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Sample records for genetic rat model

  1. Increased numbers of orexin/hypocretin neurons in a genetic rat depression model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikrouli, Elli; Wörtwein, Gitta; Soylu, Rana

    2011-01-01

    The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat is a genetic animal model of depression that displays characteristics similar to those of depressed patients including lower body weight, decreased appetite and reduced REM sleep latency. Hypothalamic neuropeptides such as orexin/hypocretin, melanin-concentra......The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat is a genetic animal model of depression that displays characteristics similar to those of depressed patients including lower body weight, decreased appetite and reduced REM sleep latency. Hypothalamic neuropeptides such as orexin/hypocretin, melanin...

  2. Alterations in cerebellar glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) activity in a genetic model of torsion dystonia (rat).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmans, G A; Beales, M; Lorden, J F; Gordon, J H

    1984-07-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) activity was studied in specific brain regions of a newly identified genetic (rat) model of human torsion dystonia. GAD activity was found to be significantly increased in the deep cerebellar nuclei of dystonic rats at 16, 20, and 24 days of age. GAD activity in the other regions examined (vermis, cerebellar hemispheres, caudate nucleus, and globus pallidus) did not differ from that of age-matched normal littermate controls. Diazepam treatment significantly reduced the frequency of dystonic movements in the mutant.

  3. Studies on BN rats model to determine the potential allergenicity of proteins from genetically modified foods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Dong Jia; Ning Li; Yong-Ning Wu; Xiao-Guang Yang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To develop a Brown Norway (BN) rat model to determine the potential allergenicity of novel proteins in genetically modified food.METHODS: The allergenicity of different proteins were compared, including ovalbumin (OVA), a potent respiratory and food allergen, bovine serum albumin (BSA), a protein that is considered to have a lesser allergenic potential,and potato acid phosphatase (PAP), a non-allergenic protein when administered to BN rats via different routes of exposure (intraperitoneally or by gavage). IgG and IgE antibody responses were determined by ELISA and PCA,respectively. An immunoassay kit was used to determine the plasma histamine level. In addition, possible systemic effect of allergens was investigated by monitoring blood pressure.RESULTS: OVA provoked very vigorous protein-specific IgG and IgE responses, low grade protein-specific IgG and IgE responses were elicited by BSA, while by neither route did PAP elicit anything. In either routes of exposure,plasma histamine level in BN rats sensitized with OVA was higher than that of BSA or PAP. In addition, an oral challenge with BSA and PAP did not induce any effect on blood pressure, while a temporary drop in systolic blood pressure in few animals of each routes of exposure was found by an oral challenge with OVA.CONCLUSION: BN rat model might be a useful and predictive animal model to study the potential allergenicity of novel food proteins.

  4. Fischer 344 and Lewis Rat Strains as a Model of Genetic Vulnerability to Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoni, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Today it is well acknowledged that both nature and nurture play important roles in the genesis of psychopathologies, including drug addiction. Increasing evidence suggests that genetic factors contribute for at least 40-60% of the variation in liability to drug dependence. Human genetic studies suggest that multiple genes of small effect, rather than single genes, contribute to the genesis of behavioral psychopathologies. Therefore, the use of inbred rat strains might provide a valuable tool to identify differences, linked to genotype, important in liability to addiction and related disorders. In this regard, Lewis and Fischer 344 inbred rats have been proposed as a model of genetic vulnerability to drug addiction, given their innate differences in sensitivity to the reinforcing and rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, as well their different responsiveness to stressful stimuli. This review will provide evidence in support of this model for the study of the genetic influence on addiction vulnerability, with particular emphasis on differences in mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission, rewarding and emotional function. It will be highlighted that Lewis and Fischer 344 rats differ not only in several indices of DA transmission and adaptive changes following repeated drug exposure, but also in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness, influencing not only the ability of the individual to cope with stressful events, but also interfering with rewarding and motivational processes, given the influence of corticosteroids on dopamine neuron functionality. Further differences between the two strains, as impulsivity or anxiousness, might contribute to their different proneness to addiction, and likely these features might be linked to their different DA neurotransmission plasticity. Although differences in other neurotransmitter systems might deserve further investigation, results from the reviewed studies might open new vistas in understanding aberrant

  5. Fischer 344 and Lewis rat strains as a model of genetic vulnerability to drug addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eCadoni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Today it is well acknowledged that both nature and nurture play important roles in the genesis of psychopathologies, including drug addiction. Increasing evidence suggests that genetic factors contribute for at least 40-60 % of the variation in liability to drug dependence. Human genetic studies suggest that multiple genes of small effect, rather than single genes, contribute to the genesis of behavioral psychopathologies. Therefore the use of inbred rat strains might provide a valuable tool to identify differences, linked to genotype, important in liability to addiction and related disorders. In this regard, Lewis and Fischer 344 inbred rats have been proposed as a model of genetic vulnerability to drug addiction, given their innate differences in sensitivity to the reinforcing and rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, as well their different responsiveness to stressful stimuli. This review will provide evidence in support of this model for the study of the genetic influence on addiction vulnerability, with particular emphasis to differences in mesolimbic dopamine (DA transmission, rewarding and emotional function. It will be highlighted that Lewis and Fischer 344 rats differ not only in several indices of DA transmission and adaptive changes following repeated drug exposure, but also in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis responsiveness, influencing not only the ability of the individual to cope with stressful events, but also interfering with rewarding and motivational processes, given the influence of corticosteroids on dopamine neurons functionality.Further differences between the two strains, as impulsivity or anxiousness, might contribute to their different proneness to addiction, and likely these features might be linked to their different DA neurotransmission plasticity. Although differences in other neurotransmitter systems might deserve further investigations, results from the reviewed studies might open new vistas in

  6. HCN channelopathy and cardiac electrophysiologic dysfunction in genetic and acquired rat epilepsy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kim L; Jones, Nigel C; Kennard, Jeremy T; Ng, Caroline; Urmaliya, Vijay; Lau, Shannen; Tran, Adora; Zheng, Thomas; Ozturk, Ezgi; Dezsi, Gabi; Megatia, Ika; Delbridge, Lea M; Pinault, Didier; Reid, Christopher A; White, Paul J; O'Brien, Terence J

    2014-04-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies indicates that epilepsy can affect cardiac function, although the molecular basis of this remains poorly understood. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels generate pacemaker activity and modulate cellular excitability in the brain and heart, with altered expression and function associated with epilepsy and cardiomyopathies. Whether HCN expression is altered in the heart in association with epilepsy has not been investigated previously. We studied cardiac electrophysiologic properties and HCN channel subunit expression in rat models of genetic generalized epilepsy (Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg, GAERS) and acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (post-status epilepticus SE). We hypothesized that the development of epilepsy is associated with altered cardiac electrophysiologic function and altered cardiac HCN channel expression. Electrocardiography studies were recorded in vivo in rats and in vitro in isolated hearts. Cardiac HCN channel messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression were measured using quantitative PCR and Western blotting respectively. Cardiac electrophysiology was significantly altered in adult GAERS, with slower heart rate, shorter QRS duration, longer QTc interval, and greater standard deviation of RR intervals compared to control rats. In the post-SE model, we observed similar interictal changes in several of these parameters, and we also observed consistent and striking bradycardia associated with the onset of ictal activity. Molecular analysis demonstrated significant reductions in cardiac HCN2 mRNA and protein expression in both models, providing a molecular correlate of these electrophysiologic abnormalities. These results demonstrate that ion channelopathies and cardiac dysfunction can develop as a secondary consequence of chronic epilepsy, which may have relevance for the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in patients with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nature and nurture: environmental influences on a genetic rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta-Raghavan, N S; Wert, S L; Morley, C; Graf, E N; Redei, E E

    2016-03-29

    In this study, we sought to learn whether adverse events such as chronic restraint stress (CRS), or 'nurture' in the form of environmental enrichment (EE), could modify depression-like behavior and blood biomarker transcript levels in a genetic rat model of depression. The Wistar Kyoto More Immobile (WMI) is a genetic model of depression that aided in the identification of blood transcriptomic markers, which successfully distinguished adolescent and adult subjects with major depressive disorders from their matched no-disorder controls. Here, we followed the effects of CRS and EE in adult male WMIs and their genetically similar control strain, the Wistar Kyoto Less Immobile (WLI), that does not show depression-like behavior, by measuring the levels of these transcripts in the blood and hippocampus. In WLIs, increased depression-like behavior and transcriptomic changes were present in response to CRS, but in WMIs no behavioral or additive transcriptomic changes occurred. Environmental enrichment decreased both the inherent depression-like behavior in the WMIs and the behavioral difference between WMIs and WLIs, but did not reverse basal transcript level differences between the strains. The inverse behavioral change induced by CRS and EE in the WLIs did not result in parallel inverse expression changes of the transcriptomic markers, suggesting that these behavioral responses to the environment work via separate molecular pathways. In contrast, 'trait' transcriptomic markers with expression differences inherent and unchanging between the strains regardless of the environment suggest that in our model, environmental and genetic etiologies of depression work through independent molecular mechanisms.

  8. Rat embryonic stem cells create new era in development of genetically manipulated rat models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazushi; Kawaharada; Masaki; Kawamata; Takahiro; Ochiya

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem(ES) cells are isolated from theinner cell mass of a blastocyst, and are used for the generation of gene-modified animals. In mice, the transplantation of gene-modified ES cells into recipient blastocysts leads to the creation of gene-targeted mice such as knock-in and knock-out mice; these gene-targeted mice contribute greatly to scientific development. Although the rat is considered a useful laboratory animal alongside the mouse, fewer genemodified rats have been produced due to the lack of robust establishment methods for rat ES cells. A new method for establishing rat ES cells using signaling inhibitors was reported in 2008. By considering the characteristics of rat ES cells, recent research has made progress in improving conditions for the stable culture of rat ES cells in order to generate gene-modified rats efficiently. In this review, we summarize several advanced methods to maintain rat ES cells and generate gene-targeted rats.

  9. Swim test immobility in a genetic rat model of depression is modified by maternal environment: a cross-foster study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Elliot; Berman, Marissa; Overstreet, David

    2006-03-01

    The Flinders sensitive line (FSL) genetic animal model of depression exhibits marked immobility during forced swimming, an accepted index of depressive like behavior in rodent depression models. The present experiment tested the hypothesis that swim test behavior in the FSL rats is influenced in part by early experience, specifically maternal environment. Male FSL and control Flinders resistant line (FRL) pups were cross fostered onto dams of the same or complementary strain. Nest quality and dam behavior during pup retrieval were measured on PN5 and PN8, and swim test behavior assessed in the adult males on PN60. FSL rats reared by foster FRL dams were significantly less immobile than FSL rats raised by FSL dams, but still significantly more immobile that the two FRL groups, which did not differ from each other. FSL dams took significantly longer to retrieve their pups and dropped them more often than the FRL control dams. Moreover, strain differences in maternal retrieval behavior significantly predicted later swim test immobility in the FSL animals. These findings suggest that swim test immobility in the FSL rats is modified by maternal environment. In contrast, the FRL control rats were relatively insensitive to the influence of maternal environment. The FSL model offers promise for understanding the interactions of genetic vulnerabilities and environmental influences in the etiology of clinical depression.

  10. The role of the dopamine D1 receptor in social cognition: studies using a novel genetic rat model­

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandenBroeke, Marie; Youn, Jiun; Ellenbroek, Arabella K.; Karel, Peter; Shan, Ling; van Boxtel, Ruben; Ooms, Sharon; Balemans, Monique; Langedijk, Jacqueline; Muller, Mareike; Vriend, Gert; Cools, Alexander R.; Cuppen, Edwin; Ellenbroek, Bart A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Social cognition is an endophenotype that is impaired in schizophrenia and several other (comorbid) psychiatric disorders. One of the modulators of social cognition is dopamine, but its role is not clear. The effects of dopamine are mediated through dopamine receptors, including the dopamine D1 receptor (Drd1). Because current Drd1 receptor agonists are not Drd1 selective, pharmacological tools are not sufficient to delineate the role of the Drd1. Here, we describe a novel rat model with a genetic mutation in Drd1 in which we measured basic behavioural phenotypes and social cognition. The I116S mutation was predicted to render the receptor less stable. In line with this computational prediction, this Drd1 mutation led to a decreased transmembrane insertion of Drd1, whereas Drd1 expression, as measured by Drd1 mRNA levels, remained unaffected. Owing to decreased transmembrane Drd1 insertion, the mutant rats displayed normal basic motoric and neurological parameters, as well as locomotor activity and anxiety-like behaviour. However, measures of social cognition like social interaction, scent marking, pup ultrasonic vocalizations and sociability, were strongly reduced in the mutant rats. This profile of the Drd1 mutant rat offers the field of neuroscience a novel genetic rat model to study a series of psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, autism, depression, bipolar disorder and drug addiction. PMID:27483345

  11. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao-Ling Lo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP. This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS, were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50% of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284 and intronic regions (169 with the least in exon's (4, suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a, excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1, neurotransmitters (Pomc, and synapses (Snap29. This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits.

  12. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits.

  13. Genetic animal models for Absence epilepsy: a review of the WAG/Rij strain of rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, A.M.L.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Based on the reviewed literature and the data presented in this paper, conclusions can be drawn with respect to the validity of the WAG/Rij strain of rats as a model for absence epilepsy in humans. The view that the WAG/Rij model has "face validity" is supported by the simultaneous presence of clini

  14. Milan hypertensive rat as a model for studying cation transport abnormality in genetic hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, P.; Barber, B.R.; Torielli, L.; Ferrandi, M.; Salardi, S.; Bianchi, G.

    1987-11-01

    Environmental factors, genetic polymorphisms, and different experimental designs have been the main impediments to evaluating a genetic association between cell membrane cation transport abnormalities and human essential or genetic hypertension. We review the results obtained in the Milan hypertensive strain of rats (MHS) and in its appropriate control normotensive strain (MNS) to illustrate our approach to defining the role of cation transport abnormality in a type of genetic hypertension. Before the development of a difference in blood pressure between the two strains, the comparison of kidney and erythrocyte functions showed that MHS had an increased glomerular filtration rate and urinary output, and lower plasma renin and urine osmolality. Kidney cross-transplantation between the strains showed that hypertension is transplanted with the kidney. Proximal tubular cell volume and sodium content were lower in MHS while sodium transport across the brush border membrane vesicles of MHS was faster. Erythrocytes in MHS were smaller and had lower sodium concentration, and Na+-K+ cotransport and passive permeability were faster. The differences in volume, sodium content, and Na+-K+ cotransport between erythrocytes of the two strains persisted after transplantation of bone marrow to irradiated F1 (MHS X MNS) hybrids. Moreover, in normal segregating F2 hybrid populations there was a positive correlation between blood pressure and Na+-K+ cotransport. These results suggest a genetic and functional link in MHS between cell membrane cation transport abnormalities and hypertension. Thus, erythrocyte cell membrane may be used for approaching the problem of defining the genetically determined molecular mechanism underlying the development of a type of essential hypertension. 35 references.

  15. Genetic threshold hypothesis of neocortical spike-and-wave discharges in the rat: an animal model of petit mal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadász, C; Carpi, D; Jando, G; Kandel, A; Urioste, R; Horváth, Z; Pierre, E; Vadi, D; Fleischer, A; Buzsáki, G

    1995-02-27

    Neocortical high-voltage spike-and-wave discharges (HVS) in the rat are an animal model of petit mal epilepsy. Genetic analysis of total duration of HVS (s/12 hr) in reciprocal F1 and F2 hybrids of F344 and BN rats indicated that the phenotypic variability of HVS cannot be explained by a simple, monogenic Mendelian model. Biometrical analysis suggested the presence of additive, dominance, and sex-linked-epistatic effects, buffering maternal influence, and heterosis. High correlation was observed between average duration (s/episode) and frequency of occurrence of spike-and-wave episodes (n/12 hr) in parental and segregating generations, indicating that common genes affect both duration and frequency of the spike-and-wave pattern. We propose that both genetic and developmental-environmental factors control an underlying quantitative variable, which, above a certain threshold level, precipitates HVS discharges. These findings, together with the recent availability of rat DNA markers for total genome mapping, pave the way to the identification of genes that control the susceptibility of the brain to spike-and-wave discharges.

  16. Genetic threshold hypothesis of neocortical spike-and-wave discharges in the rat: An animal model of petit mal epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadasz, C.; Fleischer, A. [Nathan Kline Inst. for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY (United States); Carpi, D.; Jando, G. [State Univ. of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-27

    Neocortical high-voltage spike-and-wave discharges (HVS) in the rat are an animal model of petit mal epilepsy. Genetic analysis of total duration of HVS (s/12 hr) in reciprocal F1 and F2 hybrids of F344 and BN rats indicated that the phenotypic variability of HVS cannot be explained by simple, monogenic Mendelian model. Biometrical analysis suggested the presence of additive, dominance, and sex-linked-epistatic effects, buffering maternal influence, and heterosis. High correlation was observed between average duration (s/episode) and frequency of occurrence of spike-and-wave episodes (n/12 hr) in parental and segregating generations, indicating that common genes affect both duration and frequency of the spike-and-wave pattern. We propose that both genetic and developmental - environmental factors control an underlying quantitative variable, which, above a certain threshold level, precipitates HVS discharges. These findings, together with the recent availability of rat DNA markers for total genome mapping, pave the way to the identification of genes that control the susceptibility of the brain to spike-and-wave discharges. 67 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Nortriptyline mediates behavioral effects without affecting hippocampal cytogenesis in a genetic rat depression model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersén, Asa; Wörtwein, Gitta; Gruber, Susanne H M

    2009-01-01

    A prevailing hypothesis is that neurogenesis is reduced in depression and that the common mechanism for antidepressant treatments is to increase it in adult hippocampus. Reduced neurogenesis has been shown in healthy rats exposed to stress, but it has not yet been demonstrated in depressed patients....... Emerging studies now indicate that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can, exert behavioral effects without affecting neurogenesis in mice. Here we extend our previous findings demonstrating that the number of BrdU positive cells in hippocampus was significantly higher in a rat model of depression....... These results strengthen the arguments against hypothesis of neurogenesis being necessary in etiology of depression and as requisite for effects of antidepressants, and illustrate the importance of using a disease model and not healthy animals to assess effects of potential therapies for major depressive...

  18. Effects of levetiracetam, a novel antiepileptic drug, on convulsant activity in two genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, A J; Hirsch, E; Boehrer, A; Noyer, M; Marescaux, C

    1995-11-01

    The anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam were assessed in two genetic rat models. In the audiogenic-seizure prone rat, levetiracetam, 5.4 to 96 mg/kg i.p. dose-dependently inhibited both wild running and tonic-clonic convulsions. In the GAERS model of petit mal epilepsy, levetiracetam markedly suppressed spontaneous spike-and-wave discharge (SWD) but left the underlying EEG trace normal. The effects were already marked at 5.4 mg/kg and did not increase significantly up to 170 mg/kg although more animals were completely protected. Levetiracetam produced no observable effects on behaviour apart from slight reversible sedation at 170 mg/kg. In contrast, piracetam, a structural analogue of levetiracetam, significantly and consistently suppressed SWD in GAERS rats only at the high dose of 1000 mg/kg with some slight effects at lower doses. The effect of piracetam appeared to be due to increased sleeping rather than to a direct antiepileptic effect. The results with levetiracetam argue for a clinical application in both petit mal, absence epilepsy and in treating generalised tonic-clonic and partial seizures.

  19. The deafferentation syndrome in genetically blind rats: a model of the painful phantom limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, M; Heybach, J P

    1981-02-01

    The hypothesis was tested which states that the somatic deafferentation syndrome is a visually prompted response to sensorimotor loss. The dorsal roots, C5-T2, were bilaterally cut in a strain of rats known to be genetically blind. These complete dorsal rhizotomies left the forelimbs totally anesthetic, analgesic and paretic. Contact and visual placing reactions were absent, and responses to pinprick or pinch were absent. Self-mutilation limited to the distal digits appeared on the first or second postoperative days and then progressed proximally. The forelimbs were symmetrically affected, and no other body parts were mutilated. The spatial precision of this syndrome, in the absence of visual as well as peripheral somatosensory information from the affected limb, indicates that controlled guidance of the behavior arises from an existing central representation of the limb and its relationship with the total body; a phantom limb. Consideration of other reports regarding the deafferentation syndrome leads to the view that it is motivated by disturbing abnormal sensations (pain) of central neural origin.

  20. A novel genetically-obese rat model with elevated 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity in subcutaneous adipose tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Giridharan Nappan V; Reddy Sirisha J; Kumar Chodavarapu; Prashanth Anamthathmakula; Prasad Sakamuri; Vajreswari Ayyalasomayajula

    2010-01-01

    Abstract 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) catalyzes the conversion of inactive glucocorticoids to active glucocorticoids and plays an important role in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. 11β-HSD1 activity is lower in liver and higher in omental adipose tissue of obese rodent models like obese zucker rats, Ob/Ob and db/db mice. Here, we report the 11β-HSD1 activity in liver and adipose tissue of lean and obese rats of WNIN/Ob strain, a new genetic rat model of...

  1. Photobiomodulation Suppresses Alpha-Synuclein-Induced Toxicity in an AAV-Based Rat Genetic Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abid Oueslati

    Full Text Available Converging lines of evidence indicate that near-infrared light treatment, also known as photobiomodulation (PBM, may exert beneficial effects and protect against cellular toxicity and degeneration in several animal models of human pathologies, including neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we report that chronic PMB treatment mitigates dopaminergic loss induced by unilateral overexpression of human α-synuclein (α-syn in the substantia nigra of an AAV-based rat genetic model of Parkinson's disease (PD. In this model, daily exposure of both sides of the rat's head to 808-nm near-infrared light for 28 consecutive days alleviated α-syn-induced motor impairment, as assessed using the cylinder test. This treatment also significantly reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss in the injected substantia nigra and preserved dopaminergic fibers in the ipsilateral striatum. These beneficial effects were sustained for at least 6 weeks after discontinuing the treatment. Together, our data point to PBM as a possible therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PD and other related synucleinopathies.

  2. Differential interaction with the serotonin system by S-ketamine, vortioxetine, and fluoxetine in a genetic rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Liebenberg, Nico; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina; Sanchez, Connie; Wegener, Gregers

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms mediating ketamine's antidepressant effect have only been partly resolved. Recent preclinical reports implicate serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) in the antidepressant-like action of ketamine. Vortioxetine is a multimodal-acting antidepressant that is hypothesized to exert its therapeutic activity through 5-HT reuptake inhibition and modulation of several 5-HT receptors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic-like profiles of S-ketamine, vortioxetine, and the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine in response to manipulation of 5-HT tone. Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, a genetic model of depression, were depleted of 5-HT by repeated administration of 4-chloro-DL-phenylalanine methyl ester HCl (pCPA). Using pCPA-pretreated and control FSL rats, we investigated the acute and sustained effects of S-ketamine (15 mg/kg), fluoxetine (10 mg/kg), or vortioxetine (10 mg/kg) on recognition memory and depression-like behavior in the object recognition task (ORT) and forced swim test (FST), respectively. The behavioral phenotype of FSL rats was unaffected by 5-HT depletion. Vortioxetine, but not fluoxetine or S-ketamine, acutely ameliorated the memory deficits of FSL rats in the ORT irrespective of 5-HT tone. No sustained effects were observed in the ORT. In the FST, all three drugs demonstrated acute antidepressant-like activity but only S-ketamine had sustained effects. Unlike vortioxetine, the antidepressant-like responses of fluoxetine and S-ketamine were abolished by 5-HT depletion. These observations suggest that the acute and sustained antidepressant-like effects of S-ketamine depend on endogenous stimulation of 5-HT receptors. In contrast, the acute therapeutic-like effects of vortioxetine on memory and depression-like behavior may be mediated by direct activity at 5-HT receptors.

  3. Genetic regulation of microglia activation, complement expression, and neurodegeneration in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellander, Bo-Michael; Lidman, Olle; Ohlsson, Marcus; Meijer, Britt; Piehl, Fredrik; Svensson, Mikael

    2010-08-01

    Secondary brain damage following traumatic brain injury in part depends on neuroinflammation, a process where genetic factors may play an important role. We examined the response to a standardized cortical contusion in two different inbred rat strains, Dark Agouti (DA) and Piebald Virol Glaxo (PVG). Both are well characterized in models of autoimmune neuroinflammation, where DA is susceptible and PVG resistant. We found that infiltration of polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) at 3-day postinjury was more pronounced in PVG. DA was more infiltrated by T cells at 3-day postinjury, showed an enhanced glial activation at 7-day postinjury and higher expression of C3 complement at 7-day postinjury. Neurodegeneration, assessed by Fluoro-Jade, was also more pronounced in the DA strain at 30-day postinjury. These results demonstrate differences in the response to cortical contusion injury attributable to genetic influences and suggest a link between injury-induced inflammation and neurodegeneration. Genetic factors that regulate inflammation elicited by brain trauma may be important for the development of secondary brain damage.

  4. Mitochondrial dynamics in the hippocampus is influenced by antidepressant treatment in a genetic rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, F.; Wegener, Gregers; Madsen, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Post-mortem, genetic, brain imaging, and peripheral cell studies showed that mitochondria may play an important role in the pathophysiology of depression and effects of antidepressant therapy. Here we investigated whether chronic antidepressant treatment on rats induce changes of the mitochondrial...... and SD-saline group. Impramine treatment can significantly increase the mitochondria numerical density and the number of mitochondria in FSL-imipramine group. Our results support the mitochondria plasticity hypothesis that depressive disorders may be related to impairments of mitochondria plasticity...... model of depression. The unbiased stereoloy methods were used to estimate the mitochondria numerical density, the number of mitochondria and the mean size and volume of mitochondria in CA1 stratum radiatum (CA1SR) of hippocampus. The results showed that the mitochondria numerical density and the number...

  5. Simultaneous transplantation of fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue and encapsulated genetically modified cells releasing GDNF in a hemi-parkinsonian rat model of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Bouza, Alberto; Di Santo, Stefano; Seiler, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Transplantation of fetal ventral mesencephalic (VM) neurons for Parkinson's disease (PD) is limited by poor survival and suboptimal integration of grafted tissue into the host brain. In a 6-OHDA rat model of PD we investigated the feasibility of simultaneous transplantation of rat fetal VM tissue...... and polymer-encapsulated C2C12 myoblasts genetically modified to produce glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor or mocktransfected myoblasts on graft function. Amphetamine-induced rotations were assessed prior and 2, 4, 6 and 9 weeks post-transplantation. We found that rats grafted with VM transplants...

  6. Genetic analysis of a rat model of aerobic capacity and metabolic fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Yu Ren

    Full Text Available Aerobic capacity is a strong predictor of all-cause mortality and can influence many complex traits. To explore the biological basis underlying this connection, we developed via artificial selection two rat lines that diverge for intrinsic (i.e. inborn aerobic capacity and differ in risk for complex disease traits. Here we conduct the first in-depth pedigree and molecular genetic analysis of these lines, the high capacity runners (HCR and low capacity runners (LCR. Our results show that both HCR and LCR lines maintain considerable narrow-sense heritability (h(2 for the running capacity phenotype over 28 generations (h(2 = 0.47 ± 0.02 and 0.43 ± 0.02, respectively. To minimize inbreeding, the lines were maintained by rotational mating. Pedigree records predict that the inbreeding coefficient increases at a rate of <1% per generation, ~37-38% slower than expected for random mating. Genome-wide 10K SNP genotype data for generations 5, 14, and 26 demonstrate substantial genomic evolution: between-line differentiation increased progressively, while within-line diversity deceased. Genome-wide average heterozygosity decreased at a rate of <1% per generation, consistent with pedigree-based predictions and confirming the effectiveness of rotational breeding. Linkage disequilibrium index r(2 decreases to 0.3 at ~3 Mb, suggesting that the resolution for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL can be as high as 2-3 cM. To establish a test population for QTL mapping, we conducted an HCR-LCR intercross. Running capacity of the F1 population (n=176 was intermediate of the HCR and LCR parentals (28 pairs; and the F2 population (n=645 showed a wider range of phenotypic distribution. Importantly, heritability in the F0-F2 pedigree remained high (h(2~0.6. These results suggest that the HCR-LCR lines can serve as a valuable system for studying genomic evolution, and a powerful resource for mapping QTL for a host of characters relevant to human health.

  7. Antidepressant-like properties of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and cholinergic dependency in a genetic rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenberg, Nico; Harvey, Brian H; Brand, Linda; Brink, Christiaan B

    2010-09-01

    We explored the antidepressant-like properties of two phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors in a genetic animal model of depression, namely Flinders sensitive line rats. We investigated the dose-dependency of the antidepressant-like action of sildenafil, and its interaction with the cholinergic system and behavioural correlates of monoaminergic neurotransmission, in the forced swim test. Antidepressant-like properties of tadalafil (a structurally distinct PDE5 inhibitor) were also evaluated. Flinders sensitive line rats were treated for 14 days with vehicle, fluoxetine, atropine or PDE5 inhibitors+/-atropine. Immobility, swimming and climbing behaviours were assessed in the forced swim test. In combination with atropine (1 mg/kg), both sildenafil (10, 20 mg/kg) and tadalafil (10 mg/kg) decreased immobility while increasing swimming (serotonergic) and climbing (noradrenergic) behaviours. Interestingly, sildenafil (3 mg/kg) decreased immobility while selectively increasing climbing behaviour in the absence of atropine. These results suggest that the antidepressant-like activity of PDE5 inhibitors involve alterations in monoaminergic neurotransmission, but involve a dependence on inherent cholinergic tone so that the final response is determined by the relative extent of activation of these systems. Furthermore, the behavioural profile of sildenafil alone, and its observed antidepressant-like properties, shows strict dose-dependency, with only higher doses showing an interaction with the cholinergic system.

  8. Mitochondrial dynamics in the hippocampus is influenced by antidepressant treatment in a genetic rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, F.; Wegener, Gregers; Madsen, T. M.;

    2013-01-01

    number in hippocampus. All rats were injected imipramine (a classic tricyclic antidepressant) or saline (i.p) once daily for 14 days on normal rats (10 mg/kg) and for 25 days on the Flinders Sensitive Lines (FSL) rats and their controls the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats (15 mg/kg), a genetic rat...... of mitochondria in CA1SR displayed significantly smaller in the FSL-saline group compared to FRL-saline group and SD-saline group. But the mean volume of mitochondria showed significantly bigger in the FSL-saline group compared to FRL-saline group and SD-saline group. Following treatment, the FSL-imipramine group...... and SD-saline group. Impramine treatment can significantly increase the mitochondria numerical density and the number of mitochondria in FSL-imipramine group. Our results support the mitochondria plasticity hypothesis that depressive disorders may be related to impairments of mitochondria plasticity...

  9. The expression of Fetuin-A in brain tissues of WAG/Rij Rats, genetic rat model of absence epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Yüksel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, we aimed to determine the Fetuin-A levels in different regions of the brain in absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij rats in order to contribute the identification of new potential biomarkers of the diagnosis, prognosis and follow up the epilepsy treatment. Methods: 1, 3 and 6 months old male WAG/Rij rats (n=21 with absence epilepsy were used in this study. All of the rats were decapitated under anesthesia and their cortex and thalamus tissues were isolated. Fetuin-A levels of the groups were determined by Western Blot method by using standard techniques and differences between densities of the groups were compared. Results: According to data obtained, there was no Fetuin-A expression in brain cortex and thalamus tissues of WAG/Rij rats with absence epilepsy. Conclusion: In this study, it was shown that Fetuin-A is not expressed in brain cortex and thalamus tissues of WAG/Rij rats with absence epilepsy throughout the age-related development. By evaluating the findings obtained, extensive researches that contain molecular and histological methods must be planned, Fetuin-A findings that are obtained experimentally must be confirmed. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (4: 387-390

  10. Antidepressant efficacy of high and low frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation in the FSL/FRL genetic rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselberg, Marie Louise; Wegener, Gregers; Buchholtz, Poul Erik

    2016-11-01

    Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) has appeared to be a potential non-invasive antidepressant method, which implies non-convulsive focal stimulation of the brain through a time varying magnetic field. The antidepressant potential of rTMS has been supported by animal studies showing a number of interesting similarities between magnetic stimulation and electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS). Despite these positive results, this method still contains many unknown issues. Importantly, there are fundamental uncertainties concerning the optimal combination of stimulus parameters (frequency, intensity, duration, and number of pulses) to obtain an antidepressant effect. Therefore, the present study aimed to qualify the choice of rTMS stimulus frequency in a well-validated genetic animal model of depression, the FSL/FRL rats. We compared the antidepressant effect of low frequency, high frequency rTMS and ECS to sham treatment in FRL and FSL rats using 6 parallel groups. We used the Forced Swim Test and the Open Field Test to screen the depression-like state in rats. We found that both the high frequency and the low frequency rTMS resulted in a significant antidepressant effect. However, this effect was inferior to the effect of ECS. The low frequency and high frequency groups, which received the same total impulse load and stimulus intensity, did not differ with respect to antidepressant efficacy in this study. In conclusion, this study provides robust evidence that both rTMS interventions are efficacious, although not as efficient as ECS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel genetically-obese rat model with elevated 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity in subcutaneous adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giridharan Nappan V

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1 catalyzes the conversion of inactive glucocorticoids to active glucocorticoids and plays an important role in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. 11β-HSD1 activity is lower in liver and higher in omental adipose tissue of obese rodent models like obese zucker rats, Ob/Ob and db/db mice. Here, we report the 11β-HSD1 activity in liver and adipose tissue of lean and obese rats of WNIN/Ob strain, a new genetic rat model of obesity. 11β-HSD1 activity in liver, omental and subcutaneous adipose tissues of 3 month-old male WNIN/Ob lean and obese rats was assayed. As observed in other rodent models, 11β-HSD1 activity was lower in liver and higher in omental adipose tissue. In contrast to other rodent obese models, WNIN/Ob obese rats had elevated 11β-HSD1 activity in subcutaneous adipose tissue, which is in line with the observation in human obesity. Here, we conclude that dysregulation of 11β-HSD1 in WNIN/Ob obese rat model is identical to human obesity, which makes it an excellent model for studying the effect of 11β-HSD1 inhibitors in ameliorating obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  12. A novel genetically-obese rat model with elevated 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity in subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sakamuri S S Vara; Prashanth, Anamthathmakula; Kumar, Chodavarapu Pavan; Reddy, Sirisha J; Giridharan, Nappan V; Vajreswari, Ayyalasomayajula

    2010-11-17

    11 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11 β-HSD1) catalyzes the conversion of inactive glucocorticoids to active glucocorticoids and plays an important role in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. 11 β-HSD1 activity is lower in liver and higher in omental adipose tissue of obese rodent models like obese zucker rats, Ob/Ob and db/db mice. Here, we report the 11 β-HSD1 activity in liver and adipose tissue of lean and obese rats of WNIN/Ob strain, a new genetic rat model of obesity. 11 β-HSD1 activity in liver, omental and subcutaneous adipose tissues of 3 month-old male WNIN/Ob lean and obese rats was assayed. As observed in other rodent models, 11 β-HSD1 activity was lower in liver and higher in omental adipose tissue. In contrast to other rodent obese models, WNIN/Ob obese rats had elevated 11 β-HSD1 activity in subcutaneous adipose tissue, which is in line with the observation in human obesity. Here, we conclude that dysregulation of 11 β-HSD1 in WNIN/Ob obese rat model is identical to human obesity, which makes it an excellent model for studying the effect of 11 β-HSD1 inhibitors in ameliorating obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  13. Photobiomodulation Suppresses Alpha-Synuclein-Induced Toxicity in an AAV-Based Rat Genetic Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oueslati, Abid; Lovisa, Blaise; Perrin, John; Wagnières, Georges; van den Bergh, Hubert; Tardy, Yanik; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2015-01-01

    Converging lines of evidence indicate that near-infrared light treatment, also known as photobiomodulation (PBM), may exert beneficial effects and protect against cellular toxicity and degeneration in several animal models of human pathologies, including neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we report that chronic PMB treatment mitigates dopaminergic loss induced by unilateral overexpression of human α-synuclein (α-syn) in the substantia nigra of an AAV-based rat genetic model of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In this model, daily exposure of both sides of the rat’s head to 808-nm near-infrared light for 28 consecutive days alleviated α-syn-induced motor impairment, as assessed using the cylinder test. This treatment also significantly reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss in the injected substantia nigra and preserved dopaminergic fibers in the ipsilateral striatum. These beneficial effects were sustained for at least 6 weeks after discontinuing the treatment. Together, our data point to PBM as a possible therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PD and other related synucleinopathies. PMID:26484876

  14. SNP and haplotype mapping for genetic analysis in the rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saar, K.; Beck, A.; Bihoreau, M.; Birney, E.; Brocklebank, D.; Chen, Y.; Cuppen, E.; Demonchy, S.; Dopazo, J.; Flicek, P.; Foglio, M.; Fujiyama, A.; Gut, I.G.; Gauguier, D.; Guigo, R.; Guryev, V.; Heinig, M.; Hummel, O.; Jahn, N.; Klages, S.; Kren, V.; Kube, M.; Kuhl, H.; Kuramoto, T.; Kuroki, Y.; Lechner, D.; Lee, Y.A.; Lopez-Bigas, N.; Lathrop, G.M.; Mashimo, T.; Medina, I.; Mott, R.; Patone, G.; Perrier-Cornet, J.A.; Platzer, M.; Pravenec, M.; Reinhardt, R.; Sakaki, Y.; Schilhabel, M.; Schulz, H.; Serikawa, T.; Shikhagaie, M.; Tatsumoto, S.; Taudien, S.; Toyoda, A.; Voigt, B.; Zelenika, D.; Zimdahl, H.; Hubner, N.

    2008-01-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most extensively studied model organisms. Inbred laboratory rat strains originated from limited Rattus norvegicus founder populations, and the inherited genetic variation provides an excellent resource for the correlation of genotype to phenotype. Here, we report a s

  15. SNP and haplotype mapping for genetic analysis in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saar, Kathrin; Beck, Alfred; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Birney, Ewan; Brocklebank, Denise; Chen, Yuan; Cuppen, Edwin; Demonchy, Stephanie; Dopazo, Joaquin; Flicek, Paul; Foglio, Mario; Fujiyama, Asao; Gut, Ivo G; Gauguier, Dominique; Guigo, Roderic; Guryev, Victor; Heinig, Matthias; Hummel, Oliver; Jahn, Niels; Klages, Sven; Kren, Vladimir; Kube, Michael; Kuhl, Heiner; Kuramoto, Takashi; Kuroki, Yoko; Lechner, Doris; Lee, Young-Ae; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Lathrop, G Mark; Mashimo, Tomoji; Medina, Ignacio; Mott, Richard; Patone, Giannino; Perrier-Cornet, Jeanne-Antide; Platzer, Matthias; Pravenec, Michal; Reinhardt, Richard; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Schilhabel, Markus; Schulz, Herbert; Serikawa, Tadao; Shikhagaie, Medya; Tatsumoto, Shouji; Taudien, Stefan; Toyoda, Atsushi; Voigt, Birger; Zelenika, Diana; Zimdahl, Heike; Hubner, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most extensively studied model organisms. Inbred laboratory rat strains originated from limited Rattus norvegicus founder populations, and the inherited genetic variation provides an excellent resource for the correlation of genotype to phenotype. Here, we report a s

  16. Manipulations in Maternal Environment Reverse Periodontitis in Genetically Predisposed Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sluyter, Frans; Breivik, Torbjørn; Cools, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The predisposition to develop periodontitis is partly genetically determined in humans as well as in animals. Here we demonstrate, however, that early manipulations in the maternal environment of an animal (rat) model of periodontitis can fully reverse the genetic predisposition to develop periodontitis at adult age.

  17. Neuropeptide S alters anxiety, but not depression-like behaviour in Flinders Sensitive Line rats: a genetic animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Gregers; Finger, Beate C; Elfving, Betina; Keller, Kirsten; Liebenberg, Nico; Fischer, Christina W; Singewald, Nicolas; Slattery, David A; Neumann, Inga D; Mathé, Aleksander A

    2012-04-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor (NPSR) have been implicated in the mediation of anxiolytic-like behaviour in rodents. However, little knowledge is available regarding the NPS system in depression-related behaviours, and whether NPS also exerts anxiolytic effects in an animal model of psychopathology. Therefore, the aim of this work was to characterize the effects of NPS on depression- and anxiety-related parameters, using male and female rats in a well-validated animal model of depression: the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL), their controls, the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL), and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. We found that FSL showed greater immobility in the forced swim test (FST) than FRL, confirming their phenotype. However, NPS did not affect depression-related behaviour in any rat line. No significant differences in baseline anxiety levels between the FSL and FRL strains were observed, but FSL and FRL rats displayed less anxiety-like behaviour compared to SD rats. NPS decreased anxiety-like behaviour on the elevated plus-maze in all strains. The expression of the NPSR in the amygdala, periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and hippocampus was equal in all male strains, although a trend towards reduced expression within the amygdala was observed in FSL rats compared to SD rats. In conclusion, NPS had a marked anxiolytic effect in FSL, FRL and SD rats, but did not modify the depression-related behaviour in any strain, in spite of the significant differences in innate level between the strains. These findings suggest that NPS specifically modifies anxiety behaviour but cannot overcome/reverse a genetically mediated depression phenotype.

  18. Escitalopram reduces increased hippocampal cytogenesis in a genetic rat depression model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersén, Asa; Wörtwein, Gitta; Gruber, Susanne H M

    2008-01-01

    ) reduced by escitalopram treatment in maternally separated animals to the level found in non-separated animals. These results argue against the prevailing hypothesis that adult cytogenesis is reduced in depression and that the common mechanism underlying antidepressant treatments is to increase adult...... cytogenesis. The results also point to the importance of using a disease model and not healthy animals for testing effects of potential treatments for human depression and suggest other cellular mechanisms of action than those that had previously been proposed for escitalopram....

  19. Retake the Center Stage——New Development of Rat Genetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sushuang Zheng; Kindiya Geghman; Sushila Shenoy; Chenjian Li

    2012-01-01

    The rat is a powerful model for the study of human physiology and diseases,and is preferred by physiologists,neuroscientists and toxicologists.However,the lack of robust genetic modification tools has severely limited the generation of rat genetic models over the last two decades.In the last few years,several gene-targeting strategies have been developed in rats using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU),transposons,zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs),bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mediated transgenesis,and recently established rat embryonic stem (ES) cells.The development and improvement of these approaches to genetic manipulation have created a bright future for the use of genetic rat models in investigations of gene function and human diseases.Here,we summarize the strategies used for rat genetic manipulation in current research.We also discuss BAC transgenesis as a potential tool in rat transgenic models.

  20. Genetic architecture of Wistar-Kyoto rat and spontaneously hypertensive rat substrains from different sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang-James, Yanli; Middleton, Frank A; Faraone, Stephen V

    2013-07-02

    The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) has been widely used as a model for studies of hypertension and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The inbred Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat, derived from the same ancestral outbred Wistar rat as the SHR, are normotensive and have been used as the closest genetic control for the SHR, although the WKY has also been used as a model for depression. Notably, however, substantial behavioral and genetic differences among the WKY substrains, usually from the different vendors and breeders, have been observed. These differences have often been overlooked in prior studies, leading to inconsistent and even contradictory findings. The complicated breeding history of the SHR and WKY rats and the lack of a comprehensive understanding of the genetic background of different commercial substrains make the selection of control rats a daunting task, even for researchers who are mindful of their genetic heterogeneity. In this study, we examined the genetic relationship of 16 commonly used WKY and SHR rat substrains using genome-wide SNP genotyping data. Our results confirmed a large genetic divergence and complex relationships among the SHR and WKY substrains. This understanding, although incomplete without the genome sequence, provides useful guidance in selecting substrains and helps to interpret previous reports when the source of the animals was known. Moreover, we found two closely related, yet distinct WKY substrains that may provide novel opportunities in modeling psychiatric disorders.

  1. Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Injection of Genetically Engineered Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells Expressing the Human Proenkephalin Gene in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to investigate the use of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs genetically engineered with the human proenkephalin (hPPE gene to treat bone cancer pain (BCP in a rat model. Methods. Primary cultured hBMSCs were passaged and modified with hPPE, and the cell suspensions (6 × 106 were then intrathecally injected into a rat model of BCP. Paw mechanical withdrawal threshold (PMWT was measured before and after BCP. The effects of hPPE gene transfer on hBMSC bioactivity were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Results. No changes were observed in the surface phenotypes and differentiation of hBMSCs after gene transfer. The hPPE-hBMSC group showed improved PMWT values on the ipsilateral side of rats with BCP from day 12 postoperatively, and the analgesic effect was reversed by naloxone. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-6 were ameliorated, and leucine-enkephalin (L-EK secretion was augmented, in the hPPE-engineered hBMSC group. Conclusion. The intrathecal administration of BMSCs modified with the hPPE gene can effectively relieve pain caused by bone cancer in rats and might be a potentially therapeutic tool for cancer-related pain in humans.

  2. Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Injection of Genetically Engineered Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells Expressing the Human Proenkephalin Gene in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuke; Li, Haifeng; Zhang, Dengwen; Sun, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to investigate the use of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) genetically engineered with the human proenkephalin (hPPE) gene to treat bone cancer pain (BCP) in a rat model. Methods. Primary cultured hBMSCs were passaged and modified with hPPE, and the cell suspensions (6 × 106) were then intrathecally injected into a rat model of BCP. Paw mechanical withdrawal threshold (PMWT) was measured before and after BCP. The effects of hPPE gene transfer on hBMSC bioactivity were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Results. No changes were observed in the surface phenotypes and differentiation of hBMSCs after gene transfer. The hPPE-hBMSC group showed improved PMWT values on the ipsilateral side of rats with BCP from day 12 postoperatively, and the analgesic effect was reversed by naloxone. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-6 were ameliorated, and leucine-enkephalin (L-EK) secretion was augmented, in the hPPE-engineered hBMSC group. Conclusion. The intrathecal administration of BMSCs modified with the hPPE gene can effectively relieve pain caused by bone cancer in rats and might be a potentially therapeutic tool for cancer-related pain in humans. PMID:28286408

  3. Genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPRs) and DBA/2 mice: Two animal models of audiogenic reflex epilepsy for the evaluation of new generation AEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sarro, Giovambattista; Russo, Emilio; Citraro, Rita; Meldrum, Brian S

    2015-08-06

    This review summarizes the current knowledge about DBA/2 mice and genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPRs) and discusses the contribution of such animal models on the investigation of possible new therapeutic targets and new anticonvulsant compounds for the treatment of epilepsy. Also, possible chemical or physical agents acting as proconvulsant agents are described. Abnormal activities of enzymes involved in catecholamine and serotonin synthesis and metabolism were reported in these models, and as a result of all these abnormalities, seizure susceptibility in both animals is greatly affected by pharmacological manipulations of the brain levels of monoamines and, prevalently, serotonin. In addition, both genetic epileptic models permit the evaluation of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions among several drugs measuring plasma and/or brain level of each compound. Audiogenic models of epilepsy have been used not only for reflex epilepsy studies, but also as animal models of epileptogenesis. The seizure predisposition (epileptiform response to sound stimulation) and substantial characterization of behavioral, cellular, and molecular alterations in both acute and chronic (kindling) protocols potentiate the usefulness of these models in elucidating ictogenesis, epileptogenesis, and their mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Genetic Models-Epilepsy".

  4. The Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg model of absence epilepsy exhibits alterations in fear conditioning and latent inhibition consistent with psychiatric comorbidities in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Wendie N; Cavanagh, Mary E; Greba, Quentin; Cain, Stuart M; Snutch, Terrance P; Howland, John G

    2016-01-01

    Behavioural, neurological, and genetic similarities exist in epilepsies, their psychiatric comorbidities, and various psychiatric illnesses, suggesting common aetiological factors. Rodent models of epilepsy are used to characterize the comorbid symptoms apparent in epilepsy and their neurobiological mechanisms. The present study was designed to assess Pavlovian fear conditioning and latent inhibition in a polygenetic rat model of absence epilepsy, i.e. Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) and the non-epileptic control (NEC) strain. Electrophysiological recordings confirmed the presence of spike-wave discharges in young adult GAERS but not NEC rats. A series of behavioural tests designed to assess anxiety-like behaviour (elevated plus maze, open field, acoustic startle response) and cognition (Pavlovian conditioning and latent inhibition) was subsequently conducted on male and female offspring. Results showed that GAERS exhibited significantly higher anxiety-like behaviour, a characteristic reported previously. In addition, using two protocols that differed in shock intensity, we found that both sexes of GAERS displayed exaggerated cued and contextual Pavlovian fear conditioning and impaired fear extinction. Fear reinstatement to the conditioned stimuli following unsignalled footshocks did not differ between the strains. Male GAERS also showed impaired latent inhibition in a paradigm using Pavlovian fear conditioning, suggesting that they may have altered attention, particularly related to previously irrelevant stimuli in the environment. Neither the female GAERS nor NEC rats showed evidence of latent inhibition in our paradigm. Together, the results suggest that GAERS may be a particularly useful model for assessing therapeutics designed to improve the emotional and cognitive disturbances associated with absence epilepsy.

  5. Application of adaptive nonlinear Granger causality: Disclosing network changes before and after absence seizure onset in a genetic rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sysoeva, M.V.; Sitnikova, E.Y.; Sysoev, I.V.; Bezruchko, B.P.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2014-01-01

    Background: Advanced methods of signal analysis of the preictal and ictal activity dynamics characterizing absence epilepsy in humans with absences and in genetic animal models have revealed new and unknown electroencephalographic characteristics, that has led to new insights and theories. New metho

  6. Natural and induced genetic variation in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Bartholomeus Mathijs Godefridus

    2005-01-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most studied model organisms for human heath and disease. Researchers have developed many inbred strains that specifically mimic aspects of human genetic disease, like hypertension, diabetes, and neurological disorders, like anxiety, schizophrenia, and many others. T

  7. Combined effects of low-dose spironolactone and captopril therapy in a rat model of genetic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Resende, Micheline Monteiro; Kriegel, Alison Jessica; Greene, Andrew Seth

    2006-12-01

    For several years, the severe side effects associated with the use of high doses of the aldosterone antagonist, spironolactone, limited its clinical use. Studies have recently shown efficacy and minimal side effects of low-dose spironolactone combined with standard therapy in the treatment of heart failure and hypertensive patients. The authors evaluated the effects of low-dose spironolactone alone or in combination with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors on the progression of left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling in a congenic rat model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The congenic SS-16/Mcwi rats developed severe cardiac hypertrophy despite being normotensive even on high-salt diet. SS-16/Mcwi and SS/Mcwi rats were fed a low-salt (0.4% NaCl) diet and were treated with vehicle (CON), spironolactone (20 mg/kg/d subcutaneously), captopril (100 mg/kg/d drinking water), or both spironolactone and captopril for 4 weeks. Blood pressure, plasma peptides, cardiac fibrosis, and echocardiography measurements were evaluated. Spironolactone at a low dose had no effect on blood pressure, cardiac hypertrophy, and fibrosis in either strain. However, in combination with captopril, spironolactone decreased the cardiac hypertrophy more than captopril treatment alone. In the SS-16/Mcwi rats, the combined therapy significantly preserved the cardiac index when compared with control. These data indicate that the addition of low-dose spironolactone to captopril treatment was more effective in preventing the progression of heart hypertrophy and ventricular dysfunction in the SS-16/Mcwi than captopril alone. This study suggests that combined spironolactone and captopril therapy may be useful in the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  8. Sympathoadrenal Function in Genetically Obese Zucker Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, Anton J.W.; Steffens, Anton B.; Roossien, Bert; Balkan, Börk

    1992-01-01

    The effects of genetic obesity on the actions and alterations of the sympathetic nervous system were studied in 10-12-month-old obese (fa/fa) and lean (Fa/-) Zucker rats. Blood glucose, plasma insulin, epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and free fatty acids (FFA) concentrations were measured in b

  9. A serotonin-1A receptor agonist and an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist oppose each others effects in a genetic rat epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filakovszky, J; Gerber, K; Bagdy, G

    1999-02-12

    The WAG/RIJ rats exhibit spontaneously occurring spike-wave discharges (SWD) accompanied by behavioural phenomena, with characteristics similar to the human absence type epilepsy. To study the mechanisms involved in this type of epileptiform activity we investigated the effects of the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801). Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of 8-OH-DPAT caused marked, dose dependent increase, MK-801 a decrease in the cumulative duration and number of spike-wave discharges. Pretreatment with MK-801 (10 microg/rat i.c.v.) abolished the increase caused by 8-OH-DPAT (20 microg/rat i.c.v.), but the decrease in SWD to MK-801 was counterbalanced by 8-OH-DPAT. These data provide evidence for an interaction of glutamatergic and serotonergic mechanisms in the triggering and maintenance of epileptic activity in this genetic model of absence epilepsy.

  10. Combination of selenium and green tea improves the efficacy of chemoprevention in a rat colorectal cancer model by modulating genetic and epigenetic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying; McIntosh, Graeme H; Le Leu, Richard K; Nyskohus, Laura S; Woodman, Richard J; Young, Graeme P

    2013-01-01

    Dietary supplementation of selenium and green tea holds promise in cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated the efficacies of selenium and green tea administered individually and in combination against colorectal cancer in an azoxymethane (AOM)-induced rat colonic carcinogenesis model and determined the underlying mechanisms of the protection. Four-week old Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed with diets containing 0.5% green tea extract, 1 ppm selenium as selenium-enriched milk protein, or combination of 1 ppm selenium and 0.5% green tea extract. Animals received 2 AOM (15 mg/kg) treatments to induce colonic oncogenesis. Rats were killed 8 or 30 wk later after the last AOM to examine the effect of dietary intervention on aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation or tumor development. On sacrifice, colons were examined for ACF and tumors, the mRNA levels of SFRP5 and Cyclin D1, and the proteins levels of ß-catenin, COX-2, Ki-67, DNMT1 and acetyl histone H3. The combination of selenium and green tea resulted in a significant additive inhibition of large ACF formation, this effect was greater than either selenium or green tea alone, Pselenium or green tea alone, Pselenium and green tea is more effective in suppressing colorectal oncogenesis than either agent alone. The preventive effect is associated with regulation of genetic and epigenetic biomarkers implicated in colonic carcinogenesis.

  11. Neuropeptide s alters anxiety but not depression-like behaviors in the flinders sensitive line rats, a genetic animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathe, A.; Wegener, Gregers; Finger, B.

    2010-01-01

    of cannula, 0.25 or 1.0 nmol NPS, or vehicle/5 ml were infused into the lateral ventricle. 45 min after NPS infusion animals were tested on elevated plus maze (EPM). Five days later the animals were subjected to the two-day forced swim test (FST); NPS or vehicle were injected 45 min before the second day FST...... the effects of centrally administered NPS on depression- and anxiety-related behaviors, using a well validated animal model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats and their controls the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). Methods: Male and female were tested. Seven days following insertion...... while no difference in the anxiety-like behavior was observed. These findings confirm the utility of the FSL as a model of depression useful in exploration of neurobiological correlates both of depression and those discriminating between depression and anxiety endophenotypes. NPS had marked anxiolytic...

  12. Dynamic genetic architecture of metabolic syndrome attributes in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Ondrej; Liska, Frantisek; Krenova, Drahomira; Kazdova, Ludmila; Sedova, Lucie; Zima, Tomas; Peng, Junzheng; Pelinkova, Kveta; Tremblay, Johanne; Hamet, Pavel; Kren, Vladimir

    2005-04-14

    The polydactylous rat strain (PD/Cub) is a highly inbred (F > 90) genetic model of metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to analyze the genetic architecture of the metabolic derangements found in the PD/Cub strain and to assess its dynamics in time and in response to diet and medication. We derived a PD/Cub x BN/Cub (Brown Norway) F2 intercross population of 149 male rats and performed metabolic profiling and genotyping and multiple levels of genetic linkage and statistical analyses at five different stages of ontogenesis and after high-sucrose diet feeding and dexamethasone administration challenges. The interval mapping analysis of 83 metabolic and morphometric traits revealed over 50 regions genomewide with significant or suggestive linkage to one or more of the traits in the segregating PD/Cub x BN/Cub population. The multiple interval mapping showed that, in addition to "single" quantitative train loci, there are more than 30 pairs of loci across the whole genome significantly influencing the variation of particular traits in an epistatic fashion. This study represents the first whole genome analysis of metabolic syndrome in the PD/Cub model and reveals several new loci previously not connected to the genetics of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. In addition, it attempts to present the concept of "dynamic genetic architecture" of metabolic syndrome attributes, evidenced by shifts in the genetic determination of syndrome features during ontogenesis and during adaptation to the dietary and pharmacological influences.

  13. Identification of a rat model for usher syndrome type 1B by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis-driven forward genetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.M.; Peters, T.A.; Mul, J.D.; Croes, H.J.E.; Fransen, J.A.M.; Beynon, A.J.; Guryev, V.; Plasterk, R.H.; Cuppen, E.P.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    The rat is the most extensively studied model organism and is broadly used in biomedical research. Current rat disease models are selected from existing strains and their number is thereby limited by the degree of naturally occurring variation or spontaneous mutations. We have used ENU mutagenesis t

  14. Identification of a rat model for usher syndrome type 1B by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis-driven forward genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.M.; Peters, T.A.; Mul, J.D.; Croes, H.J.; Fransen, J.A.; Beynon, A.J.; Guryev, V.; Plasterk, R.; Cuppen, E.

    2005-01-01

    The rat is the most extensively studied model organism and is broadly used in biomedical research. Current rat disease models are selected from existing strains and their number is thereby limited by the degree of naturally occurring variation or spontaneous mutations. We have used ENU mutagenesis t

  15. Identification of a rat model for usher syndrome type 1B by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis-driven forward genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Bart M G; Peters, Theo A; Mul, Joram D; Croes, Huib J; Fransen, Jack A M; Beynon, Andy J; Guryev, Victor; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Cuppen, Edwin

    2005-01-01

    The rat is the most extensively studied model organism and is broadly used in biomedical research. Current rat disease models are selected from existing strains and their number is thereby limited by the degree of naturally occurring variation or spontaneous mutations. We have used ENU mutagenesis t

  16. Identification of a rat model for usher syndrome type 1B by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis-driven forward genetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.M.; Peters, T.A.; Mul, J.D.; Croes, H.J.E.; Fransen, J.A.M.; Beynon, A.J.; Guryev, V.; Plasterk, R.H.; Cuppen, E.P.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    The rat is the most extensively studied model organism and is broadly used in biomedical research. Current rat disease models are selected from existing strains and their number is thereby limited by the degree of naturally occurring variation or spontaneous mutations. We have used ENU mutagenesis t

  17. Genetical genomic determinants of alcohol consumption in rats and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangion Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used a genetical genomic approach, in conjunction with phenotypic analysis of alcohol consumption, to identify candidate genes that predispose to varying levels of alcohol intake by HXB/BXH recombinant inbred rat strains. In addition, in two populations of humans, we assessed genetic polymorphisms associated with alcohol consumption using a custom genotyping array for 1,350 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Our goal was to ascertain whether our approach, which relies on statistical and informatics techniques, and non-human animal models of alcohol drinking behavior, could inform interpretation of genetic association studies with human populations. Results In the HXB/BXH recombinant inbred (RI rats, correlation analysis of brain gene expression levels with alcohol consumption in a two-bottle choice paradigm, and filtering based on behavioral and gene expression quantitative trait locus (QTL analyses, generated a list of candidate genes. A literature-based, functional analysis of the interactions of the products of these candidate genes defined pathways linked to presynaptic GABA release, activation of dopamine neurons, and postsynaptic GABA receptor trafficking, in brain regions including the hypothalamus, ventral tegmentum and amygdala. The analysis also implicated energy metabolism and caloric intake control as potential influences on alcohol consumption by the recombinant inbred rats. In the human populations, polymorphisms in genes associated with GABA synthesis and GABA receptors, as well as genes related to dopaminergic transmission, were associated with alcohol consumption. Conclusion Our results emphasize the importance of the signaling pathways identified using the non-human animal models, rather than single gene products, in identifying factors responsible for complex traits such as alcohol consumption. The results suggest cross-species similarities in pathways that influence predisposition to consume

  18. Immortalized Rat Astrocyte Strain Genetically Modified by Rat Preprogalanin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To construct an immortalized rat astrocyte strain genetically modified by rat preprogalanin gene (IAST/GAL) and detect its galanin (GAL) expression and secretion, a cDNA fragment of rat GAL in plasmid of pBS KS(+)-GAL was inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+) by DNA recombinant technology, then the restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing were carried out to evaluate the recombinant. The pcDNA3.1 (+)-GAL and pcDNA3.1 (+) construct were transfected into immortalized rat astrocyte strain (IAST) by lipofectamine and the population of cells which stably integrated the construct was selected with 600 μg/mL G418. Individual clones were screened and expanded into clonal cell strains. Detection of Neo gene was used to validate the success of the transfection. Immunocytochemical staining, RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay were used to detect the expression and secretion level of GAL. The recombinant had been successfully constructed by restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing. Detection of Neo gene showed that the pcDNA3.1 (+)-GAL and pcDNA3.1 (+) have been successfully transfected into IAST. After selection by using G418, IAST/GAL and IAST/Neo cell strains were obtained.IAST/GAL, IAST/Neo and IAST were immunostained positively for GAL, but the GAL average optical density of IAST/GAL was significantly higher than that of IAST/Neo and IAST (P<0.01). The level of GAL mRNA expression and the supernatant concentration of GAL in cultured IAST/GAL were significantly higher than those of IAST and IAST/Neo (P<0.01), but no significant differences were found between the IAST and IAST/Neo (P>0.05). It was concluded that IAST/GAL strain was constructed successfully and it might provide a basis for the further study of pain therapy.

  19. The rat as an animal model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Kloskowska, Ewa; Winblad, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    As a disease model, the laboratory rat has contributed enormously to neuroscience research over the years. It has also been a popular animal model for Alzheimer's disease but its popularity has diminished during the last decade, as techniques for genetic manipulation in rats have lagged behind...... as an animal model of Alzheimer's disease....

  20. Graphical models for genetic analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt; Sheehan, Nuala A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces graphical models as a natural environment in which to formulate and solve problems in genetics and related areas. Particular emphasis is given to the relationships among various local computation algorithms which have been developed within the hitherto mostly separate areas...... of graphical models and genetics. The potential of graphical models is explored and illustrated through a number of example applications where the genetic element is substantial or dominating....

  1. Transthoracic echocardiography in rats. Evalution of commonly used indices of left ventricular dimensions, contractile performance, and hypertrophy in a genetic model of hypertrophic heart failure (SHHF-Mcc-facp-Rats) in comparison with Wistar rats during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reffelmann, Thorsten; Kloner, Robert A

    2003-09-01

    Two-weekly echocardiographic examinations were conducted in nine SHHF-Mc-fa(cp) rats in comparison with eight age-matched Wistar rats. In the SHHF-rats, characterized by progressive LV-dilation and decreasing contractile function between 77-87 weeks of age, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy was most sensitively demonstrated by increased LV-mass-index (p rats.

  2. Direct in vivo cell lineage analysis in the retrorsine and 2AAF models of liver injury after genetic labeling in adult and newborn rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Pichard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS AND AIMS: When hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver regeneration proceeds from the division of non parenchymal hepatocyte progenitors. Oval cells and Small Hepatocyte-like Progenitor Cells (SHPCs represent the two most studied examples of such epithelial cells with putative stem cell capacity. In the present study we wished to compare the origin of SHPCs proliferating after retrorsine administration to the one of oval cells observed after 2-Acetyl-Amino fluorene (2-AAF treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used retroviral-mediated nlslacZ genetic labeling of dividing cells to study the fate of cells in the liver. Labeling was performed either in adult rats before treatment or in newborn animals. Labeled cells were identified and characterised by immunohistochemistry. In adult-labeled animals, labeling was restricted to mature hepatocytes. Retrorsine treatment did not modify the overall number of labeled cells in the liver whereas after 2-AAF administration unlabeled oval cells were recorded and the total number of labeled cells decreased significantly. When labeling was performed in newborn rats, results after retrorsine administration were identical to those obtained in adult-labeled rats. In contrast, in the 2-AAF regimen numerous labeled oval cells were present and were able to generate new labeled hepatocytes. Furthermore, we also observed labeled biliary tracts in 2-AAF treated rats. CONCLUSIONS: Our results strongly suggest that SHPCs are derived from hepatocytes and we confirm that SHPCs and oval cells do not share the same origin. We also show that hepatic progenitors are labeled in newborn rats suggesting future directions for in vivo lineage studies.

  3. Experimental model to induce obesity in rats

    OpenAIRE

    von Diemen,Vinicius; Trindade, Eduardo Neubarth; Trindade, Manoel Roberto Maciel

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of obesity is multifactorial and is becoming a problem of public health, due to its increased prevalence and the consequent repercussion of its comorbidities on the health of the population. The great similarity and homology between the genomes of rodents and humans make these animal models a major tool to study conditions affecting humans, which can be simulated in rats. Obesity can be induced in animals by neuroendocrine, dietary or genetic changes. The most widely used models ...

  4. Lyon遗传性高血压大鼠:一种低肾素性高血压动物模型%Lyon genetically hypertensive rats:an animal model of "low renin hypertension"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean SASSARD; LO Ming; LIU Kiao-Ling

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the data which demonstrate that Lyon genetically hypertensive (LH) rats exhibit a low renin form of hypertension. Since when compared to normotensive controls, LH rats exhibit a low renin release and are salt-sensitive. Despite this, the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system normalizes the blood pressure level and the regional blood flows in LH rats. Such a discrepancy between the compulsory presence of angiotensin Ⅱ for the hypertension to develop and the low level of renin release seen in LH rats led to two hypotheses: 1) the existence of an early, short lasting increase of renin release which would be sufficient for the occurrence of a stable hypertension;2) an hypersensitivity to the effects of angiotensin Ⅱ. The study of the long-term effects of early short lasting blockades of the renin-angiotensin system allowed to exclude the first hypothesis. Concerning a hypersensitivity to the effects of angiotensin Ⅱ, it was found to exist in the preglomerular vessels of LH rats. This increased response of renal vessels to angiotensin Ⅱ may well explain the low renin form of hypertension of our model and therefore represents an important field for further research.

  5. Modeling Alzheimer's disease in transgenic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Carmo, Sonia; Cuello, A Claudio

    2013-10-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. At the diagnostic stage, the AD brain is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal loss. Despite the large variety of therapeutic approaches, this condition remains incurable, since at the time of clinical diagnosis, the brain has already suffered irreversible and extensive damage. In recent years, it has become evident that AD starts decades prior to its clinical presentation. In this regard, transgenic animal models can shed much light on the mechanisms underlying this "pre-clinical" stage, enabling the identification and validation of new therapeutic targets. This paper summarizes the formidable efforts to create models mimicking the various aspects of AD pathology in the rat. Transgenic rat models offer distinctive advantages over mice. Rats are physiologically, genetically and morphologically closer to humans. More importantly, the rat has a well-characterized, rich behavioral display. Consequently, rat models of AD should allow a more sophisticated and accurate assessment of the impact of pathology and novel therapeutics on cognitive outcomes.

  6. No sign of decreased burrowing behavior in the genetically depressive flinders rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baastrup, C. S.; Wegener, Gregers; Finnerup, N. B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Burrowing is a natural behavior in rats and has been observed in several different strains. Furthermore decreased burrowing behavior has been shown in different rodent disease models like Multiple sclerosis, peripheral nerve injury and knee inflammation when compared with control...... animals. Burrowing has thus been suggested as a behavioral outcome of the tendency to engage in natural behaviors -a simplified surrogate measure of 'rat quality of life' (rQoL). Most of the disease models used to develop the assay, also concomitantly result in different levels of motor dysfunction...... of each drug. Results: The genetically depressive FSL rats did not burrow less than FRL control rats. Treatment with imipramin or citalopram-S did not change the burrowing behavior of the FSL rats. In contrast treatment with imipramin and citalopram-S unexpectedly decreased the burrowing behavior...

  7. Amino acid metabolism in the kidneys of genetic and nutritionally obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, M C; Remesar, X; Bladé, C; Arola, L

    1997-06-01

    The ability of the kidney to take up and/or release amino acids has been determined in two models of obesity in Zucker rats, one genetic and the other nutritional (diet-obese). There was a noticeable increase in gluconeogenic amino acids in the arterial blood of diet-obese animals whereas the genetically obese rats showed small variations in the levels of these amino acids. There were significant decreases in renal Gly and Ser, only in the genetically obese rats. Genetically obese animals showed an increase in Glutamine synthetase activity. The uptake and/or release of amino acids showed important variations between the groups. The diet-obese group exhibited greater variation, since this group took up Glu, Ala, Gy, Phe and Citrulline and released Gln, Ser, Arg and Tyr. Genetically obese rats took up Gln, His and Taurine and released Ser. These different patterns may be related to variations in the whole body metabolic rate, since the diet-obese group was more active than the genetically obese group.

  8. Genetic factors control nicotine self-administration in isogenic adolescent rat strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    Full Text Available Adult cigarette smokers usually become dependent on cigarettes during adolescence. Despite recent advances in addiction genetics, little data delineates the genetic factors that account for the vulnerability of humans to smoke tobacco. We studied the operant nicotine self-administration (SA behavior of six inbred strains of adolescent male rats (Fisher 344, Brown Norway, Dark Agouti, Spontaneous Hypertensive Rat, Wistar Kyoto and Lewis and six selected F1 hybrids. All rats were trained to press a lever to obtain food starting on postnatal day (PN 32, and then nicotine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion, i.v. reinforcement was made available on PN41-42 (10 consecutive daily 2 h sessions. Of the 12 isogenic strains, Fisher rats self-administered the fewest nicotine infusions (1.45 ± 0.36/d during the last 3 d, while Lewis rats took the most nicotine (13.0 ± 1.4/d. These strains sorted into high, intermediate and low self-administration groups in 2, 2, and 8 strains, respectively. The influence of heredity on nicotine SA (0.64 is similar to that reported for humans. Therefore, this panel of isogenic rat strains effectively models the overall impact of genetics on the vulnerability to acquire nicotine-reinforced behavior during adolescence. Separate groups of rats responded for food starting on PN41. The correlation between nicotine and food reward was not significant. Hence, the genetic control of the motivation to obtain nicotine is distinctly different from food reward, indicating the specificity of the underlying genetic mechanisms. Lastly, the behavior of F1 hybrids was not predicted from the additive behavior of the parental strains, indicating the impact of significant gene-gene interactions on the susceptibility to nicotine reward. Taken together, the behavioral characteristics of this model indicate its strong potential to identify specific genes mediating the human vulnerability to smoke cigarettes.

  9. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H.; Koller, Daniel L.; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J.; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S.; Aitman, Tim J.; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E. Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming our understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating novel genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relation between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ significantly from those of inbred mice, and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  10. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H; Koller, Daniel L; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S; Aitman, Tim J; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating new genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relationship between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci, a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show that the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ substantially from those of inbred mice and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species.

  11. Graphical models for genetic analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt; Sheehan, Nuala A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces graphical models as a natural environment in which to formulate and solve problems in genetics and related areas. Particular emphasis is given to the relationships among various local computation algorithms which have been developed within the hitherto mostly separate areas...

  12. Unraveling the genetics of chronic kidney disease using animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, Ron; DiPetrillo, K.

    2004-01-01

    Identifying genes underlying common forms of kidney disease in humans has proven difficult, expensive, and time consuming. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for several complex traits are concordant among mice, rats, and humans, suggesting that genetic findings from these animal models are relevant to

  13. Noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation in a genetic absence model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zobeiri, M.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The proposed area of onset for absence epilepsy characteristic of spontaneously occurring spike and slow-wave discharges (SWDs) in the genetic absence rat model is the subgranular layer of the somatosensory cortex. Modulation of the hyperexcitable cortical foci by bilateral transcranial direct curre

  14. Assessment of Glial Scar, Tissue Sparing, Behavioral Recovery and Axonal Regeneration following Acute Transplantation of Genetically Modified Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Contusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana O Mukhamedshina

    Full Text Available This study investigated the potential for protective effects of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCB-MCs genetically modified with the VEGF and GNDF genes on contusion spinal cord injury (SCI in rats. An adenoviral vector was constructed for targeted delivery of VEGF and GDNF to UCB-MCs. Using a rat contusion SCI model we examined the efficacy of the construct on tissue sparing, glial scar severity, the extent of axonal regeneration, recovery of motor function, and analyzed the expression of the recombinant genes VEGF and GNDF in vitro and in vivo.Transplantation of UCB-MCs transduced with adenoviral vectors expressing VEGF and GDNF at the site of SCI induced tissue sparing, behavioral recovery and axonal regeneration comparing to the other constructs tested. The adenovirus encoding VEGF and GDNF for transduction of UCB-MCs was shown to be an effective and stable vehicle for these cells in vivo following the transplantation into the contused spinal cord.Our results show that a gene delivery using UCB-MCs-expressing VEGF and GNDF genes improved both structural and functional parameters after SCI. Further histological and behavioral studies, especially at later time points, in animals with SCI after transplantation of genetically modified UCB-MCs (overexpressing VEGF and GDNF genes will provide additional insight into therapeutic potential of such cells.

  15. Neonatal sensory deprivation promotes development of absence seizures in adult rats with genetic predisposition to epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, Evgenia

    2011-03-04

    Absence epilepsy has age-related onset. In a WAG/Rij rat genetic model, absence seizures appear after puberty and they are increased with age. It is known that (1) epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is initiated at the perioral area in the somatosensory cortex; (2) sensory deprivation, i.e., whisker trimming during the critical period of development, could enhance excitatory activity in the somatosensory cortex. It is hypothesized that the cortex may become more excitable after neonatal vibrissae removal, and this may precipitate absence seizures in adult rats. We found that whisker trimming during the first postnatal weeks caused more rapid development of EEG seizure activity in adult WAG/Rij rats. Epileptic discharges in the trimmed rats were more numerous (vs control), showed longer duration and often appeared in desynchronized and drowsy EEG. The number of absence-like spindle-shaped EEG events (spike-wave spindles) in the whisker-trimmed rats was higher than in control, especially during the intermediate sleep state. An age-dependent increase of intermediate sleep state was found in the trimmed rats, but not in the intact animals. We discuss epigenetic factors that can modulate absence epilepsy in genetically prone subjects.

  16. Stress, glucocorticoids and absences in a genetic epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmacheva, Elena A; Oitzl, Melly S; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2012-05-01

    Although stress can alter the susceptibility of patients and animal models to convulsive epilepsy, little is known about the role of stress and glucocorticoid hormones in absence epilepsy. We measured the basal and acute stress-induced (foot-shocks: FS) concentrations of corticosterone in WAG/Rij rats, non-epileptic inbred ACI rats and outbred Wistar rats. The WAG/Rij strain is a genetic model for absence epilepsy and comorbidity for depression, which originates from the population of Wistar rats and, therefore, shares their genetic background. In a separate experiment, WAG/Rij rats were exposed to FS on three consecutive days. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded before and after FS, and the number of absence seizures (spike-wave-discharges, SWDs) was quantified. Both WAG/Rij rats and ACI rats exhibited elevated basal levels of corticosterone and a rapid corticosterone increase in response to acute stress. The WAG/Rij rats also displayed the most rapid normalization of corticosterone during the recovery phase compared to that of ACI and Wistar rats. FS had a biphasic effect on SWDs; an initial suppression was followed by an aggravation of the SWDs. By the third day, this aggravation of seizures was present in the hour preceding FS. This increase in SWDs may arise from anticipatory stress about the upcoming FS. Together, these results suggest that the distinct secretion profile of corticosterone found in WAG/Rij rats may contribute to the severity of the epileptic phenotype. Although the acute stressor results in an initial suppression of SWDs followed by an increase in SWDs, stress prior to a predictable negative event aggravates absences.

  17. Effect of phytate reduction of sorghum, through genetic modification, on iron and zinc availability as assessed by an in vitro dialysability bioaccessibility assay, Caco-2 cell uptake assay, and suckling rat pup absorption model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Johanita; Taylor, John R N; Du, Xiaogu; De Moura, Fabiana F; Lönnerdal, Bo; Oelofse, André

    2013-11-15

    Improved iron and zinc availability from sorghum, a commonly consumed staple, will benefit many malnourished communities in rural Africa burdened with high prevalence of iron and zinc deficiency. This research compared the effect of genetic phytate reduction in sorghum on iron and zinc bioaccessibility and uptake measured by in vitro dialysability and Caco-2 cell uptake assays to that of iron and zinc absorption measured by a suckling rat pup model. The phytate reduction (80-86%) in these sorghums significantly increased zinc availability. The Caco-2 cell method, but not the dialysability assay, proved useful in estimating zinc absorption. The measured increase in iron availability differed between the methods, possibly due to the effect of varying mineral (Ca, Fe, Zn, P) contents of the sorghums. This effect was most prominent in the iron uptake results. More research is needed to determine the effect of naturally occurring variations in mineral contents of sorghum on the iron uptake by Caco-2 cells.

  18. The rat STSL locus: characterization, chromosomal assignment, and genetic variations in sitosterolemic hypertensive rats

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    Klein Richard

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated plant sterol accumulation has been reported in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP and the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rat. Additionally, a blood pressure quantitative trait locus (QTL has been mapped to rat chromosome 6 in a New Zealand genetically hypertensive rat strain (GH rat. ABCG5 and ABCG8 (encoding sterolin-1 and sterolin-2 respectively have been shown to be responsible for causing sitosterolemia in humans. These genes are organized in a head-to-head configuration at the STSL locus on human chromosome 2p21. Methods To investigate whether mutations in Abcg5 or Abcg8 exist in SHR, SHRSP, WKY and GH rats, we initiated a systematic search for the genetic variation in coding and non-coding region of Abcg5 and Abcg8 genes in these strains. We isolated the rat cDNAs for these genes and characterized the genomic structure and tissue expression patterns, using standard molecular biology techniques and FISH for chromosomal assignments. Results Both rat Abcg5 and Abcg8 genes map to chromosome band 6q12. These genes span ~40 kb and contain 13 exons and 12 introns each, in a pattern identical to that of the STSL loci in mouse and man. Both Abcg5 and Abcg8 were expressed only in liver and intestine. Analyses of DNA from SHR, SHRSP, GH, WKY, Wistar, Wistar King A (WKA and Brown Norway (BN rat strains revealed a homozygous G to T substitution at nucleotide 1754, resulting in the coding change Gly583Cys in sterolin-1 only in rats that are both sitosterolemic and hypertensive (SHR, SHRSP and WKY. Conclusions The rat STSL locus maps to chromosome 6q12. A non-synonymous mutation in Abcg5, Gly583Cys, results in sitosterolemia in rat strains that are also hypertensive (WKY, SHR and SHRSP. Those rat strains that are hypertensive, but not sitosterolemic (e.g. GH rat do not have mutations in Abcg5 or Abcg8. This mutation allows for expression and apparent apical targeting of Abcg5

  19. Comparative Genome of GK and Wistar Rats Reveals Genetic Basis of Type 2 Diabetes.

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    Tiancheng Liu

    Full Text Available The Goto-Kakizaki (GK rat, which has been developed by repeated inbreeding of glucose-intolerant Wistar rats, is the most widely studied rat model for Type 2 diabetes (T2D. However, the detailed genetic background of T2D phenotype in GK rats is still largely unknown. We report a survey of T2D susceptible variations based on high-quality whole genome sequencing of GK and Wistar rats, which have generated a list of GK-specific variations (228 structural variations, 2660 CNV amplification and 2834 CNV deletion, 1796 protein affecting SNVs or indels by comparative genome analysis and identified 192 potential T2D-associated genes. The genes with variants are further refined with prior knowledge and public resource including variant polymorphism of rat strains, protein-protein interactions and differential gene expression. Finally we have identified 15 genetic mutant genes which include seven known T2D related genes (Tnfrsf1b, Scg5, Fgb, Sell, Dpp4, Icam1, and Pkd2l1 and eight high-confidence new candidate genes (Ldlr, Ccl2, Erbb3, Akr1b1, Pik3c2a, Cd5, Eef2k, and Cpd. Our result reveals that the T2D phenotype may be caused by the accumulation of multiple variations in GK rat, and that the mutated genes may affect biological functions including adipocytokine signaling, glycerolipid metabolism, PPAR signaling, T cell receptor signaling and insulin signaling pathways. We present the genomic difference between two closely related rat strains (GK and Wistar and narrow down the scope of susceptible loci. It also requires further experimental study to understand and validate the relationship between our candidate variants and T2D phenotype. Our findings highlight the importance of sequenced-based comparative genomics for investigating disease susceptibility loci in inbreeding animal models.

  20. Behavior genetic modeling of human fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodgers, J L; Kohler, H P; Kyvik, K O;

    2001-01-01

    Try) and number of children (NumCh). Behavior genetic models were fitted using structural equation modeling and DF analysis. A consistent medium-level additive genetic influence was found for NumCh, equal across genders; a stronger genetic influence was identified for FirstTry, greater for females than for males...

  1. Origins of albino and hooded rats: implications from molecular genetic analysis across modern laboratory rat strains.

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    Takashi Kuramoto

    Full Text Available Albino and hooded (or piebald rats are one of the most frequently used laboratory animals for the past 150 years. Despite this fact, the origin of the albino mutation as well as the genetic basis of the hooded phenotype remained unclear. Recently, the albino mutation has been identified as the Arg299His missense mutation in the Tyrosinase gene and the hooded (H locus has been mapped to the ∼460-kb region in which only the Kit gene exists. Here, we surveyed 172 laboratory rat strains for the albino mutation and the hooded (h mutation that we identified by positional cloning approach to investigate possible genetic roots and relationships of albino and hooded rats. All of 117 existing laboratory albino rats shared the same albino missense mutation, indicating they had only one single ancestor. Genetic fine mapping followed by de novo sequencing of BAC inserts covering the H locus revealed that an endogenous retrovirus (ERV element was inserted into the first intron of the Kit gene where the hooded allele maps. A solitary long terminal repeat (LTR was found at the same position to the ERV insertion in another allele of the H locus, which causes the so called Irish (h(i phenotype. The ERV and the solitary LTR insertions were completely associated with the hooded and Irish coat patterns, respectively, across all colored rat strains examined. Interestingly, all 117 albino rat strains shared the ERV insertion without any exception, which strongly suggests that the albino mutation had originally occurred in hooded rats.

  2. Genetic and non-genetic animal models for autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergaz, Zivanit; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ornoy, Asher

    2016-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated, in addition to complex genetic factors, with a variety of prenatal, perinatal and postnatal etiologies. We discuss the known animal models, mostly in mice and rats, of ASD that helps us to understand the etiology, pathogenesis and treatment of human ASD. We describe only models where behavioral testing has shown autistic like behaviors. Some genetic models mimic known human syndromes like fragile X where ASD is part of the clinical picture, and others are without defined human syndromes. Among the environmentally induced ASD models in rodents, the most common model is the one induced by valproic acid (VPA) either prenatally or early postnatally. VPA induces autism-like behaviors following single exposure during different phases of brain development, implying that the mechanism of action is via a general biological mechanism like epigenetic changes. Maternal infection and inflammation are also associated with ASD in man and animal models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Early genetic responses in rat vascular tissue after simulated diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftedal, Ingrid; Jørgensen, Arve; Røsbjørgen, Ragnhild; Flatberg, Arnar; Brubakk, Alf O

    2012-12-18

    Diving causes a transient reduction of vascular function, but the mechanisms behind this are largely unknown. The aim of this study was therefore to analyze genetic reactions that may be involved in acute changes of vascular function in divers. Rats were exposed to 709 kPa of hyperbaric air (149 kPa Po(2)) for 50 min followed by postdive monitoring of vascular bubble formation and full genome microarray analysis of the aorta from diving rats (n = 8) and unexposed controls (n = 9). Upregulation of 23 genes was observed 1 h after simulated diving. The differential gene expression was characteristic of cellular responses to oxidative stress, with functions of upregulated genes including activation and fine-tuning of stress-responsive transcription, cytokine/cytokine receptor signaling, molecular chaperoning, and coagulation. By qRT-PCR, we verified increased transcription of neuron-derived orphan receptor-1 (Nr4a3), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (Serpine1), cytokine TWEAK receptor FN14 (Tnfrsf12a), transcription factor class E basic helix-loop-helix protein 40 (Bhlhe40), and adrenomedullin (Adm). Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF1 subunit HIF1-α was stabilized in the aorta 1 h after diving, and after 4 h there was a fivefold increase in total protein levels of the procoagulant plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI1) in blood plasma from diving rats. The study did not have sufficient power for individual assessment of effects of hyperoxia and decompression-induced bubbles on postdive gene expression. However, differential gene expression in rats without venous bubbles was similar to that of all the diving rats, indicating that elevated Po(2) instigated the observed genetic reactions.

  4. Routine Discovery of Complex Genetic Models using Genetic Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jason H; Hahn, Lance W; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Thornton, Tricia A; White, Bill C

    2004-02-01

    Simulation studies are useful in various disciplines for a number of reasons including the development and evaluation of new computational and statistical methods. This is particularly true in human genetics and genetic epidemiology where new analytical methods are needed for the detection and characterization of disease susceptibility genes whose effects are complex, nonlinear, and partially or solely dependent on the effects of other genes (i.e. epistasis or gene-gene interaction). Despite this need, the development of complex genetic models that can be used to simulate data is not always intuitive. In fact, only a few such models have been published. We have previously developed a genetic algorithm approach to discovering complex genetic models in which two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influence disease risk solely through nonlinear interactions. In this paper, we extend this approach for the discovery of high-order epistasis models involving three to five SNPs. We demonstrate that the genetic algorithm is capable of routinely discovering interesting high-order epistasis models in which each SNP influences risk of disease only through interactions with the other SNPs in the model. This study opens the door for routine simulation of complex gene-gene interactions among SNPs for the development and evaluation of new statistical and computational approaches for identifying common, complex multifactorial disease susceptibility genes.

  5. Behavior genetic modeling of human fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodgers, J L; Kohler, H P; Kyvik, K O

    2001-01-01

    Try) and number of children (NumCh). Behavior genetic models were fitted using structural equation modeling and DF analysis. A consistent medium-level additive genetic influence was found for NumCh, equal across genders; a stronger genetic influence was identified for FirstTry, greater for females than for males......Behavior genetic designs and analysis can be used to address issues of central importance to demography. We use this methodology to document genetic influence on human fertility. Our data come from Danish twin pairs born from 1953 to 1959, measured on age at first attempt to get pregnant (First...

  6. Anti-anhedonic effect of deep brain stimulation of the prefrontal cortex and the dopaminergic reward system in a genetic rat model of depression: an intracranial self-stimulation paradigm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Ellis; Rummel, Julia; Schmidt, Timo T; Hadar, Ravit; Heinz, Andreas; Mathé, Aleksander A; Winter, Christine

    2014-01-01

    One of the two core symptoms of major depression (MD), whether uni- or bipolar, is the inability to experience pleasure, suggested to be triggered by dysregulation within the brain reward system. In recent years, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has evolved as a potential tool to modulate pathological neural activity; stimulation of the subgenual cingulate (Cg25) has been shown to reduce depressive symptoms, including anhedonia. In rodents, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is likely to represent the correlate of Cg25 and accordingly, stimulation of vmPFC reduces anhedonia-like behavior in rats. The present study addresses the question of whether the anti-anhedonic effect of vmPFC-DBS is mediated by the brain reward system. Rats of the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL), a validated genetic animal model of depression, and its controls, the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL), were stimulated in the vmPFC and tested in the forced swim test (FST), sucrose consumption test (SCT) and the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) paradigm. The curve-shift paradigm of ICSS was used in combination with vmPFC-DBS, d-amphetamine and fluoxetine to quantify reward-facilitating or -attenuating treatment effects. Our findings support anti-depressive efficacy of vmPFC-DBS with respect to despair- and anhedonia-like behavior, as shown in the FST and SCT, respectively. However, DBS did not elicit reward-facilitating or reward-attenuating effects on ICSS behavior. These data suggest that it is unlikely that the anti-anhedonic effect of vmPFC-DBS depends on the mesolimbic dopaminergic reward system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dr. Lewis Kitchener Dahl, the Dahl Rats and the ‘Inconvenient truth’ abou the Genetics of Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Bina

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Lewis K. Dahl is regarded as an iconic figure in the field of hypertension research. During the 1960s and 1970s he published several seminal articles in the field that shed light on the relationship between salt and hypertension. Further, the Dahl rat models of hypertension that he developed by a selective breeding strategy are among the most widely used models for hypertension research. To this day, genetic studies using this model are ongoing in our laboratory. While Dr. Dahl is known for his contributions to the field of hypertension, very little, if any, of his personal history is documented. This article details a short biography of Dr. Lewis Dahl, the history behind the development of the Dahl rats and presents an overview of the results obtained through the genetic analysis of the Dahl rat as an experimental model to study the inheritance of hypertension. PMID:25646295

  8. The WAG/Rij strain: A genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with comorbidity of depressiony

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkisova, K.Y.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2011-01-01

    A great number of clinical observations show a relationship between epilepsy and depression. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy, including absence epilepsy, has a genetic basis. The review provides evidence that WAG/Rij rats can be regarded as a valid genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with comor

  9. Low-Anxiety Rat Phenotypes Can Be Further Reduced through Genetic Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granzotto, Natalli; Ramos, André

    2013-01-01

    Background A previous study using an intercross between the inbred rat strains Lewis (LEW) and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) identified a locus on chromosome 4, named Anxrr16, influencing an experimental index of anxiety and showing a transgressive effect, with alleles from the LEW strain (more anxious) decreasing rather than increasing anxiety. Objective To confirm the location and isolate the effect of a rat genome region named Anxrr16 through a planned genomic recombination strategy, where the target locus in SHR rats was replaced with LEW genetic material. Methods A new congenic strain, named SHR.LEW-Anxrr16 (SLA16), was developed from a cross between LEW (donor) and SHR (receptor) rats and then evaluated in several anxiety-related tests. The activity and attention levels of the new strain were also evaluated, since hyperactivity was observed during its construction and because SHR is a model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Results Significant effects of Anxrr16 were found for open field central locomotion, as well as for other indices of anxiety from the light/dark box, triple test and T-maze. In all cases, the low-anxiety levels of SHR rats were further reduced by the insertion of LEW alleles. Differences in locomotor activity were found only in unfamiliar (hence stressful) environments and no genetic effects were observed in indices of attention. Conclusion The SLA16 strain can help in the identification of the molecular pathways involved in experimental anxiety and it demonstrates how apparently extreme phenotypes sometimes hide major opposite-acting genes. PMID:24386249

  10. The acute and chronic effect of vagus nerve stimulation in genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S Dedeurwaerdere; K. Vonck; P Hese van; W.J. Wadman; P Boon

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acute and chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS). This is a validated model for absence epilepsy, characterized by frequent spontaneous absences concomitant with spike and wave disc

  11. [MAM-E17 schizophrenia rat model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kállai, Veronika; Tóth, Attila; Gálosi, Rita; Szabó, Imre; Petykó, Zoltán; Karádi, Zoltán; Kállai, János; Lénárd, László

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious neuropsychiatric disorder. Several brain structures, neurotransmitter systems, genetic and environmental risk factors are suspected in the background. Because of its complexity the mechanism of the disorder is not known exactly, so the treatment of patients is unsolved. In the research of schizophrenia application of the rodent models is widespread. In this study one of these models based on the effect of methylazoxymethanol- acetate (MAM) is described, which is a neurodevelopmental, validated rat model. This antimitotic agent is able to evoke a number of schizophrenic symptomes temporarily disrupting the prenatal neurogenesis. The model reproduces numerous histological and neurophysiological changes of the human disorder, moreover it also represents several behavioral and cognitive phenomena resembling those in schizophrenia. A salient advantage of the model is the demonstration of the diachronic feature of the disorder, that is, postpubertal appearance of the positive symptoms. This model provides widespread opportunities for manipulations of the symptoms, so that using it in the future investigations can lead to a better understanding of this disorder.

  12. Phenotypic Characterization of LEA Rat: A New Rat Model of Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes

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    Tadashi Okamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have provided important information for the genetics and pathophysiology of diabetes. Here we have established a novel, nonobese rat strain with spontaneous diabetes, Long-Evans Agouti (LEA rat derived from Long-Evans (LE strain. The incidence of diabetes in the males was 10% at 6 months of age and 86% at 14 months, while none of the females developed diabetes. The blood glucose level in LEA male rats was between 200 and 300 mg/dl at 120 min according to OGTT. The glucose intolerance in correspondence with the impairment of insulin secretion was observed in male rats, which was the main cause of diabetes in LEA rats. Histological examination revealed that the reduction of β-cell mass was caused by progressive fibrosis in pancreatic islets in age-dependent manner. The intracytoplasmic hyaline droplet accumulation and the disappearance of tubular epithelial cell layer associated with thickening of basement membrane were evident in renal proximal tubules. The body mass index and glycaemic response to exogenous insulin were comparable to those of control rats. The unique characteristics of LEA rat are a great advantage not only to analyze the progression of diabetes, but also to disclose the genes involved in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  13. Genetic network models: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Someren, Eugene P.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.

    2001-06-01

    Currently, the need arises for tools capable of unraveling the functionality of genes based on the analysis of microarray measurements. Modeling genetic interactions by means of genetic network models provides a methodology to infer functional relationships between genes. Although a wide variety of different models have been introduced so far, it remains, in general, unclear what the strengths and weaknesses of each of these approaches are and where these models overlap and differ. This paper compares different genetic modeling approaches that attempt to extract the gene regulation matrix from expression data. A taxonomy of continuous genetic network models is proposed and the following important characteristics are suggested and employed to compare the models: inferential power; predictive power; robustness; consistency; stability and computational cost. Where possible, synthetic time series data are employed to investigate some of these properties. The comparison shows that although genetic network modeling might provide valuable information regarding genetic interactions, current models show disappointing results on simple artificial problems. For now, the simplest models are favored because they generalize better, but more complex models will probably prevail once their bias is more thoroughly understood and their variance is better controlled.

  14. Population genetics, community of parasites, and resistance to rodenticides in an urban brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvars-Larrive, Amélie; Pascal, Michel; Gasqui, Patrick; Cosson, Jean-François; Benoît, Etienne; Lattard, Virginie; Crespin, Laurent; Lorvelec, Olivier; Pisanu, Benoît; Teynié, Alexandre; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Bonnet, Sarah; Marianneau, Philippe; Lacôte, Sandra; Bourhy, Pascale; Berny, Philippe; Pavio, Nicole; Le Poder, Sophie; Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle; Jourdain, Elsa; Hammed, Abdessalem; Fourel, Isabelle; Chikh, Farid; Vourc'h, Gwenaël

    2017-01-01

    Brown rats are one of the most widespread urban species worldwide. Despite the nuisances they induce and their potential role as a zoonotic reservoir, knowledge on urban rat populations remains scarce. The main purpose of this study was to characterize an urban brown rat population from Chanteraines park (Hauts-de-Seine, France), with regards to haematology, population genetics, immunogenic diversity, resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides, and community of parasites. Haematological parameters were measured. Population genetics was investigated using 13 unlinked microsatellite loci. Immunogenic diversity was assessed for Mhc-Drb. Frequency of the Y139F mutation (conferring resistance to rodenticides) and two linked microsatellites were studied, concurrently with the presence of anticoagulant residues in the liver. Combination of microscopy and molecular methods were used to investigate the occurrence of 25 parasites. Statistical approaches were used to explore multiple parasite relationships and model parasite occurrence. Eighty-six rats were caught. The first haematological data for a wild urban R. norvegicus population was reported. Genetic results suggested high genetic diversity and connectivity between Chanteraines rats and surrounding population(s). We found a high prevalence (55.8%) of the mutation Y139F and presence of rodenticide residues in 47.7% of the sampled individuals. The parasite species richness was high (16). Seven potential zoonotic pathogens were identified, together with a surprisingly high diversity of Leptospira species (4). Chanteraines rat population is not closed, allowing gene flow and making eradication programs challenging, particularly because rodenticide resistance is highly prevalent. Parasitological results showed that co-infection is more a rule than an exception. Furthermore, the presence of several potential zoonotic pathogens, of which four Leptospira species, in this urban rat population raised its role in the maintenance

  15. Does prenatal valproate interact with a genetic reduction in the serotonin transporter?A rat study on anxiety and cognition

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    Bart A Ellenbroek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that prenatal exposure to valproate (or valproic acid, VPA enhances the risk of developing Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD. In line with this, a single injection of VPA induces a multitude of ASD-like symptoms in animals such as rats and mice. However, there is equally strong evidence that genetic factors contribute significantly to the risk of ASD and indeed, like most other psychiatric disorders, ASD is now generally thought to results from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Given that VPA significantly impacts on the serotonergic system, and serotonin has strong biochemical and genetic links to ASD, we aimed to investigate the interaction between genetic reduction in the serotonin transporter and prenatal valproate administration. More specifically, we exposed both wildtype (SERT+/+ rats and rats heterozygous for the serotonin transporter deletion (SERT+/- to a single injection of 400 mg/kg VPA at gestational day (GD 12. The offspring, in adulthood, was assessed in four different tests: Elevated Plus Maze and Novelty Suppressed Feeding as measures for anxiety and prepulse inhibition (PPI and latent inhibition as measures for cognition and information processing. The results show that prenatal VPA significantly increased anxiety in both paradigm, reduced PPI and reduced conditioning in the latent inhibition paradigm. However, we failed to find a significant gene – environment interaction. We propose that this may be related to the timing of the VPA injection and suggest that whereas GD12 might be optimal for affecting normal rat, rats with a genetically compromised serotonergic system may be more sensitive to VPA at earlier time points during gestation. Overall our data are the first to investigate gene * environmental interactions in a genetic rat model for ASD suggest that timing may be of crucial importance to the long-term outcome.

  16. Genetic background specific hypoxia resistance in rat is correlated with balanced activation of a cross-chromosomal genetic network centering on physiological homeostasis

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    Lei eMao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism’s response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN, Dahl salt-sensitive (SS rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 consomic rat strains under normoxia and two-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9BN and SS-18BN represent the most hypoxia resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6BN and SS-YBN segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these consomic rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia-relevant core genetic network was reverse-engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward

  17. Genetic Background Specific Hypoxia Resistance in Rat is Correlated with Balanced Activation of a Cross-Chromosomal Genetic Network Centering on Physiological Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism's response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN), Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic (CS) rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 CS rat strains under normoxia and 2-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9(BN) and SS-18(BN) represent the most hypoxia-resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6(BN) and SS-Y(BN) segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these CS rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia relevant core genetic network was reverse engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward personalized medicine.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis: identifying and characterising polymorphisms using rat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disorder characterised by erosive inflammation of the articular cartilage and by destruction of the synovial joints. It is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors, and, currently, there is no preventative treatment or cure for this disease. Genome-wide association studies have identified ∼100 new loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis, in addition to the already known locus within the major histocompatibility complex II region. However, together, these loci account for only a modest fraction of the genetic variance associated with this disease and very little is known about the pathogenic roles of most of the risk loci identified. Here, we discuss how rat models of rheumatoid arthritis are being used to detect quantitative trait loci that regulate different arthritic traits by genetic linkage analysis and to positionally clone the underlying causative genes using congenic strains. By isolating specific loci on a fixed genetic background, congenic strains overcome the challenges of genetic heterogeneity and environmental interactions associated with human studies. Most importantly, congenic strains allow functional experimental studies be performed to investigate the pathological consequences of natural genetic polymorphisms, as illustrated by the discovery of several major disease genes that contribute to arthritis in rats. We discuss how these advances have provided new biological insights into arthritis in humans. PMID:27736747

  19. Alterations in the hepatic insulin receptor kinase in genetic and acquired obesity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell, D G; Pedersen, O; Kahn, C R

    1989-11-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and type II diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we have characterized hepatic insulin receptor function in two animal models of obesity: the Zucker fatty rat (ZFR), a model of genetic obesity with severe hyperinsulinemia, and the Sprague-Dawley rat with dietary obesity, a model of acquired obesity. Zucker fatty rats were also treated with streptozotocin (STZ) in an effort to examine the effects of relative insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia in the setting of obesity. Using wheat germ agglutinin-purified insulin receptor extracted from liver, no significant difference in insulin binding was identified in either model of obesity. beta-Subunit autophosphorylation was significantly decreased in both obese models relative to that in controls (72% in the obese ZFR and 49% in the overfed Sprague-Dawley model). Kinase activity, as measured by phosphorylation of the 1142-1153 synthetic peptide, was also decreased in both models of obesity by 22% and 64%, respectively. In the Zucker rat, STZ treatment led to an 80% increase in receptor concentration and a further 70% increase in beta-subunit autophosphorylation per receptor, whereas tyrosine kinase activity toward substrate was not altered. Since kinase activity is closely linked to autophosphorylation, we determined the fraction of autophosphorylated (activated) receptors vs. non-phosphorylated (inactive) receptors by using antiphosphotyrosine antibody to precipitate receptors bound with [125I]insulin. There was no significant difference in the percentage of activated insulin receptors in the dietary obese, ZFR, or STZ-treated Zucker rat vs. that in the controls. In all models, the percentage of activated receptors ranged from 32-46% of the total receptor pool. These data suggest that in genetic and acquired obesity, autophosphorylation of the beta-subunit is reduced and is a limiting factor in insulin receptor activation. A similar fraction of all receptors appears to

  20. Effect of Keishibukuryogan on Genetic and Dietary Obesity Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengying Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has been recognized as one of the most important risk factors for a variety of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension/cardiovascular diseases, steatosis/hepatitis, and cancer. Keishibukuryogan (KBG, Gui Zhi Fu Ling Wan in Chinese is a traditional Chinese/Japanese (Kampo medicine that has been known to improve blood circulation and is also known for its anti-inflammatory or scavenging effect. In this study, we evaluated the effect of KBG in two distinct rodent models of obesity driven by either a genetic (SHR/NDmcr-cp rat model or dietary (high-fat diet-induced mouse obesity model mechanism. Although there was no significant effect on the body composition in either the SHR rat or the DIO mouse models, KBG treatment significantly decreased the serum level of leptin and liver TG level in the DIO mouse, but not in the SHR rat model. Furthermore, a lower fat deposition in liver and a smaller size of adipocytes in white adipose tissue were observed in the DIO mice treated with KBG. Importantly, we further found downregulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism in the KBG-treated liver, along with decreased liver TG and cholesterol level. Our present data experimentally support in fact that KBG can be an attractive Kampo medicine to improve obese status through a regulation of systemic leptin level and/or lipid metabolism.

  1. Penile autotransplantation in rats: An animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf M Seyam

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Penile autotransplantation in rats is feasible and provides the basis for evaluation of the corpora cavernosa in an allotransplantation model. Long-term urethral continuity and dorsal neurovascular bundle survival in this model is difficult to establish.

  2. Effects of early life trauma are dependent on genetic predisposition: a rat study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Vivienne A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma experienced early in life increases the risk of developing a number of psychological and/or behavioural disorders. It is unclear, however, how genetic predisposition to a behavioural disorder, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, modifies the long-term effects of early life trauma. There is substantial evidence from family and twin studies for susceptibility to ADHD being inherited, implying a strong genetic component to the disorder. In the present study we used an inbred animal model of ADHD, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, to investigate the long-term consequences of early life trauma on emotional behaviour in individuals predisposed to developing ADHD-like behaviour. Methods We applied a rodent model of early life trauma, maternal separation, to SHR and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY, the normotensive control strain from which SHR were originally derived. The effects of maternal separation (removal of pups from dam for 3 h/day during the first 2 weeks of life on anxiety-like behaviour (elevated-plus maze and depressive-like behaviour (forced swim test were assessed in prepubescent rats (postnatal day 28 and 31. Basal levels of plasma corticosterone were measured using radioimmunoassay. Results The effect of maternal separation on SHR and WKY differed in a number of behavioural measures. Similar to its reported effect in other rat strains, maternal separation increased the anxiety-like behaviour of WKY (decreased open arm entries but not SHR. Maternal separation increased the activity of SHR in the novel environment of the elevated plus-maze, while it decreased that of WKY. Overall, SHR showed a more active response in the elevated plus-maze and forced swim test than WKY, regardless of treatment, and were also found to have higher basal plasma corticosterone compared to WKY. Maternal separation increased basal levels of plasma corticosterone in SHR females only, possibly through adaptive

  3. Experimental crescentic glomerulonephritis: a new bicongenic rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelpha D’Souza

    2013-11-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN is a major cause of human kidney failure, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats are uniquely susceptible to CRGN following injection of nephrotoxic serum, whereas Lewis (LEW rats are resistant. Our previous genetic studies of nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN, a form of CRGN induced by nephrotoxic serum, identified Fcgr3 and Jund as WKY genes underlying the two strongest quantitative trait loci for NTN phenotypes: Crgn1 and Crgn2, respectively. We also showed that introgression of WKY Crgn1 or Crgn2 individually into a LEW background did not lead to the formation of glomerular crescents. We have now generated a bicongenic strain, LEW.WCrgn1,2, in which WKY Crgn1 and Crgn2 are both introgressed into the LEW genetic background. These rats show development of NTN phenotypes, including glomerular crescents. Furthermore, we characterised macrophage function and glomerular cytokine profiles in this new strain. Additionally, we show that LEW.WCrgn1,2 rats are resistant to the development of glomerular crescents that is usually induced following immunisation with recombinant rat α3(IVNC1, the specific Goodpasture autoantigen located in the glomerular basement membrane against which the immune response is directed in experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis. Our results show that the new bicongenic strain responds differently to two distinct experimental triggers of CRGN. This is the first time that CRGN has been induced on a normally resistant rat genetic background and identifies the LEW.WCrgn1,2 strain as a new, potentially valuable model of macrophage-dependent glomerulonephritis.

  4. Brain network reorganization differs in response to stress in rats genetically predisposed to depression and stress-resilient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, N; Becker, R; Schwarz, A J; Weber-Fahr, W; Clemm von Hohenberg, C; Vollmayr, B; Sartorius, A

    2016-12-06

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) remains a pressing clinical problem. Optimizing treatment requires better definition of the specificity of the involved brain circuits. The rat strain bred for negative cognitive state (NC) represents a genetic animal model of TRD with high face, construct and predictive validity. Vice versa, the positive cognitive state (PC) strain represents a stress-resilient phenotype. Although NC rats show depressive-like behavior, some symptoms such as anhedonia require an external trigger, i.e. a stressful event, which is similar to humans when stressful event induces a depressive episode in genetically predisposed individuals (gene-environment interaction). We aimed to distinguish neurobiological predisposition from the depressogenic pathology at the level of brain-network reorganization. For this purpose, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging time series were acquired at 9.4 Tesla scanner in NC (N=11) and PC (N=7) rats before and after stressful event. We used a graph theory analytical approach to calculate the brain-network global and local properties. There was no difference in the global characteristics between the strains. At the local level, the response in the risk strain was characterized with an increased internodal role and reduced local clustering and efficiency of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and prelimbic cortex compared to the stress-resilient strain. We suggest that the increased internodal role of these prefrontal regions could be due to the enhancement of some of their long-range connections, given their connectivity with the amygdala and other default-mode-like network hubs, which could create a bias to attend to negative information characteristic for depression.

  5. Genetically Modified Pig Models for Human Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nana Fan; Liangxue Lai

    2013-01-01

    Genetically modified animal models are important for understanding the pathogenesis of human disease and developing therapeutic strategies.Although genetically modified mice have been widely used to model human diseases,some of these mouse models do not replicate important disease symptoms or pathology.Pigs are more similar to humans than mice in anatomy,physiology,and genome.Thus,pigs are considered to be better animal models to mimic some human diseases.This review describes genetically modified pigs that have been used to model various diseases including neurological,cardiovascular,and diabetic disorders.We also discuss the development in gene modification technology that can facilitate the generation of transgenic pig models for human diseases.

  6. Genomic regulation of type 2 diabetes endophenotypes: Contribution from genetic studies in the Goto-Kakizaki rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Lathrop, Mark; Gauguier, Dominique

    2017-08-24

    The inbred Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat strain is a unique model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes mellitus caused by naturally occurring genetic variants that have been selectively isolated from an outbred colony of Wistar rats. Genetic and genomic studies in experimental crosses and congenic strains of the GK have shed light on the complex etiopathogenesis of diabetes phenotypes in this model. Diabetes-related phenotypes in the GK are under polygenic control and distinct genetic loci regulate glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, β-cell mass and plasma lipids. Metabolome and transcriptome profiling data in GK crosses and congenics, combined with GK genome resequencing, have resulted in a comprehensive landscape of genomic regulations of metabolism that can disentangle causal relationships between GK variants and diabetes phenotypes. Application of systems biology and systems genetics in the GK has contributed to improve our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms regulating metabolism. The wealth of physiological, genetic and genomic information in this strain makes it one of the most powerful model systems to improve our understanding of genetic regulations of metabolism and for testing therapeutic solutions for diabetes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy A. Irving

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer.

  8. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Amy A.; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hart, Marcia L.; Parker, Taybor; Clipson, Linda; Ford, Madeline R.; Kuramoto, Takashi; Dove, William F.; Amos-Landgraf, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc) and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer. PMID:25288683

  9. Rat reverse genetics : generation and characterization of chemically induced rat mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of animal models has been crucial for studying the function of genetic elements in the human genome. Embryonic stem (ES) cell-based homologous recombination (HR) has proven a very efficient technique for gene manipulation. However, this technique is not (yet) available for all model organism

  10. Tolerance to anticonvulsant effects of some benzodiazepines in genetically epilepsy prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sarro, G; Di Paola, E D; Aguglia, U; de Sarro, A

    1996-09-01

    The development of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effects of clonazepam, clobazam, and diazepam were studied in genetically epilepsy-prone rats following intraperitoneal (IP) or oral administration. The anticonvulsant effects were evaluated on seizures evoked by means of auditory stimulation (109 dB, 12-16 kHz). All compounds showed 60 min after IP injection antiseizure activity with ED50 against clonus of 0.24 mumol kg-1 for clonazepam, 0.72 mumol kg-1 for diazepam, and 3.9 mumol kg-1 for clobazam. After 120 min of oral administration the ED50 against clonus of 2.37 mumol kg-1 for clonazepam, 15.8 mumol kg-1 for diazepam, and 30 mumol kg-1 for clobazam. The dose chosen for the chronic treatment were 2.5 mumol kg-1 for clonazepam, 15 mumol kg-1 for diazepam, and 30 mumol kg-1 for clobazam. The animals were treated three times daily for 4 or 6 weeks. Auditory stimulation was administered 60 min after drug IP injection on various days. During treatment, tolerance was observed as a loss of drug anticonvulsant effects. No changes of occurrence of audiogenic seizures was observed in rats treated with vehicle. Tolerance to the anticonvulsant activity developed most rapidly during clobazam treatment, less rapidly following diazepam treatment, and most slowly during clonazepam treatment. Sixty minutes after IP injection on various days of chronic treatment the motor impairment induced by these benzodiazepines was also studied by means of a rotarod apparatus. The tolerance to the motor impairment developed more rapidly than the anticonvulsant effects. The response to auditory stimulation to benzodiazepines was stopped 24 and 48 h after chronic treatment with these compounds, showing no residual drug effects and that rats were still tolerant. The genetically epilepsy-prone rats is a reliable and sensitive model for studying long-term effects of anticonvulsant drugs.

  11. Genetic models of homosexuality: generating testable predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrilets, Sergey; Rice, William R.

    2006-01-01

    Homosexuality is a common occurrence in humans and other species, yet its genetic and evolutionary basis is poorly understood. Here, we formulate and study a series of simple mathematical models for the purpose of predicting empirical patterns that can be used to determine the form of selection that leads to polymorphism of genes influencing homosexuality. Specifically, we develop theory to make contrasting predictions about the genetic characteristics of genes influencing homosexuality inclu...

  12. Genetic search feature selection for affective modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez, Héctor P.; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2010-01-01

    Automatic feature selection is a critical step towards the generation of successful computational models of affect. This paper presents a genetic search-based feature selection method which is developed as a global-search algorithm for improving the accuracy of the affective models built...

  13. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignasi eOliveras

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogues. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I, displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM in these three rat types (Experiment 1, as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low PPI scores (Experiment 2. The results from Exp. 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Exp. 2, Low-PPI NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to Medium-PPI and High-PPI NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps at risk phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to schizophrenia.

  14. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras, Ignasi; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Giorgi, Osvaldo; Corda, Maria G; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogs. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I), displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I) counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM) in these three rat types (Experiment 1), as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low) PPI scores (Experiment 2). The results from Experiment 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Experiment 2, "Low-PPI" NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to "Medium-PPI" and "High-PPI" NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial, and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps "at risk") phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to schizophrenia.

  15. Genetic models of homosexuality: generating testable predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilets, Sergey; Rice, William R

    2006-12-22

    Homosexuality is a common occurrence in humans and other species, yet its genetic and evolutionary basis is poorly understood. Here, we formulate and study a series of simple mathematical models for the purpose of predicting empirical patterns that can be used to determine the form of selection that leads to polymorphism of genes influencing homosexuality. Specifically, we develop theory to make contrasting predictions about the genetic characteristics of genes influencing homosexuality including: (i) chromosomal location, (ii) dominance among segregating alleles and (iii) effect sizes that distinguish between the two major models for their polymorphism: the overdominance and sexual antagonism models. We conclude that the measurement of the genetic characteristics of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) found in genomic screens for genes influencing homosexuality can be highly informative in resolving the form of natural selection maintaining their polymorphism.

  16. MODELING OPERANT BEHAVIOR IN THE PARKINSONIAN RAT

    OpenAIRE

    Avila, Irene; Reilly, Mark P; Sanabria, Federico; Posadas-Sánchez, Diana; Chavez, Claudia L.; Banerjee, Nikhil; Killeen, Peter; Castañeda, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical principles of reinforcement (MPR; Killeen, 1994) is a quantitative model of operant behavior that contains 3 parameters representing motor capacity (δ), motivation (a), and short term memory (λ). The present study applied MPR to characterize the effects of bilateral infusions of 6-OHDA into the substantia nigra pars compacta in the rat, a model of Parkinson’s disease. Rats were trained to lever press under a 5-component fixed ratio (5, 15, 30, 60, and 100) schedule of food reinfo...

  17. Local and regional scale genetic variation in the Cape dune mole-rat, Bathyergus suillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Jacobus H; Bennett, Nigel C; Jansen van Vuuren, Bettine

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of genetic variation is determined through the interaction of life history, morphology and habitat specificity of a species in conjunction with landscape structure. While numerous studies have investigated this interplay of factors in species inhabiting aquatic, riverine, terrestrial, arboreal and saxicolous systems, the fossorial system has remained largely unexplored. In this study we attempt to elucidate the impacts of a subterranean lifestyle coupled with a heterogeneous landscape on genetic partitioning by using a subterranean mammal species, the Cape dune mole-rat (Bathyergus suillus), as our model. Bathyergus suillus is one of a few mammal species endemic to the Cape Floristic Region (CFR) of the Western Cape of South Africa. Its distribution is fragmented by rivers and mountains; both geographic phenomena that may act as geographical barriers to gene-flow. Using two mitochondrial fragments (cytochrome b and control region) as well as nine microsatellite loci, we determined the phylogeographic structure and gene-flow patterns at two different spatial scales (local and regional). Furthermore, we investigated genetic differentiation between populations and applied Bayesian clustering and assignment approaches to our data. Nearly every population formed a genetically unique entity with significant genetic structure evident across geographic barriers such as rivers (Berg, Verlorenvlei, Breede and Gourits Rivers), mountains (Piketberg and Hottentots Holland Mountains) and with geographic distance at both spatial scales. Surprisingly, B. suillus was found to be paraphyletic with respect to its sister species, B. janetta-a result largely overlooked by previous studies on these taxa. A systematic revision of the genus Bathyergus is therefore necessary. This study provides a valuable insight into how the biology, life-history and habitat specificity of animals inhabiting a fossorial system may act in concert with the structure of the surrounding

  18. Genetic models for CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Wekerle, H; Antel, J

    2001-01-01

    The use of transgenic technology to over-express or prevent expression of genes encoding molecules related to inflammation has allowed direct examination of their role in experimental disease. This article reviews transgenic and knockout models of CNS demyelinating disease, focusing primarily on ...

  19. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H.; Koller, Daniel L.; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J.; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S.; Aitman, Tim J.; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E. Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We i

  20. Genetic susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage in the rat. Evidence based on kidney-specific genome transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, P C; Churchill, M C; Bidani, A K; Griffin, K A; Picken, M; Pravenec, M; Kren, V; St Lezin, E; Wang, J M; Wang, N; Kurtz, T W

    1997-09-15

    To test the hypothesis that genetic factors can determine susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage, we derived an experimental animal model in which two genetically different yet histocompatible kidneys are chronically and simultaneously exposed to the same blood pressure profile and metabolic environment within the same host. Kidneys from normotensive Brown Norway rats were transplanted into unilaterally nephrectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-RT1.N strain) that harbor the major histocompatibility complex of the Brown Norway strain. 25 d after the induction of severe hypertension with deoxycorticosterone acetate and salt, proteinuria, impaired glomerular filtration rate, and extensive vascular and glomerular injury were observed in the Brown Norway donor kidneys, but not in the SHR-RT1.N kidneys. Control experiments demonstrated that the strain differences in kidney damage could not be attributed to effects of transplantation-induced renal injury, immunologic rejection phenomena, or preexisting strain differences in blood pressure. These studies (a) demonstrate that the kidney of the normotensive Brown Norway rat is inherently much more susceptible to hypertension-induced damage than is the kidney of the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and (b) establish the feasibility of using organ-specific genome transplants to map genes expressed in the kidney that determine susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal injury in the rat.

  1. Genetically engineered mouse models of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nawijn, Martijn C.; Bergman, Andreas M.; van der Poel, Henk G.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Mouse models of prostate cancer are used to test the contribution of individual genes to the transformation process, evaluate the collaboration between multiple genetic lesions observed in a single tumour, and perform preclinical intervention studies in prostate cancer research. Methods:

  2. Experimental model of anal fistula in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Arakaki, Mariana Sousa; Santos,Carlos Henrique Marques dos; Falcão, Gustavo Ribeiro; Cassino,Pedro Carvalho; Nakamura, Ricardo Kenithi; Gomes,Nathália Favero; Santos,Ricardo Gasparin Coutinho dos

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: the management of anal fistula remains debatable. The lack of a standard treatment free of complications stimulates the development of new options. OBJECTIVE: to develop an experimental model of anal fistula in rats. METHODS: to surgically create an anal fistula in 10 rats with Seton introduced through the anal sphincter musculature. The animals were euthanized for histological fistula tract assessment. RESULTS: all ten specimens histologically assessed had a lumen and surroundi...

  3. Relationship between Immunological Abnormalities in Rat Models of Diabetes Mellitus and the Amplification Circuits for Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Tomoko; Asao, Hironobu; Wakabayashi, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms is required in order to treat diseases. However, the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus and diabetic complications are extremely complex. Immune reactions are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications, while diabetes influences immune reactions. Furthermore, both diabetes and immune reactions are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To address these issues, animal models are useful tools. So far, various animal models of diabetes have been developed in rats, which have advantages over mice models in terms of the larger volume of tissue samples and the variety of type 2 diabetes models. In this review, we introduce rat models of diabetes and summarize the immune reactions in diabetic rat models. Finally, we speculate on the relationship between immune reactions and diabetic episodes. For example, diabetes-prone Biobreeding rats, type 1 diabetes model rats, exhibit increased autoreactive cellular and inflammatory immune reactions, while Goto-Kakizaki rats, type 2 diabetes model rats, exhibit increased Th2 reactions and attenuation of phagocytic activity. Investigation of immunological abnormalities in various diabetic rat models is useful for elucidating complicated mechanisms in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Studying immunological alterations, such as predominance of Th1/17 or Th2 cells, humoral immunity, and innate immune reactions, may improve understanding the structure of amplification circuits for diabetes in future studies.

  4. Adaptive Genetic Algorithm Model for Intrusion Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Anil Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Intrusion detection systems are intelligent systems designed to identify and prevent the misuse of computer networks and systems. Various approaches to Intrusion Detection are currently being used, but they are relatively ineffective. Thus the emerging network security systems need be part of the life system and this ispossible only by embedding knowledge into the network. The Adaptive Genetic Algorithm Model - IDS comprising of K-Means clustering Algorithm, Genetic Algorithm and Neural Network techniques. Thetechnique is tested using multitude of background knowledge sets in DARPA network traffic datasets.

  5. Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease: Vertebrate Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunjong; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex genetic disorder that is associated with environmental risk factors and aging. Vertebrate genetic models, especially mice, have aided the study of autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive PD. Mice are capable of showing a broad range of phenotypes and, coupled with their conserved genetic and anatomical structures, provide unparalleled molecular and pathological tools to model human disease. These models used in combination with aging and PD-associated toxins have expanded our understanding of PD pathogenesis. Attempts to refine PD animal models using conditional approaches have yielded in vivo nigrostriatal degeneration that is instructive in ordering pathogenic signaling and in developing therapeutic strategies to cure or halt the disease. Here, we provide an overview of the generation and characterization of transgenic and knockout mice used to study PD followed by a review of the molecular insights that have been gleaned from current PD mouse models. Finally, potential approaches to refine and improve current models are discussed. PMID:22960626

  6. Zebra fish: an uncharted behavior genetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlai, Robert

    2003-09-01

    The zebra fish has been a preferred subject of genetic analysis. It produces a large number of offspring that can be kept in small aquaria, it can be easily mutagenized using chemical mutagens (e.g., ethyl nitrosourea [ENU]), and high-resolution genetic maps exist that aid identification of novel genes. Libraries containing large numbers of mutant fish have been generated, and the genetic mechanisms of the development of zebra fish, whose embryo is transparent, have been extensively studied. Given the extensive homology of its genome with that of other vertebrate species including our own and given the available genetic tools, zebra fish has become a popular model organism. Despite this popularity, however, surprisingly little is known about its behavior. It is argued that behavioral analysis is a powerful tool with which the function of the brain may be studied, and the zebra fish will represent an excellent subject of such analysis. The present paper is a proof of concept study that uses pharmacological manipulation (exposure to alcohol) to show that the zebra fish is amenable to the behavioral genetic analysis of aggression and thus may allow us to reveal molecular mechanisms of this behavioral phenomenon relevant to vertebrates.

  7. Transplantation of human hepatocytes into tolerized genetically immunocompetent rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edwin C. Ouyang; Catherine H. Wu; Cherie Walton; Kittichai Promrat; George Y. Wu

    2001-01-01

    AIM To determine whether normal geneticallyirnmunocornpetent rodent hosts could bemanipulated to accept human hepatocytetransplants with long term survival withoutirnrnunosuppression.METHODS Tolerance towards humanhepatocytes was established by injection ofprimary human hepatocytes or Huh7 humanhepatoma cells into the peritoneal cavities offetal rats. Corresponding cells weresubsequently transplanted into newborn rats viaintrasplenic injection within 24 h after birth.RESULTS Mixed lymphocyte assays showedthat spleen cells from non-tolerized rats werestimulated to proliferate when exposed to humanhepatocytes, while cells from tolerized ratswere not. Injections made between 15 d and 17 dof gestation produced optimal tolerizaton.Transplanted human hepatocytes in rat liverswere visualized by immunohistochemicalstaining of human albumin. By dot blotting ofgenomic DNA in livers of tolerized rats 16 weeksafter hepatocyte transplantation, it was foundthat approximately 2.5 × 105 human hepatocytessurvived per rat liver. Human albumin mRNA wasdetected in rat livers by RT-PCR for 15 wk, andhuman albumin protein was also detectable in ratserum.CONCLUSION Tolerization of an immuno-competent rat can permit transplantation, andsurvival of functional human hepatocytes.

  8. Genetic Algorithm Based Microscale Vehicle Emissions Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicong Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to match emission estimations accuracy with the outputs of transport models. The overall error rate in long-term traffic forecasts resulting from strategic transport models is likely to be significant. Microsimulation models, whilst high-resolution in nature, may have similar measurement errors if they use the outputs of strategic models to obtain traffic demand predictions. At the microlevel, this paper discusses the limitations of existing emissions estimation approaches. Emission models for predicting emission pollutants other than CO2 are proposed. A genetic algorithm approach is adopted to select the predicting variables for the black box model. The approach is capable of solving combinatorial optimization problems. Overall, the emission prediction results reveal that the proposed new models outperform conventional equations in terms of accuracy and robustness.

  9. Creation of Reversible Cholestatic Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhas, Gokulakkrishna

    2011-01-01

    Cholestasis is a clinical condition commonly encountered by both surgeons and gastroenterologists. Cholestasis can cause various physiological changes and affect the nutritional status and surgical outcomes. Study of the pathophysiological changes occurring in the liver and other organs is of importance. Various studies have been done in cholestatic rat models. We used a reversible cholestatic rat model in our recent study looking at the role of methylprednisolone in the ischemia reperfusion injury. Various techniques for creation of a reversible cholestatic model have been described. Creation of a reversible cholestatic rat model can be challenging in view of the smaller size and unique hepatopancreatobiliary anatomy in rats. This video article demonstrates the creation of a reversible cholestatic model. This model can be used in various studies, such as looking at the changes in nutritional, physiological, pathological, histological and immunological changes in the gastrointestinal tract. This model can also be used to see the effects of cholestasis and various therapeutic interventions on major hepatic surgeries. PMID:21633335

  10. Animal models of schizophrenia: developmental preparation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Piotr; Wozniak, Anna; Nowakowska, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia manifests itself primarily with positive symptoms, negative symptoms and cognitive disorders. Animal models of mental diseases seem to be an important tool in understanding key theories related with pathophysiology of the disorder and are used to assess efficacy of new drugs. References describe four basic groups of animal models of schizophrenia, such as: models created by pharmacological intervention, genetic models, lesion models and models of developmental disorders of primary brain structures. Of the models referred to above, the group of developmental disorder models is particularly noteworthy, as they are primarily easy to use, and the methods are highly sensitive. High scientific value of these models is associated with the neurodevelopmental theory which stipulates that at an early stage of body development, a number of interactions between genetic and environmental factors may affect the development of neurons which may cause disorders of brain cytoarchitecture development. We review six developmental models of schizophrenia in rats (MAM--methylooxymethanol acetate, prenatal stress, maternal deprivation, isolation rearing, prenatal immune challenge and maternal malnutrition) that are all validated by disruption in PPI.

  11. A rat model for hepatitis E virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Niraj; Verbeken, Erik; Ramaekers, Kaat; Dallmeier, Kai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the prime causes of acute viral hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis E is increasingly recognized as an important problem in the transplant setting. Nevertheless, the fundamental understanding of the biology of HEV replication is limited and there are few therapeutic options. The development of such therapies is partially hindered by the lack of a robust and convenient animal model. We propose the infection of athymic nude rats with the rat HEV strain LA-B350 as such a model. A cDNA clone, pLA-B350, was constructed and the infectivity of its capped RNA transcripts was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a subgenomic replicon, pLA-B350/luc, was constructed and validated for in vitro antiviral studies. Interestingly, rat HEV proved to be less sensitive to the antiviral activity of α-interferon, ribavirin and mycophenolic acid than genotype 3 HEV (a strain that infects humans). As a proof-of-concept, part of the C-terminal polymerase sequence of pLA-B350/luc was swapped with its genotype 3 HEV counterpart: the resulting chimeric replicon replicated with comparable efficiency as the wild-type construct, confirming that LA-B350 strain is amenable to humanization (replacement of certain sequences or motifs by their counterparts from human HEV strains). Finally, ribavirin effectively inhibited LA-B350 replication in athymic nude rats, confirming the suitability of the rat model for antiviral studies. PMID:27483350

  12. A rat model for hepatitis E virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Debing

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV is one of the prime causes of acute viral hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis E is increasingly recognized as an important problem in the transplant setting. Nevertheless, the fundamental understanding of the biology of HEV replication is limited and there are few therapeutic options. The development of such therapies is partially hindered by the lack of a robust and convenient animal model. We propose the infection of athymic nude rats with the rat HEV strain LA-B350 as such a model. A cDNA clone, pLA-B350, was constructed and the infectivity of its capped RNA transcripts was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a subgenomic replicon, pLA-B350/luc, was constructed and validated for in vitro antiviral studies. Interestingly, rat HEV proved to be less sensitive to the antiviral activity of α-interferon, ribavirin and mycophenolic acid than genotype 3 HEV (a strain that infects humans. As a proof-of-concept, part of the C-terminal polymerase sequence of pLA-B350/luc was swapped with its genotype 3 HEV counterpart: the resulting chimeric replicon replicated with comparable efficiency as the wild-type construct, confirming that LA-B350 strain is amenable to humanization (replacement of certain sequences or motifs by their counterparts from human HEV strains. Finally, ribavirin effectively inhibited LA-B350 replication in athymic nude rats, confirming the suitability of the rat model for antiviral studies.

  13. Genetic background of nonmutant Piebald-Virol-Glaxo rats does not influence nephronophthisis phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yengkopiong JP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Jada Pasquale Yengkopiong, Joseph Daniel Wani LakoJohn Garang Memorial University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bor, Jonglei State, Republic of South SudanBackground: Nephronophthisis (NPHP, which affects multiple organs, is a hereditary cystic kidney disease (CKD, characterized by interstitial fibrosis and numerous fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys. It is caused by mutations in NPHP genes, which encode for ciliary proteins known as nephrocystins. The disorder affects many people across the world and leads to end-stage renal disease. The aim of this study was to determine if the genetic background of the nonmutant female Piebald-Virol-Glaxo (PVG/Seac-/- rat influences phenotypic inheritance of NPHP from mutant male Lewis polycystic kidney rats.Methods: Mating experiments were performed between mutant Lewis polycystic kidney male rats with CKD and nonmutant PVG and Wistar Kyoto female rats without cystic kidney disease to raise second filial and backcross 1 progeny, respectively. Rats that developed cystic kidneys were identified. Systolic blood pressure was determined in each rat at 12 weeks of age using the tail and cuff method. After euthanasia, blood samples were collected and chemistry was determined. Histological examination of the kidneys, pancreas, and liver of rats with and without cystic kidney disease was performed.Results: It was established that the genetic background of nonmutant female PVG rats did not influence the phenotypic inheritance of the CKD from mutant male Lewis polycystic kidney rats. The disease arose as a result of a recessive mutation in a single gene (second filial generation, CKD = 13, non-CKD = 39, Χ2 = 0.00, P ≥ 0.97; backcross 1 generation, CKD = 67, non-CKD = 72, Χ2 = 0.18, P > 0.05 and inherited as NPHP. The rats with CKD developed larger fluid-filled cystic kidneys, higher systolic blood pressure, and anemia, but there were no extrarenal cysts and disease did not lead to

  14. Modeling resistance to genetic control of insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphey, Nina; Bonsall, Michael B; Alphey, Luke

    2011-02-07

    The sterile insect technique is an area-wide pest control method that reduces pest populations by releasing mass-reared sterile insects which compete for mates with wild insects. Modern molecular tools have created possibilities for improving and extending the sterile insect technique. As with any new insect control method, questions arise about potential resistance. Genetic RIDL(®)(1) (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal) technology is a proposed modification of the technique, releasing insects that are homozygous for a repressible dominant lethal genetic construct rather than being sterilized by irradiation. Hypothetical resistance to the lethal mechanism is a potential threat to RIDL strategies' effectiveness. Using population genetic and population dynamic models, we assess the circumstances under which monogenic biochemically based resistance could have a significant impact on the effectiveness of releases for population control. We assume that released insects would be homozygous susceptible to the lethal genetic construct and therefore releases would have a built-in element of resistance dilution. We find that this effect could prevent or limit the spread of resistance to RIDL constructs; the outcomes are subject to competing selective forces deriving from the fitness properties of resistance and the release ratio. Resistance that is spreading and capable of having a significant detrimental impact on population reduction is identifiable, signaling in advance a need for mitigating action.

  15. Standardization of model to induce obesity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gipsis Suárez Román

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is a risk factor for multiple diseases. There are various rat models to induce this condition. Genetic models and diet-induced obesity are expensive. Within the models of hypothalamic obesity, there is one achieved by the administration of monosodium glutamate during the neonatal period. This substance is not expensive and causes the major metabolic alterations observed in human obesity. Objective: to select an appropriate treatment scheme to induce obesity with monosodium glutamate during neonatal period. Methods: monosodium glutamate was administered to Wistar rats during the neonatal period, using three different treatment schemes (with five, seven and ten doses of 4mg/g/day through two routes of administration: subcutaneous and intraperitoneal routes. Controls were administered 0.9% sodium chloride. To establish the diagnosis of obesity, the following variables were measured at 90 days: weight, snout-anus length and Lee index. Results: with all treatment schemes tested, snout-anus length was statistically different between the group treated with monosodium glutamate and the controls group. 100% of the rats that reached adulthood injected with monosodium glutamate was obese. Conclusion: the scheme of five doses of monosodium glutamate, applied subcutaneously on alternate days, was selected as obesity is obtained with less handling and lower percentage of neonatal deaths.

  16. Evolutionary algorithms in genetic regulatory networks model

    CERN Document Server

    Raza, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Genetic Regulatory Networks (GRNs) plays a vital role in the understanding of complex biological processes. Modeling GRNs is significantly important in order to reveal fundamental cellular processes, examine gene functions and understanding their complex relationships. Understanding the interactions between genes gives rise to develop better method for drug discovery and diagnosis of the disease since many diseases are characterized by abnormal behaviour of the genes. In this paper we have reviewed various evolutionary algorithms-based approach for modeling GRNs and discussed various opportunities and challenges.

  17. Genetic search feature selection for affective modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez, Héctor P.; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2010-01-01

    Automatic feature selection is a critical step towards the generation of successful computational models of affect. This paper presents a genetic search-based feature selection method which is developed as a global-search algorithm for improving the accuracy of the affective models built....... The method is tested and compared against sequential forward feature selection and random search in a dataset derived from a game survey experiment which contains bimodal input features (physiological and gameplay) and expressed pairwise preferences of affect. Results suggest that the proposed method...

  18. Creation of Reversible Cholestatic Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cholestasis is a clinical condition commonly encountered by both surgeons and gastroenterologists. Cholestasis can cause various physiological changes and affect the nutritional status and surgical outcomes. Study of the pathophysiological changes occurring in the liver and other organs is of importance. Various studies have been done in cholestatic rat models.

  19. Digital replantation teaching model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ad-El, D D; Harper, A; Hoffman, L A

    2000-01-01

    Replant surgery is a complex procedure that requires advanced microsurgical skills and is usually performed as an emergency operation, lasting many hours. For these reasons, teaching replantation is difficult. Although teaching models exist, they are often too general or complicated for routine use and do not simulate the stages and the pitfalls of human replant surgery. We have designed a model that is simple and imitates human replant surgery. After reviewing the rat anatomy, students dissect and replant a rat hind limb that has been sharply amputated by the instructor. They follow the same principles of "real" surgery like debridement, minimizing ischemia time, and stable fixation before anatomosis of vessels. After marking the structures, bony fixation followed by vessel and nerve anastomosis are performed. Muscle is reattached to the skin and limb vascularity evaluated. After we designed this model, plastic surgery residents performed the technique on 10 rats. An 80% limb viability rate was achieved. This model is simple to perform, simulates all the relevant structures and pitfalls of human surgery, and the rats are relatively cheap and can be used for other parallel projects.

  20. From integrative genomics to systems genetics in the rat to link genotypes to phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Moral, Aida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Complementary to traditional gene mapping approaches used to identify the hereditary components of complex diseases, integrative genomics and systems genetics have emerged as powerful strategies to decipher the key genetic drivers of molecular pathways that underlie disease. Broadly speaking, integrative genomics aims to link cellular-level traits (such as mRNA expression) to the genome to identify their genetic determinants. With the characterization of several cellular-level traits within the same system, the integrative genomics approach evolved into a more comprehensive study design, called systems genetics, which aims to unravel the complex biological networks and pathways involved in disease, and in turn map their genetic control points. The first fully integrated systems genetics study was carried out in rats, and the results, which revealed conserved trans-acting genetic regulation of a pro-inflammatory network relevant to type 1 diabetes, were translated to humans. Many studies using different organisms subsequently stemmed from this example. The aim of this Review is to describe the most recent advances in the fields of integrative genomics and systems genetics applied in the rat, with a focus on studies of complex diseases ranging from inflammatory to cardiometabolic disorders. We aim to provide the genetics community with a comprehensive insight into how the systems genetics approach came to life, starting from the first integrative genomics strategies [such as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) mapping] and concluding with the most sophisticated gene network-based analyses in multiple systems and disease states. Although not limited to studies that have been directly translated to humans, we will focus particularly on the successful investigations in the rat that have led to primary discoveries of genes and pathways relevant to human disease. PMID:27736746

  1. Effect of diets containing genetically modified potatoes expressing Galanthus nivalis lectin on rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, S W; Pusztai, A

    1999-10-16

    Diets containing genetically modified (GM) potatoes expressing the lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) had variable effects on different parts of the rat gastrointestinal tract. Some effects, such as the proliferation of the gastric mucosa, were mainly due to the expression of the GNA transgene. However, other parts of the construct or the genetic transformation (or both) could also have contributed to the overall biological effects of the GNA-GM potatoes, particularly on the small intestine and caecum.

  2. Latent spatial models and sampling design for landscape genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Ephraim M.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Knick, Steven T.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Fike, Jennifer A.; Cross, Todd B.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a spatially-explicit approach for modeling genetic variation across space and illustrate how this approach can be used to optimize spatial prediction and sampling design for landscape genetic data. We propose a multinomial data model for categorical microsatellite allele data commonly used in landscape genetic studies, and introduce a latent spatial random effect to allow for spatial correlation between genetic observations. We illustrate how modern dimension reduction approaches to spatial statistics can allow for efficient computation in landscape genetic statistical models covering large spatial domains. We apply our approach to propose a retrospective spatial sampling design for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) population genetics in the western United States.

  3. Rodent models in neuroscience research: is it a rat race?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Ellenbroek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rodents (especially Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus have been the most widely used models in biomedical research for many years. A notable shift has taken place over the last two decades, with mice taking a more and more prominent role in biomedical science compared to rats. This shift was primarily instigated by the availability of a much larger genetic toolbox for mice, particularly embryonic-stem-cell-based targeting technology for gene disruption. With the recent emergence of tools for altering the rat genome, notably genome-editing technologies, the technological gap between the two organisms is closing, and it is becoming more important to consider the physiological, anatomical, biochemical and pharmacological differences between rats and mice when choosing the right model system for a specific biological question. The aim of this short review and accompanying poster is to highlight some of the most important differences, and to discuss their impact on studies of human diseases, with a special focus on neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Large genetic animal models of Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, A Jennifer; Howland, David S

    2013-01-01

    The dominant nature of the Huntington's disease gene mutation has allowed genetic models to be developed in multiple species, with the mutation causing an abnormal neurological phenotype in all animals in which it is expressed. Many different rodent models have been generated. The most widely used of these, the transgenic R6/2 mouse, carries the mutation in a fragment of the human huntingtin gene and has a rapidly progressive and fatal neurological phenotype with many relevant pathological changes. Nevertheless, their rapid decline has been frequently questioned in the context of a disease that takes years to manifest in humans, and strenuous efforts have been made to make rodent models that are genetically more 'relevant' to the human condition, including full length huntingtin gene transgenic and knock-in mice. While there is no doubt that we have learned, and continue to learn much from rodent models, their usefulness is limited by two species constraints. First, the brains of rodents differ significantly from humans in both their small size and their neuroanatomical organization. Second, rodents have much shorter lifespans than humans. Here, we review new approaches taken to these challenges in the development of models of Huntington's disease in large brained, long-lived animals. We discuss the need for such models, and how they might be used to fill specific niches in preclinical Huntington's disease research, particularly in testing gene-based therapeutics. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of animals in which the prodromal period of disease extends over a long time span. We suggest that there is considerable 'value added' for large animal models in preclinical Huntington's disease research.

  5. Genetic mouse models for otitis media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingyin Zheng; Ken R Johnson

    2003-01-01

    @@ Genetics of Otitis Media (OM): OM is affected by multiple factors including eustachian tube (ET) structure and function, immune status, innate mucosal defense, genetic susceptibility, and pathogens.

  6. GENETIC-BASED NUTRITION RECOMMENDATION MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A.A. Fayoumi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary computing is the collective name for a range of problem-solving techniques based on principles of biological evolution, such as natural selection and genetic inheritance. These techniques are being widely applied to a variety of problems in many vital fields. Also, Evolutionary Algorithms (EA which applied the principles of Evolutionary computations, such as genetic algorithm, particle swarm, ant colony and bees algorithm and so on play an important role in decision making process. EAs serve a lot of fields which can affect our life directly, such as medicine, engineering, transportations, communications. One of these vital fields is Nutrition which can be viewed from several points of view as medical, physical, social, environmental and psychological point of view. This study, presents a proposed model that shows how evolutionary computing generally and genetic algorithm specifically-as a powerful algorithm of evolutionary algorithms-can be used to recommend an appropriate nutrition style in a medical and physical sides only to each person according to his/her personal and medical measurements.

  7. Amygdala Kindling in the WAG-Rij Rat Model of Absence Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aker, R.G.; Yananli, H.R.; Gurbanova, A.A.; Özkaynakçi, A.E.; Ates, N.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Onat, F.Y.

    2006-01-01

    Summary: Purpose: The kindling model in rats with genetic absence epilepsy is suitable for studying mechanisms involved in the propagation and generalization of seizure activity in the convulsive and nonconvulsive components of epilepsy. In the present study, we compared the amygdala kindling rate a

  8. Variability in Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation in Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure depe...

  9. Medulloblastoma: Molecular Genetics and Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Raffel

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a primary brain tumor found in the cerebellum of children. The tumor occurs in association with two inherited cancer syndromes: Turcot syndrome and Gorlin syndrome. Insights into the molecular biology of the tumor have come from looking at alterations in the genes altered in these syndromes, PTC and APC, respectively. Murine models of medulloblastoma have been constructed based on these alterations. Additional murine models that, while mimicking the appearance of the human tumor, seem unrelated to the human tumor's molecular alterations have been made. In this review, the clinical picture, origin, molecular biology, murine models of medulloblastoma are discussed. Although a great deal has been discovered about this tumor, the genetic alterations responsible for tumor development in a majority of patients have yet to be described.

  10. Genetically engineered mouse models and human osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Alvin JM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common form of bone cancer. Pivotal insight into the genes involved in human osteosarcoma has been provided by the study of rare familial cancer predisposition syndromes. Three kindreds stand out as predisposing to the development of osteosarcoma: Li-Fraumeni syndrome, familial retinoblastoma and RecQ helicase disorders, which include Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome in particular. These disorders have highlighted the important roles of P53 and RB respectively, in the development of osteosarcoma. The association of OS with RECQL4 mutations is apparent but the relevance of this to OS is uncertain as mutations in RECQL4 are not found in sporadic OS. Application of the knowledge or mutations of P53 and RB in familial and sporadic OS has enabled the development of tractable, highly penetrant murine models of OS. These models share many of the cardinal features associated with human osteosarcoma including, importantly, a high incidence of spontaneous metastasis. The recent development of these models has been a significant advance for efforts to improve our understanding of the genetics of human OS and, more critically, to provide a high-throughput genetically modifiable platform for preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics.

  11. Genetic Algorithms Principles Towards Hidden Markov Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil M. Hewahi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a general approach based on Genetic Algorithms (GAs to evolve Hidden Markov Models (HMM. The problem appears when experts assign probability values for HMM, they use only some limited inputs. The assigned probability values might not be accurate to serve in other cases related to the same domain. We introduce an approach based on GAs to find
    out the suitable probability values for the HMM to be mostly correct in more cases than what have been used to assign the probability values.

  12. [Approach to depressogenic genes from genetic analyses of animal models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    Human depression or mood disorder is defined as a complex disease, making positional cloning of susceptibility genes a formidable task. We have undertaken genetic analyses of three different animal models for depression, comparing our results with advanced database resources. We first performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis on two mouse models of "despair", namely, the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), and detected multiple chromosomal loci that control immobility time in these tests. Since one QTL detected on mouse chromosome 11 harbors the GABA A receptor subunit genes, we tested these genes for association in human mood disorder patients. We obtained significant associations of the alpha 1 and alpha 6 subunit genes with the disease, particularly in females. This result was striking, because we had previously detected an epistatic interaction between mouse chromosomes 11 and X that regulates immobility time in these animals. Next, we performed genome-wide expression analyses using a rat model of depression, learned helplessness (LH). We found that in the frontal cortex of LH rats, a disease implicated region, the LIM kinase 1 gene (Limk 1) showed greatest alteration, in this case down-regulation. By combining data from the QTL analysis of FST/TST and DNA microarray analysis of mouse frontal cortex, we identified adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP protein 1 (Cap 1) as another candidate gene for depression susceptibility. Both Limk 1 and Cap 1 are key players in the modulation of actin G-F conversion. In summary, our current study using animal models suggests disturbances of GABAergic neurotransmission and actin turnover as potential pathophysiologies for mood disorder.

  13. Genetic Programming for Automatic Hydrological Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadalawada, Jayashree; Babovic, Vladan

    2017-04-01

    One of the recent challenges for the hydrologic research community is the need for the development of coupled systems that involves the integration of hydrologic, atmospheric and socio-economic relationships. This poses a requirement for novel modelling frameworks that can accurately represent complex systems, given, the limited understanding of underlying processes, increasing volume of data and high levels of uncertainity. Each of the existing hydrological models vary in terms of conceptualization and process representation and is the best suited to capture the environmental dynamics of a particular hydrological system. Data driven approaches can be used in the integration of alternative process hypotheses in order to achieve a unified theory at catchment scale. The key steps in the implementation of integrated modelling framework that is influenced by prior understanding and data, include, choice of the technique for the induction of knowledge from data, identification of alternative structural hypotheses, definition of rules, constraints for meaningful, intelligent combination of model component hypotheses and definition of evaluation metrics. This study aims at defining a Genetic Programming based modelling framework that test different conceptual model constructs based on wide range of objective functions and evolves accurate and parsimonious models that capture dominant hydrological processes at catchment scale. In this paper, GP initializes the evolutionary process using the modelling decisions inspired from the Superflex framework [Fenicia et al., 2011] and automatically combines them into model structures that are scrutinized against observed data using statistical, hydrological and flow duration curve based performance metrics. The collaboration between data driven and physical, conceptual modelling paradigms improves the ability to model and manage hydrologic systems. Fenicia, F., D. Kavetski, and H. H. Savenije (2011), Elements of a flexible approach

  14. Models of genetic counseling and their effects on multicultural genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Linwood J

    2002-06-01

    This theoretical paper examines challenges to multicultural genetic counseling, counseling between culturally different clients and counselors, in the context of Kessler's typology of models of genetic counseling (Kessler S (1997) J Genet Counsel 6:287-295). It is suggested that challenges such as resistance to multicultural genetic counseling education may be due to conceptions about genetic counseling as a biomedical field that transcends questions of culture as well as lack of multicultural training or prejudice. Directions for future research and recommendations for multicultural genetic counseling education are briefly explored.

  15. Identification of genetic modifiers of behavioral phenotypes in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijman Isaäc J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variation in the regulatory region of the human serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4 has been shown to affect brain functionality and personality. However, large heterogeneity in its biological effects is observed, which is at least partially due to genetic modifiers. To gain insight into serotonin transporter (SERT-specific genetic modifiers, we studied an intercross between the Wistar SERT-/- rat and the behaviorally and genetically divergent Brown Norway rat, and performed a QTL analysis. Results In a cohort of >150 intercross SERT-/- and control (SERT+/+ rats we characterized 12 traits that were previously associated with SERT deficiency, including activity, exploratory pattern, cocaine-induced locomotor activity, and abdominal and subcutaneous fat. Using 325 genetic markers, 10 SERT-/--specific quantitative trait loci (QTLs for parameters related to activity and exploratory pattern (Chr.1,9,11,14, and cocaine-induced anxiety and locomotor activity (Chr.5,8 were identified. No significant QTLs were found for fat parameters. Using in silico approaches we explored potential causal genes within modifier QTL regions and found interesting candidates, amongst others, the 5-HT1D receptor (Chr. 5, dopamine D2 receptor (Chr. 8, cannabinoid receptor 2 (Chr. 5, and genes involved in fetal development and plasticity (across chromosomes. Conclusions We anticipate that the SERT-/--specific QTLs may lead to the identification of new modulators of serotonergic signaling, which may be targets for pharmacogenetic and therapeutic approaches.

  16. Large animal models of rare genetic disorders: sheep as phenotypically relevant models of human genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnapureddy, Ashish R; Stayner, Cherie; McEwan, John; Baddeley, Olivia; Forman, John; Eccles, Michael R

    2015-09-02

    Animals that accurately model human disease are invaluable in medical research, allowing a critical understanding of disease mechanisms, and the opportunity to evaluate the effect of therapeutic compounds in pre-clinical studies. Many types of animal models are used world-wide, with the most common being small laboratory animals, such as mice. However, rodents often do not faithfully replicate human disease, despite their predominant use in research. This discordancy is due in part to physiological differences, such as body size and longevity. In contrast, large animal models, including sheep, provide an alternative to mice for biomedical research due to their greater physiological parallels with humans. Completion of the full genome sequences of many species, and the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies, means it is now feasible to screen large populations of domesticated animals for genetic variants that resemble human genetic diseases, and generate models that more accurately model rare human pathologies. In this review, we discuss the notion of using sheep as large animal models, and their advantages in modelling human genetic disease. We exemplify several existing naturally occurring ovine variants in genes that are orthologous to human disease genes, such as the Cln6 sheep model for Batten disease. These, and other sheep models, have contributed significantly to our understanding of the relevant human disease process, in addition to providing opportunities to trial new therapies in animals with similar body and organ size to humans. Therefore sheep are a significant species with respect to the modelling of rare genetic human disease, which we summarize in this review.

  17. Warehouse Optimization Model Based on Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofeng Qin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes Bao Steel logistics automated warehouse system as an example. The premise is to maintain the focus of the shelf below half of the height of the shelf. As a result, the cost time of getting or putting goods on the shelf is reduced, and the distance of the same kind of goods is also reduced. Construct a multiobjective optimization model, using genetic algorithm to optimize problem. At last, we get a local optimal solution. Before optimization, the average cost time of getting or putting goods is 4.52996 s, and the average distance of the same kinds of goods is 2.35318 m. After optimization, the average cost time is 4.28859 s, and the average distance is 1.97366 m. After analysis, we can draw the conclusion that this model can improve the efficiency of cargo storage.

  18. Defective copper binding to apo-ceruloplasmin in a rat model and patients with Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojimahara, N; Nakabayashi, H; Shikata, T; Esumi, M

    1995-06-01

    To examine the mechanism of decrease in serum ceruloplasmin (Cp) in Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats, a proposed model of Wilson's disease, we analyzed Cp products at the stages of transcription and translation. Northern blot analysis and immunoblot analysis showed that the level and the molecular size of Cp mRNA and protein in LEC rats were similar to those in control Long-Evans-Agouti (LEA) rats. However, the ferroxidase activity of Cp was significantly decreased in LEC rats. We separated serum Cp into two forms by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with pH modification: one was a holo-Cp with copper and ferroxidase activity, and the other was an inactive apo-Cp without copper. Holo-Cp was the predominant form in LEA rats and normal humans, whereas apo-Cp was the major form in LEC rats and patients with Wilson's disease. The cosegregation of apo-Cp predominance with the disease in LEC rats was analyzed using backcross rats. Apo-Cp was dominant in 8 of 11 offspring with disease but in none of 19 normal offspring. These results indicate that a genetic disturbance of copper binding to apo-Cp may be closely associated with the pathogenesis in LEC rats, and probably in Wilson's disease.

  19. Genetic spectrum assignment model with constraints in cognitive radio networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Ye

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The interference constraints of genetic spectrum assignment model in cognitive radio networks are analyzed in this paper. An improved genetic spectrum assignment model is proposed. The population of genetic algorithm is divided into two sets, the feasible spectrum assignment strategies and the randomly updated spectrum assignment strategies. The penalty function is added to the utility function to achieve the spectrum assignment strategy that satisfies the interference constraints and has better fitness. The proposed method is applicable in both the genetic spectrum assignment model and the quantum genetic spectrum assignment mode. It can ensure the randomness of partial chromosomes in the population to some extent, and reduce the computational complexity caused by the constraints-free procedure after the update of population. Simulation results show that the proposed method can achieve better performance than the conventional genetic spectrum assignment model and quantum genetic spectrum assignment model

  20. A model of subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao-liaoLI; Xiao-liangWANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To build a simple and repeatable animal model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: SAH was introduced by passing a nylon thread up through the right internal carotid artery and piercing a hone in the right anterior cerebral artery. At 12 and 24 h, the rats were evaluated with rotarod test and the behavior scale (5-point scale). RESULTS: The ratswere trained through rotarod test and then randomly divided into

  1. Ictal stimulus processing during spike-wave discharges in genetic epileptic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drinkenburg, W.H.I.M.; Schuurmans, M.L.E.J.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Vossen, J.M.H.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2003-01-01

    In the present experiment it was investigated whether and to what extent auditory information processing is possible during the presence of spike-wave discharges in rats. To that end, WAG/Rij rats which are an animal model for absence epilepsy, were provided with cortical electrodes for the registra

  2. Rat Model of Parkes Weber Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Bojakowski

    Full Text Available The Parkes Weber syndrome is a congenital vascular malformation, characterized by varicose veins, arterio-venous fistulas and overgrown limbs. No broadly accepted animal model of Parkes Weber syndrome has been described. We created side-to-side arterio-venous fistula between common femoral vessels with proximal non-absorbable ligature on common femoral vein limiting the enlargement of the vein diameter in Wistar rats. Contralateral limb was sham operated. Invasive blood pressure measurements in both iliac and inferior cava veins were performed in rats 30 days after fistula creation. Tight circumference and femoral bone length were measured. Histopathology and morphology of soleus muscle, extensor digitorum longus muscle, and the common femoral vessel were analyzed. 30 days following arterio-venous fistula creation, a statistically significant elevation of blood pressure in common iliac vein and limb overgrowth was observed. Limb enlargement was caused by muscle overgrowth, varicose veins formation and bone elongation. Arterio-venous fistula with proximal outflow limitation led to significant increase of femoral vein circumference and venous wall thickness. Our study indicates that the described rat model mimics major clinical features characteristic for the human Parkes Weber syndrome: presence of arterio-venous fistula, venous hypertension and dilatation, varicose veins formation, and the limb hypertrophy. We reveal that limb overgrowth is caused by bone elongation, muscle hypertrophy, and venous dilatation. The newly established model will permit detailed studies on the mechanisms underlying the disease and on the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies for the Parkes Weber syndrome treatment.

  3. Whole-Genome Sequencing Reveals Genetic Variation in the Asian House Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajing Teng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Whole-genome sequencing of wild-derived rat species can provide novel genomic resources, which may help decipher the genetics underlying complex phenotypes. As a notorious pest, reservoir of human pathogens, and colonizer, the Asian house rat, Rattus tanezumi, is successfully adapted to its habitat. However, little is known regarding genetic variation in this species. In this study, we identified over 41,000,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, plus insertions and deletions, through whole-genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses. Moreover, we identified over 12,000 structural variants, including 143 chromosomal inversions. Further functional analyses revealed several fixed nonsense mutations associated with infection and immunity-related adaptations, and a number of fixed missense mutations that may be related to anticoagulant resistance. A genome-wide scan for loci under selection identified various genes related to neural activity. Our whole-genome sequencing data provide a genomic resource for future genetic studies of the Asian house rat species and have the potential to facilitate understanding of the molecular adaptations of rats to their ecological niches.

  4. Whole-Genome Sequencing Reveals Genetic Variation in the Asian House Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Huajing; Zhang, Yaohua; Shi, Chengmin; Mao, Fengbiao; Hou, Lingling; Guo, Hongling; Sun, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Jianxu

    2016-07-07

    Whole-genome sequencing of wild-derived rat species can provide novel genomic resources, which may help decipher the genetics underlying complex phenotypes. As a notorious pest, reservoir of human pathogens, and colonizer, the Asian house rat, Rattus tanezumi, is successfully adapted to its habitat. However, little is known regarding genetic variation in this species. In this study, we identified over 41,000,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, plus insertions and deletions, through whole-genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses. Moreover, we identified over 12,000 structural variants, including 143 chromosomal inversions. Further functional analyses revealed several fixed nonsense mutations associated with infection and immunity-related adaptations, and a number of fixed missense mutations that may be related to anticoagulant resistance. A genome-wide scan for loci under selection identified various genes related to neural activity. Our whole-genome sequencing data provide a genomic resource for future genetic studies of the Asian house rat species and have the potential to facilitate understanding of the molecular adaptations of rats to their ecological niches.

  5. Model comparisons and genetic and environmental parameter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    arc

    South African Journal of Animal Science 2005, 35 (1) ... Genetic and environmental parameters were estimated for pre- and post-weaning average daily gain ..... and BWT (and medium maternal genetic correlations) indicates that these traits ...

  6. Expression of inflammatory markers in a genetic rodent model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strenn, Nina; Suchankova, Petra; Nilsson, Staffan; Fischer, Christina; Wegener, Gregers; Mathé, Aleksander A; Ekman, Agneta

    2015-03-15

    The complex bidirectional communication between the central nervous system and the peripheral immune system is of possible relevance for both normal brain functions and the development of psychiatric disorders. The aim of this investigation was to study central expression of inflammatory markers in a genetic rat model of depression (the Flinders sensitive line (FSL) and its control, the Flinders resistant line (FRL)). A peripheral immune activation was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in order to investigate possible differences in immune reactions between the two rat lines. To confirm behavioural differences between the rat lines the forced swim test was performed, a test to assess depressive-like behaviour. Expression of candidate inflammatory genes was measured in amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and striatum using quantitative real time PCR. Our results show, for the first time, significantly lower central expression of the glial-specific protein S100B and complement factor C3 in several brain regions of the FSL rats compared to controls, both at baseline and after peripheral immune stimulation. No significant differences in immune responses to LPS were observed between the rats lines. Both S100B and C3 have been suggested to be of relevance for brain development and plasticity as well as brain disorders. These proteins may be of importance for the behavioural differences between the FSL and FRL rats, and this model may be useful in studies exploring the influence of the immune system on brain functions.

  7. [Effect of astaxanthin on preeclampsia rat model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan Rong-rong; Gao Xin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Hai-min

    2014-10-01

    The effect of astaxanthin on N(Ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) induced preeclampsia disease rats was investigated. Thirty pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10): blank group, L-NAME group and astaxanthin group. From day 5 to 20, astaxanthin group rats were treated with astaxanthin (25 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) x bw(-1)) from pregnancy (day 5). To establish the preeclamptic rat model, L-NAME group and astaxanthin group rats were injected with L-NAME (125 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) x bw(-1)) from days 10-20 of pregnancy. The blood pressure and urine protein were recorded. Serum of each group was collected and malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activities were analyzed. Pathological changes were observed with HE stain. The expression of NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa B), ROCK II (Rho-associated protein kinase II), HO-1 (heme oxygenase-1) and Caspase 3 were analyzed with immunohistochemistry. L-NAME induced typical preeclampsia symptoms, such as the increased blood pressure, urinary protein, the content of MDA, etc. Astaxanthin significantly reduced the blood pressure (P astaxanthin, the thickness of basilal membrane was improved and the content of trophoblast cells and spiral arteries was reduced. Immunohistochemistry results revealed that the expressions of NF-κB, ROCK II and Caspase 3 in placenta tissue were effectively decreased, and HO-1 was increased. Results indicated that astaxanthin can improve the preeclampsia symptoms by effectively reducing the oxidative stress and inflammatory damages of preeclampsia. It revealed that astaxanthin may be benefit for prevention and treatment of preeclampsia disease.

  8. Genetic Algorithm Approaches to Prebiobiotic Chemistry Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohn, Jason; Colombano, Silvano

    1997-01-01

    We model an artificial chemistry comprised of interacting polymers by specifying two initial conditions: a distribution of polymers and a fixed set of reversible catalytic reactions. A genetic algorithm is used to find a set of reactions that exhibit a desired dynamical behavior. Such a technique is useful because it allows an investigator to determine whether a specific pattern of dynamics can be produced, and if it can, the reaction network found can be then analyzed. We present our results in the context of studying simplified chemical dynamics in theorized protocells - hypothesized precursors of the first living organisms. Our results show that given a small sample of plausible protocell reaction dynamics, catalytic reaction sets can be found. We present cases where this is not possible and also analyze the evolved reaction sets.

  9. Development and characterization of a novel rat model of estrogen-induced mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Kirsten L; Samanas, Nyssa Becker; Harenda, Quincy Eckert; Hickman, Maureen Peters; Seiler, Nicole L; Ding, Lina; Shull, James D

    2015-04-01

    The ACI rat model of 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced mammary cancer is highly relevant for use in establishing the endocrine, genetic, and environmental bases of breast cancer etiology and identifying novel agents and strategies for preventing breast cancer. E2 treatment rapidly induces mammary cancer in female ACI rats and simultaneously induces pituitary lactotroph hyperplasia and adenoma. The pituitary tumors can result in undesired morbidity, which compromises long-term studies focused on mammary cancer etiology and prevention. We have defined the genetic bases of susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancers and pituitary tumors and have utilized the knowledge gained in these studies to develop a novel inbred rat strain, designated ACWi, that retains the high degree of susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer exhibited by ACI rats, but lacks the treatment-related morbidity associated with pituitary lactotroph hyperplasia/adenoma. When treated with E2, female ACWi rats developed palpable mammary cancer at a median latency of 116 days, an incidence of 100% by 161 days and exhibited an average of 15.6 mammary tumors per rat following 196 days of treatment. These parameters did not differ from those observed for contemporaneously treated ACI rats. None of the E2-treated ACWi rats were killed before the intended experimental end point due to any treatment-related morbidity other than mammary cancer burden, whereas 20% of contemporaneously treated ACI rats exhibited treatment-related morbidity that necessitated premature killing. The ACWi rat strain is well suited for use by those in the research community, focusing on breast cancer etiology and prevention.

  10. Genetic models of poljes in Sicily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maggio, Cipriano; Madonia, Giuliana; Vattano, Marco; De Waele, Jo

    2016-04-01

    Geomorphological and geological studies have been carried out to contribute to the recognition of controlling causes and to the definition of genetic models for poljes of Sicily. A polje is a kilometric closed depression developed mainly on karst rocks, with a conspicuously flat and alluviated bottom affected by intermittent flooding. A polje is usually characterised by relatively steep slopes enclosing an almost perfectly horizontal floor, caused by lateral solution planation related to flooding events. The origin of a polje is due to dissolution of the land surface, although geological structure generally influences its genesis. These large depressions are often elongated according to the direction of main faults, in consequence of a control due to tectonics or to differential erosion. The performed researches have shown the existence of at least seven poljes located along the north-western (chain zone) and the southern (deformed foredeep zone) areas of Sicily. These large karst depressions are developed on Mesozoic limestone/dolomitic rocks within the chain zone and on Messinian gypsum rocks within the deformed foredeep zone. They are up to 4 km in length, can reach surfaces of 3-8 km2 and are around hundred metres deep, with steep slopes and a flat bottom. Generally, they are open, occasionally active depressions and their genesis seems to be strongly controlled by structure. In particular, the studied poljes occur in two different geological/geomorphological settings: a) in graben-like tectonic depressions, where important fault slopes/scarps border the flat bottom; b) in complex depressions controlled by structure, where wide fault line slopes/scarps or large inclined degraded structural surfaces mark the poljes. Finally, landscape analysis leads to the proposition of two main genetic models in which the development of poljes is primarily due to tectonics or differential erosion followed by dissolution.

  11. Genetic screens in Caenorhabditis elegans models for neurodegenerative diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarenga Fernandes Sin, Olga; Michels, Helen; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans comprises unique features that make it an attractive model organism in diverse fields of biology. Genetic screens are powerful to identify genes and C. elegans can be customized to forward or reverse genetic screens and to establish gene function. These genetic screens can be

  12. Genetic screens in Caenorhabditis elegans models for neurodegenerative diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarenga Fernandes Sin, Olga; Michels, Helen; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans comprises unique features that make it an attractive model organism in diverse fields of biology. Genetic screens are powerful to identify genes and C. elegans can be customized to forward or reverse genetic screens and to establish gene function. These genetic screens can be

  13. Research on Modeling of Genetic Networks Based on Information Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-wei; SHAO Shi-huang; ZHANG Ying; LI Hai-ying

    2006-01-01

    As the basis of network of biology organism, the genetic network is concerned by many researchers.Current modeling methods to genetic network, especially the Boolean networks modeling method are analyzed. For modeling the genetic network, the information theory is proposed to mining the relations between elements in network. Through calculating the values of information entropy and mutual entropy in a case, the effectiveness of the method is verified.

  14. Genetic isolation of a chromosome 1 region affecting susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Lezin, E; Griffin, K A; Picken, M; Churchill, M C; Churchill, P C; Kurtz, T W; Liu, W; Wang, N; Kren, V; Zidek, V; Pravenec, M; Bidani, A K

    1999-08-01

    Linkage studies in the fawn-hooded hypertensive rat have suggested that genes influencing susceptibility to hypertension-associated renal failure may exist on rat chromosome 1q. To investigate this possibility in a widely used model of hypertension, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), we compared susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage between an SHR progenitor strain and an SHR congenic strain that is genetically identical except for a defined region of chromosome 1q. Backcross breeding with selection for the markers D1Mit3 and Igf2 on chromosome 1 was used to create the congenic strain (designated SHR.BN-D1Mit3/Igf2) that carries a 22 cM segment of chromosome 1 transferred from the normotensive Brown Norway rat onto the SHR background. Systolic blood pressure (by radiotelemetry) and urine protein excretion were measured in the SHR progenitor and congenic strains before and after the induction of accelerated hypertension by administration of DOCA-salt. At the same level of DOCA-salt hypertension, the SHR.BN-D1Mit3/Igf2 congenic strain showed significantly greater proteinuria and histologically assessed renal vascular and glomerular injury than the SHR progenitor strain. These findings demonstrate that a gene or genes that influence susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage have been trapped in the differential chromosome segment of the SHR.BN-D1Mit3/Igf2 congenic strain. This congenic strain represents an important new model for the fine mapping of gene(s) on chromosome 1 that affect susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal injury in the rat.

  15. Genetically engineered rat gliomas: PDGF-driven tumor initiation and progression in tv-a transgenic rats recreate key features of human brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Nina P; Stokum, Jesse A; Schneider, Craig S; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Xu, Su; Galisteo, Rebeca; Castellani, Rudolph J; Kim, Anthony J; Simard, J Marc; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Holland, Eric C; Woodworth, Graeme F

    2017-01-01

    Previously rodent preclinical research in gliomas frequently involved implantation of cell lines such as C6 and 9L into the rat brain. More recently, mouse models have taken over, the genetic manipulability of the mouse allowing the creation of genetically accurate models outweighed the disadvantage of its smaller brain size that limited time allowed for tumor progression. Here we illustrate a method that allows glioma formation in the rat using the replication competent avian-like sarcoma (RCAS) virus / tumor virus receptor-A (tv-a) transgenic system of post-natal cell type-specific gene transfer. The RCAS/tv-a model has emerged as a particularly versatile and accurate modeling technology by enabling spatial, temporal, and cell type-specific control of individual gene transformations and providing de novo formed glial tumors with distinct molecular subtypes mirroring human GBM. Nestin promoter-driven tv-a (Ntv-a) transgenic Sprague-Dawley rat founder lines were created and RCAS PDGFA and p53 shRNA constructs were used to initiate intracranial brain tumor formation. Tumor formation and progression were confirmed and visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy. The tumors were analyzed using histopathological and immunofluorescent techniques. All experimental animals developed large, heterogeneous brain tumors that closely resembled human GBM. Median survival was 92 days from tumor initiation and 62 days from the first point of tumor visualization on MRI. Each tumor-bearing animal showed time dependent evidence of malignant progression to high-grade glioma by MRI and neurological examination. Post-mortem tumor analysis demonstrated the presence of several key characteristics of human GBM, including high levels of tumor cell proliferation, pseudopalisading necrosis, microvascular proliferation, invasion of tumor cells into surrounding tissues, peri-tumoral reactive astrogliosis, lymphocyte infiltration, presence of numerous tumor

  16. Novel genetic linkage of rat Sp6 mutation to Amelogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muto Taro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is an inherited disorder characterized by abnormal formation of tooth enamel. Although several genes responsible for AI have been reported, not all causative genes for human AI have been identified to date. AMI rat has been reported as an autosomal recessive mutant with hypoplastic AI isolated from a colony of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat strain, but the causative gene has not yet been clarified. Through a genetic screen, we identified the causative gene of autosomal recessive AI in AMI and analyzed its role in amelogenesis. Methods cDNA sequencing of possible AI-candidate genes so far identified using total RNA of day 6 AMI rat molars identified a novel responsible mutation in specificity protein 6 (Sp6. Genetic linkage analysis was performed between Sp6 and AI phenotype in AMI. To understand a role of SP6 in AI, we generated the transgenic rats harboring Sp6 transgene in AMI (Ami/Ami + Tg. Histological analyses were performed using the thin sections of control rats, AMI, and Ami/Ami + Tg incisors in maxillae, respectively. Results We found the novel genetic linkage between a 2-bp insertional mutation of Sp6 gene and the AI phenotype in AMI rats. The position of mutation was located in the coding region of Sp6, which caused frameshift mutation and disruption of the third zinc finger domain of SP6 with 11 cryptic amino acid residues and a stop codon. Transfection studies showed that the mutant protein can be translated and localized in the nucleus in the same manner as the wild-type SP6 protein. When we introduced the CMV promoter-driven wild-type Sp6 transgene into AMI rats, the SP6 protein was ectopically expressed in the maturation stage of ameloblasts associated with the extended maturation stage and the shortened reduced stage without any other phenotypical changes. Conclusion We propose the addition of Sp6 mutation as a new molecular diagnostic criterion for the

  17. Rat traps: filling the toolbox for manipulating the rat genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, R.; Cuppen, E.

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory rat is rapidly gaining momentum as a mammalian genetic model organism. Although traditional forward genetic approaches are well established, recent technological developments have enabled efficient gene targeting and mutant generation. Here we outline the current status, possibilities

  18. Elevation of Il6 is associated with disturbed let-7 biogenesis in a genetic model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Y B; Liu, J J; Villaescusa, J C;

    2016-01-01

    in the inflammation process and IL-6 was shown to be one of its targets. In the present study, we report elevation of Il6 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of a genetic rat model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) compared to the control Flinders Resistant Line. This elevation was associated...

  19. Heritable multiplex genetic engineering in rats using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanwu Ma

    Full Text Available The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been proven to be an efficient gene-editing tool for genome modification of cells and organisms. Multiplex genetic engineering in rat holds a bright future for the study of complex disease. Here, we show that this system enables the simultaneous disruption of four genes (ApoE, B2m, Prf1, and Prkdc in rats in one-step, by co-injection of Cas9 mRNA and sgRNAs into fertilized eggs. We further observed the gene modifications are germline transmittable, and confirmed the off-target mutagenesis and mosaicism are rarely detected by comprehensive analysis. Thus, the CRISPR/Cas9 system makes it possible to efficiently and reliably generate gene knock-out rats.

  20. Naturally occurring genetic variability in expression of Gsta4 is associated with differential survival of axotomized rat motoneurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikael, Ström; Al Nimer, Faiez; Lindblom, Rickard

    2012-01-01

    such naturally occurring strain differences is a powerful approach, also known as forward genetics, to gain knowledge of mechanisms relevant for complex diseases, like injury-induced neurodegeneration. Overlapping congenic rat strains were used to fine map a gene region on rat chromosome eight previously shown...

  1. IMPACT OF GENETIC STRAIN ON BODY FAT LOSS, FOOD CONSUMPTION, METABOLISM, VENTILATION, AND MOTOR ACTIVITY IN FREE RUNNING FEMALE RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physiologic data associated with different strains of common laboratory rat strains.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Gordon , C., P. Phillips , and A. Johnstone. Impact of Genetic Strain on Body Fat Loss, Food Consumption, Metabolism, Ventilation, and Motor Activity in Free Running Female Rats. PHYSIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 153: 56-63, (2016).

  2. Left Ventricular Gene Expression Profile of Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models Used in Air Pollution Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The link between pollutant exposure and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has prompted mechanistic research with animal models of CVD. We hypothesized that the cardiac gene expression patterns of healthy and genetically compromised, CVD-prone rat models, with or without metabolic impa...

  3. Reversal learning and associative memory impairments in a BACHD rat model for Huntington disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yah-Se K Abada

    Full Text Available Chorea and psychiatric symptoms are hallmarks of Huntington disease (HD, a neurodegenerative disorder, genetically characterized by the presence of expanded CAG repeats (>35 in the Huntingtin (HTT gene. HD patients present psychiatric symptoms prior to the onset of motor symptoms and we recently found a similar emergence of non motor and motor deficits in BACHD rats carrying the human full length mutated HTT (97 CAG-CAA repeats. We evaluated cognitive performance in reversal learning and associative memory tests in different age cohorts of BACHD rats. Male wild type (WT and transgenic (TG rats between 2 and 12 months of age were tested. Learning and strategy shifting were assessed in a cross-maze test. Associative memory was evaluated in different fear conditioning paradigms (context, delay and trace. The possible confound of a fear conditioning phenotype by altered sensitivity to a 'painful' stimulus was assessed in a flinch-jump test. In the cross maze, 6 months old TG rats showed a mild impairment in reversal learning. In the fear conditioning tasks, 4, 6 and 12 months old TG rats showed a marked reduction in contextual fear conditioning. In addition, TG rats showed impaired delay conditioning (9 months and trace fear conditioning (3 months. This phenotype was unlikely to be affected by a change in 'pain' sensitivity as WT and TG rats showed no difference in their threshold response in the flinch-jump test. Our results suggest that BACHD rats have a profound associative memory deficit and, possibly, a deficit in reversal learning as assessed in a cross maze task. The time course for the emergence of these symptoms (i.e., before the occurrence of motor symptoms in this rat model for HD appears similar to the time course in patients. These data suggest that BACHD rats may be a useful model for preclinical drug discovery.

  4. Genetically modified mouse models addressing gonadotropin function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Laura D; Rulli, Susana B; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2014-03-01

    The development of genetically modified animals has been useful to understand the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the gonadotropin function. It is well known that alterations in the secretion of a single hormone is capable of producing profound reproductive abnormalities. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone normally secreted by the human placenta, and structurally and functionally it is related to pituitary LH. LH and hCG bind to the same LH/hCG receptor, and hCG is often used as an analog of LH to boost gonadotropin action. There are many physiological and pathological conditions where LH/hCG levels and actions are elevated. In order to understand how elevated LH/hCG levels may impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis we have developed a transgenic mouse model with chronic hCG hypersecretion. Female mice develop many gonadal and extragonadal phenotypes including obesity, infertility, hyperprolactinemia, and pituitary and mammary gland tumors. This article summarizes recent findings on the mechanisms involved in pituitary gland tumorigenesis and hyperprolactinemia in the female mice hypersecreting hCG, in particular the relationship of progesterone with the hyperprolactinemic condition of the model. In addition, we describe the role of hyperprolactinemia as the main cause of infertility and the phenotypic abnormalities in these mice, and the use of dopamine agonists bromocriptine and cabergoline to normalize these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  5. Sensory innervation of rat contracture shoulder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Ohtori, Seiji; Kenmoku, Tomonori; Yamazaki, Hironori; Ochiai, Satoko; Saisu, Takashi; Matsuki, Keisuke; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-02-01

    To date, few studies have investigated the cause of pain experienced by patients with frozen shoulder. The purposes of this study were to establish a rat contracture model and clarify the innervation pattern of the glenohumeral (GH) joint and subacromial bursa (SAB) using immunohistochemistry in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The rat contracture models were made by tying the animal's humerus and scapula with No. 2-0 FiberWire (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA). Contracture was confirmed on x-ray images taken 8 weeks after the operation. Subsequently, two kinds of neurotracers, Fluoro-Gold (FG) (Fluorochrome, Denver, CO, USA) and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl-indocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR, USA), were used to detect the GH joints and SAB separately. FG tracers were injected into GH joints, and DiI tracers were injected into the SAB. At 7 days after injection, DRGs were harvested between C1 and T1. Immunohistochemistry by use of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was performed. CGRP is thought to be one of the causes of pain sensation in joint disease. We evaluated the percentages of FG-labeled CGRP-immunoreactive (CGRP-ir) neurons in the total number of FG-labeled neurons and of DiI-labeled CGRP-ir neurons in the total number of DiI-labeled neurons. Abduction and total arc of the rotation were statistically significantly decreased in the contracture group. Furthermore, the percentage of CGRP-ir DRG neurons was significantly higher in the contracture group in both the GH joint and SAB. These results show that pain sensation in rat shoulder contracture may be induced by the up-regulation of CGRP expression in DRG neurons. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. No sign of decreased burrowing behavior in the genetically depressive flinders rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baastrup, C. S.; Wegener, Gregers; Finnerup, N. B.

    2012-01-01

    animals. Burrowing has thus been suggested as a behavioral outcome of the tendency to engage in natural behaviors -a simplified surrogate measure of 'rat quality of life' (rQoL). Most of the disease models used to develop the assay, also concomitantly result in different levels of motor dysfunction...... depressive flinders rats. Method: 10 flinders resistant (FRL) and 10 flinders sensitive (FSL) female rats were individually placed in a test cage with a hollow pipe (diameter: 10 cm, length: 25 cm) filled with approx. 2.5 kg of 4-7 mm grabble. The weight of displaced grabble in 1 hour served as primary......Background: Burrowing is a natural behavior in rats and has been observed in several different strains. Furthermore decreased burrowing behavior has been shown in different rodent disease models like Multiple sclerosis, peripheral nerve injury and knee inflammation when compared with control...

  7. Production of WTC.ZI-zi rat congenic strain and its pathological and genetic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto, T; Yamasaki, K; Kondo, A; Nakajima, K; Yamada, M; Serikawa, T

    1998-04-01

    A new rat congenic strain, WTC.ZI-zi, was produced after eleven generations of backcrossing between ZI strain as a donor strain and WTC strain as an inbred partner. WTC.ZI-zi/zi homozygous rats generally exhibit more conspicuous body tremor and much earlier occurrence of flaccid paresis than the original ZI strain. The average life span of the congenic strain is approximately nine months, which is also much shorter than that of the original ZI strain. Pathological analysis of the central nervous system of the congenic strain revealed more aggravated vacuolation and hypomyelination than in the original ZI strain. Establishment of the genetic profile with microsatellite markers showed that the congenic strain was genetically almost identical to the WTC strain except for a small chromosome segment bearing the zitter gene. Analysis of markers in this region implied that the length of the donor segment was approximately 13.4 centimorgans which corresponded to 0.65% of the total genome. Thus, these results suggested that expressional alterations of zitter gene were due to replacement of the genetic background from the original ZI strain to the WTC strain. Furthermore, the WTC.ZI-zi congenic strain could provide a refined tool for the analysis of zitter mutation, because the congenic strain has a strict control strain, WTC, and the length of the donor chromosome is genetically defined.

  8. Zinc and iron bioavailability of genetically modified soybeans in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, H S D; Martin, B R; Weaver, C M; Bressan, J; Esteves, E A; Costa, N M B

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate zinc and iron bioavailability of UFV-116, a new variety without 2 lipoxygenases, with better taste and flavor than a commercial variety OCEPAR 19, containing all 3 isozymes. To evaluate zinc absorption using 65Zn whole body retention and femur 65Zn uptake, rats were given 3 g of a 65ZnCl2 labeled test meal (0.25 microCi). The 2 varieties were tested at the level of 9 and 30 ppm of zinc as defatted soy flour. Two other groups (control) received egg white as source of protein and ZnS04.H20 as the zinc source. To evaluate iron absorption, using 59Fe whole body retention, animals were given a 3 g 59FeCl3 labeled test meal (0.2 microCi). The 2 varieties were tested at 12 and 25 ppm iron as defatted soy flour. Whole fat soy flour of variety 1 (UFV-116) was higher (P phytic acid, and oxalate than variety 2 (OCEPAR-19). No difference was observed among the soybean varieties (P > 0.05) for femur 65Zn retention, at different levels of zinc. However, whole body retention was lower (P < 0.05) for UFV-116 than for OCEPAR-19. Femur 65Zn uptake was correlated with the whole body retention; however, whole body retention was more sensitive. Whole body 59Fe retention from UFV-116 was lower (P < 0.05) than from OCEPAR-19. Zinc and iron bioavailability was lower for UFV-116, possibly due to its higher content of antinutrient factors, especially phytate.

  9. Genetic and Environmental Bases of Reading and Spelling: A Unified Genetic Dual Route Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Timothy C.; Castles, Anne; Luciano, Michelle; Wright, Margaret J.; Coltheart, Max; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2007-01-01

    We develop and test a dual-route model of genetic effects on reading aloud and spelling, based on irregular and non-word reading and spelling performance assessed in 1382 monozygotic and dizygotic twins. As in earlier research, most of the variance in reading was due to genetic effects. However, there were three more specific conclusions: the…

  10. Functional-mixed effects models for candidate genetic mapping in imaging genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ja-An; Zhu, Hongtu; Mihye, Ahn; Sun, Wei; Ibrahim, Joseph G

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a functional-mixed effects modeling (FMEM) framework for the joint analysis of high-dimensional imaging data in a large number of locations (called voxels) of a three-dimensional volume with a set of genetic markers and clinical covariates. Our FMEM is extremely useful for efficiently carrying out the candidate gene approaches in imaging genetic studies. FMEM consists of two novel components including a mixed effects model for modeling nonlinear genetic effects on imaging phenotypes by introducing the genetic random effects at each voxel and a jumping surface model for modeling the variance components of the genetic random effects and fixed effects as piecewise smooth functions of the voxels. Moreover, FMEM naturally accommodates the correlation structure of the genetic markers at each voxel, while the jumping surface model explicitly incorporates the intrinsically spatial smoothness of the imaging data. We propose a novel two-stage adaptive smoothing procedure to spatially estimate the piecewise smooth functions, particularly the irregular functional genetic variance components, while preserving their edges among different piecewise-smooth regions. We develop weighted likelihood ratio tests and derive their exact approximations to test the effect of the genetic markers across voxels. Simulation studies show that FMEM significantly outperforms voxel-wise approaches in terms of higher sensitivity and specificity to identify regions of interest for carrying out candidate genetic mapping in imaging genetic studies. Finally, FMEM is used to identify brain regions affected by three candidate genes including CR1, CD2AP, and PICALM, thereby hoping to shed light on the pathological interactions between these candidate genes and brain structure and function.

  11. Striatal grafts in a rat model of Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzman, R; Meyer, M; Lövblad, K O;

    1999-01-01

    Survival and integration into the host brain of grafted tissue are crucial factors in neurotransplantation approaches. The present study explored the feasibility of using a clinical MR scanner to study striatal graft development in a rat model of Huntington's disease. Rat fetal lateral ganglionic...... eminences grown as free-floating roller-tube cultures can be successfully grafted in a rat Huntington model and that a clinical MR scanner offers a useful noninvasive tool for studying striatal graft development....

  12. Sex Modifies Genetic Effects on Residual Variance in Urinary Calcium Excretion in Rat (Rattus norvegicus)

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, Guy M. L.; Nehrke, Keith W.; Bushinsky, David A; Reid, Robert; Lewandowski, Krista L.; Hueber, Paul; Scheinman, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional genetics assumes common variance among alleles or genetic groups. However, evidence from vertebrate and invertebrate models suggests that residual genotypic variance may itself be under partial genetic control. Such a phenomenon would have great significance: high-variability alleles might confound the detection of “classically” acting genes or scatter predicted evolutionary outcomes among unpredicted trajectories. Of the few works on this phenomenon, many implicate sex in some a...

  13. Maternal and genetic factors in stress-resilient and -vulnerable rats: a cross-fostering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Shusaku; Hara, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Otsuki, Koji; Hobara, Teruyuki; Yamagata, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Yoshifumi

    2010-02-26

    Early environmental factors can modulate the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress, together with subsequent brain functions and emotional behaviors. Two rat strains, Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Fischer 344 (F344), are known to exhibit differences in HPA axis reactivity and anxiety behavior in response to restraint stress in adulthood. To investigate the contribution of maternal influences in determining HPA axis and behavioral responses to stress, a cross-fostering study was performed using stress-resilient (SD) or stress-susceptible (F344) strains. We found that SD rats adopted by either an SD (in-fostered) or an F344 (cross-fostered) dam and F344 rats adopted by an SD dam (cross-fostered) showed a suppression of the HPA axis response following 14 days of repeated restraint stress. In contrast, F344 rats adopted by an F344 dam (in-fostered) did not show such HPA axis habituation. We also found that F344 rats adopted by an F344 dam showed increased anxiety-related behaviors in social interaction and novelty-suppressed feeding tests as a result of the 14 days of restraint stress, while SD rats adopted by either an SD or an F344 dam and F344 rats adopted by an SD dam showed normal anxiety-related behaviors under the same experimental conditions. These results suggest that while genetic differences between SD and F344 strains account for some of the variations in stress vulnerability, maternal factors also contribute. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A 90-Day Feeding Study in Rats to Assess the Safety of Genetically Engineered Pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Gao-Jun; Jiang, Sheng-Wang; Qian, Li-Li; Cai, Chun-Bo; Wang, Qing-Qing; Ma, De-Zun; Li, Biao; Xie, Shan-Shan; Cui, Wen-Tao; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory recently produced genetically engineered (GE) Meishan pigs containing a ZFN-edited myostatin loss-of-function mutant. These GE pigs develop and grow as normal as wild type pigs but produce pork with greater lean yield and lower fat mass. To assess any potential subchronic toxicity risks of this GE pork, a 90-day feeding study was conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were randomly divided into five groups, and fed for 90 days with basic diet and basic diets formulated with low dose and high dose pork prepared from wild type pigs and GE pigs, respectively. Animal behaviors and clinical signs were monitored twice daily, and body weight and food consumption were measured and recorded weekly. At days 45 and 90, blood tests (lipid panel, electrolytes, parameters related to liver and kidney functions, and complete blood counts) were performed. Additionally, gross pathology and histopathological analyses were performed for major organs in each group. Data analysis shows that there were no significant differences in growth rate, food consumption, and blood test parameters between rat groups fed with GE pork and wild type pork. Although differences in some liver function parameters (such as aspartate aminotransferase, total proteins, albumin, and alkaline phosphatase) and white blood cell counts (such as lymphocyte percentage and monocyte percentage) were observed between rats fed with high dose GE pork and basic diet, all test results in rats fed with GE pork are in the normal range. Additionally, there are no apparent lesions noted in all organs isolated from rats in all five feeding groups on days 45 and 90. Overall, our results clearly indicate that food consumption of GE pork produced by ZFN-edited myostatin loss-of-function mutant pigs did not have any long-term adverse effects on the health status in rats.

  15. Animal models for human genetic diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sharif Sons

    organisms are extensively used in applied research in agriculture, industry, and also in medicine, where they are ... in genetic disorder that is critical for embryonic .... by practical limitations and ethical concerns. ..... American journal of medical.

  16. A Novel Rat Model of Type 2 Diabetes: The Zucker Fatty Diabetes Mellitus ZFDM Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihide Yokoi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Zucker fatty (ZF rat harboring a missense mutation (fatty, fa in the leptin receptor gene (Lepr develops obesity without diabetes; Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats derived from the ZF strain exhibit obesity with diabetes and are widely used for research on type 2 diabetes (T2D. Here we establish a novel diabetic strain derived from normoglycemic ZF rats. In our ZF rat colony, we incidentally found fa/fa homozygous male rats having reproductive ability, which is generally absent in these animals. During maintenance of this strain by mating fa/fa males and fa/+ heterozygous females, we further identified fa/fa male rats exhibiting diabetes. We then performed selective breeding using the fa/fa male rats that exhibited relatively high blood glucose levels at 10 weeks of age, resulting in establishment of a diabetic strain that we designated Hos:ZFDM-Leprfa (ZFDM. These fa/fa male rats developed diabetes as early as 10 weeks of age, reaching 100% incidence by 21 weeks of age, while none of the fa/+ male rats developed diabetes. The phenotypic characteristics of this diabetic strain are distinct from those of normoglycemic ZF rats. ZFDM rat strain having high reproductive efficiency should serve as a more useful animal model of T2D.

  17. Pathophysiological, genetic and gene expression features of a novel rodent model of the cardio-metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Wallis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complex etiology and pathogenesis of pathophysiological components of the cardio-metabolic syndrome have been demonstrated in humans and animal models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated extensive physiological, genetic and genome-wide gene expression profiles in a congenic strain of the spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK rat containing a large region (110 cM, 170 Mb of rat chromosome 1 (RNO1, which covers diabetes and obesity quantitative trait loci (QTL, introgressed onto the genetic background of the normoglycaemic Brown Norway (BN strain. This novel disease model, which by the length of the congenic region closely mirrors the situation of a chromosome substitution strain, exhibits a wide range of abnormalities directly relevant to components of the cardio-metabolic syndrome and diabetes complications, including hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, enhanced insulin secretion both in vivo and in vitro, insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia and altered pancreatic and renal histological structures. Gene transcription data in kidney, liver, skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue indicate that a disproportionately high number (43-83% of genes differentially expressed between congenic and BN rats map to the GK genomic interval targeted in the congenic strain, which represents less than 5% of the total length of the rat genome. Genotype analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in strains genetically related to the GK highlights clusters of conserved and strain-specific variants in RNO1 that can assist the identification of naturally occurring variants isolated in diabetic and hypertensive strains when different phenotype selection procedures were applied. CONCLUSIONS: Our results emphasize the importance of rat congenic models for defining the impact of genetic variants in well-characterised QTL regions on in vivo pathophysiological features and cis-/trans- regulation of gene expression. The congenic

  18. A 90-day safety study of genetically modified rice expressing Cry1Ab protein (Bacillus thuringiensis toxin) in Wistar rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Malene; Poulsen, Morten; Wilcks, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    An animal model for safety assessment of genetically modified foods was tested as part of the SAFOTEST project. In a 90-day feeding study on Wistar rats, the transgenic KMD1 rice expressing Cry1Ab protein was compared to its non-transgenic parental wild type, Xiushui 11. The KMD1 rice contained 15......, macroscopic and histopathological examinations were performed with only minor changes to report. The aim of the study was to use a known animal model in performance of safety assessment of a GM crop, in this case KMD1 rice. The results show no adverse or toxic effects of KMD1 rice when tested in the design...... used in this 90-day study. Nevertheless the experiences from this study lead to the overall conclusion that safety assessment for unintended effects of a GM crop cannot be done without additional test group(s)....

  19. A Mutation Model from First Principles of the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorvaldsen, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a neutral Codons Probability Mutations (CPM) model of molecular evolution and genetic decay of an organism. The CPM model uses a Markov process with a 20-dimensional state space of probability distributions over amino acids. The transition matrix of the Markov process includes the mutation rate and those single point mutations compatible with the genetic code. This is an alternative to the standard Point Accepted Mutation (PAM) and BLOcks of amino acid SUbstitution Matrix (BLOSUM). Genetic decay is quantified as a similarity between the amino acid distribution of proteins from a (group of) species on one hand, and the equilibrium distribution of the Markov chain on the other. Amino acid data for the eukaryote, bacterium, and archaea families are used to illustrate how both the CPM and PAM models predict their genetic decay towards the equilibrium value of 1. A family of bacteria is studied in more detail. It is found that warm environment organisms on average have a higher degree of genetic decay compared to those species that live in cold environments. The paper addresses a new codon-based approach to quantify genetic decay due to single point mutations compatible with the genetic code. The present work may be seen as a first approach to use codon-based Markov models to study how genetic entropy increases with time in an effectively neutral biological regime. Various extensions of the model are also discussed.

  20. Reproduction of scalp acupuncture therapy on strokes in the model rats, spontaneous hypertensive rats-stroke prone (SHR-SP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Isao; Chen, Lihua; Zhou, Li; Zeng, Xiaorong; Wang, Hongdu

    2002-11-29

    Scalp acupuncture (SA) therapy on strokes has been empirically established and widely used in clinics in China. SA is particularly effective at ameliorating paralyses and speech disturbances, and the recovery rate is twice that for those treated with medication alone. To investigate the effects of SA on a scientific basis, we have developed a new experimental system that provides reliable controls and excludes psychological effects by using a genetic strain of rats, spontaneous hypertensive rats-stroke prone. Here we report that SA indeed has rapid and powerful effects to remove limb paralyses caused either by cerebral infarct or by cerebral haemorrhage. This model is well suited to study the mechanism of the effects of SA in parallel with clinical studies, and to describe the whole recovery process after the stroke onset. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

  1. Organic and genetically modified soybean diets: consequences in growth and in hematological indicators of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daleprane, Julio Beltrame; Feijó, Tatiana Silveira; Boaventura, Gilson Teles

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the protein quality of organic and genetically modified soy by feeding specific diets to rats. Three groups of Wistar rats (n=10) were used, and each group was named according to the food that they ate. There was an organic soy group (OG), a genetically modified soy group (GG), and a control group (CG). All animals received water and diet ad libitum for 455 days. At the end of this period, the weight of the GG group was the same as that of the OG, and both were higher than CG. Protein intake was similar for the OG and GG, which were significantly lower (p<0.0005) than the CG. The growth rate (GR) of the rats, albumin levels, and total levels of serum protein were comparable for all groups. Hematocrit (p<0.04) and hemoglobin (p<0.03) for the OG and GG were less than the CG. Although the OG and GG demonstrated reduced hematocrit and hemoglobin, both types of soy were utilized in a way similar to casein. This result suggests that the protein quality of soy is parallel to the standard protein casein in terms of growth promotion but not hematological indicators.

  2. Genetic inactivation of glutamate neurons in the rat sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus recapitulates REM sleep behaviour disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia Garcia, Sara; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Lazarus, Michael; Grassi, Daniela; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2017-02-01

    SEE SCHENCK AND MAHOWALD DOI101093/AWW329 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by the enactment of violent dreams during paradoxical (REM) sleep in the absence of normal muscle atonia. Accumulating clinical and experimental data suggest that REM sleep behaviour disorder might be due to the neurodegeneration of glutamate neurons involved in paradoxical sleep and located within the pontine sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus. The purpose of the present work was thus to functionally determine first, the role of glutamate sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons in paradoxical sleep and second, whether their genetic inactivation is sufficient for recapitulating REM sleep behaviour disorder in rats. For this goal, we first injected two retrograde tracers in the intralaminar thalamus and ventral medulla to disentangle neuronal circuits in which sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus is involved; second we infused bilaterally in sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus adeno-associated viruses carrying short hairpin RNAs targeting Slc17a6 mRNA [which encodes vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2)] to chronically impair glutamate synaptic transmission in sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons. At the neuroanatomical level, sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons specifically activated during paradoxical sleep hypersomnia send descending efferents to glycine/GABA neurons within the ventral medulla, but not ascending projections to the intralaminar thalamus. These data suggest a crucial role of sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons rather in muscle atonia than in paradoxical sleep generation. In line with this hypothesis, 30 days after adeno-associated virus injections into sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus rats display a decrease of 30% of paradoxical sleep daily quantities, and a significant increase of muscle tone during paradoxical sleep concomitant to a tremendous increase of abnormal motor dream

  3. Variation in rat sciatic nerve anatomy: implications for a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asato, F; Butler, M; Blomberg, H; Gordh, T

    2000-03-01

    We discovered a variation of rat sciatic nerve anatomy as an incidental finding during the anatomical exploration of the nerve lesion site in a rat neuropathic pain model. To confirm the composition and distribution of rat sciatic nerve, macroscopic anatomical investigation was performed in both left and right sides in 24 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. In all rats, the L4 and L5 spinal nerves were fused tightly to form the sciatic nerve. However, the L6 spinal nerve did not fuse with this nerve completely as a part of the sciatic nerve, but rather sent a thin branch to it in 13 rats (54%), whereas in the remaining 11 rats (46%), L6 ran separately along with the sciatic nerve. Also, the L3 spinal nerve sent a thin branch to the L4 spinal nerve or sciatic nerve in 6 rats (25%). We conclude that the components of sciatic nerve in Sprague-Dawley rats vary from L3 to L6; however, the major components are L4 and L5 macroscopically. This finding is in contrast to the standard textbooks of rat anatomy which describe the sciatic nerve as having major contributions from L4, L5, and L6.

  4. Fused pulmonary lobes is a rat model of human Fraser syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyozumi, Daiji; Nakano, Itsuko [Laboratory of Extracellular Matrix Biochemistry, Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takahashi, Ken L.; Hojo, Hitoshi; Aoyama, Hiroaki [Toxicology Division, Institute of Environmental Toxicology, 4321 Uchimoriya, Joso, Ibaraki 303-0043 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi, E-mail: sekiguch@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Extracellular Matrix Biochemistry, Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Fused pulmonary lobes (fpl) mutant rats exhibit similar phenotypes to Fraser syndrome. {yields} The fpl gene harbors a nonsense mutation in Fraser syndrome-associated gene Frem2. {yields} Fpl mutant is defined as a first model of human Fraser syndrome in rats. -- Abstract: Fused pulmonary lobes (fpl) is a mutant gene that is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and causes various developmental defects, including fusion of pulmonary lobes, and eyelid and digit anomalies in rats. Since these developmental defects closely resemble those observed in patients with Fraser syndrome, a recessive multiorgan disorder, and its model animals, we investigated whether the abnormal phenotypes observed in fpl/fpl mutant rats are attributable to a genetic disorder similar to Fraser syndrome. At the epidermal basement membrane in fpl/fpl mutant neonates, the expression of QBRICK, a basement membrane protein whose expression is attenuated in Fraser syndrome model mice, was greatly diminished compared with control littermates. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses of Fraser syndrome-related genes revealed that Frem2 transcripts were markedly diminished in QBRICK-negative embryos. Genomic DNA sequencing of the fpl/fpl mutant identified a nonsense mutation that introduced a stop codon at serine 2005 in Frem2. These findings indicate that the fpl mutant is a rat model of human Fraser syndrome.

  5. Sociability impairments in Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg: Reversal by the T-type calcium channel antagonist Z944.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henbid, Mark T; Marks, Wendie N; Collins, Madeline J; Cain, Stuart M; Snutch, Terrance P; Howland, John G

    2017-10-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is associated with interictal co-morbid symptoms including abnormalities in social behaviour. Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) is a model of CAE that exhibits physiological and behavioural alterations characteristic of the human disorder. However, it is unknown if GAERS display the social deficits often observed in CAE. Sociability in rodents is thought to be mediated by neural circuits densely populated with T-type calcium channels and GAERS contain a missense mutation in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of the clinical stage pan-T-type calcium channel blocker, Z944, on sociability behaviour in male and female GAERS and non-epileptic control (NEC) animals. Female GAERS showed reduced sociability in a three-chamber sociability task whereas male GAERS, male NECs, and female NECs all showed a preference for the chamber containing a stranger rat. In drug trials, pre-treatment with 5mg/kg of Z944 normalized sociability in female GAERS. In contrast, female NECs showed impaired sociability following Z944 treatment. Dose-dependent decreases in locomotor activity were noted following Z944 treatment in both strains. Treatment with 10mg/kg of Z944 altered exploration such that only 8 of the 16 rats tested explored both sides of the testing chamber. In those that explored the chamber, significant preference for the stranger rat was observed in GAERS but not NECs. Overall, the data suggest that T-type calcium channels are critical in regulating sociability in both GAERS and NEC animals. Future research should focus on T-type calcium channels in the treatment of sociability deficits observed in disorders such as CAE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of resveratrol on obesity-related inflammation markers in adipose tissue of genetically obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Zorita, Saioa; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Lasa, Arrate; Hijona, Elizabeth; Bujanda, Luis; Portillo, María P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether resveratrol might represent a promising therapeutic tool with which to combat adipose tissue chronic inflammation in a model of genetic obesity and to link its anti-inflammatory activity with its effect on body fat reduction. Twenty 6-wk-old male Zucker (fa/fa) rats were randomly distributed into two experimental groups. Resveratrol (RSV) was given orally (15 mg/kg body weight/d in RSV group) by means of an orogastric catheter for 6 wk. Enzyme activities were measured spectrophotometrically or fluorimetrically. Gene and protein expressions were analyzed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot respectively. Cytokine concentrations and the activity of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated β cells (NF-κB) were measured by using commercial kits. RSV reduced the weight of internal adipose tissues. In epididymal depot glucose-6P-dehydrogenase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase activities, as well as lipoprotein lipase expression and activity were reduced by RSV. The expression of hormone-sensitive lipase was increased, and that of the cluster of differentiation 36 was reduced. Serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and C-reactive protein were lower in the RSV-treated group than in the control group. Protein expression of interleukin-6 and the activity of NF-κB, were decreased by RSV. The present results provide evidence that fatty acid uptake and lipolysis are metabolic pathways involved in the response of adipose tissue to RSV. This polyphenol modulates plasma cytokine levels partially by reducing macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue and inhibiting NF-κB activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Statistical Inference of Biometrical Genetic Model With Cultural Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaobo; Ji, Tian; Wang, Xueqin; Zhang, Heping; Zhong, Shouqiang

    2013-01-01

    Twin and family studies establish the foundation for studying the genetic, environmental and cultural transmission effects for phenotypes. In this work, we make use of the well established statistical methods and theory for mixed models to assess cultural transmission in twin and family studies. Specifically, we address two critical yet poorly understood issues: the model identifiability in assessing cultural transmission for twin and family data and the biases in the estimates when sub-models are used. We apply our models and theory to two real data sets. A simulation is conducted to verify the bias in the estimates of genetic effects when the working model is a sub-model.

  8. Rat indwelling urinary catheter model of Candida albicans biofilm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett, Jeniel E; Brooks, Erin G; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Sanchez, Hiram; Zarnowski, Robert; Marchillo, Karen; Andes, David R

    2014-12-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are commonly used in the management of hospitalized patients. Candida can adhere to the device surface and propagate as a biofilm. These Candida biofilm communities differ from free-floating Candida, exhibiting high tolerance to antifungal therapy. The significance of catheter-associated candiduria is often unclear, and treatment may be problematic considering the biofilm drug-resistant phenotype. Here we describe a rodent model for the study of urinary catheter-associated Candida albicans biofilm infection that mimics this common process in patients. In the setting of a functioning, indwelling urinary catheter in a rat, Candida proliferated as a biofilm on the device surface. Characteristic biofilm architecture was observed, including adherent, filamentous cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. Similar to what occurs in human patients, animals with this infection developed candiduria and pyuria. Infection progressed to cystitis, and a biofilmlike covering was observed over the bladder surface. Furthermore, large numbers of C. albicans cells were dispersed into the urine from either the catheter or bladder wall biofilm over the infection period. We successfully utilized the model to test the efficacy of antifungals, analyze transcriptional patterns, and examine the phenotype of a genetic mutant. The model should be useful for future investigations involving the pathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, prevention, and drug resistance of Candida biofilms in the urinary tract.

  9. Evaluation of the relationship between hyperinsulinaemia and myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solskov, Lasse; Løfgren, Bo; Pold, Rasmus; Kristiansen, Steen B; Nielsen, Torsten T; Overstreet, David H; Schmitz, Ole; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Lund, Sten; Wegener, Gregers

    2009-11-09

    Major depression is associated with medical co-morbidity, such as ischaemic heart disease and diabetes, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. The FSL (Flinders Sensitive Line) rat is a genetic animal model of depression exhibiting features similar to those of depressed individuals. The aim of the present study was to compare the myocardial responsiveness to I/R (ischaemia/reperfusion) injury and the effects of IPC (ischaemic preconditioning) in hearts from FSL rats using SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats as controls and to characterize differences in glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity between FSL and SD rats. Hearts were perfused in a Langendorff model and were subjected or not to IPC before 40 min of global ischaemia, followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Myocardial infarct size was found to be significantly larger in the FSL rats than in the SD rats following I/R injury (62.4+/-4.2 compared with 46.9+/-2.9%; P<0.05). IPC reduced the infarct size (P<0.01) and improved haemodynamic function (P<0.01) in both FSL and SD rats. No significant difference was found in blood glucose levels between the two groups measured after 12 h of fasting, but fasting plasma insulin (70.1+/-8.9 compared with 40.9+/-4.7 pmol/l; P<0.05) and the HOMA (homoeostatic model assessment) index (P<0.01) were significantly higher in FSL rats compared with SD rats. In conclusion, FSL rats had larger infarct sizes following I/R injury and were found to be hyperinsulinaemic compared with SD rats, but appeared to have a maintained cardioprotective mechanism against I/R injury, as IPC reduced infarct size in these rats. This animal model may be useful in future studies when examining the mechanisms that contribute to the cardiovascular complications associated with depression.

  10. Impulsive-choice patterns for food in genetically lean and obese Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomhower, Steven R; Rasmussen, Erin B; Doherty, Tiffany S

    2013-03-15

    Behavioral-economic studies have shown that differences between lean and obese Zuckers in food consumption depend on the response requirement for food. Since a response requirement inherently increases the delay to reinforcement, differences in sensitivity to delay may also be a relevant mechanism of food consumption in the obese Zucker rat. Furthermore, the endocannabinoid neurotransmitter system has been implicated in impulsivity, but studies that attempt to characterize the effects of cannabinoid drugs (e.g., rimonabant) on impulsive choice may be limited by floor effects. The present study aimed to characterize impulsive-choice patterns for sucrose using an adjusting-delay procedure in genetically lean and obese Zuckers. Ten lean and ten obese Zucker rats chose between one lever that resulted in one pellet after a standard delay (either 1 s or 5 s) and a second lever that resulted in two or three pellets after an adjusting delay. After behavior stabilized under baseline, rimonabant (0-10 mg/kg) was administered prior to some choice sessions in the two-pellet condition. Under baseline, obese Zuckers made more impulsive choices than leans in three of the four standard-delay/pellet conditions. Additionally, in the 2-pellet condition, rimonabant increased impulsive choice in lean rats in the 1-s standard-delay condition; however, rimonabant decreased impulsive choice in obese rats in the 1-s and 5-s standard-delay conditions. These data suggest that genetic factors that influence impulsive choice are stronger in some choice conditions than others, and that the endocannabinoid system may be a relevant neuromechanism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Numeral eddy current sensor modelling based on genetic neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu A-Long

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method used to the numeral eddy current sensor modelling based on the genetic neural network to settle its nonlinear problem. The principle and algorithms of genetic neural network are introduced. In this method, the nonlinear model parameters of the numeral eddy current sensor are optimized by genetic neural network (GNN) according to measurement data. So the method remains both the global searching ability of genetic algorithm and the good local searching ability of neural network. The nonlinear model has the advantages of strong robustness,on-line modelling and high precision.The maximum nonlinearity error can be reduced to 0.037% by using GNN.However, the maximum nonlinearity error is 0.075% using the least square method.

  12. Genetic fuzzy system modeling and simulation of vascular behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jiaowei; Boonen, Harrie C.M.

    in cardiovascular disease and ultimately improve pharmacotherapy. For this purpose, novel computational approaches incorporating adaptive properties, auto-regulatory control and rule sets will be assessed, properties that are commonly lacking in deterministic models based on differential equations. We hypothesize...... in principle for any physiological system that is characterized by auto-regulatory control and adaptation. Methods: Currently, one modeling approach is being investigated, Genetic Fuzzy System (GFS). In Genetic Fuzzy Systems, the model algorithm mimics the biologic genetic evolutionary process to learn...... chromosome or individual to define the fuzzy system. The model is implemented by combining the Matlab Genetic algorithm and Fuzzy system toolboxes, respectively. To test the performance of this method, experimental data sets about calculated pressure change in different blood vessels after several chemical...

  13. Experimental model of osteosarcomas in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasmin, C.; Allouche, M.; Jude, J.G.; Klein, B. (Institut de Cancerologie et d' Immunogenetique, Villejuif (France)); Thiery, J.P.; Perdereau, B.; Gongora, R.; Gongora, G.; Mazabraud, A. (Institut Curie, Paris (France))

    1982-07-08

    Satisfactory experimental models for preclinical prediction in cancerology must answer the following criteria: reproducibility of the method used for inducing tumors; clinical, pathological and kinetic similarity with the corresponding human tumors. We have developed a model of osteosarcoma locally induced by insoluble radioactive cerium chloride (/sup 144/Ce Cl/sub 3/) in Sprague Dawley rats. This method yields over 80% of bone tumors at the injection site, of which approximately half are histologically similar to human tumors. These tumors double their volume fairly slowly (in approximately 20 days); lung metastases occur both early and frequently (80% of animals). A transplantable tumor was developed from an induced osteosarcoma and adapted to the Curie strain. Transplantation in the bone, next to the bone, or under the skin is followed by widespread metastatic dissemination. The kinetics and histological features of the primary tumor are maintained. Tumor /sup 85/strontium uptake is similar to that seen in human osteosarcomas. These new models of osteosarcomas are being used for evaluating new cancer chemotherapeutic agents and interferon, etc.

  14. Neuroprotective Effects of Liraglutide for Stroke Model of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Sato

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The number of diabetes mellitus (DM patients is increasing, and stroke is deeply associated with DM. Recently, neuroprotective effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 are reported. In this study, we explored whether liraglutide, a GLP-1 analogue exerts therapeutic effects on a rat stroke model. Wistar rats received occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 90 min. At one hour after reperfusion, liraglutide or saline was administered intraperitoneally. Modified Bederson’s test was performed at 1 and 24 h and, subsequently, rats were euthanized for histological investigation. Peripheral blood was obtained for measurement of blood glucose level and evaluation of oxidative stress. Brain tissues were collected to evaluate the level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. The behavioral scores of liraglutide-treated rats were significantly better than those of control rats. Infarct volumes of liraglutide-treated rats at were reduced, compared with those of control rats. The level of derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolite was lower in liraglutide-treated rats. VEGF level of liraglutide-treated rats in the cortex, but not in the striatum significantly increased, compared to that of control rats. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate neuroprotective effects of liraglutide on cerebral ischemia through anti-oxidative effects and VEGF upregulation.

  15. Multiple comparisons in genetic association studies: a hierarchical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Nengjun; Xu, Shizhong; Lou, Xiang-Yang; Mallick, Himel

    2014-02-01

    Multiple comparisons or multiple testing has been viewed as a thorny issue in genetic association studies aiming to detect disease-associated genetic variants from a large number of genotyped variants. We alleviate the problem of multiple comparisons by proposing a hierarchical modeling approach that is fundamentally different from the existing methods. The proposed hierarchical models simultaneously fit as many variables as possible and shrink unimportant effects towards zero. Thus, the hierarchical models yield more efficient estimates of parameters than the traditional methods that analyze genetic variants separately, and also coherently address the multiple comparisons problem due to largely reducing the effective number of genetic effects and the number of statistically "significant" effects. We develop a method for computing the effective number of genetic effects in hierarchical generalized linear models, and propose a new adjustment for multiple comparisons, the hierarchical Bonferroni correction, based on the effective number of genetic effects. Our approach not only increases the power to detect disease-associated variants but also controls the Type I error. We illustrate and evaluate our method with real and simulated data sets from genetic association studies. The method has been implemented in our freely available R package BhGLM (http://www.ssg.uab.edu/bhglm/).

  16. Enterprise Projects Set Risk Element Transmission Chaotic Genetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunbin Li

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to research projects set risk transfer process and improve risk management efficiency in projects management, combining chaos theory and genetic algorithm, put forward enterprise projects set risk element transmission chaos genetic model. Using logistic chaos mapping and chebyshev chaos mapping mixture, constructed a hybrid chaotic mapping system. The steps of adopting hybrid chaos mapping for genetic operation include projects set initialization, calculation of fitness, selection, crossover and mutation operators, fitness adjustment and condition judgment. The results showed that the model can simulate enterprise projects set risk transmission process very well and it also provides the basis for the enterprise managers to make decisions.

  17. The Neolithic transition in Europe: archaeological models and genetic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Richards

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The major pattern in the European gene pool is a southeast-northwest frequency gradient of classic genetic markers such as blood groups, which population geneticists initially attributed to the demographic impact of Neolithic farmers dispersing from the Near East. Molecular genetics has enriched this picture, with analyses of mitochondrial DNA and the Y chromosome allowing a more detailed exploration of alternative models for the spread of the Neolithic into Europe. This paper considers a range of possible models in the light of the detailed information now emerging from genetic studies.

  18. Yarn Strength Modelling Using Genetic Fuzzy Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debamalya; Ghosh, Anindya; Das, Subhasis

    2013-05-01

    This paper deals with the modelling of cotton yarn strength using genetic fuzzy expert system. Primarily a fuzzy expert system has been developed to model the cotton yarn strength from the constituent fibre parameters such as fibre strength, upper half mean length, fibre fineness and short fibre content. A binary coded genetic algorithm has been used to improve the prediction performance of the fuzzy expert system. The experimental validation confirms that the genetic fuzzy expert system has significantly better prediction accuracy and consistency than that of the fuzzy expert system.

  19. Thrombolytic and anticoagulation treatment in a rat embolic stroke model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Overgaard, K; Meden, P

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The effects of pentasaccharide (PENTA), given alone or combined with thrombolysis using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), on infarct size and clinical outcome were evaluated in a rat embolic stroke model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ninety-two rats were embolized unilaterally...

  20. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  1. The discovery and development of the BB rat colony: an animal model of spontaneous diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappel, C I; Chappel, W R

    1983-07-01

    The BB rat model of spontaneous diabetes mellitus was discovered in 1974 in Ottawa in a colony of specific pathogen-free Wistar rats. Investigations to determine the cause of rapid weight loss and death in a few weanling rats from this colony revealed polydypsia, polyuria, glucosuria, ketonuria, and hyperglycemia. These signs regressed and normal weight gain occurred when daily insulin therapy was given. Histologic studies of the pancreas of affected animals showed fibrosis and absence of beta cells. The original colony was established by crossbreeding the clinically normal parents of the diabetic animals. Approximately 10% of the offspring of these matings became diabetic. This incidence was increased to approximately 25% by father-daughter mating, suggesting a genetic component in the etiology.

  2. Behavioral and genetic evidence for a novel animal model of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Predominantly Inattentive Subtype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-James Y

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to DSM-IV there are three subtypes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, namely: ADHD predominantly inattentive type (ADHD-PI, ADHD predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Type (ADHD-HI, and ADHD combined type (ADHD-C. These subtypes may represent distinct neurobehavioral disorders of childhood onset with separate etiologies. The diagnosis of ADHD is behaviorally based; therefore, investigations into its possible etiologies should be based in behavior. Animal models of ADHD demonstrate construct validity when they accurately reproduce elements of the etiology, biochemistry, symptoms, and treatment of the disorder. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR fulfill many of the validation criteria and compare well with clinical cases of ADHD-C. The present study describes a novel rat model of the predominantly inattentive subtype (ADHD-PI. Methods ADHD-like behavior was tested with a visual discrimination task measuring overactivity, impulsiveness and inattentiveness. Several strains with varied genetic background were needed to determine what constitutes a normal comparison. Five groups of rats were used: SHR/NCrl spontaneously hypertensive and WKY/NCrl Wistar/Kyoto rats from Charles River; SD/NTac Sprague Dawley and WH/HanTac Wistar rats from Taconic Europe; and WKY/NHsd Wistar/Kyoto rats from Harlan. DNA was analyzed to determine background differences in the strains by PCR genotyping of eight highly polymorphic microsatellite markers and 2625 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Results Compared to appropriate comparison strains (WKY/NHsd and SD/NTac rats, SHR/NCrl showed ADHD-C-like behavior: striking overactivity and poor sustained attention. Compared to WKY/NHsd rats, WKY/NCrl rats showed inattention, but no overactivity or impulsiveness. WH/HanTac rats deviated significantly from the other control groups by being more active and less attentive than the WKY/NHsd and SD/NTac rats. We also found substantial

  3. Genetic and molecular analysis of radon-induced rat lung tumours; Analyse cytogenetique et moleculaire des tumeurs pulmonaires radon-induites chez le rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilly, M.N.; Joubert, Ch.; Levalois, C.; Dano, L.; Chevillard, S. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Dept. de Radiobiologie et de Radiopathologie, 92 (France)

    2002-03-01

    We have a model of radon-induced rat lung tumours, which allow us to analyse the cytogenetic and molecular alterations of the tumours. The aim is to better understand the mechanisms of radio-induced carcinogenesis and to define if it exists a specificity of radio-induced genetic alterations as compared to the genetic alterations found in the sporadic tumours. We have started our analysis by developing global cytogenetic and molecular approaches. We have shown that some alterations are recurrent. The genes that are potentially involved are the oncogene MET and the tumour suppressor Bene p16, which are also frequently altered in human lung tumours. Simultaneously, we have focussed our analysis by targeting the search of mutation in the tumour suppressor gene TP3. We have found that 8 of 39 tumours were mutated by deletion in the coding sequence of TP53. This high frequency of deletion, which is not observed in the human p53 mutation database could constitute a signature of radio-induced alterations. On this assumption, this type of alteration should not be only found on TP53 Bene but also in other suppressor genes which are inactivated by a mutation such as p16 for example. The work we are carrying out on radio-induced tumours among humans and animals is directed to this end. (author)

  4. Transmission function models of finite population genetic algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemenade, C.H.M. van; Kok, J.N.; La Poutré, J.A.; Thierens, D.

    1998-01-01

    Infinite population models show a deterministic behaviour. Genetic algorithms with finite populations behave non-deterministicly. For small population sizes, the results obtained with these models differ strongly from the results predicted by the infinite population model. When the population size i

  5. Rat traps: filling the toolbox for manipulating the rat genome

    OpenAIRE

    van Boxtel, Ruben; Cuppen, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory rat is rapidly gaining momentum as a mammalian genetic model organism. Although traditional forward genetic approaches are well established, recent technological developments have enabled efficient gene targeting and mutant generation. Here we outline the current status, possibilities and application of these techniques in the rat.

  6. Molecular genetic evidence for the place of origin of the Pacific rat, Rattus exulans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki Thomson

    Full Text Available Commensal plants and animals have long been used to track human migrations, with Rattus exulans (the Pacific rat a common organism for reconstructing Polynesian dispersal in the Pacific. However, with no knowledge of the homeland of R. exulans, the place of origin of this human-commensal relationship is unknown. We conducted a mitochondrial DNA phylogeographic survey of R. exulans diversity across the potential natural range in mainland and Island Southeast Asia in order to establish the origin of this human-commensal dyad. We also conducted allozyme electrophoresis on samples from ISEA to obtain a perspective on patterns of genetic diversity in this critical region. Finally, we compared molecular genetic evidence with knowledge of prehistoric rodent faunas in mainland and ISEA. We find that ISEA populations of R. exulans contain the highest mtDNA lineage diversity including significant haplotype diversity not represented elsewhere in the species range. Within ISEA, the island of Flores in the Lesser Sunda group contains the highest diversity in ISEA (across all loci and also has a deep fossil record of small mammals that appears to include R. exulans. Therefore, in addition to Flores harboring unusual diversity in the form of Homo floresiensis, dwarfed stegodons and giant rats, this island appears to be the homeland of R. exulans.

  7. Genetic programming-based chaotic time series modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 吴智铭; 杨根科

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a Genetic Programming-Based Modeling (GPM) algorithm on chaotic time series. GP is used here to search for appropriate model structures in function space, and the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is used for Nonlinear Parameter Estimation (NPE) of dynamic model structures. In addition, GPM integrates the results of Nonlinear Time Series Analysis (NTSA) to adjust the parameters and takes them as the criteria of established models. Experiments showed the effectiveness of such improvements on chaotic time series modeling.

  8. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Garcia Diaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Wistar Kyoto (WKY rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminary in vitro and in vivo imaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades.

  9. Will Climate Change, Genetic and Demographic Variation or Rat Predation Pose the Greatest Risk for Persistence of an Altitudinally Distributed Island Endemic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Shapcott

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Species endemic to mountains on oceanic islands are subject to a number of existing threats (in particular, invasive species along with the impacts of a rapidly changing climate. The Lord Howe Island endemic palm Hedyscepe canterburyana is restricted to two mountains above 300 m altitude. Predation by the introduced Black Rat (Rattus rattus is known to significantly reduce seedling recruitment. We examined the variation in Hedyscepe in terms of genetic variation, morphology, reproductive output and demographic structure, across an altitudinal gradient. We used demographic data to model population persistence under climate change predictions of upward range contraction incorporating long-term climatic records for Lord Howe Island. We also accounted for alternative levels of rat predation into the model to reflect management options for control. We found that Lord Howe Island is getting warmer and drier and quantified the degree of temperature change with altitude (0.9 °C per 100 m. For H. canterburyana, differences in development rates, population structure, reproductive output and population growth rate were identified between altitudes. In contrast, genetic variation was high and did not vary with altitude. There is no evidence of an upward range contraction as was predicted and recruitment was greatest at lower altitudes. Our models predicted slow population decline in the species and that the highest altitude populations are under greatest threat of extinction. Removal of rat predation would significantly enhance future persistence of this species.

  10. Leptin Influences Healing in the Sprague Dawley Rat Fracture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengcheng; Cai, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Background Leptin plays a crucial role in bone metabolism, and its level is related to bone callus formation in the fracture repair process. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant leptin on the healing process of femoral fractures in rats. Material/Methods Forty-eight male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with an average body weight of 389 g (range: 376–398 g) and an average age of 10 weeks were included in this animal research, and all rats were randomly divided into two major groups. Then standardized femur fracture models were implemented in all SD rats. Rats in the control group were treated with only 0.5 mL of physiological saline, and rats in the experimental group were treated with recombinant leptin 5 μg/kg/d along with the same 0.5 mL of physiological saline for 42 days intraperitoneally. At the same time, each major group was evenly divided into three parallel subgroups for each parallel bone evaluation separately at the second, fourth, and sixth weeks. Each subgroup included eight rats. Results The total radiological evaluation results showed that the healing progress of femoral fracture in the experimental group was superior to that in the control group from the fourth week. At the sixth week, experimental group rats began to present significantly better femoral fracture healing progress than that of the control group rats. Results of biomechanics show the ultimate load (N) and deflection ultimate load (mm) of the experimental group rats was significantly increased compared with that of the control group rats from the fourth week. Conclusions Our results suggest that leptin may have a positive effect on SD rat femur fracture healing. PMID:28088810

  11. Genetic and histopathological alterations induced by cypermethrin in rat kidney and liver: Protection by sesame oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Attia, Hossam F; El-Ella, Ghada A Abou

    2015-12-01

    Pesticides are widespread synthesized substances used for public health protection and agricultural programs. However, they cause environmental pollution and health hazards. This study aimed to examine the protective effects of sesame oil (SO) on the genetic alterations induced by cypermethrin (CYP) in the liver and kidney of Wistar rats. Male rats were divided into four groups, each containing 10 rats: the control group received vehicle, SO group (5 mL/kg b.w), CYP group (12 mg/kg b.w), and protective group received SO (5 mL/kg b.w) plus CYP (12 mg/kg b.w). Biochemical analysis showed an increase in albumin, urea, creatinine, GPT, GOT, and lipid profiles in the CYP group. Co-administration of SO with CYP normalized such biochemical changes. CYP administration decreased both the activity and mRNA expression of the examined antioxidants. SO co-administration recovered CYP, downregulating the expression of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase, and superoxide dismutase. Additionally, SO co-administration with CYP counteracted the CYP- altering the expression of renal interleukins (IL-1 and IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), anigotensinogen (AGT), AGT receptors (AT1), and genes of hepatic glucose and fatty acids metabolism. CYP induced degenerative changes in the kidney and liver histology which are ameliorated by SO. In conclusion, SO has a protective effect against alterations and pathological changes induced by CYP in the liver and kidney at genetic and histological levels.

  12. Use of surgical techniques in the rat pancreas transplantation model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ma, Yi; Guo, Zhi-Yong

    2008-01-01

    ... (also called type 1 diabetes). With the improvement of microsurgical techniques, pancreas transplantation in rats has been the major model for physiological and immunological experimental studies in the past 20 years...

  13. The Ising model in physics and statistical genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, J; Li, H; Ott, J

    2001-10-01

    Interdisciplinary communication is becoming a crucial component of the present scientific environment. Theoretical models developed in diverse disciplines often may be successfully employed in solving seemingly unrelated problems that can be reduced to similar mathematical formulation. The Ising model has been proposed in statistical physics as a simplified model for analysis of magnetic interactions and structures of ferromagnetic substances. Here, we present an application of the one-dimensional, linear Ising model to affected-sib-pair (ASP) analysis in genetics. By analyzing simulated genetics data, we show that the simplified Ising model with only nearest-neighbor interactions between genetic markers has statistical properties comparable to much more complex algorithms from genetics analysis, such as those implemented in the Allegro and Mapmaker-Sibs programs. We also adapt the model to include epistatic interactions and to demonstrate its usefulness in detecting modifier loci with weak individual genetic contributions. A reanalysis of data on type 1 diabetes detects several susceptibility loci not previously found by other methods of analysis.

  14. A NEW GENETIC SIMULATED ANNEALING ALGORITHM FOR FLOOD ROUTING MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Ling; WANG Cheng; JIANG Tie-bing

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a new approach, the Genetic Simulated Annealing (GSA), was proposed for optimizing the parameters in the Muskingum routing model. By integrating the simulated annealing method into the genetic algorithm, the hybrid method could avoid some troubles of traditional methods, such as arduous trial-and-error procedure, premature convergence in genetic algorithm and search blindness in simulated annealing. The principle and implementing procedure of this algorithm were described. Numerical experiments show that the GSA can adjust the optimization population, prevent premature convergence and seek the global optimal result.Applications to the Nanyunhe River and Qingjiang River show that the proposed approach is of higher forecast accuracy and practicability.

  15. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of P23H line 1 rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Orhan

    Full Text Available Rod-cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP, is the most common inherited degenerative photoreceptor disease, for which no therapy is currently available. The P23H rat is one of the most commonly used autosomal dominant RP models. It has been created by incorporation of a mutated mouse rhodopsin (Rho transgene in the wild-type (WT Sprague Dawley rat. Detailed genetic characterization of this transgenic animal has however never been fully reported. Here we filled this knowledge gap on P23H Line 1 rat (P23H-1 and provide additional phenotypic information applying non-invasive and state-of-the-art in vivo techniques that are relevant for preclinical therapeutic evaluations. Transgene sequence was analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Using quantitative PCR, transgene copy number was calculated and its expression measured in retinal tissue. Full field electroretinography (ERG and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT were performed at 1-, 2-, 3- and 6-months of age. Sanger sequencing revealed that P23H-1 rat carries the mutated mouse genomic Rho sequence from the promoter to the 3' UTR. Transgene copy numbers were estimated at 9 and 18 copies in the hemizygous and homozygous rats respectively. In 1-month-old hemizygous P23H-1 rats, transgene expression represented 43% of all Rho expressed alleles. ERG showed a progressive rod-cone dysfunction peaking at 6 months-of-age. SD-OCT confirmed a progressive thinning of the photoreceptor cell layer leading to the disappearance of the outer retina by 6 months with additional morphological changes in the inner retinal cell layers in hemizygous P23H-1 rats. These results provide precise genotypic information of the P23H-1 rat with additional phenotypic characterization that will serve basis for therapeutic interventions, especially for those aiming at gene editing.

  16. Transcriptome, genetic editing, and microRNA divergence substantiate sympatric speciation of blind mole rat, Spalax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kexin; Wang, Liuyang; Knisbacher, Binyamin A; Xu, Qinqin; Levanon, Erez Y; Wang, Huihua; Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Tagore, Satabdi; Fang, Xiaodong; Bazak, Lily; Buchumenski, Ilana; Zhao, Yang; Lövy, Matěj; Li, Xiangfeng; Han, Lijuan; Frenkel, Zeev; Beiles, Avigdor; Cao, Yi Bin; Wang, Zhen Long; Nevo, Eviatar

    2016-07-05

    Incipient sympatric speciation in blind mole rat, Spalax galili, in Israel, caused by sharp ecological divergence of abutting chalk-basalt ecologies, has been proposed previously based on mitochondrial and whole-genome nuclear DNA. Here, we present new evidence, including transcriptome, DNA editing, microRNA, and codon usage, substantiating earlier evidence for adaptive divergence in the abutting chalk and basalt populations. Genetic divergence, based on the previous and new evidence, is ongoing despite restricted gene flow between the two populations. The principal component analysis, neighbor-joining tree, and genetic structure analysis of the transcriptome clearly show the clustered divergent two mole rat populations. Gene-expression level analysis indicates that the population transcriptome divergence is displayed not only by soil divergence but also by sex. Gene ontology enrichment of the differentially expressed genes from the two abutting soil populations highlights reproductive isolation. Alternative splicing variation of the two abutting soil populations displays two distinct splicing patterns. L-shaped FST distribution indicates that the two populations have undergone divergence with gene flow. Transcriptome divergent genes highlight neurogenetics and nutrition characterizing the chalk population, and energetics, metabolism, musculature, and sensory perception characterizing the abutting basalt population. Remarkably, microRNAs also display divergence between the two populations. The GC content is significantly higher in chalk than in basalt, and stress-response genes mostly prefer nonoptimal codons. The multiple lines of evidence of ecological-genomic and genetic divergence highlight that natural selection overrules the gene flow between the two abutting populations, substantiating the sharp ecological chalk-basalt divergence driving sympatric speciation.

  17. Effects of garlicin on apoptosis in rat model of colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ming Xu; Jie-Ping Yu; Xiao-Fei He; Jun-Hua Li; Liang-Liang Yu; Hong-Gang Yu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of garlicin on apoptosis and expression of bcl-2 and bax in lymphocytes in rat model of ulcerative colitis (UC).METHODS: Healthy adult Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes, weighing 180±30 g, were employed in the present study. The rat model of UC was induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) enema. The experimental animals were randomly divided into garlicin treatment group (including high and low concentration), model control group, and normal control group. Rats in garlicin treatment group and model control group received intracolic garlicin daily at doses of 10.0 and 30.0 mg/kg and equal amount of saline respectively 24 h after colitis model was induced by alcohol and TNBS co-enema. Rats in normal control group received neither alcohol nor only TNBS but only saline enema in this study. On the 28th d of the experiment, rats were executed, the expression of bcl-2 and bax protein was determined immunohistochemically and the apoptotic cells were detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate fluorescence nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. At the same time, the rat colon mucosal damage index (CMDI) was calculated.RESULTS: In garlicin treatment group, the positive expression of bcl-2 in lymphocytes decreased and the number of apoptotic cells was more than that in model control group, CMDI was lower than that in model control group. The positive expression of bax in lymphocytes had no significant difference.CONCLUSION: Garlicin can protect colonic mucosa against damage in rat model of UC induced by TNBS enema.

  18. Underground water quality model inversion of genetic algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ruijie; LI Xin

    2009-01-01

    The underground water quality model with non-linear inversion problem is ill-posed, and boils down to solving the minimum of nonlinear function. Genetic algorithms are adopted in a number of individuals of groups by iterative search to find the optimal solution of the problem, the encoding strings as its operational objective, and achieving the iterative calculations by the genetic operators. It is an effective method of inverse problems of groundwater, with incomparable advantages and practical significances.

  19. Modeling evolution of insect resistance to genetically modified crops

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) for insect control have been planted on more than 200 million ha worldwide since 1996 [1]. Evolution of resistance by insect pests threatens the continued success of Bt crops [2, 3]. To delay pest resistance, refuges of non-Bt crops are planted near Bt crops to allow survival of susceptible pests [4, 5]. We used computer simulations of a population genetic model to determine if predictions from the the...

  20. Changes in extracellular levels of amygdala amino acids in genetically fast and slow kindling rat strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Rick S; Anisman, Hymie; Merali, Zul; McIntyre, Dan C

    2002-08-01

    A neurochemical basis for many of the epilepsies has long been suspected to result from an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter mechanisms. Data supporting changes in extrasynaptic amino acid levels during epileptogenesis, however, remain controversial. In the present study, we used in vivo microdialysis to measure the levels of extracellular GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) and glutamate during seizure development in rats with a genetic predisposition for (Fast), or against (Slow), amygdala kindling. Dialysates were collected from both amygdalae before, during, and up to 12 min after a threshold-triggered amygdala afterdischarge (AD). One hour later, samples were again collected from both amygdalae in response to a hippocampal threshold AD. Daily amygdala kindling commenced the next day but without dialysis. After the rats were fully kindled, the same protocol was again employed. Amino acid levels were not consistently increased above baseline with triggered seizures in either strain. Instead, before kindling, a focal seizure in the Slow rats was associated with a large decrease in GABA in the non-stimulated amygdala, while amino acid levels in the Fast rats remained near baseline in both amygdalae. Similar results were seen after kindling. By contrast, before and after kindling, hippocampal stimulation caused large decreases in all amino acid levels in both amygdalae in both strains. These data suggest that, in response to direct stimulation, extracellular amino acid concentrations remain stable in tissues associated with either greater natural (Fast) or induced (kindled Fast/Slow) excitability, but are lowered with indirect stimulation (hippocampus) and/or low excitability.

  1. Genetic, physiological and comparative genomic studies of hypertension and insulin resistance in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Coan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously mapped hypertension-related insulin resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs to rat chromosomes 4, 12 and 16 using adipocytes from F2 crosses between spontaneously hypertensive (SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats, and subsequently identified Cd36 as the gene underlying the chromosome 4 locus. The identity of the chromosome 12 and 16 genes remains unknown. To identify whole-body phenotypes associated with the chromosome 12 and 16 linkage regions, we generated and characterised new congenic strains, with WKY donor segments introgressed onto an SHR genetic background, for the chromosome 12 and 16 linkage regions. We found a >50% increase in insulin sensitivity in both the chromosome 12 and 16 strains. Blood pressure and left ventricular mass were reduced in the two congenic strains consistent with the congenic segments harbouring SHR genes for insulin resistance, hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Integrated genomic analysis, using physiological and whole-genome sequence data across 42 rat strains, identified variants within the congenic regions in Upk3bl, RGD1565131 and AABR06087018.1 that were associated with blood pressure, cardiac mass and insulin sensitivity. Quantitative trait transcript analysis across 29 recombinant inbred strains showed correlation between expression of Hspb1, Zkscan5 and Pdgfrl with adipocyte volume, systolic blood pressure and cardiac mass, respectively. Comparative genome analysis showed a marked enrichment of orthologues for human GWAS-associated genes for insulin resistance within the syntenic regions of both the chromosome 12 and 16 congenic intervals. Our study defines whole-body phenotypes associated with the SHR chromosome 12 and 16 insulin-resistance QTLs, identifies candidate genes for these SHR QTLs and finds human orthologues of rat genes in these regions that associate with related human traits. Further study of these genes in the congenic strains will lead to robust identification of the

  2. Dietary models for inducing hypercholesterolemia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheyla Leite Matos

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed at finding a dietetical model capable of promoting the highest hypercholesterolemia without affecting the development of the rats. Sixty female Fisher rats were divided into five groups. The first one was fed a control diet; the remaining four were fed hypercholesterolemic diets with cholesterol and different contents of soybean oil, starch, casein, micronutrients and fiber and, consequently, different caloric values. After eight weeks animals were evaluated in relation to growth, fecal excretion, liver weight and fat, cholesterol and its fractions, serum biochemical parameters and sistolic pressure and compared with controls. The best result was obtained with the diet containing 25 % soybean oil, 1.0 % cholesterol, 13 % fiber and 4,538.4 Kcal/Kg, since it promoted an increase in LDL-cholesterol, a decrease in the HDL fraction and affected less the hepatic function of the animals.Modelos animais têm sido usados para investigar a relação entre desordens no metabolismo do colesterol e a aterogênese. A estratégia utilizada a fim de induzir hipercolesterolemia (dietas com alto teor de gordura e com colesterol adicionado leva à redução de sua ingestão pelos animais, o que induz desnutrição. O presente trabalho objetivou encontrar um modelo dietético capaz de promover a maior hipercolesterolemia, sem afetar o desenvolvimento dos animais. Sessenta ratas Fisher foram divididas em cinco grupos. O primeiro foi alimentado com uma dieta controle; os quatros restantes receberam dietas hipercolesterolêmicas, com colesterol e diferentes teores de óleo de soja, amido, caseína, micronutrientes e fibra e, conseqüentemente, diferentes valores calóricos. Após oito semanas os animais foram avaliados em relação ao crescimento, excreção fecal, peso e teor de gordura do fígado, colesterol e suas frações, parâmetros bioquímicos séricos e pressão sistólica. Os melhores resultados foram obtidos com a dieta contendo 25

  3. A Model of Genetic Variation in Human Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fowler, James H; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2008-01-01

    Social networks influence the evolution of cooperation and they exhibit strikingly systematic patterns across a wide range of human contexts. Both of these facts suggest that variation in the topological attributes of human social networks might have a genetic basis. While genetic variation accounts for a significant portion of the variation in many complex social behaviors, the heritability of egocentric social network attributes is unknown. Here we show that three of these attributes (in-degree, transitivity, and centrality) are heritable. We then develop a "mirror network" method to test extant network models and show that none accounts for observed genetic variation in human social networks. We propose an alternative "attract and introduce" model that generates significant heritability as well as other important network features, and we show that this model with two simple forms of heterogeneity is well suited to the modeling of real social networks in humans. These results suggest that natural selection ...

  4. Multivariate Survival Mixed Models for Genetic Analysis of Longevity Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel Maia, Rafael; Madsen, Per; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    A class of multivariate mixed survival models for continuous and discrete time with a complex covariance structure is introduced in a context of quantitative genetic applications. The methods introduced can be used in many applications in quantitative genetics although the discussion presented...... concentrates on longevity studies. The framework presented allows to combine models based on continuous time with models based on discrete time in a joint analysis. The continuous time models are approximations of the frailty model in which the hazard function will be assumed to be piece-wise constant....... The discrete time models used are multivariate variants of the discrete relative risk models. These models allow for regular parametric likelihood-based inference by exploring a coincidence of their likelihood functions and the likelihood functions of suitably defined multivariate generalized linear mixed...

  5. Multivariate Survival Mixed Models for Genetic Analysis of Longevity Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel Maia, Rafael; Madsen, Per; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    A class of multivariate mixed survival models for continuous and discrete time with a complex covariance structure is introduced in a context of quantitative genetic applications. The methods introduced can be used in many applications in quantitative genetics although the discussion presented...... concentrates on longevity studies. The framework presented allows to combine models based on continuous time with models based on discrete time in a joint analysis. The continuous time models are approximations of the frailty model in which the hazard function will be assumed to be piece-wise constant....... The discrete time models used are multivariate variants of the discrete relative risk models. These models allow for regular parametric likelihood-based inference by exploring a coincidence of their likelihood functions and the likelihood functions of suitably defined multivariate generalized linear mixed...

  6. Genetics of traffic assignment models for strategic transport planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliemer, M.C.J.; Raadsen, M.P.H.; Brederode, L.J.N.; Bell, M.G.H.; Wismans, Luc Johannes Josephus; Smith, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a review and classification of traffic assignment models for strategic transport planning purposes by using concepts analogous to genetics in biology. Traffic assignment models share the same theoretical framework (DNA), but differ in capability (genes). We argue that all traffic

  7. Genetics of traffic assignment models for strategic transport planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliemer, M.C.J.; Raadsen, M.; Brederode, L.; Bell, M.; Wismans, L.J.J.; Smith, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a review and classification of traffic assignment models for strategic transport planning purposes by using concepts analogous to genetics in biology. Traffic assignment models share the same theoretical framework (DNA), but differ in capability (genes). We argue that all traffic

  8. Genetic models of absence epilepsy: New concepts and insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery, development, and use of genetic rodent models of absence epilepsy have led to a new theory about the origin of absence seizures. A focal zone has been identified in the peri-oral region of the somatosensory cortex in WAG/Rij and GAERS – the two most commonly used models – from which

  9. Genetic association in multivariate phenotypic data: power in five models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minica, C.C.; Boomsma, D.I.; van der Sluis, S.; Dolan, C.V.

    2010-01-01

    This article concerns the power of various data analytic strategies to detect the effect of a single genetic variant (GV) in multivariate data. We simulated exactly fitting monozygotic and dizygotic phenotypic data according to single and two common factor models, and simplex models. We calculated t

  10. Ovariectomized rats as a model of postmenopausal osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høegh-Andersen, Pernille; Tankó, László B; Andersen, Thomas L

    2004-01-01

    inhibited the ovariectomy-induced acceleration of cartilage and bone turnover and significantly suppressed cartilage degradation and erosion seen in vehicle-treated OVX rats. The study indicates that estrogen deficiency accelerates cartilage turnover and increases cartilage surface erosion. OVX rats provide......We aimed to assess the effect of ovariectomy on cartilage turnover and degradation, to evaluate whether ovariectomized (OVX) rats could form an experimental model of postmenopausal osteoarthritis. The effect of ovariectomy on cartilage was studied using two cohorts of female Sprague-Dawley rats...... for collagen type II degradation products (CTX-II), and bone resorption was quantified in serum using an assay for bone collagen type I fragments (CTX-I). Surface erosion in the cartilage of the knee was more severe in OVX rats than in sham-operated animals, particularly in the 7-month-old cohort (P = 0...

  11. Immune System Model Calibration by Genetic Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Presbitero, A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.; Mancini, E.; Brands, R.; Sloot, P.

    2016-01-01

    We aim to develop a mathematical model of the human immune system for advanced individualized healthcare where medication plan is fine-tuned to fit a patient's conditions through monitored biochemical processes. One of the challenges is calibrating model parameters to satisfy existing experimental

  12. Modeling diabetic sensory neuropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Nigel A

    2004-01-01

    The procedures to induce insulin-deficient diabetes in rats using streptozotocin are described along with a number of insulin treatment regimes that can be used to maintain these animals at different degrees of glycemia for periods of weeks to months. Streptozotocin-diabetic rats develop tactile allodynia, hyperalgesia following paw formalin injection and abnormal responses to thermal stimulation and the detailed methods used to evaluate these behavioral indices of abnormal sensory function are provided.

  13. Genetically obese rats with (SHR/N-cp) and without diabetes (LA/N-cp) share abnormal islet responses to glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, K I; Voyles, N R; Recant, L

    1992-10-01

    To assess the effect of hyperglycemia on the function of islets obtained from obese rats, the behavior of isolated islets from LA/N-corpulent (nondiabetic obese) and SHR/N-corpulent (diabetic obese) male rats was examined and compared. Islets from both genetic models showed a left-shifted glucose dose-response curve for insulin release (concentrations for half-maximal release, 5 to 6 mmol/L v 12 to 13 mmol/L in LA/N lean littermates and 3 mmol/L v 10 mmol/L in lean SHR/N). When insulin release was expressed per unit islet volume, the fourfold to fivefold enlarged islets from both obese diabetic and obese nondiabetic rats showed decreased insulin secretory response in high (16.5 to 28 mmol/L) glucose concentrations, although the decrease was more severe in the diabetic rats. Glucose-stimulated insulin release by islets from both models was relatively resistant to inhibition by 1.2 mmol/L mannoheptulose (eg, 82% +/- 3% inhibition in LA/N lean v 16% +/- 8% in LA/N obese), although nearly complete inhibition was observed with 16 mmol/L mannoheptulose (96% v 85%, NS). Islets of obese diabetic rats were also resistant to the calcium-channel blocker, verapamil, suggesting an abnormal pathway of stimulus-secretion coupling for glucose. Glucose oxidation to carbon dioxide was increased in both obese models at all glucose concentrations when expressed per islet. In data expressed per unit volume, the larger islets from the obese-nondiabetic rats showed a left-shifted dose-response curve with an unchanged maximum rate of glucose oxidation at high (16.5 mmol/L) glucose concentrations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Pioglitazone treatment restores in vivo muscle oxidative capacity in a rat model of diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, B.; Ciapaite, J.; van den Broek, N. M. A.; Houten, S. M.; Nicolay, K.; Prompers, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the effect of pioglitazone treatment on in vivo and ex vivo muscle mitochondrial function in a rat model of diabetes. Methods: Both the lean, healthy rats and the obese, diabetic rats are Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats. The homozygous fa/fa ZDF rats are obese and diabetic. The he

  15. The quantitative genetics of indirect genetic effects: a selective review of modelling issues : Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijma, P.

    2014-01-01

    Indirect genetic effects (IGE) occur when the genotype of an individual affects the phenotypic trait value of another conspecific individual. IGEs can have profound effects on both the magnitude and the direction of response to selection. Models of inheritance and response to selection in traits sub

  16. Genetic loci for ventricular dilatation in the LEW/Jms rat with fetal-onset hydrocephalus are influenced by gender and genetic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayorga David A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The LEW/Jms rat strain has inherited hydrocephalus, with more males affected than females and an overall expression rate of 28%. This study aimed to determine chromosomal positions for genetic loci causing the hydrocephalus. Methods An F1 backcross was made to the parental LEW/Jms strain from a cross with non-hydrocephalic Fischer 344 rats. BC1 rats were generated for two specific crosses: the first with a male LEW/Jms rat as parent and grandparent, [(F × L × L], designated B group, and the second with a female LEW/Jms rat as the parent and grandparent [L × (L × F], designated C group. All hydrocephalic and a similar number of non-hydrocephalic rats from these two groups were genotyped with microsatellite markers and the data was analyzed separately for each sex by MAPMAKER. Results The frequency of hydrocephalus was not significantly different between the two groups (18.2 and 19.9 %, but there was a significant excess of males in the B group. The mean severity of hydrocephalus, measured as the ventricle-to-brain width ratio, was ranked as B group Conclusion Phenotypic expression of hydrocephalus in Lew/Jms, although not X-linked, has a strong male bias. One, and possibly two chromosomal regions are associated with the hydrocephalus.

  17. [Improvement of genetics teaching using literature-based learning model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Shiqian, Liang; Hongyan, Qin; Yong, Ji; Hua, Han

    2015-06-01

    Genetics is one of the most important courses for undergraduate students majoring in life science. In recent years, new knowledge and technologies are continually updated with deeper understanding of life science. However, the teaching model of genetics is still based on theoretical instruction, which makes the abstract principles hard to understand by students and directly affects the teaching effect. Thus, exploring a new teaching model is necessary. We have carried out a new teaching model, literature-based learning, in the course on Microbial Genetics for undergraduate students majoring in biotechnology since 2010. Here we comprehensively analyzed the implementation and application value of this model including pre-course knowledge, how to choose professional literature, how to organize teaching process and the significance of developing this new teaching model for students and teachers. Our literature-based learning model reflects the combination of "cutting-edge" and "classic" and makes book knowledge easy to understand, which improves students' learning effect, stimulates their interests, expands their perspectives and develops their ability. This practice provides novel insight into exploring new teaching model of genetics and cultivating medical talents capable of doing both basic and clinical research in the "precision medicine" era.

  18. The Dahl salt-sensitive rat is a spontaneous model of superimposed preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Ellen E; Williams, Jan M; Garrett, Michael R; Mooney, Jennifer N; Sasser, Jennifer M

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia, a leading cause of maternal morbidity and death worldwide, are poorly understood in part due to a lack of spontaneous animal models of the disease. We hypothesized that the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat, a genetic model of hypertension and kidney disease, is a spontaneous model of superimposed preeclampsia. The Dahl S was compared with the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat, a strain with a well-characterized normal pregnancy, and the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), a genetic model of hypertension that does not experience a preeclamptic phenotype despite preexisting hypertension. Mean arterial pressure (MAP, measured via telemetry) was elevated in the Dahl S and SHR before pregnancy, but hypertension was exacerbated during pregnancy only in Dahl S. In contrast, SD and SHR exhibited significant reductions in MAP consistent with normal pregnancy. Dahl S rats exhibited a severe increase in urinary protein excretion, glomerulomegaly, increased placental hypoxia, increased plasma soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), and increased placental production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The Dahl S did not exhibit the expected decrease in uterine artery resistance during late pregnancy in contrast to the SD and SHR. Dahl S pups and litter sizes were smaller than in the SD. The Dahl S phenotype is consistent with many of the characteristics observed in human superimposed preeclampsia, and we propose that the Dahl S should be considered further as a spontaneous model to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of superimposed preeclampsia and to identify and test new therapeutic targets for its treatment.

  19. Survival of transplanted neurotrophin-3 expressing human neural stem cells and motor function in a rat model of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peiqiang Cai; Guangyun Sun; Peishu Cai; Martin Oudega; Rui Xiao; Xuewen Wang; Wei Li; Yunbing Shu; Cheng Cai; Haihao Yang; Xuebing Shan; Wuhua Luo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many methods have been attempted to repair nerves following spinal cord injury,including peripheral nerve transplantation, Schwann cell transplantation, olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation, and embryonic neural tissue transplantation. However, there is a need for improved outcomes.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the repair feasibility for rat spinal cord injury using human neural stem cells (hNSCs) genetically modified by lentivirus to express neurotrophin-3.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: In vitro cell biological experiment and in vivo randomized, controlled,genetic engineering experiment were performed at the Third Military Medical University of Chinese PLA and First People's Hospital of Yibin, China from March 2006 to December 2007.MATERIALS: A total of 64 adult, female, Wistar rats were used for the in vivo study. Of them, 48 rats were used to establish models of spinal cord hemisection, and were subsequently equally and randomly assigned to model, genetically modified hNSC, and normal hNSC groups. The remaining 16 rats served as normal controls.METHODS: hNSCs were in vitro genetically modified by lentivirus to secrete both green fluorescence protein and neurotrophin-3. Neurotrophin-3 expression was measured by Westem blot.Genetically modified hNSC or normal hNSC suspension (5×105) was injected into the rat spinal cord following T10 spinal cord hemisection. A total of 5μL Dulbecco's-modified Eagle's medium was infused into the rat spinal cord in the model group. Transgene expression and survival of transplanted hNSCs were determined by immunohistochemistry. Motor function was evaluatedusing the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The following parameters were measured: expression ofneurotrophin-3 produced by genetically modified hNSCs, transgene expression and survival ofhNSCs in rats, motor function in rats.RESULTS: hNSCs were successfully genetically modified by lentivirus to stably express neurotrophin-3. The

  20. Genetic variance of tolerance and the toxicant threshold model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshinari; Mano, Hiroyuki; Tatsuta, Haruki

    2012-04-01

    A statistical genetics method is presented for estimating the genetic variance (heritability) of tolerance to pollutants on the basis of a standard acute toxicity test conducted on several isofemale lines of cladoceran species. To analyze the genetic variance of tolerance in the case when the response is measured as a few discrete states (quantal endpoints), the authors attempted to apply the threshold character model in quantitative genetics to the threshold model separately developed in ecotoxicology. The integrated threshold model (toxicant threshold model) assumes that the response of a particular individual occurs at a threshold toxicant concentration and that the individual tolerance characterized by the individual's threshold value is determined by genetic and environmental factors. As a case study, the heritability of tolerance to p-nonylphenol in the cladoceran species Daphnia galeata was estimated by using the maximum likelihood method and nested analysis of variance (ANOVA). Broad-sense heritability was estimated to be 0.199 ± 0.112 by the maximum likelihood method and 0.184 ± 0.089 by ANOVA; both results implied that the species examined had the potential to acquire tolerance to this substance by evolutionary change.

  1. Modeling the MagnetoencephaloGram (MEG) Of Epileptic Patients Using Genetic Programming and Minimizing the Derived Models Using Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Georgopoulos, Efstratios; Likothanassis, Spiridon

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, a variation of traditional Genetic Programming(GP) is used to model the MagnetoencephaloGram(MEG) of Epileptic Patients. This variation is Linear Genetic Programming(LGP). LGP is a particular subset of GP wherein computer programs in population are represented as a sequence of instructions from imperative programming language or machine language. The derived models from this method were simplified using genetic algorithms. The proposed method was used to model the MEG signal of epileptic patients using 6 different datasets. Each dataset uses different number of previous values of MEG to predict the next value. The models were tested in datasets different from the ones which were used to produce them and the results were very promising.

  2. Predicting diabetic nephropathy using a multifactorial genetic model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Blech

    Full Text Available AIMS: The tendency to develop diabetic nephropathy is, in part, genetically determined, however this genetic risk is largely undefined. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested the hypothesis that combined analysis of multiple genetic variants can improve prediction. METHODS: Based on previous reports, we selected 27 SNPs in 15 genes from metabolic pathways involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy and genotyped them in 1274 Ashkenazi or Sephardic Jewish patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes of >10 years duration. A logistic regression model was built using a backward selection algorithm and SNPs nominally associated with nephropathy in our population. The model was validated by using random "training" (75% and "test" (25% subgroups of the original population and by applying the model to an independent dataset of 848 Ashkenazi patients. RESULTS: The logistic model based on 5 SNPs in 5 genes (HSPG2, NOS3, ADIPOR2, AGER, and CCL5 and 5 conventional variables (age, sex, ethnicity, diabetes type and duration, and allowing for all possible two-way interactions, predicted nephropathy in our initial population (C-statistic = 0.672 better than a model based on conventional variables only (C = 0.569. In the independent replication dataset, although the C-statistic of the genetic model decreased (0.576, it remained highly associated with diabetic nephropathy (χ(2 = 17.79, p<0.0001. In the replication dataset, the model based on conventional variables only was not associated with nephropathy (χ(2 = 3.2673, p = 0.07. CONCLUSION: In this proof-of-concept study, we developed and validated a genetic model in the Ashkenazi/Sephardic population predicting nephropathy more effectively than a similarly constructed non-genetic model. Further testing is required to determine if this modeling approach, using an optimally selected panel of genetic markers, can provide clinically useful prediction and if generic models can be

  3. Intraindividual variability (IIV in an animal model of ADHD - the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagvolden Terje

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is characterized by numerous behaviors including inattention, hyperactivity and impulsiveness. ADHD-affected individuals also have high intra-individual variability (IIV in reaction time. The genetic control of IIV is not well understood. The single study of the genetics of this phenomenon in humans detected only marginal associations between genotypes at two candidate genes for ADHD and variability in response time. The Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR/NCrl is an animal model of ADHD, expressing high activity, inattention and impulsive behavior during operant and task tests. The SHR might be useful for identifying genes for variability, but it is not known whether it also expresses high IIV, as is symptomatic of ADHD. We therefore conducted an investigation of IIV in the SHR. We used 16 SHR/NCrl rats and 15 Wistar-Kyoto (WKY/Nico controls applying a reinforcement schedule used in the validation of the SHR as an animal model of ADHD. We represented IIV as the average absolute deviation of individual behavior within the five 18-min segments of each experimental session from the average behavioral trait value within that session ('individual phenotypic dispersion', PDi. PDi for hyperactivity, impulsiveness and inattention in the SHR and WKY rats was analyzed using nonparametric ranking by experimental session. SHR/NCrl rats had higher PDi than WKY/Nico controls for impulsiveness and inattention. There was a significant upward trend for PDi over experimental segments within sessions for attention in SHR rats, but not in WKY. PDi for hyperactivity was correlated with PDi for impulsiveness and we therefore excluded observations associated with short IRTs (

  4. Establishment of intramedullary spinal cord glioma model in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Tian-jian; WANG Zhong-cheng; ZHANG Ya-zhuo; LI Dan; WANG Hong-yun; LI Zhen-zong

    2010-01-01

    Background Treating intramedullary spinal cord gliomas is a big challenge because of limited options, high recurrence rate and poor prognosis. An intramedullary glioma model is prerequisite for testing new treatments. This paper describes the establishment of a rodent intramedullary glioma model and presents functional progression, neuroimaging and histopathological characterization of the tumour model.Methods Fischer344 rats (n=24) were randomized into two groups. Group 1 (n=16) received a 5 μl intramedullary implantation of 9L gliosarcomal (105) cells. Group 2 (n=8) received a 5 μl intramedullary injection of Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium. The rats were anesthetized, the spinous process of the T10 vertebra and the ligamentum flavum were removed to expose the T10-11 intervertebral space and an intramedullary injection was conducted into the spinal cord. The rats were evaluated preoperatively and daily postoperatively for neurological deficits using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scale. High resolution magnetic resonance images were acquired preoperatively and weekly postoperatively.When score equal to 0, rats were sacrificed for histopathological examination.Results Rats implanted with 9L gliosarcoma cells had a statistically significant median onset of hind limb paraplegia at (16.0±0.4) days, compared with rats in the control group in which neurological deficits were absent. Imaging and pathological cross sections confirmed intramedullary 9L gliosarcoma invading the spinal cord. Rats in the control group showed no significant functional, radiological or histopathological findings of tumour.Conclusions Rats implanted with 9L cells regularly develop paraplegia in a reliable and reproducible manner. The progression of neurological deficits, neuroimaging and histopathological characteristics of intramedullary spinal cord gliomas in rats is comparable with the behaviour of infiltrative intramedullary spinal cord gliomas in patients.

  5. Model-free Estimation of Recent Genetic Relatedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conomos, Matthew P.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Weir, Bruce S.; Thornton, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Genealogical inference from genetic data is essential for a variety of applications in human genetics. In genome-wide and sequencing association studies, for example, accurate inference on both recent genetic relatedness, such as family structure, and more distant genetic relatedness, such as population structure, is necessary for protection against spurious associations. Distinguishing familial relatedness from population structure with genotype data, however, is difficult because both manifest as genetic similarity through the sharing of alleles. Existing approaches for inference on recent genetic relatedness have limitations in the presence of population structure, where they either (1) make strong and simplifying assumptions about population structure, which are often untenable, or (2) require correct specification of and appropriate reference population panels for the ancestries in the sample, which might be unknown or not well defined. Here, we propose PC-Relate, a model-free approach for estimating commonly used measures of recent genetic relatedness, such as kinship coefficients and IBD sharing probabilities, in the presence of unspecified structure. PC-Relate uses principal components calculated from genome-screen data to partition genetic correlations among sampled individuals due to the sharing of recent ancestors and more distant common ancestry into two separate components, without requiring specification of the ancestral populations or reference population panels. In simulation studies with population structure, including admixture, we demonstrate that PC-Relate provides accurate estimates of genetic relatedness and improved relationship classification over widely used approaches. We further demonstrate the utility of PC-Relate in applications to three ancestrally diverse samples that vary in both size and genealogical complexity. PMID:26748516

  6. Ex Vivo Gene Therapy Using Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Deliver Growth Factors in the Skeletal Muscle of a Familial ALS Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic protein and molecule delivery to target sites by transplanted human stem cells holds great promise for ex vivo gene therapy. Our group has demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of ex vivo gene therapy targeting the skeletal muscles in a transgenic rat model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We used human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and genetically modified them to release neuroprotective growth factors such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Intramuscular growth factor delivery via hMSCs can enhance neuromuscular innervation and motor neuron survival in a rat model of ALS (SOD1(G93A) transgenic rats). Here, we describe the protocol of ex vivo delivery of growth factors via lentiviral vector-mediated genetic modification of hMSCs and hMSC transplantation into the skeletal muscle of a familial ALS rat model.

  7. Genetic Algorithm Modeling with GPU Parallel Computing Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Cavuoti, Stefano; Brescia, Massimo; Pescapé, Antonio; Longo, Giuseppe; Ventre, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-purpose genetic algorithm, designed and implemented with GPGPU / CUDA parallel computing technology. The model was derived from a multi-core CPU serial implementation, named GAME, already scientifically successfully tested and validated on astrophysical massive data classification problems, through a web application resource (DAMEWARE), specialized in data mining based on Machine Learning paradigms. Since genetic algorithms are inherently parallel, the GPGPU computing paradigm has provided an exploit of the internal training features of the model, permitting a strong optimization in terms of processing performances and scalability.

  8. A modified rat model of isolated bilateral pulmonary contusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shaohua; Ruan, Zheng; Jie ZHANG; ZHENG, JIN

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to create a feasible specific rat model of isolated bilateral pulmonary contusion (PC) and to evaluate the relationship between severity of hypoxemia and quantity of contusion lesions. Anesthetized rats were placed in a prone position. Injury energy ranging from 2.1 to 3.0 J was produced by a falling weight passed through a specially designed arched shield to the bilateral chest wall of rats. After injury (4 h), the contusion volume was measured using computer...

  9. Spontaneous trigeminal allodynia in rats: a model of primary headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshinsky, Michael L; Sanghvi, Menka M; Maxwell, Christina R; Gonzalez, Dorian; Spangenberg, Rebecca J; Cooper, Marnie; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2012-10-01

    Animal models are essential for studying the pathophysiology of headache disorders and as a screening tool for new therapies. Most animal models modify a normal animal in an attempt to mimic migraine symptoms. They require manipulation to activate the trigeminal nerve or dural nociceptors. At best, they are models of secondary headache. No existing model can address the fundamental question: How is a primary headache spontaneously initiated? In the process of obtaining baseline periorbital von Frey thresholds in a wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat, we discovered a rat with spontaneous episodic trigeminal allodynia (manifested by episodically changing periorbital pain threshold). Subsequent mating showed that the trait is inherited. Animals with spontaneous trigeminal allodynia allow us to study the pathophysiology of primary recurrent headache disorders. To validate this as a model for migraine, we tested the effects of clinically proven acute and preventive migraine treatments on spontaneous changes in rat periorbital sensitivity. Sumatriptan, ketorolac, and dihydroergotamine temporarily reversed the low periorbital pain thresholds. Thirty days of chronic valproic acid treatment prevented spontaneous changes in trigeminal allodynia. After discontinuation, the rats returned to their baseline of spontaneous episodic threshold changes. We also tested the effects of known chemical human migraine triggers. On days when the rats did not have allodynia and showed normal periorbital von Frey thresholds, glycerol trinitrate and calcitonin gene related peptide induced significant decreases in the periorbital pain threshold. This model can be used as a predictive model for drug development and for studies of putative biomarkers for headache diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  11. ZL006, a small molecule inhibitor of PSD-95/nNOS interaction, does not induce antidepressant-like effects in two genetically predisposed rat models of depression and control animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tillmann, Sandra; Pereira, Vitor Silva; Liebenberg, Nico

    2017-01-01

    been proposed. This disruption can be achieved using small molecule inhibitors such as ZL006, which has attracted attention as ischemic stroke therapy in rodents and has been proposed as a potential novel treatment for depression. Based on this, our aim was to translate these findings to animal models...

  12. Evaluation of Buprenorphine in a Postoperative Pain Model in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Curtin, Leslie I; Grakowsky, Julie A.; Suarez, Mauricio; Thompson, Alexis C; DiPirro, Jean M.; Martin, Lisa BE; Kristal, Mark B.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the commonly prescribed analgesic buprenorphine in a postoperative pain model in rats, assessing acute postoperative pain relief, rebound hyperalgesia, and the long-term effects of postoperative opioid treatment on subsequent opioid exposure. Rats received surgery (paw incision under isoflurane anesthesia), sham surgery (anesthesia only), or neither and were treated postoperatively with 1 of several doses of subcutaneous buprenorphine. Pain sensitivity to noxious and nonnoxious m...

  13. Experimental cell transplantation therapy in rat myocardial infarction model including nude rat preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wangde; Kloner, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    As a novel potential therapeutic strategy for cardiac disease, cell transplantation therapy has been extensively investigated in experimental studies and clinical trials. Although encouraging results have been demonstrated, a number of critical questions still remain to be answered. For example, what kind of stem cell and how many cells should be used; what is the best time for cell transplantation after acute myocardial infarction; which delivery approach is better, intravenous injection or direct intramyocardial injection? Transplantation of cells derived from human tissues into experimental animals may elicit an immune rejection. Immunodeficient nude rats provide a useful myocardial infarction model for cell transplantation therapy studies. We introduce our detailed methods of direct intramyocardial injection of immature heart cells and stem cells into the myocardial infarction region of rats and nude rats. Careful maintenance under aseptic conditions and proper surgical technique are essential to improve the survival of immunodeficient rats after surgery.

  14. Safety and risk assessment of the genetically modified Lactococci on rats intestinal bacterial flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kai-Chien; Liu, Chin-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Hsing; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2010-08-15

    The interaction between Lactococcus lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK and intestinal microflora was evaluated as a method to assess safety of genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs). L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK is one kind of GMM and able to produce the intracellular subtilisin NAT (nattokinase) under induction with nisin. The host strain L. lactis NZ9000 was a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) microorganism. Six groups of Wistar rats were orally administered with L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK and L. lactis NZ9000 for 6 weeks. Fecal and cecal contents were collected to determine the number of L. lactis NZ9000, L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK, Lactobacillus, coliform bacteria, beneficial bacteria Bifidobacterium and harmful bacteria Clostridium perfringens. The liver, spleen, kidney and blood were evaluated for the bacterial translocation. After 6 weeks consumption with GM and non-GM Lactococcus, no adverse effects were observed on the rat's body weight, hematological or serum biochemical parameters, or intestinal microflora. The bacterial translocation test showed that L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK did not translocate to any organ or blood. Bifidobacterium was significantly increased in feces after administration of both Lactococcus strains (L. lactis NZ9000 and L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK), while C. perfringens remained undetectable during the experiment. These results suggested that L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK could be safe in animal experiments and monitoring of the interaction between test strains and intestinal microflora might be applied as a method for other GMM safety assessments.

  15. Genetic effects of acute spermatogonial x-irradiation of the laboratory rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, J.R.; Chapman, A.B.

    1977-02-01

    The genetic effects of one generation of spermatogonial x-irradiation in rats, by a single dose of 600 r in one experiment and by a fractionated dose of 450 r in another, were measured in three generations of their descendants. Estimates of dominant lethal mutation rates, (2 to 3) x 10/sup -4//gamete/r, from litter size differences between irradiated and nonirradiated stock were consistent with previous estimates from rats and mice. Similar consistency was found for estimates of sex-linked recessive mutation rates, (1 to 2) x 10/sup -4/ chromosome/r, from male proportions within strains; however, when measured in crossbreds the proportion of males was higher in the irradiated than in the nonirradiated lines. This inconsistency in results is in keeping with the contradictory results reported for recessive sex-linked lethal mutation rates in mice. The effects used to estimate recessive lethal mutation rates which were unusually high, (2 to 14) x 10/sup -4//gamete/r, were not significant. Other factors that could have contributed to the observed effects are postulated.

  16. Generation of obese rat model by transcription activator-like effector nucleases targeting the leptin receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuting; Lu, Wenqing; Gao, Na; Long, Yi; Shao, Yanjiao; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Huaqing; Ye, Shixin; Ma, Xueyun; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2017-02-01

    The laboratory rat is a valuable mammalian model organism for basic research and drug discovery. Here we demonstrate an efficient methodology by applying transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology to generate Leptin receptor (Lepr) knockout rats on the Sprague Dawley (SD) genetic background. Through direct injection of in vitro transcribed mRNA of TALEN pairs into SD rat zygotes, somatic mutations were induced in two of three resulting pups. One of the founders carrying bi-allelic mutation exhibited early onset of obesity and infertility. The other founder carried a chimeric mutation which was efficiently transmitted to the progenies. Through phenotyping of the resulting three lines of rats bearing distinct mutations in the Lepr locus, we found that the strains with a frame-shifted or premature stop codon mutation led to obesity and metabolic disorders. However, no obvious defect was observed in a strain with an in-frame 57 bp deletion in the extracellular domain of Lepr. This suggests the deleted amino acids do not significantly affect Lepr structure and function. This is the first report of generating the Lepr mutant obese rat model in SD strain through a reverse genetic approach. This suggests that TALEN is an efficient and powerful gene editing technology for the generation of disease models.

  17. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon.

  18. Developmental genetics in emerging rodent models: case studies and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallarino, Ricardo; Hoekstra, Hopi E; Manceau, Marie

    2016-08-01

    For decades, mammalian developmental genetic studies have focused almost entirely on two laboratory models: Mus and Rattus, species that breed readily in the laboratory and for which a wealth of molecular and genetic resources exist. These species alone, however, do not capture the remarkable diversity of morphological, behavioural and physiological traits seen across rodents, a group that represents >40% of all mammal species. Due to new advances in molecular tools and genomic technologies, studying the developmental events underlying natural variation in a wide range of species for a wide range of traits has become increasingly feasible. Here we review several recent studies and discuss how they not only provided technical resources for newly emerging rodent models in developmental genetics but also are instrumental in further encouraging scientists, from a wide range of research fields, to capitalize on the great diversity in development that has evolved among rodents.

  19. Development of a Rat Model of Hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    general measure of activity, since it can not distinguish the type of locomotor action. Dataloggers are 1.5 cm diameter x 0.5 cm thick cylinders...rat Tc when challenged by cold. Small mammals employ BAT to generate heat to sustain body temperature during cold exposure (1). Moreover, blood...water swims in rats. Physiol. Behav. 54:1081-1084, 1993. 12. Ricco, D.C., E.A. MacArdy and S.C. Kissinger. Association processes in adaptation

  20. Novel Rat Model for Neurocysticercosis Using Taenia solium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verastegui, Manuela R.; Mejia, Alan; Clark, Taryn; Gavidia, Cesar M.; Mamani, Javier; Ccopa, Fredy; Angulo, Noelia; Chile, Nancy; Carmen, Rogger; Medina, Roxana; García, Hector H.; Rodriguez, Silvia; Ortega, Ynes; Gilman, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by Taenia solium infecting the central nervous system and is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy and convulsive conditions worldwide. Research into the pathophysiology of the disease and appropriate treatment is hindered by lack of cost-effective and physiologically similar animal models. We generated a novel rat neurocysticercosis model using intracranial infection with activated T. solium oncospheres. Holtzman rats were infected in two separate groups: the first group was inoculated extraparenchymally and the second intraparenchymally, with different doses of activated oncospheres. The groups were evaluated at three different ages. Histologic examination of the tissue surrounding T. solium cysticerci was performed. Results indicate that generally infected rats developed cysticerci in the brain tissue after 4 months, and the cysticerci were observed in the parenchymal, ventricle, or submeningeal brain tissue. The route of infection did not have a statistically significant effect on the proportion of rats that developed cysticerci, and there was no dependence on infection dose. However, rat age was crucial to the success of the infection. Epilepsy was observed in 9% of rats with neurocysticercosis. In histologic examination, a layer of collagen tissue, inflammatory infiltrate cells, perivascular infiltrate, angiogenesis, spongy change, and mass effect were observed in the tissue surrounding the cysts. This study presents a suitable animal model for the study of human neurocysticercosis. PMID:26216286

  1. Novel rat model for neurocysticercosis using Taenia solium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verastegui, Manuela R; Mejia, Alan; Clark, Taryn; Gavidia, Cesar M; Mamani, Javier; Ccopa, Fredy; Angulo, Noelia; Chile, Nancy; Carmen, Rogger; Medina, Roxana; García, Hector H; Rodriguez, Silvia; Ortega, Ynes; Gilman, Robert H

    2015-08-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by Taenia solium infecting the central nervous system and is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy and convulsive conditions worldwide. Research into the pathophysiology of the disease and appropriate treatment is hindered by lack of cost-effective and physiologically similar animal models. We generated a novel rat neurocysticercosis model using intracranial infection with activated T. solium oncospheres. Holtzman rats were infected in two separate groups: the first group was inoculated extraparenchymally and the second intraparenchymally, with different doses of activated oncospheres. The groups were evaluated at three different ages. Histologic examination of the tissue surrounding T. solium cysticerci was performed. Results indicate that generally infected rats developed cysticerci in the brain tissue after 4 months, and the cysticerci were observed in the parenchymal, ventricle, or submeningeal brain tissue. The route of infection did not have a statistically significant effect on the proportion of rats that developed cysticerci, and there was no dependence on infection dose. However, rat age was crucial to the success of the infection. Epilepsy was observed in 9% of rats with neurocysticercosis. In histologic examination, a layer of collagen tissue, inflammatory infiltrate cells, perivascular infiltrate, angiogenesis, spongy change, and mass effect were observed in the tissue surrounding the cysts. This study presents a suitable animal model for the study of human neurocysticercosis.

  2. Nephron Deficiency and Predisposition to Renal Injury in a Novel One-Kidney Genetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuexiang; Johnson, Ashley C; Williams, Jan M; White, Tiffani; Chade, Alejandro R; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Ruisheng; Roman, Richard J; Lee, Jonathan W; Kyle, Patrick B; Solberg-Woods, Leah; Garrett, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    Some studies have reported up to 40% of patients born with a single kidney develop hypertension, proteinuria, and in some cases renal failure. The increased susceptibility to renal injury may be due, in part, to reduced nephron numbers. Notably, children who undergo nephrectomy or adults who serve as kidney donors exhibit little difference in renal function compared with persons who have two kidneys. However, the difference in risk between being born with a single kidney versus being born with two kidneys and then undergoing nephrectomy are unclear. Animal models used previously to investigate this question are not ideal because they require invasive methods to model congenital solitary kidney. In this study, we describe a new genetic animal model, the heterogeneous stock-derived model of unilateral renal agenesis (HSRA) rat, which demonstrates 50%-75% spontaneous incidence of a single kidney. The HSRA model is characterized by reduced nephron number (more than would be expected by loss of one kidney), early kidney/glomerular hypertrophy, and progressive renal injury, which culminates in reduced renal function. Long-term studies of temporal relationships among BP, renal hemodynamics, and renal function demonstrate that spontaneous single-kidney HSRA rats are more likely than uninephrectomized normal littermates to exhibit renal impairment because of the combination of reduced nephron numbers and prolonged exposure to renal compensatory mechanisms (i.e., hyperfiltration). Future studies with this novel animal model may provide additional insight into the genetic contributions to kidney development and agenesis and the factors influencing susceptibility to renal injury in individuals with congenital solitary kidney.

  3. Reduced impact of emotion on choice behavior in presymptomatic BACHD rats, a transgenic rodent model for Huntington Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjeroud, Najia; Yagüe, Sara; Yu-Taeger, Libo; Bozon, Bruno; Leblanc-Veyrac, Pascale; Riess, Olaf; Allain, Philippe; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Doyère, Valérie; El Massioui, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    Executive dysfunction and psychiatric symptoms are hallmarks of Huntington disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disorder genetically characterized by expanded CAG repeats in the HTT gene. Using the BACHD rat model of HD (97 CAG-CAA repeats), the present research seeks to characterize the progressive emergence of decision-making impairments in a rat version of the Iowa Gambling Task (RGT) and the impact of emotional modulation, whether positive or negative, on choice behavior. The choice efficiency shown both by WT rats (independent of their age) and the youngest BACHD rats (2 and 8months old) evidenced that they are able to integrate outcomes of past decisions to determine expected reward values for each option. However, 18months old BACHD rats made fewer choices during the RGT session and were less efficient in choosing advantageous options than younger animals. Presenting either chocolate pellets or electrical footshocks half-way through a second RGT session reduced exploratory activity (inefficient nose-poking) and choices with a weaker effect on BACHD animals than on WT. Choice efficiency was left intact in transgenic rats. Our results bring new knowledge on executive impairments and impact of emotional state on decision-making at different stages of the disease, increasing the face-validity of the BACHD rat model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical Intervention to Rescue Hirschsprung Disease in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Lincon A; Obermayr, Florian; Pontell, Louise; Young, Heather M; Xie, Dan; Croaker, David H; Song, Zan-Min; Furness, John B

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Rats with a spontaneous null mutation in endothelin receptor type B or Ednrb (sl/sl; spotting lethal) lack enteric neurons in the distal bowel and usually die within the first week after birth. This early postnatal lethality limits their use for examining the potential of cell therapy to treat Hirschsprung disease, and for studies of the influence of EDNRB on the mature CNS and vascular systems. Methods We have developed a surgical intervention to prolong the life of the spotting lethal sl/sl rat, in which we perform a colostomy on postnatal (P) day 4–6 rats to avoid the fatal obstruction caused by the lack of colonic enteric neurons. Results The stomas remained patent and functional and the rats matured normally following surgery. Weight gains were comparable between control and Hirschsprung phenotype (sl/sl) rats, which were followed until 4 weeks after surgery (5 weeks old). We confirmed the absence of enteric neurons in the distal colon of rats whose lives were saved by the surgical intervention. Conclusions This study provides a novel approach for studying EDNRB signalling in multiple organ systems in mature rats, including an animal model to study the efficacy of cell therapy to treat Hirschsprung disease. PMID:26424040

  5. Cannabis exacerbates depressive symptoms in rat model induced by reserpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadrawy, Yasser A; Sawie, Hussein G; Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Hosny, Eman N

    2017-05-01

    Cannabis sativa is one of the most widely recreational drugs and its use is more prevalent among depressed patients. Some studies reported that Cannabis has antidepressant effects while others showed increased depressive symptoms in Cannabis users. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the effect of Cannabis extract on the depressive-like rats. Twenty four rats were divided into: control, rat model of depression induced by reserpine and depressive-like rats treated with Cannabis sativa extract (10mg/kg expressed as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol). The depressive-like rats showed a severe decrease in motor activity as assessed by open field test (OFT). This was accompanied by a decrease in monoamine levels and a significant increase in acetylcholinesterase activity in the cortex and hippocampus. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity increased in the cortex and decreased in the hippocampus of rat model. In addition, a state of oxidative stress was evident in the two brain regions. This was indicated from the significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide. No signs of improvement were observed in the behavioral and neurochemical analyses in the depressive-like rats treated with Cannabis extract. Furthermore, Cannabis extract exacerbated the lipid peroxidation in the cortex and hippocampus. According to the present findings, it could be concluded that Cannabis sativa aggravates the motor deficits and neurochemical changes induced in the cortex and hippocampus of rat model of depression. Therefore, the obtained results could explain the reported increase in the depressive symptoms and memory impairment among Cannabis users. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic programming-based chaotic time series modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 吴智铭; 杨根科

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a Genetic Programming-Based Modeling(GPM)algorithm on chaotic time series. GP is used here to search for appropriate model structures in function space,and the Particle Swarm Optimization(PSO)algorithm is used for Nonlinear Parameter Estimation(NPE)of dynamic model structures. In addition,GPM integrates the results of Nonlinear Time Series Analysis(NTSA)to adjust the parameters and takes them as the criteria of established models.Experiments showed the effectiveness of such improvements on chaotic time series modeling.

  7. Genetic signatures of natural selection in a model invasive ascidian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yaping; Chen, Yiyong; Yi, Changho; Fong, Jonathan J.; Kim, Won; Rius, Marc; Zhan, Aibin

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species represent promising models to study species’ responses to rapidly changing environments. Although local adaptation frequently occurs during contemporary range expansion, the associated genetic signatures at both population and genomic levels remain largely unknown. Here, we use genome-wide gene-associated microsatellites to investigate genetic signatures of natural selection in a model invasive ascidian, Ciona robusta. Population genetic analyses of 150 individuals sampled in Korea, New Zealand, South Africa and Spain showed significant genetic differentiation among populations. Based on outlier tests, we found high incidence of signatures of directional selection at 19 loci. Hitchhiking mapping analyses identified 12 directional selective sweep regions, and all selective sweep windows on chromosomes were narrow (~8.9 kb). Further analyses indentified 132 candidate genes under selection. When we compared our genetic data and six crucial environmental variables, 16 putatively selected loci showed significant correlation with these environmental variables. This suggests that the local environmental conditions have left significant signatures of selection at both population and genomic levels. Finally, we identified “plastic” genomic regions and genes that are promising regions to investigate evolutionary responses to rapid environmental change in C. robusta. PMID:28266616

  8. A novel model of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; An, Yunfang; Li, Zeqing; Zhao, Changqing

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (IFRS) is a life-threatening inflammatory disease that affects immunocompromised patients, but animal models of the disease are scarce. This study aimed to develop an IFRS model in neutropenic rats. The model was established in three consecutive steps: unilateral nasal obstruction with Merocel sponges, followed by administration of cyclophosphamide (CPA), and, finally, nasal inoculation with Aspergillus fumigatus. Fifty healthy Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, with group I as the controls, group II undergoing unilateral nasal obstruction alone, group III undergoing nasal obstruction with fungal inoculation, group IV undergoing nasal obstruction with administration of CPA, and group V undergoing nasal obstruction with administration of CPA and fungal inoculation. Hematology, histology, and mycology investigations were performed. The changes in the rat absolute neutrophil counts (ANCs) were statistically different across the groups. The administration of CPA decreased the ANCs, whereas nasal obstruction with fungal inoculation increased the ANCs, and nasal obstruction did not change them. Histological examination of the rats in group V revealed the hyphal invasion of sinus mucosa and bone, thrombosis, and tissue infarction. No pathology indicative of IFRS was observed in the remaining groups. Positive rates of fungal culture in tissue homogenates from the maxillary sinus (62.5%) and lung (25%) were found in group V, whereas groups I, II, III, and IV showed no fungal culture in the homogenates. A rat IFRS model was successfully developed through nasal obstruction, CPA-induced neutropenia, and fungal inoculation. The disease model closely mimics the pathophysiology of anthropic IFRS.

  9. Sparse time series chain graphical models for reconstructing genetic networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abegaz, Fentaw; Wit, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    We propose a sparse high-dimensional time series chain graphical model for reconstructing genetic networks from gene expression data parametrized by a precision matrix and autoregressive coefficient matrix. We consider the time steps as blocks or chains. The proposed approach explores patterns of co

  10. [Therapeutic effect of GDNF gene-modified mesencephalic neural stem cell transplantation in a rat model of Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Kuijia; Wang, Xiangpeng; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Bo; Wang, Mingguo; Zhang, Hailong; Deng, Xingli

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effect of transplantation of mesencephalic neural stem cells (mNSCs) genetically modified by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene in a rat model of Parkinson disease. mNSCs isolated from the lateral component of the midbrain of fetal rats at gestational age of 14 or 15 days were cultured for 5 days before genetic modification with GFP or GDNF gene. Rat models of Parkinson disease established by stereotactic injection of 6-hydroxy dopamine in the ventral area of the midbrain and the medial forebrain bundle were randomized into 3 groups to receive PBS injection, GFP gene-modified mNSCs transplantation, or GDNF gene-modified mNSCs transplantation into the right stratum. The behavioral changes of the rats were evaluated by observing rotations induced by intraperitoneal injection of apomorphine after the transplantation, and the survival, migration and differentiation of the transplanted cells were identified by immunohistochemistry. Transplantation with GDNF gene-modified mNSCs significantly improved the behavioral abnormalities of the rat models as compared with PBS injection and GFP gene-modified mNSCs transplantation. At 56 days after the transplantation, a greater number of the transplanted cells survived in the rat brain and more differentiated dopaminergic neurons were detected in GDNF gene-modified mNSCs transplantation group than in GFP gene-modified mNSCs transplantation group. GDNF gene-modified mNSCs transplantation can significantly improve dyskinesia in rat models of Parkinson disease, but the molecular mechanism needs further clarification.

  11. Cerebral microbleeds in a neonatal rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carusillo Theriault, Brianna; Woo, Seung Kyoon; Karimy, Jason K.; Keledjian, Kaspar; Stokum, Jesse A.; Sarkar, Amrita; Coksaygan, Turhan; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2017-01-01

    Background In adult humans, cerebral microbleeds play important roles in neurodegenerative diseases but in neonates, the consequences of cerebral microbleeds are unknown. In rats, a single pro-angiogenic stimulus in utero predisposes to cerebral microbleeds after birth at term, a time when late oligodendrocyte progenitors (pre-oligodendrocytes) dominate in the rat brain. We hypothesized that two independent pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero would be associated with a high likelihood of perinatal microbleeds that would be severely damaging to white matter. Methods Pregnant Wistar rats were subjected to intrauterine ischemia (IUI) and low-dose maternal lipopolysaccharide (mLPS) at embryonic day (E) 19. Pups were born vaginally or abdominally at E21-22. Brains were evaluated for angiogenic markers, microhemorrhages, myelination and axonal development. Neurological function was assessed out to 6 weeks. Results mRNA (Vegf, Cd31, Mmp2, Mmp9, Timp1, Timp2) and protein (CD31, MMP2, MMP9) for angiogenic markers, in situ proteolytic activity, and collagen IV immunoreactivity were altered, consistent with an angiogenic response. Vaginally delivered pups exposed to prenatal IUI+mLPS had spontaneous cerebral microbleeds, abnormal neurological function, and dysmorphic, hypomyelinated white matter and axonopathy. Pups exposed to the same pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero but delivered abdominally had minimal cerebral microbleeds, preserved myelination and axonal development, and neurological function similar to naïve controls. Conclusions In rats, pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero can predispose to vascular fragility and lead to cerebral microbleeds. The study of microbleeds in the neonatal rat brain at full gestation may give insights into the consequences of microbleeds in human preterm infants during critical periods of white matter development. PMID:28158198

  12. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant – a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla P. Figueroa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF/Brown Norwegian (BN F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm. In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R to cysteine (C change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca2+ transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3 gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3R35C function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes.

  13. Ototoxicity of boric acid powder in a rat animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Murat; Dogru, Salim; Cesmeci, Enver; Caliskan, Halil; Kurt, Onuralp; Kuçukodaci, Zafer; Gungor, Atila

    2017-04-22

    Boric acid, which has antiseptic and acidic properties, is used to treat external and middle ear infections. However, we have not found any literature about the effect of boric acid powder on middle ear mucosa and inner ear. The purpose of this study is to investigate possible ototoxic effects of boric acid powder (BAP) on cochlear outer hair cell function and histological changes in middle ear mucosa in a rat animal model. Twenty healthy, mature Wistar albino rats were used in this study. The rats were divided into two groups, Group A and Group B, each of which consisted of 10 rats. Initially, the animals in each group underwent distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) testing of their right and left ears. After the first DPOAE test, a surgical microscope was used to make a small perforation in both ears of the rats in each group, and a second DPOAE test was used to measure both ears in all of the rats. BAP was applied to the right middle ear of the rats using tympanic membrane perforation, and the DPOAEs were measured immediately after the BAP application. The histological changes and DPOAEs were evaluated three days later in Group A and 40 days later in Group B. No significant differences were found at all of the DPOAE frequencies. In Group A, mild inflammation of the middle ear mucosa was found on the third day after BAP application. In Group B, BAP caused mild inflammatory changes on the 40th day, which declined over time. Those changes did not lead to significant fibrosis within the mucosa. In rats, BAP causes mild inflammation in middle ear mucosa and it has no ototoxic effects on cochlear outer hair cell function in the inner ear of rats. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Establishment of a rat model for canine necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, E-S; Uchida, K; Nakayama, H

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenesis of necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME), necrotizing leukoencephalitis (NLE), and granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (GME) is still uncertain, although they are considered immune-mediated diseases. The purpose of the present study is to generate a rodent model(s) of these diseases. Rats were injected with rat cerebral or cerebellar homogenate. Rats injected with cerebral homogenate (Cbr) exhibited vacuolar or malacic changes mainly in the cerebral cortex. CD3-positive T cells and Iba-1-positive and CD163-negative microglia infiltrated and activated around the lesions. IgG deposited in the glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP)-positive glia limitans from the early phase, and CD3-positive T cells attached to GFAP-positive astrocytes. Autoantibodies against GFAP were detected in the sera. These pathological features of Cbr rats were consistent with those of canine NME. In contrast, rats injected with cerebral homogenate (Cbe) exhibited demyelinating lesions with inflammatory reactions in the cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. The presence of demyelination and autoantibodies against myelin proteins in Cbe rats was similar to murine experimental autoimmune encephalitis and differed from NME, NLE, and GME. All the present findings indicate that autoantibodies together with microglia and T cells may play a major role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic canine meningoencephalomyelitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Increased GABAB receptor signaling in a rat model for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selten, Martijn M; Meyer, Francisca; Ba, Wei; Vallès, Astrid; Maas, Dorien A; Negwer, Moritz; Eijsink, Vivian D; van Vugt, Ruben W M; van Hulten, Josephus A; van Bakel, Nick H M; Roosen, Joey; van der Linden, Robert J; Schubert, Dirk; Verheij, Michel M M; Kasri, Nael Nadif; Martens, Gerard J M

    2016-09-30

    Schizophrenia is a complex disorder that affects cognitive function and has been linked, both in patients and animal models, to dysfunction of the GABAergic system. However, the pathophysiological consequences of this dysfunction are not well understood. Here, we examined the GABAergic system in an animal model displaying schizophrenia-relevant features, the apomorphine-susceptible (APO-SUS) rat and its phenotypic counterpart, the apomorphine-unsusceptible (APO-UNSUS) rat at postnatal day 20-22. We found changes in the expression of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 specifically in the prelimbic- but not the infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), indicative of reduced inhibitory function in this region in APO-SUS rats. While we did not observe changes in basal synaptic transmission onto LII/III pyramidal cells in the mPFC of APO-SUS compared to APO-UNSUS rats, we report reduced paired-pulse ratios at longer inter-stimulus intervals. The GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 55845 abolished this reduction, indicating that the decreased paired-pulse ratio was caused by increased GABAB signaling. Consistently, we find an increased expression of the GABAB1 receptor subunit in APO-SUS rats. Our data provide physiological evidence for increased presynaptic GABAB signaling in the mPFC of APO-SUS rats, further supporting an important role for the GABAergic system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  16. Detection of visual signals by rats: A computational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    We applied a neural network model of classical conditioning proposed by Schmajuk, Lam, and Gray (1996) to visual signal detection and discrimination tasks designed to assess sustained attention in rats (Bushnell, 1999). The model describes the animals’ expectation of receiving fo...

  17. Retargeting of rat parvovirus H-1PV to cancer cells through genetic engineering of the viral capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaume, Xavier; El-Andaloussi, Nazim; Leuchs, Barbara; Bonifati, Serena; Kulkarni, Amit; Marttila, Tiina; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    The rat parvovirus H-1PV is a promising anticancer agent given its oncosuppressive properties and the absence of known side effects in humans. H-1PV replicates preferentially in transformed cells, but the virus can enter both normal and cancer cells. Uptake by normal cells sequesters a significant portion of the administered viral dose away from the tumor target. Hence, targeting H-1PV entry specifically to tumor cells is important to increase the efficacy of parvovirus-based treatments. In this study, we first found that sialic acid plays a key role in H-1PV entry. We then genetically engineered the H-1PV capsid to improve its affinity for human tumor cells. By analogy with the resolved crystal structure of the closely related parvovirus minute virus of mice, we developed an in silico three-dimensional (3D) model of the H-1PV wild-type capsid. Based on this model, we identified putative amino acids involved in cell membrane recognition and virus entry at the level of the 2-fold axis of symmetry of the capsid, within the so-called dimple region. In situ mutagenesis of these residues significantly reduced the binding and entry of H-1PV into permissive cells. We then engineered an entry-deficient viral capsid and inserted a cyclic RGD-4C peptide at the level of its 3-fold axis spike. This peptide binds α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) integrins, which are overexpressed in cancer cells and growing blood vessels. The insertion of the peptide rescued viral infectivity toward cells overexpressing α(v)β(5) integrins, resulting in the efficient killing of these cells by the reengineered virus. This work demonstrates that H-1PV can be genetically retargeted through the modification of its capsid, showing great promise for a more efficient use of this virus in cancer therapy.

  18. A genetic algorithm for solving supply chain network design model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozi, Z.; Ismail, N.; Ariafar, S. H.; Tang, S. H.; Ariffin, M. K. M. A.

    2013-09-01

    Network design is by nature costly and optimization models play significant role in reducing the unnecessary cost components of a distribution network. This study proposes a genetic algorithm to solve a distribution network design model. The structure of the chromosome in the proposed algorithm is defined in a novel way that in addition to producing feasible solutions, it also reduces the computational complexity of the algorithm. Computational results are presented to show the algorithm performance.

  19. From classical genetics to quantitative genetics to systems biology: modeling epistasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Aylor

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression data has been used in lieu of phenotype in both classical and quantitative genetic settings. These two disciplines have separate approaches to measuring and interpreting epistasis, which is the interaction between alleles at different loci. We propose a framework for estimating and interpreting epistasis from a classical experiment that combines the strengths of each approach. A regression analysis step accommodates the quantitative nature of expression measurements by estimating the effect of gene deletions plus any interaction. Effects are selected by significance such that a reduced model describes each expression trait. We show how the resulting models correspond to specific hierarchical relationships between two regulator genes and a target gene. These relationships are the basic units of genetic pathways and genomic system diagrams. Our approach can be extended to analyze data from a variety of experiments, multiple loci, and multiple environments.

  20. The significance of genetics in pathophysiologic models of premature birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberos, Jose

    2017-05-31

    Prematurity is a major health problem in all countries, especially in certain ethic groups and increasing recurrence imply the influence of genetic factors. Published genetic polymorphisms are identified in relation to the 4 pathophysiological models of prematurity described: Chorioamniotic-decidual inflammation, premature contraction pathway, decidual haemorrhage and susceptibility to environmental toxins. 240 articles are identified, 52 articles are excluded because they are not original, not written in English or duplicated. From them 125 articles were included in qualitative analysis This review aims to update recent knowledge about genes associated with premature birth.

  1. Infrared Thermography in Serotonin-Induced Itch Model in Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasemian, Yousef; Gazerani, Parisa; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The study validated the application of infrared thermography in a serotonin-induced itch model in rats since the only available method in animal models of itch is the count of scratching bouts. Twenty four adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were used in 3 experiments: 1) local vasomotor response...... with no scratching reflex was investigated. Serotonin elicited significant scratching and lowered the local temperature at the site of injection. A negative dose-temperature relationship of serotonin was found by thermography. Vasoregulation at the site of serotonin injection took place in the absence of scratching...... reflexes. Thermography is a reliable, non-invasive, and objective method for assessment in serotonin-induced itch model in rat....

  2. Infrared Thermography in Serotonin-Induced Itch Model in Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasemian, Yousef; Gazerani, Parisa; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The study validated the application of infrared thermography in a serotonin-induced itch model in rats since the only available method in animal models of itch is the count of scratching bouts. Twenty four adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were used in 3 experiments: 1) local vasomotor response...... with no scratching reflex was investigated. Serotonin elicited significant scratching and lowered the local temperature at the site of injection. A negative dose-temperature relationship of serotonin was found by thermography. Vasoregulation at the site of serotonin injection took place in the absence of scratching...... reflexes. Thermography is a reliable, non-invasive, and objective method for assessment in serotonin-induced itch model in rat....

  3. Impact of animal strain on gene expression in a rat model of acute cardiac rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norsworthy Kelly J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression levels of many genes show wide natural variation among strains or populations. This study investigated the potential for animal strain-related genotypic differences to confound gene expression profiles in acute cellular rejection (ACR. Using a rat heart transplant model and 2 different rat strains (Dark Agouti, and Brown Norway, microarrays were performed on native hearts, transplanted hearts, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Results In heart tissue, strain alone affected the expression of only 33 probesets while rejection affected the expression of 1368 probesets (FDR 10% and FC ≥ 3. Only 13 genes were affected by both strain and rejection, which was Conclusion In ACR, genetic background has a large impact on the transcriptome of immune cells, but not heart tissue. Gene expression studies of ACR should avoid study designs that require cross strain comparisons between leukocytes.

  4. Effects of Vitamin D Supplementation during the Induction and Progression of Osteoarthritis in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Castillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies correlate low levels of vitamin D with the osteoarthritis (OA progression. Cytokines and metalloproteases play a major role in OA promoting the inflammation and degradation of the cartilage and can be induced through the Toll-like receptor (TLR pathway. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of vitamin D supplementation on the development of osteoarthritis (OA through examining the genetic regulation of TLRs, cytokines, and metalloproteases in chondrocytes as well as the wideness of cartilage in rats with OA. Our results demonstrate that the signaling through TLR-4 is a proinflammatory mechanism in osteoarthritis that drives the upregulation of MMP-3, IL-1β, and TNF-α gene expression, leading to cartilage degradation and inflammation. Vitamin D supplementation had a protective effect during the onset but not during the chronic stage of OA in the rat model.

  5. Canalization and symmetry in Boolean models for genetic regulatory networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, C J Olson [Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bassler, Kevin E [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2007-04-20

    Canalization of genetic regulatory networks has been argued to be favoured by evolutionary processes due to the stability that it can confer to phenotype expression. We explore whether a significant amount of canalization and partial canalization can arise in purely random networks in the absence of evolutionary pressures. We use a mapping of the Boolean functions in the Kauffman N-K model for genetic regulatory networks onto a k-dimensional Ising hypercube (where k = K) to show that the functions can be divided into different classes strictly due to geometrical constraints. The classes can be counted and their properties determined using results from group theory and isomer chemistry. We demonstrate that partially canalizing functions completely dominate all possible Boolean functions, particularly for higher k. This indicates that partial canalization is extremely common, even in randomly chosen networks, and has implications for how much information can be obtained in experiments on native state genetic regulatory networks.

  6. Characterizing a Rat Brca2 Knockout Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    this treatment (Figure 2b). Aspermatogenesis Meiosis in Brca2/ rats proceeds normally through leptotene and early zygotene (Figure 3a) with 40...Zygotene Late Zygotene Scp3Scp3 Scp3 Scp3 Scp1 CREST CRESTCREST Merge a b Figure 3 (a) Meiosis in Brca2/ spermatocytes does not progress beyond late...control of noncrossover and crossover recombination during meiosis . Cell 106: 47–57. Barlow C, Liyanage M, Moens PB, Tarsounas M, Nagashima K, Brown K

  7. The preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495, reduces the frequency of spike-wave discharges in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngomba, R.T.; Biagioni, F.; Casciato, S.; Willems-van Bree, P.C.M.; Battaglia, G.; Bruno, V.; Nicoletti, F.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2005-01-01

    We examined the expression and function of group-II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors in an animal model of absence seizures using genetically epileptic WAG/Rij rats, which develop spontaneous non-convulsive seizures after 2-3 months of age. Six-month-old WAG/Rij rats showed an increased expre

  8. Fuzzy Modelling of Knee Joint with Genetic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. K. K. Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of joint properties of lower limbs in people with spinal cord injury is significantly challenging for researchers due to the complexity of the system. The objective of this study is to develop a knee joint model capable of relating electrical parameters to dynamic joint torque as well as knee angle for functional electrical stimulation application. The joint model consists of a segmental dynamic, time-invariant passive properties and uncertain time-variant active properties. The knee joint model structure comprising optimised equations of motion and fuzzy models to represent the passive viscoelasticity and active muscle properties is formulated. The model thus formulated is optimised using genetic optimization, and validated against experimental data. The developed model can be used for simulation of joint movements as well as for control development. The results show that the model developed gives an accurate dynamic characterisation of the knee joint.

  9. ISOLATION OF HEPATIC OVAL CELLS FROM DIFFERENT MODEL RATS INCLUDING DIABETIC RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ying-li; YE Ting-ting; XIA Fang-zhen; WANG Ning-jian; YANG Hua; CHEN Yi

    2009-01-01

    Objective To acquire oval cells (progenitor stem cells) from adult rat liver of different models including diabetic rats. Methods Thirty Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into 5 groups randomly: control, 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), 2-AAF+partial hepatectomy (PH), 2-AAF+carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and diabetic groups. As two-step collagenase perfusion protocol of Seglen, oval cells were isolated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Thy1.1 positive cells were sorted by flow cytometry, and then cultured in Dulbeccos minimum Eagles medium (DMEM). Immunofluorescence staining was applied to labelling Thy1.1. Results Different rates of Thy1.1 positive oval cells were found in different rat model groups: 0.5% in 2-AAF, 0.3% in 2-hAAF+PH, 0.2% in 2-AAF+CCl4 , 0.1% in diabetic, and 0.0% in control. Isolated cells adhered to plate with fusiform or polygon as epithelial cells. Conclusion Progenitor stem cells exist in injured liver tissue including those from diabetic rats.

  10. Cytotoxic effect of aspartame (diet sweet) on the histological and genetic structures of female albino rats and their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Elfatah, Azza A M; Ghaly, Inas S; Hanafy, Safaa M

    2012-10-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of aspartame intake on the histological and genetic structures of mother albino rats and their offspring. Sixty adult female albino rats and 180 of their offspring were equally divided into two groups (control and treated), each group divided into three subgroups. Each subgroup consisted of 10 pregnant rats and 30 of their offspring. The experimental design divided into three periods: (1) the gestation period (subgroup one), (2) the gestation period and three weeks after delivery (subgroup two) and (3) animals in the third subgroup treated as subgroup two then left till the end of the ninth week after delivery. Each pregnant rat in the treated subgroups was given a single daily dose of 1 mL aspartame solution (50.4 mg) by gastric gavage throughout the time intervals of experimental design. At the end of each experimental period for control and treated subgroups, the liver of half of both control and treated groups were subjected for histological study while the liver and bone marrow of the other halves were subjected for cytogenetic studies. Body weight of both groups were recorded individually twice weekly in the morning before offering the diet. The results revealed that the rats and their offspring in the subgroups of control animals showed increases in body weight, normal histological sections, low chromosomal aberration and low DNA fragmentation. The treated animals in the three subgroups rats and their offspring revealed decreases in body weight, high histological lesions, increases in the chromosomal aberration and DNA fragmentation compared with control groups. In conclusion, the consumption of aspartame leads to histopathological lesions in the liver and alterations of the genetic system in the liver and bone marrow of mother albino rats and their offspring. These toxicological changes were directly proportional to the duration of its administration and improved after its withdrawal.

  11. Learning with Admixture: Modeling, Optimization, and Applications in Population Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jade Yu

    2016-01-01

    Population genetics is a branch of applied mathematics. It is a translation of scientific observations into mathematical models and their manipulations in order to produce quantitative predictions about evolution. Combining knowledge from genetics, statistics, and computer science, population...... data. Ohana's admixture module is based on classical structure modeling but uses new optimization subroutines through quadratic programming, which outperform the current state-of-the-art software in both speed and accuracy. Ohana presents a new method for phylogenetic tree inference using Gaussian...... the foundation for both CoalHMM and Ohana. Optimization modeling has been the main theme throughout my PhD, and it will continue to shape my work for the years to come. The algorithms and software I developed to study historical admixture and population evolution fall into a larger family of machine learning...

  12. Assessing appetitive, aversive, and negative ethanol-mediated reinforcement through an immature rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautassi, Ricardo M; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Spear, Norman E

    2009-06-01

    The motivational effects of drugs play a key role during the transition from casual use to abuse and dependence. Ethanol reinforcement has been successfully studied through Pavlovian and operant conditioning in adult rats and mice genetically selected for their ready acceptance of ethanol. Another model for studying ethanol reinforcement is the immature (preweanling) rat, which consumes ethanol and exhibits the capacity to process tactile, odor and taste cues and transfer information between different sensorial modalities. This review describes the motivational effects of ethanol in preweanling, heterogeneous non-selected rats. Preweanlings exhibit ethanol-mediated conditioned taste avoidance and conditioned place aversion. Ethanol's appetitive effects, however, are evident when using first- and second-order conditioning and operant procedures. Ethanol also devalues the motivational representation of aversive stimuli, suggesting early negative reinforcement. It seems that preweanlings are highly sensitive not only to the aversive motivational effects of ethanol but also to its positive and negative (anti-anxiety) reinforcement potential. The review underscores the advantages of using a developing rat to evaluate alcohol's motivational effects.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of the hippocampus in novel rat model of febrile seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongcheng Wang

    Full Text Available Febrile seizures (FS are the most common type of convulsive events in infants and young children, but the precise underlying genetic mechanism remains to be explored. To investigate the underlying pathogenic factors in FS and subsequent epilepsy, alterations in gene expression between the two new strains of rats (hyperthermia-prone [HP] vs hyperthermia-resistant [HR], were investigated by using the Whole Rat Genome Oligo Microarray. This process identified 1,140 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; 602 upregulated and 538 downregulated, which were analyzed to determine significant Gene Ontology (GO categories, signaling pathways and gene networks. Based on the GO analyses, the modified genes are closely related to various FS pathogenesis factors, including immune and inflammatory responses and ion transport. Certain DEGs identified have not been previously examined in relation to FS pathogenesis. Among these genes is dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4, a gene closely linked to interleukin 6 (IL-6, which played a key role in the gene network analysis. Furthermore, sitagliptin, a DPP4 inhibitor significantly decreased epileptic discharge in rats, observed via electroencephalogram, suggesting an important role for DPP4 in FS. The effectiveness of sitagliptin in reducing seizure activity may occur through a mechanism that stabilizes cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. In addition, DPP4 expression may be regulated by DNA methylation. The hippocampal gene expression profiles in novel rat models of FS provides a large database of candidate genes and pathways, which will be useful for researchers interested in disorders of neuronal excitability.

  14. An animal model of differential genetic risk for methamphetamine intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara ePhillips

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The question of whether genetic factors contribute to risk for methamphetamine (MA use and dependence has not been intensively investigated. Compared to human populations, genetic animal models offer the advantages of control over genetic family history and drug exposure. Using selective breeding, we created lines of mice that differ in genetic risk for voluntary MA intake and identified the chromosomal addresses of contributory genes. A quantitative trait locus was identified on chromosome 10 that accounts for more than 50% of the genetic variance in MA intake in the selected mouse lines. In addition, behavioral and physiological screening identified differences corresponding with risk for MA intake that have generated hypotheses that are testable in humans. Heightened sensitivity to aversive and certain physiological effects of MA, such as MA-induced reduction in body temperature, are hallmarks of mice bred for low MA intake. Furthermore, unlike MA-avoiding mice, MA-preferring mice are sensitive to rewarding and reinforcing MA effects, and to MA-induced increases in brain extracellular dopamine levels. Gene expression analyses implicate the importance of a network enriched in transcription factor genes, some of which regulate the mu opioid receptor gene, Oprm1, in risk for MA use. Neuroimmune factors appear to play a role in differential response to MA between the mice bred for high and low intake. In addition, chromosome 10 candidate gene studies provide strong support for a trace amine associated receptor 1 gene, Taar1, polymorphism in risk for MA intake. MA is a trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1 agonist, and a non-functional Taar1 allele segregates with high MA consumption. Thus, reduced TAAR1 function has the potential to increase risk for MA use. Overall, existing findings support the MA drinking lines as a powerful model for identifying genetic factors involved in determining risk for harmful MA use. Future directions include the

  15. Gait Impairment in a Rat Model of Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saara Parkkinen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of proper tests for gait evaluation following cerebral ischemia in rats has been limited. The automated, quantitative CatWalk system, which was initially designed to measure gait in models of spinal cord injury, neuropathic pain, and peripheral nerve injury, is said to be a useful tool for the study of motor impairment in stroke animals. Here we report our experiences of using CatWalk XT with rats subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO, during their six-week followup. Large corticostriatal infarct was confirmed by MRI in all MCAO rats, which was associated with severe sensorimotor impairment. In contrast, the gait impairment was at most mild, which is consistent with seemingly normal locomotion of MCAO rats. Many of the gait parameters were affected by body weight, walking speed, and motivation despite the use of a goal box. In addition, MCAO rats showed bilateral compensation, which was developed to stabilize proper locomotion. All of these interferences may confound the data interpretation. Taken together, the translational applicability of CatWalk XT in evaluating motor impairment and treatment efficacy remains to be limited at least in rats with severe corticostriatal infarct and loss of body weight.

  16. [The emphases and basic procedures of genetic counseling in psychotherapeutic model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Zhi; Zhong, Nanbert

    2006-11-01

    The emphases and basic procedures of genetic counseling are all different with those in old models. In the psychotherapeutic model, genetic counseling will not only focus on counselees' genetic disorders and birth defects, but also their psychological problems. "Client-centered therapy" termed by Carl Rogers plays an important role in genetic counseling process. The basic procedures of psychotherapeutic model of genetic counseling include 7 steps: initial contact, introduction, agendas, inquiry of family history, presenting information, closing the session and follow-up.

  17. Spontaneously hypertensive rats: a potential model to identify drugs for treatment of learning disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, A; Hong, E

    1998-04-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) of 3 to 12 months of age learned and retrieved less information than normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), although no difference was found with animals from 18 and 24 months of age. The combined influence of hypertension and aging had an additive detrimental effect on cognitive functions. Notwithstanding these deficiencies in learning and memory, SHR have seldom been used as a model in the screening of drugs with therapeutic potential for treatment of disorders of cognitive processes. Moreover, the calcium channel blocker nimodipine has beneficial effects on learning in both aged and hypertensive animals and humans. However, no attempt has been made to investigate whether nimodipine can reverse the additive deleterious effects of aging and hypertension in the same subject. We recently reported that deteriorated animals (middle-aged and/or hypertensive) chronically treated with nimodipine (via osmotic minipumps) exhibit higher learning scores. This information indicates that nimodipine can reverse the impairing effects of either aging or hypertension on learning; the presence of the two conditions, however, produces a severe impairment that can be partially reversed by this drug. Therefore, we propose that mature and middle-aged SHR represent a model for the screening of potentially useful drugs in the treatment of learning disorders, probably associated with hypertension and/or aging. Nevertheless, it must be remembered that the SHR is a genetic model and the appearance of neural disturbances could be a parallel genetic phenomenon and not necessarily or exclusively related to hypertension per se.

  18. A novel rat contact lens model for Fusarium keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Shousha, Mohamed; Santos, Andrea Rachelle C.; Oechsler, Rafael A.; Iovieno, Alfonso; Maestre-Mesa, Jorge; Ruggeri, Marco; Echegaray, Jose J.; Dubovy, Sander R.; Perez, Victor L.; Miller, Darlene; Alfonso, Eduardo C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a new contact lens–associated fungal keratitis rat model and to assess the ability of non-invasive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to detect pathological changes in vivo in fungal keratitis. Methods We used SD-OCT to image and measure the cornea of Sprague Dawley rats. Fusarium infection was initiated in the rat eye by fitting Fusarium solani–soaked contact lenses on the experimental eye, while the control animals received contact lenses soaked in sterile saline. The fungal infection was monitored with periodic slit-lamp examination and in vivo SD-OCT imaging of the rat eye, and confirmed by histology, counting of viable fungi in the infected rat cornea, and PCR with specific primers for Fusarium sp. Results We imaged and measured the rat cornea with SD-OCT. Custom-made contact lenses were developed based on the OCT measurements. Incubation of contact lenses in a F. solani suspension resulted in biofilm formation. We induced contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis by fitting the rat eyes for 4 h with the Fusarium-contaminated contact lenses. The SD-OCT images of the cornea correlated well with the slit-lamp and histopathological results and clearly defined clinical signs of infection, namely, increased corneal thickening, loss of epithelial continuity, hyper-reflective areas representing infiltrates, and endothelial plaques characteristic of fungal infection. Moreover, in three cases, SD-OCT detected the infection without any clear findings on slit-lamp examination. Infection was confirmed with histological fungal staining, PCR, and microbiological culture positivity. Conclusions We developed a highly reproducible rat contact lens model and successfully induced contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis in this model. The clinical presentation of contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis in the rat model is similar to the human condition. SD-OCT is a valuable tool that

  19. A unified model of the standard genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Marco V; Zamudio, Gabriel S; Morgado, Eberto R

    2017-03-01

    The Rodin-Ohno (RO) and the Delarue models divide the table of the genetic code into two classes of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs I and II) with recognition from the minor or major groove sides of the tRNA acceptor stem, respectively. These models are asymmetric but they are biologically meaningful. On the other hand, the standard genetic code (SGC) can be derived from the primeval RNY code (R stands for purines, Y for pyrimidines and N any of them). In this work, the RO-model is derived by means of group actions, namely, symmetries represented by automorphisms, assuming that the SGC originated from a primeval RNY code. It turns out that the RO-model is symmetric in a six-dimensional (6D) hypercube. Conversely, using the same automorphisms, we show that the RO-model can lead to the SGC. In addition, the asymmetric Delarue model becomes symmetric by means of quotient group operations. We formulate isometric functions that convert the class aaRS I into the class aaRS II and vice versa. We show that the four polar requirement categories display a symmetrical arrangement in our 6D hypercube. Altogether these results cannot be attained, neither in two nor in three dimensions. We discuss the present unified 6D algebraic model, which is compatible with both the SGC (based upon the primeval RNY code) and the RO-model.

  20. Genetic variants associated with neurodegenerative Alzheimer disease in natural models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Claudia; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Ardiles, Álvaro O; Ewer, John; Palacios, Adrián G

    2016-02-26

    The use of transgenic models for the study of neurodegenerative diseases has made valuable contributions to the field. However, some important limitations, including protein overexpression and general systemic compensation for the missing genes, has caused researchers to seek natural models that show the main biomarkers of neurodegenerative diseases during aging. Here we review some of these models-most of them rodents, focusing especially on the genetic variations in biomarkers for Alzheimer diseases, in order to explain their relationships with variants associated with the occurrence of the disease in humans.

  1. A Tri-Part Model for Genetics Literacy: Exploring Undergraduate Student Reasoning about Authentic Genetics Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Nicole A.; Duncan, Ravit Golan; Stephenson, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Genetics literacy is becoming increasingly important as advancements in our application of genetic technologies such as stem cell research, cloning, and genetic screening become more prevalent. Very few studies examine how genetics literacy is applied when reasoning about authentic genetic dilemmas. However, there is evidence that situational…

  2. A Tri-Part Model for Genetics Literacy: Exploring Undergraduate Student Reasoning about Authentic Genetics Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Nicole A.; Duncan, Ravit Golan; Stephenson, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Genetics literacy is becoming increasingly important as advancements in our application of genetic technologies such as stem cell research, cloning, and genetic screening become more prevalent. Very few studies examine how genetics literacy is applied when reasoning about authentic genetic dilemmas. However, there is evidence that situational…

  3. Development of Wistar rat model of insulin resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Ai; Ning Wang; Mei Yang; Zhi-Min Du; Yong-Chun Zhang; Bao-Feng Yang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To establish a simplified and reliable animal model of insulin resistance with low cost in Wistar rats. METHODS: Wistar rats were treated with a high fat emulsion by ig for 10 d. Changes of the diets, drinking and body weight were monitored every day and insulin resistance was evaluated by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemicclamp techniques and short insulin tolerance test using capillary blood glucose. Morphologic changes of liver, fat, skeletal muscles, and pancreatic islets were assessed under light microscope. mRNA expressions of GLUT2 and α-glucosidase in small intestine epithelium, GLUT4 in skeletal muscles and Kir6.2 in beta cell of islets were determined by in situ hybridization.RESULTS: KITT was smaller in treated animals (4.5±0.9)than in untreated control Wistar rats (6.8±1.5), and so was glucose injection rate. Both adipocyte hypertrophy and large pancreatic islets were seen in high fat fed rats,but no changes of skeletal muscles and livers wereobserved. mRNA levels of GLUT2, α-glucosidase in small intestinal epithelium and Kir6.2 mRNA in beta cells of islets increased, whereas that of GLUT4 in skeletal muscles decreased in high fat fed group compared with normal control group.CONCLUSION: An insulin resistance animal model in Wistar rats is established by ig special fat emulsion.

  4. Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease: Focus on Electrophysiological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cepeda

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the HD (Huntington's disease gene in 1993 led to the creation of genetic mouse models of the disease and opened the doors for mechanistic studies. In particular, the early changes and progression of the disease could be followed and examined systematically. The present review focuses on the contribution of these genetic mouse models to the understanding of functional changes in neurons as the HD phenotype progresses, and concentrates on two brain areas: the striatum, the site of most conspicuous pathology in HD, and the cortex, a site that is becoming increasingly important in understanding the widespread behavioural abnormalities. Mounting evidence points to synaptic abnormalities in communication between the cortex and striatum and cell-cell interactions as major determinants of HD symptoms, even in the absence of severe neuronal degeneration and death.

  5. Exchange Rate Prediction using Neural – Genetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MECHGOUG Raihane

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural network have successfully used for exchange rate forecasting. However, due to a large number of parameters to be estimated empirically, it is not a simple task to select the appropriate neural network architecture for exchange rate forecasting problem.Researchers often overlook the effect of neural network parameters on the performance of neural network forecasting. The performance of neural network is critically dependant on the learning algorithms, thenetwork architecture and the choice of the control parameters. Even when a suitable setting of parameters (weight can be found, the ability of the resulting network to generalize the data not seen during learning may be far from optimal. For these reasons it seemslogical and attractive to apply genetic algorithms. Genetic algorithms may provide a useful tool for automating the design of neural network. The empirical results on foreign exchange rate prediction indicate that the proposed hybrid model exhibits effectively improved accuracy, when is compared with some other time series forecasting models.

  6. The Ala16Val genetic dimorphism modulates the import of human manganese superoxide dismutase into rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Angela; Khoury, Hania; Prip-Buus, Carina; Cepanec, Claude; Pessayre, Dominique; Degoul, Françoise

    2003-03-01

    A genetic dimorphism encodes for either alanine (Ala) or valine (Val) in the mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) of human manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and has been reported to modulate the risk of some cancers, neurodegenerative diseases and severe alcoholic liver disease. Although functional consequences of this dimorphism on MnSOD activity have not been assessed, computer models predict a partial alpha-helix structure for the Ala-MnSOD/MTS, but a beta-sheet structure for the Val-variant, which could hamper mitochondrial import. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the in-vitro import of chimaeric proteins composed of either one of the MnSOD/MTS fused to the mouse dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) protein, and the import of the two human MnSOD precursor variants into rat liver mitochondria. Compared to Ala-proteins, the Val-MnSOD/MTS-DHFR precursor and Val-MnSOD precursor were both partly arrested within the inner mitochondrial membrane. The Ala-MnSOD precursor generated 30-40% more of the active, matricial, processed MnSOD homotetramer than the Val-MnSOD precursor. These results show that the Ala-MnSOD/MTS allows efficient MnSOD import into the mitochondrial matrix, while the Val-variant causes partial arrest of the precursor within the inner membrane and decreased formation of the active MnSOD tetramer in the mitochondrial matrix.

  7. A computational model for exploratory activity of rats with different anxiety levels in elevated plus-maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ariadne A; Morato, Silvio; Roque, Antonio C; Tinós, Renato

    2014-10-30

    The elevated plus-maze is an apparatus widely used to study the level of anxiety in rodents. The maze is plus-shaped, with two enclosed arms and two open arms, and elevated 50cm from the floor. During a test, which usually lasts for 5min, the animal is initially put at the center and is free to move and explore the entire maze. The level of anxiety is measured by variables such as the percentage of time spent and the number of entries in the enclosed arms. High percentage of time spent at and number of entries in the enclosed arms indicate anxiety. Here we propose a computational model of rat behavior in the elevated plus-maze based on an artificial neural network trained by a genetic algorithm. The fitness function of the genetic algorithm is composed of reward (positive) and punishment (negative) terms, which are incremented as the computational agent (virtual rat) moves in the maze. The punishment term is modulated by a parameter that simulates the effects of different drugs. Unlike other computational models, the virtual rat is built independently of prior known experimental data. The exploratory behaviors generated by the model for different simulated pharmacological conditions are in good agreement with data from real rats.

  8. Genetic regulation of bone strength: a review of animal model studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Douglas J; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L

    2015-01-01

    Population- and family-based studies have established that fragility fracture risk is heritable; yet, the genome-wide association studies published to date have only accounted for a small fraction of the known variation for fracture risk of either the femur or the lumbar spine. Much work has been carried out using animal models toward finding genetic loci that are associated with bone strength. Studies using animal models overcome some of the issues associated with using patient data, but caution is needed when interpreting the results. In this review, we examine the types of tests that have been used for forward genetics mapping in animal models to identify loci and/or genes that regulate bone strength and discuss the limitations of these test methods. In addition, we present a summary of the quantitative trait loci that have been mapped for bone strength in mice, rats and chickens. The majority of these loci co-map with loci for bone size and/or geometry and thus likely dictate strength via modulating bone size. Differences in bone matrix composition have been demonstrated when comparing inbred strains of mice, and these matrix differences may be associated with differences in bone strength. However, additional work is needed to identify loci that act on bone strength at the materials level.

  9. A Building Model Framework for a Genetic Algorithm Multi-objective Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, Krzysztof; Ionesi, Ana; Jradi, Muhyiddine

    2016-01-01

    implemented only in few buildings. The following difficulties hinder the widespread usage of MPC: (1) significant model development time, (2) limited portability of models, (3) model computational demand. In the present study a new model development framework for an MPC system based on a Genetic Algorithm (GA...

  10. Inferring modulators of genetic interactions with epistatic nested effects models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkl, Martin; Diekmann, Madeline; van der Wees, Marlies; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Fröhlich, Holger; Markowetz, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Maps of genetic interactions can dissect functional redundancies in cellular networks. Gene expression profiles as high-dimensional molecular readouts of combinatorial perturbations provide a detailed view of genetic interactions, but can be hard to interpret if different gene sets respond in different ways (called mixed epistasis). Here we test the hypothesis that mixed epistasis between a gene pair can be explained by the action of a third gene that modulates the interaction. We have extended the framework of Nested Effects Models (NEMs), a type of graphical model specifically tailored to analyze high-dimensional gene perturbation data, to incorporate logical functions that describe interactions between regulators on downstream genes and proteins. We benchmark our approach in the controlled setting of a simulation study and show high accuracy in inferring the correct model. In an application to data from deletion mutants of kinases and phosphatases in S. cerevisiae we show that epistatic NEMs can point to modulators of genetic interactions. Our approach is implemented in the R-package 'epiNEM' available from https://github.com/cbg-ethz/epiNEM and https://bioconductor.org/packages/epiNEM/.

  11. A New Rat Model for Orthotopic Abdominal Wall Allotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. Lao, MD

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: Technical, histological, and immunological aspects of a new rat model are described. These results give clues to what occurs in human abdominal wall transplantation. In addition, Th1, a proinflammatory cell, was found to be a potential biomarker for allograft rejection.

  12. Reducing Fear of the Laboratory Rat: A Participant Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Nigel

    1994-01-01

    Reports on the use of participant modeling in a study of 56 college-level students to reduce fear of laboratory rats. Discovers that even mild exposure reduced fear significantly. Finds that women were more fearful initially but that their fear reduction was equal to that of men. (CFR)

  13. A rat model with an isolated bladder in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Olsen, P S; Grevstad, J U

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes our method for producing a rat model with an isolated bladder in situ in which the bladder makes no contact with urine. First, the right kidney was removed, then an external catheter was placed in the right ureter for bladder infusions, and next the left ureter was anatomosed...

  14. Progress in research of rat genetic engineering%基因工程大鼠研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王贵利; 张连峰

    2013-01-01

    相对小鼠而言,大鼠在生理、行为、代谢等方面更接近人类.近年随着基因工程大鼠技术的开发,大鼠开始回归于生命科学实验和医药研究,基因工程大鼠的研究成为实验动物科学的热点.目前适用于大鼠基因工程的技术各有优缺点.本文对大鼠转基因技术,转座子技术,ZFN锌指酶技术,TALENs技术和基于胚胎干细胞的基因打靶技术的研究进展做了比较.%The characteristics of physiology, behavior and metabolism in rats are more close To those of human beings than those of mice. With the development of rat genetic engineering techniques in recent years, the genetically modified rats have been a hot point of laboratory animal science, and rats retake the center stage of life science and pharmaceutical research. The advantages, disadvantages and research progress of the transgene, transposon, ZFN (zinc finger enzymes), TALENs and embryonic stem cell-based gene targeting are compared in this review paper.

  15. A 90-day toxicology study of meat from genetically modified sheep overexpressing TLR4 in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hai; Wang, Zhixian; Hu, Rui; Kan, Tongtong; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Jinlong; Lian, Ling; Han, Hongbing; Lian, Zhengxing

    2015-01-01

    Genetic modification offers alternative strategies to traditional animal breeding. However, the food safety of genetically modified (GM) animals has attracted increasing levels of concern. In this study, we produced GM sheep overexpressing TLR4, and the transgene-positive offsprings (F1) were confirmed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot. The expression of TLR4 was 2.5-fold compared with that of the wild-type (WT) sheep samples. During the 90-day safety study, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with three different dietary concentrations (3.75%, 7.5%, and 15% wt/wt) of GM sheep meat, WT sheep meat or a commercial diet (CD). Blood samples from the rats were collected and analyzed for hematological and biochemical parameters, and then compared with hematological and biochemical reference ranges. Despite a few significant differences among the three groups in some parameters, all other values remained within the normal reference intervals and thus were not considered to be affected by the treatment. No adverse diet-related differences in body weights or relative organ weights were observed. Furthermore, no differences were observed in the gross necropsy findings or microscopic pathology of the rats whose diets contained the GM sheep meat compared with rats whose diets contained the WT sheep meat. Therefore, the present 90-day rat feeding study suggested that the meat of GM sheep overexpressing TLR4 had no adverse effect on Sprague-Dawley rats in comparison with WT sheep meat. These results provide valuable information regarding the safety assessment of meat derived from GM animals.

  16. Commensal ecology, urban landscapes, and their influence on the genetic characteristics of city-dwelling Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner-Santana, L C; Norris, D E; Fornadel, C M; Hinson, E R; Klein, S L; Glass, G E

    2009-07-01

    Movement of individuals promotes colonization of new areas, gene flow among local populations, and has implications for the spread of infectious agents and the control of pest species. Wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are common in highly urbanized areas but surprisingly little is known of their population structure. We sampled individuals from 11 locations within Baltimore, Maryland, to characterize the genetic structure and extent of gene flow between areas within the city. Clustering methods and a neighbour-joining tree based on pairwise genetic distances supported an east-west division in the inner city, and a third cluster comprised of historically more recent sites. Most individuals (approximately 95%) were assigned to their area of capture, indicating strong site fidelity. Moreover, the axial dispersal distance of rats (62 m) fell within typical alley length. Several rats were assigned to areas 2-11.5 km away, indicating some, albeit infrequent, long-distance movement within the city. Although individual movement appears to be limited (30-150 m), locations up to 1.7 km are comprised of relatives. Moderate F(ST), differentiation between identified clusters, and high allelic diversity indicate that regular gene flow, either via recruitment or migration, has prevented isolation. Therefore, ecology of commensal rodents in urban areas and life-history characteristics of Norway rats likely counteract many expected effects of isolation or founder events. An understanding of levels of connectivity of rat populations inhabiting urban areas provides information about the spatial scale at which populations of rats may spread disease, invade new areas, or be eradicated from an existing area without reinvasion.

  17. Modelling genetic susceptibility to multiple sclerosis with family data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Cullen; Lin, Rui; Stankovich, James; Broadley, Simon A

    2013-01-01

    A genetic contribution to susceptibility is well established in multiple sclerosis (MS) and 57 associated genetic loci have been identified. We have undertaken a meta-analysis of familial risk studies with the aims of providing definitive figures for risks to relatives, performing a segregation analysis and estimating the proportion of the overall genetic risk that currently identified genes represent. We have used standard methods of meta-analysis combined with novel approaches to age adjustment to provide directly comparable estimates of lifetime risk. The overall recurrence risk for monozygotic twins was 18.2% and for siblings 2.7%. The recurrence risk for dizygotic twins was significantly higher than for siblings. The overall estimate of sibling relative risk (λ(S)) was 16.8. Risks for older relatives (parents, siblings, aunts, uncles and cousins) show a latitudinal gradient, in line with population risk. No latitudinal gradient for λ(S) was seen. Segregation analysis supports a multiplicative model of one locus of moderate effect with many loci of small effect. The estimated contribution of the 57 known MS loci is 18-24% of λ(S). This meta-analysis supports the notion of MS being in part the result of multiple genetic susceptibility factors and environmental factors.

  18. AFLP genome scan in the black rat (Rattus rattus) from Madagascar: detecting genetic markers undergoing plague-mediated selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollenaere, C; Duplantier, J-M; Rahalison, L; Ranjalahy, M; Brouat, C

    2011-03-01

    The black rat (Rattus rattus) is the main reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection) in Madagascar's rural zones. Black rats are highly resistant to plague within the plague focus (central highland), whereas they are susceptible where the disease is absent (low altitude zone). To better understand plague wildlife circulation and host evolution in response to a highly virulent pathogen, we attempted to determine genetic markers associated with plague resistance in this species. To this purpose, we combined a population genomics approach and an association study, both performed on 249 AFLP markers, in Malagasy R. rattus. Simulated distributions of genetic differentiation were compared to observed data in four independent pairs, each consisting of one population from the plague focus and one from the plague-free zone. We found 22 loci (9% of 249) with higher differentiation in at least two independent population pairs or with combining P-values over the four pairs significant. Among the 22 outlier loci, 16 presented significant association with plague zone (plague focus vs. plague-free zone). Population genetic structure inferred from outlier loci was structured by plague zone, whereas the neutral loci dataset revealed structure by geography (eastern vs. western populations). A phenotype association study revealed that two of the 22 loci were significantly associated with differentiation between dying and surviving rats following experimental plague challenge. The 22 outlier loci identified in this study may undergo plague selective pressure either directly or more probably indirectly due to hitchhiking with selected loci. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Novel Dynamics Observed in a Spiking Neural Network Model of the NTS in the Rat Hind-brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingyi; Schaffer, J. David; Dilorenzo, Patricia; Laramee, Craig

    2012-02-01

    The Nucleus of the Solitary Tract (NTS) is a hind-brain structure in the rat that is the first way-station in taste processing. Its structure and function are poorly understood. Recently our group produced a model, implemented as a spiking neural network (SNN), that successfully replicated experimental data. The model's topology was manually devised and the parameters were set by a genetic algorithm. In order to better understand its information processing capabilities, we probed the model with a variety of input spike patterns and observed a striking winner-take-all decision-making dynamic. We show how the topology and tuned parameters enable this decision to depend on precise spike timing events. It is curious that the experimental data upon which the model was originally evolved did not include winner-take-all examples; this was an emergent capability. It remains for additional experiments on rats to confirm or reject this model prediction.

  20. Identification of a nutrient-sensing transcriptional network in monocytes by using inbred rat models on a cafeteria diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Micaelo, Neus; González-Abuín, Noemi; Terra, Ximena; Ardévol, Ana; Pinent, Montserrat; Petretto, Enrico; Behmoaras, Jacques; Blay, Mayte

    2016-10-01

    Obesity has reached pandemic levels worldwide. The current models of diet-induced obesity in rodents use predominantly high-fat based diets that do not take into account the consumption of variety of highly palatable, energy-dense foods that are prevalent in Western society. We and others have shown that the cafeteria (CAF) diet is a robust and reproducible model of human metabolic syndrome with tissue inflammation in the rat. We have previously shown that inbred rat strains such as Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Lewis (LEW) show different susceptibilities to CAF diets with distinct metabolic and morphometric profiles. Here, we show a difference in plasma MCP-1 levels and investigate the effect of the CAF diet on peripheral blood monocyte transcriptome, as powerful stress-sensing immune cells, in WKY and LEW rats. We found that 75.5% of the differentially expressed transcripts under the CAF diet were upregulated in WKY rats and were functionally related to the activation of the immune response. Using a gene co-expression network constructed from the genes differentially expressed between CAF diet-fed LEW and WKY rats, we identified acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 2 (Acss2) as a hub gene for a nutrient-sensing cluster of transcripts in monocytes. The Acss2 genomic region is significantly enriched for previously established metabolism quantitative trait loci in the rat. Notably, monocyte expression levels of Acss2 significantly correlated with plasma glucose, triglyceride, leptin and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels as well as morphometric measurements such as body weight and the total fat following feeding with the CAF diet in the rat. These results show the importance of the genetic background in nutritional genomics and identify inbred rat strains as potential models for CAF-diet-induced obesity. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Identification of a nutrient-sensing transcriptional network in monocytes by using inbred rat models on a cafeteria diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Micaelo, Neus; González-Abuín, Noemi; Terra, Ximena; Ardévol, Ana; Pinent, Montserrat; Petretto, Enrico; Blay, Mayte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obesity has reached pandemic levels worldwide. The current models of diet-induced obesity in rodents use predominantly high-fat based diets that do not take into account the consumption of variety of highly palatable, energy-dense foods that are prevalent in Western society. We and others have shown that the cafeteria (CAF) diet is a robust and reproducible model of human metabolic syndrome with tissue inflammation in the rat. We have previously shown that inbred rat strains such as Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Lewis (LEW) show different susceptibilities to CAF diets with distinct metabolic and morphometric profiles. Here, we show a difference in plasma MCP-1 levels and investigate the effect of the CAF diet on peripheral blood monocyte transcriptome, as powerful stress-sensing immune cells, in WKY and LEW rats. We found that 75.5% of the differentially expressed transcripts under the CAF diet were upregulated in WKY rats and were functionally related to the activation of the immune response. Using a gene co-expression network constructed from the genes differentially expressed between CAF diet-fed LEW and WKY rats, we identified acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 2 (Acss2) as a hub gene for a nutrient-sensing cluster of transcripts in monocytes. The Acss2 genomic region is significantly enriched for previously established metabolism quantitative trait loci in the rat. Notably, monocyte expression levels of Acss2 significantly correlated with plasma glucose, triglyceride, leptin and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels as well as morphometric measurements such as body weight and the total fat following feeding with the CAF diet in the rat. These results show the importance of the genetic background in nutritional genomics and identify inbred rat strains as potential models for CAF-diet-induced obesity. PMID:27483348

  2. Behavioral Phenotyping of Juvenile Long-Evans and Sprague-Dawley Rats: Implications for Preclinical Models of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M Ku

    Full Text Available The laboratory rat is emerging as an attractive preclinical animal model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD, allowing investigators to explore genetic, environmental and pharmacological manipulations in a species exhibiting complex, reciprocal social behavior. The present study was carried out to compare two commonly used strains of laboratory rats, Sprague-Dawley (SD and Long-Evans (LE, between the ages of postnatal day (PND 26-56 using high-throughput behavioral phenotyping tools commonly used in mouse models of ASD that we have adapted for use in rats. We detected few differences between young SD and LE strains on standard assays of exploration, sensorimotor gating, anxiety, repetitive behaviors, and learning. Both SD and LE strains also demonstrated sociability in the 3-chamber social approach test as indexed by spending more time in the social chamber with a constrained age/strain/sex matched novel partner than in an identical chamber without a partner. Pronounced differences between the two strains were, however, detected when the rats were allowed to freely interact with a novel partner in the social dyad paradigm. The SD rats in this particular testing paradigm engaged in play more frequently and for longer durations than the LE rats at both juvenile and young adult developmental time points. Results from this study that are particularly relevant for developing preclinical ASD models in rats are threefold: (i commonly utilized strains exhibit unique patterns of social interactions, including strain-specific play behaviors, (ii the testing environment may profoundly influence the expression of strain-specific social behavior and (iii simple, automated measures of sociability may not capture the complexities of rat social interactions.

  3. Behavioral Phenotyping of Juvenile Long-Evans and Sprague-Dawley Rats: Implications for Preclinical Models of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Katherine M.; Weir, Ruth K.; Silverman, Jill L.; Berman, Robert F.; Bauman, Melissa D.

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory rat is emerging as an attractive preclinical animal model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), allowing investigators to explore genetic, environmental and pharmacological manipulations in a species exhibiting complex, reciprocal social behavior. The present study was carried out to compare two commonly used strains of laboratory rats, Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Long-Evans (LE), between the ages of postnatal day (PND) 26–56 using high-throughput behavioral phenotyping tools commonly used in mouse models of ASD that we have adapted for use in rats. We detected few differences between young SD and LE strains on standard assays of exploration, sensorimotor gating, anxiety, repetitive behaviors, and learning. Both SD and LE strains also demonstrated sociability in the 3-chamber social approach test as indexed by spending more time in the social chamber with a constrained age/strain/sex matched novel partner than in an identical chamber without a partner. Pronounced differences between the two strains were, however, detected when the rats were allowed to freely interact with a novel partner in the social dyad paradigm. The SD rats in this particular testing paradigm engaged in play more frequently and for longer durations than the LE rats at both juvenile and young adult developmental time points. Results from this study that are particularly relevant for developing preclinical ASD models in rats are threefold: (i) commonly utilized strains exhibit unique patterns of social interactions, including strain-specific play behaviors, (ii) the testing environment may profoundly influence the expression of strain-specific social behavior and (iii) simple, automated measures of sociability may not capture the complexities of rat social interactions. PMID:27351457

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Dexamethasone in a Rat Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Earp, Justin C; Pyszczynski, Nancy A.; Molano, Diana S.; Jusko, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) is often given for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and clinical dosing regimens of DEX have often been based empirically. This study tests whether the inflammation processes in a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis alters the clearance and volume of distribution of DEX when compared with healthy controls. Groups of healthy and arthritic male Lewis rats received either a low (0.225 mg/kg) or high (2.25 mg/kg) intramuscular dose of DEX. Arthritis was induced by intraderm...

  5. Functional annotations of diabetes nephropathy susceptibility loci through analysis of genome-wide renal gene expression in rat models of diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yaomin; Kaisaki, Pamela J; Argoud, Karène

    2009-01-01

    of spontaneous (genetically determined) mild hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance (Goto-Kakizaki-GK) and experimentally induced severe hyperglycaemia (Wistar-Kyoto-WKY rats injected with streptozotocin [STZ]). RESULTS: Different patterns of transcription regulation in the two rat models of diabetes likely...... number of protein coding sequences of unknown function which can be considered as functional and, when they map to DN loci, positional candidates for DN. Further expression analysis of rat orthologs of human DN positional candidate genes provided functional annotations of known and novel genes...

  6. A Software Pattern of the Genetic Algorithm -a Study on Reusable Object Model of Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Genetic Algorithm (GA) has been a pop research field, butthere is little concern on GA in view of Software Engineering and this result in a serie s of problems. In this paper, we extract a GA's software pattern, draw a model d iagram of the reusable objects, analyze the advantages and disadvantages of the pattern, and give a sample code at the end. We are then able to improve the reus ability and expansibility of GA. The results make it easier to program a new GA code by using some existing successful operators, thereby reducing the difficult ies and workload of programming a GA's code, and facilitate the GA application.

  7. OPTIMIZATION OF TETRANDRINE TREATMENT IN RAT HEPATIC FIBROSIS MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To optimize the therapeutic dosage of tetrandrine (Tet) in rat hepatic fibrosis model. Methods 50 Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups at random including normal control, model control, Tettreated model groups of l0mg·kg-1 ·d-1, 5mg·kg-1 ·d-1 and 2.5mg·kg-1 ·d-1 ( n =10 in each group). All rats,except for the normal controls, were injected with axenic porcine serum (0. 5ml each time, twice a week) intraperitoneally for 8 weeks to establish hepatic fibrosis. After the 8th week, rats of Tet-treated model groups were given by gavage once a day with different doses of Tet for another 8 weeks. Then the liver function, serum levels of hyaluronic acid (HA) , laminin ( LM) , and procollagen type Ⅲ (PCⅢ) were tested. Collagen type Ⅰ and Ⅲ, pathological changes in liver tissue were also assessed. Results Most indices of liver function including alanine minotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase ( AST), albumin (ALB), albumin/globulin ratio (A/G) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) improved significantly in Tet-treated groups with the exception of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT) and total bilirubin (TBIL). Secondly, markedly lowered levels of HA, LM and collagen type Ⅰ, Ⅲ were also detected by radioimmunology and immunohistochemistry in the 5 mg · kg- 1 · d- 1 Tet-treated model group. Moreover, pathological findings confirmed the statistically significant improvement in hepatofibrotic degree resulted from the treatment of 5mg · kg- 1 · d-1 rather than other doses of Tet. Conclusion For experimental Wistar rats, Tet exhibited an anti-hepatofibrotic action in doses within the range of 2.5mg·kg-1 ·d-1 to 10mg·kg 1 ·d-1, and 5mg·kg-1 ·d-1 may be theoptimum one among all doses.

  8. Exploratory Bayesian model selection for serial genetics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing X; Foulkes, Andrea S; George, Edward I

    2005-06-01

    Characterizing the process by which molecular and cellular level changes occur over time will have broad implications for clinical decision making and help further our knowledge of disease etiology across many complex diseases. However, this presents an analytic challenge due to the large number of potentially relevant biomarkers and the complex, uncharacterized relationships among them. We propose an exploratory Bayesian model selection procedure that searches for model simplicity through independence testing of multiple discrete biomarkers measured over time. Bayes factor calculations are used to identify and compare models that are best supported by the data. For large model spaces, i.e., a large number of multi-leveled biomarkers, we propose a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) stochastic search algorithm for finding promising models. We apply our procedure to explore the extent to which HIV-1 genetic changes occur independently over time.

  9. Hierarchical Stochastic Simulation Algorithm for SBML Models of Genetic Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro eWatanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a hierarchical stochastic simulation algorithm which has been implemented within iBioSim, a tool used to model, analyze, and visualize genetic circuits. Many biological analysis tools flatten out hierarchy before simulation, but there are many disadvantages associated with this approach. First, the memory required to represent the model can quickly expand in the process. Second, the flattening process is computationally expensive. Finally, when modeling a dynamic cellular population within iBioSim, inlining the hierarchy of the model is inefficient since models must grow dynamically over time. This paper discusses a new approach to handle hierarchy on the fly to make the tool faster and more memory-efficient. This approach yields significant performance improvements as compared to the former flat analysis method.

  10. Genetic signatures for enhanced olfaction in the African mole-rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Stathopoulos

    Full Text Available The Olfactory Receptor (OR superfamily, the largest in the vertebrate genome, is responsible for vertebrate olfaction and is traditionally subdivided into 17 OR families. Recent studies characterising whole-OR subgenomes revealed a 'birth and death' model of evolution for a range of species, however little is known about fine-scale evolutionary dynamics within single-OR families. This study reports the first assessment of fine-scale OR evolution and variation in African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, a family of subterranean rodents endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Because of the selective pressures of life underground, enhanced olfaction is proposed to be fundamental to the evolutionary success of the Bathyergidae, resulting in a highly diversified OR gene-repertoire. Using a PCR-sequencing approach, we analysed variation in the OR7 family across 14 extant bathyergid species, which revealed enhanced levels of functional polymorphisms concentrated across the receptors' ligand-binding region. We propose that mole-rats are able to recognise a broad range of odorants and that this diversity is reflected throughout their OR7 gene repertoire. Using both classic tests and tree-based methods to test for signals of selection, we investigate evolutionary forces across the mole-rat OR7 gene tree. Four well-supported clades emerged in the OR phylogeny, with varying signals of selection; from neutrality to positive and purifying selection. Bathyergid life-history traits and environmental niche-specialisation are explored as possible drivers of adaptive OR evolution, emerging as non-exclusive contributors to the positive selection observed at OR7 genes. Our results reveal unexpected complexity of evolutionary mechanisms acting within a single OR family, providing insightful perspectives into OR evolutionary dynamics.

  11. Metformin prevents the development of chronic heart failure in the SHHF rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cittadini, Antonio; Napoli, Raffaele; Monti, Maria Gaia; Rea, Domenica; Longobardi, Salvatore; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Walser, Marion; Samà, Mariateresa; Aimaretti, Gianluca; Isgaard, Jörgen; Saccà, Luigi

    2012-04-01

    Insulin resistance is a recently identified mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of chronic heart failure (CHF). We investigated the effects of two insulin-sensitizing drugs (metformin and rosiglitazone) in a genetic model of spontaneously hypertensive, insulin-resistant rats (SHHF). Thirty SHHF rats were randomized into three treatment groups as follows: 1) metformin (100 mg/kg per day), 2) rosiglitazone (2 mg/kg per day), and 3) no drug. Ten Sprague-Dawley rats served as normal controls. At the end of the treatment period (12 months), the cardiac phenotype was characterized by histology, echocardiography, and isolated perfused heart studies. Metformin attenuated left ventricular (LV) remodeling, as shown by reduced LV volumes, wall stress, perivascular fibrosis, and cardiac lipid accumulation. Metformin improved both systolic and diastolic indices as well as myocardial mechanical efficiency, as shown by improved ability to convert metabolic energy into mechanical work. Metformin induced a marked activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and vascular endothelial growth factor and reduced tumor necrosis factor-α expression and myocyte apoptosis. Rosiglitazone did not affect LV remodeling, increased perivascular fibrosis, and promoted further cardiac lipid accumulation. In conclusion, long-term treatment with metformin, but not with rosiglitazone, prevents the development of severe CHF in the SHHF model by a wide-spectrum interaction that involves molecular, structural, functional, and metabolic-energetic mechanisms.

  12. A new rat model for studies of hypokinesia and antiorthostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Deavers, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    A new rat model (suspension and immobilization) is described for induction of hypokinesia and orthostatic manipulations. Hypokinetic responses were comparable to those in prolonged bed rest and weightlessness in humans, body or limb casted and small cage restrained animals. Responses to antiorthostasis (15 to 20 deg head down tilt) in rats were similar to those in neutral bouyancy tests in humans and animals and to those in prolonged bed rest in humans. During seven days of hypokinesia there was an atrophy of the gastrocnemius and increased excretion of urinary nitrogeneous end products. The antiorthostatic (AOH) 15 to 20 deg head down tilt resulted in diuresis, natriuresis and kaliuresis. No comparable responses were observed in orthostatic hypokinetic (OH) rats. Readaptation from AOH and OH occurred during one week recovery in metabolic cage conditions.

  13. Establishment of novel rat models for premalignant breast disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feng; Ma Zhongbing; Wang Fei; Fu Qinye; Fang Yunzhi; Zhang Qiang; Gao Dezong

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer has become one of the most common malignant tumors among females over the past several years.Breast carcinogenesis is a continuous process,which is featured by the normal epithelium progressing to premalignant lesions and then to invasive breast cancer (IBC).Targeting premalignant lesions is an effective strategy to prevent breast cancer.The establishment of animal models is critical to study the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis,which will facilitate research on breast cancer prevention and drug behaviors.In this study,we established a feasible chemically-induced rat model of premalignant breast cancer.Methods Following the administration of the drugs (carcinogen,estrogen,and progestogen) to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats,tumors or suspicious tumors were identified by palpation or ultrasound imaging,and were surgically excised for pathological evaluation.A series of four consecutive steps were carried out in order to determine the carcinogen:7,12-dimethylbenzaanthracene (DMBA) or 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea,the route of carcinogen administration,the administration period of estrogen and progestogen,and the DMBA dosage.Results Stable premalignant lesions can be induced in SD rats on administration of DMBA (15 mg/kg,administered three times) followed by administration of female hormones 5-day cycle.Results were confirmed by ultrasound and palpation.Conclusion Under the premise of drug dose and cycle,DMBA combined with estrogen and progestogen can be used as a SD rat model for breast premalignant lesions.

  14. Ameliorating effect of olive oil on fertility of male rats fed on genetically modified soya bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanaa A. F. El-Kholy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genetically modified soya bean (GMSB is a commercialized food. It has been shown to have adverse effects on fertility in animal trials. Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO has many beneficial effects including anti-oxidant properties. The aim of this study is to elucidate if addition of EVOO ameliorates the adverse effects on reproductive organs of rats fed on GMSB containing diet. Methods: Forty adult male albino rats (150–180 g of Sprague Dawley strain were separated into four groups of 10 rats each: Group 1 – control group fed on basal ration, Group 2 – fed on basal ration mixed with EVOO (30%, Group 3 – fed on basal ration mixed with GMSB (15%, and Group 4 – fed on basal ration mixed with GMSB (15% and EVOO (30%. This feeding regimen was administered for 65 days. Blood samples were collected to analyze serum zinc, vitamin E, and testosterone levels. Histopathological and weight changes in sex organs were evaluated. Results: GMSB diet reduced weight of testis (0.66±0.06 vs. 1.7±0.06, p<0.001, epididymis (0.489±0.03 vs. 0.7±0.03, p<0.001, prostate (0.04±0.009 vs. 0.68±0.04, p<0.001, and seminal vesicles (0.057±0.01 vs. 0.8±0.04, p<0.001. GMSB diet adversely affected sperm count (406±7.1 vs. 610±7.8, p<0.001, motility (p<0.001, and abnormality (p<0.001. GMSB diet also reduced serum zinc (p<0.05, vitamin E (p<0.05, and testosterone (p<0.05 concentrations. EVOO diet had no detrimental effect. Addition of EVOO to GMSB diet increased the serum zinc (p<0.05, vitamin E (p<0.05, and testosterone (p<0.05 levels and also restored the weights of testis (1.35±0.16 vs. 0.66±0.06, p<0.01, epididymis (0.614±0.13 vs. 0.489±0.03, p<0.001, prostate (0.291±0.09 vs. 0.04±0.009, p<0.001, seminal vesicle (0.516±0.18 vs. 0.057±0.01, p<0.001 along with sperm count (516±3.1 vs. 406±7.1, p<0.01, motility (p<0.01, and abnormality (p<0.05. Conclusion: EVOO ameliorates the adverse effects of GMSB on reproductive organs in adult male

  15. Long-term disease-modifying effect of the endocannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 in a rat model of audiogenic epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinogradova, L.V.; Rijn, C.M. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Modulation of the endocannabinoid (eCB) transmission is a promising approach to treating epilepsy. Animal models can be used to investigate this approach. Krushinsky-Molodkina (KM) rats have, genetically, audiogenic epilepsy. Moreover, in these animals, repeated induction of audiogenic s

  16. New rat models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu'o'ng Lê, Bá; Khorsi-Cauet, Hafida; Villegier, Anne-Sophie; Bach, Véronique; Gay-Quéheillard, Jérôme

    2011-07-01

    The majority of murine models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload were carried out in adult subjects. This cannot reflect the high risk of iron overload in children who have an increased need for iron. In this study, we developed four experimental iron overload models in young rats using iron sucrose and evaluated different markers of iron overload, tissue oxidative stress and inflammation as its consequences. Iron overload was observed in all iron-treated rats, as evidenced by significant increases in serum iron indices, expression of liver hepcidin gene and total tissue iron content compared with control rats. We also showed that total tissue iron content was mainly associated with the dose of iron whereas serum iron indices depended essentially on the duration of iron administration. However, no differences in tissue inflammatory and antioxidant parameters from controls were observed. Furthermore, only rats exposed to daily iron injection at a dose of 75 mg/kg body weight for one week revealed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation in iron-treated rats compared with their controls. The present results suggest a correlation between iron overload levels and the dose of iron, as well as the duration and frequency of iron injection and confirm that iron sucrose may not play a crucial role in inflammation and oxidative stress. This study provides important information about iron sucrose-induced iron overload in rats and may be useful for iron sucrose therapy for iron deficiency anemia as well as for the prevention and diagnosis of iron sucrose-induced iron overload in pediatric patients.

  17. Genetic Aspects of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Insights from Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati eBanerjee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that display a triad of core behavioral deficits including restricted interests, often accompanied by repetitive behavior, deficits in language and communication, and an inability to engage in reciprocal social interactions. ASD is among the most heritable disorders but is not a simple disorder with a singular pathology and has a rather complex etiology. It is interesting to note that perturbations in synaptic growth, development and stability underlie a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including ASD, schizophrenia, epilepsy and intellectual disability. Biological characterization of an increasing repertoire of synaptic mutants in various model organisms indicates synaptic dysfunction as causal in the pathophysiology of ASD. Our understanding of the genes and genetic pathways that contribute towards the formation, stabilization and maintenance of functional synapses coupled with an in-depth phenotypic analysis of the cellular and behavioral characteristics is therefore essential to unraveling the pathogenesis of these disorders. In this review, we discuss the genetic aspects of ASD emphasizing on the well conserved set of genes and genetic pathways implicated in this disorder, many of which contribute to synapse assembly and maintenance across species. We also review how fundamental research using animal models is providing key insights into the various facets of human ASD.

  18. Groove model of tibia-femoral osteoarthritis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Huub M; Weinans, Harrie; Coeleveld, Katja; van Rijen, Mattie H P; Lafeber, Floris P J G; Mastbergen, Simon C

    2017-03-01

    Several experimental models of osteoarthritis in rats are used to study the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. Many mechanically induced models have the limitation that permanent joint instability is induced by, for example, ligament transection or meniscal damage. This permanent instability will counteract the potential beneficial effects of therapy. The groove model of osteoarthritis uses a one-time trigger, surgically induced cartilage damage on the femoral condyles, and has been validated for the canine tibia-femoral compartment. The present study evaluates this model for the rat knee joint. The articular cartilage of the weight bearing surface of both femoral condyles and trochlea were damaged (grooved) without damaging the underlying subchondral bone. Severity of joint degeneration was histologically assessed, in addition to patella cartilage damage, and subchondral bone characteristics by means of (contrast-enhanced) micro-CT. Mild histological degeneration of the surgically untouched tibial plateau cartilage was observed in addition to damage of the femoral condyles, without clear synovial tissue inflammation. Contrast enhanced micro-CT demonstrated proteoglycan loss of the surgically untouched patella cartilage. Besides, a more sclerotic structure of the subchondral bone was observed. The tibia-femoral groove model in a rat results in mild knee joint degeneration, without permanent joint instability and joint inflammation. This makes the rat groove model a useful model to study the onset and progression of post-traumatic non-inflammatory osteoarthritis, creating a relatively sensitive model to study disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:496-505, 2017.

  19. Genetic Programming Modeling and Complexity Analysis of the Magnetoencephalogram of Epileptic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Efstratios F.; Adamopoulos, Adam V.; Likothanassis, Spiridon D.

    In this work MagnetoEncephaloGram (MEG) recordings of epileptic patients are modeled using a genetic programming approach. This is the first time that genetic programming is used to model MEG signal. Numerous experiments were conducted giving highly successful results. It is demonstrated that genetic programming can produce very simple nonlinear models that fit with great accuracy the observed data of MEG.

  20. Differential response of rat strains to obesogenic diets underlines the importance of genetic makeup of an individual towards obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mn, Muralidhar; Smvk, Prasad; Battula, Kiran Kumar; Nv, Giridharan; Kalashikam, Rajender Rao

    2017-08-22

    Obesity, a multifactorial disorder, results from a chronic imbalance of energy intake vs. expenditure. Apart from excessive consumption of high calorie diet, genetic predisposition also seems to be equally important for the development of obesity. However, the role of genetic predisposition in the etiology of obesity has not been clearly delineated. The present study addresses this problem by selecting three rat strains (WNIN, F-344, SD) with different genetic backgrounds and exposing them to high calorie diets. Rat strains were fed HF, HS, and HFS diets and assessed for physical, metabolic, biochemical, inflammatory responses, and mRNA expression. Under these conditions: significant increase in body weight, visceral adiposity, oxidative stress and systemic pro-inflammatory status; the hallmarks of central obesity were noticed only in WNIN. Further, they developed altered glucose and lipid homeostasis by exhibiting insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and fatty liver condition. The present study demonstrates that WNIN is more prone to develop obesity and associated co-morbidities under high calorie environment. It thus underlines the cumulative role of genetics (nature) and diet (nurture) towards the development of obesity, which is critical for understanding this epidemic and devising new strategies to control and manage this modern malady.

  1. Daily Rhythms of Feeding in the Genetically Obese and Lean Zucker Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alingh Prins, Ab; Jong-Nagelsmit, Annemarie de; Keijser, Jan; Strubbe, Jan H.

    1986-01-01

    Feeding patterns were examined in obese (fa/fa) and lean (Fa/-) adult Zucker rats over the light-dark cycle during 14 days. Obese rats eat more than lean rats especially during the dark phase. Light and dark feeding expressed as percentage of 24 hr intake showed no significant differences between th

  2. Molecular mechanism of icariin on rat asthmatic model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chang-qing; LE Jing-jing; DUAN Xiao-hong; DU Wei-jing; LIU Bao-jun; WU Jing-feng; CAO Yu-xue; DONG Jing-cheng

    2011-01-01

    Background Effects of icariin on airway inflammation in asthmatic rats and the intervention of LPS induced inflammation are interfered with the machanism of icariin. Our study aimed to observe the effect of icariin on ovalbumin-induced imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokine expression and its mechanism.Methods Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into control group (PBS), asthma group (ovalbumin (OVA)-induced),dexamethasone group, and OVA+icariin low, medium and high dose groups (5, 10, 20 mg/kg, respectively). Each group had ten rats. The model of OVA sensitization was a rat asthma model. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)method was used to observe the effects of icariin on interleukin-4 (IL-4) and inerferon Y (IFN-Y) in rats' lung tissue.Immunohistochemical staining was applied to detect the intervention effects of icariin on T cells (T-bet) and gatabinding protein 3 (GATA-3) in rat pulmonary tissue. Realtime RT-PCR was used to observe the intervention effects of icariin on T-bet and GATA-3 mRNA expression in rat pulmonary tissue and spleen lymphocytes. Western blotting was used to observe the icariin intervention effects on T-bet, GATA-3 and nuclear factor-Kappa B (NF-κB) p65 protein expressions in rat pulmonary tissue.Results The ELISA results from pulmonary tissue showed that IL-4 expression was significantly reduced (P <0.05),while the IFN-y expression increased but not significantly when we compared OVA+icariin medium and high dose groups with the asthma group. Immunohistochemical staining of pulmonary tissue showed that the GATA-3 decreased significantly while the T-bet staining did not change in the OVA+icariin high dose group. In pulmonary tissue and spleen lymphocytes T-bet and GATA-3 mRNA expressions were significantly reduced (P <0.05) in icariin treatment groups compared with the asthma model group. GATA-3 and T-bet mRNA in rat spleen lymphocytes in the asthma group were higher than in the control group. GATA-3 mRNA expression in pulmonary

  3. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijk, Ewart W; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-02-26

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as cystic organoids, were characterized by high expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5, by the expression of liver progenitor and duct markers, and by low expression of hepatocyte markers, oval cell markers, and stellate cell markers. Prolonged cultures of rat liver organoids depended on high levels of WNT-signalling and the inhibition of BMP-signaling. Upon transplantation of clonal lines to a Fah(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) rat model of liver failure, the rat liver stem cells engrafted into the host liver where they differentiated into areas with FAH and Albumin positive hepatocytes. Rat liver stem cell lines hold potential as consistent reliable cell sources for pharmacological, toxicological or metabolic studies. In addition, rat liver stem cell lines may contribute to the development of regenerative medicine in liver disease. To our knowledge, the here described liver stem cell lines represent the first organoid culture system in the rat.

  4. Phenotypic characterization of the Komeda miniature rat Ishikawa, an animal model of dwarfism caused by a mutation in Prkg2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Atsuko; Yokoi, Norihide; Namae, Misako; Fuse, Masanori; Masuyama, Taku; Sasaki, Masashi; Kawazu, Shoji; Komeda, Kajuro

    2008-12-01

    The Komeda miniature rat Ishikawa (KMI) is a spontaneous animal model of dwarfism caused by a mutation in Prkg2, which encodes cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II (cGKII). This strain has been maintained as a segregating inbred strain for the mutated allele mri. In this study, we characterized the phenotype of the KMI strain, particularly growth traits, craniofacial measurements, and organ weights. The homozygous mutant (mri/mri) animals were approximately 70% to 80% of the size of normal, heterozygous (mri/+) animals in regard to body length, weight, and naso-occipital length of the calvarium, and the retroperitoneal fat of mri/mri rats was reduced greatly. In addition, among progeny of the (BNxKMI-mri/mri)F1xKMI-mri/mri backcross, animals with the KMI phenotype (mri/mri) were easily distinguished from those showing the wild-type phenotype (mri/+) by using growth traits such as body length and weight. Genetic analysis revealed that all of the backcrossed progeny exhibiting the KMI phenotype were homozygous for the KMI allele in the 1.2-cM region between D14Rat5 and D14Rat80 on chromosome 14, suggesting strongly that mri acts in a completely recessive manner. The KMI strain is the first and only rat model with a confirmed mutation in Prkg2 and is a valuable model for studying dwarfism and longitudinal growth traits in humans and for functional studies of cGKII.

  5. A 90-day safety study in Wistar rats fed genetically modified rice expressing snowdrop lectin Galanthus nivalis (GNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; Kroghsbo, Stine; Schrøder, Malene

    2007-01-01

    diets, but none of them were considered to be adverse. In conclusion, the design of the present animal study did not enable us to conclude on the safety of the GM food. Additional group(s) where the expressed gene products have been spiked to the diet should be included in order to be able......Genetically modified plants expressing insecticidal traits offer a new strategy for crop protection, but at the same time present a challenge in terms of food safety assessment. The present 90-day feeding study was designed to assess the safety of a rice variety expressing the snowdrop Galanthus...... nivalis lectin (GNA lectin), and forms part of a EU-funded project where the objective has been to develop and validate sensitive and specific methods to assess the safety of genetically modified foods. Mate and female Wistar rats were given a purified diet containing either 60% genetically modified...

  6. Modelling the genetic risk in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Grassmann

    Full Text Available Late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a common sight-threatening disease of the central retina affecting approximately 1 in 30 Caucasians. Besides age and smoking, genetic variants from several gene loci have reproducibly been associated with this condition and likely explain a large proportion of disease. Here, we developed a genetic risk score (GRS for AMD based on 13 risk variants from eight gene loci. The model exhibited good discriminative accuracy, area-under-curve (AUC of the receiver-operating characteristic of 0.820, which was confirmed in a cross-validation approach. Noteworthy, younger AMD patients aged below 75 had a significantly higher mean GRS (1.87, 95% CI: 1.69-2.05 than patients aged 75 and above (1.45, 95% CI: 1.36-1.54. Based on five equally sized GRS intervals, we present a risk classification with a relative AMD risk of 64.0 (95% CI: 14.11-1131.96 for individuals in the highest category (GRS 3.44-5.18, 0.5% of the general population compared to subjects with the most common genetic background (GRS -0.05-1.70, 40.2% of general population. The highest GRS category identifies AMD patients with a sensitivity of 7.9% and a specificity of 99.9% when compared to the four lower categories. Modeling a general population around 85 years of age, 87.4% of individuals in the highest GRS category would be expected to develop AMD by that age. In contrast, only 2.2% of individuals in the two lowest GRS categories which represent almost 50% of the general population are expected to manifest AMD. Our findings underscore the large proportion of AMD cases explained by genetics particularly for younger AMD patients. The five-category risk classification could be useful for therapeutic stratification or for diagnostic testing purposes once preventive treatment is available.

  7. Genetic mouse models of brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras

    2014-05-01

    Progression of brain ageing is influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Analysis of genetically modified animals with uniform genetic backgrounds in a standardised, controlled environment enables the dissection of critical determinants of brain ageing on a molecular level. Human and animal studies suggest that increased load of damaged macromolecules, efficacy of DNA maintenance, mitochondrial activity, and cellular stress defences are critical determinants of brain ageing. Surprisingly, mouse lines with genetic impairment of anti-oxidative capacity generally did not show enhanced cognitive ageing but rather an increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. Mouse lines with impaired mitochondrial activity had critically short life spans or severe and rapidly progressing neurodegeneration. Strains with impaired clearance in damaged macromolecules or defects in the regulation of cellular stress defences showed alterations in the onset and progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling generally increased life span but impaired cognitive functions revealing a complex interaction between ageing of the brain and of the body. Brain ageing is accompanied by an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Transgenic mouse models expressing high levels of mutant human amyloid precursor protein showed a number of symptoms and pathophysiological processes typical for early phase of Alzheimer's disease. Generally, therapeutic strategies effective against Alzheimer's disease in humans were also active in the Tg2576, APP23, APP/PS1 and 5xFAD lines, but a large number of false positive findings were also reported. The 3xtg AD model likely has the highest face and construct validity but further studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A chronic ulcerative colitis model in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zheng; Zhen Qiang Gao; Shu Xian Wang

    2000-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION In recent years, there have been many reports about animal model to investigate drugs for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The experimental animal model often used is acetic acid-induced damage of colonic muscosa. In the present study, this animal model was investigated by administering various concentrations of TNBS.

  9. Signal attenuation as a rat model of obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltseker, Koral; Yankelevitch-Yahav, Roni; Albelda, Noa S; Joel, Daphna

    2015-01-09

    In the signal attenuation rat model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), lever-pressing for food is followed by the presentation of a compound stimulus which serves as a feedback cue. This feedback is later attenuated by repeated presentations of the stimulus without food (without the rat emitting the lever-press response). In the next stage, lever-pressing is assessed under extinction conditions (i.e., no food is delivered). At this stage rats display two types of lever-presses, those that are followed by an attempt to collect a reward, and those that are not. The latter are the measure of compulsive-like behavior in the model. A control procedure in which rats do not experience the attenuation of the feedback cue serves to distinguish between the effects of signal attenuation and of extinction. The signal attenuation model is a highly validated model of OCD and differentiates between compulsive-like behaviors and behaviors that are repetitive but not compulsive. In addition the measures collected during the procedure eliminate alternative explanations for differences between the groups being tested, and are quantitative, unbiased and unaffected by inter-experimenter variability. The major disadvantages of this model are the costly equipment, the fact that it requires some technical know-how and the fact that it is time-consuming compared to other models of OCD (11 days). The model may be used for detecting the anti- or pro-compulsive effects of pharmacological and non-pharmacological manipulations and for studying the neural substrate of compulsive behavior.

  10. Model reduction using the genetic algorithm and routh approximations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A new method of model reduction combining the genetic algorithm(GA) with the Routh approximation method is presented. It is suggested that a high-order system can be approximated by a low-order model with a time delay. The denominator parameters of the reduced-order model are determined by the Routh approximation method, then the numerator parameters and time delay are identified by the GA. The reduced-order models obtained by the proposed method will always be stable if the original system is stable and produce a good approximation to the original system in both the frequency domain and time domain. Two numerical examples show that the method is computationally simple and efficient.

  11. Genetic diversity in the SIR model of pathogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordo, Isabel; Gomes, M Gabriela M; Reis, Daniel G; Campos, Paulo R A

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model for assessing the levels and patterns of genetic diversity in pathogen populations, whose epidemiology follows a susceptible-infected-recovered model (SIR). We model the population of pathogens as a metapopulation composed of subpopulations (infected hosts), where pathogens replicate and mutate. Hosts transmit pathogens to uninfected hosts. We show that the level of pathogen variation is well predicted by analytical expressions, such that pathogen neutral molecular variation is bounded by the level of infection and increases with the duration of infection. We then introduce selection in the model and study the invasion probability of a new pathogenic strain whose fitness (R(0)(1+s)) is higher than the fitness of the resident strain (R(0)). We show that this invasion probability is given by the relative increment in R(0) of the new pathogen (s). By analyzing the patterns of genetic diversity in this framework, we identify the molecular signatures during the replacement and compare these with those observed in sequences of influenza A.

  12. Genetic diversity in the SIR model of pathogen evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Gordo

    Full Text Available We introduce a model for assessing the levels and patterns of genetic diversity in pathogen populations, whose epidemiology follows a susceptible-infected-recovered model (SIR. We model the population of pathogens as a metapopulation composed of subpopulations (infected hosts, where pathogens replicate and mutate. Hosts transmit pathogens to uninfected hosts. We show that the level of pathogen variation is well predicted by analytical expressions, such that pathogen neutral molecular variation is bounded by the level of infection and increases with the duration of infection. We then introduce selection in the model and study the invasion probability of a new pathogenic strain whose fitness (R(0(1+s is higher than the fitness of the resident strain (R(0. We show that this invasion probability is given by the relative increment in R(0 of the new pathogen (s. By analyzing the patterns of genetic diversity in this framework, we identify the molecular signatures during the replacement and compare these with those observed in sequences of influenza A.

  13. Genetic evaluation of European quails by random regression models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviana Miranda Gonçalves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare different random regression models, defined from different classes of heterogeneity of variance combined with different Legendre polynomial orders for the estimate of (covariance of quails. The data came from 28,076 observations of 4,507 female meat quails of the LF1 lineage. Quail body weights were determined at birth and 1, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 days of age. Six different classes of residual variance were fitted to Legendre polynomial functions (orders ranging from 2 to 6 to determine which model had the best fit to describe the (covariance structures as a function of time. According to the evaluated criteria (AIC, BIC and LRT, the model with six classes of residual variances and of sixth-order Legendre polynomial was the best fit. The estimated additive genetic variance increased from birth to 28 days of age, and dropped slightly from 35 to 42 days. The heritability estimates decreased along the growth curve and changed from 0.51 (1 day to 0.16 (42 days. Animal genetic and permanent environmental correlation estimates between weights and age classes were always high and positive, except for birth weight. The sixth order Legendre polynomial, along with the residual variance divided into six classes was the best fit for the growth rate curve of meat quails; therefore, they should be considered for breeding evaluation processes by random regression models.

  14. Experimental model of distraction osteogenesis in edentulous rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, Maria Montserrat Pujadas; Lewicki, Marianela; Ubios, Angela Matilde; Mandalunis, Patricia Monica

    2011-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a surgical technique producing bone lengthening by distraction of the fracture callus. Although a large number of experimental studies on the events associated with DO of craniofacial skeleton have been reported, the few employing rat mandibular bone DO used complicated designs and produced a small volume of newly formed bone. Thus, this study aims to present an original experimental model of mandibular DO in edentulous rats that produces a sufficient quantity and quality of intramembranous bone. Eight male Wistar rats, weighing 75 g, underwent extraction of lower molars. With rats weighing 350 g, right mandibular osteotomy was performed and the distraction device was placed. The distraction device was custom made using micro-implants, expansion screws, and acrylic resin. latency: 6 days, distraction: ¼ turn (0.175 mm) once a day during 6 d, consolidation: 28 d after distraction phase, sacrifice. DO-treated and contralateral hemimandibles were dissected and compared macroscopically and using radiographic studies. Histological sections were obtained and stained with H&E. A distraction gap filled with newly formed and mature bone tissue was obtained. This model of mandibular DO proved useful to obtain adequate quantity and quality of bone to study bone regeneration.

  15. Experimental model of distraction osteogenesis in edentulous rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Montserrat Pujadas Bigi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis (DO is a surgical technique producing bone lengthening by distraction of the fracture callus. Although a large number of experimental studies on the events associated with DO of craniofacial skeleton have been reported, the few employing rat mandibular bone DO used complicated designs and produced a small volume of newly formed bone. Thus, this study aims to present an original experimental model of mandibular DO in edentulous rats that produces a sufficient quantity and quality of intramembranous bone. Eight male Wistar rats, weighing 75 g, underwent extraction of lower molars. With rats weighing 350 g, right mandibular osteotomy was performed and the distraction device was placed. The distraction device was custom made using micro-implants, expansion screws, and acrylic resin. Study protocol: latency: 6 days, distraction: ¼ turn (0.175 mm once a day during 6 d, consolidation: 28 d after distraction phase, sacrifice. DO-treated and contralateral hemimandibles were dissected and compared macroscopically and using radiographic studies. Histological sections were obtained and stained with H&E. A distraction gap filled with newly formed and mature bone tissue was obtained. This model of mandibular DO proved useful to obtain adequate quantity and quality of bone to study bone regeneration.

  16. Protection of visual functions by human neural progenitors in a rat model of retinal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Gamm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A promising clinical application for stem and progenitor cell transplantation is in rescue therapy for degenerative diseases. This strategy seeks to preserve rather than restore host tissue function by taking advantage of unique properties often displayed by these versatile cells. In studies using different neurodegenerative disease models, transplanted human neural progenitor cells (hNPC protected dying host neurons within both the brain and spinal cord. Based on these reports, we explored the potential of hNPC transplantation to rescue visual function in an animal model of retinal degeneration, the Royal College of Surgeons rat. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Animals received unilateral subretinal injections of hNPC or medium alone at an age preceding major photoreceptor loss. Principal outcomes were quantified using electroretinography, visual acuity measurements and luminance threshold recordings from the superior colliculus. At 90-100 days postnatal, a time point when untreated rats exhibit little or no retinal or visual function, hNPC-treated eyes retained substantial retinal electrical activity and visual field with near-normal visual acuity. Functional efficacy was further enhanced when hNPC were genetically engineered to secrete glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. Histological examination at 150 days postnatal showed hNPC had formed a nearly continuous pigmented layer between the neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium, as well as distributed within the inner retina. A concomitant preservation of host cone photoreceptors was also observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Wild type and genetically modified human neural progenitor cells survive for prolonged periods, migrate extensively, secrete growth factors and rescue visual functions following subretinal transplantation in the Royal College of Surgeons rat. These results underscore the potential therapeutic utility of hNPC in the treatment of retinal degenerative

  17. Rat gingival model for testing drugs influencing inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaju P Jacob

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical drug testing is an important areain new drug development where animals are used.An ideal animal model for this is one which is simple,reliable and can be extrapolated to humans. Topicaldrugs for inflammation are conventionally tested onthe skin of animals after induction of inflammation.A gingival model would be simple as inflammation canbe induced naturally by the action of plaque. Rats area popular animal model for testing drugs as well as tostudy various diseases of the periodontium. Periodontaldisease including gingival inflammation develops inrats in relation to indigenous plaque or experimentallyinduced bacterial products. A number of features ofrats ranging from anatomy, histology and response tobacterial insult can be seen mirrored to a great extentin humans. There is a lot similarity in the developmentand resolution of inflammation as well as the gingivalwound healing of rats and humans. This paper tries toexplore the feasibility of using the rat gingival modelfor preclinical testing of drugs acting on or influencinginflammation and concludes by identifying potentialareas of research using this model. The addition of sucha simple and inexpensive model for preclinical testing ofdrugs will be welcomed by the drug developers.

  18. Combating Combination of Hypertension and Diabetes in Different Rat Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talma Rosenthal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rat experimental models are used extensively for studying physiological mechanisms and treatments of hypertension and diabetes co-existence. Each one of these conditions is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, and the combination of the two conditions is a potent enhancer of CVD. Five major animal models that advanced our understanding of the mechanisms and therapeutic approaches in humans are discussed in this review: Zucker, Goto-Kakizaki, SHROB, SHR/NDmcr-cp and Cohen Rosenthal diabetic hypertensive (CRDH rats. The use of various drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors (ACEIs, various angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, and calcium channel blockers (CCBs, to combat the effects of concomitant pathologies on the combination of diabetes and hypertension, as well as the non-pharmacological approach are reviewed in detail for each rat model. Results from experiments on these models indicate that classical factors contributing to the pathology of hypertension and diabetes combination—Including hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia—can now be treated, although these treatments do not completely prevent renal complications. Animal studies have focused on several mechanisms involved in hypertension/diabetes that remain to be translated into clinical medicine, including hypoxia, oxidative stress, and advanced glycation. Several target molecules have been identified that need to be incorporated into a treatment modality. The challenge continues to be the identification and interpretation of the clinical evidence from the animal models and their application to human treatment.

  19. Ranking candidate genes in rat models of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ståhl Fredrik

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rat models are frequently used to find genomic regions that contribute to complex diseases, so called quantitative trait loci (QTLs. In general, the genomic regions found to be associated with a quantitative trait are rather large, covering hundreds of genes. To help selecting appropriate candidate genes from QTLs associated with type 2 diabetes models in rat, we have developed a web tool called Candidate Gene Capture (CGC, specifically adopted for this disorder. Methods CGC combines diabetes-related genomic regions in rat with rat/human homology data, textual descriptions of gene effects and an array of 789 keywords. Each keyword is assigned values that reflect its co-occurrence with 24 different reference terms describing sub-phenotypes of type 2 diabetes (for example "insulin resistance". The genes are then ranked based on the occurrences of keywords in the describing texts. Results CGC includes QTLs from type 2 diabetes models in rat. When comparing gene rankings from CGC based on one sub-phenotype, with manual gene ratings for four QTLs, very similar results were obtained. In total, 24 different sub-phenotypes are available as reference terms in the application and based on differences in gene ranking, they fall into separate clusters. Conclusion The very good agreement between the CGC gene ranking and the manual rating confirms that CGC is as a reliable tool for interpreting textual information. This, together with the possibility to select many different sub-phenotypes, makes CGC a versatile tool for finding candidate genes. CGC is publicly available at http://ratmap.org/CGC.

  20. The Effect of Ciprofloxacin Injection on Genetically Absence Prone (WAG/Rij Rats Electroencephalogram Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Moghimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Ciprofloxacin which was used in this study is a Fluoroquinolone (FQ. This kind of drug may cause epileptic seizures probably because of the inhibition of GABA binding to its receptors. Wag/Rij rats (an animal model for generalized absence epilepsy, were used as experimental subjects.   Methods: For EEG study, electrodes were inserted into the cortex of animals according to paxinos coordinates. After and before ciprofloxacin injection, EEG was recorded and their SWDs were compared with each others.   Results: Findings showed a significant increase in the mean number of seizures during recording period. But the mean number of SWDs during seizures did not show any significant differences between groups.   Conclusion: These results may be due to involvement of GABA antagonistic effects of FQs and/or Mg2+ linked blockade of NMDA receptors. More researches are going to determine physiopathology of SWDs and find new effective substance against this kind of epilepsy.

  1. Methodological characteristics in establishing rat models of poststroke depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuyou Liu; Shi Yang; Weiyin Chen; Jinyu Wang; Yi Tang; Guanxiang Zhu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ideal model of poststroke depression (PSD) may be induced in rats guided by the theoretical evidence that "primary endogenous mechanism" and "reactivity mechanism" theories for PSD in human being.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility of comprehensive methods to induce PSD models in rats.DESrGN: A randomized controlled animal trial.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.MATERrALS: Male SD rats of SPF degree, weighing 350-500 g, were provided by the experimental animal center of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The rats were raised for 1 week adaptively, then screened behaviorally by open-field test and passive avoidance test. Forty-five rats with close scores were randomly divided into normal control group (n =10), simple stroke group (n =10), stress group (n =10) and PSD group (n =15).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the laboratory of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine from July 2002 to February 2003. ① Rat models of focal cerebral ischemia were induced by thread embolization, then treated with separate raising and unpredictable stress to induce PSD models. ②The neurologic deficit was evaluated by Longa 5-grade standard (the higher the score, the severer the neurologic deficit) and horizontal round rod test (normal rat could stay on it for at least 3 minutes). ③ The behavioral changes of PSD rats were evaluated by the saccharin water test, open-field text and passive avoidance test,including the changes of interest, spontaneous and exploratory activities, etc. ④ The levels of monoamine neurotransmitters, including norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine, in brain were determined using fluorospectrophotometry.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Score of Longa 5-grade standard; Stayed time in the horizontal round rod test;② Amount of saccharin water consumption; Open-field text: time stayed in the central square, times

  2. Comparative safety testing of genetically modified foods in a 90-day rat feeding study design allowing the distinction between primary and secondary effects of the new genetic event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Ib; Poulsen, Morten

    2007-10-01

    This article discusses the wider experiences regarding the usefulness of the 90-day rat feeding study for the testing of whole foods from genetically modified (GM) plant based on data from a recent EU-project [Poulsen, M., Schrøder, M., Wilcks, A., Kroghsbo, S., Lindecrona, R.H., Miller, A., Frenzel, T., Danier, J., Rychlik, M., Shu, Q., Emami, K., Taylor, M., Gatehouse, A., Engel, K.-H., Knudsen, I., 2007a. Safety testing of GM-rice expressing PHA-E lectin using a new animal test design. Food Chem. Toxicol. 45, 364-377; Poulsen, M., Kroghsbo, S., Schrøder, M., Wilcks, A., Jacobsen, H., Miller, A., Frenzel, T., Danier, J., Rychlik, M., Shu, Q., Emami, K., Sudhakar, D., Gatehouse, A., Engel, K.-H., Knudsen, I., 2007b. A 90-day safety in Wistar rats fed genetically modified rice expressing snowdrop lectin Galanthus nivalis (GNA). Food Chem. Toxicol. 45, 350-363; Schrøder, M., Poulsen, M., Wilcks, A., Kroghsbo, S., Miller, A., Frenzel, T., Danier, J., Rychlik, M., Emami, K., Gatehouse, A., Shu, Q., Engel, K.-H., Knudsen, I., 2007. A 90-day safety study of genetically modified rice expressing Cry1Ab protein (Bacillus thuringiensis toxin) in Wistar rats. Food Chem. Toxicol. 45, 339-349]. The overall objective of the project has been to develop and validate the scientific methodology necessary for assessing the safety of foods from genetically modified plants in accordance with the present EU regulation. The safety assessment in the project is combining the results of the 90-day rat feeding study on the GM food with and without spiking with the pure novel gene product, with the knowledge about the identity of the genetic change, the compositional data of the GM food, the results from in-vitro/ex-vivo studies as well as the results from the preceding 28-day toxicity study with the novel gene product, before the hazard characterisation is concluded. The results demonstrated the ability of the 90-day rat feeding study to detect the biological/toxicological effects of the

  3. Particulate matter inhalation exacerbates cardiopulmonary injury in a rat model of isoproterenol-induced cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure is linked to cardiovascular events and death, especially among individuals with heart disease. A model of toxic cardiomyopathy was developed in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats to explore potential mechanisms. Rats were...

  4. Gravitational Lens Modeling with Genetic Algorithms and Particle Swarm Optimizers

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Strong gravitational lensing of an extended object is described by a mapping from source to image coordinates that is nonlinear and cannot generally be inverted analytically. Determining the structure of the source intensity distribution also requires a description of the blurring effect due to a point spread function. This initial study uses an iterative gravitational lens modeling scheme based on the semilinear method to determine the linear parameters (source intensity profile) of a strongly lensed system. Our 'matrix-free' approach avoids construction of the lens and blurring operators while retaining the least squares formulation of the problem. The parameters of an analytical lens model are found through nonlinear optimization by an advanced genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimizer (PSO). These global optimization routines are designed to explore the parameter space thoroughly, mapping model degeneracies in detail. We develop a novel method that determines the L-curve for each solution automa...

  5. In vivo Drosophilia genetic model for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Taku; Cabrero, Pablo; Berkholz, Donald S; Bondeson, Daniel P; Ritman, Erik L; Thompson, James R; Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2012-12-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a major public health problem with a complex and varied etiology. Most stones are composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx), with dietary excess a risk factor. Because of complexity of mammalian system, the details of stone formation remain to be understood. Here we have developed a nephrolithiasis model using the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster, which has a simple, transparent kidney tubule. Drosophilia reliably develops CaOx stones upon dietary oxalate supplementation, and the nucleation and growth of microliths can be viewed in real time. The Slc26 anion transporter dPrestin (Slc26a5/6) is strongly expressed in Drosophilia kidney, and biophysical analysis shows that it is a potent oxalate transporter. When dPrestin is knocked down by RNAi in fly kidney, formation of microliths is reduced, identifying dPrestin as a key player in oxalate excretion. CaOx stone formation is an ancient conserved process across >400 My of divergent evolution (fly and human), and from this study we can conclude that the fly is a good genetic model of nephrolithiasis.

  6. Establishment of reproducible osteosarcoma rat model using orthotopic implantation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhe; Sun, Honghui; Fan, Qingyu; Long, Hua; Yang, Tongtao; Ma, Bao'an

    2009-05-01

    In experimental musculoskeletal oncology, there remains a need for animal models that can be used to assess the efficacy of new and innovative treatment methodologies for bone tumors. Rat plays a very important role in the bone field especially in the evaluation of metabolic bone diseases. The objective of this study was to develop a rat osteosarcoma model for evaluation of new surgical and molecular methods of treatment for extremity sarcoma. One hundred male SD rats weighing 125.45+/-8.19 g were divided into 5 groups and anesthetized intraperitoneally with 10% chloral hydrate. Orthotopic implantation models of rat osteosarcoma were performed by injecting directly into the SD rat femur with a needle for inoculation with SD tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, 2x10(5) to 1x10(6) UMR106 cells in 50 microl were injected intraosseously into median or distal part of the femoral shaft and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from ultrasound with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. In the third stage, the orthotopically implanted tumors and lung nodules were resected entirely, sectioned, and then counter stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathologic evaluation. The tumor take rate was 100% for implants with 8x10(5) tumor cells or more, which was much less than the amount required for subcutaneous implantation, with a high lung metastasis rate of 93.0%. Ultrasound and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.942; ptechnique for measuring cancer at any stage. Tumor growth curve showed that orthotopically implanted tumors expanded vigorously with time-lapse, especially in the first 3 weeks. The median time of survival was 38 days and surgical mortality was 0%. The UMR106 cell line has strong carcinogenic capability and high lung metastasis frequency. The present rat osteosarcoma model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was

  7. BDNF-secreting capsule exerts neuroprotective effects on epilepsy model of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto, Satoshi; Yasuhara, Takao; Agari, Takashi; Kondo, Akihiko; Jing, Meng; Kikuchi, Yoichiro; Shinko, Aiko; Wakamori, Takaaki; Kameda, Masahiro; Wang, Feifei; Kin, Kyohei; Edahiro, Satoru; Miyoshi, Yasuyuki; Date, Isao

    2011-01-12

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a well neurotrophic factor with neuroprotective potentials for various diseases in the central nervous system. However several previous studies demonstrated that BDNF might deteriorate symptoms for epilepsy model of animals by progression of abnormal neurogenesis. We hypothesized that continuous administration of BDNF at low dose might be more effective for epilepsy model of animals because high dose of BDNF was used in many studies. BDNF-secreting cells were genetically made and encapsulated for transplantation. Rats receiving BDNF capsule showed significant amelioration of seizure stage and reduction of the number of abnormal spikes at 7 days after kainic acid administration, compared to those of control group. The number of BrdU and BrdU/doublecortin positive cells in the hippocampus of BDNF group significantly increased, compared to that of control group. NeuN positive cells in the CA1 and CA3 of BDNF group were significantly preserved, compared to control group. In conclusion, low dose administration using encapsulated BDNF-secreting cells exerted neuroprotective effects with enhanced neurogenesis on epilepsy model of rats. These results might suggest the importance of the dose and administrative way of this neurotrophic factor to the epilepsy model of animals.

  8. Experimental model of arthritis induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Biazin, Samia Khalil; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia; de Franco, Marcello Fabiano; Puccia, Rosana; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira

    2012-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a disease caused by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), is highly prevalent in Brazil, where it is the principal cause of death by systemic mycoses. The disease primarily affects men aged 30-50 year old and usually starts as a pulmonary focus and then may spread to other organs and systems, including the joints. The present study aimed to develop an experimental model of paracoccidioidomycotic arthritis. Two-month-old male Wistar rats (n = 48) were used, divided in 6 groups: test groups EG/15 and EG/45 (received one dose of 100 μl of saline containing 10(5) Pb viable yeasts in the knee); heat killed Pb-group HK/15 and HK/45 (received a suspension of 10(5) Pb nonviable yeasts in the knee) and control groups CG/15 and CG/45 (received only sterile saline in the knee). The rats were killed 15 and 45 days postinoculation. In contrast with the control rats, the histopathology of the joints of rats of the test groups (EG/15 and EG/45) revealed a picture of well-established PCM arthritis characterized by extensive sclerosing granulomatous inflammation with numerous multiple budding fungal cells. The X-ray examination revealed joint alterations in these groups. Only metabolic active fungi evoked inflammation. The experimental model was able to induce fungal arthritis in the knees of the rats infected with metabolic active P. brasiliensis. The disease tended to be regressive and restrained by the immune system. No evidence of fungal dissemination to the lungs was observed.

  9. Chronic gastritis rat model and role of inducing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zun Xiang; Jian-Min Si; Huai-De Huang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To establish an experimental animal model of chronic gastritis in a short term and to investigate the effects of several potential inflammation-inducing factors on rat gastric mucosa.METHODS: Twenty-four healthy, male SD rats were treated with intragastric administration of 600 mL/L alcohol, 20mmol/L sodium deoxycholate and 0.5 g/L ammonia (factor A), forage containing low levels of vitamins (factor B), and/or indomethacin (factor C), according to an L8(27)orthogonal design. After 12 wk, gastric antral and body mucosae were pathologically examined.RESULTS: Chronic gastritis model was successfully induced in rats treated with factor A for 12 wk. After the treatment of animals, the gastric mucosal inflammation was significantly different from that in controls, and the number of pyloric glands at antrum and parietal cells at body were obviously reduced (P<0.01). Indomethacin induced gastritis but without atrophy, and short-term vitamin deficiency failed to induce chronic gastritis and gastric atrophy, In addition,indomethacin and vitamin deficiency had no synergistic effect in inducing gastritis with the factor A. No atypical hyperplasia and intestinal metaplasia in the gastric antrum and body were observed in all rats studied.CONCLUSION: Combined intragastric administration of 600 mL/L alcohol, 20 mmol/L sodium deoxycholate and 0.5 g/L ammonia induces chronic gastritis and gastric atrophy in rats. Indomethacin induces chronic gastritis only.The long-term roles of these factors in gastric inflammation and carcinogenesis need to be further elucidated.

  10. Creation of Consistent Burn Wounds: A Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Zhengyang Cai

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Burn infliction techniques are poorly described in rat models. An accurate study can only be achieved with wounds that are uniform in size and depth. We describe a simple reproducible method for creating consistent burn wounds in rats. Methods Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and dorsum shaved. A 100 g cylindrical stainless-steel rod (1 cm diameter was heated to 100℃ in boiling water. Temperature was monitored using a thermocouple. We performed two consecutive toe-pinch tests on different limbs to assess the depth of sedation. Burn infliction was limited to the loin. The skin was pulled upwards, away from the underlying viscera, creating a flat surface. The rod rested on its own weight for 5, 10, and 20 seconds at three different sites on each rat. Wounds were evaluated for size, morphology and depth. Results Average wound size was 0.9957 cm2 (standard deviation [SD] 0.1845 (n=30. Wounds created with duration of 5 seconds were pale, with an indistinct margin of erythema. Wounds of 10 and 20 seconds were well-defined, uniformly brown with a rim of erythema. Average depths of tissue damage were 1.30 mm (SD 0.424, 2.35 mm (SD 0.071, and 2.60 mm (SD 0.283 for duration of 5, 10, 20 seconds respectively. Burn duration of 5 seconds resulted in full-thickness damage. Burn duration of 10 seconds and 20 seconds resulted in full-thickness damage, involving subjacent skeletal muscle. Conclusions This is a simple reproducible method for creating burn wounds consistent in size and depth in a rat burn model.

  11. A novel survival model of cardioplegic arrest and cardiopulmonary bypass in rats: a methodology paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podgoreanu Mihai V

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the growing population of cardiac surgery patients with impaired preoperative cardiac function and rapidly expanding surgical techniques, continued efforts to improve myocardial protection strategies are warranted. Prior research is mostly limited to either large animal models or ex vivo preparations. We developed a new in vivo survival model that combines administration of antegrade cardioplegia with endoaortic crossclamping during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB in the rat. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were cannulated for CPB (n = 10. With ultrasound guidance, a 3.5 mm balloon angioplasty catheter was positioned via the right common carotid artery with its tip proximal to the aortic valve. To initiate cardioplegic arrest, the balloon was inflated and cardioplegia solution injected. After 30 min of cardioplegic arrest, the balloon was deflated, ventilation resumed, and rats were weaned from CPB and recovered. To rule out any evidence of cerebral ischemia due to right carotid artery ligation, animals were neurologically tested on postoperative day 14, and their brains histologically assessed. Results Thirty minutes of cardioplegic arrest was successfully established in all animals. Functional assessment revealed no neurologic deficits, and histology demonstrated no gross neuronal damage. Conclusion This novel small animal CPB model with cardioplegic arrest allows for both the study of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury as well as new cardioprotective strategies. Major advantages of this model include its overall feasibility and cost effectiveness. In future experiments long-term echocardiographic outcomes as well as enzymatic, genetic, and histologic characterization of myocardial injury can be assessed. In the field of myocardial protection, rodent models will be an important avenue of research.

  12. Oral LD50 toxicity modeling and prediction of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals on rat and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses were performed using the LD(50) oral toxicity data of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) on rodents: rat and mouse. PFCs are studied under the EU project CADASTER which uses the available experimental data for prediction and prioritization of toxic chemicals for risk assessment by using the in silico tools. The methodology presented here applies chemometrical analysis on the existing experimental data and predicts the toxicity of new compounds. QSAR analyses were performed on the available 58 mouse and 50 rat LD(50) oral data using multiple linear regression (MLR) based on theoretical molecular descriptors selected by genetic algorithm (GA). Training and prediction sets were prepared a priori from available experimental datasets in terms of structure and response. These sets were used to derive statistically robust and predictive (both internally and externally) models. The structural applicability domain (AD) of the models were verified on 376 per- and polyfluorinated chemicals including those in REACH preregistration list. The rat and mouse endpoints were predicted by each model for the studied compounds, and finally 30 compounds, all perfluorinated, were prioritized as most important for experimental toxicity analysis under the project. In addition, cumulative study on compounds within the AD of all four models, including two earlier published models on LC(50) rodent analysis was studied and the cumulative toxicity trend was observed using principal component analysis (PCA). The similarities and the differences observed in terms of descriptors and chemical/mechanistic meaning encoded by descriptors to prioritize the most toxic compounds are highlighted.

  13. Genetic Deletion of the Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor in the Rat Confers Resilience to the Development of Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallupi, Marsida; Scuppa, Giulia; de Guglielmo, Giordano; Calò, Girolamo; Weiss, Friedbert; Statnick, Michael A; Rorick-Kehn, Linda M; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    The nociceptin (NOP) receptor is a G-protein-coupled receptor whose natural ligand is the NOP/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide. Evidence from pharmacological studies suggests that the N/OFQ system is implicated in the regulation of several addiction-related phenomena, such as drug intake, withdrawal, and relapse. Here, to further explore the role of NOP system in addiction, we used NOP (-/-) rats to study the motivation for cocaine, heroin, and alcohol self-administration in the absence of N/OFQ function. Conditioned place preference (CPP) and saccharin (0.2% w/v) self-administration were also investigated. Results showed that NOP (-/-) rats self-administer less cocaine (0.25, 0.125, or 0.5 mg/infusion) both under a fixed ratio 1 and a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement compared with wild-type (Wt) controls. Consistently, cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was able to induce CPP in Wt but not in NOP (-/-). When NOP (-/-) rats were tested for heroin (20 μg/infusion) and ethanol (10% v/v) self-administration, they showed significantly lower drug intake compared with Wt. Conversely, saccharin self-administration was not affected by NOP deletion, excluding the possibility of nonspecific learning deficits or generalized disruption of reward mechanisms in NOP (-/-) rats. These findings were confirmed with pharmacological experiments using two selective NOP antagonists, SB-612111 and LY2817412. Both drugs attenuated alcohol self-administration in Wt rats but not in NOP (-/-) rats. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that genetic deletion of NOP receptors confers resilience to drug abuse and support a role for NOP receptor antagonism as a potential treatment option for drug addiction.

  14. A rat model for embolic encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Aalbæk, Bent;

    2011-01-01

    -brain-barrier. This provides our model with several advantages: minimized surgical intervention, bacteria gain access to the brain by the circulation and, no foreign materials are implated in the brain. We thereby mirror the human scenario in several ways: 1: Cerebral infarction by thrombosis or disseminated intravascular...... have recently shown that sepsis is a common cause of microabscesses in the brain, and that S. aureus is one of the most common organisms isolated from these abscesses. This raises the question whether the blood-brain barrier truly makes the brain an immune-privileged organ or not. This makes the brain...... it is difficult to obtain tissue for further examination. This puts a hard demand on animal models of brain lesions in sepsis. We hereby present a novel animal model of embolic encephalitis. Our model introduces bacteria by an embolus to an area of brain necrosis and damage to the blood...

  15. The ontology of genetic susceptibility factors (OGSF) and its application in modeling genetic susceptibility to vaccine adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu; He, Yongqun

    2014-01-01

    Due to human variations in genetic susceptibility, vaccination often triggers adverse events in a small population of vaccinees. Based on our previous work on ontological modeling of genetic susceptibility to disease, we developed an Ontology of Genetic Susceptibility Factors (OGSF), a biomedical ontology in the domain of genetic susceptibility and genetic susceptibility factors. The OGSF framework was then applied in the area of vaccine adverse events (VAEs). OGSF aligns with the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO). OGSF defines 'genetic susceptibility' as a subclass of BFO:disposition and has a material basis 'genetic susceptibility factor'. The 'genetic susceptibility to pathological bodily process' is a subclasses of 'genetic susceptibility'. A VAE is a type of pathological bodily process. OGSF represents different types of genetic susceptibility factors including various susceptibility alleles (e.g., SNP and gene). A general OGSF design pattern was developed to represent genetic susceptibility to VAE and associated genetic susceptibility factors using experimental results in genetic association studies. To test and validate the design pattern, two case studies were populated in OGSF. In the first case study, human gene allele DBR*15:01 is susceptible to influenza vaccine Pandemrix-induced Multiple Sclerosis. The second case study reports genetic susceptibility polymorphisms associated with systemic smallpox VAEs. After the data of the Case Study 2 were represented using OGSF-based axioms, SPARQL was successfully developed to retrieve the susceptibility factors stored in the populated OGSF. A network of data from the Case Study 2 was constructed by using ontology terms and individuals as nodes and ontology relations as edges. Different social network analys is (SNA) methods were then applied to verify core OGSF terms. Interestingly, a SNA hub analysis verified all susceptibility alleles of SNPs and a SNA closeness analysis verified the susceptibility genes in Case

  16. Epidemic Modelling by Ripple-Spreading Network and Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Qin Liao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical analysis and modelling is central to infectious disease epidemiology. This paper, inspired by the natural ripple-spreading phenomenon, proposes a novel ripple-spreading network model for the study of infectious disease transmission. The new epidemic model naturally has good potential for capturing many spatial and temporal features observed in the outbreak of plagues. In particular, using a stochastic ripple-spreading process simulates the effect of random contacts and movements of individuals on the probability of infection well, which is usually a challenging issue in epidemic modeling. Some ripple-spreading related parameters such as threshold and amplifying factor of nodes are ideal to describe the importance of individuals’ physical fitness and immunity. The new model is rich in parameters to incorporate many real factors such as public health service and policies, and it is highly flexible to modifications. A genetic algorithm is used to tune the parameters of the model by referring to historic data of an epidemic. The well-tuned model can then be used for analyzing and forecasting purposes. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by simulation results.

  17. Ventricular repolarization in a rat model of global heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krandycheva, Valeria; Kharin, Sergey; Strelkova, Marina; Shumikhin, Konstantin; Sobolev, Aleksey; Shmakov, Dmitry

    2013-07-01

    Isoproterenol in high doses induces infarction-like myocardial damage and structural and functional remodelling of the ventricular myocardium. The purpose of the present study was to investigate ventricular repolarization in a rat model of isoproterenol-induced heart failure. Isoproterenol was administered twice to female Wistar rats (170 mg/kg, s.c., 24 h apart). Four weeks after the injections, cardiac output was measured and unipolar epicardial ventricular electrograms were recorded in situ. Activation-recovery intervals were calculated to assess repolarization. Histological examination of the heart ventricles was also performed. Heart failure in rats treated with isoproterenol was indicated by myocardial histopathological damage and reduced cardiac output. In rats with heart failure, the regional differences in activation-recovery interval prolongation over the ventricular epicardium resulted in increasing heterogeneity in the activation-recovery interval distribution and increasing repolarization heterogeneity of the ventricular subepicardium. Myocardial damage and haemodynamic changes in heart failure induced by isoproterenol were accompanied by significant changes in ventricular repolarization, which were not associated with myocardial hypertrophy.

  18. Mapping of the stochastic Lotka-Volterra model to models of population genetics and game theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, George W. A.; McKane, Alan J.

    2017-08-01

    The relationship between the M -species stochastic Lotka-Volterra competition (SLVC) model and the M -allele Moran model of population genetics is explored via timescale separation arguments. When selection for species is weak and the population size is large but finite, precise conditions are determined for the stochastic dynamics of the SLVC model to be mappable to the neutral Moran model, the Moran model with frequency-independent selection, and the Moran model with frequency-dependent selection (equivalently a game-theoretic formulation of the Moran model). We demonstrate how these mappings can be used to calculate extinction probabilities and the times until a species' extinction in the SLVC model.

  19. Innervation of ectopic endometrium in a rat model of endometriosis

    OpenAIRE

    Berkley, Karen J; Dmitrieva, Natalia; Curtis, Kathleen S.; Papka, Raymond E

    2004-01-01

    Endometriosis (ENDO) is a disorder in which vascularized growths of endometrial tissue occur outside the uterus. Its symptoms include reduced fertility and severe pelvic pain. Mechanisms that maintain the ectopic growths and evoke symptoms are poorly understood. One factor not yet considered is that the ectopic growths develop their own innervation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the growths develop both an autonomic and a sensory innervation. We used a rat model of surgically induced EN...

  20. The Laboratory Rat as an Animal Model for Osteoporosis Research

    OpenAIRE

    Lelovas, Pavlos P; Xanthos, Theodoros T.; Thoma, Sofia E; Lyritis, George P; Dontas, Ismene A

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an important systemic disorder, affecting mainly Caucasian women, with a diverse and multifactorial etiology. A large variety of animal species, including rodents, rabbits, dogs, and primates, have been used as animal models in osteoporosis research. Among these, the laboratory rat is the preferred animal for most researchers. Its skeleton has been studied extensively, and although there are several limitations to its similarity to the human condition, these can be overcome th...

  1. Spatial memory impairments in a prediabetic rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Soares,E.; Prediger, R. D.; Nunes, S.; A.A. Castro; Viana, S .D.; Lemos, C.; C. M. Souza; Agostinho, P; Cunha, R. A.; E. Carvalho; Ribeiro, C. A. Fontes; Reis, F.; PEREIRA, F. C.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with an increased risk for brain disorders, namely cognitive impairments associated with hippocampal dysfunction underlying diabetic encephalopathy. However, the impact of a prediabetic state on cognitive function is unknown. Therefore, we now investigated whether spatial learning and memory deficits and the underlying hippocampal dysfunction were already present in a prediabetic animal model. Adult Wistar rats drinking high-sucrose (HSu) diet (35% sucrose solution duri...

  2. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q.M. Dias

    Full Text Available A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively, but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively. The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model.

  3. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Q.M.; Rossaneis, A.C.; Fais, R.S.; Prado, W.A. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-15

    A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively) similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively), but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively). The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model.

  4. Genetic Diseases and Genetic Determinism Models in French Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, Jeremy; Bruguiere, Catherine; Clement, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of genetic diseases in French secondary school biology textbooks is analysed to determine the major conceptions taught in the field of human genetics. References to genetic diseases, and the processes by which they are explained (monogeny, polygeny, chromosomal anomaly and environmental influence) are studied in recent French…

  5. Genetic Diseases and Genetic Determinism Models in French Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, Jeremy; Bruguiere, Catherine; Clement, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of genetic diseases in French secondary school biology textbooks is analysed to determine the major conceptions taught in the field of human genetics. References to genetic diseases, and the processes by which they are explained (monogeny, polygeny, chromosomal anomaly and environmental influence) are studied in recent French…

  6. A 90-day subchronic feeding study of genetically modified rice expressing Cry1Ab protein in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huan; He, Xiaoyun; Zou, Shiying; Zhang, Teng; Luo, Yunbo; Huang, Kunlun; Zhu, Zhen; Xu, Wentao

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic rice line (mfb-MH86) expressing a synthetic cry1Ab gene can be protected against feeding damage from Lepidopteran insects, including Sesamia inferens, Chilo suppressalis, Tryporyza incertulas and Cnaphalocrocis medinalis. Rice flour from mfb-MH86 and its near-isogenic control MH86 was separately formulated into rodent diets at concentrations of 17.5, 35 and 70 % (w/w) for a 90-day feeding test with rats, and all of the diets were nutritionally balanced. In this study, the responses of rats fed diets containing mfb-MH86 were compared to those of rats fed flour from MH86. Overall health, body weight and food consumption were comparable between groups fed diets containing mfb-MH86 and MH86. Blood samples were collected prior to sacrifice and a few significant differences (p genetically modified (GM) and non-GM diets. However, the values of these parameters were within the normal ranges of values for rats of this age and sex, thus not considered treatment related. In addition, upon sacrifice a large number of organs were weighed, macroscopic and histopathological examinations were performed with only minor changes to report. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that no toxic effect was observed in the conditions of the experiment, based on the different parameters assessed. GM rice mfb-MH86 is as safe and nutritious as non-GM rice.

  7. Calibration of Uncertainty Analysis of the SWAT Model Using Genetic Algorithms and Bayesian Model Averaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper, the Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Bayesian model averaging (BMA) were combined to simultaneously conduct calibration and uncertainty analysis for the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). In this hybrid method, several SWAT models with different structures are first selected; next GA i...

  8. The Fischer 344 rat as a model of presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syka, Josef

    2010-06-01

    Due to the rising number of the aged human population all over the world, presbycusis is a phenomenon that deserves the increasing attention of the medical community as regards to prevention and treatment. This requires finding appropriate animal models for human presbycusis that will be useful in future experiments. Among the available rat strains, the Fischer 344 (F344) strain promises to serve as a model producing prompt and profound presbycusis. Hearing thresholds begin to increase in this strain during the first year of life; toward the end of the second year, the thresholds are very high. The threshold shifts progress independently in both ears. The rapid deterioration of distortion product otoacoustic emissions, with the majority of outer hair cells (OHC) being present and morphologically intact, is apparently produced by the disruption of prestin. The age-related changes within inner ear function are accompanied by deterioration of acoustical signal processing within central auditory system, mainly due to impaired GABA inhibition. The loss of GABA inhibition in old animals is expressed primarily in the inferior colliculus but is also present in the cochlear nuclei and the auditory cortex. Sound-evoked behavioral reactions are also impaired in old F344 rats. Taken together, the described characteristics of the aging F344 rat auditory system supports the idea that this strain may serve as a suitable model for studying the mechanisms of presbycusis, its prevention and treatment.

  9. Aerosol Infection Model of Tuberculosis in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheshagiri Gaonkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We explored suitability of a rat tuberculosis aerosol infection model for investigating the pharmacodynamics of new antimycobacterial agents. Infection of rats via the aerosol route led to a reproducible course of M. tuberculosis infection in the lungs. The pulmonary bacterial load increased logarithmically during the first six weeks, thereafter, the infection stabilized for the next 12 weeks. We observed macroscopically visible granulomas in the lungs with demonstrable acid-fast bacilli and associated histopathology. Rifampicin (RIF at a dose range of 30 to 270 mg/kg exhibited a sharp dose response while isoniazid (INH at a dose range of 10 to 90 mg/kg and ethambutol (EMB at 100 to 1000 mg/kg showed shallow dose responses. Pyrazinamide (PZA had no dose response between 300 and 1000 mg/kg dose range. In a separate time kill study at fixed drug doses (RIF 90 mg/kg, INH 30 mg/kg, EMB 300 mg/kg, and PZA 300 mg/kg the bactericidal effect of all the four drugs increased with longer duration of treatment from two weeks to four weeks. The observed infection profile and therapeutic outcomes in this rat model suggest that it can be used as an additional, pharmacologically relevant efficacy model to develop novel antitubercular compounds at the interface of discovery and development.

  10. Aerosol infection model of tuberculosis in wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaonkar, Sheshagiri; Bharath, Sowmya; Kumar, Naveen; Balasubramanian, V; Shandil, Radha K

    2010-01-01

    We explored suitability of a rat tuberculosis aerosol infection model for investigating the pharmacodynamics of new antimycobacterial agents. Infection of rats via the aerosol route led to a reproducible course of M. tuberculosis infection in the lungs. The pulmonary bacterial load increased logarithmically during the first six weeks, thereafter, the infection stabilized for the next 12 weeks. We observed macroscopically visible granulomas in the lungs with demonstrable acid-fast bacilli and associated histopathology. Rifampicin (RIF) at a dose range of 30 to 270 mg/kg exhibited a sharp dose response while isoniazid (INH) at a dose range of 10 to 90 mg/kg and ethambutol (EMB) at 100 to 1000 mg/kg showed shallow dose responses. Pyrazinamide (PZA) had no dose response between 300 and 1000 mg/kg dose range. In a separate time kill study at fixed drug doses (RIF 90 mg/kg, INH 30 mg/kg, EMB 300 mg/kg, and PZA 300 mg/kg) the bactericidal effect of all the four drugs increased with longer duration of treatment from two weeks to four weeks. The observed infection profile and therapeutic outcomes in this rat model suggest that it can be used as an additional, pharmacologically relevant efficacy model to develop novel antitubercular compounds at the interface of discovery and development.

  11. Constructing the barley model for genetic transformation in Triticeae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LÜ Bo; WU Jia-jie; FU Dao-lin

    2015-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is one of the oldest domesticated crops, showing dramatic adaptation to various climate and environmental conditions. As a major cereal crop, barley ranks the 4th after wheat, maize and rice in terms of planting area and production al over the world. Due to its diploid nature, the cultivated barley is considered as an ideal model to study the polyploid wheat and other Triticeae species. Here, we reviewed the development, optimization, and application of transgenic approaches in barley. The most efifcient and robust genetic transformation has been built on the Agrobacterium-mediated transfer in conjunction with the immature embryo-based regeneration. We then discussed future considerations of using more practical technologies in barley transformation, such as the T-DNA/transposon tagging and the genome editing. As a cereal crop amenable to genetic transformation, barley wil serve as the most valuable carrier for global functional genomics in Triticeae and is becoming the most practical model for generating value-added products.

  12. BMP2 genetically engineered MSCs and EPCs promote vascularized bone regeneration in rat critical-sized calvarial bone defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning He

    Full Text Available Current clinical therapies for critical-sized bone defects (CSBDs remain far from ideal. Previous studies have demonstrated that engineering bone tissue using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is feasible. However, this approach is not effective for CSBDs due to inadequate vascularization. In our previous study, we have developed an injectable and porous nano calcium sulfate/alginate (nCS/A scaffold and demonstrated that nCS/A composition is biocompatible and has proper biodegradability for bone regeneration. Here, we hypothesized that the combination of an injectable and porous nCS/A with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2 gene-modified MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs could significantly enhance vascularized bone regeneration. Our results demonstrated that delivery of MSCs and EPCs with the injectable nCS/A scaffold did not affect cell viability. Moreover, co-culture of BMP2 gene-modified MSCs and EPCs dramatically increased osteoblast differentiation of MSCs and endothelial differentiation of EPCs in vitro. We further tested the multifunctional bone reconstruction system consisting of an injectable and porous nCS/A scaffold (mimicking the nano-calcium matrix of bone and BMP2 genetically-engineered MSCs and EPCs in a rat critical-sized (8 mm caviarial bone defect model. Our in vivo results showed that, compared to the groups of nCS/A, nCS/A+MSCs, nCS/A+MSCs+EPCs and nCS/A+BMP2 gene-modified MSCs, the combination of BMP2 gene -modified MSCs and EPCs in nCS/A dramatically increased the new bone and vascular formation. These results demonstrated that EPCs increase new vascular growth, and that BMP2 gene modification for MSCs and EPCs dramatically promotes bone regeneration. This system could ultimately enable clinicians to better reconstruct the craniofacial bone and avoid donor site morbidity for CSBDs.

  13. Progress and outlooks in a genetic absence epilepsy model (WAG/Rij).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijtelaar, G; Zobeiri, M

    2014-01-01

    The WAG/Rij model is a well characterized and validated genetic animal epilepsy model in which the for absence epilepsy highly characteristic spike-wave discharges (SWDs) develop spontaneously. In this review we discuss first some older and many new studies, with an emphasis on pharmacological and neurochemical studies towards the role of GABA and glutamate and the ion channels involved in the pathological firing patterns. Next, new insights and highlights from the last 5-10 years of reaearch in WAG/Rij rats are discussed. First, early environmental factors modulate SWD characteristics and antiepileptogenesis is possible. Also new is that the classically assumed association between sleep spindles and SWDs seems no longer valid as an explanatory role for the occurrence of SWDs in the genetic rodent models. A role of cortical and thalamic glial cells has been revealed, indicating a putative role for inflammatory cytokines. Neurophysiologic and signal analytical studies in this and in another rodent model (GAERS) point towards a cortical site of origin, that SWDs do not have a sudden onset, and propose a more important role for the posterior thalamus than was previously assumed. Finally it is proposed that the reticular nucleus of the thalamus might be heterogeneous with respect to its role in propagation and maintenance of SWDs. The presence of a well-established cortical region in which SWDs are elicited allows for research towards new non-invasive treatment options, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The first results show the feasibility of this new approach.

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Intestinal Iron Absorption Using Genetic Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colins, Andrea; Gerdtzen, Ziomara P.; Nuñez, Marco T.; Salgado, J. Cristian

    2017-01-01

    Iron is a trace metal, key for the development of living organisms. Its absorption process is complex and highly regulated at the transcriptional, translational and systemic levels. Recently, the internalization of the DMT1 transporter has been proposed as an additional regulatory mechanism at the intestinal level, associated to the mucosal block phenomenon. The short-term effect of iron exposure in apical uptake and initial absorption rates was studied in Caco-2 cells at different apical iron concentrations, using both an experimental approach and a mathematical modeling framework. This is the first report of short-term studies for this system. A non-linear behavior in the apical uptake dynamics was observed, which does not follow the classic saturation dynamics of traditional biochemical models. We propose a method for developing mathematical models for complex systems, based on a genetic programming algorithm. The algorithm is aimed at obtaining models with a high predictive capacity, and considers an additional parameter fitting stage and an additional Jackknife stage for estimating the generalization error. We developed a model for the iron uptake system with a higher predictive capacity than classic biochemical models. This was observed both with the apical uptake dataset used for generating the model and with an independent initial rates dataset used to test the predictive capacity of the model. The model obtained is a function of time and the initial apical iron concentration, with a linear component that captures the global tendency of the system, and a non-linear component that can be associated to the movement of DMT1 transporters. The model presented in this paper allows the detailed analysis, interpretation of experimental data, and identification of key relevant components for this complex biological process. This general method holds great potential for application to the elucidation of biological mechanisms and their key components in other complex

  15. Efficient single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in laboratory rat strains using wild rat-derived SNP candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Hedrich Hans J; Wedekind Dirk; Zeegers Dimphy; Guryev Victor; Smits Bart MG; Cuppen Edwin

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an important model for studying many aspects of human health and disease. Detailed knowledge on genetic variation between strains is important from a biomedical, particularly pharmacogenetic point of view and useful for marker selection for genetic cloning and association studies. Results We show that Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in commonly used rat strains are surprisingly well represented in wild rat isolates. Shotgun ...

  16. Integer programming model for optimizing bus timetable using genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wihartiko, F. D.; Buono, A.; Silalahi, B. P.

    2017-01-01

    Bus timetable gave an information for passengers to ensure the availability of bus services. Timetable optimal condition happened when bus trips frequency could adapt and suit with passenger demand. In the peak time, the number of bus trips would be larger than the off-peak time. If the number of bus trips were more frequent than the optimal condition, it would make a high operating cost for bus operator. Conversely, if the number of trip was less than optimal condition, it would make a bad quality service for passengers. In this paper, the bus timetabling problem would be solved by integer programming model with modified genetic algorithm. Modification was placed in the chromosomes design, initial population recovery technique, chromosomes reconstruction and chromosomes extermination on specific generation. The result of this model gave the optimal solution with accuracy 99.1%.

  17. An Intelligent Model for Pairs Trading Using Genetic Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Feng; Hsu, Chi-Jen; Chen, Chi-Chung; Chang, Bao Rong; Li, Chen-An

    2015-01-01

    Pairs trading is an important and challenging research area in computational finance, in which pairs of stocks are bought and sold in pair combinations for arbitrage opportunities. Traditional methods that solve this set of problems mostly rely on statistical methods such as regression. In contrast to the statistical approaches, recent advances in computational intelligence (CI) are leading to promising opportunities for solving problems in the financial applications more effectively. In this paper, we present a novel methodology for pairs trading using genetic algorithms (GA). Our results showed that the GA-based models are able to significantly outperform the benchmark and our proposed method is capable of generating robust models to tackle the dynamic characteristics in the financial application studied. Based upon the promising results obtained, we expect this GA-based method to advance the research in computational intelligence for finance and provide an effective solution to pairs trading for investment in practice.

  18. An Intelligent Model for Pairs Trading Using Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chi-Jen; Chen, Chi-Chung; Li, Chen-An

    2015-01-01

    Pairs trading is an important and challenging research area in computational finance, in which pairs of stocks are bought and sold in pair combinations for arbitrage opportunities. Traditional methods that solve this set of problems mostly rely on statistical methods such as regression. In contrast to the statistical approaches, recent advances in computational intelligence (CI) are leading to promising opportunities for solving problems in the financial applications more effectively. In this paper, we present a novel methodology for pairs trading using genetic algorithms (GA). Our results showed that the GA-based models are able to significantly outperform the benchmark and our proposed method is capable of generating robust models to tackle the dynamic characteristics in the financial application studied. Based upon the promising results obtained, we expect this GA-based method to advance the research in computational intelligence for finance and provide an effective solution to pairs trading for investment in practice. PMID:26339236

  19. Controversies about the genetic model of colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, P

    1995-01-01

    According to the genetic model, intestinal tumorigenesis is a result of the ordered in time inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and the activation of oncogenes. A tacit assumption is that both genes involved in the regulation of proliferation and growth factor-inducible genes, although inactivated, would not be changed during that process. The model requires that cancer cell population is homogenous, exists in a deterministic environment, and develops in a teleological manner. Meanwhile, tumorigenesis is rather a combination of both deterministic and stochastic molecular phenomena. Therefore, a novel notion of bifurcating point genes is defined as a generalization of the idea of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. Alternative stochastic mechanisms of tumorigenesis are discussed such as a decreased expression of intestinal-specific genes in cancer cells, most likely reflecting adaptation to survival within a heterogeneous, and non-equilibrated cellular population.

  20. Adaptive Fixation in Two-Locus Models of Stabilizing Selection and Genetic Drift

    OpenAIRE

    Wollstein, Andreas; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between quantitative genetics and population genetics has been studied for nearly a century, almost since the existence of these two disciplines. Here we ask to what extent quantitative genetic models in which selection is assumed to operate on a polygenic trait predict adaptive fixations that may lead to footprints in the genome (selective sweeps). We study two-locus models of stabilizing selection (with and without genetic drift) by simulations and analytically. For symmetr...

  1. Negative learning bias is associated with risk aversion in a genetic animal model of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven John Shabel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lateral habenula (LHb is activated by aversive stimuli and the omission of reward, inhibited by rewarding stimuli and is hyperactive in helpless rats – an animal model of depression. Here we test the hypothesis that congenital learned helpless (cLH rats are more sensitive to decreases in reward size and/or less sensitive to increases in reward than wild-type (WT control rats. Consistent with the hypothesis, we found that cLH rats were slower to switch preference between two responses after a small upshift in reward size on one of the responses but faster to switch their preference after a small downshift in reward size. cLH rats were also more risk-averse than WT rats – they chose a response delivering a constant amount of reward (safe response more often than a response delivering a variable amount of reward (risky response compared to WT rats. Interestingly, the level of bias towards negative events was associated with the rat’s level of risk aversion when compared across individual rats. cLH rats also showed impaired appetitive Pavlovian conditioning but more accurate responding in a two-choice sensory discrimination task. These results are consistent with a negative learning bias and risk aversion in cLH rats, suggesting abnormal processing of rewarding and aversive events in the LHb of cLH rats.

  2. Tackling intraspecific genetic structure in distribution models better reflects species geographical range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcer, Arnald; Méndez-Vigo, Belén; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos; Picó, F Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Genetic diversity provides insight into heterogeneous demographic and adaptive history across organisms' distribution ranges. For this reason, decomposing single species into genetic units may represent a powerful tool to better understand biogeographical patterns as well as improve predictions of the effects of GCC (global climate change) on biodiversity loss. Using 279 georeferenced Iberian accessions, we used classes of three intraspecific genetic units of the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana obtained from the genetic analyses of nuclear SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), chloroplast SNPs, and the vernalization requirement for flowering. We used SDM (species distribution models), including climate, vegetation, and soil data, at the whole-species and genetic-unit levels. We compared model outputs for present environmental conditions and with a particularly severe GCC scenario. SDM accuracy was high for genetic units with smaller distribution ranges. Kernel density plots identified the environmental variables underpinning potential distribution ranges of genetic units. Combinations of environmental variables accounted for potential distribution ranges of genetic units, which shrank dramatically with GCC at almost all levels. Only two genetic clusters increased their potential distribution ranges with GCC. The application of SDM to intraspecific genetic units provides a detailed picture on the biogeographical patterns of distinct genetic groups based on different genetic criteria. Our approach also allowed us to pinpoint the genetic changes, in terms of genetic background and physiological requirements for flowering, that Iberian A. thaliana may experience with a GCC scenario applying SDM to intraspecific genetic units.

  3. Gastrodin inhibits neuroinflammation in rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease model rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Li; Xin Chen; Nan Zhang; Yangwen Song; Yang Mu

    2012-01-01

    The present study showed that the latency of rats moving on a vertical grid was significantly prolonged, and the number of rats sliding down from the declined plane was increased remarkably, in rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease model rats compared with control rats. The moving latency recovered to normal levels, but the number of slides was significantly increased at 28 days after model establishment. The slope test is a meaningful approach to evaluate the symptoms of Parkinson's disease model rats treated with rotenone. In addition, loss of substantia nigral dopaminergic neurons in model rats was observed at 1 day after the model was established, and continued gradually at 14 and 28 days. The expression of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells was significantly increased in gastrodin-treated rats at 14 days. Significant numbers of activated microglia cells were observed in model rats at 14 and 28 days; treatment of rats with Madopar at 28 days suppressed microglial activation. Treatment of rats with gastrodin or Madopar at 28 days significantly reduced interleukin-1β expression. The loss of substantia nigral dopaminergic neurons paralleled the microglial activation in Parkinson's disease model rats treated with rotenone. The inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β are involved in the substantia nigral damage. Gastrodin could protect dopaminergic neurons via inhibition of interleukin-1β expression and neuroinflammation in the substantia nigra.

  4. Exploring Middle School Students' Understanding of Three Conceptual Models in Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler Freidenreich, Hava; Golan Duncan, Ravit; Shea, Nicole

    2011-11-01

    Genetics is the cornerstone of modern biology and a critical aspect of scientific literacy. Research has shown, however, that many high school graduates lack fundamental understandings in genetics necessary to make informed decisions about issues and emerging technologies in this domain, such as genetic screening, genetically modified foods, etc. Genetic literacy entails understanding three interrelated models: a genetic model that describes patterns of genetic inheritance, a meiotic model that describes the process by which genes are segregated into sex cells, and a molecular model that describes the mechanisms that link genotypes to phenotypes within an individual. Currently, much of genetics instruction, especially in terms of the molecular model, occurs at the high school level, and we know little about the ways in which middle school students can reason about these models. Furthermore, we do not know the extent to which carefully designed instruction can help younger students develop coherent and interrelated understandings in genetics. In this paper, we discuss a research study aimed at elucidating middle school students' abilities to reason about the three genetic models. As part of our research, we designed an eight-week inquiry unit that was implemented in a combined sixth- to eighth-grade science classroom. We describe our instructional design and report results based on an analysis of written assessments, clinical interviews, and artifacts of the unit. Our findings suggest that middle school students are able to successfully reason about all three genetic models.

  5. Age-dependent decline in learning and memory performances of WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Karson Ayşe; Utkan Tijen; Balcı Fuat; Arıcıoğlu Feyza; Ateş Nurbay

    2012-01-01

    RESEARCH Open Access Age-dependent decline in learning and memory performances of WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy Ayşe Karson1*, Tijen Utkan2, Fuat Balcı3, Feyza Arıcıoğlu4 and Nurbay Ateş1 Abstract Recent clinical studies revealed emotional and cognitive impairments associated with absence epilepsy. Preclinical research with genetic models of absence epilepsy however have primarily focused on dysfunctional emotional processes and paid relatively less attention t...

  6. Rat models of asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James G; Tamaoka, Meiyo

    2006-01-01

    The rat has been extensively used to model asthma and somewhat less extensively to model chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The features of asthma that have been successfully modeled include allergen-induced airway constriction, eosinophilic inflammation and allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. T-cell involvement has been directly demonstrated using adoptive transfer techniques. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are activated in response to allergen challenge in the sensitized rat and express Thelper2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). Repeated allergen exposure causes airway remodeling. Dry gas hyperpnea challenge also evokes increases in lung resistance, allowing exercise-induced asthma to be modeled. COPD is modeled using elastase-induced parenchymal injury to mimic emphysema. Cigarette smoke-induced airspace enlargement occurs but requires months of cigarette exposure. Inflammation and fibrosis of peripheral airways is an important aspect of COPD that is less well modeled. Novel approaches to the treatment of COPD have been reported including treatments aimed at parenchymal regeneration.

  7. Intraperitoneal Bilirubin Administration Decreases Infarct Area in a Rat Coronary Ischemia/Reperfusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron eBen-Amotz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bilirubin was previously considered a toxin byproduct of heme catabolism. However, a mounting body of evidence suggests that at physiological doses, bilirubin is a powerful antioxidant and anti-atherosclerotic agent. Recent clinical studies have shown that human beings with genetically-induced hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert Syndrome are protected against coronary heart disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether administration of exogenous bilirubin to normal rats would convey similar protective effects in an experimental model of coronary ischemia. We hypothesized that intraperitoneal bilirubin administration 1 hour before injury would decrease infarct area and preserve left ventricular (LV systolic function when compared to non-treated rats. Coronary ischemia was induced by temporary (30 min ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in control or bilirubin treated rats, followed by a 1-hour period of reperfusion. LV function was estimated by measurements of fractional shortening and fractional area shortening using echocardiography. LV function decreased in both experimental groups after ischemia and reperfusion, although in bilirubin-treated rats fractional shortening was less depressed during the period of ischemia (18.8 vs 25.8%, p = 0.034. Infarct size was significantly reduced in the bilirubin treated group compared to the non-treated group (13.34% vs 25.5%, p = 0.0067. Based on the results of this study, bilirubin supplementation appears to provide significant decrease in infarct size although protective effects on LV function were noted only during the period of ischemia. This result also suggests that lipid soluble antioxidant bilirubin prevents the oxidation of cardiolipin and decreases the infarct size in the heart during ischemia.

  8. Use of surgical techniques in the rat pancreas transplantation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Ma; Zhi-Yong Guo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreas transplantation is currently considered to be the most reliable and effective treatment for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (also called type 1 diabetes). With the improvement of microsurgical techniques, pancreas transplantation in rats has been the major model for physiological and immunological experimental studies in the past 20 years. We investigated the surgical techniques of pancreas transplantation in rats by analysing the difference between cervical segmental pancreas transplantation and abdominal pancreaticoduodenal transplantation. METHODS:Two hundred and forty male adult Wistar rats weighing 200-300 g were used, 120 as donors and 120 as recipients. Sixty cervical segmental pancreas transplants and 60 abdominal pancreaticoduodenal transplants were carried out and vessel anastomoses were made with microsurgical techniques. RESULTS:The time of donor pancreas harvesting in the cervical and abdominal groups was 31±6 and 37.6±3.8 min, respectively, and the lengths of recipient operations were 49.2±5.6 and 60.6±7.8 min. The time for donor operation was not signiifcantly different (P>0.05), but the recipient operation time in the abdominal group was longer than that in the cervical group (P0.05). CONCLUSIONS:Both pancreas transplantation methods are stable models for immunological and physiological studies in pancreas transplantation. Since each has its own advantages and disadvantages, the designer can choose the appropriate method according to the requirements of the study.

  9. Research of combined liver-kidney transplantation model in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiageng Zhu; Jun Li; Ruipeng Jia; Jianghao Su; Mingshun Shen; Zhigang Cao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To set up a simple and reliable rat model of combined liver-kidney transplantation. Methods: SD rats served as both donors and recipients. 4℃ sodium lactate Ringer's was infused from portal veins to donated livers,and from abdominal aorta to donated kidneys, respectively. Anastomosis of the portal vein and the inferior vena cava (IVC) inferior to the right kidney between the graft and the recipient was performed by a double cuff method, then the superior hepatic vena cava with suture. A patch of donated renal artery was anastomosed to the recipient abdominal aorta. The urethra and bile duct were reconstructed with a simple inside bracket. Results: Among 65 cases of combined liver-kidney transplantation, the success rate in the late 40 cases was 77.5%. The function of the grafted liver and kidney remained normal. Conclusion: This rat model of combined liver-kidney transplantation can be established in common laboratory conditions with high success rate and meet the needs of renal transplantation experiment.

  10. Achilles tendinosis: a morphometrical study in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rafael Duarte; Glazebrook, Mark Anthony; Campos, Vinicius Castro; Vasconcelos, Anilton Cesar

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the morphopathogenesis of Achilles tendinosis, using a rat model and presenting quantitative analysis of time-dependent histological changes. Thirty Wistar rats were used, randomly split in experimental and control groups. Animals of the experimental group were submitted to a treadmill running scheme. Five animals of each group were euthanized at four, eight and sixteen weeks. Achilles tendons were collected and processed routinely for histopath sections. Slides were stained by Hematoxylin-Eosin, Picrosirius Red, Alcian Blue, AgNOR, TUNEL and evaluated morphometrically. Cellular density decreased slightly along the time and was higher in the experimental group than in controls at fourth, eighth and sixteenth weeks. Fiber microtearing, percentual of reticular fibers and glycosaminoglycans content increased along the time and were higher in experimental group than in controls at all-time intervals. AgNOR labeling here interpreted as a marker of transcription activity was higher in the experimental groups than in controls at all-time intervals. Apoptotic cells were more frequent and diffusely distributed in tendinosis samples than in control groups. These results suggest that as mechanical overload is becoming chronic, cellular turnover and matrix deposition increases leading to tendinosis. The combination of staining techniques and morphometry used here to describe the evolution of lesions occurring in a rat model system has proved to be suited for the study of induced Achilles tendinosis.

  11. A rat model for embolic encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Aalbæk, Bent

    2011-01-01

    µl thrombin (2.5 IU/ml) in a catheter until coagulated. A sterile fibrin-clot of 5 mm was selected for embolization and injected via the ECA catheter. The common carotid artery was clamped during injection thereby directing the embolus via the internal carotid artery to the brain. The clot...... gain access to the brain by the circulation and, no foreign materials other than bacteria are implated in the brain. This ensures high face-validity and high construct-validity of the model for three reasons: 1) Cerebral infarction by thrombosis or disseminated intravascular coagulation is a key...

  12. Atp13a2 expression in the periaqueductal gray is decreased in the Pink1 -/- rat model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A; Stevenson, Sharon A; Ciucci, Michelle R

    2016-05-16

    Vocal communication deficits are common in Parkinson disease (PD). Widespread alpha-synuclein pathology is a common link between familial and sporadic PD, and recent genetic rat models based on familial genetic links increase the opportunity to explore vocalization deficits and their associated neuropathologies. Specifically, the Pink1 knockout (-/-) rat presents with early, progressive motor deficits, including significant vocal deficits, at 8 months of age. Moreover, this rat model exhibits alpha-synuclein pathology compared to age-matched non-affected wildtype (WT) controls. Aggregations are specifically dense within the periaqueductal gray (PAG), a brainstem region involved in the coordination of emotional and volitional control of vocalizations. Here, we investigated changes in gene expression within the PAG at 8 months of age in Pink1 -/- rats compared to WT. Our data demonstrate that Pink1 -/- rat mRNA expression levels of alpha-synuclein are comparable to WT. However, Pink1 -/- rats show significantly decreased levels of Atp13a2, a transmembrane lysosomal P5-type ATPase suggesting a potential mechanism for the observed abnormal aggregation. We found no difference in the expression of glucocerebrosidase (Gba) or the CASP8 and FADD-like apoptosis regulator (Cflar). Further, we show that mRNA expression levels of dopaminergic markers including Th, D1 and D2 receptor as well as GABA signaling markers including Gaba-A and glutamate decarboxylase 2 (Gad2) do not differ between genotypes. However, we found that glutamate decarboxylase 1 (Gad1) is significantly reduced in this PD model suggesting possible disruption of neurotransmission within the PAG. These results are the first to suggest the hypothesis that alpha-synuclein aggregation in this model is not a result of increased transcription, but rather a deficit in the breakdown and clearance, and that the observed vocal deficits may be related to impaired neural transmission. Altogether, these findings are

  13. Characterization of an animal model of postmenopausal hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortepiani, Lourdes A; Zhang, Huimin; Racusen, Lorraine; Roberts, L Jackson; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2003-03-01

    Blood pressure (BP) increases in postmenopausal women. The mechanisms responsible are unknown. The present study was performed to characterize a model of postmenopausal hypertension in the rat and to determine the role that oxidative stress may play in mediating the postmenopausal hypertension. Spontaneously hypertensive rats were ovariectomized (ovx) or left intact (PMR) at 8 months and were aged to 18 months. These animals were compared with young females (YF; 4 or 8 months of age) and old males (18 months) for some measurements. Estradiol levels were decreased in PMR rats to levels not different from YF rats in proestrous or from old males. BP increased progressively with age in PMR rats but not in ovx or male rats, such that the gender difference in hypertension disappeared by 18 months. Glomerular filtration rate was lower in ovx and PMR rats than in YF rats. Renal plasma flow and renal vascular resistance were similar between YF and ovx rats, but lower and higher, respectively, in PMR rats. Serum testosterone increased by 60% in ovx rats and 400% in PMR rats compared with YF rats. Plasma renin activity also increased in PMR rats but not in ovx rats. Chronic treatment (for 8 months beginning at 8 months of age) of PMR rats with vitamins E and C, but not tempol, resulted in a significant reduction in BP and excretion of F2-isoprostanes. In contrast, tempol, but not vitamins E and C, reduced BP in old males. These data suggest that the PMR rats, but not ovx rats, may be a suitable model for the study of postmenopausal hypertension, and that oxidative stress plays a role in the increased BP.

  14. A naturalistic glyceryl trinitrate infusion migraine model in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Bhatt, Deepak Kumar; Ploug, Kenneth Beri

    2012-01-01

    Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) infusion is a reliable method to provoke migraine-like headaches in humans. Previous studies have simulated this human model in anaesthetized or in awake rodents using GTN doses 10,000 times higher than used in humans. The relevance of such toxicological doses to migraine...... is not certain. Anaesthesia and low blood pressure caused by high GTN doses both can affect the expression of nociceptive marker c-fos. Therefore, our aim was to simulate the human GTN migraine model in awake rats using a clinically relevant dose....

  15. Resibufogenin corrects hypertension in a rat model of human preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Hop; Ianosi-Irimie, Monica; Danchuk, Svitlana; Rabon, Edd; Nogawa, Toshihiko; Kamano, Yoshiaki; Pettit, G Robert; Wiese, Thomas; Puschett, Jules B

    2006-02-01

    The study of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia has been hampered by a relative dearth of animal models. We developed a rat model of preeclampsia in which the excretion of a circulating inhibitor of Na/K ATPase, marinobufagenin (MBG), is elevated. These animals develop hypertension, proteinuria, and intrauterine growth restriction. The administration of a congener of MBG, resibufogenin (RBG), reduces blood pressure to normal in these animals, as is the case when given to pregnant animals rendered hypertensive by the administration of MBG. Studies of Na/K ATPase inhibition by MBG and RBG reveal that these agents are equally effective as inhibitors of the enzyme.

  16. Sleep Changes in a Rat Prenatal Stress Model of Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoven, Christian; Sickman, Helle M.; Bastlund, Jesper Frank

    Major depression is one of the most frequently occurring mental health disorders, but is characterized by diverse symptomatology. Sleep disturbances, however, are commonplace in depressive patients. These alterations include increased duration of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (REMS) and increased sleep...... fragmentation. Stressful life events during the second trimester of human pregnancy increase the risk of depression in the offspring. Similarly, rodents exposed to prenatal stress (PNS) during gestation express depression- like behavioral changes. Accordingly, we investigated sleep changes in a rat PNS model...... of depression, to elucidate whether these are similar to those seen in clinical depression. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were submitted to repeated variable stress during gestational days 13-21. The young adult offspring were surgically implanted with electrodes for subsequent electroencephalographic...

  17. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of osteosarcoma in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Yu, Menglei; Ye, Fei; Xing, Da

    2011-02-01

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant tumors of the bone and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the pediatric age group. Confirmed diagnosis and prompt treatment of osteosarcoma are critical for effective prognosis. In this study, we investigate the application of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) for the detection of osteosarcoma in an animal model. Cross-section images of a normal rat leg and a tumorous rat leg were successfully reconstructed in vivo. Morphological changes and the development of the implanted osteosarcoma were accurately mapped with time-dependent photoacoustic images. Furthermore, we evaluate the use of gold nanorods as contrast agents for imaging osteosarcoma with PAI. This is the first study that uses PAI to detect osteosarcoma in vivo, and the results suggest that PAI has the potential clinical application for detecting osteosarcoma in the early stage.

  18. Efficacy of Female Rat Models in Translational Cardiovascular Aging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Rice

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women in the United States. Aging is a primary risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease as well as cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Aging is a universal process that all humans undergo; however, research in aging is limited by cost and time constraints. Therefore, most research in aging has been done in primates and rodents; however it is unknown how well the effects of aging in rat models translate into humans. To compound the complication of aging gender has also been indicated as a risk factor for various cardiovascular diseases. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system associated with aging and gender for aging research with regard to the applicability of rat derived data for translational application to human aging.

  19. A standardised and reproducible model of intra-abdominal infection and abscess formation in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosscha, K; Nieuwenhuijs, VB; Gooszen, AW; van Duijvenbode-Beumer, H; Visser, MR; Verweij, Willem; Akkermans, LMA

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To develop a standardised and reproducible model of intra-abdominal infection and abscess formation in rats. Design: Experimental study. Setting: University hospital, The Netherlands. Subjects: 36 adult male Wistar rats. Interventions: In 32 rats, peritonitis was produced using two differ

  20. A time study of cancer genetic counselors using a genetic counselor-only patient care model versus a traditional combined genetic counselor plus medical geneticist care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, Brandie; Gustafson, Shanna; Mester, Jessica; Arscott, Patricia; Lynch, Katherine; Moline, Jessica; Eng, Charis

    2013-09-01

    Analyses of time-based effort have determined that clinical genetic services are labor-intensive, although these data derive primarily from studying geneticists' efforts in the pediatric model. No studies have investigated the time and patient care activities of cancer genetic counselors (GCs) in traditional clinics with a medical geneticist (GC/MD) compared with genetic counselor-only (GCO) appointments. In this study, 6 GCs prospectively tracked time spent in patient care activities in both clinical settings. The authors found that overall, GCs' time spent per patient was lower for GCO versus GC/MD visits. No differences were seen in time spent on results disclosure, but differences were noted in case preparation, face-to-face, and follow-up times. Furthermore, no differences were seen in number of case preparation activities or topics covered during a session. These data suggest that GCO visits result in better use of GCs' time, without a trade-off in number of patient-related activities.

  1. Comparative safety testing of genetically modified foods in a 90-day rat feeding study design allowing the distinction between primary and secondary effects of the new genetic event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Ib; Poulsen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    high dose level and a dietary design based upon compositional data on the GM food and toxicity data on the gene product is sensitive and specific enough to verify the presence/absence of the biological/nutritional/toxicological effects of the novel gene insert and further by the use of spiking able......This article discusses the wider experiences regarding the usefulness of the 90-day rat feeding study for the testing of whole foods from genetically modified (GM) plant based on data from a recent EU-project [Poulsen, M., Schroder, M., Wilcks, A., Kroghsbo, S., Lindecrona, R.H., Miller, A......., Frenzel, T., Danier, J., Rychlik, M., Shu, Q., Emami, K., Taylor, M., Gatehouse, A., Engel, K.-H., Knudsen, I., 2007a. Safety testing of GM-rice expressing PHA-E lectin using a new animal test design. Food Chem. Toxicol. 45, 364-377; Poulsen, M., Kroghsbo, S., Schroder, M., Wilcks, A., Jacobsen, H...

  2. Obesity: from animal models to human genetics to practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Craig H; Fisler, Janis S

    2010-01-01

    Although many animal models are used in genetic studies, the mouse is most common. Analysis of single-gene mutations, linkage analysis in crossbred strains, and gene targeting are the primary techniques used to associate obesity phenotypes with specific genes or alleles. The orthologous human gene can then be tested, either in linkage studies in families or in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), for effect on the phenotype. Frequent lack of concordance between mouse and human obesity genes may be due to the difference in phenotypes measured in humans (body mass index) versus mouse (fat mass or % body fat), lack of intermediate phenotypes, and the fact that identified genes account for only a small percentage of the heritability of common obesity, suggesting that many genes remain unknown. New technology allows analysis of individual genomes at a reasonable cost, making large-scale obesity genome projects in humans feasible. Such projects could identify common allelic variants that contribute to obesity and to variable individual response to obesity therapy. Currently, family history may be more predictive than genetics for risk of obesity, but individual testing could ultimately guide therapy and, in the aggregate, guide public health policy. The primary limitation to development of genotype-based diets is that successful randomized diet trials of widely ranging macronutrient content, adequately powered for finding rare Mendelian mutations, have not been performed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular genetics of cancer and tumorigenesis: Drosophila models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu-Min Deng

    2011-01-01

    Why do some cells not respond to normal control of cell division and become tumorous? Which signals trigger some tumor cells to migrate and colonize other tissues? What genetic factors are responsible for tumorigenesis and cancer development? What environmental factors play a role in cancer formation and progression? In how many ways can our bodies prevent and restrict the growth of cancerous cells?How can we identify and deliver effective drugs to fight cancer? In the fight against cancer,which kills more people than any other disease,these and other questions have long interested researchers from a diverse range of fields.To answer these questions and to fight cancer more effectively,we must increase our understanding of basic cancer biology.Model organisms,including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster,have played instrumental roles in our understanding of this devastating disease and the search for effective cures.Drosophila and its highly effective,easy-touse,and ever-expanding genetic tools have contributed toand enriched our knowledge of cancer and tumor formation tremendously.

  4. Azithromycin reduces inflammation in a rat model of acute conjunctivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Robredo, Patricia; Recalde, Sergio; Moreno-Orduña, Maite; García-García, Laura; Zarranz-Ventura, Javier; García-Layana, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Macrolide antibiotics are known to have various anti-inflammatory effects in addition to their antimicrobial activity, but the mechanisms are still unclear. The effect of azithromycin on inflammatory molecules in the lipopolysaccharide-induced rat conjunctivitis model was investigated. Methods Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided into two groups receiving topical ocular azithromycin (15 mg/g) or vehicle. In total, six doses (25 µl) were administered as one dose twice a day for three days before subconjunctival lipopolysaccharide injection (3 mg/ml). Before the rats were euthanized, mucus secretion, conjunctival and palpebral edema and redness were evaluated. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine gene expression for interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. Interleukin-6 was determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, nuclear factor-kappa B with western blot, and MMP-2 activity with gelatin zymogram. Four eyes per group were processed for histology and subsequent periodic acid-Schiff staining and CD68 for immunofluorescence. The Student t test or the Wilcoxon test for independent samples was applied (SPSS v.15.0). Results Azithromycin-treated animals showed a significant reduction in all clinical signs (p<0.05) compared to controls. Interleukin-6 (p<0.05), nuclear factor-kappa B protein expression (p<0.01), and MMP-2 activity (p<0.05) in conjunctival homogenates were significantly reduced compared with the control animals. MMP-2 gene expression showed a tendency to decrease in the azithromycin group (p=0.063). Mucus secretion by goblet cells and the macrophage count in conjunctival tissue were also decreased in the azithromycin group (p<0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that azithromycin administration ameliorates induced inflammation effects in a rat model of acute conjunctivitis. PMID:23378729

  5. A rat model for muscle regeneration in the soft palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola L Carvajal Monroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. Despite successful surgical repositioning of the muscles, optimal function is often not achieved. Scar formation and defective regeneration may hamper the functional recovery of the muscles after cleft palate repair. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate in rats, and to establish an in vivo model for muscle regeneration after surgical injury. METHODS: Fourteen adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Groups 1 (n = 4 and 2 (n = 2 were used to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate, respectively. Group 3 (n = 6 was used for surgical wounding of the soft palate, and group 4 (n = 2 was used as unwounded control group. The wounds (1 mm were evaluated by (immunohistochemistry (AZAN staining, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG, MyHC, and ASMA after 7 days. RESULTS: The present study shows that the anatomy and histology of the soft palate muscles of the rat is largely comparable with that in humans. All wounds showed clinical evidence of healing after 7 days. AZAN staining demonstrated extensive collagen deposition in the wound area, and initial regeneration of muscle fibers and salivary glands. Proliferating and differentiating satellite cells were identified in the wound area by antibody staining. CONCLUSIONS: This model is the first, suitable for studying muscle regeneration in the rat soft palate, and allows the development of novel adjuvant strategies to promote muscle regeneration after cleft palate surgery.

  6. The elusive rat model of conditioned placebo analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabb, Christopher T; White, Michelle M; Harris, Amber L; Fuchs, Perry N

    2014-10-01

    Recent research on human placebo analgesia has suggested the need for rodent models to further elucidate the neural substrates of the placebo effect. This series of 3 experiments therefore was performed in an attempt to develop a model of placebo analgesia in rats. In each study, female Sprague-Dawley rats received an L5 spinal nerve ligation to induce a neuropathic pain condition. Each rat then underwent a 4-day conditioning procedure in which an active analgesic drug or its vehicle (unconditioned stimulus) was associated with the following cues (conditioned stimuli): novel testing room (environmental), vanilla scent cue (olfactory), dim incandescent lighting (visual), restraint procedure/injection (tactile), and time of day and injection-test latency (temporal). The analgesics for each experiment were as follows: Experiment 1 used 90 mg/kg gabapentin, experiment 2 used 3mg/kg loperamide hydrochloride, and experiment 3 used 6 mg/kg morphine sulfate. On the following test day, half of the animals received the opposite treatment, resulting in 4 conditioning manipulations: drug/drug, drug/vehicle, vehicle/drug, and vehicle/vehicle. Nociceptive thresholds were assessed with the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold test each day after the conditioning procedure. In all 3 experiments, no significant differences were detected on test day between control and placebo groups, indicating a lack of a conditioned placebo analgesic response. Our results contrast with prior research that implies the existence of a reliable and robust response to placebo treatment. We conclude that placebo analgesia in rats is not particularly robust and that it is difficult to achieve using conventional procedures and proper experimental design.

  7. Variability in ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation in healthy and cardiovascular-compromised rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodavanti, Urmila P; Ledbetter, Allen D; Thomas, Ronald F; Richards, Judy E; Ward, William O; Schladweiler, Mette C; Costa, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure dependent on the type and severity of disease. Healthy male 12-14-week-old Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Wistar (WS) and Sprague Dawley (SD); and CVD-compromised spontaneously hypertensive (SH), Fawn-Hooded hypertensive (FHH), stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHSP), obese spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) and obese JCR (JCR) rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm ozone for 4 h; pulmonary injury and inflammation were analyzed immediately following (0-h) or 20-h later. Baseline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein was higher in CVD strains except for FHH when compared to healthy. Ozone-induced increases in protein and inflammation were concentration-dependent within each strain but the degree of response varied from strain to strain and with time. Among healthy rats, SD were least affected. Among CVD strains, lean rats were more susceptible to protein leakage from ozone than obese rats. Ozone caused least neutrophilic inflammation in SH and SHHF while SHSP and FHH were most affected. BALF neutrophils and protein were poorly correlated when considering the entire dataset (r = 0.55). The baseline and ozone-induced increases in cytokine mRNA varied markedly between strains and did not correlate with inflammation. These data illustrate that the degree of ozone-induced lung injury/inflammation response is likely influenced by both genetic and physiological factors that govern the nature of cardiovascular compromise in CVD models.

  8. Structure Refinement for Vulnerability Estimation Models using Genetic Algorithm Based Model Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method for model structure refinement is proposed and applied in estimation of cumulative number of vulnerabilities according to time. Security as a quality characteristic is presented and defined. Vulnerabilities are defined and their importance is assessed. Existing models used for number of vulnerabilities estimation are enumerated, inspecting their structure. The principles of genetic model generators are inspected. Model structure refinement is defined in comparison with model refinement and a method for model structure refinement is proposed. A case study shows how the method is applied and the obtained results.

  9. Estimation of genetic parameters and genetic change for stillbirth in Iranian Holstein cows: a comparison between linear and threshold models

    OpenAIRE

    N.G. HOSSEIN-ZADEH

    2008-01-01

    Data on stillbirth from the Animal Breeding Center of Iran collected from January 1990 to December 2007 and comprising 668810 Holstein calving events from 2506 herds were analyzed. Linear and threshold animal and sire models were used to estimate genetic parameters and genetic trends for stillbirth in the first, second, and third parities. Mean incidence of stillbirth decreased from first to third parities: 23.7%, 22.1%, and 21.8%, respectively. Phenotypic rates of stillbirth decreased from 1...

  10. Effects of aglycone genistein in a rat experimental model of postmenopausal metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitto, Alessandra; Altavilla, Domenica; Bonaiuto, Antonio; Polito, Francesca; Minutoli, Letteria; Di Stefano, Vincenzo; Giuliani, Daniela; Guarini, Salvatore; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Squadrito, Francesco

    2009-03-01

    Genistein aglycone, a soy derived isoflavone, has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women. We therefore investigated its effects in an experimental model of postmenopausal metabolic syndrome. Female spontaneously hypertensive obese rats (SHROB, n=40), a genetic model of syndrome X, and age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY, n=40) rats were used. A group of SHROB (n=20) and WKY (n=20) animals were ovariectomized (OVX). Four weeks after surgery all animals were randomized to receive either genistein (54 mg/human equivalent dose/day for 4 weeks), or vehicle. Body weight, food intake, systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate, plasma glucose, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), total plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, and uterine weights were studied. Furthermore, we investigated acetylcholine- and sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation of aortic rings as well as NG-L-arginine (L-NMA: 10-100 mM) induced vasoconstriction in phenylephrine-precontracted aortic segments. Liver expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARA and gamma (PPARG was also assessed. OVX animals had a slight increase in SBP, body weight, insulin resistance, and plasma cholesterol. OVX-SHROB rats showed also impaired endothelial responses, blunted L-NMA induced contraction (L-NMA 100 mM, WKY=2.2+/-0.3 g/mg tissue; OVX-SHROB=1.1+/-0.4 g/mg tissue). Genistein treatment decreased SBP and plasma lipids, ameliorated endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance, increased HDL cholesterol, and enhanced liver expression of PPARA and PPARG. Our data suggest that genistein is effective in ameliorating cardiovascular profiles in an experimental model of postmenopausal metabolic syndrome, attenuating the features of this disease. The effects of genistein are likely mediated by PPARA and PPARG receptors. This evidence would support the rationale for some pilot clinical trials using genistein in postmenopausal women affected by metabolic

  11. Newly Developed Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Fujii, Hideki; Goto, Shunsuke; Nakai, Kentaro; Kono, Keiji; Watanabe, Shuhei; Shinohara, Masami; Nishi, Shinichi

    2017-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is associated with all-cause and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. Thus, elucidating its pathophysiological mechanisms is essential for improving the prognosis. We evaluated characteristics of CKD-MBD in a newly developed CKD rat model. We used male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT) rats, which are used as models for nonobese type 2 diabetes. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx). At 10 weeks, the rats were classified into six groups and administered with a vehicle or a low- or high-dose paricalcitol thrice a week. At 20 weeks, the rats were sacrificed; blood and urinary biochemical analyses and histological analysis of the aorta were performed. At 20 weeks, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, blood pressure, and renal function were not significantly different among the six groups. Serum calcium and phosphate levels tended to be higher in SDT-Nx rats than in SD-Nx rats. The urinary excretion of calcium and phosphate was significantly greater in SDT-Nx rats than in SD-Nx rats. After administering paricalcitol, serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels were significantly higher in SDT-Nx rats than in SD-Nx rats. The degree of aortic calcification was significantly more severe and the aortic calcium content was significantly greater in SDT-Nx rats than in SD-Nx rats. We suggest that our new CKD rat model using SDT rats represents a useful CKD-MBD model, and this model was greatly influenced by paricalcitol administration. Further studies are needed to clarify the detailed mechanisms underlying this model.

  12. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  13. A series of rat segmental forelimb ectopic implantation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianyu; Luo, Xusong; Gao, Bowen; Liu, Fei; Gu, Chuan; Yu, Qingxiong; Li, Qingfeng; Zhu, Hainan

    2017-05-09

    Temporary ectopic implantation has been performed in clinical practice to salvage devascularized amputated tissues for delayed replantation purpose. In this study, we established a series of segmental forelimb ectopic implantation models in rats, including forelimb, forearm, forepaw, digit, and double forelimbs, to mimic the clinical context. Time of amputated limbs harvesting in donors and ectopic implantation process in recipients were recorded. Survival time and mortalities of recipients were also recorded. Sixty days after ectopic implantation, a full-field laser perfusion imager (FLPI) was used to detect the blood flow of amputated limbs and micro-CT imaging was used to examine bone morphological changes. Histological sections of amputated limbs were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to evaluate pathological changes. Implanted amputated limbs in all models achieved long term survival and there were no obvious morphological and histological changes were found according to results of micro-CT and histology study. Thus, a series of rat segmental forelimb temporary ectopic implantation models have been well established. To our knowledge, this is the first rodent animal model related to forelimb temporary ectopic implantation. These models might facilitate further research related to salvage, reconstruction and better aesthetic and functional outcome of upper extremity/digit in temporary ectopic implantation scenario.

  14. Local identification of piecewise deterministic models of genetic networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cinquemani, Eugenio; Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Summers, Sean; Lygeros, John

    2009-01-01

    We address the identification of genetic networks under stationary conditions. A stochastic hybrid description of the genetic interactions is considered and an approximation of it in stationary conditions is derived. Contrary to traditional structure identification methods based on fitting determini

  15. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism.

  16. Ripple-Spreading Network Model Optimization by Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bing Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small-world and scale-free properties are widely acknowledged in many real-world complex network systems, and many network models have been developed to capture these network properties. The ripple-spreading network model (RSNM is a newly reported complex network model, which is inspired by the natural ripple-spreading phenomenon on clam water surface. The RSNM exhibits good potential for describing both spatial and temporal features in the development of many real-world networks where the influence of a few local events spreads out through nodes and then largely determines the final network topology. However, the relationships between ripple-spreading related parameters (RSRPs of RSNM and small-world and scale-free topologies are not as obvious or straightforward as in many other network models. This paper attempts to apply genetic algorithm (GA to tune the values of RSRPs, so that the RSNM may generate these two most important network topologies. The study demonstrates that, once RSRPs are properly tuned by GA, the RSNM is capable of generating both network topologies and therefore has a great flexibility to study many real-world complex network systems.

  17. Toward Developing Genetic Algorithms to Aid in Critical Infrastructure Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-05-01

    Today’s society relies upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, telecommunication, financial and energy. Understanding these interdependencies is necessary in order to protect our critical infrastructure. The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System, CIMS©, examines the interrelationships between infrastructure networks. CIMS© development is sponsored by the National Security Division at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in its ongoing mission for providing critical infrastructure protection and preparedness. A genetic algorithm (GA) is an optimization technique based on Darwin’s theory of evolution. A GA can be coupled with CIMS© to search for optimum ways to protect infrastructure assets. This includes identifying optimum assets to enforce or protect, testing the addition of or change to infrastructure before implementation, or finding the optimum response to an emergency for response planning. This paper describes the addition of a GA to infrastructure modeling for infrastructure planning. It first introduces the CIMS© infrastructure modeling software used as the modeling engine to support the GA. Next, the GA techniques and parameters are defined. Then a test scenario illustrates the integration with CIMS© and the preliminary results.

  18. Role of exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone resorption in a rat model for periodontal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayilvahanan Shanmugam

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans a causative agent of periodontal disease in humans, forms biofilm on biotic and abiotic surfaces. A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm is heterogeneous in nature and is composed of proteins, extracellular DNA and exopolysaccharide. To explore the role played by the exopolysaccharide in the colonization and disease progression, we employed genetic reduction approach using our rat model of A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis. To this end, a genetically modified strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans lacking the pga operon was compared with the wild-type strain in the rat infection model. The parent and mutant strains were primarily evaluated for bone resorption and disease. Our study showed that colonization, bone resorption/disease and antibody response were all elevated in the wild-type fed rats. The bone resorption/disease caused by the pga mutant strain, lacking the exopolysaccharide, was significantly less (P < 0.05 than the bone resorption/disease caused by the wild-type strain. Further analysis of the expression levels of selected virulence genes through RT-PCR showed that the decrease in colonization, bone resorption and antibody titer in the absence of the exopolysaccharide might be due to attenuated levels of colonization genes, flp-1, apiA and aae in the mutant strain. This study demonstrates that the effect exerted by the exopolysaccharide in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone resorption has hitherto not been recognized and underscores the role played by the exopolysaccharide in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced disease.

  19. Identification of Hammerstein Model Based on Quantum Genetic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Hai Li

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear system identification is a main topic of modern identification. A new method for nonlinear system identification is presented by using Quantum Genetic Algorithm(QGA).The problems of nonlinear system identification are cast as function optimization overprameter space,and the Quantum Genetic Algorithm is adopted to solve the optimization problem. Simulation experiments show that: compared with the genetic algorithm, quantum genetic algorithm is an effective swarm intelligence algorith...

  20. Arterial hypoxemia and intrapulmonary vasodilatation in rat models of portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuta, Yasumi; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Ohsuga, Masaru; Akimoto, Toshio; Komeichi, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Shuji; Kato, Yoshihito; Miyamoto, Akiko; Satomura, Katsuaki; Takano, Teruo

    2005-08-01

    Rats with chronic bile duct ligation (CBDL) and portal vein ligation (PVL) are used as models of portal hypertension. CBDL rats show hypoxemia with intrapulmonary vasodilatation (IPVD), and are recognized as a model of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), while PVL rats are normoxemic. We investigated the differences in arterial oxygenation between these models, and the key factors leading to HPS. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared as CBDL or PVL models, or as Sham rats. Arterial oxygenation, hemodynamics (reference sample method), and IPVD were simultaneously evaluated in conscious and unrestrained animals, using (141)Ce- or (113)Sn-labeled microspheres (15 microm in diameter), respectively. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitrate/nitrite (end products of nitric oxide; NOx) production by the lung tissue (increment across the lungs) was also determined. The extent of IPVD was similar in both models, but hypoxemia was only observed in CBDL rats. The ET-1 level and the increment in NOx were significantly increased in CBDL rats, and the increment was directly correlated with impairment of oxygenation. Blood flow through the bronchial arteries (anatomical shunting) was increased in CBDL rats, reaching more than three times the level in PVL rats or Sham rats. These results support the hypothesis that NO derived from the lung tissues contributes to hypoxemia, and IPVD appears to be a prerequisite for impaired oxygenation. The considerable increase of anatomical shunting may potentially contribute to impaired oxygenation in CBDL rats.

  1. Genetic fuzzy system modeling and simulation of vascular behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jiaowei; Boonen, Harrie C.M.

    and find the optimal parameters in a Fuzzy Control set that can control the fluctuation of physical features in a blood vessel, based on experimental data (training data). Our solution is to create chromosomes or individuals composed of a sequence of parameters in the fuzzy system and find the best...... chromosome or individual to define the fuzzy system. The model is implemented by combining the Matlab Genetic algorithm and Fuzzy system toolboxes, respectively. To test the performance of this method, experimental data sets about calculated pressure change in different blood vessels after several chemical...... treatments are chosen as training and testing data sets. In the simulation, the fuzzy control system is trained by pressure data of one blood vessel and tested with pressure data of other blood vessels. Results: Right now, some rough results show that trained fuzzy control system can be used to predict...

  2. Surgery results in exaggerated and persistent cognitive decline in a rat model of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaomei; Degos, Vincent; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Zhu, Yinggang; Vacas, Susana; Terrando, Niccolò; Nelson, Jeffrey; Su, Xiao; Maze, Mervyn

    2013-05-01

    Postoperative cognitive decline can be reproduced in animal models. In a well-validated rat model of the Metabolic Syndrome, we sought to investigate whether surgery induced a more severe and persistent form of cognitive decline similar to that noted in preliminary clinical studies. In rats that had been selectively bred for low and high exercise endurance, the low capacity runners (LCR) exhibited features of Metabolic Syndrome (obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension). Tibial fracture surgery was performed under isoflurane anesthesia in LCR and high capacity runner (HCR) rats and cognitive function was assessed postoperatively in a trace-fear conditioning paradigm and Morris Water Maze; non-operated rats were exposed to anesthesia and analgesia (sham). Group sizes were n = 6. On postoperative D7, LCR rats had shorter freezing times than postoperative HCR rats. Five months postoperatively, LCR rats had a flatter learning trajectory and took longer to locate the submerged platform than postoperative HCR rats; dwell-time in the target quadrant in a probe trial was shorter in the postoperative LCR compared to HCR rats. LCR and HCR sham rats did not differ in any test. Postoperatively, LCR rats diverged from HCR rats exhibiting a greater decline in memory, acutely, with persistent learning and memory decline, remotely; this could not be attributed to changes in locomotor or swimming performance. This Metabolic Syndrome animal model of surgery-induced cognitive decline corroborates, with high fidelity, preliminary findings of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome patients.

  3. New Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > The New Genetics The New Genetics Living Laboratories Classroom Poster Order a Free Copy ... Piece to a Century-Old Evolutionary Puzzle Computing Genetics Model Organisms RNA Interference The New Genetics is ...

  4. In vivo investigations of genetically modified microorganisms using germ-free rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund jacobsen, Bodil

    systems based on the activation of a killing gene have resulted in the reduced survival of the contained Escherichia coli or in the prevention of plasmid transfer between E. coli in the gnotobiotic rat. Gene transfer between Lactococcus lactis strains has been demonstrated in the gastrointestinal tract...... of gnotobiotic rats. The plasmid pLMP1 containing a selectable marker of a I!,. lactis strain was not transferred. The use of germ-free rats has led to a reduction in the number of laboratory animals needed for obtaining information regarding the fate and effect of GMMO in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract....

  5. Effects of genetically modified T2A-1 rice on the GI health of rats after 90-day supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yanfang; Xu, Wentao; He, Xiaoyun; Liu, Haiyan; Cao, Sishuo; Qi, Xiaozhe; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxin (Bt) rice will be commercialized as a main food source. Traditional safety assessments on genetically modified products pay little attention on gastrointestinal (GI) health. More data about GI health of Bt rice must be provided to dispel public' doubts about the potential effects on human health. We constructed an improved safety assessment animal model using a basic subchronic toxicity experiment, measuring a range of parameters including microflora composition, intestinal permeability, epithelial structure, fecal enzymes, bacterial activity, and intestinal immunity. Significant differences were found between rice-fed groups and AIN93G-fed control groups in several parameters, whereas no differences were observed between genetically modified and non-genetically modified groups. No adverse effects were found on GI health resulting from genetically modified T2A-1 rice. In conclusion, this study may offer a systematic safety assessment model for GM material with respect to the effects on GI health. PMID:23752350

  6. A Mathematical Model Accounting for the Organisation in Multiplets of the Genetic Code

    OpenAIRE

    Sciarrino, A.

    2001-01-01

    Requiring stability of genetic code against translation errors, modelised by suitable mathematical operators in the crystal basis model of the genetic code, the main features of the organisation in multiplets of the mitochondrial and of the standard genetic code are explained.

  7. Establishment of animal model of dual liver transplantation in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available The animal model of the whole-size and reduced-size liver transplantation in both rat and mouse has been successfully established. Because of the difficulties and complexities in microsurgical technology, the animal model of dual liver transplantation was still not established for twelve years since the first human dual liver transplantation has been made a success. There is an essential need to establish this animal model to lay a basic foundation for clinical practice. To study the physiological and histopathological changes of dual liver transplantation, "Y" type vein from the cross part between vena cava and two iliac of donor and "Y' type prosthesis were employed to recanalize portal vein and the bile duct between dual liver grafts and recipient. The dual right upper lobes about 45-50% of the recipient liver volume were taken as donor, one was orthotopically implanted at its original position, the other was rotated 180° sagitally and heterotopically positioned in the left upper quadrant. Microcirculation parameters, liver function, immunohistochemistry and survival were analyzed to evaluate the function of dual liver grafts. No significant difference in the hepatic microcirculatory flow was found between two grafts in the first 90 minutes after reperfusion. Light and electronic microscope showed the liver architecture was maintained without obvious features of cellular destruction and the continuity of the endothelium was preserved. Only 3 heterotopically positioned graft appeared patchy desquamation of endothelial cell, mitochondrial swelling and hepatocytes cytoplasmic vacuolization. Immunohistochemistry revealed there is no difference in hepatocyte activity and the ability of endothelia to contract and relax after reperfusion between dual grafts. Dual grafts made a rapid amelioration of liver function after reperfusion. 7 rats survived more than 7 days with survival rate of 58.3.%. Using "Y" type vein and bile duct prosthesis, we

  8. Antifibrotic effect of heparin on liver fibrosis model in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Binita; Shah; Gaurang; Shah

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of chronic thrombin inhibition by heparin on experimentally induced chronic liver injury (liver fibrosis) in rats. METHODS: Chronic liver injury (liver fibrosis) was induced in Wistar rats by oral administration of carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) for 7 wk, an animal model with persistent severe hepatic fibrosis. Intravenous administration of the thrombin antagonist (heparin) started 1 wk after the start of CCl 4 intoxication for 6 wk. After completion of treatment (7 wk), markers of hepatic dysfunction were measured and changes evaluated histopathologically. RESULTS: Higher serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total, direct and indirect bilirubin levels, as well as lower fibrinogen levels, were found in CCl 4 intoxicated rats. Heparin, silymarin and combination of drug (heparin and silymarin) treatment for 6 wk prevented a rise in SGOT, SGPT, ALP, total, direct and indirect bilirubin levels and improved fibrinogen levels. Deterioration in hepatic function determined by the fibrosis area was retarded, as evident from hepatic histopathology. Total protein levels were not changed in all groups.CONCLUSION: Heparin, a thrombin antagonist, preserved hepatic function and reduced severity of hepatic dysfunction/fibrogenesis. Combination of heparin and silymarin produced additional benefits on liver fibrosis.

  9. Innervation of ectopic endometrium in a rat model of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkley, Karen J; Dmitrieva, Natalia; Curtis, Kathleen S; Papka, Raymond E

    2004-07-27

    Endometriosis (ENDO) is a disorder in which vascularized growths of endometrial tissue occur outside the uterus. Its symptoms include reduced fertility and severe pelvic pain. Mechanisms that maintain the ectopic growths and evoke symptoms are poorly understood. One factor not yet considered is that the ectopic growths develop their own innervation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the growths develop both an autonomic and a sensory innervation. We used a rat model of surgically induced ENDO whose growths mimic those in women. Furthermore, similar to women with ENDO, such rats exhibit reduced fertility and increased pelvic nociception. The ENDO was induced by autotransplanting, on mesenteric cascade arteries, small pieces of uterus that formed vascularized cysts. The cysts and healthy uterus were harvested from proestrous rats and immunostained using the pan-neuronal marker PGP9.5 and specific markers for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) (sensory C and A delta fibers), substance P (SP) (sensory C and A delta fibers) and vesicular monoamine transporter (sympathetic fibers). Cysts (like the uterus) were robustly innervated, with many PGP9.5-stained neurites accompanying blood vessels and extending into nearby luminal epithelial layers. CGRP-, SP-, and vesicular monoamine transporter-immunostained neurites also were observed, with CGRP and SP neurites extending the furthest into the cyst lining. These results demonstrate that ectopic endometrial growths develop an autonomic and sensory innervation. This innervation could contribute not only to symptoms associated with ENDO but also to maintenance of the ectopic growths.

  10. Experimental models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Otto; Cervinkova, Zuzana

    2014-07-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the Western world, and it persists at a high prevalence. NAFLD is characterised by the accumulation of triglycerides in the liver and includes a spectrum of histopathological findings, ranging from simple fatty liver through non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis, which may progress to hepatocellular carcinoma. The pathogenesis of NAFLD is closely related to the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of NAFLD in humans has currently been limited by the lack of satisfactory animal models. The ideal animal model for NAFLD should reflect all aspects of the intricate etiopathogenesis of human NAFLD and the typical histological findings of its different stages. Within the past several years, great emphasis has been placed on the development of an appropriate model for human NASH. This paper reviews the widely used experimental models of NAFLD in rats. We discuss nutritional, genetic and combined models of NAFLD and their pros and cons. The choice of a suitable animal model for this disease while respecting its limitations may help to improve the understanding of its complex pathogenesis and to discover appropriate therapeutic strategies. Considering the legislative, ethical, economical and health factors of NAFLD, animal models are essential tools for the research of this disease.

  11. Estimation of genetic parameters and genetic change for stillbirth in Iranian Holstein cows: a comparison between linear and threshold models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. HOSSEIN-ZADEH

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Data on stillbirth from the Animal Breeding Center of Iran collected from January 1990 to December 2007 and comprising 668810 Holstein calving events from 2506 herds were analyzed. Linear and threshold animal and sire models were used to estimate genetic parameters and genetic trends for stillbirth in the first, second, and third parities. Mean incidence of stillbirth decreased from first to third parities: 23.7%, 22.1%, and 21.8%, respectively. Phenotypic rates of stillbirth decreased from 1993 to 1998, for first, second and third calvings, and then increased from 1998 to 2007 for the first three parities. Direct heritability estimates of stillbirth for parities 1, 2 and 3 ranged from 2.2 to 8.7%, 0.6 to 5.1% and 0.1 to 3.8%, respectively, and maternal heritability estimates of stillbirth for parities 1, 2 and 3 ranged from 1.4 to 6.3%, 0.5 to 4.2% and 0.08 to 2.0%, respectively, using linear and threshold animal models. The threshold sire model estimates of heritabilities for stillbirth in this study were 0.021 to 0.071, while the linear sire model estimates of heritabilities for stillbirth in the current study were from 0.003 to 0.021 over the parities. There was a slightly increasing genetic trend for stillbirth rate in parities 1 and 2 over time with the analysis of linear animal and linear sire models. There was a significant decreasing genetic trend for stillbirth rate in parity 1 and 3 over time with the analysis of threshold animal and threshold sire models, but the genetic trend for stillbirth rate in parity 2 with these models of analysis was significantly positive. The low estimates of heritability obtained in this study implied that much of the improvement in stillbirth could be attained by improvement of production environment rather than genetic selection.;

  12. Experimental Population Genetics in the Introductory Genetics Laboratory Using "Drosophila" as a Model Organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald; Kennon, Tillman

    2009-01-01

    Hypotheses of population genetics are derived and tested by students in the introductory genetics laboratory classroom as they explore the effects of biotic variables (physical traits of fruit flies) and abiotic variables (island size and distance) on fruit fly populations. In addition to this hypothesis-driven experiment, the development of…

  13. Experimental Population Genetics in the Introductory Genetics Laboratory Using "Drosophila" as a Model Organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald; Kennon, Tillman

    2009-01-01

    Hypotheses of population genetics are derived and tested by students in the introductory genetics laboratory classroom as they explore the effects of biotic variables (physical traits of fruit flies) and abiotic variables (island size and distance) on fruit fly populations. In addition to this hypothesis-driven experiment, the development of…

  14. Genetic models for the study of luteinizing hormone receptor function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prema eNarayan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor, LHCGR, is essential for fertility in men and women. LHCGR binds luteinizing hormone (LH as well as the highly homologous chorionic gonadotropin (CG. Signaling from LHCGR is required for steroidogenesis and gametogenesis in males and females and for sexual differentiation in the male. The importance of LHCGR in reproductive physiology is underscored by the large number of naturally occurring inactivating and activating mutations in the receptor that result in reproductive disorders. Consequently, several genetically modified mouse models have been developed for the study of LHCGR function. They include targeted deletion of LH and LHCGR that mimic inactivating mutations in hormone and receptor, expression of a constitutively active mutant in LHCGR that mimics activating mutations associated with familial male-limited precocious puberty and transgenic models of LH and hCG overexpression. This review summarizes the salient findings from these models and their utility in understanding the physiological and pathological consequences of loss and gain of function in LHCGR signaling.

  15. A modified rat model of isolated bilateral pulmonary contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaohua; Ruan, Zheng; Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Jin

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to create a feasible specific rat model of isolated bilateral pulmonary contusion (PC) and to evaluate the relationship between severity of hypoxemia and quantity of contusion lesions. Anesthetized rats were placed in a prone position. Injury energy ranging from 2.1 to 3.0 J was produced by a falling weight passed through a specially designed arched shield to the bilateral chest wall of rats. After injury (4 h), the contusion volume was measured using computer-generated three-dimensional reconstruction from a chest computed tomographic scan and expressed as a percentage of total lung volume. Arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO(2)) in blood gas analysis and contusion volume percentage were used to assess the severity of contusion. Heart and lung biopsy was used to confirm the diagnosis and rule out the existence of myocardial contusion. There were 3 cases of death and 1 case of death in the 3.0 J and the 2.4 J group, respectively. PaO(2) in the 2.7 J group was significantly lower than that in the lower energy groups (Ppulmonary contusion in the 2.7 J group was significantly higher compared to that of the lower energy groups (Pcontusion percentage (R(2)=0.76). Hemorrhage, edema and neutrophil infiltration were determined by lung biopsy. No evidence of myocardial contusion was documented in multiple heart biopsies. The method illustrated in this research effectively duplicates isolated bilateral pulmonary contusion in rats, the severity of which is highly correlated with the contusion size. Thus, 2.7 J can be regarded as the maximal energy for sublethal injury.

  16. Chaos in blood flow control in genetic and renovascular hypertensive rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yip, K P; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Marsh, D J

    1991-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure and flow in renal proximal tubules oscillate at 30-40 mHz in normotensive rats anesthetized with halothane. The oscillations originate in tubuloglomerular feedback, a mechanism that provides local blood flow regulation. Instead of oscillations, spontaneously hypertensive rats...... with time after the application of the renal artery clip. Statistical measures of deterministic chaos were applied to tubular pressure data. The correlation dimension, a measure of the dimension of the phase space attractor generating the time series, indicated the presence of a low-dimension strange...... (SHR) have aperiodic tubular pressure fluctuations; the pattern is suggestive of deterministic chaos. Normal rats made hypertensive by clipping one renal artery had similar aperiodic tubular pressure fluctuations in the unclipped kidney, and the fraction of rats with irregular fluctuations increased...

  17. Fatty acid composition of brown adipose tissue in genetically heat-tolerant FOK rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, T.; Furuyama, F.; Kuroshima, A.

    The phospholipid fatty acid composition of brown adipose tissue (BAT) was examined in inbred heat-tolerant FOK rats and compared with that in conventional Wistar rats not previously exposed to heat. The FOK rats showed higher unsaturation states, as indicated by higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and a higher unsaturation index and polyunsaturated fatty acids/saturated fatty acids ratio. This higher level of unsaturation was characterized by the higher amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. It may be concluded that the increased docosahexaenoic acid level in BAT phospholipids brings about the hyperplasia of BAT, causing an enhancement of its in vivo thermogernic activity as well as the systemic non-shivering thermogenesis observed in heat-tolerant FOK rats.

  18. Safety assessment of genetically modified milk containing human beta-defensin-3 on rats by a 90-day feeding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Gao, Ming-Qing; Liang, Dong; Yin, Songna; Yao, Kezhen; Zhang, Yong

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, transgenic technology has been widely applied in many fields. There is concern about the safety of genetically modified (GM) products with the increased prevalence of GM products. In order to prevent mastitis in dairy cows, our group produced transgenic cattle expressing human beta-defensin-3 (HBD3) in their mammary glands, which confers resistance to the bacteria that cause mastitis. The milk derived from these transgenic cattle thus contained HBD3. The objective of the present study was to analyze the nutritional composition of HBD3 milk and conduct a 90-day feeding study on rats. Rats were divided into 5 groups which consumed either an AIN93G diet (growth purified diet for rodents recommended by the American Institute of Nutrition) with the addition of 10% or 30% HBD3 milk, an AIN93G diet with the addition of 10% or 30% conventional milk, or an AIN93G diet alone. The results showed that there was no difference in the nutritional composition of HBD3 and conventional milk. Furthermore, body weight, food consumption, blood biochemistry, relative organ weight, and histopathology were normal in those rats that consumed diets containing HBD3. No adverse effects were observed between groups that could be attributed to varying diets or gender. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanism of auditory hypersensitivity in human autism using autism model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida-Eto, Michiru; Hara, Nao; Ohkawara, Takeshi; Narita, Masaaki

    2017-04-01

    Auditory hypersensitivity is one of the major complications in autism spectrum disorder. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the auditory brain center is affected in autism model rats. Autism model rats were prepared by prenatal exposure to thalidomide on embryonic day 9 and 10 in pregnant rats. The superior olivary complex (SOC), a complex of auditory nuclei, was immunostained with anti-calbindin d28k antibody at postnatal day 50. In autism model rats, SOC immunoreactivity was markedly decreased. Strength of immunostaining of SOC auditory fibers was also weak in autism model rats. Surprisingly, the size of the medial nucleus of trapezoid body, a nucleus exerting inhibitory function in SOC, was significantly decreased in autism model rats. Auditory hypersensitivity may be, in part, due to impairment of inhibitory processing by the auditory brain center. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  20. ideal hepatotoxicity model in rats using carbon tetrachloride (ccl4)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    twenty five (25) rats each; rats in group I are negative control, were not induced with lipid peroxidation. Rats in ... MDA after 96 hours of CCl4 treatment compared with control group. However, rats treated ... EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN. Experimental ... Biochemical Analysis ... these parameters was shown to be proportional to.

  1. Changes in the Brain Endocannabinoid System in Rat Models of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaga, Irena; Jastrzębska, Joanna; Zaniewska, Magdalena; Bystrowska, Beata; Gawliński, Dawid; Faron-Górecka, Agata; Broniowska, Żaneta; Miszkiel, Joanna; Filip, Małgorzata

    2017-04-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in the pathophysiology of depression. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of changes in the eCB system, such as levels of neuromodulators, eCB synthesizing and degrading enzymes, and cannabinoid (CB) receptors, in different brain structures in animal models of depression using behavioral and biochemical analyses. Both models used, i.e., bulbectomized (OBX) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, were characterized at the behavioral level by increased immobility time. In the OBX rats, anandamide (AEA) levels were decreased in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum and increased in the nucleus accumbens, while 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) levels were increased in the prefrontal cortex and decreased in the nucleus accumbens with parallel changes in the expression of eCB metabolizing enzymes in several structures. It was also observed that CB1 receptor expression decreased in the hippocampus, dorsal striatum, and nucleus accumbens, and CB2 receptor expression decreased in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. In WKY rats, the levels of eCBs were reduced in the prefrontal cortex (2-AG) and dorsal striatum (AEA) and increased in the prefrontal cortex (AEA) with different changes in the expression of eCB metabolizing enzymes, while the CB1 receptor density was increased in several brain regions. These findings suggest that dysregulation in the eCB system is implicated in the pathogenesis of depression, although neurochemical changes were linked to the particular brain structure and the factor inducing depression (surgical removal of the olfactory bulbs vs. genetic modulation).

  2. Increased wheel-running activity in the genetically skeletal muscle fast-twitch fiber-dominant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Masataka; Nakano, Hiroshi; Higaki, Yasuki; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Katsuta, Shigeru; Kumagai, Shuzo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether genetic differences in muscle histochemical characteristics were related to the voluntary wheel-running activity level by using genetically fast-twitch fiber-dominant rats (FFDR) and control rats (CR). The rats were divided into four groups; sedentary CR (Sed-CR), wheel-running CR (WR-CR), sedentary FFDR (Sed-FFDR), and wheel-running FFDR (WR-FFDR). Wheel access was started at age 9 wk and lasted for 7 days. The FFDR showed a lower percentage of type I fibers of the deep portion of gastrocnemius and soleus muscles and a higher percentage of both type IIX fibers of the gastrocnemius muscle and type IIA fibers of the soleus muscle compared with CR. A higher capillary density and smaller fiber cross-sectional area were also observed in FFDR. The daily running distance in WR-FFDR was higher than in WR-CR for each 7 days. The total running distance for 7 days in WR-FFDR was 3.2-fold higher than in WR-CR. On day 7 of the 7-day test, the total number of active 1-min intervals for 24 h, the average rpm when they were active, and the maximum rpm for any single 1-min period in the WR-FFDR were significantly higher than in the WR-CR (1.5-, 2.9-, and 2.0-fold, respectively). These results suggest that mechanical or physiological muscle characteristics may thus affect the wheel-running activity level.

  3. The Cooccurrence of Obesity, Osteoporosis, and Sarcopenia in the Ovariectomized Rat: A Study for Modeling Osteosarcopenic Obesity in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ezzat-Zadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity, osteoporosis, and sarcopenia may individually occur due to age-related gradual alterations in body composition. This study investigates the cooccurrence of these age-related diseases in female animals with low levels of ovarian hormone in the absence of complex multifactorial process of chronological aging. Methods. Thirty-six 5- and 10-month-old female rats were chosen to model pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. Rats were divided into three treatment groups in each age category—sham, ovariectomized (ovx, and ovx + E2 (17β-estradiol, 10 μg/kg—and were pair-fed. Volunteer wheel running activity, body composition, bone microstructure, serum C-telopeptides of type I collagen, bone specific alkaline phosphatase, E2, and gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed. Results. The cooccurrence of osteoporosis, sarcopenia, and obesity was observed in the older ovx rats associated with a significant (p<0.05 increased fat mass (30%, bone loss (9.6%, decreased normalized muscle mass-to-body-weight ratio (10.5%, and a significant decrease in physical activity (57%. The ratio of tibial bone mineral density to combined muscle mass was significantly decreased in both ovx age categories. Conclusion. Ovariectomized rat could be used as an experimental model to examine the effect of loss of ovarian hormones, while controlling for energy intake and expenditure, to conduct obesity and body composition translational research in females without the confounding effect of genetic background.

  4. Novel rat tail discitis model using bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostian, Phillip A; Karnes, Jonathan M; Cui, Shari; Robinson, Lisa J; Daffner, Scott D; Witt, Michelle R; Emery, Sanford E

    2017-09-01

    Management of spondylodiscitis is a challenging clinical problem requiring medical and surgical treatment strategies. The purpose of this study was to establish a rat model of spondylodiscitis that utilizes bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), thus permitting in vivo surveillance of infection intensity. Inocula of the bioluminescent S. aureus strain XEN36 were created in concentrations of 10(2) CFU/0.1 ml, 10(4)  CFU/0.1 ml, and 10(6)  CFU/0.1 ml. Three groups of rats were injected with the bacteria in the most proximal intervertebral tail segment. The third most proximal tail segment was injected with saline as a control. Bioluminescence was measured at baseline, 3 days, and weekly for a total of 6 weeks. Detected bioluminescence for each group peaked at day 3 and returned to baseline in 21 days. The average intensity was highest for the experimental group injected with the most concentrated bacterial solution (10(6)  CFU/0.1 ml). Radiographic analysis revealed loss of intervertebral disc space and evidence of osseous bridging. Saline-injected spaces exhibited no decrease in intervertebral spacing as compared to distal sites. Histologic analysis revealed neutrophilic infiltrates, destruction of the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, destruction of vertebral endplates, and osseous bridging. Saline-injected discs exhibited preserved annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus on histology. This study demonstrates that injection of bioluminescent S. aureus into the intervertebral disc of a rat tail is a viable animal model for spondylodiscitis research. This model allows for real-time, in vivo quantification of infection intensity, which m