WorldWideScience

Sample records for genetic transduction

  1. Genetics of auditory mechano-electrical transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Nicolas; Petit, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The hair bundles of cochlear hair cells play a central role in the auditory mechano-electrical transduction (MET) process. The identification of MET components and of associated molecular complexes by biochemical approaches is impeded by the very small number of hair cells within the cochlea. In contrast, human and mouse genetics have proven to be particularly powerful. The study of inherited forms of deafness led to the discovery of several essential proteins of the MET machinery, which are currently used as entry points to decipher the associated molecular networks. Notably, MET relies not only on the MET machinery but also on several elements ensuring the proper sound-induced oscillation of the hair bundle or the ionic environment necessary to drive the MET current. Here, we review the most significant advances in the molecular bases of the MET process that emerged from the genetics of hearing.

  2. Genetic analysis of gravity signal transduction in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Baldwin, Katherine

    To grow downward into the soil, roots use gravity as a guide. Specialized cells, named stato-cytes, enable this directional growth response by perceiving gravity. Located in the columella region of the cap, these cells sense a reorientation of the root within the gravity field through the sedimentation of, and/or tension/pressure exerted by, dense amyloplasts. This process trig-gers a gravity signal transduction pathway that leads to a fast alkalinization of the cytoplasm and a change in the distribution of the plasma membrane-associated auxin-efflux carrier PIN3. The latter protein is uniformly distributed within the plasma membrane on all sides of the cell in vertically oriented roots. However, it quickly accumulates at the bottom side upon gravis-timulation. This process correlates with a preferential transport of auxin to the bottom side of the root cap, resulting in a lateral gradient across the tip. This gradient is then transported to the elongation zone where it promotes differential cellular elongation, resulting in downward curvature. We isolated mutations that affect gravity signal transduction at a step that pre-cedes cytoplasmic alkalinization and/or PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport across the cap. arg1 and arl2 mutations identify a common genetic pathway that is needed for all three gravity-induced processes in the cap statocytes, indicating these genes function early in the pathway. On the other hand, adk1 affects gravity-induced PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport, but it does not interfere with cytoplasmic alkalinization. ARG1 and ARL2 encode J-domain proteins that are associated with membranes of the vesicular trafficking path-way whereas ADK1 encodes adenosine kinase, an enzyme that converts adenosine derived from nucleic acid metabolism and the AdoMet cycle into AMP, thereby alleviating feedback inhibi-tion of this important methyl-donor cycle. Because mutations in ARG1 (and ARL2) do not completely eliminate

  3. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Barker, Richard; Su, Shih-Heng

    Like most other plant organs, roots use gravity as a directional guide for growth. Specialized cells within the columella region of the root cap (the statocytes) sense the direction of gravity through the sedimentation of starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts). Amyloplast movement and/or pressure on sensitive membranes triggers a gravity signal transduction pathway within these cells, which leads to a fast transcytotic relocalization of plasma-membrane associated auxin-efflux carrier proteins of the PIN family (PIN3 and PIN7) toward the bottom membrane. This leads to a polar transport of auxin toward the bottom flank of the cap. The resulting lateral auxin gradient is then transmitted toward the elongation zones where it triggers a curvature that ultimately leads to a restoration of vertical downward growth. Our laboratory is using strategies derived from genetics and systems biology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that modulate gravity sensing and signal transduction in the columella cells of the root cap. Our previous research uncovered two J-domain-containing proteins, ARG1 and ARL2, as contributing to this process. Mutations in the corresponding paralogous genes led to alterations of root and hypocotyl gravitropism accompanied by an inability for the statocytes to develop a cytoplasmic alkalinization, relocalize PIN3, and transport auxin laterally, in response to gravistimulation. Both proteins are associated peripherally to membranes belonging to various compartments of the vesicular trafficking pathway, potentially modulating the trafficking of defined proteins between plasma membrane and endosomes. MAR1 and MAR2, on the other end, are distinct proteins of the plastidic outer envelope protein import TOC complex (the transmembrane channel TOC75 and the receptor TOC132, respectively). Mutations in the corresponding genes enhance the gravitropic defects of arg1. Using transformation-rescue experiments with truncated versions of TOC132 (MAR2), we have shown

  4. Genetic Basis of Ethylene Perception and Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziqiang Zhu; Hongwei Guo

    2008-01-01

    Ethylene is a simple gaseous hormone in plants. It plays important roles in plant development and stress tolerance. In the presence of ethylene treatment, all ethylene receptors are in an activated form, which can physically interact with CTR1 and consequently recruit CTR1 protein to endoplasmic reticulum membrane to activate it. Activated CTR1 suppresses the downstream signal transduction by an unknown mechanism. Upon binding to its receptors, ethylene will inactivate the receptor/CTR1 module and in turn alleviate their inhibitory effect on two positive regulators acting downstream of CTRI: EIN2 and EIN3. Genetic study reveals that EIN2 is an essential component in the ethylene signaling pathway but its biochemical function remains a mystery. EIN3 is a plant-specific transcription factor and its protein abundance in the nucleus is rapidly induced upon ethylene treatment. In the absence of ethylene signal, EIN3 protein is degraded by an SCF complex containing one of the two F-box proteins EBF1/EBF2 in a 26S proteasome-dependent manner. EIN3 can bind to the promoter sequences of a number of downstream components, such as ERFs, which in turn bind to a GCC box,a cis-element found in many ethylene-regulated defense genes. Ethylene has been shown to also regulate many other hormones' signaling pathways including auxin, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid, implying the existence of complicated signaling networks in the growth, development and defense responses of various plants.

  5. Retroviral Transduction of Helper T Cells as a Genetic Approach to Study Mechanisms Controlling their Differentiation and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yogesh; Garden, Oliver A.; Lang, Florian; Cobb, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Helper T cell development and function must be tightly regulated to induce an appropriate immune response that eliminates specific pathogens yet prevents autoimmunity. Many approaches involving different model organisms have been utilized to understand the mechanisms controlling helper T cell development and function. However, studies using mouse models have proven to be highly informative due to the availability of genetic, cellular, and biochemical systems. One genetic approach in mice used by many labs involves retroviral transduction of primary helper T cells. This is a powerful approach due to its relative ease, making it accessible to almost any laboratory with basic skills in molecular biology and immunology. Therefore, multiple genes in wild type or mutant forms can readily be tested for function in helper T cells to understand their importance and mechanisms of action. We have optimized this approach and describe here the protocols for production of high titer retroviruses, isolation of primary murine helper T cells, and their transduction by retroviruses and differentiation toward the different helper subsets. Finally, the use of this approach is described in uncovering mechanisms utilized by microRNAs (miRNAs) to regulate pathways controlling helper T cell development and function. PMID:27842353

  6. Use of two-component signal transduction systems in the construction of synthetic genetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninfa, Alexander J

    2010-04-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are a common type of signaling system in prokaryotes; the typical cell has dozens of systems regulating aspects of physiology and controlling responses to environmental conditions. In this review, I consider how these systems may be useful for engineering novel cell functions. Examples of successful incorporation of two-component systems into engineered systems are noted, and features of the systems that favor or hinder potential future use of these signaling systems for synthetic biology applications are discussed. The focus will be on the engineering of novel couplings of sensory functions to signaling outputs. Recent successes in this area are noted, such as the development of light-sensitive transmitter proteins and chemotactic receptors responsive to nitrate. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Genetics of Signal Transduction and the Feto-Maternal Relationship. A Study of Cytosolic Low Molecular Weight Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottini, E.; Cosmi, E.; Nicotra, M.; Santeusanio, G.; La Torre, M.; Bottini, N.; Lucarini, N.

    1998-01-01

    Intracellular kinases mediate positive signalling from surface receptors by phosphorylating critical target proteins whereas phosphatases inhibit this process. Differential phosphatase activity at the feto-maternal interface could determine the appropriate relative growth and development on each side of the placenta. The highly polymorphic cytosolic low molecular weight phosphotyrosine-phosphatase (ACP1-cLMWPTPase) has been studied in 170 women who had at least two consecutive spontaneous abortions along with their husbands and in 352 normal puerperae along with their newborn babies. Symmetry analysis of joint wife/husband and mother/infant distribution suggests that when ACP1 activity is lower in the mother than in either her aborted fetus or her child, the probability of abortion is higher and the survival to term is lower as compared to pairs in which the ACP1 activity is higher in the mother than in her fetus. Further analysis has shown that the effect is due to S isoform: i.e. a high mother/fetus S isoform ratio favours intrauterine survival. Analysis of gestational duration and birth weight suggests that a high ACP1 maternal activity coupled with a low or moderate fetal activity favour fetal growth and developmental maturation. The present data indicate that maternal-fetal genetic differences in signal transduction could contribute significantly to variability of intrauterine developmental parameters and to pathological manifestation of pregnancy. PMID:10427472

  8. Energy transduction in Escherichia coli. Genetic alteration of a membrane polypeptide of the (Ca2+,Mg2+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, R D; Shandell, A

    1975-12-25

    Recent genetic analyses of the membrane components involved in energy transduction in Escherichia coli have concentrated on the (Ca2+, Mg2+)-ATPase complex (EC 3.6.1.3). Many mutants have been described with altered biochemical properties and defects in energy-requiring processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, transhydrogenase activity, and active transport of several solutes. This report describes the isolation of a mutant strain of E. coli that is defective in several energy-requiring processes. The strain BG-31 was obtained by "localized mutagenesis" using phage P1c1. The mutation maps at approximately 73.5 min on the E. coli chromosome. Reversion and suppression analyses indicate that the defect is the result of a single amber mutation. This strain is unable to utilize succinate, D-lactate, or malate for growth. Mutant cells are unable to couple the energy derived from the hydrolysis of ATP to the active transport of proline, although coupling of energy derived from electron transport to solute transport appears normal when examined in both cells and isolated membrane vesicles. Isolated membranes of the mutant are unable to couple the energy derived from the hydrolysis of ATP to transhydrogenase activity while they can utilize the energy generated from electron transport to drive transhydrogenase activity. Extracts of strain BG-31 have normal levels of (Ca2+, Mg2+)-ATPase activity. The ATPase portion of the complex, bacterial F1 (BF1), is poorly attached to the membrane portion of the complex. In vitro reconstitution of transhydrogenase activity with stripped membrane fractions and crude preparations of BF1 localize the defect in strain BG-31 to the membrane portion of the complex. Analysis of membranes of the strain BG-31 by acrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate demonstrate the absence of a single polypeptide of molecular weight about 54,000 and the appearance of a new polypeptide of lower molecular weight, about 25

  9. Genetic analysis of the functions and interactions of components of the LevQRST signal transduction complex of Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zeng

    Full Text Available Transcription of the genes for a fructan hydrolase (fruA and a fructose/mannose sugar:phosphotransferase permease (levDEFG in Streptococcus mutans is activated by a four-component regulatory system consisting of a histidine kinase (LevS, a response regulator (LevR and two carbohydrate-binding proteins (LevQT. The expression of the fruA and levD operons was at baseline in a levQ mutant and substantially decreased in a levT null mutant, with lower expression with the cognate inducers fructose or mannose, but slightly higher expression in glucose or galactose. A strain expressing levQ with two point mutations (E170A/F292S did not require inducers to activate gene expression and displayed altered levD expression when growing on various carbohydrates, including cellobiose. Linker-scanning (LS mutagenesis was used to generate three libraries of mutants of levQ, levS and levT that displayed various levels of altered substrate specificity and of fruA/levD gene expression. The data support that LevQ and LevT are intimately involved in the sensing of carbohydrate signals, and that LevQ appears to be required for the integrity of the signal transduction complex, apparently by interacting with the sensor kinase LevS.

  10. Systems genetics of the nuclear factor-κB signal transduction network. I. Detection of several quantitative trait loci potentially relevant to aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, Vincent P; Curran, Joanne E; Charlesworth, Jac; Peralta, Juan M; Voruganti, V Saroja; Cole, Shelley A; Dyer, Thomas D; Johnson, Matthew P; Moses, Eric K; Göring, Harald H H; Williams, Jeff T; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Williams-Blangero, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    A theory of aging holds that senescence is caused by a dysregulated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signal transduction network (STN). We adopted a systems genetics approach in our study of the NF-κB STN. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) was used to identify gene/gene product interactions between NF-κB and the genes in our transcriptional profiling array. Principal components factor analysis (PCFA) was performed on a sub-network of 19 genes, including two initiators of the toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) and TIR (Toll/interleukin-1 receptor)-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF). TLR pathways are either MyD88-dependent or TRIF-dependent. Therefore, we also performed PCFA on a subset excluding the MyD88 transcript, and on another subset excluding two TRIF transcripts. Using linkage analysis we found that each set gave rise to at least one factor with a logarithm of the odds (LOD) score greater than 3, two on chromosome 15 at 15q12 and 15q22.2, and another two on chromosome 17 at 17p13.3 and 17q25.3. We also found several suggestive signals (2

  11. SENTRA, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, M.; Romine, M. F.; Maltsev, N.; Mathematics and Computer Science; PNNL

    2000-01-01

    SENTRA, available via URL http://wit.mcs.anl.gov/WIT2/Sentra/, is a database of proteins associated with microbial signal transduction. The database currently includes the classical two-component signal transduction pathway proteins and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, but will be expanded to also include other classes of signal transduction systems that are modulated by phosphorylation or methylation reactions. Although the majority of database entries are from prokaryotic systems, eukaroytic proteins with bacterial-like signal transduction domains are also included. Currently SENTRA contains signal transduction proteins in 34 complete and almost completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, as well as sequences from 243 organisms available in public databases (SWISS-PROT and EMBL). The analysis was carried out within the framework of the WIT2 system, which is designed and implemented to support genetic sequence analysis and comparative analysis of sequenced genomes.

  12. Gibberellin Signal Transduction in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-Min Fan; Xiaoyan Feng; Yu Wang; Xing Wang Deng

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, significant knowledge has accumulated regarding gibberellin (GA) signal transduction in rice as a result of studies using multiple approaches, particularly molecular genetics. The present review highlights the recent developments in the identification of GA signaling pathway components, the discovery of GA-induced destruction of GA signaling represser (DELLA protein), and the possible mechanism underlying the regulation of GA-responsive gene expression in rice.

  13. Sensory Transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Austin L.; Ramot, Daniel; Goodman, Miriam B.

    The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has a well-defined and comparatively simple repertoire of sensory-guided behaviors, all of which rely on its ability to detect chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. In this chapter, we review what is known about the ion channels that mediate sensation in this remarkable model organism. Genetic screens for mutants defective in sensory-guided behaviors have identified genes encoding channel proteins, which are likely transducers of chemical, thermal, and mechanical stimuli. Such classical genetic approaches are now being coupled with molecular genetics and in vivo cellular physiology to elucidate how these channels are activated in specific sensory neurons. The ion channel superfamilies implicated in sensory transduction in C. elegans - CNG, TRP, and DEG/ENaC - are conserved across phyla and also appear to contribute to sensory transduction in other organisms, including vertebrates. What we learn about the role of these ion channels in C. elegans sensation is likely to illuminate analogous processes in other animals, including humans.

  14. Quantitation of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, S; Brand, M D

    2000-12-01

    Conventional qualitative approaches to signal transduction provide powerful ways to explore the architecture and function of signaling pathways. However, at the level of the complete system, they do not fully depict the interactions between signaling and metabolic pathways and fail to give a manageable overview of the complexity that is often a feature of cellular signal transduction. Here, we introduce a quantitative experimental approach to signal transduction that helps to overcome these difficulties. We present a quantitative analysis of signal transduction during early mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes, with steady-state respiration rate as a convenient marker of metabolic stimulation. First, by inhibiting various key signaling pathways, we measure their relative importance in regulating respiration. About 80% of the input signal is conveyed via identifiable routes: 50% through pathways sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C and MAP kinase and 30% through pathways sensitive to an inhibitor of calcineurin. Second, we quantify how each of these pathways differentially stimulates functional units of reactions that produce and consume a key intermediate in respiration: the mitochondrial membrane potential. Both the PKC and calcineurin routes stimulate consumption more strongly than production, whereas the unidentified signaling routes stimulate production more than consumption, leading to no change in membrane potential despite increased respiration rate. The approach allows a quantitative description of the relative importance of signal transduction pathways and the routes by which they activate a specific cellular process. It should be widely applicable.

  15. Transductive Ordinal Regression

    CERN Document Server

    Seah, Chun-Wei; Ong, Yew-Soon

    2011-01-01

    Ordinal regression is commonly formulated as a multi-class problem with ordinal constraints. The challenge of designing accurate classifiers for ordinal regression generally increases with the number of classes involved, due to the large number of labeled patterns that are needed. The availability of ordinal class labels, however, are often costly to calibrate or difficult to obtain. Unlabeled patterns, on the other hand, often exist in much greater abundance and are freely available. To take benefits from the abundance of unlabeled patterns, we present a novel transductive learning paradigm for ordinal regression in this paper, namely Transductive Ordinal Regression (TOR). The key challenge of the present study lies in the precise estimation of both the ordinal class label of the unlabeled data and the decision functions of the ordinal classes, simultaneously. The core elements of the proposed TOR include an objective function that caters to several commonly used loss functions casted in transductive setting...

  16. Integrins mediating bone signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Chuanglong; WANG Yuanliang; YANG Lihua; ZHANG Jun

    2004-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesions play critical roles in diverse cell functions. Integrins offers a platform on which mechanical stimuli, cytoskeletal organization, biochemical signals can concentrate. Mechanical stimuli transmitted by integrins influence the cytoskeleton, in turn, the cytoskeleton influences cell adhesion via integrins, then cell adhesion results in a series of signal transduction cascades. In skeleton, integrins also have a key role for bone resoption by osteoclasts and reformation by osteoblasts. In present review, the proteins involved in integrin signal transduction and integrin signal transduction pathways were discussed, mainly on the basic mechanisms of integrin signaling and the roles of integrins in bone signal transduction, which may give insight into new therapeutic agents to all kinds of skeletal diseases and new strategies for bone tissue engineering.

  17. Molecular basis of mechanosensory transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Peter G.; Walker, Richard G.

    2001-09-01

    Mechanotransduction - a cell's conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal - reveals vital features of an organism's environment. From hair cells and skin mechanoreceptors in vertebrates, to bristle receptors in flies and touch receptors in worms, mechanically sensitive cells are essential in the life of an organism. The scarcity of these cells and the uniqueness of their transduction mechanisms have conspired to slow molecular characterization of the ensembles that carry out mechanotransduction. But recent progress in both invertebrates and vertebrates is beginning to reveal the identities of proteins essential for transduction.

  18. Meeting Report: Teaching Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, IJsbrand; Thomas, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    In July, 2005, the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology at the campus of the University of Bordeaux, France, hosted a focused week of seminars, workshops, and discussions around the theme of "teaching signal transduction." The purpose of the summer school was to offer both junior and senior university instructors a chance to reflect on the…

  19. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  20. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies.

  1. Polylysine modification of adenoviral fiber protein enhances muscle cell transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouri, K; Feero, W G; Myerburg, M M; Wickham, T J; Kovesdi, I; Hoffman, E P; Clemens, P R

    1999-07-01

    Adenoviral vectors (ADVs) are used widely for gene delivery to different tissues including muscle. One particularly promising use for ADVs is in the transfer of the dystrophin gene to the muscle of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, studies in different animal models of DMD suggest that ADVs inefficiently transduce mature skeletal muscle. In this article we test whether AdZ.F(pK7), a genetically modified ADV that expresses a polylysine moiety on the end of the fiber protein, could enhance transduction of muscle cells and circumvent the maturation-dependent loss of muscle infectivity by ADVs. The efficiency of transduction was tested at different levels of muscle maturation. In vitro, AdZ.F(pK7) showed a higher level of transduction at all stages of differentiation including myoblasts, myotubes, and single muscle fibers. In vivo, mature skeletal muscle was transduced fourfold better by AdZ.F(pK7) than by the unmodifled vector (AdZ.F). Together, these observations demonstrate improved ADV transduction of skeletal muscle by modifying ADV tropism, and provide a proof-of-principle that modification of ADVs to target muscle-specific molecules could result in tissue-specific transfer of skeletal muscle tissue as well.

  2. The psychobiology of mind-body communication: the complex, self-organizing field of information transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, E L

    1996-01-01

    The current information revolution in molecular biology has important implications for an new understanding of the phenomenology of mind, memory and behavior as a complex, self-organizing field of information transduction. This paper traces the pathways of information transduction in life processes from the molecular-genetic level to the dynamics of mind and behavior together with suggestions for future research exploring the psychobiology of mind-body communication and its implications for the psychotherapeutic arts of the future.

  3. Cellular semiotics and signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2007-01-01

    to the processes of sign interpretation and transmission between organisms of the same or different species). In Biosemiotics it is customary to recognise the cell as the most elementary integration unit for semiosis. Therefore intra and intercellular communication constitute the departure point for the study......Semiosis, the processes of production, communication and interpretation of signs - coding and de-coding - takes place within and between organisms. The term "endosemiosis" refers to the processes of interpretation and sign transmission inside an organism (as opposed to "exosemiosis", which refers...... considering semiotic logic in order to construct our understanding of living phenomena. Given the central integrating role of signal transduction in physiological and ecological studies, this chapter outlines its semiotic implications. The multi-modality and modularity of signal molecules and relative...

  4. Architectures and representations for string transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrupala, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    String transduction problems are ubiquitous in natural language processing: they include transliteration, grapheme-to-phoneme conversion, text normalization and translation. String transduction can be reduced to the simpler problems of sequence labeling by expressing the target string as a sequence

  5. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B;

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long...

  6. Sentra, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltsev, N.; Marland, E.; Yu, G. X.; Bhatnagar, S.; Lusk, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2002-01-01

    Sentra (http://www-wit.mcs.anl.gov/sentra) is a database of signal transduction proteins with the emphasis on microbial signal transduction. The database was updated to include classes of signal transduction systems modulated by either phosphorylation or methylation reactions such as PAS proteins and serine/threonine kinases, as well as the classical two-component histidine kinases and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Currently, Sentra contains signal transduction proteins from 43 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes as well as sequences from SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL. Signal transduction proteins are annotated with information describing conserved domains, paralogous and orthologous sequences, and conserved chromosomal gene clusters. The newly developed user interface supports flexible search capabilities and extensive visualization of the data.

  7. The Hippo signal transduction network in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackerhage, Henning; Del Re, Dominic P; Judson, Robert N; Sudol, Marius; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-08-05

    The discovery of the Hippo pathway can be traced back to two areas of research. Genetic screens in fruit flies led to the identification of the Hippo pathway kinases and scaffolding proteins that function together to suppress cell proliferation and tumor growth. Independent research, often in the context of muscle biology, described Tead (TEA domain) transcription factors, which bind CATTCC DNA motifs to regulate gene expression. These two research areas were joined by the finding that the Hippo pathway regulates the activity of Tead transcription factors mainly through phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivators Yap and Taz, which bind to and activate Teads. Additionally, many other signal transduction proteins crosstalk to members of the Hippo pathway forming a Hippo signal transduction network. We discuss evidence that the Hippo signal transduction network plays important roles in myogenesis, regeneration, muscular dystrophy, and rhabdomyosarcoma in skeletal muscle, as well as in myogenesis, organ size control, and regeneration of the heart. Understanding the role of Hippo kinases in skeletal and heart muscle physiology could have important implications for translational research. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Transduction of chemical into electrical energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachmansohn, D

    1976-01-01

    The paper recalls some fundamental notions, developed by Otto Meyerhof, which were used in the analysis of the transduction of chemical into mechanical energy during muscular contraction. These notions formed the basis of the approach to the analysis of the transduction of chemical into electrical energy, i.e., the very principle underlying nerve and muscle excitability and bioelectricity. Instrumental for this purpose was the use, since 1937, of electric organs of fish, a tissue highly specialized for bioelectrogenesis.

  9. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  10. Behavioral genetics and taste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachmanov Alexander A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review focuses on behavioral genetic studies of sweet, umami, bitter and salt taste responses in mammals. Studies involving mouse inbred strain comparisons and genetic analyses, and their impact on elucidation of taste receptors and transduction mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the effect of genetic variation in taste responsiveness on complex traits such as drug intake is considered. Recent advances in development of genomic resources make behavioral genetics a powerful approach for understanding mechanisms of taste.

  11. The cornucopia of intestinal chemosensory transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul P Bertrand

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemosensory transduction mechanisms that the gastrointestinal (GI tract uses to detect chemical and nutrient stimuli are poorly understood. The GI tract is presented with a wide variety of stimuli including potentially harmful chemicals or toxins as well as 'normal' stimuli including nutrients, bacteria and mechanical forces. Sensory transduction is at its simplest the conversion of these stimuli into a neural code in afferent nerves. Much of the information encoded is used by the enteric nervous system (ENS to generate local reflexes while complementary information is sent to the central nervous system (CNS via afferents or by release of hormones to affect behaviour. This review focuses on the chemosensory transduction mechanisms present in the GI tract. It examines the expression and localisation of the machinery for chemosensory transduction. It summarises the types of cells which might be involved in detecting stimuli and releasing neuroactive transmitters. Finally, it highlights the idea that chemosensory transduction mechanisms in the GI tract utilise many overlapping and complementary mechanisms for detecting and transducing stimuli into reflex action.

  12. Targeting two-component signal transduction: a novel drug discovery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ario; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takafumi; Furuta, Eiji; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2007-01-01

    We have developed two screening systems for isolating inhibitors that target bacterial two-component signal transduction: (1) a differential growth assay using a temperature-sensitive yycF mutant (CNM2000) of Bacillus subtilis, which is supersensitive to histidine kinase inhibitors, and (2) a high-throughput genetic system for targeting the homodimerization of histidine kinases essential for the bacterial two-component signal transduction. By using these methods, we have been able to identify various types of inhibitors that block the autophosphorylation of histidine kinases with different modes of actions.

  13. Bioinformatics analyses for signal transduction networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Research in signaling networks contributes to a deeper understanding of organism living activities. With the development of experimental methods in the signal transduction field, more and more mechanisms of signaling pathways have been discovered. This paper introduces such popular bioin-formatics analysis methods for signaling networks as the common mechanism of signaling pathways and database resource on the Internet, summerizes the methods of analyzing the structural properties of networks, including structural Motif finding and automated pathways generation, and discusses the modeling and simulation of signaling networks in detail, as well as the research situation and tendency in this area. Now the investigation of signal transduction is developing from small-scale experiments to large-scale network analysis, and dynamic simulation of networks is closer to the real system. With the investigation going deeper than ever, the bioinformatics analysis of signal transduction would have immense space for development and application.

  14. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction and visceral pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnstock Geoffrey

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this review, evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that mechanosensory transduction occurs in tubes and sacs and can initiate visceral pain. Experimental evidence for this mechanism in urinary bladder, ureter, gut, lung, uterus, tooth-pulp and tongue is reviewed. Potential therapeutic strategies are considered for the treatment of visceral pain in such conditions as renal colic, interstitial cystitis and inflammatory bowel disease by agents that interfere with mechanosensory transduction in the organs considered, including P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonists that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and agents that inhibit or enhance ATP release and breakdown.

  15. Energy transduction in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert

    In the discovery of some general principles of energy transduction, lactic acid bacteria have played an important role. In this review, the energy transducing processes of lactic acid bacteria are discussed with the emphasis on the major developments of the past 5 years. This work not only includes

  16. Inhibitors targeting two-component signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Okada, Ario; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2008-01-01

    A two-component signal transduction system (TCS) is an attractive target for antibacterial agents. In this chapter, we review the TCS inhibitors developed during the past decade and introduce novel drug discovery systems to isolate the inhibitors of the YycG/YycF system, an essential TCS for bacterial growth, in an effort to develop a new class of antibacterial agents.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Two-Component Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschiedrich, Christopher P; Keidel, Victoria; Szurmant, Hendrik

    2016-09-25

    Two-component systems (TCS) comprising sensor histidine kinases and response regulator proteins are among the most important players in bacterial and archaeal signal transduction and also occur in reduced numbers in some eukaryotic organisms. Given their importance to cellular survival, virulence, and cellular development, these systems are among the most scrutinized bacterial proteins. In the recent years, a flurry of bioinformatics, genetic, biochemical, and structural studies have provided detailed insights into many molecular mechanisms that underlie the detection of signals and the generation of the appropriate response by TCS. Importantly, it has become clear that there is significant diversity in the mechanisms employed by individual systems. This review discusses the current knowledge on common themes and divergences from the paradigm of TCS signaling. An emphasis is on the information gained by a flurry of recent structural and bioinformatics studies.

  18. Molecular biology of thermosensory transduction in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ichiro; Mori, Ikue

    2015-10-01

    As the environmental temperature prominently influences diverse biological aspects of the animals, thermosensation and the subsequent information processing in the nervous system has attracted much attention in biology. Thermotaxis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an ideal behavioral paradigm by which to address the molecular mechanism underlying thermosensory transduction. Molecular genetic analysis in combination with other physiological and behavioral studies revealed that sensation of ambient temperature is mediated mainly by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling in thermosensory neurons. The information of the previously perceived temperature is also stored within the thermosensory neurons, and the consequence of the comparison between the past and the present temperature is conveyed to the downstream interneurons to further regulate the motor-circuits that encode the locomotion.

  19. Signal transduction immunohistochemistry - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Alexander E. Kalyuzhny statement that immunohistochemical detection of labile, low abundance and short-lived signal transduction molecules appears to be a very challenging task actually captures the same reader’s feeling. Each of us daily using immunohistochemical protocols to reveal targets either useful for research or diagnostic aims will surely wonder by which tricky techniques it is possible to overcome the preservation and unmasking of those labile antigens involved in signal transduction. Well, by seventheen chapters grouped in five parts Prof. Alexander E. Kalyuzhny is presenting an invaluable technical and methodological source of hints to satisfy our needs: to overcome troubleshottings if we are already in the field or to orientate those entering the field....

  20. Energy Harvesting By Optimized Piezo Transduction Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Boban, Bijo; Satheesh, U; Devaprakasam, D

    2014-01-01

    We report generation of electrical energy from nonlinear mechanical noises available in the ambient environment using optimized piezo transduction mechanisms. Obtaining energy from an ambient vibration has been attractive for remotely installed standalone microsystems and devices. The mechanical noises in the ambient environment can be converted to electrical energy by a piezo strip based on the principle of piezoelectric effect. In this work, we have designed and developed a standalone energy harvesting module based on piezo transduction mechanisms. Using this designed module we harvested noise energy and stored electrical energy in a capacitor. Using NI-PXI workstation with a LabVIEW programming, the output voltage of the piezo strip and voltage of the capacitor were measured and monitored. In this paper we discuss about the design, development, implementation, performance and characteristics of the energy harvesting module.

  1. Optical racetrack resonator transduction of nanomechanical cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, V T K; Diao, Z; Freeman, M R; Hiebert, W K

    2014-02-07

    Optomechanical transduction has demonstrated its supremacy in probing nanomechanical displacements. In order to apply nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS) as force and mass sensors, knowledge about the transduction responsivity (i.e. the change in measured optical transmission with nanomechanical displacement) and its tradeoffs with system design is paramount. We compare the measured responsivities of NOMS devices with varying length, optomechanical coupling strength gom, and optical cavity properties. Cantilever beams 1.5 to 5 μm long are fabricated 70 to 160 nm from a racetrack resonator optical cavity and their thermomechanical (TM) noise signals are measured. We derive a generic expression for the transduction responsivity of the NOMS in terms of optical and mechanical system parameters such as finesse, optomechanical coupling constant, and interaction length. The form of the expression holds direct insight as to how these parameters affect the responsivity. With this expression, we obtain the optomechanical coupling constants using only measurements of the TM noise power spectra and optical cavity transmission slopes. All optical pump/probe operation is also demonstrated in our side-coupled cantilever-racetrack NOMS. Finally, to assess potential operation in a gas sensing environment, the TM noise signal of a device is measured at atmospheric pressure.

  2. Cultured lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects have altered cAMP signal transduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, L E; Diamond, I; Gordon, A.

    1988-01-01

    Previous work has shown that freshly isolated lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects show significantly reduced basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels. This decrease could be due to ethanol-induced cellular adaptation or to a genetic difference in the regulation of cAMP signal transduction. Therefore, we cultured human lymphocytes in defined medium without ethanol for 7-8 days and then examined differences in receptor-dependent cAMP accumulation between lymphocytes from alcoholic an...

  3. Viral Infection: An Evolving Insight into the Signal Transduction Pathways Responsible for the Innate Immune Response

    OpenAIRE

    Kotwal, Girish J.; Steven Hatch; Marshall, William L.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune response is initiated by the interaction of stereotypical pathogen components with genetically conserved receptors for extracytosolic pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or intracytosolic nucleic acids. In multicellular organisms, this interaction typically clusters signal transduction molecules and leads to their activations, thereby initiating signals that activate innate immune effector mechanisms to protect the host. In some cases programmed cell death—a funda...

  4. Analysis of the gravitaxis signal transduction chain in Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Adeel

    Abstract Euglena gracilis is a photosynthetic, eukaryotic flagellate. It can adapt autotrophic and heterotrophic mode of growth and respond to different stimuli, this makes it an organism of choice for different research disciplines. It swims to reach a suitable niche by employing different stimuli such as oxygen, light, gravity and different chemicals. Among these stimuli light and gravity are the most important. Phototaxis (locomotion under light stimulus) and gravitaxis (locomotion under gravity stimulus) synergistically help cells to attain an optimal niche in the environment. However, in the complete absence of light or under scarcity of detectable light, cells can totally depend on gravity to find its swimming path. Therefore gravity has certain advantages over other stimuli.Unlike phototatic signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis no clear primary gravity receptor has been identified in Euglena cells so far. However, there are some convincing evidence that TRP like channels act as a primary gravity receptor in Euglena gracilis.Use of different inhibitors gave rise to the involvement of protein kinase and calmodulin proteins in signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis. Recently, specific calmodulin (Calmodulin 2) and protein kinase (PKA) have been identified as potential candidates of gravitactic signal transduction chain. Further characterization and investigation of these candidates was required. Therefore a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques was employed to localize proteins in cells and also to find interacting partners. For localization studies, specific antibodies were raised and characterized. Specificity of antibodies was validated by knockdown mutants, Invitro-translated proteins and heterologously expressed proteins. Cell fractionation studies, involving separation of the cell body and flagella for western blot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence studies were performed for subcellular localization. In order to find

  5. Aptamer modification improves the adenoviral transduction of malignant glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Zheng, Xiaojing; Di, BingYan; Wang, Dongyang; Zhang, Yaling; Xia, Haibin; Mao, Qinwen

    2013-12-01

    Adenovirus has shown increasing promise in the gene-viral therapy for glioblastoma, a treatment strategy that relies on the delivery of viruses or transgenes into tumor cells. However, targeting of adenovirus to human glioblastoma remains a challenge due to the low expression level of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in glioma cells. Aptamers are small and highly structured single-stranded oligonucleotides that bind at high affinity to a target molecule, and are good candidates for targeted imaging and therapy. In this study, to construct an aptamer-modified Ad5, we first genetically modified the HVR5 of Ad hexon by biotin acceptor peptide (BAP), which would be metabolically biotinylated during production in HEK293 cells, and then attached the biotin labeled aptamer to the modified Ad through avidin–biotin binding. The aptamers used in this study includes AS1411 and GBI-10. The former is a DNA aptamer that can bind to nucleolin, a nuclear matrix protein found on the surface of cancer cells. The latter is a DNA aptamer that can recognize the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C on the surface of human glioblastoma cells. To examine if aptamer-modification of the hexon protein could improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency, a glioblastoma cell line, U251, was transduced with aptamer-modified Ads. The transduction efficiency of AS1411- or GBI-10-modified Ad was approximately 4.1-fold or 5.2-fold higher than that of the control. The data indicated that aptamer modified adenovirus would be a useful tool for cancer gene therapy.

  6. Electromechanical Energy Transduction for Hybrid Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy Vanja, Sridhar; Kelly, Michael W.; Caruso, A. N.

    2010-03-01

    Hybrid vehicle technology seeks to reduce the total energy consumption used for vehicle locomotion by recovering and reutilizing kinetic energy that is otherwise unrecovered or dissipated in conventional vehicle deceleration. The goal of the work is to determine the transduction mechanisms that work towards a Carnot efficiency without considering constraints or limitations placed by cost or materials. Specifically, this talk will present ideal thermodynamic models of energy exchange between mechanical, electrostatic, electromechanical and electrochemical devices with a goal of projecting an ideal hybrid vehicle.

  7. Brassinosteroid signal transduction: An emerging picture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiaomei; MA Ligeng

    2003-01-01

    Steroid hormones play essential roles in animal growth and development. Steroid signaling in animal system is focused on the direct gene regulation response mediated by its nuclear receptors. Recently, steroid hormones are also found in plants. Identification of BRI1 - a critical component of the plasma-membrane steroid receptor complex, and the related signal transduction pathway mediated by the membrane receptor have revealed an elementary picture of BR signaling from the cell surface perception to the activation of BR-responsive nuclear genes.

  8. Automated modelling of signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aach John

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracellular signal transduction is achieved by networks of proteins and small molecules that transmit information from the cell surface to the nucleus, where they ultimately effect transcriptional changes. Understanding the mechanisms cells use to accomplish this important process requires a detailed molecular description of the networks involved. Results We have developed a computational approach for generating static models of signal transduction networks which utilizes protein-interaction maps generated from large-scale two-hybrid screens and expression profiles from DNA microarrays. Networks are determined entirely by integrating protein-protein interaction data with microarray expression data, without prior knowledge of any pathway intermediates. In effect, this is equivalent to extracting subnetworks of the protein interaction dataset whose members have the most correlated expression profiles. Conclusion We show that our technique accurately reconstructs MAP Kinase signaling networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This approach should enhance our ability to model signaling networks and to discover new components of known networks. More generally, it provides a method for synthesizing molecular data, either individual transcript abundance measurements or pairwise protein interactions, into higher level structures, such as pathways and networks.

  9. Engineering key components in a synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, Mauricio S; Kevin J Morey; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Bowen, Tessa A.; Smith, J. Jeff; Webb, Colleen T.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Medford, June I.

    2009-01-01

    Signal transduction underlies how living organisms detect and respond to stimuli. A goal of synthetic biology is to rewire natural signal transduction systems. Bacteria, yeast, and plants sense environmental aspects through conserved histidine kinase (HK) signal transduction systems. HK protein components are typically comprised of multiple, relatively modular, and conserved domains. Phosphate transfer between these components may exhibit considerable cross talk between the otherwise apparent...

  10. Specificity in stress response: epidermal keratinocytes exhibit specialized UV-responsive signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Makoto; Gazel, Alix; Pintucci, Giuseppe; Shuck, Alyssa; Shifteh, Shiva; Ginsburg, Dov; Rao, Laxmi S; Kaneko, Takehiko; Freedberg, Irwin M; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2003-10-01

    UV light, a paradigmatic initiator of cell stress, invokes responses that include signal transduction, activation of transcription factors, and changes in gene expression. Consequently, in epidermal keratinocytes, its principal and frequent natural target, UV regulates transcription of a distinctive set of genes. Hypothesizing that UV activates distinctive epidermal signal transduction pathways, we compared the UV-responsive activation of the JNK and NFkappaB pathways in keratinocytes, with the activation of the same pathways by other agents and in other cell types. Using of inhibitors and antisense oligonucleotides, we found that in keratinocytes only UVB/UVC activate JNK, while in other cell types UVA, heat shock, and oxidative stress do as well. Keratinocytes express JNK-1 and JNK-3, which is unexpected because JNK-3 expression is considered brain-specific. In keratinocytes, ERK1, ERK2, and p38 are activated by growth factors, but not by UV. UVB/UVC in keratinocytes activates Elk1 and AP1 exclusively through the JNK pathway. JNKK1 is essential for UVB/UVC activation of JNK in keratinocytes in vitro and in human skin in vivo. In contrast, in HeLa cells, used as a control, crosstalk among signal transduction pathways allows considerable laxity. In parallel, UVB/UVC and TNFalpha activate the NFkappaB pathway via distinct mechanisms, as shown using antisense oligonucleotides targeted against IKKbeta, the active subunit of IKK. This implies a specific UVB/UVC responsive signal transduction pathway independent from other pathways. Our results suggest that in epidermal keratinocytes specific signal transduction pathways respond to UV light. Based on these findings, we propose that the UV light is not a genetic stress response inducer in these cells, but a specific agent to which epidermis developed highly specialized responses.

  11. Quantifying efficient information transduction of biochemical signaling cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Cells can be considered as systems that utilize changes in thermodynamic entropy as information. Therefore, they serve as useful models for investigating the relationships between entropy production and information transmission, i.e., signal transduction. Based on the hypothesis that cells apply a chemical reaction cascade for the most efficient transduction of information, we adopted a coding design that minimizes the number of bits per concentration of molecules that are employed for information transduction. As a result, the average rate of entropy production is uniform across all cycles in a cascade reaction. Thus, the entropy production rate can be a valuable measure for the quantification of intracellular signal transduction.

  12. Adeno-associated viral vector transduction of human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Murphy, Mary; O'Brien, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have received considerable attention in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. One aspect of MSC research focuses on genetically modifying the cells with the aim of enhancing their regenerative potential. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) holds promise as a vector...... in human MSCs and to assess whether AAV transduction affects MSC multipotentiality. The results indicated that human MSCs could indeed be transiently transduced in vitro by the AAV2 vector with efficiencies of up to 65%. The percentage of GFP-positive cells peaked at 4 days post-transduction and declined...... rapidly towards 0% after day 8. The level of transgene expression in the GFP-positive population increased 4-fold over a 10,000 fold viral dose increase. This dose-response contrasted with the 200-fold increase observed in similarly transduced 293-cells, indicating a relatively restricted transgene...

  13. Nonequilibrium phase transitions in biomolecular signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric; Krishnamurthy, Supriya; Fontana, Walter; Krakauer, David

    2011-11-01

    We study a mechanism for reliable switching in biomolecular signal-transduction cascades. Steady bistable states are created by system-size cooperative effects in populations of proteins, in spite of the fact that the phosphorylation-state transitions of any molecule, by means of which the switch is implemented, are highly stochastic. The emergence of switching is a nonequilibrium phase transition in an energetically driven, dissipative system described by a master equation. We use operator and functional integral methods from reaction-diffusion theory to solve for the phase structure, noise spectrum, and escape trajectories and first-passage times of a class of minimal models of switches, showing how all critical properties for switch behavior can be computed within a unified framework.

  14. Striatal Signal Transduction and Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philibin, Scott D.; Hernandez, Adan; Self, David W.; Bibb, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Drug addiction is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by loss of control over motivated behavior. The need for effective treatments mandates a greater understanding of the causes and identification of new therapeutic targets for drug development. Drugs of abuse subjugate normal reward-related behavior to uncontrollable drug-seeking and -taking. Contributions of brain reward circuitry are being mapped with increasing precision. The role of synaptic plasticity in addiction and underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to the formation of the addicted state are being delineated. Thus we may now consider the role of striatal signal transduction in addiction from a more integrative neurobiological perspective. Drugs of abuse alter dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Dopamine receptors important for reward serve as principle targets of drugs abuse, which interact with glutamate receptor signaling critical for reward learning. Complex networks of intracellular signal transduction mechanisms underlying these receptors are strongly stimulated by addictive drugs. Through these mechanisms, repeated drug exposure alters functional and structural neuroplasticity, resulting in transition to the addicted biological state and behavioral outcomes that typify addiction. Ca2+ and cAMP represent key second messengers that initiate signaling cascades, which regulate synaptic strength and neuronal excitability. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are fundamental mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity that are dysregulated by drugs of abuse. Increased understanding of the regulatory mechanisms by which protein kinases and phosphatases exert their effects during normal reward learning and the addiction process may lead to novel targets and pharmacotherapeutics with increased efficacy in promoting abstinence and decreased side effects, such as interference with natural reward, for drug addiction. PMID

  15. Striatal signal transduction and drug addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Philibin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by loss of control over motivated behavior. The need for effective treatments mandates a greater understanding of the causes and identification of new therapeutic targets for drug development. Drugs of abuse subjugate normal reward-related behavior to uncontrollable drug-seeking and -taking. Contributions of brain reward circuitry are being mapped with increasing precision. The role of synaptic plasticity in addiction and underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to the formation of the addicted state are being delineated. Thus we may now consider the role of striatal signal transduction in addiction from a more integrative neurobiological perspective. Drugs of abuse alter dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Dopamine receptors important for reward serve as principle targets of drugs abuse, which interact with glutamate receptor signaling critical for reward learning. Complex networks of intracellular signal transduction mechanisms underlying these receptors are strongly stimulated by addictive drugs. Through these mechanisms, repeated drug exposure alters functional and structural neuroplasticity, resulting in transition to the addicted biological state and behavioral outcomes that typify addiction. Ca2+ and cAMP represent key second messengers that initiate signaling cascades, which regulate synaptic strength and neuronal excitability. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are fundamental mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity that are dysregulated by drugs of abuse. Increased understanding of the regulatory mechanisms by which protein kinases and phosphatases exert their effects during normal reward learning and the addiction process may lead to novel targets and pharmacotherapeutics with increased efficacy in promoting abstinence and decreased side effects, such as interference with natural reward, for drug

  16. FCJ-124 Interactive Environments as Fields of Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristoph Brunner

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a critical inquiry of interactive environments as fields of transduction. It is argued that Gilbert Simondon’s concepts of individuation, transduction, in-formation, the preindividual, and the associated milieu enable a processual thinking of the analysis and design of interactive technologies as technogenetic emergence. These concepts offer a way for interaction design to understand interactive environments through the dynamics between fields of transduction and fields of experience in relational and affective terms. The article analyses the way in which two technological assemblages, Voz Alta and the Impossible Room, provide different experiential fields experimenting with the transductive power of digital and interactive media. We emphasise the potential for creating new modes of experience. Our aim is to underline the necessary convergences between practices of design and thought; to enable affectively engaging fields of transduction.

  17. Transductive versions of the LASSO and the Dantzig Selector

    CERN Document Server

    Alquier, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Transductive methods are useful in prediction problems when the training dataset is composed of a large number of unlabeled observations and a smaller number of labeled observations. In this paper, we propose an approach for developing transductive prediction procedures that are able to take advantage of the sparsity in the high dimensional linear regression. More precisely, we define transductive versions of the LASSO and the Dantzig Selector . These procedures combine labeled and unlabeled observations of the training dataset to produce a prediction for the unlabeled observations. We propose an experimental study of the transductive estimators, that shows that they improve the LASSO and Dantzig Selector in many situations, and particularly in high dimensional problems when the predictors are correlated. We then provide non-asymptotic theoretical guarantees for these estimation methods. Interestingly, our theoretical results show that the Transductive LASSO and Dantzig Selector satisfy sparsity inequalities ...

  18. The Membrane and Lipids as Integral Participants in Signal Transduction: Lipid Signal Transduction for the Non-Lipid Biochemist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyster, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of signal transduction have often focused on the cascades of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and their cytoplasmic substrates that become activated in response to extracellular signals. Lipids, lipid kinases, and lipid phosphatases have not received the same amount of attention as proteins in studies of signal transduction.…

  19. Mechanisms of UV-induced signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulms, D.; Schwarz, T. [Univ. Muenster, Muenster (Germany). Ludwing Boltzmann Inst. for Cell Biology and Immunobiology of the Skin

    2002-04-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) causes a variety of biological effects that can be either beneficial or harmful for human health. To exert these effects on a cellular basis, UV uses a variety of signaling pathways. DNA is the major chromophore for UVB. Thus, nuclear DNA damage has been detected to be a major mediator of numerous UVB effects, and experimental reduction of DNA damage is associated with a loss of these effects. On the other hand, UV has been found to utilize molecular components within the cytoplasm or at the cell membrane for signaling. UV can directly activate cell surface receptors, kinases, and transcription factors. The nuclear and extranuclear signaling pathways are generated independently and have been recently recognized to be not mutually exclusive but to contribute to various UV effects in an independent and additive way. Further knowledge of how these signaling pathways relate to each other will certainly increase our understanding of how UV acts as a pathogen. The following review will briefly discuss current aspects of the mechanisms involved in UV-induced signal transduction. (author)

  20. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Russo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycosphingolipids (GSLs are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development.

  1. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Domenico; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; D’Angelo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development. PMID:27754465

  2. The sensory transduction pathways in bacterial chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Barry L.

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is a useful model for investigating in molecular detail the behavioral response of cells to changes in their environment. Peritrichously flagellated bacteria such as coli and typhimurium swim by rotating helical flagella in a counterclockwise direction. If flagellar rotation is briefly reversed, the bacteria tumble and change the direction of swimming. The bacteria continuously sample the environment and use a temporal sensing mechanism to compare the present and immediate past environments. Bacteria respond to a broad range of stimuli including changes in temperature, oxygen concentration, pH and osmotic strength. Bacteria are attracted to potential sources of nutrition such as sugars and amino acids and are repelled by other chemicals. In the methylation-dependent pathways for sensory transduction and adaptation in E. coli and S. typhimurium, chemoeffectors bind to transducing proteins that span the plasma membrane. The transducing proteins are postulated to control the rate of autophosphorylation of the CheA protein, which in turn phosphorylates the CheY protein. The phospho-CheY protein binds to the switch on the flagellar motor and is the signal for clockwise rotation of the motor. Adaptation to an attractant is achieved by increasing methylation of the transducing protein until the attractant stimulus is cancelled. Responses to oxygen and certain sugars involve methylation-independent pathways in which adaption occurs without methylation of a transducing protein. Taxis toward oxygen is mediated by the electron transport system and changes in the proton motive force. Recent studies have shown that the methylation-independent pathway converges with the methylation-dependent pathway at or before the CheA protein.

  3. The transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Richard D

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intercostal muscles are richly innervated by mechanoreceptors. In vivo studies of cat intercostal muscle have shown that there are 3 populations of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors: primary muscle spindles (1°, secondary muscle spindles (2° and Golgi tendon organs (GTO. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanical transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors in response to controlled length and velocity displacements of the intercostal space. Mechanoreceptors, recorded from dorsal root fibers, were localized within an isolated intercostal muscle space (ICS. Changes in ICS displacement and the velocity of ICS displacement were independently controlled with an electromagnetic motor. ICS velocity (0.5 – 100 μm/msec to a displacement of 2,000 μm and displacement (50–2,000 μm at a constant velocity of 10 μm/msec parameters encompassed the full range of rib motion. Results Both 1° and 2° muscle spindles were found evenly distributed within the ICS. GTOs were localized along the rib borders. The 1° spindles had the greatest discharge frequency in response to displacement amplitude followed by the 2° afferents and GTOs. The 1° muscle spindles also possessed the greatest discharge frequency in response to graded velocity changes, 3.0 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. GTOs had a velocity response of 2.4 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1 followed by 2° muscle spindles at 0.6 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. Conclusion The results of this study provide a systematic description of the mechanosenitivity of the 3 types of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors. These mechanoreceptors have discharge properties that transduce the magnitude and velocity of intercostal muscle length.

  4. Signal transduction in the footsteps of goethe and schiller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Karlheinz; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Entschladen, Frank; Serfling, Edgar; Thiel, Gerald; Kieser, Arnd; Giehl, Klaudia; Ehrhardt, Christina; Feller, Stephan M; Ullrich, Oliver; Schaper, Fred; Janssen, Ottmar; Hass, Ralf

    2009-02-04

    The historical town of Weimar in Thuringia, the "green heart of Germany" was the sphere of Goethe and Schiller, the two most famous representatives of German literature's classic era. Not yet entirely as influential as those two cultural icons, the Signal Transduction Society (STS) has nevertheless in the last decade established within the walls of Weimar an annual interdisciplinary Meeting on "Signal Transduction - Receptors, Mediators and Genes", which is well recognized as a most attractive opportunity to exchange results and ideas in the field.The 12th STS Meeting was held from October 28 to 31 and provided a state-of-the-art overview of various areas of signal transduction research in which progress is fast and discussion lively. This report is intended to share with the readers of CCS some highlights of the Meeting Workshops devoted to specific aspects of signal transduction.

  5. Signal Transduction in the Footsteps of Goethe and Schiller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feller Stephan M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The historical town of Weimar in Thuringia, the "green heart of Germany" was the sphere of Goethe and Schiller, the two most famous representatives of German literature's classic era. Not yet entirely as influential as those two cultural icons, the Signal Transduction Society (STS has nevertheless in the last decade established within the walls of Weimar an annual interdisciplinary Meeting on "Signal Transduction – Receptors, Mediators and Genes", which is well recognized as a most attractive opportunity to exchange results and ideas in the field. The 12th STS Meeting was held from October 28 to 31 and provided a state-of-the-art overview of various areas of signal transduction research in which progress is fast and discussion lively. This report is intended to share with the readers of CCS some highlights of the Meeting Workshops devoted to specific aspects of signal transduction.

  6. Transduction mechanisms and their applications in micromechanical devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, M.; Blom, F.R.; Bouwstra, S.; Lammerink, T.S.J.; Pol, van de F.C.M.; Tilmans, H.A.C.; Popma, Th.J.A.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1989-01-01

    Transduction mechanisms and their applications in micromechanical actuators and resonating sensors are presented. They include piezoelectric, dielectric, electro-thermo-mechanic, opto-thermo-mechanic, and thermo-pneumatic mechanisms. Advantages and disadvantages with respect to technology and perfor

  7. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  8. Falsification of the ionic channel theory of hair cell transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Michelangelo

    2013-11-01

    The hair cell provides the transduction of mechanical vibrations in the balance and acoustic sense of all vertebrates that swim, walk, or fly. The current theory places hair cell transduction in a mechanically controlled ion channel. Although the theory of a mechanical input modulating the flow of ions through an ion pore has been a useful tool, it is falsified by experimental data in the literature and can be definitively falsified by a proposed experiment.

  9. One-component systems dominate signal transduction in prokaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich, Luke E; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2005-01-01

    Two-component systems that link environmental signals to cellular responses are viewed as the primary mode of signal transduction in prokaryotes. By analyz-ing information encoded by 145 prokaryotic genomes, we found that the majority of signal transduction systems consist of a single protein that contains input and output domains but lacks phosphotransfer domains typical of two-component systems. One-component systems are evolutionarily older, more widely distributed among bacteria and archa...

  10. Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0820 TITLE: Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two...Report 3. DATES COVERED 15 September 2011-14 September 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients...the arena of serotonin sensitivity, from those cells obtained from autistic subjects with normal serum serotonin . This was not the case, as the

  11. Targeting Visceral Fat by Intraperitoneal Delivery of Novel AAV Serotype Vector Restricting Off-Target Transduction in Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It is challenging to genetically manipulate fat in adults. We demonstrate that intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of an engineered adeno-associated virus (AAV serotype Rec2 leads to high transduction of multiple visceral fat depots at a dose of 1 to 2 orders lower than commonly used doses for systemic gene delivery. To target adipose tissue, we develop a single AAV vector harboring two expression cassettes: one using the CBA promoter to drive transgene expression and one using the liver-specific albumin promoter to drive a microRNA-targeting WPRE sequence that only exists in this AAV vector. This dual-cassette vector achieves highly selective transduction of visceral fat while severely restricting off-target transduction of liver. As proof of efficacy, i.p. administration of an adipose-targeting Rec2 vector harboring the leptin gene corrects leptin deficiency, obesity, and metabolic syndromes of ob/ob mice. This study provides a powerful tool to genetically manipulate fat for basic research and gene therapies of genetic and acquired diseases.

  12. Modeling Signal Transduction and Lipid Rafts in Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ashok

    2011-03-01

    Experimental evidence increasingly suggests that lipid rafts are nanometer sized cholesterol dependent dynamic assemblies enriched in sphingolipids and associated proteins. Lipid rafts are dynamic structures that break-up and reform on a relatively short time-scale, and are believed to facilitate the interactions of raft-associated proteins. The role of these rafts in signaling has been controversial, partly due to controversies regarding the existence and nature of the rafts themselves. Experimental evidence has indicated that in several cell types, especially T cells, rafts do influence signal transduction and T cell activation. Given the emerging consensus on the biophysical character of lipid rafts, the question can be asked as to what roles they possibly play in signal transduction. Here we carry out simulations of minimal models of the signal transduction network that regulates Src-family kinase dynamics in T cells and other cell types. By separately treating raft-based biochemical interactions, we find that rafts can indeed putatively play an important role in signal transduction, and in particular may affect the sensitivity of signal transduction. This illuminates possible functional consequences of membrane heterogeneities on signal transduction and points towards mechanisms for spatial control of signaling by cells.

  13. Engineering key components in a synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Mauricio S; Morey, Kevin J; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Bowen, Tessa A; Smith, J Jeff; Webb, Colleen T; Hellinga, Homme W; Medford, June I

    2009-01-01

    Signal transduction underlies how living organisms detect and respond to stimuli. A goal of synthetic biology is to rewire natural signal transduction systems. Bacteria, yeast, and plants sense environmental aspects through conserved histidine kinase (HK) signal transduction systems. HK protein components are typically comprised of multiple, relatively modular, and conserved domains. Phosphate transfer between these components may exhibit considerable cross talk between the otherwise apparently linear pathways, thereby establishing networks that integrate multiple signals. We show that sequence conservation and cross talk can extend across kingdoms and can be exploited to produce a synthetic plant signal transduction system. In response to HK cross talk, heterologously expressed bacterial response regulators, PhoB and OmpR, translocate to the nucleus on HK activation. Using this discovery, combined with modification of PhoB (PhoB-VP64), we produced a key component of a eukaryotic synthetic signal transduction pathway. In response to exogenous cytokinin, PhoB-VP64 translocates to the nucleus, binds a synthetic PlantPho promoter, and activates gene expression. These results show that conserved-signaling components can be used across kingdoms and adapted to produce synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathways.

  14. Genetic Engineering: The Modification of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, Robert L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes somatic and genetic manipulations of individual genotypes, using diabetes control as an example of the first mode that is potentially realizable be derepression or viral transduction of genes. Advocates the use of genetic engineering of the second mode to remove man from his biological limitations, but offers maxims to ensure the…

  15. Prolonged maturation and enhanced transduction of dendritic cells migrated from human skin explants after in situ delivery of CD40-targeted adenoviral vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gruijl, TD; Luykx-de Bakker, SA; Tillman, BW; van den Eertwegh, AJM; Buter, J; Lougheed, SM; van der Bij, GJ; Safer, AM; Haisma, HJ; Curiel, DT; Scheper, RJ; Pinedo, HM; Gerritsen, WR

    2002-01-01

    Therapeutic tumor vaccination with viral vectors or naked DNA, carrying the genetic code for tumor-associated Ags, critically depends on the in vivo transduction of dendritic cells (DC). Transfection of predominantly nonprofessional APC and only small numbers of DC may hamper proper T cell activatio

  16. NF1 Signal Transduction and Vascular Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    as well as clinically available pharmaceuticals , we are determining the critical regulatory pathways that drive the changes seen following the loss of...loss in the adult endothelium and can serve as a model system for investigation of both cardiovascular effects and the tumor microenvironment. Body: Aim...Korf, B. R. (2002). Cardiovascular disease in neurofibromatosis 1: report of the NF1 Cardiovascular Task Force. Genet Med 4, 105-111. Munchhof, A. M

  17. A CRISPR-Based Toolbox for Studying T Cell Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shen; Weiss, Arthur; Wang, Haopeng

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful technology to perform genome editing in a variety of cell types. To facilitate the application of Cas9 in mapping T cell signaling pathways, we generated a toolbox for large-scale genetic screens in human Jurkat T cells. The toolbox has three different Jurkat cell lines expressing distinct Cas9 variants, including wild-type Cas9, dCas9-KRAB, and sunCas9. We demonstrated that the toolbox allows us to rapidly disrupt endogenous gene expression at the DNA level and to efficiently repress or activate gene expression at the transcriptional level. The toolbox, in combination with multiple currently existing genome-wide sgRNA libraries, will be useful to systematically investigate T cell signal transduction using both loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic screens. PMID:27057542

  18. A CRISPR-Based Toolbox for Studying T Cell Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Chi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful technology to perform genome editing in a variety of cell types. To facilitate the application of Cas9 in mapping T cell signaling pathways, we generated a toolbox for large-scale genetic screens in human Jurkat T cells. The toolbox has three different Jurkat cell lines expressing distinct Cas9 variants, including wild-type Cas9, dCas9-KRAB, and sunCas9. We demonstrated that the toolbox allows us to rapidly disrupt endogenous gene expression at the DNA level and to efficiently repress or activate gene expression at the transcriptional level. The toolbox, in combination with multiple currently existing genome-wide sgRNA libraries, will be useful to systematically investigate T cell signal transduction using both loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic screens.

  19. EDITORIAL: Special section on signal transduction Special section on signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsman, Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    This special section of Physical Biology focuses on multiple aspects of signal transduction, broadly defined as the study of the mechanisms by which cells communicate with their environment. Mechanisms of cell communication involve detection of incoming signals, which can be chemical, mechanical or electromagnetic, relaying these signals to intracellular processes, such as cytoskeletal networks or gene expression systems, and, ultimately, converting these signals to responses such as cell differentiation or death. Given the multiscale nature of signal transduction systems, they must be studied at multiple levels, from the identities and structures of molecules comprising signal detection and interpretation networks, to the systems-level properties of these networks. The 11 papers in this special section illustrate some of the most exciting aspects of signal transduction research. The first two papers, by Marie-Anne Félix [1] and by Efrat Oron and Natalia Ivanova [2], focus on cell-cell interactions in developing tissues, using vulval patterning in worm and cell fate specification in mammalian embryos as prime examples of emergent cell behaviors. Next come two papers from the groups of Julio Saez-Rodriguez [3] and Kevin Janes [4]. These papers discuss how the causal relationships between multiple components of signaling systems can be inferred using multivariable statistical analysis of empirical data. An authoritative review by Zarnitsyna and Zhu [5] presents a detailed discussion of the sequence of signaling events involved in T-cell triggering. Once the structure and components of the signaling systems are determined, they can be modeled using approaches that have been successful in other physical sciences. As two examples of such approaches, reviews by Rubinstein [6] and Kholodenko [7], present reaction-diffusion models of cell polarization and thermodynamics-based models of gene regulation. An important class of models takes the form of enzymatic networks

  20. A transduction path method of solid state sensor analysis and investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Dubay, Curtis L.

    1984-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This paper proposes a "transduction path" method of analysis for solid state sensors. It is based upon the idea that a sensor represents a transduction path from some input measurand to an electrical output. The transduction path may consist of one or more transduction or modification principles drawn from all fields of science. Also proposed is a "transduction path diagram" which provides a graphical representation of a transductio...

  1. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Lihong, E-mail: lhtong@ecjtu.edu.cn [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China); Lim, C.W. [Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China); Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China)

    2016-06-03

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media. - Highlights: • Theory and modeling both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed. • The modeling is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. • Acoustic response characteristics of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are predicted by the proposed model.

  2. SLAM-enriched hematopoietic stem cells maintain long-term repopulating capacity after lentiviral transduction using an abbreviated protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laje, P; Zoltick, P W; Flake, A W

    2010-03-01

    Gene transfer to long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) using integrating viral vectors is an important goal in gene therapy. The SLAM (signaling lymphocyte activation molecule)-family receptors have recently been used for the isolation of highly enriched murine HSCs. This HSC enrichment protocol is relatively simple, and results in an HSC population with comparable repopulating capacity to c-kit(+)lin(-)Sca-1(+) (KSL) HSCs. The capacity to withstand genetic manipulation and, most importantly, to maintain long-term repopulating capacity of SLAM-enriched HSC populations has not been reported. In this study, SLAM-enriched HSCs were assessed for transduction efficiency and in vivo long-term repopulating capacity after lentiviral transduction using an abbreviated transduction protocol and KSL-enriched HSCs as a reference population. SLAM- and KSL-enriched HSCs were efficiently transduced by lentiviral vector using a simple protocol that involves minimal in vitro manipulation and no pre-stimulation. SLAM-HSCs are at least equal to KSL-HSCs with respect to efficiency of transduction and maintenance of long-term repopulating capacity. Although there was a reduction in repopulating capacity related to enrichment and culture manipulations relative to freshly isolated bone marrow (BM) cells, no detrimental effects were identified on long-term competitive capacity related to transduction, as transduced cells maintained stable levels of chimerism in competition with non-transduced cells and freshly isolated BM cells. These results support the SLAM-HSC enrichment protocol as a simple and efficient method for HSC enrichment for gene transfer studies.

  3. Molecular signal transduction in vascular cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Apoptosis is a form of genetically programmed cell death, which plays a key role in regulation of cellularity in a variety of tissue and cell types including the cardiovascular tissues. Under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions, various biophysiological and biochemical factors, including mechanical forces, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, cytokines, growth factors, oxidized lipoproteins, etc., may influence apoptosis of vascular cells. The Fas/Fas ligand/caspase death-signaling pathway, Bcl-2 protein family/mitochondria, the tumor suppressive gene p53, and the proto-oncogene c-myc may be activated in atherosclerotic lesions, and mediates vascular apoptosis during the development of atherosclerosis. Abnormal expression and dysfunction of these apoptosis-regulating genes may attenuate or accelerate vascular cell apoptosis and affect the integrity and stability of atherosclerotic plaques. Clarification of the molecular mechanism that regulates apoptosis may help design a new strategy for treatment of atherosclerosis and its major complication, the acute vascular syndromes.

  4. Nonreciprocal Radio Frequency Transduction in a Parametric Mechanical Artificial Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pu; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Jingwei; Tian, Tian; Yin, Peiran; Duan, Changkui; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    Generating nonreciprocal radio frequency transduction plays important roles in a wide range of research and applications, and an aspiration is to integrate this functionality into microcircuits without introducing a magnetic field, which, however, remains challenging. By designing a 1D artificial lattice structure with a neighbor interaction engineered parametrically, we predicted a nonreciprocity transduction with a large unidirectionality. We then experimentally demonstrated the phenomenon on a nanoelectromechanical chip fabricated by conventional complementary metal-silicon processing. A unidirectionality with isolation as high as 24 dB is achieved, and several different transduction schemes are realized by programing the control voltage topology. Apart from being used as a radio frequency isolator, the system provides a way to build a practical on-chip programmable device for broad research and applications in the radio frequency domain.

  5. Gene Expression Pattern of Signal Transduction in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Huiyu; JIE Shenghua; GUO Tiannan; HUANG Shi'ang

    2006-01-01

    To explore the transcriptional gene expression profiles of signaling pathway in Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a series of cDNA microarray chips were tested. The results showed that differentially expressed genes related to singal transduction in CML were screened out and the genes involved in Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K), Ras-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and other signaling pathway genes simultaneously. The results also showed that most of these genes were up-expression genes , which suggested that signal transduction be overactivated in CML. Further analysis of these differentially expressed signal transduction genes will be helpful to understand the molecular mechanism of CML and find new targets of treatment.

  6. Microenvironment Dependent Photobiomodulation on Function-Specific Signal Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timon Cheng-Yi Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular photobiomodulation on a cellular function has been shown to be homeostatic. Its function-specific pathway mechanism would be further discussed in this paper. The signal transduction pathways maintaining a normal function in its function-specific homeostasis (FSH, resisting the activation of many other irrelative signal transduction pathways, are so sparse that it can be supposed that there may be normal function-specific signal transduction pathways (NSPs. A low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light may promote the activation of partially activated NSP and/or its redundant NSP so that it may induce the second-order phase transition of a function from its dysfunctional one far from its FSH to its normal one in a function-specific microenvironment and may also induce the first-order functional phase transition of the normal function from low level to high level.

  7. The development of taste transduction and taste chip technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; LIU Qingjun; XU Ying; CAI Hua; QIN Lifeng; WANG Lijiang; WANG Ping

    2005-01-01

    The intrinsic perception process of taste is obviously far less known than those of vision, audition, touch and olfaction. Despite that taste cells utilize a variety of sensory mechanisms to translate plenty of gustatory sensations such as sour, sweet, bitter, salty and umami into cellular signals, gustatory perception mechanisms are still under exploration due to the lack of effective methods on cellular and molecular level. Recently the development of molecular biological and electrophysiological studies has promoted exploration of olfactory and gustatory transduction and coding mechanisms dramatically. Based on the studies of artificial olfaction, artificial taste and cell-based biosensor in our laboratory, this paper reviews the current research on taste transduction mechanism. We introduce the recent advances in cell chip that combined biology with microelectronics, discuss taste cell chip as well as its potential of prospective application in taste transduction mechanism in detail and propose the research trends of taste chip in future.

  8. Phosphoinositide pathway and the signal transduction network in neural development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenza Rita Lo Vasco

    2012-01-01

    The development of the nervous system is under the strict control of a number of signal transduction pathways,often interconnected.Among them,the phosphoinositide (PI) pathway and the related phospholipase C (PI-PLC) family of enzymes have been attracting much attention.Besides their well-known role in the regulation of intracellular calcium levels,PI-PLC enzymes interact with a number of molecules belonging to further signal transduction pathways,contributing to a specific and complex network in the developing nervous system.In this review,the connections of PI signalling with further transduction pathways acting during neural development are discussed,with special regard to the role of the PI-PLC family of enzymes.

  9. Cell cycle and cell signal transduction in marine phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingwen; JIAO Nianzhi; CAI Huinong

    2006-01-01

    As unicellular phytoplankton, the growth of a marine phytoplankton population results directly from the completion of a cell cycle, therefore, cell-environment communication is an important way which involves signal transduction pathways to regulate cell cycle progression and contribute to growth, metabolism and primary production and respond to their surrounding environment in marine phytoplankton. Cyclin-CDK and CaM/Ca2+ are essentially key regulators in control of cell cycle and signal transduction pathway, which has important values on both basic research and applied biotechnology. This paper reviews progress made in this research field, which involves the identification and characterization of cyclins and cell signal transduction system, cell cycle control mechanisms in marine phytoplankton cells, cell cycle proteins as a marker of a terminal event to estimate the growth rate of phytoplankton at the species level, cell cycle-dependent toxin production of toxic algae and cell cycle progression regulated by environmental factors.

  10. Expression of SMAD signal transduction molecules in the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Michael; Hougaard, D.; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2001-01-01

    Members of the TGF-beta superfamily of cytokines have been implicated in pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis and in regulation and differentiation of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells. Different TGF-beta members signal through phosphorylation of different signal transduction proteins, which eve...... is known to transduce signals from receptors binding bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) these results indicate a previously unknown role of BMP-like ligands in islet function.......Members of the TGF-beta superfamily of cytokines have been implicated in pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis and in regulation and differentiation of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells. Different TGF-beta members signal through phosphorylation of different signal transduction proteins, which...

  11. On the Monadic Second-Order Transduction Hierarchy

    CERN Document Server

    Blumensath, Achim

    2010-01-01

    We compare classes of finite relational structures via monadic second-order transductions. More precisely, we study the preorder C <= K :iff C is a subset of tau(K) for some transduction tau. If we only consider classes of incidence structures we can completely describe the resulting hierarchy. It is linear of order type omega + 3. Each level can be characterised in terms of a suitable variant of tree-width. Canonical representatives of the various levels are: the class of all trees of height n, for each n in N, of all paths, of all trees, and of all grids.

  12. One-component systems dominate signal transduction in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Luke E.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2009-01-01

    Two-component systems that link environmental signals to cellular responses are viewed as the primary mode of signal transduction in prokaryotes. By analyz-ing information encoded by 145 prokaryotic genomes, we found that the majority of signal transduction systems consist of a single protein that contains input and output domains but lacks phosphotransfer domains typical of two-component systems. One-component systems are evolutionarily older, more widely distributed among bacteria and archaea, and display a greater diversity of domains than two-component systems. PMID:15680762

  13. Lentiviral-mediated gene delivery in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells: optimized design and procedures for highly efficient transduction compatible with clinical constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouas, Redouane; Uch, Rathviro; Cleuter, Yvette; Jordier, François; Bagnis, Claude; Mannoni, Patrice; Lewalle, Philippe; Martiat, Philippe; Van den Broeke, Anne

    2002-09-01

    Gene delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) could represent a powerful method of inducing potent, long-lasting immunity. Although recent studies underline the intense interest in lentiviral vector-mediated monocyte-derived DC transduction, efficient gene transfer methods currently require high multiplicities of infection and are not compatible with clinical constraints. We have designed a strategy to optimize the efficiency and clinical relevance of this approach. Initially, using a third generation lentiviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein, we found that modifying the vector design, the DC precursor cell type, and the DC differentiation stage for transduction results in sustained transgene expression in 75-85% of immature DCs (transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 8). This high efficiency was reproducible among different donors irrespective of whether DCs were expanded from fresh or cryopreserved CD14(+) precursors. We then developed procedures that bypass the need for highly concentrated lentiviral preparations and the addition of polybrene to achieve efficient transduction. DCs transduced under these conditions retain their immature phenotype and immunostimulatory potential in both autologous and allogeneic settings. Furthermore, genetically modified DCs maintain their ability to respond to maturation signals and secrete bioactive IL-12, indicating that they are fully functional. Finally, the level of transgene expression is preserved in the therapeutically relevant mature DCs, demonstrating that there is neither promoter-silencing nor loss of transduced cells during maturation. The novel approach described should advance lentiviral-mediated monocyte-derived DC transduction towards a clinical reality.

  14. A functional TOC complex contributes to gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Karen Strohm

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although plastid sedimentation has long been recognized as important for a plant’s perception of gravity, it was recently shown that plastids play an additional function in gravitropism. The Translocon at the Outer envelope membrane of Chloroplasts (TOC complex transports nuclear-encoded proteins into plastids, and a receptor of this complex, Toc132, was previously hypothesized to contribute to gravitropism either by directly functioning as a gravity signal transducer or by indirectly mediating the plastid localization of a gravity signal transducer. Here we show that mutations in multiple genes encoding TOC complex components affect gravitropism in a genetically sensitized background and that the cytoplasmic acidic domain of Toc132 is not required for its involvement in this process. Furthermore, mutations in Toc132 enhance the gravitropic defect of a mutant whose amyloplasts lack starch. Finally, we show that the levels of several nuclear-encoded root proteins are altered in toc132 mutants. These data suggest that the TOC complex indirectly mediates gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis and support the idea that plastids are involved in gravitropism not only through their ability to sediment but also as part of the signal transduction mechanism.

  15. A functional TOC complex contributes to gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Allison K; Barrett-Wilt, Greg A; Masson, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Although plastid sedimentation has long been recognized as important for a plant's perception of gravity, it was recently shown that plastids play an additional function in gravitropism. The Translocon at the Outer envelope membrane of Chloroplasts (TOC) complex transports nuclear-encoded proteins into plastids, and a receptor of this complex, Toc132, was previously hypothesized to contribute to gravitropism either by directly functioning as a gravity signal transducer or by indirectly mediating the plastid localization of a gravity signal transducer. Here we show that mutations in multiple genes encoding TOC complex components affect gravitropism in a genetically sensitized background and that the cytoplasmic acidic domain of Toc132 is not required for its involvement in this process. Furthermore, mutations in TOC132 enhance the gravitropic defect of a mutant whose amyloplasts lack starch. Finally, we show that the levels of several nuclear-encoded root proteins are altered in toc132 mutants. These data suggest that the TOC complex indirectly mediates gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis and support the idea that plastids are involved in gravitropism not only through their ability to sediment but also as part of the signal transduction mechanism.

  16. Empirical Properties of Multilingual Phone-To-Word Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    EMPIRICAL PROPERTIES OF MULTILINGUAL PHONE-TO-WORD TRANSDUCTION Geoffrey Zweig Microsoft Research gzweig@microsoft.com Jon Nedel U.S. Department of...69–88, 2002. [2] G. Saon, G. Zweig , and D. Povey, “Anatomy of an extremely fast LVCSR decoder,” in Interspeech, 2005. [3] S. Ortmanns, H. Ney, and A

  17. Exploring signal transduction networks using mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, L.A.T.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics can be used to answer a diversity of biological questions. In this thesis, we describe the application of several MS-based proteomics approaches to get insight into several aspects of signal transduction. In Chapter 2, quantitative global phosphoproteomics are

  18. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S;

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...

  19. Coordinate gene regulation by fimbriae-induced signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    of Ag43 production. No effect was observed in an oxyR mutant. We conclude that fimbriae expression per se constitutes a signal transduction mechanism that affects a number of unrelated genes via the thiol-disulfide status of OxyR. Thus, phase variation in fimbrial expression is coordinated...

  20. Diffusion wave and signal transduction in biological live cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Tian You

    2012-01-01

    Transduction of mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals is a fundamental subject for cell physics. In the experiments of FRET signal in cells a wave propagation in nanoscope was observed. We here develop a diffusion wave concept and try to give an explanation to the experimental observation. The theoretical prediction is in good agreement to result of the experiment.

  1. Signal transduction by growth factor receptors: signaling in an instant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Blagoev, Blagoy;

    2007-01-01

    -out by mass spectrometry-based proteomics has allowed exciting views on the very early events in signal transduction. Activation profiles of regulated phosphorylation sites on epidermal growth factor receptor and downstream signal transducers showed different kinetics within the first ten seconds...

  2. Cell biology symposium: Membrane trafficking and signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    In general, membrane trafficking is a broad group of processes where proteins and other large molecules are distributed throughout the cell as well as adjacent extracellular spaces. Whereas signal transduction is a process where signals are transmitted through a series of chemical or molecular event...

  3. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.; Testerink, C.; Wang, M.

    1998-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C), c

  4. The sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue: prospecting signal transduction in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Mendes Souza

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available EST sequencing has enabled the discovery of many new genes in a vast array of organisms, and the utility of this approach to the scientific community is greatly increased by the establishment of fully annotated databases. The present study aimed to identify sugarcane ESTs sequenced in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST project (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br that corresponded to signal transduction components. We also produced a sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br/private/mining-reports/QG/QG-mining.htm that covered the main categories and pathways. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs encoding enzymes for hormone (gibberellins, ethylene, auxins, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid biosynthetic pathways were found and tissue specificity was inferred from their relative frequency of occurrence in the different libraries. Whenever possible, transducers of hormones and plant peptide signaling were catalogued to the respective pathway. Over 100 receptors were found in sugarcane, which contains a large family of Ser/Thr kinase receptors and also photoreceptors, histidine kinase receptors and their response regulators. G-protein and small GTPases were analyzed and compared to known members of these families found in mammalian and plant systems. Major kinase and phosphatase pathways were mapped, with special attention being given to the MAP kinase and the inositol pathway, both of which are well known in plants.O sequenciamento de ESTs (etiquetas de sequencias transcritas tem possibilitado a descoberta de muitos novos genes em uma ampla variedade de organismos. Um aumento do aproveitamento desta informação pela comunidade científica tem sido possível graças ao desenvolvimento de base de dados contendo seqüências completamente anotadas. O trabalho aqui relatado teve como objetivo a identificação de ESTs de cana de açúcar seqüenciadas através do projeto SUCEST (http://sucest.lad.ic. unicamp.br que

  5. Broad-minded links cell cycle-related kinase to cilia assembly and hedgehog signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyuk Wan; Norman, Ryan X; Tran, John; Fuller, Kimberly P; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Eggenschwiler, Jonathan T

    2010-02-16

    Recent findings indicate that mammalian Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction occurs within primary cilia, although the cell biological mechanisms underlying both Shh signaling and ciliogenesis have not been fully elucidated. We show that an uncharacterized TBC domain-containing protein, Broad-minded (Bromi), is required for high-level Shh responses in the mouse neural tube. We find that Bromi controls ciliary morphology and proper Gli2 localization within the cilium. By use of a zebrafish model, we further show that Bromi is required for proper association between the ciliary membrane and axoneme. Bromi physically interacts with cell cycle-related kinase (CCRK), whose Chlamydomonas homolog regulates flagellar length. Biochemical and genetic interaction data indicate that Bromi promotes CCRK stability and function. We propose that Bromi and CCRK control the structure of the primary cilium by coordinating assembly of the axoneme and ciliary membrane, allowing Gli proteins to be properly activated in response to Shh signaling.

  6. Signal transduction pathways in liver and the influence of hepatitis C virus infection on their activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdalena M Dabrowska; Anatol Panasiuk; Robert Flisiak

    2009-01-01

    In liver, the most intensively studied transmembrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways are the Janus kinase signal transduction pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinases signal transduction pathway, the transforming growth factor b signal transduction pathway, the tumor necrosis factor a signal transduction pathway and the recently discovered sphingolipid signal transduction pathway. All of them are activated by many different cytokines and growth factors. They regulate specific cell mechanisms such as hepatocytes proliferation, growth, differentiation, adhesion, apoptosis, and synthesis and degradation of the extracellular matrix. The replication cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is intracellular and requires signal transduction to the nucleus to regulate transcription of its genes. Moreover, HCV itself, by its structural and nonstructural proteins, could influence the activity of the second signal messengers. Thus, the inhibition of the transmembrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways could be a new therapeutic target in chronic hepatitis C treatment.

  7. Optimization of lentiviral vector transduction into peripheral blood mononuclear cells in combination with the fibronectin fragment CH-296 stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Hideto; Goto, Yumi; Yamakawa, Satoko; Tanaka, Shinya; Tosaka, Yasuhiro; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi

    2011-03-01

    Large scale T-cell expansion and efficient gene transduction are required for adoptive T-cell gene therapy. Based on our previous observations, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) can be expanded efficiently while conserving a naïve phenotype by stimulating with both recombinant human fibronectin fragment (CH-296) and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies. In this article, we explored the possibility of using this co-stimulation method to generate engineered T cells using lentiviral vector. Human PBMCs were stimulated with anti-CD3 together with immobilized CH-296 or anti-CD28 antibody as well as anti-CD3/anti-CD28 conjugated beads and transduced with lentiviral vector simultaneously. Co-stimulation with CH-296 gave superior transduction efficiency than with anti-CD28. Next, PBMCs were stimulated and transduced with anti-CD3/CH-296 or with anti-CD3/CD28 beads. T-cell expansion, gene transfer efficiencies and immunophenotypes were analysed. Stimulation with anti-CD3/CH-296 resulted in more than 10-times higher cell expansion and higher gene transfer efficiency with conservation of the naïve phenotype compared with anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation method. Thus, lentiviral transduction with anti-CD3/CH-296 co-stimulation is an efficient way to generate large numbers of genetically modified T cells and may be suitable for many gene therapy protocols that use adoptive T-cell transfer therapy.

  8. DMPD: LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18304834 LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Cytokine. ...2008 May;42(2):145-51. Epub 2008 Mar 4. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS/TLR4 signal transduction path...way. PubmedID 18304834 Title LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Authors Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Publica

  9. Molecular methods for the study of signal transduction in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2013-09-03

    Novel and improved analytical methods have led to a rapid increase in our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying plant signal transduction. Progress has been made both at the level of single-component analysis and in vivo imaging as well as at the systems level where transcriptomics and particularly phosphoproteomics afford a window into complex biological responses. Here we review the role of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP in plant signal transduction as well as the discovery and biochemical and biological characterization of an increasing number of complex multi-domain nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP from ATP and GTP, respectively. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  10. A PKD Channel-based Biosensor for Taste Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunsheng; Du, Liping; Hu, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a micro electrode array (MEA)-based biosensor for taste transduction using heterologous expressed taste polycystic kidney disease-like (PKD) channels as molecular sensors. Taste PKD1L3/2L1 channels were expressed on the plasma membrane of human embryo kidney (HEK)-293 cells [1]. Then the cells were cultured on the surface of MEA chip [2] to record the responses of PKD channels to sour stimulations by monitoring membrane potential. The results indicate this MEA-based biosensor can record the special off-responses of PKD channels to sour stimulation in a non-invasive manner for a long term. It may provide an alternative tool for the research of taste transduction, especially for the characterization of taste ion channels.

  11. The new sideway of CNTF signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The action of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on intercellular free Ca2+ concentrations [Ca2+]I induced by glutamate (Glu) in primary cultured hippocampal neurons were detected with Fura2/AM,a Ca2+-sensitive fluorophore,and the morphological influence of G-protein on it was ob- jected. Glu could induce rapid increase of [Ca2+]I in hippo- campal neurons. CNTF had no significant action on [Ca2+]I in resting hippocampal neurons. However,after incubation of CNTF for 5 min,the increase of [Ca2+]I in hippocampal neurons rapidly induced by Glu was inhibited. Pretussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G protein could block the action. These results indicate that a new non-genomic rapid sideway might exist in the upper stream of CNTF signal transduction pathway,which was related to Ca2+ signal transduction.

  12. Role of the phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway in the endometrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenza Rita Lo Vasco

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium concentration triggers physiological events in all cell types. Unregulated elevation in calcium concentrations is often cytotoxic.In fact, uncontrolled calcium levels alter proteins’ function, apoptosis regulation, as well as proliferation, secretion and contraction.Calcium levels are tightly regulated.A great interest was paid to signal transduction pathways for their role in mammalian reproduction.The role of phosphoinositide(PI) signal transduction pathway and related phosphoinositide-specific phospholipaseC(PI-PLC) enzymes in the regulation of calcium levels was actively studied and characterized.However, the role of PI signaling andPI-PLC enzymes in the endometrium is far to be completely highlighted.In the present review the role ofPI, the expression of selectedPI-PLC enzymes and the crosstalk with further signaling systems in the endometrium will be discussed.

  13. Study of spatial signal transduction in bistable switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Yao, Cheng-Gui; Tang, Jun; Liu, Li-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Bistable switch modules are among the most important fundamental motifs in signal-transduction pathways. To better understand their spatial signal transduction, we model the diffusion process in the one-dimensional (1-D) domain. We find that when none of the elements diffuse, the response of the system exhibits a spatial switch-like property. However, when one of the elements is highly diffusible, the response of the system does not show any spatial switching behavior. Furthermore, we observe that the spatial responses of the system are more sensitive to the time constant of the switch when none of the elements are diffusible. Further, a slow loop keeps the system in the high steady state more positions than that in the fast loop. Finally, we consolidate our numerical results analytically by performing a mathematical method.

  14. Maxwell's demon in biochemical signal transduction with feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Sosuke; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2015-06-23

    Signal transduction in living cells is vital to maintain life itself, where information transfer in noisy environment plays a significant role. In a rather different context, the recent intensive research on 'Maxwell's demon'-a feedback controller that utilizes information of individual molecules-have led to a unified theory of information and thermodynamics. Here we combine these two streams of research, and show that the second law of thermodynamics with information reveals the fundamental limit of the robustness of signal transduction against environmental fluctuations. Especially, we find that the degree of robustness is quantitatively characterized by an informational quantity called transfer entropy. Our information-thermodynamic approach is applicable to biological communication inside cells, in which there is no explicit channel coding in contrast to artificial communication. Our result could open up a novel biophysical approach to understand information processing in living systems on the basis of the fundamental information-thermodynamics link.

  15. Tuning piezoresistive transduction in nanomechanical resonators by geometrical asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llobet, J.; Sansa, M.; Lorenzoni, M.; Pérez-Murano, F., E-mail: francesc.perez@csic.es [Institut de Microelectrònica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Borrisé, X. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra Spain (Spain); San Paulo, A. [Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (IMM-CSIC), 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-17

    The effect of geometrical asymmetries on the piezoresistive transduction in suspended double clamped beam nanomechanical resonators is investigated. Tapered silicon nano-beams, fabricated using a fast and flexible prototyping method, are employed to determine how the asymmetry affects the transduced piezoresistive signal for different mechanical resonant modes. This effect is attributed to the modulation of the strain in pre-strained double clamped beams, and it is confirmed by means of finite element simulations.

  16. Post-translational modification of PII signal transduction proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mike eMerrick

    2015-01-01

    The PII proteins constitute one of the most widely distributed families of signal transduction proteins in nature. They are pivotal players in the control of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria and archaea, and are also found in the plastids of plants. Quite remarkably PII proteins control the activities of a diverse range of enzymes, transcription factors and membrane transport proteins, and in all known cases they achieve their regulatory effect by direct interaction with their target. PII prot...

  17. Identification of photoperception and light signal transduction pathways in citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Quecini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies employing model species have elucidated several aspects of photoperception and light signal transduction that control plant development. However, the information available for economically important crops is scarce. Citrus genome databases of expressed sequence tags (EST were investigated in order to identify genes coding for functionally characterized proteins responsible for light-regulated developmental control in model plants. Approximately 176,200 EST sequences from 53 libraries were queried and all bona fide and putative photoreceptor gene families were found in citrus species. We have identified 53 orthologs for several families of transcriptional regulators and cytoplasmic proteins mediating photoreceptor-induced responses although some important Arabidopsis phytochrome- and cryptochrome-signaling components are absent from citrus sequence databases. The main gene families responsible for phototropin-mediated signal transduction were present in citrus transcriptome, including general regulatory factors (14-3-3 proteins, scaffolding elements and auxin-responsive transcription factors and transporters. A working model of light perception, signal transduction and response-eliciting in citrus is proposed based on the identified key components. These results demonstrate the power of comparative genomics between model systems and economically important crop species to elucidate several aspects of plant physiology and metabolism.

  18. An Electrokinetic Model of Transduction in the Semicircular Canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Dennis P.

    1970-01-01

    Transduction in the semicircular canal was studied by focusing an infrared beam on either side of exposed ampullae from the posterior canals of Rana pipiens. The direction of fluid movement resulting from a stimulus was inferred by observing the polarity of the change in afferent impulse mean rate relative to the spontaneous value. On the basis of the accepted functional polarization of this receptor, the results indicate that fluid moved toward the warmer side of the ampulla. Convection and thermal reception were shown to be unlikely explanations for these results. Morover, cupular displacements toward the warmer side would not be expected. Because thermo-osmosis can cause fluid to move toward the warmer side in a gelatin membrane, the results can be interpreted as evidence that thermo-osmosis occurred in the gelatinous cupula and influenced the transduction mechanism. Thermo-osmosis of liquids appears to be due to an electric field that is set up in a charged membrane; hence, the hair cells might have detected an electric field that occurred in the cupula during thermo-osmosis. Electroreception might be an important link in the transduction of physiological stimuli also. Rotational stimuli could result in weak electric fields in the cupula by the mechanoelectric effect. Cupular displacements could be important for large stimuli, but extrapolations to threshold stimuli suggest displacements of angstrom amplitudes. Therefore, electroreception by the hair cells could be an explanation of the great sensitivity that has been observed in the semicircular canal and other labyrinthine receptors. PMID:5496906

  19. State-time spectrum of signal transduction logic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNamara, Aidan; Terfve, Camille; Henriques, David; Peñalver Bernabé, Beatriz; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio

    2012-08-01

    Despite the current wealth of high-throughput data, our understanding of signal transduction is still incomplete. Mathematical modeling can be a tool to gain an insight into such processes. Detailed biochemical modeling provides deep understanding, but does not scale well above relatively a few proteins. In contrast, logic modeling can be used where the biochemical knowledge of the system is sparse and, because it is parameter free (or, at most, uses relatively a few parameters), it scales well to large networks that can be derived by manual curation or retrieved from public databases. Here, we present an overview of logic modeling formalisms in the context of training logic models to data, and specifically the different approaches to modeling qualitative to quantitative data (state) and dynamics (time) of signal transduction. We use a toy model of signal transduction to illustrate how different logic formalisms (Boolean, fuzzy logic and differential equations) treat state and time. Different formalisms allow for different features of the data to be captured, at the cost of extra requirements in terms of computational power and data quality and quantity. Through this demonstration, the assumptions behind each formalism are discussed, as well as their advantages and disadvantages and possible future developments.

  20. Signal Transduction Pathways of TNAP: Molecular Network Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Négyessy, László; Györffy, Balázs; Hanics, János; Bányai, Mihály; Fonta, Caroline; Bazsó, Fülöp

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing body of evidence pointing on the involvement of tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) in brain function and diseases like epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease, our understanding about the role of TNAP in the regulation of neurotransmission is severely limited. The aim of our study was to integrate the fragmented knowledge into a comprehensive view regarding neuronal functions of TNAP using objective tools. As a model we used the signal transduction molecular network of a pyramidal neuron after complementing with TNAP related data and performed the analysis using graph theoretic tools. The analyses show that TNAP is in the crossroad of numerous pathways and therefore is one of the key players of the neuronal signal transduction network. Through many of its connections, most notably with molecules of the purinergic system, TNAP serves as a controller by funnelling signal flow towards a subset of molecules. TNAP also appears as the source of signal to be spread via interactions with molecules involved among others in neurodegeneration. Cluster analyses identified TNAP as part of the second messenger signalling cascade. However, TNAP also forms connections with other functional groups involved in neuronal signal transduction. The results indicate the distinct ways of involvement of TNAP in multiple neuronal functions and diseases.

  1. Key cancer cell signal transduction pathways as therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Melisi, Davide; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2006-02-01

    Growth factor signals are propagated from the cell surface, through the action of transmembrane receptors, to intracellular effectors that control critical functions in human cancer cells, such as differentiation, growth, angiogenesis, and inhibition of cell death and apoptosis. Several kinases are involved in transduction pathways via sequential signalling activation. These kinases include transmembrane receptor kinases (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR); or cytoplasmic kinases (e.g., PI3 kinase). In cancer cells, these signalling pathways are often altered and results in a phenotype characterized by uncontrolled growth and increased capability to invade surrounding tissue. Therefore, these crucial transduction molecules represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. This review will summarize current knowledge of key signal transduction pathways, that are altered in cancer cells, as therapeutic targets for novel selective inhibitors. The most advanced targeted agents currently under development interfere with function and expression of several signalling molecules, including the EGFR family; the vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors; and cytoplasmic kinases such as Ras, PI3K and mTOR.

  2. Transduction in Streptomyces hygroscopicus mediated by the temperate bacteriophage SH10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süss, F; Klaus, S

    1981-01-01

    The temperate actinophage SH10 mediates generalized transduction in Streptomyces hygroscopicus at low frequency. The efficiency of transduction depends on the average phage input, age of outgrowing spores of the recipient and on the selective marker. The highest EOT was found for the auxotrophic mutants 21(phe-) and 5(try-) (4.2 x 10(-6) and 2.7 x 10(-6), respectively). Transduction of the thermosensitive mutant NG14-216 ts 35 was two orders of magnitude lower (2.5 x 10(-8)). The transductant colonies segregated into stable and unstable clones. Stable transductants were never found to be lysogenic for phage SH10.

  3. Exploring Transduction Mechanisms of Protein Transduction Domains (PTDs in Living Cells Utilizing Single-Quantum Dot Tracking (SQT Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific protein domains known as protein transduction domains (PTDs can permeate cell membranes and deliver proteins or bioactive materials into living cells. Various approaches have been applied for improving their transduction efficacy. It is, therefore, crucial to clarify the entry mechanisms and to identify the rate-limiting steps. Because of technical limitations for imaging PTD behavior on cells with conventional fluorescent-dyes, how PTDs enter the cells has been a topic of much debate. Utilizing quantum dots (QDs, we recently tracked the behavior of PTD that was derived from HIV-1 Tat (TatP in living cells at the single-molecule level with 7-nm special precision. In this review article, we initially summarize the controversy on TatP entry mechanisms; thereafter, we will focus on our recent findings on single-TatP-QD tracking (SQT, to identify the major sequential steps of intracellular delivery in living cells and to discuss how SQT can easily provide direct information on TatP entry mechanisms. As a primer for SQT study, we also discuss the latest findings on single particle tracking of various molecules on the plasma membrane. Finally, we discuss the problems of QDs and the challenges for the future in utilizing currently available QD probes for SQT. In conclusion, direct identification of the rate-limiting steps of PTD entry with SQT should dramatically improve the methods for enhancing transduction efficiency.

  4. Dual transgene expression in murine cerebellar Purkinje neurons by viral transduction in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie K Bosch

    Full Text Available Viral-vector mediated gene transfer to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in vivo is a promising avenue for gene therapy of cerebellar ataxias and for genetic manipulation in functional studies of animal models of cerebellar disease. Here, we report the results of experiments designed to identify efficient methods for viral transduction of adult murine Purkinje neurons in vivo. For these analyses, several lentiviral and an adeno-associated virus (AAV, serotype 1, vector with various promoter combinations were generated and compared for in situ transduction efficiency, assayed by fluorescent reporter protein expression in Purkinje neurons. Additional experiments were also conducted to identify the optimal experimental strategy for co-expression of two proteins in individual Purkinje neurons. Of the viruses tested, AAV1 with a CAG promoter exhibited the highest specificity for Purkinje neurons. To deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron, several methods were tested, including: an internal ribosome entry site (IRES, a 2A sequence, a dual promoter vector, and co-injection of two viruses. Efficient expression of both proteins in the same Purkinje neuron was only achieved by co-injecting two AAV1-CAG viruses. We found that use of an AAV1-CAG virus outperformed similar lentivirus vectors and that co-injection of two AAV1-CAG viruses could be used to efficiently deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron in adult mice. AAV1 with a CAG promoter is highly efficient and selective at transducing adult cerebellar Purkinje neurons and two AAV-CAG viruses can be used to efficiently express two proteins in the same neuron in vivo.

  5. Adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells: in vitro responses and in vivo immune responses after cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Treacy

    Full Text Available Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are non-hematopoietic cells with multi-lineage potential which makes them attractive targets for regenerative medicine applications. However, to date, therapeutic success of MSC-therapy is limited and the genetic modification of MSCs using viral vectors is one option to improve their therapeutic potential. Ex-vivo genetic modification of MSCs using recombinant adenovirus (Ad could be promising to reduce undesired immune responses as Ad will be removed before cell/tissue transplantation. In this regard, we investigated whether Ad-modification of MSCs alters their immunological properties in vitro and in vivo. We found that Ad-transduction of MSCs does not lead to up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class I and II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. Moreover, Ad-transduction caused no significant changes in terms of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, chemokine and chemokine receptor and Toll-like receptor expression. In addition, Ad-modification of MSCs had no affect on their ability to suppress T cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo injection of Ad-transduced MSCs did not change the frequency of various immune cell populations (antigen presenting cells, T helper and cytotoxic T cells, natural killer and natural killer T cells neither in the blood nor in tissues. Our results indicate that Ad-modification has no major influence on the immunological properties of MSCs and therefore can be considered as a suitable gene vector for therapeutic applications of MSCs.

  6. The ABA signal transduction mechanism in commercial crops: learning from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Giora

    2012-08-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) affects a wide range of stages of plant development as well as the plant's response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Manipulation of ABA signaling in commercial crops holds promising potential for improving crop yields. Several decades of research have been invested in attempts to identify the first components of the ABA signaling cascade. It was only in 2009, that two independent groups identified the PYR/PYL/RCAR protein family as the plant ABA receptor. This finding was followed by a surge of studies on ABA signal transduction, many of them using Arabidopsis as their model. The ABA signaling cascade was found to consist of a double-negative regulatory mechanism assembled from three protein families. These include the ABA receptors, the PP2C family of inhibitors, and the kinase family, SnRK2. It was found that ABA-bound PYR/RCARs inhibit PP2C activity, and that PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s. Researchers today are examining how the elucidation of the ABA signaling cascade in Arabidopsis can be applied to improvements in commercial agriculture. In this article, we have attempted to review recent studies which address this issue. In it, we discuss various approaches useful in identifying the genetic and protein components involved. Finally, we suggest possible commercial applications of genetic manipulation of ABA signaling to improve crop yields.

  7. Notch and the awesome power of genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Iva

    2012-07-01

    Notch is a receptor that mediates cell-cell interactions in animal development, and aberrations in Notch signal transduction can cause cancer and other human diseases. Here, I describe the major advances in the Notch field from the identification of the first mutant in Drosophila almost a century ago through the elucidation of the unusual mechanism of signal transduction a little over a decade ago. As an essay for the GENETICS Perspectives series, it is my personal and critical commentary as well as an historical account of discovery.

  8. Characterization of the ABA signal transduction pathway in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Uri; Biton, Iris; Schwartz, Amnon; Ben-Ari, Giora

    2012-05-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many key processes in plants including the response to abiotic stress. ABA signal transduction consists of a double-negative regulatory mechanism, whereby ABA-bound PYR/RCARs inhibit PP2C activity, and PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s. We studied and analyzed the various genes participating in the ABA signaling cascade of the grape (Vitis vinifera). The grape ABA signal transduction consists of at least six SnRK2s. Yeast two-hybrid system was used to test direct interactions between core components of grape ABA signal transduction. We found that a total of forty eight interactions can occur between the various components. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and abiotic stresses such as drought, high salt concentration and cold, were applied to vines growing in a hydroponic system. These stresses regulated the expression of various grape SnRK2s as well as ABFs in leaves and roots. Based on the interactions between SnRK2s and its targets and the expression pattern, we suggest that VvSnRK2.1 and VvSnRK2.6, can be considered the major VvSnRK2 candidates involved in the stomata response to abiotic stress. Furthermore, we found that the expression pattern of the two grape ABF genes indicates organ specificity of these genes. The key role of ABA signaling in response to abiotic stresses makes the genes involve in this signaling potential candidates for manipulation in programs designed to improve fruit tree performance in extreme environments.

  9. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Quan; Poulsen, Lars K.; Gerwien, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles...... of beta1 and beta2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR)....

  10. [Regulation of plant height by gibberellins biosynthesis and signal transduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lingzhu; Cheng, Jianhui; Li, Lin; Wu, Jiang

    2012-02-01

    Plant height is one of the most important agronomic traits that could affect both crop yield and quality. Among all the hormones, gibberellins are crucial to regulate plant height. Cloning and molecular mechanism research of the plant height genes associated gibberellins have extremely important value for the regulation of crop growth and agricultural production, and have been widely used in rice, wheat and other grain crops breeding. In order to promote utilization of gibberellins in fruit trees, flowers and other horticultural crops breeding, we reviewed the regulation of plant height by gibberellins biosynthesis and signal transduction at the molecular level in this paper.

  11. Myosin individualized: single nucleotide polymorphisms in energy transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieben Eric D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin performs ATP free energy transduction into mechanical work in the motor domain of the myosin heavy chain (MHC. Energy transduction is the definitive systemic feature of the myosin motor performed by coordinating in a time ordered sequence: ATP hydrolysis at the active site, actin affinity modulation at the actin binding site, and the lever-arm rotation of the power stroke. These functions are carried out by several conserved sub-domains within the motor domain. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affect the MHC sequence of many isoforms expressed in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and non-muscle tissue. The purpose of this work is to provide a rationale for using SNPs as a functional genomics tool to investigate structurefunction relationships in myosin. In particular, to discover SNP distribution over the conserved sub-domains and surmise what it implies about sub-domain stability and criticality in the energy transduction mechanism. Results An automated routine identifying human nonsynonymous SNP amino acid missense substitutions for any MHC gene mined the NCBI SNP data base. The routine tested 22 MHC genes coding muscle and non-muscle isoforms and identified 89 missense mutation positions in the motor domain with 10 already implicated in heart disease and another 8 lacking sequence homology with a skeletal MHC isoform for which a crystallographic model is available. The remaining 71 SNP substitutions were found to be distributed over MHC with 22 falling outside identified functional sub-domains and 49 in or very near to myosin sub-domains assigned specific crucial functions in energy transduction. The latter includes the active site, the actin binding site, the rigid lever-arm, and regions facilitating their communication. Most MHC isoforms contained SNPs somewhere in the motor domain. Conclusions Several functional-crucial sub-domains are infiltrated by a large number of SNP substitution sites suggesting these

  12. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapder, Tarunendu; Talukder, Srijeeta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Banik, Suman K.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique. PMID:26812153

  13. Bio-inspired signal transduction with heterogeneous networks of nanoscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Javier; Manzanares, José A.; Mafé, Salvador

    2012-02-01

    Networks of single-electron transistors mimic some of the essential properties of neuron populations, because weak electrical signals trigger network oscillations with a frequency proportional to the input signal. Input potentials representing the pixel gray level of a grayscale image can then be converted into rhythms and the image can be recovered from these rhythms. Networks of non-identical nanoscillators complete the noisy transduction more reliably than identical ones. These results are important for signal processing schemes and could support recent studies suggesting that neuronal variability enhances the processing of biological information.

  14. Coordinate gene regulation by fimbriae-induced signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    whether fimbriae expression can affect expression of other genes, Analysis of gene expression in two E.coli strains, differing in the fim locus, indicated the flu gene to be affected. The flu gene encodes the antigen 43 (Ag43) surface protein, specifically involved in bacterial aggregation...... of Ag43 production. No effect was observed in an oxyR mutant. We conclude that fimbriae expression per se constitutes a signal transduction mechanism that affects a number of unrelated genes via the thiol-disulfide status of OxyR. Thus, phase variation in fimbrial expression is coordinated...

  15. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarunendu Mapder

    Full Text Available To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique.

  16. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapder, Tarunendu; Talukder, Srijeeta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Banik, Suman K

    2016-01-01

    To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique.

  17. Solar-powered nanomechanical transduction from crystalline molecular rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Sven O; Cole, Jacqueline M

    2013-06-25

    A photoinduced solid-state SO₂ isomerism drives a larger mechanical change (benzene-ring rotation) in a neighbouring ion (i.e., the system acts as a solar-powered molecular transducer). The ring rotation and SO₂ photoisomerisation are observed using in situ X-ray crystallography and are controllable, reproducible, and metastable at low temperatures. This discovery presents a new range of materials for solar-energy-based molecular transduction. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Roles of lipid turnover in transmembrane signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, B R

    1991-11-01

    Cells of higher organisms respond to external stimuli with a cascade of intracellular biochemical events initiated by binding of a hormone, growth factor, or neurotransmitter to a specific cell surface receptor. Previously well-characterized signal transduction pathways involve cyclic nucleotides as intracellular second messengers. Over the past decade, increasing attention has been focused on other signaling pathways in which membrane lipids serve as second messengers or their precursors. This review describes current understanding of these pathways and points to recent discoveries likely to open new frontiers in the coming decade.

  19. Mechanical transduction mechanisms of RecA-like molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jung-Chi

    2011-12-01

    A majority of ATP-dependent molecular motors are RecA-like proteins, performing diverse functions in biology. These RecA-like molecular motors consist of a highly conserved core containing the ATP-binding site. Here I examined how ATP binding within this core is coupled to the conformational changes of different RecA-like molecular motors. Conserved hydrogen bond networks and conformational changes revealed two major mechanical transduction mechanisms: (1) intra-domain conformational changes and (2) inter-domain conformational changes. The intra-domain mechanism has a significant hydrogen bond rearrangement within the domain containing the P-loop, causing relative motion between two parts of the protein. The inter-domain mechanism exhibits little conformational change in the P-loop domain. Instead, the major conformational change is observed between the P-loop domain and an adjacent domain or subunit containing the arginine finger. These differences in the mechanical transduction mechanisms may link to the underlying energy surface governing a Brownian ratchet or a power stroke.

  20. Dual-transduction-mode sensing approach for chemical detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liang (Frank); Swensen, James S.

    2012-11-01

    Smart devices such as electronic nose have been developed for application in many fields like national security, defense, environmental regulation, health care, pipeline monitoring and food analysis. Despite a large array of individual sensors, these devices still lack the ability to identify a target at a very low concentration out of a mixture of odors, limited by a single type of transduction as the sensing response to distinguish one odor from another. Here, we propose a new sensor architecture empowering each individual sensor with multi-dimensional transduction signals. The resolving power of our proposed electronic nose is thereby multiplied by a set of different and independent variables which synergistically will provide a unique combined fingerprint for each analyte. We demonstrate this concept using a Light Emitting Organic Field-Effect Transistor (LEOFET). Sensing response has been observed on both electrical and optical output signals from a green LEOFET upon exposure to an explosive taggant, with optical signal exhibiting much higher sensitivity. This new sensor architecture opens a field of devices for smart detection of chemical and biological targets.

  1. Gravity perception and signal transduction in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, I.; Wolke, A.; Briegleb, W.; Ivanova, K.

    Cellular signal processing in multi-, as well as in unicellular organisms, has to rely on fundamentally similar mechanisms. Free-living single cells often use the gravity vector for their spatial orientation (gravitaxis) and show distinct gravisensitivities. In this investigation the gravisensitive giant ameboid cell Physarum polycephalum (Myxomycetes, acellular slime molds) is used. Its gravitaxis and the modulation of its intrinsic rhythmic contraction activity by gravity was demonstrated in 180 °turn experiments and in simulated, as well as in actual, near-weightlessness studies (fast-rotating clinostat; Spacelab D1, IML-1). The stimulus perception was addressed in an IML-2 experiment, which provided information on the gravireceptor itself by the determination of the cell's acceleration-sensitivity threshold. Ground-based experiments designed to elucidate the subsequent steps in signal transduction leading to a motor response, suggest that an acceleration stimulus induces changes in the level of second messenger, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), indicating also that the acceleration-stimulus signal transduction chain of Physarum uses an ubiquitous second messenger pathway.

  2. Spatial regulation and the rate of signal transduction activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizar N Batada

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Of the many important signaling events that take place on the surface of a mammalian cell, activation of signal transduction pathways via interactions of cell surface receptors is one of the most important. Evidence suggests that cell surface proteins are not as freely diffusible as implied by the classic fluid mosaic model and that their confinement to membrane domains is regulated. It is unknown whether these dynamic localization mechanisms function to enhance signal transduction activation rate or to minimize cross talk among pathways that share common intermediates. To determine which of these two possibilities is more likely, we derive an explicit equation for the rate at which cell surface membrane proteins interact based on a Brownian motion model in the presence of endocytosis and exocytosis. We find that in the absence of any diffusion constraints, cell surface protein interaction rate is extremely high relative to cytoplasmic protein interaction rate even in a large mammalian cell with a receptor abundance of a mere two hundred molecules. Since a larger number of downstream signaling events needs to take place, each occurring at a much slower rate than the initial activation via association of cell surface proteins, we conclude that the role of co-localization is most likely that of cross-talk reduction rather than coupling efficiency enhancement.

  3. Receptor domains of two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Julie; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard

    2011-05-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are found ubiquitously in prokaryotes, and in archaea, fungi, yeast and some plants, where they regulate physiologic and molecular processes at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Two-component systems sense changes in environmental conditions when a specific ligand binds to the receptor domain of the histidine kinase sensory component. The structures of many histidine kinase receptors are known, including those which sense extracellular and cytoplasmic signals. In this review, we discuss the basic architecture of two-component signalling circuits, including known system ligands, structure and function of both receptor and signalling domains, the chemistry of phosphotransfer, and cross-talk between different two-component pathways. Given the importance of these systems in regulating cellular responses, many biochemical techniques have been developed for their study and analysis. We therefore also review current methods used to study two-component signalling, including a new affinity-based proteomics approach used to study inducible resistance to the antibiotic vancomycin through the VanSR two-component signal transduction system.

  4. Fetus Sound Stimulation: Cilia Memristor Effect of Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Jankovic-Raznatovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. Methods. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Results. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1 shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2 shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the “memristor” property. Conclusion. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction.

  5. Optical Microresonators for Sensing and Transduction: A Materials Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylman, Kevin D; Knapper, Kassandra A; Horak, Erik H; Rea, Morgan T; Vanga, Sudheer K; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2017-08-01

    Optical microresonators confine light to a particular microscale trajectory, are exquisitely sensitive to their microenvironment, and offer convenient readout of their optical properties. Taken together, this is an immensely attractive combination that makes optical microresonators highly effective as sensors and transducers. Meanwhile, advances in material science, fabrication techniques, and photonic sensing strategies endow optical microresonators with new functionalities, unique transduction mechanisms, and in some cases, unparalleled sensitivities. In this progress report, the operating principles of these sensors are reviewed, and different methods of signal transduction are evaluated. Examples are shown of how choice of materials must be suited to the analyte, and how innovations in fabrication and sensing are coupled together in a mutually reinforcing cycle. A tremendously broad range of capabilities of microresonator sensors is described, from electric and magnetic field sensing to mechanical sensing, from single-molecule detection to imaging and spectroscopy, from operation at high vacuum to in live cells. Emerging sensing capabilities are highlighted and put into context in the field. Future directions are imagined, where the diverse capabilities laid out are combined and advances in scalability and integration are implemented, leading to the creation of a sensor unparalleled in sensitivity and information content. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Fetus sound stimulation: cilia memristor effect of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic-Raznatovic, Svetlana; Dragojevic-Dikic, Svetlana; Rakic, Snezana; Nikolic, Branka; Plesinac, Snezana; Tasic, Lidija; Perisic, Zivko; Sovilj, Mirjana; Adamovic, Tatjana; Koruga, Djuro

    2014-01-01

    This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA) circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS) and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB) and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1) shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2) shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the "memristor" property. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction.

  7. Advances in NF-κB Signaling Transduction and Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription have been the most attractive subjects for both basic research and pharmaceutical industries due to its important roles in both physiological and pathogenesis, particularly the close association of dysregulated NF-κB with tumorgenesis and inflammation. Several novel intracellular molecular events that regulate NF-κB activity have been described recently, including the discovery of an alternative signaling pathway that appears inducing a specific subset genes involved in adoptive immune response. Multi-level and multi-dimensional regulation of NF-κB activity by phosphorylation and acetylation modifications have unveiled and became the hottest targets for potentially tissue specific molecular interventions. Another emerging mechanism for NF-κB-responsive gene's regulation where NF-κB participates the transcriptional regulation independent of its cognate regulatory binding site within the target gene's promoter but facilitating the transaction activity of other involved transcription factors,that implicated an novel transcriptional activities for NF-κB. Thus, the current review will focus on these recent progresses that have been made on NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004; 1(6):425-435.

  8. Advances in NF-κB Signaling Transduction and Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Xiao

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription have been the most attractive subjects for both basic research and pharmaceutical industries due to its important roles in both physiological and pathogenesis, particularly the close association of dysregulated NF-κB with tumorgenesis and inflammation. Several novel intracellular molecular events that regulate NF-κB activity have been described recently, including the discovery of an alternative signaling pathway that appears inducing a specific subset genes involved in adoptive immune response. Multi-level and multi-dimensional regulation of NF-κB activity by phosphorylation and acetylation modifications have unveiled and became the hottest targets for potentially tissue specific molecular interventions. Another emerging mechanism for NF-κB-responsive gene's regulation where NF-κB participates the transcriptional regulation independent of its cognate regulatory binding site within the target gene's promoter but facilitating the transaction activity of other involved transcription factors,that implicated an novel transcriptional activities for NF-κB. Thus, the current review will focus on these recent progresses that have been made on NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):425-435.

  9. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...... of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  10. Heavy metal accumulation and signal transduction in herbaceous and woody plants: Paving the way for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhi-Bin; He, Jiali; Polle, Andrea; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Heavy metal (HM)-accumulating herbaceous and woody plants are employed for phytoremediation. To develop improved strategies for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency, knowledge of the microstructural, physiological and molecular responses underlying HM-accumulation is required. Here we review the progress in understanding the structural, physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying HM uptake, transport, sequestration and detoxification, as well as the regulation of these processes by signal transduction in response to HM exposure. The significance of genetic engineering for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency is also discussed. In herbaceous plants, HMs are taken up by roots and transported into the root cells via transmembrane carriers for nutritional ions. The HMs absorbed by root cells can be further translocated to the xylem vessels and unloaded into the xylem sap, thereby reaching the aerial parts of plants. HMs can be sequestered in the cell walls, vacuoles and the Golgi apparatuses. Plant roots initially perceive HM stress and trigger the signal transduction, thereby mediating changes at the molecular, physiological, and microstructural level. Signaling molecules such as phytohormones, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO), modulate plant responses to HMs via differentially expressed genes, activation of the antioxidative system and coordinated cross talk among different signaling molecules. A number of genes participated in HM uptake, transport, sequestration and detoxification have been functionally characterized and transformed to target plants for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency. Fast growing woody plants hold an advantage over herbaceous plants for phytoremediation in terms of accumulation of high HM-amounts in their large biomass. Presumably, woody plants accumulate HMs using similar mechanisms as herbaceous counterparts, but the processes of HM accumulation and signal transduction can be more complex in woody plants.

  11. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in

  12. Signal Sensing and Transduction by Histidine Kinases as Unveiled through Studies on a Temperature Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriata, Luciano A; Albanesi, Daniela; Dal Peraro, Matteo; de Mendoza, Diego

    2017-06-20

    Histidine kinases (HK) are the sensory proteins of two-component systems, responsible for a large fraction of bacterial responses to stimuli and environmental changes. Prototypical HKs are membrane-bound proteins that phosphorylate cognate response regulator proteins in the cytoplasm upon signal detection in the membrane or periplasm. HKs stand as potential drug targets but also constitute fascinating systems for studying proteins at work, specifically regarding the chemistry and mechanics of signal detection, transduction through the membrane, and regulation of catalytic outputs. In this Account, we focus on Bacillus subtilis DesK, a membrane-bound HK part of a two-component system that maintains appropriate membrane fluidity at low growth temperatures. Unlike most HKs, DesK has no extracytoplasmic signal-sensing domains; instead, sensing is carried out by 10 transmembrane helices (coming from two protomers) arranged in an unknown structure. The fifth transmembrane helix from each protomer connects, without any of the intermediate domains found in other HKs, into the dimerization and histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain located in the cytoplasm, which is followed by the ATP-binding domains (ABD). Throughout the years, genetic, biochemical, structural, and computational studies on wild-type, mutant, and truncated versions of DesK allowed us to dissect several aspects of DesK's functioning, pushing forward a more general understanding of its own structure/function relationships as well as those of other HKs. We have shown that the sensing mechanism is rooted in temperature-dependent membrane properties, most likely a combination of thickness, fluidity, and water permeability, and we have proposed possible mechanisms by which DesK senses these properties and transduces the signals. X-ray structures and computational models have revealed structural features of TM and cytoplasmic regions in DesK's kinase- and phosphatase-competent states. Biochemical and genetic

  13. Monocyte Signal Transduction Receptors in Active and Latent Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Druszczynska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that promote either resistance or susceptibility to TB disease remain insufficiently understood. Our aim was to compare the expression of cell signaling transduction receptors, CD14, TLR2, CD206, and β2 integrin LFA-1 on monocytes from patients with active TB or nonmycobacterial lung disease and healthy individuals with M.tb latency and uninfected controls to explain the background of the differences between clinical and subclinical forms of M.tb infection. A simultaneous increase in the expression of the membrane bound mCD14 receptor and LFA-1 integrin in patients with active TB may be considered a prodrome of breaking immune control by M.tb bacilli in subjects with the latent TB and absence of clinical symptoms.

  14. Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked Hybrid Actuation/Transduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A novel full piezoelectric multilayer stacked hybrid actuation/transduction system. The system demonstrates significantly-enhanced electromechanical performance by utilizing the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer stacked negative and positive strain components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that for this system, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The system consists of at least 2 layers which include electromechanically active components. The layers are arranged such that when electric power is applied, one layer contracts in a transverse direction while the second layer expands in a transverse direction which is perpendicular to the transverse direction of the first layer. An alternate embodiment includes a third layer. In this embodiment, the outer two layers contract in parallel transverse directions while the middle layer expands in a transverse direction which is perpendicular to the transverse direction of the outer layers.

  15. Simulation of signal transduction in model multiprotein systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Julius

    2009-03-01

    To simulate the dynamics of multiprotein machines, I have developed a method called multiconformer Brownian dynamics (mcBD). In this method, proteins rotate and translate via Brownian motion while their conformations are varied among a prestored set of structures on a simplified energy landscape, taking into account inter-protein interactions. As an example, I build a simple model of a G-protein coupled receptor/G-protein complex, and show that ligand binding causes conformational shifts, which induce GDP to leave, GTP to bind, and the complex to dissociate. The two proteins couple their fast fluctuations together into large-scale coordinated functional motions, resulting in signal transduction. I vary the shapes, electrostatics, and energy landscapes of the proteins independently and examine the impact this has on the system's function. In one result, increasing the binding between proteins improves the fidelity of communication, but at the expense of overall switching frequency.

  16. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  17. Melusin Promotes a Protective Signal Transduction Cascade in Stressed Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, Matteo; Brancaccio, Mara

    2016-01-01

    Melusin is a chaperone protein selectively expressed in heart and skeletal muscles. Melusin expression levels correlate with cardiac function in pre-clinical models and in human patients with aortic stenosis. Indeed, previous studies in several animal models indicated that Melusin plays a broad cardioprotective role in different pathological conditions. Chaperone proteins, besides playing a role in protein folding, are also able to facilitate supramolecular complex formation and conformational changes due to activation/deactivation of signaling molecules. This role sets chaperone proteins as crucial regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways. In particular Melusin activates AKT and ERK1/2 signaling, protects cardiomyocytes from apoptosis and induces a compensatory hypertrophic response in several pathological conditions. Therefore, selective delivery of the Melusin gene in heart via cardiotropic adenoviral associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9), may represent a new promising gene-therapy approach for different cardiac pathologies. PMID:27672636

  18. Signal Transduction Model of Magnetic Sensing in Cryptochrome Mediated Photoreception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Phillise Tiffeny

    While migratory birds have long been known to use the Earth's magnetic field for navigation, the precise biophysical mechanism behind this magnetic sense remains unconfirmed. A leading theory of magnetoreception suggests a chemical compass model with a yet undetermined molecular reaction site and unknown magnetically sensitive reactants. The cryptochrome photoreceptor has emerged as a promising candidate site. This investigation numerically models the first order kinetics of cryptochrome mediated photoreception, in order to evaluate its ability to function as a magnetic sensor and transduce orientation information along a neural pathway. A signal-to-noise ratio is defined to quantify the threshold for the functioning of a cryptochrome-based chemical compass. The model suggests that a flavin-superoxide radical pair in cryptochrome functions as the chemical reactants for magnetoreception. Such a cryptochrome-based signal transduction model reasonably predicts the general light intensity and wavelength effects that have been experimentally observed in migratory birds.

  19. Signal Transduction and Intracellular Trafficking by the Interleukin 36 Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Siddhartha S.; Singh, Divyendu; Raymond, Ernest L.; Ganesan, Rajkumar; Caviness, Gary; Grimaldi, Christine; Woska, Joseph R.; Mennerich, Detlev; Brown, Su-Ellen; Mbow, M. Lamine; Kao, C. Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Improper signaling of the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R), a member of the IL-1 receptor family, has been associated with various inflammation-associated diseases. However, the requirements for IL-36R signal transduction remain poorly characterized. This work seeks to define the requirements for IL-36R signaling and intracellular trafficking. In the absence of cognate agonists, IL-36R was endocytosed and recycled to the plasma membrane. In the presence of IL-36, IL-36R increased accumulation in LAMP1+ lysosomes. Endocytosis predominantly used a clathrin-mediated pathway, and the accumulation of the IL-36R in lysosomes did not result in increased receptor turnover. The ubiquitin-binding Tollip protein contributed to IL-36R signaling and increased the accumulation of both subunits of the IL-36R. PMID:26269592

  20. MAPK Assays in Arabidopsis MAMP-PRR Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hoo Sun; Sheen, Jen

    2017-01-01

    Activation of MAPK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase) cascades after MAMP (Microbe-Associated Molecular Pattern) perception through PRR (Pattern Recognition Receptor) is one of the first conserved responses when plants encounter microbial organisms. Phosphorylation of various cellular factors in the MAMP-PRR pathway by MAPK cascades is critical for broad-spectrum plant innate immunity. Measurement of MAPK activation and identification of MAPK phosphorylation targets in the MAMP-PRR signal transduction pathway are essential to understand how plants reprogram their cellular processes to cope with unfavorable microbial attack. Here, we describe detailed protocols of three assays measuring MAPK activity after MAMP perception: (1) immune-blotting analysis with anti-phospho ERK1/2 antibody; (2) in-gel kinase assay using a general substrate myelin basic protein (MBP); (3) an in vitro kinase assay to evaluate phosphorylation of MAPK substrate candidates during MAMP-PRR signaling based on a protoplast expression system.

  1. Modeling of biological doses and mechanical effects on bone transduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rieger, Romain; Jennane, Rachid; 10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.01.003

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress, hormones like parathyroid and mineral elements like calcium mediate the amplitude of stimulus signal which affects the rate of bone remodeling. The current study investigates the theoretical effects of different metabolic doses in stimulus signal level on bone. The model was built considering the osteocyte as the sensing center mediated by coupled mechanical shear stress and some biological factors. The proposed enhanced model was developed based on previously published works dealing with different aspects of bone transduction. It describes the effects of physiological doses variations of Calcium, Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E2 on the stimulus level sensed by osteocytes in response to applied shear stress generated by interstitial fluid flow. We retained the metabolic factors (Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide, and Prostaglandin E2) as parameters of bone cell mechanosensitivity because stimulation/inhibition of induced pathways stimulates osteogenic response in vivo. We t...

  2. The mechanism of signal transduction by two-component systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casino, Patricia; Rubio, Vicente; Marina, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Two-component systems, composed of a homodimeric histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), are major signal transduction devices in bacteria. Typically the signal triggers HK autophosphorylation at one His residue, followed by phosphoryl transfer from the phospho-His to an Asp residue in the RR. Signal extinction frequently involves phospho-RR dephosphorylation by a phosphatase activity of the HK. Our understanding of these reactions and of the determinants of partner specificity among HK-RR couples has been greatly increased by recent crystal structures and biochemical experiments on HK-RR complexes. Cis-autophosphorylation (one subunit phosphorylates itself) occurs in some HKs while trans-autophosphorylation takes place in others. We review and integrate this new information, discuss the mechanism of the three reactions and propose a model for transmembrane signaling by these systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Determinants of specificity in two-component signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornaia, Anna I; Laub, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Maintaining the faithful flow of information through signal transduction pathways is critical to the survival and proliferation of organisms. This problem is particularly challenging as many signaling proteins are part of large, paralogous families that are highly similar at the sequence and structural levels, increasing the risk of unwanted cross-talk. To detect environmental signals and process information, bacteria rely heavily on two-component signaling systems comprised of sensor histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators. Although most species encode dozens of these signaling pathways, there is relatively little cross-talk, indicating that individual pathways are well insulated and highly specific. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that enforce this specificity. Further, we highlight recent studies that have revealed how these mechanisms evolve to accommodate the introduction of new pathways by gene duplication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Signal transduction in Mimosa pudica: biologically closed electrical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Foster, Justin C; Markin, Vladislav S

    2010-05-01

    Biologically closed electrical circuits operate over large distances in biological tissues. The activation of such circuits can lead to various physiological and biophysical responses. Here, we analyse the biologically closed electrical circuits of the sensitive plant Mimosa pudica Linn. using electrostimulation of a petiole or pulvinus by the charged capacitor method, and evaluate the equivalent electrical scheme of electrical signal transduction inside the plant. The discharge of a 100 microF capacitor in the pulvinus resulted in the downward fall of the petiole in a few seconds, if the capacitor was charged beforehand by a 1.5 V power supply. Upon disconnection of the capacitor from Ag/AgCl electrodes, the petiole slowly relaxed to the initial position. The electrical properties of the M. pudica were investigated, and an equivalent electrical circuit was proposed that explains the experimental data.

  5. Reactive oxygen species mediate insulin signal transduction in mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Takeshi; Goto, Motomitsu; Tominaga, Takashi; Sugiyama, Mariko; Tsunekawa, Taku; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Banno, Ryoichi; Suga, Hidetaka; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Arima, Hiroshi

    2016-04-21

    In the hypothalamus, several reports have implied that ROS mediate physiological effects of insulin. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of insulin-induced ROS production and the effect of ROS on insulin signal transduction in mouse hypothalamic organotypic cultures. Insulin increased intracellular ROS, which were suppressed by NADPH oxidase inhibitor. H2O2 increased phospho-insulin receptor β (p-IRβ) and phospho-Akt (p-Akt) levels. Insulin-induced increases in p-IRβ and p-Akt levels were attenuated by ROS scavenger or NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Our data suggest that insulin-induced phosphorylation of IRβ and Akt is mediated via ROS which are predominantly produced by NADPH oxidase in mouse hypothalamus.

  6. Signal transduction pathway profiling of individual tumor samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Carsten

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction pathways convey information from the outside of the cell to transcription factors, which in turn regulate gene expression. Our objective is to analyze tumor gene expression data from microarrays in the context of such pathways. Results We use pathways compiled from the TRANSPATH/TRANSFAC databases and the literature, and three publicly available cancer microarray data sets. Variation in pathway activity, across the samples, is gauged by the degree of correlation between downstream targets of a pathway. Two correlation scores are applied; one considers all pairs of downstream targets, and the other considers only pairs without common transcription factors. Several pathways are found to be differentially active in the data sets using these scores. Moreover, we devise a score for pathway activity in individual samples, based on the average expression value of the downstream targets. Statistical significance is assigned to the scores using permutation of genes as null model. Hence, for individual samples, the status of a pathway is given as a sign, + or -, and a p-value. This approach defines a projection of high-dimensional gene expression data onto low-dimensional pathway activity scores. For each dataset and many pathways we find a much larger number of significant samples than expected by chance. Finally, we find that several sample-wise pathway activities are significantly associated with clinical classifications of the samples. Conclusion This study shows that it is feasible to infer signal transduction pathway activity, in individual samples, from gene expression data. Furthermore, these pathway activities are biologically relevant in the three cancer data sets.

  7. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C. [Unite d`Endocrinologie Moleculaire, Jouy en Josas (France)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Transductive multi-view zero-shot learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanwei; Hospedales, Timothy M; Xiang, Tao; Gong, Shaogang

    2015-11-01

    Most existing zero-shot learning approaches exploit transfer learning via an intermediate semantic representation shared between an annotated auxiliary dataset and a target dataset with different classes and no annotation. A projection from a low-level feature space to the semantic representation space is learned from the auxiliary dataset and applied without adaptation to the target dataset. In this paper we identify two inherent limitations with these approaches. First, due to having disjoint and potentially unrelated classes, the projection functions learned from the auxiliary dataset/domain are biased when applied directly to the target dataset/domain. We call this problem the projection domain shift problem and propose a novel framework, transductive multi-view embedding, to solve it. The second limitation is the prototype sparsity problem which refers to the fact that for each target class, only a single prototype is available for zero-shot learning given a semantic representation. To overcome this problem, a novel heterogeneous multi-view hypergraph label propagation method is formulated for zero-shot learning in the transductive embedding space. It effectively exploits the complementary information offered by different semantic representations and takes advantage of the manifold structures of multiple representation spaces in a coherent manner. We demonstrate through extensive experiments that the proposed approach (1) rectifies the projection shift between the auxiliary and target domains, (2) exploits the complementarity of multiple semantic representations, (3) significantly outperforms existing methods for both zero-shot and N-shot recognition on three image and video benchmark datasets, and (4) enables novel cross-view annotation tasks.

  9. Genetic Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Genetics Archive Regulation of Genetic Tests Genetic Discrimination Overview Many Americans fear that participating in research ... I) and employment (Title II). Read more Genetic Discrimination and Other Laws Genetic Discrimination and Other Laws ...

  10. Cochlear gene therapy with ancestral AAV in adult mice: complete transduction of inner hair cells without cochlear dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Jun; Hashimoto, Ken; Xiao, Ru; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Liberman, M. Charles

    2017-01-01

    The use of viral vectors for inner ear gene therapy is receiving increased attention for treatment of genetic hearing disorders. Most animal studies to date have injected viral suspensions into neonatal ears, via the round window membrane. Achieving transduction of hair cells, or sensory neurons, throughout the cochlea has proven difficult, and no studies have been able to efficiently transduce sensory cells in adult ears while maintaining normal cochlear function. Here, we show, for the first time, successful transduction of all inner hair cells and the majority of outer hair cells in an adult cochlea via virus injection into the posterior semicircular canal. We used a “designer” AAV, AAV2/Anc80L65, in which the main capsid proteins approximate the ancestral sequence state of AAV1, 2, 8, and 9. Our injections also transduced ~10% of spiral ganglion cells and a much larger fraction of their satellite cells. In the vestibular sensory epithelia, the virus transduced large numbers of hair cells and virtually all the supporting cells, along with close to half of the vestibular ganglion cells. We conclude that this viral vector and this delivery route hold great promise for gene therapy applications in both cochlear and vestibular sense organs. PMID:28367981

  11. Light-sensitive coupling of rhodopsin and melanopsin to Gi/o and Gq signal transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengxiu; Sun, Wenyu; Kramp, Kristopher; Zheng, Maohua; Salom, David; Jastrzebska, Beata; Jin, Hui; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) initiates signal transduction cascades that affect many physiological responses. The worm Caenorhabditis elegans expresses >1000 of these receptors along with their cognate heterotrimeric G proteins. Here, we report properties of 9-cis-retinal regenerated bovine opsin [(b)isoRho] and human melanopsin [(h)Mo], two light-activated, heterologously expressed GPCRs in the nervous system of C. elegans with various genetically engineered alterations. Profound transient photoactivation of Gi/o signaling by (b)isoRho led to a sudden and transient loss of worm motility dependent on cyclic adenosine monophosphate, whereas transient photoactivation of Gq signaling by (h)Mo enhanced worm locomotion dependent on phospholipase Cβ. These transgenic C. elegans models provide a unique way to study the consequences of Gi/o and Gq signaling in vivo with temporal and spatial precision and, by analogy, their relationship to human neuromotor function.—Cao, P., Sun, W., Kramp, K., Zheng, M., Salom, D., Jastrzebska, B., Jin, H., Palczewski, K., Feng, Z. Light-sensitive coupling of rhodopsin and melanopsin to Gi/o and Gq signal transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:22090313

  12. Noninvasive imaging of receptor function: signal transduction pathways and physiological readouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Markus

    2008-09-01

    Intracellular signaling describes the process of information propagation from the cell surface to the location within the cell where a biological response is executed. Signaling pathways involve a complex network of interacting molecular species. It is obvious that information on the activation of individual pathways is highly relevant in biomedical research, both from a diagnostic point of view and for evaluating therapeutic interventions. Modern molecular imaging approaches are capable of providing such information in a temporo-spatially resolved manner. Two strategies can be pursued: imaging individual pathway molecules or targeting protein-protein interactions, which are key elements of the signaling networks. Assays such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer, two-hybrid, protein fragment complementation or protein splicing have been adapted to allow studies in live mice. The major issues in imaging signal transduction are sensitivity, as critical species occur at low concentration, and the fact that the processes targeted are intracellular, that is, exogenous probes have to cross the cell membrane. Currently, the majority of these imaging methods are based on genetic engineering approaches and are therefore confined to experimental studies in animals. Exogenous probes for targeting intracellular pathway molecules are being developed and may allow translation into the clinic.

  13. Viral infection: an evolving insight into the signal transduction pathways responsible for the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Girish J; Hatch, Steven; Marshall, William L

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune response is initiated by the interaction of stereotypical pathogen components with genetically conserved receptors for extracytosolic pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or intracytosolic nucleic acids. In multicellular organisms, this interaction typically clusters signal transduction molecules and leads to their activations, thereby initiating signals that activate innate immune effector mechanisms to protect the host. In some cases programmed cell death-a fundamental form of innate immunity-is initiated in response to genotoxic or biochemical stress that is associated with viral infection. In this paper we will summarize innate immune mechanisms that are relevant to viral pathogenesis and outline the continuing evolution of viral mechanisms that suppress the innate immunity in mammalian hosts. These mechanisms of viral innate immune evasion provide significant insight into the pathways of the antiviral innate immune response of many organisms. Examples of relevant mammalian innate immune defenses host defenses include signaling to interferon and cytokine response pathways as well as signaling to the inflammasome. Understanding which viral innate immune evasion mechanisms are linked to pathogenesis may translate into therapies and vaccines that are truly effective in eliminating the morbidity and mortality associated with viral infections in individuals.

  14. Involvement of the Cpx signal transduction pathway of E. coli in biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorel, C; Vidal, O; Prigent-Combaret, C; Vallet, I; Lejeune, P

    1999-09-01

    In a genetic screening directed to identify genes involved in biofilm formation, mutations in the cpxA gene were found to reduce biofilm formation by affecting microbial adherence to solid surfaces. This effect was detected in Escherichia coli K12 as well as in E. coli strains isolated from patients with catheter-related bacteremia. We show that the negative effect of the cpxA mutation on biofilm formation results from a decreased transcription of the curlin encoding csgA gene. The effect of the cpxA mutation could not be observed in cpxR- mutants, suggesting that they affect the same regulatory pathway. The cpxA101 mutation abolishes cpxA phosphatase activity and results in the accumulation of phosphorylated CpxR. Features of the strain carrying the cpxA101 mutation are a reduced ability to form biofilm and low levels of csgA transcription. Our results indicate that the cpxA gene increases the levels of csgA transcription by dephosphorylation of CpxR, which acts as a negative regulator at csgA. Thus, we propose the existence of a new signal transduction pathway involved in the adherence process in addition to the EnvZ-OmpR two-component system.

  15. Remodeling the clock: coactivators and signal transduction in the circadian clockworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Frank

    2009-03-01

    Most organisms on earth such as cyanobacteria, fungi, plants, insects, animals, and humans synchronize their physiological and behavioral activities with the environmental cycles of day and night. Significant progress has been made in unraveling the genetic components that constitute a molecular circadian clock, which facilitates the temporal control of physiology and behavior. Clock genes assemble interlocked transcriptional/translational feedback loops that underlie the circadian oscillations. Recent investigations revealed that posttranslational regulation of clock proteins is crucial for functioning of the molecular oscillator and for precise temporal control of circadian transcription. This review provides an overview of the homologous clockworks in Drosophila and mammals, with a special focus on recent insights in the posttranslational regulation of clock proteins as well as the role of coactivators, repressors, and signal transduction for circadian controlled genome-wide transcription. The emerging mechanisms of clock gene regulation provide an understanding of the temporal control of transcription in general and the circadian orchestration of physiology and behavior in particular.

  16. The mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter: regulation by auxiliary subunits and signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhun, Bong Sook; Mishra, Jyotsna; Monaco, Sarah; Fu, Deming; Jiang, Wenmin; Sheu, Shey-Shing; O-Uchi, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis, the Ca(2+) influx-efflux balance, is responsible for the control of numerous cellular functions, including energy metabolism, generation of reactive oxygen species, spatiotemporal dynamics of Ca(2+) signaling, and cell growth and death. Recent discovery of the molecular identity of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) provides new possibilities for application of genetic approaches to study the mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx mechanism in various cell types and tissues. In addition, the subsequent discovery of various auxiliary subunits associated with MCU suggests that mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is not solely regulated by a single protein (MCU), but likely by a macromolecular protein complex, referred to as the MCU-protein complex (mtCUC). Moreover, recent reports have shown the potential role of MCU posttranslational modifications in the regulation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake through mtCUC. These observations indicate that mtCUCs form a local signaling complex at the inner mitochondrial membrane that could significantly regulate mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling, as well as numerous mitochondrial and cellular functions. In this review we discuss the current literature on mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake mechanisms, with a particular focus on the structure and function of mtCUC, as well as its regulation by signal transduction pathways, highlighting current controversies and discrepancies.

  17. Scraping through the ice: uncovering the role of TRPM8 in cold transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Daniel D; Knowlton, Wendy M; McKemy, David D

    2011-06-01

    The proper detection of environmental temperatures is essential for the optimal growth and survival of organisms of all shapes and phyla, yet only recently have the molecular mechanisms for temperature sensing been elucidated. The discovery of temperature-sensitive ion channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily has been pivotal in explaining how temperatures are sensed in vivo, and here we will focus on the lone member of this cohort, TRPM8, which has been unequivocally shown to be cold sensitive. TRPM8 is expressed in somatosensory neurons that innervate peripheral tissues such as the skin and oral cavity, and recent genetic evidence has shown it to be the principal transducer of cool and cold stimuli. It is remarkable that this one channel, unlike other thermosensitive TRP channels, is associated with both innocuous and noxious temperature transduction, as well as cold hypersensitivity during injury and, paradoxically, cold-mediated analgesia. With ongoing research, the field is getting closer to answering a number of fundamental questions regarding this channel, including the cellular mechanisms of TRPM8 modulation, the molecular context of TRPM8 expression, as well as the full extent of the role of TRPM8 in cold signaling in vivo. These findings will further our understanding of basic thermotransduction and sensory coding, and may have important implications for treatments for acute and chronic pain.

  18. Membrane penetrating peptides greatly enhance baculovirus transduction efficiency into mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hong-Zhang [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wu, Carol P. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chao, Yu-Chan, E-mail: mbycchao@imb.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Catherine Yen-Yen, E-mail: liucat_2@yahoo.com [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Ligation of CTP with GP64 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} Fusion of PTD with VP39 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} CTP and PTD-carrying viruses improve the transduction of co-transduced baculoviruses. {yields} Virus entry and gene expression can be separate events in different cell types. -- Abstract: The baculovirus group of insect viruses is widely used for foreign gene introduction into mammalian cells for gene expression and protein production; however, the efficiency of baculovirus entry into mammalian cells is in general still low. In this study, two recombinant baculoviruses were engineered and their ability to improve viral entry was examined: (1) cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) was fused with baculovirus envelope protein, GP64, to produce a cytoplasmic membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-CTP); and (2) the protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV TAT protein was fused with the baculovirus capsid protein VP39 to form a nuclear membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-PTD). Transduction experiments showed that both viruses had better transduction efficiency than vE, a control virus that only expresses EGFP in mammalian cells. Interestingly, vE-CTP and vE-PTD were also able to improve the transduction efficiency of a co-transduced baculovirus, resulting in higher levels of gene expression. Our results have described new routes to further enhance the development of baculovirus as a tool for gene delivery into mammalian cells.

  19. Roles of ABA Signal Transduction during Higher Plant Seed Development and Germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Hongbo; Liang Zongsuo; Shao Mingan

    2003-01-01

    ABA is one of the 5 phytohormones in higher plants, which is also the most important hormone that regulates higher plants in response to environmental stress, by ABA signal transduction. Understanding ABA signal transduction at the molecular level is crucial to biology and ecology, and rational breeding complied with corresponding eco-environmental changes.Great advancements have taken place over the past 10 years by application of the 4rabidopsis experimental system. Many components involved in ABA signal transduction have been isolated and identified and a clear overall picture of gene expression and control for this transduction has become an Accepted fact. On the basis of the work in our laboratory, in conjunction with the data available at the moment, the authors have attempted to integrate ABA signal transduction pathways into a common one and give some insights into the relationship between ABA signal transduction and other hormone signal transduction pathways, with an emphasis upon the ABA signal transduction during higher plant seed development. A future challenge in this field is that different experimental systems are applied and various receptors and genes need to be characterized through the utilization of microarray chips.

  20. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Prado

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as a chaperone for the CGRP receptor. Instead, RCP is a novel signal transduction molecule that couples the CGRP receptor to the cellular signal transduction machinery. RCP thus represents a prototype for a new class of signal transduction proteins that are required for regulation of G protein-coupled receptors.

  1. Direct sensing and signal transduction during bacterial chemotaxis toward aromatic compounds in Comamonas testosteroni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhou; Ni, Bin; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Wu, Yu-Fan; He, Yun-Zhe; Parales, Rebecca E; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Micro-organisms sense and chemotactically respond to aromatic compounds. Although the existence of chemoreceptors that bind to aromatic attractants and subsequently trigger chemotaxis have long been speculated, such a chemoreceptor has not been demonstrated. In this report, we demonstrated that the chemoreceptor MCP2901 from Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 binds to aromatic compounds and initiates downstream chemotactic signaling in addition to its ability to trigger chemotaxis via citrate binding. The function of gene MCP2901 was investigated by genetic deletion from CNB-1 and genetic complementation of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP)-null mutant CNB-1Δ20. Results showed that the expression of MCP2901 in the MCP-null mutant restored chemotaxis toward nine tested aromatic compounds and nine carboxylic acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analyses demonstrated that the ligand-binding domain of MCP2901 (MCP2901LBD) bound to citrate, and weakly to gentisate and 4-hydroxybenzoate. Additionally, ITC assays indicated that MCP2901LBD bound strongly to 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate and 2-hydroxybenzoate, which are isomers of gentisate and 4-hydroxybenzoate respectively that are not metabolized by CNB-1. Agarose-in-plug and capillary assays showed that these two molecules serve as chemoattractants for CNB-1. Through constructing membrane-like MCP2901-inserted Nanodiscs and phosphorelay activity assays, we demonstrated that 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate and 2-hydroxybenzoate altered kinase activity of CheA. This is the first evidence of an MCP binding to an aromatic molecule and triggering signal transduction for bacterial chemotaxis.

  2. Differences in two-component signal transduction proteins among the genus Brucella: implications for host preference and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binnewies, Tim Terence; Ussery, David; Lavín, JL

    2010-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are the predominant bacterial signal transduction mechanisms. Species of the genus Brucella are genetically highly related and differ mainly in mammalian host adaptation and pathogenesis. In this study, TCS proteins encoded in the available genome sequences of Brucella...... species have been identified using bioinformatic methods. All the Brucella species share an identical set of TCS proteins, and the number of TCS proteins in the closely related opportunistic human pathogen Ochrobactrum anthropi was higher than in Brucella species as expected from its lifestyle. O....... anthropi lacks orthologs of the Brucella TCSs NodVW, TceSR and TcfSR, suggesting that these TCS proteins could be necessary for the adaptation of Brucella as an intracellular pathogen. This genomic analysis revealed the presence of a differential distribution of TCS pseudogenes among Brucella species...

  3. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-11-23

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions.

  4. NO, nitrotyrosine, and cyclic GMP in signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafy, K. A.; Krumenacker, J. S.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in biology has evolved from being recognized as an environmental pollutant to an endogenously produced substance involved in cell communication and signal transduction. NO is produced by a family of enzymes called nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), which can be stimulated by a variety of factors that mediate responses to various stimuli. NO can initiate its biological effects through activation of the heterodimeric enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), or through several other chemical reactions. Activation of sGC results in the production of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), an intracellular second messenger signaling molecule, which can subsequently mediate such diverse physiological events such as vasodilatation and immunomodulation. Chemically reactive NO can affect physiological changes through modifications to cellular proteins, one of which is tyrosine nitration. The demonstration that NO is involved in so many biological pathways indicates the importance of this endogenously produced substance, and suggests that there is much more to be discovered about its role in biology in years to come.

  5. Mannotriose regulates learning and memory signal transduction in the hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lina Zhang; Weiwei Dai; Xueli Zhang; Zhangbin Gong; Guoqin Jin

    2013-01-01

    Rehmannia is a commonly used Chinese herb, which improves learning and memory. However, the crucial components of the signal transduction pathway associated with this effect remain elusive. Pri-mary hippocampal neurons were cultured in vitro, insulted with high-concentration (1 × 10-4 mol/L) cor-ticosterone, and treated with 1 × 10-4 mol/L mannotriose. Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay and western blot analysis showed that hippocampal neuron survival rates and protein levels of glucocorti-coid receptor, serum and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinase, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were al dramatical y decreased after high-concentration corticosterone-induced injury. This effect was reversed by mannotriose, to a similar level as RU38486 and donepezil. Our findings indicate that mannotriose could protect hippocampal neurons from high-concentration corticosterone-induced injury. The mechanism by which this occurred was associated with levels of glucocorticoid receptor protein, serum and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinase, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  6. ROPs in the spotlight of plant signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berken, A

    2006-11-01

    Small guanine nucleotide binding proteins of the Rho family called ROP play a crucial role as regulators of signal transduction in plants. They participate in pathways that influence growth and development, and the adaptation of plants to various environmental situations. As members of the Ras superfamily, ROPs function as molecular switches cycling between a GDP-bound 'off' and a GTP-bound 'on' state in a strictly regulated manner. Latest research provided fascinating new insights into ROP regulation by novel guanine nucleotide exchange factors, unconventional GTPase activating proteins, and guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors, which apparently organize localized ROP activation. Important progress has also been made concerning signaling components upstream and downstream of the ROP cycle involving receptor-like serine/threonine kinases and effectors that can manipulate cytoskeletal dynamics, intracellular calcium levels, H2O2 production and further cellular targets. This review outlines the fast developing knowledge on ROP GTPases highlighting their specific features, regulation and roles in a cellular signaling context.

  7. Phosphoproteomics-based systems analysis of signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eKozuka-Hata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transduction systems coordinate complex cellular information to regulate biological events such as cell proliferation and differentiation. Although the accumulating evidence on widespread association of signaling molecules has revealed essential contribution of phosphorylation-dependent interaction networks to cellular regulation, their dynamic behavior is mostly yet to be analyzed. Recent technological advances regarding mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics have enabled us to describe the comprehensive status of phosphorylated molecules in a time-resolved manner. Computational analyses based on the phosphoproteome dynamics accelerate generation of novel methodologies for mathematical analysis of cellular signaling. Phosphoproteomics-based numerical modeling can be used to evaluate regulatory network elements from a statistical point of view. Integration with transcriptome dynamics also uncovers regulatory hubs at the transcriptional level. These omics-based computational methodologies, which have firstly been applied to representative signaling systems such as the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway, have now opened up a gate for systems analysis of signaling networks involved in immune response and cancer.

  8. BowTieBuilder: modeling signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schröder Adrian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensory proteins react to changing environmental conditions by transducing signals into the cell. These signals are integrated into core proteins that activate downstream target proteins such as transcription factors (TFs. This structure is referred to as a bow tie, and allows cells to respond appropriately to complex environmental conditions. Understanding this cellular processing of information, from sensory proteins (e.g., cell-surface proteins to target proteins (e.g., TFs is important, yet for many processes the signaling pathways remain unknown. Results Here, we present BowTieBuilder for inferring signal transduction pathways from multiple source and target proteins. Given protein-protein interaction (PPI data signaling pathways are assembled without knowledge of the intermediate signaling proteins while maximizing the overall probability of the pathway. To assess the inference quality, BowTieBuilder and three alternative heuristics are applied to several pathways, and the resulting pathways are compared to reference pathways taken from KEGG. In addition, BowTieBuilder is used to infer a signaling pathway of the innate immune response in humans and a signaling pathway that potentially regulates an underlying gene regulatory network. Conclusion We show that BowTieBuilder, given multiple source and/or target proteins, infers pathways with satisfactory recall and precision rates and detects the core proteins of each pathway.

  9. Signal transduction around thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP in atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuepper Michael

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, a novel interleukin-7-like cytokine, triggers dendritic cell-mediated inflammatory responses ultimately executed by T helper cells of the Th2 subtype. TSLP emerged as a central player in the development of allergic symptoms, especially in the airways, and is a prime regulatory cytokine at the interface of virus- or antigen-exposed epithelial cells and dendritic cells (DCs. DCs activated by epithelium-derived TSLP can promote naïve CD4+ T cells to adopt a Th2 phenotype, which in turn recruite eosinophilic and basophilic granulocytes as well as mast cells into the airway mucosa. These different cells secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines operative in inducing an allergic inflammation and atopic asthma. TSLP is, thus, involved in the control of both an innate and an adaptive immune response. Since TSLP links contact of allergen with the airway epithelium to the onset and maintainance of the asthmatic syndrome, defining the signal transduction underlying TSLP expression and function is of profound interest for a better understandimg of the disease and for the development of new therapeutics.

  10. Post-translational modification of PII signal transduction proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike eMerrick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The PII proteins constitute one of the most widely distributed families of signal transduction proteins in nature. They are pivotal players in the control of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria and archaea, and are also found in the plastids of plants. Quite remarkably PII proteins control the activities of a diverse range of enzymes, transcription factors and membrane transport proteins, and in all known cases they achieve their regulatory effect by direct interaction with their target. PII proteins in the Proteobacteria and the Actinobacteria are subject to post-translational modification by uridylylation or adenylylation respectively, whilst in some Cyanobacteria they can be modified by phosphorylation. In all these cases the protein’s modification state is influenced by the cellular nitrogen status and is thought to regulate its activity. However in many organisms there is no evidence for modification of PII proteins and indeed the ability of these proteins to respond to the cellular nitrogen status is fundamentally independent of post-translational modification. In this review we explore the role of post-translational modification in PII proteins in the light of recent studies.

  11. Signal transduction in cells of the immune system in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Kathrin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Life on Earth developed in the presence and under the constant influence of gravity. Gravity has been present during the entire evolution, from the first organic molecule to mammals and humans. Modern research revealed clearly that gravity is important, probably indispensable for the function of living systems, from unicellular organisms to men. Thus, gravity research is no more or less a fundamental question about the conditions of life on Earth. Since the first space missions and supported thereafter by a multitude of space and ground-based experiments, it is well known that immune cell function is severely suppressed in microgravity, which renders the cells of the immune system an ideal model organism to investigate the influence of gravity on the cellular and molecular level. Here we review the current knowledge about the question, if and how cellular signal transduction depends on the existence of gravity, with special focus on cells of the immune system. Since immune cell function is fundamental to keep the organism under imnological surveillance during the defence against pathogens, to investigate the effects and possible molecular mechanisms of altered gravity is indispensable for long-term space flights to Earth Moon or Mars. Thus, understanding the impact of gravity on cellular functions on Earth will provide not only important informations about the development of life on Earth, but also for therapeutic and preventive strategies to cope successfully with medical problems during space exploration.

  12. Modulation of signal transduction by tea catechins and related phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Masahito [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States); Weinstein, I. Bernard [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States)]. E-mail: ibw1@columbia.edu

    2005-12-11

    Epidemiologic studies in human populations and experimental studies in rodents provide evidence that green tea and its constituents can inhibit both the development and growth of tumors at a variety of tissue sites. In addition, EGCG, a major biologically active component of green tea, inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence that these effects are mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of the activity of specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and related downstream pathways of signal transduction. We also review evidence indicating that the antitumor effects of the related polyphenolic phytochemicals resveratrol, genistein, curcumin, and capsaicin are exerted via similar mechanisms. Some of these agents (EGCG, genistein, and curcumin) appear to directly target specific RTKs, and all of these compounds cause inhibition of the activity of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B, thus inhibiting cell proliferation and enhancing apoptosis. Critical areas of future investigation include: (1) identification of the direct molecular target(s) of EGCG and related polyphenolic compounds in cells; (2) the in vivo metabolism and bioavailability of these compounds; (3) the ancillary effects of these compounds on tumor-stromal interactions; (4) the development of synergistic combinations with other antitumor agents to enhance efficacy in cancer prevention and therapy, and also minimize potential toxicities.

  13. Rewiring the specificity of two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerker, Jeffrey M; Perchuk, Barrett S; Siryaporn, Albert; Lubin, Emma A; Ashenberg, Orr; Goulian, Mark; Laub, Michael T

    2008-06-13

    Two-component signal transduction systems are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to environmental stimuli. Bacteria often employ tens or hundreds of these paralogous signaling systems, comprised of histidine kinases (HKs) and their cognate response regulators (RRs). Faithful transmission of information through these signaling pathways and avoidance of detrimental crosstalk demand exquisite specificity of HK-RR interactions. To identify the determinants of two-component signaling specificity, we examined patterns of amino acid coevolution in large, multiple sequence alignments of cognate kinase-regulator pairs. Guided by these results, we demonstrate that a subset of the coevolving residues is sufficient, when mutated, to completely switch the substrate specificity of the kinase EnvZ. Our results shed light on the basis of molecular discrimination in two-component signaling pathways, provide a general approach for the rational rewiring of these pathways, and suggest that analyses of coevolution may facilitate the reprogramming of other signaling systems and protein-protein interactions.

  14. Evolution of two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, Emily J; Laub, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    To exist in a wide range of environmental niches, bacteria must sense and respond to a variety of external signals. A primary means by which this occurs is through two-component signal transduction pathways, typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase that receives the input stimuli and then phosphorylates a response regulator that effects an appropriate change in cellular physiology. Histidine kinases and response regulators have an intrinsic modularity that separates signal input, phosphotransfer, and output response; this modularity has allowed bacteria to dramatically expand and diversify their signaling capabilities. Recent work has begun to reveal the molecular basis by which two-component proteins evolve. How and why do orthologous signaling proteins diverge? How do cells gain new pathways and recognize new signals? What changes are needed to insulate a new pathway from existing pathways? What constraints are there on gene duplication and lateral gene transfer? Here, we review progress made in answering these questions, highlighting how the integration of genome sequence data with experimental studies is providing major new insights.

  15. The Evolution of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, Emily J.; Laub, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    To exist in a wide range of environmental niches, bacteria must sense and respond to a myriad of external signals. A primary means by which this occurs is through two-component signal transduction pathways, typically comprised of a histidine kinase that receives the input stimuli and a response regulator that effects an appropriate change in cellular physiology. Histidine kinases and response regulators have an intrinsic modularity that separates signal input, phosphotransfer, and output response; this modularity has allowed bacteria to dramatically expand and diversify their signaling capabilities. Recent work has begun to reveal the molecular basis by which two-component proteins evolve. How and why do orthologous signaling proteins diverge? How do cells gain new pathways and recognize new signals? What changes are needed to insulate a new pathway from existing pathways? What constraints are there on gene duplication and lateral gene transfer? Here, we review progress made in answering these questions, highlighting how the integration of genome sequence data with experimental studies is providing major new insights. PMID:22746333

  16. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  17. Glycation & the RAGE axis: targeting signal transduction through DIAPH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhtman, Alexander; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2017-02-01

    The consequences of chronic disease are vast and unremitting; hence, understanding the pathogenic mechanisms mediating such disorders holds promise to identify therapeutics and diminish the consequences. The ligands of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) accumulate in chronic diseases, particularly those characterized by inflammation and metabolic dysfunction. Although first discovered and reported as a receptor for advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the expansion of the repertoire of RAGE ligands implicates the receptor in diverse milieus, such as autoimmunity, chronic inflammation, obesity, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Areas covered: This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the ligand families of RAGE and data from human subjects and animal models on the role of the RAGE axis in chronic diseases. The recent discovery that the cytoplasmic domain of RAGE binds to the formin homology 1 (FH1) domain, DIAPH1, and that this interaction is essential for RAGE ligand-stimulated signal transduction, is discussed. Finally, we review therapeutic opportunities targeting the RAGE axis as a means to mitigate chronic diseases. Expert commentary: With the aging of the population and the epidemic of cardiometabolic disease, therapeutic strategies to target molecular pathways that contribute to the sequelae of these chronic diseases are urgently needed. In this review, we propose that the ligand/RAGE axis and its signaling nexus is a key factor in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and that therapeutic interruption of this pathway may improve quality and duration of life.

  18. Decoding the phosphorylation code in Hedgehog signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongbin Chen; Jin Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis,and its deregulation leads to numerous human disorders including cancer.Binding of Hh to Patched (Ptc),a twelve-transmembrane protein,alleviates its inhibition of Smoothened (Smo),a seven-transmembrane protein related to G-proteincoupled receptors (GPCRs),leading to Smo phosphorylation and activation.Smo acts through intracellular signaling complexes to convert the latent transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Gli from a truncated repressor to a fulllength activator,leading to derepression/activation of Hh target genes.Increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylation participates in almost every step in the signal relay from Smo to Ci/Gli,and that differential phosphorylation of several key pathway components may be crucial for translating the Hh morphogen gradient into graded pathway activities.In this review,we focus on the multifaceted roles that phosphorylation plays in Hh signal transduction,and discuss the conservation and difference between Drosophila and mammalian Hh signaling mechanisms.

  19. Nanomechanical motion transduction with a scalable localized gap plasmon architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxworthy, Brian J.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.

    2016-12-01

    Plasmonic structures couple oscillating electromagnetic fields to conduction electrons in noble metals and thereby can confine optical-frequency excitations at nanometre scales. This confinement both facilitates miniaturization of nanophotonic devices and makes their response highly sensitive to mechanical motion. Mechanically coupled plasmonic devices thus hold great promise as building blocks for next-generation reconfigurable optics and metasurfaces. However, a flexible approach for accurately batch-fabricating high-performance plasmomechanical devices is currently lacking. Here we introduce an architecture integrating individual plasmonic structures with precise, nanometre features into tunable mechanical resonators. The localized gap plasmon resonators strongly couple light and mechanical motion within a three-dimensional, sub-diffraction volume, yielding large quality factors and record optomechanical coupling strength of 2 THz.nm-1. Utilizing these features, we demonstrate sensitive and spatially localized optical transduction of mechanical motion with a noise floor of 6 fm.Hz-1/2, representing a 1.5 orders of magnitude improvement over existing localized plasmomechanical systems.

  20. New Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > The New Genetics The New Genetics Living Laboratories Classroom Poster Order a Free Copy ... Piece to a Century-Old Evolutionary Puzzle Computing Genetics Model Organisms RNA Interference The New Genetics is ...

  1. Top-Down CMOS-NEMS Polysilicon Nanowire with Piezoresistive Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigó, Eloi; Sansa, Marc; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Uranga, Arantxa; Barniol, Núria

    2015-07-14

    A top-down clamped-clamped beam integrated in a CMOS technology with a cross section of 500 nm × 280 nm has been electrostatic actuated and sensed using two different transduction methods: capacitive and piezoresistive. The resonator made from a single polysilicon layer has a fundamental in-plane resonance at 27 MHz. Piezoresistive transduction avoids the effect of the parasitic capacitance assessing the capability to use it and enhance the CMOS-NEMS resonators towards more efficient oscillator. The displacement derived from the capacitive transduction allows to compute the gauge factor for the polysilicon material available in the CMOS technology.

  2. Modeling Signal Transduction Networks: A comparison of two Stochastic Kinetic Simulation Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettigrew, Michel F.; Resat, Haluk

    2005-09-15

    Simulations of a scalable four compartment reaction model based on the well known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal transduction system are used to compare two stochastic algorithms ? StochSim and the Gibson-Gillespie. It is concluded that the Gibson-Gillespie is the algorithm of choice for most realistic cases with the possible exception of signal transduction networks characterized by a moderate number (< 100) of complex types, each with a very small population, but with a high degree of connectivity amongst the complex types. Keywords: Signal transduction networks, Stochastic simulation, StochSim, Gillespie

  3. Top-Down CMOS-NEMS Polysilicon Nanowire with Piezoresistive Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigó, Eloi; Sansa, Marc; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Uranga, Arantxa; Barniol, Núria

    2015-01-01

    A top-down clamped-clamped beam integrated in a CMOS technology with a cross section of 500 nm × 280 nm has been electrostatic actuated and sensed using two different transduction methods: capacitive and piezoresistive. The resonator made from a single polysilicon layer has a fundamental in-plane resonance at 27 MHz. Piezoresistive transduction avoids the effect of the parasitic capacitance assessing the capability to use it and enhance the CMOS-NEMS resonators towards more efficient oscillator. The displacement derived from the capacitive transduction allows to compute the gauge factor for the polysilicon material available in the CMOS technology. PMID:26184222

  4. Active Learning for Transductive Support Vector Machines with Applications to Text Classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a novel active learning approach for transductive support vector machines with applications to text classification. The concept of the centroid of the support vectors is proposed so that the selective sampling based on measuring the distance from the unlabeled samples to the centroid is feasible and simple to compute. With additional hypothesis, active learning offers better performance with comparison to regular inductive SVMs and transductive SVMs with random sampling,and it is even competitive to transductive SVMs on all available training data. Experimental results prove that our approach is efficient and easy to implement.

  5. New insights into transduction pathways that regulate boar sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado de Llera, A; Martin-Hidalgo, D; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J; Bragado, M J

    2016-01-01

    Detailed molecular mechanisms mediating signal transduction cascades that regulate boar sperm function involving Ser/Thr and tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins have been reviewed previously. Therefore, this review will focus in those kinase pathways identified recently (boar spermatozoa that regulate different functional spermatozoa processes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cell energy sensor kinase that was first identified in mammalian spermatozoa in 2012, and since then it has emerged as an essential regulator of boar sperm function. Signaling pathways leading to AMPK activation in boar sperm are highlighted in this review (PKA, CaMKKα/β, and PKC as well as Ca(2+) and cAMP messengers as upstream regulators). Interestingly, stimuli considered as cell stress (hyperosmotic stress, inhibition of mitochondrial activity, absence of intracellular Ca(2+)) markedly activate AMPK in boar spermatozoa. Moreover, AMPK plays a remarkable and necessary regulatory role in mammalian sperm function, controlling essential boar sperm functional processes such as motility, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, organization and fluidity of plasma membrane, and outer acrosome membrane integrity. These mentioned processes are all required under fluctuating environment of spermatozoa when transiting through the female reproductive tract to achieve fertilization. An applied role of AMPK in artificial insemination techniques is also suggested as during boar seminal doses preservation at 17 °C, physiological levels of AMPK activity markedly increase (maximum on Day 7) and result essential to maintain the aforementioned fundamental sperm processes. Moreover, regulation of sperm function exerted by the glycogen synthase kinase 3 and Src family kinase pathways is summarized.

  6. Computational study of noise in a large signal transduction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohonen Keijo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemical systems are inherently noisy due to the discrete reaction events that occur in a random manner. Although noise is often perceived as a disturbing factor, the system might actually benefit from it. In order to understand the role of noise better, its quality must be studied in a quantitative manner. Computational analysis and modeling play an essential role in this demanding endeavor. Results We implemented a large nonlinear signal transduction network combining protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, phospholipase A2, and β isoform of phospholipase C networks. We simulated the network in 300 different cellular volumes using the exact Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm and analyzed the results in both the time and frequency domain. In order to perform simulations in a reasonable time, we used modern parallel computing techniques. The analysis revealed that time and frequency domain characteristics depend on the system volume. The simulation results also indicated that there are several kinds of noise processes in the network, all of them representing different kinds of low-frequency fluctuations. In the simulations, the power of noise decreased on all frequencies when the system volume was increased. Conclusions We concluded that basic frequency domain techniques can be applied to the analysis of simulation results produced by the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. This approach is suited not only to the study of fluctuations but also to the study of pure noise processes. Noise seems to have an important role in biochemical systems and its properties can be numerically studied by simulating the reacting system in different cellular volumes. Parallel computing techniques make it possible to run massive simulations in hundreds of volumes and, as a result, accurate statistics can be obtained from computational studies.

  7. Signal transduction molecule patterns indicating potential glioblastoma therapy approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruceru ML

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Linda Cruceru,1 Ana-Maria Enciu,1,2,7 Adrian Claudiu Popa,1,3 Radu Albulescu,2,4,7 Monica Neagu,2,7 Cristiana Pistol Tanase,2,7 Stefan N Constantinescu5–7 1Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Bucharest, Romania; 2Victor Babes National Institute of Pathology, Bucharest, Romania; 3Army Centre for Medical Research, Bucharest, Romania; 4National Institute for Chemical Pharmaceutical R&D, Bucharest, Romania; 5de Duve Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium; 6Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Brussels, Belgium; 7Operational Sectorial Programme for Competitive Economic Growth Canbioprot at Victor Babes National Institute of Pathology, Bucharest, Romania Purpose: The expression of an array of signaling molecules, along with the assessment of real-time cell proliferation, has been performed in U87 glioma cell line and in patients’ glioblastoma established cell cultures in order to provide a better understanding of cellular and molecular events involved in glioblastoma pathogenesis. Experimental therapy was performed using a phosphatydylinositol-3´-kinase (PI3K inhibitor. Patients and methods: xMAP technology was employed to assess expression levels of several signal transduction molecules and real-time xCELLigence platform for cell behavior. Results: PI3K inhibition induced the most significant effects on global signaling pathways in patient-derived cell cultures, especially on members of the mitogen-activated protein-kinase family, P70S6 serine-threonine kinase, and cAMP response element-binding protein expression and further prevented tumor cell proliferation. Conclusion: The PI3K pathway might be a prime target for glioblastoma treatment. Keywords: personalized medicine, PI3K inhibitor, targeted therapy, xCELLigence, xMAP analysis

  8. Signal transduction through the IL-4 and insulin receptor families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A; Frankel, M; Paul, W E; Pierce, J H

    1995-07-01

    Activation of tyrosine kinase-containing receptors and intracellular tyrosine kinases by ligand stimulation is known to be crucial for mediating initial and subsequent events involved in mitogenic signal transduction. Receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) contain cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domains that undergo autophosphorylation upon ligand stimulation. Activation of these receptors also leads to pronounced and rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) in cells of connective tissue origin. A related substrate, designated 4PS, is similarly phosphorylated by insulin and IGF-1 stimulation in many hematopoietic cell types. IRS-1 and 4PS possess a number of tyrosine phosphorylation sites that are within motifs that bind specific SH2-containing molecules known to be involved in mitogenic signaling such as PI-3 kinase, SHPTP-2 (Syp) and Grb-2. Thus, they appear to act as docking substrates for a variety of signaling molecules. The majority of hematopoietic cytokines bind to receptors that do not possess intrinsic kinase activity, and these receptors have been collectively termed as members of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Despite their lack of tyrosine kinase domains, stimulation of these receptors has been demonstrated to activate intracellular kinases leading to tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple substrates. Recent evidence has demonstrated that activation of different members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases is involved in mediating tyrosine phosphorylation events by specific cytokines. Stimulation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) receptor, a member of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily, is thought to result in activation of Jak1, Jak3, and/or Fes tyrosine kinases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Second-chance signal transduction explains cooperative flagellar switching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry G Zot

    Full Text Available The reversal of flagellar motion (switching results from the interaction between a switch complex of the flagellar rotor and a torque-generating stationary unit, or stator (motor unit. To explain the steeply cooperative ligand-induced switching, present models propose allosteric interactions between subunits of the rotor, but do not address the possibility of a reaction that stimulates a bidirectional motor unit to reverse direction of torque. During flagellar motion, the binding of a ligand-bound switch complex at the dwell site could excite a motor unit. The probability that another switch complex of the rotor, moving according to steady-state rotation, will reach the same dwell site before that motor unit returns to ground state will be determined by the independent decay rate of the excited-state motor unit. Here, we derive an analytical expression for the energy coupling between a switch complex and a motor unit of the stator complex of a flagellum, and demonstrate that this model accounts for the cooperative switching response without the need for allosteric interactions. The analytical result can be reproduced by simulation when (1 the motion of the rotor delivers a subsequent ligand-bound switch to the excited motor unit, thereby providing the excited motor unit with a second chance to remain excited, and (2 the outputs from multiple independent motor units are constrained to a single all-or-none event. In this proposed model, a motor unit and switch complex represent the components of a mathematically defined signal transduction mechanism in which energy coupling is driven by steady-state and is regulated by stochastic ligand binding. Mathematical derivation of the model shows the analytical function to be a general form of the Hill equation (Hill AV (1910 The possible effects of the aggregation of the molecules of haemoglobin on its dissociation curves. J Physiol 40: iv-vii.

  10. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped...... for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...... of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  11. Postaggregative Differentiation Induction by Cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium : Intracellular Transduction Pathway and Requirement for Additional Stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Pauline; Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M. van; Driel, Roel van; Spek, Wouter; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Pinas, Johan

    1986-01-01

    Cyclic AMP induces postaggregative differentiation in aggregation competent cells of Dictyostelium by interacting with cell surface cAMP receptors. We investigated the transduction pathway of this response and additional requirements for the induction of postaggregative differentiation. Optimal indu

  12. Transduction of plasmid DNA in Streptomyces spp. and related genera by bacteriophage FP43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenney, M A; Baltz, R H

    1988-05-01

    A segment (hft) of bacteriophage FP43 DNA cloned into plasmid pIJ702 mediated high-frequency transduction of the resulting plasmid (pRHB101) by FP43 in Streptomyces griseofuscus. The transducing particles contained linear concatemers of plasmid DNA. Lysates of FP43 prepared on S. griseofuscus containing pRHB101 also transduced many other Streptomyces species, including several that restrict plaque formation by FP43 and at least two that produce restriction endonucleases that cut pRHB101 DNA. Transduction efficiencies in different species were influenced by the addition of anti-FP43 antiserum to the transduction plates, the temperature for cell growth before transduction, the multiplicity of infection, and the host on which the transducing lysate was prepared. FP43 lysates prepared on S. griseofuscus(pRHB101) also transduced species of Streptoverticillium, Chainia, and Saccharopolyspora.

  13. Enhanced transduction of polymer photonic crystal band-edge lasers via additional layer deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Cameron; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Buss, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We present the concept of enhanced transduction for polymer photonic crystal lasers by deposition of an additional polymer layer with selective gas response. We report a significant increase in sensitivity to changes in gas concentration....

  14. Effects of electrode surface structure on the mechanoelectrical transduction of IPMC sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmre, Viljar; Pugal, David; Kim, Kwang

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effects of electrode surface structure on the mechanoelectrical transduction of IPMC sensors. A physics-based mechanoelectrical transduction model was developed that takes into account the electrode surface profile (shape) by describing the polymer-electrode interface as a Koch fractal structure. Based on the model, the electrode surface effects were experimentally investigated in case of IPMCs with Pd-Pt electrodes. IPMCs with different electrode surface structures were fabricated through electroless plating process by appropriately controlling the synthesis parameters and conditions. The changes in the electrode surface morphology and the corresponding effects on the IPMC mechanoelectrical transduction were examined. Our experimental results indicate that increasing the dispersion of Pd particles near the membrane surface, and thus the polymer-electrode interfacial area, leads to a higher peak mechanoelectrically induced voltage of IPMC. However, the overall effect of the electrode surface structure is relatively low compared to the electromechanical transduction, which is in good agreement with theoretical prediction.

  15. SELF-ADAPTIVE CONTROLS OF A COMPLEX CELLULAR SIGNALING TRANSDUCTION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; ZHOU Zhiyuan; DAI Rongyang; LUO Bo; ZHENG Xiaoli; YANG Wenli; HE Tao; WU Minglu

    2004-01-01

    In cells, the interactions of distinct signaling transduction pathways originating from cross-talkings between signaling molecules give rise to the formation of signaling transduction networks, which contributes to the changes (emergency) of kinetic behaviors of signaling system compared with single molecule or pathway. Depending on the known experimental data, we have constructed a model for complex cellular signaling transduction system, which is derived from signaling transduction of epidermal growth factor receptor in neuron. By the computational simulating methods, the self-adaptive controls of this system have been investigated. We find that this model exhibits a relatively stable selfadaptive system, especially to over-stimulation of agonist, and the amplitude and duration of signaling intermediates in it could be controlled by multiple self-adaptive effects, such as "signal scattering", "positive feedback", "negative feedback" and "B-Raf shunt". Our results provide an approach to understanding the dynamic behaviors of complex biological systems.

  16. Isolation, culture and adenoviral transduction of parietal cells from mouse gastric mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gliddon, Briony L; Nguyen, Nhung V; Gunn, Priscilla A; Gleeson, Paul A; Driel, Ian R van [The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: i.vandriel@unimelb.edu.au

    2008-09-01

    Here we describe a method for the isolation of intact gastric glands from mice and primary culture and transfection of mouse gastric epithelial cells. Collagenase digestion of PBS-perfused mouse stomachs released large intact gastric glands that were plated on a basement membrane matrix. The heterogeneous gland cell cultures typically contain {approx}60% parietal cells. Isolated mouse parietal cells remain viable in culture for up to 5 days and react strongly with an antibody specific to the gastric H{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase. Isolated intact mouse gastric glands and primary cultures of mouse parietal cells respond to the secretagogue, histamine. Typical morphological changes from a resting to an acid-secreting active parietal cell were observed. In resting cultures of mouse parietal cells, the H{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase displayed a cytoplasmic punctate staining pattern consistent with tubulovesicle element structures. Following histamine stimulation, an expansion of internal apical vacuole structures was observed together with a pronounced redistribution of the H{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase from the cytoplasm to the apical vacuoles. A reproducible procedure to express genes of interest exogenously in these cultures of mouse parietal cells was also established. This method combines recombinant adenoviral transduction with magnetic field-assisted transfection resulting in {approx}30% transduced parietal cells. Adenoviral-transduced parietal cells maintain their ability to undergo agonist-induced activation. This protocol will be useful for the isolation, culture and expression of genes in parietal cells from genetically modified mice and as such will be an invaluable tool for studying the complex exocytic and endocytic trafficking events of the H{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase which underpin the regulation of acid secretion.

  17. ISL1 protein transduction promotes cardiomyocyte differentiation from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananeh Fonoudi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs have the potential to provide an unlimited source of cardiomyocytes, which are invaluable resources for drug or toxicology screening, medical research, and cell therapy. Currently a number of obstacles exist such as the insufficient efficiency of differentiation protocols, which should be overcome before hESC-derived cardiomyocytes can be used for clinical applications. Although the differentiation efficiency can be improved by the genetic manipulation of hESCs to over-express cardiac-specific transcription factors, these differentiated cells are not safe enough to be applied in cell therapy. Protein transduction has been demonstrated as an alternative approach for increasing the efficiency of hESCs differentiation toward cardiomyocytes. METHODS: We present an efficient protocol for the differentiation of hESCs in suspension by direct introduction of a LIM homeodomain transcription factor, Islet1 (ISL1 recombinant protein into the cells. RESULTS: We found that the highest beating clusters were derived by continuous treatment of hESCs with 40 µg/ml recombinant ISL1 protein during days 1-8 after the initiation of differentiation. The treatment resulted in up to a 3-fold increase in the number of beating areas. In addition, the number of cells that expressed cardiac specific markers (cTnT, CONNEXIN 43, ACTININ, and GATA4 doubled. This protocol was also reproducible for another hESC line. CONCLUSIONS: This study has presented a new, efficient, and reproducible procedure for cardiomyocytes differentiation. Our results will pave the way for scaled up and controlled differentiation of hESCs to be used for biomedical applications in a bioreactor culture system.

  18. Signal transduction pathways regulating cyclooxygenase-2 expression: potential molecular targets for chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kyung-Soo; Surh, Young-Joon

    2004-09-15

    Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been reported to be elevated in human colorectal adenocarcinoma and other tumors, including those of breast, cervical, prostate, and lung. Genetic knock-out or pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 has been shown to protect against experimentally-induced carcinogenesis. Results from epidemiological and laboratory studies indicate that regular intake of selective COX-2 inhibitors reduces the risk of several forms of human malignancies. Thus, it is conceivable that targeted inhibition of abnormally or improperly elevated COX-2 provides one of the most effective and promising strategies for cancer chemoprevention. The COX-2 promoter contains a TATA box and binding sites for several transcription factors including nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), nuclear factor for interleukin-6/CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (NF-IL6/C/EBP) and cyclic AMP response element (CRE) binding protein. Upregulation of COX-2 is mediated by a variety of stimuli including tumor promoters, oncogenes, and growth factors. Stimulation of either protein kinase C (PKC) or Ras signaling enhances mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity, which, in turn, activates transcription of cox-2. Celecoxib, the first US FDA approved selective COX-2 inhibitor, initially developed for the treatment of adult rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, has been reported to reduce the formation of polyps in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. This COX-2 specific inhibitor also protects against experimentally-induced carcinogenesis, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The present review covers the signal transduction pathways responsible for regulating COX-2 expression as novel molecular targets of chemopreventive agents with celecoxib as a specific example.

  19. The MiST2 database: a comprehensive genomics resource on microbial signal transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich, Luke E.; Igor B Zhulin

    2009-01-01

    The MiST2 database (http://mistdb.com) identifies and catalogs the repertoire of signal transduction proteins in microbial genomes. Signal transduction systems regulate the majority of cellular activities including the metabolism, development, host-recognition, biofilm production, virulence, and antibiotic resistance of human pathogens. Thus, knowledge of the proteins and interactions that comprise these communication networks is an essential component to furthering biomedical discovery. Thes...

  20. Sentra : a database of signal transduction proteins for comparative genome analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, M.; Glass, E. M.; Syed, M. H.; Zhang, Y.; Rodriguez, A.; Maltsev, N.; Galerpin, M. Y.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; NIH

    2007-01-01

    Sentra (http://compbio.mcs.anl.gov/sentra), a database of signal transduction proteins encoded in completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, has been updated to reflect recent advances in understanding signal transduction events on a whole-genome scale. Sentra consists of two principal components, a manually curated list of signal transduction proteins in 202 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and an automatically generated listing of predicted signaling proteins in 235 sequenced genomes that are awaiting manual curation. In addition to two-component histidine kinases and response regulators, the database now lists manually curated Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases and protein phosphatases, as well as adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases, as defined in several recent reviews. All entries in Sentra are extensively annotated with relevant information from public databases (e.g. UniProt, KEGG, PDB and NCBI). Sentra's infrastructure was redesigned to support interactive cross-genome comparisons of signal transduction capabilities of prokaryotic organisms from a taxonomic and phenotypic perspective and in the framework of signal transduction pathways from KEGG. Sentra leverages the PUMA2 system to support interactive analysis and annotation of signal transduction proteins by the users.

  1. Signal transduction pathways in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and biotechnological implications under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z X; Li, H C; Wei, Y P; Chu, W Y; Chong, Y L; Long, X H; Liu, Z P; Qin, S; Shao, H B

    2015-06-01

    Cyanobacteria have developed various response mechanisms in long evolution to sense and adapt to external or internal changes under abiotic stresses. The signal transduction system of a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 includes mainly two-component signal transduction systems of eukaryotic-type serine/threonine kinases (STKs), on which most have been investigated at present. These two-component systems play a major role in regulating cell activities in cyanobacteria. More and more co-regulation and crosstalk regulations among signal transduction systems had been discovered due to increasing experimental data, and they are of great importance in corresponding to abiotic stresses. However, mechanisms of their functions remain unknown. Nevertheless, the two signal transduction systems function as an integral network for adaption in different abiotic stresses. This review summarizes available knowledge on the signal transduction network in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and biotechnological implications under various stresses, with focuses on the co-regulation and crosstalk regulations among various stress-responding signal transduction systems.

  2. Efficient lentiviral gene transfer to canine repopulating cells using an overnight transduction protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Peter A; Keyser, Kirsten A; Peterson, Laura J; Neff, Tobias; Thomasson, Bobbie M; Thompson, Jesse; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2004-05-15

    The use of lentiviral vectors for the transduction of hematopoietic stem cells has evoked much interest owing to their ability to stably integrate into the genome of nondividing cells. However, published large animal studies have reported highly variable gene transfer rates of typically less than 1%. Here we report the use of lentiviral vectors for the transduction of canine CD34(+) hematopoietic repopulating cells using a very short, 18-hour transduction protocol. We compared lentiviral transduction of hematopoietic repopulating cells from either stem cell factor (SCF)- and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed marrow or mobilized peripheral blood in a competitive repopulation assay in 3 dogs. All dogs engrafted rapidly within 9 days. Transgene expression was detected in all lineages (B cells, T cells, granulocytes, and red blood cells as well as platelets) indicating multilineage engraftment of transduced cells, with overall long-term marking levels of up to 12%. Gene transfer levels in mobilized peripheral blood cells were slightly higher than in primed marrow cells. In conclusion, we show efficient lentiviral transduction of canine repopulating cells using an overnight transduction protocol. These results have important implications for the design of stem cell gene therapy protocols, especially for those diseases in which the maintenance of stem cells in culture is a major limitation.

  3. Signal transduction, receptors, mediators and genes: younger than ever - the 13th meeting of the Signal Transduction Society focused on aging and immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klotz Lars-Oliver

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 13th meeting of the Signal Transduction Society was held in Weimar, from October 28 to 30, 2009. Special focus of the 2009 conference was "Aging and Senescence", which was co-organized by the SFB 728 "Environmentally-Induced Aging Processes" of the University of Düsseldorf and the study group 'Signal Transduction' of the German Society for Cell Biology (DGZ. In addition, several other areas of signal transduction research were covered and supported by different consortia associated with the Signal Transduction Society including the long-term associated study groups of the German Society for Immunology and the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and for instance the SFB/Transregio 52 "Transcriptional Programming of Individual T Cell Subsets" located in Würzburg, Mainz and Berlin. The different research areas that were introduced by outstanding keynote speakers attracted more than 250 scientists, showing the timeliness and relevance of the interdisciplinary concept and exchange of knowledge during the three days of the scientific program. This report gives an overview of the presentations of the conference.

  4. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles of β1 andβ2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR). Methods Basophils (purity of 10%-50%) were preincubated with anti-CD29 or anti-CD18 blocking antibodies before used for adhesion study. Basophils were preincubated with the pharmacological inhibitors wortmannin, PP1, PD98059 before used for adhesion and HR study. Cell adherence to bovine serum albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) was monitored using cell associated histamine as a basophil marker and the histamine was measured by the glass fiber assay.Results Basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn was inhibited by anti-CD29. Interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induced adhesion to BSA was inhibited by anti-CD18. Wortmannin at 1 μmol/L and PP1 at 20 μmol/L strongly interfered with, whereas PD98059 at 50 μmol/L weakly inhibited basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn. One μmol/L wortmannin strongly inhibited IL-3, IL-5, GM-CSF and anti-IgE induced adhesion to BSA. PP1 at 20 μmol/L partly inhibited anti-IgE induced adhesion. Fifty μmol/L PD98059 marginally inhibited IL-5, weakly inhibited anti-IgE, partly inhibited GM-CSF induced adhesion. Wortmannin, PP1 and PD98059 inhibited anti-IgE (1:100 or 1:1000) induced basophil HR in a dose dependent manner. They inhibited calcium ionophore A23187 (10 μmol/L, 5 μmol/L) induced basophil HR in a dose dependent manner, but to different extend with PP1 being the most efficient.Conclusions Basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn is mediated by β1-integrins whereas cytokine induced adhesion

  5. Full Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked Hybrid Actuation/Transduction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Zu, Tian-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The Stacked HYBATS (Hybrid Actuation/Transduction system) demonstrates significantly enhanced electromechanical performance by using the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer, stacked negative strain components and positive strain components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that, for Stacked HYBATS, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The coupled resonance mode between positive strain and negative strain components of Stacked HYBATS is much stronger than the resonance of a single element actuation only when the effective lengths of the two kinds of elements match each other. Compared with the previously invented hybrid actuation system (HYBAS), the multilayer Stacked HYBATS can be designed to provide high mechanical load capability, low voltage driving, and a highly effective piezoelectric constant. The negative strain component will contract, and the positive strain component will expand in the length directions when an electric field is applied on the device. The interaction between the two elements makes an enhanced motion along the Z direction for Stacked-HYBATS. In order to dominate the dynamic length of Stacked-HYBATS by the negative strain component, the area of the cross-section for the negative strain component will be much larger than the total cross-section areas of the two positive strain components. The transverse strain is negative and longitudinal strain positive in inorganic materials, such as ceramics/single crystals. Different piezoelectric multilayer stack configurations can make a piezoelectric ceramic/single-crystal multilayer stack exhibit negative strain or positive strain at a certain direction without increasing the applied voltage. The difference of this innovation from the HYBAS is that all the elements can be made from one-of-a-kind materials. Stacked HYBATS can provide an extremely effective piezoelectric

  6. Neural transduction in Xenopus laevis lateral line system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelioff, D; Honrubia, V

    1978-03-01

    1. The process of neural excitation in hair cell systems was studied in an in vitro preparation of the Xenopus laevis (African clawed toad) lateral line organ. A specially designed stimulus chamber was used to apply accurately controlled pressure, water movement, or electrical stimuli, and to record the neural responses of the two afferent fibers innervating each organ or stitch. The objective of the study was to determine the characteristics of the neural responses to these stimuli, and thus gain insight into the transduction process. 2. A sustained deflection of the hair cell cilia due to a constant flow of water past the capula resulted in a maintained change in the mean firing rate (MFR) of the afferent fibers. The data also demonstrated that the neural response was proportional to the velocity of the water flow and indicated that both deflection and movement of the cilia were the effective physiological stimuli for this hair cell system. 3. The preparations responded to sinusoidal water movements (past the capula) over the entire frequency range of the stimulus chamber, 0.1-130 Hz, and were most sensitive between 10 and 40 Hz. The variation of the MFR and the percent modulation indicated that the average dynamic range of each organ was 23.5 dB. 4. The thresholds, if any, for sustained pressure changes and for sinusoidal pressure variations in the absence of water movements were very high. Due to the limitations of the stimulus chamber it was not possible to generate pressure stimuli of sufficient magnitude to elicit a neural response without also generating suprathreshold water-movement stimuli. Sustained pressures had no detectable effect on the neural response to water-movement stimuli. 5. The preparations were very sensitive to electrical potentials applied across the toad skin on which the hair cells were located. Potentials which made the ciliated surfaces of the hair cells positive with respect to their bases increased the MFR of the fibers, whereas

  7. The Nla28S/Nla28 two-component signal transduction system regulates sporulation in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Zaara; Garza, Anthony G

    2012-09-01

    The response regulator Nla28 is a key component in a cascade of transcriptional activators that modulates expression of many important developmental genes in Myxococcus xanthus. In this study, we identified and characterized Nla28S, a histidine kinase that modulates the activity of this important regulator of M. xanthus developmental genes. We show that the putative cytoplasmic domain of Nla28S has the in vitro biochemical properties of a histidine kinase protein: it hydrolyzes ATP and undergoes an ATP-dependent autophosphorylation that is acid labile and base stable. We also show that the putative cytoplasmic domain of Nla28S transfers a phosphoryl group to Nla28 in vitro, that the phosphotransfer is specific, and that a substitution in the predicted site of Nla28 phosphorylation (aspartate 53) abolishes the phosphotransfer reaction. In phenotypic studies, we found that a mutation in nla28S produces a developmental phenotype similar to, but weaker than, that produced by a mutation in nla28; both mutations primarily affect sporulation. Together, these data indicate that Nla28S is the in vivo histidine kinase partner of Nla28 and that the primary function of the Nla28S/Nla28 two-component signal transduction system is to regulate sporulation genes. The results of genetic studies suggest that phosphorylation of Nla28S is important for the in vivo sporulation function of the Nla28S/Nla28 two-component system. In addition, the quorum signal known as A-signal is important for full developmental expression of the nla28S-nla28 operon, suggesting that quorum signaling regulates the availability of the Nla28S/Nla28 signal transduction circuit in developing cells.

  8. Genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  9. Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers create ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human Genome ...

  10. The SOS Response Master Regulator LexA Regulates the Gene Transfer Agent of Rhodobacter capsulatus and Represses Transcription of the Signal Transduction Protein CckA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinski, Kevin S.; Brimacombe, Cedric A.; Westbye, Alexander B.; Ding, Hao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gene transfer agent of Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA) is a genetic exchange element that combines central aspects of bacteriophage-mediated transduction and natural transformation. RcGTA particles resemble a small double-stranded DNA bacteriophage, package random ∼4-kb fragments of the producing cell genome, and are released from a subpopulation (5-fold in the lexA mutant, and a lexA cckA double mutant was found to have the same phenotype as a ΔcckA single mutant in terms of RcGTA production. The data indicate that LexA is required for RcGTA production and maximal recipient capability and that the RcGTA-deficient phenotype of the lexA mutant is largely due to the overexpression of cckA. IMPORTANCE This work describes an unusual phenotype of a lexA mutant of the alphaproteobacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus in respect to the phage transduction-like genetic exchange carried out by the R. capsulatus gene transfer agent (RcGTA). Instead of the expected SOS response characteristic of prophage induction, this lexA mutation not only abolishes the production of RcGTA particles but also impairs the ability of cells to receive RcGTA-borne genes. The data show that, despite an apparent evolutionary relationship to lambdoid phages, the regulation of RcGTA gene expression differs radically. PMID:26833411

  11. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic counseling provides information and support to people who have, or may be at risk for, genetic disorders. A ... meets with you to discuss genetic risks. The counseling may be for yourself or a family member. ...

  12. Plasmid Transduction Using Bacteriophage Φadh for Expression of CC Chemokines by Lactobacillus gasseri ADH▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelin, Leonard H.; Mavri-Damelin, Demetra; Klaenhammer, Todd R.; Tiemessen, Caroline T.

    2010-01-01

    Vaginal mucosal microfloras are typically dominated by Gram-positive Lactobacillus species, and colonization of vaginal mucosa by exogenous microbicide-secreting Lactobacillus strains has been proposed as a means of enhancing this natural mucosal barrier against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We asked whether an alternative strategy could be utilized whereby anti-HIV molecules are expressed within the cervicovaginal milieu by endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus populations which have been engineered in situ via transduction. In this study, we therefore investigated the feasibility of utilizing transduction for the expression of two HIV coreceptor antagonists, the CC chemokines CCL5 and CCL3, in a predominant vaginal Lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus gasseri. Modifying a previously established transduction model, which utilizes L. gasseri ADH and its prophage Φadh, we show that mitomycin C induction of L. gasseri ADH transformants containing pGK12-based plasmids with CCL5 and CCL3 expression and secretion cassettes (under the control of promoters P6 and P59, respectively) and a 232-bp Φadh cos site fragment results in the production of transducing particles which contain 8 to 9 copies of concatemeric plasmid DNA. High-frequency transduction for these particles (almost 6 orders of magnitude greater than that for pGK12 alone) was observed, and transductants were found to contain recircularized expression plasmids upon subsequent culture. Importantly, transductants produced CC chemokines at levels comparable to those produced by electroporation-derived transformants. Our findings therefore lend support to the potential use of transduction in vaginal Lactobacillus species as a novel strategy for the prevention of HIV infection across mucosal membranes. PMID:20418431

  13. Plasmid transduction using bacteriophage Phi(adh) for expression of CC chemokines by Lactobacillus gasseri ADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelin, Leonard H; Mavri-Damelin, Demetra; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Tiemessen, Caroline T

    2010-06-01

    Vaginal mucosal microfloras are typically dominated by Gram-positive Lactobacillus species, and colonization of vaginal mucosa by exogenous microbicide-secreting Lactobacillus strains has been proposed as a means of enhancing this natural mucosal barrier against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We asked whether an alternative strategy could be utilized whereby anti-HIV molecules are expressed within the cervicovaginal milieu by endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus populations which have been engineered in situ via transduction. In this study, we therefore investigated the feasibility of utilizing transduction for the expression of two HIV coreceptor antagonists, the CC chemokines CCL5 and CCL3, in a predominant vaginal Lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus gasseri. Modifying a previously established transduction model, which utilizes L. gasseri ADH and its prophage Phiadh, we show that mitomycin C induction of L. gasseri ADH transformants containing pGK12-based plasmids with CCL5 and CCL3 expression and secretion cassettes (under the control of promoters P6 and P59, respectively) and a 232-bp Phiadh cos site fragment results in the production of transducing particles which contain 8 to 9 copies of concatemeric plasmid DNA. High-frequency transduction for these particles (almost 6 orders of magnitude greater than that for pGK12 alone) was observed, and transductants were found to contain recircularized expression plasmids upon subsequent culture. Importantly, transductants produced CC chemokines at levels comparable to those produced by electroporation-derived transformants. Our findings therefore lend support to the potential use of transduction in vaginal Lactobacillus species as a novel strategy for the prevention of HIV infection across mucosal membranes.

  14. Synthetic modular systems--reverse engineering of signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune

    2005-01-01

    During the last decades, biology has decomposed cellular systems into genetic, functional and molecular networks. It has become evident that these networks consist of components with specific functions (e.g., proteins and genes). This has generated a considerable amount of knowledge and hypotheses...... concerning cellular organization. The idea discussed here is to test the extent of this knowledge by reconstructing, or reverse engineering, new synthetic biological systems from known components. We will discuss how integration of computational methods with proteomics and engineering concepts might lead us...

  15. Signal transduction pathways that regulate CAB gene expression. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, J.

    1993-12-31

    We have completed the initial genetic and phenotypic characterization of several classes of new mutants that affect CAB gene expression. The doc mutants (for dark overexpression of cab) are characterized by elevated levels of CAB gene expression in the dark; however, unlike the previously isolated de-etiolated mutants (also isolated in my lab), the doc mutants still appear etiolated. The doc alleles define 3 loci, each of which maps to a separate chromosome. The details of the mutant isolation scheme and the genetic and phenotypic description of these new mutants are described. The second class of mutants, the gun mutants (for genomes uncoupled) show accumulation of CAB mRNA in the absence of chloroplast gene expression and development. Thus, the normally tightly coordinated expression between the chloroplast and nuclear genes that encode chloroplast-destined proteins has been uncoupled. We have shown that the Arabidopsis HY3 locus encodes the type B phytochrome apoprotein gene and have characterized the phenotypes of null hy3 alleles to ascertain a role for this phytochrome in Arabidopsis development. We have also isolated and characterized a number of alleles of the phytochrome A gene.

  16. Oxysterols stimulate Sonic hedgehog signal transduction and proliferation of medulloblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Ryan B; Scott, Matthew P

    2006-05-30

    Sterol synthesis is required for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction. Errors in Shh signal transduction play important roles in the formation of human tumors, including medulloblastoma (MB). It is not clear which products of sterol synthesis are necessary for Shh signal transduction or how they act. Here we show that cholesterol or specific oxysterols are the critical products of sterol synthesis required for Shh pathway signal transduction in MB cells. In MB cells, sterol synthesis inhibitors reduce Shh target gene transcription and block Shh pathway-dependent proliferation. These effects of sterol synthesis inhibitors can be reversed by exogenous cholesterol or specific oxysterols. We also show that certain oxysterols can maximally activate Shh target gene transcription through the Smoothened (Smo) protein as effectively as the known Smo full agonist, SAG. Thus, sterols are required and sufficient for Shh pathway activation. These results suggest that oxysterols may be critical regulators of Smo, and thereby Shh signal transduction. Inhibition of Shh signaling by sterol synthesis inhibitors may offer a novel approach to the treatment of MB and other Shh pathway-dependent human tumors.

  17. Suppression of tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of melanoma cells by transduction of interferon gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lykhova A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate an inhibitory effect of baculovirus-mediated transduction of the murine interferon-beta gene on mouse melanoma in vitro and in vivo. Methods. Studies were performed on B16 mouse melanoma (MM-4 cell line. Transduction, immunocytochemical and tumor cell biology approaches have been used in this study. Results. Transduction of MM-4 cells by the recombinant baculovirus with IFN-beta gene is accompanied by morphological changes of tumor cells, suppression of cell proliferation, significant inhibition of platting efficiency of cells and their colonies formation in semisolid agar. Moreover, transduction of melanoma MM-4 cells by the baculovirus IFN-transgene leads to inhibition of tumorigenicity and metastatic ability of the cells in vivo. The intravenous administration of recombinant baculovirus vector with IFN gene inhibits growth of metastases induced in the lungs of mice by intravenously injected tumor cells. Conclusions. Transduction of mouse melanoma cells by the recombinant baculovirus with murine IFN-beta gene inhibits their proliferative potential, tumorigenicity and metastatic activity.

  18. Discovery of intramolecular signal transduction network based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Ma

    Full Text Available A novel approach to reveal intramolecular signal transduction network is proposed in this work. To this end, a new algorithm of network construction is developed, which is based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation. A key feature of this approach is that direction information is specified after inferring protein residue-residue interaction network involved in the process of signal transduction. This enables fundamental analysis of the regulation hierarchy and identification of regulation hubs of the signaling network. A well-studied allosteric enzyme, E. coli aspartokinase III, is used as a model system to demonstrate the new method. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new approach is able to predict all the sites that have been experimentally proved to desensitize allosteric regulation of the enzyme. In addition, the signal transduction network shows a clear preference for specific structural regions, secondary structural types and residue conservation. Occurrence of super-hubs in the network indicates that allosteric regulation tends to gather residues with high connection ability to collectively facilitate the signaling process. Furthermore, a new parameter of propagation coefficient is defined to determine the propagation capability of residues within a signal transduction network. In conclusion, the new approach is useful for fundamental understanding of the process of intramolecular signal transduction and thus has significant impact on rational design of novel allosteric proteins.

  19. Neuro-protective effects of CNTF on hippocampal neurons via an unknown signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In our previous study, we proposed that there may be an unknown pathway in the upper stream of the known signal transduction pathway of Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) that mediates the neuro-protective function of CNTF. In the present experiment, we observed that the neuro-protective function of the non-classic signal transduction pathway in a L-NMDA (a glutamic acid ion type receptor atagonist) induced hippocampal neuron injury model, using primary culture rat hippocampal neurons, continuous photography and gp130 immunohistochemical assay. The results showed that L-NMDA induced injurious reaction of hippocampal neurons, and CNTF was able to inhibit the toxic action of L-NMDA on hippocampal neurons. Additionally, when JAK/STATs in the known classic signal transduction pathway of CNTF were blocked by PTPi-2, the protective effect of CNTF against L-NMDA injury still existed. L-NMDA caused a rapid increase in the concentration of hippocampal intracellular free [Ca2+]i. CNTF was able to attenuate L-NMDA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, and blocking JAK/STATs in the known classic signal trans- duction pathway of CNTF did not affect L-NMDA- induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, indicating that, apart from the known classic signal transduction pathway, there may be some other transduction pathways for CNTF to exert the protective effect on hippocampal neurons, and this pathway is related to [Ca2+].

  20. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W.; Smith, Gina A.; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T.; Zachary, Ian C.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. PMID:27044325

  1. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145 promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes.

  2. The role of the CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP) in adrenomedullin receptor signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Oliver, K R; Dickerson, I M

    2001-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are usually thought to act as monomer receptors that bind ligand and then interact with G proteins to initiate signal transduction. In this study we report an intracellular peripheral membrane protein named the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor component protein (RCP) required for signal transduction at the G protein-coupled receptor for adrenomedullin. Cell lines were made that expressed an antisense construct of the RCP cDNA, and in these cells diminished RCP expression correlated with loss of adrenomedullin signal transduction. In contrast, loss of RCP did not diminish receptor density or affinity, therefore RCP does not appear to act as a chaperone protein. Instead, RCP represents a novel class of protein required to couple the adrenomedullin receptor to the cellular signal transduction pathway. A candidate adrenomedullin receptor named the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) has been described, which forms high affinity adrenomedullin receptors when co-expressed with the accessory protein receptor-activity modifying protein 2 (RAMP2). RCP co-immunoprecipitated with CRLR and RAMP2, indicating that a functional adrenomedullin receptor is composed of at least three proteins: the ligand binding protein (CRLR), an accessory protein (RAMP2), and a coupling protein for signal transduction (RCP).

  3. MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction regulates the actin cytoskeleton through the downregulation of WAVE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C-L; Ueno, M; Liu, D; Masuya, D; Nakano, J; Yokomise, H; Nakagawa, T; Miyake, M

    2006-10-19

    Motility-related protein-1 (MRP-1/CD9) is involved in cell motility. We studied the change in the actin cytoskeleton, and the expression of actin-related protein (Arp) 2 and Arp3 and the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family according to MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction into HT1080 cells. The frequency of cells with lamellipodia was significantly lower in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells than in control HT1080 cells (PMRP-1/CD9 gene transduction affected the subcellular localization of Arp2 and Arp3 proteins. Furthermore, MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction induced a downregulation of WAVE2 expression (PMRP-1/CD9 monoclonal antibody inhibited downregulation of WAVE2 in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells (PMRP-1/CD9 gene transduction. Furthermore, downregulation of WAVE2 by transfection of WAVE2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) mimicked the morphological effects of MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction and suppressed cell motility. However, transfection of each siRNA for Wnt1, Wnt2b1 or Wnt5a did not affect WAVE2 expression. Transfection of WAVE2-specific siRNA also did not affect expressions of these Wnts. These results indicate that MRP-1/CD9 regulates the actin cytoskeleton by downregulating of the WAVE2, through the Wnt-independent signal pathway.

  4. Analysis of nitrated proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in mating signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Lee, Na Young; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Lee, Min Young; Choi, Do-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a PTM that regulates signal transduction and inflammatory responses, and is related to neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. The cellular function of PTN remains unclear because the low stoichiometry of PTN limits the identification and quantification of nitrated peptides. Effective enrichment is an important aspect of PTN analysis. In this study, we analyzed the in vivo nitroproteome elicited by mating signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a novel chemical enrichment method followed by LC-MS/MS. Nitroproteome profiling successfully identified changes in the nitration states of 14 proteins during mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae, making this the first reported in vivo nitroproteome in yeast. We investigated the biological functions of these nitroproteins and their relationships to mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae using a protein-protein interaction network. Our results suggest that PTN and denitration may be involved in nonreactive nitrogen species-mediated signal transduction and can provide clues for understanding the functional roles of PTN in vivo.

  5. [Progress of studies on effects of acupuncture on cellular signal transduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian; Li, Zhong-ren

    2011-04-01

    In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism of acupuncture in regulating different physiological functional activities at cellular level, abundant researches have been conducted on cellular signal transduction activities. The present article preliminarily analyzes acupuncture stimulation induced various cellular signaling pathways from the afferent physical signals of the regional mechanical stimulation at the acupoint, activation of receptors of the cellular membrane such as Guanine nucleotide binding protein coupled receptors, etc., intracellular second messenger molecules including cAMP, Ca2+, inositol triphosphate, diacyl glycerol, etc., signal transduction pathways as mitogen-activated protein kinase, Janus kinase-signal transduction and transcription activator, nitrogen oxide-cyclic guanylic acid, etc., to the extremely complicated cellular signal transduction networks. In addition, the present paper also makes a discussion on the present developing situation of acupuncture research. It is possible that the connective tissue of the body surface will become a key point in the future research on acupuncture remedy. More attention should be paid to the interrelation among various intracellular signaling pathways and the network of cellular signal transduction in the research on acupuncture therapy for regulating a variety of physiological effects.

  6. Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skerker, Jeffrey M; Prasol, Melanie S; Perchuk, Barrett S; Biondi, Emanuele G; Laub, Michael T

    2005-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals...

  7. Plant Genes Involved in Symbiotic Sinal Perception/Signal Transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, A; Soyano, T; Hayashi, H

    2014-01-01

    to nodule primordia formation, and the infection thread initiation in the root hairs guiding bacteria towards dividing cortical cells. This chapter focuses on the plant genes involved in the recognition of the symbiotic signal produced by rhizobia, and the downstream genes, which are part of a complex......A host genetic programme that is initiated upon recognition of specific rhizobial Nod factors governs the symbiosis of legumes with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. This programme coordinates two major developmental processes that run in parallel in legume roots: de novo cortical cell division leading...... symbiotic signalling pathway that leads to the generation of calcium spiking in the nuclear regions and activation of transcription factors controlling symbiotic genes induction...

  8. Optomechanical Transduction and Characterization of a Silica Microsphere Pendulum via Evanescent Light

    CERN Document Server

    Madugani, Ramgopal; Ward, Jonathan M; Le, Vu H; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2015-01-01

    Transduction of the motion of a micron- or nano-sized object to an optical signal is essential for optomechanical systems. Here, we study the optical response of a cantilever-like, silica, microsphere pendulum, evanescently coupled to a ?ber taper. In this system, the optical coupling element also acts as the mechanical motion transducer and the pendulum's oscillations modulate the optical whispering gallery modes (WGMs) both dispersively and dissipatively. This unique mechanism leads to an experimentally-observable, asymmetric response function of the transduction spectrum. This phenomenon is explained by using coupled mode theory with Fourier transforms. The optomechanical transduction and its relation to the external coupling gap is experimentally investigated in depth and shows good agreement with the theory. A deep understanding of this mechanism is necessary in order to explore cooling and trapping of a micropendulum system.

  9. Evaluating the Role of Wnt Signal Transduction in Promoting the Development of the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard M. Eisenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wnts are a family of secreted signaling proteins that are encoded by 19 distinct genes in the vertebrate genome. These molecules initiate several signal transduction pathways: the canonical Wnt, Wnt/Ca2+, and Wnt/planar cell polarity pathways. Wnt proteins have major impact on embryonic development, tumor progression, and stem cell differentiation. Wnt signal transduction also influences the formation of the heart, yet many issues concerning the involvement of Wnt regulation in initiating cardiac development remain unresolved. In this review, we will examine the published record to discern (a what has been shown by experimental studies on the participation of Wnt signaling in cardiogenesis, and (b what are the important questions that need to be addressed to understand the importance and function of Wnt signal transduction in facilitating the development of the heart.

  10. Gene expression, signal transduction pathways and functional networks associated with growth of sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sass, Hjalte Christian Reeberg; Borup, Rehannah; Alanin, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine global gene expression in relation to Vestibular schwannomas (VS) growth rate and to identify signal transduction pathways and functional molecular networks associated with growth. Repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to surgery determined...... of signal transduction pathways and functional molecular networks associated with tumor growth. In total 109 genes were deregulated in relation to tumor growth rate. Genes associated with apoptosis, growth and cell proliferation were deregulated. Gene ontology included regulation of the cell cycle, cell...... differentiation and proliferation, among other functions. Fourteen pathways were associated with tumor growth. Five functional molecular networks were generated. This first study on global gene expression in relation to vestibular schwannoma growth rate identified several genes, signal transduction pathways...

  11. Postaggregative differentiation induction by cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium: intracellular transduction pathway and requirement for additional stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, P; Van Lookeren Campagne, M M; Van Driel, R; Spek, W; Van Haastert, P J; Pinas, J

    1986-11-01

    Cyclic AMP induces postaggregative differentiation in aggregation competent cells of Dictyostelium by interacting with cell surface cAMP receptors. We investigated the transduction pathway of this response and additional requirements for the induction of postaggregative differentiation. Optimal induction of postaggregative gene expression requires that vegetative cells are first exposed to 2-4 hr of nanomolar cAMP pulses, and subsequently for 4-6 hr to steady-state cAMP concentrations in the micromolar range. Cyclic AMP pulses, which are endogenously produced before and during aggregation, induce full responsiveness to cAMP as a morphogen. The transduction pathway from the cell surface cAMP receptor to postaggregative gene expression may involve Ca2+ ions as intracellular messengers. A cAMP-induced increase in intracellular cAMP or cGMP levels is not involved in the transduction pathway.

  12. Analysis of a signal transduction pathway involved in leaf epidermis differentiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip W. Becraft

    2005-05-23

    The major objective of this study was to identify and analyze signal transduction factors that function with the CR4 receptor kinase. We pursued this analysis in Arabidopsis. Analysis of other members of the ACR4 related receptor (CRR) family produced biochemical evidence consistent with some of them functioning in ACR4 signal transduction. Yeast 2-hybrid identified six proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of ACR4, representing putative downstream signal transduction components. The interactions for all 6 proteins were verified by in vitro pull down assays. Five of the interacting proteins were phosphorylated by ACR4. We also identified candidate interactors with the extracellular TNFR domain. We hypothesize this may be the ligand binding domain for ACR4. In one approach, yeast 2-hybrid was again used and five candidate proteins identified. Nine additional candidates were identified in a genome wide scan of Arabidopsis amino acid sequences that threaded onto the TNF structure.

  13. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xingguo; HUANG Wei; WU Qingyu

    2006-01-01

    Two-component systems are signal transduction systems which enable bacteria to regulate cellular functions in response to changing environmental conditions. The unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has become a model organism for a range of biochemical and molecular biology studies aiming at investigating environmental stress response. The publication of the complete genome sequence of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 provided a tremendous stimulus for research in this field, and at least 80 open reading frames were identified as members of the two-component signal transduction systems in this single species of cyanobacteria. To date, functional roles have been determined for only a limited number of such proteins. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the two-component signal transduction systems in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and describes recent achievements in elucidating the functional roles of these systems.

  14. Bacterial signal transduction networks via connectors and development of the inhibitors as alternative antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial cells possess a signal transduction system that differs from those described in higher organisms, including human cells. These so-called two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) consist of a sensor (histidine kinase, HK) and a response regulator, and are involved in cellular functions, such as virulence, drug resistance, biofilm formation, cell wall synthesis, cell division. They are conserved in bacteria across all species. Although TCSs are often studied and characterized individually, they are assumed to interact with each other and form signal transduction networks within the cell. In this review, I focus on the formation of TCS networks via connectors. I also explore the possibility of using TCS inhibitors, especially HK inhibitors, as alternative antimicrobial agents.

  15. The progress of olfactory transduction and biomimetic olfactory-based biosensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU ChunSheng; WANG LiJiang; ZHOU Jun; ZHAO LuHang; WANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    Olfaction is a very important sensation for all animals. Recently great progress has been made in the research of olfactory transduction. Especially the novel finding of the gene superfamily encoding olfactory receptors has led to rapid advances in olfactory transduction. These advances also promoted the research of biomimetic olfactory-based biosensors and some obvious achievements have been obtained due to their potential commercial prospects and promising industrial applications. This paper briefly introduces the biological basis of olfaction, summarizes the progress of olfactory signal transduction in the olfactory neuron, the olfactory bulb and the olfactory cortex, outlines the latest developments and applications of biomimetic olfactory-based biosensors. Finally, the olfactory biosensor based on light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) is addressed in detail based on our recent work and the research trends of olfactory biosensors in future are discussed.

  16. [Acupuncture-moxibustion and mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Shen; Zhong-Ren, Li

    2012-03-01

    The Literatures on mechanism of acupuncture from the aspect of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathways are analyzed in this paper. And the result shows that many acupuncture effects are closely related with the regulation of MAPK signal transduction pathway. However, the current studies only cover limited aspects, and there problems still existed in the experiment designation. Acupuncture and electroacupuncture are often adopted for the treatment group, while moxibustion is not applied for most of them. There are not unified wave model, frequency and stimulation period for electroacupuncture. And the studies still remain in simple confirmation and proper inference. In the future, the domain of researches should be further wid ened and the experiment designation further perfected. Therefore, the therapeutic effect of acupuncture in clinic will be greatly improved through researches on MAPK signal transduction pathway and the production mechanism of acupuncture effect.

  17. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soon Sung [Department of Food Science and Nutrition and RIC Center, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Cheon [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyeok Yil [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duk-Soo [Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan-Si 330-090 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Woo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hyun Sook, E-mail: wazzup@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young, E-mail: sychoi@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. {yields} PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. {yields} PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1{beta}, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  18. Ephrin A2 receptor targeting does not increase adenoviral pancreatic cancer transduction in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A van Geer; Conny T Bakker; Naoya Koizumi; Hiroyuki Mizuguchi; John G Wesseling; Ronald PJ Oude Elferink; Piter J Bosma

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To generate an adenoviral vector specifically targeting the EphA2 receptor (EphA2R) highly expressed on pancreatic cancer cells in vivo.METHODS:YSA,a small peptide ligand that binds the EphA2R with high affinity,was inserted into the HI loop of the adenovirus serotype 5 fiber knob.To further increase the specificity of this vector,binding sites for native adenoviral receptors,the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and integrin,were ablated from the viral capsid.The ablated retargeted adenoviral vector was produced on 293T cells.Specific targeting of this novel adenoviral vector to pancreatic cancer was investigated on established human pancreatic cancer cell lines.Upon demonstrating specific in vitro targeting,in vivo targeting to subcutaneous growing human pancreatic cancer was tested by intravenous and intraperitoneal administration of the ablated adenoviral vector.RESULTS:Ablation of native cellular binding sites reduced adenoviral transduction at least 100-fold.Insertion of the YSA peptide in the HI loop restored adenoviral transduction of EphA2R-expressing cells but not of cells lacking this receptor.YSA-mediated transduction was inhibited by addition of synthetic YSA peptide.The transduction specificity of the ablated retargeted vector towards human pancreatic cancer cells was enhanced almost 10-fold in vitro.In a subsequent in vivo study in a nude (nu/nu) mouse model however,no increased adenoviral targeting to subcutaneously growing human pancreas cancer nodules was seen upon injection into the tail vein,nor upon injection into the peritoneum.CONCLUSION:Targeting the EphA2 receptor increases specificity of adenoviral transduction of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro but fails to enhance pancreatic cancer transduction in vivo.

  19. Impact of Lentiviral Vector-Mediated Transduction on the Tightness of a Polarized Model of Airway Epithelium and Effect of Cationic Polymer Polyethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Castellani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lentiviral (LV vectors are promising agents for efficient and long-lasting gene transfer into the lung and for gene therapy of genetically determined pulmonary diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, however, they have not been evaluated for cytotoxicity and impact on the tightness of the airway epithelium. In this study, we evaluated the transduction efficiency of a last-generation LV vector bearing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP gene as well as cytotoxicity and tight junction (TJ integrity in a polarized model of airway epithelial cells. High multiplicities of infection (MOI showed to be cytotoxic, as assessed by increase in propidium iodide staining and decrease in cell viability, and harmful for the epithelial tightness, as demonstrated by the decrease of transepithelial resistance (TER and delocalization of occludin from the TJs. To increase LV efficiency at low LV:cell ratio, we employed noncovalent association with the polycation branched 25ߙkDa polyethylenimine (PEI. Transduction of cells with PEI/LV particles resulted in 2.5–3.6-fold increase of percentage of GFP-positive cells only at the highest PEI:LV ratios (1×107 PEI molecules/transducing units with 50 MOI LV as compared to plain LV. At this dose PEI/LV transduction resulted in 6.5±2.4% of propidium iodide-positive cells. On the other hand, PEI/LV particles did not determine any alteration of TER and occludin localization. We conclude that PEI may be useful for improving the efficiency of gene transfer mediated by LV vectors in airway epithelial cells, in the absence of high acute cytotoxicity and alteration in epithelial tightness.

  20. NET-SYNTHESIS: a software for synthesis, inference and simplification of signal transduction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachalo, Sema; Zhang, Ranran; Sontag, Eduardo; Albert, Réka; DasGupta, Bhaskar

    2008-01-15

    We present a software for combined synthesis, inference and simplification of signal transduction networks. The main idea of our method lies in representing observed indirect causal relationships as network paths and using techniques from combinatorial optimization to find the sparsest graph consistent with all experimental observations. We illustrate the biological usability of our software by applying it to a previously published signal transduction network and by using it to synthesize and simplify a novel network corresponding to activation-induced cell death in large granular lymphocyte leukemia. NET-SYNTHESIS is freely downloadable from http://www.cs.uic.edu/~dasgupta/network-synthesis/

  1. Quasi steady-state approximations in complex intracellular signal transduction networks - a word of caution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram; Bersani, A.M.; Bersani, E.

    2008-01-01

    Enzyme reactions play a pivotal role in intracellular signal transduction. Many enzymes are known to possess Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics and the MM approximation is often used when modeling enzyme reactions. However, it is known that the MM approximation is only valid at low enzyme concentrati......Enzyme reactions play a pivotal role in intracellular signal transduction. Many enzymes are known to possess Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics and the MM approximation is often used when modeling enzyme reactions. However, it is known that the MM approximation is only valid at low enzyme...

  2. Cancer classification through filtering progressive transductive support vector machine based on gene expression data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinguo; Chen, Dan

    2017-08-01

    Traditional supervised classifiers neglect a large amount of data which not have sufficient follow-up information, only work with labeled data. Consequently, the small sample size limits the advancement of design appropriate classifier. In this paper, a transductive learning method which combined with the filtering strategy in transductive framework and progressive labeling strategy is addressed. The progressive labeling strategy does not need to consider the distribution of labeled samples to evaluate the distribution of unlabeled samples, can effective solve the problem of evaluate the proportion of positive and negative samples in work set. Our experiment result demonstrate that the proposed technique have great potential in cancer prediction based on gene expression.

  3. Regulation of apoptotic signal transduction pathways by the heat shock proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Zhengyu; ZHAO; Xia; WEI; Yuquan

    2004-01-01

    The study about apoptotic signal transductions has become a project to reveal the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (hsps), which play an important role in cell growth and apoptosis, have attracted great attentions. A lot of researches have showed there is a hsps superfamily including hsp90, hsp70, hsp60 and hsp27, etc., which regulates the biological behaviors of cells, particularly apoptotic signal transduction in Fas pathway, JNK/SAPK pathway and caspases pathway at different levels, partly by the function of molecular chaperone.

  4. [Signal transduction and drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis--A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Zhe

    2015-08-04

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection kills two million people every year, and the chemotherapy has led to significant amount of drug resistance. Signal transduction systems are used by bacteria to survive or adapt to their living environment, but the relationship to drug resistance is not well understood. In this article, we introduced the two-component signal transduction systems of M. tuberculosis and analyzed their relationship with drug resistance. We identified five two-component system pairs involved in the formation of drug resistance. Therefore, these two-component systems are good targeting sites for small biochemical drugs to target so as to reverse the drug resistance and virulence.

  5. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp) in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Prado, M.A.; B. Evans-Bain; Santi, S. L.; Dickerson, I M

    2001-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor component protein (RCP) is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as...

  6. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  7. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  8. Baculoviral transduction facilitates TALEN-mediated targeted transgene integration and Cre/LoxP cassette exchange in human-induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haibao; Lau, Cia-Hin; Goh, Sal-Lee; Liang, Qingle; Chen, Can; Du, Shouhui; Phang, Rui-Zhe; Tay, Felix Chang; Tan, Wee-Kiat; Li, Zhendong; Tay, Johan Chin-Kang; Fan, Weimin; Wang, Shu

    2013-10-01

    Safety and reliability of transgene integration in human genome continue to pose challenges for stem cell-based gene therapy. Here, we report a baculovirus-transcription activator-like effector nuclease system for AAVS1 locus-directed homologous recombination in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This viral system, when optimized in human U87 cells, provided a targeted integration efficiency of 95.21% in incorporating a Neo-eGFP cassette and was able to mediate integration of DNA insert up to 13.5 kb. In iPSCs, targeted integration with persistent transgene expression was achieved without compromising genomic stability. The modified iPSCs continued to express stem cell pluripotency markers and maintained the ability to differentiate into three germ lineages in derived embryoid bodies. Using a baculovirus-Cre/LoxP system in the iPSCs, the Neo-eGFP cassette at the AAVS1 locus could be replaced by a Hygro-mCherry cassette, demonstrating the feasibility of cassette exchange. Moreover, as assessed by measuring γ-H2AX expression levels, genome toxicity associated with chromosomal double-strand breaks was not detectable after transduction with moderate doses of baculoviral vectors expressing transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Given high targeted integration efficiency, flexibility in transgene exchange and low genome toxicity, our baculoviral transduction-based approach offers great potential and attractive option for precise genetic manipulation in human pluripotent stem cells.

  9. Better Targeting, Better Efficiency for Wide-scale Neuronal Transduction with the Synapsin Promoter and AAV-PHP.B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasey L Jackson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Widespread genetic modification of cells in the central nervous system (CNS with a viral vector has become possible and increasingly more efficient. We previously applied an AAV9 vector with the cytomegalovirus/chicken beta-actin hybrid (CBA promoter and achieved wide-scale CNS transduction in neonatal and adult rats. However, this method transduces a variety of tissues in addition to the CNS. Thus we studied intravenous AAV9 gene transfer with a synapsin promoter to better target the neurons. We noted in systematic comparisons that the synapsin promoter drives lower level expression than does the CBA promoter. The engineered AAV-PHP.B serotype was compared with AAV9, and AAV-PHP.B did enhance the efficiency of expression. Combining the synapsin promoter with AAV-PHP.B could therefore be advantageous in terms of combining two refinements of targeting and efficiency. Wide-scale expression was used to model a disease with widespread pathology. Vectors encoding the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-related protein TDP-43 with the synapsin promoter and AAV-PHP.B were used for efficient CNS-targeted TDP-43 expression. Intracerebroventricular injections were also explored to limit TDP-43 expression to the CNS. The neuron-selective promoter and the AAV-PHP.B enhanced gene transfer and ALS disease modeling in adult rats.

  10. Distinct signal transduction pathways downstream of the (PRR revealed by microarray and ChIP-chip analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Zaade

    Full Text Available The (prorenin receptor ((PRR signaling is involved in different pathophysiologies ranging from cardiorenal end-organ damage via diabetic retinopathy to tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF is an adaptor protein of the (PRR. Furthermore, recent publications suggest that major functions of the (PRR are mediated ligand-independently by its transmembrane and intracellular part, which acts as an accessory protein of V-ATPases. The transcriptome and recruitmentome downstream of the V-ATPase function and PLZF in the context of the (PRR are currently unknown. Therefore, we performed a set of microarray and chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip experiments using siRNA against the (PRR, stable overexpression of PLZF, the PLZF translocation inhibitor genistein and the specific V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin to dissect transcriptional pathways downstream of the (PRR. We were able to identify distinct and overlapping genetic signatures as well as novel real-time PCR-validated target genes of the different molecular functions of the (PRR. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses of our data confirm the role of (PRŔs signal transduction pathways in cardiovascular disease and tumorigenesis.

  11. Establishment of clonal MIN-O transplant lines for molecular imaging via lentiviral transduction & in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, David L; Chen, Jane Qian; Cherry, Simon R; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2012-01-01

    As the field of molecular imaging evolves and increasingly is asked to fill the discovery and validation space between basic science and clinical applications, careful consideration should be given to the models in which studies are conducted. The MIN-O mouse model series is an established in vivo model of human mammary precancer ductal carcinoma in situ with progression to invasive carcinoma. This series of transplant lines is propagated in vivo and experiments utilizing this model can be completed in non-engineered immune intact FVB/n wild type mice thereby modeling the tumor microenvironment with biological relevance superior to traditional tumor cell xenografts. Unfortunately, the same qualities that make this and many other transplant lines more biologically relevant than standard cell lines for molecular imaging studies present a significant obstacle as somatic genetic re-engineering modifications common to many imaging applications can be technically challenging. Here, we describe a protocol for the efficient lentiviral transduction of cell slurries derived from precancerous MIN-O lesions, in vitro culture of "MIN-O-spheres" derived from single cell clones, and the subsequent transplantation of these spheres to produce transduced sublines suitable for optical imaging applications. These lines retain the physiologic and pathologic properties, including multilineage differentiation, and complex microanatomic interaction with the host stroma characteristic of the MIN-O model. We also present the in vivo imaging and immunohistochemical analysis of serial transplantation of one such subline and detail the progressive multifocal loss of the transgene in successive generations.

  12. Establishment of clonal MIN-O transplant lines for molecular imaging via lentiviral transduction & in vitro culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Boucher

    Full Text Available As the field of molecular imaging evolves and increasingly is asked to fill the discovery and validation space between basic science and clinical applications, careful consideration should be given to the models in which studies are conducted. The MIN-O mouse model series is an established in vivo model of human mammary precancer ductal carcinoma in situ with progression to invasive carcinoma. This series of transplant lines is propagated in vivo and experiments utilizing this model can be completed in non-engineered immune intact FVB/n wild type mice thereby modeling the tumor microenvironment with biological relevance superior to traditional tumor cell xenografts. Unfortunately, the same qualities that make this and many other transplant lines more biologically relevant than standard cell lines for molecular imaging studies present a significant obstacle as somatic genetic re-engineering modifications common to many imaging applications can be technically challenging. Here, we describe a protocol for the efficient lentiviral transduction of cell slurries derived from precancerous MIN-O lesions, in vitro culture of "MIN-O-spheres" derived from single cell clones, and the subsequent transplantation of these spheres to produce transduced sublines suitable for optical imaging applications. These lines retain the physiologic and pathologic properties, including multilineage differentiation, and complex microanatomic interaction with the host stroma characteristic of the MIN-O model. We also present the in vivo imaging and immunohistochemical analysis of serial transplantation of one such subline and detail the progressive multifocal loss of the transgene in successive generations.

  13. Differences in two-component signal transduction proteins among the genus Brucella: implications for host preference and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavín, José Luis; Binnewies, Tim T; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Ussery, David W; García-Lobo, Juan M; Oguiza, José A

    2010-08-26

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are the predominant bacterial signal transduction mechanisms. Species of the genus Brucella are genetically highly related and differ mainly in mammalian host adaptation and pathogenesis. In this study, TCS proteins encoded in the available genome sequences of Brucella species have been identified using bioinformatic methods. All the Brucella species share an identical set of TCS proteins, and the number of TCS proteins in the closely related opportunistic human pathogen Ochrobactrum anthropi was higher than in Brucella species as expected from its lifestyle. O. anthropi lacks orthologs of the Brucella TCSs NodVW, TceSR and TcfSR, suggesting that these TCS proteins could be necessary for the adaptation of Brucella as an intracellular pathogen. This genomic analysis revealed the presence of a differential distribution of TCS pseudogenes among Brucella species. Moreover, there were also differences in TCS pseudogenes between strains belonging to the same Brucella species, and in particular between B. suis biovars 1 and 2. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Better Targeting, Better Efficiency for Wide-Scale Neuronal Transduction with the Synapsin Promoter and AAV-PHP.B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kasey L; Dayton, Robert D; Deverman, Benjamin E; Klein, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    Widespread genetic modification of cells in the central nervous system (CNS) with a viral vector has become possible and increasingly more efficient. We previously applied an AAV9 vector with the cytomegalovirus/chicken beta-actin (CBA) hybrid promoter and achieved wide-scale CNS transduction in neonatal and adult rats. However, this method transduces a variety of tissues in addition to the CNS. Thus we studied intravenous AAV9 gene transfer with a synapsin promoter to better target the neurons. We noted in systematic comparisons that the synapsin promoter drives lower level expression than does the CBA promoter. The engineered adeno-associated virus (AAV)-PHP.B serotype was compared with AAV9, and AAV-PHP.B did enhance the efficiency of expression. Combining the synapsin promoter with AAV-PHP.B could therefore be advantageous in terms of combining two refinements of targeting and efficiency. Wide-scale expression was used to model a disease with widespread pathology. Vectors encoding the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-related protein transactive response DNA-binding protein, 43 kDa (TDP-43) with the synapsin promoter and AAV-PHP.B were used for efficient CNS-targeted TDP-43 expression. Intracerebroventricular injections were also explored to limit TDP-43 expression to the CNS. The neuron-selective promoter and the AAV-PHP.B enhanced gene transfer and ALS disease modeling in adult rats.

  15. Sensory Transduction in Microorganisms 2008 Gordon Research Conference (January 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ann M. Stock

    2009-04-08

    Research into the mechanisms involved in the sensing and responses of microorganisms to changes in their environments is currently very active in a large number of laboratories worldwide. An increasingly wide range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species are being studied with regard to their sensing of diverse chemical and physical stimuli, including nutrients, toxins, intercellular signaling molecules, redox indicators, light, pressure, magnetic fields, and surface contact, leading to adaptive responses affecting motile behavior, gene expression and/or development. The ease of manipulation of microorganisms has facilitated application of a broad range of techniques that have provided comprehensive descriptions of cellular behavior and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Systems and their molecular components have been probed at levels ranging from the whole organism down to atomic resolution using behavioral analyses; electrophysiology; genetics; molecular biology; biochemical and biophysical characterization; structural biology; single molecule, fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy; computational modeling; bioinformatics and genomic analyses. Several model systems such as bacterial chemotaxis and motility, fruiting body formation in Myxococcus xanthus, and motility and development in Dictyostelium discoideum have traditionally been a focus of this meeting. By providing a basis for assessment of similarities and differences in mechanisms, understanding of these pathways has advanced the study of many other microbial sensing systems. This conference aims to bring together researchers investigating different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial systems using diverse approaches to compare data, share methodologies and ideas, and seek to understand the fundamental principles underlying sensory responses. Topic areas include: (1) Receptor Sensing and Signaling; (2) Intracellular Signaling (two-component, c-di-GMP, c-AMP, etc.); (3) Intracellular Localization and

  16. FASEB summer research conference on signal transduction in plants. Final report, June 16, 1996--June 21, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomax, T.L.; Quatrano, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    This is the program from the second FASEB conference on Signal Transduction in Plants. Topic areas included the following: environmental signaling; perception and transduction of light signals; signaling in plant microbe interactions; signaling in plant pathogen interactions; cell, cell communication; cytoskeleton, plasma membrane, and cellwall continuum; signaling molecules in plant growth and development I and II. A list of participants is included.

  17. FASEB summer research conference on signal transduction in plants. Final report, June 16, 1996--June 21, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomax, T.L.; Quatrano, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    This is the program from the second FASEB conference on Signal Transduction in Plants. Topic areas included the following: environmental signaling; perception and transduction of light signals; signaling in plant microbe interactions; signaling in plant pathogen interactions; cell, cell communication; cytoskeleton, plasma membrane, and cellwall continuum; signaling molecules in plant growth and development I and II. A list of participants is included.

  18. Hair cell mechano-transduction : Its influence on the gross mechanical characteristics of a hair cell sense organ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanNetten, Sietse M.

    1997-01-01

    The complex mechanical behaviour of a hair cell bundle appears to be a direct consequence of the gating forces on the individual transduction channels. The mechanical molecular interactions involved in transduction channel gating, therefore, also bear a reciprocal influence, via the hair bundles; on

  19. DMPD: Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15379975 Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor...-4. Palsson-McDermott EM, O'Neill LA. Immunology. 2004 Oct;113(2):153-62. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal... transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. PubmedID 15379975 Title Signal

  20. Transduction of the MPG-tagged fusion protein into mammalian cells and oocytes depends on amiloride-sensitive endocytic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheon Yong-Pil

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MPG is a cell-permeable peptide with proven efficiency to deliver macromolecular cargoes into cells. In this work, we examined the efficacy of MPG as an N-terminal tag in a fusion protein to deliver a protein cargo and its mechanism of transduction. Results We examined transduction of MPG-EGFP fusion protein by live imaging, flow cytometry, along with combination of cell biological and pharmacological methods. We show that MPG-EGFP fusion proteins efficiently enter various mammalian cells within a few minutes and are co-localized with FM4-64, a general marker of endosomes. The transduction of MPG-EGFP occurs rapidly and is inhibited at a low temperature. The entry of MPG-EGFP is inhibited by amiloride, but cytochalasin D and methyl-β-cyclodextrin did not inhibit the entry, suggesting that macropinocytosis is not involved in the transduction. Overexpression of a mutant form of dynamin partially reduced the transduction of MPG-EGFP. The partial blockade of MPG-EGFP transduction by a dynamin mutant is abolished by the treatment of amiloride. MPG-EGFP transduction is also observed in the mammalian oocytes. Conclusion The results show that the transduction of MPG fusion protein utilizes endocytic pathway(s which is amiloride-sensitive and partially dynamin-dependent. Collectively, the MPG fusion protein could be further developed as a novel tool of "protein therapeutics", with potentials to be used in various cell systems including mammalian oocytes.

  1. Hair cell mechano-transduction : Its influence on the gross mechanical characteristics of a hair cell sense organ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanNetten, SM

    1997-01-01

    The complex mechanical behaviour of a hair cell bundle appears to be a direct consequence of the gating forces on the individual transduction channels. The mechanical molecular interactions involved in transduction channel gating, therefore, also bear a reciprocal influence, via the hair bundles; on

  2. PathFinder: mining signal transduction pathway segments from protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiong

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Signal transduction pathway is the chain of processes by which a cell converts an extracellular signal into a response. In most unicellular organisms, the number of signal transduction pathways influences the number of ways the cell can react and respond to the environment. Discovering signal transduction pathways is an arduous problem, even with the use of systematic genomic, proteomic and metabolomic technologies. These techniques lead to an enormous amount of data and how to interpret and process this data becomes a challenging computational problem. Results In this study we present a new framework for identifying signaling pathways in protein-protein interaction networks. Our goal is to find biologically significant pathway segments in a given interaction network. Currently, protein-protein interaction data has excessive amount of noise, e.g., false positive and false negative interactions. First, we eliminate false positives in the protein-protein interaction network by integrating the network with microarray expression profiles, protein subcellular localization and sequence information. In addition, protein families are used to repair false negative interactions. Then the characteristics of known signal transduction pathways and their functional annotations are extracted in the form of association rules. Conclusion Given a pair of starting and ending proteins, our methodology returns candidate pathway segments between these two proteins with possible missing links (recovered false negatives. In our study, S. cerevisiae (yeast data is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  3. Polymer-enhanced adenoviral transduction of CAR-negative bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasman, Laura M; Barua, Sutapa; Lu, Ping; Rege, Kaushal; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The application of adenoviral gene therapy for cancer is limited by immune clearance of the virus as well as poor transduction efficiency, since the protein used for viral entry (CAR) serves physiological functions in adhesion and is frequently decreased among cancer cells. Cationic polymers have been used to enhance adenoviral gene delivery, but novel polymers with low toxicity are needed to realize this approach. We recently identified polymers that were characterized by high transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA and a low toxicity profile. In this study we evaluated the novel cationic polymer EGDE-3,3' for its potential to increase adenoviral transduction of the CAR-negative bladder cancer cell line TCCSUP. The amount of adenovirus required to transduce 50-60% of the cells was reduced 100-fold when Ad.GFP was preincubated with the EGDE-3,3' polymer. Polyethyleneimine (pEI), a positively charged polymer currently used as a standard for enhancing adenoviral transduction, also increased infectivity, but transgene expression was consistently higher with EGDE-3,3'. In addition, EGDE-3,3'-supplemented transduction of an adenovirus expressing an apoptosis inducing transgene, Ad.GFP-TRAIL, significantly enhanced the amount of cell death. Thus, our results indicate that novel biocompatible polymers may be useful in improving the delivery of adenoviral gene therapy.

  4. A mathematical model of the mating signal transduction pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Ivan Milac

    1998-09-14

    Outline of two major goals in my proposal for this fellowship. First goal having no previous training in biology, was to become knowledgeable of the paradigms, experimental techniques, and current research interests of molecular biology. Second goal was to construct a mathematical model of the mating signal transduction pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  5. Beacon Editor: Capturing Signal Transduction Pathways Using the Systems Biology Graphical Notation Activity Flow Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmarakeby, Haitham; Arefiyan, Mostafa; Myers, Elijah; Li, Song; Grene, Ruth; Heath, Lenwood S

    2017-08-28

    The Beacon Editor is a cross-platform desktop application for the creation and modification of signal transduction pathways using the Systems Biology Graphical Notation Activity Flow (SBGN-AF) language. Prompted by biologists' requests for enhancements, the Beacon Editor includes numerous powerful features for the benefit of creation and presentation.

  6. Intracellular signal transduction by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor of Xenopus melanotrope cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurk, MJ van den; Cruijsen, P.M.; Schoeber, J.P.H.; Scheenen, W.J.J.M.; Roubos, E.W.; Jenks, B.G.

    2008-01-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is expressed in various types of endocrine pituitary cell, but the intracellular mechanism this G protein-coupled receptor uses in these cells is not known. In the present study we investigated possible intracellular signal transduction pathway(s)

  7. Molecular insights into the mechanism of sensing and signal transduction of the thermosensor DesK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballering, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325784876

    2016-01-01

    The ability to sense and respond to environmental signals is essential for cell survival. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying signaling processes remains a challenge, however. This thesis provides molecular insights into the mechanism of sensing and signal transduction of the thermosensor

  8. The efficiency of expressing human neprilysin by using lentiviral vector transduction in neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the transduction efficiency of expressing human neprilysin by using lentiviral(Lenti-NEP) in mouse embryonic neural stem cells(NSC) in vitro. Methods Primary NSC were harvested from C57BL/6J pregnant mouse at embryonic day

  9. Vectofusin-1, a new viral entry enhancer, strongly promotes lentiviral transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenard, David; Ingrao, Dina; Seye, Ababacar; Buisset, Julien; Genries, Sandrine; Martin, Samia; Kichler, Antoine; Galy, Anne

    2013-05-07

    Gene transfer into hCD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs) using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) has several promising therapeutic applications. Yet, efficiency, safety, and cost of LV gene therapy could be ameliorated by enhancing target cell transduction levels and reducing the amount of LV used on the cells. Several transduction enhancers already exist such as fibronectin fragments and cationic compounds, but all present limitations. In this study, we describe a new transduction enhancer called Vectofusin-1, which is a short cationic peptide, active on several LV pseudotypes. Vectofusin-1 is used as a soluble additive to safely increase the frequency of transduced HSCs and to augment the level of transduction to one or two copies of vector per cell in a vector dose-dependent manner. Vectofusin-1 acts at the entry step by promoting the adhesion and the fusion between viral and cellular membranes. Vectofusin-1 is therefore a promising additive that could significantly ameliorate hCD34(+) cell-based gene therapy.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e90; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.17; published online 7 May 2013.

  10. Investigation of the charge effect on the electrochemical transduction in a quinone-based DNA sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisberg, S.; Piro, B.; Noel, V.

    2008-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism involved in the electrochemical transduction process of a conducting polymer-based DNA sensor, peptide nucleic acids (PNA) were used. PNA are DNA analogues having similar hybridization properties but are neutral. This allows to discriminate the electrostatic effect of D...

  11. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  12. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  13. NA+ AS COUPLING ION IN ENERGY TRANSDUCTION IN EXTREMOPHILIC BACTERIA AND ARCHAEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelmans, G.; Poolman, B.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    For microoganisms to live under extreme physical conditions requires important adaptations of the cells. In many organisms the use of Na+ instead of protons as coupling ion in energy transduction is associated with such adaptation. This review focuses on the enzymes that are responsible for the gene

  14. Efficient transduction of neurons using Ross River glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsson, J; Nielsen, T Tolstrup; Staflin, K

    2006-01-01

    , including the possibility to establish stable producer cell lines. After injection of RRV-LV expressing green fluorescent protein into different structures in the rat brain we found efficient transduction of both neurons and glial cells. By using two cell-type-specific promoters, neuron-specific enolase...

  15. Decitabine suspends human CD34+ cell differentiation and proliferation during lentiviral transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Naoya; Hsieh, Matthew M; Platner, Charlotte; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Tisdale, John F

    2014-01-01

    Efficient ex vivo transduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is encumbered by differentiation which reduces engraftment. We hypothesized that inhibiting DNA methyltransferase with decitabine would block differentiation of transduced CD34+ cells under cytokine stimulation and thus improve transduction efficiency for engrafting HSCs. Human CD34+ cells in cytokine-containing media were treated with or without decitabine for 24 or 48 hours, and then these cells were transduced with a GFP-expressing lentiviral vector. Utilizing decitabine pre-treatment for 48 hours, we observed an equivalent percentage of successfully transduced cells (GFP-positivity) and a higher percentage of cells that retained CD34 positivity, compared to no decitabine exposure. Cell proliferation was inhibited after decitabine exposure. Similar results were observed among CD34+ cells from six different donors. Repopulating activity was evaluated by transplantation into NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull mice and demonstrated an equivalent percentage of GFP-positivity in human cells from decitabine-treated samples and a trend for higher human cell engraftment (measured 20-24 weeks after transplantation), compared to no decitabine exposure. In conclusion, ex vivo decitabine exposure inhibits both differentiation and proliferation in transduced human CD34+ cells and modestly increases the engraftment ability in xenograft mice, while the transduction efficiency is equivalent in decitabine exposure, suggesting improvement of lentiviral transduction for HSCs.

  16. Decitabine suspends human CD34+ cell differentiation and proliferation during lentiviral transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Uchida

    Full Text Available Efficient ex vivo transduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is encumbered by differentiation which reduces engraftment. We hypothesized that inhibiting DNA methyltransferase with decitabine would block differentiation of transduced CD34+ cells under cytokine stimulation and thus improve transduction efficiency for engrafting HSCs. Human CD34+ cells in cytokine-containing media were treated with or without decitabine for 24 or 48 hours, and then these cells were transduced with a GFP-expressing lentiviral vector. Utilizing decitabine pre-treatment for 48 hours, we observed an equivalent percentage of successfully transduced cells (GFP-positivity and a higher percentage of cells that retained CD34 positivity, compared to no decitabine exposure. Cell proliferation was inhibited after decitabine exposure. Similar results were observed among CD34+ cells from six different donors. Repopulating activity was evaluated by transplantation into NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull mice and demonstrated an equivalent percentage of GFP-positivity in human cells from decitabine-treated samples and a trend for higher human cell engraftment (measured 20-24 weeks after transplantation, compared to no decitabine exposure. In conclusion, ex vivo decitabine exposure inhibits both differentiation and proliferation in transduced human CD34+ cells and modestly increases the engraftment ability in xenograft mice, while the transduction efficiency is equivalent in decitabine exposure, suggesting improvement of lentiviral transduction for HSCs.

  17. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  18. Genetic modification and genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-06-26

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  19. 2R and remodeling of vertebrate signal transduction engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huminiecki Lukasz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole genome duplication (WGD is a special case of gene duplication, observed rarely in animals, whereby all genes duplicate simultaneously through polyploidisation. Two rounds of WGD (2R-WGD occurred at the base of vertebrates, giving rise to an enormous wave of genetic novelty, but a systematic analysis of functional consequences of this event has not yet been performed. Results We show that 2R-WGD affected an overwhelming majority (74% of signalling genes, in particular developmental pathways involving receptor tyrosine kinases, Wnt and transforming growth factor-β ligands, G protein-coupled receptors and the apoptosis pathway. 2R-retained genes, in contrast to tandem duplicates, were enriched in protein interaction domains and multifunctional signalling modules of Ras and mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. 2R-WGD had a fundamental impact on the cell-cycle machinery, redefined molecular building blocks of the neuronal synapse, and was formative for vertebrate brains. We investigated 2R-associated nodes in the context of the human signalling network, as well as in an inferred ancestral pre-2R (AP2R network, and found that hubs (particularly involving negative regulation were preferentially retained, with high connectivity driving retention. Finally, microarrays and proteomics demonstrated a trend for gradual paralog expression divergence independent of the duplication mechanism, but inferred ancestral expression states suggested preferential subfunctionalisation among 2R-ohnologs (2ROs. Conclusions The 2R event left an indelible imprint on vertebrate signalling and the cell cycle. We show that 2R-WGD preferentially retained genes are associated with higher organismal complexity (for example, locomotion, nervous system, morphogenesis, while genes associated with basic cellular functions (for example, translation, replication, splicing, recombination; with the notable exception of cell cycle tended to be excluded. 2R

  20. Engineering fusogenic molecules to achieve targeted transduction of enveloped lentiviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Pin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lentiviral vectors with broad tropism are one of the most promising gene delivery systems capable of efficiently delivering genes of interest into both dividing and non-dividing cells while maintaining long-term transgene expression. However, there are needs for developing lentiviral vectors with the capability to deliver genes to specific cell types, thus reducing the "off-target" effect of gene therapy. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of engineering the fusion-active domain of a fusogenic molecule (FM with the aim to improve targeted transduction of lentiviral vectors co-displaying an anti-CD20 antibody (αCD20 and a FM. Results Specific mutations were introduced into the fusion domain of a binding-deficient Sindbis virus glycoprotein to generate several mutant FMs. Lentiviral vectors incorporated with αCD20 and one of the engineered FMs were successfully produced and demonstrated to be able to preferentially deliver genes to CD-20-expressing cells. Lentiviral vectors bearing engineered FMs exhibited 8 to 17-fold enhanced transduction towards target cells as compared to the parental FM. Different levels of enhancement were observed for the different engineered FMs. A pH-dependent study of vector transduction showed that the broader pH range of the engineered FM is a possible mechanism for the resulted increase in transduction efficiency. Conclusion The fusion domain of Sindbis virus glycoprotein is amenable for engineering and the engineered proteins provide elevated capacity to mediate lentiviral vectors for targeted transduction. Our data suggests that application of such an engineering strategy can optimize the two-molecular targeting method of lentiviral vectors for gene delivery to predetermined cells.

  1. Enrichment of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells facilitates transduction for stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kismet; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kaufman, Michael L; Cooper, Aaron R; Masiuk, Katelyn; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to treat this illness without the major immunological complications associated with allogeneic transplantation. However, transduction efficiency by β-globin lentiviral vectors using CD34-enriched cell populations is suboptimal and large vector production batches may be needed for clinical trials. Transducing a cell population more enriched for HSC could greatly reduce vector needs and, potentially, increase transduction efficiency. CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, comprising ∼1%-3% of all CD34(+) cells, were isolated from healthy cord blood CD34(+) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing an antisickling form of beta-globin (CCL-β(AS3) -FB). Isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells were able to generate progeny over an extended period of long-term culture (LTC) compared to the CD34(+) cells and required up to 40-fold less vector for transduction compared to bulk CD34(+) preparations containing an equivalent number of CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells. Transduction of isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells was comparable to CD34(+) cells measured by quantitative PCR at day 14 with reduced vector needs, and average vector copy/cell remained higher over time for LTC initiated from CD34(+) /38(-) cells. Following in vitro erythroid differentiation, HBBAS3 mRNA expression was similar in cultures derived from CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells or unfractionated CD34(+) cells. In vivo studies showed equivalent engraftment of transduced CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells when transplanted in competition with 100-fold more CD34(+) /CD38(+) cells. This work provides initial evidence for the beneficial effects from isolating human CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells to use significantly less vector and potentially improve transduction for HSC gene therapy.

  2. The signal transduction mechanisms on the intestinal mucosa of rat following irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lee, K. J.; Lee, J. S. [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-06-01

    Phospholipase C(PLC) isozymes play significant roles in signal transduction mechanism. The exact mechanisms of these signal transduction following irradiation, however, were not clearly documented. Thus, this study was planned to determine the biological significance of PLC, ras oncoprotein, EGFR, and PKC in damage and regeneration of rat intestinal mucosa following irradiation. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated to entire body with a single dose of 8Gy. The rats were divided into 5 groups according to the sacrifice days after irradiation. The expression of PLC, ras oncoprotein, EGRF PKC in each group were examined by the immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The histopathologic findings were observed using H and E stain, and the mitoses for the evidence of regeneration were counted using the light microscopy and PCNA kit. The phosphoinositide(PI) hydrolyzing activity assay was also done for the indirect evaluation of PLC-{gamma}1 activity. In the immunohistochemistry, the expression of PLC-{beta} was negative for all groups. The expression of PLC-{gamma}1 was highest in the group III followed by group II in the proliferative zone of mucosa. The expression of PKC-{delta}1 was strongly positive in group I followed by group II in the damaged surface epithelium. The above findings were also confirmed in the immunoblotting study. In the immunoblotting study, the expressions of PLC-{beta}, PLC-{gamma}1, and PLC-{delta}1 were the same as the results of immunohistochemistry. The expression of ras oncoprotein was weakly positive in groups II, III and IV and the expression of PKC was weakly positive in the group II and III. PLC-{gamma}1 mediated signal transduction including ras oncoprotein, EGFR, and PKC play a significant role in mucosal regeneration after irradiation. PLC-{delta}1 mediated signal transduction might have an important role in mucosal damage after irradiation. Further studies will be necessary to confirm the signal transduction mediating the PLC

  3. Towards the systematic discovery of signal transduction networks using phosphorylation dynamics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yachie Nozomu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous and fundamental regulatory mechanism that controls signal transduction in living cells. The number of identified phosphoproteins and their phosphosites is rapidly increasing as a result of recent mass spectrometry-based approaches. Results We analyzed time-course phosphoproteome data obtained previously by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with the stable isotope labeling using amino acids in cell culture (SILAC method. This provides the relative phosphorylation activities of digested peptides at each of five time points after stimulating HeLa cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF. We initially calculated the correlations between the phosphorylation dynamics patterns of every pair of peptides and connected the strongly correlated pairs to construct a network. We found that peptides extracted from the same intracellular fraction (nucleus vs. cytoplasm tended to be close together within this phosphorylation dynamics-based network. The network was then analyzed using graph theory and compared with five known signal-transduction pathways. The dynamics-based network was correlated with known signaling pathways in the NetPath and Phospho.ELM databases, and especially with the EGF receptor (EGFR signaling pathway. Although the phosphorylation patterns of many proteins were drastically changed by the EGF stimulation, our results suggest that only EGFR signaling transduction was both strongly activated and precisely controlled. Conclusions The construction of a phosphorylation dynamics-based network provides a useful overview of condition-specific intracellular signal transduction using quantitative time-course phosphoproteome data under specific experimental conditions. Detailed prediction of signal transduction based on phosphoproteome dynamics remains challenging. However, since the phosphorylation profiles of kinase-substrate pairs on the specific pathway were localized in the dynamics

  4. Conditional Dicer substrate formation via shape and sequence transduction with small conditional RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochrein, Lisa M; Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Shahgholi, Mona; Yin, Peng; Pierce, Niles A

    2013-11-20

    RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) enables knockdown of a gene of choice, executing the logical operation: silence gene Y. The fact that the siRNA is constitutively active is a significant limitation, making it difficult to confine knockdown to a specific locus and time. To achieve spatiotemporal control over silencing, we seek to engineer small conditional RNAs (scRNAs) that mediate 'conditional RNAi' corresponding to the logical operation: if gene X is transcribed, silence independent gene Y. By appropriately selecting gene X, knockdown of gene Y could then be restricted in a tissue- and time-specific manner. To implement the logic of conditional RNAi, our approach is to engineer scRNAs that, upon binding to mRNA 'detection target' X, perform shape and sequence transduction to form a Dicer substrate targeting independent mRNA 'silencing target' Y, with subsequent Dicer processing yielding an siRNA targeting mRNA Y for destruction. Toward this end, here we design and experimentally validate diverse scRNA mechanisms for conditional Dicer substrate formation. Test tube studies demonstrate strong OFF/ON conditional response, with at least an order of magnitude increase in Dicer substrate production in the presence of the cognate mRNA detection target. By appropriately dimensioning and/or chemically modifying the scRNAs, only the product of signal transduction, and not the reactants or intermediates, is efficiently processed by Dicer, yielding siRNAs. These mechanism studies explore diverse design principles for engineering scRNA signal transduction cascades including reactant stability vs metastability, catalytic vs noncatalytic transduction, pre- vs post-transcriptional transduction, reactant and product molecularity, and modes of molecular self-assembly and disassembly.

  5. Imaging Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  6. Genetic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, D

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the basic principles of genetics, including the classification of genetic disorders and a consideration of the rules and mechanisms of inheritance. The most common pitfalls in clinical genetic diagnosis are described, with emphasis on the problem of the negative or misleading family history.

  7. Imaging Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  8. Sonic Hedgehog: A Good Gene Gone Bad? Detection and Treatment of Genetic Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaich, Lauren E.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a case of a baby born with the genetic condition holoprosencephaly in which students explore the "Sonic hedgehog" gene, signal transduction, and the ethics of body and tissue donation. Presents a two-part assignment that features students writing an informed consent document that explains the science behind this congenital abnormality,…

  9. Light-sensitive coupling of rhodopsin and melanopsin to G(i/o) and G(q) signal transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengxiu; Sun, Wenyu; Kramp, Kristopher; Zheng, Maohua; Salom, David; Jastrzebska, Beata; Jin, Hui; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2012-02-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) initiates signal transduction cascades that affect many physiological responses. The worm Caenorhabditis elegans expresses >1000 of these receptors along with their cognate heterotrimeric G proteins. Here, we report properties of 9-cis-retinal regenerated bovine opsin [(b)isoRho] and human melanopsin [(h)Mo], two light-activated, heterologously expressed GPCRs in the nervous system of C. elegans with various genetically engineered alterations. Profound transient photoactivation of G(i/o) signaling by (b)isoRho led to a sudden and transient loss of worm motility dependent on cyclic adenosine monophosphate, whereas transient photoactivation of G(q) signaling by (h)Mo enhanced worm locomotion dependent on phospholipase Cβ. These transgenic C. elegans models provide a unique way to study the consequences of G(i/o) and G(q) signaling in vivo with temporal and spatial precision and, by analogy, their relationship to human neuromotor function.

  10. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    OpenAIRE

    Vorhaus Daniel B; Resnik David B

    2006-01-01

    Abstract In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound....

  11. Membrane Guanylate Cyclase, A Multimodal Transduction Machine: History, Present and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameshwar K Sharma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A sequel to these authors’ earlier comprehensive reviews which covered the field of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC from its origin to the year 2010, this article contains 13 parts. The first is HISTORICAL and covers MGC from the year 1963-1987, summarizing its colorful developmental stages from its passionate pursuit to its consolidation. The second deals with the establishment of its BIOCHEMICAL IDENTITY. MGC becomes the transducer of a hormonal signal and founder of the peptide hormone receptor family, and creates the notion that hormone signal transduction is its sole physiological function. The third defines its EXPANSION. The discovery of ROS-GC subfamily is made and it links ROS-GC with the physiology of PHOTOTRANSDUCTION. Parts 4 to 7 cover its BIOCHEMISTRY and PHYSIOLOGY. The noteworthy events are that augmented by GCAPs, ROS-GC proves to be a transducer of the free Ca2+ signals generated within neurons; ROS-GC becomes a two-component transduction system and establishes itself as a source of cyclic GMP, the second messenger of phototransduction. Part 8 demonstrates how this knowledge begins to be TRANSLATED into the diagnosis and providing the molecular definition of retinal dystrophies. Part 9 discusses a striking property of ROS-GC where it becomes a [Ca2+]i bimodal switch and transcends its signaling role in other neural transduction processes. In this course, discovery of the first CD-GCAP (Ca2+-dependent guanylate cycles activator, the S100B protein, is made. It extends the role of ROS-GC transduction system beyond the photoreceptor cells to the signaling processes in the synapse region between photoreceptor and cone ON-bipolar cells; in Part 10, discovery of ANOTHER CD-GCAP, NC, is made and its linkage with signaling of the inner plexiform layer neurons is established. Part 11 discusses linkage of the ROS-GC transduction system with other sensory transduction processes: Pineal gland, Olfaction and Gustation. In the

  12. DMPD: Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14751759 Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withTo...;16(1):17-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of... CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. PubmedID 14751759 Title Signal transduction pa

  13. Signal Transduction at the Single-Cell Level: Approaches to Study the Dynamic Nature of Signaling Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handly, L Naomi; Yao, Jason; Wollman, Roy

    2016-09-25

    Signal transduction, or how cells interpret and react to external events, is a fundamental aspect of cellular function. Traditional study of signal transduction pathways involves mapping cellular signaling pathways at the population level. However, population-averaged readouts do not adequately illuminate the complex dynamics and heterogeneous responses found at the single-cell level. Recent technological advances that observe cellular response, computationally model signaling pathways, and experimentally manipulate cells now enable studying signal transduction at the single-cell level. These studies will enable deeper insights into the dynamic nature of signaling networks.

  14. Genetic barcodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz -Ulrich G

    2015-08-04

    Herein are described multicolor FISH probe sets termed "genetic barcodes" targeting several cancer or disease-related loci to assess gene rearrangements and copy number changes in tumor cells. Two, three or more different fluorophores are used to detect the genetic barcode sections thus permitting unique labeling and multilocus analysis in individual cell nuclei. Gene specific barcodes can be generated and combined to provide both numerical and structural genetic information for these and other pertinent disease associated genes.

  15. Efficiency of retroviral transduction into hematopoietic cells by cocultivation procedure does not correlate with viral titer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnis, C; Chischportich, C; Imbert, A M; Van den Broeke, A; Cornet, V; Mannoni, P

    1997-01-01

    Relative transduction efficiency with retroviral vector-producing clones was assayed by cocultivating TF-1, a human CD34+ hematopoietic cell line and YR-2, a sheep B-lymphoid cell line, with LacZ containing vector-producing cells, and then by scoring the percentage of X-Gal+ cells. At the same time, viral titer was estimated by titration assay with murine fibroblasts. Results clearly demonstrated a lack of correlation between viral titer and efficiency of transduction into hematopoietic cells, which depends neither on the type of packaging cell line, PG-13 and GP-envAM12 in this study, nor on the type of LacZ containing retroviral vector. These results strongly favor consideration of interactions between producers and target cells of the study for the screening of producing cell lines.

  16. Systematic Prediction of Scaffold Proteins Reveals New Design Principles in Scaffold-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianfei; Neiswinger, Johnathan; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins play a crucial role in facilitating signal transduction in eukaryotes by bringing together multiple signaling components. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of scaffold proteins in signal transduction by integrating protein-protein interaction and kinase-substrate relationship networks. We predicted 212 scaffold proteins that are involved in 605 distinct signaling pathways. The computational prediction was validated using a protein microarray-based approach. The predicted scaffold proteins showed several interesting characteristics, as we expected from the functionality of scaffold proteins. We found that the scaffold proteins are likely to interact with each other, which is consistent with previous finding that scaffold proteins tend to form homodimers and heterodimers. Interestingly, a single scaffold protein can be involved in multiple signaling pathways by interacting with other scaffold protein partners. Furthermore, we propose two possible regulatory mechanisms by which the activity of scaffold proteins is coordinated with their associated pathways through phosphorylation process. PMID:26393507

  17. Signal Transduction Pathways of EMT Induced by TGF-β, SHH, and WNT and Their Crosstalks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT is a key step in development, wound healing, and cancer development. It involves cooperation of signaling pathways, such as transformation growth factor-β (TGF-β, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH, and WNT pathways. These signaling pathways crosstalk to each other and converge to key transcription factors (e.g., SNAIL1 to initialize and maintain the process of EMT. The functional roles of multi-signaling pathway crosstalks in EMT are sophisticated and, thus, remain to be explored. In this review, we focused on three major signal transduction pathways that promote or regulate EMT in carcinoma. We discussed the network structures, and provided a brief overview of the current therapy strategies and drug development targeted to these three signal transduction pathways. Finally, we highlighted systems biology approaches that can accelerate the process of deconstructing complex networks and drug discovery.

  18. Signal Transduction Pathways of EMT Induced by TGF-β, SHH, and WNT and Their Crosstalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyu; Tian, Xiao-Jun; Xing, Jianhua

    2016-03-28

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key step in development, wound healing, and cancer development. It involves cooperation of signaling pathways, such as transformation growth factor-β (TGF-β), Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), and WNT pathways. These signaling pathways crosstalk to each other and converge to key transcription factors (e.g., SNAIL1) to initialize and maintain the process of EMT. The functional roles of multi-signaling pathway crosstalks in EMT are sophisticated and, thus, remain to be explored. In this review, we focused on three major signal transduction pathways that promote or regulate EMT in carcinoma. We discussed the network structures, and provided a brief overview of the current therapy strategies and drug development targeted to these three signal transduction pathways. Finally, we highlighted systems biology approaches that can accelerate the process of deconstructing complex networks and drug discovery.

  19. Molecular mechanism of cellular reception of ionizing radiation and of activation of signal transduction pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    The author reviewed what in cells receives ionizing radiation as a stress and which signal transduction pathway is activated to induce the stress reaction in the following order: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) pathway by radiation, activation of MAP kinase superfamily by radiation, induction of p53 function by radiation, and radiation exposure and stress reaction pathway. Conclusion was as follows: Cellular receptors to radiation can be cell membrane and DNA. Membrane reception of radiation induces activation of tyrosine kinase and sphingomyelinase, which resulting in activation of PKC- and MAP kinase-mediated signal transduction. The signal generated in the nucleus participates in regulation of cell cycle and in DNA repair. Therefore, it seems that irradiation of ionizing radiation gives energy to various cellular receptor sites as well as DNA, which generate various independent signals to be transduced and accumulated in the nucleus, and leading to cellular response. (K.H.). 63 refs.

  20. FIST: a sensory domain for diverse signal transduction pathways in prokaryotes and ubiquitin signaling in eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borziak, Kirill [ORNL; Jouline, Igor B [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: Sensory domains that are conserved among Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya are important detectors of common signals detected by living cells. Due to their high sequence divergence, sensory domains are difficult to identify. We systematically look for novel sensory domains using sensitive profile-based searches initi-ated with regions of signal transduction proteins where no known domains can be identified by current domain models. Results: Using profile searches followed by multiple sequence alignment, structure prediction, and domain architecture analysis, we have identified a novel sensory domain termed FIST, which is present in signal transduction proteins from Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya. Remote similarity to a known ligand-binding fold and chromosomal proximity of FIST-encoding genes to those coding for proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and transport suggest that FIST domains bind small ligands, such as amino acids.

  1. Neural signal transduction aided by noise in multisynaptic excitatory and inhibitory pathways with saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2011-08-01

    We study the stochastic resonance phenomenon in saturating dynamical models of neural signal transduction, at the synaptic stage, wherein the noise in multipathways enhances the processing of neuronal information integrated by excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents. For an excitatory synaptic pathway, the additive intervention of an inhibitory pathway reduces the stochastic resonance effect. However, as the number of synaptic pathways increases, the signal transduction is greatly improved for parallel multipathways that feature both excitation and inhibition. The obtained results lead us to the realization that the collective property of inhibitory synapses assists neural signal transmission, and a parallel array of neurons can enhance their responses to multiple synaptic currents by adjusting the contributions of excitatory and inhibitory currents.

  2. Hypergravity modifies the signal transduction of ionizing radiation through p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okaichi, Kumio; Usui, Aya; Okumura, Yutaka [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Atomic Disease Inst.; Ohnishi, Takeo [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    To determine the possible effect of hypergravity to modify the signal transduction of ionizing radiation, we analyzed the accumulation of p53 and the expression of p53-dependent genes, Waf-1 and Bax, using the western blot analysis. Hypergravity (20 x g) induced the accumulation of p53 in the human glioblastoma cell line A172 after 3 h of incubation. Low-dose (0.5 Gy) irradiation to the cells accumulated p53 1.5 h after irradiation, and induced Waf-1 and Bax. Under the condition of hypergravity (20 x g), the peak of p53 accumulation was shifted from 1.5 h to 3 h after irradiation, and the inductions of Waf-1 and Bax were suppressed entirely. These results indicate that hypergravity modifies the signal transduction of ionizing radiation through p53 in the cells. (author)

  3. Role of functionality in two-component signal transduction: A stochastic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Arnab; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K.

    2014-03-01

    We present a stochastic formalism for signal transduction processes in a bacterial two-component system. Using elementary mass action kinetics, the proposed model takes care of signal transduction in terms of a phosphotransfer mechanism between the cognate partners of a two-component system, viz., the sensor kinase and the response regulator. Based on the difference in functionality of the sensor kinase, the noisy phosphotransfer mechanism has been studied for monofunctional and bifunctional two-component systems using the formalism of the linear noise approximation. Steady-state analysis of both models quantifies different physically realizable quantities, e.g., the variance, the Fano factor (variance/mean), and mutual information. The resultant data reveal that both systems reliably transfer information of extracellular environment under low external stimulus and in a high-kinase-and-phosphatase regime. We extend our analysis further by studying the role of the two-component system in downstream gene regulation.

  4. Systematic Prediction of Scaffold Proteins Reveals New Design Principles in Scaffold-Mediated Signal Transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfei Hu

    Full Text Available Scaffold proteins play a crucial role in facilitating signal transduction in eukaryotes by bringing together multiple signaling components. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of scaffold proteins in signal transduction by integrating protein-protein interaction and kinase-substrate relationship networks. We predicted 212 scaffold proteins that are involved in 605 distinct signaling pathways. The computational prediction was validated using a protein microarray-based approach. The predicted scaffold proteins showed several interesting characteristics, as we expected from the functionality of scaffold proteins. We found that the scaffold proteins are likely to interact with each other, which is consistent with previous finding that scaffold proteins tend to form homodimers and heterodimers. Interestingly, a single scaffold protein can be involved in multiple signaling pathways by interacting with other scaffold protein partners. Furthermore, we propose two possible regulatory mechanisms by which the activity of scaffold proteins is coordinated with their associated pathways through phosphorylation process.

  5. Signal Transduction Pathways of EMT Induced by TGF-β, SHH, and WNT and Their Crosstalks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyu; Tian, Xiao-Jun; Xing, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key step in development, wound healing, and cancer development. It involves cooperation of signaling pathways, such as transformation growth factor-β (TGF-β), Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), and WNT pathways. These signaling pathways crosstalk to each other and converge to key transcription factors (e.g., SNAIL1) to initialize and maintain the process of EMT. The functional roles of multi-signaling pathway crosstalks in EMT are sophisticated and, thus, remain to be explored. In this review, we focused on three major signal transduction pathways that promote or regulate EMT in carcinoma. We discussed the network structures, and provided a brief overview of the current therapy strategies and drug development targeted to these three signal transduction pathways. Finally, we highlighted systems biology approaches that can accelerate the process of deconstructing complex networks and drug discovery. PMID:27043642

  6. Coating with spermine-pullulan polymer enhances adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Yao, Xinglei; Faiola, Francesco; Liu, Bojun; Zhang, Tianyuan; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Gao, Jian-Qing; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with multilineage potential, which makes them attractive tools for regenerative medicine applications. Efficient gene transfer into MSCs is essential not only for basic research in developmental biology but also for therapeutic applications involving gene-modification in regenerative medicine. Adenovirus vectors (Advs) can efficiently and transiently introduce an exogenous gene into many cell types via their primary receptors, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors, but not into MSCs, which are deficient in coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors expression. To overcome this problem, we developed an Adv coated with a spermine-pullulan (SP) cationic polymer and investigated its physicochemical properties and internalization mechanisms. We demonstrated that the SP coating could enhance adenoviral transduction of MSCs without detectable cytotoxicity or effects on differentiation. Our results argue in favor of the potentiality of the SP-coated Adv as a prototype vector for efficient and safe transduction of MSCs. PMID:28008251

  7. Sensory cilia and integration of signal transduction in human health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren T; Pedersen, Lotte B; Schneider, Linda

    2007-01-01

    the extracellular environment in order to control basic cellular processes during embryonic and postnatal development, as well as in tissue homeostasis in adulthood. Consequently, defects in building of the cilium or in transport or function of ciliary signal proteins are associated with a series of pathologies......, including developmental disorders and cancer. In this review, we highlight recent examples of the mechanisms by which signal components are selectively targeted and transported to the ciliary membrane and we present an overview of the signal transduction pathways associated with primary and motile cilia......The primary cilium is a hallmark of mammalian tissue cells. Recent research has shown that these organelles display unique sets of selected signal transduction modules including receptors, ion channels, effector proteins and transcription factors that relay chemical and physical stimuli from...

  8. Effects of AC Coils Parameters on Transduction Efficiency of EMAT for Steel Plate Inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the transduction efficiency of electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT for steel plates inspection, the constitutive equation of magnetostrictive material was theoretically derived and simplified while the magnetostrictive force is parallel to the material surface. Based on the multiphysics field FEM, the effects of such excitation parameters as current, frequency, and pulse number in AC coils on magnetostrictive strain were mainly simulated, and the influence of the coil with different winding shapes on magnetostrictive strain was also analyzed. The simulation and experimental results indicate that magnetostrictive strain increases with a continuously increasing excitation current density, but it decreases with the increase of the frequency and pulse number of AC currents. Moreover, on condition that loop length and AC currents are held constant, spiral type coils have higher transduction efficiency than homocentric squares and figure-of-eight coils.

  9. Mechanobiology of cartilage: how do internal and external stresses affect mechanochemical transduction and elastic energy storage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Frederick H; Bradica, Gino

    2002-12-01

    Articular cartilage is a multilayered structure that lines the surfaces of all articulating joints. It contains cells, collagen fibrils, and proteoglycans with compositions that vary from the surface layer to the layer in contact with bone. It is composed of several zones that vary in structure, composition, and mechanical properties. In this paper we analyze the structure of the extracellular matrix found in articular cartilage in an effort to relate it to the ability of cartilage to store, transmit, and dissipate mechanical energy during locomotion. Energy storage and dissipation is related to possible mechanisms of mechanochemical transduction and to changes in cartilage structure and function that occur in osteoarthritis. In addition, we analyze how passive and active internal stresses affect mechanochemical transduction in cartilage, and how this may affect cartilage behavior in health and disease.

  10. Two-component signal transduction system SaeRS positively regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qiang; Qi, Yijun; Ma, Yuanfang; Qu, Di

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is a causative pathogen of nosocomial infection, expresses its virulent traits such as biofilm and autolysis regulated by two-component signal transduction system SaeRS. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the S. epidermidis 1457 wild-type and saeRS mutant to identify candidates regulated by saeRS using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/lonization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Of 55 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two strains, 15 were upregulated and 40 were downregulated. The downregulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis and TCA cycle, suggesting that glucose is not properly utilized in S. epidermidis when saeRS was deleted. The study will be helpful for treatment of S. epidermidis infection from the viewpoint of metabolic modulation dependent on two-component signal transduction system SaeRS.

  11. Structural insight into partner specificity and phosphoryl transfer in two-component signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casino, Patricia; Rubio, Vicente; Marina, Alberto

    2009-10-16

    The chief mechanism used by bacteria for sensing their environment is based on two conserved proteins: a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and an effector response regulator (RR). The signal transduction process involves highly conserved domains of both proteins that mediate autokinase, phosphotransfer, and phosphatase activities whose output is a finely tuned RR phosphorylation level. Here, we report the structure of the complex between the entire cytoplasmic portion of Thermotoga maritima class I HK853 and its cognate, RR468, as well as the structure of the isolated RR468, both free and BeF(3)(-) bound. Our results provide insight into partner specificity in two-component systems, recognition of the phosphorylation state of each partner, and the catalytic mechanism of the phosphatase reaction. Biochemical analysis shows that the HK853-catalyzed autokinase reaction proceeds by a cis autophosphorylation mechanism within the HK subunit. The results suggest a model for the signal transduction mechanism in two-component systems.

  12. Involvement of Ca2+/CaM in the signal transduction of acetylcholine regulating stomatal movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    It has been known that the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) also exists in plants and is able to regulate the movement of stomata. In another aspect, Ca2+/CaM as the second messengers have a critical role of signal transduction in stomatal guard-cell. Here we showed that Ca2+/CaM were also involved in theACh regulated stomatal movement. In the medium containing Ca2+, the Ca2+ channel blockers (NIF and Ver) and CaM inhibitors (TFP and W7) could neutralize the ACh induced stomatal opening, however, they are ineffective in the medium containing K+. Those results indicated that Ca2+/CaM were involved in the signal transduction pathway of ACh regulating stomatal movement.

  13. Knowledge representation model for systems-level analysis of signal transduction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Yup; Zimmer, Ralf; Lee, Sang-Yup; Hanisch, Daniel; Park, Sunwon

    2004-01-01

    A Petri-net based model for knowledge representation has been developed to describe as explicitly and formally as possible the molecular mechanisms of cell signaling and their pathological implications. A conceptual framework has been established for reconstructing and analyzing signal transduction networks on the basis of the formal representation. Such a conceptual framework renders it possible to qualitatively understand the cell signaling behavior at systems-level. The mechanisms of the complex signaling network are explored by applying the established framework to the signal transduction induced by potent proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha The corresponding expert-knowledge network is constructed to evaluate its mechanisms in detail. This strategy should be useful in drug target discovery and its validation.

  14. Low Dose Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Depsipeptide (FR901228), Promotes Adenoviral Transduction in Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Navid; Mischen, Blaine T.; Helman, Lee J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. Transduction of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells with adenoviral vectors for in vivo and in vitro applications has been limited by the low to absent levels of coxackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). This study investigates the potential use of low doses of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, depsipeptide (FR901228), currently in Phase II human trials, to enhance adenoviral uptake in six rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Methods. Differences in adenoviral uptake in the presence and absence of dep...

  15. Regulation of human androgen receptor by corepressors and signal transduction in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The thesis primarily addresses the role of transcriptional corepressor and signal transduction cascades in regulating androgen receptor (AR) activity. AR is a ligand-activated transcription factor and is important for the development of male phenotype. Malfunctioning of AR function has been implicated in the progression of the prostate cancer (CaP). Clinical management of the CaP most often involves the administration of anti-hormones (Cas, CPA) that bind to AR and turn it transcr...

  16. Enhanced transduction of photonic crystal dye lasers for gas sensing via swelling polymer film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Cameron; Lind, Johan Ulrik; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner;

    2011-01-01

    We present the enhanced transduction of a photonic crystal dye laser for gas sensing via deposition of an additional swelling polymer film. Device operation involves swelling of the polymer film during exposure to specific gases, leading to a change in total effective refractive index. Experimental...... in its application to other intracavity-based detection schemes to enable gas sensing. © 2011 Optical Society of America....

  17. Sensing of aqueous phosphates by polymers with dual modes of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldakov, Dmitry; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2004-04-21

    A new approach to sensing of aqueous phosphate-related anions based on chromogenic conductive polymers is demonstrated. This method utilizes synergy between low-level p-doping in a polythiophene polymer and hydrogen bonding to increase anion-sensor affinity. These chromogenic conductive polymers show anion-specific changes both in color and in conductivity upon increasing concentration of anions, thus providing two independent modes of signal transduction.

  18. Screening and identification of key signal transduction pathways in pulmonary silicotic fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛荣

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the differential gene expression profile of the lung tissues in experimental silicosis rats and to screen for and identify the key signal transduction pathways in pulmonary silicotic fibrosis.Methods A total of 80 rats were randomly divided into control group(n=40)and silica-instilled group(n=40).Each group was equally divided into five subgroups,and each subgroup was treated at 1,7,14,21,

  19. Signal transduction of erythrocytes after specific binding of ecdysterone and cholesterol immobilized on nanodispersed magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mykhaylyk, O.M. E-mail: helek@iptelecom.net.ua; Kotzuruba, A.V.; Buchanevich, O.M.; Korduban, A.M.; Meged, E.F.; Gulaya, N.M

    2001-07-01

    Concurrent binding of cholesterol and ecdysterone immobilized on nanodispersed magnetite to intact rat erythrocytes was investigated. Several binding components on erythrocyte plasma membrane with different affinities were revealed in the range of 10{sup -15}-10{sup -8} M. The specific binding modulates signal transduction through adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase systems as manifested by the decrease in cAMP and increase in cGMP second messenger production.

  20. Signal transduction by erythrocytes on specific binding of doxorubicin immobilized on nanodispersed magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mykhaylyk, Olga [Institute Applied Problems Physics and Biophysics, NAS, Sluzhbova 3, UA-03142 Kyiv (Ukraine)]. E-mail: Olga.Mykhaylyk@gmx.net; Kotzuruba, Anatoliy [Institute of Biochemistry, NAS, Leontovicha 9, UA-01030 Kyiv (Ukraine); Dudchenko, Nataliya [Institute Applied Problems Physics and Biophysics, NAS, Sluzhbova 3, UA-03142 Kyiv (Ukraine); Toerok, Gyula [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2005-05-15

    Two specific binding sites for doxorubicin were revealed at the plasma membrane of human erythrocytes on investigation of the binding of doxorubicin magnetic nanoconjugates. Free and conjugated doxorubicins modulated signal transduction in erythrocytes in a similar way. Both up-regulated nitric oxide and cyclic GMP (cGMP) and down-regulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and stabilize the membranes of damaged erythrocytes.

  1. Transduction and apoptosis induction in the rat prostate, using adenovirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, W; Chen, P; Schroeder, R; Feneley, M R; Rodriguez, R; Wickham, T J; King, C R; Bruder, J T

    2001-08-10

    Proapoptotic adenovirus vectors offer great promise for the treatment of cancer and nonmalignant conditions. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is a common nonmalignant enlargement of the prostate that involves epithelial, stromal, and smooth muscle components of the gland. We tested the hypothesis that an adenovirus vector expressing Fas ligand can be used to induce apoptosis in the prostate. We analyzed the efficiency of transduction and apoptosis induction in primary cultures of human prostate cells after adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. Efficient transduction was observed in primary prostate epithelial cells. Stromal and smooth muscle cells were more difficult to transduce, as no coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression was detectable on these cells. However, transduction was achieved in these cells when the multiplicity of infection was increased to 100 focal-forming units per cell, or when the vectors were delivered as calcium phosphate precipitates. Infection of all three primary prostate cell types with an adenovirus vector that expresses Fas ligand (AdFasL/G) resulted in rapid apoptosis. Direct injection of the rat prostate with an adenovirus vector carrying luciferase resulted in substantial luciferase expression. TUNEL analysis demonstrated that AdFasL/G administration induced low-level apoptosis in prostatic epithelial cells throughout the gland. As a first step toward enhancing the efficiency of prostate transduction in vivo, we tested an adenovirus vector that was engineered to have an expanded tropism. This vector, AdZ.F2K(pK7), was 10- to 500-fold more efficient than unmodified vectors in transducing prostate epithelial, smooth muscle, and stromal cells in culture. Moreover, AdZ.F2K(pK7) was more efficient than an unmodified vector at transducing the rat prostate in vivo, although the effect was dose dependent.

  2. Correlative study on the JAK-STAT/PSMβ3 signal transduction pathway in asthenozoospermia

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Junguo; ZHANG Li; LI, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible mechanism of Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transduction and activator of transcription (STAT)/PSMβ3 signaling in the occurrence of asthenozoospermia. We examined seminal fluid samples from 30 cases of asthenozoospermia and 30 healthy controls. Sperm was collected using the Percoll density gradient centrifugation method. The expression of JAK, STAT and PSMβ3 mRNA was assessed by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR and the protein leve...

  3. Role of Glycolytic Intermediates in Global Regulation and Signal Transduction. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J.C.

    2000-05-08

    The goal of this project is to determine the role of glycolytic intermediates in regulation of cell physiology. It is known that many glycolytic intermediates are involved in regulation of enzyme activities at the kinetic level. However, little is known regarding the role of these metabolites in global regulation and signal transduction. This project aims to investigate the role of glycolytic intermediates in the regulation of gene expression.

  4. TNF-alpha/IL-1/NF-kappaB transduction pathway in human cancer prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royuela, M; Rodríguez-Berriguete, G; Fraile, B; Paniagua, R

    2008-10-01

    TNFalpha exerts apoptosis throughout an intracellular transduction pathway that involves the kinase proteins TRAF-2 (integration point of apoptotic and survival signals), ASK1 (pro-apoptotic protein), MEK-4 (p38 activator and metastasis suppressor gene), JNK (stress mitogen activated protein kinase) and the transcription factor AP-1. TNFalpha also exerts proliferation by p38 activation, or when TRAF-2 simultaneously induces the transcription factor NF-kappaB by NIK. NIK and p38 may also be activated by IL-1. P38 activated several transcription factors such as Elk-1, ATF-2 and NF-kappaB. NIK also may activate NF-kappaB. The aim of the present article was to evaluate the different components of this TNFalpha/IL-1 transduction pathway in human prostate carcinoma (PC) in comparison with normal human prostate. In prostate cancer, pro-apoptotic TNFalpha/AP-1 pathway is probably inactivated by different factors such as p21 (at ASK-1 level) and bcl-2 (at JNK level), or diverted towards p38 or NIK activation. IL-1alpha enhances proliferation through IL-1RI that activates either NIK or p38 transduction pathway. P38 and NIK activate different transcription factors related with cell proliferation and survival such as ATF-2, Elk-1 or NF-kappaB. In order to search a possible target to cancer prostate treatment we proposed that inhibition of several proinflamatory cytokines such as IL-1 and TNFalpha might be a possible target for PC treatment, because decrease the activity of all transduction pathway members that activate transcription factors as NF-kappaB, Elk-1 or ATF-2.

  5. Evolution and phyletic distribution of two-component signal transduction systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wuichet, Kristin; Cantwell, Brian J.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2010-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are abundant in prokaryotes. They enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions in response to changing environmental conditions. These systems are also found, although in much smaller numbers, in lower eukaryotes and plants, where they appear to control a few very specific functions. Two-component systems have evolved in Bacteria from much simpler one-component systems bringing about the benefit of extracellular versus intracellular sensing. We ...

  6. Physiological performance of warm-adapted marine ectotherms: Thermal limits of mitochondrial energy transduction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Eloy; Hendricks, Eric; Menze, Michael A; Torres, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Thermal regimes in aquatic systems have profound implications for the physiology of ectotherms. In particular, the effect of elevated temperatures on mitochondrial energy transduction in tropical and subtropical teleosts may have profound consequences on organismal performance and population viability. Upper and lower whole-organism critical temperatures for teleosts suggest that subtropical and tropical species are not susceptible to the warming trends associated with climate change, but sub-lethal effects on energy transduction efficiency and population dynamics remain unclear. The goal of the present study was to compare the thermal sensitivity of processes associated with mitochondrial energy transduction in liver mitochondria from the striped mojarra (Eugerres plumieri), the whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias furnieri) and the palometa (Trachinotus goodei), to those of the subtropical pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides) and the blue runner (Caranx crysos). Mitochondrial function was assayed at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40°C and results obtained for both tropical and subtropical species showed a reduction in the energy transduction efficiency of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system in most species studied at temperatures below whole-organism critical temperature thresholds. Our results show a loss of coupling between O2 consumption and ATP production before the onset of the critical thermal maxima, indicating that elevated temperature may severely impact the yield of ATP production per carbon unit oxidized. As warming trends are projected for tropical regions, increasing water temperatures in tropical estuaries and coral reefs could impact long-term growth and reproductive performance in tropical organisms, which are already close to their upper thermal limit.

  7. Histidine Phosphotransfer Proteins in Fungal Two-Component Signal Transduction Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) protein Ypd1 is an important participant in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae multistep two-component signal transduction pathway and, unlike the expanded histidine kinase gene family, is encoded by a single gene in nearly all model and pathogenic fungi. Ypd1 is essential for viability in both S. cerevisiae and in Cryptococcus neoformans. These and other aspects of Ypd1 biology, combined with the availability of structural and mutational data in S. cerevisiae, s...

  8. Mechanism of active transport: free energy dissipation and free energy transduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Tanford, C

    1982-01-01

    The thermodynamic pathway for "chemiosmotic" free energy transduction in active transport is discussed with an ATP-driven Ca2+ pump as an illustrative example. Two innovations are made in the analysis. (i) Free energy dissipated as heat is rigorously excluded from overall free energy bookkeeping by focusing on the dynamic equilibrium state of the chemiosmotic process. (ii) Separate chemical potential terms for free energy donor and transported ions are used to keep track of the thermodynamic ...

  9. The shear stress of it all: the cell membrane and mechanochemical transduction

    OpenAIRE

    White, Charles R; Frangos, John A.

    2007-01-01

    As the inner lining of the vessel wall, vascular endothelial cells are poised to act as a signal transduction interface between haemodynamic forces and the underlying vascular smooth-muscle cells. Detailed analyses of fluid mechanics in atherosclerosis-susceptible regions of the vasculature reveal a strong correlation between endothelial cell dysfunction and areas of low mean shear stress and oscillatory flow with flow recirculation. Conversely, steady shear stress stimulates cellular respons...

  10. Tapping of Love waves in an isotropic surface waveguide by surface-to-bulk wave transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, H.-S.; Chang, C.-P.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical study of tapping a Love wave in an isotropic microacoustic surface waveguide is given. The surface Love wave is tapped by partial transduction into a bulk wave at a discontinuity. It is shown that, by careful design of the discontinuity, the converted bulk wave power and the radiation pattern may be controlled. General formulas are derived for the calculation of these important characteristics from a relatively general surface contour deformation.

  11. Model for external influences on cellular signal transduction pathways including cytosolic calcium oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichwald, C.; Kaiser, F. [Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    Experiments on the effects of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields on cells of the immune system, T-lymphocytes in particular, suggest that the external field interacts with the cell at the level of intracellular signal transduction pathways. These are directly connected with changes in the calcium-signaling processes of the cell. Based on these findings, a theoretical model for receptor-controlled cytosolic calcium oscillations and for external influences on the signal transduction pathway is presented. The authors discuss the possibility that the external field acts on the kinetics of the signal transduction between the activated receptors at the cell membrane and the G-proteins. It is shown that, depending on the specific combination of cell internal biochemical and external physical parameters, entirely different responses of the cell can occur. The authors compare the effects of a coherent (periodic) modulation and of incoherent perturbations (noise). The model and the calculations are based on the theory of self-sustained, nonlinear oscillators. It is argued that these systems form an ideal basis for information-encoding processes in biological systems.

  12. Molecular characterization of a calmodulin involved in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis in Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiker, Viktor; Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2010-04-01

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis shows a negative gravitactic behavior. This is based on physiological mechanisms which in the past have been indirectly assessed. Meanwhile, it was possible to isolate genes involved in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis. The DNA sequences of five calmodulins were found in Euglena, one of which was only known in its protein structure (CaM.1); the other four are new. The biosynthesis of the corresponding proteins of CaM.1-CaM.5 was inhibited by means of RNA interference to determine their involvement in the gravitactic signal transduction chain. RNAi of CaM.1 inhibits free swimming of the cells and pronounced cell-form aberrations. The division of cells was also hampered. After recovery from RNAi the cell showed precise negative gravitaxis again. Blockage of CaM.3 to CaM. 5 did not impair gravitaxis. In contrast, the blockage of CaM.2 has only a transient and not pronounced influence on motility and cell form, but leads to a total loss of gravitactic orientation for more than 30 days. This indicates that CaM.2 is an element in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis in E. gracilis. The results are discussed with regard to the current working model of gravitaxis in E. gracilis.

  13. Progestins alter photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in eyes of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanbin; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Environmental progestins are implicated in endocrine disruption in vertebrates. Additional targets that may be affected in organisms are poorly known. Here we report that progesterone (P4) and drospirenone (DRS) interfere with the photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in the eyes of zebrafish. Breeding pairs of adult zebrafish were exposed to P4 and DRS for 21 days with different measured concentrations of 7–742 ng/L and 99-13´650 ng/L, respectively. Of totally 10 key photo-transduction cascade genes analyzed, transcriptional levels of most were significantly up-regulated, or normal down-regulation was attenuated. Similarly, for some circadian rhythm genes, dose-dependent transcriptional alterations were also observed in the totally 33 genes analyzed. Significant alterations occurred even at environmental relevant levels of 7 ng/L P4. Different patterns were observed for these transcriptional alterations, of which, the nfil3 family displayed most significant changes. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of sampling time for the determination and interpretation of gene expression data, and put forward recommendations for sampling strategies to avoid false interpretations. Our results suggest that photo-transduction signals and circadian rhythm are potential targets for progestins. Further studies are required to assess alterations on the protein level, on physiology and behavior, as well as on implications in mammals.

  14. A biosensor for urea from succinimide-modified acrylic microspheres based on reflectance transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianas, Alizar; Heng, Lee Yook; Ahmad, Musa

    2011-01-01

    New acrylic microspheres were synthesised by photopolymerisation where the succinimide functional group was incorporated during the microsphere preparation. An optical biosensor for urea based on reflectance transduction with a large linear response range to urea was successfully developed using this material. The biosensor utilized succinimide-modified acrylic microspheres immobilized with a Nile blue chromoionophore (ETH 5294) for optical detection and urease enzyme was immobilized on the surface of the microspheres via the succinimide groups. No leaching of the enzyme or chromoionophore was observed. Hydrolysis of the urea by urease changes the pH and leads to a color change of the immobilized chromoionophore. When the color change was monitored by reflectance spectrophotometry, the linear response range of the biosensor to urea was from 0.01 to 1,000 mM (R2 = 0.97) with a limit of detection of 9.97 μM. The biosensor response showed good reproducibility (relative standard deviation = 1.43%, n = 5) with no interference by major cations such as Na+, K+, NH4+ and Mg2+. The use of reflectance as a transduction method led to a large linear response range that is better than that of many urea biosensors based on other optical transduction methods.

  15. Interplay of Specific Trans- and Juxtamembrane Interfaces in Plexin A3 Dimerization and Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Rachael; Khakbaz, Pouyan; Bera, Indrani; Klauda, Jeffery B; Iovine, M Kathryn; Berger, Bryan W

    2016-09-01

    Plexins are transmembrane proteins that serve as guidance receptors during angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, neuronal development, and zebrafish fin regeneration, with a putative role in cancer metastasis. Receptor dimerization or clustering, induced by extracellular ligand binding but modulated in part by the plexin transmembrane (TM) and juxtamembrane (JM) domains, is thought to drive plexin activity. Previous studies indicate that isolated plexin TM domains interact through a conserved, small-x3-small packing motif, and the cytosolic JM region interacts through a hydrophobic heptad repeat; however, the roles and interplay of these regions in plexin signal transduction remain unclear. Using an integrated experimental and simulation approach, we find disruption of the small-x3-small motifs in the Danio rerio Plexin A3 TM domain enhances dimerization of the TM-JM domain by enhancing JM-mediated dimerization. Furthermore, mutations of the cytosolic JM heptad repeat that disrupt dimerization do so even in the presence of TM domain mutations. However, mutations to the small-x3-small TM interfaces also disrupt Plexin A3 signaling in a zebrafish axonal guidance assay, indicating the importance of this TM interface in signal transduction. Collectively, our experimental and simulation results demonstrate that multiple TM and JM interfaces exist in the Plexin A3 homodimer, and these interfaces independently regulate dimerization that is important in Plexin A3 signal transduction.

  16. Receptor clustering affects signal transduction at the membrane level in the reaction-limited regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caré, Bertrand R.; Soula, Hédi A.

    2013-01-01

    Many types of membrane receptors are found to be organized as clusters on the cell surface. We investigate the potential effect of such receptor clustering on the intracellular signal transduction stage. We consider a canonical pathway with a membrane receptor (R) activating a membrane-bound intracellular relay protein (G). We use Monte Carlo simulations to recreate biochemical reactions using different receptor spatial distributions and explore the dynamics of the signal transduction. Results show that activation of G by R is severely impaired by R clustering, leading to an apparent blunted biological effect compared to control. Paradoxically, this clustering decreases the half maximal effective dose (ED50) of the transduction stage, increasing the apparent affinity. We study an example of inter-receptor interaction in order to account for possible compensatory effects of clustering and observe the parameter range in which such interactions slightly counterbalance the loss of activation of G. The membrane receptors’ spatial distribution affects the internal stages of signal amplification, suggesting a functional role for membrane domains and receptor clustering independently of proximity-induced receptor-receptor interactions.

  17. Image informatics for studying signal transduction in cells interacting with 3D matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeranis, Dimitrios S.; Guo, Jin; Chen, Chengpin; Yannas, Ioannis V.; Wei, Xunbin; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-03-01

    Cells sense and respond to chemical stimuli on their environment via signal transduction pathways, complex networks of proteins whose interactions transmit chemical information. This work describes an implementation of image informatics, imaging-based methodologies for studying signal transduction networks. The methodology developed focuses on studying signal transduction networks in cells that interact with 3D matrices. It utilizes shRNA-based knock down of network components, 3D high-content imaging of cells inside the matrix by spectral multi-photon microscopy, and single-cell quantification using features that describe both cell morphology and cell-matrix adhesion pattern. The methodology is applied in a pilot study of TGFβ signaling via the SMAD pathway in fibroblasts cultured inside porous collagen-GAG scaffolds, biomaterials similar to the ones used clinically to induce skin regeneration. Preliminary results suggest that knocking down all rSMAD components affects fibroblast response to TGFβ1 and TGFβ3 isoforms in different ways, and suggest a potential role for SMAD1 and SMAD5 in regulating TGFβ isoform response. These preliminary results need to be verified with proteomic results that can provide solid evidence about the particular role of individual components of the SMAD pathway.

  18. Influence of arsenate and arsenite on signal transduction pathways: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druwe, Ingrid L.; Vaillancourt, Richard R. [The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Arsenic has been a recognized contaminant and toxicant, as well as a medicinal compound throughout human history. Populations throughout the world are exposed to arsenic and these exposures have been associated with a number of human cancers. Not much is known about the role of arsenic as a human carcinogen and more recently its role in non-cancerous diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus have been uncovered. The health effects associated with arsenic are numerous and the association between arsenic exposure and human disease has intensified the search for molecular mechanisms that describe the biological activity of arsenic in humans and leads to the aforementioned disease states. Arsenic poses a human health risk due in part to the regulation of cellular signal transduction pathways and over the last few decades, some cellular mechanisms that account for arsenic toxicity, as well as, signal transduction pathways have been discovered. However, given the ubiquitous nature of arsenic in the environment, making sense of all the data remains a challenge. This review will focus on our knowledge of signal transduction pathways that are regulated by arsenic. (orig.)

  19. The signal transduction pathway in the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells induced by urotensin Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈亚红; 赵鸣武; 姚婉贞; 庞永政; 唐朝枢

    2004-01-01

    Background Human urotensin Ⅱ (UⅡ) is the most potent mammalian vasoconstrictor identified so far. Our previous study showed that UⅡ is a potent mitogen of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) inducing ASMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. The signal transduction pathway of UⅡ mitogenic effect remains to be clarified. This study was conducted to investigate the signal transduction pathway in the proliferation of ASMC induced by UⅡ.Methods In primary cultures of rat ASMCs, activities of protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and calcineurin (CaN) induced by UⅡ were measured. The effect of CaN on PKC and MAPK was studied by adding cyclosporin A (CsA), a specific inhibitor of CaN. Using H7 and PD98059, inhibitors of PKC and MAPK, respectively, to study the effect of PKC and MAPK on CaN. The cytosolic free calcium concentration induced by UⅡ was measured using Fura-2/AM. Results UⅡ 10-7 mol/L stimulated ASMC PKC and MAPK activities by 44% and 24% (P0.05). CsA 10-6 mol/L inhibited UⅡ-stimulated PKC activity by 14% (P0.05).Conclusions UⅡ increases cytosolic free calcium concentration and activates PKC, MAPK and CaN. The signal transduction pathway between PKC and CaN has cross-talk.

  20. A Biosensor for Urea from Succinimide-Modified Acrylic Microspheres Based on Reflectance Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Ahmad

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available New acrylic microspheres were synthesised by photopolymerisation where the succinimide functional group was incorporated during the microsphere preparation. An optical biosensor for urea based on reflectance transduction with a large linear response range to urea was successfully developed using this material. The biosensor utilized succinimide-modified acrylic microspheres immobilized with a Nile blue chromoionophore (ETH 5294 for optical detection and urease enzyme was immobilized on the surface of the microspheres via the succinimide groups. No leaching of the enzyme or chromoionophore was observed. Hydrolysis of the urea by urease changes the pH and leads to a color change of the immobilized chromoionophore. When the color change was monitored by reflectance spectrophotometry, the linear response range of the biosensor to urea was from 0.01 to 1,000 mM (R2 = 0.97 with a limit of detection of 9.97 mM. The biosensor response showed good reproducibility (relative standard deviation = 1.43%, n = 5 with no interference by major cations such as Na+, K+, NH4+ and Mg2+. The use of reflectance as a transduction method led to a large linear response range that is better than that of many urea biosensors based on other optical transduction methods.

  1. A new method to identify dynamic transduction properties of aortic baroreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimachi, M; Imaizumi, T; Sunagawa, K; Hirooka, Y; Todaka, K; Takeshita, A; Nakamura, M

    1990-03-01

    We identified, in 17 alpha-chloralose-anesthetized rabbits, the dynamic transduction characteristics of the aortic arch baroreceptors using a "white-noise technique." We recorded aortic pressure and aortic depressor nerve activity while perturbing pressure by rapid, intermittent ventricular pacing (400 beats/min). Dividing the cross-power spectrum between nerve activity and pressure by the power spectrum of pressure yielded the transfer function. The gain of the transfer function increased threefold as the frequency increased from 0.005 to 5 Hz, suggesting that the baroreceptors responded primarily to dynamic rather than to static changes in pressure. To quantify the nonlinear properties of baroreceptor transduction, we compared measured instantaneous nerve activity with that linearly predicted. We demonstrated that the major nonlinearity was attributable to "threshold". The overall baroreceptor transduction properties could be represented by a cascade connection of a linear subsystem followed by a nonlinear subsystem with threshold. The white-noise technique made it possible to identify the unbiased linear properties in a nonlinear system, and thus was very useful in identifying complex biological systems.

  2. Optomechanical transduction of an integrated silicon cantilever probe using a microdisk resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Srinivasan, Kartik; Rakher, Matthew T; Davanco, Marcelo; Aksyuk, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive transduction of the motion of a microscale cantilever is central to many applications in mass, force, magnetic resonance, and displacement sensing. Reducing cantilever size to nanoscale dimensions can improve the bandwidth and sensitivity of techniques like atomic force microscopy, but current optical transduction methods suffer when the cantilever is small compared to the achievable spot size. Here, we demonstrate sensitive optical transduction in a monolithic cavity-optomechanical system in which a sub-picogram silicon cantilever with a sharp probe tip is separated from a microdisk optical resonator by a nanoscale gap. High quality factor (Q ~ 10^5) microdisk optical modes transduce the cantilever's MHz frequency thermally-driven vibrations with a displacement sensitivity of ~ 4.4x10^-16 m\\sqrt[2]{Hz} and bandwidth > 1 GHz, and a dynamic range > 10^6 is estimated for a 1 s measurement. Optically-induced stiffening due to the strong optomechanical interaction is observed, and engineering of probe d...

  3. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 transduction in the central nervous system of nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranch, Lluis; Salegio, Ernesto A; San Sebastian, Waldy; Kells, Adrian P; Foust, Kevin D; Bringas, John R; Lamarre, Clementine; Forsayeth, John; Kaspar, Brian K; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2012-04-01

    Widespread distribution of gene products at clinically relevant levels throughout the CNS has been challenging. Adeno-associated virus type 9 (AAV9) vector has been reported as a good candidate for intravascular gene delivery, but low levels of preexisting antibody titers against AAV in the blood abrogate cellular transduction within the CNS. In the present study we compared the effectiveness of vascular delivery and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) delivery of AAV9 in transducing CNS tissue in nonhuman primates. Both delivery routes generated similar distribution patterns, although we observed a more robust level of transduction after CSF delivery. Consistent with previous reports administering AAV9, we found greater astrocytic than neuronal tropism via both routes, although we did find a greater magnitude of CNS transduction after CSF delivery compared with intravascular delivery. Last, we have demonstrated that delivery of AAV9 into the CSF does not shield against AAV antibodies. This has obvious implications when developing and/or implementing any clinical trial studies.

  4. De novo designed protein transduction domain mimics from simple synthetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezgel, A Özgül; Telfer, Janice C; Tew, Gregory N

    2011-08-08

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) that readily transverse cellular membranes are of great interest and are attractive tools for the intracellular delivery of bioactive molecules. Learning to program synthetic polymers and oligomers with the appropriate chemical information to capture adequately the biological activity of proteins is critical to our improved understanding of how these natural molecules work. In addition, the versatility of these synthetic mimics provides the opportunity to discover analogs with superior properties compared with their native sequences. Here we report the first detailed structure-activity relationship of a new PTD family of polymers based on a completely abiotic backbone. The synthetic approach easily allows doubling the density of guanidine functional groups, which increases the transduction efficiency of the sequences. Cellular uptake studies on three different cell lines (HEK 293T, CHO, and Jurkat T cells) confirm that these synthetic analogs are highly efficient novel protein transduction domain mimics (PTDMs), which are more effective than TAT(49-57) and nonaarginine (R9) and also highlight the usefulness of polymer chemistry at the chemistry-biology interface.

  5. Morphing structures and signal transduction in Mimosa pudica L. induced by localized thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; O'Neal, Lawrence; Volkova, Maia I; Markin, Vladislav S

    2013-10-15

    Leaf movements in Mimosa pudica, are in response to thermal stress, touch, and light or darkness, appear to be regulated by electrical, hydrodynamical, and chemical signal transduction. The pulvinus of the M. pudica shows elastic properties. We have found that the movements of the petiole, or pinnules, are accompanied by a change of the pulvinus morphing structures. After brief flaming of a pinna, the volume of the lower part of the pulvinus decreases and the volume of the upper part increases due to the redistribution of electrolytes between these parts of the pulvinus; as a result of these changes the petiole falls. During the relaxation of the petiole, the process goes in the opposite direction. Ion and water channel blockers, uncouplers as well as anesthetic agents diethyl ether or chloroform decrease the speed of alert wave propagation along the plant. Brief flaming of a pinna induces bidirectional propagation of electrical signal in pulvini. Transduction of electrical signals along a pulvinus induces generation of an action potential in perpendicular direction between extensor and flexor sides of a pulvinus. Inhibition of signal transduction and mechanical responses in M. pudica by volatile anesthetic agents chloroform or by blockers of voltage gated ion channels shows that the generation and propagation of electrical signals is a primary effect responsible for turgor change and propagation of an excitation. There is an electrical coupling in a pulvinus similar to the electrical synapse in the animal nerves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Transduction of human primitive repopulating hematopoietic cells with lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with various envelope proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon-Sang; Wielgosz, Matthew M; Hargrove, Phillip; Kepes, Steven; Gray, John; Persons, Derek A; Nienhuis, Arthur W

    2010-07-01

    Lentiviral vectors are useful for transducing primitive hematopoietic cells. We examined four envelope proteins for their ability to mediate lentiviral transduction of mobilized human CD34(+) peripheral blood cells. Lentiviral particles encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) were pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G), the amphotropic (AMPHO) murine leukemia virus envelope protein, the endogenous feline leukemia viral envelope protein or the feline leukemia virus type C envelope protein. Because the relative amount of genome RNA per ml was similar for each pseudotype, we transduced CD34(+) cells with a fixed volume of each vector preparation. Following an overnight transduction, CD34(+) cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice which were sacrificed 12 weeks later. The average percentages of engrafted human CD45(+) cells in total bone marrow were comparable to that of the control, mock-transduced group (37-45%). Lenti-particles pseudotyped with the VSV-G envelope protein transduced engrafting cells two- to tenfold better than particles pseudotyped with any of the gamma-retroviral envelope proteins. There was no correlation between receptor mRNA levels for the gamma-retroviral vectors and transduction efficiency of primitive hematopoietic cells. These results support the use of the VSV-G envelope protein for the development of lentiviral producer cell lines for manufacture of clinical-grade vector.

  7. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorhaus Daniel B

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  8. Genetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, John

    1973-01-01

    Presents a review of genetic engineering, in which the genotypes of plants and animals (including human genotypes) may be manipulated for the benefit of the human species. Discusses associated problems and solutions and provides an extensive bibliography of literature relating to genetic engineering. (JR)

  9. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for certain types of genetic conditions (such as Down syndrome) in the baby if mother-to-be is 35 years of age or more, or is concerned at any age about her chances of having a child with a genetic condition To learn about the ...

  10. Excitation and Adaptation in Bacteria–a Model Signal Transduction System that Controls Taxis and Spatial Pattern Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Xue

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The machinery for transduction of chemotactic stimuli in the bacterium E. coli is one of the most completely characterized signal transduction systems, and because of its relative simplicity, quantitative analysis of this system is possible. Here we discuss models which reproduce many of the important behaviors of the system. The important characteristics of the signal transduction system are excitation and adaptation, and the latter implies that the transduction system can function as a “derivative sensor” with respect to the ligand concentration in that the DC component of a signal is ultimately ignored if it is not too large. This temporal sensing mechanism provides the bacterium with a memory of its passage through spatially- or temporally-varying signal fields, and adaptation is essential for successful chemotaxis. We also discuss some of the spatial patterns observed in populations and indicate how cell-level behavior can be embedded in population-level descriptions.

  11. Effects of Electrode Surface Morphology on the Transduction of Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmre, Viljar

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are innovative smart materials that exhibit electromechanical and mechanoelectrical transduction (conversion of electrical input into mechanical deformation and vice versa). Due to low driving voltage (Pd-Pt electrodes-based IPMCs, with the aim to improve the electrode surface design and thereby enhance the transduction performance of the material. Firstly, the synthesis techniques are developed to control and manipulate the surface structure of the mentioned electrodes through the electroless plating process. Using these techniques, IPMCs with different electrode surface structures are fabricated. The changes in the electrode surface morphology and the resulting effects on the material's electromechanical, mechanoelectrical, electrochemical and mechanical properties area examined and analyzed. This study shows that increasing the impregnation-reduction cycles under appropriate conditions leads to the formation and growth of platinum nanoparticles with sharp tips and edges---called Pt nanothorn assemblies---at the polymer-electrode interface. IPMCs designed with such nanostructured Pt electrodes are first to be reported. The experiments demonstrate that the formation and growth of Pt nanothorn assemblies at the electrode interface increases considerably the total transported charge during the transduction, thereby increasing significantly the displacement and blocking force output of IPMC. The improvement of the mentioned electromechanical properties was 3--5 times, depending on the input voltage and frequency used. Also, the peak mechanoelectrically induced voltage increased somewhat, although the overall effect of the surface structure was relatively low compared to the electromechanical transduction. The Pd-Pt electrodes-based composite systems are introduced due to their unique highly capacitive palladium inner surface layer. It is shown that by controlling the impregnation time in Pd complex solution during the

  12. Genetic Romanticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tupasela, Aaro

    2016-01-01

    . This article compares and contrasts the work of two doctors in Finland, Elias Lönnrot and Reijo Norio, working over a century and a half apart, to examine the ways in which they have contributed to the formation of national identity and unity. The notion of genetic romanticism is introduced as a term...... to complement the notion of national romanticism that has been used to describe the ways in which nineteenth-century scholars sought to create and deploy common traditions for national-romantic purposes. Unlike national romanticism, however, strategies of genetic romanticism rely on the study of genetic...... inheritance as a way to unify populations within politically and geographically bounded areas. Thus, new genetics have contributed to the development of genetic romanticisms, whereby populations (human, plant, and animal) can be delineated and mobilized through scientific and medical practices to represent...

  13. hHO-1 combined with GATA-4 transduction promotes myocardial transdifferentiation and anti- apoptosis of rat mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning-bo DENG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To explore if the rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs modified by human heme oxygenase 1 (hHO-1 gene combined with GATA-4 gene may promote the ability of anti-apoptosis and myocardial transdifferentiation in vitro in hypoxia ischemic environment. Methods The rat BMSCs were isolated and cultured by whole bone marrow adherence and identified in vitro, and then were transfected with recombinant adenovirus; Western blotting was used to determinate the optimal time of gene expression; the genetically modified BMSCs were taken to hypoxia serum-free conditions simulating ischemia hypoxia microenvironment in vivo; CCK-8 kit and trypan blue staining were performed to detect the 12, 24, 48 and 72h survival rates in hypoxia ischemia respectively; flow cytometry was used to detect the apoptosis of BMSCs in hypoxia ischemia for 24h. The cardiomyocyte-specific cardiac troponin I (cTnI was detected by Western blotting and cellular immunofluorescence. Results The 12, 24, 48 and 72h survival rates were higher in hHO-1+GATA-4 group cultured in ischemia and hypoxia condition than in hHO-1 group (P<0.05 and GATA-4 group (P<0.05. After 24h cultivation in ischemia hypoxia condition, the apoptotic rates were lower in hHO-1+GATA-4 group than in hHO-1 group (P<0.05 and GATA-4 group (P<0.05. No significant difference existed in cTnI expressions between GATA-4 group and hHO-1+GATA-4 group. Conclusion Compared with transfection of hHO-1 or GATA-4 single gene, hHO-1 combined with GATA-4 transduction can significantly increase the survival rate of BMSCs in hypoxia ischemic condition, but myocardial transdifferentiation does not increase significantly. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.04.08

  14. Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Skerker

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. These systems allow cells to adapt to prevailing conditions by modifying cellular physiology, including initiating programs of gene expression, catalyzing reactions, or modifying protein-protein interactions. These signaling pathways have also been demonstrated to play a role in coordinating bacterial cell cycle progression and development. Here we report a system-level investigation of two-component pathways in the model organism Caulobacter crescentus. First, by a comprehensive deletion analysis we show that at least 39 of the 106 two-component genes are required for cell cycle progression, growth, or morphogenesis. These include nine genes essential for growth or viability of the organism. We then use a systematic biochemical approach, called phosphotransfer profiling, to map the connectivity of histidine kinases and response regulators. Combining these genetic and biochemical approaches, we identify a new, highly conserved essential signaling pathway from the histidine kinase CenK to the response regulator CenR, which plays a critical role in controlling cell envelope biogenesis and structure. Depletion of either cenK or cenR leads to an unusual, severe blebbing of cell envelope material, whereas constitutive activation of the pathway compromises cell envelope integrity, resulting in cell lysis and death. We propose that the CenK-CenR pathway may be a suitable target for new antibiotic development, given previous successes in targeting the bacterial cell wall. Finally, the ability of our in vitro phosphotransfer profiling method to identify signaling pathways that operate in vivo takes advantage of an observation that histidine kinases are endowed with a global kinetic preference for their cognate response regulators. We propose that this

  15. Two-Component Signal Transduction Pathways Regulating Growth and Cell Cycle Progression in a Bacterium: A System-Level Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerker, Jeffrey M; Prasol, Melanie S; Perchuk, Barrett S; Biondi, Emanuele G

    2005-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. These systems allow cells to adapt to prevailing conditions by modifying cellular physiology, including initiating programs of gene expression, catalyzing reactions, or modifying protein–protein interactions. These signaling pathways have also been demonstrated to play a role in coordinating bacterial cell cycle progression and development. Here we report a system-level investigation of two-component pathways in the model organism Caulobacter crescentus. First, by a comprehensive deletion analysis we show that at least 39 of the 106 two-component genes are required for cell cycle progression, growth, or morphogenesis. These include nine genes essential for growth or viability of the organism. We then use a systematic biochemical approach, called phosphotransfer profiling, to map the connectivity of histidine kinases and response regulators. Combining these genetic and biochemical approaches, we identify a new, highly conserved essential signaling pathway from the histidine kinase CenK to the response regulator CenR, which plays a critical role in controlling cell envelope biogenesis and structure. Depletion of either cenK or cenR leads to an unusual, severe blebbing of cell envelope material, whereas constitutive activation of the pathway compromises cell envelope integrity, resulting in cell lysis and death. We propose that the CenK–CenR pathway may be a suitable target for new antibiotic development, given previous successes in targeting the bacterial cell wall. Finally, the ability of our in vitro phosphotransfer profiling method to identify signaling pathways that operate in vivo takes advantage of an observation that histidine kinases are endowed with a global kinetic preference for their cognate response regulators. We propose that this system

  16. Recombinant Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A with N-terminal Mitochondrial Transduction Domain Increases Respiration and Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R.; Portell, Francisco R.; Dunham, Lisa D.; Quigley, Caitlin K.; Bennett, James P

    2009-01-01

    We developed a scalable procedure to produce human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) modified with an N-terminal protein transduction domain (PTD) and mitochondrial localization signal (MLS) that allow it to cross membranes and enter mitochondria through its “mitochondrial transduction domain” (MTD=PTD+MLS). Alexa488-labeled MTD-TFAM rapidly entered the mitochondrial compartment of cybrid cells carrying the G11778A LHON mutation. MTD-TFAM reversibly increased respiration and levels ...

  17. A Genetic Approach to Identifying Signal Transduction Mechanisms Initiated by Receptors for TGF-B-Related Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    first discovery of mammalian TGF-ßl 16 years ago as a factor capable of inducing anchorage-independent growth of normal rat kidney fibroblasts...and -4 and 60A is 70% identical to BMP-5 through -8 (Kingsley, 1994a). When implanted subcutaneously in rats , Dpp and 60A proteins are able to...The TGF-ß signaling pathway is essential for Drosophila oogenesis . Development 122, 1555-1565. Vaahtokari, A., Abert, T., Jernvall, J., Keranen

  18. Retrograde labeling, transduction and genetic targeting allow cellular analysis of corticospinal motor neurons: Implications in health and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Hernan Jara

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN have a unique ability to receive, integrate, translate, and transmit the cerebral cortex’s input toward spinal cord targets and therefore, act as a spokesperson for the initiation and modulation of voluntary movements that require cortical input. CSMN degeneration has an immense impact on motor neuron circuitry and is one of the underlying causes of numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as primary lateral sclerosis, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In addition, CSMN death results in long-term paralysis in spinal cord injury patients. Detailed cellular analyses are crucial to gain a better understanding of the pathologies underlying CSMN degeneration. However, visualizing and identifying these vulnerable neuron populations in the complex and heterogeneous environment of the cerebral cortex has proved challenging. Here, we will review recent developments and current applications of novel strategies that reveal the cellular and molecular basis of CSMN health and vulnerability. Such studies hold promise for building long-term effective treatment solutions in the near future.

  19. Inconsistent Transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie Koldkjær; Riis, Morten S.

    2017-01-01

    with the objects in question on their own premises. Therefore, tuning into the “not-knowing” requires expanding the perspective to encompass non-human forms of knowledge incorporated through an object-oriented ontological line of thinking. By switching the focus from the human perspective to that of the objects...... of translations within and between objects. As a consequence, the aesthetic dimension and the knowledge derived from artistic research struggle to position themselves as more than candy on the surface of the scientific field unless considered within alternative knowledge paradigms that acknowledge...

  20. Inconsistent Transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie Koldkjær; Riis, Morten S.

    2017-01-01

    argue that, to manifest the conditions hidden in knowledge and the unconscious transferences that accompany the need to be scientific, one must be critical of traditional understandings of knowledge production. Therefore, it is crucial to explore understandings of knowledge production that are directed...... of translations within and between objects. As a consequence, the aesthetic dimension and the knowledge derived from artistic research struggle to position themselves as more than candy on the surface of the scientific field unless considered within alternative knowledge paradigms that acknowledge...

  1. Maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS Proteins Interact with Ethylene Receptor Signaling Complex, Supporting a Regulatory Role for ARGOS in Ethylene Signal Transduction[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Habben, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to environmental cues. ARGOS genes reduce plant sensitivity to ethylene when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). A previous genetic study suggested that the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-localized maize ARGOS1 targets the ethylene signal transduction components at or upstream of CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, but the mechanism of ARGOS modulating ethylene signaling is unknown. Here, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that ZmARGOS1, as well as the Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1, physically interacts with Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), an ethylene receptor interacting protein that regulates the activity of ETHYLENE RESPONSE1. The protein-protein interaction was also detected with the yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid system. Using the same yeast assay, we found that maize RTE1 homolog REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 LIKE4 (ZmRTL4) and ZmRTL2 also interact with maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS proteins. Like AtRTE1 in Arabidopsis, ZmRTL4 and ZmRTL2 reduce ethylene responses when overexpressed in maize, indicating a similar mechanism for ARGOS regulating ethylene signaling in maize. A polypeptide fragment derived from ZmARGOS8, consisting of a Pro-rich motif flanked by two transmembrane helices that are conserved among members of the ARGOS family, can interact with AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins in Arabidopsis. The conserved domain is necessary and sufficient to reduce ethylene sensitivity in Arabidopsis and maize. Overall, these results suggest a physical association between ARGOS and the ethylene receptor signaling complex via AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins, supporting a role for ARGOS in regulating ethylene perception and the early steps of signal transduction in Arabidopsis and maize. PMID:27268962

  2. Genetic Breakthrough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new calf breeding technique shows promise for treating malignant tumors Chinese scientists have successfully bred a genetically altered cow capable of producing cancer-curing proteins for human beings.

  3. Mitochondrial genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Chinnery, Patrick Francis; Hudson, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last 10 years the field of mitochondrial genetics has widened, shifting the focus from rare sporadic, metabolic disease to the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in a growing spectrum of human disease. The aim of this review is to guide the reader through some key concepts regarding mitochondria before introducing both classic and emerging mitochondrial disorders. Sources of data In this article, a review of the current mitochondrial genetics literature was con...

  4. Semi-Supervised Transductive Hot Spot Predictor Working on Multiple Assumptions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-05-23

    Protein-protein interactions are critically dependent on just a few residues (“hot spots”) at the interfaces. Hot spots make a dominant contribution to the binding free energy and if mutated they can disrupt the interaction. As mutagenesis studies require significant experimental efforts, there exists a need for accurate and reliable computational hot spot prediction methods. Compared to the supervised hot spot prediction algorithms, the semi-supervised prediction methods can take into consideration both the labeled and unlabeled residues in the dataset during the prediction procedure. The transductive support vector machine has been utilized for this task and demonstrated a better prediction performance. To the best of our knowledge, however, none of the transductive semi-supervised algorithms takes all the three semisupervised assumptions, i.e., smoothness, cluster and manifold assumptions, together into account during learning. In this paper, we propose a novel semi-supervised method for hot spot residue prediction, by considering all the three semisupervised assumptions using nonlinear models. Our algorithm, IterPropMCS, works in an iterative manner. In each iteration, the algorithm first propagates the labels of the labeled residues to the unlabeled ones, along the shortest path between them on a graph, assuming that they lie on a nonlinear manifold. Then it selects the most confident residues as the labeled ones for the next iteration, according to the cluster and smoothness criteria, which is implemented by a nonlinear density estimator. Experiments on a benchmark dataset, using protein structure-based features, demonstrate that our approach is effective in predicting hot spots and compares favorably to other available methods. The results also show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art transductive learning methods.

  5. Developing Itô stochastic differential equation models for neuronal signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Tiina; Linne, Marja-Leena; Ruohonen, Keijo

    2006-08-01

    Mathematical modeling and simulation of dynamic biochemical systems are receiving considerable attention due to the increasing availability of experimental knowledge of complex intracellular functions. In addition to deterministic approaches, several stochastic approaches have been developed for simulating the time-series behavior of biochemical systems. The problem with stochastic approaches, however, is the larger computational time compared to deterministic approaches. It is therefore necessary to study alternative ways to incorporate stochasticity and to seek approaches that reduce the computational time needed for simulations, yet preserve the characteristic behavior of the system in question. In this work, we develop a computational framework based on the Itô stochastic differential equations for neuronal signal transduction networks. There are several different ways to incorporate stochasticity into deterministic differential equation models and to obtain Itô stochastic differential equations. Two of the developed models are found most suitable for stochastic modeling of neuronal signal transduction. The best models give stable responses which means that the variances of the responses with time are not increasing and negative concentrations are avoided. We also make a comparative analysis of different kinds of stochastic approaches, that is the Itô stochastic differential equations, the chemical Langevin equation, and the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. Different kinds of stochastic approaches can be used to produce similar responses for the neuronal protein kinase C signal transduction pathway. The fine details of the responses vary slightly, depending on the approach and the parameter values. However, when simulating great numbers of chemical species, the Gillespie algorithm is computationally several orders of magnitude slower than the Itô stochastic differential equations and the chemical Langevin equation. Furthermore, the chemical

  6. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Scheler

    Full Text Available We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of

  7. An Integrated Model of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Trafficking and Signal Transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resat, Haluk; Ewald, Jonathan A.; Dixon, David A.; Wiley, H. S.

    2003-08-01

    Endocytic trafficking of many types of receptors can have profound effects on subsequent signaling events. Quantitative models of these processes, however, have usually considered trafficking and signaling independently. Here, we present an integrated model of both the trafficking and signaling pathway of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) using a probability weighted-dynamic Monte Carlo simulation. Our model consists of hundreds of distinct endocytic compartments and about 13,000 reactions/events that occur over a broad spatio-temporal range. By using a realistic multi-compartment model, we can investigate the distribution of the receptors among cellular compartments as well as their potential signal transduction characteristics. Our new model also allows the incorporation of physio-chemical aspects of ligand-receptor interactions, such as pH-dependent binding in different endosomal compartments. To determine the utility of this approach, we simulated the differential activation of the EGFR by two of its ligands, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor- alpha (TGF-a). Our simulations predict that when EGFR is activated with TGF-a, receptor activation is biased toward the cell surface whereas EGF produces a signaling bias towards the endosomal compartment. Experiments confirm these predictions from our model and simulations. Our model accurately predicts the kinetics and extent of receptor down-regulation induced by either EGF or TGF-a. Our results suggest that receptor trafficking controls the compartmental bias of signal transduction, rather than simply modulating signal magnitude. Our model provides a new approach to evaluating the complex effect of receptor trafficking on signal transduction. Importantly, the stochastic and compartmental nature of the simulation allows these models to be directly tested by high-throughput approaches, such as quantitative image analysis.

  8. Do signal transduction cascades influence survival in triple-negative breast cancer? A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, Jan-Niclas; Kölbl, Alexandra C; Jeschke, Udo; Andergassen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a rather aggressive form of breast cancer, comprised by early metastasis formation and reduced overall survival of the affected patients. Steroid hormone receptors and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 are not overexpressed, limiting therapeutic options. Therefore, new treatment options have to be investigated. The aim of our preliminary study was to detect coherences between some molecules of intracellular signal transduction pathways and survival of patients with TNBC, in order to obtain some hints for new therapeutical solutions. Methods Thirty-one paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples, which were determined to be negative for steroid hormone receptors as well as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, were immunohistochemically stained for a number of signal transduction molecules from several signaling pathways. β-Catenin, HIF1α, MCL, Notch1, LRP6, XBP1, and FOXP3 were stained with specific antibodies, and their staining was correlated with patient survival by Kaplan–Meier analyses. Results Only two of the investigated molecules have shown correlation with overall survival. Cytoplasmic staining of HIF1α and centro-tumoral lymphocyte FOXP3 staining showed statistically significant correlations with survival. Conclusion The coherence of signal transduction molecules with survival of patients with TNBC is still controversially discussed in the literature. Our study comprises one more mosaic stone in the elucidation of these intracellular processes and their influences on patient outcome. Lots of research still has to be done in this field, but it would be worthwhile as it may offer new therapeutic targets for a group of patients with breast cancer, which is still hard to treat. PMID:27307757

  9. Signal transduction pathway analysis in fibromatosis: receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Justin M. M.; Black, Jennifer O.; Itani, Doha M.; Fasig, John H.; Keedy, Vicki L.; Hande, Kenneth R.; Whited, Brent W.; Homlar, Kelly C.; Halpern, Jennifer L.; Holt, Ginger E.; Schwartz, Herbert S.; Coffin, Cheryl M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite reports of receptor tyrosine kinase activation in desmoid-type fibromatosis, therapeutic benefits of kinase inhibitor therapy are unpredictable. Variability in signal transduction or cellular kinases heretofore unevaluated in desmoid tumors may be responsible for these inconsistent responses. In either case, a better understanding of growth regulatory signaling pathways is necessary to assess the theoretical potential of inhibitor therapy. Immunohistochemical analysis of tyrosine kinases and activated isoforms of downstream signal transduction proteins was performed on a tissue microarray containing 27 cases of desmoid-type fibromatosis and 14 samples of scar; 6 whole sections of normal fibrous tissue were studied for comparison. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor, β type, and focal adhesion kinase 1 were expressed in all desmoid tumors and healing scars but only 80% and 50% of nonproliferative fibrous tissue samples, respectively. Hepatocyte growth factor receptor was detected in 89% of desmoids and all scars tested, but not in any of the fibrous tissue samples. Epidermal growth factor receptor was detected in only 12% of desmoids and not in scar or fibrous tissue. Mast/stem cell growth factor receptor, receptor tyrosine–protein kinase erbB-2, and phosphorylated insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor/insulin receptor were negative in all study cases. Variable levels of phosphorylated downstream signal transduction molecules RAC-α/β/γ serine/threonine-protein kinase, mitogenactivated protein kinase, and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 were observed in desmoids (58%, 62%, and 67%), scar tissues (100%, 86%, and 86%), and fibrous tissue (33%, 17%, and 17%). These results indicate that tyrosine kinase signaling is active in both fibromatosis and healing scar, but not in most nonproliferating fibrous tissues. Although platelet-derived growth factor receptor, β type, is expressed ubiquitously in desmoids, the kinases driving

  10. Signal transduction pathway analysis in fibromatosis: receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Justin M M; Black, Jennifer O; Itani, Doha M; Fasig, John H; Keedy, Vicki L; Hande, Kenneth R; Whited, Brent W; Homlar, Kelly C; Halpern, Jennifer L; Holt, Ginger E; Schwartz, Herbert S; Coffin, Cheryl M

    2012-10-01

    Despite reports of receptor tyrosine kinase activation in desmoid-type fibromatosis, therapeutic benefits of kinase inhibitor therapy are unpredictable. Variability in signal transduction or cellular kinases heretofore unevaluated in desmoid tumors may be responsible for these inconsistent responses. In either case, a better understanding of growth regulatory signaling pathways is necessary to assess the theoretical potential of inhibitor therapy. Immunohistochemical analysis of tyrosine kinases and activated isoforms of downstream signal transduction proteins was performed on a tissue microarray containing 27 cases of desmoid-type fibromatosis and 14 samples of scar; 6 whole sections of normal fibrous tissue were studied for comparison. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor, β type, and focal adhesion kinase 1 were expressed in all desmoid tumors and healing scars but only 80% and 50% of nonproliferative fibrous tissue samples, respectively. Hepatocyte growth factor receptor was detected in 89% of desmoids and all scars tested, but not in any of the fibrous tissue samples. Epidermal growth factor receptor was detected in only 12% of desmoids and not in scar or fibrous tissue. Mast/stem cell growth factor receptor, receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2, and phosphorylated insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor/insulin receptor were negative in all study cases. Variable levels of phosphorylated downstream signal transduction molecules RAC-α/β/γ serine/threonine-protein kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 were observed in desmoids (58%, 62%, and 67%), scar tissues (100%, 86%, and 86%), and fibrous tissue (33%, 17%, and 17%). These results indicate that tyrosine kinase signaling is active in both fibromatosis and healing scar, but not in most nonproliferating fibrous tissues. Although platelet-derived growth factor receptor, β type, is expressed ubiquitously in desmoids, the kinases driving cell

  11. Preparation and functional analysis of recombinant protein transduction domain-metallothionein fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kwang Suk; Won, Young-Wook; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2010-08-01

    In order for proteins to be used as pharmaceuticals, delivery technologies need to be developed to overcome biochemical and anatomical barriers to protein drug transport, to protect proteins from systemic degradation, and to target the drug action to specific sites. Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are used for the non-specific transduction of bio-active cargo, such as proteins, genes, and particles, through cellular membranes to overcome biological barriers. Metallothionein (MT) is a low molecular weight intra-cellular protein that consists of 61 amino acids, including 20 cysteine residues, and is over-expressed under stressful conditions. Although MT has the potential to improve the viability of islet cells and cardiomyocytes by inhibiting diabetic-induced apoptosis and by removing reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby prevent or reduce diabetes and diabetic complications, all MT applications have been made for gene therapy or under induced over-expression of endogenous MT. To overcome the drawbacks of ineffective intra-cellular MT protein uptake, a human MT gene was cloned and fused with protein transduction domains (PTDs), such as HIV-1 Tat and undeca-arginine, in a bacterial expression vector to produce PTD-MT fusion proteins. The expression and purification of three types of proteins were optimized by adding Zn ions to maintain their stability and functionality mimicking intra-cellular stable conformation of MT as a Zn-MT cluster. The Zn-MT cluster showed better stability than MT in vitro. PTD-MT fusion proteins strongly protected Ins-1 beta cells against oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by glucolipotoxicity with or without hypoxia, and also protected H9c2 cardiomyocytes against hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis with or without hypoxia. PTD-MT recombinant fusion proteins may be useful protein therapeutics for the treatment or prevention of diabetes and diabetes-related complications.

  12. Effects of acute hyperinsulinemia on insulin signal transduction and glucose transporters in ovine fetal skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marianne S; Thamotharan, M; Kao, Doris; Devaskar, Sherin U; Qiao, Liping; Friedman, Jacob E; Hay, William W

    2005-02-01

    To test the effects of acute fetal hyperinsulinemia on the pattern and time course of insulin signaling in ovine fetal skeletal muscle, we measured selected signal transduction proteins in the mitogenic, protein synthetic, and metabolic pathways in the skeletal muscle of normally growing fetal sheep in utero. In experiment 1, 4-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were conducted in anesthetized twin fetuses to produce selective fetal hyperinsulinemia-euglycemia in one twin and euinsulinemia-euglycemia in the other. Serial skeletal muscle biopsies were taken from each fetus during the clamp and assayed by Western blot for selected insulin signal transduction proteins. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, and the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase doubled at 30 min and gradually returned to control values by 240 min. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1,2 was increased fivefold through 120 min of insulin infusion and decreased to control concentration by 240 min. Protein kinase B phosphorylation doubled at 30 min and remained elevated throughout the study. Phosphorylation of p70 S6K increased fourfold at 30, 60, and 120 min. In the second experiment, a separate group of nonanesthetized singleton fetuses was clamped to intermediate and high hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic conditions for 1 h. GLUT4 increased fourfold in the plasma membrane at 1 h, and hindlimb glucose uptake increased significantly at the higher insulin concentration. These data demonstrate that an acute increase in fetal plasma insulin concentration stimulates a unique pattern of insulin signal transduction proteins in intact skeletal muscle, thereby increasing pathways for mRNA translation, glucose transport, and cell growth.

  13. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species) with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of individual transfer

  14. Comparison of the Efficiency of Viral Transduction and Episomal Transfection in Human Fibroblast Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, A S; Lupatov, A Yu; Kholodenko, I V; Yarygin, K N

    2015-11-01

    Induced pluripotent cells were derived from adult human skin fibroblast by using two methods of reprogramming. Episomal transfection with vectors containing oriP/EBNA-1 sequence for delivery of reprogramming genes Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, L-Myc, and Lin28 proved to be more effective than viral transduction with Sendai virus-based vector: ~200 and 8 colonies per 10(5) cells were found on day 21 of culturing, respectively. Colonies of induced pluripotent cells obtained by these two methods expressed pluripotency marker Tra1-60.

  15. Mechanisms of nociceptive transduction and transmission: a machinery for pain sensation and tools for selective analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binshtok, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    Many surgical and dental procedures depend on use of local anesthetics to reversibly eliminate pain. By the blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels, local anesthetics prevent the transmission of nociceptive information. However, since all local anesthetics act non-selectively on all types of axons they also cause a loss of innocuous sensation, motor paralysis and autonomic block. Thus, approaches that produce only a selective blockade of pain fibers are of great potential clinical importance. In this chapter we will review the recent findings describing mechanisms of pain transduction and transmission and introduce novel therapeutic approaches to produce pain-selective analgesia.

  16. Effect of the opioid methionine enkephalinamide on signal transduction in human T-lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A N; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1998-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR/CD3) induced fluctuations in intracellular free ionizied calcium, [Ca2+]i, was analysed in the human T leukemia cell clone, Jurkat, cultured in the presence of the opioid methionine enkephalinamide (Met-Enk) in titrated concentrations (10[-7] to 10[-15] M) or saline (PBS....... Moreover, the levels of [Ca2+]i in this particular fraction were lower than control levels prior to ligation of the TCR/CD3 complex. The data support the idea that signal transduction in T cells can be influenced by endogenous opioid. The data therefore give credit to the evolving hypothesis...

  17. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Allevato, G; Norstedt, G

    1994-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated...... a number of GH receptor mutants and analyzed their function after transfection into various cell lines. A truncated GH receptor missing 184 amino acids at the C-terminus was unable to mediate GH effects on transcription of the Spi 2.1 and insulin genes. However, this mutant was fully active in mediating GH...

  18. Do certain signal transduction mechanisms explain the comorbidity of epilepsy and mood disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luisa; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; Alcántara-González, David; Cruzblanca, Humberto; Castro, Elena

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that mood disorders are highly prevalent in patients with epilepsy. Although several studies have aimed to characterize alterations in different types of receptors associated with both disturbances, there is a lack of studies focused on identifying the causes of this comorbidity. Here, we described some changes at the biochemical level involving serotonin, dopamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors as well as signal transduction mechanisms that may explain the coexistence of both epilepsy and mood disorders. Finally, the identification of common pathophysiological mechanisms associated with receptor-receptor interaction (heterodimers) could allow designing new strategies for treatment of patients with epilepsy and comorbid mood disorders.

  19. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Anna W.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Moreno Morales, Neydis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) and their cognate response regulators make up two-component signal transduction systems which direct bacteria to mount phenotypic responses to changes in environmental light quality. Most of these systems utilize single-domain response regulators to transduce signals through unknown pathways and mechanisms. Here we describe the photocycle and autophosphorylation kinetics of RtBphP1, a red light-regulated histidine kinase from the desert bacterium Ramlibacter tataouinensis. RtBphP1 undergoes red to far-red photoconversion with rapid thermal reversion to the dark state. RtBphP1 is autophosphorylated in the dark; this activity is inhibited under red light. The RtBphP1 cognate response regulator, the R. tataouinensis bacteriophytochrome response regulator (RtBRR), and a homolog, AtBRR from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, crystallize unexpectedly as arm-in-arm dimers, reliant on a conserved hydrophobic motif, hFWAhL (where h is a hydrophobic M, V, L, or I residue). RtBRR and AtBRR dimerize distinctly from four structurally characterized phytochrome response regulators found in photosynthetic organisms and from all other receiver domain homodimers in the Protein Data Bank. A unique cacodylate-zinc-histidine tag metal organic framework yielded single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phases and may be of general interest. Examination of the effect of the BRR stoichiometry on signal transduction showed that phosphorylated RtBRR is accumulated more efficiently than the engineered monomeric RtBRR (RtBRRmon) in phosphotransfer reactions. Thus, we conclude that arm-in-arm dimers are a relevant signaling intermediate in this class of two-component regulatory systems. IMPORTANCE BphP histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators comprise widespread red light-sensing two-component systems. Much work on BphPs has focused on structural understanding of light sensing and on enhancing the natural infrared fluorescence of these

  20. Towards biochemical filters with a sigmoidal response to pH changes: buffered biocatalytic signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Marcos; Privman, Vladimir; Arugula, Mary A.; Melnikov, Dmitriy; Bocharova, Vera; Katz, Evgeny

    We realize a biochemical filtering process by introducing a buffer in a biocatalytic signal-transduction logic system based on the function of an enzyme, esterase. The input, ethyl butyrate, is converted into butyric acid-the output signal, which in turn is measured by the drop in the pH value. The developed approach offers a versatile "network element" for increasing the complexity of biochemical information processing systems. Evaluation of an optimal regime for quality filtering is accomplished in the framework of a kinetic rate-equation model.

  1. The emerging role of phosphoinositide clustering in intracellular trafficking and signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picas, Laura; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frederique; Goud, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are master regulators of multiple cellular processes: from vesicular trafficking to signaling, cytoskeleton dynamics, and cell growth. They are synthesized by the spatiotemporal regulated activity of phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. The recent observation that some protein modules are able to cluster phosphoinositides suggests that alternative or complementary mechanisms might operate to stabilize the different phosphoinositide pools within cellular compartments. Herein, we discuss the different known and potential molecular players that are prone to engage phosphoinositide clustering and elaborate on how such a mechanism might take part in the regulation of intracellular trafficking and signal transduction. PMID:27092250

  2. A model for signal transduction during quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Suman K.; Fenley, Andrew T.; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2009-12-01

    We present a framework for analyzing luminescence regulation during quorum sensing in the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Using a simplified model for signal transduction in the quorum sensing pathway, we identify key dimensionless parameters that control the system's response. These parameters are estimated using experimental data on luminescence phenotypes for different mutant strains. The corresponding model predictions are consistent with results from other experiments which did not serve as input for determining model parameters. Furthermore, the proposed framework leads to novel testable predictions for luminescence phenotypes and for responses of the network to different perturbations.

  3. Synaptic signal transduction aided by noise in a dynamical saturating model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Duan, Fabing; Abbott, Derek

    2010-02-01

    A generic dynamical model with saturation for neural signal transduction at the synaptic stage is presented. Analysis of this model of a synaptic pathway demonstrates its ability to give rise to stochastic resonance or improvement by noise, at this stage of signal transmission. Beyond the case of the intrinsic threshold nonlinearity of the neuron response, the results extend the feasibility of stochastic resonance to neural saturating dynamics at the synaptic stage. The present results also constitute the exposition of a new type of nonlinear (saturating) dynamics capable of stochastic resonance.

  4. Nanomechanoelectronic signal transduction scheme with metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor-embedded microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tark, Soo-Hyun; Srivastava, Arvind; Chou, Stanley; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2009-03-01

    We explore various metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET)-embedded microcantilever designs to assess their performance as an efficient nanomechanoelectronic signal transduction platform for monitoring deflection in microcantilever-based phenomena such as biochemical sensing and actuation. The current-voltage characteristics of embedded MOSFETs show current noise in the nanoampere range with a large signal-to-noise ratio sufficient to provide measureable output signal. The change in drain current with cantilever deflection is consistent with the effect of stress on carrier mobility and drain current reported in previous studies, validating that the MOSFET cantilevers can directly transduce deflection of a microcantilever into reproducible change in electrical signal.

  5. Spatially resolved shear distribution in microfluidic chip for studying force transduction mechanisms in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbin; Heo, Jinseok; Hua, Susan Z

    2010-01-21

    Fluid shear stress has profound effects on cell physiology. Here we present a versatile microfluidic method capable of generating variable magnitudes, gradients, and different modes of shear flow, to study sensory and force transduction mechanisms in cells. The chip allows cell culture under spatially resolved shear flow conditions as well as study of cell response to shear flow in real-time. Using this chip, we studied the effects of chronic shear stress on cellular functions of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK), renal epithelial cells. We show that shear stress causes reorganization of actin cytoskeleton, which suppresses flow-induced Ca(2+) response.

  6. Phenomenally High Transduction Air/gas Transducers for Practical Non-Contact Ultrasonic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Mahesh C.

    2009-03-01

    Based on novel acoustic impedance matching layers and high coupling piezoelectric materials this paper describes exceptionally high air/gas transduction ultrasonic transducers. By providing applications oriented performance of these transducers we also usher in the era of much desired Non-Contact Ultrasound (NCU) testing and analysis of a wide range of materials including early stage formation of materials such as uncured composite prepregs, green ceramics and powder metals, plastics, elastomers, porous, hygroscopic, chemically bonded and other materials. Besides quality control, ultimately NCU offers timely opportunities for cost-effective materials production, energy savings, and environment protection.

  7. Two-component systems and their co-option for eukaryotic signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, G Eric; Shiu, Shin-Han; Armitage, Judith P

    2011-05-10

    Two-component signaling pathways involve histidine kinases, response regulators, and sometimes histidine-containing phosphotransfer proteins. Prevalent in prokaryotes, these signaling elements have also been co-opted to meet the needs of signal transduction in eukaryotes such as fungi and plants. Here we consider the evolution of such regulatory systems, with a particular emphasis on the roles they play in signaling by the plant hormones cytokinin and ethylene, in phytochrome-mediated perception of light, and as integral components of the circadian clock. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Signal transduction meets systems biology: deciphering specificity determinants for protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    Two recent papers [Gao et al. Mol. Microbiol. 69, 1358 (2008); Skerker et al. Cell 133, 1043 (2008)] describe investigations into the specificity of protein-protein interactions that occur during signal transduction by two-component regulatory systems. This MicroCommentary summarizes and provides context for the reported findings. The results offer insights into molecular determinants that provide specificity to maintain signal separation and thus prevent deleterious crosstalk between pathways, as well as the potential extent and nature of interactions that may combine signals to achieve beneficial cross regulation among pathways. The methods employed are suitable for application to other systems. PMID:18694439

  9. Evolution and phyletic distribution of two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuichet, Kristin; Cantwell, Brian J; Zhulin, Igor B

    2010-04-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are abundant in prokaryotes. They enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions in response to changing environmental conditions. These systems are also found, although in much smaller numbers, in lower eukaryotes and plants, where they appear to control a few very specific functions. Two-component systems have evolved in Bacteria from much simpler one-component systems bringing about the benefit of extracellular versus intracellular sensing. We review reports establishing the origins of two-component systems and documenting their occurrence in major lineages of Life. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Anna W; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Moreno Morales, Neydis; Forest, Katrina T

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) and their cognate response regulators make up two-component signal transduction systems which direct bacteria to mount phenotypic responses to changes in environmental light quality. Most of these systems utilize single-domain response regulators to transduce signals through unknown pathways and mechanisms. Here we describe the photocycle and autophosphorylation kinetics of RtBphP1, a red light-regulated histidine kinase from the desert bacterium Ramlibacter tataouinensis RtBphP1 undergoes red to far-red photoconversion with rapid thermal reversion to the dark state. RtBphP1 is autophosphorylated in the dark; this activity is inhibited under red light. The RtBphP1 cognate response regulator, the R. tataouinensis bacteriophytochrome response regulator (RtBRR), and a homolog, AtBRR from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, crystallize unexpectedly as arm-in-arm dimers, reliant on a conserved hydrophobic motif, hFWAhL (where h is a hydrophobic M, V, L, or I residue). RtBRR and AtBRR dimerize distinctly from four structurally characterized phytochrome response regulators found in photosynthetic organisms and from all other receiver domain homodimers in the Protein Data Bank. A unique cacodylate-zinc-histidine tag metal organic framework yielded single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phases and may be of general interest. Examination of the effect of the BRR stoichiometry on signal transduction showed that phosphorylated RtBRR is accumulated more efficiently than the engineered monomeric RtBRR (RtBRRmon) in phosphotransfer reactions. Thus, we conclude that arm-in-arm dimers are a relevant signaling intermediate in this class of two-component regulatory systems. BphP histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators comprise widespread red light-sensing two-component systems. Much work on BphPs has focused on structural understanding of light sensing and on enhancing the natural infrared fluorescence of these proteins, rather than

  11. The gravity persistent signal (gps) Mutants of Arabidopsis: Insights into Gravitropic Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, S.

    The gravitropic response of Arabidopsis stems is rapid with a visible within 30 min and vertical reorientation within 2 h. However, horizontal gravistimulation for 3 h at 4°C does not cause curvature. When the stems are subsequently placed in the vertical position at RT, they bend in response to the previous, horizontal gravistimulation. These results indicate that the gravity perception step can occur at 4°C, but that part of the response is sensitive to cold. At 4°C, starch-containing amyloplasts in the endodermis of the inflorescence stems sedimented normally but auxin transport was abolished indicating that the cold treatment affected early events of the signal transduction pathway that occur after amyloplast sedimentation but prior to auxin transport. The gps mutants of Arabidopsis are a unique group of mutants that respond abnormally after gravistimulation at 4°C. gps1 shows no response to the cold gravistimulation, gps2 bends the wrong way as compared to wild type and gps3 over responds, bending past the anticipated curvature. The mutants were selected from a T-DNA tagged population. Cloning strategies based on the tag have been employed to identify the genes disrupted. GPS1 was cloned using TAIL PCR and is At3g20130, a cytochrome P450, CYP705A22, of unknown function. GPS1p::GFP fusions are being used to determine temporal and spatial expression of GPS1. The mutation in gps3 appears to disrupt a non-coding region downstream of At1g43950 No function has yet been determined for this region, but it appears that the mutation disrupts transcription of a transcription factor homologous to the DNA binding domain of an auxin response factor (ARF) 9-like protein. The identity of GPS2 is as yet unknown. The gps mutants represent potentially three independent aspects of signal transduction in the gravitropic response: perception or retention of the gravity signal (gps1), determination of the polarity of the response (gps2), and the tissue specificity of the

  12. Towards biochemical filters with a sigmoidal response to pH changes: buffered biocatalytic signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Marcos; Privman, Vladimir; Arugula, Mary A; Melnikov, Dmitriy; Bocharova, Vera; Katz, Evgeny

    2011-03-14

    We realize a biochemical filtering process by introducing a buffer in a biocatalytic signal-transduction logic system based on the function of an enzyme, esterase. The input, ethyl butyrate, is converted into butyric acid--the output signal, which in turn is measured by the drop in the pH value. The developed approach offers a versatile "network element" for increasing the complexity of biochemical information processing systems. Evaluation of an optimal regime for quality filtering is accomplished in the framework of a kinetic rate-equation model.

  13. [Effects of electro-acupuncture on signal transduction pathway of hypothalamic neuroendocrine system in ovariectomized rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Feng; Ma, Shu-Lan; Chen, Bo-Ying

    2009-06-01

    To compare the varieties and contents of the main nerval information molecules in perfusate from hypothalamic medial preoptic area (MPOA) of the rats in different sexual cycles and the ovariectomized rats treated by electro-acupuncture, so as to observe the similarities and differences of hypothalamic neuroendocrine signal transduction pathway under the physiological and pathological status, and to explore the mechanisms of neuroendocrine signal transduction of electro-acupuncture therapeutic effect in perimenopausal syndrome. The stereo localization technique and push-and-pull perfusion of the rat brain nucleus were adopted for collecting the hypothalamic MPOA perfusate of the female rats with normal sexual cycle, and also for collecting the MPOA perfusate of ovariectomized rats after electro-acupuncture treatment as acupuncture perfusate (AP). After being respectively microinjected into MPOA of the ovariectomized rats, the influence of the different perfusates on vagina cytology and serum estradiol (E2) level was observed. The contents of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), dopamine (DA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), aspartate (Asp) and beta-endorphin (beta-EP) in the perfusate of each group were detected by radioimmunoassay or high performance liquid chromatography, and then the varieties and contents of these substances in the perfusate of each group were compared and analyzed. The contents of neural active substances including DA, GABA, Glu, and beta-EP in the perfusate from the rats' MPOA during different stages of sexual cycle showed some regular changes. After the perfusate was microinjected respectively into the MPOA of the ovariectomized rats, the changes of animal vaginal exfoliated cells and serum E2 level showed the similar four-stage cycle characteristics as normal rats; the changes of vaginal exfoliated cells and serum E2 level of the ovariectomized rats without electro-acupuncture treatment showed the acupuncture-like effects

  14. Modelling and simulation of signal transductions in an apoptosis pathway by using timed Petri nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chen Li; Qi-Wei Ge; Mitsuru Nakata; Hiroshi Matsuno; Satoru Miyano

    2007-01-01

    This paper first presents basic Petri net components representing molecular interactions and mechanisms of signalling pathways, and introduces a method to construct a Petri net model of a signalling pathway with these components. Then a simulation method of determining the delay time of transitions, by using timed Petri nets – i.e. the time taken in firing of each transition – is proposed based on some simple principles that the number of tokens flowed into a place is equivalent to the number of tokens flowed out. Finally, the availability of proposed method is confirmed by observing signalling transductions in biological pathways through simulation experiments of the apoptosis signalling pathways as an example.

  15. Enhanced lentiviral transduction of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in the presence of conditioned medium from dying monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masurier, C; Boutin, S; Veron, P; Bernard, J; Danos, O; Davoust, J

    2007-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are attractive vehicles for the transduction of human dendritic cells (DCs) in order to mobilize their endogenous antigen presentation pathways. We analyzed here how to improve the efficiency of LV transduction, which we performed at the initial stages of the differentiation of purified monocytes into dendritic cells (Mo-DCs). Using LVs pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope G glycoprotein (VSV-G), we found that a conditioned medium derived from dying monocytes (MCM) improved by 2- to 10- fold the proportion of transduced Mo-DCs. This enhanced transduction efficiency requires the presence of MCM during the initial stage of LV transduction and does not affect the phenotype and antigen presentation function of terminally differentiated Mo-DCs. Importantly, we found that MCM derived from a human acute monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1, was equally effective. The MCM activity was heat stable (56 degrees C) and was present in the soluble fraction after high-speed centrifugation. Altogether our results show that a soluble factor present in dying monocyte cultures can replace advantageously facilitating agents such as Polybrene, to achieve high LV transductions levels. This protocol can be performed with autologous monocytes and is therefore applicable in clinical settings.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Two-component Signal Transduction System in Two Streptomycete Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu WEI; Yixue LI; Weihua WANG; Zhiwei CAO; Hong YU; Xiaojing WANG; Jing ZHAO; Hao TAN; Hao XU; Weihong JIANG

    2007-01-01

    Species of the genus Streptomyces are major bacteria responsible for producing most natural antibiotics. Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces avermitilis were sequenced in 2002 and 2003,respectively. Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), consisting of a histidine sensor kinase (SK) and a cognate response regulator (RR), form the most common mechanism of transmembrane signal transduction in prokaryotes. TCSs in S. coelicolor A3(2) have been analyzed in detail. Here, we identify and classify the SK and RR of S. avermitilis and compare the TCSs with those of S. coelicolor A3(2) by computational approaches. Phylogenetic analysis of the cognate SK-RR pairs of the two species indicated that the cognate SK-RR pairs fall into four classes according to the distribution of their orthologs in other organisms. In addition to the cognate SK-RR pairs, some potential partners of non-cognate SK-RR were found, including those of unpaired SK and orphan RR and the cross-talk between different components in either strain. Our study provides new clues for further exploration of the molecular regulation mechanism of streptomycetes with industrial importance.

  17. Low Dose Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Depsipeptide (FR901228), Promotes Adenoviral Transduction in Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navid, Fariba; Mischen, Blaine T; Helman, Lee J

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. Transduction of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells with adenoviral vectors for in vivo and in vitro applications has been limited by the low to absent levels of coxackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). This study investigates the potential use of low doses of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, depsipeptide (FR901228), currently in Phase II human trials, to enhance adenoviral uptake in six rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.Methods. Differences in adenoviral uptake in the presence and absence of depsipeptide (FR901228) were assessed using an adenoviral construct tagged with green fluorescent protein. Changes in CAR and alpha(v) integrin expression RMS in response to pretreatment with depsipeptide (FR901128) was determined using RT-PCR.Results. Pretreatment of five of six RMS cell lines with 0.5 ng/ml of depsipeptide (FR901228) for 72 h resulted in increased viral uptake as assessed by green fluorescent protein expression. RT-PCR analysis for CAR showed that in four of these five cell lines, CAR expression was increased 2.8-8.1-fold in cells treated with depsipeptide (FR901228) as compared to control. alpha(v) integrin expression was substantially increased in the one cell line, RH5, which showed increased GFP expression in response to depsipeptide (FR901228) pretreatment but a minimal increase in CAR expression.Conclusions. Depsipeptide (FR901228) can be used as a vehicle to enhance adenoviral transduction in a majority of RMS cells. The mechanism of increased viral uptake appears to mediate via upregulation of CAR.

  18. Molecular Analysis of the Graviperception Signal Transduction in the Flagellate Euglena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häder, Donat; Daiker, Viktor; Richter, Peter; Lebert, Michael

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis perceives and reacts to the gravitational vector of the Earth. Recent results of experiments on parabolic rocket flights have revealed that the orientation can be explained by passive orientation only to a small extend while the remainder relies on an active physiological sensor and an internal sensory transduction chain. Our current working hypothesis is based on the fact that the cellular contents is heavier than the surrounding medium and consequently exerts pressure onto the lower membrane where it activates mechano-sensitive ion channels located at the front end under the trailing flagellum. We recently succeeded in identifying these channels as gene products of the TRP family. RNAi of the corresponding gene abolished graviperception. These channels allow a gated influx of calcium which depolarizes the internal electrical potential and eventually causes a course correction by the flagellar beating. The inwardly gated calcium binds to a specific calmodulin which is likewise an intrinsic element of the signal transduction chain. RNAi of the related mRNA also stopped graviperception. This calmodulin is thought to activate an adenylyl cyclase which generates cyclic AMP which in turn modulates the beating pattern of the flagellum.

  19. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  20. Preclinical validation: LV/IL-12 transduction of patient leukemia cells for immunotherapy of AML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 (IL-12 is a potent cytokine that may be harnessed to treat cancer. To date, nearly 100 IL-12-based clinical trials have been initiated worldwide. Yet systemic administration of IL-12 is toxic. Different strategies are being developed to reduce such toxicities by restricting IL-12 distribution. Our previous studies employed lentivector-mediated expression of murine IL-12 in tumor cells and demonstrated effective protection in both mouse leukemia and solid tumor challenge models. In this study, we carried out preclinical validation studies using a novel lentivector to engineer expression of human IL-12 in acute myeloid leukemia blast cells isolated from 21 patients. Acute myeloid leukemia cells were transduced with a bicistronic lentivector that encodes the human IL-12 cDNA as a fusion, as well as a LNGFR (ΔLNGFR/mutant thymidylate kinase cassette as a marking and cell-fate control element. A range of 20–70% functional transduction efficiencies was achieved. Transduced acute myeloid leukemia cells produced bioactive IL-12 protein and displayed dose-dependent sensitivity to the prodrug 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine. In vitro immortalization assays using transduced mouse hematopoietic stem cells demonstrated minimal genotoxic risk from our IL-12 vector. Scale-up transduction and cell processing was subsequently validated in a GMP facility to support our (now approved Clinical Trial Application (CTA.

  1. Thermodynamic and choreographic constraints for energy transduction by cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, António V

    2004-07-23

    Cooperative effects are fundamental for electroprotonic energy transduction processes, crucial to sustain much of life chemistry. However, the primary cooperative mechanism by which transmembrane proteins couple the downhill transfer of electrons to the uphill activation (acidification) of protic groups is still a matter of great controversy. To understand cooperative processes fully, it is necessary to obtain the microscopic thermodynamic parameters of the functional centres and relate them to the relevant structural features, a task difficult to achieve for large proteins. The approach discussed here explores how this may be done by extrapolation from mechanisms used by simpler proteins operative in similar processes. The detailed study of small, soluble cytochromes performing electroprotonic activation has shown how they use anti-electrostatic effects to control the synchronous movement of charges. These include negative e(-)/H(+) (redox-Bohr effect) cooperativities. This capacity is the basis to discuss an unorthodox mechanism consistent with the available experimental data on the process of electroprotonic energy transduction performed by cytochrome c oxidase (CcO).

  2. Sensory transduction channel subunits, tax-4 and tax-2, modify presynaptic molecular architecture in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B Hellman

    Full Text Available During development, neural activity is important for forming proper connections in neural networks. The effect of activity on the gross morphology and synaptic strength of neurons has been well documented, but little is known about how activity affects different molecular components during development. Here, we examine the localization of four fluorescently-tagged presynaptic proteins, RAB-3, SNG-1/synaptogyrin, SYD-2/Liprin-α, and SAD-1/SAD kinase, in the C. elegans thermosensory neuron AFD. We show that tax-4 and tax-2, two genes that encode the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel necessary for sensory transduction in AFD, disrupt the localization of all four proteins. In wild-type animals, the synaptic vesicle (SV markers RAB-3 and SNG-1 and the active zone markers SYD-2 and SAD-1 localize in a stereotyped, punctate pattern in the AFD axon. In tax-4 and tax-2 mutants, SV and SYD-2 puncta are more numerous and less intense. Interestingly, SAD-1 puncta are also less intense but do not increase in number. The change in puncta number can be rescued cell-autonomously in AFD. These results suggest that sensory transduction genes tax-4 and tax-2 are necessary for the proper assembly of presynapses.

  3. Measurement of the formation of complexes in tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladbury, John E., E-mail: j.ladbury@biochem.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-01

    The use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a full thermodynamic characterization of an interaction in one experiment. The determination of the affinity is an important value; however, the additional layer of information provided by the change in enthalpy and entropy can help in understanding the biology. This is demonstrated with respect to tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides highly complementary data to high-resolution structural detail. An overview of the methodology of the technique is provided. Ultimately, the correlation of the thermodynamic parameters determined by ITC with structural perturbation observed on going from the free to the bound state should be possible at an atomic level. Currently, thermodynamic data provide some insight as to potential changes occurring on complex formation. Here, this is demonstrated in the context of in vitro quantification of intracellular tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction and the issue of specificity of the important interactions. The apparent lack of specificity in the interactions of domains of proteins involved in early signalling from membrane-bound receptors is demonstrated using data from ITC.

  4. Two-Component Signal Transduction System SaeRS Positively Regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Lou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is a causative pathogen of nosocomial infection, expresses its virulent traits such as biofilm and autolysis regulated by two-component signal transduction system SaeRS. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the S. epidermidis 1457 wild-type and saeRS mutant to identify candidates regulated by saeRS using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/lonization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Of 55 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two strains, 15 were upregulated and 40 were downregulated. The downregulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis and TCA cycle, suggesting that glucose is not properly utilized in S. epidermidis when saeRS was deleted. The study will be helpful for treatment of S. epidermidis infection from the viewpoint of metabolic modulation dependent on two-component signal transduction system SaeRS.

  5. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Desikan, Radhika; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction.

  6. Information content and cross-talk in biological signal transduction: An information theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ashok; Lyons, Samanthe

    2014-03-01

    Biological cells respond to chemical cues provided by extra-cellular chemical signals, but many of these chemical signals and the pathways they activate interfere and overlap with one another. How well cells can distinguish between interfering extra-cellular signals is thus an important question in cellular signal transduction. Here we use information theory with stochastic simulations of networks to address the question of what happens to total information content when signals interfere. We find that both total information transmitted by the biological pathway, as well as its theoretical capacity to discriminate between overlapping signals, are relatively insensitive to cross-talk between the extracellular signals, until significantly high levels of cross-talk have been reached. This robustness of information content against cross-talk requires that the average amplitude of the signals are large. We predict that smaller systems, as exemplified by simple phosphorylation relays (two-component systems) in bacteria, should be significantly much less robust against cross-talk. Our results suggest that mammalian signal transduction can tolerate a high amount of cross-talk without degrading information content, while smaller bacterial systems cannot.

  7. THE ENHANCED GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN AS A MARKER FOR HUMAN TUMOR CELLS LABELLED BY RETROVIRAL TRANSDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅建新; 王玮; 白霞; 卢大儒; 阮长耿; 陈子兴

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of marking the human tumor cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in vitro. Methods: The retroviral vector LGSN encoding EGFP was constructed and three human tumor cell lines were infected with LGSN amphotropic virus. Tumor cell lines that stably express EGFP were selected with G418. The integration and expression of EGFP gene were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry (FCM). Results: After gene transfection and ping-pong transduction, amphotropic producer line Am12/LGSN was generated with a stable green fluorescence signal readily detectable by FCM in up to 97% of examined cells. The viral titer in the supernatants was up to 8.2×105CFU/ml. After transduction and selection, G418-resistant leukemia K562, mammary carcinoma MCF-7, and bladder cancer 5637 cells were developed, in which the integration of both EGFP and neomycin resistance gene was confirmed by DNA amplification. In comparison with uninfected cells, FCM analysis revealed EGFP expression in up to 90% (range 85.5%~90.0%) of tumor cells containing LGSN provirus. Conclusion: The retroviral vector LGSN can effectively mark the human tumor cells with a stably EGFP expression which may be in studying tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis.

  8. Targeted genome editing by lentiviral protein transduction of zinc-finger and TAL-effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yujia; Bak, Rasmus O; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2014-04-24

    Future therapeutic use of engineered site-directed nucleases, like zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), relies on safe and effective means of delivering nucleases to cells. In this study, we adapt lentiviral vectors as carriers of designer nuclease proteins, providing efficient targeted gene disruption in vector-treated cell lines and primary cells. By co-packaging pairs of ZFN proteins with donor RNA in 'all-in-one' lentiviral particles, we co-deliver ZFN proteins and the donor template for homology-directed repair leading to targeted DNA insertion and gene correction. Comparative studies of ZFN activity in a predetermined target locus and a known nearby off-target locus demonstrate reduced off-target activity after ZFN protein transduction relative to conventional delivery approaches. Additionally, TALEN proteins are added to the repertoire of custom-designed nucleases that can be delivered by protein transduction. Altogether, our findings generate a new platform for genome engineering based on efficient and potentially safer delivery of programmable nucleases.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01911.001.

  9. Correlative study on the JAK-STAT/PSMβ3 signal transduction pathway in asthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junguo; Zhang, Li; Li, Bing

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible mechanism of Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transduction and activator of transcription (STAT)/PSMβ3 signaling in the occurrence of asthenozoospermia. We examined seminal fluid samples from 30 cases of asthenozoospermia and 30 healthy controls. Sperm was collected using the Percoll density gradient centrifugation method. The expression of JAK, STAT and PSMβ3 mRNA was assessed by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR and the protein levels of p-JAK, p-STAT and PSMβ3 were measured by western blot analysis. The PSMβ3 mRNA and protein expression levels were also measured after application of a JAK inhibitor, AG-490, to the control group, with a FITC-labeled monoclonal rabbit anti-human PSMβ3 primary antibody. The cells were observed under a laser confocal microscope. The mRNA levels of JAK, STAT and PSMβ3 in asthenozoospermia were decreased significantly (Pasthenozoospermia were also reduced and the differences were statistically significant (Pasthenozoospermia group. PSMβ3 was mainly expressed in round-headed sperm, and less in asthenozoospermia. In conclusion, the JAK-STAT/PSMβ3 signaling transduction pathway may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of asthenozoospermia.

  10. Transduction mechanism of carbon nanotubes in solid-contact ion-selective electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Bobacka, Johan; Rius, F Xavier

    2009-01-15

    Porous carbon materials and carbon nanotubes were recently used as solid contacts in ion-selective electrodes (ISE), and the signal transduction mechanism of these carbon-based materials is therefore of great interest. In this work the ion-to-electron transduction mechanism of carbon nanotubes is studied by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are deposited on glassy carbon (GC) disk electrodes by repetitive spraying, resulting in SWCNT layers with thicknesses of 10, 35, and 50 mum. The impedance spectra of these GC/SWCNT electrodes in contact with aqueous electrolyte solution show a very small resistance and a large bulk capacitance that is related to a large effective double layer at the SWCNT/electrolyte interface. Interestingly, the impedance response of GC/SWCNT is very similar to that of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) film electrodes studied earlier under the same experimental conditions. The same equivalent circuit is valid for both types of materials. The reason is that both materials can be described schematically as an asymmetric capacitor where one side is formed by electronic charge (electrons/holes) in the SWCNT wall or along the conjugated polymer chain of PEDOT and the other side is formed by ions (anions/cations) in the solution (or in the ion-selective membrane when used as a solid contact in ISE).

  11. P2CS: a two-component system resource for prokaryotic signal transduction research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Méjean Vincent

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the escalation of high throughput prokaryotic genome sequencing, there is an ever-increasing need for databases that characterise, catalogue and present data relating to particular gene sets and genomes/metagenomes. Two-component system (TCS signal transduction pathways are the dominant mechanisms by which micro-organisms sense and respond to external as well as internal environmental changes. These systems respond to a wide range of stimuli by triggering diverse physiological adjustments, including alterations in gene expression, enzymatic reactions, or protein-protein interactions. Description We present P2CS (Prokaryotic 2-Component Systems, an integrated and comprehensive database of TCS signal transduction proteins, which contains a compilation of the TCS genes within 755 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and 39 metagenomes. P2CS provides detailed annotation of each TCS gene including family classification, sequence features, functional domains, as well as genomic context visualization. To bypass the generic problem of gene underestimation during genome annotation, we also constituted and searched an ORFeome, which improves the recovery of TCS proteins compared to searches on the equivalent proteomes. Conclusion P2CS has been developed for computational analysis of the modular TCSs of prokaryotic genomes and metagenomes. It provides a complete overview of information on TCSs, including predicted candidate proteins and probable proteins, which need further curation/validation. The database can be browsed and queried with a user-friendly web interface at http://www.p2cs.org/.

  12. [Two-component signal transduction as attractive drug targets in pathogenic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Ryutaro; Igarashi, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Gene clusters contributing to processes such as cell growth and pathogenicity are often controlled by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs). TCS consists of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). TCSs are attractive as drug targets for antimicrobials because many HK and RR genes are coded on the bacterial genome though few are found in lower eukaryotes. The HK/RR signal transduction system is distinct from serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphorylation in higher eukaryotes. Specific inhibitors against TCS systems work differently from conventional antibiotics, and developing them into new drugs that are effective against various drug-resistant bacteria may be possible. Furthermore, inhibitors of TCSs that control virulence factors may reduce virulence without killing the pathogenic bacteria. Previous TCS inhibitors targeting the kinase domain of the histidine kinase sensor suffered from poor selectivity. Recent TCS inhibitors, however, target the sensory domains of the sensors blocking the quorum sensing system, or target the essential response regulator. These new targets are introduced, together with several specific TCSs that have the potential to serve as effective drug targets.

  13. P2CS: a two-component system resource for prokaryotic signal transduction research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Mohamed; Ortet, Philippe; Jourlin-Castelli, Cécile; Ansaldi, Mireille; Méjean, Vincent; Whitworth, David E

    2009-07-15

    With the escalation of high throughput prokaryotic genome sequencing, there is an ever-increasing need for databases that characterise, catalogue and present data relating to particular gene sets and genomes/metagenomes. Two-component system (TCS) signal transduction pathways are the dominant mechanisms by which micro-organisms sense and respond to external as well as internal environmental changes. These systems respond to a wide range of stimuli by triggering diverse physiological adjustments, including alterations in gene expression, enzymatic reactions, or protein-protein interactions. We present P2CS (Prokaryotic 2-Component Systems), an integrated and comprehensive database of TCS signal transduction proteins, which contains a compilation of the TCS genes within 755 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and 39 metagenomes. P2CS provides detailed annotation of each TCS gene including family classification, sequence features, functional domains, as well as genomic context visualization. To bypass the generic problem of gene underestimation during genome annotation, we also constituted and searched an ORFeome, which improves the recovery of TCS proteins compared to searches on the equivalent proteomes. P2CS has been developed for computational analysis of the modular TCSs of prokaryotic genomes and metagenomes. It provides a complete overview of information on TCSs, including predicted candidate proteins and probable proteins, which need further curation/validation. The database can be browsed and queried with a user-friendly web interface at http://www.p2cs.org/.

  14. Using Unlabeled Data to Improve Inductive Models by Incorporating Transductive Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShengJun Cheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how to use labeled and unlabeled data to improve inductive models with the help of transductivemodels.We proposed a solution for the self-training scenario. Self- training is an effective semi-supervised wrapper method which can generalize any type of supervised inductive model to the semi-supervised settings. it iteratively refines a inductive model by bootstrap from unlabeled data. Standard self-training uses the classifier model(trained on labeled examples to label and select candidates from the unlabeled training set, which may be problematic since the initial classifier may not be able to provide highly confident predictions as labeled training data is always rare. As a result, it could always suffer from introducing too much wrongly labeled candidates to the labeled training set, which may severely degrades performance. To tackle this problem, we propose a novel self-training style algorithm which incorporate a graph-based transductive model in the self-labeling process. Unlike standard self-training, our algorithm utilizes labeled and unlabeled data as a whole to label and select unlabeled examples for training set augmentation. A robust transductive model based on graph markov random walk is proposed, which exploits manifold assumption to output reliable predictions on unlabeled data using noisy labeled examples. The proposed algorithm can greatly minimize the risk of performance degradation due to accumulated noise in the training set. Experiments show that the proposed algorithm can effectively utilize unlabeled data to improve classification performance.

  15. STAT1 is involved in signal transduction in the EPO induced HEL cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGCHU; CHANGYUNGUI; 等

    1998-01-01

    Erythropoietin(EPO) is the major regulator of mamalian erythropoisis,which stimulates the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells through interaction with its receptor(EPO-R),Here we use HEL cells (a human erythro-leukemia cell line) as a model to elucidate the pathway of signal transduction in the EPO-induced HEL cells.Our data show that the EPOR (EPO receptor) on the surface of HEL cells interacts with the Janus tyrosine protein kinase(Jak2) to transduce intracellular signals through phosphorylation of cytoplasmic proteins in EPO-treated HEL cells.Both STAT1 and STAT5 in this cell line are tyrosine-phosphorylated and translocated to nucleus following the dinding of EPO to HEL cells.Furthermore,the dinding of both STAT1 and STAT5 proteins to specific DNA elements(SIE and PIE elements) is revealed in an EPO-dependent manner,Our data demonstrate that the pathway of signal transduction following the binding of EPO to HEL cells is similar to immature eryhroid cell from the spleen of mice infected with anemia strain of Friend virus.

  16. New insights into the organization of plasma membrane and its role in signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenichi G N

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membranes have heterogeneous structures for efficient signal transduction, required to perform cell functions. Recent evidence indicates that the heterogeneous structures are produced by (1) compartmentalization by actin-based membrane skeleton, (2) raft domains, (3) receptor-receptor interactions, and (4) the binding of receptors to cytoskeletal proteins. This chapter provides an overview of recent studies on diffusion, clustering, raft association, actin binding, and signal transduction of membrane receptors, especially glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored receptors. Studies on diffusion of GPI-anchored receptors suggest that rafts may be small and/or short-lived in plasma membranes. In steady state conditions, GPI-anchored receptors form transient homodimers, which may represent the "standby state" for the stable homodimers and oligomers upon ligation. Furthermore, It is proposed that upon ligation, the binding of GPI-anchored receptor clusters to cytoskeletal actin filaments produces a platform for downstream signaling, and that the pulse-like signaling easily maintains the stability of the overall signaling activity.

  17. Signal transduction meets vesicle traffic: the software and hardware of GLUT4 translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klip, Amira; Sun, Yi; Chiu, Tim Ting; Foley, Kevin P

    2014-05-15

    Skeletal muscle is the major tissue disposing of dietary glucose, a function regulated by insulin-elicited signals that impart mobilization of GLUT4 glucose transporters to the plasma membrane. This phenomenon, also central to adipocyte biology, has been the subject of intense and productive research for decades. We focus on muscle cell studies scrutinizing insulin signals and vesicle traffic in a spatiotemporal manner. Using the analogy of an integrated circuit to approach the intersection between signal transduction and vesicle mobilization, we identify signaling relays ("software") that engage structural/mechanical elements ("hardware") to enact the rapid mobilization and incorporation of GLUT4 into the cell surface. We emphasize how insulin signal transduction switches from tyrosine through lipid and serine phosphorylation down to activation of small G proteins of the Rab and Rho families, describe key negative regulation step of Rab GTPases through the GTPase-activating protein activity of the Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160), and focus on the mechanical effectors engaged by Rabs 8A and 10 (the molecular motor myosin Va), and the Rho GTPase Rac1 (actin filament branching and severing through Arp2/3 and cofilin). Finally, we illustrate how actin filaments interact with myosin 1c and α-Actinin4 to promote vesicle tethering as preamble to fusion with the membrane.

  18. Hepatocyte growth factor improves direct reprogramming of fibroblasts towards endothelial progenitor cells via ETV2 transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Van Pham

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human fibroblasts can be differentiated into endothelial progenitor cells by direct reprogramming via ETV-2 transfection. Previously, we have shown that the efficacy of direct reprogramming can be enhanced by hypoxia treatment. In this study, we aim to investigate whether the efficacy of direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into EPCs via Ets variant gene 2 (ETV2 transfection can be increased with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF treatment. Foreskin-derived fibroblasts were cultured in standard medium (DMEM/F12 supplemented with fetal bovine serum. They were then transduced with a viral vector expressing ETV2 in culture medium supplemented with HGF. The transduced fibroblasts were cultured in endothelial cell medium supplemented with HGF for 28 days. The efficacy of direct reprogramming was evaluated based on expression of CD31 and VEGFR2 markers by transduced cells. Phenotypic and functional characterization of induced EPCs were also confirmed by expression of particular genes and in vitro angiogenesis assays. Our results showed that HGF significantly increased the efficacy of direct reprogramming of fibroblasts towards EPCs via ETV2 transcription factors; efficiency increased from 5.41+/-1.51% for ETV2 transduction alone to 12.31+/-2.15% for ETV2 transduction combined with HGF treatment. These findings suggest the rationale for combined use of ETV2 and HGF in direct in vitro reprogramming of fibroblasts into EPCs. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(9.000: 836-843

  19. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase proteins as novel regulators of signal transduction pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary; Louisa; Holton; Michael; Emerson; Ludwig; Neyses; Angel; L; Armesilla

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs) play a key role as regulators of calcium-triggered signal transduction pathways via interaction with partner proteins. PMCAs regulate these pathways by targeting specific proteins to cellular sub-domains where the levels of intracellular freecalcium are kept low by the calcium ejection properties of PMCAs. According to this model, PMCAs have been shown to interact functionally with the calcium-sensitive proteins neuronal nitric oxide synthase, calmodulindependent serine protein kinase, calcineurin and endothelial nitric oxidase synthase. Transgenic animals with altered expression of PMCAs are being used to evaluate the physiological significance of these interactions. To date, PMCA interactions with calcium-dependent partner proteins have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system via regulation of the nitric oxide and calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells pathways. This new evidence suggests that PMCAs play a more sophisticated role than the mere ejection of calcium from the cells, by acting as modulators of signaling transduction pathways.

  20. The shear stress of it all: the cell membrane and mechanochemical transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles R; Frangos, John A

    2007-08-29

    As the inner lining of the vessel wall, vascular endothelial cells are poised to act as a signal transduction interface between haemodynamic forces and the underlying vascular smooth-muscle cells. Detailed analyses of fluid mechanics in atherosclerosis-susceptible regions of the vasculature reveal a strong correlation between endothelial cell dysfunction and areas of low mean shear stress and oscillatory flow with flow recirculation. Conversely, steady shear stress stimulates cellular responses that are essential for endothelial cell function and are atheroprotective. The molecular basis of shear-induced mechanochemical signal transduction and the endothelium's ability to discriminate between flow profiles remains largely unclear. Given that fluid shear stress does not involve a traditional receptor/ligand interaction, identification of the molecule(s) responsible for sensing fluid flow and mechanical force discrimination has been difficult. This review will provide an overview of the haemodynamic forces experienced by the vascular endothelium and its role in localizing atherosclerotic lesions within specific regions of the vasculature. Also reviewed are several recent lines of evidence suggesting that both changes in membrane microviscosity linked to heterotrimeric G proteins, and the transmission of tension across the cell membrane to the cell-cell junction where known shear-sensitive proteins are localized, may serve as the primary force-sensing elements of the cell.

  1. Uncovering signal transduction networks from high-throughput data by integer linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xing-Ming; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-05-01

    Signal transduction is an important process that transmits signals from the outside of a cell to the inside to mediate sophisticated biological responses. Effective computational models to unravel such a process by taking advantage of high-throughput genomic and proteomic data are needed to understand the essential mechanisms underlying the signaling pathways. In this article, we propose a novel method for uncovering signal transduction networks (STNs) by integrating protein interaction with gene expression data. Specifically, we formulate STN identification problem as an integer linear programming (ILP) model, which can be actually solved by a relaxed linear programming algorithm and is flexible for handling various prior information without any restriction on the network structures. The numerical results on yeast MAPK signaling pathways demonstrate that the proposed ILP model is able to uncover STNs or pathways in an efficient and accurate manner. In particular, the prediction results are found to be in high agreement with current biological knowledge and available information in literature. In addition, the proposed model is simple to be interpreted and easy to be implemented even for a large-scale system.

  2. Genetic GIScience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacquez, Geoffrey; Sabel, Clive E; Shi, Chen

    2015-01-01

    The exposome, defined as the totality of an individual's exposures over the life course, is a seminal concept in the environmental health sciences. Although inherently geographic, the exposome as yet is unfamiliar to many geographers. This article proposes a place-based synthesis, genetic...... geographic information science (genetic GIScience), that is founded on the exposome, genome+, and behavome. It provides an improved understanding of human health in relation to biology (the genome+), environmental exposures (the exposome), and their social, societal, and behavioral determinants (the behavome......). Genetic GIScience poses three key needs: first, a mathematical foundation for emergent theory; second, process-based models that bridge biological and geographic scales; third, biologically plausible estimates of space?time disease lags. Compartmental models are a possible solution; this article develops...

  3. α2,3 and α2,6 N-Linked Sialic Acids Facilitate Efficient Binding and Transduction by Adeno-Associated Virus Types 1 and 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhijian; Miller, Edward; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are promising vectors in the field of gene therapy. Different AAV serotypes display distinct tissue tropism, believed to be related to the distribution of their receptors on target cells. Of the 11 well-characterized AAV serotypes, heparan sulfate proteoglycan and sialic acid have been suggested to be the attachment receptors for AAV type 2 and types 4 and 5, respectively. In this report, we identify the receptor for the two closely related serotypes, AAV1 and AAV6. First, we demonstrate using coinfection experiments and luciferase reporter analysis that AAV1 and AAV6 compete for similar receptors. Unlike heparin sulfate, enzymatic or genetic removal of sialic acid markedly reduced AAV1 and AAV6 binding and transduction. Further analysis using lectin staining and lectin competition assays identified that AAV1 and AAV6 use either α2,3-linked or α2,6-linked sialic acid when transducing numerous cell types (HepG2, Pro-5, and Cos-7). Treatment of cells with proteinase K but not glycolipid inhibitor reduced AAV1 and AAV6 infection, supporting the hypothesis that the sialic acid that facilitates infection is associated with glycoproteins rather than glycolipids. In addition, we determined by inhibitor (N-benzyl GalNAc)- and cell line-specific (Lec-1) studies that AAV1 and AAV6 require N-linked and not O-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, a resialylation experiment on a deficient Lec-2 cell line confirmed a 2,3 and 2,6 N-linked sialic acid requirement, while studies of mucin with O-linked sialic acid showed no inhibition effect for AAV1 and AAV6 transduction on Cos-7 cells. Finally, using a glycan array binding assay we determined that AAV1 efficiently binds to NeuAcα2-3GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc, as well as two glycoproteins with α2,3 and α2,6 N-linked sialic acids. Taken together, competition, genetic, inhibitor, enzymatic reconstitution, and glycan array experiments support α2,3 and α2,6 sialic acids that are present on N

  4. Receptor component protein (RCP): a member of a multi-protein complex required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Dickerson, I M

    2002-08-01

    The calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor component protein (RCP) is a 148-amino-acid intracellular protein that is required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction at receptors for the neuropeptide CGRP. RCP works in conjunction with two other proteins to constitute a functional CGRP receptor: calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor-activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). CRLR has the stereotypical seven-transmembrane topology of a G-protein-coupled receptor; it requires RAMP1 for trafficking to the cell surface and for ligand specificity, and requires RCP for coupling to the cellular signal transduction pathway. We have made cell lines that expressed an antisense construct of RCP and determined that CGRP-mediated signal transduction was reduced, while CGRP binding was unaffected. Furthermore, signalling at two other endogenous G-protein-coupled receptors was unaffected, suggesting that RCP was specific for a limited subset of receptors.

  5. Lipid Rafts and Signal Transduction of Cell%脂筏与细胞信号转导

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范玉贞

    2011-01-01

    论述了脂筏的组成、结构与功能,脂筏在细胞信号转导正负调控、T细胞的信号转导、精子膜的信号转导过程中的作用及其机制.小窝蛋白及其参与的信号转导过程与葡萄糖运输、糖尿病及其并发症有密切关系.%This article discusses the composition,structure and function of lipid rafts and the mechanism of lipid rafts in signal transduction plus or minus regulation,T cell signal transduction,signal transduction process of sperm membrane.Caveolins and its partic

  6. Z-shaped magnetostrictive patch for efficient transduction of a torsional wave mode in a cylindrical waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Il; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Yoon Young

    2006-10-01

    An earlier investigation [C. I. Park et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 224105 (2005)] using topology optimization showed that if V-shaped yokes are attached to magnetostrictive strips obliquely bonded on the surface of a cylindrical waveguide, the transduction efficiency of ultrasonic torsional waves can be substantially increased. However, some unwanted wave modes are also generated unless some damping treatment is applied. This investigation shows that if the strips are reconfigured as Z-shaped patches, the transduction efficiency gained by the optimization technique can be maintained without the generation of unwanted modes. By experiments using the Z-shaped patches, the transduction characteristics including the frequency characteristics of an ultrasonic torsional wave are also investigated.

  7. Insulin signal transduction in skeletal muscle from glucose-intolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients [corrected

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Song, X M; Jensen, C B;

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether defects in the insulin signal transduction cascade are present in skeletal muscle from prediabetic individuals, we excised biopsies from eight glucose-intolerant male first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes (IGT relatives) and nine matched control subjects...... in signal transduction noted for IRS-1 and PI 3-kinase may be attributed to elevated basal phosphorylation/activity of these parameters, because absolute phosphorylation/activity under insulin-stimulated conditions was similar between IGT relatives and control subjects. Insulin increased Akt serine......, the elevated basal activity of these signaling intermediates and the lack of a strong correlation between these parameters to glucose metabolism suggests that other defects of insulin signal transduction and/or downstream components of glucose metabolism may play a greater role in the development of insulin...

  8. Modulated expression of genes associated with NO signal transduction contributes to the cholesterol-lowering effect of electro-acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Tan, Guang-Hong; Zhang, Yi-Zheng

    2012-07-01

    Electro-acupuncture (EA) at Fenglong acupoint (ST40) can lower the levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols. To study the hepatic genes responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effect of EA, suppression subtractive hybridization combined with the switch mechanism at the 5'-end of RNA template cDNA synthesis and long-distance PCR were employed using hepatic tissues from hypercholesterolemia and EA-treated mice. 68 % of the identified genes are involved in metabolism, immune response, and signal transduction pathways. Real-time PCR and western blot indicate that EA at ST40 induces the expression of nNOS and Mt1, two genes involved in NO signal transduction. EA treatment for hypercholesterolemia thus involves the modulation of several biological pathways and provides a physiological link between NO signal transduction and the cholesterol-lowering effect of EA.

  9. RNA genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, E. (Instituto de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Canto Blanco, Madrid (ES)); Holland, J.J. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: RNA-directed virus replication Volume 1. Topics covered include: Replication of the poliovirus genome; Influenza viral RNA transcription and replication; and Relication of the reoviridal: Information derived from gene cloning and expression.

  10. Genetic counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MF, eds. Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 30. Review Date 1/25/2016 Updated by: Chad Haldeman-Englert, MD, FACMG, Fullerton Genetics Center, Asheville, NC. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare ...

  11. Both membrane-dependent and DNA damage-dependent signal transduction chains are activated following UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattner, C.; Knebel, A.; Bender, K.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Herrlich, P. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Genetik

    1997-03-01

    Irradiation of cultured cells with short wave length ultraviolet light (UVC) activates at least two types of signal transduction chains which ultimately lead to changes in gene expression. One type involves cell surface receptors and is activated with very rapid kinetics. One or several membrane associated protein tyrosine phosphatases are inhibited in less than one minute following UV exposure. Consequently the dephosphorylation of tyrosine-phosphorylated growth factor receptors is impaired. This process is ligand-independent and suggests spontaneous autophosphorylation activity of receptor tyrosine kinases. The UV-induced auto-phosphorylations trigger-signal transduction to the nucleus and activate transcription of immediate early genes such as c-fos. The other type of signal transduction chain has its origin in DNA damage. It occurs with delayed kinetics. We analyzed several human fibroblastic cell lines with distinct deficiencies in nucleotide excision repair mechanisms for the dose dependence of UV-induced late appearing and stable collagenase I mRNA. Several cell lines with deficiencies in the preferential repair of transcribed genes required lower doses of UV than wild type cells or cells solely deficient in the repair of the overall genome. These data suggest the existence of a signal transduction cascade whose stimulation is elicited by lesions in transcribed genes. It appears that similar or identical transcription factors are activated by both types of UV-induced signal transduction. For instance the transcription factor NF{kappa}B is activated by both, a DNA damage independent and a DNA damage dependent signal transduction chain. (authors)

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF HUMAN SINGLE CHAIN INTELEUKIN-12 GENE TRANSDUCTION ON THE BIOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR OF HEPATOMA 7721 CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金莉; 来保长; 耿宜萍; 王一理; 司履生

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the anti-tumor effects of human single chain interleukin-12 (hscIL-12). Method. pcDNA/hscIL-12 recombinant was transfected into human hepatic carcinoma cells (7721 cells) by lipofectin method. The 7721/hscIL-12 cells which secrete hscIL-12 stably, were obtained via G418 selection, and in vitro the influence of hscIL-12 gene transduction on the growth of tumor cells was evaluated by cellcycle analysis. In vivo, genetically engineered 7721 cells (7721/hscIL-12, 7721/pcDNA) and parental cells were implanted into BALB/c nude mice, respectively. 7721/pcDNA and 7721/hscIL-12 groups were divided into two sub-groups on day 8: one was administered with hPBL twice, 6 days at interval; the other was given equalvolume of PBS. Mice were sacrificed on day 26, and spleens and tumors were taken out for histologic assay. Results. hscIL-12 produced stably by 7721/hscIL-12 cells had bioactivity, and it was proved by Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and in situ hybridization. In vitro, compared with 7721 and 7721/pcDNA, the7721/hscIL-12 grew much more slowly. FACS assay showed apparent G1 arrest of 7721/hscIL-12 cells. In ani-mal experiment, on day 8 after inoculation, the tumors of 7721 and 7721/pcDNA group were up to 5 -7mm,while those of 7721/hscIL-12 group were 2 -4mm. When treated with hPBL, the tumor of 7721/hscIL-12 groupdisappeared completely. Histologically, the tumors from 7721/hscIL-12 without hPBL treatment had numerouslymphocyte infiltration, the tumor cells displayed depression looking, atrophy, focal necrosis and apoptosis, whereas the tumors of 7721 and 772l/pcDNA groups grew thrivingly.Conclusion. hsclL-12 transduced 7721 cells could induced significant antitumor immune response which resulted in tumor regression totally when the hPBL was inoculated, and also hscIL-12 has certain effects on mice immune system. These findings suggest that hscIL-12 and hscIL-12 gene therapy might have promising prospects in clinical application.

  13. Involvement of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway in burns-induced lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xu-lin; XIA Zhao-fan; WEI Duo; WANG Yong-jie; WANG Chang-rong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Acute lung injury (ALI) is a leading complication in extensively burned patients, especially those with inhalation injury.1 It can cause hypoxia resulting in injury of remote organs and dysfunction. P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) is a stress activated protein kinase in the MAPK family.2 Most of the previous studies have demonstrated that p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway mediated ALI in rats with acute severe pancreatitis, sepsis etc.3-5 However, there is little information regarding the role of p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway in ALI after severe burn trauma.

  14. Signal transduction across cellular membranes can be mediated by coupling of the clustering of anchored proteins in both leaflets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Tongtao; Zhang, Xianren

    2012-01-01

    One key question in signal transduction is how the signal is relayed from the outer leaflet of a cellular membrane to the inner leaflet. Using a simulation model, a mechanism for the mediation of signal transduction is proposed here in which the coupling between membrane proteins in different leaflets can be achieved by the clustering of anchored proteins, without recruiting transmembrane proteins. Depending on the hydrophobic length of the anchored proteins, three coupling patterns, including face-to-face clustering, interdigitated clustering, and weak-coupled clustering, are observed in this work. This observation provides a possible explanation of how a particular downstream signaling pathway is selected.

  15. Real-time monitoring of intracellular signal transduction in PC12 cells by non-adiabatic tapered optical fiber biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Asadollahi, A.; Noraeipoor, Z.; Dargahi, L.

    2014-05-01

    Real-time observation of intracellular process of signal transduction is very useful for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications as well as for basic research work of cell biology. For feasible and reagentless observation of intracellular alterations in real time, we examined the use of a nonadiabatic tapered optical fiber (NATOF) biosensor for monitoring of intracellular signal transduction that was mainly translocation of protein kinase C via refractive index change in PC12 cells adhered on tapered fiber sensor without any indicator reagent. PC12 cells were stimulated with KCl . Our results suggest that complex intracellular reactions could be real-time monitored and characterized by NATOF biosensor.

  16. In vitro analysis of the TAT protein transduction domain as a drug delivery vehicle in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin Lee, Stephanie Hui; Jefferies, Ryan; Watt, Paul; Hopkins, Richard; Sotzik, Frank; Reid, Simon; Armson, Anthony; Boxell, Annika; Ryan, Una

    2008-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to analyse the capability of HIV-1 derived TAT protein transduction domain (PTD) fused with Green Fluorescent Protein (TAT-GFP) as a delivery vehicle into a range of protozoan parasites. Successful transduction of native purified TAT-GFP was observed by fluorescent microscopy in Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia duodenalis, and Neospora caninum. The ability to transduce peptides and other cargo into protozoan parasites, will greatly assist in the delivery of future peptide-based drugs and target validation peptides.

  17. Elucidation of the Signal Transduction Pathways Activated by the Plant Natriuretic Peptide AtPNP-A

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-11-01

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) comprise a novel class of hormones that share some sequence similarity in the active site with their animal analogues that function as regulators of salt and water balance. A PNP present in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPNP-A) has been assigned a role in abiotic and biotic stress responses, and the recombinant protein has been demonstrated to elicit cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent stomatal guard cell opening, regulate ion movements, and induce osmoticum-dependent water uptake. Although the importance of the hormone in maintaining ion and fluid homeostasis has been established, key components of the AtPNP-A-dependent signal transduction pathway remain unknown. Since identification of the binding partners of AtPNP-A, including its receptor(s), is fundamental to understanding the mode of its action at the molecular level, comprehensive protein-protein interaction studies, involving yeast two-hybrid screening, affinity-based assays, protein cross-linking and co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric (MS) analyses have been performed. Several candidate binding partners of AtPNP-A identified with at least two independent methods were subsequently expressed as recombinant proteins, purified, and the specificity of their interactions with the recombinant AtPNP-A was verified using surface plasmon resonance. Several specific binary interactants of AtPNP-A were subjected to functional assays aimed at unraveling the consequences of the interactions in planta. These experiments have revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are novel secondary messengers involved in the transduction of AtPNP-A signal in suspension-cultured cells of A. thaliana (Col-0). Further insight into the AtPNP-A dependent signalling events occurring in suspension-cultured cells in ROS-dependent or ROS-independent manner have been obtained from the large-scale proteomics study employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labelling followed by MS analysis to

  18. Coating with spermine-pullulan polymer enhances adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan L

    2016-12-01

    coating could enhance adenoviral transduction of MSCs without detectable cytotoxicity or effects on differentiation. Our results argue in favor of the potentiality of the SP-coated Adv as a prototype vector for efficient and safe transduction of MSCs. Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, adenovirus vectors, spermine-pullulan, polymer, gene transduction

  19. Plant gravitropic signal transduction: A network analysis leads to gene discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development. Although a significant body of research has helped define the events of gravity perception, the role of the plant growth regulator auxin, and the mechanisms resulting in the gravity response, the events of signal transduction, those that link the biophysical action of perception to a biochemical signal that results in auxin redistribution, those that regulate the gravitropic effects on plant growth, remain, for the most part, a “black box.” Using a cold affect, dubbed the gravity persistent signal (GPS) response, we developed a mutant screen to specifically identify components of the signal transduction pathway. Cloning of the GPS genes have identified new proteins involved in gravitropic signaling. We have further exploited the GPS response using a multi-faceted approach including gene expression microarrays, proteomics analysis, and bioinformatics analysis and continued mutant analysis to identified additional genes, physiological and biochemical processes. Gene expression data provided the foundation of a regulatory network for gravitropic signaling. Based on these gene expression data and related data sets/information from the literature/repositories, we constructed a gravitropic signaling network for Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. To generate the network, both a dynamic Bayesian network approach and a time-lagged correlation coefficient approach were used. The dynamic Bayesian network added existing information of protein-protein interaction while the time-lagged correlation coefficient allowed incorporation of temporal regulation and thus could incorporate the time-course metric from the data set. Thus the methods complemented each other and provided us with a more comprehensive evaluation of connections. Each method generated a list of possible interactions associated with a statistical significance value. The two networks were then overlaid to generate a more rigorous, intersected

  20. Lentiviral Transduction of Mammary Stem Cells for Analysis of Gene Function during Development and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welm, Bryan E.; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J. P.; Bledau, Anita S.; Welm, Alana L.; Werb, Zena

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The mouse mammary gland is the only epithelial organ capable of complete regeneration upon orthotopic transplantation, making it ideally suited for in vivo gene function studies through viral mediated gene delivery. A hurdle that has challenged the widespread adoption of this technique has been the inability to transduce mammary stem cells effectively. We have overcome this limitation by infecting total primary mammary epithelial cells in suspension with high titer lentiviruses. Transduced cells gave rise to all major cell types of the mammary gland, and were capable of clonal outgrowth and functional differentiation in serial transplants. To demonstrate that this method is a valuable alternative to developing transgenic animals, we used lentiviral-mediated Wnt-1 overexpression to replicate MMTV-Wnt-1 mammary phenotypes and used a dominant-negative Xenopus Suppressor of Hairless to reveal a requirement for Notch signaling during ductal morphogenesis. Importantly, this method is also applicable to transduction of cells from other tissues. PMID:18371425

  1. [Estimating the parameters of signal transduction pathways with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taiyuan; Jia, Jianfang; Wang, Hong; Yue, Hong

    2009-02-01

    The modeling of signal transduction pathways is a task of systems biology. However, such a task is very difficult because of the structure complexity, the strong nonlinearity of signaling pathways and the noised and incomplete measurements. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LM algorithm) is applied to estimate the unknown parameters of the signaling pathways. With this method, the identifiability of unknown parameters is appraised, and the sensitivity equations of original model are evaluated. Then we append the sensitivity equations to the original model in order to form the augmented model, and we apply the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to the augmented model in order to estimate parameters. TNFalpha mediated NF-kappaB signaling pathway is taken as an example to illustrate the effectiveness of this method, and the simulation results are given.

  2. Architecture and signal transduction mechanism of the bacterial chemosensory array: progress, controversies, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falke, Joseph J; Piasta, Kene N

    2014-12-01

    Recent research has deepened our understanding of the ancient, conserved chemosensory array that detects small molecule attractants and repellents, and directs the chemotaxis of bacterial and archaeal cells towards an optimal chemical environment. Here we review advances towards a molecular description of the ultrastable lattice architecture and ultrasensitive signal transduction mechanism of the chemosensory array, as well as controversies and challenges requiring further research. Ultimately, a full molecular understanding of array structure and on-off switching will foster (i) the design of novel therapies that block pathogenic wound seeking and infection, (ii) the development of highly specific, sensitive, stable biosensors, and (iii) the elucidation of general functional principles shared by receptor patches in all branches of life.

  3. The molecular machinery regulating apoptosis signal transduction and its implication in human physiology and pathophysiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, C T; Passante, E; Rehm, M

    2011-02-01

    The regulation of apoptotic cell death, a terminal and fatal cell fate decision, has been intensely investigated and, due to its paramount implications for human health and disease, has sparked one of the most prolific and competitive research fields in biological and biomedical sciences of the past decades. Many key components of the molecular machinery processing and transducing apoptotic cell death signals have been described in great detail by now, dramatically advancing our understanding of how the network of apoptosis signaling proteins integrates and regulates cell death signals, and ultimately executes apoptosis. Building on the latest significant advances in deciphering apoptosis signal transduction as well as on the central original groundbreaking discoveries in cell death research, we here present an in-depth description of the current knowledge on the core molecular machinery of apoptotic signaling and how it is implicated in human physiology and pathophysiologies.

  4. Creating and analyzing pathway and protein interaction compendia for modelling signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirouac Daniel C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the information-processing capabilities of signal transduction networks, how those networks are disrupted in disease, and rationally designing therapies to manipulate diseased states require systematic and accurate reconstruction of network topology. Data on networks central to human physiology, such as the inflammatory signalling networks analyzed here, are found in a multiplicity of on-line resources of pathway and interactome databases (Cancer CellMap, GeneGo, KEGG, NCI-Pathway Interactome Database (NCI-PID, PANTHER, Reactome, I2D, and STRING. We sought to determine whether these databases contain overlapping information and whether they can be used to construct high reliability prior knowledge networks for subsequent modeling of experimental data. Results We have assembled an ensemble network from multiple on-line sources representing a significant portion of all machine-readable and reconcilable human knowledge on proteins and protein interactions involved in inflammation. This ensemble network has many features expected of complex signalling networks assembled from high-throughput data: a power law distribution of both node degree and edge annotations, and topological features of a “bow tie” architecture in which diverse pathways converge on a highly conserved set of enzymatic cascades focused around PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, JAK/STAT, NFκB, and apoptotic signaling. Individual pathways exhibit “fuzzy” modularity that is statistically significant but still involving a majority of “cross-talk” interactions. However, we find that the most widely used pathway databases are highly inconsistent with respect to the actual constituents and interactions in this network. Using a set of growth factor signalling networks as examples (epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor, and wingless, we find a multiplicity of network topologies in which receptors couple to downstream

  5. Auxin as a Model for the Integration of Hormonal Signal Processing and Transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.D.Teale; F.A.Ditengou; A.D.Dovzhenko; X.Li; A.M.Molendijk; B.Ruperti; I.Paponov; K.Palme

    2008-01-01

    The regulation of plant growth responds to many stimuli.These responses allow environmental adaptation,thereby increasing fitness.In many cases,the relay of information about a plant's environment is through plant hormones.These messengers integrate environmental information into developmental pathways to determine plant shape.This review will use,as an example,auxin in the root ofArabidopsis thaliana to illustrate the complex nature of hormonal signal processing and transduction.It will then make the case that the application of a systems-biology approach is necessary,if the relationship between a plant's environment and its growth/developmental responses is to be properly understood.

  6. Transcriptional Crosstalk between Nuclear Receptors and Cytokine Signal Transduction Pathways in Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihua Wang; Xiaohu Zhang; William L. Farrar; Xiaoyi Yang

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear receptor superfamily and the transcriptional factors associated with cytokines are inherently different families of signaling molecules and activate gene transcription by binding to their respective responsive element. However, it has become increasingly clear from our works and others that nuclear receptors are important regulators of cytokine production and function through complex and varied interactions between these distinct transcriptional factors. This review provides a general overview of the mechanism of action of nuclear receptors and their transcriptional crosstalk with transcriptional factors associated with cytokine transduction pathways. One of the most important mechanistic aspects is protein to protein interaction through a direct or co-regulator-mediated indirect manner. Such crosstalk is crucially involved in physiological and therapeutic roles of nuclear receptors and their ligands in immunity,inflammation and cytokine-related tumors. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):416-424.

  7. Real-time neutron scattering investigations of biological signal transduction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Roland [Institut Laue-Langevinx, Grenoble Cedex (France); Hendriks, Johnny [Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Crielaard, Wim [Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences and Academic Center for Dentistry, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-07-01

    During their catalytic cycle, proteins involved in biological signal transduction undergo unexpectedly large conformational changes, which are at the core of their biological functioning. Until now it has been extremely difficult to obtain experimental insight into the nature of these conformational changes. Mathematical modeling and time-resolved X-ray crystallography have resulted in probable routes along which these conformational changes may take place, but so far this fundamental biological phenomenon has hardly been tackled experimentally. Here, we report on an attempt to observe structural changes in Photoactive Yellow Protein with time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering using diffractometer D22 at the high-flux reactor of the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France.

  8. Smartphone Operated Signal Transduction by Ion Nanogating (STING) Amplifier for Nanopore Sensors: Design and Analytical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Kahnemouyi, Sina; Fan, Hsinwen; Mak, Wai Han; Lohith, Akshar; Seger, Adam; Teodorescu, Mircea; Pourmand, Nader

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we demonstrated a handheld wireless voltage-clamp amplifier for current measurement of nanopore sensors. This amplifier interfaces a sensing probe and connects wirelessly with a computer or smartphone for the required stimulus input, data processing and storage. To test the proposed Signal Transduction by Ion Nanogating (STING) wireless amplifier, in the current study the system was tested with a nano-pH sensor to measure pH of standard buffer solutions and the performance was compared against the commercial voltage-clamp amplifier. To our best knowledge, STING amplifier is the first miniaturized wireless voltage-clamp platform operated with a customized smart-phone application (app). PMID:27602408

  9. The ubiquitin–proteasome system and signal transduction pathways regulating Epithelial Mesenchymal transition of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voutsadakis Ioannis A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epithelial to Mesenchymal transition (EMT in cancer, a process permitting cancer cells to become mobile and metastatic, has a signaling hardwire forged from development. Multiple signaling pathways that regulate carcinogenesis enabling characteristics in neoplastic cells such as proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and angiogenesis are also the main players in EMT. These pathways, as almost all cellular processes, are in their turn regulated by ubiquitination and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS. Ubiquitination is the covalent link of target proteins with the small protein ubiquitin and serves as a signal to target protein degradation by the proteasome or to other outcomes such as endocytosis, degradation by the lysosome or specification of cellular localization. This paper reviews signal transduction pathways regulating EMT and being regulated by ubiquitination.

  10. An Efficient Method to Identify Conditionally Activated Transcription Factors and their Corresponding Signal Transduction Pathway Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Hu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A signal transduction pathway (STP is a cascade composed of a series of signal transferring steps, which often activate one or more transcription factors (TFs to control the transcription of target genes. Understanding signaling pathways is important to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of disease. Many condition-annotated pathways have been deposited in public databases. However, condition-annotated pathways are far from complete, considering the large number of possible conditions. Computational methods to assist in the identification of conditionally activated pathways are greatly needed. In this paper, we propose an efficient method to identify conditionally activated pathway segments starting from the identification of conditionally activated TFs, by incorporating protein-DNA binding data, gene expression data and protein interaction data. Applying our methods on several microarray datasets, we have discovered many significantly activated TFs and their corresponding pathway segments, which are supported by evidence in the literature.

  11. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Analysis of Sensitivity Amplification in Biological Signal Transduction

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, H

    2003-01-01

    Based on a thermodynamic analysis of the kinetic model for the protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, we study the ATP (or GTP) energy utilization of this ubiquitous biological signal transduction process. It was shown that the free energy from hydrolysis inside cells, Delta G (phosphorylation potential), controls the amplification and sensitivity of the switch-like cellular module; the response coefficient of the sensitivity amplification approaches the optimal 1 and the Hill coefficeint increases with increasing Delta G. Futhermore, we show the high amplification in zero-order ultrasensitivity is mechanistically related to the proofreading kinetics for protein biosynthesis. Both utilize multiple kinetic cycles in time to gain temporal cooperativity, in contrast to allosteric cooperativity that utilizes multiple subunits in a protein.

  12. MAPKs and Signal Transduction in the Control of Gastrointestinal Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana H. Osaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways are activated by several stimuli and transduce the signal inside cells, generating diverse responses including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Each MAPK cascade comprises a series of molecules, and regulation takes place at different levels. They communicate with each other and with additional pathways, creating a signaling network that is important for cell fate determination. In this review, we focus on ERK, JNK, p38 and ERK5, the major MAPKs, and their interactions with PI3K-Akt, TGFβ/Smad and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. More importantly, we describe how MAPKs regulate cell proliferation and differentiation in the rapidly renewing epithelia that lines the gastrointestinal tract and, finally, we highlight the recent findings on nutritional aspects that affect MAPK transduction cascades.

  13. Involvement of the second messenger cAMP in gravity-signal transduction in physarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, I.; Rabien, H.; Ivanova, K.

    The aim of the investigation was to clarify, whether cellular signal processing following graviperception involves second messenger pathways. The test object was a most gravisensitive free-living ameboid cell, the myxomycete (acellular slime mold) Physarum polycephalum. It was demonstrated that the motor response is related to acceleration-dependent changes in the levels of the cellular second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Rotating Physarum plasmodia in the gravity field of the Earth about a horizontal axis increased their cAMP concentration. Depriving the cells for a few days of the acceleration stimulus (near weightlessness in a space experiment on STS-69) slightly lowered plasmodial cAMP levels. Thus, the results provide first indications that the acceleration-stimulus signal transduction chain of Physarum uses an ubiquitous second messenger pathway.

  14. Novel aspects on signal-transduction in the pancreatic beta-cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Per-Olof; Leibiger, Ingo B

    2006-03-01

    The glucose-stimulus/insulin-secretion-coupling by the pancreatic beta-cell, which guarantees the maintenance of glucose homeostasis in man, is regulated by a sophisticated interplay between glucose and a plethora of additional factors. Besides other nutrients, incretins, nerval innervation, systemic growth factors as well as autocrine and paracrine regulatory loops within the islet of Langerhans modulate the function of the insulin-producing beta-cell. Although the modulatory role of these factors is well appreciated, the underlying molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. However, in most cases beta-cell membrane receptors coupled primarily to either G-proteins or tyrosine kinases, which subsequently activate respective second messenger cascades, are involved. In the present mini-review we will discuss the role of signaling through some of these receptor-operated effector systems in the light of pancreatic beta-cell signal-transduction.

  15. Mechanism of Infrared Detection and Transduction by Beetle Melanophila Acuminata In memory of Jerry Wolken

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meir Israelowitz; Jeong-Ah Kwon; Syed W. H. Rizvi; Christoph Gille; Herb P. von Schroeder

    2011-01-01

    The Melanophila acuminata beetle is attracted to forest fires via a pair of infrared sensory organs composed of sensilla. Our histological work showed that each sensillum contains lipid layers surrounding a protein layer and a unique polysaccharide base that is associated with a neuron to each sensillum. Infrared microscopy showed that the protein region maximally absorbs infrared radiation at 3 μm wavelength and at 10 μm, which corresponds to the known radiation produced by forest fires at 3 μm.Mathematical calculations showed that the physical properties of the sensilla are such that the expected temperature rise is insufficient for transduction of the infrared signal through mechanical means or as a thermal receptor as previously thought;hence the protein plays the pivotal role in perception of single photons and transmission of the signal within the sensilla.

  16. Electrochemical transduction of DNA hybridization at modified electrodes by using an electroactive pyridoacridone intercalator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffier, Laurent; Wang, Bingquan Stuart; Roget, André; Livache, Thierry; Demeunynck, Martine; Mailley, Pascal

    2014-02-01

    A synthetic redox probe structurally related to natural pyridoacridones was designed and electrochemically characterised. These heterocycles behave as DNA intercalators due to their extended planar structure that promotes stacking in between nucleic acid base pairs. Electrochemical characterization by cyclic voltammetry revealed a quasi-reversible electrochemical behaviour occurring at a mild negative potential in aqueous solution. The study of the mechanism showed that the iminoquinone redox moiety acts similarly to quinone involving a two-electron reduction coupled with proton transfer. The easily accessible potential region with respect to aqueous electro-inactive window makes the pyridoacridone ring suitable for the indirect electrochemical detection of chemically unlabelled DNA. Its usefulness as electrochemical hybridization indicator was assessed on immobilised DNA and compared to doxorubicin. The voltamperometric response of the intercalator acts as an indicator of the presence of double-stranded DNA at the electrode surface and allows the selective transduction of immobilised oligonucleotide hybridization at both macro- and microscale electrodes.

  17. Efficient, Broadband and Wide-Angle Hot-Electron Transduction using Metal-Semiconductor Hyperbolic Metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Sakhdari, Maryam

    2016-05-20

    Hot-electron devices are emerging as promising candidates for the transduction of optical radiation into electrical current, as they enable photodetection and solar/infrared energy harvesting at sub-bandgap wavelengths. Nevertheless, poor photoconversion quantum yields and low bandwidth pose fundamental challenge to fascinating applications of hot-electron optoelectronics. Based on a novel hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) structure, we theoretically propose a vertically-integrated hot-electron device that can efficiently couple plasmonic excitations into electron flows, with an external quantum efficiency approaching the physical limit. Further, this metamaterial-based device can have a broadband and omnidirectional response at infrared and visible wavelengths. We believe that these findings may shed some light on designing practical devices for energy-efficient photodetection and energy harvesting beyond the bandgap spectral limit.

  18. Preliminary evaluation of nanoscale biogenic magnetite-based ferromagnetic transduction mechanisms for mobile phone bioeffects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranfield, Charles; Wieser, Heinz Gregor; Al Madan, Jaffar; Dobson, Jon

    2003-03-01

    Ferromagnetic transduction models have been proposed as a potential mechanism for mobile phone bioeffects. These models are based on the coupling of RF and pulsed electromagnetic emissions to biogenic magnetite (Fe3O4) present in the human brain via either ferromagnetic resonance or mechanical activation of cellular ion channels. We have tested these models experimentally for the first time using a bacterial analogue (Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum) which produces intracellular biogenic magnetite similar to that present in the human brain. Experimental evaluation revealed that exposure to mobile phone emissions resulted in a consistent and significantly higher proportion of cell death in exposed cultures versus sham exposure (p = 0.037). Though there appears to be a repeatable trend toward higher cell mortality in magnetite-producing bacteria exposed to mobile phone emissions, it is not yet clear that this would extrapolate to a deleterious health effect in humans.

  19. Controlled membrane translocation provides a mechanism for signal transduction and amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Matthew J.; Keymeulen, Flore; Ciaccia, Maria; Williams, Nicholas H.; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2017-05-01

    Transmission and amplification of chemical signals across lipid bilayer membranes is of profound significance in many biological processes, from the development of multicellular organisms to information processing in the nervous system. In biology, membrane-spanning proteins are responsible for the transmission of chemical signals across membranes, and signal transduction is often associated with an amplified signalling cascade. The ability to reproduce such processes in artificial systems has potential applications in sensing, controlled drug delivery and communication between compartments in tissue-like constructs of synthetic vesicles. Here we describe a mechanism for transmitting a chemical signal across a membrane based on the controlled translocation of a synthetic molecular transducer from one side of a lipid bilayer membrane to the other. The controlled molecular motion has been coupled to the activation of a catalyst on the inside of a vesicle, which leads to a signal-amplification process analogous to the biological counterpart.

  20. Studies on the mitogenic effect of transferrin by membrane signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEUNGTM; PLLIM; 等

    1990-01-01

    One of the earliest events leading to cell activation and growth is the hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids producing various membrane signals induced by an interaction between growth factors or hormones with their respective receptors on the cell membrane [1].To demonstrate the mitogenic action of transferrin,our results show that an addition of transferrin to “serum-deprived” rat hepatoma cells produced a rapid but transient rise in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate(IP3) level,and at the same time,an increased intracellular Ca2+ activity and a cytoplasmic alkalinization were observed.These signal transductions further lend support to the mitogenic nature of transferrin.In addition,a possible link between the receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin with the generation of intracellular signals is discussed herewith.

  1. Genomic analysis of two-component signal transduction proteins in basidiomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavín, José L; Ramírez, Lucía; Ussery, David W; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Oguiza, José A

    2010-01-01

    Two-component system (TCS) proteins are components of complex signal transduction pathways in fungi, and play essential roles in the regulation of several cellular functions and responses. Species of basidiomycetes have a marked variation in their specific physiological traits, morphological complexity and lifestyles. In this study, we have used the available complete genomes of basidiomycetes to carry out a thorough identification and an extensive comparative analysis of the TCS proteins in this fungal phylum. In comparison with ascomycetes, basidiomycetes exhibit an intermediate number of TCS proteins. Several TCS proteins are highly conserved among all the basidiomycetes, and other TCS proteins appear to be specific to particular species of basidiomycetes. Moreover, some species appear to have developed a unique histidine kinase group with unusual domain architecture, the Dual-histidine kinases. The presence of differential sets of TCS proteins between basidiomycete species might reflect their adaptation to diverse environmental niches.

  2. Histidine phosphotransfer proteins in fungal two-component signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassler, Jan S; West, Ann H

    2013-08-01

    The histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) protein Ypd1 is an important participant in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae multistep two-component signal transduction pathway and, unlike the expanded histidine kinase gene family, is encoded by a single gene in nearly all model and pathogenic fungi. Ypd1 is essential for viability in both S. cerevisiae and in Cryptococcus neoformans. These and other aspects of Ypd1 biology, combined with the availability of structural and mutational data in S. cerevisiae, suggest that the essential interactions between Ypd1 and response regulator domains would be a good target for antifungal drug development. The goal of this minireview is to summarize the wealth of data on S. cerevisiae Ypd1 and to consider the potential benefits of conducting related studies in pathogenic fungi.

  3. An intimate link: two-component signal transduction systems and metal transport systems in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamna; Senadheera, Dilani B; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved various strategies to contend with high concentrations of environmental heavy metal ions for rapid, adaptive responses to maintain cell viability. Evidence gathered in the past two decades suggests that bacterial two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTSs) are intimately involved in monitoring cation accumulation, and can regulate the expression of related metabolic and virulence genes to elicit adaptive responses to changes in the concentration of these ions. Using examples garnered from recent studies, we summarize the cross-regulatory relationships between metal ions and TCSTSs. We present evidence of how bacterial TCSTSs modulate metal ion homeostasis and also how metal ions, in turn, function to control the activities of these signaling systems linked with bacterial survival and virulence.

  4. Two-component signal transduction as potential drug targets in pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Eguchi, Yoko; Watanabe, Takafumi; Okamoto, Sho; Doi, Akihiro; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2010-04-01

    Gene clusters contributing to processes such as cell growth and pathogenicity are often controlled by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs). Specific inhibitors against TCS systems work differently from conventional antibiotics, and developing them into new drugs that are effective against various drug-resistant bacteria may be possible. Furthermore, inhibitors of TCSs that control virulence factors may reduce virulence without killing the pathogenic bacteria. Previous TCS inhibitors targeting the kinase domain of the histidine kinase sensor suffered from poor selectivity. Recent TCS inhibitors, however, target the sensory domains of the sensors blocking the quorum sensing system, or target the essential response regulator. These new targets are introduced, together with several specific TCSs that have the potential to serve as effective drug targets. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. THE TRANSMEMBRANE SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION IN HEp-2 CELLS INDUCED BY BACTERIAL ADHERENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ In order to understand the role of transmembrane signal transduction of host cells in the early steps of infection,the adherence of E. coli to HEp-2 cells and the change of activity of phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) induced by the adherence were investigated.The adherence of enteropathogenic E.coli (EPEC), strain E.7, induced a significant increase of inositol-triphosphat (IP-3) level in HEp-2 cells. The adherence of the bacteria and the increase of IP-3 was kinetically correlated. Whereas the increase of IP3 level induced by the adherence of the control strain EPEC (H511), a non-piliated strain, was much meager than that by E7, a piliated strain. The results highlighted an important role of transmembrane signals like IP-3 in the pathogenesis of EPEC.

  6. Electro-Optomechanical Transduction & Quantum Hard-Sphere Model for Dissipative Rydberg-EIT Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Emil

    established the requirements for efficient performance, we turn to the question of optimization. We address this by developing a unifying equivalent-circuit formalism for electro-optomechanical transducers. This approach accommodates arbitrary linear circuits and integrates the novel optomechanical...... transduction functionality into the well-established framework of electrical engineering, thereby facilitating its implementation in potential applications such as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and radio astronomy. We consider such optomechanical sensing of weak electrical signals and discuss how......, thus capturing the dualistic particle-wave nature of light as it manifests itself in dissipative Rydberg-EIT media. Using this approach, we analyze the saturation behavior of the transmission through one-dimensional Rydberg-EIT media in the regime of non-perturbative single-polariton EIT-decay relevant...

  7. Signal transduction pathway of nitric oxide inducing PC12 cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study signal transduction pathway of nitric oxideinducing death of PC12 cells.Methods: Cell survival rate was measured with MTT assay, and caspase-3 activity with caspase-3 assay kits after PC12 cells were incubated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), caspase-3 inhibitor Ⅱ plus SNP or p38 inhibitor-SB203580 plus SNP.Results: SNP induced death of PC12 cells in dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced caspase-3 activity gradually. Both caspase-3 inhibitor Ⅱ and SB203580 reduced cell death, but SB203580 reduced caspase-3 activity significantly.Conclusions: NO may induce death of PC12 cells through activation of p38 and caspase-3.

  8. Transduction of Repetitive Mechanical Stimuli by Piezo1 and Piezo2 Ion Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda H. Lewis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Several cell types experience repetitive mechanical stimuli, including vein endothelial cells during pulsating blood flow, inner ear hair cells upon sound exposure, and skin cells and their innervating dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons when sweeping across a textured surface or touching a vibrating object. While mechanosensitive Piezo ion channels have been clearly implicated in sensing static touch, their roles in transducing repetitive stimulations are less clear. Here, we perform electrophysiological recordings of heterologously expressed mouse Piezo1 and Piezo2 responding to repetitive mechanical stimulations. We find that both channels function as pronounced frequency filters whose transduction efficiencies vary with stimulus frequency, waveform, and duration. We then use numerical simulations and human disease-related point mutations to demonstrate that channel inactivation is the molecular mechanism underlying frequency filtering and further show that frequency filtering is conserved in rapidly adapting mouse DRG neurons. Our results give insight into the potential contributions of Piezos in transducing repetitive mechanical stimuli.

  9. Comprehensive analysis of signal transduction in three-dimensional ECM-based tumor cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, Iris; Hehlgans, Stephanie; Zong, Yaping; Cordes, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of signal transduction and protein phosphorylation is fundamental to understanding physiological and pathological cell behavior and identifying novel therapeutic targets. Despite the fact that the use of physiological three-dimensional cell culture assays is increasing, 3D proteomics and phosphoproteomics remain challenging due to difficulties with easy, robust and reproducible sample preparation. Here, we present an easy-to-perform, reliable and time-efficient method for the production of 3D cell lysates that does not compromise cell adhesion before cell lysis. The samples can be used for western blotting as well as phosphoproteome array technology. This technique will be of interest for researchers working in all fields of biology and drug development. PMID:26618185

  10. Comprehensive analysis of signal transduction in three-dimensional ECM-based tumor cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Eke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of signal transduction and protein phosphorylation is fundamental to understand physiological and pathological cell behavior as well as identification of novel therapeutic targets. Despite the fact that more physiological three-dimensional cell culture assays are increasingly used, particularly proteomics and phosphoproteomics remain challenging due to easy, robust and reproducible sample preparation. Here, we present an easy-to-perform, reliable and time-efficient method for the production of 3D cell lysates without compromising cell adhesion before cell lysis. The samples can be used for Western blotting as well as phosphoproteome array technology. This technique would be of interest for researchers working in all fields of biology and drug development.

  11. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimova, Elena T; Kapchina-Toteva, Veneta M; Woltering, Ernst J

    2007-06-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl(3)-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 microM AlCl(3) showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation. Cell death was effectively inhibited by protease and human caspase inhibitors indicating a cell death execution mechanism with similarities to animal apoptosis. Cell death was suppressed by application of antoxidants and by inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), phospholipase D (PLD) and ethylene signalling pathways. The results suggest that low concentrations of heavy metal ions stimulate both PLC and PLD signalling pathways leading to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent cell death executed by caspase-like proteases.

  12. Electro-Optomechanical Transduction & Quantum Hard-Sphere Model for Dissipative Rydberg-EIT Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Emil

    transduction functionality into the well-established framework of electrical engineering, thereby facilitating its implementation in potential applications such as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and radio astronomy. We consider such optomechanical sensing of weak electrical signals and discuss how...... the equivalent circuit formalism can be used to optimize the electrical circuit design. We also discuss the parameter requirements for transducing microwave photons in the quantum regime. Part II: Effective photon-photon interactions can be engineered by combining long-range Rydberg interactions between atoms....... We introduce a new approach to analyzing this challenging many-body problem in the limit of large optical depth per blockade radius. The idea is to separate the single-polariton EIT physics from the Rydberg-Rydberg interactions in a serialized manner while using a hard-sphere model for the latter...

  13. The merged basins of signal transduction pathways in spatiotemporal cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yingchun; Hou, Yang; He, Siyu; Ma, Caixia; Sun, Mengyao; He, Huimin; Gao, Ning

    2014-03-01

    Numerous evidences have indicated that a signal system is composed by signal pathways, each pathway is composed by sub-pathways, and the sub-pathway is composed by the original signal terminals initiated with a protein/gene. We infer the terminal signals merged signal transduction system as "signal basin". In this article, we discussed the composition and regulation of signal basins, and the relationship between the signal basin control and triple W of spatiotemporal cell biology. Finally, we evaluated the importance of the systemic regulation to gene expression by signal basins under triple W. We hope our discussion will be the beginning to cause the attention for this area from the scientists of life science.

  14. Melanoma genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Read, Jazlyn; Wadt, Karin A W; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 10% of melanoma cases report a relative affected with melanoma, and a positive family history is associated with an increased risk of developing melanoma. Although the majority of genetic alterations associated with melanoma development are somatic, the underlying presence...... of heritable melanoma risk genes is an important component of disease occurrence. Susceptibility for some families is due to mutation in one of the known high penetrance melanoma predisposition genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, POT1, ACD, TERF2IP and TERT. However, despite such mutations being implicated...... in a combined total of approximately 50% of familial melanoma cases, the underlying genetic basis is unexplained for the remainder of high-density melanoma families. Aside from the possibility of extremely rare mutations in a few additional high penetrance genes yet to be discovered, this suggests a likely...

  15. Force transduction and lipid binding in MscL: a continuum-molecular approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Vanegas

    Full Text Available The bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL, a small protein mainly activated by membrane tension, is a central model system to study the transduction of mechanical stimuli into chemical signals. Mutagenic studies suggest that MscL gating strongly depends on both intra-protein and interfacial lipid-protein interactions. However, there is a gap between this detailed chemical information and current mechanical models of MscL gating. Here, we investigate the MscL bilayer-protein interface through molecular dynamics simulations, and take a combined continuum-molecular approach to connect chemistry and mechanics. We quantify the effect of membrane tension on the forces acting on the surface of the channel, and identify interactions that may be critical in the force transduction between the membrane and MscL. We find that the local stress distribution on the protein surface is largely asymmetric, particularly under tension, with the cytoplasmic side showing significantly larger and more localized forces, which pull the protein radially outward. The molecular interactions that mediate this behavior arise from hydrogen bonds between the electronegative oxygens in the lipid headgroup and a cluster of positively charged lysine residues on the amphipathic S1 domain and the C-terminal end of the second trans-membrane helix. We take advantage of this strong interaction (estimated to be 10-13 kT per lipid to actuate the channel (by applying forces on protein-bound lipids and explore its sensitivity to the pulling magnitude and direction. We conclude by highlighting the simple motif that confers MscL with strong anchoring to the bilayer, and its presence in various integral membrane proteins including the human mechanosensitive channel K2P1 and bovine rhodopsin.

  16. Signal transduction and Nobel Prize%信号转导与诺贝尔奖

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晓强; 王跃民

    2013-01-01

    Signal transduction is one of frontiers in life sciences, and many achievements in this field were awarded Nobel Prize. From the initial signal molecular to the subsequent second messenger and reversible phosphorylation, to the G-protein and receptor, and until today signal network system, these researches had greatly expanded the understanding of the phenomenon of life and provided new alternative for a lot of diseases. In this article, the brief history of signal transduction is reviewed according to the research course of classical signaling pathway. It is comprehensively introduced including background, history, significance and utilization of Nobel Prize-related achievements.%信号转导是生命科学前沿领域之一,至今已有多项成果荣获诺贝尔奖。从最初的信号分子,到第二信使和可逆磷酸化,再到G蛋白和G蛋白偶联受体,直到今天的信号网络系统,这些研究极大地拓展了人们对生命现象的理解和认识,从而为多种疾病的治疗提供了新的选择。笔者以经典信号通路研究历程为主线,回顾了信号转导研究的发展简史,全面地介绍了诺贝尔奖相关成果的研究背景、历程、意义和应用。

  17. MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis and its prognostic impact in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-hua Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1/protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1 signal transduction axis plays an important role in tumorigenesis. To explore the expression and prognostic value of MMP-1 and PAR-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC, we evaluated the expression of two proteins in resected specimens from 85 patients with ESCC by immunohistochemistry. Sixty-two (72.9% and 58 (68.2% tumors were MMP-1- and PAR-1-positive, respectively, while no significant staining was observed in normal esophageal squamous epithelium. MMP-1 and PAR-1 overexpression was significantly associated with tumor node metastasis (TNM stage and regional lymph node involvement. Patients with MMP-1- and PAR-1-positive tumors, respectively, had poorer disease-free survival (DFS than those with negative ESCC (P = 0.002 and 0.003, respectively. Univariate analysis showed a significant relationship between TNM stage [hazard ratio (HR = 2.836, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.866-4.308], regional lymph node involvement (HR = 2.955, 95%CI = 1.713-5.068, MMP-1 expression (HR = 2.669, 95%CI = 1.229-6.127, and PAR-1 expression (HR = 1.762, 95%CI = 1.156-2.883 and DFS. Multivariate analysis including the above four parameters identified TNM stage (HR = 2.035, 95%CI = 1.167-3.681, MMP-1 expression (HR = 2.109, 95%CI = 1.293-3.279, and PAR-1 expression (HR = 1.967, 95%CI = 1.256-2.881 as independent and significant prognostic factors for DFS. Our data suggest for the first time that MMP-1 and PAR-1 were both overexpressed in ESCC and are novel predictors of poor patient prognosis after curative resection. The MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis might be a new therapeutic target for future therapies tailored against ESCC.

  18. Signal transduction by M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUO, LIQIANG; LIU, YUQIANG; DING, ZHIBO; SUN, WENDONG; YUAN, MINGZHEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms used during signal transduction by M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRM3) in prostate cancer. The microarray datasets of GSE3325, including 5 clinically localized primary prostate cancers and 4 benign prostate tissues, were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) in primary prostate cancer tissues compared with benign controls were screened using the Limma package. Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Next, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed. Additionally, microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with DEGs were predicted and miRNA-target DEG analysis was performed using a Web-based Gene Set Analysis Toolkit. Finally, the PPI network and the miRNA-target DEG network were integrated using Cytoscape. In total, 224 DEGs were screened in the prostate cancer tissues, including 113 upregulated and 111 downregulated genes. CHRM3 and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were enriched in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. EGF and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (Myc) were enriched in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. EGF with the highest degree of connectivity was the hub node in the PPI network, and miR-34b could interact with Myc directly in the miRNA-target DEG network. EGF and Myc may exhibit significant roles in the progression of prostate cancer via regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and the MAPK signaling pathway. CHRM3 may activate these two pathways in prostate cancer progression. Thus, these two key factors and pathways may be crucial mechanisms during signal transduction by CHRM3 in prostate cancer. PMID:26870222

  19. Downstream reporter gene imaging for signal transduction pathway of dopamine type 2 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Uyenchi N.; Min, Jung Joon; Moon, Sung Min; Bom, Hee Seung [School of Midicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The Dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) signal pathway regulates gene expression by phosphorylation of proteins including cAMP reponse element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor. In this study, we developed a reporter strategy using the GAL4 fusion CREB to assess the phosphorylation of CREB, one of the targets of the D2R signal transduction pathway. We used three plasmids: GAL4 fusion transactivator (pCMV-CREB), firefly luciferase reporter with GAL4 binding sites (pG5-FLUC), and D2R plasmid (pCMV-D2R). Group 1 293T cells were transiently transfected with pCMV-CREB and pG5-FLUC, and group 2 cells were transfected with all three plasmids. Transfected cells were stimulated with different concentrations of dopamine (0-200 M). For animal studies, group 1 and 2 cells (1x10{sup 6}) were subcutaneously injected on the left and right thigh of six nude mice, respectively. Dopamine stimiulation was performed with intraperitoneal injection of L-DOPA incombination with carbidopa, a peripheral DOPA decarboxylase inhibitor. Bioluminescence optical imaging studies were performed before and after L-DOPA injection. In cell culture studies, group 1 cells showed strong luciferase activity which implies direct activation of the signaling pathway due to growth factors contained in culture medium. Group 2 cells showed strong luciferase activity and a further increase after administration of dopamine. In animal studies, group 1 and 2 cells showed bioluminescence signal before L-DOPA injection, but signal from group 2 cells significantly increased 12 h after L-DOPA injection. The signal from group 1 cells disappeared thereafter, but group 2 cells continued to show signal until 36 h of L-DOPA injection. This study demonstrates imaging of the D2R signal transduction pathway and should be useful for noninvasive imaging of downstream effects of G-coupled protein pathways.

  20. MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis and its prognostic impact in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Hong-hua; Zhang, Xi; Cao, Pei-guo [Department of Oncology, the Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province (China)

    2011-11-18

    The matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1)/protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) signal transduction axis plays an important role in tumorigenesis. To explore the expression and prognostic value of MMP-1 and PAR-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we evaluated the expression of two proteins in resected specimens from 85 patients with ESCC by immunohistochemistry. Sixty-two (72.9%) and 58 (68.2%) tumors were MMP-1- and PAR-1-positive, respectively, while no significant staining was observed in normal esophageal squamous epithelium. MMP-1 and PAR-1 overexpression was significantly associated with tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage and regional lymph node involvement. Patients with MMP-1- and PAR-1-positive tumors, respectively, had poorer disease-free survival (DFS) than those with negative ESCC (P = 0.002 and 0.003, respectively). Univariate analysis showed a significant relationship between TNM stage [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.836, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.866-4.308], regional lymph node involvement (HR = 2.955, 95%CI = 1.713-5.068), MMP-1 expression (HR = 2.669, 95%CI = 1.229-6.127), and PAR-1 expression (HR = 1.762, 95%CI = 1.156-2.883) and DFS. Multivariate analysis including the above four parameters identified TNM stage (HR = 2.035, 95%CI = 1.167-3.681), MMP-1 expression (HR = 2.109, 95%CI = 1.293-3.279), and PAR-1 expression (HR = 1.967, 95%CI = 1.256-2.881) as independent and significant prognostic factors for DFS. Our data suggest for the first time that MMP-1 and PAR-1 were both overexpressed in ESCC and are novel predictors of poor patient prognosis after curative resection. The MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis might be a new therapeutic target for future therapies tailored against ESCC.