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Sample records for genetic secrets protecting

  1. Genetic secrets: Protecting privacy and confidentiality in the genetic era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothstein, M.A. [ed.

    1998-07-01

    Few developments are likely to affect human beings more profoundly in the long run than the discoveries resulting from advances in modern genetics. Although the developments in genetic technology promise to provide many additional benefits, their application to genetic screening poses ethical, social, and legal questions, many of which are rooted in issues of privacy and confidentiality. The ethical, practical, and legal ramifications of these and related questions are explored in depth. The broad range of topics includes: the privacy and confidentiality of genetic information; the challenges to privacy and confidentiality that may be projected to result from the emerging genetic technologies; the role of informed consent in protecting the confidentiality of genetic information in the clinical setting; the potential uses of genetic information by third parties; the implications of changes in the health care delivery system for privacy and confidentiality; relevant national and international developments in public policies, professional standards, and laws; recommendations; and the identification of research needs.

  2. Genetic secrets: Protecting privacy and confidentiality in the genetic era. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothstein, M.A. [ed.

    1998-09-01

    Few developments are likely to affect human beings more profoundly in the long run than the discoveries resulting from advances in modern genetics. Although the developments in genetic technology promise to provide many additional benefits, their application to genetic screening poses ethical, social, and legal questions, many of which are rooted in issues of privacy and confidentiality. The ethical, practical, and legal ramifications of these and related questions are explored in depth. The broad range of topics includes: the privacy and confidentiality of genetic information; the challenges to privacy and confidentiality that may be projected to result from the emerging genetic technologies; the role of informed consent in protecting the confidentiality of genetic information in the clinical setting; the potential uses of genetic information by third parties; the implications of changes in the health care delivery system for privacy and confidentiality; relevant national and international developments in public policies, professional standards, and laws; recommendations; and the identification of research needs.

  3. Family Secrets: The Bioethics of Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Dina G.; DuPre, Michael J.; Holt, Susan; Chen, Shaw-Ree; Wischnowski, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses "Family Secrets," a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum module that focuses on the bioethical implications of genetic testing. In high school biology classrooms throughout New York State, students are using "Family Secrets" to learn about DNA testing; Huntington's disease (HD); and the ethical, legal,…

  4. Standpoints and protection of business secrets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brane Bertoncelj

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The human impact on an information system where data bases, containing business secretes, are stored is one of the most unreliable and unforeseeable factors. For this reason, it must not be underestimated. The results of this study indicate a correlation between behavioural intention and protection of business secretes. There is a statistically significant correlation between behavioural intention and behavioural supervision. This means that an increased level of perceived supervision over one's own behaviour is related to behavioural intention. A great majority of participants would not divulge a business secret due to internal moral factors, i.e., they possess the appropriate capabilities to determine the advantages of social moral values over personal values.

  5. Developing and protecting intellectual property in virtual projects : Trade secret protection in Telecommunications

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez Ruiz, Diego Hernan

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is intended to develop a comprehensive understanding of how trade secrets can be used as a means to protect knowledge developed through projects conducted in the telecommunications sector. At the same time, the study explores which mechanisms should be employed to regulate access and utilization of trade secrets when their disclosure is inevitable to accomplish project requirements. Telecommunication firms are large and globally distributed organizations whose business operations ...

  6. Protection of multicast scalable video by secret sharing: simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskicioglu, Ahmet M.; Dexter, Scott; Delp, Edward J., III

    2003-06-01

    Security is an increasingly important attribute for multimedia applications that require prevention of unauthorized access to copyrighted data. Two approaches have been used to protect scalable video content in distribution: Partial encryption and progressive encryption. Partial encryption provides protection for only selected portions of the video. Progressive encryption allows transcoding with simple packet truncation, and eliminates the need to decrypt the video packets at intermediate network nodes with low complexity. Centralized Key Management with Secret Sharing (CKMSS) is a recent approach in which the group manager assigns unique secret shares to the nodes in the hierarchical key distribution tree. It allows the reconstruction of different keys by communicating different activating shares for the same prepositioned information. Once the group key is established, it is used until a member joins/leaves the multicast group or periodic rekeying occurs. In this paper, we will present simulation results regarding the communication and processing requirements of the CKMSS scheme applied to scalable video. In particular, we have measured the rekey message size and the processing time needed by the server for each join/leave request and periodic rekey event.

  7. Genetic modification: a tool for enhancing cellulase secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusuiya Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic (LC biomass is abundantly available as a low-cost resource on the Earth. LC conversion into energy carriers is the most accepted alternative energy production policy because it is non-competitor to food or feed. LC ethanol has brought cellulases to the forefront which was otherwise lost in oblivion during last decades. LC biomass can be converted into value added products or into sugars by various routes, e.g., thermo-chemical, chemical, or biological methods. Biological route via enzymes is one of the most eco-friendly and feasible method. Both fungi and bacteria are known to degrade biomass. Fungi have been greatly exploited for cellulase production due to their inherent properties of secreting extracellular cellulase. These microorganisms are known as cellulase producers for many decades, however, to bring the enzymatic biomass conversion to an economically feasible status, extensive research efforts have been made in last decade to enhance cellulase titers. Mutations and genetic interventions along with bioprocess development have played a very important role for enhancing cellulase production. This review will present a critical overview of the on-going research towards improving cellulase production for biofuel industry via genetic modification, which will include mutation and genetic engineering employed to exert changes at genetic level in microorganisms.

  8. Intestinal epithelial cell secretion of RELM-beta protects against gastrointestinal worm infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    IL-4 and IL-13 protect against parasitic helminths, but little is known about the mechanism of host protection. We show that IL-4/IL-13 confer immunity against worms by inducing intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) to differentiate into goblet cells that secrete resistin-like molecule beta (RELMB). R...

  9. A novel genetic system for recombinant protein secretion in the Antarctic Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino Gennaro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The final aim of recombinant protein production is both to have a high specific production rate and a high product quality. It was already shown that using cold-adapted bacteria as host vectors, some "intractable" proteins can be efficiently produced at temperature as low as 4°C. Results A novel genetic system for the production and secretion of recombinant proteins in the Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 was set up. This system aims at combining the low temperature recombinant product production with the advantages of extra-cellular protein targeting. The psychrophilic α-amylase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAB23 was used as secretion carrier. Three chimerical proteins were produced by fusing intra-cellular proteins to C-terminus of the psychrophilic α-amylase and their secretion was analysed. Data reported in this paper demonstrate that all tested chimeras were translocated with a secretion yield always higher than 80%. Conclusion Data presented here demonstrate that the "cold" gene-expression system is efficient since the secretion yield of tested chimeras is always above 80%. These secretion performances place the α-amylase derived secretion system amongst the best heterologous secretion systems in Gram-negative bacteria reported so far. As for the quality of the secreted passenger proteins, data presented suggest that the system also allows the correct disulphide bond formation of chimera components, secreting a fully active passenger.

  10. A Genetic Screen Identifies Hypothalamic Fgf15 as a Regulator of Glucagon Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Picard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia, which restores normal blood glucose levels to ensure sufficient provision of glucose to the brain, is critical for survival. To discover underlying brain regulatory systems, we performed a genetic screen in recombinant inbred mice for quantitative trait loci (QTL controlling glucagon secretion in response to neuroglucopenia. We identified a QTL on the distal part of chromosome 7 and combined this genetic information with transcriptomic analysis of hypothalami. This revealed Fgf15 as the strongest candidate to control the glucagon response. Fgf15 was expressed by neurons of the dorsomedial hypothalamus and the perifornical area. Intracerebroventricular injection of FGF19, the human ortholog of Fgf15, reduced activation by neuroglucopenia of dorsal vagal complex neurons, of the parasympathetic nerve, and lowered glucagon secretion. In contrast, silencing Fgf15 in the dorsomedial hypothalamus increased neuroglucopenia-induced glucagon secretion. These data identify hypothalamic Fgf15 as a regulator of glucagon secretion.

  11. Neuroticism and Morning Cortisol Secretion: Both Heritable, But No Shared Genetic Influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, H; Rijsdijk, F.V.; Rosmalen, J.G.M.; Snieder, Harold; Ormel, J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroticism is widely used as an explanatory concept in etiological research of psychopathology. To clarify what neuroticism actually represents, we investigated the phenotypic and genetic relationship between neuroticism and the morning cortisol secretion. In the current classic twin study, 125 fem

  12. Neuroticism and Morning Cortisol Secretion : Both Heritable, But No Shared Genetic Influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, Harriette; Rijsdijk, Fruehling V.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.; Snieder, Harold; Ormel, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroticism is widely used as an explanatory concept in etiological research of psychopathology. To clarify what neuroticism actually represents, we investigated the phenotypic and genetic relationship between neuroticism and the morning cortisol secretion. In the current classic twin study, 125 fem

  13. Genetic variants in MTNR1B affecting insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müssig, Karsten; Staiger, Harald; Machicao, Fausto; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus has markedly increased worldwide over the past decades. Pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction as well as central and peripheral insulin resistance appears to be elementary features in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Major environmental conditions predisposing to the development of type 2 diabetes are excessive food intake and sedentary life-style on the background of a genetic predisposition. Recent genome-wide association studies identified several novel type 2 diabetes risk genes, with impaired pancreatic beta-cell function as the underlying mechanism of increased diabetes risk in the majority of genes. Many of the novel type 2 diabetes risk genes, including MTNR1B which encodes one of the two known human melatonin receptors, were unexpected at first glance. However, previous animal as well as human studies already pointed to a significant impact of the melatonin system on the regulation of glucose homeostasis, in addition to its well known role in modulation of sleep and circadian rhythms. This brief review aims to give an overview of how alterations in the melatonin system could contribute to an increased diabetes risk, paying special attention to the role of melatonin receptors in pancreatic beta-cell function.

  14. A genetic strategy to measure circulating Drosophila insulin reveals genes regulating insulin production and secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangbin; Alfa, Ronald W; Topper, Sydni M; Kim, Grace E S; Kockel, Lutz; Kim, Seung K

    2014-08-01

    Insulin is a major regulator of metabolism in metazoans, including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) suggest a genetic basis for reductions of both insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion, phenotypes commonly observed in humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To identify molecular functions of genes linked to T2DM risk, we developed a genetic tool to measure insulin-like peptide 2 (Ilp2) levels in Drosophila, a model organism with superb experimental genetics. Our system permitted sensitive quantification of circulating Ilp2, including measures of Ilp2 dynamics during fasting and re-feeding, and demonstration of adaptive Ilp2 secretion in response to insulin receptor haploinsufficiency. Tissue specific dissection of this reduced insulin signaling phenotype revealed a critical role for insulin signaling in specific peripheral tissues. Knockdown of the Drosophila orthologues of human T2DM risk genes, including GLIS3 and BCL11A, revealed roles of these Drosophila genes in Ilp2 production or secretion. Discovery of Drosophila mechanisms and regulators controlling in vivo insulin dynamics should accelerate functional dissection of diabetes genetics.

  15. Genetic information, non-discrimination, and privacy protections in genetic counseling practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Anya E R; Roche, Myra I

    2014-12-01

    The passage of the Genetic Information Non Discrimination Act (GINA) was hailed as a pivotal achievement that was expected to calm the fears of both patients and research participants about the potential misuse of genetic information. However, 6 years later, patient and provider awareness of legal protections at both the federal and state level remains discouragingly low, thereby, limiting their potential effectiveness. The increasing demand for genetic testing will expand the number of individuals and families who could benefit from obtaining accurate information about the privacy and anti-discriminatory protections that GINA and other laws extend. In this paper we describe legal protections that are applicable to individuals seeking genetic counseling, review the literature on patient and provider fears of genetic discrimination and examine their awareness and understandings of existing laws, and summarize how genetic counselors currently discuss genetic discrimination. We then present three genetic counseling cases to illustrate issues of genetic discrimination and provide relevant information on applicable legal protections. Genetic counselors have an unprecedented opportunity, as well as the professional responsibility, to disseminate accurate knowledge about existing legal protections to their patients. They can strengthen their effectiveness in this role by achieving a greater knowledge of current protections including being able to identify specific steps that can help protect genetic information.

  16. Genetically engineered mouse models to evaluate the role of Wnt secretion in bone development and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bart O

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in components of the Wnt signaling pathway are associated with altered bone development and homeostasis in several human diseases. We created genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) that mimic the cellular defect associated with the Porcupine mutations in patients with Goltz Syndrome/Focal Dermal Hypoplasia. These GEMMs were established by utilizing mice containing a conditionally inactivatable allele of Wntless/GPR177 (a gene encoding a protein required for the transport of Porcupine-modified ligand to the plasma membrane for secretion). We crossed this strain to another which drives cre-mediated gene deletion in mature osteoblasts (Osteocalcin-cre) resulted in mice lacking the ability to secrete Wnt ligands in this cell type. These mice displayed severely reduced bone mass and provide a model to understand the effects of disrupting the ability to secrete Wnt ligands on the skeletal system.

  17. The gonococcal genetic island and type IV secretion in the pathogenic Neisseria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan E Ramsey

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Eighty percent of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains and some Neisseria meningitidis strains encode a 57 kb gonococcal genetic island (GGI. The GGI was horizontally acquired and is inserted in the chromosome at the replication terminus. The GGI is flanked by direct repeats, and site-specific recombination at these sites results in excision of the GGI and may be responsible for its original acquisition. Although the role of the GGI in N. meningitidis is unclear, the GGI in N. gonorrhoeae encodes a type IV secretion system (T4SS. Type IV secretion systems are versatile multi-protein complexes and include both conjugation systems as well as effector systems that translocate either proteins or DNA-protein complexes. In N. gonorrhoeae, the T4SS secretes single-stranded chromosomal DNA into the extracellular milieu in a contact-independent manner. Importantly, the DNA secreted through the T4SS is effective in natural transformation and therefore contributes to the spread of genetic information through Neisseria populations. Mutagenesis experiments have identified genes for DNA secretion including those encoding putative structural components of the apparatus, peptidoglycanases which may act in assembly, and relaxosome components for processing the DNA and delivering it to the apparatus. The T4SS may also play a role in infection by N. gonorrhoeae. During intracellular infection, N. gonorrhoeae requires the Ton complex for iron acquisition and survival. However, N. gonorrhoeae strains that do not express the Ton complex can survive intracellularly if they express structural components of the T4SS. These data provide evidence that the T4SS is expressed during intracellular infection and suggest that the T4SS may provide an advantage for intracellular survival. Here we review our current understanding of how the GGI and type IV secretion affect natural transformation and pathogenesis in N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis.

  18. Semiochemical compounds of preen secretion reflect genetic make-up in a seabird species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclaire, S.; Merkling, T.; Raynaud, C.; Mulard, Hervé; Bessiere, J.-M.; Lhuillier, E.M.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Danchin, E.

    2012-01-01

    Several vertebrates choose their mate according to genetic heterozygosity and relatedness, and use odour cues to assess their conspecifics' genetic make-up. In birds, although several species (including the blacklegged kittiwake) exhibit non-random mating according to genetic traits, the cues used to assess genetic characteristics remain unknown. The importance of olfaction in birds' social behaviour is gaining attention among researchers, and it has been suggested that, as in other vertebrates, bird body scent may convey information about genetic traits. Here, we combined gas chromatography data and genetic analyses at microsatellite loci to test whether semiochemical messages in preen secretion of kittiwakes carried information about genetic heterozygosity and relatedness. Semiochemical profile was correlated with heterozygosity in males and females, while semiochemical distance was correlated with genetic distance only in male-male dyads. Our study is the first to demonstrate a link between odour and genetics in birds, which sets the stage for the existence of sophisticated odour-based mechanisms of mate choice also in birds. ?? 2011 The Royal Society.

  19. Semiochemical compounds of preen secretion reflect genetic make-up in a seabird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclaire, Sarah; Merkling, Thomas; Raynaud, Christine; Mulard, Hervé; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Lhuillier, Emeline; Hatch, Scott A; Danchin, Etienne

    2012-03-22

    Several vertebrates choose their mate according to genetic heterozygosity and relatedness, and use odour cues to assess their conspecifics' genetic make-up. In birds, although several species (including the black-legged kittiwake) exhibit non-random mating according to genetic traits, the cues used to assess genetic characteristics remain unknown. The importance of olfaction in birds' social behaviour is gaining attention among researchers, and it has been suggested that, as in other vertebrates, bird body scent may convey information about genetic traits. Here, we combined gas chromatography data and genetic analyses at microsatellite loci to test whether semiochemical messages in preen secretion of kittiwakes carried information about genetic heterozygosity and relatedness. Semiochemical profile was correlated with heterozygosity in males and females, while semiochemical distance was correlated with genetic distance only in male-male dyads. Our study is the first to demonstrate a link between odour and genetics in birds, which sets the stage for the existence of sophisticated odour-based mechanisms of mate choice also in birds.

  20. Neuroticism and Morning Cortisol Secretion: Both Heritable, But No Shared Genetic Influences

    OpenAIRE

    Riese, Harriette; Rijsdijk, Fruehling V.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.; Snieder, Harold; Ormel, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroticism is widely used as an explanatory concept in etiological research of psychopathology. To clarify what neuroticism actually represents, we investigated the phenotypic and genetic relationship between neuroticism and the morning cortisol secretion. In the current classic twin study, 125 female twin pairs (74 monozygotic and 51 dizygotic pairs) participated. For each participant, 4 different neuroticism scores were available to calculate a neuroticism composite score that was used in ...

  1. Genetically modified mesenchymal stem/stromal cells transfected with adiponectin gene can stably secrete adiponectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Murad; Murali, Malliga Raman; Kamarul, Tunku

    2017-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) hold promises for the treatment of diverse diseases and regeneration of injured tissues. Genetic modification of MSCs through gene delivery might enhance their therapeutic potential. Adiponectin has been appeared as a potential biomarker for predicting various diseases. Plasma adiponectin levels are negatively correlated with various metabolic and vascular diseases and supplementation of exogenous adiponectin ameliorates the diseases. This study aims to develop adiponectin secreting genetically modified MSCs (GM-MSCs) as a potent strategic tool to complement endogenous adiponectin for the treatment of adiponectin deficiency diseases. Human bone marrow derived MSCs were isolated, expanded in vitro and transfected with adiponectin gene containing plasmid vector. Total RNA was extracted and cDNA was prepared by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of adiponectin gene and protein in GM-MSCs was analyzed by PCR and Western blotting respectively. The secretion of adiponectin protein from GM-MSCs was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of adiponectin gene and plasmid DNA was detected in GM-MSCs but not in control group of MSCs. Adiponectin gene expression was detected in GM-MSCs at 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28days after transfection. Western blotting analysis revealed the expression of adiponectin protein only in GM-MSCs. The GM-MSCs stably secreted adiponectin protein into culture media at least for 4weeks. GM-MSCs express and secret adiponectin protein. Therefore, these adiponectin secreting GM-MSCs could be instrumental for the supplementation of adiponectin in the treatment of adiponectin deficiency related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetically distinct pathways guide effector export through the type VI secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, John C; Beck, Christina M; Goo, Young Ah; Russell, Alistair B; Harding, Brittany N; De Leon, Justin A; Cunningham, David A; Tran, Bao Q; Low, David A; Goodlett, David R; Hayes, Christopher S; Mougous, Joseph D

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial secretion systems often employ molecular chaperones to recognize and facilitate export of their substrates. Recent work demonstrated that a secreted component of the type VI secretion system (T6SS), haemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp), binds directly to effectors, enhancing their stability in the bacterial cytoplasm. Herein, we describe a quantitative cellular proteomics screen for T6S substrates that exploits this chaperone-like quality of Hcp. Application of this approach to the Hcp secretion island I-encoded T6SS (H1-T6SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa led to the identification of a novel effector protein, termed Tse4 (type VI secretion exported 4), subsequently shown to act as a potent intra-specific H1-T6SS-delivered antibacterial toxin. Interestingly, our screen failed to identify two predicted H1-T6SS effectors, Tse5 and Tse6, which differ from Hcp-stabilized substrates by the presence of toxin-associated PAAR-repeat motifs and genetic linkage to members of the valine-glycine repeat protein G (vgrG) genes. Genetic studies further distinguished these two groups of effectors: Hcp-stabilized effectors were found to display redundancy in interbacterial competition with respect to the requirement for the two H1-T6SS-exported VgrG proteins, whereas Tse5 and Tse6 delivery strictly required a cognate VgrG. Together, we propose that interaction with either VgrG or Hcp defines distinct pathways for T6S effector export.

  3. Conservation genetics of the protected moth "Graellsia isabellae" (Lepidoptera, Saturniidae)

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    [Abstract] Evolutionary and molecular genetics provides valuable information for the efficient conservation of endangered species. In this thesis, I have used a combination of newly generated genetic and ecological data to assess the conservation status of the protected moth Graellsia isabellae. Firstly, I reconstructed the evolutionary history of this iconic insect by using genetic data obtained from samples obtained across the whole known distribution area: Iberia Peninsula and French Alps....

  4. Neuropeptide Y (NPY): genetic variation in the human promoter alters glucocorticoid signaling, yielding increased NPY secretion and stress responses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Kuixing; Rao, Fangwen; Miramontes-Gonzalez, Jose Pablo; Hightower, C Makena; Vaught, Brian; Chen, Yuhong; Greenwood, Tiffany A; Schork, Andrew J; Wang, Lei; Mahata, Manjula; Stridsberg, Mats; Khandrika, Srikrishna; Biswas, Nilima; Fung, Maple M; Waalen, Jill; Middelberg, Rita P; Heath, Andrew C; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Whitfield, John B; Baker, Dewleen G; Schork, Nicholas J; Nievergelt, Caroline M; O'Connor, Daniel T

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to understand whether genetic variation at the Neuropeptide Y (NPY) locus governs secretion and stress responses in vivo as well as NPY gene expression in sympathochromaffin cells...

  5. [Human genetic data from a data protection law perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte In den Bäumen, Tobias

    2007-02-01

    The collection and use of genetic data have caused much concern in the German population. Data protection is widely seen as the tool to address these fears. The term genetic data is not self-explanatory, as it depends on the different types of genetic diseases. The protection of genetic data as defined with regard to the different sets of diseases needs to fit into the preexisting data protection legislation. Still, the particularities of genetic data such as the multipersonal impact need to be considered. A balance between the information needs of society and the right to privacy requires a medically driven criteria. The medical term of indication which corresponds with the data protection term of purpose should serve as a tool in order to balance the rights of the patients and their relatives or between clients and third persons involved. Some countries have set up new legislative acts to address the challenges of human genetics. The current state of German data protection law leaves citizen rather unprotected as long as the data are used for medical purposes in a wider sense. A special law on the collection of genetic data has been discussed for several years, but it should be questioned whether the scope of a sector-specific law would serve citizens better. It seems to be preferable to adjust the existing Data Protection Act rather than drafting a specific law which covers the field of human genetics. This adaptation should reflect upon the different technical ways in which genetic data are collected and used.

  6. Yersinia pestis Yop secretion protein F: purification, characterization, and protective efficacy against bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swietnicki, Wieslaw; Powell, Bradford S; Goodin, Jeremy

    2005-07-01

    Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative human pathogen that uses a type III secretion system to deliver virulence factors into human hosts. The delivery is contact-dependent and it has been proposed that polymerization of Yop secretion protein F (YscF) is used to puncture mammalian cell membranes to facilitate delivery of Yersinia outer protein effectors into host cells. To evaluate the potential immunogenicity and protective efficacy of YscF against Y. pestis, we used a purified recombinant YscF protein as a potential vaccine candidate in a mouse subcutaneous infection model. YscF was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and protein identity was confirmed by ion trap mass spectrometry. The recombinant protein was highly alpha-helical and formed relatively stable aggregates under physiological conditions. The properties were consistent with behavior expected for the native YscF, suggesting that the antigen was properly folded. Ten mice were inoculated subcutaneously, administered booster injections after one month, and challenged with 130 LD(50) of wild type Y. pestis CO92. Six animals in the vaccinated group but none in the control group survived the challenge. The vaccinated animals produced high levels of specific antibodies against YscF as determined by Western blot. The data were statistically significant (P = 0.053 by two-tailed Fisher's test), suggesting that the YscF protein can provide a protective immune response against lethal plague challenge during subcutaneous plague infection.

  7. Partially Protective Immunity Induced by a 20 kDa Protein Secreted by Trichinella spiralis Stichocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Bi

    Full Text Available Trichinella spiralis infection induces protective immunity against re-infection in animal models. Identification of the antigens eliciting acquired immunity during infection is important for vaccine development against Trichinella infection and immunodiagnosis.The T. spiralis adult cDNA library was immunoscreened with sera from pigs experimentally infected with 20,000 infective T. spiralis larvae. Total 43 positive clones encoding for 28 proteins were identified; one of the immunodominant proteins was 20 kDa Ts-ES-1 secreted by Trichinella stichocytes and existing in the excretory/secretory (ES products of T. spiralis adult and muscle larval worms. Ts-ES-1 contains 172 amino acids with a typical signal peptide in the first 20 amino acids. The expression of Ts-ES-1 was detected in both the adult and muscle larval stages at the mRNA and protein expression levels. Mice immunized with recombinant Ts-ES-1 (rTs-ES-1 formulated with ISA50v2 adjuvant exhibited a significant worm reduction in both the adult worm (27% and muscle larvae burden (42.1% after a challenge with T. spiralis compared to the adjuvant control group (p<0.01. The rTs-ES-1-induced protection was associated with a high level of specific anti-Ts-ES-1 IgG antibodies and a Th1/Th2 mixed immune response.The newly identified rTs-ES-1 is an immunodominant protein secreted by Trichinella stichocytes during natural infection and enables to the induction of partial protective immunity in vaccinated mice against Trichinella infection. Therefore, rTs-ES-1 is a potential candidate for vaccine development against trichinellosis.

  8. Genetic engineering of cell lines using lentiviral vectors to achieve antibody secretion following encapsulated implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Bohrmann, Bernd; Kopetzki, Erhard; Schweitzer, Christoph; Jacobsen, Helmut; Moniatte, Marc; Aebischer, Patrick; Schneider, Bernard L

    2014-01-01

    The controlled delivery of antibodies by immunoisolated bioimplants containing genetically engineered cells is an attractive and safe approach for chronic treatments. To reach therapeutic antibody levels there is a need to generate renewable cell lines, which can long-term survive in macroencapsulation devices while maintaining high antibody specific productivity. Here we have developed a dual lentiviral vector strategy for the genetic engineering of cell lines compatible with macroencapsulation, using separate vectors encoding IgG light and heavy chains. We show that IgG expression level can be maximized as a function of vector dose and transgene ratio. This approach allows for the generation of stable populations of IgG-expressing C2C12 mouse myoblasts, and for the subsequent isolation of clones stably secreting high IgG levels. Moreover, we demonstrate that cell transduction using this lentiviral system leads to the production of a functional glycosylated antibody by myogenic cells. Subsequent implantation of antibody-secreting cells in a high-capacity macroencapsulation device enables continuous delivery of recombinant antibodies in the mouse subcutaneous tissue, leading to substantial levels of therapeutic IgG detectable in the plasma.

  9. Argonaute 2 complexes selectively protect the circulating microRNAs in cell-secreted microvesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limin Li

    Full Text Available Cell-secreted miRNAs are highly stable and can serve as biomarkers for various diseases and signaling molecules in intercellular communication. The mechanism underlying the stability of circulating miRNAs, however, remains incompletely understood. Here we show that Argonaute 2 (Ago2 complexes and microvesicles (MVs provide specific and non-specific protection for miRNA in cell-secreted MVs, respectively. First, the resistance of MV-encapsulated miRNAs to RNaseA was both depended on intact vesicular structure of MVs and protease-sensitive. Second, an immunoprecipitation assay using a probe complementary to human miR-16, a miRNA primarily located in the MVs and showed a strong, protease-sensitive resistance to RNaseA, identified Ago2 as a major miR-16-associated protein. Compared with protein-free miR-16, Ago2-associated miR-16 was resistant to RNaseA in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Third, when the miR-16/Ago2 complex was disrupted by trypaflavine, the resistance of miR-16 to RNaseA was decreased. In contrast, when the association of miR-16 with the Ago2 complexes was increased during cell apoptosis, although the total amount of miR-16 and Ago2 remained unchanged, the resistance of miR-16 to RNaseA in the MVs was enhanced. A similar correlation between the increase of miR-223/Ago2 association and the resistance of miR-223 against RNaseA was observed during all trans retinoic acid (ATRA-induced cell differentiation of promyelocytic HL60 cells. In conclusion, the association of miRNAs with Ago2 complexes, an event that is linked to cell functional status, plays a critical role in stabilizing the circulating miRNAs in cell-secreted MVs.

  10. Maturation of secreted HCV particles by incorporation of secreted ApoE protects from antibodies by enhancing infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankwitz, Dorothea; Doepke, Mandy; Hueging, Kathrin; Weller, Romy; Bruening, Janina; Behrendt, Patrick; Lee, Ji-Young; Vondran, Florian W R; Manns, Michael P; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) evades humoral immunity and establishes chronic infections. Virus particles circulate in complex with lipoproteins facilitating antibody escape. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is essential for intracellular HCV assembly and for HCV cell entry. We aimed to explore if ApoE released from non-infected cells interacts with and modulates secreted HCV particles. ApoE secreted from non-infected cells was incubated with HCV from primary human hepatocytes or Huh-7.5 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation, viral infectivity and neutralization experiments were conducted. Physiological levels of secreted ApoE (10-60µg/ml) enhanced the infectivity of HCV up to 8-fold across all genotypes, which indirectly decreased virus neutralization by antibodies targeting E1 or E2 up to 10-fold. Infection enhancement was observed for particles produced in primary human hepatocytes and Huh-7.5 cells. Selective depletion of ApoE ablated infection enhancement. Addition of HA-tagged ApoE to HCV particles permitted co-precipitation of HCV virions. Serum ApoE levels ranged between 10-60µg/ml, which is ca 100-fold higher than in Huh-7.5 conditioned cell culture fluids. Serum-derived HCV particles carried much higher amounts of ApoE than cell culture-derived HCV particles. Serum ApoE levels correlated with efficiency of co-precipitation of HCV upon exogenous addition of HA-ApoE. ApoE-dependent infection enhancement was independent of the hypervariable region 1 and SR-B1, but was dependent on heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Physiological quantities of secreted ApoE stimulate HCV infection and increase antibody escape, by incorporating into virus particles and enhancing particle interactions with cellular HSPGs. Thus, secreted particles undergo ApoE-dependent maturation to enhance infectivity and to facilitate evasion from neutralizing antibodies. Lay summary: This study shows that HCV particle infectivity is remodeled by secreted ApoE after particle release from cells. Fluctuation of

  11. Autophagy Protects against Colitis by the Maintenance of Normal Gut Microflora and Secretion of Mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Koichiro; Nishitani, Mayo; Takakura, Atsushi; Imai, Yasuyuki; Komatsu, Masaaki; Kawashima, Hiroto

    2015-08-14

    Genome-wide association studies of inflammatory bowel diseases identified susceptible loci containing an autophagy-related gene. However, the role of autophagy in the colon, a major affected area in inflammatory bowel diseases, is not clear. Here, we show that colonic epithelial cell-specific autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7) conditional knock-out (cKO) mice showed exacerbation of experimental colitis with more abundant bacterial invasion into the colonic epithelium. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that cKO mice had abnormal microflora with an increase of some genera. Consistently, expression of antimicrobial or antiparasitic peptides such as angiogenin-4, Relmβ, intelectin-1, and intelectin-2 as well as that of their inducer cytokines was significantly reduced in the cKO mice. Furthermore, secretion of colonic mucins that function as a mucosal barrier against bacterial invasion was also significantly diminished in cKO mice. Taken together, our results indicate that autophagy in colonic epithelial cells protects against colitis by the maintenance of normal gut microflora and secretion of mucus.

  12. The secreted glycoprotein lubricin protects cartilage surfaces and inhibits synovial cell overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, David K.; Marcelino, Jose; Baker, MacArthur; Gong, Yaoqin; Smits, Patrick; Lefebvre, Véronique; Jay, Gregory D.; Stewart, Matthew; Wang, Hongwei; Warman, Matthew L.; Carpten, John D.

    2005-01-01

    The long-term integrity of an articulating joint is dependent upon the nourishment of its cartilage component and the protection of the cartilage surface from friction-induced wear. Loss-of-function mutations in lubricin (a secreted glycoprotein encoded by the gene PRG4) cause the human autosomal recessive disorder camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome (CACP). A major feature of CACP is precocious joint failure. In order to delineate the mechanism by which lubricin protects joints, we studied the expression of Prg4 mRNA during mouse joint development, and we created lubricin-mutant mice. Prg4 began to be expressed in surface chondrocytes and synoviocytes after joint cavitation had occurred and remained strongly expressed by these cells postnatally. Mice lacking lubricin were viable and fertile. In the newborn period, their joints appeared normal. As the mice aged, we observed abnormal protein deposits on the cartilage surface and disappearance of underlying superficial zone chondrocytes. In addition to cartilage surface changes and subsequent cartilage deterioration, intimal cells in the synovium surrounding the joint space became hyperplastic, which further contributed to joint failure. Purified or recombinant lubricin inhibited the growth of these synoviocytes in vitro. Tendon and tendon sheath involvement was present in the ankle joints, where morphologic changes and abnormal calcification of these structures were observed. We conclude that lubricin has multiple functions in articulating joints and tendons that include the protection of surfaces and the control of synovial cell growth. PMID:15719068

  13. A Cryptographic SoC for Robust Protection of Secret Keys in IPTV DRM Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghan; Yang, Hae-Yong; Yeom, Yongjin; Park, Jongsik

    The security level of an internet protocol television (IPTV) digital right management (DRM) system ultimately relies on protection of secret keys. Well known devices for the key protection include smartcards and battery backup SRAMs (BB-SRAMs); however, these devices could be vulnerable to various physical attacks. In this paper, we propose a secure and cost-effective design of a cryptographic system on chip (SoC) that integrates the BB-SRAM with a cell-based design technique. The proposed SoC provides robust safeguard against the physical attacks, and satisfies high-speed and low-price requirements of IPTV set-top boxes. Our implementation results show that the maximum encryption rate of the SoC is 633Mb/s. In order to verify the data retention capabilities, we made a prototype chip using 0.18µm standard cell technology. The experimental results show that the integrated BB-SRAM can reliably retain data with a 1.4µA leakage current.

  14. Killing by Type VI secretion drives genetic phase separation and correlates with increased cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Luke; Bernardy, Eryn; Thomas, Jacob; Kalziqi, Arben; Pentz, Jennifer; Brown, Sam P.; Hammer, Brian K.; Yunker, Peter J.; Ratcliff, William C.

    2017-02-01

    By nature of their small size, dense growth and frequent need for extracellular metabolism, microbes face persistent public goods dilemmas. Genetic assortment is the only general solution stabilizing cooperation, but all known mechanisms structuring microbial populations depend on the availability of free space, an often unrealistic constraint. Here we describe a class of self-organization that operates within densely packed bacterial populations. Through mathematical modelling and experiments with Vibrio cholerae, we show how killing adjacent competitors via the Type VI secretion system (T6SS) precipitates phase separation via the `Model A' universality class of order-disorder transition mediated by killing. We mathematically demonstrate that T6SS-mediated killing should favour the evolution of public goods cooperation, and empirically support this prediction using a phylogenetic comparative analysis. This work illustrates the twin role played by the T6SS, dealing death to local competitors while simultaneously creating conditions potentially favouring the evolution of cooperation with kin.

  15. Research on Intellectual Property Rights Protection of Agricultural Plant Genetic Resources in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of definition of agricultural plant genetic resources,this paper takes the two most important forms of intellectual property protection regarding agricultural plant genetic resources-patent rights and new plant variety rights as an example,to expound the current situation of intellectual property protection of agricultural plant genetic resources in China.It reveals the problems of intellectual property protection as follows:the awareness of intellectual property protection of agricultural plant genetic resources is weak;the system of laws and regulations is not sound;the protection system is not perfect;the management system lacks standardization.It further puts forward corresponding countermeasures and suggestions as follows:promote the protection awareness of agricultural plant genetic resources in whole society;enact special law system to protect agricultural plant genetic resources;improve the management system of agricultural plant genetic resources;strengthen the international protection of agricultural plant genetic resources in China.

  16. New genetic tools to identify and protect typical italian products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Lanteri

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available During last decades the use of local varieties was strongly reduced due to introduction of modern cultivars characterized by higher yield, and breed for different traits of agronomic value. However, these cultivars not always have the quality aspects that was found in old traditional and typical crops also depending from the know-how of traditional cultivation. Nowadays the practise of intensive agriculture select only a small number of species and varieties with a consequent reduction of the diversity in agro-ecosystems and risk of loss of important alleles characterizing genetic materials adapted to specific environments. The creation of quality marks of the European Union proved to be a successful system to protect typical products through the Denomination of Origins (PDO- Protected Denomination of Origin and PGI- Protected Geographical Indication. However, the protection of quality needs efficient instruments to discriminate DOP or IGP varieties in the field and to trace them along the agro-food chain. DNA fingerprinting represents an excellent system to discriminate herbaceous and tree species as well as to quantify the amount of genetic variability present in germplasm collections. The paper describes several examples in which AFLPs, SSRs and minisatellite markers were successfully used to identify tomato, artichoke, grape, apple and walnut varieties proving to be effective in discriminating also closely related genetic material. DNA fingerprinting based on SSR is also a powerful tool to trace and authenticate row plant materials in agro-food chains. The paper describes examples of varieties traceability in the food chains durum wheat, olive, apple and tomato pursued through the identification of SSR allelic profiles obtained from DNA isolated from complex highly processed food, such as bread, olive oil, apple pureè and nectar and peeled tomato.

  17. New genetic tools to identify and protect typical italian products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Lanteri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available During last decades the use of local varieties was strongly reduced due to introduction of modern cultivars characterized by higher yield, and breed for different traits of agronomic value. However, these cultivars not always have the quality aspects that was found in old traditional and typical crops also depending from the know-how of traditional cultivation. Nowadays the practise of intensive agriculture select only a small number of species and varieties with a consequent reduction of the diversity in agro-ecosystems and risk of loss of important alleles characterizing genetic materials adapted to specific environments. The creation of quality marks of the European Union proved to be a successful system to protect typical products through the Denomination of Origins (PDO- Protected Denomination of Origin and PGI- Protected Geographical Indication. However, the protection of quality needs efficient instruments to discriminate DOP or IGP varieties in the field and to trace them along the agro-food chain. DNA fingerprinting represents an excellent system to discriminate herbaceous and tree species as well as to quantify the amount of genetic variability present in germplasm collections. The paper describes several examples in which AFLPs, SSRs and minisatellite markers were successfully used to identify tomato, artichoke, grape, apple and walnut varieties proving to be effective in discriminating also closely related genetic material. DNA fingerprinting based on SSR is also a powerful tool to trace and authenticate row plant materials in agro-food chains. The paper describes examples of varieties traceability in the food chains durum wheat, olive, apple and tomato pursued through the identification of SSR allelic profiles obtained from DNA isolated from complex highly processed food, such as bread, olive oil, apple pureè and nectar and peeled tomato.

  18. Dual expression profile of type VI secretion system immunity genes protects pandemic Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah T Miyata

    Full Text Available The Vibrio cholerae type VI secretion system (T6SS assembles as a molecular syringe that injects toxic protein effectors into both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. We previously reported that the V. cholerae O37 serogroup strain V52 maintains a constitutively active T6SS to kill other Gram-negative bacteria while being immune to attack by kin bacteria. The pandemic O1 El Tor V. cholerae strain C6706 is T6SS-silent under laboratory conditions as it does not produce T6SS structural components and effectors, and fails to kill Escherichia coli prey. Yet, C6706 exhibits full resistance when approached by T6SS-active V52. These findings suggested that an active T6SS is not required for immunity against T6SS-mediated virulence. Here, we describe a dual expression profile of the T6SS immunity protein-encoding genes tsiV1, tsiV2, and tsiV3 that provides pandemic V. cholerae strains with T6SS immunity and allows T6SS-silent strains to maintain immunity against attacks by T6SS-active bacterial neighbors. The dual expression profile allows transcription of the three genes encoding immunity proteins independently of other T6SS proteins encoded within the same operon. One of these immunity proteins, TsiV2, protects against the T6SS effector VasX which is encoded immediately upstream of tsiV2. VasX is a secreted, lipid-binding protein that we previously characterized with respect to T6SS-mediated virulence towards the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Our data suggest the presence of an internal promoter in the open reading frame of vasX that drives expression of the downstream gene tsiV2. Furthermore, VasX is shown to act in conjunction with VasW, an accessory protein to VasX, to compromise the inner membrane of prokaryotic target cells. The dual regulatory profile of the T6SS immunity protein-encoding genes tsiV1, tsiV2, and tsiV3 permits V. cholerae to tightly control T6SS gene expression while maintaining immunity to T6SS activity.

  19. Molecular Characterization of Genetic Loci Required for Secretion of Exoproducts in Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    DeShazer, David; Brett, Paul J.; Mary N Burtnick; Woods, Donald E.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Burkholderia pseudomallei secretes protease, lipase, and phospholipase C (PLC) into the extracellular milieu, but their mechanisms of secretion and roles in pathogenesis have not been elucidated. In this study, we isolated and characterized 29 transposon mutants unable to secrete protease, lipase, and PLC.

  20. Secrets Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Helena Guamanzara Torres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of the book The Law of Secrets, of the author Juan Carlos Martínez-Villalba Riofrío studying the secrets and how law does protect. To this end, the author has analyzed the general theory of secrecy, secrets and methodology, its overall rating, essential elements and their different legal dimensions, the secret as a subjective right. It also establishes that professional secrecy is protected by constitutional principles such as the right to privacy.

  1. [Protection of genetic data in Spain. Analysis based on the general principles of personal data protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Amez, Javier

    2006-01-01

    The genetic data is Spain is not regulated specifically, rather, we must look at the regulation on the protection of data of a personal nature. This is turn, establishes a series of general principles to apply to any type of data. Analysing this with other regulations that are dispersed both in the national and international regulations, we can deduce the rights and obligations in this field. This highlights the fact that one can't dispose of the genetic data in the same manner as the personal data.

  2. Killing by Type VI secretion drives genetic phase separation and correlates with increased cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Luke; Bernardy, Eryn; Thomas, Jacob; Kalziqi, Arben; Pentz, Jennifer; Brown, Sam P.; Hammer, Brian K.; Yunker, Peter J.; Ratcliff, William C.

    2017-01-01

    By nature of their small size, dense growth and frequent need for extracellular metabolism, microbes face persistent public goods dilemmas. Genetic assortment is the only general solution stabilizing cooperation, but all known mechanisms structuring microbial populations depend on the availability of free space, an often unrealistic constraint. Here we describe a class of self-organization that operates within densely packed bacterial populations. Through mathematical modelling and experiments with Vibrio cholerae, we show how killing adjacent competitors via the Type VI secretion system (T6SS) precipitates phase separation via the ‘Model A' universality class of order-disorder transition mediated by killing. We mathematically demonstrate that T6SS-mediated killing should favour the evolution of public goods cooperation, and empirically support this prediction using a phylogenetic comparative analysis. This work illustrates the twin role played by the T6SS, dealing death to local competitors while simultaneously creating conditions potentially favouring the evolution of cooperation with kin. PMID:28165005

  3. Genetic disruption of uncoupling protein 1 in mice renders brown adipose tissue a significant source of FGF21 secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Keipert

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Here we show that the genetic ablation of UCP1 increases FGF21 gene expression in adipose tissue. The removal of adaptive nonshivering thermogenesis renders BAT a significant source of endogenous FGF21 under thermal stress. Thus, the thermogenic competence of BAT is not a requirement for FGF21 secretion. Notably, high endogenous FGF21 levels in UCP1-deficient models and subjects may confound pharmacological FGF21 treatments.

  4. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cell Secreted IGF-1 Protects Myoblasts from the Negative Effect of Myostatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gehmert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin, a TGF-β family member, is associated with inhibition of muscle growth and differentiation and might interact with the IGF-1 signaling pathway. Since IGF-1 is secreted at a bioactive level by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs, these cells (ASCs provide a therapeutic option for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD. But the protective effect of stem cell secreted IGF-1 on myoblast under high level of myostatin remains unclear. In the present study murine myoblasts were exposed to myostatin under presence of ASCs conditioned medium and investigated for proliferation and apoptosis. The protective effect of IGF-1 was further examined by using IGF-1 neutralizing and receptor antibodies as well as gene silencing RNAi technology. MyoD expression was detected to identify impact of IGF-1 on myoblasts differentiation when exposed to myostatin. IGF-1 was accountable for 43.6% of the antiapoptotic impact and 48.8% for the proliferative effect of ASCs conditioned medium. Furthermore, IGF-1 restored mRNA and protein MyoD expression of myoblasts under risk. Beside fusion and transdifferentiation the beneficial effect of ASCs is mediated by paracrine secreted cytokines, particularly IGF-1. The present study underlines the potential of ASCs as a therapeutic option for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other dystrophic muscle diseases.

  5. Genetic Ablation of the ClC-2 Cl- Channel Disrupts Mouse Gastric Parietal Cell Acid Secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghali P Nighot

    Full Text Available The present studies were designed to examine the effects of ClC-2 ablation on cellular morphology, parietal cell abundance, H/K ATPase expression, parietal cell ultrastructure and acid secretion using WT and ClC-2-/- mouse stomachs. Cellular histology, morphology and proteins were examined using imaging techniques, electron microscopy and western blot. The effect of histamine on the pH of gastric contents was measured. Acid secretion was also measured using methods and secretagogues previously established to give maximal acid secretion and morphological change. Compared to WT, ClC-2-/- gastric mucosal histological organization appeared disrupted, including dilation of gastric glands, shortening of the gastric gland region and disorganization of all cell layers. Parietal cell numbers and H/K ATPase expression were significantly reduced by 34% (P<0.05 and 53% (P<0.001 respectively and cytoplasmic tubulovesicles appeared markedly reduced on electron microscopic evaluation without evidence of canalicular expansion. In WT parietal cells, ClC-2 was apparent in a similar cellular location as the H/K ATPase by immunofluorescence and appeared associated with tubulovesicles by immunogold electron microscopy. Histamine-stimulated [H+] of the gastric contents was significantly (P<0.025 lower by 9.4 fold (89% in the ClC-2-/- mouse compared to WT. Histamine/carbachol stimulated gastric acid secretion was significantly reduced (range 84-95%, P<0.005 in ClC-2-/- compared to WT, while pepsinogen secretion was unaffected. Genetic ablation of ClC-2 resulted in reduced gastric gland region, reduced parietal cell number, reduced H/K ATPase, reduced tubulovesicles and reduced stimulated acid secretion.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of lipoapoptosis and metformin protection in GLP-1 secreting cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappe, Camilla; Holst, Jens Juul; Zhang, Qimin

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that elevated serum free fatty acids (hyperlipidemia) contribute to the pathogenesis of type-2-diabetes, and lipotoxicity is observed in many cell types. We recently published data indicating lipotoxic effects of simulated hyperlipidemia also in GLP-1-secreting cells, where t...

  7. Non-immunoglobulin fraction of human milk protects rabbits against enterotoxin-induced intestinal fluid secretion.

    OpenAIRE

    Otnaess, A B; Svennerholm, A M

    1982-01-01

    Human milk was fractionated by ammonium sulphate precipitation and column chromatography. A milk fraction depleted of secretory immunoglobulin A and with an apparent molecular weight of greater than 400,000 inhibited fluid secretion induced by cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin in rabbit ileal loops.

  8. The constitutional protection of trade secrets and patents under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    The Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 ("Biosimilars Act") is for the field of pharmaceutical products the single most important legislative development since passage of the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984 ("Hatch-Waxman Act"), on which portions of the Biosimilars Act are clearly patterned. Congress revised section 351 of the Public Health Service Act (PHSA) to create a pathway for FDA approval of "biosimilar" biological products. Each biosimilar applicant is required to cite in its application a "reference product" that was approved on the basis of a full application containing testing data and manufacturing information, which is owned and was submitted by another company and much of which constitutes trade secret information subject to constitutional protection. Because the Biosimilars Act authorizes biosimilar applicants to cite these previously approved applications, the implementation of the new legislative scheme raises critical issues under the Fifth Amendment of the Constitution, pursuant to which private property--trade secrets included--may not be taken for public use, without "just compensation." FDA must confront those issues as it implements the scheme set out in the Biosimilars Act. This article will discuss these issues, after providing a brief overview of the Biosimilars Act and a more detailed examination of the law of trade secrets.

  9. PaCATB, a secreted catalase protecting Podospora anserina against exogenous oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zintel, Sandra; Bernhardt, Dominik; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2011-01-01

    . Genetic modulation of the abundance of PaCATB identified differential effects on the phenotype of the corresponding strains. Deletion of PaCatB resulted in decreased resistance, over-expression in increased resistance against hydrogen peroxide. While the lifespan of the genetically modified strains...... was found to be unaffected under standard growth conditions, increased exogenous hydrogen peroxide stress in the growth medium markedly reduced the lifespan of the PaCatB deletion strain but extended the lifespan of PaCatB over-expressors. Overall our data identify a component of the secretome of P...

  10. Protective effects of neurotrophic factor-secreting cells in a 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadan, Ofer; Bahat-Stromza, Merav; Barhum, Yael; Levy, Yossef S; Pisnevsky, Anat; Peretz, Hagit; Ilan, Avihay Bar; Bulvik, Shlomo; Shemesh, Noam; Krepel, Dana; Cohen, Yoram; Melamed, Eldad; Offen, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is a promising treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. In our laboratory, a novel protocol has been developed to induce bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into neurotrophic factors- secreting cells (NTF-SC), thus combining stem cell-based therapy with the NTF-based neuroprotection. These cells produce and secrete factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor. Conditioned medium of the NTF-SC that was applied to a neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) 1 h before exposure to the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) demonstrated marked protection. An efficacy study was conducted on the 6-OHDA-induced lesion, a rat model of Parkinson's disease. The cells, either MSC or NTF-SC, were transplanted on the day of 6-OHDA administration and amphetamine-induced rotations were measured as a primary behavior index. We demonstrated that when transplanted posterior to the 6-OHDA lesion, the NTF-SC ameliorated amphetamine-induced rotations by 45%. HPLC analysis demonstrated that 6-OHDA induced dopamine depletion to a level of 21% compared to the untreated striatum. NTF-SC inhibited dopamine depletion to a level of 72% of the contralateral striatum. Moreover, an MRI study conducted with iron-labeled cells, followed by histological verification, revealed that the engrafted cells migrated toward the lesion. In a histological assessment, we found that the cells induced regeneration in the damaged striatal dopaminergic nerve terminal network. We therefore conclude that the induced MSC have a therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative processes and diseases, both by the NTFs secretion and by the migratory trait toward the diseased tissue.

  11. Evaluation of insulin expression and secretion in genetically engineered gut K and L-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zalinah

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy could provide an effective treatment of diabetes. Previous studies have investigated the potential for several cell and tissue types to produce mature and active insulin. Gut K and L-cells could be potential candidate hosts for gene therapy because of their special features. Results In this study, we isolated gut K and L-cells to compare the potential of both cell types to produce insulin when exposed to similar conditions. The isolated pure K and L-cells were transfected with recombinant plasmids encoding insulin and with specific promoters for K or L-cells. Insulin expression was studied in response to glucose or meat hydrolysate. We found that glucose and meat hydrolysate efficiently induced insulin secretion from K and L-cells. However, the effects of meat hydrolysate on insulin secretion were more potent in both cells compared with glucose. Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays showed that L-cells secreted more insulin compared with K-cells regardless of the stimulator, although this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion The responses of K and L-cells to stimulation with glucose or meat hydrolysate were generally comparable. Therefore, both K and L-cells show similar potential to be used as surrogate cells for insulin gene expression in vitro. The potential use of these cells for diabetic gene therapy warrants further investigation.

  12. PaCATB, a secreted catalase protecting Podospora anserina against exogenous oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zintel, Sandra; Bernhardt, Dominik; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2011-01-01

    was found to be unaffected under standard growth conditions, increased exogenous hydrogen peroxide stress in the growth medium markedly reduced the lifespan of the PaCatB deletion strain but extended the lifespan of PaCatB over-expressors. Overall our data identify a component of the secretome of P....... Genetic modulation of the abundance of PaCATB identified differential effects on the phenotype of the corresponding strains. Deletion of PaCatB resulted in decreased resistance, over-expression in increased resistance against hydrogen peroxide. While the lifespan of the genetically modified strains....... anserina as a new effective factor to cope with environmental stress, stress that under natural conditions is constantly applied on organisms and influences aging processes....

  13. Role in virulence and protective efficacy in pigs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium secreted components identified by signature-tagged mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnell, Sonya C; Bowen, Alison; Morgan, Eirwen; Maskell, Duncan J; Wallis, Timothy S; Stevens, Mark P

    2007-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a zoonotic enteric pathogen of worldwide importance and pigs are a significant reservoir of human infection. Signature-tagged transposon mutagenesis (STM) was used to identify genes required by S. Typhimurium to colonize porcine intestines. A library of 1045 signature-tagged mutants of S. Typhimurium ST4/74 Nal(R) was screened following oral inoculation of pigs in duplicate. A total of 119 attenuating mutations were identified in 95 different genes, many of which encode known or putative secreted or surface-anchored molecules. A large number of attenuating mutations were located within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI)-1 and -2, confirming important roles for type III secretion systems (T3SS)-1 and -2 in intestinal colonization of pigs. Roles for genes encoded in other pathogenicity islands and islets, including the SPI-6-encoded Saf atypical fimbriae, were also identified. Given the role of secreted factors and the protection conferred against other pathogens by vaccination with extracellular and type III secreted proteins, the efficacy of a secreted protein vaccine from wild-type S. Typhimurium following intramuscular vaccination of pigs was evaluated. Serum IgG responses against type III secreted proteins were induced following vaccination and a significant reduction in faecal excretion of S. Typhimurium was observed in the acute phase of infection compared to mock-vaccinated animals. Vaccination with secreted proteins from an isogenic S. Typhimurium prgH mutant produced comparable levels of protection to vaccination with the preparation from the parent strain, indicating that protection was not reliant on T3SS-1 secreted proteins. The data provide valuable information for the control of Salmonella in pigs.

  14. Recombinant Forms of Leishmania amazonensis Excreted/Secreted Promastigote Surface Antigen (PSA Induce Protective Immune Responses in Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Petitdidier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Preventive vaccination is a highly promising strategy for interrupting leishmaniasis transmission that can, additionally, contribute to elimination. A vaccine formulation based on naturally excreted secreted (ES antigens was prepared from L. infantum promastigote culture supernatant. This vaccine achieved successful results in Phase III trials and was licensed and marketed as CaniLeish. We recently showed that newly identified ES promastigote surface antigen (PSA, from both viable promastigotes and axenically-grown amastigotes, represented the major constituent and the highly immunogenic antigen of L. infantum and L. amazonensis ES products. We report here that three immunizations with either the recombinant ES LaPSA-38S (rPSA or its carboxy terminal part LaPSA-12S (Cter-rPSA, combined with QA-21 as adjuvant, confer high levels of protection in naive L. infantum-infected Beagle dogs, as checked by bone marrow parasite absence in respectively 78.8% and 80% of vaccinated dogs at 6 months post-challenge. The parasite burden in infected vaccinated dogs was significantly reduced compared to placebo group, as measured by q-PCR. Moreover, our results reveal humoral and cellular immune response clear-cut differences between vaccinated and control dogs. An early increase in specific IgG2 antibodies was observed in rPSA/QA-21- and Cter-rPSA/QA-21-immunized dogs only. They were found functionally active in vitro and were highly correlated with vaccine protection. In vaccinated protected dogs, IFN-γ and NO productions, as well as anti-leishmanial macrophage activity, were increased. These data strongly suggest that ES PSA or its carboxy-terminal part, in recombinant forms, induce protection in a canine model of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis by inducing a Th1-dominant immune response and an appropriate specific antibody response. These data suggest that they could be considered as important active components in vaccine candidates.

  15. Autophagy facilitates secretion and protects against degeneration of the Harderian gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Ulrich; Fobker, Manfred; Lengauer, Barbara; Brandstetter, Marlene; Resch, Guenter P; Gröger, Marion; Plenz, Gabriele; Pammer, Johannes; Barresi, Caterina; Hartmann, Christine; Rossiter, Heidemarie

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial derived Harderian gland consists of 2 types of secretory cells. The more numerous type A cells are responsible for the secretion of lipid droplets, while type B cells produce dark granules of multilamellar bodies. The process of autophagy is constitutively active in the Harderian gland, as confirmed by our analysis of LC3 processing in GFP-LC3 transgenic mice. This process is compromised by epithelial deletion of Atg7. Morphologically, the Atg7 mutant glands are hypotrophic and degenerated, with highly vacuolated cells and pyknotic nuclei. The mutant glands accumulate lipid droplets coated with PLIN2 (perilipin 2) and contain deposits of cholesterol, ubiquitinated proteins, SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1) positive aggregates and other metabolic products such as porphyrin. Immunofluorescence stainings show that distinct cells strongly aggregate both proteins and lipids. Electron microscopy of the Harderian glands reveals that its organized structure is compromised, and the presence of large intracellular lipid droplets and heterologous aggregates. We attribute the occurrence of large vacuoles to a malfunction in the formation of multilamellar bodies found in the less abundant type B Harderian gland cells. This defect causes the formation of large tertiary lysosomes of heterologous content and is accompanied by the generation of tight lamellar stacks of endoplasmic reticulum in a pseudo-crystalline form. To test the hypothesis that lipid and protein accumulation is the cause for the degeneration in autophagy-deficient Harderian glands, epithelial cells were treated with a combination of the proteasome inhibitor and free fatty acids, to induce aggregation of misfolded proteins and lipid accumulation, respectively. The results show that lipid accumulation indeed enhanced the toxicity of misfolded proteins and that this was even more pronounced in autophagy-deficient cells. Thus, we conclude autophagy controls protein and lipid catabolism and anabolism to

  16. Vaccination with a single CD4 T cell peptide epitope from a Salmonella type III-secreted effector protein provides protection against lethal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Jonathan R; Petersen, Hailey E; Frederick, Daniel R; Morici, Lisa A; McLachlan, James B

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella infections affect millions worldwide and remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. It is known from mouse studies that CD4 T cells are essential mediators of immunity against Salmonella infection, yet it is not clear whether targeting CD4 T cell responses directly with peptide vaccines against Salmonella can be effective in combating infection. Additionally, it is not known whether T cell responses elicited against Salmonella secreted effector proteins can provide protective immunity against infection. In this study, we investigated both of these possibilities using prime-boost immunization of susceptible mice with a single CD4 T cell peptide epitope from Salmonella secreted effector protein I (SseI), a component of the Salmonella type III secretion system. This immunization conferred significant protection against lethal oral infection, equivalent to that conferred by whole heat-killed Salmonella bacteria. Surprisingly, a well-characterized T cell epitope from the flagellar protein FliC afforded no protection compared to immunization with an irrelevant control peptide. The protective response appeared to be most associated with polyfunctional CD4 T cells raised against the SseI peptide, since no antibodies were produced against any of the peptides and very little CD8 T cell response was observed. Overall, this study demonstrates that eliciting CD4 T cell responses against components of the Salmonella type III secretion system can contribute to protection against infection and should be considered in the design of future Salmonella subunit vaccines.

  17. Neuropeptide Y (NPY): genetic variation in the human promoter alters glucocorticoid signaling, yielding increased NPY secretion and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuixing; Rao, Fangwen; Miramontes-Gonzalez, Jose Pablo; Hightower, C Makena; Vaught, Brian; Chen, Yuhong; Greenwood, Tiffany A; Schork, Andrew J; Wang, Lei; Mahata, Manjula; Stridsberg, Mats; Khandrika, Srikrishna; Biswas, Nilima; Fung, Maple M; Waalen, Jill; Middelberg, Rita P; Heath, Andrew C; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Whitfield, John B; Baker, Dewleen G; Schork, Nicholas J; Nievergelt, Caroline M; O'Connor, Daniel T

    2012-10-23

    This study sought to understand whether genetic variation at the Neuropeptide Y (NPY) locus governs secretion and stress responses in vivo as well as NPY gene expression in sympathochromaffin cells. The NPY is a potent pressor peptide co-released with catecholamines during stress by sympathetic axons. Genome-wide linkage on NPY secretion identified a LOD (logarithm of the odds ratio) peak spanning the NPY locus on chromosome 7p15. Our approach began with genomics (linkage and polymorphism determination), extended into NPY genetic control of heritable stress traits in twin pairs, established transcriptional mechanisms in transfected chromaffin cells, and concluded with observations on blood pressure (BP) in the population. Systematic polymorphism tabulation at NPY (by re-sequencing across the locus: promoter, 4 exons, exon/intron borders, and untranslated regions; on 2n = 160 chromosomes of diverse biogeographic ancestries) identified 16 variants, of which 5 were common. We then studied healthy twin/sibling pairs (n = 399 individuals), typing 6 polymorphisms spanning the locus. Haplotype and single nucleotide polymorphism analyses indicated that proximal promoter variant ∇-880Δ (2-bp TG/-, Ins/Del, rs3037354) minor/Δ allele was associated with several heritable (h(2)) stress traits: higher NPY secretion (h(2) = 73 ± 4%) as well as greater BP response to environmental (cold) stress, and higher basal systemic vascular resistance. Association of ∇-880Δ and plasma NPY was replicated in an independent sample of 361 healthy young men, with consistent allelic effects; genetic variation at NPY also associated with plasma NPY in another independent series of 2,212 individuals derived from Australia twin pairs. Effects of allele -880Δ to increase NPY expression were directionally coordinate in vivo (on human traits) and in cells (transfected NPY promoter/luciferase reporter activity). Promoter -880Δ interrupts a novel glucocorticoid response element motif, an effect

  18. Neutralization of schwann cell-secreted VEGF is protective to in vitro and in vivo experimental diabetic neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela M Taiana

    Full Text Available The pathogenetic role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in long-term retinal and kidney complications of diabetes has been demonstrated. Conversely, little is known in diabetic neuropathy. We examined the modulation of VEGF pathway at mRNA and protein level on dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and Schwann cells (SC induced by hyperglycaemia. Moreover, we studied the effects of VEGF neutralization on hyperglycemic DRG neurons and streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy. Our findings demonstrated that DRG neurons were not affected by the direct exposition to hyperglycaemia, whereas showed an impairment of neurite outgrowth ability when exposed to the medium of SC cultured in hyperglycaemia. This was mediated by an altered regulation of VEGF and FLT-1 receptors. Hyperglycaemia increased VEGF and FLT-1 mRNA without changing their intracellular protein levels in DRG neurons, decreased intracellular and secreted protein levels without changing mRNA level in SC, while reduced the expression of the soluble receptor sFLT-1 both in DRG neurons and SC. Bevacizumab, a molecule that inhibits VEGF activity preventing the interaction with its receptors, restored neurite outgrowth and normalized FLT-1 mRNA and protein levels in co-cultures. In diabetic rats, it both prevented and restored nerve conduction velocity and nociceptive thresholds. We demonstrated that hyperglycaemia early affected neurite outgrowth through the impairment of SC-derived VEGF/FLT-1 signaling and that the neutralization of SC-secreted VEGF was protective both in vitro and in vivo models of diabetic neuropathy.

  19. Effects of San Qi on Gastric Secretion and Protective Factors of Gastric Mucosa in the Rat with Precancerous Lesion of Stomach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石雪迎; 赵凤志; 戴欣; 董秀云; 方杰; 杨会敏

    2003-01-01

    @@ In the model rat with precancerous lesion of stomach induced by the combined method of insertion of a spring into the pylorus and high salt hot paste, effects of San Qi (三七 Radix Notoginseng) on gastric secretion and protective factors of stomach were investigated.

  20. Ephedrine hydrochloride protects mice from LPS challenge by promoting IL-10 secretion and inhibiting proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuejuan; Guo, Ziyi; He, Weigang; Yang, Yang; Li, Yuhu; Zheng, Aoxiang; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Jinzhu; Wen, Mingyue; Yang, Muyi; An, Huazhang; Ji, Guang; Yu, Yizhi

    2012-05-01

    Sepsis and its derivative endotoxic shock are still serious conditions with high mortality in the intensive care unit. The mechanisms that ensure the balance of proinflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokine production are of particular importance. As an active α- and β-adrenergic agonist, ephedrine hydrochloride (EH) is a widely used agent for cardiovascular diseases, especially boosting blood pressure. Here we demonstrate that EH increased Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated production of interleukin 10 (IL-10) through p38 MAPK activation. Simultaneously, EH negatively regulated the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Consistently, EH increased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced serum IL-10 and inhibited tumor necrotic factor-α (TNFα) production in vivo. As a result, EH treatment protected mice from endotoxic shock by lethal LPS challenge. In brief, our data demonstrated that EH could contribute to immune homeostasis by balancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokine in TLR4 signaling. This study provides a potential usage of EH in autoimmunologic diseases or other severe inflammations.

  1. Authentication Without Secrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Lyndon G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robertson, Perry J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This work examines a new approach to authentication, which is the most fundamental security primitive that underpins all cyber security protections. Current Internet authentication techniques require the protection of one or more secret keys along with the integrity protection of the algorithms/computations designed to prove possession of the secret without actually revealing it. Protecting a secret requires physical barriers or encryption with yet another secret key. The reason to strive for "Authentication without Secret Keys" is that protecting secrets (even small ones only kept in a small corner of a component or device) is much harder than protecting the integrity of information that is not secret. Promising methods are examined for authentication of components, data, programs, network transactions, and/or individuals. The successful development of authentication without secret keys will enable far more tractable system security engineering for high exposure, high consequence systems by eliminating the need for brittle protection mechanisms to protect secret keys (such as are now protected in smart cards, etc.). This paper is a re-release of SAND2009-7032 with new figures numerous edits.

  2. Secretion of protective antigens by tissue-stage nematode larvae revealed by proteomic analysis and vaccination-induced sterile immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitson, James P; Ivens, Al C; Harcus, Yvonne; Filbey, Kara J; McSorley, Henry J; Murray, Janice; Bridgett, Stephen; Ashford, David; Dowle, Adam A; Maizels, Rick M

    2013-08-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4) larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL) members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs) and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel repertoire of H

  3. Secretion of protective antigens by tissue-stage nematode larvae revealed by proteomic analysis and vaccination-induced sterile immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Hewitson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4 larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel

  4. Protection of epithelial cells from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis invasion by antibodies against the SPI-1 type III secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desin, Taseen S; Mickael, Claudia S; Lam, Po-King S; Potter, Andrew A; Köster, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) is one of the major causes of bacterial food-borne illness in humans. During the course of infection, Salmonella Enteritidis uses 2 type III secretion systems (T3SS), one of which is encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). SPI-1 plays a major role in the invasion process. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of sera against the SPI-1 T3SS components on invasion in vitro using polarized human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). Antisera to SipD protected Caco-2 cells against entry of wild-type Salmonella Enteritidis. On the other hand, sera against InvG, PrgI, SipA, SipC, SopB, SopE, and SopE2 did not affect Salmonella Enteritidis entry. To illustrate the specificity of anti-SipD mediated inhibition, SipD-specific antibodies were depleted from the serum. Antiserum depleted of SipD-specific antibodies lost its capacity to inhibit Salmonella Enteritidis entry. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that antibodies against the SPI-1 needle tip protein (SipD) inhibit Salmonella Enteritidis invasion and that the SipD protein may be an important target in blocking SPI-1 mediated virulence of Salmonella Enteritidis.

  5. Helicobacter pylori-Mediated Protection from Allergy Is Associated with IL-10-Secreting Peripheral Blood Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Khiyam; Letley, Darren P; Greenaway, A Borgel; Kenefeck, Rupert; Winter, Jody A; Tomlinson, William; Rhead, Joanne; Staples, Emily; Kaneko, Kazuyo; Atherton, John C; Robinson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections are usually established in early childhood and continuously stimulate immunity, including T-helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and regulatory T-cell (Treg) responses, throughout life. Although known to be the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, disease occurs in a minority of those who are infected. Recently, there has been much interest in beneficial effects arising from infection with this pathogen. Published data robustly show that the infection is protective against asthma in mouse models. Epidemiological studies show that H. pylori is inversely associated with human allergy and asthma, but there is a paucity of mechanistic data to explain this. Since Th1 and Treg responses are reported to protect against allergic responses, we investigated if there were links between the human systemic Th1 and Treg response to H. pylori and allergen-specific IgE levels. The human cytokine and T-cell responses were examined using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 49 infected and 58 uninfected adult patients. Concentrations of total and allergen-specific plasma IgE were determined by ELISA and ImmunoCAP assays. These responses were analyzed according to major virulence factor genotypes of the patients' colonizing H. pylori strains. An in vitro assay was employed, using PBMCs from infected and uninfected donors, to determine the role of Treg cytokines in the suppression of IgE. Significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-secreting CD4(+)CD25(hi) Tregs, but not H. pylori-specific Th1 cells, were present in the peripheral blood of infected patients. Total and allergen-specific IgE concentrations were lower when there was a strong Treg response, and blocking IL-10 in vitro dramatically restored IgE responses. IgE concentrations were also significantly lower when patients were infected with CagA(+) strains or those expressing the more active i1 form of VacA. The systemic IL-10(+) Treg response is therefore likely to play a role in H

  6. Helicobacter pylori-mediated protection from allergy is associated with IL-10-secreting peripheral blood regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khiyam eHussain

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infections are usually established in early childhood and continuously stimulate immunity, including T-helper 1 (Th1, Th17 and regulatory T-cell (Treg responses, throughout life. Although known to be the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, disease occurs in a minority of those who are infected. Recently there has been much interest in beneficial effects arising from infection with this pathogen. Published data robustly show that the infection is protective against asthma in mouse models. Epidemiological studies show that H. pylori is inversely associated with human allergy and asthma, but there is a paucity of mechanistic data to explain this. Since Th1 and Treg responses are reported to protect against allergic responses, we investigated if there were links between the human systemic Th1 and Treg response to H. pylori and allergen-specific IgE levels. The human cytokine and T-cell responses were examined using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 49 infected and 58 uninfected adult patients. Concentrations of total and allergen-specific plasma IgE were determined by ELISA and ImmunoCAP assays. These responses were analysed according to major virulence factor genotypes of the patients’ colonizing H. pylori strains. An in vitro assay was employed, using PBMCs from infected and uninfected donors, to determine the role of Treg cytokines in the suppression of IgE. Significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-secreting CD4+CD25hi Tregs, but not H. pylori-specific Th1 cells, were present in the peripheral blood of infected patients. Total and allergen-specific IgE concentrations were lower when there was a strong Treg response, and blocking IL-10 in vitro dramatically restored IgE responses. IgE concentrations were also significantly lower when patients were infected with CagA+ strains or those expressing the more active i1 form of VacA. The systemic IL-10+ Treg response is therefore likely to play a

  7. Protection of genetic heritage in the era of cloning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eudes Quintino de Oliveira Júnior

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on human beings has expanded greatly due to progress and the evolution of society as well as customs. Not only the unceasing development of research on human beings, but also interference in the beginning and end of life with homologous and heterogonous human reproduction, surrogate motherhood, cloning, gene therapies, eugenics,euthanasia, dysthanasia, orthothanasia, assisted suicide, genetic engineering, reassignment surgery in cases of transsexuality, the use of recombinant DNA technology and embryonic stem cells, transplantation of human organs and tissues, biotechnology and many other scientific advances. Scientific progress goes faster than the real needs of human beings, who are the final recipient of the entire evolutionary progress. Hence, there is the need to scrutinize whether new technologies are necessary, suitable and timely so that humanity can achieve its postulate of bene vivere. Human cloning, as an abrupt scientific fact, has presented itself to the world community as a procedure that can be performed with relative success and with little difficulty, since it achieved its objectives with the cloning of Dolly the sheep. This issue became the topic of discussion not only in the scientific community but in the lay population, and it received from both, global disapproval. The conclusion is that the human being is unique, with a life cycle defined by the rules of nature. Reversal will cause a violation of the genetic heritage and, above all, will confront the constitutional principle of human dignity.

  8. GDNF secreting human neural progenitor cells protect dying motor neurons, but not their projection to muscle, in a rat model of familial ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Suzuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by rapid loss of muscle control and eventual paralysis due to the death of large motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Growth factors such as glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF are known to protect motor neurons from damage in a range of models. However, penetrance through the blood brain barrier and delivery to the spinal cord remains a serious challenge. Although there may be a primary dysfunction in the motor neuron itself, there is also increasing evidence that excitotoxicity due to glial dysfunction plays a crucial role in disease progression. Clearly it would be of great interest if wild type glial cells could ameliorate motor neuron loss in these models, perhaps in combination with the release of growth factors such as GDNF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human neural progenitor cells can be expanded in culture for long periods and survive transplantation into the adult rodent central nervous system, in some cases making large numbers of GFAP positive astrocytes. They can also be genetically modified to release GDNF (hNPC(GDNF and thus act as long-term 'mini pumps' in specific regions of the rodent and primate brain. In the current study we genetically modified human neural stem cells to release GDNF and transplanted them into the spinal cord of rats over-expressing mutant SOD1 (SOD1(G93A. Following unilateral transplantation into the spinal cord of SOD1(G93A rats there was robust cellular migration into degenerating areas, efficient delivery of GDNF and remarkable preservation of motor neurons at early and end stages of the disease within chimeric regions. The progenitors retained immature markers, and those not secreting GDNF had no effect on motor neuron survival. Interestingly, this robust motor neuron survival was not accompanied by continued innervation of muscle end plates and thus resulted in no

  9. Protection against RAGE-mediated neuronal cell death by sRAGE-secreting human mesenchymal stem cells in 5xFAD transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myeongjoo; Oh, Seyeon; Park, Hyunjin; Ahn, Hyosang; Choi, Junwon; Kim, Hyungho; Lee, Hye Sun; Lee, Sojung; Park, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Seung U; Lee, Bonghee; Byun, Kyunghee

    2017-07-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is the most commonly encountered neurodegenerative disease, causes synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss due to various pathological processes that include tau abnormality and amyloid beta (Aβ) accumulation. Aβ stimulates the secretion and the synthesis of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) ligand by activating microglial cells, and has been reported to cause neuronal cell death in Aβ1-42 treated rats and in mice with neurotoxin-induced Parkinson's disease. The soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE) is known to reduce inflammation, and to decrease microglial cell activation and Aβ deposition, and thus, it protects from neuronal cell death in AD. However, sRAGE protein has too a short half-life for therapeutic purposes. We developed sRAGE-secreting umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (sRAGE-MSCs) to enhance the inhibitory effects of sRAGE on Aβ deposition and to reduce the secretion and synthesis of RAGE ligands in 5xFAD mice. In addition, these cells improved the viability of injected MSCs, and enhanced the protective effects of sRAGE by inhibiting the binding of RAGE and RAGE ligands in 5xFAD mice. These findings suggest sRAGE protein from sRAGE-MSCs has better protection against neuronal cell death than sRAGE protein or single MSC treatment by inhibiting the RAGE cell death cascade and RAGE-induce inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic mapping identifies novel highly protective antigens for an apicomplexan parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damer P Blake

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for a myriad of diseases in humans and livestock; yet despite intensive effort, development of effective sub-unit vaccines remains a long-term goal. Antigenic complexity and our inability to identify protective antigens from the pool that induce response are serious challenges in the development of new vaccines. Using a combination of parasite genetics and selective barriers with population-based genetic fingerprinting, we have identified that immunity against the most important apicomplexan parasite of livestock (Eimeria spp. was targeted against a few discrete regions of the genome. Herein we report the identification of six genomic regions and, within two of those loci, the identification of true protective antigens that confer immunity as sub-unit vaccines. The first of these is an Eimeria maxima homologue of apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1 and the second is a previously uncharacterised gene that we have termed 'immune mapped protein-1' (IMP-1. Significantly, homologues of the AMA-1 antigen are protective with a range of apicomplexan parasites including Plasmodium spp., which suggest that there may be some characteristic(s of protective antigens shared across this diverse group of parasites. Interestingly, homologues of the IMP-1 antigen, which is protective against E. maxima infection, can be identified in Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Overall, this study documents the discovery of novel protective antigens using a population-based genetic mapping approach allied with a protection-based screen of candidate genes. The identification of AMA-1 and IMP-1 represents a substantial step towards development of an effective anti-eimerian sub-unit vaccine and raises the possibility of identification of novel antigens for other apicomplexan parasites. Moreover, validation of the parasite genetics approach to identify effective antigens supports its adoption in other parasite systems where legitimate

  11. Oral delivery of the Sj23LHD-GST antigen by Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system protects against Schistosoma japonicum infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease and oral vaccine delivery system would be benefit for prevention of this disease. Although attenuated salmonella has been used as an antigen expression vector for oral vaccine development, the membrane-bound vacuoles in which bacteria reside hinders the presentation of expressed heterologous antigens to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. The present work used an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain VNP20009 to secretory expression of Sj23LHDGST bivalent antigen from Schistosoma japonicum and tested the protective efficacy against S. japonicum infection in orally immunized mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Promoters (nirB or pagC were used to express the antigen (Sj23LHDGST and the Salmonella type III or α-hemolysin secretion system was employed to secrete it. The immunoblotting analysis and fluorescent microscopy revealed that the antigen was effectively expressed and delivered to the cytosol of macrophages in vitro. Among recombinant vaccine strains, an engineered VNP20009 which expressed the antigen by nirB promoter and secreted it through type III secretion system (nirB-sopE(1-104-Sj23LHD-GST efficiently protected against S. japonicum infection in a mouse model. This strain elicited a predominantly IgG(2a antibody response and a markedly increase in the production of IL-12 and IFN-γ. The flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that this strain caused T cell activation as evidenced by significantly increased expression of CD44 and CD69. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Oral delivery of antigen by nirB-driven Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system is a novel, safe, inexpensive, efficient and convenient approach for schistosome vaccine development.

  12. Impaired Prosaposin Secretion During Nerve Regeneration in Diabetic Rats and Protection of Nerve Regeneration by a Prosaposin-Derived Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Prosaposin is both a precursor of sphingolipid activator proteins and a secreted neurotrophic and myelinotrophic factor. Because peripheral nerve regeneration is impaired in diabetes mellitus, we measured prosaposin protein levels from control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats by collecting endoneurial fluid secreted into a bridging tube connecting the ends of transected sciatic nerve. Prosaposin protein levels were significantly reduced in endoneurial fluid from diabetic rats and increased in...

  13. Role of oxygen tension and genetic background during the epigenetic conversion of mouse fibroblasts into insulin secreting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Zenobi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic cell conversion overcomes the stability of a mature cell phenotype transforming a somatic cell in an unlimited source of autologous cells of a different type. It is based on the exposure to a demethylating agent followed by an induction protocol. In our work we exposed mouse dermal fibroblasts to the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. Cell differentiation was directed toward the endocrine pancreatic lineage with a sequential combination of Activin A, Retinoic Acid, B27 supplement, ITS and bFGF. The overall duration of the process was 10 days. Aim of this work was to evaluate the role of oxygen during differentiation of dermal fibroblasts derived from two different mouse strains, NOD and C57 BL/6J. During differentiation, both cell lines were cultured either in the standard in vitro culture 20% oxygen concentration or in the lower and more physiological 5% of oxygen. Our results show that C57 BL/6J cells are able to differentiate into insulin secreting cells in both oxygen tensions with a higher amount of insulin release in low oxygen conditions. On the other hand, cells of NOD mice, which are physiologically predisposed to the onset of diabetes, differentiate in 20% of oxygen but not in low oxygen and they died after three days of culture. However, if these cells are moved to 5% of oxygen after their differentiation in high oxygen they remain viable for up to four days. Furthermore, their capacity to release insulin remains unchanged for 24 hours. Results suggest that genetic background has a profound effect on the role of oxygen during the in vitro differentiation process, possibly reflecting the different susceptibility to the disease of the strains used in the experiment.Supported by EFSD and Carraresi Foundation

  14. Genetic Structure in a Small Pelagic Fish Coincides with a Marine Protected Area: Seascape Genetics in Patagonian Fjords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales-Aguirre, Cristian B; Ferrada-Fuentes, Sandra; Galleguillos, Ricardo; Hernández, Cristián E

    2016-01-01

    Marine environmental variables can play an important role in promoting population genetic differentiation in marine organisms. Although fjord ecosystems have attracted much attention due to the great oscillation of environmental variables that produce heterogeneous habitats, species inhabiting this kind of ecosystem have received less attention. In this study, we used Sprattus fuegensis, a small pelagic species that populates the inner waters of the continental shelf, channels and fjords of Chilean Patagonia and Argentina, as a model species to test whether environmental variables of fjords relate to population genetic structure. A total of 282 individuals were analyzed from Chilean Patagonia with eight microsatellite loci. Bayesian and non-Bayesian analyses were conducted to describe the genetic variability of S. fuegensis and whether it shows spatial genetic structure. Results showed two well-differentiated genetic clusters along the Chilean Patagonia distribution (i.e. inside the embayment area called TicToc, and the rest of the fjords), but no spatial isolation by distance (IBD) pattern was found with a Mantel test analysis. Temperature and nitrate were correlated to the expected heterozygosities and explained the allelic frequency variation of data in the redundancy analyses. These results suggest that the singular genetic differences found in S. fuegensis from inside TicToc Bay (East of the Corcovado Gulf) are the result of larvae retention bya combination of oceanographic mesoscale processes (i.e. the west wind drift current reaches the continental shelf exactly in this zone), and the local geographical configuration (i.e. embayment area, islands, archipelagos). We propose that these features generated an isolated area in the Patagonian fjords that promoted genetic differentiation by drift and a singular biodiversity, adding support to the existence of the largest marine protected area (MPA) of continental Chile, which is the Tic-Toc MPA.

  15. The Trade Secret and the Protection of Traditional Knowledge%商业秘密与传统知识保护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡晓东

    2014-01-01

    The protection of traditional knowledge mainly focuses on the protection of cultural heritage and biodiversity and protection of human rights .As a kind of intellectual property law,trade secret lawcan protect the holder against outsiders’ improper access to ,disclosure and use of a part of traditional knowl-edge .The way that making use of trade secret law protect traditional knowledge protection can enhance the the trust between indigenous people and outsiders (including human biological scientists ,explorers) , encourage valuable information disclosure ,which is beneficial to the society as a whole .Generally speak-ing ,infringement of trade secrets has three forms :violating contract obligation ,transgressing non-con-tract obligation (honesty obligation) and improper taking .There are two kinds of traditional protections :preventative protection and active protection .%传统知识保护主要是围绕文化遗产保护、生物多样性保护或者人权展开,作为一种知识产权法,商业秘密法可以保护持有人免受外来者不当地获取、披露和使用一部分传统知识。利用商业秘密法保护传统知识,可以增进少数民族与外来者(包括人类科学家、生物勘探者)之间的信任,鼓励有价值信息的披露,从而有益于整个社会。一般来说,侵害商业秘密有违反合同义务、违反非合同义务(诚信义务)、不正当获取三种形式。传统知识保护有“防御性保护”和“积极性保护”两种方法。

  16. Immune and Genetic Correlates of Vaccine Protection Against Mucosal Infection by SIV in Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letvin, Norman L; Rao, Srinivas S; Montefiori, David C; Seaman, Michael S; Sun, Yue; Lim, So-Yon; Yeh, Wendy W; Asmal, Mohammed; Gelman, Rebecca S; Shen, Ling; Whitney, James B; Seoighe, Cathal; Lacerda, Miguel; Keating, Sheila; Norris, Philip J; Hudgens, Michael G; Gilbert, Peter B; Buzby, Adam P; Mach, Linh V; Zhang, Jinrong; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Shaw, George M; Schmidt, Stephen D; Todd, John-Paul; Dodson, Alan; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J

    2011-05-04

    The RV144 vaccine trial in Thailand demonstrated that an HIV vaccine could prevent infection in humans and highlights the importance of understanding protective immunity against HIV. We used a nonhuman primate model to define immune and genetic mechanisms of protection against mucosal infection by the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). A plasmid DNA prime/recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) boost vaccine regimen was evaluated for its ability to protect monkeys from infection by SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 isolates after repeat intrarectal challenges. Although this prime-boost vaccine regimen failed to protect against SIVmac251 infection, 50% of vaccinated monkeys were protected from infection with SIVsmE660. Among SIVsmE660-infected animals, there was about a one-log reduction in peak plasma virus RNA in monkeys expressing the major histocompatibility complex class I allele Mamu-A*01, implicating cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the control of SIV replication once infection is established. Among Mamu-A*01-negative monkeys challenged with SIVsmE660, no CD8(+) T cell response or innate immune response was associated with protection against virus acquisition. However, low levels of neutralizing antibodies and an envelope-specific CD4(+) T cell response were associated with vaccine protection in these monkeys. Moreover, monkeys that expressed two TRIM5 alleles that restrict SIV replication were more likely to be protected from infection than monkeys that expressed at least one permissive TRIM5 allele. This study begins to elucidate the mechanisms of vaccine protection against immunodeficiency viruses and highlights the need to analyze these immune and genetic correlates of protection in future trials of HIV vaccine strategies.

  17. Induction of ssDNA-binding autoantibody secreting B cell immunity during murine malaria infection is a critical part of the protective immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Kaiissar; Li, Changchun; Inafuku, Masashi; Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Abo, Toru; Sato, Yoshiya; Watanabe, Hisami

    2013-01-01

    Although it has been hypothesized that autoimmune-like phenomena may play a critical role in the protective immune responses to both human and animal malaria, there are still no evidence-based data to support this view. In this study we demonstrate that the majority of anti-single stranded (ss) DNA autoantibody secreting B cells were confined to B220(+)CD21(+)CD23(-) cells and that these cells expanded significantly in the spleen of C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii 17X non-lethal (PyNL). To determine the role of ssDNA-binding autoantibody secreting B cell responses in murine malaria, we conjugated generation 6 (poly) amidoamine dendrimer nanoparticles with ssDNA to deplete ssDNA-binding autoreactive B cells in vivo. Our data revealed that 55.5% of mice died after DNA-coated nanoparticle-mediated in vivo depletion of ssDNA-specific autoreactive B cells and subsequent challenge using PyNL. Adoptive transfer of B cells with ssDNA specificity to mice, followed by PyNL infection, caused a later appearance and inhibition of parasitemia. The possible mechanism by which the ssDNA-binding autoantibody secreting B cells is involved in the protection against murine malaria has also been demonstrated.

  18. Inspiration from genetics to promote recognition and protection within ad hoc sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Korsnes, Reinert

    2009-01-01

    This work illustrates potentials for recognition within {\\em ad hoc} sensor networks if their nodes possess individual inter-related biologically inspired genetic codes. The work takes ideas from natural immune systems protecting organisms from infection. Nodes in the present proposal have individual gene sets fitting into a self organised phylogenetic tree. Members of this population are genetically ''relatives''. Outsiders cannot easily copy or introduce a new node in the network without going through a process of conception between two nodes in the population. Related nodes can locally decide to check each other for their genetic relation without directly revealing their gene sets. A copy/clone of a gene sequence or a random gene set will appear as alien. Nodes go through a cycle of introduction (conception or ''birth'') with parents in the network and later exit from it (''death''). Hence the phylogenetic tree is dynamic or possesses a genetic drift. Typical lifetimes of gene sets and number of offspring ...

  19. Evaluation of immunogenicity and protective efficacy of orally delivered Shigella type III secretion system proteins IpaB and IpaD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Shannon J; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Martinez-Becerra, Francisco J; Choudhari, Shyamal P; Clements, John D; Picking, Wendy L; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2013-06-19

    Shigella spp. are food- and water-borne pathogens that cause shigellosis, a severe diarrheal and dysenteric disease that is associated with a high morbidity and mortality in resource-poor countries. No licensed vaccine is available to prevent shigellosis. We have recently demonstrated that Shigella invasion plasmid antigens (Ipas), IpaB and IpaD, which are components of the bacterial type III secretion system (TTSS), can prevent infection in a mouse model of intranasal immunization and lethal pulmonary challenge. Because they are conserved across Shigella spp. and highly immunogenic, these proteins are excellent candidates for a cross-protective vaccine. Ideally, such a vaccine could be administered to humans orally to induce mucosal and systemic immunity. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Shigella IpaB and IpaD administered orally with a double mutant of the Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (dmLT) as a mucosal adjuvant. We characterized the immune responses induced by oral vs. intranasal immunization and the protective efficacy using a mouse pulmonary infection model. Serum IgG and fecal IgA against IpaB were induced after oral immunization. These responses, however, were lower than those obtained after intranasal immunization despite a 100-fold dosage increase. The level of protection induced by oral immunization with IpaB and IpaD was 40%, while intranasal immunization resulted in 90% protective efficacy. IpaB- and IpaD-specific IgA antibody-secreting cells in the lungs and spleen and T-cell-derived IL-2, IL-5, IL-17 and IL-10 were associated with protection. These results demonstrate the immunogenicity of orally administered IpaB and IpaD and support further studies in humans.

  20. Implications of genetics and current protected areas for conservation of 5 endangered primates in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijin; Liu, Guangjian; Roos, Christian; Wang, Ziming; Xiang, ZuoFu; Zhu, Pingfen; Wang, Boshi; Ren, Baoping; Shi, Fanglei; Pan, Huijuan; Li, Ming

    2015-12-01

    Most of China's 24-28 primate species are threatened with extinction. Habitat reduction and fragmentation are perhaps the greatest threats. We used published data from a conservation genetics study of 5 endangered primates in China (Rhinopithecus roxellana, R. bieti, R. brelichi, Trachypithecus francoisi, and T. leucocephalus); distribution data on these species; and the distribution, area, and location of protected areas to inform conservation strategies for these primates. All 5 species were separated into subpopulations with unique genetic components. Gene flow appeared to be strongly impeded by agricultural land, meadows used for grazing, highways, and humans dwellings. Most species declined severely or diverged concurrently as human population and crop land cover increased. Nature reserves were not evenly distributed across subpopulations with unique genetic backgrounds. Certain small subpopulations were severely fragmented and had higher extinction risk than others. Primate mobility is limited and their genetic structure is strong and susceptible to substantial loss of diversity due to local extinction. Thus, to maximize preservation of genetic diversity in all these primate species, our results suggest protection is required for all sub-populations. Key priorities for their conservation include maintaining R. roxellana in Shennongjia national reserve, subpopulations S4 and S5 of R. bieti and of R. brelichi in Fanjingshan national reserve, subpopulation CGX of T. francoisi in central Guangxi Province, and all 3 T. leucocephalus sub-populations in central Guangxi Province. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  1. 试论保护企业商业秘密的措施%Try a Theory a Protection Business Enterprise Business Secret of Measure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大立

    2009-01-01

    商业秘密是企业知识产权的重要组成部分,是企业重要的无形资产,对增强企业的市场竞争能力和企业的生存与发展具有重大影响.企业必须采取有效措施,切实加强商业秘密的保护和管理.我们应该切实做到该保密的信息能够保住,可以交流信息的还应该要交流,使商业秘密的保护工作和信息交流工作更好地协调,以适应建立社会主义市场经济体制和高新技术迅猛发展新形势的需要,为保持企业在市场中竞争优势作出努力.%The business secret is the importance of the business enterprise intelligent property right to constitute part, is a business enterprise importance of immaterial assets, to strengthen business enterprise of market competition ability and business enterprise of existence and development have a graveness influence.The business enterprise has to adopt valid measure, practical strengthen busi-ness a secret of protection and management. We should be practical to attain the information that should keep secret and can protect, can exchanges information of also should want exchanges, make business clandestine of protection work and information exchanges work betterly moderate, with orientation establishment system and Gao Xin's technique of the socialism market economy be fast fierce development new situation of demand, for keep a business enterprise competitive advantage to make effort in the market.

  2. A live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis secreting detoxified heat labile toxin enhances mucosal immunity and confers protection against wild-type challenge in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalsiamthara, Jonathan; Kamble, Nitin Machindra; Lee, John Hwa

    2016-06-04

    A live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) capable of constitutively secreting detoxified double mutant Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (dmLT) was developed. The biologically adjuvanted strain was generated via transformation of a highly immunogenic SE JOL1087 with a plasmid encoding dmLT gene cassette; the resultant strain was designated JOL1641. A balanced-lethal host-vector system stably maintained the plasmid via auxotrophic host complementation with a plasmid encoded aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (asd) gene. Characterization by western blot assay revealed the dmLT subunit proteins in culture supernatants of JOL1641. For the investigation of adjuvanticity and protective efficacy, chickens were immunized via oral or intramuscular routes with PBS, JOL1087 and JOL1641. Birds immunized with JOL1641 showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) increases in intestinal SIgA production at the 1(st) and 2(nd) weeks post-immunization via oral and intramuscular routes, respectively. Interestingly, while both strains showed significant splenic protection via intramuscular immunization, JOL1641 outperformed JOL1087 upon oral immunization. Oral immunization of birds with JOL1641 significantly reduced splenic bacterial counts. The reduction in bacterial counts may be correlated with an adjuvant effect of dmLT that increases SIgA secretion in the intestines of immunized birds. The inclusion of detoxified dmLT in the strain did not cause adverse reactions to birds, nor did it extend the period of bacterial fecal shedding. In conclusion, we report here that dmLT could be biologically incorporated in the secretion system of a live attenuated Salmonella-based vaccine, and that this construction is safe and could enhance mucosal immunity, and protect immunized birds against wild-type challenge.

  3. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  4. Immunoglobins in mammary secretions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, W L; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulins secreted in colostrum and milk by the lactating mammal are major factors providing immune protection to the newborn. Immunoglobulins in mammary secretions represent the cumulative immune response of the lactating animal to exposure to antigenic stimulation that occurs through inte...

  5. Genetic structure of the rattan Calamus thwaitesii in core, buffer and peripheral regions of three protected areas in centralWestern Ghats, India: do protected areas serve as refugia for genetic resources of economically important plants?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. T. Ramesha; G. Ravikanth; M. Nageswara Rao; K. N. Ganeshaiah; R. Uma Shaanker

    2007-01-01

    Given the increasing anthropogenic pressures on forests, the various protected areas—national parks, sanctuaries, and biosphere reserves—serve as the last footholds for conserving biological diversity. However, because protected areas are often targeted for the conservation of selected species, particularly charismatic animals, concerns have been raised about their effectiveness in conserving nontarget taxa and their genetic resources. In this paper, we evaluate whether protected areas can serve as refugia for genetic resources of economically important plants that are threatened due to extraction pressures. We examine the population structure and genetic diversity of an economically important rattan, Calamus thwaitesii, in the core, buffer and peripheral regions of three protected areas in the central Western Ghats, southern India. Our results indicate that in all the three protected areas, the core and buffer regions maintain a better population structure, as well as higher genetic diversity, than the peripheral regions of the protected area. Thus, despite the escalating pressures of extraction, the protected areas are effective in conserving the genetic resources of rattan. These results underscore the importance of protected areas in conservation of nontarget species and emphasize the need to further strengthen the protected-area network to offer refugia for economically important plant species.

  6. Genetic deletion of Rab27B in pancreatic acinar cells affects granules size and has inhibitory effects on amylase secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Lentz, Stephen I; Williams, John A

    2016-03-18

    Small G protein Rab27B is expressed in various secretory cell types and plays a role in mediating secretion. In pancreatic acinar cells, Rab27B was found to be expressed on the zymogen granule membrane and by overexpression to regulate the secretion of zymogen granules. However, the effect of Rab27B deletion on the physiology of pancreatic acinar cells is unknown. In the current study, we utilized the Rab27B KO mouse model to better understand the role of Rab27B in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Our data show that Rab27B deficiency had no obvious effects on the expression of major digestive enzymes and other closely related proteins, e.g. similar small G proteins, such as Rab3D and Rab27A, and putative downstream effectors. The overall morphology of acinar cells was not changed in the knockout pancreas. However, the size of zymogen granules was decreased in KO acinar cells, suggesting a role of Rab27B in regulating the maturation of secretory granules. The secretion of digestive enzymes was moderately decreased in KO acini, compared with the WT control. These data indicate that Rab27B is involved at a different steps of zymogen granule maturation and secretion, which is distinct from that of Rab3D.

  7. The Australian joint inquiry into the Protection of Human Genetic Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrot, David

    2003-04-01

    The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) and the Australian Health Ethics Committee are currently engaged in an inquiry into the Protection of Human Genetic Information. In particular, the Attorney-General and the Minister for Health and Ageing have asked us to focus, in relation to human genetic information and tissue samples, on how best to ensure world's best practice in relation to: privacy protection; protection against unlawful discrimination; and the maintenance of high ethical standards in medical research and clinical practice. While initial concerns and controversies have related mainly to aspects of medical research (e.g. consent; re-use of samples) and access to private insurance coverage, relevant issues arise in a wide variety of contexts, including: employment; medical practice; tissue banks and genetic databases; health administration; superannuation; access to government services (e.g. schools, nursing homes); law enforcement; and use by government authorities (e.g. for immigration purposes) or other bodies (e.g. by sports associations). Under the Australian federal system, it is also the case that laws and practices may vary across states and territories. For example, neonatal genetic testing is standard, but storage and retention policies for the resulting 'Guthrie cards' differ markedly. Similarly, some states have developed highly linked health information systems (e.g. incorporating hospitals, doctors' offices and public records), while others discourage such linkages owing to concerns about privacy. The challenge for Australia is to develop policies, standards and practices that promote the intelligent use of genetic information, while providing a level of security with which the community feels comfortable. The inquiry is presently reviewing the adequacy of existing laws and regulatory mechanisms, but recognizes that it will be even more important to develop a broad mix of strategies, such as community and professional education, and the

  8. Impaired Prosaposin Secretion During Nerve Regeneration in Diabetic Rats and Protection of Nerve Regeneration by a Prosaposin-Derived Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivalt, Corinne G.; Vu, Yvonne; Mizisin, Leah M.; Mizisin, Andrew P.; Calcutt, Nigel A.

    2009-01-01

    Prosaposin is both a precursor of sphingolipid activator proteins and a secreted neurotrophic and myelinotrophic factor. Because peripheral nerve regeneration is impaired in diabetes mellitus, we measured prosaposin protein levels from control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats by collecting endoneurial fluid secreted into a bridging tube connecting the ends of transected sciatic nerve. Prosaposin protein levels were significantly reduced in endoneurial fluid from diabetic rats and increased in the proximal nerve stump compared to controls. To investigate whether a prosaposin-derived peptide could improve nerve regeneration, rats were treated with prosaptide TX14(A) following sciatic nerve crush. In control rats, TX14(A) was without effect in the uninjured nerve but shortened toe spread recovery time after nerve crush. In diabetic rats, efficacy of prosaptide TX14(A) was confirmed by correction of thermal hypoalgesia, formalin-evoked hyperalgesia and conduction slowing in the uninjured nerve. The peptide also prevented diabetes-induced abnormalities in nerve regeneration distance and mean axonal diameter of regenerated axons, whereas delayed recovery of toe spread was not improved. Muscle denervation atrophy was attenuated by TX14(A) in both control and diabetic rats. These results suggest that reduced prosaposin secretion after nerve injury may contribute to impaired regeneration rates in diabetic rats and that prosaptide TX14(A) can improve aspects of nerve regeneration. PMID:18596543

  9. Impaired prosaposin secretion during nerve regeneration in diabetic rats and protection of nerve regeneration by a prosaposin-derived peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivalt, Corinne G; Vu, Yvonne; Mizisin, Leah M; Mizisin, Andrew P; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2008-07-01

    Prosaposin is both a precursor of sphingolipid activator proteins and a secreted neurotrophic and myelinotrophic factor. Because peripheral nerve regeneration is impaired in diabetes mellitus, we measured prosaposin protein levels from control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats by collecting endoneurial fluid secreted into a bridging tube connecting the ends of transected sciatic nerve. Prosaposin protein levels were significantly reduced in endoneurial fluid from diabetic rats and increased in the proximal nerve stump compared to controls. To investigate whether a prosaposin-derived peptide could improve nerve regeneration, rats were treated with prosaptide TX14(A) after sciatic nerve crush. In control rats, TX14(A) was without effect in the uninjured nerve but shortened toe spread recovery time after nerve crush. In diabetic rats, efficacy of prosaptide TX14(A) was confirmed by correction of thermal hypoalgesia, formalin-evoked hyperalgesia, and conduction slowing in the uninjured nerve. The peptide also prevented diabetes-induced abnormalities in nerve regeneration distance and mean axonal diameter of regenerated axons, whereas delayed recovery of toe spread was not improved. Muscle denervation atrophy was attenuated by TX14(A) in both control and diabetic rats. These results suggest that reduced prosaposin secretion after nerve injury may contribute to impaired regeneration rates in diabetic rats, and that prosaptide TX14(A) can improve aspects of nerve regeneration.

  10. Developments in Genetic and Epigenetic Data Protection in Behavioral and Mental Health Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    The legal system has been preparing for an explosion of epigenetic issues in public health, environmental regulation and litigation. So far, this explosion has been muted, and for now epigenetic data protection merely seems to be "enjoying" the same technological and legal challenges experienced by other clinical and research data. However, three areas of development suggest where epigenetic data protection may prove problematic. This article examines these three issues, noting the rapid expansion of research based on EMR-sourced clinical data, the large number of data protection models that can apply to genetic data (including point-of-use prohibitions on discrimination and confidentiality), and the increasing and controversial dangers of deidentified information being reidentified.

  11. Genetic Moderation of Cortisol Secretion in Holocaust Survivors: A Pilot Study on the Role of ADRA2B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Ayala; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Sagi-Schwartz, Abraham; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2012-01-01

    In the current study we tested whether "ADRA2B" moderates stress regulation of Holocaust survivors as indexed by their diurnal cortisol secretion and cortisol reactivity to a stressor. Salivary cortisol levels of 54 female Holocaust survivors and participants in the comparison group were assessed during a routine day and in response to a…

  12. Genetic Moderation of Cortisol Secretion in Holocaust Survivors: A Pilot Study on the Role of ADRA2B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Ayala; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Sagi-Schwartz, Abraham; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2012-01-01

    In the current study we tested whether "ADRA2B" moderates stress regulation of Holocaust survivors as indexed by their diurnal cortisol secretion and cortisol reactivity to a stressor. Salivary cortisol levels of 54 female Holocaust survivors and participants in the comparison group were assessed during a routine day and in response to a…

  13. Elevated Glucose Oxidation, Reduced Insulin Secretion, and a Fatty Heart May Be Protective Adaptions in Ischemic CAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannukainen, J C; Lautamäki, R; Mari, A; Pärkkä, J P; Bucci, M; Guzzardi, M A; Kajander, S; Tuokkola, T; Knuuti, J; Iozzo, P

    2016-07-01

    Insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and ectopic fat deposition have been implicated in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD) and type 2 diabetes, which is common in CAD patients. We investigated whether CAD is an independent predictor of these metabolic abnormalities and whether this interaction is influenced by superimposed myocardial ischemia. We studied CAD patients with (n = 8) and without (n = 14) myocardial ischemia and eight non-CAD controls. Insulin sensitivity and secretion and substrate oxidation were measured during fasting and oral glucose tolerance testing. We used magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy, positron emission and computerized tomography to characterize CAD, cardiac function, pericardial and abdominal adipose tissue, and myocardial, liver, and pancreatic triglyceride contents. Ischemic CAD was characterized by elevated oxidative glucose metabolism and a proportional decline in β-cell insulin secretion and reduction in lipid oxidation. Cardiac function was preserved in CAD groups, whereas cardiac fat depots were elevated in ischemic CAD compared to non-CAD subjects. Liver and pancreatic fat contents were similar in all groups and related with surrounding adipose masses or systemic insulin sensitivity. In ischemic CAD patients, glucose oxidation is enhanced and correlates inversely with insulin secretion. This can be seen as a mechanism to prevent glucose lowering because glucose is required in oxygen-deprived tissues. On the other hand, the accumulation of cardiac triglycerides may be a physiological adaptation to the limited fatty acid oxidative capacity. Our results underscore the urgent need of clinical trials that define the optimal/safest glycemic range in situations of myocardial ischemia.

  14. [From genetic privacy to the right to genetic data protection. Basic protection of genetic data in Spanish law (regarding SSTC290/2000 and 292/2000, of November 30) (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane Rodríguez, José Antonio

    2002-01-01

    In the second part the author examines the repercussions of constitutional case law on the legal protection of genetic information. He then considers the special nature of genetic information and addresses the corresponding need for special treatment thereof in law. A specific model is suggested for the legal status of such information. This model is based on the Spanish Constitution and the European Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine. The article then casts a critical eye over data protection legislation in Spain (in particular Law 15/1999 of 13 December) concentrating on five principles, four of which are substantive and the fifth procedural: 1) consent; 2) purpose; 3) confidentiality; 4) quality; 5) proportionality. Lastly, the article gives examples of areas in which the model might be applied (for instance in employment contracts, insurance, access to information by family members).

  15. Generation of a safe Salmonella Gallinarum vaccine candidate that secretes an adjuvant protein with immunogenicity and protective efficacy against fowl typhoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandre, R M; Lee, J H

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a live, attenuated Salmonella Gallinarum (SG) that secretes heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit protein (LTB), and evaluated this strain as a new vaccine candidate by assessing its safety, immunogenicity and protective efficacy against fowl typhoid. An asd(+) p15A ori low-copy plasmid containing eltB encoding LTB was transformed into a ΔlonΔcpxRΔasd SG (JOL967) to construct the candidate, JOL1355. In Experiments 1 and 2, birds were orally immunized with JOL1355 at 4 weeks of age, while control birds were inoculated with sterile phosphate-buffered saline. In Experiment 2, the birds of both groups were orally challenged with a virulent SG at 8 weeks of age. In Experiment 1, examination for safety revealed that the immunized group did not show any bacterial counts of the vaccine candidate in the liver and spleen. Birds immunized with the vaccine candidate showed a significant increase in systemic IgG and mucosal secretory IgA levels in Experiment 2. In addition, the lymphocyte proliferation response and the numbers of CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells were also significantly elevated in the immunized group, which indicated that the candidate also induced cellular immune responses. In the protection assay, efficient protection with only 16% mortality in the immunized group was observed against challenge compared with 76% mortality in the control group. These results indicate that the live, attenuated SG secreting LTB can be a safe vaccine candidate. In addition, it can induce humoral and cellular immune responses and can efficiently reduce mortality of birds exposed to fowl typhoid.

  16. Evaluation of genetically inactivated alpha toxin for protection in multiple mouse models of Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Brady

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Development of a vaccine against this pathogen is an important goal. While S. aureus protective antigens have been identified in the literature, the majority have only been tested in a single animal model of disease. We wished to evaluate the ability of one S. aureus vaccine antigen to protect in multiple mouse models, thus assessing whether protection in one model translates to protection in other models encompassing the full breadth of infections the pathogen can cause. We chose to focus on genetically inactivated alpha toxin mutant HlaH35L. We evaluated the protection afforded by this antigen in three models of infection using the same vaccine dose, regimen, route of immunization, adjuvant, and challenge strain. When mice were immunized with HlaH35L and challenged via a skin and soft tissue infection model, HlaH35L immunization led to a less severe infection and decreased S. aureus levels at the challenge site when compared to controls. Challenge of HlaH35L-immunized mice using a systemic infection model resulted in a limited, but statistically significant decrease in bacterial colonization as compared to that observed with control mice. In contrast, in a prosthetic implant model of chronic biofilm infection, there was no significant difference in bacterial levels when compared to controls. These results demonstrate that vaccines may confer protection against one form of S. aureus disease without conferring protection against other disease presentations and thus underscore a significant challenge in S. aureus vaccine development.

  17. Individual identification and genetic variation of lions (Panthera leo from two protected areas in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talatu Tende

    Full Text Available This survey was conducted in two protected areas in Nigeria to genetically identify individual lions and to determine the genetic variation within and between the populations. We used faecal sample DNA, a non-invasive alternative to the risky and laborious task of taking samples directly from the animals, often preceded by catching and immobilization. Data collection in Yankari Game Reserve (YGR spanned through a period of five years (2008 -2012, whereas data in Kainji Lake National Park (KLNP was gathered for a period of three years (2009, 2010 and 2012. We identified a minimum of eight individuals (2 males, 3 females, 3 unknown from YGR and a minimum of ten individuals (7 males, 3 females from KLNP. The two populations were found to be genetically distinct as shown by the relatively high fixation index (FST  = 0.17 with each population exhibiting signs of inbreeding (YGR FIS  = 0.49, KLNP FIS  = 0.38. The genetic differentiation between the Yankari and Kainji lions is assumed to result from large spatial geographic distance and physical barriers reducing gene flow between these two remaining wild lion populations in Nigeria. To mitigate the probable inbreeding depression in the lion populations within Nigeria it might be important to transfer lions between parks or reserves or to reintroduce lions from the zoos back to the wild.

  18. Psoriasis Patients Are Enriched for Genetic Variants That Protect against HIV-1 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyan; Hayashi, Genki; Lai, Olivia Y.; Dilthey, Alexander; Kuebler, Peter J.; Wong, Tami V.; Martin, Maureen P.; Fernandez Vina, Marcelo A.; McVean, Gil; Wabl, Matthias; Leslie, Kieron S.; Maurer, Toby; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Carrington, Mary; Bowcock, Anne M.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Liao, Wilson

    2012-01-01

    An important paradigm in evolutionary genetics is that of a delicate balance between genetic variants that favorably boost host control of infection but which may unfavorably increase susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Here, we investigated whether patients with psoriasis, a common immune-mediated disease of the skin, are enriched for genetic variants that limit the ability of HIV-1 virus to replicate after infection. We analyzed the HLA class I and class II alleles of 1,727 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 3,581 controls and found that psoriasis patients are significantly more likely than controls to have gene variants that are protective against HIV-1 disease. This includes several HLA class I alleles associated with HIV-1 control; amino acid residues at HLA-B positions 67, 70, and 97 that mediate HIV-1 peptide binding; and the deletion polymorphism rs67384697 associated with high surface expression of HLA-C. We also found that the compound genotype KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, which respectively encode a natural killer cell activating receptor and its putative ligand, significantly increased psoriasis susceptibility. This compound genotype has also been associated with delay of progression to AIDS. Together, our results suggest that genetic variants that contribute to anti-viral immunity may predispose to the development of psoriasis. PMID:22577363

  19. Psoriasis patients are enriched for genetic variants that protect against HIV-1 disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyan Chen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An important paradigm in evolutionary genetics is that of a delicate balance between genetic variants that favorably boost host control of infection but which may unfavorably increase susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Here, we investigated whether patients with psoriasis, a common immune-mediated disease of the skin, are enriched for genetic variants that limit the ability of HIV-1 virus to replicate after infection. We analyzed the HLA class I and class II alleles of 1,727 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 3,581 controls and found that psoriasis patients are significantly more likely than controls to have gene variants that are protective against HIV-1 disease. This includes several HLA class I alleles associated with HIV-1 control; amino acid residues at HLA-B positions 67, 70, and 97 that mediate HIV-1 peptide binding; and the deletion polymorphism rs67384697 associated with high surface expression of HLA-C. We also found that the compound genotype KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, which respectively encode a natural killer cell activating receptor and its putative ligand, significantly increased psoriasis susceptibility. This compound genotype has also been associated with delay of progression to AIDS. Together, our results suggest that genetic variants that contribute to anti-viral immunity may predispose to the development of psoriasis.

  20. Protection against avian necrotic enteritis after immunisation with NetB genetic or formaldehyde toxoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P; Mot, Dorien; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Savva, Christos G; Basak, Ajit K; Van Immerseel, Filip; Titball, Richard W

    2013-08-20

    NetB (necrotic enteritis toxin B) is a recently identified β-pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens. This toxin has been shown to play a major role in avian necrotic enteritis. In recent years, a dramatic increase in necrotic enteritis has been observed, especially in countries where the use of antimicrobial growth promoters in animal feedstuffs has been banned. The aim of this work was to determine whether immunisation with a NetB toxoid would provide protection against necrotic enteritis. The immunisation of poultry with a formaldehyde NetB toxoid or with a NetB genetic toxoid (W262A) resulted in the induction of antibody responses against NetB and provided partial protection against disease.

  1. Alfa-lipoic acid protects testosterone secretion pathway and sperm quality against 4-tert-octylphenol induced reproductive toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Azza I; El-Missiry, Mohamed A; Koriem, Khaled M; El-Sayed, Aml A

    2012-07-01

    The protective effect of α-lipoic acid (LA) (50 mg/kg bw) against 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) (50 mg/kg bw) induced reproductive toxicity in male rats was studied. LA was injected 1h prior to OP administration three times a week. OP caused significant increase in oxidative stress in hypothalamus and epididymal sperm, disturbed hormonal levels in serum, decreased sperm quality, increased DNA fragmentation and loss of 35 and 95 kDa proteins in sperm, as well as elevated proliferating index in testis. LA protected against oxidative stress through promoting the levels of glutathione and glutathione-S-transferase in hypothalamus and sperm. In addition, LA prevented the decrease in testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and inhibited the elevations in sex-hormone-binding globulin levels and showed normal sperm quality. LA modulated proliferation of germ cell, protected against DNA fragmentation and maintained membrane protein organization in the sperm. In conclusion, LA normalized oxidative stress and protected testosterone synthesis pathway across hypothalamus-testicular axis and sperm quality indicating its defensive influence against OP-induced oxidative reproductive dysfunction in male rats.

  2. Genetically attenuated, P36p-deficient malarial sporozoites induce protective immunity and apoptosis of infected liver cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, M.R. van; Douradinha, B.; Franke-Fayard, B.; Heussler, V.; Dooren, M.W. van; Schaijk, B.C.L. van; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Sauerwein, R.W.; Mota, M.M.; Waters, A.P.; Janse, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Immunization with Plasmodium sporozoites that have been attenuated by gamma-irradiation or specific genetic modification can induce protective immunity against subsequent malaria infection. The mechanism of protection is only known for radiation-attenuated sporozoites, involving cell-mediated and hu

  3. Genetic and histopathological alterations induced by cypermethrin in rat kidney and liver: Protection by sesame oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Attia, Hossam F; El-Ella, Ghada A Abou

    2015-12-01

    Pesticides are widespread synthesized substances used for public health protection and agricultural programs. However, they cause environmental pollution and health hazards. This study aimed to examine the protective effects of sesame oil (SO) on the genetic alterations induced by cypermethrin (CYP) in the liver and kidney of Wistar rats. Male rats were divided into four groups, each containing 10 rats: the control group received vehicle, SO group (5 mL/kg b.w), CYP group (12 mg/kg b.w), and protective group received SO (5 mL/kg b.w) plus CYP (12 mg/kg b.w). Biochemical analysis showed an increase in albumin, urea, creatinine, GPT, GOT, and lipid profiles in the CYP group. Co-administration of SO with CYP normalized such biochemical changes. CYP administration decreased both the activity and mRNA expression of the examined antioxidants. SO co-administration recovered CYP, downregulating the expression of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase, and superoxide dismutase. Additionally, SO co-administration with CYP counteracted the CYP- altering the expression of renal interleukins (IL-1 and IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), anigotensinogen (AGT), AGT receptors (AT1), and genes of hepatic glucose and fatty acids metabolism. CYP induced degenerative changes in the kidney and liver histology which are ameliorated by SO. In conclusion, SO has a protective effect against alterations and pathological changes induced by CYP in the liver and kidney at genetic and histological levels.

  4. Immune Responses and Protective Efficacy Induced by 85B Antigen and Early Secreted Antigenic Target-6 kDa Antigen Fusion Protein Secreted by Recombinant Bacille Calmette-Guérin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changhong SHI; Xiaowu WANG; Hai ZHANG; Zhikai XU; Yuan LI; Lintian YUAN

    2007-01-01

    In an attempt to improve immune responses and protective efficacy, we constructed two recombinant bacille Calmette-Guérin (rBCG) strains expressing an 85B antigen (Ag85B) and early secreted antigenic target-6 kDa antigen (ESAT6) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) fusion protein. Both rBCG strains have the same protein insertion but in a different order (Ag85B-ESAT6 and ESAT6-Ag85B). The cultured supernatant of rBCG strains and the sera from the mice immunized with the fusion protein Ag85B-ESAT6 or ESAT6-Ag85B formed a band with a fraction size of 37 kDa, equalivalent to the sum of Ag85B and ESAT6. Six weeks after BALB/c mice were immunized with BCG or rBCG, spleen lymphocytes showed significant proliferation in response to culture filtrate protein of MTB. Compared with the BCG group, mice vaccinated with rBCG elicited a high level increase of immunoglobulin G antibodies to culture filtrate protein in the serum. The γ-interferon levels in the lymphocyte culture medium supernatants increased remarkably in the rBCG1 group, significantly higher than that of the BCG immunized group (P<0.05). Four weeks after vaccination, mice were infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv and a dramatic reduction in the numbers of MTB colony forming units in the spleens and lungs was observed in the two rBCG immunization groups.Although these rBCG strains were more immunogenic, their protective effect was comparable to the classical BCG strain, and there were no significant differences between two rBCG groups (P>0.05).

  5. Immune responses and protective efficacy induced by 85B antigen and early secreted antigenic target-6 kDa antigen fusion protein secreted by recombinant bacille Calmette-Guérin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changhong; Wang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Hai; Xu, Zhikai; Li, Yuan; Yuan, Lintian

    2007-04-01

    In an attempt to improve immune responses and protective efficacy, we constructed two recombinant bacille Calmette-Guérin (rBCG) strains expressing an 85B antigen (Ag85B) and early secreted antigenic target-6 kDa antigen (ESAT6) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) fusion protein. Both rBCG strains have the same protein insertion but in a different order (Ag85B-ESAT6 and ESAT6-Ag85B). The cultured supernatant of rBCG strains and the sera from the mice immunized with the fusion protein Ag85B-ESAT6 or ESAT6-Ag85B formed a band with a fraction size of 37 kDa, equalivalent to the sum of Ag85B and ESAT6. Six weeks after BALB/c mice were immunized with BCG or rBCG, spleen lymphocytes showed significant proliferation in response to culture filtrate protein of MTB. Compared with the BCG group, mice vaccinated with rBCG elicited a high level increase of immunoglobulin G antibodies to culture filtrate protein in the serum. The gamma-interferon levels in the lymphocyte culture medium supernatants increased remarkably in the rBCG1 group, significantly higher than that of the BCG immunized group (p0.05).

  6. IL-22 is mainly produced by IFNγ-secreting cells but is dispensable for host protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Behrends

    Full Text Available Anti-inflammatory treatment of autoimmune diseases is associated with an increased risk of reactivation tuberculosis (TB. Besides interleukin (IL-17A, IL-22 represents a classical T helper (TH17 cytokine and shares similar pathological effects in inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis or arthritis. Whereas IL-17A supports protective immune responses during mycobacterial infections, the role of IL-22 after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is yet poorly characterized. Therefore, we here characterize the cell types producing IL-22 and the protective function of this cytokine during experimental TB in mice. Like IL-17A, IL-22 is expressed early after infection with Mtb in an IL-23-dependent manner. Surprisingly, the majority of IL-22-producing cells are not positive for IL-17A but have rather functional characteristics of interferon-gamma-producing TH1 cells. Although we found minor differences in the number of naive and central memory T cells as well as in the frequency of TH1 and polyfunctional T cells in mice deficient for IL-22, the absence of IL-22 does not affect the outcome of Mtb infection. Our study revealed that although produced by TH1 cells, IL-22 is dispensable for protective immune responses during TB. Therefore, targeting of IL-22 in inflammatory disease may represent a therapeutic approach that does not incur the danger of reactivation TB.

  7. Connecting Palau's marine protected areas: a population genetic approach to conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Annick; Toonen, Robert J.; Donahue, Megan J.; Karl, Stephen A.

    2017-09-01

    Bleaching events are becoming more frequent and are projected to become annual in Micronesia by 2040. To prepare for this threat, the Government of Palau is reviewing its marine protected area network to increase the resilience of the reefs by integrating connectivity into the network design. To support their effort, we used high-throughput sequencing of microsatellites to create genotypes of colonies of the coral Acropora hyacinthus to characterize population genetic structure and dispersal patterns that led to the recovery of Palau's reefs from a 1998 bleaching event. We found no evidence of a founder effect or refugium where colonies may have survived to recolonize the reef. Instead, we found significant pairwise F' st values, indicating population structure and low connectivity among most of the 25 sites around Palau. We used kinship to measure genetic differences at the individual level among sites and found that differences were best explained by the degree of exposure to the ocean [ F 1,20 = 3.015, Pr(> F) = 0.01], but with little of the total variation explained. A permutation test of the pairwise kinship coefficients revealed that there was self-seeding within sites. Overall, the data point to the population of A. hyacinthus in Palau recovering from a handful of surviving colonies with population growth primarily from self-seeding and little exchange among sites. This finding has significant implications for the management strategies for the reefs of Palau, and we recommend increasing the number and distribution of management areas around Palau to capture the genetic architecture and increase the chances of protecting potential refuges in the future.

  8. Oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum strain AYA enhances IgA secretion and provides survival protection against influenza virus infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Kikuchi

    Full Text Available The mucosal immune system provides the first line of defense against inhaled and ingested pathogenic microbacteria and viruses. This defense system, to a large extent, is mediated by the actions of secretory IgA. In this study, we screened 140 strains of lactic acid bacteria for induction of IgA production by murine Peyer's patch cells. We selected one strain and named it Lactobacillus plantarum AYA. We found that L. plantarum AYA-induced production of IL-6 in Peyer's patch dendritic cells, with this production promoting IgA(+ B cells to differentiate into IgA-secreting plasma cells. We also observed that oral administration of L. plantarum AYA in mice caused an increase in IgA production in the small intestine and lung. This production of IgA correlated strongly with protective ability, with the treated mice surviving longer than the control mice after lethal influenza virus infection. Our data therefore reveals a novel immunoregulatory role of the L. plantarum AYA strain which enhances mucosal IgA production and provides protection against respiratory influenza virus infection.

  9. Microbial phenolic metabolites improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and protect pancreatic beta cells against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced toxicity via ERKs and PKC pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Millán, Elisa; Ramos, Sonia; Alvarez, Carmen; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis; Martín, María Ángeles

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative stress is accepted as one of the causes of beta cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Therefore, identification of natural antioxidant agents that preserve beta cell mass and function is considered an interesting strategy to prevent or treat diabetes. Recent evidences indicated that colonic metabolites derived from flavonoids could possess beneficial effects on various tissues. The aim of this work was to establish the potential anti-diabetic properties of the microbial-derived flavonoid metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DHPAA), 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) and 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid (HPPA). To this end, we tested their ability to influence beta cell function and to protect against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced beta cell toxicity. DHPAA and HPPA were able to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in a beta cell line INS-1E and in rat pancreatic islets. Moreover, pre-treatment of cells with both compounds protected against beta cell dysfunction and death induced by the pro-oxidant. Finally, experiments with pharmacological inhibitors indicate that these effects were mediated by the activation of protein kinase C and the extracellular regulated kinases pathways. Altogether, these findings strongly suggest that the microbial-derived flavonoid metabolites DHPAA and HPPA may have anti-diabetic potential by promoting survival and function of pancreatic beta cells.

  10. [Search problems of human radiation protection in the world of genetics of aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koterov, A N

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the urgency for protection from negative effects of radiation in the range of low and medium dose where classic radioprotectors are ineffective is increased. In this respect it seems promising to study the molecular pathways that increase, on the one hand, the stability of the genome against radiation damage (inducers of carcinogenesis), and, on the other hand, elevate the radiation sensitivity of cell populations in order to eliminate potentially carcinogenic cells. This approach requires modification of cascade mechanisms of signal transduction to apoptosis and responses to DNA damage. Research plan is similar to the Genetics of Aging, where a number of hypotheses about the mechanism of aging have been proposed, including a decrease in the stability of the genome to external influences. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference "The genetics of aging and longevity" (Moscow, April 2012) demonstrated, however, that patterns of aging mechanisms identified in model animals (nematodes, drosophila and mice) are far from the possibility of their practical application. Discovered genes that may be responsible for life expectancy (stress-inducible protein and other components of the signal transduction cascade, as well as suppressors and inducers) rarely find significance in the study of the genomes of centenarian cohorts. This may be due to the difficulty in transferring molecular genetic patterns from model objects to large mammals, including humans, with respect to systems of signal transduction. This point must be taken into account during the search for a new generation of radioprotective agents that promote anti-carcinogenic potential of human cells exposed to radiation at low and moderate doses. It may be necessary to search for such tools in large laboratory animals and in human tissue cultures obtained through genetic engineering or cloning.

  11. The genomes of closely related Pantoea ananatis maize seed endophytes having different effects on the host plant differ in secretion system genes and mobile genetic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibani-Tezerji, Raheleh; Naveed, Muhammad; Jehl, Marc-André; Sessitsch, Angela; Rattei, Thomas; Mitter, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The seed as a habitat for microorganisms is as yet under-explored and has quite distinct characteristics as compared to other vegetative plant tissues. In this study, we investigated three closely related P. ananatis strains (named S6, S7, and S8), which were isolated from maize seeds of healthy plants. Plant inoculation experiments revealed that each of these strains exhibited a different phenotype ranging from weak pathogenic (S7), commensal (S8), to a beneficial, growth-promoting effect (S6) in maize. We performed a comparative genomics analysis in order to find genetic determinants responsible for the differences observed. Recent studies provided exciting insight into the genetic drivers of niche adaption and functional diversification of the genus Pantoea. However, we report here for the first time on the analysis of P. ananatis strains colonizing the same ecological niche but showing distinct interaction strategies with the host plant. Our comparative analysis revealed that genomes of these three strains are highly similar. However, genomic differences in genes encoding protein secretion systems and putative effectors, and transposase/integrases/phage related genes could be observed.

  12. The genomes of closely related Pantoea ananatis maize seed endophytes having different effects on the host plant differ in secretion system genes and mobile genetic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh eSheibani-Tezerji

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The seed as a habitat for microorganisms is as yet under-explored and has quite distinct characteristics as compared to other vegetative plant tissues. In this study, we investigated three closely related P. ananatis strains (named S6, S7 and S8, which were isolated from maize seeds of healthy plants. Plant inoculation experiments revealed that each of these strains exhibited a different phenotype ranging from weak pathogenic (S7, commensal (S8, to a beneficial, growth-promoting effect (S6 in maize. We performed a comparative genomics analysis in order to find genetic determinants responsible for the differences observed. Recent studies provided exciting insight into the genetic drivers of niche adaption and functional diversification of the genus Pantoea. However, we report here for the first time on the analysis of P. ananatis strains colonizing the same ecological niche but showing distinct interaction strategies with the host plant. Our comparative analysis revealed that genomes of these three strains are highly similar. However, genomic differences in genes encoding protein secretion systems and putative effectors, and transposase/integrases/phage related genes could be observed.

  13. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the cell wall hydrolase activity of the major secreted protein of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar J J Claes

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG produces two major secreted proteins, designated here Msp1 (LGG_00324 or p75 and Msp2 (LGG_00031 or p40, which have been reported to promote the survival and growth of intestinal epithelial cells. Intriguingly, although each of these proteins shares homology with cell wall hydrolases, a physiological function that correlates with such an enzymatic activity remained to be substantiated in LGG. To investigate the bacterial function, we constructed knock-out mutants in the corresponding genes aiming to establish a genotype to phenotype relation. Microscopic examination of the msp1 mutant showed the presence of rather long and overly extended cell chains, which suggests that normal daughter cell separation is hampered. Subsequent observation of the LGG wild-type cells by immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the Msp1 protein accumulates at the septum of exponential-phase cells. The cell wall hydrolyzing activity of the Msp1 protein was confirmed by zymogram analysis. Subsequent analysis by RP-HPLC and mass spectrometry of the digestion products of LGG peptidoglycan (PG by Msp1 indicated that the Msp1 protein has D-glutamyl-L-lysyl endopeptidase activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy and the failure to construct a knock-out mutant suggest an indispensable role for Msp2 in priming septum formation in LGG.

  14. Protective effect of Calendula officinalis extract against UVB-induced oxidative stress in skin: evaluation of reduced glutathione levels and matrix metalloproteinase secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Yris Maria; Catini, Carolina Dias; Vicentini, Fabiana T M C; Nomizo, Auro; Gerlach, Raquel Fernanda; Fonseca, Maria José Vieira

    2010-02-17

    Calendula officinalis flowers have long been employed time in folk therapy, and more than 35 properties have been attributed to decoctions and tinctures from the flowers. The main uses are as remedies for burns (including sunburns), bruises and cutaneous and internal inflammatory diseases of several origins. The recommended doses are a function both of the type and severity of the condition to be treated and the individual condition of each patient. Therefore, the present study investigated the potential use of Calendula officinalis extract to prevent UV irradiation-induced oxidative stress in skin. Firstly, the physico-chemical composition of marigold extract (ME) (hydroalcoholic extract) was assessed and the in vitro antioxidant efficacy was determined using different methodologies. Secondly, the cytotoxicity was evaluated in L929 and HepG2 cells with the MTT assay. Finally, the in vivo protective effect of ME against UVB-induced oxidative stress in the skin of hairless mice was evaluated by determining reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and monitoring the secretion/activity of metalloproteinases. The polyphenol, flavonoid, rutin and narcissin contents found in ME were 28.6 mg/g, 18.8 mg/g, 1.6 mg/g and 12.2mg/g, respectively and evaluation of the in vitro antioxidant activity demonstrated a dose-dependent effect of ME against different radicals. Cytoxicity experiments demonstrated that ME was not cytotoxic for L929 and HepG2 cells at concentrations less than or equal to of 15 mg/mL. However, concentrations greater than or equal to 30 mg/mL, toxic effects were observed. Finally, oral treatment of hairless mice with 150 and 300 mg/kg of ME maintained GSH levels close to non-irradiated control mice. In addition, this extract affects the activity/secretion of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP-2 and -9) stimulated by exposure to UVB irradiation. However, additional studies are required to have a complete understanding of the protective effects of ME for skin

  15. A genetically adjuvanted influenza B virus vector increases immunogenicity and protective efficacy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Christian; Wressnigg, Nina; Shurygina, Anna Polina; Wolschek, Markus; Stukova, Marina; Romanovskaya-Romanko, Ekatherina; Romanova, Julia; Kiselev, Oleg; Muster, Thomas; Egorov, Andrej

    2015-10-01

    The existence of multiple antigenically distinct types and subtypes of influenza viruses allows the construction of a multivalent vector system for the mucosal delivery of foreign sequences. Influenza A viruses have been exploited successfully for the expression of extraneous antigens as well as immunostimulatory molecules. In this study, we describe the development of an influenza B virus vector whose functional part of the interferon antagonist NS1 was replaced by human interleukin 2 (IL2) as a genetic adjuvant. We demonstrate that IL2 expressed by this viral vector displays immune adjuvant activity in immunized mice. Animals vaccinated with the IL2 viral vector showed an increased hemagglutination inhibition antibody response and higher protective efficacy after challenge with a wild-type influenza B virus when compared to mice vaccinated with a control virus. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to construct influenza B vaccine strains expressing immune-potentiating foreign sequences from the NS genomic segment. Based on these data, it is now hypothetically possible to create a trivalent (or quadrivalent) live attenuated influenza vaccine in which each component expresses a selected genetic adjuvant with tailored expression levels.

  16. The law of genomic sovereignty and the protection of "Mexican genetic patrimony".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz-Marín, Ernesto; Méndez, Alberto Arellano

    2012-06-01

    We present a socio-legal analysis of the policy agenda known as genomic sovereignty in Mexico--in which the notion was first coined--and its translation into a national law of health aimed at regulating population genomics research in the country. Based in more than 2 years of participant observation we sustain that the notion of genomic sovereignty, aimed at protecting the "unique" genetic patterns of populations needs to be critically reassessed. The main problem with such notion is that there are no scientifically sound ways to delimit the genetic "uniqueness" of any population in the world. Arising from this dilemma it becomes increasingly clear that the patrimonial doctrines that have been used to regulate population genomics in Mexico are inoperative, and rather than creating a legal environment in which medical genomics can become a national public good, it has created a law that has been used to monopolise human genomic research in the country; making blood samples and data tool for dispute amongst scientific elites.

  17. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Márcia I.; Chiminacio Neto, Nelson; Padeski, Marcela C.; Barros, Ana Cláudia M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL), a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32). Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003). Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23), compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07). Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031). These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy. PMID:26745156

  18. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Paola Rosa; Miyazaki, Márcia I; Chiminacio Neto, Nelson; Padeski, Marcela C; Barros, Ana Cláudia M; Boldt, Angelica B W; Messias-Reason, Iara J

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL), a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32). Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003). Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23), compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07). Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031). These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy.

  19. Genetic ablation of CXCR2 protects against cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation and injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad A Lerner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Antagonism of CXCR2 receptors, predominately located on neutrophils and critical for their immunomodulatory activity, is an attractive pharmacological therapeutic approach aimed at reducing the potentially damaging effects of heightened neutrophil influx into the lung caused by environmental agents including tobacco smoke. The role CXCR2 in lung inflammation in response to cigarette smoke (CS inhalation using the mutant mouse approach is not known. We hypothesized that genetic ablation of CXCR2 would protect mice against CS-induced inflammation and DNA damaging response. We used CXCR2 -/- deficient/mutant (knock-out, KO mice, and assessed the changes in critical lung inflammatory NF-B-driven chemokines released from the parenchyma of CS-exposed mice, and indications of the extent of tissue damage assessed by the number of DNA damaging γH2AX positive cells. CXCR2 KO mice exhibited protection from heightened levels of neutrophils measured in BALF taken from mice exposed to CS. IL-8 (KC mouse levels in the BALF from CS-exposed CXCR2 KO were elevated compared to WT. IL-6 levels in BALF were refractory to increase by CS in CXCR2 KO mice. There were no significant changes to MIP-2, MCP-1, or IL-1β. Total levels of NF-κB were maintained at lower levels in CS-exposed CXCR2 KO mice compared to WT mice exposed to CS. Finally CXCR2 KO mice were protected from increased number of lung cells positive for DNA damage response and senescence marker γH2AX, CXCR2 KO mice are protected from heightened inflammatory response mediated by increased neutrophil response as a result of acute 3 day CS exposure. This is also associated with changes in pro-inflammatory chemokines and reduced incursion of γH2AX indicating CXCR2 deficient mice are protected from lung injury. Thus CXCR2 may be a pharmacological target in setting of inflammation and DNA damage in the pathogenesis of COPD.

  20. Identification and genetics of 6-thioguanine secreted by Erwinia species and its interference with the growth of other bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensing, A; Gernold, M; Jock, S; Jansen, R; Geider, K

    2014-04-01

    We identified a compound in culture supernatants of Erwinia species, such as Erwinia amylovora, E. pyrifoliae, E. billingiae, E. tasmaniensis, E. persicina and E. rhapontici absorbing at 340 nm, which was associated before with the yellow pigment produced by E. amylovora on media containing copper ions. The compound was purified from E. tasmaniensis strain Et1/99 supernatants by chromatography on Dowex-1 and Dowex-50 columns and identified by HPLC/MS and NMR analysis as 6-thioguanine (6TG). Its signal at 167 Da matched with the expected molecular mass. By random mutagenesis with miniTn5, we obtained mutants defective in the genes for pyrimidine and purine metabolism. A specific gene cluster with ycf genes described by us before, absent in the corresponding region of Escherichia coli, was identified in the genome sequence of three Erwinia species and named tgs region for thioguanine synthesis. Clones of the tgs gene cluster promoted 6TG synthesis and secretion in E. coli, when the bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with amino acids. 6TG was bacteriostatic for E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium strains, with cell growth resumed after prolonged incubation. Similar results were obtained with P. agglomerans strains. Bacteria from the genus Pectobacterium were barely and Rahnella or Gibbsiella species were not inhibited by 6TG. Adenine and guanine relieved the toxic effect of 6TG on E. coli. Non-producing strains were fully virulent on host plants. 6TG synthesis may help erwinias to interfere with growth of some microorganisms in the environment.

  1. Lack of recognition of genetic biodiversity: International policy and its implementation in Baltic Sea marine protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laikre, Linda; Lundmark, Carina; Jansson, Eeva; Wennerström, Lovisa; Edman, Mari; Sandström, Annica

    2016-10-01

    Genetic diversity is needed for species' adaptation to changing selective pressures and is particularly important in regions with rapid environmental change such as the Baltic Sea. Conservation measures should consider maintaining large gene pools to maximize species' adaptive potential for long-term survival. In this study, we explored concerns regarding genetic variation in international and national policies that governs biodiversity and evaluated if and how such policy is put into practice in management plans governing Baltic Sea Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in Sweden, Finland, Estonia, and Germany. We performed qualitative and quantitative textual analysis of 240 documents and found that agreed international and national policies on genetic biodiversity are not reflected in management plans for Baltic Sea MPAs. Management plans in all countries are largely void of goals and strategies for genetic biodiversity, which can partly be explained by a general lack of conservation genetics in policies directed toward aquatic environments.

  2. Notre-Dame des Fleurs et Miracle de la rose, de Jean Genet. L’écriture mise au secret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascaline Hamon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Notre-Dame des Fleurs et Miracle de la Rose sont les deux romans que Jean Genet a composés durant des périodes d’incarcération. La fiction se veut alors non seulement un remède à la solitude carcérale et à la marginalisation de son auteur, mais également un lieu de dévoilement des pratiques d’écriture propres à l’univers carcéral. Le roman tout entier se trouve dès lors habité d’une tension entre la liberté créatrice, qui fait la part belle aux provocations de l’auteur et à l’expression de ses fantasmes et un enfermement contraignant, qui pèse comme une menace sur la possibilité d’écrire.Our Lady of the Flowers and Miracle of the Rose were written during Genet’s time of imprisonment. The fictional narrative operates not only as a remedy to the experience of solitude and marginalization, but also brings the practice of prison writings into focus. The novels are haunted by a tension between a creative freedom which can launch provocations and phantasms, and the constraint of imprisonment, which threatens the very possibility of writing.

  3. Targeted genetic inactivation of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IVa impairs insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells and evokes type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsubo, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    The biological significance of protein N-glycosylation has been elucidated using a mouse model bearing a genetic mutation of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases (GnTs), which initiate the formation of specific branch structures on the mannose core of N-glycans. These glycosylation defects evoked a variety of abnormalities and disorders in specific cell types, tissues, and the whole body, reflecting functional requirements. N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IVa (GnT-IVa) initiates the GlcNAcbeta1-4 branch synthesis on the Manalpha1-3 arm of the N-glycan core thereby increasing N-glycan branch complexity. To investigate the physiological function of GnT-IVa, we engineered and characterized GnT-IVa-deficient mice. GnT-IVa-deficient mice showed a metabolic disorder subsequently diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. In this chapter, methods for characterizing GnT-IVa-deficient mice by physiological analyses to detect metabolic alterations and biochemical analyses using primary isolated pancreatic beta cells are summarized and discussed. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dendritic cell based genetic immunization stimulates potent tumor protection dependent on CD8 CTL cells in the absence of autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Huang, Weiyi

    2008-09-01

    Although antibodies (Abs) produced by B cells can treat cancer in certain models, T cells have been accountable for the major effector to control cancer. Immune recognition toward tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), a melanoma associated antigen up-regulated on the surface of B16F10 melanomas, generally leads to tumor protection mediated by Abs. In this study, immunization with dendritic cells ex vivo transduced with adenovirus encoding TRP-1 stimulates immune activation and potent tumor protection mediated by CD8 T cells in the absence of autoimmune consequence. Transfer of CD8 T cells from immunized mice also leads to tumor protection. The immune activation and CD8 T cell mediated tumor protection rely on the CD4 T cell help. Thus DC based genetic immunization targeting TRP-1, an antigen usually causes Ab predominant immune recognition, is capable of stimulating potent tumor protection dependent on CD8 T cells in the absence of autoimmunity.

  5. [Trisomy 21 and breast cancer: A genetic abnormality which protects against breast cancer?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel-Billard, C; Cordier, C; Tomasetto, C; Jégu, J; Mathelin, C

    2016-04-01

    Trisomy 21 (T21) is the most common chromosomal abnormality and one of the main causes of intellectual disability. The tumor profile of T21 patients is characterized by the low frequency of solid tumors including breast cancer. The objective of this work was to analyze the literature to find possible clues for the low frequency of breast cancer in T21 persons with a focus on one hand to the various risks and protective factors against breast cancer for women T21, and on the other hand to changes in the expression of different genes located on chromosome 21. T21 women have hormonal and societal risk factors for breast cancer: frequent nulliparity, lack of breastfeeding, physical inactivity and high body mass index. The age of menopause, earlier in T21 women, has a modest protective effect against breast cancer. The low rate of breast tumors in T21 women is probably mainly linked to the reduced life expectancy compared to the general population (risk of death before the age of onset of the majority of breast cancers) and the presence of a third chromosome 21, characterizing the disease. It might lead to the increased expression of a number of genes contributing directly or undirectly to tumor suppression, decreased tumor angiogenesis and increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, changes in the mammary stroma of persons T21 could have an inhibitory role on the development of breast tumors. The low frequency of breast cancers for T21 patients may not only be explained by hormonal and societal factors, but also by genetic mechanisms which could constitute an interesting axis of research in breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic Markers of Insulin Sensitivity and Insulin Secretion Are Associated With Spontaneous Postnatal Growth and Response to Growth Hormone Treatment in Short SGA Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; Day, Felix

    2015-01-01

    with spontaneous postnatal weight gain (regression coefficient [B]: 0.12 SD scores per allele; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01-0.23; P = .03) and also in response to GH therapy with first-year height velocity (B: 0.18 cm/y per allele; 95% CI, 0.02-0.35; P = .03) and change in IGF-1 (B: 0.17 SD scores per allele......; 95% CI, 0.00-0.32; P = .03). The association with first-year height velocity was independent of reported predictors of response to GH therapy (adjusted P = .04). The insulin secretion allele score (GS-InSec) was positively associated with spontaneous postnatal height gain (B: 0.15; 95% CI, 0.......01-0.30; P = .03) and disposition index both before (B: 0.02; 95% CI, 0.00-0.04; P = .04) and after 1 year of GH therapy (B: 0.03; 95% CI, 0.01-0.05; P = .002), but not with growth and IGF-1 responses to GH therapy. Neither of the allele scores was associated with size at birth. CONCLUSION: Genetic allele...

  7. Genetic consequences of a century of protection: serial founder events and survival of the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstad, Kristina M; Colbourne, Rogan M; Robertson, Hugh A; Allendorf, Fred W; Daugherty, Charles H

    2013-07-07

    We present the outcome of a century of post-bottleneck isolation of a long-lived species, the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii, LSK) and demonstrate that profound genetic consequences can result from protecting few individuals in isolation. LSK were saved from extinction by translocation of five birds from South Island, New Zealand to Kapiti Island 100 years ago. The Kapiti population now numbers some 1200 birds and provides founders for new populations. We used 15 microsatellite loci to compare genetic variation among Kapiti LSK and the populations of Red Mercury, Tiritiri Matangi and Long Islands that were founded with birds from Kapiti. Two LSK native to D'Urville Island were also placed on Long Island. We found extremely low genetic variation and signatures of acute and recent genetic bottleneck effects in all four populations, indicating that LSK have survived multiple genetic bottlenecks. The Long Island population appears to have arisen from a single mating pair from Kapiti, suggesting there is no genetic contribution from D'Urville birds among extant LSK. The Ne/NC ratio of Kapiti Island LSK (0.03) is exceptionally low for terrestrial vertebrates and suggests that genetic diversity might still be eroding in this population, despite its large census size.

  8. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  9. Genetic deletion of Mst1 alters T cell function and protects against autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin V Salojin

    Full Text Available Mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (Mst1 is a MAPK kinase kinase kinase which is involved in a wide range of cellular responses, including apoptosis, lymphocyte adhesion and trafficking. The contribution of Mst1 to Ag-specific immune responses and autoimmunity has not been well defined. In this study, we provide evidence for the essential role of Mst1 in T cell differentiation and autoimmunity, using both genetic and pharmacologic approaches. Absence of Mst1 in mice reduced T cell proliferation and IL-2 production in vitro, blocked cell cycle progression, and elevated activation-induced cell death in Th1 cells. Mst1 deficiency led to a CD4+ T cell development path that was biased toward Th2 and immunoregulatory cytokine production with suppressed Th1 responses. In addition, Mst1-/- B cells showed decreased stimulation to B cell mitogens in vitro and deficient Ag-specific Ig production in vivo. Consistent with altered lymphocyte function, deletion of Mst1 reduced the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE and protected against collagen-induced arthritis development. Mst1-/- CD4+ T cells displayed an intrinsic defect in their ability to respond to encephalitogenic antigens and deletion of Mst1 in the CD4+ T cell compartment was sufficient to alleviate CNS inflammation during EAE. These findings have prompted the discovery of novel compounds that are potent inhibitors of Mst1 and exhibit desirable pharmacokinetic properties. In conclusion, this report implicates Mst1 as a critical regulator of adaptive immune responses, Th1/Th2-dependent cytokine production, and as a potential therapeutic target for immune disorders.

  10. Intradermal delivery of Shigella IpaB and IpaD type III secretion proteins: kinetics of cell recruitment and antigen uptake, mucosal and systemic immunity, and protection across serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Shannon J; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Andar, Abhay U; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; van de Verg, Lillian; Walker, Richard; Picking, Wendy L; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2014-02-15

    Shigella is one of the leading pathogens contributing to the vast pediatric diarrheal disease burden in low-income countries. No licensed vaccine is available, and the existing candidates are only partially effective and serotype specific. Shigella type III secretion system proteins IpaB and IpaD, which are conserved across Shigella spp., are candidates for a broadly protective, subunit-based vaccine. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of IpaB and IpaD administered intradermally (i.d.) with a double-mutant of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (dmLT) adjuvant using microneedles. Different dosage levels of IpaB and IpaD, with or without dmLT, were tested in mice. Vaccine delivery into the dermis, recruitment of neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells, and colocalization of vaccine Ag within skin-activated APC were demonstrated through histology and immunofluorescence microscopy. Ag-loaded neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells remained in the tissue at least 1 wk. IpaB, IpaD, and dmLT-specific serum IgG- and IgG-secreting cells were produced following i.d. immunization. The protective efficacy was 70% against Shigella flexneri and 50% against Shigella sonnei. Similar results were obtained when the vaccine was administered intranasally, with the i.d. route requiring 25-40 times lower doses. Distinctively, IgG was detected in mucosal secretions; secretory IgA, as well as mucosal and systemic IgA Ab-secreting cells, were seemingly absent. Vaccine-induced T cells produced IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. These results demonstrate the potential of i.d. vaccination with IpaB and IpaD to prevent Shigella infection and support further studies in humans.

  11. Genetic vaccination against the melanocyte lineage-specific antigen gp100 induces cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated tumor protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, M W; de Boer, A J; Figdor, C G; Adema, G J

    1998-06-15

    Melanocyte lineage-specific antigens, such as gp100, have been shown to induce both cellular and humoral immune responses against melanoma. Therefore, these antigens are potential targets for specific antimelanoma immunotherapy. A novel approach to induce both cellular and humoral immunity is genetic vaccination, the injection of antigen-encoding naked plasmid DNA. In a mouse model, we investigated whether genetic vaccination against the human gp100 antigen results in specific antitumor immunity. The results demonstrate that vaccinated mice were protected against a lethal challenge with syngeneic B16 melanoma-expressing human gp100, but not control-transfected B16. Both cytotoxic T cells and IgG specific for human gp100 could be detected in human gp100-vaccinated mice. However, only adoptive transfer of spleen-derived lymphocytes, not of the serum, isolated from protected mice was able to transfer antitumor immunity to nonvaccinated recipients, indicating that CTLs are the predominant effector cells. CTI, lines generated from human gp100-vaccinated mice specifically recognized human gp100. Interestingly, one of the CTL lines cross-reacted between human and mouse gp100, indicating the recognition of a conserved epitope. However, these CTLs did not appear to be involved in the observed tumor protection. Collectively, our results indicate that genetic vaccination can result in a potent antitumor response in vivo and constitutes a potential immunotherapeutic strategy to fight cancer.

  12. Genetic-linked Inattentiveness Protects Individuals from Internet Overuse: A Genetic Study of Internet Overuse Evaluating Hypotheses Based on Addiction, Inattention, Novelty-seeking and Harm-avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The all-pervasive Internet has created serious problems, such as Internet overuse, which has triggered considerable debate over its relationship with addiction. To further explore its genetic susceptibilities and alternative explanations for Internet overuse, we proposed and evaluated four hypotheses, each based on existing knowledge of the biological bases of addiction, inattention, novelty-seeking, and harm-avoidance. Four genetic loci including DRD4 VNTR, DRD2 Taq1A, COMT Val158Met and 5-HTTLPR length polymorphisms were screened from seventy-three individuals. Our results showed that the DRD4 4R/4R individuals scored significantly higher than the 2R or 7R carriers in Internet Addiction Test (IAT. The 5-HTTLPR short/short males scored significantly higher in IAT than the long variant carriers. Bayesian analysis showed the most compatible hypothesis with the observed genetic results was based on attention (69.8%, whereas hypotheses based harm-avoidance (21.6%, novelty-seeking (7.8% and addiction (0.9% received little support. Our study suggests that carriers of alleles (DRD4 2R and 7R, 5-HTTLPR long associated with inattentiveness are more likely to experience disrupted patterns and reduced durations of Internet use, protecting them from Internet overuse. Furthermore, our study suggests that Internet overuse should be categorized differently from addiction due to the lack of shared genetic contributions.

  13. The DNA of coral reef biodiversity: predicting and protecting genetic diversity of reef assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkoe, Kimberly A; Gaggiotti, Oscar E; Treml, Eric A; Wren, Johanna L K; Donovan, Mary K; Toonen, Robert J

    2016-04-27

    Conservation of ecological communities requires deepening our understanding of genetic diversity patterns and drivers at community-wide scales. Here, we use seascape genetic analysis of a diversity metric, allelic richness (AR), for 47 reef species sampled across 13 Hawaiian Islands to empirically demonstrate that large reefs high in coral cover harbour the greatest genetic diversity on average. We found that a species's life history (e.g. depth range and herbivory) mediates response of genetic diversity to seascape drivers in logical ways. Furthermore, a metric of combined multi-species AR showed strong coupling to species richness and habitat area, quality and stability that few species showed individually. We hypothesize that macro-ecological forces and species interactions, by mediating species turnover and occupancy (and thus a site's mean effective population size), influence the aggregate genetic diversity of a site, potentially allowing it to behave as an apparent emergent trait that is shaped by the dominant seascape drivers. The results highlight inherent feedbacks between ecology and genetics, raise concern that genetic resilience of entire reef communities is compromised by factors that reduce coral cover or available habitat, including thermal stress, and provide a foundation for new strategies for monitoring and preserving biodiversity of entire reef ecosystems.

  14. Increased genetic risk or protection for canine autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis in Giant Schnauzers depends on DLA class II genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbe, M; Sundberg, K; Hansen, I R; Strandberg, E; Nachreiner, R F; Hedhammar, A; Kennedy, L J; Andersson, G; Björnerfeldt, S

    2010-06-01

    Dogs represent an excellent comparative model for autoimmune thyroiditis as several dog breeds develop canine lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT), which is clinically similar to Hashimoto's thyroiditis in human. We obtained evidence that dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II genotype function as either genetic risk factor that predisposes for CLT or as protective factor against the disease. Genetic diversity at their DLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 loci were defined and potential association to major histocompatibility complex II haplotypes and alleles was analyzed. Giant Schnauzers carrying the DLA-DRB1*01201/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00201 haplotype showed an increased risk (odds ratio of 6.5) for developing CLT. The same risk haplotype has, to date, been observed in three different breeds affected by this disease, Giant Schnauzer, Dobermann, and Labrador Retriever, indicating that it is a common genetic risk factor in a variety of breeds affected by this disease. Importantly, protection for development of the disease was found in dogs carrying the DLA-DRB1*01301/DQA1*00301/DQB1*00501 haplotype (odds ratio of 0.3).

  15. Identifying priority areas for land protection in the South Atlantic: A landscape genetics pilot study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Identifies genetic “hotspots” for sustaining populations and maintaining within-species adaptive capacity throughout the LCC. Evaluates the overlap between these...

  16. Genetic influences can protect against unresponsive parenting in the prediction of child social competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryzin, Mark J; Leve, Leslie D; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Shaw, Daniel S; Natsuaki, Misaki N; Reiss, David

    2015-01-01

    Although social competence in children has been linked to the quality of parenting, prior research has typically not accounted for genetic similarities between parents and children, or for interactions between environmental (i.e., parental) and genetic influences. In this article, the possibility of a Gene x Environment (G × E) interaction in the prediction of social competence in school-age children is evaluated. Using a longitudinal, multimethod data set from a sample of children adopted at birth (N = 361), a significant interaction was found between birth parent sociability and sensitive, responsive adoptive parenting when predicting child social competence at school entry (age 6), even when controlling for potential confounds. An analysis of the interaction revealed that genetic strengths can buffer the effects of unresponsive parenting. © 2015 The Authors. Child Development © 2015 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  17. Differential Insulin Secretion of High-Fat Diet-Fed C57BL/6NN and C57BL/6NJ Mice: Implications of Mixed Genetic Background in Metabolic Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Attané

    Full Text Available Many metabolic studies employ tissue-specific gene knockout mice, which requires breeding of floxed gene mice, available mostly on C57BL/6N (NN genetic background, with cre or Flp recombinase-expressing mice, available on C57BL/6J (JJ background, resulting in the generation of mixed C57BL/6NJ (NJ genetic background mice. Recent awareness of many genetic differences between NN and JJ strains including the deletion of nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (nnt, necessitates examination of the consequence of mixed NJ background on glucose tolerance, beta cell function and other metabolic parameters. Male mice with NN and NJ genetic background were fed with normal or high fat diets (HFD for 12 weeks and glucose and insulin homeostasis were studied. Genotype had no effect on body weight and food intake in mice fed normal or high fat diets. Insulinemia in the fed and fasted states and after a glucose challenge was lower in HFD-fed NJ mice, even though their glycemia and insulin sensitivity were similar to NN mice. NJ mice showed mild glucose intolerance. Moreover, glucose- but not KCl-stimulated insulin secretion in isolated islets was decreased in HFD-fed NJ vs NN mice without changes in insulin content and beta cell mass. Under normal diet, besides reduced fed insulinemia, NN and NJ mice presented similar metabolic parameters. However, HFD-fed NJ mice displayed lower fed and fasted insulinemia and glucose-induced insulin secretion in vivo and ex vivo, as compared to NN mice. These results strongly caution against using unmatched mixed genetic background C57BL/6 mice for comparisons, particularly under HFD conditions.

  18. A Genetic Algorithms-based Approach for Optimized Self-protection in a Pervasive Service Middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Weishan; Ingstrup, Mads; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2009-01-01

    the constraints of heterogeneous devices and networks. In this paper, we present a Genetic Algorithms-based approach for obtaining optimized security configurations at run time, supported by a set of security OWL ontologies and an event-driven framework. This approach has been realized as a prototype for self...

  19. Google Secrets

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Become a Google guru with these effective tips, tricks, and techniques Sure, you use Google. But do you really use Google-and everything it has to offer-in the most effective way possible? Wish you could just sit down with a Google expert who would show you how to take your Google savviness to the next level? With Google Secrets, you can! Tech expert Jerri Ledford reveals the ins, outs, and little-known facts about Google to show you how to sharpen your skills so you can get more done, more efficiently. You may already be familiar with Google's most popular applications, but this indispensable

  20. Blockade of the programmed death-1 (PD1 pathway undermines potent genetic protection from type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora M Kochupurakkal

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Inhibition of PD1-PDL1 signaling in NOD mice accelerates onset of type 1 diabetes implicating this pathway in suppressing the emergence of pancreatic beta cell reactive T-cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which PD1 signaling protects from type 1 diabetes is not clear. We hypothesized that differential susceptibility of Idd mouse strains to type 1 diabetes when challenged with anti PDL1 will identify genomic loci that collaborate with PD1 signaling in suppressing type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Anti PDL1 was administered to NOD and various Idd mouse strains at 10 weeks of age and onset of disease was monitored by measuring blood glucose levels. Additionally, histological evaluation of the pancreas was performed to determine degree of insulitis. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using Log-Rank and Student's t-test. RESULTS: Blockade of PDL1 rapidly precipitated type 1 diabetes in nearly all NOD Idd congenic strains tested, despite the fact that all are moderately (Idd5, Idd3 and Idd10/18 or highly (Idd3/10/18 and Idd9 protected from spontaneous type 1 diabetes by virtue of their protective Idd genes. Only the Idd3/5 strain, which is nearly 100% protected from spontaneous disease, remained normoglycemic following PDL1 blockade. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that multiple Idd loci collaborate with PD1 signaling. Anti PDL1 treatment undermines a large portion of the genetic protection mediated by Idd genes in the NOD model of type 1 diabetes. Basal insulitis correlated with higher susceptibility to type 1 diabetes. These findings have important implications since the PD1 pathway is a target for immunotherapy.

  1. Protective activity of cedron (Aloysia triphylla) infusion over genetic damage induced by cisplatin evaluated by the comet assay technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano-Ponce, Enrique; Fernández, Julia; Vargas, Gilda; Rivera, Pilar; Carballo, Marta A

    2004-08-30

    Using the comet assay technique, this paper examines the protection from the cisplatin-induced genetic damage in mouse bone marrow cells provided by cedron-leaf infusion. Animals were separated into six groups: (I) untreated, (II) negative control, (III) treated with cedron-leaf infusion (5%), (IV) treated with cisplatin (6 mg/kg b.w.), (V) pretreated with infusion and treated with cisplatin and (VI) positive control (cyclophosphamide, 20 mg/kg b.w.). Based on the tail moment values found, four types of comets were distinguished. No statistical differences (P<0.01) were found between untreated animals, negative control and infusion treated mice. As expected, treatment of mice with a single dose of cis-DDP-induced genetic damage and the pretreatment with infusion prior to cis-DDP injection inhibited the capacity of cisplatin to induce genetic damage. Cell viability was up to 90% in all cases. The results suggest that infusion could exert its in vivo antigenotoxic action by enhancing the antioxidant status of bone marrow cells. The found could be attributed to its scavenging potency towards free radicals.

  2. Do genetic factors protect for early onset lung cancer? A case control study before the age of 50 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilge Bettina

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early onset lung cancer shows some familial aggregation, pointing to a genetic predisposition. This study was set up to investigate the role of candidate genes in the susceptibility to lung cancer patients younger than 51 years at diagnosis. Methods 246 patients with a primary, histologically or cytologically confirmed neoplasm, recruited from 2000 to 2003 in major lung clinics across Germany, were matched to 223 unrelated healthy controls. 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms of genes with reported associations to lung cancer have been genotyped. Results Genetic associations or gene-smoking interactions was found for GPX1(Pro200Leu and EPHX1(His113Tyr. Carriers of the Leu-allele of GPX1(Pro200Leu showed a significant risk reduction of OR = 0.6 (95% CI: 0.4–0.8, p = 0.002 in general and of OR = 0.3 (95% CI:0.1–0.8, p = 0.012 within heavy smokers. We could also find a risk decreasing genetic effect for His-carriers of EPHX1(His113Tyr for moderate smokers (OR = 0.2, 95% CI:0.1–0.7, p = 0.012. Considered both variants together, a monotone decrease of the OR was found for smokers (OR of 0.20; 95% CI: 0.07–0.60 for each protective allele. Conclusion Smoking is the most important risk factor for young lung cancer patients. However, this study provides some support for the T-Allel of GPX1(Pro200Leu and the C-Allele of EPHX1(His113Tyr to play a protective role in early onset lung cancer susceptibility.

  3. Genetic Diversity and Protective Efficacy of the RTS,S/AS01 Malaria Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neafsey, Daniel E; Juraska, Michal; Bedford, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Background The RTS,S/AS01 vaccine targets the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum and has partial protective efficacy against clinical and severe malaria disease in infants and children. We investigated whether the vaccine efficacy was specific to certain parasite genotypes at the c...

  4. Type I Diabetes Mellitus: Genetic Factors and Presumptive Enteroviral Etiology or Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Precechtelova; Maria Borsanyiova; Sona Sarmirova; Shubhada Bopegamage

    2014-01-01

    We review type 1 diabetes and host genetic components, as well as epigenetics and viruses associated with type 1 diabetes, with added emphasis on the enteroviruses, which are often associated with triggering the disease. Genus Enterovirus is classified into twelve species of which seven (Enterovirus A, Enterovirus B, Enterovirus C, and Enterovirus D and Rhinovirus A, Rhinovirus B, and Rhinovirus C) are human pathogens. These viruses are transmitted mainly by the fecal-oral route; they may als...

  5. An accompanying genetic severe deficiency of tissue factor protects mice with a protein C deficiency from lethal endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, Francis J; Donahue, Deborah L; Navari, Rudolph M; Ploplis, Victoria A; Walsh, Mark

    2011-01-06

    Mice with a severe genetic deficiency of protein C (PC), PC(-/-)PC(tg4), display enhanced susceptibility to lethal effects of gram-negative endotoxemia induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), whereas mice severely deficient in tissue factor (TF), TF(-/-)hTF(tg), are protected from LPS-mediated lethality. In this study, we show that a simultaneous severe deficiency of TF protected low-PC mice from LPS-induced death, resulting in a survival profile similar to that experienced by wild-type (WT) mice. Plasma and whole blood coagulation assays, the latter measured by thromboelastography, demonstrated development of coagulopathies in LPS-treated mice, which were more severe in the case of the doubly deficient TF(-/-)hTF(tg)/PC(-/-)PC(tg4) mice, mainly reflecting earlier signs of disseminated intravascular coagulation in this latter cohort. Markers of inflammation were also elevated in response to LPS in both groups of mice at times just preceding death. We conclude that whereas coagulopathies are more exacerbated in LPS-treated TF(-/-)hTF(tg)/PC(-/-)PC(tg4) mice, the lowering of TF levels in mice with an accompanying severe PC deficiency confers protection against death compared with mice with a single severe PC deficiency. This suggests that proteases generated as a result of factor VIIa/TF-mediated thrombin generation play a mechanistic role in the enhanced lethality seen under very low PC conditions in an endotoxemia model in mice.

  6. Protective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessam M. Abdel-Wahab

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Many active ingredients extracted from herbal and medicinal plants are extensively studied for their beneficial effects. Antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging properties of thymoquinone (TQ have been reported. The present study evaluated the possible protective effects of TQ against the toxicity and oxidative stress of sodium fluoride (NaF in the liver of rats. Rats were divided into four groups, the first group served as the control group and was administered distilled water whereas the NaF group received NaF orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 4 weeks, TQ group was administered TQ orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 5 weeks, and the NaF-TQ group was first given TQ for 1 week and was secondly administered 10 mg/kg/day NaF in association with 10 mg/kg TQ for 4 weeks. Rats intoxicated with NaF showed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation whereas the level of reduced glutathione (GSH and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione S-transferase (GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were reduced in hepatic tissues. The proper functioning of the liver was also disrupted as indicated by alterations in the measured liver function indices and biochemical parameters. TQ supplementation counteracted the NaF-induced hepatotoxicity probably due to its strong antioxidant activity. In conclusion, the results obtained clearly indicated the role of oxidative stress in the induction of NaF toxicity and suggested hepatoprotective effects of TQ against the toxicity of fluoride compounds.

  7. A Mouse Model for Conditional Secretion of Specific Single-Chain Antibodies Provides Genetic Evidence for Regulation of Cortical Plasticity by a Non-cell Autonomous Homeoprotein Transcription Factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During postnatal life the cerebral cortex passes through critical periods of plasticity allowing its physiological adaptation to the environment. In the visual cortex, critical period onset and closure are influenced by the non-cell autonomous activity of the Otx2 homeoprotein transcription factor, which regulates the maturation of parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons (PV cells. In adult mice, the maintenance of a non-plastic adult state requires continuous Otx2 import by PV cells. An important source of extra-cortical Otx2 is the choroid plexus, which secretes Otx2 into the cerebrospinal fluid. Otx2 secretion and internalization requires two small peptidic domains that are part of the DNA-binding domain. Thus, mutating these "transfer" sequences also modifies cell autonomous transcription, precluding this approach to obtain a cell autonomous-only mouse. Here, we develop a mouse model with inducible secretion of an anti-Otx2 single-chain antibody to trap Otx2 in the extracellular milieu. Postnatal secretion of this single-chain antibody by PV cells delays PV maturation and reduces plasticity gene expression. Induced adult expression of this single-chain antibody in cerebrospinal fluid decreases Otx2 internalization by PV cells, strongly induces plasticity gene expression and reopens physiological plasticity. We provide the first mammalian genetic evidence for a signaling mechanism involving intercellular transfer of a homeoprotein transcription factor. Our single-chain antibody mouse model is a valid strategy for extracellular neutralization that could be applied to other homeoproteins and signaling molecules within and beyond the nervous system.

  8. Evaluation of three herbicide resistance genes for use in genetic transformations and for potential crop protection in algae production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggeman, Andrew J; Kuehler, Daniel; Weeks, Donald P

    2014-09-01

    Genes conferring resistance to the herbicides glyphosate, oxyfluorfen and norflurazon were developed and tested for use as dominant selectable markers in genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and as potential tools for the protection of commercial-scale algal production facilities against contamination by organisms sensitive to these broad-spectrum herbicides. A synthetic glyphosate acetyltransferase (GAT) gene, when fitted with a strong Chlamydomonas promoter, conferred a 2.7×-fold increase in tolerance to the EPSPS inhibitor, glyphosate, in transgenic cells compared with progenitor WT cells. A mutant Chlamydomonas protoporphyrinogen oxidase (protox, PPO) gene previously shown to produce an enzyme insensitive to PPO-inhibiting herbicides, when genetically engineered, generated transgenic cells able to tolerate up to 136× higher levels of the PPO inhibitor, oxyfluorfen, than nontransformed cells. Genetic modification of the Chlamydomonas phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene-based gene sequences found in various norflurazon-resistant organisms allowed production of transgenic cells tolerant to 40× higher levels of norflurazon than nontransgenic cells. The high efficiency of all three herbicide resistance genes in producing transgenic cells demonstrated their suitability as dominant selectable markers for genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas and, potentially, other eukaryotic algae. However, the requirement for high concentrations of glyphosate and its associated negative effects on cell growth rates preclude its consideration for use in large-scale production facilities. In contrast, only low doses of norflurazon and oxyfluorfen (~1.5 μm and ~0.1 μm, respectively) are required for inhibition of cell growth, suggesting that these two herbicides may prove effective in large-scale algal production facilities in suppressing growth of organisms sensitive to these herbicides.

  9. Ethics, genetics and dynamics: an emerging systematic approach to radiation protection of the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentreath, R J

    2004-01-01

    There is now a general consensus of opinion that an explicit approach is necessary to demonstrate radiation protection of the environment, and that this approach needs to be developed in a systematic way. The framework that is emerging links ethical and moral issues (anthropocentric, biocentric, and ecocentric) to broad-based principles and objectives of environmental protection (sustainable development, maintaining biological diversity, and habitat protection) and then links these, in turn, to the needs of current environmental management practices, such as environmental exploitation, pollution control, and nature conservation. The relevance of this to radiation is that its effects (such as causing early mortality, morbidity, reduced reproductive success, as well as resulting in observable (scorable) cytogenetic damage) are those that may have a bearing on these same environmental management practices. The devise that would appear to be most useful to bridge the gap between our disparate data on radiation effects and the needs of environmental management, is that of adding to the concept of Reference Man in the shape of a small set of Reference Animals and Plants. This approach has now been adopted by the ICRP, adding new dynamics-the motive forces, both moral and physical-to the subject. The way is now clear for rapid progress to be made on a number of fronts.

  10. Ethics, genetics and dynamics: an emerging systematic approach to radiation protection of the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentreath, R.J

    2004-07-01

    There is now a general consensus of opinion that an explicit approach is necessary to demonstrate radiation protection of the environment, and that this approach needs to be developed in a systematic way. The framework that is emerging links ethical and moral issues (anthropocentric, biocentric, and ecocentric) to broad-based principles and objectives of environmental protection (sustainable development, maintaining biological diversity, and habitat protection) and then links these, in turn, to the needs of current environmental management practices, such as environmental exploitation, pollution control, and nature conservation. The relevance of this to radiation is that its effects (such as causing early mortality, morbidity, reduced reproductive success, as well as resulting in observable (scorable) cytogenetic damage) are those that may have a bearing on these same environmental management practices. The devise that would appear to be most useful to bridge the gap between our disparate data on radiation effects and the needs of environmental management, is that of adding to the concept of Reference Man in the shape of a small set of Reference Animals and Plants. This approach has now been adopted by the ICRP, adding new dynamics--the motive forces, both moral and physical--to the subject. The way is now clear for rapid progress to be made on a number of fronts.

  11. Aging Secret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The canny world of advertising has caught on to the free radical theory of aging, marketing a whole array of antioxidants for preventing anything from wrinkles to dry hair to reducing the risk of heart disease--promising to help slow the hands of time. Working with genetically engineered mice--to produce a natural antioxidant enzyme called…

  12. Aging Secret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The canny world of advertising has caught on to the free radical theory of aging, marketing a whole array of antioxidants for preventing anything from wrinkles to dry hair to reducing the risk of heart disease--promising to help slow the hands of time. Working with genetically engineered mice--to produce a natural antioxidant enzyme called…

  13. shRNA-Based Screen Identifies Endocytic Recycling Pathway Components That Act as Genetic Modifiers of Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation, Secretion and Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana A Gonçalves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-Synuclein (aSyn misfolding and aggregation is common in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, which are known as synucleinopathies. Accumulating evidence suggests that secretion and cell-to-cell trafficking of pathological forms of aSyn may explain the typical patterns of disease progression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling aSyn aggregation and spreading of pathology are still elusive. In order to obtain unbiased information about the molecular regulators of aSyn oligomerization, we performed a microscopy-based large-scale RNAi screen in living cells. Interestingly, we identified nine Rab GTPase and kinase genes that modulated aSyn aggregation, toxicity and levels. From those, Rab8b, Rab11a, Rab13 and Slp5 were able to promote the clearance of aSyn inclusions and rescue aSyn induced toxicity. Furthermore, we found that endocytic recycling and secretion of aSyn was enhanced upon Rab11a and Rab13 expression in cells accumulating aSyn inclusions. Overall, our study resulted in the identification of new molecular players involved in the aggregation, toxicity, and secretion of aSyn, opening novel avenues for our understanding of the molecular basis of synucleinopathies.

  14. Antioxidant rich flavonoids from Oreocnide integrifolia enhance glucose uptake and insulin secretion and protects pancreatic β-cells from streptozotocin insult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansarullah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin deficiency is the prime basis of all diabetic manifestations and agents that can bring about insulin secretion would be of pivotal significance for cure of diabetes. To test this hypothesis, we carried out bioactivity guided fractionation of Oreocnide integrifolia (Urticaceae; a folklore plant consumed for ameliorating diabetic symptoms using experimental models. Methods We carried out bioassay guided fractionation using RINmF and C2C12 cell line for glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS and glucose uptake potential of fractions. Further, the bioactive fraction was challenged for its GSIS in cultured mouse islets with basal (4.5 mM and stimulated (16.7 mM levels of glucose concentrations. The Flavonoid rich fraction (FRF was exposed to 2 mM streptozotocin stress and the anti-ROS/RNS potential was evaluated. Additionally, the bioactive fraction was assessed for its antidiabetic and anti-apoptotic property in-vivo using multidose streptozotocin induced diabetes in BALB/c mice. Results The results suggested FRF to be the most active fraction as assessed by GSIS in RINm5F cells and its ability for glucose uptake in C2C12 cells. FRF displayed significant potential in terms of increasing intracellular calcium and cAMP levels even in presence of a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, IBMX in cultured pancreatic islets. FRF depicted a dose-dependent reversal of all the cytotoxic manifestations except peroxynitrite and NO formation when subjected in-vitro along with STZ. Further scrutinization of FRF for its in-vivo antidiabetic property demonstrated improved glycemic indices and decreased pancreatic β-cell apoptosis. Conclusions Overall, the flavonoid mixture has shown to have significant insulin secretogogue, insulinomimetic and cytoprotective effects and can be evaluated for clinical trials as a therapeutant in the management of diabetic manifestations.

  15. Clinical and Molecular Features of Laron Syndrome, A Genetic Disorder Protecting from Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Anna; Kołodziej-Rzepa, Marta; Biesaga, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, genetic disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The disease is caused by mutations of the growth hormone (GH) gene, leading to GH/insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF1) signalling pathway defect. Patients with LS have characteristic biochemical features, such as a high serum level of GH and low IGF1 concentration. Laron syndrome was first described by the Israeli physician Zvi Laron in 1966. Globally, around 350 people are affected by this syndrome and there are two large groups living in separate geographic regions: Israel (69 individuals) and Ecuador (90 individuals). They are all characterized by typical appearance such as dwarfism, facial phenotype, obesity and hypogenitalism. Additionally, they suffer from hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and sleep disorders, but surprisingly have a very low cancer risk. Therefore, studies on LS offer a unique opportunity to better understand carcinogenesis and develop new strategies of cancer treatment.

  16. Microbial cell surfaces and secretion systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tommassen, J.P.M.; Wosten, H.A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial cell surfaces, surface-exposed organelles, and secreted proteins are important for the interaction with the environment, including adhesion to hosts, protection against host defense mechanisms, nutrient acquisition, and intermicrobial competition. Here, we describe the structures of the ce

  17. AAV8-mediated in vivo overexpression of miR-155 enhances the protective capacity of genetically attenuated malarial parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentzschel, Franziska; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Börner, Kathleen; Heiss, Kirsten; Knapp, Bettina; Sattler, Julia M; Kaderali, Lars; Castoldi, Mirco; Bindman, Julia G; Malato, Yann; Willenbring, Holger; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Grimm, Dirk

    2014-12-01

    Malaria, caused by protozoan Plasmodium parasites, remains a prevalent infectious human disease due to the lack of an efficient and safe vaccine. This is directly related to the persisting gaps in our understanding of the parasite's interactions with the infected host, especially during the clinically silent yet essential liver stage of Plasmodium development. Previously, we and others showed that genetically attenuated parasites (GAP) that arrest in the liver induce sterile immunity, but only upon multiple administrations. Here, we comprehensively studied hepatic gene and miRNA expression in GAP-injected mice, and found both a broad activation of IFNγ-associated pathways and a significant increase of murine microRNA-155 (miR-155), that was especially pronounced in non-parenchymal cells including liver-resident macrophages (Kupffer cells). Remarkably, ectopic upregulation of this miRNA in the liver of mice using robust hepatotropic adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) vectors enhanced GAP's protective capacity substantially. In turn, this AAV8-mediated miR-155 expression permitted a reduction of GAP injections needed to achieve complete protection against infectious parasite challenge from previously three to only one. Our study highlights a crucial role of mammalian miRNAs in Plasmodium liver infection in vivo and concurrently implies their great potential as future immune-augmenting agents in improved vaccination regimes against malaria and other diseases.

  18. Genetic and Histopathological Responses to Cadmium Toxicity in Rabbit's Kidney and Liver: Protection by Ginger (Zingiber officinale).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiomy, Ahmed A; Mansour, Ahmed A

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the protective effects of ginger (G) on the genetic response induced by cadmium (Cd) and immunohistochemical expression of Caspase3 and MKI67 in the kidney and liver of rabbits. Male rabbits were divided into three groups; each group contains 10 animals: group (C) received basic diet and tap water for 12 weeks, the second group (Cd) received 200 mg/kg b.w CdCl2 in water for 12 weeks, group (Cd + G) was given 200 mg/kg b.w CdCl2 in water and 400 mg ginger/kg b.w in food for 12 weeks. Cd administration increased the activity of mRNA expression of the examined apoptotic (Caspase3), proliferation (MKI67), proto-oncogene (C-fos), and antioxidant (GST), while decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic (Bcl2). Ginger counteracted the effects of Cd in (Cd + G) group and downregulated the previously upregulated genes under Cd administration appeared in (Cd) group. The immunohistochemical expression of Caspase3 and MKI67 in the liver and kidney cells of the (C) group was shown very faint to negative reactions, strong staining in hepatocytes and the tubular epithelium in cadmium-treated group, while slight staining in some hepatocytes and tubular epithelium in co-administration with ginger in (Cd + G) group. In conclusion, ginger administration showed a protective effect against cadmium toxicity.

  19. Reevaluation of Fatty Acid Receptor 1 as a Drug Target for the Stimulation of Insulin Secretion in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert; Kaiser, Gabriele; Gerst, Felicia; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E.; Grundmann, Manuel; Machicao, Fausto; Peter, Andreas; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Ullrich, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The role of free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1/GPR40) in glucose homeostasis is still incompletely understood. Small receptor agonists stimulating insulin secretion are undergoing investigation for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Surprisingly, genome-wide association studies did not discover diabetes risk variants in FFAR1. We reevaluated the role of FFAR1 in insulin secretion using a specific agonist, FFAR1-knockout mice and human islets. Nondiabetic individuals were metabolically phenotyped and genotyped. In vitro experiments indicated that palmitate and a specific FFAR1 agonist, TUG-469, stimulate glucose-induced insulin secretion through FFAR1. The proapoptotic effect of chronic exposure of β-cells to palmitate was independent of FFAR1. TUG-469 was protective, whereas inhibition of FFAR1 promoted apoptosis. In accordance with the proapoptotic effect of palmitate, in vivo cross-sectional observations demonstrated a negative association between fasting free fatty acids (NEFAs) and insulin secretion. Because NEFAs stimulate secretion through FFAR1, we examined the interaction of genetic variation in FFAR1 with NEFA and insulin secretion. The inverse association of NEFA and secretion was modulated by rs1573611 and became steeper for carriers of the minor allele. In conclusion, FFAR1 agonists support β-cell function, but variation in FFAR1 influences NEFA effects on insulin secretion and therefore could affect therapeutic efficacy of FFAR1 agonists. PMID:23378609

  20. Biomarkers of safety and immune protection for genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania vaccines against visceral leishmaniasis-Discovery and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas eGannavaram

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite intense efforts there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal and endemic in many tropical countries. A major shortcoming in the vaccine development against blood borne parasitic agents such as Leishmania is the inadequate predictive power of the early immune responses mounted in the host against the experimental vaccines. Often immune correlates derived from in-bred animal models do not yield immune markers of protection that can be readily extrapolated to humans. The limited efficacy of vaccines based on DNA, sub-unit, heat killed parasites has led to the realization that acquisition of durable immunity against the protozoan parasites requires a controlled infection with a live attenuated organism. Recent success of irradiated malaria parasites as a vaccine candidate further strengthens this approach to vaccination. We developed several gene deletion mutants in L. donovani as potential live attenuated vaccines and reported extensively on the immunogenicity of LdCentrin1 deleted mutant in mice, hamsters and dogs. Additional limited studies using genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccine candidates have been reported. However, for the live attenuated parasite vaccines, the primary barrier against widespread use remains the absence of clear biomarkers associated with protection and safety. Recent studies in evaluation of vaccines e.g., influenza and yellow fever vaccines, using systems biology tools demonstrated the power of such strategies in understanding the immunological mechanisms that underpin a protective phenotype. Applying similar tools in isolated human tissues such as PBMCs from healthy individuals infected with live attenuated parasites such as LdCen1-/- in vitro followed by human microarray hybridization experiments will enable us to understand how early vaccine-induced gene expression profiles and the associated immune responses are coordinately regulated

  1. Before they are gone - improving gazelle protection using wildlife forensic genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadas, Lia; Hermon, Dalia; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila

    2016-09-01

    Throughout their habitats gazelles (genus Gazella) face immediate threats due to anthropogenic effects and natural environmental changes. Excessive poaching plays a major role in their populations decline. Three unique populations of gazelles currently live in Israel: mountain gazelle (Gazella gazella), Dorcas gazelle (Gazella Dorcas) and acacia gazelle (Gazella arabica acacia). Ongoing habitat degradation and constant pressure from illegal hunting has caused a continuous decrease in the last 10 years, stressing the need for drastic measures to prevent species extinction. Wildlife forensic science assists enforcement agencies in the escalating arms race against poachers. Wildlife forensic genetic tests being implemented in our laboratory offer both species and individual identification, which rely on two mitochondrial genes (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA) and nine nuclear Short Tandem Repeats (STR), respectively. The current study, presents a poaching case in which mitochondrial DNA-based species identification revealed the presence of mountain gazelle DNA on the seized items. Subsequently, STR markers linked the suspect to more than one gazelle, increasing the severity of the criminal charges.

  2. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-02-16

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression -but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  3. Energy, ageing, fidelity and sex: oocyte mitochondrial DNA as a protected genetic template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Wilson B M; Lucas, Cathy H; Agip, Ahmed-Noor A; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Allen, John F

    2013-07-19

    Oxidative phosphorylation couples ATP synthesis to respiratory electron transport. In eukaryotes, this coupling occurs in mitochondria, which carry DNA. Respiratory electron transport in the presence of molecular oxygen generates free radicals, reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are mutagenic. In animals, mutational damage to mitochondrial DNA therefore accumulates within the lifespan of the individual. Fertilization generally requires motility of one gamete, and motility requires ATP. It has been proposed that oxidative phosphorylation is nevertheless absent in the special case of quiescent, template mitochondria, that these remain sequestered in oocytes and female germ lines and that oocyte mitochondrial DNA is thus protected from damage, but evidence to support that view has hitherto been lacking. Here we show that female gametes of Aurelia aurita, the common jellyfish, do not transcribe mitochondrial DNA, lack electron transport, and produce no free radicals. In contrast, male gametes actively transcribe mitochondrial genes for respiratory chain components and produce ROS. Electron microscopy shows that this functional division of labour between sperm and egg is accompanied by contrasting mitochondrial morphology. We suggest that mitochondrial anisogamy underlies division of any animal species into two sexes with complementary roles in sexual reproduction. We predict that quiescent oocyte mitochondria contain DNA as an unexpressed template that avoids mutational accumulation by being transmitted through the female germ line. The active descendants of oocyte mitochondria perform oxidative phosphorylation in somatic cells and in male gametes of each new generation, and the mutations that they accumulated are not inherited. We propose that the avoidance of ROS-dependent mutation is the evolutionary pressure underlying maternal mitochondrial inheritance and the developmental origin of the female germ line.

  4. Genetic activation of Nrf2 protects against fasting-induced oxidative stress in livers of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Kun Jennifer Zhang

    Full Text Available Acute fasting causes elevated oxidative stress. The current study investigated the effects of the nuclear factor erythoid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, the sensor of oxidative stress in cells, on energy homeostasis and liver pathophysiology during fasting. Feed was removed from mice possessing none (Nrf2-null, normal (wild-type, WT, enhanced (Keap1-knockdown, K1-KD, and maximum (hepatocyte-specific Keap1-knockout, K1-HKO Nrf2 activity in liver for 24 h. Body weight, blood glucose, and blood lipid profiles were similar among mice with graded Nrf2 activity under either fed or fasted conditions. Fasting reduced liver size in mice expressing Nrf2, but not in Nrf2-null mice. Nrf2-null mice accumulated more non-esterified free fatty acids and triglycerides in liver after fasting than the other genotypes of mice. Fatty acids are mainly catabolized in mitochondria, and Nrf2-null mice had lower mitochondrial content in liver under control feeding conditions, which was further reduced by fasting. In contrast, mitochondrial contents in mice with enhanced Nrf2 activity were not affected by fasting. Oxidative stress, determined by staining of free radicals and quantification of malondialdehyde equivalents, was highest in Nrf2-null and lowest in K1-HKO mice after fasting. The exacerbated oxidative stress in livers of Nrf2-null mice is predicted to lead to damages to mitochondria, and therefore diminished oxidation and increased accumulation of lipids in livers of Nrf2-null mice. In summary, the Nrf2-regulated signaling pathway is critical in protecting mitochondria from oxidative stress during feed deprivation, which ensures efficient utilization of fatty acids in livers of mice.

  5. Flufenamic acid protects against intestinal fluid secretion and barrier leakage in a mouse model of Vibrio cholerae infection through NF-κB inhibition and AMPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongkorpsakol, Pawin; Satitsri, Saravut; Wongkrasant, Preedajit; Chittavanich, Pamorn; Kittayaruksakul, Suticha; Srimanote, Potjanee; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2017-03-05

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated inflammatory responses play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of diarrhea caused by the Vibrio cholerae El Tor variant (EL), which is a major bacterial strain causing recent cholera outbreaks. Flufenamic acid (FFA) has previously been demonstrated to be a potent activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a negative regulator of NF-κB signaling. This study aimed to investigate the anti-diarrheal efficacy of FFA in a mouse model of EL infection and to investigate the mechanisms by which FFA activates AMPK in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). In a mouse closed loop model of EL infection, FFA treatment (20mg/kg) significantly abrogated EL-induced intestinal fluid secretion and barrier disruption. In addition, FFA suppressed NF-κB nuclear translocation and expression of proinflammatory mediators and promoted AMPK phosphorylation in the EL-infected mouse intestine. In T84 cells, FFA induced AMPK activation. Furthermore, FFA promoted tight junction assembly and prevented interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-induced barrier disruption in an AMPK-dependent manner. Biochemical and molecular docking analyses indicated that FFA activates AMPK via a direct stimulation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase beta (CaMKKβ) activity. Collectively, our data indicate that FFA represents a class of existing drugs that may be of potential utility in the treatment of cholera caused by EL infection via AMPK-mediated suppression of NF-κB signaling in IEC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic integrity of the Dark European honey bee (Apis mellifera mellifera) from protected populations: a genome-wide assessment using SNPs and mtDNA sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, M Alice; Henriques, Dora; Chávez-Galarza, Julio

    2014-01-01

    to preserve the genetic integrity of A. m. mellifera, protected populations had a measurable component of their gene pool derived from commercial C-lineage honey bees. Here we used both sequence data from the tRNAleu-cox2 intergenic mtDNA region and a genome-wide scan, with over 1183 single nucleotide...

  7. Genetic integrity of the Dark European honey bee (Apis mellifera mellifera) from protected populations: a genome-wide assessment using SNPs and mtDNA sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, M Alice; Henriques, Dora; Chávez-Galarza, Julio

    2014-01-01

    to preserve the genetic integrity of A. m. mellifera, protected populations had a measurable component of their gene pool derived from commercial C-lineage honey bees. Here we used both sequence data from the tRNAleu-cox2 intergenic mtDNA region and a genome-wide scan, with over 1183 single nucleotide...

  8. Genetic immunization elicits antigen-specific protective immune responses and decreases disease severity in Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Nisha; Tarleton, Rick L

    2002-10-01

    Immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi requires elicitation of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to extracellular trypomastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. In this study, the effectiveness of the T. cruzi trans-sialidase family (ts) genes ASP-1, ASP-2, and TSA-1 as genetic vaccines was assessed. Immunization of mice with plasmids encoding ASP-1, ASP-2, or TSA-1 elicited poor antigen-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and T. cruzi-specific antibody responses. Codelivery of interleukin-12 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor plasmids with antigen-encoding plasmids resulted in a substantial increase in CTL activity and antibody production and in increased resistance to T. cruzi infection. In pooled results from two to four experiments, 30 to 60% of mice immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids and 60 to 80% of mice immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids plus cytokine adjuvants survived a lethal challenge with T. cruzi. In comparison, 90% of control mice injected with empty plasmid DNA died during the acute phase of infection. However, the pool of three ts genes provided no greater protection than the most effective single gene (ASP-2) either with or without coadministration of cytokine plasmids. Importantly, the extent of tissue parasitism, inflammation, and associated tissue damage in skeletal muscles during the chronic phase of T. cruzi infection in mice immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids plus cytokine adjuvants was remarkably reduced compared to mice immunized with only cytokine adjuvants or empty plasmid DNA. These results identify new vaccine candidates and establish some of the methodologies that might be needed to develop effective vaccine-mediated control of T. cruzi infection. In addition, this work provides the first evidence that prophylactic genetic immunization can prevent the development of Chagas' disease.

  9. Lactic Acid Bacteria Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Toxicity of Graphene Oxide by Maintaining Normal Intestinal Permeability under different Genetic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Xiaoming; Jia, Ruhan; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is safe and useful for food and feed fermentation. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible beneficial effect of LAB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus) pretreatment against toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and the underlying mechanisms. LAB prevented GO toxicity on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in wild-type nematodes. LAB blocked translocation of GO into secondary targeted organs through intestinal barrier by maintaining normal intestinal permeability in wild-type nematodes. Moreover, LAB prevented GO damage on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in exposed nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes (sod-2, sod-3, gas-1, and aak-2) to GO toxicity by sustaining normal intestinal permeability. LAB also sustained the normal defecation behavior in both wild-type nematodes and nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes. Therefore, the beneficial role of LAB against GO toxicity under different genetic backgrounds may be due to the combinational effects on intestinal permeability and defecation behavior. Moreover, the beneficial effects of LAB against GO toxicity was dependent on the function of ACS-22, homologous to mammalian FATP4 to mammalian FATP4. Our study provides highlight on establishment of pharmacological strategy to protect intestinal barrier from toxicity of GO.

  10. Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture: The evolution of radiation protection--from erythema to genetic risks to risks of cancer to...?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhold, Charles B

    2004-09-01

    Radiation Protection has evolved and will continue to evolve as new information becomes available, as the result of changes in public perception and concern and, perhaps in the future, as a result of enormous expenditures on reducing small risks. In the early part of the last century it was a sense of real danger among medical Practitioners that prompted the first set of exposure limiting suggestions. Addressing medical concerns continued to be the basis of guidance until after the Second World War. An array of new sources and applications led to new approaches, which modified many of the technical issues but didn't result in substantial changes in the dose limits. Fallout from the first generation of thermonuclear weapons in the 1950's resulted in focusing attention on genetic effects, which continued until the middle 1970's. Data from the Japanese Survivor Studies provided the information for risk based recommendations beginning in 1977 and continue to do so today. Both the ICRP and the NCRP are heavily criticized by both those groups of individuals which believe the risk estimates are underestimated and by those which believe the risks are greatly overestimated. Perhaps both organizations can take some comfort in Saint Thomas Aquinas' suggestion, "In medio virtus."

  11. Genetic association study of exfoliation syndrome identifies a protective rare variant at LOXL1 and five new susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Tin; Ozaki, Mineo; Lee, Mei Chin; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Mizoguchi, Takanori; Igo, Robert P; Haripriya, Aravind; Williams, Susan E; Astakhov, Yury S; Orr, Andrew C; Burdon, Kathryn P; Nakano, Satoko; Mori, Kazuhiko; Abu-Amero, Khaled; Hauser, Michael; Li, Zheng; Prakadeeswari, Gopalakrishnan; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Kang, Jae H; Nelson, Sarah; Hayashi, Ken; Manabe, Shin-Ichi; Kazama, Shigeyasu; Zarnowski, Tomasz; Inoue, Kenji; Irkec, Murat; Coca-Prados, Miguel; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Järvelä, Irma; Schlottmann, Patricio; Lerner, S Fabian; Lamari, Hasnaa; Nilgün, Yildirim; Bikbov, Mukharram; Park, Ki Ho; Cha, Soon Cheol; Yamashiro, Kenji; Zenteno, Juan C; Jonas, Jost B; Kumar, Rajesh S; Perera, Shamira A; Chan, Anita S Y; Kobakhidze, Nino; George, Ronnie; Vijaya, Lingam; Do, Tan; Edward, Deepak P; de Juan Marcos, Lourdes; Pakravan, Mohammad; Moghimi, Sasan; Ideta, Ryuichi; Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kappelgaard, Per; Wirostko, Barbara; Thomas, Samuel; Gaston, Daniel; Bedard, Karen; Greer, Wenda L; Yang, Zhenglin; Chen, Xueyi; Huang, Lulin; Sang, Jinghong; Jia, Hongyan; Jia, Liyun; Qiao, Chunyan; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Xuyang; Zhao, Bowen; Wang, Ya-Xing; Xu, Liang; Leruez, Stéphanie; Reynier, Pascal; Chichua, George; Tabagari, Sergo; Uebe, Steffen; Zenkel, Matthias; Berner, Daniel; Mossböck, Georg; Weisschuh, Nicole; Hoja, Ursula; Welge-Luessen, Ulrich-Christoph; Mardin, Christian; Founti, Panayiota; Chatzikyriakidou, Anthi; Pappas, Theofanis; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios; Lambropoulos, Alexandros; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Shetty, Rohit; Porporato, Natalia; Saravanan, Vijayan; Venkatesh, Rengaraj; Shivkumar, Chandrashekaran; Kalpana, Narendran; Sarangapani, Sripriya; Kanavi, Mozhgan R; Beni, Afsaneh Naderi; Yazdani, Shahin; Lashay, Alireza; Naderifar, Homa; Khatibi, Nassim; Fea, Antonio; Lavia, Carlo; Dallorto, Laura; Rolle, Teresa; Frezzotti, Paolo; Paoli, Daniela; Salvi, Erika; Manunta, Paolo; Mori, Yosai; Miyata, Kazunori; Higashide, Tomomi; Chihara, Etsuo; Ishiko, Satoshi; Yoshida, Akitoshi; Yanagi, Masahide; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Ohashi, Tsutomu; Sakurai, Toshiya; Sugimoto, Takako; Chuman, Hideki; Aihara, Makoto; Inatani, Masaru; Miyake, Masahiro; Gotoh, Norimoto; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Ikeda, Yoko; Ueno, Morio; Sotozono, Chie; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Sagong, Min; Park, Kyu Hyung; Ahn, Jeeyun; Cruz-Aguilar, Marisa; Ezzouhairi, Sidi M; Rafei, Abderrahman; Chong, Yaan Fun; Ng, Xiao Yu; Goh, Shuang Ru; Chen, Yueming; Yong, Victor H K; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Olawoye, Olusola O; Ashaye, Adeyinka O; Ugbede, Idakwo; Onakoya, Adeola; Kizor-Akaraiwe, Nkiru; Teekhasaenee, Chaiwat; Suwan, Yanin; Supakontanasan, Wasu; Okeke, Suhanya; Uche, Nkechi J; Asimadu, Ifeoma; Ayub, Humaira; Akhtar, Farah; Kosior-Jarecka, Ewa; Lukasik, Urszula; Lischinsky, Ignacio; Castro, Vania; Grossmann, Rodolfo Perez; Megevand, Gordana Sunaric; Roy, Sylvain; Dervan, Edward; Silke, Eoin; Rao, Aparna; Sahay, Priti; Fornero, Pablo; Cuello, Osvaldo; Sivori, Delia; Zompa, Tamara; Mills, Richard A; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Hewitt, Alex W; Coote, Michael; Crowston, Jonathan G; Astakhov, Sergei Y; Akopov, Eugeny L; Emelyanov, Anton; Vysochinskaya, Vera; Kazakbaeva, Gyulli; Fayzrakhmanov, Rinat; Al-Obeidan, Saleh A; Owaidhah, Ohoud; Aljasim, Leyla Ali; Chowbay, Balram; Foo, Jia Nee; Soh, Raphael Q; Sim, Kar Seng; Xie, Zhicheng; Cheong, Augustine W O; Mok, Shi Qi; Soo, Hui Meng; Chen, Xiao Yin; Peh, Su Qin; Heng, Khai Koon; Husain, Rahat; Ho, Su-Ling; Hillmer, Axel M; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Escudero-Domínguez, Francisco A; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Martinon-Torres, Frederico; Salas, Antonio; Pathanapitoon, Kessara; Hansapinyo, Linda; Wanichwecharugruang, Boonsong; Kitnarong, Naris; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Nguyn, Hip X; Nguyn, Giang T T; Nguyn, Trình V; Zenz, Werner; Binder, Alexander; Klobassa, Daniela S; Hibberd, Martin L; Davila, Sonia; Herms, Stefan; Nöthen, Markus M; Moebus, Susanne; Rautenbach, Robyn M; Ziskind, Ari; Carmichael, Trevor R; Ramsay, Michele; Álvarez, Lydia; García, Montserrat; González-Iglesias, Héctor; Rodríguez-Calvo, Pedro P; Cueto, Luis Fernández-Vega; Oguz, Çilingir; Tamcelik, Nevbahar; Atalay, Eray; Batu, Bilge; Aktas, Dilek; Kasım, Burcu; Wilson, M Roy; Coleman, Anne L; Liu, Yutao; Challa, Pratap; Herndon, Leon; Kuchtey, Rachel W; Kuchtey, John; Curtin, Karen; Chaya, Craig J; Crandall, Alan; Zangwill, Linda M; Wong, Tien Yin; Nakano, Masakazu; Kinoshita, Shigeru; den Hollander, Anneke I; Vesti, Eija; Fingert, John H; Lee, Richard K; Sit, Arthur J; Shingleton, Bradford J; Wang, Ningli; Cusi, Daniele; Qamar, Raheel; Kraft, Peter; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Heegaard, Steffen; Kivelä, Tero; Reis, André; Kruse, Friedrich E; Weinreb, Robert N; Pasquale, Louis R; Haines, Jonathan L; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Jonasson, Fridbert; Allingham, R Rand; Milea, Dan; Ritch, Robert; Kubota, Toshiaki; Tashiro, Kei; Vithana, Eranga N; Micheal, Shazia; Topouzis, Fotis; Craig, Jamie E; Dubina, Michael; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Stefansson, Kari; Wiggs, Janey L; Pasutto, Francesca; Khor, Chiea Chuen

    2017-07-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is the most common known risk factor for secondary glaucoma and a major cause of blindness worldwide. Variants in two genes, LOXL1 and CACNA1A, have previously been associated with XFS. To further elucidate the genetic basis of XFS, we collected a global sample of XFS cases to refine the association at LOXL1, which previously showed inconsistent results across populations, and to identify new variants associated with XFS. We identified a rare protective allele at LOXL1 (p.Phe407, odds ratio (OR) = 25, P = 2.9 × 10(-14)) through deep resequencing of XFS cases and controls from nine countries. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of XFS cases and controls from 24 countries followed by replication in 18 countries identified seven genome-wide significant loci (P < 5 × 10(-8)). We identified association signals at 13q12 (POMP), 11q23.3 (TMEM136), 6p21 (AGPAT1), 3p24 (RBMS3) and 5q23 (near SEMA6A). These findings provide biological insights into the pathology of XFS and highlight a potential role for naturally occurring rare LOXL1 variants in disease biology.

  12. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Samudrala

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates--effector proteins--are not. We have used a novel computational approach to confidently identify new secreted effectors by integrating protein sequence-based features, including evolutionary measures such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, G+C content, amino acid composition, and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and validated on a set of effectors from the animal pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. We show that this approach can predict known secreted effectors with high specificity and sensitivity. Furthermore, by considering a large set of effectors from multiple organisms, we computationally identify a common putative secretion signal in the N-terminal 20 residues of secreted effectors. This signal can be used to discriminate 46 out of 68 total known effectors from both organisms, suggesting that it is a real, shared signal applicable to many type III secreted effectors. We use the method to make novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. Typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated. We also apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, identifying the majority of known secreted proteins in addition to providing a number of novel predictions. This approach provides a new way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  13. Protection against 1,2-di-methylhydrazine-induced systemic oxidative stress and altered brain neurotransmitter status by probiotic Escherichia coli CFR 16 secreting pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sumeet; Singh, Ashish; Chaudhari, Nirja; Nampoothiri, Laxmipriya P; Kumar, G Naresh

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutant 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) is attributed to systemic oxidative stress and is known to cause neurotropic effect by altering brain neurotransmitter status. Probiotics are opted as natural therapeutic against oxidative stress and also have the ability to modulate gut-brain axis. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is water-soluble, heat-stable antioxidant molecule. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant efficacy of PQQ-producing probiotic E. coli CFR 16 on DMH-induced systemic oxidative damage and altered neurotransmitter status in rat brain. Adult virgin Charles Forster rats (200-250 g) were given DMH dose (25 mg/kg body weight, s.c.) for 8 weeks. Blood lipid peroxidation levels exhibited a marked increase while antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase were found to be reduced in DMH-treated rats. Likewise, brain serotonin and norepinephrine levels displayed a significant decrease, whereas epinephrine levels demonstrated a marked increase in brain of these rats. PQQ-producing E. coli CFR 16 supplementation reduced systemic oxidative stress and also restored brain neurotransmitter status. However, E. coli CFR 16 did not show any effect on these parameters. In contrast, E. coli CFR 16:: vgb-gfp and E. coli CFR 16:: vgb-gfp vector exhibited some degree of protection again oxidative stress but they were not able to modulate neurotransmitter levels. In conclusion, continuous and sustained release of PQQ by probiotic E. coli in rat intestine ameliorates systemic oxidative stress and restored brain neurotransmitter levels.

  14. Distribution, Functional Expression, and Genetic Organization of Cif, a Phage-Encoded Type III-Secreted Effector from Enteropathogenic and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukiadis, Estelle; Nobe, Rika; Herold, Sylvia; Tramuta, Clara; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Ooka, Tadasuke; Morabito, Stefano; Kérourédan, Monique; Brugère, Hubert; Schmidt, Herbert; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Oswald, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) inject effector proteins into host cells via a type III secretion system encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). One of these effectors is Cif, encoded outside the LEE by a lambdoid prophage. In this study, we demonstrated that the Cif-encoding prophage of EPEC strain E22 is inducible and produces infectious phage particles. We investigated the distribution and functional expression of Cif in 5,049 E. coli strains of human, animal, and environmental origins. A total of 115 E. coli isolates from diverse origins and geographic locations carried cif. The presence of cif was tightly associated with the LEE, since all the cif-positive isolates were positive for the LEE. These results suggested that the Cif-encoding prophages have been widely disseminated within the natural population of E. coli but positively selected within the population of LEE-positive strains. Nonetheless, 66% of cif-positive E. coli strains did not induce a typical Cif-related phenotype in eukaryotic cells due to frameshift mutations or insertion of an IS element in the cif gene. The passenger region of the prophages carrying cif was highly variable and showed various combinations of IS elements and genes coding for other effectors such as nleB, nleC, nleH, nleG, espJ, and nleA/espI (some of which were also truncated). This diversity and the presence of nonfunctional effectors should be taken into account to assess EPEC and EHEC pathogenicity and tropism. PMID:17873042

  15. Distribution, functional expression, and genetic organization of Cif, a phage-encoded type III-secreted effector from enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukiadis, Estelle; Nobe, Rika; Herold, Sylvia; Tramuta, Clara; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Ooka, Tadasuke; Morabito, Stefano; Kérourédan, Monique; Brugère, Hubert; Schmidt, Herbert; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Oswald, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) inject effector proteins into host cells via a type III secretion system encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). One of these effectors is Cif, encoded outside the LEE by a lambdoid prophage. In this study, we demonstrated that the Cif-encoding prophage of EPEC strain E22 is inducible and produces infectious phage particles. We investigated the distribution and functional expression of Cif in 5,049 E. coli strains of human, animal, and environmental origins. A total of 115 E. coli isolates from diverse origins and geographic locations carried cif. The presence of cif was tightly associated with the LEE, since all the cif-positive isolates were positive for the LEE. These results suggested that the Cif-encoding prophages have been widely disseminated within the natural population of E. coli but positively selected within the population of LEE-positive strains. Nonetheless, 66% of cif-positive E. coli strains did not induce a typical Cif-related phenotype in eukaryotic cells due to frameshift mutations or insertion of an IS element in the cif gene. The passenger region of the prophages carrying cif was highly variable and showed various combinations of IS elements and genes coding for other effectors such as nleB, nleC, nleH, nleG, espJ, and nleA/espI (some of which were also truncated). This diversity and the presence of nonfunctional effectors should be taken into account to assess EPEC and EHEC pathogenicity and tropism.

  16. Protection against Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli by Non-Genetically Modified Organism Receptor Mimic Bacterial Ghosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Adrienne W; Chen, Austen Y; Wang, Hui; McAllister, Lauren J; Höggerl, Florian; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Shewell, Lucy K; Jennings, Michael P; Morona, Renato; Lubitz, Werner; Paton, James C

    2015-09-01

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) causes severe gastrointestinal infections in humans that may lead to life-threatening systemic sequelae, such as the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Rapid diagnosis of STEC infection early in the course of disease opens a window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention, for example, by administration of agents that neutralize Shiga toxin (Stx) in the gut lumen. We previously developed a recombinant bacterium that expresses a mimic of the Stx receptor globotriaosyl ceramide (Gb3) on its surface through modification of the lipopolysaccharide (A. W. Paton, R. Morona, and J. C. Paton, Nat Med 6:265-270, 2000, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/73111). This construct was highly efficacious in vivo, protecting mice from otherwise fatal STEC disease, but the fact that it is a genetically modified organism (GMO) has been a barrier to clinical development. In the present study, we have overcome this issue by development of Gb3 receptor mimic bacterial ghosts (BGs) that are not classified as GMOs. Gb3-BGs neutralized Stx1 and Stx2 in vitro with high efficiency, whereas alternative Gb3-expressing non-GMO subbacterial particles (minicells and outer membrane blebs) were ineffective. Gb3-BGs were highly efficacious in a murine model of STEC disease. All mice (10/10) treated with Gb3-BGs survived challenge with a highly virulent O113:H21 STEC strain and showed no pathological signs of renal injury. In contrast, 6/10 mice treated with control BGs succumbed to STEC challenge, and survivors exhibited significant weight loss, neutrophilia, and histopathological evidence of renal damage. Thus, Gb3-BGs offer a non-GMO approach to treatment of STEC infection in humans, particularly in an outbreak setting.

  17. Genetic ablation of the fpr1 gene confers protection from smoking-induced lung emphysema in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardini, Silvia; Dalli, Jesmond; Fineschi, Silvia; Perretti, Mauro; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Lucattelli, Monica

    2012-09-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is the main causative factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Current research supports the concept that airway inflammation is central to the development and progression of the disease. Studies have demonstrated that neutrophils are increased in COPD lungs and that neutrophil-associated products correlate with the development and severity of COPD. The peptide FMLP is an active component of CS. FMLP interacts on the neutrophil and macrophage membranes with a high-affinity receptor subtype (FPR1) and with a low-affinity subtype FPRL1, promoting a chemotactic response, superoxide anion production, and degranulation. Bacterial colonization of the lower respiratory tract and lung cell damage may represent further sources of formyl peptides in patients with COPD. We investigated the role of FPR in a mouse model on lung inflammation and emphysema induced by CS. Here, we report the novel observation that genetic ablation of the FPR1 gene (Fpr1) confers protection from smoking-induced lung emphysema in mice. Compared with wild-type mice, Fpr1 knockout mice displayed marked decreases in the lung migration of neutrophils and macrophages after CS exposure. Upon transgenic approach, the changes in cell numbers were accompanied by marked modulation of the expression of genes implicated in the inflammatory response. Administration of the FPR1 antagonist cyclosporine H to wild-type mice attenuated the acute inflammatory response evoked by CS. These findings may have clinical significance because current smokers and subjects with emphysema showed increased FPR expression in bronchoalveolar fluids and on peripheral neutrophils. Modulating the FPR1 signal should be explored as a potential new therapy.

  18. Construction of a recombinant-attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis strain secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit protein and its immunogenicity and protection efficacy against salmonellosis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandre, Rahul M; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-01-09

    A live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) strain secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) protein was constructed as a new vaccine candidate. The comparative effect of this vaccine candidate was evaluated with a previously reported SE vaccine, JOL919. An asd+, p15A ori plasmid containing eltB-encoding LTB was introduced into a ΔlonΔcpxRΔasd SE strain, and designated as JOL1364. In a single immunization experiment, group A chickens were orally inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline as a control, group B chickens were orally immunized with JOL919, and group C chickens were orally immunized with JOL1364. The immunized groups B and C showed significantly higher systemic, mucosal and cellular immune responses as compared to those of the control group. In addition, the immunized group C showed significantly higher mucosal and cellular immune responses as compared to those of the immunized group B at the 1st week post-immunization. In the examination of protection efficacy, the immunized groups B and C showed lower gross lesion scores in the liver and spleen, and lower bacterial counts of SE challenge strain in the liver, spleen, and caeca as compared to those of the control group. The number of SE-positive birds was significantly lower in the immunized group C as compared to that of the control group at the 14th day post-challenge. In addition, the number of birds carrying the challenge strain in the caeca was significantly lower in the immunized group C than those in the immunized group B and control group at the 7th and 14th day post-challenge. These results indicate that immunization with the JOL1364 vaccine candidate can induce higher mucosal and cellular immune responses than those of the JOL919 for efficient protection against salmonellosis.

  19. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from cervical cancer tumors induce TGF-β1 expression and IL-10 expression and secretion in the cervical cancer cells, resulting in protection from cytotoxic T cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rocha, R; Moreno-Lafont, M; Mora-García, M L; Weiss-Steider, B; Montesinos, J J; Piña-Sánchez, P; Monroy-García, A

    2015-12-01

    Cervical cancer (CeCa) tumors are characterized by increased expression of TGF-β1 and IL-10, which are correlated with downregulated expression of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (HLA-I) on cancer cells and a reduced immune response mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are important components in the tumor microenvironment that have been suggested to contribute to cancer progression through the induction of TGF-β1 and IL-10. In this study, we provided evidence that MSCs derived from cervical tumors (CeCa-MSCs) cocultured with CeCa cells induced significant expression of TGF-β1 and secretion of IL-10 by CeCa cells compared to MSCs derived from the normal cervix (NCx-MSCs) and normal bone marrow (BM-MSCs; gold standard). This increase in expression was associated with a significant downregulation of HLA-I molecules and protection of the cells against specific CTL lysis. Interestingly, the addition of the neutralizing antibody anti-TGF-β to the CeCa/CeCa-MSCs coculture strongly inhibited the expression and production of IL-10 by CeCa cells. Anti-TGF-β as well as anti-IL-10 also abolished HLA-I downregulation, and reversed the inhibition of CTL cytotoxicity. These results provide evidence that TGF-β1 and IL-10 could play an important role in the downregulation of HLA-I molecules on CeCa cells induced by tumor MSCs. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism through which MSCs may protect tumor cells from immune recognition by specific CTLs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit with a commercial vaccine for efficacy of protection against internal egg contamination by Salmonella in hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandre, Rahul M; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang Youel; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-07-01

    This study compared a new live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (SE-LTB) with a commercial Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine for efficacy of protection against SE infection in laying hens. Chickens were divided into 3 groups of 20 each. Group A chickens were inoculated orally with phosphate-buffered saline and served as controls, group B chickens were inoculated orally with the vaccine candidate, and group C chickens were inoculated intramuscularly with a commercial vaccine, the primary inoculation in groups B and C being at 10 wk of age and the booster at 16 wk. Groups B and C showed significantly higher titers of plasma immunoglobulin G, intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A, and egg yolk immunoglobulin Y antibodies compared with the control group, and both vaccinated groups showed a significantly elevated cellular immune response. After virulent challenge, group B had significantly lower production of thin-shelled and/or malformed eggs and a significantly lower rate of SE contamination of eggs compared with the control group. Furthermore, the challenge strain was detected significantly less in all of the examined organs of group B compared with the control group. Group C had lower gross lesion scores only in the spleen and had lower bacterial counts only in the spleen, ceca, and ovary. These findings indicate that vaccination with the SE-LTB vaccine candidate can efficiently reduce internal egg and internal organ contamination by Salmonella and has advantages over the commercial vaccine.

  1. The presence of MOMA-2+ macrophages in the outer B cell zone and protection of the splenic micro-architecture from LPS-induced destruction depend on secreted IgM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael B; Rüger, Beate; Vaculik, Christine; Becherer, Alexander; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Yanagida, Genya; Losert, Udo M; Chen, Jianzhu; Carroll, Michael C; Eibl, Martha M

    2007-10-01

    The role secretory IgM has in protecting splenic tissue from LPS-induced damage was assessed in mice incapable of secreting IgM but able to express surface IgM and IgD. Within seconds after LPS challenge, 99% of the (131)I-labeled LPS was found in the liver and the spleen of both sIgM-deficient and wild-type mice. In the spleen FITC-labeled LPS was found on the surface of 2F8(+) scavenger receptor macrophages localized in the outer marginal zone, while none of the labeled LPS could be detected on marginal zone ER-TR9(+) and MOMA-1(+) macrophages. An additional population of macrophages, MOMA-2(+), were capable of producing C3 locally in the T and B cell zone after LPS challenge. Local C3 production was regulated, as no C3 was found in splenic tissue of unchallenged mice. Interestingly, in the absence of circulating and locally produced secretory IgM, MOMA-2(+) macrophages of the T and B cell zone failed to establish an additional ring of C3-producing macrophages in the outer B cell zone close to the marginal zone upon LPS challenge. The consequence was a massive destruction of the microarchitecture of the spleen where marginal zones disorganized, lymphoid follicles and T cell zones disrupted and follicular DC (FDC) networks disappeared.

  2. Co-administration of a plasmid DNA encoding IL-15 improves long-term protection of a genetic vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S Eickhoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immunization of mice with the Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase (TS gene using plasmid DNA, adenoviral vector, and CpG-adjuvanted protein delivery has proven highly immunogenic and provides protection against acute lethal challenge. However, long-term protection induced by TS DNA vaccines has not been reported. The goal of the present work was to test whether the co-administration of a plasmid encoding IL-15 (pIL-15 could improve the duration of protection achieved through genetic vaccination with plasmid encoding TS (pTS alone. METHODOLOGY: We immunized BALB/c mice with pTS in the presence or absence of pIL-15 and studied immune responses [with TS-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT, serum IgG ELISAs, intracellular cytokine staining (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, tetramer staining, and CFSE dilution assays] and protection against lethal systemic challenge at 1 to 6 months post vaccination. Mice receiving pTS alone developed robust TS-specific IFN-γ responses and survived a lethal challenge given within the first 3 months following immunization. The addition of pIL-15 to pTS vaccination did not significantly alter T cell responses or protection during this early post-vaccination period. However, mice vaccinated with both pTS and pIL-15 challenged 6 months post-vaccination were significantly more protected against lethal T. cruzi challenges than mice vaccinated with pTS alone (P6 months post immunization. Also, these TS-specific T cells were better able to expand after in vitro re-stimulation. CONCLUSION: Addition of pIL-15 during genetic vaccination greatly improved long-term T cell survival, memory T cell expansion, and long-term protection against the important human parasite, T. cruzi.

  3. Privacy and intra-familiy communication of genetic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniz, Helena

    2004-01-01

    The new knowledge (and predictions) created by DNA tests and the family nature of genetic information has already lead to a new problem: the intra-familiar communication of genetic data. This raises questions such as the following. Is there a duty to inform in cases when treatment is possible and the patient does not permit disclosure of genetic results to relatives? Is there an obligation to warn or merely an authorization (that could be used or not)? Could privacy protection be maintain as an individual interest but with some justified violations? A balance needs to be establishes between the interest of privacy and the need to disclose secret information.

  4. High heritability and genetic correlation of intravenous glucose- and tolbutamide-induced insulin secretion among non-diabetic family members of type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesing, Anette Marianne Prior; Hornbak, Malene; Allin, Kristine H.

    2014-01-01

    ∈±∈SE: 0.49∈±∈0.14) and beta cell responsiveness to glucose (h 2∈±∈SE: 0.66∈±∈0.12). Additionally, strong genetic correlations were found between measures of beta cell response after glucose and tolbutamide stimulation, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.77 to 0.88. Furthermore, we identified......Aims/hypothesis: The aim of this study was to estimate the heritability of quantitative measures of glucose regulation obtained from a tolbutamide-modified frequently sampled IVGTT (t-FSIGT) and to correlate the heritability of the glucose-stimulated beta cell response to the tolbutamide......-induced beta cell response. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) having an exclusive effect on either glucose- or tolbutamide-stimulated insulin release were identified. Methods: Two hundred and eighty-four non-diabetic family members of patients with type 2 diabetes underwent a t...

  5. The Protective Effect of Minocycline in a Paraquat-Induced Parkinson's Disease Model in Drosophila is Modified in Altered Genetic Backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arati A. Inamdar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies link the herbicide paraquat to increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD. We previously reported that Drosophila exposed to paraquat recapitulate PD symptoms, including region-specific degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Minocycline, a tetracycline derivative, exerts ameliorative effects in neurodegenerative disease models, including Drosophila. We investigated whether our environmental toxin-based PD model could contribute to an understanding of cellular and genetic mechanisms of minocycline action and whether we could assess potential interference with these drug effects in altered genetic backgrounds. Cofeeding of minocycline with paraquat prolonged survival, rescued mobility defects, blocked generation of reactive oxygen species, and extended dopaminergic neuron survival, as has been reported previously for a genetic model of PD in Drosophila. We then extended this study to identify potential interactions of minocycline with genes regulating dopamine homeostasis that might modify protection against paraquat and found that deficits in GTP cyclohydrolase adversely affect minocycline rescue. We further performed genetic studies to identify signaling pathways that are necessary for minocycline protection against paraquat toxicity and found that mutations in the Drosophila genes that encode c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and Akt/Protein kinase B block minocycline rescue.

  6. Trade Secrets in the Legal Studies Curriculum--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Trade secrets can be a valuable company asset because of their potential to last forever. Unfortunately, along with such a significant benefit, there is also a significant risk--the risk that the trade secret can be lost in an instant if it is not sufficiently protected. Companies must be vigilant in protecting these secrets. However, the law is…

  7. Pheochromocytomas and secreting paragangliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimenez-Roqueplo Anne-Paule

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Catecholamine-producing tumors may arise in the adrenal medulla (pheochromocytomas or in extraadrenal chromaffin cells (secreting paragangliomas. Their prevalence is about 0.1% in patients with hypertension and 4% in patients with a fortuitously discovered adrenal mass. An increase in the production of catecholamines causes symptoms (mainly headaches, palpitations and excess sweating and signs (mainly hypertension, weight loss and diabetes reflecting the effects of epinephrine and norepinephrine on α- and β-adrenergic receptors. Catecholamine-producing tumors mimic paroxysmal conditions with hypertension and/or cardiac rhythm disorders, including panic attacks, in which sympathetic activation linked to anxiety reproduces the same signs and symptoms. These tumors may be sporadic or part of any of several genetic diseases: familial pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma syndromes, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, neurofibromatosis 1 and von Hippel-Lindau disease. Familial cases are diagnosed earlier and are more frequently bilateral and recurring than sporadic cases. The most specific and sensitive diagnostic test for the tumor is the determination of plasma or urinary metanephrines. The tumor can be located by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy. Treatment requires resection of the tumor, generally by laparoscopic surgery. About 10% of tumors are malignant either at first operation or during follow-up, malignancy being diagnosed by the presence of lymph node, visceral or bone metastases. Recurrences and malignancy are more frequent in cases with large or extraadrenal tumors. Patients, especially those with familial or extraadrenal tumors, should be followed-up indefinitely.

  8. Genetic Mechanisms of Coffee Extract Protection in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model of β-Amyloid Peptide Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Dostal, Vishantie; Roberts, Christine M; Link, Christopher D

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that coffee and/or caffeine consumption may reduce Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk. We found that coffee extracts can similarly protect against β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) toxicity in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans Alzheimer's disease model. The primary protective component(s) in this model is not caffeine, although caffeine by itself can show moderate protection. Coffee exposure did not decrease Aβ transgene expression and did not need to be present during...

  9. 企业雇员离职后商业秘密保护的利益衡量--以GM前工程师涉嫌窃取商业秘密案为背景%The Interests Measurement of Trade Secret Protection Following the Termination of Employment Relationship--regarding GM former engineer’s alleged theft of trade secrets case as the background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔汪卫

    2014-01-01

    Trade secret is an important part of intellectual property rights, and the protection of trade secret has played a positive role in encouraging enterprises to technological innovation and promoting intellectual development. However, the flow of enterprise personnel is the need of social economy and science technology and is also the inevitable result of the law of growth of talents, which causes a problem of how to identify enterprise employee business secrets and employee's knowledge, experience and skills and how to balance the conflict between freedom to choose a job and business secret rights. We use the theory of balancing interests to balance the interests of all parties and to determine whether the standard of non-competition agreement is justified and to protect non-competition agreement in meeting the standard. At the same time, the confidential agreement and non-compete agreement should be restricted from regional scope, time limit and economic compensation and other aspects in order to protect the lawful rights and interests of employees and realize the balancing of bilateral interests.%商业秘密是知识产权的重要组成部分,保护商业秘密对鼓励企业技术创新、促进智力成果开发都起到了积极作用。然而,企业人员的流动是社会经济与科学技术发展的需要,也是人才成长规律的必然结果,这就造成了企业雇员离职后商业秘密与雇员自身知识、经验和技能的界限如何认定、自由择业权与企业商业秘密权的冲突如何权衡等问题。运用利益衡量理论平衡各方利益,确定竞业禁止协议是否具有合理性的认定标准,对于符合认定标准的竞业禁止协议进行保护。同时,应当对保密协议和竞业禁止协议从地域范围、时间期限和经济补偿等方面进行必要限制,以保障雇员的合法权益,实现双方利益的平衡。

  10. A recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus-based Lassa fever vaccine protects guinea pigs and macaques against challenge with geographically and genetically distinct Lassa viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Safronetz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV is endemic in several West African countries and is the etiological agent of Lassa fever. Despite the high annual incidence and significant morbidity and mortality rates, currently there are no approved vaccines to prevent infection or disease in humans. Genetically, LASV demonstrates a high degree of diversity that correlates with geographic distribution. The genetic heterogeneity observed between geographically distinct viruses raises concerns over the potential efficacy of a "universal" LASV vaccine. To date, several experimental LASV vaccines have been developed; however, few have been evaluated against challenge with various genetically unique Lassa virus isolates in relevant animal models.Here we demonstrate that a single, prophylactic immunization with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV expressing the glycoproteins of LASV strain Josiah from Sierra Leone protects strain 13 guinea pigs from infection / disease following challenge with LASV isolates originating from Liberia, Mali and Nigeria. Similarly, the VSV-based LASV vaccine yields complete protection against a lethal challenge with the Liberian LASV isolate in the gold-standard macaque model of Lassa fever.Our results demonstrate the VSV-based LASV vaccine is capable of preventing morbidity and mortality associated with non-homologous LASV challenge in two animal models of Lassa fever. Additionally, this work highlights the need for the further development of disease models for geographical distinct LASV strains, particularly those from Nigeria, in order to comprehensively evaluate potential vaccines and therapies against this prominent agent of viral hemorrhagic fever.

  11. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred; McDermott, Jason E.

    2009-04-24

    The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates, effector proteins, are not. We have used a machine learning approach to identify new secreted effectors. The method integrates evolutionary measures, such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, and sequence-based features, such as G+C content, amino acid composition and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from Salmonella typhimurium and validated on a corresponding set of effectors from Pseudomonas syringae, after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. The method was able to identify all of the known effectors in P. syringae with a specificity of 84% and sensitivity of 82%. The reciprocal validation, training on P. syringae and validating on S. typhimurium, gave similar results with a specificity of 86% when the sensitivity level was 87%. These results show that type III effectors in disparate organisms share common features. We found that maximal performance is attained by including an N-terminal sequence of only 30 residues, which agrees with previous studies indicating that this region contains the secretion signal. We then used the method to define the most important residues in this putative secretion signal. Finally, we present novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated, and apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. This approach is a novel and effective way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  12. Peer Victimization and Anxiety in Genetically Vulnerable Youth: The Protective Roles of Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Anti-Bullying Classroom Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond, Fanny-Alexandra; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Many victimized youngsters are at risk of developing internalizing problems, and this risk seems to be especially pronounced when they are genetically vulnerable for these problems. It is unclear, however, whether protective features of the school environment such as anti-bullying classroom policies and teacher's perceived self-efficacy in handling bullying situations can mitigate these negative outcomes. Using a genetically informed design based on twins, this study examined the potential moderating role of classroom anti-bullying policies and teachers' perceived self-efficacy in handling bullying situations in regard to the additive and interactive effects of peer victimization and genetic vulnerability on anxiety symptoms. To this end, 208 monozygotic and same-sex dizygotic twins (120 girls) rated their level of anxiety and peer victimization in grade 6 (mean age = 12.1 years, SD = 2.8). Teachers rated their self-efficacy in handling bullying situations and the extent of anti-bullying classroom policies. Multilevel regressions revealed triple interactions showing that genetic disposition for anxiety predicted actual anxiety for twins who were highly victimized by their peers, but only when their teachers had low perceived self-efficacy in handling bullying situations or when anti-bullying classroom rules were absent or rarely enforced. In contrast, for victimized youth with teachers who perceive themselves as effective or in classrooms where anti-bullying classroom policies were strongly enforced, genetic disposition for anxiety was not associated with actual anxiety symptoms. Anti-bullying programs should continue to promote teachers' involvement, as well as the enforcement of anti-bullying classroom policies, in order to diminish peer victimization and its related consequences.

  13. Risk and protective genetic variants in suicidal behaviour: association with SLC1A2, SLC1A3, 5-HTR1B &NTRK2 polymorphisms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Therese M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Suicidal behaviour is known to aggregate in families. Patients with psychiatric disorders are at higher risk for suicide attempts (SA), however protective and risk genetic variants for suicide appear to be independent of underlying psychiatric disorders. Here we investigate genetic variants in genes important for neurobiological pathways linked to suicidal behaviour and\\/or associated endophenotypes, for association with SA among patients with co-existing psychiatric illness. Selected gene-gene and gene-environment interactions were also tested. METHODS: DNA was obtained from bloods of 159 patients (76 suicide attempters and 83 non-attempters), who were profiled for DSM-IV Axis I psychiatric diagnosis. Twenty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 18 candidate genes (COMT, 5-HT2A, 5-HT1A, 5-HTR1B, TPH1, MAO-A, TPH2, DBH, CNR1, BDNF, ABCG1, GABRA5, GABRG2, GABRB2, SLC1A2, SLC1A3, NTRK2, CRHR1) were genotyped. Genotyping was performed by KBioscience. Tests of association between genetic variants and SA were conducted using Chi squared and Armitage Trend tests. Binary logistical regression analyses were performed to evaluate the contribution of individual genetic variants to the prediction of SA, and to examine SNPs for potential gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. RESULTS: Our analysis identified 4 SNPs (rs4755404, rs2269272, rs6296 and rs1659400), which showed evidence of association with SA compared to a non-attempter control group. We provide evidence of a 3-locus gene-gene interaction, and a putative gene-environment interaction, whereby genetic variation at the NTRK2 locus may moderate the risk associated with history of childhood abuse. CONCLUSION: Preliminary findings suggest that allelic variability in SLC1A2\\/3, 5-HTR1B and NTRK2 may be relevant to the underlying diathesis for suicidal acts.

  14. [From the molecular genetics of Alport's syndrome to principles of organo-protection in chronic renal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Oliver; Weber, Manfred

    2005-12-15

    Scarring is known to be the endpoint of most chronic kidney diseases. Therefore, prevention of renal fibrosis is a very important topic. The hereditary type IV collagen disease Alport's syndrome is a rare, but challenging cause of chronic renal fibrosis. Increasing knowledge about the pathogenesis of Alport's syndrome may help to find principles of nephro-protection in chronic renal diseases. The defect gene in Alport's syndrome causes an altered assembly of extracellular matrix leading to a defect cell-matrix interaction and fibrosis. This scarring is regulated by comparable mechanisms as in diabetic nephropathy or chronic inflammatory renal diseases. NEPHRO-PROTECTION IN ANIMAL MODELS: By using an Alport animal model of chronic renal fibrosis, principles of nephro-protective therapies such as blockade of the renin-angiotensin system or the effect of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors can be investigated. CURRENT AND FUTURE NEPHRO-PROTECTION IN HUMANS: The same model serves for evaluation of new organo-protective therapies such as vasopeptidase inhibitors, blockade of endothelin, chemokine and collagen receptors as well as stem cell therapy and their potential benefit for patients with chronic renal diseases.

  15. Genetically Engineered Ascorbic acid-deficient Live Mutants of Leishmania donovani induce long lasting Protective Immunity against Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sneha; Madhubala, Rentala

    2015-06-02

    Visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani is the most severe systemic form of the disease. There are still no vaccines available for humans and there are limitations associated with the current therapeutic regimens for leishmaniasis. Recently, we reported functional importance of Arabino-1, 4-lactone oxidase (ALO) enzyme from L. donovani involved in ascorbate biosynthesis pathway. In this study, we have shown that ΔALO parasites do not affect the ability of null mutants to invade visceral organs but severely impair parasite persistence beyond 16 week in BALB/c mice and hence are safe as an immunogen. Both short term (5 week) and long term (20 week) immunization with ΔALO parasites conferred sustained protection against virulent challenge in BALB/c mice, activated splenocytes and resulted in induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Protection in immunized mice after challenge correlated with the stimulation of IFN-γ producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Antigen-mediated cell immunity correlated with robust nitrite and superoxide generation, macrophage-derived oxidants critical in controlling Leishmania infection. Our data shows that live attenuated ΔALO parasites are safe, induce protective immunity and can provide sustained protection against Leishmania donovani. We further conclude that the parasites attenuated in their anti-oxidative defence mechanism can be exploited as vaccine candidates.

  16. The significance of protecting domestic native corn from genetically modified seeds: a perspective from local Mexican NGOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanamaria Vazquez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, there has been an ongoing global discussion about the use of genetically modified organisms (GMO and their insertion in geographic regions where there is a vast pool of native landraces such as Mexican corn, Indian rice, Peruvian potato. This discussion takes place between those who defend native landraces along with traditional farming knowledge (TK and those who defend genetic engineering products (GMO, turning the discussion into a running social confrontation between large corporations and domestic NGO’s network. Both sides are accompanied by leading scientific communities.Based on the Political Economy perspective of K. Polanyi and his analytical categories, this paper examines the case of the Mexican GMO controversy between predominantly US agroindustry and Mexican NGOs. It shows the performance of NGO’s in trying to avoid the insertion of GM corn in México through a legal injunction that is banning the commercialization of this GM corn in the whole territory.

  17. Genetic Immunization Elicits Antigen-Specific Protective Immune Responses and Decreases Disease Severity in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi requires elicitation of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to extracellular trypomastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. In this study, the effectiveness of the T. cruzi trans-sialidase family (ts) genes ASP-1, ASP-2, and TSA-1 as genetic vaccines was assessed. Immunization of mice with plasmids encoding ASP-1, ASP-2, or TSA-1 elicited poor antigen-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and T. cruzi-specific antibody responses. Codelivery of int...

  18. Incretin secretion: direct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balk-Møller, Emilie; Holst, Jens Juul; Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich

    2014-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are secreted from gastro-intestinal K- and L-cells, respectively, and play an important role in post-prandial blood glucose regulation. They do this by direct stimulation of the pancreatic β...... enzyme responsible for incretin degradation (dipeptidyl peptidase-4) is inhibited (drugs are already on the market) while the secretion of endogenous GLP-1 secretion is stimulated at the same time may prove particularly rewarding. In this section we review current knowledge on the mechanisms for direct...

  19. A Study of Broadband, Thin-Layer Electromagnetic Protection Materials Based on Genetic Algorithms%基于遗传算法的宽带薄层电磁防护材料研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦思良; 王庆国; 曲兆明

    2011-01-01

    针对电磁防护材料需要具有宽频带和低厚度的特点,构造了防护材料的优化目标函数.采用遗传算法对多层防护材料进行优化,在给定屏蔽效能阈值和总厚度限制的要求下,得到了多层匹配后具有良好电磁防护性能的防护材料.%The optimized functions of multi-layered electromagnetic protection materials have been established, based on the requirements of maximum protection bandwidth and given thickness. The genetic algorithm has been employed to optimize the multi-layered protection materials with given thickness and shielding efficiency. Protection materials with good electromagnetic protection properties have been obtained by using the genetic algorithm.

  20. Type VI secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Dor; Orth, Kim

    2015-03-30

    Bacteria employ a variety of tools to survive in a competitive environment. Salomon and Orth describe one such tool-the Type 6 Secretion Systems used by bacteria to deliver a variety of toxins into competing cells.

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies GPC5 as a novel genetic locus protective against sudden cardiac arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan E Arking

    Full Text Available Existing studies indicate a significant genetic component for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA and genome-wide association studies (GWAS provide an unbiased approach for identification of novel genes. We performed a GWAS to identify genetic determinants of SCA.We used a case-control design within the ongoing Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study (Oregon-SUDS. Cases (n = 424 were SCAs with coronary artery disease (CAD among residents of Portland, OR (2002-07, population approximately 1,000,000 and controls (n = 226 were residents with CAD, but no history of SCA. All subjects were of White-European ancestry and GWAS was performed using Affymetrix 500K/5.0 and 6.0 arrays. High signal markers were genotyped in SCA cases (n = 521 identified from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC and the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS (combined n = 19,611. No SNPs reached genome-wide significance (p<5x10(-8. SNPs at 6 loci were prioritized for follow-up primarily based on significance of p<10(-4 and proximity to a known gene (CSMD2, GPR37L1, LIN9, B4GALNT3, GPC5, and ZNF592. The minor allele of GPC5 (GLYPICAN 5, rs3864180 was associated with a lower risk of SCA in Oregon-SUDS, an effect that was also observed in ARIC/CHS whites (p<0.05 and blacks (p<0.04. In a combined Cox proportional hazards model analysis that adjusted for race, the minor allele exhibited a hazard ratio of 0.85 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.98; p<0.01.A novel genetic locus for SCA, GPC5, was identified from Oregon-SUDS and successfully validated in the ARIC and CHS cohorts. Three other members of the Glypican family have been previously implicated in human disease, including cardiac conditions. The mechanism of this specific association requires further study.

  2. Identification of evolutionary hotspots based on genetic data from multiple terrestrial and aquatic taxa and gap analysis of hotspots in protected lands encompassed by the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J.; Snider, M.; Duke, J.; Moyer, G.R.

    2014-01-01

     The southeastern United States is a recognized hotspot of biodiversity for a variety of aquatic taxa, including fish, amphibians, and mollusks. Unfortunately, the great diversity of the area is accompanied by a large proportion of species at risk of extinction . Gap analysis was employed to assess the representation of evolutionary hotspots in protected lands w h ere an evolutionary hotspot was defined as an area with high evolutionary potential and measured by atypical patterns of genetic divergence, genetic diversity, and to a lesser extent genetic similarity across multiple terrestrial or aquatic taxa. A survey of the primary literature produced 16 terrestrial and 14 aquatic genetic datasets for estimation of genetic divergence and diversity. Relative genetic diversity and divergence values for each terrestrial and aquatic dataset were used for interpolation of multispecies genetic surfaces and subsequent visualization using ArcGIS. The multispecies surfaces interpolated from relative divergences and diversity data identified numerous evolutionary hotspots for both terrestrial and aquatic taxa , many of which were afforded some current protection. For instance, 14% of the cells identified as hotspots of aquatic diversity were encompassed by currently protected areas. Additionally, 25% of the highest 1% of terrestrial diversity cells were afforded some level of protection. In contrast, areas of high and low divergence among species, and areas of high variance in diversity were poorly represented in the protected lands. Of particular interest were two areas that were consistently identified by several different measures as important from a conservation perspective. These included an area encompassing the panhandle of Florida and southern Georgia near the Apalachicola National Forest (displaying varying levels of genetic divergence and greater than average levels of genetic diversity) and a large portion of the coastal regions of North and South Carolina

  3. Genetic Algorithm to Make Persistent Security and Quality of Image in Steganography from RS Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Nair, T R Gopalakrishnan; S, Manas

    2012-01-01

    Retention of secrecy is one of the significant features during communication activity. Steganography is one of the popular methods to achieve secret communication between sender and receiver by hiding message in any form of cover media such as an audio, video, text, images etc. Least significant bit encoding is the simplest encoding method used by many steganography programs to hide secret message in 24bit, 8bit colour images and grayscale images. Steganalysis is a method of detecting secret message hidden in a cover media using steganography. RS steganalysis is one of the most reliable steganalysis which performs statistical analysis of the pixels to successfully detect the hidden message in an image. However, existing steganography method protects the information against RS steganalysis in grey scale images. This paper presents a steganography method using genetic algorithm to protect against the RS attack in colour images. Stego image is divided into number of blocks. Subsequently, with the implementation ...

  4. Fundamental right to freedom of genetic research and the protection of personal data: the principles of prevention and precaution to guarantee the right to privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Linden Ruaro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews fundamental rights of freedom of research and protection of personal data in the field of human genetics, it proposes the application of the precautionary principle of prevention. Evaluates the Brazilian legislation on the subject matter of research as to guarantee privacy measure of personal data and information collected in scientific research, a situation that worsens in the middle in digital and virtual world because it is a space virtually rapid development. Focuses on the limitation of fundamental rights, based on the conception that are not absolute. It proposes the principles of precaution and prevention among virtual environment. The deductive and dialectical methods are adopted, having premised most fundamental rights related and under Brazilian law; the dialectical method was used because the issue is the subject of constant debate is necessary confrontation of doctrinal currents and the Brazilian legislation.

  5. Genetically modified foods in China and the United States: A primer of regulation and intellectual property protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Yuen-Ting Wong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Food is a basic and personal necessity to human. Safety of food is a prime factor to consider apart from nutrition, quality and cost. Genetically modified (GM foods first came on the market in 1994. Yet safety, transparency and traceability of GM foods are still under hot debate. Nonetheless, the market of GM foods is huge and attractive. Regulatory affairs and intellectual property (IP are two critical factors affecting the development and commercial success of a food product. This article will take a look at the GM food technology and regulatory framework for GM foods in China and the United States. This article will also discuss the unique patent issues and non-patent IP tools for safeguarding the technology in these two countries.

  6. Blending genetics and sociocultural historical inquiry: ethics, culture, and human subjects protection in international cross cultural research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Deborah A; Caldwell, Dennis; Taylor, Andre D; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we examine the implementation and difficulties when conducting genetics research in a rural, traditional West African culture within the frame of the United States' grounded research ethics. Research challenges are highlighted by Western researchers following U.S. Institutional Review Board (IRB) guidelines and practices in a non-Western country. IRB concepts are culture bound in Western ideals that may not have synchronicity and compatibility with non-Western cultures. Differences in sociocultural norms, traditions, language, and geography were influencing factors that can affect application of IRB principles. Suggestions for change are offered, which will potentially aid researchers considering application of IRB requirements when conducting research in non-Westernized, non-industrialized countries.

  7. 商业秘密保护若干问题分析--以中青旅与中国旅案为例%Analysis of Issues of Trade Secret Protection---Taking the case of Youth Travel v. State Travel as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛正英

    2015-01-01

    在市场竞争中,商业秘密作为一项无体信息为企业发展增添了很多优势。但商业秘密侵权中,对于商业秘密的认定、举证责任的分配,以及侵权损害赔偿额的认定等却愈来愈模糊,《反不正当竞争法》在对商业秘密的保护上问题也是日趋增多。因此,我国需要在个案中减轻权利人的举证责任,引入权利人对于损害赔偿的自由选择权,增加惩罚性赔偿制度。%Trade secrets as information adds an important competitive advantage for company development in the mar-ket ,but infringement of trade secrets for the identification,proof of infringement damages and allocation of responsibil-ities for the amount of compensation are increasingly blurred,Anti-unfair Competition Law is also increasing in the protection of trade secrets. China needs to reduce the burden of proof in some cases,introduce the right of free choice of damages for the right person,and add punishment reparation system.

  8. Cross-protection of the Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Against Variants of Genetically Related High-Risk HPV Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Ariana; Chen, Zigui; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Porras, Carolina; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Panagiotou, Orestis A; Befano, Brian; Burk, Robert D; Schiffman, Mark

    2016-03-15

    Results from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT) demonstrated partial cross-protection by the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which targets HPV-16 and HPV-18, against HPV-31, -33, and -45 infection and an increased incidence of HPV-51 infection. A study nested within the CVT intention-to-treat cohort was designed to assess high-risk HPV variant lineage-specific vaccine efficacy (VE). The 2 main end points were (1) long-term incident infections persisting for ≥2 years and/or progression to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (ie, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 [CIN 2/3]) and (2) incident transient infections lasting for infections due to HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -45, and -51 resulting in persistent infection and/or CIN 2/3 were matched (ratio, 1:2) to the more-frequent transient viral infections, by HPV type. Variant lineages were determined by sequencing the upstream regulatory region and/or E6 region. VEs against persistent or transient infections with HPV-16, -18, -33, -35, -45, and -51 did not differ significantly by variant lineage. As the possible exception, VEs against persistent infection and/or CIN 2/3 due to HPV-31 A/B and HPV-31C variants were -7.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], -33.9% to 0%) and 86.4% (95% CI, 65.1%-97.1%), respectively (P = .02 for test of equal VE). No difference in VE was observed by variant among transient HPV-31 infections (P = .68). Overall, sequence variation at the variant level does not appear to explain partial cross-protection by the bivalent HPV vaccine. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. 基因技术对女性权益保护的挑战及对策%The Challenge and Method of Women Protection to Genetic Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑丽娜

    2012-01-01

    Genetic technology pushes forword social development,but it arises some discrimination questions as well.Women are discriminated by sexual and gene.It provides a higher acquirement for gender protection.Our country should create a rich social resource to protect women in a board environment.%基因技术的发展推动了社会进步,但同时也带来了基因歧视等社会问题。女性作为弱势群体,遭受性别和基因的双重歧视。这就对女性权益保护提出了新的挑战和更高的要求。针对女性遭受歧视的表现,我国应该创造良好充足的社会资源,为女性保护提供更广阔的空间。

  10. Intestinal Bicarbonate Secretion in Cystic Fibrosis Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke LL

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene-targeted disruption of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR in mice results in an intestinal disease phenotype that is remarkably similar to bowel disease in cystic fibrosis patients. In the intestinal segment downstream from the stomach (i.e., the duodenum, CFTR plays an important role in bicarbonate secretion that protects the epithelium from acidic gastric effluent. In this report, we examine the role of CFTR in cAMP-stimulated bicarbonate secretion in the murine duodenum and the mechanisms of acid-base transport that are revealed in CFTR knockout (CF mice. Ion substitution, channel blocker and pH stat studies comparing duodena from wild-type and CF mice indicate that CFTR mediates a HCO(3(- conductance across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the presence of a favorable cell-to-lumen HCO(3(- gradient, the CFTR-mediated HCO(3(- current accounts for about 80% of stimulated HCO(3(- secretion. Exposure of the duodenal mucosa to acidic pH reveals another role of CFTR in facilitating HCO(3(- secretion via an electroneutral, 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-stilbene-2,2' disulfonic acid (DIDS sensitive Cl(-/HCO(3(- exchange process. In CF duodenum, other apical membrane acid-base transporters retain function, thereby affording limited control of transepithelial pH. Activity of a Cl(--dependent anion exchanger provides near-constant HCO(3(- secretion in CF intestine, but under basal conditions the magnitude of secretion is lessened by simultaneous activity of a Na(+/H(+ exchanger (NHE. During cAMP stimulation of CF duodenum, a small increase in net base secretion is measured but the change results from cAMP inhibition of NHE activity rather than increased HCO(3(- secretion. Interestingly, a small inward current that is sensitive to the anion channel blocker, 5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropyl amino-benzoate (NPPB, is also activated during cAMP stimulation of the CFTR-null intestine but the identity of the current is yet to be

  11. High yield secretion of recombinant proteins from the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martinez, E M; Fimognari, L; Sakuragi, Y

    2017-02-16

    Microalga-based biomanufacturing of recombinant proteins is attracting growing attention due to its advantages in safety, metabolic diversity, scalability, and sustainability. Secretion of recombinant proteins can accelerate the use of microalgal platforms by allowing post-translational modifications and easy recovery of products from the culture media. However, currently, the yields of secreted recombinant proteins are low, which hampers the commercial application of this strategy. This study aimed at expanding the genetic tools for enhancing secretion of recombinant proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a widely used green microalga as a model organism and a potential industrial biotechnology platform. We demonstrated that the putative signal sequence from C. reinhardtii gametolysin can assist the secretion of the yellow fluorescent protein Venus into the culture media. In order to increase the secretion yields, Venus was C-terminally fused with synthetic glycomodules comprised of tandem serine (Ser) and proline (Pro) repeats of 10 and 20 units [hereafter (SP)n, wherein n=10 or 20]. The yields of the (SP)n-fused Venus were higher than Venus without the glycomodule by up to 12 folds, with the maximum yield of 15 mg L(-1) . Moreover, the presence of the glycomodules confererred an enhanced proteolytic protein stability. The Venus-(SP)n proteins were shown to be glycosylated, and a treatment of the cells with Brefeldin A led to a suggestion that glycosylation of the (SP)n glycomodules starts in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Taken together, the results demonstrate the utility of the gametolysin signal sequence and (SP)n glycomodule to promote a more efficient biomanufacturing of microalgae-based recombinant proteins. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Protective effect of compression socks in a marathon runner with a genetic predisposition to thrombophilia due to Factor V Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Amanda L; Pescatello, Linda S; Thompson, Paul D; Taylor, Beth A

    2015-07-01

    The present case study is an analysis of the effect of compression socks on hemostatic activation following a marathon in a female endurance athlete found to be heterozygous for the coagulation factor V (F5 1691 G>A [Arg>Gln rs6025/560]) risk allele that predisposes one to a genetically inherited disorder of blood clotting, Factor V Leiden. Markers for coagulation and fibrinolysis were obtained 24 h prior to (PRE), immediately after (FINISH) and 24 h after (POST) completion of two marathons: the first in which the runner was not wearing compression socks, and the second in which the runner wore compression socks throughout the race. Compression socks worn during a marathon appeared to lower the overall impact on hemostasis as well as clot formation in this particular athlete as evidenced by lower t-PA (-56%), TAT (-63%) and D-dimer (-30%). Hemostatic activation may be lower with the use of compression socks, and thus may be effective for preserving hemostasis in endurance athletes at risk.

  13. Unconventional protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Wang, Juan; Wang, Junqi; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Robinson, David G; Jiang, Liwen

    2012-10-01

    It is generally believed that protein secretion or exocytosis is achieved via a conventional ER (endoplasmic reticulum)-Golgi-TGN (trans-Golgi network)-PM (plasma membrane) pathway in the plant endomembrane system. However, such signal peptide (SP)-dependent protein secretion cannot explain the increasing number of SP-lacking proteins which are found outside of the PM in plant cells. The process by which such leaderless secretory proteins (LSPs) gain access to the cell exterior is termed unconventional protein secretion (UPS) and has been well-studied in animal and yeast cells, but largely ignored by the plant community. Here, we review the evidence for UPS in plants especially in regard to the recently discovered EXPO (exocyst-positive-organelle).

  14. Circular from January 26, 2004, taken for the enforcement of the by-law from January 26, 2004, relative to the national defense secrecy protection in the domain of nuclear materials protection and control; Circulaire du 26 janvier 2004 prise pour l'application de l'arrete du 26 janvier 2004 relatif a la protection du secret de la defense nationale dans le domaine de la protection et du controle des matieres nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-01-15

    The by-law of January 26, 2004 gives a regulatory foundation to the classification of sensible informations relative to the security and physical protection of nuclear materials. This circular recalls, in this framework, the conditions of implementation of the regulation relative to the protection of national defense secrecies in the domain of the protection of nuclear facilities and materials. (J.S.)

  15. The cancer-associated FGFR4-G388R polymorphism enhances pancreatic insulin secretion and modifies the risk of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Shereen; Zheng, Lei; Florez, Jose C; Stefan, Norbert; Mayr, Thomas; Hliang, Maw Maw; Jablonski, Kathleen; Harden, Maegan; Stančáková, Alena; Laakso, Markku; Haring, Hans-Ulrich; Ullrich, Axel; Asa, Sylvia L

    2013-06-04

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4)-R388 single-nucleotide polymorphism has been associated with cancer risk and prognosis. Here we show that the FGFR4-R388 allele yields a receptor variant that preferentially promotes STAT3/5 signaling. This STAT activation transcriptionally induces Grb14 in pancreatic endocrine cells to promote insulin secretion. Knockin mice with the FGFR4 variant allele develop pancreatic islets that secrete more insulin, a feature that is reversed through Grb14 deletion and enhanced with FGF19 administration. We also show in humans that the FGFR4-R388 allele enhances islet function and may protect against type 2 diabetes. These data support a common genetic link underlying cancer and hyperinsulinemia.

  16. Profound Differences in Virus Population Genetics Correspond to Protection from CD4 Decline Resulting from Feline Lentivirus Coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinash Padhi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CD4 decline is a hallmark of disease onset in individuals infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV or Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1. Cats that are infected with a poorly replicating, apathogenic FIV (PLV prior to exposure to a virulent FIV strain (FIVC maintain CD4 numbers by mechanisms that are not correlated with a measurable adaptive immune response or reduction in circulating viral load. We employed population genetic approaches based on the 3' portion of the viral genome to estimate the population structure of FIVC from single and dual infected cats. In dual infected cats, FIVC effective population size was decreased during the initial viral expansion phase, and after three weeks of infection, the population declined sharply. The FIVC population recovered to pre-bottleneck levels approximately seven weeks post-FIVC infection. However, the population emerging from the bottleneck in dual infected cats was distinct based on estimates of temporal population structure and substitution profiles. The transition to transversion rate ratio (k increased from early to late phases in dual infected cats due primarily to a decrease in transversions whereas in single infected cats, k declined over time. Although one clone with extensive G to A substitutions, indicative of host cytidine deaminase editing, was recovered from a dual infected cat during the bottleneck, the post bottleneck population had an overall reduction in G to A substitutions. These data are consistent with a model of PLV-induced host restriction, putatively involving host DNA editing, that alters the dynamics of FIVC throughout the course of infection leading to disease attenuation.

  17. Genetically engineered Lactococcus lactis protect against house dust mite allergy in a BALB/c mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqing Ai

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccine based on lactic acid bacteria is an attractive concept for the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, but their mechanisms of action in vivo are poorly understood. Therefore, we sought to investigate how recombinant major dust mite allergen Der p2-expressing Lactococcus lactis as a mucosal vaccine induced the immune tolerance against house dust mite allergy in a mouse model.Three strains of recombinant L. lactis producing Der p2 in different cell components (extracellular, intracellular and cell wall were firstly constructed. Their prophylactic potential was evaluated in a Der p2-sensitised mouse model, and immunomodulation properties at the cellular level were determined by measuring cytokine production in vitro.Der p2 expressed in the different recombinant L. lactis strains was recognized by a polyclonal anti-Der p2 antibody. Oral treatment with the recombinant L. lactis prior sensitization significantly prevented the development of airway inflammation in the Der p2-sensitized mice, as determined by the attenuation of inflammatory cells infiltration in the lung tissues and decrease of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage. In addition, the serum allergen-specific IgE levels were significantly reduced, and the levels of IL-4 in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes cell cultures were also markedly decreased upon allergen stimulation in the mice fed with the recombinant L. lactis strains. These protective effects correlated with a significant up-regulation of regulatory T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes.Oral pretreatment with live recombinant L. lactis prevented the development of allergen-induced airway inflammation primarily by the induction of specific mucosal immune tolerance.

  18. Genetic architecture promotes the evolution and maintenance of cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frénoy, Antoine; Taddei, François; Misevic, Dusan

    2013-01-01

    When cooperation has a direct cost and an indirect benefit, a selfish behavior is more likely to be selected for than an altruistic one. Kin and group selection do provide evolutionary explanations for the stability of cooperation in nature, but we still lack the full understanding of the genomic mechanisms that can prevent cheater invasion. In our study we used Aevol, an agent-based, in silico genomic platform to evolve populations of digital organisms that compete, reproduce, and cooperate by secreting a public good for tens of thousands of generations. We found that cooperating individuals may share a phenotype, defined as the amount of public good produced, but have very different abilities to resist cheater invasion. To understand the underlying genetic differences between cooperator types, we performed bio-inspired genomics analyses of our digital organisms by recording and comparing the locations of metabolic and secretion genes, as well as the relevant promoters and terminators. Association between metabolic and secretion genes (promoter sharing, overlap via frame shift or sense-antisense encoding) was characteristic for populations with robust cooperation and was more likely to evolve when secretion was costly. In mutational analysis experiments, we demonstrated the potential evolutionary consequences of the genetic association by performing a large number of mutations and measuring their phenotypic and fitness effects. The non-cooperating mutants arising from the individuals with genetic association were more likely to have metabolic deleterious mutations that eventually lead to selection eliminating such mutants from the population due to the accompanying fitness decrease. Effectively, cooperation evolved to be protected and robust to mutations through entangled genetic architecture. Our results confirm the importance of second-order selection on evolutionary outcomes, uncover an important genetic mechanism for the evolution and maintenance of

  19. Genetic architecture promotes the evolution and maintenance of cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Frénoy

    Full Text Available When cooperation has a direct cost and an indirect benefit, a selfish behavior is more likely to be selected for than an altruistic one. Kin and group selection do provide evolutionary explanations for the stability of cooperation in nature, but we still lack the full understanding of the genomic mechanisms that can prevent cheater invasion. In our study we used Aevol, an agent-based, in silico genomic platform to evolve populations of digital organisms that compete, reproduce, and cooperate by secreting a public good for tens of thousands of generations. We found that cooperating individuals may share a phenotype, defined as the amount of public good produced, but have very different abilities to resist cheater invasion. To understand the underlying genetic differences between cooperator types, we performed bio-inspired genomics analyses of our digital organisms by recording and comparing the locations of metabolic and secretion genes, as well as the relevant promoters and terminators. Association between metabolic and secretion genes (promoter sharing, overlap via frame shift or sense-antisense encoding was characteristic for populations with robust cooperation and was more likely to evolve when secretion was costly. In mutational analysis experiments, we demonstrated the potential evolutionary consequences of the genetic association by performing a large number of mutations and measuring their phenotypic and fitness effects. The non-cooperating mutants arising from the individuals with genetic association were more likely to have metabolic deleterious mutations that eventually lead to selection eliminating such mutants from the population due to the accompanying fitness decrease. Effectively, cooperation evolved to be protected and robust to mutations through entangled genetic architecture. Our results confirm the importance of second-order selection on evolutionary outcomes, uncover an important genetic mechanism for the evolution and

  20. Secrets of Successful Homeschooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Parents who homeschool gifted children often find the daily practice of home education very different from what they had imagined. Gifted children are complex in both personality and learning styles. Parents who say that homeschooling works well for their gifted children have learned from others or discovered on their own several secrets that make…

  1. Physiology of bile secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alejandro Esteller

    2008-01-01

    The formation of bile depends on the structural and functional integrity of the bile-secretory apparatus and its impairment,in different situations,results in the syndrome of cholestasis.The structural bases that permit bile secretion as well as various aspects related with its composition and flow rate in physiological conditions will first be reviewed.Canalicular bile is produced by polarized hepatocytes that hold transporters in their basolateral (sinusoidal) and apical (canalicular) plasma membrane.This review summarizes recent data on the molecular determinants of this primary bile formation.The major function of the biliary tree is modification of canalicular bile by secretory and reabsorptive processes in bileduct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) as bile passes through bile ducts.The mechanisms of fluid and solute transport in cholangiocytes will also be discussed.In contrast to hepatocytes where secretion is constant and poorly controlled,cholangiocyte secretion is regulated by hormones and nerves.A short section dedicated to these regulatory mechanisms of bile secretion has been included.The aim of this revision was to set the bases for other reviews in this series that will be devoted to specific issues related with biliary physiology and pathology.

  2. Salivary Gland Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, H. L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes materials and procedures for an experiment utilizing a live dog to demonstrate: (1) physiology of the salivary gland; (2) parasympathetic control of the salivary gland; (3) influence of varying salivary flow rates on sodium and potassium ions, osmolarity and pH; and (4) salivary secretion as an active process. (DS)

  3. Almost-perfect secret sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Kaced, Tarik

    2011-01-01

    Splitting a secret s between several participants, we generate (for each value of s) shares for all participants. The goal: authorized groups of participants should be able to reconstruct the secret but forbidden ones get no information about it. In this paper we introduce several notions of non- perfect secret sharing, where some small information leak is permitted. We study its relation to the Kolmogorov complexity version of secret sharing (establishing some connection in both directions) and the effects of changing the secret size (showing that we can decrease the size of the secret and the information leak at the same time).

  4. Identifying source populations and genetic structure for savannah elephants in human-dominated landscapes and protected areas in the Kenya-Tanzania borderlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa A Ahlering

    Full Text Available We investigated the genetic metapopulation structure of elephants across the trans Rift Valley region of Kenya and Tanzania, one of the remaining strongholds for savannah elephants (Loxodonata africana in East Africa, using microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA markers. We then examined this population structure to determine the source population for a recent colonization event of savannah elephants on community-owned land within the trans rift valley region. Four of the five sampled populations showed significant genetic differentiation (p<0.05 as measured with both mtDNA haplotypes and microsatellites. Only the samples from the adjacent Maasai Mara and Serengeti ecosystems showed no significant differentiation. A phylogenetic neighbour-joining tree constructed from mtDNA haplotypes detected four clades. Clade four corresponds to the F clade of previous mtDNA studies that reported to have originated in forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis but to also be present in some savannah elephant populations. The split between clade four and the other three clades corresponded strongly to the geographic distribution of mtDNA haplotypes across the rift valley in the study area. Clade four was the dominant clade detected on the west side of the rift valley with rare occurrences on the east side. Finally, the strong patterns of population differentiation clearly indicated that the recent colonists to the community-owned land in Kenya came from the west side of the rift valley. Our results indicate strong female philopatry within the isolated populations of the trans rift valley region, with gene flow primarily mediated via male movements. The recent colonization event from Maasai Mara or Serengeti suggests there is hope for maintaining connectivity and population viability outside formal protected areas in the region.

  5. Are Secrets Immoral? The Construction of Secrets in Everyday Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunthner, Susanne; Luckmann, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the communicative treatment of secrets, presenting examples from recorded communicative interactions in a wide range of social milieus and settings in which the participants revealed knowledge of secrets, tried to dig out old secrets without appearing to be doing so, and occasionally, appeared to be hiding some items of knowledge from…

  6. A mathematical model of insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, A G; Hogg, J M; Ollerton, R L; Luzio, S; Owens, D R

    1994-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic state of excessive blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia), which may result from many environmental and genetic factors, often acting jointly. The major regulator of glucose concentration in the blood is insulin. It is known that about 50% of the insulin is taken up by the liver on passing through it after secretion from the pancreas. The precise value of this fractional uptake is not known, so the prehepatic insulin secretion rates cannot be readily estimated from the plasma insulin concentration levels. By utilizing the equimolar secretion of insulin and connecting peptide (C-peptide) from the pancreas, a noninvasive method has been formulated. This was based on a compartmental model which involved the pancreas, liver, and plasma. The resulting differential equation yielded a gamma variate solution which could be readily linearized. The model was then tested on 56 normal (51 nonobese and 5 obese) subjects, and three groups of subjects with diabetes who could be labelled as mild, moderate, and severe (based on the fasting plasma glucose concentration) with 83, 88, and 64 subjects respectively. We have focused on the human patient environment of the clinician to produce a distinct model which gave a consistent pattern within all four groups with good fits between observed and theoretical values of the plasma insulin levels. The consequent rates for insulin secretion were consistent across the groups and were clinically meaningful.

  7. Interleukin-12 and protective immunity to schistosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mountford A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The attenuated vaccine against Schistosoma mansoni induces Th1-mediated protective immunity and we have sought to identify a role for IL-12 in this model. Elevated levels of IL-12 (p40 mRNA were detected in the lymph nodes (LN and the lungs of vaccinated mice, whilst treatment of vaccinated mice with anti-IL-12 antibodies decreased the ratio of IFNg:IL-4 secreted by in vitro-cultured LN cells. However, there was only marginal abrogation of the level of resistance in these mice. Soluble antigens from the lung-stage of the parasite (SLAP appeared to be efficient stimulators of IFNg and IL-12 secretion. These antigens when used to immunise mice in conjunction with IL-12 as an adjuvant, elicited a polarised Th1 response with abundant IFNg secretion but no IL-4. This immunisation regime also induced significant protection against reinfection, whereas inoculation of mice with SLAP alone did not. The induction of a dominant Th1 response using SLAP + IL-12 probably operates via IFNg production by natural killer (NK cells stimulated by IL-12, since in vivo ablation of NK cells using anti-NK1.1 antibody reduced CD4+-dependent IFNg production from cultured LN cells by over 97%. Nevertheless, in mice with a genetic disruption of the IFNg receptor, administration of SLAP + IL-12 induced levels of IFNg equal to those in wild-type mice, thus showing that in this model IL-12 can directly prime T cells independent of IFNg. Clearly, IL-12 has a critical role in protective immunity to schistosomes and it may aid the development of an effective vaccine against this disease

  8. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  9. Telling stories: keeping secrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the reticence of some farm women to share their experiences with historians and how that desire to keep secrets collides with the desire by scholars to tell the stories of these women. It argues that scholars must continue to struggle with the issue of which stories to tell publicly and which to keep private. The author discusses her own experience telling stories about rural women in the 1970s and the need to give voice to the heritage of rural women, especially of groups that have feared revealing their experiences. She offers examples of historians of rural women who have successfully worked with formerly silenced populations and urges historians to continue to tell stories about these lives, to reevaluate what has been already learned, to ask new questions, and to discuss which secrets need to be shared.

  10. Bucarest, Strictement Secret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela Mihai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available L’émission Bucarest, strictement secret représente un documentaire organisésous la forme d’une série télé, qui dépeint le Bucarest à partir de deux perspectives: de l’histoire, de la conte et du lieu. La valeur d’une cité réside dans l’existence d’une mystique, d’un romantisme abscons, à part et des caractères empruntés de drames de Shakespeare, mystérieux, serrés d’angoisse et des secrets qui assombrissent leur existence. Par conséquence, le rôle du metteur en scène est de dévoiler leur vraie identité et de remettre en place, autant que possible, la vérité.

  11. Invasive blue mussels threaten regional scale genetic diversity in mainland and remote offshore locations: the need for baseline data and enhanced protection in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jonathan P A; Zbawicka, Małgorzata; Westfall, Kristen M; Wenne, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Human-mediated biological transfers of species have substantially modified many ecosystems with profound environmental and economic consequences. However, in many cases, invasion events are very hard to identify because of the absence of an appropriate baseline of information for receiving sites/regions. In this study, use of high-resolution genetic markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms - SNPs) highlights the threat of introduced Northern Hemisphere blue mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) at a regional scale to Southern Hemisphere lineages of blue mussels via hybridization and introgression. Analysis of a multispecies SNP dataset reveals hotspots of invasive Northern Hemisphere blue mussels in some mainland New Zealand locations, as well as the existence of unique native lineages of blue mussels on remote oceanic islands in the Southern Ocean that are now threatened by invasive mussels. Samples collected from an oil rig that has moved between South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand were identified as invasive Northern Hemisphere mussels, revealing the relative ease with which such non-native species may be moved from region to region. In combination, our results highlight the existence of unique lineages of mussels (and by extension, presumably of other taxa) on remote offshore islands in the Southern Ocean, the need for more baseline data to help identify bioinvasion events, the ongoing threat of hybridization and introgression posed by invasive species, and the need for greater protection of some of the world's last great remote areas.

  12. Individual radiation sensitivity (gender, age, genetic disposition). Consequences for radiation protection; Individuelle Strahlenempfindlichkeit (Geschlecht-Alter-genetische Disposition). Konsequenzen fuer den Strahlenschutz?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The effects of ionising radiation on human health is influenced by a number of physiological and molecular biological factors. This is also valid for the causation of stochastic radiation effects especially the causation of cancer. Several epidemiological studies have resulted with respect to the total rate of solid cancers that women are more sensitive than men by a factor of 1.6 to 2.0. For leukaemia this is not the case. The largest studies come from the investigations on the survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. But also studies on the population of the Techa River (Southeast Urals) yield such data. The analyses of single cancer localizations come to different results with respect to the dependence on the sex. Secondary cancers after radiotherapy for cancer treatment show also higher rates in women than in men. A similar situation is observed with respect to the dependence of cancer rate on age. The total rate of solid cancers is highest with children and decreases with increasing age. The effects are very different again with single cancer localizations. An especially strong age dependence was observed for thyroid cancer. Increasingly individuals have been found who are especially radiosensitive on the basis of their genetic disposition also with respect to the causation of cancer. Mechanisms and possibilities to trace these individuals are discussed. It is also discussed whether and to which extent these data should have consequences for the practical radiological protection. (orig.)

  13. Secret Key Crypto Implementations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, Guido Marco; Melzani, Filippo

    This chapter presents the algorithm selected in 2001 as the Advanced Encryption Standard. This algorithm is the base for implementing security and privacy based on symmetric key solutions in almost all new applications. Secret key algorithms are used in combination with modes of operation to provide different security properties. The most used modes of operation are presented in this chapter. Finally an overview of the different techniques of software and hardware implementations is given.

  14. Genetically enhanced cows resist intramammary Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Robert J; Powell, Anne M; Paape, Max J; Kerr, David E; Bannerman, Douglas D; Pursel, Vernon G; Wells, Kevin D; Talbot, Neil; Hawk, Harold W

    2005-04-01

    Mastitis, the most consequential disease in dairy cattle, costs the US dairy industry billions of dollars annually. To test the feasibility of protecting animals through genetic engineering, transgenic cows secreting lysostaphin at concentrations ranging from 0.9 to 14 micrograms/ml [corrected] in their milk were produced. In vitro assays demonstrated the milk's ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus. Intramammary infusions of S. aureus were administered to three transgenic and ten nontransgenic cows. Increases in milk somatic cells, elevated body temperatures and induced acute phase proteins, each indicative of infection, were observed in all of the nontransgenic cows but in none of the transgenic animals. Protection against S. aureus mastitis appears to be achievable with as little as 3 micrograms/ml [corrected] of lysostaphin in milk. Our results indicate that genetic engineering can provide a viable tool for enhancing resistance to disease and improve the well-being of livestock.

  15. Dynamic secrets in communication security

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Sheng; Towsley, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic secrets are constantly generated and updated from messages exchanged between two communication users. When dynamic secrets are used as a complement to existing secure communication systems, a stolen key or password can be quickly and automatically reverted to its secret status without disrupting communication. 'Dynamic Secrets in Communication Security' presents unique security properties and application studies for this technology. Password theft and key theft no longer pose serious security threats when parties frequently use dynamic secrets. This book also illustrates that a dynamic

  16. The Genetic Architecture of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T Jerram

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D is classically characterised by the clinical need for insulin, the presence of disease-associated serum autoantibodies, and an onset in childhood. The disease, as with other autoimmune diseases, is due to the interaction of genetic and non-genetic effects, which induce a destructive process damaging insulin-secreting cells. In this review, we focus on the nature of this interaction, and how our understanding of that gene–environment interaction has changed our understanding of the nature of the disease. We discuss the early onset of the disease, the development of distinct immunogenotypes, and the declining heritability with increasing age at diagnosis. Whilst Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA have a major role in causing T1D, we note that some of these HLA genes have a protective role, especially in children, whilst other non-HLA genes are also important. In adult-onset T1D, the disease is often not insulin-dependent at diagnosis, and has a dissimilar immunogenotype with reduced genetic predisposition. Finally, we discuss the putative nature of the non-genetic factors and how they might interact with genetic susceptibility, including preliminary studies of the epigenome associated with T1D.

  17. Efficient production of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch by using a genetically modified L-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient and alpha-amylase-secreting Lactobacillus plantarum strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kenji; Zhang, Qiao; Shinkawa, Satoru; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve direct and efficient fermentation of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch, we constructed L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL1)-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum and introduced a plasmid encoding Streptococcus bovis 148 alpha-amylase (AmyA). The resulting strain produced only D-lactic acid from glucose and successfully expressed amyA. With the aid of secreting AmyA, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished. After 48 h of fermentation, 73.2 g/liter of lactic acid was produced with a high yield (0.85 g per g of consumed sugar) and an optical purity of 99.6%. Moreover, a strain replacing the ldhL1 gene with an amyA-secreting expression cassette was constructed. Using this strain, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics. This is the first report of direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw starch.

  18. Visual Secret Sharing Based Digital Image Watermarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Surekha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a spatial domain image watermarking technique based on Visual Secret Sharing (VSS and unique statistical properties is proposed. A random looking image is generated during watermark hiding process and is secretly registered with an arbitrator for verification during conflicts. Another random looking image is generated during watermark revelation stage and is combined with the existing one, to recover the watermark. This whole process is done without altering the image to be protected and hence the quality of the cover image is high. When compared with similar existing techniques, the proposed technique has three main advantages: Provides greater convenience in carrying and storing the intermediate images called shares; Provides high security; Reduce tradeoff between spatial and frequency domain techniques in terms of robustness

  19. Autotransporter protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tame, Jeremy R H

    2011-12-01

    Autotransporter proteins are a large family of virulence factors secreted from Gram-negative bacteria by a unique mechanism. First described in the 1980s, these proteins have a C-terminal region that folds into a β-barrel in the bacterial outer membrane. The so-called passenger domain attached to this barrel projects away from the cell surface and may be liberated from the cell by self-cleavage or surface proteases. Although the majority of passenger domains have a similar β-helical structure, they carry a variety of sub-domains, allowing them to carry out widely differing functions related to pathogenesis. Considerable biochemical and structural characterisation of the barrel domain has shown that 'autotransporters' in fact require a conserved and essential protein complex in the outer membrane for correct folding. Although the globular domains of this complex projecting into the periplasmic space have also been structurally characterised, the overall secretion pathway of the autotransporters remains highly puzzling. It was presumed for many years that the passenger domain passed through the centre of the barrel domain to reach the cell surface, driven at least in part by folding. This picture is complicated by conflicting data, and there is currently little hard information on the true nature of the secretion intermediates. As well as their medical importance therefore, autotransporters are proving to be an excellent system to study the folding and membrane insertion of outer membrane proteins in general. This review focuses on structural aspects of autotransporters; their many functions in pathogenesis are beyond its scope.

  20. Windows 8 secrets

    CERN Document Server

    Thurrott, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Tips, tricks, treats, and secrets revealed on Windows 8 Microsoft is introducing a major new release of its Windows operating system, Windows 8, and what better way to learn all its ins and outs than from two internationally recognized Windows experts and Microsoft insiders, authors Paul Thurrott and Rafael Rivera? They cut through the hype to get at useful information you'll not find anywhere else, including what role this new OS plays in a mobile and tablet world. Regardless of your level of knowledge, you'll discover little-known facts about how things work, what's new and different, and h

  1. Induction of an Immune-Protective T-Cell Repertoire With Diverse Genetic Coverage by a Novel Viral-Vectored Tuberculosis Vaccine in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Damjanovic, Daniela; Yao, Yushi; Bramson, Jonathan; Smaill, Fiona; Xing, Zhou

    2016-12-15

     Whether a candidate tuberculosis vaccine induces clinically relevant protective T-cell repertoires in humans will not be known until the completion of costly efficacy clinical trials.  We have developed an integrated immunologic approach to investigate the clinical relevance of T cells induced by a novel tuberculosis vaccine in a phase 1 trial. This approach consists of screening for likely dominant T-cell epitopes, establishing antigen-specific memory T-cell lines for identifying CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell epitopes, determining the ability of vaccine-induced T cells to inhibit mycobacterial growth in infected cells, and examining the genetic diversity of HLA recognition and the clinical relevance of identified T-cell epitopes.  A single-dose immunization in BCG-primed adults with an adenovirus-based tuberculosis vaccine elicits a repertoire of memory T cells capable of recognizing multiple Ag85A epitopes. These T cells are polyfunctional and cytotoxic and can inhibit mycobacterial growth in infected target cells. Some identified T-cell epitopes are promiscuous and recognizable by the common HLA alleles. These epitopes are clinically relevant to the epitopes identified in people with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and treated patients with tuberculosis.  These data support further clinical development of this candidate vaccine. Our approach helps fill the gap in clinical tuberculosis vaccine development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Ghrelin and gastric acid secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koji Yakabi; Junichi Kawashima; Shingo Kato

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, was originally isolated from rat and human stomach. Ghrelin has been known to increase the secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administered peripherally or centrally. Ghrelin is also known to stimulate the gastric motility and the secretion of gastric acid. In the previous studies, the action of ghrelin on acid secretion was shown to be as strong as that of histamine and gastrin in-vivo experiment. In the studies, the mechanism for the action of ghrelin was also investigated. It was shown that vagotomy completely inhibited the action of ghrelin on the secretion of gastric acid suggesting that vagal nerve is involved in the mechanism for the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. As famotidine did not inhibit ghrelin-in-duced acid secretion in the study by Masuda et al, they concluded that histamine was not involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. However, we have shown that famotidine completely inhibited ghrelin-induced acid secretion and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA was increased in gastric mucosa by ghrelin injection which is inhibited by vagotomy Our results indicate that histamine is involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. Furthermore synergistic action of gastrin and ghrelin on gastric add secretion was shown. Although gastrin has important roles in postprandial secretion of gastric acid, ghrelin may be related to acid secretion during fasting period or at night. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the physiological role of ghrelin in acid secretion.

  3. Ghrelin and gastric acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakabi, Koji; Kawashima, Junichi; Kato, Shingo

    2008-11-07

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, was originally isolated from rat and human stomach. Ghrelin has been known to increase the secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administered peripherally or centrally. Ghrelin is also known to stimulate the gastric motility and the secretion of gastric acid. In the previous studies, the action of ghrelin on acid secretion was shown to be as strong as that of histamine and gastrin in in-vivo experiment. In the studies, the mechanism for the action of ghrelin was also investigated. It was shown that vagotomy completely inhibited the action of ghrelin on the secretion of gastric acid suggesting that vagal nerve is involved in the mechanism for the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. As famotidine did not inhibit ghrelin-induced acid secretion in the study by Masuda et al, they concluded that histamine was not involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. However, we have shown that famotidine completely inhibited ghrelin-induced acid secretion and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA was increased in gastric mucosa by ghrelin injection which is inhibited by vagotomy Our results indicate that histamine is involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. Furthermore synergistic action of gastrin and ghrelin on gastric acid secretion was shown. Although gastrin has important roles in postprandial secretion of gastric acid, ghrelin may be related to acid secretion during fasting period or at night. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the physiological role of ghrelin in acid secretion.

  4. On Converting Secret Sharing Scheme to Visual Secret Sharing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Daoshun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traditional Secret Sharing (SS schemes reconstruct secret exactly the same as the original one but involve complex computation. Visual Secret Sharing (VSS schemes decode the secret without computation, but each share is m times as big as the original and the quality of the reconstructed secret image is reduced. Probabilistic visual secret sharing (Prob.VSS schemes for a binary image use only one subpixel to share the secret image; however the probability of white pixels in a white area is higher than that in a black area in the reconstructed secret image. SS schemes, VSS schemes, and Prob. VSS schemes have various construction methods and advantages. This paper first presents an approach to convert (transform a -SS scheme to a -VSS scheme for greyscale images. The generation of the shadow images (shares is based on Boolean XOR operation. The secret image can be reconstructed directly by performing Boolean OR operation, as in most conventional VSS schemes. Its pixel expansion is significantly smaller than that of VSS schemes. The quality of the reconstructed images, measured by average contrast, is the same as VSS schemes. Then a novel matrix-concatenation approach is used to extend the greyscale -SS scheme to a more general case of greyscale -VSS scheme.

  5. 遗传资源知识产权保护的正当性分析%The Analysis of the Legitimacy of Intellectual Property Rights Protection of Genetic Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许鲁艳

    2015-01-01

    Genetic resources are important biological resources in the 21st century, and how to protect the genetic resources is a prereq-uisite for countries to compete .Genetical resources can be used by the biotechnology industrialization production and its value is hard to estimate.The importance of genetic resources and the continuous "biopiracy"phenomenon in recent years also shows the necessity of the protection .The protection of intellectual property rights on genetical resources , no matter from the social contract theory , the basic function of intellectual property law or from the concrete system such as the TRIPs agreement is justified .%遗传资源是21世纪重要的生物资源,如何对遗传资源进行保护是各个国家进行竞争的前提。遗传资源可以通过生物技术进行产业化生产,具有难以估计的商业价值。遗传资源的重要性以及近年来不断发生的“生物剽窃”现象也显现出对其保护的必要性。对遗传资源进行知识产权保护,无论从理论角度如社会契约论、对知识产权法基本功能重解下的分析还是从具体制度如Trips协议的制定来进行价值判断都是正当的。

  6. RIC-7 promotes neuropeptide secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingsong Hao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides is mediated by exocytosis of distinct secretory organelles, synaptic vesicles (SVs and dense core vesicles (DCVs respectively. Relatively little is known about factors that differentially regulate SV and DCV secretion. Here we identify a novel protein RIC-7 that is required for neuropeptide secretion in Caenorhabditis elegans. The RIC-7 protein is expressed in all neurons and is localized to presynaptic terminals. Imaging, electrophysiology, and behavioral analysis of ric-7 mutants indicates that acetylcholine release occurs normally, while neuropeptide release is significantly decreased. These results suggest that RIC-7 promotes DCV-mediated secretion.

  7. Salmonella-secreted Virulence Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffron, Fred; Niemann, George; Yoon, Hyunjin; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-05-01

    In this short review we discuss secreted virulence factors of Salmonella, which directly affect Salmonella interaction with its host. Salmonella secretes protein to subvert host defenses but also, as discussed, to reduce virulence thereby permitting the bacteria to persist longer and more successfully disperse. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is the best known and well studied of the mechanisms that enable secretion from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm. Other secretion systems include outer membrane vesicles, which are present in all Gram-negative bacteria examined to date, two-partner secretion, and type VI secretion will also be addressed. Excellent reviews of Salmonella secreted effectors have focused on themes such as actin rearrangements, vesicular trafficking, ubiquitination, and the activities of the virulence factors themselves. This short review is based on S. Typhimurium infection of mice because it is a model of typhoid like disease in humans. We have organized effectors in terms of events that happen during the infection cycle and how secreted effectors may be involved.

  8. Circular threshold quantum secret sharing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yu-Guang; Wen Qiao-Yan

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a circular threshold quantum secret sharing (TQSS) scheme with polarized single photons.A polarized single photon sequence runs circularly among any t or more of n parties and any t or more of n parties can reconstruct the secret key when they collaborate.It shows that entanglement is not necessary for quantum secret sharing.Moreover,the theoretic efficiency is improved to approach 100% as the single photons carrying the secret key are deterministically forwarded among any t or more of n parties,and each photon can carry one bit of information without quantum storage.This protocol is feasible with current technology.

  9. Issue of Franchising Operational Resources:IP and Business Secret

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    萧仁杰

    2015-01-01

    Franchising is a business model which uses business resources(trade mark, patent or business secret etc) to contract others to use for profit.In the franchise operation, business resources are the core value, business resources can make the franchisee to establish strong competitiveness or edges within the market, which also made a franchisor to develop and growth.Business resources are usually makes the franchise operation to have sufficient market advantages, the content of intellectual property or trade secrets which usually other industry competitors do not have, which made this kind of business resources for the franchisor more attractive to investors in the business world. Although, intellectual property and trade secrets there are a lot of different in the field of franchising sector, but there are sometimes have some overlap in content, it is a decision for franchisor to use intellectual property rights, or to use the trade secret to franchising as the core resource for protection.

  10. A Public Secret

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbæk, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on anthropological fieldwork undertaken at two elite universities in Beijing. It addresses the paradoxical situation of the many instances of suicide among Chinese elite university students in Beijing, which constitute a public secret. The pressure of education weighs heavily...... on the shoulders of China’s only child in each family, known as the generation of little emperors and little empresses. Since the 1980s, the suzhi jiaoyu reforms (education for quality) have involved various attempts to reduce the pressure of education. However, simultaneously the aim is to increase...... the competitiveness of individuals. Drawing on existential and phenomenological thought, I suggest that the discourse seems to objectify and quantify a concern for well-being, rather than recognising its intersubjective character. Finally, I argue that the suicides are controversial since they are seen as a form...

  11. Identification of new secreted effectors in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Kaoru; Worley, Micah; Niemann, George; Heffron, Fred

    2005-10-01

    A common theme in bacterial pathogenesis is the secretion of bacterial products that modify cellular functions to overcome host defenses. Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to inject effector proteins into host cells. The genes encoding the structural components of the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among bacterial species and can be identified by sequence homology. In contrast, the sequences of secreted effector proteins are less conserved and are therefore difficult to identify. A strategy was developed to identify virulence factors secreted by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium into the host cell cytoplasm. We constructed a transposon, which we refer to as mini-Tn5-cycler, to generate translational fusions between Salmonella chromosomal genes and a fragment of the calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase gene derived from Bordetella pertussis (cyaA'). In-frame fusions to bacterial proteins that are secreted into the eukaryotic cell cytoplasm were identified by high levels of cyclic AMP in infected cells. The assay was sufficiently sensitive that a single secreted fusion could be identified among several hundred that were not secreted. This approach identified three new effectors as well as seven that have been previously characterized. A deletion of one of the new effectors, steA (Salmonella translocated effector A), attenuated virulence. In addition, SteA localizes to the trans-Golgi network in both transfected and infected cells. This approach has identified new secreted effector proteins in Salmonella and will likely be useful for other organisms, even those in which genetic manipulation is more difficult.

  12. Midgut proteins released by microapocrine secretion in Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walciane; Cardoso, Christiane; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Terra, Walter R; Ferreira, Clélia

    2013-01-01

    Microapocrine vesicles bud from the lepidopteran midgut microvilli as double membrane vesicles. To identify the proteins secreted by this process, antibodies raised against isolated microapocrine vesicles from Spodoptera frugiperda were used for screening a midgut cDNA expression library. Positive clones were sequenced, assembled and N blasted against S. frugiperda sequences obtained by pyrosequencing midgut mRNA. This procedure led to the extension of microapocrine sequences that were annotated. A similar procedure was used to identify midgut microvillar proteins that necessarily are part of the microapocrine vesicle. Forty-eight proteins were associated with microvillar membranes. They pertain to 8 functional groups: digestive enzymes, peritrophic membrane, protection, transporters, receptors, secretory machinery, cytoskeleton and signaling, and unknown. Twenty-eight proteins are putatively secreted by microapocrine secretion. Most of them are digestive enzymes, but the list also includes proteins involved in protection and in peritrophic membrane formation. Among the identified digestive enzymes, aminopeptidases are typically microvillar and group into the classes 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6. There are two amylases secreted by microapocrine secretion: one is a digestive enzyme and the other is a transporter-like amylase with no clear function. One lipase has a predicted transmembrane loop, whereas the others are supposed to be secreted by microapocrine secretion and be digestive. Trypsin is membrane bound and is delivered by microapocrine secretion, but has no predicted features to bind membranes. It may remain bound through the signal peptide till be delivered into the midgut lumen. Proteins supposed to be involved in the microapocrine secretory machinery were: calmodulin, annexin, myosin 7a, and gelsolin 1. Their putative roles are discussed, but more research is necessary to settle this subject.

  13. Protective Effect of R Allele of PON1 Gene on the Coronary Artery Disease in the Presence of Specific Genetic Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Balcerzyk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genetic susceptibility to CAD may be determined by polymorphic variants of genes encoding isoforms involved in the processes important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, including lipids disorders. Participation of single polymorphic variants is relatively small, however its significance may increase in the presence of specific genetic or environmental background.

  14. Yohimbine increases human salivary secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelut, E; Rispail, Y; Berlan, M; Montastruc, J L

    1989-01-01

    The effect of oral yohimbine (14 mg) on salivary secretion was evaluated in healthy volunteers. Yohimbine significantly increased salivary secretion when compared with placebo. This effect was significant from 60 min until 180 min after administration under our experimental conditions. Yohimbine (or alpha 2-adrenoceptor blocking agents) could have a potential interest in the treatment of dry mouths. PMID:2789932

  15. Genetic considerations on the introduction of farmed fish in marine protected areas: The case of study of white seabream restocking in the Gulf of Castellammare (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Wangüemert, Mercedes; Fernández, Tomás Vega; Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Giacalone, Maximiliano; D'Anna, Giovanni; Badalamenti, Fabio

    2012-02-01

    Human exploitation has drastically reduced the abundance and distribution of several marine fish and invertebrate populations through overfishing and habitat destruction. Restocking can potentially mitigate these impacts and help to reconstitute depleted stocks but genetic repercussions must be considered. In the present study, the degree of genetic similarity between white seabream (Diplodus sargus Linnaeus 1758) individuals reared for restocking purposes and the receiving population in the Gulf of Castellammare fishery reserve (Sicily, Italy) was assessed using microsatellites. We also inferred the spatial pattern of the genetic structure of D. sargus and connectivity along Sicilian coasts. The farmed population showed significant heterozygosity deficiency in 6 loci and an important reduction in the number of alleles, which could indicate an incipient inbreeding. Both the farmed population and the target one for restocking (Castellammare fishery reserve), showed high and significant values of genetic differentiation due to different allele frequencies, number of privative alleles and total number of alleles. These findings indicate a low degree of genetic similarity between both populations, therefore this restocking initiative is not advisable. The genetic connectivity pattern, highly consistent with oceanographic currents, identified two distinct metapopulations of white seabream around Sicily. Thus it is recommended to utilize broods from the same metapopulation for restocking purposes to provide a better genetic match to the wild populations.

  16. Multiparty Quantum Secret Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Fu-Guo; LI Xi-Han; LI Chun-Yan; ZHOU Ping; LIANG Yu-Jie; ZHOU Hong-Yu

    2006-01-01

    @@ A multiparty quantum secret report scheme is proposed with quantum encryption. The boss Alice and her M agents first share a sequence of (M + 1)-particle Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states that only Alice knows which state each (M + 1)-particle quantum system is in. Each agent exploits a controlled-not (CNot) gate to encrypt the travelling particle by using the particle in the GHZ state as the control qubit. The boss Alice decrypts the travelling particle with a CNot gate after performing a σx operation on her particle in the GHZ state or not.After the GHZ states (the quantum key) are used up, the parties check whether there is a vicious eavesdropper,say Eve, monitoring the quantum line, by picking out some samples from the GHZ states shared and measuring them with two measuring bases. After confirming the security of the quantum key, they use the remaining GHZ states repeatedly for the next round of quantum communication. This scheme has the advantage of high intrinsic efficiency for the qubits and total efficiency.

  17. Ergodic Secret Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Bassily, Raef

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce two new achievable schemes for the fading multiple access wiretap channel (MAC-WT). In the model that we consider, we assume that perfect knowledge of the state of all channels is available at all the nodes in a causal fashion. Our schemes use this knowledge together with the time varying nature of the channel model to align the interference from different users at the eavesdropper perfectly in a one-dimensional space while creating a higher dimensionality space for the interfering signals at the legitimate receiver hence allowing for better chance of recovery. While we achieve this alignment through signal scaling at the transmitters in our first scheme (scaling based alignment (SBA)), we let nature provide this alignment through the ergodicity of the channel coefficients in the second scheme (ergodic secret alignment (ESA)). For each scheme, we obtain the resulting achievable secrecy rate region. We show that the secrecy rates achieved by both schemes scale with SNR as 1/2log(SNR...

  18. Secreted and membrane-bound mucins and idiopathic peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niv, Yaron; Boltin, Doron

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-negative peptic ulcer disease has increased over the last two decades, especially in the Western world and in countries with low H. pylori infection rates. Idiopathic peptic ulcer disease is a recently described entity which relates to peptic ulcers not caused by H. pylori, NSAID/aspirin therapy, other ulcerogenic organisms and drugs, or other rare malignant and benign diseases. Structural and secreted mucins create the unstirred gastric mucus layer and maintain a stable pH above the gastric mucosa. This mucous layer prevents enzymatic attack by acid and pepsin. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase by NSAID and aspirin inhibits prostaglandin production, inhibits mucin and bicarbonate secretion, and exposes the mucosa to the toxic effects of acid and intragastric enzymes. There is also a complex relationship between H. pylori and different mucin subtypes which on one hand facilitates mucin invasion but on the other hand protects the gastric mucosa. Genetic and epigenetic changes in the mucin molecule may be responsible for idiopathic peptic ulcer disease, but this hypothesis must be further investigated. Herein, the mucin hypothesis of idiopathic peptic ulcer disease is explored.

  19. Protective Action of Complex Prescription Yinbai Granule on Acute Liver Injury and Its Effect on Bile Secretion in Rats%复方茵柏颗粒对大鼠急性肝损伤的保护作用及对胆汁分泌的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田静; 蒋小琴; 潘旭旺; 刘杭

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the protective action of complex prescription Yinbai granule on liver injury and its cho-lagogue action. Methods: Acute liver injury was induced by carbon tetrachloride in rats. The biochemical indexes and pathological changes were used for evaluation. The cholagogue action was studied by biliary drainage method. Results; Compared with those of the CC14 control group, AST, ALT and bilirubin levels of complex prescription Yinbai granule group were declined significantly. The pathological changes revealed that liver injury was relieved. There was no change in bile secretion after administration of complex prescription Yinbai granule. Conclusion: Complex prescription Yinbai granule has protective action on acute liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride, and promotive action on bile secretion.%目的:研究复方茵柏颗粒对急性肝损伤大鼠的肝脏保护作用和对胆汁分泌的影响.方法:用四氯化碳致大鼠急性肝损伤,以生化指标和病理变化评价复方茵柏颗粒的药物作用,以胆总管插管引流法观察药物对胆汁分泌的影响,并与复方茵柏合剂作用相比较.结果:与模型对照组比较,复方茵柏颗粒剂组和合剂组AST、ALT及胆红素指标明显下降,病理切片显示各给药组肝组织损伤明显减轻;复方茵柏颗粒组与合剂组给药后对胆汁分泌有促进作用.结论:复方茵柏颗粒对四氯化碳所致的大鼠急性肝损伤有保护作用,促进肝损伤大鼠胆汁分泌,其保肝利胆作用与复方茵柏合剂相当.

  20. Can Protein in Common Skin Bacteria Offer Disease Protection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162192.html Can Protein in Common Skin Bacteria Offer Disease Protection? RoxP ... Swedish researchers report that Propionibacterium acnes secretes a protein called RoxP that protects against bacteria that are ...

  1. Helicobacter pylori in lacrimal secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batioglu-Karaaltin, Aysegul; Saatci, Ozlem; Akpinar, Meltem; Celik, Melih Ozgür; Develioglu, Omer; Yigit, Ozgur; Külekçi, Mehmet; Akarsubaşı, Alper Tunga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Helicobacter pylori in human lacrimal and nasal secretions. Eighty patients with complaints of dyspepsia who had undergone endoscopies and gastric antrum biopsies were included in the study. A total of five specimens, including 2 lacrimal secretion samples, 2 nasal mucosal swab samples, and 1 gastric antrum biopsy, were collected from each patient and investigated with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods consisting of the urease enzyme coding gene GlmM (UreC) and the H pylori-specific 16S rRNA coding gene. The Reflux Symptom Index and ophthalmologic complaints of the patients were recorded. The detected positivity rates of the H pylori 16S rRNA coding gene in gastric biopsies and nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions were 55, 11.2, and 20%, respectively. The patients were grouped as gastric-antrum-biopsy-negative (Group I [n = 36]) and -positive (Group II [n = 44). In Group II, H pylori positivity in the lacrimal and nasal mucous secretions was 36.3 and 18%, respectively. A comparison between the groups in terms of H pylori presence in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions yielded statistically significant differences (p = 0.0001, p = 0.003). The simultaneous presence of H pylori in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions was 13.6% in Group II. H pylori positivity in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions had a positive moderate correlation (r = 0.40; p = 0.0003). The present study is the first report on the presence of H pylori in lacrimal secretions through nested PCR, which suggested the presence of a number of mechanisms for H pylori transmission to lacrimal secretions.

  2. Secret key generation via a modified quantum secret sharing protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. M.; Evans, P. G.; Lawrie, B.; Legré, M.; Lougovski, P.; Ray, W.; Williams, B. P.; Qi, B.; Grice, W. P.

    2015-05-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over ~6km of telecom. fiber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N - 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and significantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  3. Secret Key Generation via a Modified Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith IV, Amos M [ORNL; Evans, Philip G [ORNL; Lawrie, Benjamin J [ORNL; Legre, Matthieu [ID Quantique, Inc.; Lougovski, Pavel [ORNL; Ray, William R [ORNL; Williams, Brian P [ORNL; Qi, Bing [ORNL; Grice, Warren P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over 6km of telecom. ber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N > 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and signicantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  4. Characterization of a secreted Chlamydia protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Allan C; Vandahl, Brian; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that are important human pathogens. The Chlamydia genomes contain orthologues to secretion apparatus proteins from other intracellular bacteria, but only a few secreted proteins have been identified. Most likely, effector proteins are secreted in ord...

  5. Role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinsei; Lee, Min Goo

    2014-06-01

    Transepithelial bicarbonate secretion plays a key role in the maintenance of fluid and protein secretion from epithelial cells and the protection of the epithelial cell surface from various pathogens. Epithelial bicarbonate secretion is mainly under the control of cAMP and calcium signaling. While the physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of cAMP-induced bicarbonate secretion are relatively well defined, those induced by calcium signaling remain poorly understood in most epithelia. The present review summarizes the current status of knowledge on the role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion. Specifically, this review introduces how cytosolic calcium signaling can increase bicarbonate secretion by regulating membrane transport proteins and how it synergizes with cAMP-induced mechanisms in epithelial cells. In addition, tissue-specific variations in the pancreas, salivary glands, intestines, bile ducts, and airways are discussed. We hope that the present report will stimulate further research into this important topic. These studies will provide the basis for future medicines for a wide spectrum of epithelial disorders including cystic fibrosis, Sjögren's syndrome, and chronic pancreatitis.

  6. Ghrelin and gastric acid secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Yakabi, Koji; Kawashima, Junichi; Kato, Shingo

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, was originally isolated from rat and human stomach. Ghrelin has been known to increase the secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administered peripherally or centrally. Ghrelin is also known to stimulate the gastric motility and the secretion of gastric acid. In the previous studies, the action of ghrelin on acid secretion was shown to be as strong as that of histamine and gastrin in in-vivo experiment. In t...

  7. 基因資訊保護之研究⎯⎯以個人資料保護法草案為中心 The Protection of Genetic Information: AnAnalysis Focused on the Draft of the Protection of Personal Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    林維信 Wei-Hsin Lin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available 基因資訊係指每人所帶之遺傳特徵及性向表現之資訊。日前我國曾推動「台灣基因資料庫」(Taiwan Biobank)之國家計畫,雖然該計畫目前暫緩,然在國家、研究機構未放棄蒐集、建立國人基因資料庫,且諸多利益催生之下,台灣人民基因資訊之權益應如何保護,遂生問題。 2005 年2 月行政院通過「個人資料保護法」修正草案(下稱草案),其中第2 條第2 款雖增列「基因」為個人資料、第6 條明定原則上禁止蒐集、處理及利用,然除此之外,對「基因」相關保護之規定,與其他個人資料如姓名、電話、教育、職業等規定無異,似未察覺基因資訊之特性,草案對基因資訊之保護,似有未足。 本文參考世界人類基因組及人權宣言、國際人類基因資料宣言等國際規範,進行分析及辯證,認為應健全並周延基因資訊保護之法制,除了就草案提出全面而具體之修正建議,以期周延基因資訊保護之外,並認為宜另訂專法以保護基因資訊為妥。 Genetic information is defined as the information that contains the hereditary characteristics and the physical features of each individual. The establishment of the Taiwan Biobank, a national program, has been merely introduced. Moreover, concerning great interests, research institutes and various related organizations have continued to make progress in the collection and establishment of a national genetic database. Although the program has been halted at present, the protection of the benefits of the genetic information of the Taiwan People still became a challenge. In February 2005, a bill of amendment1 was passed, protecting the privacy of personal information. In the document, “genetic information” has been classified as personal in article 2(2, and the collection and usage of such are restricted by article 6. However, other than the above mentioned

  8. Intranasal immunization with secretion protein Pgp3enhances protective immunity against mice genital Chlamydia muridarum infection%沙眼衣原体分泌性蛋白Pgp3滴鼻免疫增强小鼠对衣原体生殖道感染的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆春雪; 吴移谋; 彭波; 李忠玉; 胡四海; 钟光明

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To validate the immune protective efficacy of Chlamydia secretion protein Pgp3 and to analyze the potential immune mechanisms related to this protection. [Methods] The prokaryotic recombinant protein Pgp3 was purified and evaluated for its protective efficacy in a genital tract infected mouse model. Groups of BALB/c mice were immunized intranasally or intramuscularly with adjuvants plus Pgp3 protein or PBS and GST control. Humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated. After Chlamydia muridarum in-travaginal challenge, the chlamydia shedding from the lower genital tract and the chlamy-dia-induced upper genital tract gross pathology and histopathological characterization were also detected. [Results] Adjuvant plus Pgp3 immunization can induce high level of Pgp3 specific antibody as well as IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-5 cytokine production. More importantly, intra-nasal immunization compare with intramuscular route induced more Thl-dominant immunity that significantly reduced the shedding of live organisms from the lower genital tract and attenuated inflammatory pathologies in the oviduct tissues. [Conculsion] These observations have demonstrated that secretion protein Pgp3 intranasal immunization can induce protective immunity against chlamydial infection and pathology in mice.%[目的]探讨不同免疫途径沙眼衣原体(Chlamydia trachomatis,Ct)分泌性蛋白Pgp3的免疫保护效果,分析其可能的保护机制,以确定Pgp3蛋白疫苗在Ct疫苗研制中的应用价值.[方法]分泌性蛋白Pgp3经滴鼻或肌注途径免疫雌性Balb/c小鼠,免疫60 d后,阴道接种鼠沙眼衣原体(Chlamydia muridarum,Cm)建立生殖道感染动物模型,在该模型中评价Pgp3蛋白疫苗抗Cm感染的保护效果,并探讨其机制.[结果]滴鼻或肌注免疫后,小鼠血清及生殖道中检测到了特异性抗体;小鼠脾淋巴细胞产生IFN-γ、IL-17及IL-5水平均明显高于对照组,且滴鼻免疫组IFN-γ水平

  9. 植物遗传资源保护中农民权的若干理论问题探析%Analysis of Several Theoretical Problems about Farmers ’ Rights in the Protection of Plant Genetic Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷朝霞

    2015-01-01

    The issue of farmers’ rights is one of the contentions between developed and developing countries on the protection and sustainable use of plant genetic resources .Farmers’ rights arising in the exploitation and protection of plant genetic resources ,by its very nature ,are a new type of intellectual property rights ,similar to the prior right in patent law .The subjects of farmers’ rights are farmers as a group who have long been making enormous contributions to the conservation and improvement of plant genetic resources .The objects of farmers’ rights should cover plant genetic resources of food and agriculture both in situ and ex situ conditions ,through the identification ,preservation and improvement by farmers .The content of farmers’ rights includes moral rights and property rights to be enjoyed by farmers .%农民权问题是发达国家和发展中国家在植物遗传资源保护及可持续利用中争论的焦点问题之一。植物遗传资源开发、保护中出现的农民权,就其性质而言,是一种新型的知识产权,类似专利法中的先用权;其权利主体是那些长期以来在保存、改良和提供植物遗传资源中做出贡献的农民群体;经过农民鉴别、保存、改良的原生境条件下和非原生境条件下的粮食和农业植物遗传资源是农民权的客体;其权利内容包括农民群体享有的精神权利和财产权利。

  10. Secret Key Generation From Mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Gungor, Onur; Koksal, C Emre

    2011-01-01

    We consider secret key generation from relative localization information of a pair of nodes in a mobile wireless network in the presence of a mobile eavesdropper. Our scheme consists of two phases: in the first phase, legitimate node pair exchanges beacon signals to establish localization information based on noisy observations of these beacons; in the second phase, nodes generate secret key bits via a public discussion. Our problem can be categorized under the source models of information theoretic secrecy, where the distance between the legitimate nodes acts as the observed common randomness. We characterize the achievable secret key bit rate in terms of the observation noise variance at the legitimate nodes and the eavesdropper. This work provides a framework that combines information theoretic secrecy and wireless localization, and proves that the localization information provides a significant additional resource for secret key generation in mobile wireless networks.

  11. Incretins, insulin secretion and Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Holst, Jens Møller

    2004-01-01

    the genes encoding their receptors have been deleted. In patients with Type 2 diabetes, the incretin effect is either greatly impaired or absent, and it is assumed that this could contribute to the inability of these patients to adjust their insulin secretion to their needs. In studies of the mechanism...... of the impaired incretin effect in Type 2 diabetic patients, it has been found that the secretion of GIP is generally normal, whereas the secretion of GLP-1 is reduced, presumably as a consequence of the diabetic state. It might be of even greater importance that the effect of GLP-1 is preserved whereas...... the effect of GIP is severely impaired. The impaired GIP effect seems to have a genetic background, but could be aggravated by the diabetic state. The preserved effect of GLP-1 has inspired attempts to treat Type 2 diabetes with GLP-1 or analogues thereof, and intravenous GLP-1 administration has been shown...

  12. An Image Secret Sharing Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    M. E. Hellman, “On secret sharing systems,” vol. IT-29, no. 1, pp. 35–41, Jan. 1983. [10] K. Kurosawa , K. Okada, K. Sakano, W. Ogata, and S. Tsujii...Ed., Berlin, Germany, 1994, pp. 1–12. [14] W. Ogata and K. Kurosawa , “Some ba- sic properties of general nonperfect secret sharing schemes,” J.UCS

  13. Testing of chemicals for genetic activity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a report of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Gene-Tox Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, F.K.; von Borstel, R.C.; von Halle, E.S.; Parry, J.M.; Siebert, D.; Zetterberg, G.; Barale, R.; Loprieno, N.

    1984-01-01

    This review article with over 200 references summarizes the results of mutation screening tests with 492 chemicals using saccharomyces cerevisiae as the test organism. In addition, an extensive description of S. cerevisiae as a test organism is given. Yeast can be used to study genetic effects both in mitotic and in meiotic cells because it can be cultured as a stable haploid or a stable diploid. The most commonly used genetic endpoint has been mitotic recombination either as mitotic crossing-over or mitotic gene conversion. Data were available on tests with 492 chemicals, of which 249 were positive, as reported in 173 articles or reports. The genetic test/carcinogenicity accuracy was 0.74, based on the carcinogen listing established in the gene-tox program. The yeast tests supplement the bacterial tests for detecting agents that act via radical formation, antibacterial drugs, and other chemicals interfering with chromosome segregation and recombination processes.

  14. 胆囊胆固醇结石易患鼠和免患鼠肝胆脂质代谢和分泌的差别%Differences between hepatic and biliary lipid metabolism and secretion in genetically gallstone-susceptible and gallstone-resistant mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许国强; 赵力; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate differences between hepatic and biliary lipid metabolism and secretion of genetically gallstone-susceptible (C57L) and resistant (AKR) mice and the mechanism of cholesterol gallstone formation.Methods The inbred C57L and AKR mice were fed a lithogenic diet containing 15% fat, 1.25% cholesterol and 0.5% cholic acid for four weeks. Hepatic cholesterol content and secretion rates of biliary lipids, as well as phenotypes of the liver and gallbladder were determined and examined before and after the feeding of the lithogenic diet. Results Both before and after ingestion of the lithogenic diet, hepatic secretion rates of all biliary lipids in C57L mice were markedly higher than that of AKR mice (P<0.05, P<0.01, respectively), whereas hepatic cholesterol contents of C57L mice were significantly lower than that of AKR mice (P<0.05). Furthermore, after consumption of the lithogenic diet, the increase in hepatic secretion rate of biliary cholesterol in C57L mice was significantly higher than that in AKR mice (P<0.01). Cholesterol gallstones formed in C57L mice and fatty livers developed in AKR mice. Conclusions Biliary cholesterol hypersecretion is the key pathophysiological defect of gallstone formation, lith genes have effects on biliary cholesterol hypersecretion and susceptibility to cholesterol gallstone formation in C57L mice. Lithogenic bile is formed at the canalicular membrane and precedes the development of cholesterol gallstones. It is most likely that cholesterol and bile acid hyposecretion make the AKR strain susceptible to the development of fatty livers and resistant to gallstone formation.%目的研究胆囊胆固醇结石易患鼠(C57L)和免患鼠(AKR)肝胆脂质代谢和分泌的特征以及胆囊胆固醇结石形成的机制.方法用含15%脂肪、1.25%胆固醇和0.5%胆酸的结石餐饲喂C57L和AKR鼠四周,检测并比较两种鼠在结石餐干预前、后肝脏胆固醇含量、肝内胆汁中脂质的分泌率以及胆

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-TIERED INSECT RESISTANCE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM FOR GENETICALLY MODIFIED CORN HYBRIDS EXPRESSING THE PLANT INCORPORATED PROTECTANT, BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A significant increase in genetically modified corn planting driven by biofuel demand is expected for the 2007 growing season with future planted acreages approaching 80% of total corn plantings anticipated by 2009. As demand increases, incidence of farmer non-compliance with ma...

  16. Suppression of Insulin Production and Secretion by a Decretin Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfa, Ronald W.; Park, Sangbin; Skelly, Kathleen-Rose; Poffenberger, Gregory; Jain, Nimit; Gu, Xueying; Kockel, Lutz; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yinghua; Powers, Alvin C.; Kim, Seung K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Decretins, hormones induced by fasting that suppress insulin production and secretion, have been postulated from classical human metabolic studies. From genetic screens, we identified Drosophila Limostatin (Lst), a peptide hormone that suppresses insulin secretion. Lst is induced by nutrient restriction in gut-associated endocrine cells. limostatin deficiency led to hyperinsulinemia, hypoglycemia and excess adiposity. A conserved 15-residue polypeptide encoded by limostatin suppressed secretion by insulin-producing cells. Targeted knockdown of CG9918, a Drosophila orthologue of Neuromedin U receptors (NMUR), in insulin-producing cells phenocopied limostatin deficiency, and attenuated insulin suppression by purified Lst, suggesting CG9918 encodes an Lst receptor. NMUR1 is expressed in islet β-cells, and purified NMU suppresses insulin secretion from human islets. A human mutant NMU variant that co-segregates with familial early-onset obesity and hyperinsulinemia fails to suppress insulin secretion. We propose Lst as an index member of an ancient hormone class called decretins, which suppress insulin output. PMID:25651184

  17. [Protection of radiosensitive human cells against the action of heavy metals by antimutagens and adapting factors: association with genetic and protein polymorphisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, I M; Shagirova, Zh M; Sinel'shchikova, T A; Mavletova, D A; Kuz'mina, N S; Zasukhina, G D

    2009-06-01

    Cells of a diploid line obtained from embryos with the Down's syndrome, known to be unable to repair gamma-induced DNA damage, were treated with natural (garlic extract, retinol) and synthetic (crown compound) antimutagens and with adapting factors (heat shock, low CdCl2 concentrations, 10(-8) M). The protective effect was evaluated by registering DNA breaks and cell survival, and the protection coefficients were calculated. The most effective results were obtained with the use of the garlic extract and retinol. No protection of the DNA structure was observed when cells were treated with low concentrations of cadmium chloride and then with high concentrations, i. e., no adaptive response (AR) was formed under these conditions. The spectrum of proteins in treated and control cells as well as detoxication genes (GSTM1, GSTT1 , CYPIA1) were determined.

  18. Secret sharing using biometric traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmatov, Alisher; Yanikoglu, Berrin; Savas, Erkay; Levi, Albert

    2006-04-01

    In biometric based authentication, biometric traits of a person are matched against his/her stored biometric profile and access is granted if there is sufficient match. However, there are other access scenarios, which require participation of multiple previously registered users for a successful authentication or to get an access grant for a certain entity. For instance, there are cryptographic constructs generally known as secret sharing schemes, where a secret is split into shares and distributed amongst participants in such a way that it is reconstructed/revealed only when the necessary number of share holders come together. The revealed secret can then be used for encryption or authentication (if the revealed key is verified against the previously registered value). In this work we propose a method for the biometric based secret sharing. Instead of splitting a secret amongst participants, as is done in cryptography, a single biometric construct is created using the biometric traits of the participants. During authentication, a valid cryptographic key is released out of the construct when the required number of genuine participants present their biometric traits.

  19. Thyroid hormones and renin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    Circulating angiotensin is produced by the action of renin from the kidneys on circulating angiotensinogen. There are other renin-angiotensin systems in various organs in the body, and recent observations raise the intriguing possibility that angiotensin II is produced by a totally intracellular pathway in the juxtaglomerular cells, the gonadotrops of the anterior pituitary, neurons, in the brain, salivary duct cells, and neuroblastoma cells. Circulating angiotensin II levels depend in large part on the plasma concentration of angiotensinogen, which is hormonally regulated, and on the rate of renin secretion. Renin secretion is regulated by an intrarenal baroreceptor mechanism, a macula densa mechanism, angiotensin II, vasopressin, and the sympathetic nervous system. The increase in renin secretion produced by sympathetic discharge is mediated for the most part by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the juxtaglomerular cells. Hyperthyroidism would be expected to be associated with increased renin secretion in view of the increased beta-adrenergic activity in this condition, and hypothyroidism would be associated with decreased plasma renin activity due to decreased beta-adrenergic activity. Our recent research on serotonin-mediated increases in renin secretion that depend on the integrity of the dorsal raphe nucleus and the mediobasal hypothalamus has led us to investigate the effect of the pituitary on the renin response to p-chloroamphetamine. The response is potentiated immediately after hypophysectomy, but 22 days after the operation, it is abolished. This slowly developing decrease in responsiveness may be due to decreased thyroid function.

  20. Shigella IpaD has a dual role: signal transduction from the type III secretion system needle tip and intracellular secretion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrich, A Dorothea; Guillossou, Enora; Blocker, Ariel J; Martinez-Argudo, Isabel

    2013-02-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are protein injection devices essential for the interaction of many Gram-negative bacteria with eukaryotic cells. While Shigella assembles its T3SS when the environmental conditions are appropriate for invasion, secretion is only activated after physical contact with a host cell. First, the translocators are secreted to form a pore in the host cell membrane, followed by effectors which manipulate the host cell. Secretion activation is tightly controlled by conserved T3SS components: the needle tip proteins IpaD and IpaB, the needle itself and the intracellular gatekeeper protein MxiC. To further characterize the role of IpaD during activation, we combined random mutagenesis with a genetic screen to identify ipaD mutant strains unable to respond to host cell contact. Class II mutants have an overall defect in secretion induction. They map to IpaD's C-terminal helix and likely affect activation signal generation or transmission. The Class I mutant secretes translocators prematurely and is specifically defective in IpaD secretion upon activation. A phenotypically equivalent mutant was found in mxiC. We show that IpaD and MxiC act in the same intracellular pathway. In summary, we demonstrate that IpaD has a dual role and acts at two distinct locations during secretion activation.

  1. Copyright, Patent, and Trade Secret Protection of Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    claim passes muster under section 101. However, if theI mathemacical algocithm is merely presented and solved by the claimed invencion , as was the case in...case of copyright infringement or ma- merits. See Midway Mfg. Co. v. Bandai- sonable likelihood of success on the merits America , Inc., 546 F.Supp. 125...in Mackay Radio & Telegraph Co. v. Radio Corp. of America , 306 U. S. 86, the applicant sought a patent on a directional antenna system in which the

  2. Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Radiation Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Radiation Protection Document Library View and download EPA radiation ...

  3. On family secrets and -K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgad, Yariv

    2014-08-01

    In this paper I present a novel interpretation of family secrets. Leaning on Bion's concept of -K, the constitution of secrecy is interpreted in terms of family dynamics that actively prevent knowledge formation and mental growth. Family secrets are interpreted as a destructive process that attacks the family's truth-generating-space - the shared semiotic space within which meanings are constituted through family relationships. The paper explores the microstructure interpersonal process of -K through the analysis of Mike Leigh's movie, Secrets and Lies. Two scenes in the movie are used to demonstrate how -K is worked out in the form of a specific intersubjective semiotic endeavor that unconsciously blocks the process of meaning-making.

  4. Of Plants, and Other Secrets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Marder

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I inquire into the reasons for the all-too-frequent association of plants and secrets. Among various hypotheses explaining this connection from the standpoint of plant morphology and physiology, the one that stands out is the idea that plants are not only objects in the natural environment, but also subjects with a peculiar mode of accessing the world. The core of the “plant enigma” is, therefore, onto-phenomenological. Positively understood, the secret of their subjectivity leaves just enough space for the self-expression and the self-interpretation of vegetal life.

  5. BIO-PROSPECTING, IPR, TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND ITS TRADE SECRETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lad Meenal Deepak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Bio-prospecting involves searching for collecting, and deriving genetic material from samples of bio-diversity that can be used in commercialized pharmaceutical, agricultural, industrial, or chemical processing end products. Salient features of Bio-prospecting are: Conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, Rights of traditional, indigenous knowledge holders; fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the research, indigenous knowledge, intellectual property, or application of biological resources. The meaningful participation in these processes by traditional, indigenous knowledge holders.As far as Bio-prospecting & final commercial manufacturing company is concerned certain larger pharmaceutical companies operate their own Bio-prospecting units. They can develop a commercial drug from an idea to Bio-prospecting for genetic material, clinical trial, manufacturing & marketing.Herbal medicines are not marketed as pharmaceuticals & are not regulated by FDA. These drugs lack in quality control & mostly sold as dietary supplements. Pharmaceutical industries ordinarily synthesize compounds from a limited amount of natural products & the Herbal medicine industries usually don’t attempt to do so because of high cost involved for the relatively low return. Pharmaceutical Bio-prospecting involves high returns & requires low volume harvesting.The convential biological diversities are an international protocol which gives expression to the novel idea that the Bio-prospecting process could yield conservation & develop benefits. The Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS Agreement under the World Trade Organization (WTO is the pre-eminent international agreement governing intellectual property rights. It covers a broad range of intellectual property rights, including copyright, trademarks, geographical indications, trade secrets, and patents. Along with TRIPS a focuses given to rights of traditional indigenous

  6. Genetic Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Genetics Archive Regulation of Genetic Tests Genetic Discrimination Overview Many Americans fear that participating in research ... I) and employment (Title II). Read more Genetic Discrimination and Other Laws Genetic Discrimination and Other Laws ...

  7. 1α, 25(OH)2D3 protects pancreatic β-cell line from cytokine-induced apoptosis and impaired insulin secretion%1α,25-二羟维生素D3对胰岛β细胞的保护作用及其机制探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王安平; 李霞; 超晨; 黄干; 刘碧莲; 彭健; 周智广

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the protective effects and potential mechanisms of 1α,25 (OH)2D3 (VitD3 ) on pancreatic β-cells.Methods The apoptosis of NIT-1 cells was induced by interleukin-1 β(IL-1 β ) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in vitro.Then the apoptotic rate of NIT-1 cells was determined by Hoechest33342 staining and Annexin V-FITC/PI flow cytometry.The insulin secretion level of NIT-1 cells was measured by ELISA.The NIT-1 cells were treated with VitD3 at the final concentrations of 10-8 mol/L or underwent transient transfection with vitamin D receptor (VDR)-SiRNA.Results After the treatment of VitD3,the apoptotic rate of NIT-1 cells decreased to 39.7%.There were significant differences in apoptotic rate between the VitD3 treatment and IL-1 β/IFN-γ groups (68.4%) ( P < 0.01 ).Similarly impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) of NIT-1 cells recovered ( (7.34 ± 0.21 ) ng/ml ) after the treatment of VitD3 as compared with the IL-1 β/IFN-γ group ( ( 4.88 ± 0.32 ) ng/ml,P < 0.01 ).Moreover,most of the protective effects of VitD3 on pancreatic β-cells could be blocked by the transfection of VDR-SiRNA.Conclusion VitD3 may protect pancreatic β-cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis and impaired insulin secretion through its conjugation with VDR.%目的 观察1α,25-二羟维生素D3(简称VitD3)抑制白介素1β (IL-1β)和干扰素γ(IFN-γ)诱导胰岛β细胞凋亡的作用及对胰岛素分泌功能的影响,探讨其可能的作用机制.方法 将VitD3和IL-1β/IFN-γ作用于细胞后,采用四甲基偶氮唑盐比色法检测细胞的生长增殖率、赫斯特荧光染色观察细胞凋亡形态变化、磷脂结合蛋白V/碘化丙啶双染色流式检测细胞凋亡率、酶联免疫分析检测葡萄糖刺激胰岛素分泌(GSIS).结果 IL-1 β/IFN-γ组细胞生长增殖率为32.0%±2.7%,不同浓度VitD3( 10 -10、10-9、10-8mol/L)+IL-1β/IFN-γ组细胞生长增殖率分别为54.0%±3.2%、59.0%±1.5%,73.0%±2.1

  8. Raspberry Pi for secret agents

    CERN Document Server

    Sjogelid, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This book is an easy-to-follow guide with practical examples in each chapter. Suitable for the novice and expert alike, each topic provides a fast and easy way to get started with exciting applications and also guides you through setting up the Raspberry Pi as a secret agent toolbox.

  9. Histaminergic regulation of prolactin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, U P

    1990-01-01

    of DA synthesis and of DA or serotonin (5-HT) receptors inhibit or prevent the PRL stimulatory action of HA infused centrally or systemically. However, other factors regulating PRL secretion (e.g. beta-endorphin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, vasopressin or TRH) may be involved in the mediation...

  10. In vitro studies on protective effect of Glycyrrhiza glabra root extracts against cadmium-induced genetic and oxidative damage in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirican, Ebubekir; Turkez, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is a modern environmental contaminant that is toxic and carcinogenic. Glycyrrhiza glabra is a traditional medicinal herb which grows in the various parts of the World. Recent studies demonstrated that G. glabra has antifungal, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and powerful antiinflammatory features. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetic safety of extracts from G. glabra and its effects on cadmium (as CdCl2) induced genotoxicity. Therefore we evaluated the capability of G. glabra extract to inhibit the rate of micronucleus (MN), sister chromatid exchange (SCE) formations induced by CdCl2. Moreover, to assess the effects of G. glabra on cell viability and oxidative status, we performed 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) assays. Our results showed that there were significant increases (P glabra extract (5, 10 and 20 ppm) and CdCl2 resulted in decreases of MN and SCE rates as compared to the group treated with CdCl2 alone. Again, the results of MTT and TAC assays clearly indicated dose dependent ameliorative effects of G. glabra extracts against CdCl2 toxicity. In conclusion, this study demonstrated for the first time that G. glabra extracts provided increased resistance of DNA against CdCl2 induced genetic and oxidative damage in human lymphocytes. So, the risk on target tissues of CdCl2 could be reduced and ensured early recovery from its toxicity.

  11. Wnt Secretion and Gradient Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir L. Katanaev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Concentration gradients formed by the lipid-modified morphogens of the Wnt family are known for their pivotal roles during embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Wnt morphogens are also implicated in a variety of human diseases, especially cancer. Therefore, the signaling cascades triggered by Wnts have received considerable attention during recent decades. However, how Wnts are secreted and how concentration gradients are formed remains poorly understood. The use of model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster has provided important advances in this area. For instance, we have previously shown that the lipid raft-associated reggie/flotillin proteins influence Wnt secretion and spreading in Drosophila. Our work supports the notion that producing cells secrete Wnt molecules in at least two pools: a poorly diffusible one and a reggie/flotillin-dependent highly diffusible pool which allows morphogen spreading over long distances away from its source of production. Here we revise the current views of Wnt secretion and spreading, and propose two models for the role of the reggie/flotillin proteins in these processes: (i reggies/flotillins regulate the basolateral endocytosis of the poorly diffusible, membrane-bound Wnt pool, which is then sorted and secreted to apical compartments for long-range diffusion, and (ii lipid rafts organized by reggies/flotillins serve as “dating points” where extracellular Wnt transiently interacts with lipoprotein receptors to allow its capture and further spreading via lipoprotein particles. We further discuss these processes in the context of human breast cancer. A better understanding of these phenomena may be relevant for identification of novel drug targets and therapeutic strategies.

  12. Pheochromocytoma with Negative Metanephrines: A Rarity and the Significance of Dopamine Secreting Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bozin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a 25-year-old female with a dopamine secreting PPGL diagnosed retrospectively with biochemical analysis. This finding resulted in change in approach to investigation and management, given their important clinical implications. There are important differences in management of dopamine secreting PPGL compared to classical noradrenaline and adrenaline-secreting PPGL. This includes the risk of peri-operative cardiovascular collapse peri-operatively with alpha/beta blockade, risk of malignancy/recurrence, and associated genetic abnormalities.

  13. Sur les usages publics du secret : les archives du Service Secret Communiste Roumain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Mihalache

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available L’étude s’occupe des dossiers de l’ancienne police politique du régime communiste de Roumanie, la Securitate. Il a comme point de départ le fait que la mémoire sociale, le contexte politique et les débats publics actuels influencent la recherche historique, modifiant les perceptions sur le document d’archive. Ce dernier n’est plus vu seulement comme source principale de la recherche historique, devenant outil redoutable dans les disputes électorales, car, en base des informations extraites d’un dossier de la Securitate, l’on peut évincer un adversaire incommode. Se montrant utile à dénoncer la collaboration de quelqu’un sous le régime communiste, le document d’archive a acquis des mises symboliques imprévues, étant caché, protégé, volé, racheté, truqué, perdu et redécouvert à commande. Toutes ces pratiques compromettent de plus en plus les chances des historiens de reconstituer de manière crédible l’histoire récente des Roumains. On obtient difficilement l’accès aux dossiers de la Securitate, la patrimonialisation excessive des documents - en vérité leur trésorisation - étant conséquence directe du prestige idéologique et social que le secret détenait au temps communiste.This article focuses on the Securitate files as a political stake, but also as first rank sources for academic research, not from the current perspective of recent history, but from that of cultural history. In post-communist Romania, silence is the secret’s poor relative and confidentiality its respectable form. Ironically or not, we could state that in our country the secrets of communist repression are literally protected by law. The secret is an unbidden, illegitimate competence. In its ethics it does not matter what is good and what is bad, what is true and what is false. The main interest is what is said and what isn’t. The secret being a convention, a pact, the gesture of not saying seems to be more important than

  14. Authenticated quantum secret sharing with quantum dialogue based on Bell states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulkasim, Hussein; Hamad, Safwat; El Bahnasy, Khalid; Rida, Saad Z.

    2016-08-01

    This work proposes a scheme that combines the advantages of a quantum secret sharing procedure and quantum dialogue. The proposed scheme enables the participants to simultaneously make mutual identity authentications, in a simulated scenario where the boss, Alice, shares a secret with her two agents Bob and Charlie. The secret is protected by checking photons to keep untrustworthy agents and outer attacks from getting useful information. Before the two agents cooperate to recover Alice’s secret, they must authenticate their identity using parts of a pre-shared key. In addition, the whole pre-shared key is reused as part of recovering the secret data to avoid any leaks of information. In comparison with previous schemes, the proposed method can efficiently detect eavesdropping and it is free from information leaks. Furthermore, the proposed scheme proved to be secure against man-in-the-middle attacks, impersonation attacks, entangled-and-measure attacks, participant attacks, modification attacks and Trojan-horse attacks.

  15. Pituitary regulation of corpus luteum progesterone secretion in cyclic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Criado, J E; López, F; Aguilar, E

    1986-09-01

    Pituitary LH and PRL secretion during the early postovulatory period of the rat estrous cycle seem to affect the corpus luteum (CL) autonomy to secrete progesterone. Thus, while PRL would act luteotropically, LH would be luteolytic. To further investigate these facts, 4-day cyclic rats, treated with either 1 mg bromocriptine (CB) or 0.25 ml 70% ethanol (ETOH) at 1600 h on estrus, were injected with 0.5 ml of either an anti-LH serum (LHAS) or normal horse serum (NHS) at 0800 h on metestrus. Rats treated at 0800 h on metestrus with both, CB and LHAS, were also used. To verify through a different procedure the effect of LH and/or PRL deprivation in estrous cycle CL progesterone secretion, hypophysectomy (HYPOX) and sham HYPOX (SHAM) were done at 0800 h on metestrus in either CB- or ETOH-injected rats at 1600 h on estrus. Hypophysectomized rats at 1600 h on estrus were also used. Progesterone secretion was prolonged up to 0800 h on diestrus in those rats deprived of LH from 0800 h on metestrus (ETOH/LHAS, -/CB + LHAS, ETOH/HYPOX) compared with controls (ETOH/NHS, ETOH/SHAM). This luteotropic effect was absent in those rats lacking estrous afternoon PRL (CB/LHAS, CB/HYPOX, HYPOX/-). No effect on CL progesterone secretion was detected in those rats exclusively deprived of PRL on the afternoon of estrus (CB/NHS, CB/SHAM). These results suggest that in the absence of the protective effects of PRL secretion on the afternoon of estrus, rat CL become extremely sensitive to the luteolytic effects of early diestrous LH levels, and this results in 4-day estrous cycles.

  16. Plant genetics: unlocking the secrets of self-incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, D

    2000-03-09

    At last, clear evidence has been obtained, from transformation of the pollen incompatibility reaction of Brassica, showing that angiosperm self-incompatibility involves separate genes for the pollen and pistil incompatibility recognition processes.

  17. Prelysosomal Compartments in the Unconventional Secretion of Amyloidogenic Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Borland

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic link between neuron-to-neuron transmission of secreted amyloid and propagation of protein malconformation cytopathology and disease has recently been uncovered in animal models. An enormous interest in the unconventional secretion of amyloids from neurons has followed. Amphisomes and late endosomes are the penultimate maturation products of the autophagosomal and endosomal pathways, respectively, and normally fuse with lysosomes for degradation. However, under conditions of perturbed membrane trafficking and/or lysosomal deficiency, prelysosomal compartments may instead fuse with the plasma membrane to release any contained amyloid. After a brief introduction to the endosomal and autophagosomal pathways, we discuss the evidence for autophagosomal secretion (exophagy of amyloids, with a comparative emphasis on Aβ1–42 and α-synuclein, as luminal and cytosolic amyloids, respectively. The ESCRT-mediated import of cytosolic amyloid into late endosomal exosomes, a known vehicle of transmission of macromolecules between cells, is also reviewed. Finally, mechanisms of lysosomal dysfunction, deficiency, and exocytosis are exemplified in the context of genetically identified risk factors, mainly for Parkinson’s disease. Exocytosis of prelysosomal or lysosomal organelles is a last resort for clearance of cytotoxic material and alleviates cytopathy. However, they also represent a vehicle for the concentration, posttranslational modification, and secretion of amyloid seeds.

  18. Secretion of Anti-Plasmodium Effector Proteins from a Natural Pantoea agglomerans Isolate by Using PelB and HlyA Secretion Signals▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Dawn C.; Lampe, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The insect-vectored disease malaria is a major world health problem. New control strategies are needed to supplement the current use of insecticides and medications. A genetic approach can be used to inhibit development of malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) in the mosquito host. We hypothesized that Pantoea agglomerans, a bacterial symbiont of Anopheles mosquitoes, could be engineered to express and secrete anti-Plasmodium effector proteins, a strategy termed paratransgenesis. To this end, plasmids that include the pelB or hlyA secretion signals from the genes of related species (pectate lyase from Erwinia carotovora and hemolysin A from Escherichia coli, respectively) were created and tested for their efficacy in secreting known anti-Plasmodium effector proteins (SM1, anti-Pbs21, and PLA2) in P. agglomerans and E. coli. P. agglomerans successfully secreted HlyA fusions of anti-Pbs21 and PLA2, and these strains are under evaluation for anti-Plasmodium activity in infected mosquitoes. Varied expression and/or secretion of the effector proteins was observed, suggesting that the individual characteristics of a particular effector may require empirical testing of several secretion signals. Importantly, those strains that secreted efficiently grew as well as wild-type strains under laboratory conditions and, thus, may be expected to be competitive with the native microbiota in the environment of the mosquito midgut. PMID:21602368

  19. Secretion of anti-Plasmodium effector proteins from a natural Pantoea agglomerans isolate by using PelB and HlyA secretion signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Dawn C; Lampe, David J

    2011-07-01

    The insect-vectored disease malaria is a major world health problem. New control strategies are needed to supplement the current use of insecticides and medications. A genetic approach can be used to inhibit development of malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) in the mosquito host. We hypothesized that Pantoea agglomerans, a bacterial symbiont of Anopheles mosquitoes, could be engineered to express and secrete anti-Plasmodium effector proteins, a strategy termed paratransgenesis. To this end, plasmids that include the pelB or hlyA secretion signals from the genes of related species (pectate lyase from Erwinia carotovora and hemolysin A from Escherichia coli, respectively) were created and tested for their efficacy in secreting known anti-Plasmodium effector proteins (SM1, anti-Pbs21, and PLA2) in P. agglomerans and E. coli. P. agglomerans successfully secreted HlyA fusions of anti-Pbs21 and PLA2, and these strains are under evaluation for anti-Plasmodium activity in infected mosquitoes. Varied expression and/or secretion of the effector proteins was observed, suggesting that the individual characteristics of a particular effector may require empirical testing of several secretion signals. Importantly, those strains that secreted efficiently grew as well as wild-type strains under laboratory conditions and, thus, may be expected to be competitive with the native microbiota in the environment of the mosquito midgut.

  20. Genetic Algorithm Based Image Steganography for Enhancement of Concealing Capacity and Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yoti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a Genetic Algorithm based steganography for enhancement of embedding capacity and security. Steganography is a method to provide secret communication between sender and receiver by concealing message in cover image. LSB bit encoding method is that the simplest encoding method to cover secret message in color pictures and grayscale pictures. Steganalysis is a method of detecting secret message hidden in a cover image. RS steganalysis is one of the most reliable steganalysis which performs statistical analysis of the pixels to successfully detection of hidden message in an image. This paper presents a secured steganography method using genetic algorithm to protect against the RS attack in color images. The proposed steganography scheme embeds message in integer wavelet transform coefficients by using a mapping function. This mapping function based on GA in an 8x8 block on the input cover color image. After embedding the message optimal pixel adjustment process is applied. By applying the OPAP the error difference between the cover image and stego image is minimized. Frequency domain technique is used to increase the robustness of proposed method. Use of IWT prevents the floating point precision problems of the wavelet filter. GA is used to increase the hiding capacity of image and maintains the quality of image. Experimental results are shows that the proposed steganography method is more secured against RS attack as compared to existing methods. Result showed that Peak signal to noise ratio and image utilization, 49.65 db and 100% respectively.

  1. Type III Secretion: a Virulence Factor Delivery System Essential for the Pathogenicity of Burkholderia mallei

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich, Ricky L; DeShazer, David

    2004-01-01

    By creating mutations in the Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 animal pathogen-like type III secretion system (TTSS), this study analyzes the correlation between type III secretion and the pathogenicity of ATCC 23344 in vivo. Mutagenesis demonstrated that a functional TTSS was required for the full pathogenicity of ATCC 23344 in the BALB/c mouse and Syrian hamster models of infection. However, vaccination with each mutant failed to elicit a protective immunity against challenge with wild-type AT...

  2. A Bespoke Technique for Secret Messaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahimn Pandya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The communication of digital assets on the internet infrastructure is increasing in its volume with threats on its security with regard to active and passive attacks of eavesdroppers. This concern has opened up the research channel to improve the techniques of secure and reliable communication protecting intellectual property rights and message security. Constant efforts of researchers in this area to achieve communication at faster rate maintaining security of digital assets, is giving improved techniques to achieve the goal. The efforts made here in this work are in the direction to enhance level of security in making faster reliable and secure communication. In spite of continued efforts, still as on today, it is challenging to hide the communication from eavesdropper. The disciplines of Cryptography, Steganography and Digital Watermarking are still popular areas of research. They are continuously digging to find robust and effective algorithms to protect digital communications and digital assets. It is very true that if the complexity in algorithm is increased, higher security level can be achieved. In the reviewed work, Researchers have developed algorithms for text encryption and embedment in digital watermarking using LSB at cost of time. The proposed work is targeted to maintain the tradeoff between the complexity level of algorithm and security level of message considering the time factor. The proposed work has evolved with two algorithms: AMEADT (ASCII Message Encryption and Decryption Technique to protect secret message and AMEAET (ASCII Message Embedment and Extraction Technique to embed encrypted text to digital image. The implementation of these algorithms has resulted in justifying higher level of security with comparatively lower level of complexity of algorithm.

  3. Incretin hormone secretion over the day

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahren, B; Carr, RD; Deacon, Carolyn F.

    2010-01-01

    . Regulation of incretin hormone secretion is less well characterized. The main stimulus for incretin hormone secretion is presence of nutrients in the intestinal lumen, and carbohydrate, fat as well as protein all have the capacity to stimulate GIP and GLP-1 secretion. More recently, it has been established...

  4. Pancreatic bicarbonate secretion involves two proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Wang, Jing; Henriksen, Katrine L.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas secretes fluid rich in digestive enzymes and bicarbonate. The alkaline secretion is important in buffering of acid chyme entering duodenum and for activation of enzymes. This secretion is formed in pancreatic ducts, and studies to date show that plasma membranes of duct epithelium expres...

  5. Keeping Secrets : Quantity, Quality and Consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijns, T.

    2005-01-01

    Keeping Secrets deals with the consequences of an elusive yet everyday phenomenon. It addresses both the quantity and quality of secret-keeping. With respect to quantity, it presents research on the intra- and interpersonal consequences of keeping secrets from parents in adolescence. With respect t

  6. Electronic enhancement of tear secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Mark; Lim Chung, Jae; Kossler, Andrea; Kook, Koung Hoon; Loudin, Jim; Franke, Manfred; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Objective. To study electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves for enhanced tear secretion, as a potential treatment for dry eye disease. We investigate the response pathways and electrical parameters to safely maximize tear secretion. Approach. We evaluated the tear response to electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves in isofluorane-anesthetized rabbits. In acute studies, electrical stimulation was performed using bipolar platinum foil electrodes, implanted beneath the inferior lacrimal gland, and a monopolar electrode placed near the afferent ethmoid nerve. Wireless microstimulators with bipolar electrodes were implanted beneath the lacrimal gland for chronic studies. To identify the response pathways, we applied various pharmacological inhibitors. To optimize the stimulus, we measured tear secretion rate (Schirmer test) as a function of pulse amplitude (1.5-12 mA), duration (0.1-1 ms) and repetition rate (10-100 Hz). Main results. Stimulation of the lacrimal gland increased tear secretion by engaging efferent parasympathetic nerves. Tearing increased with stimulation amplitude, pulse duration and repetition rate, up to 70 Hz. Stimulation with 3 mA, 500 μs pulses at 70 Hz provided a 4.5 mm (125%) increase in Schirmer score. Modulating duty cycle further increased tearing up to 57%, compared to continuous stimulation in chronically implanted animals (36%). Ethmoid (afferent) nerve stimulation increased tearing similar to gland stimulation (3.6 mm) via a reflex pathway. In animals with chronically implanted stimulators, a nearly 6 mm increase (57%) was achieved with 12-fold less charge density per pulse (0.06-0.3 μC mm-2 with 170-680 μs pulses) than the damage threshold (3.5 μC mm-2 with 1 ms pulses). Significance. Electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland or afferent nerves may be used as a treatment for dry eye disease. Clinical trials should validate this approach in patients with aqueous tear deficiency, and

  7. A dopamine-secreting pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Minami, M; Kano, H; Ohhira, M; Nakamura, K; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-01-01

    We describe a patient with pheochromocytoma, which secretes dopamine. He was admitted to hospital because of chronic diarrhea. After surgical resection of the tumor, dramatic cessation of the diarrhea and blood pressure elevation were observed. Decreased expression of dopamine beta-hydroxylase in the tumor was considered a possible mechanism of producing a pathophysiological concentration of dopamine. This case shows that excessive excretion of dopamine, a vasodilative hormone, may affect blood pressure.

  8. Multiscale modelling of saliva secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneyd, James; Crampin, Edmund; Yule, David

    2014-11-01

    We review a multiscale model of saliva secretion, describing in brief how the model is constructed and what we have so far learned from it. The model begins at the level of inositol trisphosphate receptors (IPR), and proceeds through the cellular level (with a model of acinar cell calcium dynamics) to the multicellular level (with a model of the acinus), finally to a model of a saliva production unit that includes an acinus and associated duct. The model at the level of the entire salivary gland is not yet completed. Particular results from the model so far include (i) the importance of modal behaviour of IPR, (ii) the relative unimportance of Ca(2+) oscillation frequency as a controller of saliva secretion, (iii) the need for the periodic Ca(2+) waves to be as fast as possible in order to maximise water transport, (iv) the presence of functional K(+) channels in the apical membrane increases saliva secretion, (v) the relative unimportance of acinar spatial structure for isotonic water transport, (vi) the prediction that duct cells are highly depolarised, (vii) the prediction that the secondary saliva takes at least 1mm (from the acinus) to reach ionic equilibrium. We end with a brief discussion of future directions for the model, both in construction and in the study of scientific questions.

  9. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-07

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance.

  10. Central effects of humanin on hepatic triglyceride secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhenwei; Su, Kai; Cui, Lingguang; Tas, Emir; Zhang, Ting; Dong, H Henry; Yakar, Shoshana; Muzumdar, Radhika H

    2015-08-01

    Humanin (HN) is an endogenous mitochondria-associated peptide that has been shown to protect against various Alzheimer's disease-associated insults, myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, and reactive oxygen species-induced cell death. We have shown previously that HN improves whole body glucose homeostasis by improving insulin sensitivity and increasing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from the β-cells. Here, we report that intraperitoneal treatment with one of HN analogs, HNG, decreases body weight gain, visceral fat, and hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The decrease in hepatic TG accumulation is due to increased activity of hepatic microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) and increased hepatic TG secretion. Both intravenous (iv) and intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of HNG acutely increase TG secretion from the liver. Vagotomy blocks the effect on both iv and icv HNG on TG secretion, suggesting that the effects of HNG on hepatic TG flux are centrally mediated. Our data suggest that HN is a new player in central regulation of peripheral lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. New Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > The New Genetics The New Genetics Living Laboratories Classroom Poster Order a Free Copy ... Piece to a Century-Old Evolutionary Puzzle Computing Genetics Model Organisms RNA Interference The New Genetics is ...

  12. The ethical, legal and social implications of umbilical cord blood banking: learning important lessons from the protection of human genetic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrot, David

    2012-03-01

    Internationally networked umbilical cord blood banks hold great promise for better clinical outcomes, but also raise a host of potential ethical and legal concerns. There is now significant accumulated experience in Australia and overseas with regard to the establishment of human genetic research databases and tissue collections, popularly known as "biobanks". For example, clear lessons emerge from the controversies that surrounded, stalled or derailed the establishment of some early biobanks, such as Iceland's deCODE, Autogen's Tonga database, a proposed biobank in Newfoundland, Canada, and the proposed Taiwan biobank. More recent efforts in the United Kingdom, Japan, Quebec and Tasmania have been relatively more successful in generating public support, recognising the critical need for openness and transparency, and ample public education and debate, in order to build community acceptance and legitimacy. Strong attention must be paid to ensuring that other concerns--about privacy, discrimination, informed consent, governance, security, commercial fairness and financial probity--are addressed in structural terms and monitored thereafter, in order to maintain public confidence and avoid a backlash that inevitably would imperil such research. Once lost, credibility is very difficult to restore.

  13. Genetically-Defined Deficiency of Mannose-Binding Lectin Is Associated with Protection after Experimental Stroke in Mice and Outcome in Human Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Alvaro; Planas, Anna M.; Justicia, Carles; Urra, Xabier; Jensenius, Jens C.; Torres, Ferran; Lozano, Francisco; Chamorro, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Background The complement system is a major effector of innate immunity that has been involved in stroke brain damage. Complement activation occurs through the classical, alternative and lectin pathways. The latter is initiated by mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs). Here we investigated whether the lectin pathway contributes to stroke outcome in mice and humans. Methodology/Principal Findings Focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in MBL-null mice induced smaller infarctions, better functional outcome, and diminished C3 deposition and neutrophil infiltration than in wild-type mice. Accordingly, reconstitution of MBL-null mice with recombinant human MBL (rhMBL) enhanced brain damage. In order to investigate the clinical relevance of these experimental observations, a study of MBL2 and MASP-2 gene polymorphism rendering the lectin pathway dysfunctional was performed in 135 stroke patients. In logistic regression adjusted for age, gender and initial stroke severity, unfavourable outcome at 3 months was associated with MBL-sufficient genotype (OR 10.85, p = 0.008) and circulating MBL levels (OR 1.29, p = 0.04). Individuals carrying MBL-low genotypes (17.8%) had lower C3, C4, and CRP levels, and the proinflammatory cytokine profile was attenuated versus MBL-sufficient genotypes. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, genetically defined MBL-deficiency is associated with a better outcome after acute stroke in mice and humans. PMID:20140243

  14. Huntingtin-interacting protein 14 is a type 1 diabetes candidate protein regulating insulin secretion and beta-cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, Lukas Adrian; Størling, Zenia Marian; Ortis, Fernanda; Lage, Kasper; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus; Bergholdt, Regine; Hald, Jacob; Brorsson, Caroline Anna; Eizirik, Decio Laks; Pociot, Flemming; Brunak, Søren; Størling, Joachim

    2011-09-13

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a complex disease characterized by the loss of insulin-secreting β-cells. Although the disease has a strong genetic component, and several loci are known to increase T1D susceptibility risk, only few causal genes have currently been identified. To identify disease-causing genes in T1D, we performed an in silico "phenome-interactome analysis" on a genome-wide linkage scan dataset. This method prioritizes candidates according to their physical interactions at the protein level with other proteins involved in diabetes. A total of 11 genes were predicted to be likely disease genes in T1D, including the INS gene. An unexpected top-scoring candidate gene was huntingtin-interacting protein (HIP)-14/ZDHHC17. Immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic sections demonstrated that HIP14 is almost exclusively expressed in insulin-positive cells in islets of Langerhans. RNAi knockdown experiments established that HIP14 is an antiapoptotic protein required for β-cell survival and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IFN-γ) that mediate β-cell dysfunction in T1D down-regulated HIP14 expression in insulin-secreting INS-1 cells and in isolated rat and human islets. Overexpression of HIP14 was associated with a decrease in IL-1β-induced NF-κB activity and protection against IL-1β-mediated apoptosis. Our study demonstrates that the current network biology approach is a valid method to identify genes of importance for T1D and may therefore embody the basis for more rational and targeted therapeutic approaches.

  15. Secreted proteins from the helminth Fasciola hepatica inhibit the initiation of autoreactive T cell responses and prevent diabetes in the NOD mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Lund

    Full Text Available Infections with helminth parasites prevent/attenuate auto-inflammatory disease. Here we show that molecules secreted by a helminth parasite could prevent Type 1 Diabetes (T1D in nonobese diabetic (NOD mice. When delivered at 4 weeks of age (coincident with the initiation of autoimmunity, the excretory/secretory products of Fasciola hepatica (FhES prevented the onset of T1D, with 84% of mice remaining normoglycaemic and insulitis-free at 30 weeks of age. Disease protection was associated with suppression of IFN-γ secretion from autoreactive T cells and a switch to the production of a regulatory isotype (from IgG2a to IgG1 of autoantibody. Following FhES injection, peritoneal macrophages converted to a regulatory M2 phenotype, characterised by increased expression levels of Ym1, Arg-1, TGFβ and PD-L1. Expression of these M2 genetic markers increased in the pancreatic lymph nodes and the pancreas of FhES-treated mice. In vitro, FhES-stimulated M2 macrophages induced the differentiation of Tregs from splenocytes isolated from naïve NOD mice. Collectively, our data shows that FhES contains immune-modulatory molecules that mediate protection from autoimmune diabetes via the induction and maintenance of a regulatory immune environment.

  16. Unconventional Pathways of Secretion Contribute to Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael J. D.; Brough, David

    2017-01-01

    In the conventional pathway of protein secretion, leader sequence-containing proteins leave the cell following processing through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi body. However, leaderless proteins also enter the extracellular space through mechanisms collectively known as unconventional secretion. Unconventionally secreted proteins often have vital roles in cell and organism function such as inflammation. Amongst the best-studied inflammatory unconventionally secreted proteins are interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1α, IL-33 and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In this review we discuss the current understanding of the unconventional secretion of these proteins and highlight future areas of research such as the role of nuclear localisation. PMID:28067797

  17. Cheater identifiable visual secret sharing scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zhi; Chen Kefei

    2005-01-01

    The visual secret sharing scheme proposed by Naor and Shamir provides a way to encrypt a secret black-white image into shares. A qualified group of participants can recover the secret message without using any cryptographic computation. But the original scheme can easily be corrupted by malicious participant. We propose an extension of VSS(visual secret sharing) to identify cheaters before the secret is recovered. Without the need for any additional information and cryptographic computation, every participant can verify the validity of shares of other participants, thus the security of VSS is enhanced.

  18. Construction and immune protection evaluation of recombinant polyvalent OmpAs derived from genetically divergent ompA by DNA shuffling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Chu, Xiao; Li, Dan; Zeng, Zao-Hai; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2016-02-01

    A wide variety of bacterial infections is a major challenge in aquaculture. Development of polyvalent vaccines that can fight against as many pathogens as possible is especially necessary. The present study uses DNA shuffling to create a new hybrid OmpA with improved cross-protection against Vibrio alginolyticus and Edwardsiella tarda through the recombination of six OmpA genes from Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus, E. tarda and Escherichia coli. Out of the 43 recombinant chimeras genes constructed using VA0764 primers, EompAs-19 was demonstrated as an ideal polyvalent vaccine against infections caused V. alginolyticus and E. tarda. Compared with VA0764, OmpAs-19 had three mutations, which may be a molecular basis of EompAs-19 as an efficient polyvalent vaccine against both V. alginolyticus and E. tarda infections. These results develop a polyvalent vaccine that prevents the infections caused by extracellular and intracellular bacteria. Thus, the present study highlights the way to develop polyvalent vaccines against microbial infections by DNA shuffling.

  19. DPP4 gene variation affects GLP-1 secretion, insulin secretion, and glucose tolerance in humans with high body adiposity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böhm, Anja; Wagner, Robert; Machicao, Fausto

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP-4) cleaves and inactivates the insulinotropic hormones glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide, collectively termed incretins. DPP-4 inhibitors entered clinical practice as approved therapeutics for type-2 diabetes in 2006. However......-BMI interaction effects were detected (p = 0.8). After stratification for body fat content, the SNP negatively affected glucose-stimulated GLP-1 levels (p = 0.0229), insulin secretion (p = 0.0061), and glucose tolerance (p = 0.0208) in subjects with high body fat content only. CONCLUSIONS: A common variant, i......, inter-individual variance in the responsiveness to DPP-4 inhibitors was reported. Thus, we asked whether genetic variation in the DPP4 gene affects incretin levels, insulin secretion, and glucose tolerance in participants of the TÜbingen Family study for type-2 diabetes (TÜF). RESEARCH DESIGN...

  20. Secret sharing scheme with inherited characteristic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zhenjun; Meng Fanzhen

    2006-01-01

    To assure the shareholders can look for their "legal" attorneys to renew the secret, once the secret sharing scheme is initialized, a secret sharing scheme with inherited characteristic is constructed. In this scheme, each shareholder can produce a new share by his algorithm, which is equivalent to the primary one. Together with other shares, the primary secret can be renewed. Since this scheme is constructed not by replacing the primary share with a new share produced by the dealer in his primitive secret sharing scheme, so no matter how much shares the shareholder produces, these shares can not be gathered together to renew the secret in this scheme. Compared with the existing secret sharing schemes, this scheme provides more agility for the shareholders by investing each of them a function but not affect its security.

  1. Diversity and subcellular distribution of archaeal secreted proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechthild ePohlschroder

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Secreted proteins make up a significant percentage of a prokaryotic proteome and play critical roles in important cellular processes such as polymer degradation, nutrient uptake, signal transduction, cell wall biosynthesis and motility. The majority of archaeal proteins are believed to be secreted either in an unfolded conformation via the universally conserved Sec pathway or in a folded conformation via the Twin arginine transport (Tat pathway. Extensive in vivo and in silico analyses of N-terminal signal peptides that target proteins to these pathways have led to the development of computational tools that not only predict Sec and Tat substrates with high accuracy but also provide information about signal peptide processing and targeting. Predictions therefore include indications as to whether a substrate is a soluble secreted protein, a membrane or cell-wall anchored protein, or a surface structure subunit, and whether it is targeted for post-translational modification such as glycosylation or the addition of a lipid. The use of these in silico tools, in combination with biochemical and genetic analyses of transport pathways and their substrates, has resulted in improved predictions of the subcellular localization of archaeal secreted proteins, allowing for a more accurate annotation of archaeal proteomes, and has led to the identification of potential adaptations to extreme environments, as well as archaeal kingdom-specific pathways. A more comprehensive understanding of the transport pathways and post-translational modifications of secreted archaeal proteins will also generate invaluable insights that will facilitate the identification of commercially valuable archaeal enzymes and the development of heterologous systems in which to efficiently express them.

  2. LcrG secretion is not required for blocking of Yops secretion in Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matson Jyl S

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LcrG, a negative regulator of the Yersinia type III secretion apparatus has been shown to be primarily a cytoplasmic protein, but is secreted at least in Y. pestis. LcrG secretion has not been functionally analyzed and the relevance of LcrG secretion on LcrG function is unknown. Results An LcrG-GAL4AD chimera, originally constructed for two-hybrid analyses to analyze LcrG protein interactions, appeared to be not secreted but the LcrG-GAL4AD chimera retained the ability to regulate Yops secretion. This result led to further investigation to determine the significance of LcrG secretion on LcrG function. Additional analyses including deletion and substitution mutations of amino acids 2–6 in the N-terminus of LcrG were constructed to analyze LcrG secretion and LcrG's ability to control secretion. Some changes to the N-terminus of LcrG were found to not affect LcrG's secretion or LcrG's secretion-controlling activity. However, substitution of poly-isoleucine in the N-terminus of LcrG did eliminate LcrG secretion but did not affect LcrG's secretion controlling activity. Conclusion These results indicate that secretion of LcrG, while observable and T3SS mediated, is not relevant for LcrG's ability to control secretion.

  3. 78 FR 27370 - Proposed Change to Data Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Information Act and the Trade Secrets Act. All proposed changes to the data protection provisions for Forms.... Energy Information Administration Proposed Change to Data Protection AGENCY: U.S. Energy Information... proposes to change and strengthen the data protection provisions on Forms EIA-3, EIA-5, EIA-7A, and EIA-8A...

  4. 77 FR 70745 - Proposed Change to Data Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... Information Act and the Trade Secrets Act. All proposed changes to the data protection provisions for Forms.... Energy Information Administration Proposed Change to Data Protection AGENCY: U.S. Energy Information.... Disclosure limitation procedures were applied to all data. The data protection policy for Form EIA-7A was...

  5. Weegee’s City Secrets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan TRACHTENBERG

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available En tant que photographe indépendant de meurtres, d’accidents, d’incendies, mais aussi de moments de loisirs dans la ville — de scènes de violence et de plaisir — Weegee travaillait essentiellement la nuit et utilisait un flash puissant associé à son appareil-photo de presse. Ses « secrets pour réaliser des photographies avec un flash » consistent à donner des conseils pratiques et techniques pour débutants. Mais au cœur de la rhétorique de ses « secrets » se trouvent des réflexions subtiles et convaincantes révélant la relation entre la lumière et l’obscurité, et plus particulièrement la manière dont la lumière du flash permet de rendre visible l’obscurité. Dans le récit de Weegee, le flash confère à la photographie le pouvoir d’écrire — d’écrire avec la lumière, un mode de représentation singulièrement approprié pour enregistrer des instants de vie dans les rues nocturnes de la ville.As a freelance photographer of crime, accidents, fires, and also of the recreational life of the city—scenes of violence and of pleasure—Weegee worked mainly at night and employed a powerful photoflash attachment to his press camera. His "secrets of shooting with photoflash" consist of practical technical advice for beginners. But within the rhetoric of his "secrets" there lie cogent and subtle reflections on the relation of light to darkness, especially on the way the flash of light makes darkness visible. In Weegee’s account, the photoflash gives photography the power of writing—writing with light, a mode of picturing uniquely suited to recording instants of life on city streets at night.

  6. Fractalkine (CX3CL1, a new factor protecting β-cells against TNFα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rutti

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that human islets express and secrete CX3CL1 and CX3CL1 impacts them by decreasing glucagon secretion without affecting insulin secretion. Moreover, CX3CL1 decreases basal apoptosis of human β-cells. We further demonstrate that CX3CL1 protects β-cells from the adverse effects of TNFα on their function by restoring the expression and phosphorylation of key proteins of the insulin secretion pathway.

  7. The evidence for secretion clearance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, D R

    2001-11-01

    Many acute and chronic respiratory diseases are associated with increased respiratory secretions in the airways. Narrative reviews and a few systematic reviews of secretion clearance techniques have been published. These reviews raise concerns regarding the lack of evidence to support the various secretion clearance techniques. I conducted a comprehensive MEDLINE search of the following subjects: chest physical therapy, chest physiotherapy, postural drainage, forced expiratory technique, autogenic drainage, high-frequency chest wall compression, flutter device and secretions, positive expiratory pressure and secretions, intrapulmonary percussion, mechanical in-exsufflation and secretions. This was followed by a comprehensive search of cross-references to identify additional studies. The results of this review are reported herein. There are a number of methodological limitations of the literature reporting studies of the use of secretion clearance techniques. Most of the studies were small, most used crossover designs, and few used sham therapy. Many studies were limited to short-term outcomes such as sputum clearance with a single treatment session. Despite the clinical observation that retained secretions are detrimental to respiratory function and despite anecdotal associations between secretion clearance and improvements in respiratory function, there is a dearth of high-level evidence to support any secretion clearance technique.

  8. b-Series gangliosides crucially regulate leptin secretion in adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shuting; Ohkawa, Yuki; Tokizane, Kyohei; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Banno, Ryoichi; Furukawa, Keiko; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Koichi

    2015-04-01

    Gangliosides are widely involved in the regulation of cells and organs. However, little is known about their roles in leptin secretion from adipose tissues. Genetic deletion of b-series gangliosides resulted in the marked reduction of serum leptin. Expression analysis of leptin revealed that leptin accumulated in the adipose tissues of GD3 synthase-knockout (GD3S KO) mice. Analysis of primary cultured stromal vascular fractions (SVF) derived from GD3S KO mice revealed that leptin secretion was reduced, although leptin amounts in cells were increased compared with those of wild type. Interestingly, addition of b-series gangliosides to the culture medium of differentiated SVF resulted in the restoration of leptin secretion. Results of methyl-β-cyclodextrin treatment of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells as well as immunocytostaining of leptin and caveolin-1 suggested that b-series gangliosides regulate the leptin secretion from adipose tissues in lipid rafts.

  9. 遗传减毒伯氏疟原虫ANKA株的构建及其免疫保护效应%Establishment of a genetically attenuated strain of Plasmodium berghei ANKA and its immune protective effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁艳; 谭章平; 卢潇; 徐文岳; 付雍

    2016-01-01

    目的:构建遗传减毒伯氏疟原虫ANKA株(Plasmodium berghei ANKA,P.b ANKA),并用此减毒疟原虫株免疫C57BL/6J小鼠观察免疫保护效果。方法分别扩增UIS3基因编码序列两端的非编码区5′UTR和3′UTR及用于筛选的抗性标记hDHFR,然后利用融合PCR原理,扩增全长同源重组片段(5′UTR+hDHFR+3′UTR),最后常规PCR扩增获得大量线性化同源重组片段并纯化。体外培养富集伯氏疟原虫ANKA株的成熟裂殖体,将线性化同源重组片段通过电转的方式导入裂殖体中并接种到小鼠体内,再对转化后的疟原虫进行筛选和鉴定,最后用构建成功的减毒伯氏疟原虫ANKA株免疫小鼠并攻击,观察减毒株的免疫保护效力。结果成功扩增3个独立片段5′UTR、hDHFR和3′UTR ,长度分别为798、1628和759 bp ,后经融合 PCR 反应形成全长重组片段5′UTR+hDHFR+3′UTR ,长度为3185 bp。转化至裂殖体后经筛选鉴定获得遗传减毒伯氏疟原虫ANKA株,将此遗传减毒株免疫小鼠后攻击,小鼠红内期原虫率为0%,脑型疟发生率为0%,存活率为100%,可使其完全抵御野生型疟原虫感染。结论成功构建遗传减毒伯氏疟原虫ANKA株,此减毒株对小鼠的免疫保护率为100%,此模型的建立可为研究红前期疫苗免疫保护机制奠定基础。%Objective To construct a genetically attenuated strain of Plasmodium berghei ANKA, and observe the immune protective effect. Methods The PCR amplified 5′untranslated region and 3′untranslated region of UIS3 gene coding sequence and resistance marker hDHFR fragments were used for the construction of full-length homologous recombination fragments ( 5′UTR+hDHFR+3′UTR ) by fusion PCR . The linearized homologous recombination fragments were introduced into mature schizonts which were enriched through in vitro culture and inoculated into the mice. Screening and identification of

  10. Metabolic regulation of insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Kevin; Newsholme, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of metabolic fuel homeostasis is a critical function of β-cells, which are located in the islets of Langerhans of the animal pancreas. Impairment of this β-cell function is a hallmark of pancreatic β-cell failure and may lead to development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. β-Cells are essentially "fuel sensors" that monitor and react to elevated nutrient load by releasing insulin. This response involves metabolic activation and generation of metabolic coupling factors (MCFs) that relay the nutrient signal throughout the cell and induce insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Glucose is the most important insulin secretagogue as it is the primary fuel source in food. Glucose metabolism is central to generation of MCFs that lead to insulin release, most notably ATP. In addition, other classes of nutrients are able to augment insulin secretion and these include members of the lipid and amino acid family of nutrients. Therefore, it is important to investigate the interplay between glucose, lipid, and amino acid metabolism, as it is this mixed nutrient sensing that generate the MCFs required for insulin exocytosis. The mechanisms by which these nutrients are metabolized to generate MCFs, and how they impact on β-cell insulin release and function, are discussed in detail in this article.

  11. Comparative transcriptional analysis of Bacillus subtilis cells overproducing either secreted proteins, lipoproteins or membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marciniak, Bogumila C.; Trip, Hein; van-der Veek, Patricia J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Marciniak, Bogumiła C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bacillus subtilis is a favorable host for the production of industrially relevant proteins because of its capacity of secreting proteins into the medium to high levels, its GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) status, its genetic accessibility and its capacity to grow in large

  12. Comparative transcriptional analysis of Bacillus subtilis cells overproducing either secreted proteins, lipoproteins or membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marciniak, Bogumila C.; Trip, Hein; van-der Veek, Patricia J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Marciniak, Bogumiła C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bacillus subtilis is a favorable host for the production of industrially relevant proteins because of its capacity of secreting proteins into the medium to high levels, its GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) status, its genetic accessibility and its capacity to grow in large fermentatio

  13. Genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  14. Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers create ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human Genome ...

  15. Quantum secret sharing with minimized quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortescue, Ben; Gour, Gilad

    2013-03-01

    Standard techniques for sharing a quantum secret among multiple players (such that certain subsets of the players can recover the secret while others are denied all knowledge of the secret) require a large amount of quantum communication to distribute the secret, which is likely to be the most costly resource in any practical scheme. Two known methods for reducing this cost are the use of imperfect ``ramp'' secret sharing (in which security is sacrificed for efficiency) and classical encryption (in which certain elements of the players' shares consist of classical information only). We demonstrate how one may combine these methods to reduce the required quantum communication below what has been previously achieved, in some cases to a provable minimum, without any loss of security. The techniques involved are closely-related to the properties of stabilizer codes, and thus have strong potential for being adapted to a wide range of quantum secret sharing schemes.

  16. Ecology of type II secretion in marine gammaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Flavia F; Egan, Suhelen; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2008-05-01

    Compelling findings on the direct association of the type II secretion (T2S) system with different ecological functions in marine bacteria have challenged the traditional view of the T2S pathway, the function of which has been mostly studied in pathogenic bacteria. The availability of a number of whole-genome sequence data sets enabled the analysis of the genetic composition of the T2S system across a number of Vibrios and Alteromonads. The widespread Gammaproteobacteria, in particular the Alteromonadales and the Vibrionales group, are recognized to play significant roles in the cycling of nutrients in coastal and pelagic marine ecosystems and are also found associated with marine eukaryotes. The combined analysis of the role and the genetic composition of the T2S system in Gammaproteobacteria provides important evidence for the significance of the T2S pathway in the ecology of environmental bacteria.

  17. Secretion by numbers: protein traffic in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, Anastasias; Christie, Peter J.; Fernandez, Rachel C.; Palmer, Tracy; Plano, Greg V.; Pugsley, Anthony P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Almost all aspects of protein traffic in bacteria were covered at the ASM-FEMS meeting on the topic in Iraklio, Crete in May 2006. The studies presented ranged from mechanistic analysis of specific events leading proteins to their final destinations to the physiological roles of the targeted proteins. Among the highlights from the meeting that are reviewed here are the molecular dynamics of SecA protein, membrane protein insertion, type III secretion needles and chaperones, type IV secretion, the two partner and autosecretion systems, the ‘secretion competent state’, and the recently discovered type VI secretion system. PMID:17020575

  18. Random Secretion of Growth Hormone in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prank, Klaus; Kloppstech, Mirko; Nowlan, Steven J.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Brabant, Georg

    1996-08-01

    In normal humans, growth hormone (GH) is secreted from a gland located adjacent to the brain (pituitary) into the blood in distinct pulses, but in patients bearing a tumor within the pituitary (acromegaly) GH is excessively secreted in an irregular manner. It has been hypothesized that GH secretion in the diseased state becomes random. This hypothesis is supported by demonstrating that GH secretion in patients with acromegaly cannot be distinguished from a variety of linear stochastic processes based on the predictability of the fluctuations of GH concentration in the bloodstream.

  19. Production of a cyanogenic secretion by a thyridid caterpillar (Calindoea trifascialis, Thyrididae, Lepidoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Christopher; Schroeder, Frank; Meinwald, Jerrold; Eisner, Maria; Eisner, Thomas

    2001-06-01

    The thyridid caterpillar, Calindoea trifascialis, when disturbed, emits a defensive secretion from two sac-like glands that open dorsolaterally on the first abdominal segment. The larva has two arm-like protuberances that project outward from the body just in front of the gland openings. These "arms", which are wetted by secretion when the larva activates its glands, appear to function specifically for administration of the fluid. A primary component of the secretion is mandelonitrile, a cyanogenic compound, but the fluid also contains other potential deterrents, including benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, (E,E)-α-farnesene, and 3-methylbutyl-3-methylbutanoate. Tests done in the field in Vietnam, where the species is native, showed the secretion to be protective against ants.

  20. On the new member's subsecret distribution protocol in dynamic group secret-sharing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cheng; WANG Wei-nong

    2005-01-01

    Secret-sharing is a common method to protect important data, such as the private key of a public-key system. Dynamic Group Secret-sharing (DGS) is a system where all of the members in a group hold a subsecret of the key information and where the number of members in the group is variable. This kind of secret-sharing is broadly used in many special distribution systems, such as Self-secure Ad-hoc Network. Distributing this subsecret to a new member when he enters the group is the common method that ensures all the members participate in the same secret-sharing. However, no' atisfactory subsecret distribution scheme exists at present. This paper proposes a new protocol that tries to satisfy both security and efficiency.

  1. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic counseling provides information and support to people who have, or may be at risk for, genetic disorders. A ... meets with you to discuss genetic risks. The counseling may be for yourself or a family member. ...

  2. A Novel Scheme for Image Authentication and Secret Data Sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auqib Hamid Lone

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Privacy protection is of extreme importance especially in security sensitive environments. Neither cryptography nor steganography comes up with ultimate solution for privacy preservation in open systems. However, combination of steganography and cryptography can greatly increase the security of communication and is usually considered a good practice for securing security driven communication environments. In this paper we propose a novel scheme for image authentication and secret data sharing based on three level security model viz: Compression, steganography and cryptography. Compression optimizes the resource usage, steganography conceals the existence of message and cryptography is used to achieve confidentiality and authentication.

  3. [Genetic information and future medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Akihiro

    2012-11-01

    Rapid technological advances in genetic analysis have revealed the genetic background of various diseases. Elucidation of the genes responsible for a disease enables better clinical management of the disease and helps to develop targeted drugs. Also, early diagnosis and management of at-risk family members can be made by identification of a genetic disease in the proband. On the other hand, genetic issues often cause psychological distress to the family. To perform genetic testing appropriately and to protect patients and family members from any harm, guidelines for genetic testing were released from the alliance of Japanese genetics-related academic societies in 2003. As genetic testing is becoming incorporated into clinical practice more broadly, the guideline was revised and released by the Japanese Society of Medical Sciences in 2011. All medical professionals in Japan are expected to follow this guideline.

  4. Genetic toxicology: web resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert R

    2002-04-25

    Genetic toxicology is the scientific discipline dealing with the effects of chemical, physical and biological agents on the heredity of living organisms. The Internet offers a wide range of online digital resources for the field of Genetic Toxicology. The history of genetic toxicology and electronic data collections are reviewed. Web-based resources at US National Library of Medicine (NLM), including MEDLINE, PUBMED, Gateway, Entrez, and TOXNET, are discussed. Search strategies and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) are reviewed in the context of genetic toxicology. The TOXNET group of databases are discussed with emphasis on those databases with genetic toxicology content including GENE-TOX, TOXLINE, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, Integrated Risk Information System, and Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System. Location of chemical information including chemical structure and linkage to health and regulatory information using CHEMIDPLUS at NLM and other databases is reviewed. Various government agencies have active genetic toxicology research programs or use genetic toxicology data to assist fulfilling the agency's mission. Online resources at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) are outlined. Much of the genetic toxicology for pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals and pesticides that is performed in the world is regulatory-driven. Regulatory web resources are presented for the laws mandating testing, guidelines on study design, Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, and requirements for electronic data collection and reporting. The Internet provides a range of other supporting resources to the field of genetic toxicology. The web links for key professional societies and journals in genetic toxicology are listed. Distance education, educational media resources, and job placement services are also

  5. Noninvasive clearance of airway secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, K A; Anderson, B D

    1996-06-01

    Airway clearance techniques are indicated for specific diseases that have known clearance abnormalities (Table 2). Murray and others have commented that such techniques are required only for patients with a daily sputum production of greater than 30 mL. The authors have observed that patients with diseases known to cause clearance abnormalities can have sputum clearance with some techniques, such as positive expiratory pressure, autogenic drainage, and active cycle of breathing techniques, when PDPV has not been effective. Hasani et al has shown that use of the forced exhalatory technique in patients with nonproductive cough still resulted in movement of secretions proximally from all regions of the lung in patients with airway obstruction. It is therefore reasonable to consider airway clearance techniques for any patient who has a disease known to alter mucous clearance, including CF, dyskinetic cilia syndromes, and bronchiectasis from any cause. Patients with atelectasis from mucous plugs and hypersecretory states, such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, patients with pain secondary to surgical procedures, and patients with neuromuscular disease, weak cough, and abnormal patency of the airway may also benefit from the application of airway clearance techniques. Infants and children up to 3 years of age with airway clearance problems need to be treated with PDPV. Manual percussion with hands alone or a flexible face mask or cup and small mechanical vibrator/percussors, such as the ultrasonic devices, can be used. The intrapulmonary percussive ventilator shows growing promise in this area. The high-frequency oscillator is not supplied with vests of appropriate sizes for tiny babies and has not been studied in this group. Young patients with neuromuscular disease may require assisted ventilation and airway oscillations can be applied. CPAP alone has been shown to improve achievable flow rates that will increase air-liquid interactions for patients with these diseases

  6. Metabolic control of renin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2013-01-01

    One emerging topic in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) research is the direct local control of renin synthesis and release by endogenous metabolic intermediates. During the past few years, our laboratory has characterized the localization and signaling of the novel metabolic receptor GPR91 in the normal and diabetic kidney and established GPR91 as a new, direct link between high glucose and RAS activation in diabetes. GPR91 (also called SUCNR1) binds tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate succinate which can rapidly accumulate in the local tissue environment when energy supply and demand are out of balance. In a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with metabolic stress, succinate signaling via GPR91 appears to be an important mediator or modulator of renin secretion. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the control of renin release by molecules of endogenous metabolic pathways with the main focus on succinate/GPR91.

  7. [Functional morphology of stomach secretions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebich, H G

    1985-01-01

    The stimulation of gastric secretion is regulated by neurovagal, endocrine and immunological reactions. During the gastric phase of digestion, especially acetylcholin, gastrin and histamin react as main transmitters, activated by mediators (prostaglandines, leucotrienes, lipoxygenases). The dominant role of nervus vagus has to be seen in the transactions of vago-vagal reflexes, the stimulation of gastrin liberation by an non-cholinergic mechanism and the regulation of the gastric microcirculation. The antrum pylori can be seen as an immunological area of reception, where immunological active cells (macrophages, NK-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes) are recognizing antigens (e.g. food antigens). These immunocytes induce a cascade of endocrine and exocrine mechanisms of digestion. Mastcells, located intra-and extraepithelial, take a regulatory influence in producing histamins, leucotrienes and also prostaglandines.

  8. [Mucoprotein secretion in calculous gallbladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Lobato, R; Ortega, L; Balibrea, J L; Torres, A J; García-Calvo, M; Alvarez Sánchez, J A

    1994-05-01

    Secretion of mucoproteins or mucine (MP) have been studied as possible markers in several pathological conditions of the digestive tract, such us colonic polyposis or gastric dysplasia. In the gallbladder (VB) it has been established that form the core of crystalization for the calculi. A study in 100 gallbladders have been made based on the utility of the analysis of the qualitative and quantitative modifications of MP in lithogenesis. It was been determined by histochemical techniques the three main types of MP (neutral, low and high sulphated acid) to evaluate the alterations in the process of lithiasis. Results show a high production of the MP in VB with lithiasis, presenting in 97% a mixed composition of MP (48.9% of 2 types, and 3 types in 46%), without a predominating type in this pathology.

  9. Sun protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surfaces that reflect light, such as water, sand, concrete, snow, and areas that are painted white. DO ... protect the ears or sides of the face. Special clothing that protects the skin by absorbing UV ...

  10. Negotiating Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel

    strategies are entangled in cultural, religious, and national identities. Using ethnographic methods, I investigate protection against selected risks: harm from evil eyes, violation of domestic sanctity, and cultural heritage dilapidation. Protection against these risks is examined through studies...

  11. Sun Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 100% UV ray protection (look for models that advertise both UVB and UVA protection). Use a broad- ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  12. Elastase secretion in Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Gabriela A; Magliano, Ana C M; Pral, Elizabeth M F; Alfieri, Silvia C

    2009-11-01

    Acanthamoeba species are frequently isolated from soil and water collections. In the environment, the organisms multiply as phagotrophic trophozoites and encyst under adverse conditions. Several species are known to infect man, causing keratitis and opportunistic diseases. The mechanisms underlying tissue damage and invasion by the amoebae are being elucidated and the involvement of secreted peptidases, particularly serine peptidases, has been demonstrated. Here, elastase activity was examined in Acanthamoeba-conditioned medium (ACM), making use of elastin-Congo red (ECR) and synthetic peptide p-nitroanilide substrates. ACM hydrolysed ECR over a broad pH range and optimally at a pH of 7.5 and above. Indicating the activity of serine and metallopeptidases, Congo red release was potently inhibited by PMSF, antipain, chymostatin and 1,10-phenanthroline, partially reduced by elastatinal and EDTA, and unaffected by 1,7-phenanthroline and E-64. Screening with synthetic substrates mainly showed the activity of serine peptidases. ACM efficiently hydrolysed Suc-Ala(2)-Pro-Leu-pNA and Suc-Ala(2)-Pro-Phe-pNA over a broad pH range (7.0-9.5) and was weakly active against Suc-Ala(3)-pNA, a substrate found to be optimally hydrolysed at a pH around 7.0. Following ammonium sulfate precipitation of ACM proteins and FPLC analysis, the majority of the ECR-splitting activity, characterised as serine peptidases, bound to CM-sepharose and co-eluted with part of the Suc-Ala(2)-Pro-Phe-pNA-hydrolysing activity in a gradient of 0-0.6M NaCl. In the corresponding FPLC fractions, serine peptidases resolving in the region of 70-130kDa were detected in gelatin gels. Overall, the results demonstrate that trophozoites secrete elastases, and additionally suggest the high molecular weight serine peptidases as possible elastase candidates.

  13. DYNAMIC AND VERIFIABLE SECRET SHARING AMONG WEIGHTED PARTICIPANTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanshuo ZHANG; Zhuojun LIU

    2007-01-01

    A secret sharing scheme permits a secret to be shared among participants in such a way that only qualified subsets of participants can recover the secret. Secret sharing is useful in management of cryptographic keys. Based on identity, we analyze the secret sharing scheme among weighted participants. Then we present a dynamic scheme about secret sharing among weighted participants. At last, we analyze the secret sharing scheme among weighted participants, which can make all weighted participants verifiable and dynamic.

  14. Ghrelin directly stimulates glucagon secretion from pancreatic alpha-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Sakata, Ichiro; Kohno, Daisuke; Perello, Mario; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Repa, Joyce J; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2011-09-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that the peptide hormone ghrelin raises blood glucose. Such has been attributed to ghrelin's ability to enhance GH secretion, restrict insulin release, and/or reduce insulin sensitivity. Ghrelin's reported effects on glucagon have been inconsistent. Here, both animal- and cell-based systems were used to determine the role of glucagon in mediating ghrelin's effects on blood glucose. The tissue and cell distribution of ghrelin receptors (GHSR) was evaluated by quantitative PCR and histochemistry. Plasma glucagon levels were determined following acute acyl-ghrelin injections and in pharmacological and/or transgenic mouse models of ghrelin overexpression and GHSR deletion. Isolated mouse islets and the α-cell lines αTC1 and InR1G9 were used to evaluate ghrelin's effects on glucagon secretion and the role of calcium and ERK in this activity. GHSR mRNA was abundantly expressed in mouse islets and colocalized with glucagon in α-cells. Elevation of acyl-ghrelin acutely (after sc administration, such that physiologically relevant plasma ghrelin levels were achieved) and chronically (by slow-releasing osmotic pumps and as observed in transgenic mice harboring ghrelinomas) led to higher plasma glucagon and increased blood glucose. Conversely, genetic GHSR deletion was associated with lower plasma glucagon and reduced fasting blood glucose. Acyl-ghrelin increased glucagon secretion in a dose-dependent manner from mouse islets and α-cell lines, in a manner requiring elevation of intracellular calcium and phosphorylation of ERK. Our study shows that ghrelin's regulation of blood glucose involves direct stimulation of glucagon secretion from α-cells and introduces the ghrelin-glucagon axis as an important mechanism controlling glycemia under fasting conditions.

  15. Physiological and Molecular Analysis of Aluminium-Induced Organic Acid Anion Secretion from Grain Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. is abundant in oxalate and can secrete oxalate under aluminium (Al stress. However, the features of Al-induced secretion of organic acid anions (OA and potential genes responsible for OA secretion are poorly understood. Here, Al-induced OA secretion in grain amaranth roots was characterized by ion charomatography and enzymology methods, and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH together with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR was used to identify up-regulated genes that are potentially involved in OA secretion. The results showed that grain amaranth roots secrete both oxalate and citrate in response to Al stress. The secretion pattern, however, differs between oxalate and citrate. Neither lanthanum chloride (La nor cadmium chloride (Cd induced OA secretion. A total of 84 genes were identified as up-regulated by Al, in which six genes were considered as being potentially involved in OA secretion. The expression pattern of a gene belonging to multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE family, AhMATE1, was in close agreement with that of citrate secretion. The expression of a gene encoding tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter and four genes encoding ATP-binding cassette transporters was differentially regulated by Al stress, but the expression pattern was not correlated well with that of oxalate secretion. Our results not only reveal the secretion pattern of oxalate and citrate from grain amaranth roots under Al stress, but also provide some genetic information that will be useful for further characterization of genes involved in Al toxicity and tolerance mechanisms.

  16. Physiological and Molecular Analysis of Aluminium-Induced Organic Acid Anion Secretion from Grain Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.) Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Xu, Jia-Meng; Lou, He-Qiang; Xiao, Chuan; Chen, Wei-Wei; Yang, Jian-Li

    2016-01-01

    Grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.) is abundant in oxalate and can secrete oxalate under aluminium (Al) stress. However, the features of Al-induced secretion of organic acid anions (OA) and potential genes responsible for OA secretion are poorly understood. Here, Al-induced OA secretion in grain amaranth roots was characterized by ion charomatography and enzymology methods, and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) together with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to identify up-regulated genes that are potentially involved in OA secretion. The results showed that grain amaranth roots secrete both oxalate and citrate in response to Al stress. The secretion pattern, however, differs between oxalate and citrate. Neither lanthanum chloride (La) nor cadmium chloride (Cd) induced OA secretion. A total of 84 genes were identified as up-regulated by Al, in which six genes were considered as being potentially involved in OA secretion. The expression pattern of a gene belonging to multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family, AhMATE1, was in close agreement with that of citrate secretion. The expression of a gene encoding tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter and four genes encoding ATP-binding cassette transporters was differentially regulated by Al stress, but the expression pattern was not correlated well with that of oxalate secretion. Our results not only reveal the secretion pattern of oxalate and citrate from grain amaranth roots under Al stress, but also provide some genetic information that will be useful for further characterization of genes involved in Al toxicity and tolerance mechanisms. PMID:27144562

  17. Physiological and Molecular Analysis of Aluminium-Induced Organic Acid Anion Secretion from Grain Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.) Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Xu, Jia-Meng; Lou, He-Qiang; Xiao, Chuan; Chen, Wei-Wei; Yang, Jian-Li

    2016-04-30

    Grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.) is abundant in oxalate and can secrete oxalate under aluminium (Al) stress. However, the features of Al-induced secretion of organic acid anions (OA) and potential genes responsible for OA secretion are poorly understood. Here, Al-induced OA secretion in grain amaranth roots was characterized by ion charomatography and enzymology methods, and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) together with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to identify up-regulated genes that are potentially involved in OA secretion. The results showed that grain amaranth roots secrete both oxalate and citrate in response to Al stress. The secretion pattern, however, differs between oxalate and citrate. Neither lanthanum chloride (La) nor cadmium chloride (Cd) induced OA secretion. A total of 84 genes were identified as up-regulated by Al, in which six genes were considered as being potentially involved in OA secretion. The expression pattern of a gene belonging to multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family, AhMATE1, was in close agreement with that of citrate secretion. The expression of a gene encoding tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter and four genes encoding ATP-binding cassette transporters was differentially regulated by Al stress, but the expression pattern was not correlated well with that of oxalate secretion. Our results not only reveal the secretion pattern of oxalate and citrate from grain amaranth roots under Al stress, but also provide some genetic information that will be useful for further characterization of genes involved in Al toxicity and tolerance mechanisms.

  18. Insulin secretion and sensitivity in space flight: diabetogenic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Uchakin, Peter N.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.

    2002-01-01

    Nearly three decades of space flight research have suggested that there are subclinical diabetogenic changes that occur in microgravity. Alterations in insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and metabolism of protein and amino acids support the hypothesis that insulin plays an essential role in the maintenance of muscle mass in extended-duration space flight. Experiments in flight and after flight and ground-based bedrest studies have associated microgravity and its experimental paradigms with manifestations similar to those of diabetes, physical inactivity, and aging. We propose that these manifestations are characterized best by an etiology that falls into the clinical category of "other" causes of diabetes, including, but not restricted to, genetic beta-cell defects, insulin action defects, diseases of the endocrine pancreas, endocrinopathies, drug or chemically induced diabetes, infections, immune-mediated metabolic alteration, and a host of genetic related diseases. We present data showing alterations in tumor necrosis factor-alpha production, insulin secretion, and amino acid metabolism in pancreatic islets of Langerhans cultured in a ground-based cell culture bioreactor that mimics some of the effects of microgravity. Taken together, space flight research, ground-based studies, and bioreactor studies of pancreatic islets of Langerhans support the hypothesis that the pancreas is unable to overcome peripheral insulin resistance and amino acid dysregulation during space flight. We propose that measures of insulin secretion and insulin action will be necessary to design effective countermeasures against muscle loss, and we advance the "disposition index" as an essential model to be used in the clinical management of space flight-induced muscle loss.

  19. The vascular secret of Klotho

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewin, Ewa; Olgaard, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Klotho is an evolutionarily highly conserved protein related to longevity. Increasing evidence of a vascular protecting effect of the Klotho protein has emerged and might be important for future treatments of uremic vascular calcification. It is still disputed whether Klotho is locally expressed ...

  20. Genetically modified laboratory mice with sebaceous glands abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Carmen; Schneider, Marlon R

    2016-12-01

    Sebaceous glands (SG) are exocrine glands that release their product by holocrine secretion, meaning that the whole cell becomes a secretion following disruption of the membrane. SG may be found in association with a hair follicle, forming the pilosebaceous unit, or as modified SG at different body sites such as the eyelids (Meibomian glands) or the preputial glands. Depending on their location, SG fulfill a number of functions, including protection of the skin and fur, thermoregulation, formation of the tear lipid film, and pheromone-based communication. Accordingly, SG abnormalities are associated with several diseases such as acne, cicatricial alopecia, and dry eye disease. An increasing number of genetically modified laboratory mouse lines develop SG abnormalities, and their study may provide important clues regarding the molecular pathways regulating SG development, physiology, and pathology. Here, we summarize in tabulated form the available mouse lines with SG abnormalities and, focusing on selected examples, discuss the insights they provide into SG biology and pathology. We hope this survey will become a helpful information source for researchers with a primary interest in SG but also as for researchers from unrelated fields that are unexpectedly confronted with a SG phenotype in newly generated mouse lines.

  1. On Secret Sharing with Nonlinear Product Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cascudo Pueyo, Ignacio; Cramer, Ronald; Mirandola, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Multiplicative linear secret sharing is a fundamental notion in the area of secure multiparty computation and, since recently, in the area of two-party cryptography as well. In a nutshell, this notion guarantees that the product of two secrets is obtained as a linear function of the vector consis...

  2. Secret-involved Information System Security Audit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Ya-lan

    2015-01-01

    Secret-involved information system security audit is a network security technology developing rapidly in recent years.It uses various technical to detect the problem of secret-involved information system,and uses certain audit methods to analyze all kinds of suspicious behavior and irregularities.

  3. "The Secret Garden": A Literary Journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the life of Frances Hodgson Burnett, author of "The Secret Garden." Argues that it not only tells an enthralling tale, but takes readers on a journey through the history of English literature. Discusses the gothic tradition and romanticism of "The Secret Garden." Lists classic elements in the book and offers five ideas…

  4. On Secret Sharing with Nonlinear Product Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cascudo Pueyo, Ignacio; Cramer, Ronald; Mirandola, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Multiplicative linear secret sharing is a fundamental notion in the area of secure multiparty computation and, since recently, in the area of two-party cryptography as well. In a nutshell, this notion guarantees that the product of two secrets is obtained as a linear function of the vector consis...

  5. Chloride transport-driven alveolar fluid secretion is a major contributor to cardiogenic lung edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solymosi, Esther A; Kaestle-Gembardt, Stefanie M; Vadász, István; Wang, Liming; Neye, Nils; Chupin, Cécile Julie Adrienne; Rozowsky, Simon; Ruehl, Ramona; Tabuchi, Arata; Schulz, Holger; Kapus, Andras; Morty, Rory E; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2013-06-18

    Alveolar fluid clearance driven by active epithelial Na(+) and secondary Cl(-) absorption counteracts edema formation in the intact lung. Recently, we showed that impairment of alveolar fluid clearance because of inhibition of epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaCs) promotes cardiogenic lung edema. Concomitantly, we observed a reversal of alveolar fluid clearance, suggesting that reversed transepithelial ion transport may promote lung edema by driving active alveolar fluid secretion. We, therefore, hypothesized that alveolar ion and fluid secretion may constitute a pathomechanism in lung edema and aimed to identify underlying molecular pathways. In isolated perfused lungs, alveolar fluid clearance and secretion were determined by a double-indicator dilution technique. Transepithelial Cl(-) secretion and alveolar Cl(-) influx were quantified by radionuclide tracing and alveolar Cl(-) imaging, respectively. Elevated hydrostatic pressure induced ouabain-sensitive alveolar fluid secretion that coincided with transepithelial Cl(-) secretion and alveolar Cl(-) influx. Inhibition of either cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) or Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporters (NKCC) blocked alveolar fluid secretion, and lungs of CFTR(-/-) mice were protected from hydrostatic edema. Inhibition of ENaC by amiloride reproduced alveolar fluid and Cl(-) secretion that were again CFTR-, NKCC-, and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-dependent. Our findings show a reversal of transepithelial Cl(-) and fluid flux from absorptive to secretory mode at hydrostatic stress. Alveolar Cl(-) and fluid secretion are triggered by ENaC inhibition and mediated by NKCC and CFTR. Our results characterize an innovative mechanism of cardiogenic edema formation and identify NKCC1 as a unique therapeutic target in cardiogenic lung edema.

  6. Toxins and Secretion Systems of Photorhabdus luminescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athina Rodou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Photorhabdus luminescens is a nematode-symbiotic, gram negative, bioluminescent bacterium, belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae.Recent studies show the importance of this bacterium as an alternative source of insecticides, as well as an emerging human pathogen. Various toxins have been identified and characterized in this bacterium. These toxins are classified into four major groups: the toxin complexes (Tcs, the Photorhabdus insect related (Pir proteins, the “makes caterpillars floppy” (Mcf toxins and the Photorhabdus virulence cassettes (PVC; the mechanisms however of toxin secretion are not fully elucidated. Using bioinformatics analysis and comparison against the components of known secretion systems, multiple copies of components of all known secretion systems, except the ones composing a type IV secretion system, were identified throughout the entire genome of the bacterium. This indicates that Photorhabdus luminescens has all the necessary means for the secretion of virulence factors, thus it is capable of establishing a microbial infection.

  7. Toxins and secretion systems of Photorhabdus luminescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodou, Athina; Ankrah, Dennis O; Stathopoulos, Christos

    2010-06-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens is a nematode-symbiotic, gram negative, bioluminescent bacterium, belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae. Recent studies show the importance of this bacterium as an alternative source of insecticides, as well as an emerging human pathogen. Various toxins have been identified and characterized in this bacterium. These toxins are classified into four major groups: the toxin complexes (Tcs), the Photorhabdus insect related (Pir) proteins, the "makes caterpillars floppy" (Mcf) toxins and the Photorhabdus virulence cassettes (PVC); the mechanisms however of toxin secretion are not fully elucidated. Using bioinformatics analysis and comparison against the components of known secretion systems, multiple copies of components of all known secretion systems, except the ones composing a type IV secretion system, were identified throughout the entire genome of the bacterium. This indicates that Photorhabdus luminescens has all the necessary means for the secretion of virulence factors, thus it is capable of establishing a microbial infection.

  8. Regulation of glucagon secretion by incretins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Christensen, M; Lund, A;

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon secretion plays an essential role in the regulation of hepatic glucose production, and elevated fasting and postprandial plasma glucagon concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) contribute to their hyperglycaemia. The reason for the hyperglucagonaemia is unclear, but recent...... that endogenous GLP-1 plays an important role in regulation of glucagon secretion during fasting as well as postprandially. The mechanisms whereby GLP-1 regulates glucagon secretion are debated, but studies in isolated perfused rat pancreas point to an important role for a paracrine regulation by somatostatin...... studies have shown lack of suppression after oral but preserved suppression after isoglycaemic intravenous glucose, pointing to factors from the gut. Gastrointestinal hormones that are secreted in response to oral glucose include glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) that strongly inhibits glucagon secretion...

  9. Prevalence of type III secretion system in effective biocontrol pseudomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almario, Juliana; Gobbin, Davide; Défago, Geneviève; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Rezzonico, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    Functional type III secretion system (T3SS) genes are needed for effective biocontrol of Pythium damping-off of cucumber by Pseudomonas fluorescens KD, but whether biocontrol Pseudomonas strains with T3SS genes display overall a higher plant-protecting activity is unknown. The assessment of 198 biocontrol fluorescent pseudomonads originating from 60 soils worldwide indicated that 32% harbour the ATPase-encoding T3SS gene hrcN, which was most often found in tomato isolates. The hrcN(+) biocontrol strains (and especially those also producing 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and displaying 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity) displayed higher plant-protecting ability in comparison with hrcN(-) biocontrol strains, both in the Pythium/cucumber and Fusarium/cucumber pathosystems.

  10. Non-classical protein secretion in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausbøll Anders

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present an overview of bacterial non-classical secretion and a prediction method for identification of proteins following signal peptide independent secretion pathways. We have compiled a list of proteins found extracellularly despite the absence of a signal peptide. Some of these proteins also have known roles in the cytoplasm, which means they could be so-called "moon-lightning" proteins having more than one function. Results A thorough literature search was conducted to compile a list of currently known bacterial non-classically secreted proteins. Pattern finding methods were applied to the sequences in order to identify putative signal sequences or motifs responsible for their secretion. We have found no signal or motif characteristic to any majority of the proteins in the compiled list of non-classically secreted proteins, and conclude that these proteins, indeed, seem to be secreted in a novel fashion. However, we also show that the apparently non-classically secreted proteins are still distinguished from cellular proteins by properties such as amino acid composition, secondary structure and disordered regions. Specifically, prediction of disorder reveals that bacterial secretory proteins are more structurally disordered than their cytoplasmic counterparts. Finally, artificial neural networks were used to construct protein feature based methods for identification of non-classically secreted proteins in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusion We present a publicly available prediction method capable of discriminating between this group of proteins and other proteins, thus allowing for the identification of novel non-classically secreted proteins. We suggest candidates for non-classically secreted proteins in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The prediction method is available online.

  11. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a Live Vaccine Vehicle for the Induction of Protective Anti-Viral Cell-Mediated Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Slifka, Mark K.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Jensen, Eric R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Miller, Jeff F.

    1995-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive bacterium that is able to enter host cells, escape from the endocytic vesicle, multiply within the cytoplasm, and spread directly from cell to cell without encountering the extracellular milieu. The ability of LM to gain access to the host cell cytosol allows proteins secreted by the bacterium to efficiently enter the pathway for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen processing and presentation. We have established a genetic system for expression and secretion of foreign antigens by recombinant strains, based on stable site-specific integration of expression cassettes into the LM genome. The ability of LM recombinants to induce protective immunity against a heterologous pathogen was demonstrated with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). LM strains expressing the entire LCMV nucleoprotein or an H-2L^d-restricted nucleoprotein epitope (aa 118-126) were constructed. Immunization of mice with LM vaccine strains conferred protection against challenge with virulent strains of LCMV that otherwise establish chronic infection in naive adult mice. In vivo depletion of CD8^+ T cells from vaccinated mice abrogated their ability to clear viral infection, showing that protective anti-viral immunity was due to CD8^+ T cells.

  12. Identification of protein secretion systems and novel secreted proteins in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krehenbrink Martin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins secreted by bacteria play an important role in infection of eukaryotic hosts. Rhizobia infect the roots of leguminous plants and establish a mutually beneficial symbiosis. Proteins secreted during the infection process by some rhizobial strains can influence infection and modify the plant defence signalling pathways. The aim of this study was to systematically analyse protein secretion in the recently sequenced strain Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Results Similarity searches using defined protein secretion systems from other Gram-negative bacteria as query sequences revealed that R. l. bv. viciae 3841 has ten putative protein secretion systems. These are the general export pathway (GEP, a twin-arginine translocase (TAT secretion system, four separate Type I systems, one putative Type IV system and three Type V autotransporters. Mutations in genes encoding each of these (except the GEP were generated, but only mutations affecting the PrsDE (Type I and TAT systems were observed to affect the growth phenotype and the profile of proteins in the culture supernatant. Bioinformatic analysis and mass fingerprinting of tryptic fragments of culture supernatant proteins identified 14 putative Type I substrates, 12 of which are secreted via the PrsDE, secretion system. The TAT mutant was defective for the symbiosis, forming nodules incapable of nitrogen fixation. Conclusion None of the R. l. bv. viciae 3841 protein secretion systems putatively involved in the secretion of proteins to the extracellular space (Type I, Type IV, Type V is required for establishing the symbiosis with legumes. The PrsDE (Type I system was shown to be the major route of protein secretion in non-symbiotic cells and to secrete proteins of widely varied size and predicted function. This is in contrast to many Type I systems from other bacteria, which typically secrete specific substrates encoded by genes often localised in close proximity to

  13. The Genetic Privacy Act and commentary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annas, G.J.; Glantz, L.H.; Roche, P.A.

    1995-02-28

    The Genetic Privacy Act is a proposal for federal legislation. The Act is based on the premise that genetic information is different from other types of personal information in ways that require special protection. Therefore, to effectively protect genetic privacy unauthorized collection and analysis of individually identifiable DNA must be prohibited. As a result, the premise of the Act is that no stranger should have or control identifiable DNA samples or genetic information about an individual unless that individual specifically authorizes the collection of DNA samples for the purpose of genetic analysis, authorized the creation of that private information, and has access to and control over the dissemination of that information.

  14. Lycaenid Caterpillar Secretions Manipulate Attendant Ant Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Masaru K; Pierce, Naomi E; Tsuji, Kazuki

    2015-08-31

    Mutualistic interactions typically involve the exchange of different commodities between species. Nutritious secretions are produced by a number of insects and plants in exchange for services such as defense. These rewards are valuable metabolically and can be used to reinforce the behavior of symbiotic partners that can learn and remember them effectively. We show here novel effects of insect exocrine secretions produced by caterpillars in modulating the behavior of attendant ants in the food-for-defense interaction between lycaenid butterflies and ants. Reward secretions from the dorsal nectary organ (DNO) of Narathura japonica caterpillars function to reduce the locomotory activities of their attendant ants, Pristomyrmex punctatus workers. Moreover, workers that feed from caterpillar secretions are significantly more likely to show aggressive responses to eversion of the tentacle organs of the caterpillars. Analysis of the neurogenic amines in the brains of workers that consumed caterpillar secretions showed a significant decrease in levels of dopamine compared with controls. Experimental treatments in which reserpine, a known inhibitor of dopamine in Drosophila, was fed to workers similarly reduced their locomotory activity. We conclude that DNO secretions of lycaenid caterpillars can manipulate attendant ant behavior by altering dopaminergic regulation and increasing partner fidelity. Unless manipulated ants also receive a net nutritional benefit from DNO secretions, this suggests that similar reward-for-defense interactions that have been traditionally considered to be mutualisms may in fact be parasitic in nature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. THE BUFFER CAPACITY OF AIRWAY EPITHELIAL SECRETIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusik eKim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF. The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 µl volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO3- is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO3- secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO3- secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions.

  16. Characterization of the Single Stranded DNA Binding Protein SsbB Encoded in the Gonoccocal Genetic Island

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, Samta; Zweig, Maria; Peeters, Eveline; Siewering, Katja; Hackett, Kathleen T.; Dillard, Joseph P.; van der Does, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Background: Most strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae carry a Gonococcal Genetic Island which encodes a type IV secretion system involved in the secretion of ssDNA. We characterize the GGI-encoded ssDNA binding protein, SsbB. Close homologs of SsbB are located within a conserved genetic cluster found in

  17. Microbial carcinogenic toxins and dietary anti-cancer protectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Trevor W; Darlington, L Gail

    2017-07-01

    Several toxins are known which account for the ability of some bacteria to initiate or promote carcinogenesis. These ideas are summarised and evidence is discussed for more specific mechanisms involving chymotrypsin and the bacterial chymotryptic enzyme subtilisin. Subtilisin and Bacillus subtilis are present in the gut and environment and both are used commercially in agriculture, livestock rearing and meat processing. The enzymes deplete cells of tumour suppressors such as deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and neogenin, so their potential presence in the food chain might represent an important link between diet and cancer. Over-eating increases secretion of chymotrypsin which is absorbed from the gut and could contribute to several forms of cancer linked to obesity. Inhibition of these serine proteases by Bowman-Birk inhibitors in fruit and vegetables could account for some of the protective effects of a plant-rich diet. These interactions represent previously unknown non-genetic mechanisms for the modification of tumour suppressor proteins and provide a plausible explanation contributing to both the pro-oncogenic effects of meat products and the protective activity of a plant-rich diet. The data suggest that changes to farming husbandry and food processing methods to remove these sources of extrinsic proteases might significantly reduce the incidence of several cancers.

  18. Recombinant nucleocapsid-like particles from dengue-2 virus induce protective CD4+ and CD8+ cells against viral encephalitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Lázaro; López, Carlos; Lazo, Laura; Valdés, Iris; Marcos, Ernesto; Alonso, Ruby; Gambe, Ailyn; Martín, Jorge; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2009-10-01

    Virus-like particles are a highly effective type of subunit vaccine that mimics the overall structure of virus particles without containing infectious genetic material. In this work, a particulate form of the recombinant capsid protein from dengue-2 was evaluated in mice to determine the level of protection against viral challenge and to measure the antigen-induced cell-mediated immunity (CMI). The nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) adjuvanted with alum did not induce antiviral antibodies. However, splenocytes from the immunized animals secreted high levels of IFN-gamma upon virus stimulation, and a significant protection rate was achieved after challenge with lethal dengue-2 virus. Finally, both IFN-gamma secretion and protection against viral encephalitis were demonstrated to be dependent on CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. This study provides new evidences regarding the protective role of the CMI in the mouse model without the induction of neutralizing antibodies. Further studies in non-human primates or humanized mice should be carried out to elucidate the usefulness of the NLPs as a potential vaccine candidate against dengue disease.

  19. HCO3- secretion in rat duodenum after treatment with omeprazole and ranitidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, L; Flemström, G; Gustavsson, S; Jedstedt, G; Lönnerholm, G

    1987-01-01

    The bicarbonate secretion by the duodenal mucosa, which is stimulated by luminal acid, is very probably important in mucosal protection against the acid. It was of interest to investigate whether long-term deprivation of the mucosa of this acid stimulus affected the alkali secretion. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated for 4-6 weeks with either omeprazole, 14 mg/kg body weight twice daily, or ranitidine, 300 mg/kg twice daily, by means of gastric intubation. The rate of bicarbonate secretion by the duodenal mucosa was determined in situ by continuous titration. Neither the basal secretion nor the increase in secretion in response to stimulation by prostaglandin E2 or luminal acid (pH 2.0 for 5 or 60 min) differed in treated animals from that in controls that had received placebo (p greater than 0.05). Thus, 4-6 weeks of treatment with omeprazole or ranitidine did not reduce duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in the rat, nor did these drugs diminish the ability of this mucosa to respond to prolonged luminal acidification or luminally administered prostaglandin E2.

  20. Selective condensation drives partitioning and sequential secretion of cyst wall proteins in differentiating Giardia lamblia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Konrad

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Controlled secretion of a protective extracellular matrix is required for transmission of the infective stage of a large number of protozoan and metazoan parasites. Differentiating trophozoites of the highly minimized protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia secrete the proteinaceous portion of the cyst wall material (CWM consisting of three paralogous cyst wall proteins (CWP1-3 via organelles termed encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs. Phylogenetic and molecular data indicate that Diplomonads have lost a classical Golgi during reductive evolution. However, neogenesis of ESVs in encysting Giardia trophozoites transiently provides basic Golgi functions by accumulating presorted CWM exported from the ER for maturation. Based on this "minimal Golgi" hypothesis we predicted maturation of ESVs to a trans Golgi-like stage, which would manifest as a sorting event before regulated secretion of the CWM. Here we show that proteolytic processing of pro-CWP2 in maturing ESVs coincides with partitioning of CWM into two fractions, which are sorted and secreted sequentially with different kinetics. This novel sorting function leads to rapid assembly of a structurally defined outer cyst wall, followed by slow secretion of the remaining components. Using live cell microscopy we find direct evidence for condensed core formation in maturing ESVs. Core formation suggests that a mechanism controlled by phase transitions of the CWM from fluid to condensed and back likely drives CWM partitioning and makes sorting and sequential secretion possible. Blocking of CWP2 processing by a protease inhibitor leads to mis-sorting of a CWP2 reporter. Nevertheless, partitioning and sequential secretion of two portions of the CWM are unaffected in these cells. Although these cysts have a normal appearance they are not water resistant and therefore not infective. Our findings suggest that sequential assembly is a basic architectural principle of protective wall formation and requires

  1. Digestive Secretion of Dionaea muscipula (Venus's Flytrap).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, J; Iott, K; Schwab, D W; Semersky, F E

    1969-03-01

    The digestive fluid of Dionaea muscipula has been studied with respect to its protein content as a function of time after entrapment of protein material and some enzymes of the secretion. Maximum secretion of enzyme occurs within the first 3 days of the digestive cycle and protein reaches its maximum at 4 days. Phosphatase, proteinase, nuclease and amylase have been observed in the secretion. The enzymes have acid pH optima and the proteinase has a molecular weight of about 40,000.

  2. Digestive Secretion of Dionaea muscipula (Venus's Flytrap)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, J.; Iott, K.; Schwab, D. W.; Semersky, F. E.

    1969-01-01

    The digestive fluid of Dionaea muscipula has been studied with respect to its protein content as a function of time after entrapment of protein material and some enzymes of the secretion. Maximum secretion of enzyme occurs within the first 3 days of the digestive cycle and protein reaches its maximum at 4 days. Phosphatase, proteinase, nuclease and amylase have been observed in the secretion. The enzymes have acid pH optima and the proteinase has a molecular weight of about 40,000. PMID:16657071

  3. Secreted HSP Vaccine for Malaria Prophylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0098 TITLE: Secreted HSP Vaccine for Malaria Prophylaxis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Natasa Strbo CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Secreted HSP Vaccine for Malaria Prophylaxis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NATASA STRBO, M.D., D.SC NAME(S) AND E-M tzA UNIVERS]TY OF MTAMI 1600 NW 1OTH AVENUE ROOM...Here we developed malaria vaccine that relies on secreted gp96-lg chaperon-ing Plasmodium falciparum antigenic sporozoite proteins CSP and AMA1. The

  4. Hash function based secret sharing scheme designs

    CERN Document Server

    Chum, Chi Sing

    2011-01-01

    Secret sharing schemes create an effective method to safeguard a secret by dividing it among several participants. By using hash functions and the herding hashes technique, we first set up a (t+1, n) threshold scheme which is perfect and ideal, and then extend it to schemes for any general access structure. The schemes can be further set up as proactive or verifiable if necessary. The setup and recovery of the secret is efficient due to the fast calculation of the hash function. The proposed scheme is flexible because of the use of existing hash functions.

  5. The genetics of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiling, Hendrik Willem

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a chronic disease, characterized by hyperglycaemia, caused by decreased insulin secretion by beta-cells and insulin resistance of target tissues of insulin. Several risk factors are known, like decreased exercise, ageing and western diet. Also genetic variance can alter susc

  6. Genetics of opiate addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Brian; Butelman, Eduardo R; Yuferov, Vadim; Randesi, Matthew; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2014-11-01

    Addiction to MOP-r agonists such as heroin (and also addiction to prescription opioids) has reemerged as an epidemic in the twenty first century, causing massive morbidity. Understanding the genetics contributing to susceptibility to this disease is crucial for the identification of novel therapeutic targets, and also for discovery of genetic markers which would indicate relative protection or vulnerability from addiction, and relative responsiveness to pharmacotherapy. This information could thus eventually inform clinical practice. In this review, we focus primarily on association studies of heroin and opiate addiction, and further describe the studies which have been replicated in this field, and are thus more likely to be useful for translational efforts.

  7. Genetics and caries: prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Rezende Vieira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Caries remains the most prevalent non-contagious infectious disease in humans. It is clear that the current approaches to decrease the prevalence of caries in human populations, including water fluoridation and school-based programs, are not enough to protect everyone. The scientific community has suggested the need for innovative work in a number of areas in cariology, encompassing disease etiology, epidemiology, definition, prevention, and treatment. We have pioneered the work on genetic studies to identify genes and genetic markers of diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic value. This paper summarizes a presentation that elaborated on these initial findings.

  8. Commercial secret as an instrument of company competitive strategy effectiveness increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peskova Dinara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern companies are very much diversified in scale, sectoral affiliation, marketing behavior. There are many theoretical and applied studies in effective competitiveness strategies (see Porter, M. (2002, 1998, Kramer, M. (1998, Fatkhutdinov, R. A. (2000, Feigelson, V. M. (1996 and others.They present famous approaches and probably there is no need to repeat them in this article. We would like to feature a different concept (suggested by Yudanov A. and followers with terminology adopted from natural sciences and show the way the commercial secret can increase effectiveness of competitiveness strategy. We also perform valid methods of commercial secret protection.

  9. 7 CFR 371.3 - Plant protection and quarantine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Regulating the field release into the environment, interstate movement, and importation of genetically modified organisms. (7) Serving as a member of the North American Plant Protection Organization...

  10. Information Flow in Secret Sharing Protocols

    CERN Document Server

    Kashefi, Elham; Mhalla, Mehdi; Perdrix, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The entangled graph states have emerged as an elegant and powerful quantum resource, indeed almost all multiparty protocols can be written in terms of graph states including measurement based quantum computation (MBQC), error correction and secret sharing amongst others. In addition they are at the forefront in terms of implementations. As such they represent an excellent opportunity to move towards integrated protocols involving many of these elements. In this paper we look at expressing and extending graph state secret sharing and MBQC in a common framework and graphical language related to flow. We do so with two main contributions. First we express in entirely graphical terms which set of players can access which information in graph state secret sharing protocols. These succinct graphical descriptions of access allow us to take known results from graph theory to make statements on the generalisation of the previous schemes to present new secret sharing protocols. Second, we give a set of necessary condit...

  11. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantellini E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the aim of this work is to highlight the importance of a correct management of the secretions in the patient submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV. Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and secretion in patients with mechanically ventilation. We focus on the use of in-ex suflator achine (cough machine associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO.Results: we observe a reduction of pulmonary infection and a better management of bronchial secretion in patient undergone to the use of in-ex suflator machine (cough machine associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO.Conclusions: the correct approach to patients submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV expect the use of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO (VEST and in-ex suflator machine (cough machine to decrease pulmonary infection thank to a reduction of permanence of bronchial secretions in the lungs .

  12. Proton pump inhibitors inhibit pancreatic secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Barbuskaite, Dagne; Tozzi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    +/K+-ATPases are expressed and functional in human pancreatic ducts and whether proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have effect on those. Here we show that the gastric HKα1 and HKβ subunits (ATP4A; ATP4B) and non-gastric HKα2 subunits (ATP12A) of H+/K+-ATPases are expressed in human pancreatic cells. Pumps have similar...... of major ions in secretion follow similar excretory curves in control and PPI treated animals. In addition to HCO3-, pancreas also secretes K+. In conclusion, this study calls for a revision of the basic model for HCO3- secretion. We propose that proton transport is driving secretion, and that in addition...

  13. Acetylcholine regulates ghrelin secretion in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Broglio (Fabio); E. Ghigo (Ezio); C. Gottero; F. Prodam (Flavia); S. Destefanis; A. Benso; C. Gauna (Carlotta); L.J. Hofland (Leo); E. Arvat; A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGhrelin secretion has been reportedly increased by fasting and energy restriction but decreased by food intake, glucose, insulin, and somatostatin. However, its regulation is still far from clarified. The cholinergic system mediates some ghrelin actions, e.g.

  14. Cell Secretion: Current Structural and Biochemical Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Trikha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential physiological functions in eukaryotic cells, such as release of hormones and digestive enzymes, neurotransmission, and intercellular signaling, are all achieved by cell secretion. In regulated (calcium-dependent secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and transiently fuse with specialized, permanent, plasma membrane structures, called porosomes or fusion pores. Porosomes are supramolecular, cup-shaped lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane that mediate and control the release of vesicle cargo to the outside of the cell. The sizes of porosomes range from 150nm in diameter in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas to 12nm in neurons. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of the porosome and the cellular activities required for cell secretion, such as membrane fusion and swelling of secretory vesicles. The discovery of the porosome complex and the molecular mechanism of cell secretion are summarized in this article.

  15. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  16. A Salmonella Typhi homologue of bacteriophage muramidases controls typhoid toxin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Hélène; Galán, Jorge E

    2013-01-01

    Unlike other Salmonella, which can infect a broad range of hosts causing self-limiting infection, Salmonella Typhi is an exclusively human pathogen that causes typhoid fever, a life-threatening systemic disease. Typhoid toxin is a unique virulence factor of Salmonella Typhi, which is expressed when the bacteria are within mammalian cells. Here, we report that an N-acetyl-β-D-muramidase similar to phage endolysins encoded within the same pathogenicity islet as the toxin is required for typhoid toxin secretion. Genetic and functional analysis of TtsA revealed unique amino acids at its predicted peptidoglycan-binding domain that are essential for protein secretion and that distinguishes this protein from other homologues. We propose that TtsA defines a new protein secretion mechanism recently evolved from the machine that mediates phage release.

  17. Association of type 2 diabetes candidate polymorphisms in KCNQ1 with incretin and insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müssig, Karsten; Staiger, Harald; Machicao, Fausto;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: KCNQ1 gene polymorphisms are associated with type 2 diabetes. This linkage appears to be mediated by altered beta-cell function. In an attempt to study underlying mechanisms, we examined the effect of four KCNQ1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on insulin secretion upon different...... stimuli. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We genotyped 1,578 nondiabetic subjects at increased risk of type 2 diabetes for rs151290, rs2237892, rs2237895, and rs2237897. All participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT); glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and gastric inhibitory peptide secretion...... and basal or stimulated incretin levels (all P > or = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Common genetic variation in KCNQ1 is associated with insulin secretion upon oral glucose load in a German population at increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The discrepancy between orally and intravenously administered glucose seems...

  18. Genetic modification and genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-06-26

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  19. Linear multi-secret sharing schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Liangliang; LIU Mulan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the linear multi-secret sharing schemes are studied by using monotone span programs. A relation between computing monotone Boolean functions by using monotone span programs and realizing multi-access structures by using linear multisecret sharing schemes is shown. Furthermore, the concept of optimal linear multi-secret sharing scheme is presented and the several schemes are proved to be optimal.

  20. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient

    OpenAIRE

    Mantellini E.; Perrero L.; Provenzano G.; Petrozzino S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: the aim of this work is to highlight the importance of a correct management of the secretions in the patient submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV). Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and secretion in patients with mechanically ventilation. We focus on the use of in-ex suflator achine (cough machine) associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO).Results: we observe a reduction of pulmonary infection and a better managemen...

  1. Secretion of invertase in mitotic yeast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Makarow, M

    1988-01-01

    In mammalian cells intracellular transport is inhibited during mitosis. Here we show that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae secretion continues uninterrupted during mitosis. S. cerevisiae cells were arrested in mitosis by treating wild-type cells with the microtubule-inhibitor nocodazole, or by incubating a temperature-sensitive cell division cycle mutant (cdc16) at the restrictive temperature. Secretion of invertase into the periplasmic space was equally efficient in mitotic and in unsyn...

  2. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  3. Percolation of secret in a network

    CERN Document Server

    Leverrier, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we explore the analogy between entanglement and secret classical correlations in the context of large networks, more precisely the question of percolation of secret correlations in a network. It is known that entanglement percolation in quantum networks can display a highly nontrivial behavior depending on the topology of the network and on the presence of entanglement between the nodes. Here we show that this behavior, thought to be of a genuine quantum nature, also occurs in a classical context.

  4. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  5. The protective role of transferrin in Müller glial cells after iron-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Emilie; Fontaine, Isabelle; Jonet, Laurent; Guillou, Florian; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Courtois, Yves; Jeanny, Jean-Claude

    2008-05-20

    Transferrin (Tf) expression is enhanced by aging and inflammation in humans. We investigated the role of transferrin in glial protection. We generated transgenic mice (Tg) carrying the complete human transferrin gene on a C57Bl/6J genetic background. We studied human (hTf) and mouse (mTf) transferrin localization in Tg and wild-type (WT) C57Bl/6J mice using immunochemistry with specific antibodies. Müller glial (MG) cells were cultured from explants and characterized using cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) and vimentin antibodies. They were further subcultured for study. We incubated cells with FeCl(3)-nitrilotriacetate to test for the iron-induced stress response; viability was determined by direct counting and measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Tf expression was determined by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR with human- or mouse-specific probes. hTf and mTf in the medium were assayed by ELISA or radioimmunoassay (RIA), respectively. mTf was mainly localized in retinal pigment epithelium and ganglion cell layers in retina sections of both mouse lines. hTf was abundant in MG cells. The distribution of mTf and hTf mRNA was consistent with these findings. mTf and hTf were secreted into the medium of MG cell primary cultures. Cells from Tg mice secreted hTf at a particularly high level. However, both WT and Tg cell cultures lose their ability to secrete Tf after a few passages. Tg MG cells secreting hTf were more resistant to iron-induced stress toxicity than those no longer secreted hTf. Similarly, exogenous human apo-Tf, but not human holo-Tf, conferred resistance to iron-induced stress on MG cells from WT mice. hTf localization in MG cells from Tg mice was reminiscent of that reported for aged human retina and age-related macular degeneration, both conditions associated with iron deposition. The role of hTf in protection against toxicity in Tg MG cells probably involves an adaptive mechanism developed in neural retina to

  6. Genetics of gigantism and acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A

    Gigantism and acromegaly are rare disorders that are caused by excessive GH secretion and/or high levels of its mediator, IGF-1. Gigantism occurs when excess GH or IGF-1 lead to increased linear growth, before the end of puberty and epiphyseal closure. The majority of cases arise from a benign GH-secreting pituitary adenoma, with an incidence of pituitary gigantism and acromegaly of approximately 8 and 11 per million person-years, respectively. Over the past two decades, our increasing understanding of the molecular and genetic etiologies of pituitary gigantism and acromegaly yielded several genetic causes, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and 4, McCune-Albright syndrome, Carney complex, familial isolated pituitary adenoma, pituitary adenoma association due to defects in familial succinate dehydrogenase genes, and the recently identified X-linked acrogigantism. The early diagnosis of these conditions helps guide early intervention, screening, and genetic counseling of patients and their family members. In this review, we provide a concise and up-to-date discussion on the genetics of gigantism and acromegaly. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Spinal astrocytes produce and secrete dynorphin neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlert, Andrew; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Fitzsimmons, Bethany; Yaksh, Tony; Hook, Vivian

    2013-04-01

    Dynorphin peptide neurotransmitters (neuropeptides) have been implicated in spinal pain processing based on the observations that intrathecal delivery of dynorphin results in proalgesic effects and disruption of extracellular dynorphin activity (by antisera) prevents injury evoked hyperalgesia. However, the cellular source of secreted spinal dynorphin has been unknown. For this reason, this study investigated the expression and secretion of dynorphin-related neuropeptides from spinal astrocytes (rat) in primary culture. Dynorphin A (1-17), dynorphin B, and α-neoendorphin were found to be present in the astrocytes, illustrated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, in a discrete punctate pattern of cellular localization. Measurement of astrocyte cellular levels of these dynorphins by radioimmunoassays confirmed the expression of these three dynorphin-related neuropeptides. Notably, BzATP (3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate) and KLA (di[3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonyl]-lipid A) activation of purinergic and toll-like receptors, respectively, resulted in stimulated secretion of dynorphins A and B. However, α-neoendorphin secretion was not affected by BzATP or KLA. These findings suggest that dynorphins A and B undergo regulated secretion from spinal astrocytes. These findings also suggest that spinal astrocytes may provide secreted dynorphins that participate in spinal pain processing.

  8. An unexpected knock on Corrigan's secret door.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woywodt, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    Corrigan's secret door describes a metaphorical escape route for busy physicians. The term was derived from the successful and exceptionally busy professional life of Irish physician Dominic John Corrigan (1802-80). It is claimed that Corrigan's outpatient clinic was so busy that he required a secret door in his consulting rooms to escape from the ever-growing queue of eager patients. The origins of this charming story are unknown, and the door may have never existed. However, at present, Corrigan's secret door is often quoted when busy physicians have their own little ways in surviving a stressful professional life. Generations of British-trained doctors have grown up with Corrigan's secret door, as it was featured in the introduction of the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine. Accordingly, trainees as well as more senior doctors are often reminded that having a 'secret door' is vital in surviving in the medical profession. My own escape is through classical music and the violoncello, in particular. As the name implies, my own secret door is normally invisible to colleagues and patients. This little article is about a patient who found me out, and a reflection on the role of classical music and the cello in my professional life.

  9. Imaging Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  10. Genetic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, D

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the basic principles of genetics, including the classification of genetic disorders and a consideration of the rules and mechanisms of inheritance. The most common pitfalls in clinical genetic diagnosis are described, with emphasis on the problem of the negative or misleading family history.

  11. Imaging Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  12. Consumer protection

    OpenAIRE

    Štěrbová, Alena

    2010-01-01

    77 Resumé This thesis is dedicated to the consumer protection. My reason for the choice of this topic was following. A field of consumer protection is being continually developed. It is complicated for a layman to be well informed about all his rights and duties not only because the Czech legal regulation suffers from a immense fragmentation. Moreover, the implementation of EC directives ( as a source of many provisions protecting a consumer in the Civil Code) into our legal system was carrie...

  13. Mesothelial cells promote early ovarian cancer metastasis through fibronectin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Hilary A; Chiang, Chun-Yi; White, Erin A; Schryver, Elizabeth M; Habis, Mohammed; Romero, Iris L; Ladanyi, Andras; Penicka, Carla V; George, Joshy; Matlin, Karl; Montag, Anthony; Wroblewski, Kristen; Yamada, S Diane; Mazar, Andrew P; Bowtell, David; Lengyel, Ernst

    2014-10-01

    Ovarian cancer (OvCa) metastasizes to organs in the abdominal cavity, such as the omentum, which are covered by a single layer of mesothelial cells. Mesothelial cells are generally thought to be "bystanders" to the metastatic process and simply displaced by OvCa cells to access the submesothelial extracellular matrix. Here, using organotypic 3D cultures, we found that primary human mesothelial cells secrete fibronectin in the presence of OvCa cells. Moreover, we evaluated the tumor stroma of 108 human omental metastases and determined that fibronectin was consistently overexpressed in these patients. Blocking fibronectin production in primary mesothelial cells in vitro or in murine models, either genetically (fibronectin 1 floxed mouse model) or via siRNA, decreased adhesion, invasion, proliferation, and metastasis of OvCa cells. Using a coculture model, we determined that OvCa cells secrete TGF-β1, which in turn activates a TGF-β receptor/RAC1/SMAD-dependent signaling pathway in the mesothelial cells that promotes a mesenchymal phenotype and transcriptional upregulation of fibronectin. Additionally, blocking α5 or β1 integrin function with antibodies reduced metastasis in an orthotopic preclinical model of OvCa metastasis. These findings indicate that cancer-associated mesothelial cells promote colonization during the initial steps of OvCa metastasis and suggest that mesothelial cells actively contribute to metastasis.

  14. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    OpenAIRE

    Vorhaus Daniel B; Resnik David B

    2006-01-01

    Abstract In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound....

  15. Protective Eyewear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of ... They protect your eyes from the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays, which can damage your eyes. Pick sunglasses ...

  16. Protected Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset shows the boundaries of properties in Kansas in public or institutional ownership that contain ecological resources that merit some level of protection....

  17. Memory protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Accidental overwriting of files or of memory regions belonging to other programs, browsing of personal files by superusers, Trojan horses, and viruses are examples of breakdowns in workstations and personal computers that would be significantly reduced by memory protection. Memory protection is the capability of an operating system and supporting hardware to delimit segments of memory, to control whether segments can be read from or written into, and to confine accesses of a program to its segments alone. The absence of memory protection in many operating systems today is the result of a bias toward a narrow definition of performance as maximum instruction-execution rate. A broader definition, including the time to get the job done, makes clear that cost of recovery from memory interference errors reduces expected performance. The mechanisms of memory protection are well understood, powerful, efficient, and elegant. They add to performance in the broad sense without reducing instruction execution rate.

  18. Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M

    2001-04-01

    Major achievements of SCK-CEN's Radiation Protection Department in 2000 are described. The main areas for R and D of the department remain neutron dosimetry and neutron activation analysis, safeguards information handling and non-destructive assay techniques. Further activities include low-level radioactivity measurements in environmental and biological samples and radiation protection research. Finally, achievements in decision strategy research and social sciences in nuclear research are reported.

  19. Corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  20. Cytokine secretion and NK cell activity in human ADAM17 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukerman, Pinchas; Eisenstein, Eli M; Chavkin, Maor; Schmiedel, Dominik; Wong, Eitan; Werner, Marion; Yaacov, Barak; Averbuch, Diana; Molho-Pessach, Vered; Stepensky, Polina; Kaynan, Noa; Bar-On, Yotam; Seidel, Einat; Yamin, Rachel; Sagi, Irit; Elpeleg, Orly; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2015-12-29

    Genetic deficiencies provide insights into gene function in humans. Here we describe a patient with a very rare genetic deficiency of ADAM17. We show that the patient's PBMCs had impaired cytokine secretion in response to LPS stimulation, correlating with the clinical picture of severe bacteremia from which the patient suffered. ADAM17 was shown to cleave CD16, a major NK killer receptor. Functional analysis of patient's NK cells demonstrated that his NK cells express normal levels of activating receptors and maintain high surface levels of CD16 following mAb stimulation. Activation of individual NK cell receptors showed that the patient's NK cells are more potent when activated directly by CD16, albeit no difference was observed in Antibody Depedent Cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays. Our data suggest that ADAM17 inhibitors currently considered for clinical use to boost CD16 activity should be cautiously applied, as they might have severe side effects resulting from impaired cytokine secretion.

  1. Analysis and Improvement of a Secret Broadcast with Binding Encryption in Broadcasting Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingwu; Li, Fagen; Takagi, Tsuyoshi

    A secret broadcasting scheme deals with secure transmission of a message so that more than one privileged receiver can decrypt it. Jeong et al. proposed an efficient secret broadcast scheme using binding encryption to obtain the security properties of IND-CPA semantic security and decryption consistency. Thereafter, Wu et al. showed that the Jeong et al.'s scheme just achieves consistency in relatively weak condition and is also inefficient, and they constructed a more efficient scheme to improve the security. In this letter, we demonstrate that the Wu et al.'s scheme is also a weak decryption consistency and cannot achieve the decryption consistency if an adversary has the ability to tamper with the ciphertext. We also present an improved and more efficient secret broadcast scheme to remedy the weakness. The proposed scheme achieves decryption consistency and IND-CCA security, which can protect against stronger adversary's attacks and allows us to broadcast a digital message securely.

  2. On the trade secret rights abuses in China anti-monopoly regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹艳蓉

    2012-01-01

      The competition is the core of the market economy, the existence of fair and effective competition in the market economy of China continue to improve the protection of the building. As the trade secrets will give rights holders the right to bring in the dominant position of market competition, while the competitor's profit-driven nature of the decision that he will inevitably exist the possibility of abuse of their rights, they will inevitably affect the orderly development of the market economy. The trade secrets with the anti-monopoly regulatory power abuse by many countries and regions of the attention as the market competition escort who fully embodies the important position.In this paper, to explore the relationship between trade secrets and antitrust laws, based on the improvement of relevant systems in China conducted a preliminary thinking.

  3. Resveratrol increases F508del-CFTR dependent salivary secretion in cystic fibrosis mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhooghe, Barbara; Bouckaert, Charlotte; Capron, Arnaud; Wallemacq, Pierre; Leal, Teresinha; Noel, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a fatal genetic disease associated with widespread exocrine gland dysfunction. Studies have suggested activating effects of resveratrol, a naturally-occurring polyphenol compound with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, on CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein function. We assayed, in F508del-CFTR homozygous (CF) and in wild-type mice, the effect of resveratrol on salivary secretion in basal conditions, in response to inhibition by atropine (basal β-adrenergic-dependent component) and to stimulation by isoprenaline (CFTR-dependent component). Both components of the salivary secretion were smaller in CF mice than in controls. Two hours after intraperitoneal administration of resveratrol (50 mg/kg) dissolved in DMSO, the compound was detected in salivary glands. As in both CF and in wild-type mice, DMSO alone increased the response to isoprenaline in males but not in females, the effect of resveratrol was only measured in females. In wild-type mice, isoprenaline increased secretion by more than half. In CF mice, resveratrol rescued the response to isoprenaline, eliciting a 2.5-fold increase of β-adrenergic-stimulated secretion. We conclude that the salivary secretion assay is suitable to test DMSO-soluble CFTR modulators in female mice. We show that resveratrol applied in vivo to mice reaches salivary glands and increases β-adrenergic secretion. Immunolabelling of CFTR in human bronchial epithelial cells suggests that the effect is associated with increased CFTR protein expression. Our data support the view that resveratrol is beneficial for treating CF. The salivary secretion assay has a potential application to test efficacy of novel CF therapies. PMID:26092868

  4. Resveratrol increases F508del-CFTR dependent salivary secretion in cystic fibrosis mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dhooghe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a fatal genetic disease associated with widespread exocrine gland dysfunction. Studies have suggested activating effects of resveratrol, a naturally-occurring polyphenol compound with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, on CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR protein function. We assayed, in F508del-CFTR homozygous (CF and in wild-type mice, the effect of resveratrol on salivary secretion in basal conditions, in response to inhibition by atropine (basal β-adrenergic-dependent component and to stimulation by isoprenaline (CFTR-dependent component. Both components of the salivary secretion were smaller in CF mice than in controls. Two hours after intraperitoneal administration of resveratrol (50 mg/kg dissolved in DMSO, the compound was detected in salivary glands. As in both CF and in wild-type mice, DMSO alone increased the response to isoprenaline in males but not in females, the effect of resveratrol was only measured in females. In wild-type mice, isoprenaline increased secretion by more than half. In CF mice, resveratrol rescued the response to isoprenaline, eliciting a 2.5-fold increase of β-adrenergic-stimulated secretion. We conclude that the salivary secretion assay is suitable to test DMSO-soluble CFTR modulators in female mice. We show that resveratrol applied in vivo to mice reaches salivary glands and increases β-adrenergic secretion. Immunolabelling of CFTR in human bronchial epithelial cells suggests that the effect is associated with increased CFTR protein expression. Our data support the view that resveratrol is beneficial for treating CF. The salivary secretion assay has a potential application to test efficacy of novel CF therapies.

  5. Sirt1 regulates insulin secretion by repressing UCP2 in pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bordone

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Sir2 and insulin/IGF-1 are the major pathways that impinge upon aging in lower organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans a possible genetic link between Sir2 and the insulin/IGF-1 pathway has been reported. Here we investigate such a link in mammals. We show that Sirt1 positively regulates insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. Sirt1 represses the uncoupling protein (UCP gene UCP2 by binding directly to the UCP2 promoter. In beta cell lines in which Sirt1 is reduced by SiRNA, UCP2 levels are elevated and insulin secretion is blunted. The up-regulation of UCP2 is associated with a failure of cells to increase ATP levels after glucose stimulation. Knockdown of UCP2 restores the ability to secrete insulin in cells with reduced Sirt1, showing that UCP2 causes the defect in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Food deprivation induces UCP2 in mouse pancreas, which may occur via a reduction in NAD (a derivative of niacin levels in the pancreas and down-regulation of Sirt1. Sirt1 knockout mice display constitutively high UCP2 expression. Our findings show that Sirt1 regulates UCP2 in beta cells to affect insulin secretion.

  6. Protein secretion biotechnology in Gram-positive bacteria with special emphasis on Streptomyces lividans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anné, Jozef; Vrancken, Kristof; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Van Impe, Jan; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2014-08-01

    Proteins secreted by Gram-positive bacteria are released into the culture medium with the obvious benefit that they usually retain their native conformation. This property makes these host cells potentially interesting for the production of recombinant proteins, as one can take full profit of established protocols for the purification of active proteins. Several state-of-the-art strategies to increase the yield of the secreted proteins will be discussed, using Streptomyces lividans as an example and compared with approaches used in some other host cells. It will be shown that approaches such as increasing expression and translation levels, choice of secretion pathway and modulation of proteins thereof, avoiding stress responses by changing expression levels of specific (stress) proteins, can be helpful to boost production yield. In addition, the potential of multi-omics approaches as a tool to understand the genetic background and metabolic fluxes in the host cell and to seek for new targets for strain and protein secretion improvement is discussed. It will be shown that S. lividans, along with other Gram-positive host cells, certainly plays a role as a production host for recombinant proteins in an economically viable way. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey.

  7. A protein secretion system linked to bacteroidete gliding motility and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Keiko; Naito, Mariko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Hirakawa, Hideki; Shoji, Mikio; McBride, Mark J; Rhodes, Ryan G; Nakayama, Koji

    2010-01-05

    Porphyromonas gingivalis secretes strong proteases called gingipains that are implicated in periodontal pathogenesis. Protein secretion systems common to other Gram-negative bacteria are lacking in P. gingivalis, but several proteins, including PorT, have been linked to gingipain secretion. Comparative genome analysis and genetic experiments revealed 11 additional proteins involved in gingipain secretion. Six of these (PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN, PorW, and Sov) were similar in sequence to Flavobacterium johnsoniae gliding motility proteins, and two others (PorX and PorY) were putative two-component system regulatory proteins. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that porK, porL, porM, porN, porP, porT, and sov were down-regulated in P. gingivalis porX and porY mutants. Disruption of the F. johnsoniae porT ortholog resulted in defects in motility, chitinase secretion, and translocation of a gliding motility protein, SprB adhesin, to the cell surface, providing a link between a unique protein translocation system and a motility apparatus in members of the Bacteroidetes phylum.

  8. A study of over production and enhanced secretion of enzymes. Quarterly report 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashek, W.V.

    1992-12-28

    The current project is concerned with the over-production and enhanced secretion of PPO, cellulase and lignin peroxidase. The project is divided into two segments: over-production of lignocellulolytic enzymes by genetic engineering methodologies and hyper-production and enhanced secretion of these enzymes by biochemical/electron microscopical techniques. The former approach employs recombinant DNA procedures, ligation of appropriate nuclease generated DNA fragments into a vector and the subsequent transformation of Escherichia coli to yield E. coli harboring a C. versicolor DNA insert. The biochemistry/electron microscopical method involves substrate induction and the time-dependent addition of respiration and PPO inhibitors to elevate C.versicolor`s ability to synthesize and secrete lignocellulosic enzymes. In this connection, cell fractionation/kinetic analysis, TEM immunoelectron microscopic localization and TEM substrate localization of PPO are being employed to assess the route of secretion. Both approaches will culminate in the batch culture of either E. coli or C. versicolor, in a fermentor with the subsequent development of rapid isolation and purification procedures to yield elevated quantities of pure lignocellulosic enzymes. During the past year, research effort were directed toward determining the route of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) secretion by the wood-decay fungus, Coriolus versicolor. In addition, research activities were continued to over-produce and to purify PPO as well as define the time-dependent intra- and extra-cellular appearances of C. versicolor ligninases and cellulases.

  9. Genetic Testing in the Workplace: A Caste System for Workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Sheldon W.

    1999-01-01

    "Authorized" genetic testing may be obtained from employees with coercion or threat. Unless protections are put in place, employers and health insurers will use genetic screening to hire and fire. (JOW)

  10. Protected Areas - Protected Federal Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Federal Lands data consists of land areas that are run and maintained by U.S. Governmental authorities and are considered protected.The Department of Natural...

  11. Effects of endothelin family on ANP secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kuichang; Park, Byung Mun; Choi, Young Tae; Kim, Jong Hun; Cho, Kyung Woo; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2016-08-01

    The endothelins (ET) peptide family consists of ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, and sarafotoxin (s6C, a snake venom) and their actions appears to be different among isoforms. The aim of this study was to compare the secretagogue effect of ET-1 on atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion with ET-3 and evaluate its physiological meaning. Isolated nonbeating atria from male Sprague-Dawley rats were used to evaluate stretch-activated ANP secretion in response to ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, and s6C. Changes in mean blood pressure (MAP) were measured during acute injection of ET-1 and ET-3 with and without natriuretic peptide receptor-A antagonist (A71915) in anesthetized rats. Changes in atrial volume induced by increased atrial pressure from o to 1, 2, 4, or 6cm H2O caused proportional increases in mechanically-stimulated extracellular fluid (ECF) translocation and stretch-activated ANP secretion. ET-1 (10nM) augmented basal and stretch-activated ANP secretion in terms of ECF translocation, which was blocked by the pretreatment with ETA receptor antagonist (BQ123, 1μM) but not by ETB receptor antagonist (BQ788, 1μM). ETA receptor antagonist itself suppressed stretch-activated ANP secretion. As compared to ET-1- induced ANP secretion (3.2-fold by 10nM), the secretagogue effects of ANP secretion by ET-2 was similar (2.8-fold by 10nM) and ET-3 and s6C were less potent (1.7-fold and 1.5-fold by 100nM, respectively). Acute injection of ET-1 or ET-3 increased mean blood pressure (MAP), which was augmented in the presence of natriuretic peptide receptor-A antagonist. Therefore, we suggest that the order of secretagogue effect of ET family on ANP secretion was ET-1≥ET-2>ET-3>s6C and ET-1-induced ANP secretion negatively regulates the pressor effect of ET-1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Huntingtin-interacting protein 14 is a type 1 diabetes candidate protein regulating insulin secretion and β-cell apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berchtold, Lukas Adrian; Størling, Zenia Marian; Ortis, Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a complex disease characterized by the loss of insulin-secreting β-cells. Although the disease has a strong genetic component, and several loci are known to increase T1D susceptibility risk, only few causal genes have currently been identified. To identify disease-causing...

  13. Human adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas show frequent loss of heterozygosity at the glucocorticoid receptor gene locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A.T.M. Huizenga (Nannette); P. de Lange (Pieter); J.W. Koper (Jan); R.N. Clayton (Richard); W.E. Farrell (William); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); F.H. de Jong (Frank); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractCorticotropinomas are characterized by a relative resistance to the negative feedback action of cortisol on ACTH secretion. In this respect there is a similarity with the clinical syndrome of cortisol resistance. As cortisol resistance can be caused by genetic abnormali

  14. Role of adipose secreted factors and kisspeptin in the metabolic control of gonadotropin secretion and puberty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factors secreted by adipose tissue continue to be discovered. Evidence indicates a strong link between neural influences and adipocyte expression and secretion of a wide array of cytokines, neurotrophic factors, growth factors, binding proteins, and neuropeptides. These “adipokines” are linked to im...

  15. Secrets and the Sociological Imagination: Using PostSecret.com to Illustrate Sociological Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Shiri

    2014-01-01

    Introductory sociology classes afford instructors an opportunity to expose students, often from a variety of backgrounds and majors, to the sociological imagination. In this article, I describe how the use of secrets from a popular website, PostSecret.com, can help teach students about the sociological imagination and incorporate biographical…

  16. Meaningful Share Generation for Increased Number of Secrets in Visual Secret-Sharing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Ulutas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new scheme for hiding two halftone secret images into two meaningful shares created from halftone cover images. Meaningful shares are more desirable than noise-like (meaningless shares in Visual Secret Sharing because they look natural and do not attract eavesdroppers' attention. Previous works in the field focus on either increasing number of secrets or creating meaningful shares for one secret image. The method outlined in this paper both increases the number of secrets and creates meaningful shares at the same time. While the contrast ratio of shares is equal to that of Extended Visual Cryptography, two secrets are encoded into two shares as opposed to one secret in the Extended Visual Cryptography. Any two natural-looking images can be used as cover unlike the Halftone Visual Cryptography method where one cover should be the negative of the other cover image and can only encode one secret. Effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by an experiment.

  17. Shared Secrets versus Secrets Kept Private Are Linked to Better Adolescent Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijns, Tom; Finkenauer, Catrin; Keijsers, Loes

    2013-01-01

    It is a household notion that secrecy is bad while sharing is good. But what about shared secrets? The present research adopts a functional analysis of sharing secrets, arguing that it should negate harmful consequences generally associated with secrecy and serves important interpersonal functions in adolescence. A survey study among 790 Dutch…

  18. [Genetic causes of type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, D

    1998-03-10

    The characterisation of the intracellular signal transmission regulating the secretion of insulin from the beta cells of the pancreatic islets has enabled the initiation of massive effort to find the genetic causes of beta cell dysfunction in Type II diabetes. The search for genetic determinants began when several genes involved in the mechanisms of insulin secretion were cloned in the human genoma, and when informative polymorphism was described within or in the vicinity of these genes. The rational approach to identify the putative genes causing diabetes would be to examine genes which encode for proteins likely to be important in the beta cell control of insulin secretion. A large number of mutations which cause Type II diabetes have been found recently. Type II diabetes is therefore probably a heterogenous disease, with a polygenic inheritance of a combination of major and minor genes affecting obesity, insulin secretion, and insulin action. Thus, a genotypic classification of Type II diabetes will eventually be possible, and it might also be possible to explain the sometimes puzzling observations made in diabetes research by the heterogeneity of Type II diabetes and the interaction between environmental and genetic factors.

  19. Effect of herpesvirus infection on pancreatic duct cell secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Péter Hegyi; András Varró; Mária K Kovács; Mike A Gray; Barry E Argent; Zsolt Boldogk(o)i; Balázs (O)rd(o)g; Zoltán Rakonczai Jr; Tamás Takács; János Lonovics; Annamária Szabolcs; Réka Sári; András Tóth; Julius G Papp

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of acute infection caused by herpesvirus (pseudorabies virus, PRV) on pancreatic ductal secretion.METHODS: The virulent Ba-DupGreen (BDG) and nonvirulent Ka-RREpOlacgfp (KEG) genetically modified strains of PRV were used in this study and both of them contain the gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP). Small intra/interlobular ducts were infected with BDG virus (107 PFU/mL for 6 h) or with KEG virus (1010 PFU/mL for 6 h), while non-infected ducts were incubated only with the culture media. The ducts were then cultured for a further 18 h.The rate of HCO3- secretion [base efflux -J(B-)] was determined from the buffering capacity of the cells and the initial rate of intracellular acidification (1) after sudden blockage of basolateral base loaders with dihydro-4,4,-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2,-disulfonic acid (500 μmol/L)and amiloride (200 μmol/L), and (2) after alkali loading the ducts by exposure to NH4Cl. All the experiments were performed in HCO3--buffered Ringer solution at 37 ℃ (n = 5ducts for each experimental condition). Viral structural proteins were visualized by immunohistochemistry. Virallyencoded GFP and immunofluorescence signals were recorded by a confocal laser scanning microscope.RESULTS: The BDG virus infected the majority of accessible cells of the duct as judged by the appearance of GFP and viral antigens in the ductal cells. KEG virus caused a similarly high efficiency of infection. After blockage of basolateral base loaders, BDG infection significantly elevated -J(B-) 24 h after the infection, compared to the non-infected group. However, KEG infection did not modify -J(B-). After alkali loading the ducts, -J(B-) was significantly elevated in the BDG group compared to the control group 24 h after the infection. As we found with the inhibitor stop method, no change was observed in the group KEG compared to the non-infected group.CONCLUSION: Incubation with the BDG or KEG strains of PRV results in an effective

  20. Machine Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, R

    2014-01-01

    The protection of accelerator equipment is as old as accelerator technology and was for many years related to high-power equipment. Examples are the protection of powering equipment from overheating (magnets, power converters, high-current cables), of superconducting magnets from damage after a quench and of klystrons. The protection of equipment from beam accidents is more recent. It is related to the increasing beam power of high-power proton accelerators such as ISIS, SNS, ESS and the PSI cyclotron, to the emission of synchrotron light by electron–positron accelerators and FELs, and to the increase of energy stored in the beam (in particular for hadron colliders such as LHC). Designing a machine protection system requires an excellent understanding of accelerator physics and operation to anticipate possible failures that could lead to damage. Machine protection includes beam and equipment monitoring, a system to safely stop beam operation (e.g. dumping the beam or stopping the beam at low energy) and an ...

  1. Oral 'hydrogen water' induces neuroprotective ghrelin secretion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Yamafuji, Megumi; Tachibana, Tomoko; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Noda, Mami; Nakaya, Haruaki

    2013-11-20

    The therapeutic potential of molecular hydrogen (H₂) is emerging in a number of human diseases and in their animal models, including in particular Parkinson's disease (PD). H₂ supplementation of drinking water has been shown to exert disease-modifying effects in PD patients and neuroprotective effects in experimental PD model mice. However, H₂ supplementation does not result in detectable changes in striatal H₂ levels, indicating an indirect effect. Here we show that H₂ supplementation increases gastric expression of mRNA encoding ghrelin, a growth hormone secretagogue, and ghrelin secretion, which are antagonized by the β1-adrenoceptor blocker, atenolol. Strikingly, the neuroprotective effect of H₂ water was abolished by either administration of the ghrelin receptor-antagonist, D-Lys(3) GHRP-6, or atenolol. Thus, the neuroprotective effect of H₂ in PD is mediated by enhanced production of ghrelin. Our findings point to potential, novel strategies for ameliorating pathophysiology in which a protective effect of H₂ supplementation has been demonstrated.

  2. Ion transport mechanisms linked to bicarbonate secretion in the esophageal submucosal glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange; Nakhoul, Hani N; Kalliny, Medhat I; Gyftopoulos, Alex; Rabon, Edd; Doetjes, Rienk; Brown, Karen; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2011-07-01

    The esophageal submucosal glands (SMG) secrete HCO(3)(-) and mucus into the esophageal lumen, where they contribute to acid clearance and epithelial protection. This study characterized the ion transport mechanisms linked to HCO(3)(-) secretion in SMG. We localized ion transporters using immunofluorescence, and we examined their expression by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. We measured HCO(3)(-) secretion by using pH stat and the isolated perfused esophagus. Using double labeling with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase as a marker, we localized Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NBCe1) and Cl(-)-HCO(3)(-) exchanger (SLC4A2/AE2) to the basolateral membrane of duct cells. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator channel (CFTR) was confirmed by immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization. We identified anion exchanger SLC26A6 at the ducts' luminal membrane and Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) (NKCC1) at the basolateral membrane of mucous and duct cells. pH stat experiments showed that elevations in cAMP induced by forskolin or IBMX increased HCO(3)(-) secretion. Genistein, an activator of CFTR, which does not increase intracellular cAMP, also stimulated HCO(3)(-) secretion, whereas glibenclamide, a Cl(-) channel blocker, and bumetanide, a Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) blocker, decreased it. CFTR(inh)-172, a specific CFTR channel blocker, inhibited basal HCO(3)(-) secretion as well as stimulation of HCO(3)(-) secretion by IBMX. This is the first report on the presence of CFTR channels in the esophagus. The role of CFTR in manifestations of esophageal disease in cystic fibrosis patients remains to be determined.

  3. Biochemical characterization of rat colonic mucins secreted in response to Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, S K; Chadee, K

    1992-04-01

    Invasion of the colonic mucosa by Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites is preceded by colonic mucus depletion. The aim of our studies was to determine whether E. histolytica caused a differential secretion of mucin species in a rat colonic loop model. Mucus secretion in response to amoebae was followed by release of acid-precipitable 3H-glucosamine metabolically labelled glycoproteins and in vitro labelling of glycoprotein secretion with NaB3H4. The secretory response consisted of high-Mr goblet cell mucins and an increase in the secretion of low-Mr nonmucin glycoproteins as determined by Sepharose 4B column chromatography. High-Mr mucins subfractionated by Cellex-E (ECTEOLA) ion-exchange chromatography demonstrated a minor neutral and a major acidic mucin (greater than 98%) species. Marked differences between the neutral and acidic mucin species were indicated by immunogenicity and amino acid compositions. Thin-section histochemistry of rat colons confirmed secretion of neutral and acidic mucins in response to E. histolytica and demonstrated secretory activity from goblet cells from both the crypts and interglandular epithelium. E. histolytica mucus secretagogue activity was generalized and may function to deplete the host's protective mucus layer, facilitating invasion by the parasites.

  4. Genetic barcodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz -Ulrich G

    2015-08-04

    Herein are described multicolor FISH probe sets termed "genetic barcodes" targeting several cancer or disease-related loci to assess gene rearrangements and copy number changes in tumor cells. Two, three or more different fluorophores are used to detect the genetic barcode sections thus permitting unique labeling and multilocus analysis in individual cell nuclei. Gene specific barcodes can be generated and combined to provide both numerical and structural genetic information for these and other pertinent disease associated genes.

  5. Hiding secret data into a carrier image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu COSMA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The object of steganography is embedding hidden information in an appropriate multimedia carrier, e.g., image, audio, or video. There are several known methods of solving this problem, which operate either in the space domain or in the frequency domain, and are distinguished by the following characteristics: payload, robustness and strength. The payload is the amount of secret data that can be embedded in the carrier without inducing suspicious artefacts, robustness indicates the degree in which the secret data is affected by the normal processing of the carrier e.g., compression, and the strength indicate how easy the presence of hidden data can be detected by steganalysis techniques. This paper presents a new method of hiding secret data into a digital image compressed by a technique based on the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT [2] and the Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Trees (SPIHT subband coding algorithm [6]. The proposed method admits huge payloads and has considerable strength.

  6. The 'Secret' of success part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Mike

    2011-03-01

    Practice success is defined across the four'dimensions' of oral health, patient satisfaction, job satisfaction and financial profit. It is suggested that the 'secret' of success in dental practice is to make patient (customer) satisfaction the primary focus. Not a very earth shattering or surprising'secret' perhaps! This is hardly a new idea, and not a concept restricted to dental practice. This principle applies to all businesses. This series of articles reviews evidence from across a broad spectrum of publications: from populist business publications through to refereed scientific papers, this'secret' seems to be confirmed. The evidence for which aspects of our service are most important in achieving patient satisfaction (and therefore success) is explored. Good oral health outcomes for patients are defined as the primary purpose of dental practice and, therefore, an essential dimension of success. The link between positive patient perceptions of general care and their own oral health to practice success is explored.

  7. Melatonin Secretion Pattern in Critically Ill Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Holst, René; Jennum, Poul

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients have abnormal circadian and sleep homeostasis. This may be associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The aims of this pilot study were (1) to describe melatonin secretion in conscious critically ill mechanically ventilated patients and (2) to describe whether melatonin...... secretion and sleep patterns differed in these patients with and without remifentanil infusion. Eight patients were included. Blood-melatonin was taken every 4th hour, and polysomnography was carried out continually during a 48-hour period. American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria were used for sleep...... scoring if sleep patterns were identified; otherwise, Watson's classification was applied. As remifentanil was periodically administered during the study, its effect on melatonin and sleep was assessed. Melatonin secretion in these patients followed a phase-delayed diurnal curve. We did not observe any...

  8. A histamine H2 receptor antagonist, roxatidine, stimulates mucus secretion and synthesis by cultured rabbit gastric mucosal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Okabe, S

    1995-12-01

    We examined the effects of the known antisecretory and mucosal protective drug, roxatidine, on the secretion and synthesis of mucus by cultured rabbit gastric mucosal cells. The amounts of secreted and synthesized mucus were determined by the [3H] glucosamine labelling method. Exposure of the cells to roxatidine for 8 hr caused increases in the secretion and synthesis of mucus in a dose-related manner. The increase in mucus synthesis was maximally induced 4 hr after the addition of roxatidine, while mucus secretion was maximally enhanced a further 4 hr later. However, other H2 antagonists such as cimetidine, rantidine and famotidine failed to stimulate the secretion and synthesis of gastric mucus. In addition, neither indomethacin nor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester affected the roxatidine-induced increases in mucus secretion and synthesis. We conclude that roxatidine directly acts on gastric mucosal cells, inducing increases in both the secretion and synthesis of mucus, and that an unknown regulatory pathway might be involved in these stimulatory actions of roxatidine.

  9. Lubiprostone Stimulates Duodenal Bicarbonate Secretion in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Mizumori, Misa; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid, is used for the treatment of chronic constipation. No published study has addressed the effect of lubiprostone on intestinal ion secretion in vivo. Aim The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that lubiprostone augments duodenal HCO3 − secretion (DBS). Methods Rat proximal duodenal loops were perfused with pH 7.0 Krebs, control vehicle (medium-chain triglycerides), or lubiprostone (0.1–10 μM). We measured DBS with flow-through pH and CO2...

  10. Quantum Secret Sharing by applying Analytic Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ruilong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a novel $(2,2)$-threshold scheme and then generalize this to a $(n,n)$-threshold scheme for quantum secret sharing (QSS) which makes use of the fundamentals of Analytic Geometry. The dealer aptly selects GHZ states related to the coefficients which determine straight lines on a two-dimension plane. Then by computing each two of the lines intercept or not, we obtain a judging matrix whose rank can be used to determine the secret stored in entangled bits. Based on ...

  11. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas.

  12. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorhaus Daniel B

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  13. Protection Myopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Salter, Ammon; Li, Cher

    The strategies firms use to protect their intellectual property and knowledge can strongly influence their ability to capture the benefits of their innovative efforts. Using the attention-based theory, we explore positive and negative sides of legal appropriability. While asserting the benefits f...

  14. Radiation protection

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    This will be a simple explanation of the reasons why CERN has to be careful about radiation protections issues, a practical guide on how to recognize radiation dangers, the monitoring systems that make sure radiation levels are well tolerable norms, and a quick summary of what radiation levels mean in terms of personal risk.

  15. Genetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, John

    1973-01-01

    Presents a review of genetic engineering, in which the genotypes of plants and animals (including human genotypes) may be manipulated for the benefit of the human species. Discusses associated problems and solutions and provides an extensive bibliography of literature relating to genetic engineering. (JR)

  16. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for certain types of genetic conditions (such as Down syndrome) in the baby if mother-to-be is 35 years of age or more, or is concerned at any age about her chances of having a child with a genetic condition To learn about the ...

  17. Unique substrates secreted by the type VI secretion system of Francisella tularensis during intramacrophage infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette E Bröms

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacteria have evolved sophisticated secretion machineries specialized for the secretion of macromolecules important for their life cycles. The Type VI secretion system (T6SS is the most widely spread bacterial secretion machinery and is encoded by large, variable gene clusters, often found to be essential for virulence. The latter is true for the atypical T6SS encoded by the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI of the highly pathogenic, intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis. We here undertook a comprehensive analysis of the intramacrophage secretion of the 17 FPI proteins of the live vaccine strain, LVS, of F. tularensis. All were expressed as fusions to the TEM β-lactamase and cleavage of the fluorescent substrate CCF2-AM, a direct consequence of the delivery of the proteins into the macrophage cytosol, was followed over time. The FPI proteins IglE, IglC, VgrG, IglI, PdpE, PdpA, IglJ and IglF were all secreted, which was dependent on the core components DotU, VgrG, and IglC, as well as IglG. In contrast, the method was not directly applicable on F. novicida U112, since it showed very intense native β-lactamase secretion due to FTN_1072. Its role was proven by ectopic expression in trans in LVS. We did not observe secretion of any of the LVS substrates VgrG, IglJ, IglF or IglI, when tested in a FTN_1072 deficient strain of F. novicida, whereas IglE, IglC, PdpA and even more so PdpE were all secreted. This suggests that there may be fundamental differences in the T6S mechanism among the Francisella subspecies. The findings further corroborate the unusual nature of the T6SS of F. tularensis since almost all of the identified substrates are unique to the species.

  18. Genetic Romanticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tupasela, Aaro

    2016-01-01

    . This article compares and contrasts the work of two doctors in Finland, Elias Lönnrot and Reijo Norio, working over a century and a half apart, to examine the ways in which they have contributed to the formation of national identity and unity. The notion of genetic romanticism is introduced as a term...... to complement the notion of national romanticism that has been used to describe the ways in which nineteenth-century scholars sought to create and deploy common traditions for national-romantic purposes. Unlike national romanticism, however, strategies of genetic romanticism rely on the study of genetic...... inheritance as a way to unify populations within politically and geographically bounded areas. Thus, new genetics have contributed to the development of genetic romanticisms, whereby populations (human, plant, and animal) can be delineated and mobilized through scientific and medical practices to represent...

  19. Multispecies genetic objectives in spatial conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Erica S; Beger, Maria; Henriques, Romina; Selkoe, Kimberly A; von der Heyden, Sophie

    2016-12-07

    The growing threats to biodiversity and global alteration of habitats and species distributions make it increasingly necessary to consider evolutionary patterns in conservation decision-making. Yet there is no clear-cut guidance on how genetic features can be incorporated into conservation planning processes, with multiple molecular markers and several genetic metrics for each marker type to choose from. Genetic patterns also differ between species, but the potential trade-offs amongst genetic objectives for multiple species in conservation planning are currently understudied. This study compares spatial conservation prioritizations derived from two metrics of both genetic diversity (nucleotide and haplotype diversity) and genetic isolation (private haplotypes and local genetic differentiation) for mitochondrial DNA for five marine species. The findings show that conservation plans based solely on habitat representation noticeably differ from those additionally including genetic data, with habitat-based conservation plans selecting fewer conservation priority areas. Furthermore, all four genetic metrics selected approximately similar conservation priority areas, which is likely a result of prioritizing genetic patterns across a genetically diverse array of species. Largely, the results suggest that multi-species genetic conservation objectives are vital to create protected area networks that appropriately preserve community-level evolutionary patterns. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Scalable Mechanisms for Rational Secret Sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Dani, Varsha; Saia, Jared

    2012-01-01

    We consider the classical secret sharing problem in the case where all agents are selfish but rational. In recent work, Kol and Naor show that, when there are two players, in the non-simultaneous communication model, i.e. when rushing is possible, there is no Nash equilibrium that ensures both players learn the secret. However, they describe a mechanism for this problem, for any number of players, that is an epsilon-Nash equilibrium, in that no player can gain more than epsilon utility by deviating from it. Unfortunately, the Kol and Naor mechanism, and, to the best of our knowledge, all previous mechanisms for this problem require each agent to send O(n) messages in expectation, where n is the number of agents. This may be problematic for some applications of rational secret sharing such as secure multi-party computation and simulation of a mediator. We address this issue by describing mechanisms for rational secret sharing that are designed for large n. Both of our results hold for n > 2, and are Nash equil...

  1. Secret Shopping as User Experience Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Crystal M.

    2015-01-01

    Secret shopping is a form of unobtrusive evaluation that can be accomplished with minimal effort, but still produce rich results. With as few as 11 shoppers, the author was able to identify trends in user satisfaction with services provided across two entry-level desks at Illinois Wesleyan University's The Ames Library. The focus of this secret…

  2. Secret Sharing Schemes and Advanced Encryption Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Professor Bard xv Mansager, my academic advisor in the Department of Applied Mathematics. Bard was the one who reassured me that the Math Department...are obtained by an eavesdropper, and the eavesdropper decomposes the public shares into the generalized formula yi = (xi+α)k−b0 for secret recovery

  3. Secret Codes, Remainder Arithmetic, and Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Lyman C.

    This pamphlet is designed for use as enrichment material for able junior and senior high school students who are interested in mathematics. No more than a clear understanding of basic arithmetic is expected. Students are introduced to ideas from number theory and modern algebra by learning mathematical ways of coding and decoding secret messages.…

  4. An Approach to Hide Secret Speech Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhi-jun; DUAN Hai-xin; LI Xing

    2006-01-01

    This paper presented an approach to hide secret speech information in code excited linear prediction(CELP)-based speech coding scheme by adopting the analysis-by-synthesis (ABS)-based algorithm of speech information hiding and extracting for the purpose of secure speech communication. The secret speech is coded in 2.4Kb/s mixed excitation linear prediction (MELP), which is embedded in CELP type public speech. The ABS algorithm adopts speech synthesizer in speech coder. Speech embedding and coding are synchronous, i.e. a fusion of speech information data of public and secret. The experiment of embedding 2.4 Kb/s MELP secret speech in G.728 scheme coded public speech transmitted via public switched telephone network (PSTN) shows that the proposed approach satisfies the requirements of information hiding, meets the secure communication speech quality constraints, and achieves high hiding capacity of average 3.2 Kb/s with an excellent speech quality and complicating speakers' recognition.

  5. Acetylcholine regulates ghrelin secretion in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Broglio (Fabio); E. Ghigo (Ezio); C. Gottero; F. Prodam (Flavia); S. Destefanis; A. Benso; C. Gauna (Carlotta); L.J. Hofland (Leo); E. Arvat; A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGhrelin secretion has been reportedly increased by fasting and energy restriction but decreased by food intake, glucose, insulin, and somatostatin. However, its regulation is still far from clarified. The cholinergic system mediates some ghrelin actions, e.g. stimulatio

  6. Secret Shopping as User Experience Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Crystal M.

    2015-01-01

    Secret shopping is a form of unobtrusive evaluation that can be accomplished with minimal effort, but still produce rich results. With as few as 11 shoppers, the author was able to identify trends in user satisfaction with services provided across two entry-level desks at Illinois Wesleyan University's The Ames Library. The focus of this secret…

  7. Kinins as mediators of intestinal secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaginella, T S; Kachur, J F

    1989-01-01

    Kinins are small peptides that have diverse biological actions. Concentrations of kinins in the nanomolar or subnanomolar range induce intestinal smooth muscle contraction and evoke mucosal electrolyte secretion. Hyperkininemia is associated with effects on gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal inflammation. Bradykinin and kallidin are the predominant kinins with effects on the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. Bradykinin stimulates chloride ion secretion by the guinea pig and rabbit ileum, rabbit colon, rat colon and monolayers of human HCA-7 cells. Kinins directly or indirectly stimulate phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C. Cells in the lamina propria of the mucosa (e.g., fibroblasts, mast cells, leukocytes), by liberating cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid, are involved in the kinin response; direct effects on epithelial cells cannot be ruled out, however. Antagonists now exist for kinin receptors. Based on studies with these antagonists in smooth muscle preparations, two subgroups of kinin receptor have been identified. The B2-type receptor appears to be responsible for both the contraction of ileal muscle and ileal secretion. Kinins are probably more important as pathophysiological rather than as physiological mediators. They may amplify the effect of inflammatory products that induce intestinal secretion. The precise involvement of kinins in clinical mucosal secretory states and diarrhea will require quantitative assessment of their levels during each phase of mucosal inflammation. Additional studies on the mechanism of action of kinins will be essential in designing therapy to mitigate the symptoms associated with mucosal inflammation.

  8. Secret Symmetries in AdS/CFT

    CERN Document Server

    de Leeuw, Marius; Moriyama, Sanefumi; Regelskis, Vidas; Torrielli, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We discuss special quantum group (secret) symmetries of the integrable system associated to the AdS/CFT correspondence. These symmetries have by now been observed in a variety of forms, including the spectral problem, the boundary scattering problem, n-point amplitudes, the pure-spinor formulation and quantum affine deformations.

  9. Metabolic priming by a secreted fungal effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djamei, Armin; Schipper, Kerstin; Rabe, Franziska; Ghosh, Anupama; Vincon, Volker; Kahnt, Jörg; Osorio, Sonia; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Feussner, Ivo; Feussner, Kirstin; Meinicke, Peter; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Schwarz, Heinz; Macek, Boris; Mann, Matthias; Kahmann, Regine

    2011-10-05

    Maize smut caused by the fungus Ustilago maydis is a widespread disease characterized by the development of large plant tumours. U. maydis is a biotrophic pathogen that requires living plant tissue for its development and establishes an intimate interaction zone between fungal hyphae and the plant plasma membrane. U. maydis actively suppresses plant defence responses by secreted protein effectors. Its effector repertoire comprises at least 386 genes mostly encoding proteins of unknown function and expressed exclusively during the biotrophic stage. The U. maydis secretome also contains about 150 proteins with probable roles in fungal nutrition, fungal cell wall modification and host penetration as well as proteins unlikely to act in the fungal-host interface like a chorismate mutase. Chorismate mutases are key enzymes of the shikimate pathway and catalyse the conversion of chorismate to prephenate, the precursor for tyrosine and phenylalanine synthesis. Root-knot nematodes inject a secreted chorismate mutase into plant cells likely to affect development. Here we show that the chorismate mutase Cmu1 secreted by U. maydis is a virulence factor. The enzyme is taken up by plant cells, can spread to neighbouring cells and changes the metabolic status of these cells through metabolic priming. Secreted chorismate mutases are found in many plant-associated microbes and might serve as general tools for host manipulation.

  10. Insulin: pancreatic secretion and adipocyte regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgard, L H; Hausman, G J; Sanz Fernandez, M V

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is the primary acute anabolic coordinator of nutrient partitioning. Hyperglycemia is the main stimulant of insulin secretion, but other nutrients such as specific amino acids, fatty acids, and ketoacids can potentiate pancreatic insulin release. Incretins are intestinal hormones with insulinotropic activity and are secreted in response to food ingestion, thus integrating diet chemical composition with the regulation of insulin release. In addition, prolactin is required for proper islet development, and it stimulates β-cell proliferation. Counterintuitively, bacterial components appear to signal insulin secretion. In vivo lipopolysaccharide infusion acutely increases circulating insulin, which is paradoxical as endotoxemia is a potent catabolic condition. Insulin is a potent anabolic orchestrator of nutrient partitioning, and this is particularly true in adipocytes. Insulin dictates lipid accretion in a dose-dependent manner during preadipocyte development in adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular cell culture. However, in vivo studies focused on insulin's role in regulating adipose tissue metabolism from growing, and market weight pigs are sometimes inconsistent, and this variability appears to be animal, age and depot dependent. Additionally, porcine adipose tissue synthesizes and secretes a number of adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, and so forth) that directly or indirectly influence insulin action. Therefore, because insulin has an enormous impact on agriculturally important phenotypes, it is critical to have a better understanding of how insulin homeostasis is governed.

  11. The loss of Sirt1 in mouse pancreatic beta cells impairs insulin secretion by disrupting glucose sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luu, L; Dai, F F; Prentice, K J;

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) has emerged as a key metabolic regulator of glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion. Enhanced SIRT1 activity has been shown to be protective against diabetes, although the mechanisms remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine how SIRT1 regulates insulin...

  12. Evolutionary complexity for protection of critical assets.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Chandross, Michael Evan

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed as part of a one-year LDRD project, 'Evolutionary Complexity for Protection of Critical Assets.' A brief introduction is given to the topics of genetic algorithms and genetic programming, followed by a discussion of relevant results obtained during the project's research, and finally the conclusions drawn from those results. The focus is on using genetic programming to evolve solutions for relatively simple algebraic equations as a prototype application for evolving complexity in computer codes. The results were obtained using the lil-gp genetic program, a C code for evolving solutions to user-defined problems and functions. These results suggest that genetic programs are not well-suited to evolving complexity for critical asset protection because they cannot efficiently evolve solutions to complex problems, and introduce unacceptable performance penalties into solutions for simple ones.

  13. Histone deacetylase 3 inhibition improves glycaemia and insulin secretion in obese diabetic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, Morten; Galbo, Thomas; Poulsen, Steen Seier;

    2015-01-01

    Failure of pancreatic β cells to compensate for insulin resistance is a prerequisite for the development of type 2 diabetes. Sustained elevated circulating levels of free fatty acids and glucose contribute to β-cell failure. Selective inhibition of Histone deacetylase (HDAC)-3 protects pancreatic β...... cells against inflammatory and metabolic insults in vitro. Here we tested the ability of a selective HDAC3 inhibitor, BRD3308, to reduce hyperglycemia and increase insulin secretion in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. At diabetes onset, an ambulatory hyperglycemic clamp was performed. HDAC3......3 as a key therapeutic target for β-cell protection in type 2 diabetes....

  14. Fha interaction with phosphothreonine of TssL activates type VI secretion in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jer-Sheng; Wu, Hsin-Hui; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Ma, Lay-Sun; Pang, Yin-Yuin; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Lai, Erh-Min

    2014-03-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a widespread protein secretion system found in many Gram-negative bacteria. T6SSs are highly regulated by various regulatory systems at multiple levels, including post-translational regulation via threonine (Thr) phosphorylation. The Ser/Thr protein kinase PpkA is responsible for this Thr phosphorylation regulation, and the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain-containing Fha-family protein is the sole T6SS phosphorylation substrate identified to date. Here we discovered that TssL, the T6SS inner-membrane core component, is phosphorylated and the phosphorylated TssL (p-TssL) activates type VI subassembly and secretion in a plant pathogenic bacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Combining genetic and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that TssL is phosphorylated at Thr 14 in a PpkA-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the PpkA kinase activity is responsible for the Thr 14 phosphorylation, which is critical for the secretion of the T6SS hallmark protein Hcp and the putative toxin effector Atu4347. TssL phosphorylation is not required for the formation of the TssM-TssL inner-membrane complex but is critical for TssM conformational change and binding to Hcp and Atu4347. Importantly, Fha specifically interacts with phosphothreonine of TssL via its pThr-binding motif in vivo and in vitro and this interaction is crucial for TssL interaction with Hcp and Atu4347 and activation of type VI secretion. In contrast, pThr-binding ability of Fha is dispensable for TssM structural transition. In conclusion, we discover a novel Thr phosphorylation event, in which PpkA phosphorylates TssL to activate type VI secretion via its direct binding to Fha in A. tumefaciens. A model depicting an ordered TssL phosphorylation-induced T6SS assembly pathway is proposed.

  15. Special structures of hoopoe eggshells enhance the adhesion of symbiont-carrying uropygial secretion that increase hatching success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Vivaldi, Manuel; Soler, Juan J; Peralta-Sánchez, Juan M; Arco, Laura; Martín-Platero, Antonio M; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Valdivia, Eva

    2014-11-01

    Animals live in a bacterial world, and detecting and exploring adaptations favouring mutualistic relationships with antibiotic-producing bacteria as a strategy to fight pathogens are of prime importance for evolutionary ecologists. Uropygial secretion of European hoopoes (Upupa epops, Linnaeus) contains antimicrobials from mutualistic bacteria that may be used to prevent embryo infection. Here, we investigated the microscopic structure of hoopoe eggshells looking for special features favouring the adhesion of antimicrobial uropygial secretions. We impeded female access to the uropygial gland and compared microscopic characteristics of eggshells, bacterial loads of eggs and of uropygial secretion, and hatching success of experimental and control females. Then, we explored the link between microbiological characteristics of uropygial secretion and these of eggs of hoopoes, as well as possible fitness benefits. The microscopic study revealed special structures in hoopoes' eggshells (crypts). The experimental prevention of females' gland access demonstrated that crypts are filled with uropygial secretion and that symbiotic enterococci bacteria on the eggshells come, at least partially, from those in the female's uropygial gland. Moreover, the experiment resulted in a higher permeability of eggshells by several groups of bacteria and in elimination of the positive relationships detected for control nests between hatching success and density of symbiotic bacteria, either in the uropygial secretion of females or on the eggshell. The findings of specialized crypts on the eggshells of hoopoes, and of video-recorded females smearing secretion containing symbiotic bacteria at a high density onto the eggshells strongly support a link between secretion and bacteria on eggs. Moreover, the detected associations between bacteria and hatching success suggest that crypts enhancing the adhesion of symbiont-carrying uropygial secretion likely protect embryos against infections.

  16. Characterization of EssB, a protein required for secretion of ESAT-6 like proteins in Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Yi-Hsing; Anderson Mark; Hendrickx Antoni PA; Missiakas Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus secretes EsxA and EsxB, two small polypeptides of the WXG100 family of proteins. Genetic analyses have shown that production and secretion of EsxA and EsxB require an intact ESAT-6 Secretion System (ESS), a cluster of genes that is conserved in many Firmicutes and encompasses esxA and esxB . Here, we characterize EssB, one of the proteins encoded by the ESS cluster. EssB is highly conserved in Gram-positive bacteria and belongs to the Cluster of ...

  17. Protective Clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    CONTROL NO* /ZOMOS A0-6n9 164 NAVAL AIR ENGINEERING CENTER PHILADELPHIA PA AERONAUTICAL MATERIALS LAB METHODS OF SANITIZING AND DEODORIZING ...SANITIZING, DEODORIZING , AND ANTISTATIC AGENTS IS DESCRIBED* RECOMMENDATIONS ARE MADE FOR THE USE OF QUATERNARY AMMONIUM 1OMPOUNDS FOR SANITIZING AND...EQUIPMENT. HONEYCOMB CORES. SANDWICH CONSTRUCTION, METAL PLATES. ALUMINUM . TESTS. LAND MINES (U) SEVERAL OF THE BLAST PROTECTIVE COMBAT BOOT CONCEPTS

  18. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    Radioactive Shipping Service

    2005-01-01

    The section of the radiation protection group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tél. 73171

  19. Radiation protection

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    The section of the Radiation Protection Group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tel. 73171

  20. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The section of the Radiation Protection Group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tél. 73171

  1. Rac Regulates Giardia lamblia Encystation by Coordinating Cyst Wall Protein Trafficking and Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krtková, Jana; Thomas, Elizabeth B; Alas, Germain C M; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Behjatnia, Habib R; Hehl, Adrian B; Paredez, Alexander R

    2016-08-23

    Encystation of the common intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia involves the production, trafficking, and secretion of cyst wall material (CWM). However, the molecular mechanism responsible for the regulation of these sequential processes remains elusive. Here, we examined the role of GlRac, Giardia's sole Rho family GTPase, in the regulation of endomembrane organization and cyst wall protein (CWP) trafficking. Localization studies indicated that GlRac is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus-like encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs). Constitutive GlRac signaling increased levels of the ER marker PDI2, induced ER swelling, reduced overall CWP1 production, and promoted the early maturation of ESVs. Quantitative analysis of cells expressing constitutively active hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged GlRac (HA-Rac(CA)) revealed fewer but larger ESVs than control cells. Consistent with the phenotype of premature maturation of ESVs in HA-Rac(CA)-expressing cells, constitutive GlRac signaling resulted in increased CWP1 secretion and, conversely, morpholino depletion of GlRac blocked CWP1 secretion. Wild-type cells unexpectedly secreted large quantities of CWP1 into the medium, and free CWP1 was used cooperatively during cyst formation. These results, in part, could account for the previously reported observation that G. lamblia encysts more efficiently at high cell densities. These studies of GlRac show that it regulates encystation at several levels, and our findings support its coordinating role as a regulator of CWP trafficking and secretion. The central role of GlRac in regulating membrane trafficking and the cytoskeleton, both of which are essential to Giardia parasitism, further suggests its potential as a novel target for drug development to treat giardiasis. The encystation process is crucial for the transmission of giardiasis and the life cycle of many protists. Encystation for Giardia lamblia involves the assembly of a protective cyst wall

  2. Properties of Duvernoy's secretions from opisthoglyphous and aglyphous colubrid snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S A; Kardong, K V

    1994-10-01

    Relatively little attention has been given to the biological properties of Duvernoy's secretions produced by opisthoglyphous and some aglyphous colubrid snakes. A review is presented of literature pertaining to these secretions. Most detailed analyses of Duvernoy's secretions and their biological properties have been performed since the late 1970s. The dispholidines, Dispholidus typus and Thelotornis sp., and the natricines, Rhabdophis tigrinus and R. subminiata, have received the most attention due to the high toxicity of their secretions and their medical importance. These species produce secretions with variably strong prothrombin-activating activity, defibrinating activity, and hemorrhagic potential. Boigines, and natricines other than Rhabdophis, produce secretions of low to moderate toxicity and are variably hemorrhagic and proteolytic. Xenodontines and homalopsines similarly show hemorrhagic potential with low to moderate toxicity. Neurotoxic activity has been reported only from secretions of the boigines, Boiga blandingi and B. irregularis and the xenodontine, Heterodon platyrhinos. These species produce secretions containing postsynaptically acting components. Analyses of some of these secretions have shown that enzymes common to many ophidian venoms such as phospholipases A and L-amino acid oxidase are uncommon in the colubrid secretions studied. This may be due to few studies assaying for multiple enzyme activities and/or the unavailability of many secretion samples for study. Methods of secretion extraction, storage, and assay are discussed. Projected future research and the adaptive implications of Duvernoy's secretions are considered.

  3. Somatomammotrophic cells in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting human pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, M; Brina, M; Spada, A; Giannattasio, G

    1989-11-01

    A morphological study has been carried out on 20 GH-secreting adenomas removed from acromegalic normoprolactinemic patients, on 29 PRL-secreting adenomas removed from hyperprolactinemic patients without signs of acromegaly and on one normal human anterior pituitary gland collected at autopsy. The protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopic technique has been utilized in order to verify the presence of mixed cells producing both GH and PRL (somatomammotrophs) in these pituitary tissues. In the normal pituitary a considerable number of somatomammotrophs (15-20%) was found, thus supporting the idea that these cells are normal components of the human anterior pituitary gland. In 10 GH-secreting adenomas and in 10 PRL-secreting adenomas somatomammotrophs were present in a variable number (from 4 to 20% of the whole cell population in GH adenomas and from 1 to 47% in PRL tumors). It can be concluded therefore that these cells, largely present in all GH/PRL-secreting adenomas, can also be found in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting tumors without clinical evidence of a mixed secretion. Adenomatous somatomammotrophs displayed ultrastructural features of adenomatous somatotrophs and mammotrophs (prominent Golgi complexes, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, irregular nuclei). The size and the number of granules were variable. In some cells GH and PRL were stored in distinct secretory granules, in others in mixed granules or both in mixed and distinct granules, thus suggesting that in adenomatous somatomammotrophs the efficiency of the mechanisms of sorting of the two hormones varies from one cell to another.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Activated platelets enhance IL-10 secretion and reduce TNF-α secretion by monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Hasselbalch, Hans C; Nielsen, Claus H

    2013-01-01

    Activated platelets are known to modulate immune responses by secreting or shedding a range of immunomodulatory substances. We examined the influence of activated platelets on cytokine production by normal human mononuclear cells, induced by tetanus toxoid (TT), human thyroglobulin (TG), Escheric......Activated platelets are known to modulate immune responses by secreting or shedding a range of immunomodulatory substances. We examined the influence of activated platelets on cytokine production by normal human mononuclear cells, induced by tetanus toxoid (TT), human thyroglobulin (TG...

  5. Involvement of type VI secretion system in secretion of iron chelator pyoverdine in Pseudomonas taiwanensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jen; Kuo, Tzu-Yen; Hsieh, Feng-Chia; Chen, Pi-Yu; Wang, Chang-Sheng; Shih, Yu-Ling; Lai, Ying-Mi; Liu, Je-Ruei; Yang, Yu-Liang; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Rice bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. Therefore, in addition to breeding disease-resistant rice cultivars, it is desirable to develop effective biocontrol agents against Xoo. Here, we report that a soil bacterium Pseudomonas taiwanensis displayed strong antagonistic activity against Xoo. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry, we identified an iron chelator, pyoverdine, secreted by P. taiwanensis that could inhibit the growth of Xoo. Through Tn5 mutagenesis of P. taiwanensis, we showed that mutations in genes that encode components of the type VI secretion system (T6SS) as well as biosynthesis and maturation of pyoverdine resulted in reduced toxicity against Xoo. Our results indicated that T6SS is involved in the secretion of endogenous pyoverdine. Mutations in T6SS component genes affected the secretion of mature pyoverdine from the periplasmic space into the extracellular medium after pyoverdine precursor is transferred to the periplasm by the inner membrane transporter PvdE. In addition, we also showed that other export systems, i.e., the PvdRT-OpmQ and MexAB-OprM efflux systems (for which there have been previous suggestions of involvement) and the type II secretion system (T2SS), are not involved in pyoverdine secretion. PMID:27605490

  6. Long-term outcomes of surgery and radiotherapy for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, El [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate treatment outcome and long term complication after surgery and radiotherapy (RT) for pituitary adenoma. From 1990 to 2009, 73 patients with surgery and RT for pituitary adenoma were analyzed in this study. Median age was 51 years (range, 25 to 71 years). Median tumor size was 3 cm (range, 1 to 5 cm) with suprasellar (n = 21), cavernous sinus extension (n = 14) or both (n = 5). Hormone secreting tumor was diagnosed in 29 patients; 16 patients with prolactin, 12 patients with growth hormone, and 1 patient with adrenocorticotrophic hormone. Impairment of visual acuity or visual field was presented in 33 patients at first diagnosis. Most patients (n = 64) received RT as postoperative adjuvant setting. Median RT dose was 45 Gy (range, 45 to 59.4 Gy). Median follow-up duration was 8 years (range, 3 to 22 years). In secreting tumors, hormone normalization rate was 55% (16 of 29 patients). For 25 patients with evaluable visual field and visual acuity test, 21 patients (84%) showed improvement of visual disturbance after treatment. The 10-year tumor control rate for non-secreting and secreting adenoma was 100% and 58%, respectively (p < 0.001). Progression free survival rate at 10 years was 98%. Only 1 patient experienced endocrinological recurrence. Following surgery, 60% (n = 44) suffered from pituitary function deficit. Late complication associated with RT was only 1 patient, who developed cataract. Surgery and RT are very effective and safe in hormonal and tumor growth control for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma.

  7. Genetic Breakthrough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new calf breeding technique shows promise for treating malignant tumors Chinese scientists have successfully bred a genetically altered cow capable of producing cancer-curing proteins for human beings.

  8. Identification of Protein Secretion Systems in Bacterial Genomes Using MacSyFinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abby, Sophie S; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2017-01-01

    Protein secretion systems are complex molecular machineries that translocate proteins through the outer membrane, and sometimes through multiple other barriers. They have evolved by co-option of components from other envelope-associated cellular machineries, making them sometimes difficult to identify and discriminate. Here, we describe how to identify protein secretion systems in bacterial genomes using MacSyFinder. This flexible computational tool uses the knowledge stemming from experimental studies to identify homologous systems in genome data. It can be used with a set of predefined models-"TXSScan"-to identify all major secretion systems of diderm bacteria (i.e., with inner and with LPS-containing outer membranes). For this, it identifies and clusters colocalized components of secretion systems using sequence similarity searches with hidden Markov model protein profiles. Finally, it checks whether the genetic content and organization of clusters satisfy the constraints of the model. TXSScan models can be customized to search for variants of known systems. The models can also be built from scratch to identify novel systems. In this chapter, we describe a complete pipeline of analysis, including the identification of a reference set of experimentally studied systems, the identification of components and the construction of their protein profiles, the definition of the models, their optimization, and, finally, their use as tools to search genomic data.

  9. Mitochondrial genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Chinnery, Patrick Francis; Hudson, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last 10 years the field of mitochondrial genetics has widened, shifting the focus from rare sporadic, metabolic disease to the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in a growing spectrum of human disease. The aim of this review is to guide the reader through some key concepts regarding mitochondria before introducing both classic and emerging mitochondrial disorders. Sources of data In this article, a review of the current mitochondrial genetics literature was con...

  10. Biliary cholesterol secretion : More than a simple ABC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Arne; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Biliary cholesterol secretion is a process important for 2 major disease complexes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cholesterol gallstone disease With respect to cardiovascular disease, biliary cholesterol secretion is regarded as the final step for the elimination of cholesterol originat

  11. Biliary cholesterol secretion : More than a simple ABC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Arne; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Biliary cholesterol secretion is a process important for 2 major disease complexes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cholesterol gallstone disease With respect to cardiovascular disease, biliary cholesterol secretion is regarded as the final step for the elimination of cholesterol

  12. Stego-audio Using Genetic Algorithm Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Santhi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of digital multimedia applications, the secure data transmission becomes the main issue in data communication system. So the multimedia data hiding techniques have been developed to ensure the secured data transfer. Steganography is an art of hiding a secret message within an image/audio/video file in such a way that the secret message cannot be perceived by hacker/intruder. In this study, we use RSA encryption algorithm to encrypt the message and Genetic Algorithm (GA to encode the message in the audio file. This study presents a method to access the negative audio bytes and includes the negative audio bytes in the message encoding and position embedding process. This increases the capacity of encoding message in the audio file. The use of GA operators in Genetic Algorithm reduces the noise distortions.

  13. Genetics of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence strongly indicate that genetic factors contribute to the risk for alcohol use disorders (AUD). There is substantial heterogeneity in AUD, which complicates studies seeking to identify specific genetic factors. To identify these genetic effects, several different alcohol-related phenotypes have been analyzed, including diagnosis and quantitative measures related to AUDs. Study designs have used candidate gene analyses, genetic linkage studies, genomewide association studies (GWAS), and analyses of rare variants. Two genes that encode enzymes of alcohol metabolism have the strongest effect on AUD: aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B each has strongly protective variants that reduce risk, with odds ratios approximately 0.2-0.4. A number of other genes important in AUD have been identified and replicated, including GABRA2 and alcohol dehydrogenases 1B and 4. GWAS have identified additional candidates. Rare variants are likely also to play a role; studies of these are just beginning. A multifaceted approach to gene identification, targeting both rare and common variations and assembling much larger datasets for meta-analyses, is critical for identifying the key genes and pathways important in AUD.

  14. Mining secreted proteins that function in pepper fruit development and ripening using a yeast secretion trap (YST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Je Min, E-mail: jemin@knu.ac.kr [Department of Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Horticultural Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Jik [Biotechnology Institute, Nongwoo Bio Co, Ltd, Yeoju (Korea, Republic of); Department of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Rose, Jocelyn K.C. [Department of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Yeam, Inhwa [Department of Horticulture and Breeding, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Dong [Department of Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Yeast secretion trap (YST) is a valuable tool for mining secretome. • A total of 80 secreted proteins are newly identified via YST in pepper fruits. • The secreted proteins are differentially regulated during pepper development and ripening. • Transient GFP-fusion assay and in planta secretion trap can effectively validate the secretion of proteins. - Abstract: Plant cells secrete diverse sets of constitutively- and conditionally-expressed proteins under various environmental and developmental states. Secreted protein populations, or secretomes have multiple functions, including defense responses, signaling, metabolic processes, and developmental regulation. To identify genes encoding secreted proteins that function in fruit development and ripening, a yeast secretion trap (YST) screen was employed using pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruit cDNAs. The YST screen revealed 80 pepper fruit-related genes (CaPFRs) encoding secreted proteins including cell wall proteins, several of which have not been previously described. Transient GFP-fusion assay and an in planta secretion trap were used to validate the secretion of proteins encoded by selected YST clones. In addition, RNA gel blot analyses provided further insights into their expression and regulation during fruit development and ripening. Integrating our data, we conclude that the YST provides a valuable functional genomics tool for the identification of substantial numbers of novel secreted plant proteins that are associated with biological processes, including fruit development and ripening.

  15. In vivo and in vitro analysis of the effect of various acid-secretion blockers on UDP-galactosyltransferase activities in rat gastric mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Gastric mucus glycoprotein is important for the protection of gastric mucosa from acid. UDP-galactosyltransfer-ase (UDP-Gal-T) is a key enzyme for the synthesis of gastric mucus glycoprotein. In this study, we investigted the effects of five acid-secretion blockers, cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine, roxatidine and omprazole on the UDP-Gal-T activity in rat gastric mucosa to clarify the interaction of the acid-secretion blocker and the gastric mucosal barrier. Intraperitoneal administration ...

  16. Protecting Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    House Science Committee Chairman Robert Walker (R-Pa.) has introduced a bill into Congress to give the United States the legislative authority to implement the 1991 Environmental Protocol to the Antarctic Treaty. That protocol established rules and principles to shield the Antarctic environment from human spoilage—placing limits on the discharge of pollutants, protecting plant and animal life, and requiring environmental impact assessments before new activities and programs are launched. The protocol also forbids prospecting or developing of mineral resources except for scientific research.

  17. Quantum Secret Sharing Based on Chinese Remainder Theorem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Rong-Hua; SU Qian; GUO Ying; LEE Moon Ho

    2011-01-01

    A novel quantum secret sharing (QSS) scheme is proposed on the basis of Chinese Remainder Theorem (CRT).In the scheme, the classical messages are mapped to secret sequences according to CRT equations, and distributed to different receivers by different dimensional superdense-coding respectively.CRT's secret sharing function, together with high-dimensional superdense-coding, provide convenience, security, and large capability quantum channel for secret distribution and recovering.Analysis shows the security of the scheme.

  18. Co-culture of clonal beta cells with GLP-1 and glucagon-secreting cell line impacts on beta cell insulin secretion, proliferation and susceptibility to cytotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alastair D; Vasu, Srividya; Moffett, R Charlotte; Flatt, Peter R

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the direct effects on insulin releasing MIN6 cells of chronic exposure to GLP-1, glucagon or a combination of both peptides secreted from GLUTag L-cell and αTC1.9 alpha-cell lines in co-culture. MIN6, GLUTag and αTC1.9 cell lines exhibited high cellular hormone content and release of insulin, GLP-1 and glucagon, respectively. Co-culture of MIN6 cells with GLUTag cells significantly increased cellular insulin content, beta-cell proliferation, insulin secretory responses to a range of established secretogogues and afforded protection against exposure cytotoxic concentrations of glucose, lipid, streptozotocin or cytokines. Benefits of co-culture of MIN6 cells with αTC1.9 alphacells were limited to enhanced beta-cell proliferation with marginal positive actions on both insulin secretion and cellular protection. In contrast, co-culture of MIN6 with GLUTag cells plus αTC1.9 cells, markedly enhanced both insulin secretory responses and protection against beta-cell toxins compared with co-culture with GLUTag cells alone. These data indicate important long-term effects of conjoint GLP-1 and glucagon exposure on beta-cell function. This illustrates the possible functional significance of alpha-cell GLP-1 production as well as direct beneficial effects of dual agonism at beta-cell GLP-1 and glucagon receptors.

  19. Common genetic variation in the human CTF1 locus, encoding cardiotrophin-1, determines insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Z Lutz

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recently, cardiotrophin-1, a member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines was described to protect beta-cells from apoptosis, to improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance, and to prevent streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice. Here, we studied whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CTF1 locus, encoding cardiotrophin-1, influence insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in humans. METHODS: We genotyped 1,771 German subjects for three CTF1 tagging SNPs (rs1046276, rs1458201, and rs8046707. The subjects were metabolically characterized by an oral glucose tolerance test. Subgroups underwent magnetic resonance (MR imaging/spectroscopy and hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps. RESULTS: After appropriate adjustment, the minor allele of CTF1 SNP rs8046707 was significantly associated with decreased in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity. The other tested SNPs were not associated with OGTT-derived sensitivity parameters, nor did the three tested SNPs show any association with OGTT-derived parameters of insulin release. In the MR subgroup, SNP rs8046707 was nominally associated with lower visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, the SNP rs1458201 showed a nominal association with increased VLDL levels. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this study, even though preliminary and awaiting further confirmation by independent replication, provides first evidence that common genetic variation in CTF1 could contribute to insulin sensitivity in humans. Our SNP data indicate an insulin-desensitizing effect of cardiotrophin-1 and underline that cardiotrophin-1 represents an interesting target to influence insulin sensitivity.

  20. Measurement of secretion in nasal lavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Krogsgaard, O W; Mygind, N

    1987-01-01

    secretion to be carried out on the whole sample of lavage fluid, thereby avoiding the necessity of complete admixture between marker and lavage fluid which would be pertinent to marker molecules measured chemically. The radiation from a nasal lavage is minimal and the procedure is fully acceptable...... for repeated use in humans. 4. The nasal lavage technique adopted allowed the return of 99.2% (median value) of the instilled volume. The area irrigated was visualized on a gamma-camera, and was demonstrated to cover an area larger than the area reached by challenge from a pumpspray, i.e. a large part...... of the nose, yet not the oropharynx. 5. A dose related increase in nasal secretion harvested by the nasal lavage in 10 persons challenged with histamine chloride could be demonstrated by this technique. 6. It is concluded that the use of 99mTc-albumin in a nasal washing provides a safe, simple and quick...