiation process of becoming germline cells.

  11. Genetically engineered mouse models for functional studies of SKP1-CUL1-F-box-protein (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Zhou; Wenyi Wei; Yi Sun

    2013-01-01

    The SCF (SKP1 (S-phase-kinase-associated protein 1),Cullin-1,F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligases,the founding member of Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs),are the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases in mammals.Each individual SCF E3 ligase consists of one adaptor protein SKP1,one scaffold protein cullin-1 (the first family member of the eight cullins),one F-box protein out of 69 family members,and one out of two RING (Really Interesting New Gene) family proteins RBX1/ROC1 or RBX2/ROC2/SAG/RNF7.Various combinations of these four components construct a large number of SCF E3s that promote the degradation of many key regulatory proteins in cell-context,temporally,and spatially dependent manners,thus controlling precisely numerous important cellular processes,including cell cycle progression,apoptosis,gene transcription,signal transduction,DNA replication,maintenance of genome integrity,and tumorigenesis.To understand how the SCF E3 ligases regulate these cellular processes and embryonic development under in vivo physiological conditions,a number of mouse models with transgenic (Tg) expression or targeted deletion of components of SCF have been established and characterized.In this review,we will provide a brief introduction to the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases,followed by a comprehensive overview on the existing Tg and knockout (KO) mouse models of the SCF E3s,and discuss the role of each component in mouse embryogenesis,cell proliferation,apoptosis,carcinogenesis,as well as other pathogenic processes associated with human diseases.We will end with a brief discussion on the future directions of this research area and the potential applications of the knowledge gained to more effective therapeutic interventions of human diseases.

  12. Partial Correction of Psoriasis upon Genetic Knock-Down of Human TNF-α by Lentivirus-Encoded shRNAs in a Xenograft Mouse Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Maria; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia

    reduced the amount of released TNF- more than 50% upon viral transduction, was selected for in vivo studies. In vivo studies were carried out in a xenograft mouse model in which human psoriatic plaques keratome skin biopsies were transplanted onto SCID mice. Initial studies using eGFP-encoding lentiviral...... vectors demonstrated efficient transduction of human psoriatic skin. Grafted psoriatic skin was exposed to viral vector-encoded TNF- shRNAs by a single intradermal injection of purified VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (150 l containing 46.4 ng p24/ l was injected at a single site). Biopsies were...

  13. Historically defined autobiographical periods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Norman R.; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Lee, Peter J.;

    2012-01-01

    The chapter reviews a research programme that has demonstrated the existence of historically defined autobiographical periods and identified the conditions that bring them about. Data from four samples of World War II-generation adults show that historically defined autobiographical periods endure...... over time and theoretical implications are discussed, notably by introducing a new approach to autobiographical memory, Transition Theory, which assumes that autobiographical memory is organized by transitional events that can be selfinitiated or externally imposed - historically defined...

  14. Developmental regulation of planar cell polarity and hair-bundle morphogenesis in auditory hair cells: lessons from human and mouse genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaowei; Sipe, Conor W

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common and costly sensory defect in humans and genetic causes underlie a significant proportion of affected individuals. In mammals, sound is detected by hair cells (HCs) housed in the cochlea of the inner ear, whose function depends on a highly specialized mechanotransduction organelle, the hair bundle. Understanding the factors that regulate the development and functional maturation of the hair bundle is crucial for understanding the pathophysiology of human deafness. Genetic analysis of deafness genes in animal models, together with complementary forward genetic screens and conditional knock-out mutations in essential genes, have provided great insights into the molecular machinery underpinning hair-bundle development and function. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of hair-bundle morphogenesis, with an emphasis on the molecular pathways governing hair-bundle polarity and orientation. We next discuss the proteins and structural elements important for hair-cell mechanotransduction as well as hair-bundle cohesion and maintenance. In addition, developmental signals thought to regulate tonotopic features of HCs are introduced. Finally, novel approaches that complement classic genetics for studying the molecular etiology of human deafness are presented. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:85-101. doi: 10.1002/wdev.202 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  15. 10. international mouse genome conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  16. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...

  17. Mouse models for cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Lynette Moore; Ping Ji

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of cancer enable researchers to leamn about tumor biology in complicated and dynamic physiological systems. Since the development of gene targeting in mice, cancer biologists have been among the most frequent users of transgenic mouse models, which have dramatically increased knowledge about how cancers form and grow. The Chinese Joumnal of Cancer will publish a series of papers reporting the use of mouse models in studying genetic events in cancer cases. This editorial is an overview of the development and applications of mouse models of cancer and directs the reader to upcoming papers describing the use of these models to be published in coming issues, beginning with three articles in the current issue.

  18. Mouse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Da Silva-Buttkus, Patricia; Neff, Frauke; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Kemter, Elisabeth; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Matloka, Mikolaj; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Rozman, Jan; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Schrewe, Anja; Stöger, Claudia; Tost, Monica; Adamski, Jerzy; Aigner, Bernhard; Beckers, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Busch, Dirk H; Esposito, Irene; Graw, Jochen; Illig, Thomas; Ivandic, Boris; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mempel, Martin; Neschen, Susanne; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Suhre, Karsten; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Model organisms like the mouse are important tools to learn more about gene function in man. Within the last 20 years many mutant mouse lines have been generated by different methods such as ENU mutagenesis, constitutive and conditional knock-out approaches, knock-down, introduction of human genes, and knock-in techniques, thus creating models which mimic human conditions. Due to pleiotropic effects, one gene may have different functions in different organ systems or time points during development. Therefore mutant mouse lines have to be phenotyped comprehensively in a highly standardized manner to enable the detection of phenotypes which might otherwise remain hidden. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) has been established at the Helmholtz Zentrum München as a phenotyping platform with open access to the scientific community (www.mousclinic.de; [1]). The GMC is a member of the EUMODIC consortium which created the European standard workflow EMPReSSslim for the systemic phenotyping of mouse models (http://www.eumodic.org/[2]). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mouse genetic differences in voluntary wheel running, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and learning on the multi-strain-adapted plus water maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Jennifer R; Rhodes, Justin S

    2015-03-01

    Moderate levels of aerobic exercise broadly enhance cognition throughout the lifespan. One hypothesized contributing mechanism is increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Recently, we measured the effects of voluntary wheel running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in 12 different mouse strains, and found increased neurogenesis in all strains, ranging from 2- to 5-fold depending on the strain. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which increased neurogenesis from wheel running is associated with enhanced performance on the water maze for 5 of the 12 strains, chosen based on their levels of neurogenesis observed in the previous study (C57BL/6 J, 129S1/SvImJ, B6129SF1/J, DBA/2 J, and B6D2F1/J). Mice were housed with or without a running wheels for 30 days then tested for learning and memory on the plus water maze, adapted for multiple strains, and rotarod test of motor performance. The first 10 days, animals were injected with BrdU to label dividing cells. After behavioral testing animals were euthanized to measure adult hippocampal neurogenesis using standard methods. Levels of neurogenesis depended on strain but all mice had a similar increase in neurogenesis in response to exercise. All mice acquired the water maze but performance depended on strain. Exercise improved water maze performance in all strains to a similar degree. Rotarod performance depended on strain. Exercise improved rotarod performance only in DBA/2 J and B6D2F1/J mice. Taken together, results demonstrate that despite different levels of neurogenesis, memory performance and motor coordination in these mouse strains, all strains have the capacity to increase neurogenesis and improve learning on the water maze through voluntary wheel running.

  20. Genetic evidence of the regulatory role of parathyroid hormone-related protein in articular chondrocyte maintenance in an experimental mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macica, Carolyn; Liang, Guoying; Nasiri, Ali; Broadus, Arthur E

    2011-11-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) regulates the rate of differentiation of growth chondrocytes and is also expressed in articular chondrocytes. This study tested the hypothesis that PTHrP might have a regulatory role in articular chondrocyte maintenance. Control sequences of growth differentiation factor 5 were used to delete PTHrP from articular chondrocytes in the mid-region of mouse articular cartilage. Mice with conditional deletion of PTHrP (knockout [KO]) and littermate control mice were evaluated for degenerative changes using both a time-course design and destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) technique. A total histologic score of degenerative changes was determined for the femoral and tibial articular surfaces (total maximum score of 60). The time-course study revealed degenerative changes in only a minority of the KO mice. In the DMM model, male KO mice were highly susceptible to DMM-induced degenerative changes (mean ± SEM total histologic score 45 ± 2.7 in KO mice versus 23 ± 1.4 in controls; P PTHrP normally functions in a feedback loop with Indian hedgehog (IHH), in which a reduction in one signaling partner induces a compensatory increase in the other. A number of phenotypic and functional markers were documented in KO mice to suggest that the IHH-PTHrP axis is capable of compensating in response to a partial Cre-driven PTHrP deletion, a finding that underscores the need to subject the mouse articular cartilage to a destabilizing challenge in order to elicit frankly degenerative findings. PTHrP may regulate articular chondrocyte maintenance in mice. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Genetic Differences among the a/J x C57bl/6j Recombinant Inbred Mouse Lines and Their Degree of Association with Glucocorticoid-Induced Cleft Palate

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Sharon L.; Erickson, Robert P.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate was injected intramuscularly into A/J, C57BL/6J and recombinant inbred lines from these two parental lines to study the genetics of steroid-induced cleft palate in a situation of identical maternal and fetal genotypes. The strains were typed for H-2 (the major histocompatibility locus), β-glucuronidase and β2-microglobulin, which served as markers on chromosomes 17, 5 and 2, respectively. Hepatic glucocorticoid binding capacity had been previously measured in H...

  2. Defining Documentary Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film......A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film...

  3. Definably amenable NIP groups

    OpenAIRE

    Chernikov, Artem; Simon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We study definably amenable NIP groups. We develop a theory of generics, showing that various definitions considered previously coincide, and study invariant measures. Applications include: characterization of regular ergodic measures, a proof of the conjecture of Petrykowski connecting existence of bounded orbits with definable amenability in the NIP case, and the Ellis group conjecture of Newelski and Pillay connecting the model-theoretic connected component of an NIP group with the ideal s...

  4. Mouse models of medulloblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochong Wu; Paul A. Northcott; Sidney Croul; Michael D. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Despite its prevalence and importance in pediatric neuro-oncology, the genes and pathways responsible for its initiation, maintenance,and progression remain poorly understood. Genetically engineered mouse models are an essential tool for uncovering the molecular and cellular basis of human diseases, including cancer, and serve a valuable role as preclinical models for testing targeted therapies. In this review, we summarize how such models have been successfully applied to the study of medulloblastoma over the past decade and what we might expect in the coming years.

  5. Panx3 links body mass index and tumorigenesis in a genetically heterogeneous mouse model of carcinogen-induced cancer. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Body mass index (BMI) has been implicated as a primary factor influencing cancer development. However, understanding the relationship between these two complex traits has been confounded by both environmental and genetic heterogeneity. Analysis of QTL linked to tumorigenesis and BMI identified several loci associated with both phenotypes. Exploring these loci in greater detail revealed a novel relationship between the Pannexin 3 gene (Panx3) and both BMI and tumorigenesis. Panx3 is positively associated with BMI and is strongly tied to a lipid metabolism gene expression network.

  6. 4D atlas of the mouse embryo for precise morphological staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael D; van Eede, Matthijs C; Spring, Shoshana; Jevtic, Stefan; Boughner, Julia C; Lerch, Jason P; Henkelman, R Mark

    2015-10-15

    After more than a century of research, the mouse remains the gold-standard model system, for it recapitulates human development and disease and is quickly and highly tractable to genetic manipulations. Fundamental to the power and success of using a mouse model is the ability to stage embryonic mouse development accurately. Past staging systems were limited by the technologies of the day, such that only surface features, visible with a light microscope, could be recognized and used to define stages. With the advent of high-throughput 3D imaging tools that capture embryo morphology in microscopic detail, we now present the first 4D atlas staging system for mouse embryonic development using optical projection tomography and image registration methods. By tracking 3D trajectories of every anatomical point in the mouse embryo from E11.5 to E14.0, we established the first 4D atlas compiled from ex vivo 3D mouse embryo reference images. The resulting 4D atlas comprises 51 interpolated 3D images in this gestational range, resulting in a temporal resolution of 72 min. From this 4D atlas, any mouse embryo image can be subsequently compared and staged at the global, voxel and/or structural level. Assigning an embryonic stage to each point in anatomy allows for unprecedented quantitative analysis of developmental asynchrony among different anatomical structures in the same mouse embryo. This comprehensive developmental data set offers developmental biologists a new, powerful staging system that can identify and compare differences in developmental timing in wild-type embryos and shows promise for localizing deviations in mutant development.

  7. Human neural stem cells genetically modified to overexpress brain-derived neurotrophic factor promote functional recovery and neuroprotection in a mouse stroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong J; Lim, In J; Lee, Min C; Kim, Seung U

    2010-11-15

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a lethal stroke type; mortality approaches 50%, and current medical therapy against ICH shows only limited effectiveness, so an alternative approach is required, such as stem cell-based cell therapy. Previously we have shown that intravenously transplanted human neural stem cells (NSCs) selectively migrate to the brain and promote functional recovery in rat ICH model, and others have shown that intracerebral infusion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) results in improved structural and functional outcome from cerebral ischemia. We postulated that human NSCs overexpressing BDNF transplanted into cerebral cortex overlying ICH lesion could provide improved survival of grafted NSCs and increased angiogenesis and behavioral recovery in mouse ICH model. ICH was induced in adult mice by injection of bacterial collagenase into striatum. The HB1.F3.BDNF (F3.BDNF) human NSC line produces sixfold higher amounts of BDNFF over the parental F3 cell line in vitro, induces behavioral improvement, and produces a threefold increase in cell survival at 2 weeks and 8 weeks posttransplantation. Brain transplantation of human NSCs overexpressing BDNF provided differentiation and survival of grafted human NSCs and renewed angiogenesis of host brain and functional recovery of ICH animals. These results indicate that the F3.BDNF human NSCs should be of great value as a cellular source for experimental studies involving cellular therapy for human neurological disorders, including ICH.

  8. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): from genes to mice--a community resource for mouse biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppig, Janan T; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Blake, Judith A; Anagnostopoulos, A; Baldarelli, R M; Baya, M; Beal, J S; Bello, S M; Boddy, W J; Bradt, D W; Burkart, D L; Butler, N E; Campbell, J; Cassell, M A; Corbani, L E; Cousins, S L; Dahmen, D J; Dene, H; Diehl, A D; Drabkin, H J; Frazer, K S; Frost, P; Glass, L H; Goldsmith, C W; Grant, P L; Lennon-Pierce, M; Lewis, J; Lu, I; Maltais, L J; McAndrews-Hill, M; McClellan, L; Miers, D B; Miller, L A; Ni, L; Ormsby, J E; Qi, D; Reddy, T B K; Reed, D J; Richards-Smith, B; Shaw, D R; Sinclair, R; Smith, C L; Szauter, P; Walker, M B; Walton, D O; Washburn, L L; Witham, I T; Zhu, Y

    2005-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) forms the core of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) system (http://www.informatics.jax.org), a model organism database resource for the laboratory mouse. MGD provides essential integration of experimental knowledge for the mouse system with information annotated from both literature and online sources. MGD curates and presents consensus and experimental data representations of genotype (sequence) through phenotype information, including highly detailed reports about genes and gene products. Primary foci of integration are through representations of relationships among genes, sequences and phenotypes. MGD collaborates with other bioinformatics groups to curate a definitive set of information about the laboratory mouse and to build and implement the data and semantic standards that are essential for comparative genome analysis. Recent improvements in MGD discussed here include the enhancement of phenotype resources, the re-development of the International Mouse Strain Resource, IMSR, the update of mammalian orthology datasets and the electronic publication of classic books in mouse genetics.

  9. Host-dependent control of early regulatory and effector T-cell differentiation underlies the genetic susceptibility of RAG2-deficient mouse strains to transfer colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valatas, V; He, J; Rivollier, A; Kolios, G; Kitamura, K; Kelsall, B L

    2013-05-01

    De novo differentiation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (induced (i) Tregs) occurs preferentially in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). We addressed the contribution of background genetic factors in affecting the balance of iTreg, T helper type 1 (Th1), and Th17 cell differentiation in GALT in vivo following the transfer of naive CD4(+)CD45RB(high) T cells to strains of RAG2-deficient mice with differential susceptibility to inflammatory colitis. iTregs represented up to 5% of CD4(+) T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes of less-susceptible C57BL/6 RAG2(-/-) mice compared with <1% in highly susceptible C57BL/10 RAG2(-/-) mice 2 weeks following T-cell transfer before the onset of colitis. Early Treg induction was correlated inversely with effector cell expansion and the severity of colitis development, was controlled primarily by host and not T-cell-dependent factors, and was strongly associated with interleukin-12 (IL-12)/23 production by host CD11c(+)CD103(+) dendritic cells. These data highlight the importance of genetic factors regulating IL-12/23 production in controlling the balance between iTreg differentiation and effector-pathogenic CD4(+) T-cell expansion in lymphopenic mice and indicate a direct role for iTregs in the regulation of colonic inflammation in vivo.

  10. Can play be defined?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Can play be defined? There is reason to raise critical questions about the established academic demand that at phenomenon – also in humanist studies – should first of all be defined, i.e. de-lineated and by neat lines limited to a “little box” that can be handled. The following chapter develops t....... Human beings can very well understand play – or whatever phenomenon in human life – without defining it........ The academic imperative of definition seems to be linked to the positivistic attempts – and produces sometimes monstrous definitions. Have they any philosophical value for our knowledge of what play is? Definition is not a universal instrument of knowledge-building, but a culturally specific construction...

  11. Nouns to Define Homophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Campo Arias

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The term ‘homophobia’ was introduced in the academic context more than 40 years ago. However, its meaning has changed over time. Objective. To review the nouns used in the last twelve years to define homophobia. Methodology. The authors conducted a systematic search in Medline through Pubmed that included editorials, letters to editors, comments and narrative reviews, in English and Spanish. A qualitative analysis (Grounded theory was applied to analyze nouns used to define homophobia since 2001 through 2012. Results. Authors reviewed three papers including ten nouns to define homophobia, the most common noun was fear. The terms were grouped into two domains: negative attitude and discomfort with homosexuality. Conclusion. Fear is the most used word to describe homophobia. The terms were grouped into two domains: negative attitude and discomfort toward homosexuality.

  12. Defining "intermittent UVR exposure"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, Mette; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Petersen, Bibi Øager;

    2016-01-01

    to define and quantify “intermittent UVR exposure” by an objective measure. Methods: A broad study population of adults and children had data collected during a summer period. Data were personal UVR dosimetry measurements, from which the number of “intermittent days” was derived, sun behaviour diaries.......001). The corresponding numbers for prediction of nevi and lentigo density by retrospective questionnaire data was lower (R2 = 0.11, R2 = 0.26, p defined objective measure of intermittent UVR exposure. This measure may provide a better prediction of solar skin damage and CMM...

  13. Chemically defined medium and Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Kozak, Elena; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C. elegans has been established as a powerful genetic system. Use of a chemically defined medium (C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM)) now allows standardization and systematic manipulation of the nutrients that animals receive. Liquid cultivation allows automated culturing and experimentation and should be of use in large-scale growth and screening of animals. RESULTS: We find that CeMM is versatile and culturing is simple. CeMM can be used in a solid or liquid state, it can be stored unused for at least a year, unattended actively growing cultures may be maintained longer than with standard techniques, and standard C. elegans protocols work well with animals grown in defined medium. We also find that there are caveats to using defined medium. Animals in defined medium grow more slowly than on standard medium, appear to display adaptation to the defined medium, and display altered growth rates as they change the composition of the defined medium. CONCLUSIONS: As was suggested with the introduction of C. elegans as a potential genetic system, use of defined medium with C. elegans should prove a powerful tool.

  14. Mouse models in oncoimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Smyth, Mark J; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental cancer research and the development of efficacious antineoplastic treatments both rely on experimental systems in which the relationship between malignant cells and immune cells can be studied. Mouse models of transplantable, carcinogen-induced or genetically engineered malignancies - each with their specific advantages and difficulties - have laid the foundations of oncoimmunology. These models have guided the immunosurveillance theory that postulates that evasion from immune control is an essential feature of cancer, the concept that the long-term effects of conventional cancer treatments mostly rely on the reinstatement of anticancer immune responses and the preclinical development of immunotherapies, including currently approved immune checkpoint blockers. Specific aspects of pharmacological development, as well as attempts to personalize cancer treatments using patient-derived xenografts, require the development of mouse models in which murine genes and cells are replaced with their human equivalents. Such 'humanized' mouse models are being progressively refined to characterize the leukocyte subpopulations that belong to the innate and acquired arms of the immune system as they infiltrate human cancers that are subjected to experimental therapies. We surmise that the ever-advancing refinement of murine preclinical models will accelerate the pace of therapeutic optimization in patients.

  15. Introducing DartMouse: The Mouse Speed Congenic Facility at Dartmouth Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, H.; Tomlinson, C.; Fiering, S.; Gorham, J.D.; Muirhead, K.

    2010-01-01

    CF-9 DartMouse™ is the Mouse Speed Congenic Facility at Dartmouth Medical School. Use of DartMouse allows for the rapid introgression of modified genes onto any inbred strain of mouse. Speed congenic strains of mice are achievable in 5 generations (1 to 1.5 years), versus 10 generations (∼3 years) required by conventional back-crossing. The application of DartMouse services saves both money and time for researchers using the laboratory mouse for any number of pre-clinical disease models. DartMouse is a complete service facility that works closely with clients at and outside of Dartmouth, helping to design appropriate breeding schemes to optimize back-crossing speed and efficiency. Clients supply mouse tail snips. DartMouse isolates genomic DNA, performs and analyzes complete genome-wide scans, and returns data in graphical and spreadsheet formats. DartMouse discusses results with clients and makes specific recommendations on breeder selection. DartMouse uses “SNP-Chip” technology on an Illumina BeadStation 500 Platform. Chips use a 377 SNP array covering the mouse genome with an average interval density of <7 cM. Turnaround time from receipt of tails to results is typically <2 weeks. One of DartMouse's most popular services is the “background check” in which the genetic background of supposedly fully back-crossed mice can be thoroughly assessed across all chromosomes. DartMouse was inaugurated in the summer of 2008, and received ARRA-funding in the fall of 2009. Our plans are to make DartMouse a regional and national core facility for the generation of speed congenic mice and for the verification of genetic background for conventionally back-crossed mice.

  16. Tissue-specific in vivo genetic toxicity of nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons assessed using the Muta™Mouse transgenic rodent assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Alexandra S.; Lemieux, Christine L.; Arlt, Volker M.; White, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Test batteries to screen chemicals for mutagenic hazard include several endpoints regarded as effective for detecting genotoxic carcinogens. Traditional in vivo methods primarily examine clastogenic endpoints in haematopoietic tissues. Although this approach is effective for identifying systemically distributed clastogens, some mutagens may not induce clastogenic effects; moreover, genotoxic effects may be restricted to the site of contact and/or related tissues. An OECD test guideline for transgenic rodent (TGR) gene mutation assays was released in 2011, and the TGR assays permit assessment of mutagenicity in any tissue. This study assessed the responses of two genotoxicity endpoints following sub-chronic oral exposures of male Muta™Mouse to 9 carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Clastogenicity was assessed via induction of micronuclei in peripheral blood, and mutagenicity via induction of lacZ transgene mutations in bone marrow, glandular stomach, small intestine, liver, and lung. Additionally, the presence of bulky PAH-DNA adducts was examined. Five of the 9 PAHs elicited positive results across all endpoints in at least one tissue, and no PAHs were negative or equivocal across all endpoints. All PAHs were positive for lacZ mutations in at least one tissue (sensitivity = 100%), and for 8 PAHs, one or more initial sites of chemical contact (i.e., glandular stomach, liver, small intestine) yielded a greater response than bone marrow. Five PAHs were positive in the micronucleus assay (sensitivity = 56%). Furthermore, all PAHs produced DNA adducts in at least one tissue. The results demonstrate the utility of the TGR assay for mutagenicity assessment, especially for compounds that may not be systemically distributed. PMID:26603514

  17. On Defining Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Though central to any pedagogical development of physics, the concept of mass is still not well understood. Properly defining mass has proven to be far more daunting than contemporary textbooks would have us believe. And yet today the origin of mass is one of the most aggressively pursued areas of research in all of physics. Much of the excitement…

  18. Defining Data Science

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yangyong; Xiong, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Data science is gaining more and more and widespread attention, but no consensus viewpoint on what data science is has emerged. As a new science, its objects of study and scientific issues should not be covered by established sciences. Data in cyberspace have formed what we call datanature. In the present paper, data science is defined as the science of exploring datanature.

  19. Defining Mathematical Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This theoretical paper outlines the process of defining "mathematical giftedness" for a present study on how primary school teaching shapes the mindsets of children who are mathematically gifted. Mathematical giftedness is not a badge of honour or some special value attributed to a child who has achieved something exceptional.…

  20. Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caba, Cosmin Marius

    resources are limited. Hence, to counteract this trend, current QoS mechanisms must become simpler to deploy and operate, in order to motivate NSPs to employ QoS techniques instead of overprovisioning. Software Defined Networking (SDN) represents a paradigm shift in the way telecommunication and data...

  1. Defining Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  2. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  3. Software Defined Cyberinfrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Ian; Blaiszik, Ben; Chard, Kyle; Chard, Ryan

    2017-07-17

    Within and across thousands of science labs, researchers and students struggle to manage data produced in experiments, simulations, and analyses. Largely manual research data lifecycle management processes mean that much time is wasted, research results are often irreproducible, and data sharing and reuse remain rare. In response, we propose a new approach to data lifecycle management in which researchers are empowered to define the actions to be performed at individual storage systems when data are created or modified: actions such as analysis, transformation, copying, and publication. We term this approach software-defined cyberinfrastructure because users can implement powerful data management policies by deploying rules to local storage systems, much as software-defined networking allows users to configure networks by deploying rules to switches.We argue that this approach can enable a new class of responsive distributed storage infrastructure that will accelerate research innovation by allowing any researcher to associate data workflows with data sources, whether local or remote, for such purposes as data ingest, characterization, indexing, and sharing. We report on early experiments with this approach in the context of experimental science, in which a simple if-trigger-then-action (IFTA) notation is used to define rules.

  4. Defining in Classroom Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Maria Alessandra; Fischbein, Efraim

    1997-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the defining process in geometrical context in the reference frame of the theory of "figural concepts." Presents analysis of some examples taken from a teaching experiment at the sixth-grade level. Contains 30 references. (Author/ASK)

  5. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  6. Investigation of gene effects and epistatic interactions between Akt1 and neuregulin 1 in the regulation of behavioral phenotypes and social functions in genetic mouse models of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hsun eHuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence from human genetic studies has suggested several functional candidate genes that might contribute to susceptibility to schizophrenia, including AKT1 and neuregulin 1 (NRG1. Recent findings also revealed that NRG1 stimulates the PI3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway, which might be involved in the functional outcomes of some schizophrenic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Akt1-deficiency and Nrg1-deficiency alone or in combination in the regulation of behavioral phenotypes, cognition, and social functions using genetically modified mice as a model. Male Akt1+/-, Nrg1+/-, and double mutant mice were bred and compared with their wild-type littermate controls. In experiment 1, general physical examination revealed that all mutant mice displayed a normal profile of body weight during development and a normal brain activity with microPET scan. In experiment 2, no significant genotypic differences were found in our basic behavioral phenotyping, including locomotion, anxiety-like behavior, and sensorimotor gating. However, both Nrg1+/- and double mutant mice exhibited impaired episodic-like memory. Double mutant mice also had impaired sociability. In experiment 3, a synergistic epistasis between Akt1 and Nrg1 was further confirmed in double mutant mice in that they had impaired social interaction compared to the other 3 groups, especially encountering with a novel male or an ovariectomized female. Double mutant and Nrg1+/- mice also emitted fewer female urine-induced ultrasonic vocalization calls. Collectively, our results indicate that double deficiency of Akt1 and Nrg1 can result in the impairment of social cognitive functions, which might be pertinent to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia-related social cognition.

  7. A report from the Sixth International Mouse Genome Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S. [Saint Mary`s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics

    1992-12-31

    The Sixth Annual Mouse Genome Conference was held in October, 1992 at Buffalo, USA. The mouse is one of the primary model organisms in the Human Genome Project. Through the use of gene targeting studies the mouse has become a powerful biological model for the study of gene function and, in addition, the comparison of the many homologous mutations identified in human and mouse have widened our understanding of the biology of these two organisms. A primary goal in the mouse genome program has been to create a genetic map of STSs of high resolution (<1cM) that would form the basis for the physical mapping of the whole mouse genome. Buffalo saw substantial new progress towards the goal of a very high density genetic map and the beginnings of substantive efforts towards physical mapping in chromosome regions with a high density of genetic markers.

  8. Reduction in parvalbumin expression not loss of the parvalbumin-expressing GABA interneuron subpopulation in genetic parvalbumin and shank mouse models of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filice, Federica; Vörckel, Karl Jakob; Sungur, Ayse Özge; Wöhr, Markus; Schwaller, Beat

    2016-01-27

    A reduction of the number of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive (PV(+)) GABAergic interneurons or a decrease in PV immunoreactivity was reported in several mouse models of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This includes Shank mutant mice, with SHANK being one of the most important gene families mutated in human ASD. Similar findings were obtained in heterozygous (PV+/-) mice for the Pvalb gene, which display a robust ASD-like phenotype. Here, we addressed the question whether the observed reduction in PV immunoreactivity was the result of a decrease in PV expression levels and/or loss of the PV-expressing GABA interneuron subpopulation hereafter called "Pvalb neurons". The two alternatives have important implications as they likely result in opposing effects on the excitation/inhibition balance, with decreased PV expression resulting in enhanced inhibition, but loss of the Pvalb neuron subpopulation in reduced inhibition. Stereology was used to determine the number of Pvalb neurons in ASD-associated brain regions including the medial prefrontal cortex, somatosensory cortex and striatum of PV-/-, PV+/-, Shank1-/- and Shank3B-/- mice. As a second marker for the identification of Pvalb neurons, we used Vicia Villosa Agglutinin (VVA), a lectin recognizing the specific extracellular matrix enwrapping Pvalb neurons. PV protein and Pvalb mRNA levels were determined quantitatively by Western blot analyses and qRT-PCR, respectively. Our analyses of total cell numbers in different brain regions indicated that the observed "reduction of PV(+) neurons" was in all cases, i.e., in PV+/-, Shank1-/- and Shank3B-/- mice, due to a reduction in Pvalb mRNA and PV protein, without any indication of neuronal cell decrease/loss of Pvalb neurons evidenced by the unaltered numbers of VVA(+) neurons. Our findings suggest that the PV system might represent a convergent downstream endpoint for some forms of ASD, with the excitation/inhibition balance shifted towards enhanced inhibition due to the

  9. Isolation of Mouse Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E; Lionakis, Michail S

    2015-08-03

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments.

  10. Defining the fascial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adstrum, Sue; Hedley, Gil; Schleip, Robert; Stecco, Carla; Yucesoy, Can A

    2017-01-01

    Fascia is a widely used yet indistinctly defined anatomical term that is concurrently applied to the description of soft collagenous connective tissue, distinct sections of membranous tissue, and a body pervading soft connective tissue system. Inconsistent use of this term is causing concern due to its potential to confuse technical communication about fascia in global, multiple discipline- and multiple profession-spanning discourse environments. The Fascia Research Society acted to address this issue by establishing a Fascia Nomenclature Committee (FNC) whose purpose was to clarify the terminology relating to fascia. This committee has since developed and defined the terms a fascia, and, more recently, the fascial system. This article reports on the FNC's proposed definition of the fascial system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...... to “harmful”)”. Furthermore, a distinction between six types of legal moralism is made. The six types are grouped according to whether they are concerned with the enforcement of positive or critical morality, and whether they are concerned with criminalising, legally restricting, or refraining from legally...... protecting morally wrong behaviour. This is interesting because not all types of legal moralism are equally vulnerable to the different critiques of legal moralism that have been put forth. Indeed, I show that some interesting types of legal moralism have not been criticised at all....

  12. Define Digital Vernacular

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳; 李海英; James Stevens; Rough Nelson

    2014-01-01

    As science and technology developed, the tools of humans developed from humans’hands, to mechanical and digital technologies. The tools influ-ence almost everything in the humans’world, so does vernacular. The digital vernacular could be understood as using digital technology to vernacular; the digital means technologies. It also could be understood as doing vernacular in a digital way;the digital means data and information, in other words it can be seeking truth from facts. Define digital vernacular is not only what is digital vernacular, but also about how to do the digital vernacular and what kind of attitude we should hold to-ward the digital vernacular. Define digital vernacular as both thinking and doing.

  13. Defining local food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Safania Normann

    2013-01-01

    Despite evolving local food research, there is no consistent definition of “local food.” Various understandings are utilized, which have resulted in a diverse landscape of meaning. The main purpose of this paper is to examine how researchers within the local food systems literature define local...... food, and how these definitions can be used as a starting point to identify a new taxonomy of local food based on three domains of proximity....

  14. [To define internet addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonioni, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Internet addiction is a new behavioral disorder difficult to define, especially when referring to young teenagers who make great use of web-mediated relationships. It's necessary to separate the cases of overt dependency on those in which the abuse of internet seems to have a different value, offering the only way to achieve the possible relationship. Internet is mediating a new way of communicating and thinking, this may favor the onset of clinical phenomena intended to surprise.

  15. Decidability of definability

    CERN Document Server

    Tsankov, Manuel Bodirsky; Michael Pinsker; Todor

    2010-01-01

    For a fixed infinite structure $\\Gamma$ with finite signature $\\tau$, we study the following computational problem: Input are quantifier-free first-order $\\tau$-formulas $\\phi_0,\\phi_1,\\dots,\\phi_n$ that define relations $R_0,R_1,\\dots,R_n$ over $\\Gamma$. The question is whether the relation $R_0$ is primitive positive definable from $R_1,\\ldots,R_n$, i.e., definable by a first-order formula that uses only relation symbols for $R_1, \\dots, R_n$, equality, conjunctions, and existential quantification (disjunction, negation, and universal quantification are forbidden). We show decidability of this problem for all structures $\\Gamma$ that have a first-order definition in an ordered homogeneous structure $\\Delta$ with a finite language whose age is a Ramsey class and determined by finitely many forbidden substructures. Examples for structures $\\Gamma$ with this property are the order of the rationals, the random graph, the homogeneous universal poset, the random tournament, all homogeneous universal $C$-relations...

  16. A linkage map of mouse chromosome 8: further definition of homologous linkage relationships between mouse chromosome 8 and human chromosomes 8, 16, and 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, T A; Rochelle, J M; Saunders, A M; Seldin, M F

    1991-05-01

    Using an interspecific cross, a mouse chromosome 8 linkage map spanning 72 cM has been defined by the segregation of restriction fragment length variants. Linkage and genetic distance were established for 10 loci by analysis of 114 meiotic events and indicated the following gene order: (centromere)-Insr-3.5 cM-Plat-26.3 cM-Crryps/Mel/Jund-3.5 cM-Junb/Ucp-10.5 cM-Mt-1-27.2 cM-Acta2-0.9 cM-Aprt. These data provide further definition of mouse chromosome 8 linkage relationships and the relationship between segments of this chromosome and human chromosomes 8, 16, and 19.

  17. Can a genetically-modified organism-containing diet influence embryo development? A preliminary study on pre-implantation mouse embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Cisterna

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, pre-mRNAs undergo several transformation steps to generate mature mRNAs. Recent studies have demonstrated that a diet containing a genetically modified (GM soybean can induce modifications of nuclear constituents involved in RNA processing in some tissues of young, adult and old mice. On this basis, we have investigated the ultrastructural and immunocytochemical features of pre-implantation embryos from mice fed either GM or non- GM soybean in order to verify whether the parental diet can affect the morpho-functional development of the embryonic ribonucleoprotein structural constituents involved in premRNA pathways. Morphological observations revealed that the general aspect of embryo nuclear components is similar in the two experimental groups. However, immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization results suggest a temporary decrease of pre-mRNA transcription and splicing in 2-cell embryos and a resumption in 4-8-cell embryos from mice fed GM soybean; moreover, pre-mRNA maturation seems to be less efficient in both 2-cell and 4-8-cell embryos from GM-fed mice than in controls. Although our results are still preliminary and limited to the pre-implantation phases, the results of this study encourage deepening on the effects of food components and/or contaminants on embryo development.

  18. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D' Andrea, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Niedernhofer, Laura J., E-mail: niedernhoferl@upmc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, 5117 Centre Avenue, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion 2.6, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  19. Genetic and Diet-Induced Obesity Increased Intestinal Tumorigenesis in the Double Mutant Mouse Model Multiple Intestinal Neoplasia X Obese via Disturbed Glucose Regulation and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Thi Ngo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied how spontaneous or carcinogen-induced intestinal tumorigenesis was affected by genetic or diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6J-ApcMin/+ X C57BL/6J-Lepob/+ mice. Obesity was induced by the obese (ob mutation in the lep gene coding for the hormone leptin, or by a 45% fat diet. The effects of obesity were examined on spontaneous intestinal tumors caused by the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc gene and on tumors induced by the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP. F1 ob/ob (homozygous mutated mice had increased body weight (bw and number of spontaneous and PhIP-induced small intestinal tumors (in ApcMin/+ mice, versus ob/wt (heterozygous mutated and wt/wt mice (homozygous wild-type. A 45% fat diet exacerbated bw and spontaneous tumor numbers versus 10% fat, but not PhIP-induced tumors. Except for bw, ob/wt and wt/wt were not significantly different. The obesity caused hyperglucosemia and insulinemia in ob/ob mice. A 45% fat diet further increased glucose, but not insulin. Inflammation was seen as increased TNFα levels in ob/ob mice. Thus the results implicate disturbed glucose regulation and inflammation as mechanisms involved in the association between obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis. Ob/ob mice had shorter lifespan than ob/wt and wt/wt mice.

  20. Genetic ablation of Bcl-x attenuates invasiveness without affecting apoptosis or tumor growth in a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H Hager

    Full Text Available Tumor cell death is modulated by an intrinsic cell death pathway controlled by the pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. Up-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members has been shown to suppress cell death in pre-clinical models of human cancer and is implicated in human tumor progression. Previous gain-of-function studies in the RIP1-Tag2 model of pancreatic islet carcinogenesis, involving uniform or focal/temporal over-expression of Bcl-x(L, demonstrated accelerated tumor formation and growth. To specifically assess the role of endogenous Bcl-x in regulating apoptosis and tumor progression in this model, we engineered a pancreatic beta-cell-specific knockout of both alleles of Bcl-x using the Cre-LoxP system of homologous recombination. Surprisingly, there was no appreciable effect on tumor cell apoptosis rates or on tumor growth in the Bcl-x knockout mice. Other anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members were expressed but not substantively altered at the mRNA level in the Bcl-x-null tumors, suggestive of redundancy without compensatory transcriptional up-regulation. Interestingly, the incidence of invasive carcinomas was reduced, and tumor cells lacking Bcl-x were impaired in invasion in a two-chamber trans-well assay under conditions mimicking hypoxia. Thus, while the function of Bcl-x in suppressing apoptosis and thereby promoting tumor growth is evidently redundant, genetic ablation implicates Bcl-x in selectively facilitating invasion, consistent with a recent report documenting a pro-invasive capability of Bcl-x(L upon exogenous over-expression.

  1. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Integration of Mouse Phenome Data Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, John M [MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire, UK; Adams, Neils [Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, United Kingdom; Aidinis, Vassilis [MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire, UK; Blake, Judith A [Jackson Laboratory, The, Bar Harbor, ME; Bogue, Molly [Jackson Laboratory, The, Bar Harbor, ME; Brown, Steve D M [MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire, UK; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Davidson, Duncan [MRC Human Genetics Unit, Edinburgh, UK; Duran, Christopher [MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire, UK; Eppig, Janan T [Jackson Laboratory, The, Bar Harbor, ME; Gailus-Durner, Valerie [Institute of Experimental Genetics, Neuherberg, Germany; Gkoutos, Georgios V [University of Cambridge; Greenaway, Simon [MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire, UK; Angelis, Martin Hrabe de [Institute of Experimental Genetics, Neuherberg, Germany; Kollias, George [BSRC Fleming, Athens, Greece; Leblanc, Sophie [Institut Clinique de la Souris, Cedex, France; Lee, Kirsty [MRC Human Genetics Unit, Edinburgh, UK; Lengger, Christoph [Institute of Experimental Genetics, Neuherberg, Germany; Maier, Holger [Institute of Experimental Genetics, Neuherberg, Germany; Mallon, Ann-Marie [MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire, UK; Masuya, Hiroshi [RIKEN, Japan; Melvin, David [Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, United Kingdom; Muller, Werner [Faculty of Life Sciences, Manchester, UK; Parkinson, Helen [European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus; Proctor, Glenn [European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus; Reuveni, Eli [Mouse Biology Unit, Rome, Italy; Schofield, Paul [University of Cambridge; Shukla, Aadya [University of Oxford; Smith, Cynthia [Jackson Laboratory, The, Bar Harbor, ME; Toyoda, Tetsuro [RIKEN, Japan; Vasseur, Laurent [Institut Clinique de la Souris, Cedex, France; Wakana, Shigeharu [RIKEN, Japan; Walling, Alison [MRC Mary Lyon Centre, Oxfordshire, UK; White, Jacqui [Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, United Kingdom; Wood, Joe [MRC Mary Lyon Centre, Oxfordshire, UK; Zouberakis, Michalis [BSRC Fleming, Athens, Greece

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the functions encoded in the mouse genome will be central to an understanding of the genetic basis of human disease. To achieve this it will be essential to be able to characterise the phenotypic consequences of variation and alterations in individual genes. Data on the phenotypes of mouse strains are currently held in a number of different forms (detailed descriptions of mouse lines, first line phenotyping data on novel mutations, data on the normal features of inbred lines, etc.) at many sites worldwide. For the most efficient use of these data sets, we have set in train a process to develop standards for the description of phenotypes (using ontologies), and file formats for the description of phenotyping protocols and phenotype data sets. This process is ongoing, and needs to be supported by the wider mouse genetics and phenotyping communities to succeed. We invite interested parties to contact us as we develop this process further.

  3. Conditional Expression of Human 15-Lipoxygenase-1 in Mouse Prostate Induces Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia: The FLiMP Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddhav P. Kelavkar

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and mortality of prostate cancer (PCa vary greatly in different geographic regions, for which lifestyle factors, such as dietary fat intake, have been implicated. Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LO-1, which metabolizes polyunsaturated fatty acids, is a highly regulated, tissue-specific, lipid-peroxidating enzyme that functions in physiological membrane remodeling and in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. We have shown that aberrant overexpression of 15-LO-1 occurs in human PCa, particularly high-grade PCa, and in high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN, and that the murine orthologue is increased in SV40-based genetically engineered mouse (GEM models of PCa, such as LADY and TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate. To further define the role of 15-LO-1 in prostate carcinogenesis, we established a novel GEM model with targeted overexpression of h15-LO-1 in the prostate [human fifteen lipoxygenase-1 in mouse prostate (FLiMP]. We used a Cre- mediated and a loxP-mediated recombination strategy to target h15-LO-1 specifically to the prostate of C57BL/6 mice. Wild-type (wt, FLiMP+/-, and FLiMP+/+ mice aged 7 to 21, 24 to 28, and 35 weeks were characterized by histopathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC, and DNA/RNA and enzyme analyses. Compared to wt mice, h15-LO-1 enzyme activity was increased similarly in both homozygous FLiMP+/+ and hemizygous FLiMP+/- prostates. Dorsolateral and ventral prostates of FLiMP mice showed focal and progressive epithelial hyperplasia with nuclear atypia, indicative of the definition of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN according to the National Cancer Institute. These foci showed increased proliferation by Ki-67 IHC. No progression to invasive PCa was noted up to 35 weeks. By IHC, h15-LO-1 expression was limited to luminal epithelial cells, with increased expression in mPIN foci (similar to human HGPIN. In summary, targeted overexpression of h

  4. Defining Z in Q

    CERN Document Server

    Koenigsmann, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    We show that ${\\mathbb Z}$ is definable in ${\\mathbb Q}$ by a universal first-order formula in the language of rings. We also present an $\\forall\\exists$-formula for ${\\mathbb Z}$ in ${\\mathbb Q}$ with just one universal quantifier. We exhibit new diophantine subsets of ${\\mathbb Q}$ like the set of non-squares or the complement of the image of the norm map under a quadratic extension. Finally, we show that there is no existential formula for ${\\mathbb Z}$ in ${\\mathbb Q}$, provided one assumes a strong variant of the Bombieri-Lang Conjecture for varieties over ${\\mathbb Q}$ with many ${\\mathbb Q}$-rational points.

  5. High-throughput mouse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Hilary; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2011-04-01

    Comprehensive phenotyping will be required to reveal the pleiotropic functions of a gene and to uncover the wider role of genetic loci within diverse biological systems. The challenge will be to devise phenotyping approaches to characterise the thousands of mutants that are being generated as part of international efforts to acquire a mutant for every gene in the mouse genome. In order to acquire robust datasets of broad based phenotypes from mouse mutants it is necessary to design and implement pipelines that incorporate standardised phenotyping platforms that are validated across diverse mouse genetics centres or mouse clinics. We describe here the rationale and methodology behind one phenotyping pipeline, EMPReSSslim, that was designed as part of the work of the EUMORPHIA and EUMODIC consortia, and which exemplifies some of the challenges facing large-scale phenotyping. EMPReSSslim captures a broad range of data on diverse biological systems, from biochemical to physiological amongst others. Data capture and dissemination is pivotal to the operation of large-scale phenotyping pipelines, including the definition of parameters integral to each phenotyping test and the associated ontological descriptions. EMPReSSslim data is displayed within the EuroPhenome database, where a variety of tools are available to allow the user to search for interesting biological or clinical phenotypes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inefficient constitutive inhibition of P2X3 receptors by brain natriuretic peptide system contributes to sensitization of trigeminal sensory neurons in a genetic mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenkova, Anna; Vilotti, Sandra; Ntamati, Niels; van den Maagdenberg, Arn Mjm; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    On trigeminal ganglion neurons, pain-sensing P2X3 receptors are constitutively inhibited by brain natriuretic peptide via its natriuretic peptide receptor-A. This inhibition is associated with increased P2X3 serine phosphorylation and receptor redistribution to non-lipid raft membrane compartments. The natriuretic peptide receptor-A antagonist anantin reverses these effects. We studied whether P2X3 inhibition is dysfunctional in a genetic familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 model produced by introduction of the human pathogenic R192Q missense mutation into the mouse CACNA1A gene (knock-in phenotype). This model faithfully replicates several properties of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1, with gain-of-function of CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels, raised levels of the algogenic peptide calcitonin gene-related peptide, and enhanced activity of P2X3 receptors in trigeminal ganglia. In knock-in neurons, anantin did not affect P2X3 receptor activity, membrane distribution, or serine phosphorylation level, implying ineffective inhibition by the constitutive brain natriuretic peptide/natriuretic peptide receptor-A pathway. However, expression and functional properties of this pathway remained intact together with its ability to downregulate TRPV1 channels. Reversing the familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 phenotype with the CaV2.1-specific antagonist, ω-agatoxin IVA restored P2X3 activity to wild-type level and enabled the potentiating effects of anantin again. After blocking calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors, P2X3 receptors exhibited wild-type properties and were again potentiated by anantin. P2X3 receptors on mouse trigeminal ganglion neurons are subjected to contrasting modulation by inhibitory brain natriuretic peptide and facilitatory calcitonin gene-related peptide that both operate via complex intracellular signaling. In the familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 migraine model, the action of calcitonin gene-related peptide appears to prevail over brain natriuretic

  7. Conditionally reprogrammed normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells display a progenitor-cell-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R Saenz

    Full Text Available Mammary epithelial (ME cells cultured under conventional conditions senesce after several passages. Here, we demonstrate that mouse ME cells isolated from normal mammary glands or from mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV-Neu-induced mammary tumors, can be cultured indefinitely as conditionally reprogrammed cells (CRCs on irradiated fibroblasts in the presence of the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632. Cell surface progenitor-associated markers are rapidly induced in normal mouse ME-CRCs relative to ME cells. However, the expression of certain mammary progenitor subpopulations, such as CD49f+ ESA+ CD44+, drops significantly in later passages. Nevertheless, mouse ME-CRCs grown in a three-dimensional extracellular matrix gave rise to mammary acinar structures. ME-CRCs isolated from MMTV-Neu transgenic mouse mammary tumors express high levels of HER2/neu, as well as tumor-initiating cell markers, such as CD44+, CD49f+, and ESA+ (EpCam. These patterns of expression are sustained in later CRC passages. Early and late passage ME-CRCs from MMTV-Neu tumors that were implanted in the mammary fat pads of syngeneic or nude mice developed vascular tumors that metastasized within 6 weeks of transplantation. Importantly, the histopathology of these tumors was indistinguishable from that of the parental tumors that develop in the MMTV-Neu mice. Application of the CRC system to mouse mammary epithelial cells provides an attractive model system to study the genetics and phenotype of normal and transformed mouse epithelium in a defined culture environment and in vivo transplant studies.

  8. Large-scale phenotyping of an accurate genetic mouse model of JNCL identifies novel early pathology outside the central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Staropoli

    Full Text Available Cln3(Δex7/8 mice harbor the most common genetic defect causing juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL, an autosomal recessive disease involving seizures, visual, motor and cognitive decline, and premature death. Here, to more thoroughly investigate the manifestations of the common JNCL mutation, we performed a broad phenotyping study of Cln3(Δex7/8 mice. Homozygous Cln3(Δex7/8 mice, congenic on a C57BL/6N background, displayed subtle deficits in sensory and motor tasks at 10-14 weeks of age. Homozygous Cln3(Δex7/8 mice also displayed electroretinographic changes reflecting cone function deficits past 5 months of age and a progressive decline of retinal post-receptoral function. Metabolic analysis revealed increases in rectal body temperature and minimum oxygen consumption in 12-13 week old homozygous Cln3(Δex7/8 mice, which were also seen to a lesser extent in heterozygous Cln3(Δex7/8 mice. Heart weight was slightly increased at 20 weeks of age, but no significant differences were observed in cardiac function in young adults. In a comprehensive blood analysis at 15-16 weeks of age, serum ferritin concentrations, mean corpuscular volume of red blood cells (MCV, and reticulocyte counts were reproducibly increased in homozygous Cln3(Δ (ex7/8 mice, and male homozygotes had a relative T-cell deficiency, suggesting alterations in hematopoiesis. Finally, consistent with findings in JNCL patients, vacuolated peripheral blood lymphocytes were observed in homozygous Cln3(Δ (ex7/8 neonates, and to a greater extent in older animals. Early onset, severe vacuolation in clear cells of the epididymis of male homozygous Cln3(Δ (ex7/8 mice was also observed. These data highlight additional organ systems in which to study CLN3 function, and early phenotypes have been established in homozygous Cln3(Δ (ex7/8 mice that merit further study for JNCL biomarker development.

  9. Software-Defined Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂华; 杨晓君; 刘淘英

    2015-01-01

    The cluster architecture has played an important role in high-end computing for the past 20 years. With the advent of Internet services, big data, and cloud computing, traditional clusters face three challenges: 1) providing flexible system balance among computing, memory, and I/O capabilities;2) reducing resource pooling overheads;and 3) addressing low performance-power efficiency. This position paper proposes a software-defined cluster (SDC) architecture to deal with these challenges. The SDC architecture inherits two features of traditional cluster: its architecture is multicomputer and it has loosely-coupled interconnect. SDC provides two new mechanisms: global I/O space (GIO) and hardware-supported native access (HNA) to remote devices. Application software can define a virtual cluster best suited to its needs from resources pools provided by a physical cluster, and traditional cluster ecosystems need no modification. We also discuss a prototype design and implementation of a 32-processor cloud server utilizing the SDC architecture.

  10. Mouse cell culture: methods and protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Elvira M. Guerra Shinohara

    2010-01-01

    The mouse is, out of any doubt, the experimental animal par excellence for many many colleagues within the scientific community, notably for those working in mammalian biology (in a broad sense, from basic genetic to modeling human diseases), starting at least from 1664 Robert Hooke experiments on air’s propertyn. Not surprising then that mouse cell cultures is a well established field of research itself and that there are several handbooks devoted to this discipline. Here, Andrew Ward ...

  11. Implementing Software Defined Radio

    CERN Document Server

    Grayver, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Software Defined Radio makes wireless communications easier, more efficient, and more reliable. This book bridges the gap between academic research and practical implementation. When beginning a project, practicing engineers, technical managers, and graduate students can save countless hours by considering the concepts presented in these pages. The author covers the myriad options and trade-offs available when selecting an appropriate hardware architecture. As demonstrated here, the choice between hardware- and software-centric architecture can mean the difference between meeting an aggressive schedule and bogging down in endless design iterations. Because of the author’s experience overseeing dozens of failed and successful developments, he is able to present many real-life examples. Some of the key concepts covered are: Choosing the right architecture for the market – laboratory, military, or commercial Hardware platforms – FPGAs, GPPs, specialized and hybrid devices Standardization efforts to ens...

  12. Defining cyber warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan D. Mladenović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyber conflicts represent a new kind of warfare that is technologically developing very rapidly. Such development results in more frequent and more intensive cyber attacks undertaken by states against adversary targets, with a wide range of diverse operations, from information operations to physical destruction of targets. Nevertheless, cyber warfare is waged through the application of the same means, techniques and methods as those used in cyber criminal, terrorism and intelligence activities. Moreover, it has a very specific nature that enables states to covertly initiate attacks against their adversaries. The starting point in defining doctrines, procedures and standards in the area of cyber warfare is determining its true nature. In this paper, a contribution to this effort was made through the analysis of the existing state doctrines and international practice in the area of cyber warfare towards the determination of its nationally acceptable definition.

  13. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2004-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  14. A rapid detection method of inbred mouse DNA genetic quality based on PCR-LDR platform%基于PCR-LDR平台的近交系小鼠遗传质量快速检测方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢雯; 鲍世民; 谢建云; 李凯; 周宇荀; 肖君华

    2012-01-01

    目的 建立基于PCR-LDR平台的近交系小鼠SNP快速分型方法,用于检测实验小鼠的遗传质量与品系纯度.方法 利用可移植性极高的PCR-LDR技术,以常见近交系小鼠为研究对象,选取了21条染色体上的45个SNP位点,分别设计引物和探针,经过筛选和验证,建立了多重PCR-LDR(polymerase chain reaction and ligase detection reaction,PCR-LDR)分型方案.结果 四组多重PCR-LDR可实现45个SNP位点的基因分型,其中43个、44个与45个SNP在样本中的检出率分别为100%、90.9%与36.4%.所有样本经分型确定为纯合体,并得到了常见近交系小鼠SNP位点信息.结论 实现了常见近交系小鼠快速、高通量的基因分型,可用于遗传质量检测和品系鉴定.%Objrctlve Purity of laboratory animals plays a critical role affecting the experimental results. The aim of this study was to validate a high-throughput genotyping platform, valuable in inbred mouse genetic DNA monitoring and strain identification. Methods Multiple polymerase chain reaction and ligase detection reaction (PCR-LDR) genotyping panels were constructed. Forty-five single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on 21 chromosomes were selected as targets, as well as specific primers and probes to these SNP were designed, respectively. A multiple PCR-LDR genotyping protocol was established. Results Forty-five SNP were successfully genotyped in four panels. The positive detection rate of 43, 44 and 45 SNPs were 100% , 90. 9% and 36. 4% , respectively. All samples collected were homozygous and their genotypes were identified by PCR-LDR. Conclusion The result9 of this study provide a rapid and high-throughput genotyping approach, which is sufficient for genetic contamination monitoring and strain identification.

  15. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells differentiate to neuron-like cells upon inhibition of BMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Monika; Prashar, Paritosh; Yadav, Prem Swaroop; Sen, Jonaki

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are a source of autologous stem cells that have the potential for undergoing differentiation into multiple cell types including neurons. Although the neuronal differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells has been studied for a long time, the molecular players involved are still not defined. Here we report that the genetic deletion of two members of the bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) family, Bmp2 and Bmp4 in mouse BMSCs causes their differentiation into cells with neuron-like morphology. Surprisingly these cells expressed certain markers characteristic of both neuronal and glial cells. Based on this observation, we inhibited BMP signaling in mouse BMSCs through a brief exposure to Noggin protein which also led to their differentiation into cells expressing both neuronal and glial markers. Such cells seem to have the potential for further differentiation into subtypes of neuronal and glial cells and thus could be utilized for cell-based therapeutic applications.

  16. Defining the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Simon; Maslin, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Time is divided by geologists according to marked shifts in Earth's state. Recent global environmental changes suggest that Earth may have entered a new human-dominated geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Should the Anthropocene - the idea that human activity is a force acting upon the Earth system in ways that mean that Earth will be altered for millions of years - be defined as a geological time-unit at the level of an Epoch? Here we appraise the data to assess such claims, first in terms of changes to the Earth system, with particular focus on very long-lived impacts, as Epochs typically last millions of years. Can Earth really be said to be in transition from one state to another? Secondly, we then consider the formal criteria used to define geological time-units and move forward through time examining whether currently available evidence passes typical geological time-unit evidence thresholds. We suggest two time periods likely fit the criteria (1) the aftermath of the interlinking of the Old and New Worlds, which moved species across continents and ocean basins worldwide, a geologically unprecedented and permanent change, which is also the globally synchronous coolest part of the Little Ice Age (in Earth system terms), and the beginning of global trade and a new socio-economic "world system" (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by a temporary drop in atmospheric CO2, centred on 1610 CE; and (2) the aftermath of the Second World War, when many global environmental changes accelerated and novel long-lived materials were increasingly manufactured, known as the Great Acceleration (in Earth system terms) and the beginning of the Cold War (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by the peak in radionuclide fallout in 1964. We finish by noting that the Anthropocene debate is politically loaded, thus transparency in the presentation of evidence is essential if a formal definition of the Anthropocene is to avoid becoming a debate about bias. The

  17. Genetic Characterization of a Novel HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF74_01B) Identified among Intravenous Drug Users in Malaysia: Recombination History and Phylogenetic Linkage with Previously Defined Recombinant Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Hui Ting; Chow, Wei Zhen; Takebe, Yutaka; Chook, Jack Bee; Chan, Kok Gan; Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed; Koh, Clayton; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2015-01-01

    In many parts of Southeast Asia, the HIV-1 epidemic has been driven by the sharing of needles and equipment among intravenous drug users (IDUs). Over the last few decades, many studies have proven time and again that the diversity of HIV-1 epidemics can often be linked to the route of infection transmission. That said, the diversity and complexity of HIV-1 molecular epidemics in the region have been increasing at an alarming rate, due in part to the high tendency of the viral RNA to recombine. This scenario was exemplified by the discovery of numerous circulating recombinant forms (CRFs), especially in Thailand and Malaysia. In this study, we characterized a novel CRF designated CRF74_01B, which was identified in six epidemiologically unlinked IDUs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The near-full length genomes were composed of CRF01_AE and subtype B', with eight breakpoints dispersed in the gag-pol and nef regions. Remarkably, this CRF shared four and two recombination hotspots with the previously described CRF33_01B and the less prevalent CRF53_01B, respectively. Genealogy-based Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of CRF74_01B genomic regions showed that it is closely related to both CRF33_01B and CRF53_01B. This observation suggests that CRF74_01B was probably a direct descendent from specific lineages of CRF33_01B, CRF53_01B and subtype B' that could have emerged in the mid-1990s. Additionally, it illustrated the active recombination processes between prevalent HIV-1 subtypes and recombinants in Malaysia. In summary, we report a novel HIV-1 genotype designated CRF74_01B among IDUs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The characterization of the novel CRF74_01B is of considerable significance towards the understanding of the genetic diversity and population dynamics of HIV-1 circulating in the region.

  18. Genetic GIScience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacquez, Geoffrey; Sabel, Clive E; Shi, Chen

    2015-01-01

    The exposome, defined as the totality of an individual's exposures over the life course, is a seminal concept in the environmental health sciences. Although inherently geographic, the exposome as yet is unfamiliar to many geographers. This article proposes a place-based synthesis, genetic...... geographic information science (genetic GIScience), that is founded on the exposome, genome+, and behavome. It provides an improved understanding of human health in relation to biology (the genome+), environmental exposures (the exposome), and their social, societal, and behavioral determinants (the behavome......). Genetic GIScience poses three key needs: first, a mathematical foundation for emergent theory; second, process-based models that bridge biological and geographic scales; third, biologically plausible estimates of space?time disease lags. Compartmental models are a possible solution; this article develops...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... musty or mouse-like odor as a side effect of excess phenylalanine in the body. Children with classic PKU tend to have lighter skin ... Success (GEMSS) MalaCards: phenylketonuria March of Dimes Montreal Children's ... Technology, and Research in Genetics Swedish Information Center for ...

  20. Bitopic Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 3 (S1P3) Antagonist Rescue from Complete Heart Block: Pharmacological and Genetic Evidence for Direct S1P3 Regulation of Mouse Cardiac Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, M. Germana; Vincent, Kevin P.; Repetto, Emanuela; Nguyen, Nhan; Brown, Steven J.; Abgaryan, Lusine; Riley, Sean W.; Leaf, Nora B.; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Kiosses, William B.; Kohno, Yasushi; Brown, Joan Heller; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular pharmacology of the G protein–coupled receptors for sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) provides important insight into established and new therapeutic targets. A new, potent bitopic S1P3 antagonist, SPM-354, with in vivo activity, has been used, together with S1P3-knockin and S1P3-knockout mice to define the spatial and functional properties of S1P3 in regulating cardiac conduction. We show that S1P3 is a key direct regulator of cardiac rhythm both in vivo and in isolated perfused hearts. 2-Amino-2-[2-(4-octylphenyl)ethyl]propane-1,3-diol in vivo and S1P in isolated hearts induced a spectrum of cardiac effects, ranging from sinus bradycardia to complete heart block, as measured by a surface electrocardiogram in anesthetized mice and in volume-conducted Langendorff preparations. The agonist effects on complete heart block are absent in S1P3-knockout mice and are reversed in wild-type mice with SPM-354, as characterized and described here. Homologous knockin of S1P3-mCherry is fully functional pharmacologically and is strongly expressed by immunohistochemistry confocal microscopy in Hyperpolarization Activated Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Potassium Channel 4 (HCN4)-positive atrioventricular node and His-Purkinje fibers, with relative less expression in the HCN4-positive sinoatrial node. In Langendorff studies, at constant pressure, SPM-354 restored sinus rhythm in S1P-induced complete heart block and fully reversed S1P-mediated bradycardia. S1P3 distribution and function in the mouse ventricular cardiac conduction system suggest a direct mechanism for heart block risk that should be further studied in humans. A richer understanding of receptor and ligand usage in the pacemaker cells of the cardiac system is likely to be useful in understanding ventricular conduction in health, disease, and pharmacology. PMID:26494861

  1. On defining dietary fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Jonathan W

    2003-02-01

    Establishing a definition for dietary fibre has historically been a balance between nutrition knowledge and analytical method capabilities. While the most widely accepted physiologically-based definitions have generally been accurate in defining the dietary fibre in foods, scientists and regulators have tended, in practice, to rely on analytical procedures as the definitional basis in fact. As a result, incongruities between theory and practice have resulted in confusion regarding the components that make up dietary fibre. In November 1998 the president of the American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC) appointed an expert scientific review committee and charged it with the task of reviewing and, if necessary, updating the definition of dietary fibre. The committee was further charged with assessing the state of analytical methodology and making recommendations relevant to the updated definition. After due deliberation, an updated definition of dietary fibre was delivered to the AACC Board of Directors for consideration and adoption (Anon, 2000; Jones 2000b). The updated definition includes the same food components as the historical working definition used for approximately 30 years (a very important point, considering that the majority of the research of the past 30 years delineating the positive health effects of dietary fibre is based on that working definition). However, the updated definition more clearly delineates the make-up of dietary fibre and its physiological functionality. As a result, relatively few changes will be necessary in analytical methodology. Current methodologies, in particular AACC-approved method of analysis 32-05 (Grami, 2000), Association of Official Analytical Chemists' official method of analysis 985.29 (Horwitz, 2000a) or AACC 32-07 (Grami, 2000) Association of Official Analytical Chemists 991.43 (Horwitz, 2000a) will continue to be sufficient and used for most foods. A small number of additional methods will be necessary to

  2. Towards a genetic definition of cancer-associated inflammation: role of the IDO pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, George C; Metz, Richard; Muller, Alexander J

    2010-05-01

    Chronic inflammation drives the development of many cancers, but a genetic definition of what constitutes 'cancer-associated' inflammation has not been determined. Recently, a mouse genetic study revealed a critical role for the immune escape mediator indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in supporting inflammatory skin carcinogenesis. IDO is generally regarded as being immunosuppressive; however, there was no discernable difference in generalized inflammatory processes in IDO-null mice under conditions where tumor development was significantly suppressed, implicating IDO as key to establishing the pathogenic state of 'cancer-associated' inflammation. Here we review recent findings and their potential implications to understanding the relationship between immune escape and inflammation in cancer. Briefly, we propose that genetic pathways of immune escape in cancer are synonymous with pathways that define 'cancer-associated' inflammation and that these processes may be identical rather than distinct, as generally presumed, in terms of their genetic definition.

  3. Mammalian developmental genetics in the twentieth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artzt, Karen

    2012-12-01

    This Perspectives is a review of the breathtaking history of mammalian genetics in the past century and, in particular, of the ways in which genetic thinking has illuminated aspects of mouse development. To illustrate the power of that thinking, selected hypothesis-driven experiments and technical advances are discussed. Also included in this account are the beginnings of mouse genetics at the Bussey Institute, Columbia University, and The Jackson Laboratory and a retrospective discussion of one of the classic problems in developmental genetics, the T/t complex and its genetic enigmas.

  4. Layer- and column-specific knockout of NMDA receptors in pyramidal neurons of the mouse barrel cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Aronoff

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Viral vectors injected into the mouse brain offer the possibility for localized genetic modifications in a highly controlled manner. Lentivector injection into mouse neocortex transduces cells within a diameter of approximately 200µm, which closely matches the lateral scale of a column in barrel cortex. The depth and volume of the injection determines which cortical layer is transduced. Furthermore, transduced gene expression from the lentivector can be limited to predominantly pyramidal neurons by using a 1.3kb fragment of the αCaMKII promoter. This technique therefore allows genetic manipulation of a specific cell type in defined columns and layers of the neocortex. By expressing Cre recombinase from such a lentivector in gene-targeted mice carrying a floxed gene, highly specific genetic lesions can be induced. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this approach by specifically knocking out NMDA receptors (NMDARs in pyramidal neurons in the somatosensory barrel cortex of gene-targeted mice carrying floxed NMDAR 1 genes. Neurons transduced with lentivector encoding GFP and Cre recombinase exhibit not only reductions in NMDAR 1 mRNA levels, but reduced NMDAR-dependent currents and pairing-induced synaptic potentiation. This technique for knockout of NMDARs in a cell type, column- and layer-specific manner in the mouse somatosensory cortex may help further our understanding of the functional roles of NMDARs in vivo during sensory perception and learning.

  5. Mouse models of NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia: biological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportoletti, P; Varasano, E; Rossi, R; Mupo, A; Tiacci, E; Vassiliou, G; Martelli, M P; Falini, B

    2015-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) carrying nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutations displays distinct biological and clinical features that led to its inclusion as a provisional disease entity in the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of myeloid neoplasms. Studies of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of NPM1-mutated AML have benefited greatly from several mouse models of this leukemia developed over the past few years. Immunocompromised mice xenografted with NPM1-mutated AML served as the first valuable tool for defining the biology of the disease in vivo. Subsequently, genetically engineered mouse models of the NPM1 mutation, including transgenic and knock-in alleles, allowed the generation of mice with a constant genotype and a reproducible phenotype. These models have been critical for investigating the nature of the molecular effects of these mutations, defining the function of leukemic stem cells in NPM1-mutated AML, identifying chemoresistant preleukemic hemopoietic stem cells and unraveling the key molecular events that cooperate with NPM1 mutations to induce AML in vivo. Moreover, they can serve as a platform for the discovery and validation of new antileukemic drugs in vivo. Advances derived from the analysis of these mouse models promise to greatly accelerate the development of new molecularly targeted therapies for patients with NPM1-mutated AML.

  6. Hyperhomocysteinemia: genetic determinants and selected mouse models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilfix, Brian M

    2003-01-01

    .... Although severe hyperhomocysteinemia is found in a number of inborn errors of metabolism, mild hyperhomocysteinemia is of concern because of its prevalence in the general population and its effect...

  7. Ink4a/Arf −/− and HRAS(G12V) transform mouse mammary cells into triple-negative breast cancer containing tumorigenic CD49f− quiescent cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kai, Kazuharu; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Arima, Yoshimi; Takamoto, Yayoi; Ohnishi, Nobuyuki; Bartholomeusz, Chandra; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Pusztai, Lajos; Saya, Hideyuki; Ueno, Naoto T.

    2013-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity within individual breast tumors is a well-known phenomenon that may contribute to drug resistance. This heterogeneity is dependent on several factors, such as types of oncogenic drivers and tumor precursor cells. The purpose of our study was to engineer a mouse mammary tumor model with intratumoral heterogeneity by using defined genetic perturbations. To achieve this, we used mice with knockout (−/−) of Ink4a/Arf, a tumor suppressor locus; these mice are known to be...

  8. An encyclopedia of mouse genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, M; Hillier, L; Kucaba, T; Allen, M; Barstead, R; Beck, C; Blistain, A; Bonaldo, M; Bowers, Y; Bowles, L; Cardenas, M; Chamberlain, A; Chappell, J; Clifton, S; Favello, A; Geisel, S; Gibbons, M; Harvey, N; Hill, F; Jackson, Y; Kohn, S; Lennon, G; Mardis, E; Martin, J; Mila, L; McCann, R; Morales, R; Pape, D; Person, B; Prange, C; Ritter, E; Soares, M; Schurk, R; Shin, T; Steptoe, M; Swaller, T; Theising, B; Underwood, K; Wylie, T; Yount, T; Wilson, R; Waterston, R

    1999-02-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier model system for studies of mammalian development due to the powerful classical genetic analysis possible (see also the Jackson Laboratory web site, http://www.jax.org/) and the ever-expanding collection of molecular tools. To enhance the utility of the mouse system, we initiated a program to generate a large database of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that can provide rapid access to genes. Of particular significance was the possibility that cDNA libraries could be prepared from very early stages of development, a situation unrealized in human EST projects. We report here the development of a comprehensive database of ESTs for the mouse. The project, initiated in March 1996, has focused on 5' end sequences from directionally cloned, oligo-dT primed cDNA libraries. As of 23 October 1998, 352,040 sequences had been generated, annotated and deposited in dbEST, where they comprised 93% of the total ESTs available for mouse. EST data are versatile and have been applied to gene identification, comparative sequence analysis, comparative gene mapping and candidate disease gene identification, genome sequence annotation, microarray development and the development of gene-based map resources.

  9. Use of an intron length polymorphism to localize the tropoelastin gene to mouse Chromosome 5 in a region of linkage conservation with human Chromosome 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wydner, K.S.; Passmore, H.C. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sechler, J.L.; Boyd, C.D. [UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The complete coding sequence for mouse tropoelastin was obtained from overlapping reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplimers. These cDNA fragments were derived from mouse tropoelastin mRNA using PCR oligomers complementary to conserved domains within rat tropoelastin mRNA. A comparison of coding domains of mouse and rat tropoelastin mRNA revealed a greater than 93% homology at the nucleotide level and over 96% similarity in the predicted amino acid sequence. PCR primers complementary to regions of the mouse tropoelastin mRNA were used to define a novel intron length polymorphism (ILP) within intron 8 of the mouse tropoelastin gene (Eln). This ILP proved to be informative in an intraspecific backcross in which genomic DNA samples from 75 backcross mice were used to map the tropoelastin gene to a position in the distal half of mouse chromosome 5. The linkage and genetic distances between Eln and the closest molecular markers used in this study are centromere-D5Mit95, D5Mit96-6.7 cM-Gus, Eln-4.0 cM-Zp3-telomere.

  10. The dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 induces tumor regression in a genetically engineered mouse model of PIK3CA wild-type colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin Roper

    Full Text Available To examine the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 in treatment of PIK3CA wild-type colorectal cancer (CRC.PIK3CA mutant and wild-type human CRC cell lines were treated in vitro with NVP-BEZ235, and the resulting effects on proliferation, apoptosis, and signaling were assessed. Colonic tumors from a genetically engineered mouse (GEM model for sporadic wild-type PIK3CA CRC were treated in vivo with NVP-BEZ235. The resulting effects on macroscopic tumor growth/regression, proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and signaling were examined.In vitro treatment of CRC cell lines with NVP-BEZ235 resulted in transient PI3K blockade, sustained decreases in mTORC1/mTORC2 signaling, and a corresponding decrease in cell viability (median IC(50 = 9.0-14.3 nM. Similar effects were seen in paired isogenic CRC cell lines that differed only in the presence or absence of an activating PIK3CA mutant allele. In vivo treatment of colonic tumor-bearing mice with NVP-BEZ235 resulted in transient PI3K inhibition and sustained blockade of mTORC1/mTORC2 signaling. Longitudinal tumor surveillance by optical colonoscopy demonstrated a 97% increase in tumor size in control mice (p = 0.01 vs. a 43% decrease (p = 0.008 in treated mice. Ex vivo analysis of the NVP-BEZ235-treated tumors demonstrated a 56% decrease in proliferation (p = 0.003, no effects on apoptosis, and a 75% reduction in angiogenesis (p = 0.013.These studies provide the preclinical rationale for studies examining the efficacy of the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 in treatment of PIK3CA wild-type CRC.

  11. Contemporary approaches for modifying the mouse genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David J.; van der Weyden, Louise

    2008-01-01

    The mouse is a premiere experimental organism that has contributed significantly to our understanding of vertebrate biology. Manipulation of the mouse genome via embryonic stem (ES) cell technology makes it possible to engineer an almost limitless repertoire of mutations to model human disease and assess gene function. In this review we outline recent advances in mouse experimental genetics and provide a “how-to” guide for those people wishing to access this technology. We also discuss new technologies, such as transposon-mediated mutagenesis, and resources of targeting vectors and ES cells, which are likely to dramatically accelerate the pace with which we can assess gene function in vivo, and the progress of forward and reverse genetic screens in mice. PMID:18559964

  12. Mouse polyoma virus and adenovirus replication in mouse cells temperature-sensitive in DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinin, R; Fabbro, J; Dubsky, M

    1985-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus multiplies, apparently without impediment, in temperature-inactivated ts A1S9, tsC1 and ts2 mouse fibroblasts. Thus, the DNA of mouse adenovirus can replicate in the absence of functional DNA topoisomerase II, a DNA-chain-elongation factor, and a protein required for traverse of the G1/S interface, respectively, encoded in the ts A1S9, tsC1 and ts2 genetic loci. These results are compared with those obtained with polyoma virus.

  13. Progress of gene targeting in mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Gene targeting is a powerful approach of study- ing the genefunction in vivo. Specific genetic modifications, including simple gene disruption, point mutations, large chromosomal deletions and rearrangements, targeted incor- poration of foreign genes, could be introduced into the mouse genome by gene targeting. Recent studies make it possible to do the gene targeting with temporal and spatial control.

  14. Time course of cytokine upregulation in the lacrimal gland and presence of autoantibodies in a predisposed mouse model of Sjögren's Syndrome: the influence of sex hormones and genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Stefanie; Mostafa, Safinaz; Rowan, Vanessa Seamon; Azzarolo, Ana Maria

    2014-11-01

    expression of IL-1β and IL-4 was observed only at later experimental time points in the lacrimal glands of OVX C57BL/10 mice, while no significant changes in the expression of TNF-α and IL-10 were seen at any experimental times in this group. No significant differences were observed in the levels of the cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-4, and IL-10 in the lacrimal glands of the OVX C57BL/10 mice at any of the experimental times studied compared to the sham-operated group. IFN-γ was not detected in either mouse strains at the level of mRNA and protein. OVX in the NOD.B10.H2(b) mice also caused an increase in the levels of anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies in the serum only, while no anti-La/SSB autoantibodies were found in the serum or lacrimal gland supernatants. Physiological doses of E2 or DHT at time of OVX prevented the upregulation of cytokines and the presence of anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies in these animals. These results showed that a decrease in the concentrations of ovarian hormones in the genetically predisposed mice accelerated the onset of the disease by upregulating various pro-inflammatory cytokines at different time points and promoting the formation of anti-Ro/SSA serum autoantibodies, creating an environment favorable for the initiation of SS.

  15. A resposta oxidativa em corações de camundongos é modulada por background genético The oxidative response of mouse hearts is modulated by genetic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Santos-Silva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: o tabagismo apresenta importante papel sobre as doenças cardiovasculares, entretanto permanecem pouco compreendidos os motivos pelos quais alguns seres humanos as desenvolvem e outros não. OBJETIVO: nosso objetivo foi analisar o perfil redox do coração de diferentes linhagens de camundongos após exposição à fumaça de cigarro. MÉTODOS: camundongos machos suíços (n = 10, C3H (n = 10, BALB/c (n = 10 e C57BL/6 (n = 10 foram expostos à fumaça de cigarro (12 cigarros/dia, enquanto os respectivos controles (n = 10 ao ar ambiente por 60 dias. Após sacrifício, o coração foi retirado para análises bioquímicas. RESULTADOS: embora o conteúdo de malondialdeído não tenha aumentado em nenhum grupo, a atividade da catalase diminuiu no grupo suíço (p BACKGROUND: Smoking plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases. However, the reasons why some individuals develop those diseases and others do not remain to be explained. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at assessing the redox profile of the heart of different mouse strains after exposure to cigarette smoke. METHODS: Male mice of the Swiss (n = 10, C3H (n = 10, BALB/c (n = 10 and C57BL/6 (n = 10 strains were exposed to cigarette smoke (12 cigarettes/day, while their respective controls (n = 10 were exposed to ambient air for 60 days. After being euthanized, their heart was removed for biochemical analyses. RESULTS: Although the malondialdehyde content did not increase in any of the groups, catalase activity decreased in the Swiss (p < 0.05 and BALB/c (p < 0.05 strain mice as compared with their respective control groups, while myeloperoxidase decreased in the C3H (p < 0.05 and C57BL/6 (p < 0.001 strain mice as compared with their respective control groups. The reduced glutathione content decreased in the Swiss, C3H, C57BL/6 (p < 0.05 and BALB/c (p < 0,001 strain mice as compared with their respective control groups. Regarding reduced glutathione content, an increase was

  16. Prenatal screening and genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alderson, P; Aro, A R; Dragonas, T

    2001-01-01

    Although the term 'genetic screening' has been used for decades, this paper discusses how, in its most precise meaning, genetic screening has not yet been widely introduced. 'Prenatal screening' is often confused with 'genetic screening'. As we show, these terms have different meanings, and we...... examine definitions of the relevant concepts in order to illustrate this point. The concepts are i) prenatal, ii) genetic screening, iii) screening, scanning and testing, iv) maternal and foetal tests, v) test techniques and vi) genetic conditions. So far, prenatal screening has little connection...... with precisely defined genetics. There are benefits but also disadvantages in overstating current links between them in the term genetic screening. Policy making and professional and public understandings about screening could be clarified if the distinct meanings of prenatal screening and genetic screening were...

  17. Human/mouse homology relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBry, R.W.; Seldin, M.F. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Conservation of genomic organization in different mammalian species has long been recognized, but only recently has it been possible to examine these relationships systematically on a genome-wide scale in some detail. Mapping of several mammalian species in progressing rapidly, but by far the most detailed information is still to be found in the human and mouse databases. Perhaps the most important aspect of recent progress in genome mapping data. With mapping databases continuing to expand at a greater than linear rate, any attempt at a comprehensive comparative map is doomed to be out of date by the time it is published. However, we feel that it is valuable to provide a summary that is as nearly up to date as possible. We have made a particular effort to include recent human physical mapping data and to identify those mouse genes that have been well-mapped with respect to each other by virtue of having been examined in the same cross. As the human-mouse comparative map becomes more dense, it is not surprising that the observed number of conserved linkage groups continues to increase. Nadeau et al. placed 425 loci on both maps, which delineated over 100 conserved linkage groups. Copeland et al. put a total of 917 markers on both the human and the mouse maps, marking 101 segments of conserved linkage groups. In the present summary, we have placed 1416 loci, and these define at least 181 different conserved linkage groups. 47 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Elizabeth Hijona; Angel Cosme; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies ranking 4th among cancer-related death in the western world and in the United States,and potent therapeutic options are lacking.Although during the last few years there have been important advances in the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer,currently specific mechanisms of treatment resistance remain poorly understood and new effective systemic drugs need to be developed and probed.In vivo models to study pancreatic cancer and approach this issue remain limited and present different molecular features that must be considered in the studies depending on the purpose to fit special research themes.In the last few years,several genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed.These models mimic the disease as they reproduce genetic alterations implicated in the progression of pancreatic cancer.Genetic alterations such as activating mutations in KRas,or TGFb and/or inactivation of tumoral suppressors such as p53,INK4A/ARF BRCA2 and Smad4 are the most common drivers to pancreatic carcinogenesis and have been used to create transgenic mice.These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes,from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to lesions that progress histologically culminating in fully invasive and metastatic disease and represent the most useful preclinical model system.These models can characterize the cellular and molecular pathology of pan