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Sample records for genetic organization gene

  1. Diversification in the genetic architecture of gene expression and transcriptional networks in organ differentiation of Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Derek R; Benedict, Catherine I; Berg, Arthur; Novaes, Evandro; Novaes, Carolina R D B; Yu, Qibin; Dervinis, Christopher; Maia, Jessica M; Yap, John; Miles, Brianna; Kirst, Matias

    2010-05-04

    A fundamental goal of systems biology is to identify genetic elements that contribute to complex phenotypes and to understand how they interact in networks predictive of system response to genetic variation. Few studies in plants have developed such networks, and none have examined their conservation among functionally specialized organs. Here we used genetical genomics in an interspecific hybrid population of the model hardwood plant Populus to uncover transcriptional networks in xylem, leaves, and roots. Pleiotropic eQTL hotspots were detected and used to construct coexpression networks a posteriori, for which regulators were predicted based on cis-acting expression regulation. Networks were shown to be enriched for groups of genes that function in biologically coherent processes and for cis-acting promoter motifs with known roles in regulating common groups of genes. When contrasted among xylem, leaves, and roots, transcriptional networks were frequently conserved in composition, but almost invariably regulated by different loci. Similarly, the genetic architecture of gene expression regulation is highly diversified among plant organs, with less than one-third of genes with eQTL detected in two organs being regulated by the same locus. However, colocalization in eQTL position increases to 50% when they are detected in all three organs, suggesting conservation in the genetic regulation is a function of ubiquitous expression. Genes conserved in their genetic regulation among all organs are primarily cis regulated (approximately 92%), whereas genes with eQTL in only one organ are largely trans regulated. Trans-acting regulation may therefore be the primary driver of differentiation in function between plant organs.

  2. Genes and quantitative genetic variation involved with senescence in cells, organs and the whole plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit ePujol

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Senescence, the deterioration of morphological, physiological and reproductive functions with age that ends with the death of the organism, was widely studied in plants. Genes were identified that are linked to the deterioration of cells, organs and the whole plant. It is however unclear whether those genes are the source of age dependent deterioration or get activated to regulate such deterioration. Furthermore, it is also unclear whether such genes are active as a direct consequence of age or because they are specifically involved in some developmental stages. At the individual level, it is the relationship between quantitative genetic variation and age that can be used to detect the genetic signature of senescence. Surprisingly, the latter approach was only scarcely applied to plants. This may be the consequence of the demanding requirements for such approaches and/or the fact that most research interest was directed towards plants that avoid senescence. Here, I review those aspects in turn and call for an integrative genetic theory of senescence in plants. Such conceptual development would have implications for the management of plant genetic resources and generate progress on fundamental questions raised by ageing research.

  3. Finding the joker among the maize endogenous reference genes for genetically modified organism (GMO) detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternò, Annalisa; Marchesi, Ugo; Gatto, Francesco; Verginelli, Daniela; Quarchioni, Cinzia; Fusco, Cristiana; Zepparoni, Alessia; Amaddeo, Demetrio; Ciabatti, Ilaria

    2009-12-09

    The comparison of five real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods targeted at maize ( Zea mays ) endogenous sequences is reported. PCR targets were the alcohol dehydrogenase (adh) gene for three methods and high-mobility group (hmg) gene for the other two. The five real-time PCR methods have been checked under repeatability conditions at several dilution levels on both pooled DNA template from several genetically modified (GM) maize certified reference materials (CRMs) and single CRM DNA extracts. Slopes and R(2) coefficients of all of the curves obtained from the adopted regression model were compared within the same method and among all of the five methods, and the limit of detection and limit of quantitation were analyzed for each PCR system. Furthermore, method equivalency was evaluated on the basis of the ability to estimate the target haploid genome copy number at each concentration level. Results indicated that, among the five methods tested, one of the hmg-targeted PCR systems can be considered equivalent to the others but shows the best regression parameters and a higher repeteability along the dilution range. Thereby, it is proposed as a valid module to be coupled to different event-specific real-time PCR for maize genetically modified organism (GMO) quantitation. The resulting practicability improvement on the analytical control of GMOs is discussed.

  4. Diversification in the genetic architecture of gene expression and transcriptional networks in organ differentiation of Populus

    OpenAIRE

    Drost, Derek R.; Benedict, Catherine I.; Berg, Arthur; Novaes, Evandro; Novaes, Carolina R. D. B.; Yu, Qibin; Dervinis, Christopher; Jessica M Maia; Yap, John; Miles, Brianna; Kirst, Matias

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental goal of systems biology is to identify genetic elements that contribute to complex phenotypes and to understand how they interact in networks predictive of system response to genetic variation. Few studies in plants have developed such networks, and none have examined their conservation among functionally specialized organs. Here we used genetical genomics in an interspecific hybrid population of the model hardwood plant Populus to uncover transcriptional networks in xylem, leav...

  5. ASSESSING POSSIBLE ECOLOGICAL RISKS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS: GENE EXPRESSION ASSAYS AND GENETIC MONITORING OF NON-TARGET ORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread planting of genetically modified crops with the Bt transgene pesticide has led to concern over non-target effects of Bt compounds in agroecosystems. While some research suggests that non-target organisms exposed to Bt toxin exhibit reduced fecundity and increased morta...

  6. GeneEd -- A Genetics Educational Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 GeneEd — A Genetics Educational Resource Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Science ... The Hereditary Material of Life / GeneEd — A Genetics Educational Resource / Using The Genetics Home Reference Website / Understanding the ...

  7. Genetically Modified Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claro Llaguno

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have brought to public attention concerns about Bt corn and genetically modified organisms (GMO in general. The timing, it seems, is most appropriate considering two related developments early this year: the final approval of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety in Montreal on January 29, 2001, and the OECD Edinburgh Conference on GM food safety last February 28- March 1, 2001. The protocol makes clear that GMOs include all living modified organisms (LMO defined as "any living organism that possesses a novel combination of genetic material obtained through the use of modern biotechnology". This includes seeds, live fish, and other organisms intentionally obtained for release to the environment. It would seem that the common understanding about GMOs as referring to farm-to-table products is perforce expanded to embrace genetically modified farm animals and aquatic resources. Being a trade agreement, the Montreal accord primarily deals with the safety issues related to the transboundary movement of LMOs around the globe. The OECD conference on the other hand, called for an international body "to address all sides of the GM debate" in response to the public outcry, particularly in Western Europe, regarding the risks the new products pose to human health and the environment. Some points of contention, which remain unresolved, include issues such as whether countries should be allowed to develop their own GM food based on their needs, and whether a global moratorium on GMOs and mandatory labeling should be enforced worldwide.

  8. Harnessing microbial gene pools to remediate persistent organic pollutants using genetically modified plants--a viable technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylott, Elizabeth L; Johnston, Emily J; Bruce, Neil C

    2015-11-01

    It has been 14 years since the international community came together to legislate the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), restricting the production and use of specific chemicals that were found to be environmentally stable, often bioaccumulating, with long-term toxic effects. Efforts are continuing to remove these pollutants from the environment. While incineration and chemical treatment can be successful, these methods require the removal of tonnes of soil, at high cost, and are damaging to soil structure and microbial communities. The engineering of plants for in situ POP remediation has had highly promising results, and could be a more environmentally-friendly alternative. This review discusses the characterization of POP-degrading bacterial pathways, and how the genes responsible have been harnessed using genetic modification (GM) to introduce these same abilities into plants. Recent advances in multi-gene cloning, genome editing technologies and expression in monocot species are accelerating progress with remediation-applicable species. Examples include plants developed to degrade 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), trichloroethylene (TCE), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). However, the costs and timescales needed to gain regulatory approval, along with continued public opposition, are considerable. The benefits and challenges in this rapidly developing and promising field are discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. PCR for Anti-herbicide Genes Detection in Genetically Modified Organisms%转基因产品中抗除草剂基因的PCR检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许文涛; 黄昆仑; 邓爱科; 罗云波

    2005-01-01

    抗除草剂作物占全球转基因作物的75%以上,并且这类作物还有不断增加的趋势.首次建立并优化了对4类转基因作物(大豆(Glycincmax)、玉米(Zeamays)、棉花(Gossypiumhirsutnm)和油菜(Brassica campestrisvar.oleifera))的5种外源抗除草剂基因(bar、pat、cp4-epspsl、cp4-sps2和gox)的PCR检测方法,并在实践中应用.结果表明,本方法灵敏特异、结果准确可靠,可对目前批准的所有抗除草剂转基因产品进行定性检测.%The GMO (genetically modified organisms) containing anti-herbicide genes account for more than 75% of all GMO and the proportion is increasing. The 5 kinds of the anti-herbicide genes (bar, pat, cp4-epspsl, cp4-epsps2 and gox) were examined by PCR in 4 kinds of genetically modified crops (soybean (Glycine max), maize (Zea mays), cotton (Gossypinm hirsutnm) and rape (Brassica campestris var. oleifera)). Results indicated that the method found was sensitive, specific and credible, and all genetically modified crops containing the anti-herbicide genes could be analyzed by this method.

  10. What makes genetically modified organisms so distasteful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, K G

    2001-10-01

    The debate concerning genetically modified organisms goes on unabated and reflects some genuine concerns. I suggest that a significantly large number of educated people believe that moving genes around between species is intuitively wrong and that this is based on an essentialist view of the world. This essentialist view has a long history that dates back to Plato and Aristotle and was eventually overthrown by the population thinking of Charles Darwin. The essentialist, who is antipathetic to population thinking, will naturally find the transfer of a gene from one organism to another distasteful, and this, I argue, is the result of Platonic thinking, which still remains and casts its spell over us today.

  11. Evolution of genetic organization in digital organisms

    CERN Document Server

    Ofria, C A; Ofria, Charles; Adami, Christoph

    1999-01-01

    We examine the evolution of expression patterns and the organization of genetic information in populations of self-replicating digital organisms. Seeding the experiments with a linearly expressed ancestor, we witness the development of complex, parallel secondary expression patterns. Using principles from information theory, we demonstrate an evolutionary pressure towards overlapping expressions causing variation (and hence further evolution) to sharply drop. Finally, we compare the overlapping sections of dominant genomes to those portions which are singly expressed and observe a significant difference in the entropy of their encoding.

  12. Transcriptomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes during Flower Organ Development in Genetic Male Sterile and Male Fertile Tagetes erecta by Digital Gene-Expression Profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Ai

    Full Text Available Tagetes erecta is an important commercial plant of Asteraceae family. The male sterile (MS and male fertile (MF two-type lines of T. erecta have been utilized in F1 hybrid production for many years, but no report has been made to identify the genes that specify its male sterility that is caused by homeotic conversion of floral organs. In this study, transcriptome assembly and digital gene expression profiling were performed to generate expression profiles of MS and MF plants. A cDNA library was generated from an equal mixture of RNA isolated from MS and MF flower buds (1 mm and 4 mm in diameter. Totally, 87,473,431 clean tags were obtained and assembled into 128,937 transcripts among which 65,857 unigenes were identified with an average length of 1,188 bp. About 52% of unigenes (34,176 were annotated in Nr, Nt, Pfam, KOG/COG, Swiss-Prot, KO (KEGG Ortholog database and/or GO. Taking the above transcriptome as reference, 125 differentially expressed genes were detected in both developmental stages of MS and MF flower buds. MADS-box genes were presumed to be highly related to male sterility in T. erecta based on histological and cytological observations. Twelve MADS-box genes showed significantly different expression levels in flower buds 4 mm in diameter, whereas only one gene expressed significantly different in flower buds 1 mm in diameter between MS and MF plants. This is the first transcriptome analysis in T. erecta and will provide a valuable resource for future genomic studies, especially in flower organ development and/or differentiation.

  13. Transcriptomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes during Flower Organ Development in Genetic Male Sterile and Male Fertile Tagetes erecta by Digital Gene-Expression Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Ye; Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Weining; Zhang, Chunling; Cao, Zhe; Bao, Manzhu; He, Yanhong

    2016-01-01

    Tagetes erecta is an important commercial plant of Asteraceae family. The male sterile (MS) and male fertile (MF) two-type lines of T. erecta have been utilized in F1 hybrid production for many years, but no report has been made to identify the genes that specify its male sterility that is caused by homeotic conversion of floral organs. In this study, transcriptome assembly and digital gene expression profiling were performed to generate expression profiles of MS and MF plants. A cDNA library was generated from an equal mixture of RNA isolated from MS and MF flower buds (1 mm and 4 mm in diameter). Totally, 87,473,431 clean tags were obtained and assembled into 128,937 transcripts among which 65,857 unigenes were identified with an average length of 1,188 bp. About 52% of unigenes (34,176) were annotated in Nr, Nt, Pfam, KOG/COG, Swiss-Prot, KO (KEGG Ortholog database) and/or GO. Taking the above transcriptome as reference, 125 differentially expressed genes were detected in both developmental stages of MS and MF flower buds. MADS-box genes were presumed to be highly related to male sterility in T. erecta based on histological and cytological observations. Twelve MADS-box genes showed significantly different expression levels in flower buds 4 mm in diameter, whereas only one gene expressed significantly different in flower buds 1 mm in diameter between MS and MF plants. This is the first transcriptome analysis in T. erecta and will provide a valuable resource for future genomic studies, especially in flower organ development and/or differentiation.

  14. Emergence of DHA-1-producing Klebsiella spp. in the Parisian region: genetic organization of the ampC and ampR genes originating from Morganella morganii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdet, Charlotte; Benzerara, Yahia; Gautier, Valérie; Adam, Olivier; Ould-Hocine, Zahia; Arlet, Guillaume

    2006-02-01

    Eleven Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates and one Klebsiella oxytoca clinical isolate showing various pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types and producing an inducible DHA-1 class C beta-lactamase were isolated in the Parisian region between 1998 and 2003. The aim of this study was to compare the genetic organization of the bla(DHA-1) genes in this collection of clinical isolates. In four isolates, the Morganella morganii-derived genomic region containing bla(DHA-1) was inserted in an entire complex sul1-type integron, including a region common to In6-In7 (CR1), as previously described in a bla(DHA-1)-producing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis KF92 isolate from Saudi Arabia in 1992. Different gene cassette arrays were characterized in each of these integrons. In two of them, an additional 10-kb fragment was inserted between the CR1 and the M. morganii-derived region and was similar to the sap (ABC transporter family) and psp (phage shock protein) operons originated from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The length of the M. morganii region was variable, suggesting that several independent recombination events have occurred and that open reading frame orf513 encodes a recombinase involved in the mobilization of the resistance genes. The genetic organization of bla(DHA-1) was identical in the eight other isolates. This structure is likely derived from a complex integron following the insertion of IS26, leading to the deletion of the first part of integron. The horizontal transfer of one plasmid carrying that truncated integron was shown for seven of these isolates.

  15. UNDERSTANDING OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last sixteen years biotechnology, genetic engineering, transgenic organisms or genetically modified organisms (GMOs have been raising numerous controversies. In the scientific sphere, genetic engineering and GMOs represent a special challenge for geneticists, breeders and physicians, in philosophy it is a topic of interest for bioethicists and agricultural ethicists, environmentalists are interested in the interconnectictions between new technology and environment protection, for multinational companies this is a potential source of huge profits, and for certain governments they represent an instrument for strategic control of food production within their countries as well as internationally. By taking into account the views of both advocates and opponents of this "revolutionary" method, authors believe that we should not a priori reject new and insufficiently studied technologies, but that in this particular it is necessary to be extremely cautious, in other words that from (bioethical point of view only those GMO investigations limited to scientific purposes are justified, provided that all required precautions have been taken. Also, authors are of the opinion that in this region as well as in Europe as a whole, at this moment, transgenic organisms are not necessery, neither in agricultural production nor in the food chain. Arguments for such a statement are found primarily in the potential issues that intentional breeding of GMOs might inflict upon the human health and environment. Namely, if borders of individual species are not overstepped and if their endogenous traits are made stronger, the potential risk of causing irreparable damage for both present and future generations which may be brought by changed biological succession will be reduced, i.e. one of the four fundamental bioethical principles will be applied and that is the nonmaleficence. Further intentional decreasing of biodiversity should not be allowed, which means

  16. Development and validation of real-time PCR screening methods for detection of cry1a.105 and cry2ab2 genes in genetically modified organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinon, A.Z.; Prins, T.W.; Dijk, van J.P.; Arisi, C.M.; Scholtens-Toma, I.M.J.; Kok, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Primers and probes were developed for the element-specific detection of cry1A.105 and cry2Ab2 genes, based on their DNA sequence as present in GM maize MON89034. Cry genes are present in many genetically modified (GM) plants and they are important targets for developing GMO element-specific detectio

  17. Development and validation of real-time PCR screening methods for detection of cry1a.105 and cry2ab2 genes in genetically modified organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinon, A.Z.; Prins, T.W.; Dijk, van J.P.; Arisi, C.M.; Scholtens-Toma, I.M.J.; Kok, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Primers and probes were developed for the element-specific detection of cry1A.105 and cry2Ab2 genes, based on their DNA sequence as present in GM maize MON89034. Cry genes are present in many genetically modified (GM) plants and they are important targets for developing GMO element-specific

  18. Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardmore, J A; Porter, Joanne S

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the nature of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), the range of aquatic species in which GMOs have been produced, the methods and target genes employed, the benefits to aquaculture, the problems attached to use of GMOs in aquatic species and the regulatory and other social frameworks surrounding them. A set of recommendations aimed at best practice is appended. This states the potential value of GMOs in aquaculture but also calls for improved knowledge particularly of sites of integration, risk analysis, progress in achieving sterility in fish for production and better dissemination of relevant information.

  19. Organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonegawa, S; Brack, C; Hozumi, N; Pirrotta, V

    1978-01-01

    The nucleotide-sequence determination of a cloned, embryonic Vlambda gene directly demonstrated that V genes are separate from a corresponding C gene in embryonic cells. Analysis by restriction enzymes of total cellular DNA from various sources strongly suggested that the two separate immunoglobulin genes become continuous during differentiation of B lymphocytes. There seems to be a strict correlation between the joining event and activation of the joined genes. Cloning of more immunoglobulin genes from embryo and plasma cells will not only provide direct demonstration of such a gene-joining event but also help in the elucidation of a possible relationship of the event to gene activation mechanisms.

  20. Transboundary movements of genetically modified organisms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transboundary movements of genetically modified organisms and the ... of posing untold and undiscovered threats to human beings and other living organisms. ... use of living modified organisms (LMOs) such as genetically engineered plants, animals, and microbes were at last being catered for, albeit leaving aside the ...

  1. Genetic rhetoric: Science, authority, and genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Elizabeth Parthenia

    This dissertation is an analysis of how the cultural authority of genetics works through language. An analysis of the rhetorical construction of knowledge and authority in cultural contexts, the study is intended to contribute to a larger discussion aimed at keeping the intersections of science and culture within the realm of rhetoric, that is within the realm of communication and dialogue. Of special concern is the influence of genetic rhetoric on the cultural momentum of biological determinism to explain away social organization, class inequalities, racial differences, gender differences, and stigmatized behaviors by rooting them in the construct of the biological individual. This study separates questions of legitimacy from questions of authority and focuses on the way that authority of genetics works through language. With authority defined as the function of resisting challenges to legitimacy and/or power, the study consists of three parts. First, a historical analysis of the terms science, genetics, and gene, shows how these words came to refer not only to areas and objects of study but also to sources of epistemological legitimacy outside culture and language. The relationships between these words and their referents are examined in socio-historical context to illustrate how the function of signaling authority was inscribed in the literal definition of these terms. Second, introductory chapters of contemporary Genetics textbooks are examined. In these texts the foundations of legitimacy associated with genetics and science are maintained as the authors articulate idealized views of science and genetics in relation to society. Finally, articles in the popular press reporting on and discussing recent research correlating genetics and homosexuality are examined. The popular press reports of "gay gene" research serve as textual examples of figurative representations of genetics concepts shaping discourse about social issues. I argue that the cultural authority

  2. Predictability of Genetic Interactions from Functional Gene Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H. Young

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing genetic interactions is crucial to understanding cellular and organismal response to gene-level perturbations. Such knowledge can inform the selection of candidate disease therapy targets, yet experimentally determining whether genes interact is technically nontrivial and time-consuming. High-fidelity prediction of different classes of genetic interactions in multiple organisms would substantially alleviate this experimental burden. Under the hypothesis that functionally related genes tend to share common genetic interaction partners, we evaluate a computational approach to predict genetic interactions in Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By leveraging knowledge of functional relationships between genes, we cross-validate predictions on known genetic interactions and observe high predictive power of multiple classes of genetic interactions in all three organisms. Additionally, our method suggests high-confidence candidate interaction pairs that can be directly experimentally tested. A web application is provided for users to query genes for predicted novel genetic interaction partners. Finally, by subsampling the known yeast genetic interaction network, we found that novel genetic interactions are predictable even when knowledge of currently known interactions is minimal.

  3. A genetic screen for modifiers of UFO meristem activity identifies three novel FUSED FLORAL ORGANS genes required for early flower development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, J Z; Fletcher, J C; Chen, X; Meyerowitz, E M

    1998-06-01

    In a screen to identify novel genes required for early Arabidopsis flower development, we isolated four independent mutations that enhance the Ufo phenotype toward the production of filamentous structures in place of flowers. The mutants fall into three complementation groups, which we have termed FUSED FLORAL ORGANS (FFO) loci. ffo mutants have specific defects in floral organ separation and/or positioning; thus, the FFO genes identify components of a boundary formation mechanism(s) acting between developing floral organ primordia. FFO1 and FFO3 have specific functions in cauline leaf/stem separation and in first- and third-whorl floral organ separation, with FFO3 likely acting to establish and FFO1 to maintain floral organ boundaries. FFO2 acts at early floral stages to regulate floral organ number and positioning and to control organ separation within and between whorls. Plants doubly mutant for two ffo alleles display additive phenotypes, indicating that the FFO genes may act in separate pathways. Plants doubly mutant for an ffo gene and for ufo, lfy, or clv3 reveal that the FFO genes play roles related to those of UFO and LFY in floral meristem initiation and that FFO2 and FFO3 may act to control cell proliferation late in inflorescence development.

  4. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  5. [Elucidation of key genes in sex determination in genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; He, Zhumei

    2014-06-01

    Sex is an important and complex feature of organisms, which is controlled by the genetic and environmental factors. The genetic factors, i.e., genes, are vital in sex determination. However, not all the related genes play the same roles, and some key genes play a vital role in the sex determination and differentiation. With the development of the modern genetics, a great progress on the key genes has been made in sex determination. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of sex determination and the strategy of how to study the key genes in sex determination. It will help us to understand the mechanism of sex determination better in the teaching of genetics.

  6. COL5A1: Fine genetic mapping, intron/exon organization, and exclusion as candidate gene in families with tuberous sclerosis complex 1, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, D.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Papenberg, K.A.; Marchuk, D.A. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Type V collagen is the only fibrillar collagen which has yet to be implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic diseases in humans or mice. To begin examining the possible role of type V collagen in genetic disease, we have previously mapped COL5A1, the gene for the {alpha}1 chain of type V collagen, to 9q23.2{r_arrow}q34.3 and described two restriction site polymorphisms which allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for nail-patella syndrome. We have now used these polymorphisms to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for tuberous sclerosis complex 1 and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II. In addition, we describe a CA repeat, with observed heterozygosity of about 0.5, in a COL5A1 intron, which has allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and to place COL5A1 on the CEPH family genetic map between markers D9S66 and D9S67. We have also determined the entire intron/exon organization of COL5A1, which will facilitate characterization of mutations in genetic diseases with which COL5A1 may be linked in future studies.

  7. Biocontainment of genetically modified organisms by synthetic protein design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Daniel J.; Lajoie, Marc J.; Mee, Michael T.; Takeuchi, Ryo; Kuznetsov, Gleb; Norville, Julie E.; Gregg, Christopher J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Church, George M.

    2015-02-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly deployed at large scales and in open environments. Genetic biocontainment strategies are needed to prevent unintended proliferation of GMOs in natural ecosystems. Existing biocontainment methods are insufficient because they impose evolutionary pressure on the organism to eject the safeguard by spontaneous mutagenesis or horizontal gene transfer, or because they can be circumvented by environmentally available compounds. Here we computationally redesign essential enzymes in the first organism possessing an altered genetic code (Escherichia coli strain C321.ΔA) to confer metabolic dependence on non-standard amino acids for survival. The resulting GMOs cannot metabolically bypass their biocontainment mechanisms using known environmental compounds, and they exhibit unprecedented resistance to evolutionary escape through mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer. This work provides a foundation for safer GMOs that are isolated from natural ecosystems by a reliance on synthetic metabolites.

  8. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases : Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marian, Ali J; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on "omics." Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments,

  9. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases : Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marian, Ali J.; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on “omics.” Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments,

  10. Gene set analysis for interpreting genetic studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pers, Tune H

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation of genome-wide association study (GWAS) results is lacking behind the discovery of new genetic associations. Consequently, there is an urgent need for data-driven methods for interpreting genetic association studies. Gene set analysis (GSA) can identify aetiologic pathways and func......Interpretation of genome-wide association study (GWAS) results is lacking behind the discovery of new genetic associations. Consequently, there is an urgent need for data-driven methods for interpreting genetic association studies. Gene set analysis (GSA) can identify aetiologic pathways...

  11. GENE MUTATIONS, GENETIC DISEASE AND PHARMACOGENETIC GENES DISORDER

    OpenAIRE

    Ishak

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell mutation is able to create genetic variance in a cell population and can induce cancer and tumor when gene mutations took place at repressor gene in controlling cell cycles such as p53 gene. Whereas germline cell mutation can cause genetic disease such as sickle cell anemia, breast cancer, thalassemia, parkinson’s as well as defect of biochemical pathway that influence drug-receptor interaction, which has negative effect and lead to hospitalized of patient. Most of reports mentio...

  12. The Detection of Genetically Modified Organisms: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovesná, Jaroslava; Demnerová, Kateřina; Pouchová, Vladimíra

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are those whose genetic material has been altered by the insertion of a new gene or by the deletion of an existing one(s). Modern biotechnology, in particular, the rise of genetic engineering, has supported the development of GMOs suitable for research purposes and practical applications (Gepts, 2002; Novoselova,Meuwissen, & Huirne, 2007; Sakakibara & Saito, 2006). For over 20 years GM bacteria and other GM organisms have been used in laboratories for the study of gene functions (Maliga & Small, 2007; Ratledge & Kristiansen, 2006). Agricultural plants were the first GMOs to be released into the environment and placed on the market. Farmers around the world use GMsoybeans, GMcorn and GM cotton that are herbicide tolerant, or insect resistant, or combine several traits that reduce the costs associated with crop production (Corinne, Fernandez-Cornejo, & Goodhue, 2004).

  13. Gene finding in genetically isolated populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Heutink (Peter); B.A. Oostra (Ben)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe struggle to identify susceptibility genes for complex disorders has stimulated geneticists to develop new approaches. One approach that has gained considerable interest is to focus on genetically isolated populations rather than on the general population. There rema

  14. [Risk assessment of genetically modified organisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Thadeu Estevam Moreira Maramaldo; Dias, Aline Peçanha Muzy; Scheidegger, Erica Miranda Damasio; Marin, Victor Augustus

    2011-01-01

    Since the commercial approve in 1996, the global area of transgenic crops has raised more than 50 times. In the last two decades, governments have been planning strategies and protocols for safety assessment of food and feed genetically modified (GM). Evaluation of food safety should be taken on a case-by-case analysis depending on the specific traits of the modified crops and the changes introduced by the genetic modification, using for this the concept of substantial equivalence. This work presents approaches for the risk assessment of GM food, as well as some problems related with the genetic construction or even with the expression of the inserted gene.

  15. A Candida albicans CRISPR system permits genetic engineering of essential genes and gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Valmik K; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Fink, Gerald R

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic yeast that causes mucosal and systematic infections with high mortality. The absence of facile molecular genetics has been a major impediment to analysis of pathogenesis. The lack of meiosis coupled with the absence of plasmids makes genetic engineering cumbersome, especially for essential functions and gene families. We describe a C. albicans CRISPR system that overcomes many of the obstacles to genetic engineering in this organism. The high frequency with which CRISPR-induced mutations can be directed to target genes enables easy isolation of homozygous gene knockouts, even without selection. Moreover, the system permits the creation of strains with mutations in multiple genes, gene families, and genes that encode essential functions. This CRISPR system is also effective in a fresh clinical isolate of undetermined ploidy. Our method transforms the ability to manipulate the genome of Candida and provides a new window into the biology of this pathogen.

  16. Genetically Modified Organisms and Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAHID eALI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases. Since the eradication of small pox in 1976, many other potentially life compromising if not threatening diseases have been dealt with subsequently. This event was a major leap not only in the scientific world already burdened with many diseases but also in the mindset of the common man who became more receptive to novel treatment options. Among the many protozoan diseases, the leishmaniases have emerged as one of the largest parasite killers of the world, second only to malaria. There are three types of leishmaniases namely cutaneous (CL, mucocutaneous (ML and visceral (VL, caused by a group of more than 20 species of Leishmania parasites. Visceral leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar is the most severe form and almost fatal if untreated. Since the first attempts at leishmanization, we have killed parasite vaccines, subunit protein or DNA vaccines, and now we have live recombinant carrier vaccines and live attenuated parasite vaccines under various stages of development. Although some research has shown promising results, many more potential genes need to be evaluated as live attenuated vaccine candidates. This mini-review attempts to summarize the success and failures of genetically modified organisms used in vaccination against some of major parasitic diseases for their application in leishmaniasis.

  17. Genetically modified organisms and visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhajer, Rudra; Ali, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases. Since the eradication of small pox in 1976, many other potentially life compromising if not threatening diseases have been dealt with subsequently. This event was a major leap not only in the scientific world already burdened with many diseases but also in the mindset of the common man who became more receptive to novel treatment options. Among the many protozoan diseases, the leishmaniases have emerged as one of the largest parasite killers of the world, second only to malaria. There are three types of leishmaniasis namely cutaneous (CL), mucocutaneous (ML), and visceral (VL), caused by a group of more than 20 species of Leishmania parasites. Visceral leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar is the most severe form and almost fatal if untreated. Since the first attempts at leishmanization, we have killed parasite vaccines, subunit protein, or DNA vaccines, and now we have live recombinant carrier vaccines and live attenuated parasite vaccines under various stages of development. Although some research has shown promising results, many more potential genes need to be evaluated as live attenuated vaccine candidates. This mini-review attempts to summarize the success and failures of genetically modified organisms used in vaccination against some of major parasitic diseases for their application in leishmaniasis.

  18. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases: Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Ali J; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-12-27

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on "omics." Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments, describes the basis of human genetic diversity, and addresses the phenotypic consequences of genetic variants. Rare variants with large effect sizes are responsible for single-gene disorders, whereas complex polygenic diseases are typically due to multiple genetic variants, each exerting a modest effect size. To illustrate the clinical implications of genetic variants with large effect sizes, 3 common forms of hereditary cardiomyopathies are discussed as prototypic examples of single-gene disorders, including their genetics, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, and treatment. The genetic basis of complex traits is discussed in a separate paper. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The evolution of secondary organization in immune system gene libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hightower, R.; Forrest, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-02-01

    A binary model of the immune system is used to study the effects of evolution on the genetic encoding for antibody molecules. We report experiments which show that the evolution of immune system genes, simulated by the genetic algorithm, can induce a high degree of genetic organization even though that organization is not explicitly required by the fitness function. This secondary organization is related to the true fitness of an individual, in contrast to the sampled fitness which is the explicit fitness measure used to drive the process of evolution.

  20. Development and validation of real-time PCR screening methods for detection of cry1A.105 and cry2Ab2 genes in genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinon, Andréia Z; Prins, Theo W; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Arisi, Ana Carolina M; Scholtens, Ingrid M J; Kok, Esther J

    2011-05-01

    Primers and probes were developed for the element-specific detection of cry1A.105 and cry2Ab2 genes, based on their DNA sequence as present in GM maize MON89034. Cry genes are present in many genetically modified (GM) plants and they are important targets for developing GMO element-specific detection methods. Element-specific methods can be of use to screen for the presence of GMOs in food and feed supply chains. Moreover, a combination of GMO elements may indicate the potential presence of unapproved GMOs (UGMs). Primer-probe combinations were evaluated in terms of specificity, efficiency and limit of detection. Except for specificity, the complete experiment was performed in 9 PCR runs, on 9 different days and by testing 8 DNA concentrations. The results showed a high specificity and efficiency for cry1A.105 and cry2Ab2 detection. The limit of detection was between 0.05 and 0.01 ng DNA per PCR reaction for both assays. These data confirm the applicability of these new primer-probe combinations for element detection that can contribute to the screening for GM and UGM crops in food and feed samples.

  1. Genetic control of organ shape and tissue polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia A Green

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which genes control organ shape are poorly understood. In principle, genes may control shape by modifying local rates and/or orientations of deformation. Distinguishing between these possibilities has been difficult because of interactions between patterns, orientations, and mechanical constraints during growth. Here we show how a combination of growth analysis, molecular genetics, and modelling can be used to dissect the factors contributing to shape. Using the Snapdragon (Antirrhinum flower as an example, we show how shape development reflects local rates and orientations of tissue growth that vary spatially and temporally to form a dynamic growth field. This growth field is under the control of several dorsoventral genes that influence flower shape. The action of these genes can be modelled by assuming they modulate specified growth rates parallel or perpendicular to local orientations, established by a few key organisers of tissue polarity. Models in which dorsoventral genes only influence specified growth rates do not fully account for the observed growth fields and shapes. However, the data can be readily explained by a model in which dorsoventral genes also modify organisers of tissue polarity. In particular, genetic control of tissue polarity organisers at ventral petal junctions and distal boundaries allows both the shape and growth field of the flower to be accounted for in wild type and mutants. The results suggest that genetic control of tissue polarity organisers has played a key role in the development and evolution of shape.

  2. Genes and genetic testing in hereditary ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Erin; Burmeister, Margit

    2014-07-22

    Ataxia is a neurological cerebellar disorder characterized by loss of coordination during muscle movements affecting walking, vision, and speech. Genetic ataxias are very heterogeneous, with causative variants reported in over 50 genes, which can be inherited in classical dominant, recessive, X-linked, or mitochondrial fashion. A common mechanism of dominant ataxias is repeat expansions, where increasing lengths of repeated DNA sequences result in non-functional proteins that accumulate in the body causing disease. Greater understanding of all ataxia genes has helped identify several different pathways, such as DNA repair, ubiquitination, and ion transport, which can be used to help further identify new genes and potential treatments. Testing for the most common mutations in these genes is now clinically routine to help with prognosis and treatment decisions, but next generation sequencing will revolutionize how genetic testing will be done. Despite the large number of known ataxia causing genes, however, many individuals with ataxia are unable to obtain a genetic diagnosis, suggesting that more genes need to be discovered. Utilization of next generation sequencing technologies, expression studies, and increased knowledge of ataxia pathways will aid in the identification of new ataxia genes.

  3. Modifier genes and the plasticity of genetic networks in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A Hamilton

    Full Text Available Modifier genes are an integral part of the genetic landscape in both humans and experimental organisms, but have been less well explored in mammals than other systems. A growing number of modifier genes in mouse models of disease nonetheless illustrate the potential for novel findings, while new technical advances promise many more to come. Modifier genes in mouse models include induced mutations and spontaneous or wild-derived variations captured in inbred strains. Identification of modifiers among wild-derived variants in particular should detect disease modifiers that have been shaped by selection and might therefore be compatible with high fitness and function. Here we review selected examples and argue that modifier genes derived from natural variation may provide a bias for nodes in genetic networks that have greater intrinsic plasticity and whose therapeutic manipulation may therefore be more resilient to side effects than conventional targets.

  4. Attitudes towards genetically modified and organic foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Marieke; Lindeman, Marjaana; Hursti, Ulla-Kaisa Koivisto

    2006-05-01

    Finnish students (N=3261) filled out a questionnaire on attitudes towards genetically modified and organic food, plus the rational-experiential inventory, the magical thinking about food and health scale, Schwartz's value survey and the behavioural inhibition scale. In addition, they reported their eating of meat. Structural equation modelling of these measures had greater explanatory power for attitudes towards genetically modified (GM) foods than for attitudes towards organic foods (OF). GM attitudes were best predicted by natural science education and magical food and health beliefs, which mediated the influence of thinking styles. Positive attitudes towards organic food, on the other hand, were more directly related to such individual differences as thinking styles and set of values. The results of the study indicate that OF attitudes are rooted in more fundamental personal attributes than GM attitudes, which are embedded in a more complex but also in a more modifiable network of characteristics.

  5. Genes, genetics, and Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, F; Wong, R W K; Rabie, A B M

    2010-05-01

    To present current views that are pertinent to the investigation of the genetic etiology of Class III malocclusion. Class III malocclusion is thought to be a polygenic disorder that results from an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental factors. However, research on family pedigrees has indicated that Class III malocclusion might also be a monogenic dominant phenotype. Recent studies have reported that genes that encode specific growth factors or other signaling molecules are involved in condylar growth under mechanical strain. These genes, which include Indian hedgehog homolog (IHH), parathyroid-hormone like hormone (PTHLH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and variations in their levels of expression play an important role in the etiology of Class III malocclusion. In addition, genome-wide scans have revealed chromosomal loci that are associated with Class III malocclusion. It is likely that chromosomal loci 1p36, 12q23, and 12q13 harbor genes that confer susceptibility to Class III malocclusion. In a case-control association study, we identified erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1 (EPB41) to be a new positional candidate gene that might be involved in susceptibility to mandibular prognathism. Most of the earlier studies on the genetic etiology of Class III malocclusion have focused on the patterns of inheritance of this phenotype. Recent investigations have focused on understanding the genetic variables that affect Class III malocclusion and might provide new approaches to uncovering the genetic etiology of this phenotype.

  6. Advances in gene technology: Human genetic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, W.A.; Ahmad, F.; Black, S.; Schultz, J.; Whelan, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the papers presented at the conference on the subject of ''advances in Gene technology: Human genetic disorders''. Molecular biology of various carcinomas and inheritance of metabolic diseases is discussed and technology advancement in diagnosis of hereditary diseases is described. Some of the titles discussed are-Immunoglobulin genes translocation and diagnosis; hemophilia; oncogenes; oncogenic transformations; experimental data on mice, hamsters, birds carcinomas and sarcomas.

  7. 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene is associated with multiple organ dysfunction and septic shock in pneumonia induced severe sepsis: prospective, observational, genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madách, Krisztina; Aladzsity, István; Szilágyi, Agnes; Fust, George; Gál, János; Pénzes, István; Prohászka, Zoltán

    2010-01-01

    Activation of inflammation and coagulation are closely related and mutually interdependent in sepsis. The acute-phase protein, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key element in the inhibition of fibrinolysis. Elevated levels of PAI-1 have been related to worse outcome in pneumonia. We aimed to evaluate the effect of functionally relevant 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene in pneumonia induced sepsis. We enrolled 208 Caucasian patients with severe sepsis due to pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Patients were followed up until ICU discharge or death. Clinical data were collected prospectively and the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Patients were stratified according to the occurrence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, septic shock or death. We found that carriers of the PAI-1 4G/4G and 4G/5G genotypes have a 2.74-fold higher risk for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (odds ratio [OR] 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.335 - 5.604; p = 0.006) and a 2.57-fold higher risk for septic shock (OR 95%CI = 1.180 - 5.615; p = 0.018) than 5G/5G carriers. The multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for independent predictors, such as age, nosocomial pneumonia and positive microbiological culture also supported that carriers of the 4G allele have a higher prevalence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.957; 95%CI = 1.306 -6.698; p = 0.009) and septic shock (aOR = 2.603; 95%CI = 1.137 - 5.959; p = 0.024). However, genotype and allele analyses have not shown any significant difference regarding mortality in models non-adjusted or adjusted for acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II. Patients bearing the 4G allele had higher disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) score at admission (p = 0.007) than 5G/5G carriers. Moreover, in 4G allele carriers the length of ICU stay of non-survivors was longer

  8. Genetically modified organisms : herbicide-resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Retuerta, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    Pòster Due to the overgrowth of weeds, and the fact that herbicides cannot differentiate between crops and weeds, herbicide-resistant crops have been developed. This kind of genetically modified organisms (GMO) allows farmers to eliminate all weeds in a unique implementation of the herbicide meaning: less spraying, less “traffic” in the field and lower operating costs. However, this, like any other innovation, has generated much controversy

  9. On the relation between gene flow theory and genetic gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolliams John A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In conventional gene flow theory the rate of genetic gain is calculated as the summed products of genetic selection differential and asymptotic proportion of genes deriving from sex-age groups. Recent studies have shown that asymptotic proportions of genes predicted from conventional gene flow theory may deviate considerably from true proportions. However, the rate of genetic gain predicted from conventional gene flow theory was accurate. The current note shows that the connection between asymptotic proportions of genes and rate of genetic gain that is embodied in conventional gene flow theory is invalid, even though genetic gain may be predicted correctly from it.

  10. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... July 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, ... factors. Population-Based Autism Genetics and Environment Study Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from ...

  11. Molecular genetics of Psoriasis (Principles, technology, gene location, genetic polymorphism and gene expression).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Robaee, Ahmad A

    2010-11-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with an etiology bases on both environmental and genetic factors. As is the case of many autoimmune diseases its real cause remains poorly defined. However, it is known that genetic factors contribute to disease susceptibility. The linkage analysis has been used to identify multiple loci and alleles that confer risk of the disease. Some other studies have focused upon single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for mapping of probable causal variants. Other studies, using genome-wide analytical techniques, tried to link the disease to copy number variants (CNVs) that are segments of DNA ranging in size from kilobases to megabases that vary in copy number. CNVs represent an important element of genomic polymorphism in humans and harboring dosage-sensitive genes may cause or predispose to a variety of human genetic diseases. The mechanisms giving rise to SNPs and CNVs can be considered as fundamental processes underlying gene duplications, deletions, insertions, inversions and complex combinations of rearrangements. The duplicated genes being the results of 'successful' copies are fixed and maintained in the population. Conversely, many 'unsuccessful' duplicates remain in the genome as pseudogenes. There is another form of genetic variations termed copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH) with less information about their potential impact on complex diseases. Additional studies would include associated gene expression variations with either SNPs or CNVs. Now many genetic techniques such as PCR, real time PCR, microarray and restriction fragment length analysis are available for detecting genetic polymorphisms, gene mapping and estimation of gene expression. Recently, the scientists have used these tools to define genetic signatures of disease, to understand genetic causes of disease and to characterize the effects of certain drugs on gene expression. This review highlights the principles, technology and applications on

  12. [Genetically modified organisms: a new threat to food safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spendeler, Liliane

    2005-01-01

    This article analyzes all of the food safety-related aspects related to the use of genetically modified organisms into agriculture and food. A discussion is provided as to the uncertainties related to the insertion of foreign genes into organisms, providing examples of unforeseen, undesirable effects and of instabilities of the organisms thus artificially fabricated. Data is then provided from both official agencies as well as existing literature questioning the accuracy and reliability of the risk analyses as to these organisms being harmless to health and discusses the almost total lack of scientific studies analyzing the health safety/dangerousness of transgenic foods. Given all these unknowns, other factors must be taken into account, particularly genetic contamination of the non-genetically modified crops, which is now starting to become widespread in some parts of the world. Not being able of reversing the situation in the even of problems is irresponsible. Other major aspects are the impacts on the environment (such as insects building up resistances, the loss of biodiversity, the increase in chemical products employed) with indirect repercussions on health and/or future food production. Lastly, thoughts for discussion are added concerning food safety in terms of food availability and food sovereignty, given that the transgenic seed and related agrochemicals market is currently cornered by five large-scale transnational companies. The conclusion entails an analysis of biotechnological agriculture's contribution to sustainability.

  13. Rapid creation of forward-genetics tools for C. briggsae using TALENs: lessons for nonmodel organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qing; Shen, Yongquan; Chen, Xiangmei; Shifman, Yelena; Ellis, Ronald E

    2014-02-01

    Although evolutionary studies of gene function often rely on RNA interference, the ideal approach would use reverse genetics to create null mutations for cross-species comparisons and forward genetics to identify novel genes in each species. We have used transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to facilitate both approaches in Caenorhabditis nematodes. First, by combining golden gate cloning and TALEN technology, we can induce frameshifting mutations in any gene. Second, by combining this approach with bioinformatics we can predict and create the resources needed for forward genetic analysis in species like Caenorhabditis briggsae. Although developing genetic model organisms used to require years to isolate marker mutations, balancers, and tools, with TALENs, these reagents can now be produced in months. Furthermore, the analysis of nonsense mutants in related model organisms allows a directed approach for making these markers and tools. When used together, these methods could simplify the adaptation of other organisms for forward and reverse genetics.

  14. Population genetics of non-genetic traits: Evolutionary roles of stochasticity in gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-05-01

    The role of stochasticity in evolutionary genetics has long been debated. To date, however, the potential roles of non-genetic traits in evolutionary processes have been largely neglected. In molecular biology, growing evidence suggests that stochasticity in gene expression (SGE) is common and that SGE has major impacts on phenotypes and fitness. Here, we provide a general overview of the potential effects of SGE on population genetic parameters, arguing that SGE can indeed have a profound effect on evolutionary processes. Our analyses suggest that SGE potentially alters the fate of mutations by influencing effective population size and fixation probability. In addition, a genetic control of SGE magnitude could evolve under certain conditions, if the fitness of the less-fit individual increases due to SGE and environmental fluctuation. Although empirical evidence for our arguments is yet to come, methodological developments for precisely measuring SGE in living organisms will further advance our understanding of SGE-driven evolution.

  15. Gene finding in genetically isolated populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heutink, Peter; Oostra, Ben A

    2002-10-01

    The struggle to identify susceptibility genes for complex disorders has stimulated geneticists to develop new approaches. One approach that has gained considerable interest is to focus on genetically isolated populations rather than on the general population. There remains much controversy and theoretical debate over the feasibility and advantages of such populations, but recent results speak in favor of the feasibility of this approach, and will be reviewed here.

  16. Genetic bases of the evolution of organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Dragoslav M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological progress consists of the continuous increase of divergence with simultaneous maintenance and the increase of conformance (harmoniousness of living systems. A mutual balance between divergence of forms and the degree of perfection of their structure and function indicates a level of the evolutionary development of a particular group of organisms, i.e. a level and prospects of their evolutionary progress. An enormous potential of combined genetic polymorphousness is reduced to adaptive landscapes of a limited number of developmental programmes that make actual units of inheritance and variability within each species.

  17. Genetic control of root growth: from genes to networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, Radka; Ogura, Takehiko; Satbhai, Santosh B; Ristova, Daniela; Busch, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Roots are essential organs for higher plants. They provide the plant with nutrients and water, anchor the plant in the soil, and can serve as energy storage organs. One remarkable feature of roots is that they are able to adjust their growth to changing environments. This adjustment is possible through mechanisms that modulate a diverse set of root traits such as growth rate, diameter, growth direction and lateral root formation. The basis of these traits and their modulation are at the cellular level, where a multitude of genes and gene networks precisely regulate development in time and space and tune it to environmental conditions. This review first describes the root system and then presents fundamental work that has shed light on the basic regulatory principles of root growth and development. It then considers emerging complexities and how they have been addressed using systems-biology approaches, and then describes and argues for a systems-genetics approach. For reasons of simplicity and conciseness, this review is mostly limited to work from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in which much of the research in root growth regulation at the molecular level has been conducted. While forward genetic approaches have identified key regulators and genetic pathways, systems-biology approaches have been successful in shedding light on complex biological processes, for instance molecular mechanisms involving the quantitative interaction of several molecular components, or the interaction of large numbers of genes. However, there are significant limitations in many of these methods for capturing dynamic processes, as well as relating these processes to genotypic and phenotypic variation. The emerging field of systems genetics promises to overcome some of these limitations by linking genotypes to complex phenotypic and molecular data using approaches from different fields, such as genetics, genomics, systems biology and phenomics. © The Author 2015. Published by

  18. Development and Validation of a P-35S, T-nos, T-35S and P-FMV Tetraplex Real-time PCR Screening Method to Detect Regulatory Genes of Genetically Modified Organisms in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Albert; Murmann, Petra; Kaenzig, Andre; Breitenmoser, Alda

    2014-10-01

    In routine analysis screening methods based on real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) are most commonly used for the detection of genetically modified (GM) plant material in food and feed. Screening tests are based on sequences frequently used for GM development, allowing the detection of a large number of GMOs (genetically modified organisms). Here, we describe the development and validation of a tetraplex real-time PCR screening assay comprising detection systems for the regulatory genes Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter, Agrobacterium tumefaciens nos terminator, Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S terminator and Figwort Mosaic Virus 34S promoter. Three of the four primer and probe combinations have already been published elsewhere, whereas primers and probe for the 35S terminator have been developed in-house. Adjustment of primer and probe concentrations revealed a high PCR sensitivity with insignificant physical cross-talk between the four detection channels. The sensitivity of each PCR-system is sufficient to detect a GMO concentration as low as 0.05% of the containing respective element. The specificity of the described tetraplex is high when tested on DNA from GM maize, soy, rapeseed and tomato. We also demonstrate the robustness of the system by inter-laboratory tests. In conclusion, this method provides a sensitive and reliable screening procedure for the detection of the most frequently used regulatory elements present in GM crops either authorised or unauthorised for food.

  19. Pattern Genes Suggest Functional Connectivity of Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yangmei; Pan, Jianbo; Cai, Meichun; Yao, Lixia; Ji, Zhiliang

    2016-05-01

    Human organ, as the basic structural and functional unit in human body, is made of a large community of different cell types that organically bound together. Each organ usually exerts highly specified physiological function; while several related organs work smartly together to perform complicated body functions. In this study, we present a computational effort to understand the roles of genes in building functional connection between organs. More specifically, we mined multiple transcriptome datasets sampled from 36 human organs and tissues, and quantitatively identified 3,149 genes whose expressions showed consensus modularly patterns: specific to one organ/tissue, selectively expressed in several functionally related tissues and ubiquitously expressed. These pattern genes imply intrinsic connections between organs. According to the expression abundance of the 766 selective genes, we consistently cluster the 36 human organs/tissues into seven functional groups: adipose & gland, brain, muscle, immune, metabolism, mucoid and nerve conduction. The organs and tissues in each group either work together to form organ systems or coordinate to perform particular body functions. The particular roles of specific genes and selective genes suggest that they could not only be used to mechanistically explore organ functions, but also be designed for selective biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  20. The population genetics of cooperative gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Alexander J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in gene regulatory networks drive the evolution of phenotypic diversity both within and between species. Rewiring of transcriptional networks is achieved either by changes to transcription factor binding sites or by changes to the physical interactions among transcription factor proteins. It has been suggested that the evolution of cooperative binding among factors can facilitate the adaptive rewiring of a regulatory network. Results We use a population-genetic model to explore when cooperative binding of transcription factors is favored by evolution, and what effects cooperativity then has on the adaptive re-writing of regulatory networks. We consider a pair of transcription factors that regulate multiple targets and overlap in the sets of target genes they regulate. We show that, under stabilising selection, cooperative binding between the transcription factors is favoured provided the amount of overlap between their target genes exceeds a threshold. The value of this threshold depends on several population-genetic factors: strength of selection on binding sites, cost of pleiotropy associated with protein-protein interactions, rates of mutation and population size. Once it is established, we find that cooperative binding of transcription factors significantly accelerates the adaptive rewiring of transcriptional networks under positive selection. We compare our qualitative predictions to systematic data on Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factors, their binding sites, and their protein-protein interactions. Conclusions Our study reveals a rich set of evolutionary dynamics driven by a tradeoff between the beneficial effects of cooperative binding at targets shared by a pair of factors, and the detrimental effects of cooperative binding for non-shared targets. We find that cooperative regulation will evolve when transcription factors share a sufficient proportion of their target genes. These findings help to

  1. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter.

  2. Genetic Innovation in Vertebrates: Gypsy Integrase Genes and Other Genes Derived from Transposable Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domitille Chalopin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their ability to drive DNA rearrangements and to serve as a source of new coding and regulatory sequences, transposable elements (TEs are considered as powerful evolutionary agents within genomes. In this paper, we review the mechanism of molecular domestication, which corresponds to the formation of new genes derived from TE sequences. Many genes derived from retroelements and DNA transposons have been identified in mammals and other vertebrates, some of them fulfilling essential functions for the development and survival of their host organisms. We will particularly focus on the evolution and expression of Gypsy integrase (GIN genes, which have been formed from ancient event(s of molecular domestication and have evolved differentially in some vertebrate sublineages. What we describe here is probably only the tip of the evolutionary iceberg, and future genome analyses will certainly uncover new TE-derived genes and biological functions driving genetic innovation in vertebrates and other organisms.

  3. Tanaman Genetically Modified Organism (GMO dan Perspektif Hukumnya di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwono Prianto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Genetically modified organism (GMO merupakan organisme yang gen-gennya telah diubah dengan menggunakan teknik rekayasa genetika. Produk rekayasa genetika diklasifikasikan menjadi 4 macam, yaitu generasi pertama: satu sifat; generasi kedua: kumpulan sifat; generasi ketiga dan keempat: near-intragenic, intragenic, dan cisgenic. Adapun produk rekayasa genetika pada tanaman di Indonesia di antaranya adalah padi, tomat, tebu, singkong, dan kentang. Regulasi tanaman hasil rekayasa genetika diatur oleh beberapa lembaga, di antaranya Kementerian Lingkungan Hidup, Kementerian Pertanian, Komisi Keamanan Hayati, Tim Teknis Keamanan Hayati, dan Biosafety Clearing House, berdasarkan peraturan pemerintah No. 21 tahun 2005. Pengujian yang dilakukan pada produk rekayasa genetika meliputi analisis sumber gen penyebab alergi, sekuens homolog asam amino, resistensi pepsin, skrining serum, serta penggunaan hewan uji. Berbagai produk GMO di Indonesia sejauh ini merupakan produk yang dibutuhkan dalam memenuhi kebutuhan hidup sehari-hari, yang perlu diawasi secara ketat dari segi dampaknya terhadap lingkungan melalui ketentuan hukum yang berlaku, yang diwakili oleh instansi-instansi terkait tersebut.Abstract Genetically modified organism (GMO is an organism whose genes that have been altered by using genetic engineering techniques. Genetic engineering products are classified into 4 types, which are the first generation: one trait; the second generation: a collection of properties; the third and fourth generation: near-intragenic, intragenic, and cisgenic. The genetic engineering products in plants in Indonesia include rice, tomatoes, sugar cane, cassava, and potatoes. The application of the genetically engineered crops is regulated by several institutions, including the Ministry of Environment, the Ministry of Agriculture, the Biosafety Commission, the Biosafety Technical Team and the Biosafety Clearing House, under government regulation No. 21 of the year

  4. Organization, Integration and Assembly of Genetic and Epigenetic Regulatory Machinery in Nuclear Microenvironments: Implications for Biological Control in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Gary S.; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Stein, Janet L.; Lian, Jane B; van Wijnen, Andre; Montecino, Martin; Young, Daniel W.; Javed, Amjad; Pratap, Jitesh; Choi, Je-Yong; Ali, Syed A; Pande, Sandhya; Hassan, Mohammad Q.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing awareness that the fidelity of gene expression necessitates coordination of transcription factor metabolism and organization of genes and regulatory proteins within the three dimensional context of nuclear architecture. The regulatory machinery that governs genetic and epigenetic control of gene expression is compartmentalized in nuclear microenvironments. Temporal and spatial parameters of regulatory complex organization and assembly are functionally linked to biological con...

  5. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1.

  6. Genetic variation in genes affecting milk composition and quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Henriette Pasgaard

    In the past decade major advances in next generation sequencing technologies have provided new opportuneties for the detection of genetic variation. Combining the knowlegde of genetic variation with phenotypic distributions provides considerable possibilites for detection of candidate genes....... In addition, exploring genetic variation related to the major milk proteins of bovine milk indntified genetic variations with possitive effects on milk coagulation...

  7. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li; Rachul, Christen

    2012-06-08

    Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND), we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People's Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  8. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO. News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Methods Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND, we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People’s Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. Results The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  9. Partial AUC maximization for essential gene prediction using genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyu-Baek; Ha, Beom-Yong; Ju, Sanghun; Kim, Sangsoo

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genes indispensable for an organism's life and their characteristics is one of the central questions in current biological research, and hence it would be helpful to develop computational approaches towards the prediction of essential genes. The performance of a predictor is usually measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). We propose a novel method by implementing genetic algorithms to maximize the partial AUC that is restricted to a specific interval of lower false positive rate (FPR), the region relevant to follow-up experimental validation. Our predictor uses various features based on sequence information, protein-protein interaction network topology, and gene expression profiles. A feature selection wrapper was developed to alleviate the over-fitting problem and to weigh each feature's relevance to prediction. We evaluated our method using the proteome of budding yeast. Our implementation of genetic algorithms maximizing the partial AUC below 0.05 or 0.10 of FPR outperformed other popular classification methods.

  10. Using genetically engineered animal models in the postgenomic era to understand gene function in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Matthew T; Harris, R Adron; Noronha, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, researchers have made substantial progress in identifying genetic variations that underlie the complex phenotype of alcoholism. Not much is known, however, about how this genetic variation translates into altered biological function. Genetic animal models recapitulating specific characteristics of the human condition have helped elucidate gene function and the genetic basis of disease. In particular, major advances have come from the ability to manipulate genes through a variety of genetic technologies that provide an unprecedented capacity to determine gene function in the living organism and in alcohol-related behaviors. Even newer genetic-engineering technologies have given researchers the ability to control when and where a specific gene or mutation is activated or deleted, allowing investigators to narrow the role of the gene's function to circumscribed neural pathways and across development. These technologies are important for all areas of neuroscience, and several public and private initiatives are making a new generation of genetic-engineering tools available to the scientific community at large. Finally, high-throughput "next-generation sequencing" technologies are set to rapidly increase knowledge of the genome, epigenome, and transcriptome, which, combined with genetically engineered mouse mutants, will enhance insight into biological function. All of these resources will provide deeper insight into the genetic basis of alcoholism.

  11. Environmental risk assessment for medicinal products containing genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anliker, B; Longhurst, S; Buchholz, C J

    2010-01-01

    Many gene therapy medicinal products and also some vaccines consist of, or contain, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which require specific consideration in the environmental risk assessment (ERA) before marketing authorisation or clinical trial applications. The ERA is performed in order to identify the potential risks for public health and the environment, which may arise due to the clinical use of these medicinal products. If such environmental risks are identified and considered as not acceptable, the ERA should go on to propose appropriate risk management strategies capable to reduce these risks. This article will provide an overview of the legal basis and requirements for the ERA of GMO-containing medicinal products in the context of marketing authorisation in the EU and clinical trials in Germany. Furthermore, the scientific principles and methodology that generally need to be followed when preparing an ERA for GMOs are discussed.

  12. DNA enrichment approaches to identify unauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulandhu, Alfred J; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Dobnik, David; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Shi, Jianxin; Zel, Jana; Kok, Esther J

    2016-07-01

    With the increased global production of different genetically modified (GM) plant varieties, chances increase that unauthorized GM organisms (UGMOs) may enter the food chain. At the same time, the detection of UGMOs is a challenging task because of the limited sequence information that will generally be available. PCR-based methods are available to detect and quantify known UGMOs in specific cases. If this approach is not feasible, DNA enrichment of the unknown adjacent sequences of known GMO elements is one way to detect the presence of UGMOs in a food or feed product. These enrichment approaches are also known as chromosome walking or gene walking (GW). In recent years, enrichment approaches have been coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis and implemented in, amongst others, the medical and microbiological fields. The present review will provide an overview of these approaches and an evaluation of their applicability in the identification of UGMOs in complex food or feed samples.

  13. Genetic architecture of gene expression in ovine skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kogelman, Lisette Johanna Antonia; Byrne, Keren; Vuocolo, Tony

    2011-01-01

    -based gene expression data we directly tested the hypothesis that there is genetic structure in the gene expression program in ovine skeletal muscle.Results: The genetic performance of six sires for a well defined muscling trait, longissimus lumborum muscle depth, was measured using extensive progeny testing...

  14. Myostatin: genetic variants, therapy and gene doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Katayama Yamada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery, myostatin (MSTN has been at the forefront of muscle therapy research because intrinsic mutations or inhibition of this protein, by either pharmacological or genetic means, result in muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. In addition to muscle growth, MSTN inhibition potentially disturbs connective tissue, leads to strength modulation, facilitates myoblast transplantation, promotes tissue regeneration, induces adipose tissue thermogenesis and increases muscle oxidative phenotype. It is also known that current advances in gene therapy have an impact on sports because of the illicit use of such methods. However, the adverse effects of these methods, their impact on athletic performance in humans and the means of detecting gene doping are as yet unknown. The aim of the present review is to discuss biosynthesis, genetic variants, pharmacological/genetic manipulation, doping and athletic performance in relation to the MSTN pathway. As will be concluded from the manuscript, MSTN emerges as a promising molecule for combating muscle wasting diseases and for triggering wide-ranging discussion in view of its possible use in gene doping.Desde sua descoberta, a miostatina (MSTN entrou na linha de frente em pesquisas relacionadas às terapias musculares porque mutações intrínsecas ou inibição desta proteína tanto por abordagens farmacológicas como genéticas resultam em hipertrofia muscular e hiperplasia. Além do aumento da massa muscular, a inibição de MSTN potencialmente prejudica o tecido conectivo, modula a força muscular, facilita o transplante de mioblastos, promove regeneração tecidual, induz termogênese no tecido adiposo e aumenta a oxidação na musculatura esquelética. É também sabido que os atuais avanços em terapia gênica têm uma relação com o esporte devido ao uso ilícito de tal método. Os efeitos adversos de tal abordagem, seus efeitos no desempenho de atletas e métodos para detectar doping genético s

  15. Ecologically relevant stress resistance: from microarrays and quantitative trait loci to candidate genes – A research plan and preliminary results using Drosophila as a model organism and climatic and genetic stress as model stresses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volker Loeschcke; Jesper G Sørensen; Torsten N Kristensen

    2004-12-01

    We aim at studying adaptation to genetic and environmental stress and its evolutionary implications at different levels of biological organization. Stress influences cellular processes, individual physiology, genetic variation at the population level, and the process of natural selection. To investigate these highly connected levels of stress effects, it is advisable – if not critical – to integrate approaches from ecology, evolution, physiology, molecular biology and genetics. To investigate the mechanisms of stress resistance, how resistance evolves, and what factors contribute to and constrain its evolution, we use the well-defined model systems of Drosophila species, representing both cosmopolitan species such as D. melanogaster with a known genome map, and more specialized and ecologically well described species such as the cactophilic D. buzzatii. Various climate-related stresses are used as model stresses including desiccation, starvation, cold and heat. Genetic stress or genetic load is modelled by studying the consequences of inbreeding, the accumulation of (slightly) deleterious mutations, hybridization or the loss of genetic variability. We present here a research plan and preliminary results combining various approaches: molecular techniques such as microarrays, quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses, quantitative PCR, ELISA or Western blotting are combined with population studies of resistance to climatic and genetic stress in natural populations collected across climatic gradients as well as in selection lines maintained in the laboratory.

  16. On Gene Concepts and Teaching Genetics: Episodes from Classical Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burian, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the teaching of advanced high school courses or undergraduate courses for non-biology majors about genetics or history of genetics. It will probably be difficult to take the approach described here in a high school science course, although the general approach could help improve such courses. It would be ideal for a college…

  17. On Gene Concepts and Teaching Genetics: Episodes from Classical Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burian, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the teaching of advanced high school courses or undergraduate courses for non-biology majors about genetics or history of genetics. It will probably be difficult to take the approach described here in a high school science course, although the general approach could help improve such courses. It would be ideal for a college…

  18. Genetic variation in organisms with sexual and asexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, B O

    2003-03-01

    The genetic variation in a partially asexual organism is investigated by two models suited for different time scales. Only selectively neutral variation is considered. Model 1 shows, by the use of a coalescence argument, that three sexually derived individuals per generation are sufficient to give a population the same pattern of allelic variation as found in fully sexually reproducing organisms. With less than one sexual event every third generation, the characteristic pattern expected for asexual organisms appear, with strong allelic divergence between the gene copies in individuals. At intermediary levels of sexuality, a complex situation reigns. The pair-wise allelic divergence under partial sexuality exceeds, however, always the corresponding value under full sexuality. These results apply to large populations with stable reproductive systems. In a more general framework, Model 2 shows that a small number of sexual individuals per generation is sufficient to make an apparently asexual population highly genotypically variable. The time scale in terms of generations needed to produce this effect is given by the population size and the inverse of the rate of sexuality.

  19. Genetic and epigenetic changes in malignant cells of tumors of urogenital organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordiyuk V. V.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available More than 90 % of human malignant neoplasms are presented by epithelial tumors. Cancer of urogenital organs is a serious problem because of wide spread of disease and high mortality rates. Tumorogenesis is associated with different defects of genetic apparatus of cells as well as epigenetic factors (DNA methylation disorders, chromatin reorganizations in processes of histones modifications, regulation of gene expression with small non-coding RNAs. In this review we analyzed genetic and epigenetic changes in the urogenital tumors

  20. SYBR Green I Based PCR for Detection of the bar and pat Genes in Genetically Modifed Organisms%转基因产品中bar和pat基因的SYBR Green I-PCR检测方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许文涛; 黄昆仑; 罗云波

    2006-01-01

    SYBR Green I是一种在实时定量PCR检测中广泛使用的DNA结合染料.PCR结果可以通过溶解曲线分析来鉴定而不再需要使用传统的琼脂糖凝胶电泳来鉴定,因为PCR特定扩增产物的溶解温度的特异性是类似于琼脂糖凝胶电泳中的扩增条带的特异性.建立了基于扩增产物溶解曲线分析的二重实时定量PCR对转bar和pat基因的作物进行检测的方法.获得了bar和pat基因的特异性扩增产物和他们的特定溶解温度,并且通过几组不同的二重PCR对他们的扩增产物进行了溶解曲线鉴定.还对影响溶解曲线分析的一些因素进行了研究和讨论.结果表明基于扩增产物的溶解温度建立的二重PCR检测方法是可行的,该方法对转bar和pat基因的作物可达到0.9%的检测限.%SYBR Green I is widely used in real-time PCR applications as an intercalating dye. The use of melting curve analysis eliminates the necessity for agarose gel electrophoresis because the melting temperature (Tm) of the specific amplicon is analogous to the detection of an electrophoretic band. In this paper we reported the development of a duplex real-time PCR suitable for the detection of the bar andpat genes in genetically modifed organisms, based on the intercalating dye SYBR Green I and the analysis of the melting curves of the amplified products. Using this method, different amplification products specific for the bar and pat genes were obtained and identified by their specific Tm. We have combined amplification of these products in a number of duplex reactions and showed the suitability of the methods for identification of GMOs with a sensitivity of 0.9% in duplex reactions.

  1. Production of Genetically Improved Organic Nile Tilapia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charo, H.; Komen, J.; Bovenhuis, H.; Rezk, M.A.; Ponzoni, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    Demand for organic products for human consumption has been on the increase due to the belief that organic products are safer and healthier to the consumer and the environment. In developing countries, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) is usually grown in low-input organically fed ponds with littl

  2. Human nucleolus organizers on nonhomologous chromosomes can share the same ribosomal gene variants.

    OpenAIRE

    Krystal, M; D'Eustachio, P; Ruddle, F H; Arnheim, N

    1981-01-01

    The distributions of three human ribosomal gene polymorphisms among individual chromosomes containing nucleolus organizers were analyzed by using mouse--human hybrid cells. Different nucleolus organizers can contain the same variant, suggesting the occurrence of genetic exchanges among ribosomal gene clusters on nonhomologous chromosomes. Such exchanges appear to occur less frequently in mice. This difference is discussed in terms of the nucleolar organization and chromosomal location of ribo...

  3. Modular genetic regulatory networks increase organization during pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadlou, Hamid; Podgorski, Gregory J; Flann, Nicholas S

    2016-08-01

    Studies have shown that genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) consist of modules that are densely connected subnetworks that function quasi-autonomously. Modules may be recognized motifs that comprise of two or three genes with particular regulatory functions and connectivity or be purely structural and identified through connection density. It is unclear what evolutionary and developmental advantages modular structure and in particular motifs provide that have led to this enrichment. This study seeks to understand how modules within developmental GRNs influence the complexity of multicellular patterns that emerge from the dynamics of the regulatory networks. We apply an algorithmic complexity to measure the organization of the patterns. A computational study was performed by creating Boolean intracellular networks within a simulated epithelial field of embryonic cells, where each cell contains the same network and communicates with adjacent cells using contact-mediated signaling. Intracellular networks with random connectivity were compared to those with modular connectivity and with motifs. Results show that modularity effects network dynamics and pattern organization significantly. In particular: (1) modular connectivity alone increases complexity in network dynamics and patterns; (2) bistable switch motifs simplify both the pattern and network dynamics; (3) all other motifs with feedback loops increase multicellular pattern complexity while simplifying the network dynamics; (4) negative feedback loops affect the dynamics complexity more significantly than positive feedback loops.

  4. Method for genetic identification of unknown organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Fitch, Joseph P.; Hindson, Benjamin J.; Carter, Chance J.; Beer, Neil Reginald

    2016-08-23

    A method of rapid, genome and proteome based identification of unknown pathogenic or non-pathogenic organisms in a complex sample. The entire sample is analyzed by creating millions of emulsion encapsulated microdroplets, each containing a single pathogenic or non-pathogenic organism sized particle and appropriate reagents for amplification. Following amplification, the amplified product is analyzed.

  5. Genetic correction using engineered nucleases for gene therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei Lisa; Nakano, Takao; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations in humans are associated with congenital disorders and phenotypic traits. Gene therapy holds the promise to cure such genetic disorders, although it has suffered from several technical limitations for decades. Recent progress in gene editing technology using tailor-made nucleases, such as meganucleases (MNs), zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) and, more recently, CRISPR/Cas9, has significantly broadened our ability to precisely modify target sites in the human genome. In this review, we summarize recent progress in gene correction approaches of the human genome, with a particular emphasis on the clinical applications of gene therapy.

  6. Equine immunoglobulins and organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Stefanie; Rusitzka, Tamara V; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of how equine immunoglobulin genes are organized has increased significantly in recent years. For equine heavy chains, 52 IGHV, 40 IGHD, 8 IGHJ and 11 IGHC are present. Seven of these IGHCs are gamma chain genes. Sequence diversity is increasing between fetal, neonatal, foal and adult age. The kappa light chain contains 60 IGKV, 5 IGKJ and 1 IGKC, whereas there are 144 IGLV, 7 IGLJ, and 7 IGLC for the lambda light chain, which is expressed predominantly in horses. Significant transcriptional differences for IGLV and IGLC are identified in different breeds. Allotypic and allelic variants are observed for IGLC1, IGLC5, and IGLC6/7, and two IGLV pseudogenes are also transcribed. During age development, a decrease in IGLVs is noted, although nucleotide diversity and significant differences in gene usage increased. The following paper suggests a standardization of the existing nomenclature of immunoglobulin genes.

  7. Plant genetics. A tomato gene weighs in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebley, J

    2000-07-07

    What makes some people big and others small--obviously our genes, but which ones? Working out the complex of genes that control such quantitative traits in animals and plants is one of the big challenges facing geneticists. In his Perspective, Doebley discusses new results that identify the fw2.2 gene as one of the genes determining fruit size in the tomato (Frary et al.).

  8. Genetics in PSC: what do the "risk genes" teach us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folseraas, Trine; Liaskou, Evaggelia; Anderson, Carl A; Karlsen, Tom H

    2015-06-01

    A role of genetics in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) development is now firmly established. A total of 16 risk genes have been reported at highly robust ("genome-wide") significance levels, and ongoing efforts suggest that the list will ultimately be considerably longer. Importantly, this genetic risk pool so far accounts for less than 10 % of an estimated overall PSC susceptibility. The relative importance of genetic versus environmental factors (including gene-gene and gene-environment interactions) in remaining aspects of PSC pathogenesis is unknown, and other study designs than genome-wide association studies are needed to explore these aspects. For some of the loci, e.g. HLA and FUT2, distinct interacting environmental factors may exist, and working from the genetic associations may prove one valid path for determining the specific nature of environmental triggers. So far the biological implications for PSC risk genes are typically merely hypothesized based on previously published literature, and there is therefore a strong need for dedicated translational studies to determine their roles within the specific disease context of PSC. Apparently, most risk loci seem to involve in a subset of biological pathways for which genetic associations exist in a multitude of immune-mediated diseases, accounting for both inflammatory bowel disease as well as prototypical autoimmunity. In the present article, we will survey the current knowledge on PSC genetics with a particular emphasis on the pathophysiological insight potentially gained from genetic risk loci involving in this profound immunogenetic pleiotropy.

  9. Platform Biotechnology. Gaming the deliberative release of genetically modified organism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Jacobus

    2014-01-01

    The deliberate release of genetically modified organisms (GMO’s) often leads to heated discussions on presumed risks and benefits. Examples are controversies concerning the introduction of plant varieties that have resistance to e.g. diseases or herbicides and the construction of micro-organisms

  10. Platform Biotechnology. Gaming the deliberative release of genetically modified organism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Jacobus

    2014-01-01

    The deliberate release of genetically modified organisms (GMO’s) often leads to heated discussions on presumed risks and benefits. Examples are controversies concerning the introduction of plant varieties that have resistance to e.g. diseases or herbicides and the construction of micro-organisms tha

  11. Platform Biotechnology. Gaming the deliberative release of genetically modified organism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Jacobus

    2014-01-01

    The deliberate release of genetically modified organisms (GMO’s) often leads to heated discussions on presumed risks and benefits. Examples are controversies concerning the introduction of plant varieties that have resistance to e.g. diseases or herbicides and the construction of micro-organisms tha

  12. [Genetic basis of head and neck cancers and gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Halil Erdem; Özkırış, Mahmut; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Surgery and combinations of traditional treatments are not successful enough particularly for advanced stage head and neck cancer. The major disadvantages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the lack of specificity for the target tissue and toxicity to the patient. As a result, gene therapy may offer a more specific approach. The aim of gene therapy is to present therapeutic genes into cancer cells which selectively eliminate malignant cells with no systemic toxicity to the patient. This article reviews the genetic basis of head and neck cancers and important concepts in cancer gene therapy: (i) inhibition of oncogenes; (ii) tumor suppressor gene replacement; (iii) regulation of immune response against malignant cells; (iv) genetic prodrug activation; and (v) antiangiogenic gene therapy. Currently, gene therapy is not sufficient to replace the traditional treatments of head and neck cancers, however there is no doubt that it will have an important role in the near future.

  13. Genetic architecture of gene expression in ovine skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogelman Lisette JA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In livestock populations the genetic contribution to muscling is intensively monitored in the progeny of industry sires and used as a tool in selective breeding programs. The genes and pathways conferring this genetic merit are largely undefined. Genetic variation within a population has potential, amongst other mechanisms, to alter gene expression via cis- or trans-acting mechanisms in a manner that impacts the functional activities of specific pathways that contribute to muscling traits. By integrating sire-based genetic merit information for a muscling trait with progeny-based gene expression data we directly tested the hypothesis that there is genetic structure in the gene expression program in ovine skeletal muscle. Results The genetic performance of six sires for a well defined muscling trait, longissimus lumborum muscle depth, was measured using extensive progeny testing and expressed as an Estimated Breeding Value by comparison with contemporary sires. Microarray gene expression data were obtained for longissimus lumborum samples taken from forty progeny of the six sires (4-8 progeny/sire. Initial unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis revealed strong genetic architecture to the gene expression data, which also discriminated the sire-based Estimated Breeding Value for the trait. An integrated systems biology approach was then used to identify the major functional pathways contributing to the genetics of enhanced muscling by using both Estimated Breeding Value weighted gene co-expression network analysis and a differential gene co-expression network analysis. The modules of genes revealed by these analyses were enriched for a number of functional terms summarised as muscle sarcomere organisation and development, protein catabolism (proteosome, RNA processing, mitochondrial function and transcriptional regulation. Conclusions This study has revealed strong genetic structure in the gene expression program within

  14. Identification of common genetic modifiers of neurodegenerative diseases from an integrative analysis of diverse genetic screens in model organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An array of experimental models have been developed in the small model organisms C. elegans, S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster for the study of various neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and expanded polyglutamine diseases as exemplified by Huntington's disease (HD and related ataxias. Genetic approaches to determine the nature of regulators of the disease phenotypes have ranged from small scale to essentially whole genome screens. The published data covers distinct models in all three organisms and one important question is the extent to which shared genetic factors can be uncovered that affect several or all disease models. Surprisingly it has appeared that there may be relatively little overlap and that many of the regulators may be organism or disease-specific. There is, however, a need for a fully integrated analysis of the available genetic data based on careful comparison of orthologues across the species to determine the real extent of overlap. Results We carried out an integrated analysis using C. elegans as the baseline model organism since this is the most widely studied in this context. Combination of data from 28 published studies using small to large scale screens in all three small model organisms gave a total of 950 identifications of genetic regulators. Of these 624 were separate genes with orthologues in C. elegans. In addition, 34 of these genes, which all had human orthologues, were found to overlap across studies. Of the common genetic regulators some such as chaperones, ubiquitin-related enzymes (including the E3 ligase CHIP which directly links the two pathways and histone deacetylases were involved in expected pathways whereas others such as the peroxisomal acyl CoA-oxidase suggest novel targets for neurodegenerative disease therapy Conclusions We identified a significant number of overlapping regulators of neurodegenerative disease models. Since the diseases

  15. Evidence for mitochondrial genetic control of autosomal gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, Irfahan; Qi, Tuan; Lloyd-Jones, Luke; Holloway, Alexander; Jan Bonder, Marc; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Powell, Joseph E; Franke, Lude; Montgomery, Grant W; Visscher, Peter M; McRae, Allan F

    2016-10-18

    The mitochondrial and nuclear genomes coordinate and co-evolve in eukaryotes in order to adapt to environmental changes. Variation in the mitochondrial genome is capable of affecting expression of genes on the nuclear genome. Sex-specific mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression has been demonstrated in Drosophila melanogaster, where males were found to drive most of the total variation in gene expression. This has potential implications for male-related health and disease resulting from variation in mtDNA solely inherited from the mother. We used a family-based study comprised of 47,323 gene expression probes and 78 mitochondrial SNPs (mtSNPs) from n = 846 individuals to examine the extent of mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in humans. This identified 15 significant probe-mtSNP associations (P[Formula: see text]) corresponding to 5 unique genes on the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, with three of these genes corresponding to mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in the nuclear genome. The associated mtSNPs for three genes (one cis and two trans associations) were replicated (P expression in any of these five probes. Sex-specific effects were examined by applying our analysis to males and females separately and testing for differences in effect size. The MEST gene was identified as having the most significantly different effect sizes across the sexes (P [Formula: see text]). MEST was similarly expressed in males and females with the G allele; however, males with the C allele are highly expressed for MEST, while females show no expression of the gene. This study provides evidence for the mitochondrial genetic control of expression of several genes in humans, with little evidence found for sex-specific effects.

  16. Obesity genetics: a monopoly game of genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Joselyn; Aguirre, Miguel; Velasco, Manuel; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that affects all ethnic populations worldwide. The etiology of this disease is based on the interaction of genetic factors, environment and lifestyles indicators. Genetic contribution to the epidemic has gained attention from 2 sources: monogenic syndromes that display severe obesity, and the polygenic model of common obesity. Single mutations can render a syndrome with severe obesity resulting from alteration in central o peripheral appetite control mechanisms. The interaction of several polymorphisms and epigenetic modifications constitute the basic plot for common obesity, molecular ingredients that should not confuse the investigator-they make this riddle even harder to decipher.

  17. Risk assessment of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waigmann E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    EFSA’s remit in the risk assessment of GMOs is very broad encompassing genetically modified plants, microorganisms and animals and assessing their safety for humans, animals and the environment. The legal frame for GMOs is set by Directive 2001/18/EC on their release into the environment, and Regulation (EC No 1829/2003 on GM food and feed. The main focus of EFSA’s GMO Panel and GMO Unit lies in the evaluation of the scientific risk assessment of new applications for market authorisation of GMOs, and in the development of corresponding guidelines for the applicants. The EFSA GMO Panel has elaborated comprehensive guidance documents on GM plants, GM microorganisms and GM animals, as well as on specific aspects of risk assessment such as the selection of comparators. EFSA also provides special scientific advice upon request of the European Commission; examples are post-market environmental monitoring of GMOs, and consideration of potential risks of new plant breeding techniques. The GMO Panel regularly reviews its guidance documents in the light of experience gained with the evaluation of applications, technological progress in breeding technologies and scientific developments in the diverse areas of risk assessment.

  18. Functional genetics for all: engineered nucleases, CRISPR and the gene editing revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Anna F; Averof, Michalis

    2014-01-01

    Developmental biology, as all experimental science, is empowered by technological advances. The availability of genetic tools in some species - designated as model organisms - has driven their use as major platforms for understanding development, physiology and behavior. Extending these tools to a wider range of species determines whether (and how) we can experimentally approach developmental diversity and evolution. During the last two decades, comparative developmental biology (evo-devo) was marked by the introduction of gene knockdown and deep sequencing technologies that are applicable to a wide range of species. These approaches allowed us to test the developmental role of specific genes in diverse species, to study biological processes that are not accessible in established models and, in some cases, to conduct genome-wide screens that overcome the limitations of the candidate gene approach. The recent discovery of CRISPR/Cas as a means of precise alterations into the genome promises to revolutionize developmental genetics. In this review we describe the development of gene editing tools, from zinc-finger nucleases to TALENs and CRISPR, and examine their application in gene targeting, their limitations and the opportunities they present for evo-devo. We outline their use in gene knock-out and knock-in approaches, and in manipulating gene functions by directing molecular effectors to specific sites in the genome. The ease-of-use and efficiency of CRISPR in diverse species provide an opportunity to close the technology gap that exists between established model organisms and emerging genetically-tractable species.

  19. From nucleosome to chromosome: a dynamic organization of genetic information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Fransz; H. de Jong

    2011-01-01

    Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence

  20. From nucleosome to chromosome: a dynamic organization of genetic information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, P.F.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence

  1. From nucleosome to chromosome : a dynamic organization of genetic information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, P.; de Jong, H.

    2011-01-01

    Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence

  2. Complementation of Yeast Genes with Human Genes as an Experimental Platform for Functional Testing of Human Genetic Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Akil; Tammpere, Erik; Kofoed, Megan; Keong, Christelle; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip

    2015-11-01

    While the pace of discovery of human genetic variants in tumors, patients, and diverse populations has rapidly accelerated, deciphering their functional consequence has become rate-limiting. Using cross-species complementation, model organisms like the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can be utilized to fill this gap and serve as a platform for testing human genetic variants. To this end, we performed two parallel screens, a one-to-one complementation screen for essential yeast genes implicated in chromosome instability and a pool-to-pool screen that queried all possible essential yeast genes for rescue of lethality by all possible human homologs. Our work identified 65 human cDNAs that can replace the null allele of essential yeast genes, including the nonorthologous pair yRFT1/hSEC61A1. We chose four human cDNAs (hLIG1, hSSRP1, hPPP1CA, and hPPP1CC) for which their yeast gene counterparts function in chromosome stability and assayed in yeast 35 tumor-specific missense mutations for growth defects and sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. This resulted in a set of human-yeast gene complementation pairs that allow human genetic variants to be readily characterized in yeast, and a prioritized list of somatic mutations that could contribute to chromosome instability in human tumors. These data establish the utility of this cross-species experimental approach. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Gene therapy in dentistry: tool of genetic engineering. Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Khushboo; Singh, Saurabh; Garg, Kavita Nitish

    2015-03-01

    Advances in biotechnology have brought gene therapy to the forefront of medical research. The concept of transferring genes to tissues for clinical applications has been discussed nearly half a century, but the ability to manipulate genetic material via recombinant DNA technology has brought this goal to reality. The feasibility of gene transfer was first demonstrated using tumour viruses. This led to development of viral and nonviral methods for the genetic modification of somatic cells. Applications of gene therapy to dental and oral problems illustrate the potential impact of this technology on dentistry. Preclinical trial results regarding the same have been very promising. In this review we will discuss methods, vectors involved, clinical implication in dentistry and scientific issues associated with gene therapy.

  4. Noise-plasticity correlations of gene expression in the multicellular organism Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, Koudai; Nagano, Atsushi J; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-12-21

    Gene expression levels exhibit stochastic variations among genetically identical organisms under the same environmental conditions (called gene expression "noise" or phenotype "fluctuation"). In yeast and Escherichia coli, positive correlations have been found between such gene expression noise and "plasticity" with environmental variations. To determine the universality of such correlations in both unicellular and multicellular organisms, we focused on the relationships between gene expression "noise" and "plasticity" in Arabidopsis thaliana, a multicellular model organism. In recent studies on yeast and E. coli, only some gene groups with specific properties of promoter architecture, average expression levels, and functions exhibited strong noise-plasticity correlations. However, we found strong noise-plasticity correlations for most gene groups in Arabidopsis; additionally, promoter architecture, functional essentiality of genes, and circadian rhythm appeared to have only a weak influence on the correlation strength. The differences in the characteristics of noise-plasticity correlations may result from three-dimensional chromosomal structures and/or circadian rhythm.

  5. Considering spatial and temporal scale in landscape-genetic studies of gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Corey Devin; Epperson, Bryan K; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Holderegger, Rolf; James, Patrick M A; Rosenberg, Michael S; Scribner, Kim T; Spear, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    Landscape features exist at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and these naturally affect spatial genetic structure and our ability to make inferences about gene flow. This article discusses how decisions about sampling of genotypes (including choices about analytical methods and genetic markers) should be driven by the scale of spatial genetic structure, the time frame that landscape features have existed in their current state, and all aspects of a species' life history. Researchers should use caution when making inferences about gene flow, especially when the spatial extent of the study area is limited. The scale of sampling of the landscape introduces different features that may affect gene flow. Sampling grain should be smaller than the average home-range size or dispersal distance of the study organism and, for raster data, existing research suggests that simplifying the thematic resolution into discrete classes may result in low power to detect effects on gene flow. Therefore, the methods used to characterize the landscape between sampling sites may be a primary determinant for the spatial scale at which analytical results are applicable, and the use of only one sampling scale for a particular statistical method may lead researchers to overlook important factors affecting gene flow. The particular analytical technique used to correlate landscape data and genetic data may also influence results; common landscape-genetic methods may not be suitable for all study systems, particularly when the rate of landscape change is faster than can be resolved by common molecular markers.

  6. Relationship of disease-associated gene expression to cardiac phenotype is buffered by genetic diversity and chromatin regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbassi, Elaheh; Monte, Emma; Chapski, Douglas J; Lopez, Rachel; Rosa Garrido, Manuel; Kim, Joseph; Wisniewski, Nicholas; Rau, Christoph D; Wang, Jessica J; Weiss, James N; Wang, Yibin; Lusis, Aldons J; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Expression of a cohort of disease-associated genes, some of which are active in fetal myocardium, is considered a hallmark of transcriptional change in cardiac hypertrophy models. How this transcriptome remodeling is affected by the common genetic variation present in populations is unknown. We examined the role of genetics, as well as contributions of chromatin proteins, to regulate cardiac gene expression and heart failure susceptibility. We examined gene expression in 84 genetically distinct inbred strains of control and isoproterenol-treated mice, which exhibited varying degrees of disease. Unexpectedly, fetal gene expression was not correlated with hypertrophic phenotypes. Unbiased modeling identified 74 predictors of heart mass after isoproterenol-induced stress, but these predictors did not enrich for any cardiac pathways. However, expanded analysis of fetal genes and chromatin remodelers as groups correlated significantly with individual systemic phenotypes. Yet, cardiac transcription factors and genes shown by gain-/loss-of-function studies to contribute to hypertrophic signaling did not correlate with cardiac mass or function in disease. Because the relationship between gene expression and phenotype was strain specific, we examined genetic contribution to expression. Strikingly, strains with similar transcriptomes in the basal heart did not cluster together in the isoproterenol state, providing comprehensive evidence that there are different genetic contributors to physiological and pathological gene expression. Furthermore, the divergence in transcriptome similarity versus genetic similarity between strains is organ specific and genome-wide, suggesting chromatin is a critical buffer between genetics and gene expression.

  7. Effect of Duplicate Genes on Mouse Genetic Robustness: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixi Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to S. cerevisiae and C. elegans, analyses based on the current knockout (KO mouse phenotypes led to the conclusion that duplicate genes had almost no role in mouse genetic robustness. It has been suggested that the bias of mouse KO database toward ancient duplicates may possibly cause this knockout duplicate puzzle, that is, a very similar proportion of essential genes (PE between duplicate genes and singletons. In this paper, we conducted an extensive and careful analysis for the mouse KO phenotype data and corroborated a strong effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetics robustness. Moreover, the effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetic robustness is duplication-age dependent, which holds after ruling out the potential confounding effect from coding-sequence conservation, protein-protein connectivity, functional bias, or the bias of duplicates generated by whole genome duplication (WGD. Our findings suggest that two factors, the sampling bias toward ancient duplicates and very ancient duplicates with a proportion of essential genes higher than that of singletons, have caused the mouse knockout duplicate puzzle; meanwhile, the effect of genetic buffering may be correlated with sequence conservation as well as protein-protein interactivity.

  8. Computational Genetic Regulatory Networks Evolvable, Self-organizing Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Knabe, Johannes F

    2013-01-01

    Genetic Regulatory Networks (GRNs) in biological organisms are primary engines for cells to enact their engagements with environments, via incessant, continually active coupling. In differentiated multicellular organisms, tremendous complexity has arisen in the course of evolution of life on earth. Engineering and science have so far achieved no working system that can compare with this complexity, depth and scope of organization. Abstracting the dynamics of genetic regulatory control to a computational framework in which artificial GRNs in artificial simulated cells differentiate while connected in a changing topology, it is possible to apply Darwinian evolution in silico to study the capacity of such developmental/differentiated GRNs to evolve. In this volume an evolutionary GRN paradigm is investigated for its evolvability and robustness in models of biological clocks, in simple differentiated multicellularity, and in evolving artificial developing 'organisms' which grow and express an ontogeny starting fr...

  9. Network statistics of genetically-driven gene co-expression modules in mouse crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pier eScott-Boyer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In biology, networks are used in different contexts as ways to represent relationships between entities, such as for instance interactions between genes, proteins or metabolites. Despite progress in the analysis of such networks and their potential to better understand the collective impact of genes on complex traits, one remaining challenge is to establish the biologic validity of gene co-expression networks and to determine what governs their organization. We used WGCNA to construct and analyze seven gene expression datasets from several tissues of mouse recombinant inbred strains (RIS. For six out of the 7 networks, we found that linkage to module QTLs (mQTLs could be established for 29.3% of gene co-expression modules detected in the several mouse RIS. For about 74.6% of such genetically-linked modules, the mQTL was on the same chromosome as the one contributing most genes to the module, with genes originating from that chromosome showing higher connectivity than other genes in the modules. Such modules (that we considered as genetically-driven had network statistic properties (density, centralization and heterogeneity that set them apart from other modules in the network. Altogether, a sizeable portion of gene co-expression modules detected in mouse RIS panels had genetic determinants as their main organizing principle. In addition to providing a biologic interpretation validation for these modules, these genetic determinants imparted on them particular properties that set them apart from other modules in the network, to the point that they can be predicted to a large extent on the basis of their network statistics.

  10. Analysis of genetically modified organisms by pyrosequencing on a portable photodiode-based bioluminescence sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qinxin; Wei, Guijiang; Zhou, Guohua

    2014-07-01

    A portable bioluminescence analyser for detecting the DNA sequence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) was developed by using a photodiode (PD) array. Pyrosequencing on eight genes (zSSIIb, Bt11 and Bt176 gene of genetically modified maize; Lectin, 35S-CTP4, CP4EPSPS, CaMV35S promoter and NOS terminator of the genetically modified Roundup ready soya) was successfully detected with this instrument. The corresponding limit of detection (LOD) was 0.01% with 35 PCR cycles. The maize and soya available from three different provenances in China were detected. The results indicate that pyrosequencing using the small size of the detector is a simple, inexpensive, and reliable way in a farm/field test of GMO analysis.

  11. Curing genetic disease with gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A

    2014-01-01

    Development of viral vectors that allow high efficiency gene transfer into mammalian cells in the early 1980s foresaw the treatment of severe monogenic diseases in humans. The application of gene transfer using viral vectors has been successful in diseases of the blood and immune systems, albeit with several curative studies also showing serious adverse events (SAEs). In children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, these SAEs were caused by inappropriate activation of oncogenes. Subsequent studies have defined the vector sequences responsible for these transforming events. Members of the Transatlantic Gene Therapy Consortium [TAGTC] have collaboratively developed new vectors that have proven safer in preclinical studies and used these vectors in new clinical trials in SCID-X1. These trials have shown evidence of early efficacy and preliminary integration analysis data from the SCID-X1 trial suggest an improved safety profile.

  12. More Genetic Engineering With Cloned Hemoglobin Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Cells modified to enhance growth and production of proteins. Method for enhancing both growth of micro-organisms in vitro and production of various proteins or metalbolites in these micro-organisms provides for incorporation of selected chromosomal or extrachormosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences into micro-organisms from other cells or from artificial sources. Incorporated DNA includes parts encoding desired product(s) or characteristic(s) of cells and parts that control expression of productor characteristic-encoding parts in response to variations in environment. Extended method enables increased research into growth of organisms in oxygen-poor environments. Industrial applications found in enhancement of processing steps requiring oxygen in fermentation, enzymatic degradation, treatment of wastes containing toxic chemicals, brewing, and some oxidative chemical reactions.

  13. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least two years. Hemophilia Patients born with Hemophilia are not able to induce blood clots and suffer from external and internal bleeding that can be life threatening. In a clinical trial conducted in the United States , the therapeutic gene was introduced into the liver of patients, who ...

  14. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon.

  15. DNA enrichment approaches to identify unauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMOs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arulandhu, Alfred J.; Dijk, van Jeroen P.; Dobnik, David; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Shi, Jianxin; Zel, Jana; Kok, Esther J.

    2016-01-01

    With the increased global production of different genetically modified (GM) plant varieties, chances increase that unauthorized GM organisms (UGMOs) may enter the food chain. At the same time, the detection of UGMOs is a challenging task because of the limited sequence information that will gener

  16. Regulation of Genetically Modified Organisms in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossman, M.R.; Bryan Endres, A.

    2000-01-01

    To be successful, laws that regulate genetically modified organisms (GMOs) must help society decide rationally when to pause and when to proceed in adopting new biotechnological developments. In the context of European Union (EU) institutions and lawmaking procedures, this article examines European

  17. Regulation of Genetically Modified Organisms in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossman, M.R.; Bryan Endres, A.

    2000-01-01

    To be successful, laws that regulate genetically modified organisms (GMOs) must help society decide rationally when to pause and when to proceed in adopting new biotechnological developments. In the context of European Union (EU) institutions and lawmaking procedures, this article examines European

  18. Class Teacher Candidates' Opinions on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural Keles, Pinar; Aydin, Suleyman

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the Class teacher candidates' opinions on Genetically Modified Organisms. The study was carried out with 101 teacher candidates who were studying in the 3rd grade of Agri Ibrahim Çeçen University Classroom Teacher Department in 2016-2017 academic year. Of the students who participated in the survey, 56 were…

  19. The gene vitellogenin has multiple coordinating effects on social organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Mindy Nelson

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Temporal division of labor and foraging specialization are key characteristics of honeybee social organization. Worker honeybees (Apis mellifera initiate foraging for food around their third week of life and often specialize in collecting pollen or nectar before they die. Variation in these fundamental social traits correlates with variation in worker reproductive physiology. However, the genetic and hormonal mechanisms that mediate the control of social organization are not understood and remain a central question in social insect biology. Here we demonstrate that a yolk precursor gene, vitellogenin, affects a complex suite of social traits. Vitellogenin is a major reproductive protein in insects in general and a proposed endocrine factor in honeybees. We show by use of RNA interference (RNAi that vitellogenin gene activity paces onset of foraging behavior, primes bees for specialized foraging tasks, and influences worker longevity. These findings support the view that the worker specializations that characterize hymenopteran sociality evolved through co-option of reproductive regulatory pathways. Further, they demonstrate for the first time how coordinated control of multiple social life-history traits can originate via the pleiotropic effects of a single gene that affects multiple physiological processes.

  20. Genetic organization of Acetobacter for acetic acid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beppu, T

    Plasmid vectors for the acetic acid-producing strains of Acetobacter and Gluconobacter were constructed from their cryptic plasmids and the efficient transformation conditions were established. The systems allowed to reveal the genetic background of the strains used in the acetic acid fermentation. Genes encoding indispensable components in the acetic acid fermentation, such as alcohol dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and terminal oxidase, were cloned and characterized. Spontaneous mutations at high frequencies in the acetic acid bacteria to cause the deficiency in ethanol oxidation were analyzed. A new insertion sequence element, IS1380, was identified as a major factor of the genetic instability, which causes insertional inactivation of the gene encoding cytochrome c, an essential component of the functional alcohol dehydrogenase complex. Several genes including the citrate synthase gene of A. aceti were identified to confer acetic acid resistance, and the histidinolphosphate aminotransferase gene was cloned as a multicopy suppressor of an ethanol sensitive mutant. Improvement of the acetic acid productivity of an A. aceti strain was achieved through amplification of the aldehyde dehydrogenase gene with a multicopy vector. In addition, spheroplast fusion of the Acetobacter strains was developed and applied to improve their properties.

  1. JavaGenes and Condor: Cycle-Scavenging Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Al; Langhirt, Eric; Livny, Miron; Ramamurthy, Ravishankar; Soloman, Marvin; Traugott, Steve

    2000-01-01

    A genetic algorithm code, JavaGenes, was written in Java and used to evolve pharmaceutical drug molecules and digital circuits. JavaGenes was run under the Condor cycle-scavenging batch system managing 100-170 desktop SGI workstations. Genetic algorithms mimic biological evolution by evolving solutions to problems using crossover and mutation. While most genetic algorithms evolve strings or trees, JavaGenes evolves graphs representing (currently) molecules and circuits. Java was chosen as the implementation language because the genetic algorithm requires random splitting and recombining of graphs, a complex data structure manipulation with ample opportunities for memory leaks, loose pointers, out-of-bound indices, and other hard to find bugs. Java garbage-collection memory management, lack of pointer arithmetic, and array-bounds index checking prevents these bugs from occurring, substantially reducing development time. While a run-time performance penalty must be paid, the only unacceptable performance we encountered was using standard Java serialization to checkpoint and restart the code. This was fixed by a two-day implementation of custom checkpointing. JavaGenes is minimally integrated with Condor; in other words, JavaGenes must do its own checkpointing and I/O redirection. A prototype Java-aware version of Condor was developed using standard Java serialization for checkpointing. For the prototype to be useful, standard Java serialization must be significantly optimized. JavaGenes is approximately 8700 lines of code and a few thousand JavaGenes jobs have been run. Most jobs ran for a few days. Results include proof that genetic algorithms can evolve directed and undirected graphs, development of a novel crossover operator for graphs, a paper in the journal Nanotechnology, and another paper in preparation.

  2. Genetic characteristics of vancomycin resistance gene cluster in Enterococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunhui, Chen; Xiaogang, Xu

    2015-05-01

    Vancomycin resistant enterococci has become an important nosocomial pathogen since it is discovered in late 1980s. The products, encoded by vancomycin resistant gene cluster in enterococci, catalyze the synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors with low affinity with glycopeptide antibiotics including vancomycin and teicoplanin and lead to resistance. These vancomycin resistant gene clusters are classified into nine types according to their gene sequences and organization, or D-Ala:D-Lac (VanA, VanB, VanD and VanM) and D-Ala:D-Ser (VanC, VanE, VanG, VanL and VanN) ligase gene clusters based on the differences of their encoded ligases. Moreover, these gene clusters are characterized by their different resistance levels and infection models. In this review, we summarize the classification, gene organization and infection model of vancomycin resistant gene cluster in Enterococcus spp.

  3. Genes in new environments: genetics and evolution in biological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, George K; Navajas, Maria

    2003-11-01

    The availability of new genetic technologies has positioned the field of biological control as a test bed for theories in evolutionary biology and for understanding practical aspects of the release of genetically manipulated material. Purposeful introductions of pathogens, parasites, predators and herbivores, when considered as replicated semi-natural field experiments, show the unpredictable nature of biological colonization. The characteristics of organisms and their environments that determine this variation in the establishment and success of biological control can now be explored using genetic tools. Lessons from studies of classical biological control can help inform researchers and policy makers about the risks that are associated with the release of genetically modified organisms, particularly with respect to long-term evolutionary changes.

  4. 'Smoking genes': a genetic association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoraida Verde

    Full Text Available Some controversy exists on the specific genetic variants that are associated with nicotine dependence and smoking-related phenotypes. The purpose of this study was to analyse the association of smoking status and smoking-related phenotypes (included nicotine dependence with 17 candidate genetic variants: CYP2A6*1×2, CYP2A6*2 (1799T>A [rs1801272], CYP2A6*9 (-48T>G [rs28399433], CYP2A6*12, CYP2A13*2 (3375C>T [rs8192789], CYP2A13*3 (7520C>G, CYP2A13*4 (579G>A, CYP2A13*7 (578C>T [rs72552266], CYP2B6*4 (785A>G, CYP2B6*9 (516G>T, CHRNA3 546C>T [rs578776], CHRNA5 1192G>A [rs16969968], CNR1 3764C>G [rs6928499], DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A [rs1800497], 5HTT LPR, HTR2A -1438A>G [rs6311] and OPRM1 118A>G [rs1799971]. We studied the genotypes of the aforementioned polymorphisms in a cohort of Spanish smokers (cases, N = 126 and ethnically matched never smokers (controls, N = 80. The results showed significant between-group differences for CYP2A6*2 and CYP2A6*12 (both PA (Taq1A polymorphisms was 3.60 (95%CI: 1.75, 7.44 and 2.63 (95%CI: 1.41, 4.89 respectively. Compared with the wild-type genotype, the OR for being a non-smoker in carriers of the minor CYP2A6*2 allele was 1.80 (95%CI: 1.24, 2.65. We found a significant genotype effect (all P≤0.017 for the following smoking-related phenotypes: (i cigarettes smoked per day and CYP2A13*3; (ii pack years smoked and CYP2A6*2, CYP2A6*1×2, CYP2A13*7, CYP2B6*4 and DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A; (iii nicotine dependence (assessed with the Fagestrom test and CYP2A6*9. Overall, our results suggest that genetic variants potentially involved in nicotine metabolization (mainly, CYP2A6 polymorphisms are those showing the strongest association with smoking-related phenotypes, as opposed to genetic variants influencing the brain effects of nicotine, e.g., through nicotinic acetylcholine (CHRNA5, serotoninergic (HTR2A, opioid (OPRM1 or cannabinoid receptors (CNR1.

  5. Organization, integration, and assembly of genetic and epigenetic regulatory machinery in nuclear microenvironments: implications for biological control in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Gary S; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Stein, Janet L; Lian, Jane B; van Wijnen, Andre J; Montecino, Martin; Young, Daniel W; Javed, Amjad; Pratap, Jitesh; Choi, Je-Yong; Ali, Syed A; Pande, Sandhya; Hassan, Mohammad Q

    2009-02-01

    There is growing awareness that the fidelity of gene expression necessitates coordination of transcription factor metabolism and organization of genes and regulatory proteins within the three-dimensional context of nuclear architecture. The regulatory machinery that governs genetic and epigenetic control of gene expression is compartmentalized in nuclear microenvironments. Temporal and spatial parameters of regulatory complex organization and assembly are functionally linked to biological control and are compromised with the onset and progression of tumorigenesis. High throughput imaging of cells, tissues, and tumors, including live cell analysis, is expanding research's capabilities toward translating components of nuclear organization into novel strategies for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  6. The genetics of alcoholism: identifying specific genes through family studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2006-09-01

    Alcoholism is a complex disorder with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Studies in humans have begun to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of the risk for alcoholism. Here we briefly review strategies for identifying individual genes in which variations affect the risk for alcoholism and related phenotypes, in the context of one large study that has successfully identified such genes. The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) is a family-based study that has collected detailed phenotypic data on individuals in families with multiple alcoholic members. A genome-wide linkage approach led to the identification of chromosomal regions containing genes that influenced alcoholism risk and related phenotypes. Subsequently, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in positional candidate genes located within the linked chromosomal regions, and analyzed for association with these phenotypes. Using this sequential approach, COGA has detected association with GABRA2, CHRM2 and ADH4; these associations have all been replicated by other researchers. COGA has detected association to additional genes including GABRG3, TAS2R16, SNCA, OPRK1 and PDYN, results that are awaiting confirmation. These successes demonstrate that genes contributing to the risk for alcoholism can be reliably identified using human subjects.

  7. Biofuel Potential of Plants Transformed Genetically With NAC Family Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhana eSingh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available NAC genes contribute to enhance survivability of plants under conditions of environmental stress and in secondary growth of the plants, thereby building biomass. Thus, genetic transformation of plants using NAC genes provides a possibility to tailor made biofuel plants. Over-expression studies have indicated that NAC family genes can provide tolerance to various biotic and abiotic stresses, either by physiological or biochemical changes at the cellular level, or by affecting visible morphological and anatomical changes, for example by development of lateral roots in a number of plants. Over-expression of these genes also work as triggers for development of secondary cell walls. In our laboratory, we have observed a NAC gene from Lepidium latifolium contributing to both enhanced biomass as well as cold stress tolerance of model plants tobacco. Thus, we have reviewed all the developments of genetic engineering using NAC genes which could enhance the traits required for biofuel plants, either by enhancing the stress tolerance or by enhancing the biomass of the plants. KeywordsNAC, Genetically engineered plants, Abiotic stress tolerance, Secondary growth, Cell wall synthesis, Biomass

  8. Control of patterning, growth, and differentiation by floral organ identity genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablowski, Robert

    2015-02-01

    In spite of the different morphologies of sepals, petals, stamens, and carpels, all these floral organs are believed to be modified versions of a ground-state organ similar to the leaf. Modifications of the ground-state developmental programme are orchestrated by different combinations of MADS-domain transcription factors encoded by floral organ identity genes. In recent years, much has been revealed about the gene regulatory networks controlled by the floral organ identity genes and about the genetic pathways that control leaf development. This review examines how floral organ identity is connected with the control of morphogenesis and differentiation of shoot organs, focusing on the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Direct links have emerged between floral organ identity genes and genes involved in abaxial-adaxial patterning, organ boundary formation, tissue growth, and cell differentiation. In parallel, predictive models have been developed to explain how the activity of regulatory genes can be coordinated by intercellular signalling and constrained by tissue mechanics. When combined, these advances provide a unique opportunity for revealing exactly how leaf-like organs have been 'metamorphosed' into floral organs during evolution and showing crucial regulatory points in the generation of plant form. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. GeneNetwork: framework for web-based genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloan, Zachary; Arends, Danny; Broman, Karl W.; Centeno, Arthur; Furlotte, Nicholas; Nijveen, H.; Yan, Lei; Zhou, Xiang; Williams, Robert W.; Prins, Pjotr

    2016-01-01

    GeneNetwork (GN) is a free and open source (FOSS) framework for web-based genetics that can be deployed anywhere. GN allows biologists to upload high-throughput experimental data, such as expression data from microarrays and RNA-seq, and also `classic' phenotypes, such as disease phenotypes. These p

  10. Impact of genetic polymorphisms of four cytokine genes on treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manar Obada

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... genes on treatment induced viral clearance in HCV infected Egyptian .... shown to influence TNF-a expression [11]. Interferon gamma ... has been carried out in accordance with The Code of Ethics of the World ... Molecular testing. Genomic DNA ..... Our findings could be explained on the basis that genetic.

  11. Identification of genetic elements associated with EPSPS gene amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed populations can have high genetic plasticity and rapid responses to environmental selection pressures. For example, 100-fold amplification of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene evolved to confer resistance to glyphosate, the world's most important herbicide, in the wee...

  12. Propagation of genetic variation in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plahte, Erik; Gjuvsland, Arne B; Omholt, Stig W

    2013-08-01

    A future quantitative genetics theory should link genetic variation to phenotypic variation in a causally cohesive way based on how genes actually work and interact. We provide a theoretical framework for predicting and understanding the manifestation of genetic variation in haploid and diploid regulatory networks with arbitrary feedback structures and intra-locus and inter-locus functional dependencies. Using results from network and graph theory, we define propagation functions describing how genetic variation in a locus is propagated through the network, and show how their derivatives are related to the network's feedback structure. Similarly, feedback functions describe the effect of genotypic variation of a locus on itself, either directly or mediated by the network. A simple sign rule relates the sign of the derivative of the feedback function of any locus to the feedback loops involving that particular locus. We show that the sign of the phenotypically manifested interaction between alleles at a diploid locus is equal to the sign of the dominant feedback loop involving that particular locus, in accordance with recent results for a single locus system. Our results provide tools by which one can use observable equilibrium concentrations of gene products to disclose structural properties of the network architecture. Our work is a step towards a theory capable of explaining the pleiotropy and epistasis features of genetic variation in complex regulatory networks as functions of regulatory anatomy and functional location of the genetic variation.

  13. Identification of genetic elements associated with EPSPs gene amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A Gaines

    Full Text Available Weed populations can have high genetic plasticity and rapid responses to environmental selection pressures. For example, 100-fold amplification of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS gene evolved in the weed species Amaranthus palmeri to confer resistance to glyphosate, the world's most important herbicide. However, the gene amplification mechanism is unknown. We sequenced the EPSPS gene and genomic regions flanking EPSPS loci in A. palmeri, and searched for mobile genetic elements or repetitive sequences. The EPSPS gene was 10,229 bp, containing 8 exons and 7 introns. The gene amplification likely proceeded through a DNA-mediated mechanism, as introns exist in the amplified gene copies and the entire amplified sequence is at least 30 kb in length. Our data support the presence of two EPSPS loci in susceptible (S A. palmeri, and that only one of these was amplified in glyphosate-resistant (R A. palmeri. The EPSPS gene amplification event likely occurred recently, as no sequence polymorphisms were found within introns of amplified EPSPS copies from R individuals. Sequences with homology to miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs were identified next to EPSPS gene copies only in R individuals. Additionally, a putative Activator (Ac transposase and a repetitive sequence region were associated with amplified EPSPS genes. The mechanism controlling this DNA-mediated amplification remains unknown. Further investigation is necessary to determine if the gene amplification may have proceeded via DNA transposon-mediated replication, and/or unequal recombination between different genomic regions resulting in replication of the EPSPS gene.

  14. Gene-Environment Interactions in Asthma: Genetic and Epigenetic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Uk; Kim, Jeong Dong; Park, Choon-Sik

    2015-07-01

    Over the past three decades, a large number of genetic studies have been aimed at finding genetic variants associated with the risk of asthma, applying various genetic and genomic approaches including linkage analysis, candidate gene polymorphism studies, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, contrary to general expectation, even single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) discovered by GWAS failed to fully explain the heritability of asthma. Thus, application of rare allele polymorphisms in well defined phenotypes and clarification of environmental factors have been suggested to overcome the problem of 'missing' heritability. Such factors include allergens, cigarette smoke, air pollutants, and infectious agents during pre- and post-natal periods. The first and simplest interaction between a gene and the environment is a candidate interaction of both a well known gene and environmental factor in a direct physical or chemical interaction such as between CD14 and endotoxin or between HLA and allergens. Several GWAS have found environmental interactions with occupational asthma, aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease, tobacco smoke-related airway dysfunction, and farm-related atopic diseases. As one of the mechanisms behind gene-environment interaction is epigenetics, a few studies on DNA CpG methylation have been reported on subphenotypes of asthma, pitching the exciting idea that it may be possible to intervene at the junction between the genome and the environment. Epigenetic studies are starting to include data from clinical samples, which will make them another powerful tool for re-search on gene-environment interactions in asthma.

  15. Parallels between UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS and FIMBRIATA, genes controlling flower development in Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, G C; Goodrich, J; Wilkinson, M D; Simon, R; Haughn, G W; Coen, E S

    1995-09-01

    The unusual floral organs (ufo) mutant of Arabidopsis has flowers with variable homeotic organ transformations and inflorescence-like characteristics. To determine the relationship between UFO and previously characterized meristem and organ identity genes, we cloned UFO and determined its expression pattern. The UFO gene shows extensive homology with FIMBRIATA (FIM), a gene mediating between meristem and organ identity genes in Antirrhinum. All three UFO mutant alleles that we sequenced are predicted to produce truncated proteins. UFO transcripts were first detected in early floral meristems, before organ identity genes had been activated. At later developmental stages, UFO expression is restricted to the junction between sepal and petal primordia. Phenotypic, genetic, and expression pattern comparisons between UFO and FIM suggest that they are cognate homologs and play a similar role in mediating between meristem and organ identity genes. However, some differences in the functions and genetic interactions of UFO and FIM were apparent, indicating that changes in partially redundant pathways have occurred during the evolutionary divergence of Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum.

  16. Genetic variance in the adiponutrin gene family and childhood obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovisa E Johansson

    Full Text Available AIM: The adiponutrin gene family consists of five genes (PNPLA1-5 coding for proteins with both lipolytic and lipogenic properties. PNPLA3 has previously been associated with adult obesity. Here we investigated the possible association between genetic variants in these genes and childhood and adolescent obesity. METHODS/RESULTS: Polymorphisms in the five genes of the adiponutrin gene family were selected and genotyped using the Sequenom platform in a childhood and adolescent obesity case-control study. Six variants in PNPLA1 showed association with obesity (rs9380559, rs12212459, rs1467912, rs4713951, rs10947600, and rs12199580, p0.05. When analyzing these SNPs in relation to phenotypes, two SNPs in the PNPLA3 gene showed association with insulin sensitivity (rs12483959: beta = -0.053, p = 0.016, and rs2072907: beta = -0.049, p = 0.024. No associations were seen for PNPLA2, PNPLA4, and PNPLA5. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic variation in the adiponutrin gene family does not seem to contribute strongly to obesity in children and adolescents. PNPLA1 exhibited a modest effect on obesity and PNPLA3 on insulin sensitivity. These data, however, require confirmation in other cohorts and ethnic groups.

  17. Genetics of ischaemic stroke; single gene disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flossmann, Enrico

    2006-08-01

    Examples of single gene disorders have been described for all major subtypes of ischaemic stroke: accelerated atherosclerosis and subsequent thrombo-embolism (e.g. homocysteinuria), weakening of connective tissue resulting in arterial dissections (e.g. Ehler-Danlos type IV), disorders of cerebral small vessels (e.g. cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy and the collagen COL4A1 mutation), disorders increasing the thrombogenic potential of the heart through affecting the myocardium or the heart valves or through disturbance of the heart rhythm (e.g. hypertrophic cardiomyopathy), mitochondrial cytopathies increasing cerebral tissue susceptibility to insults (e.g. mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes), and finally disorders of coagulation that can either directly cause stroke or act synergistically with the aforementioned abnormalities (e.g. sickle cell disease). Most of these disorders are rare but they are important to consider particularly in young patients with stroke, those with a family history or those who have other characteristics of a particular syndrome.

  18. UFO: an Arabidopsis gene involved in both floral meristem and floral organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, J Z; Meyerowitz, E M

    1995-05-01

    We describe the role of the UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene in Arabidopsis floral development based on a genetic and molecular characterization of the phenotypes of nine ufo alleles. UFO is required for the proper identity of the floral meristem and acts in three different aspects of the process that distinguishes flowers from shoots. UFO is involved in establishing the whorled pattern of floral organs, controlling the determinacy of the floral meristem, and activating the APETALA3 and PISTILLATA genes required for petal and stamen identity. In many respects, UFO acts in a manner similar to LEAFY, but the ufo mutant phenotype also suggests an additional role for UFO in defining boundaries within the floral primordia or controlling cell proliferation during floral organ growth. Finally, genetic interactions that prevent flower formation and lead to the generation of filamentous structures implicate UFO as a member of a new, large, and diverse class of genes in Arabidopsis necessary for flower formation.

  19. Manteia, a predictive data mining system for vertebrate genes and its applications to human genetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassy, Olivier; Pourquié, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The function of genes is often evolutionarily conserved, and comparing the annotation of ortholog genes in different model organisms has proved to be a powerful predictive tool to identify the function of human genes. Here, we describe Manteia, a resource available online at http://manteia.igbmc.fr. Manteia allows the comparison of embryological, expression, molecular and etiological data from human, mouse, chicken and zebrafish simultaneously to identify new functional and structural correlations and gene-disease associations. Manteia is particularly useful for the analysis of gene lists produced by high-throughput techniques such as microarrays or proteomics. Data can be easily analyzed statistically to characterize the function of groups of genes and to correlate the different aspects of their annotation. Sophisticated querying tools provide unlimited ways to merge the information contained in Manteia along with the possibility of introducing custom user-designed biological questions into the system. This allows for example to connect all the animal experimental results and annotations to the human genome, and take advantage of data not available for human to look for candidate genes responsible for genetic disorders. Here, we demonstrate the predictive and analytical power of the system to predict candidate genes responsible for human genetic diseases.

  20. The genetic architecture of gene expression in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viñuela Rodriguez, A.

    2011-01-01

    Most organisms are exposed to a continuously changing environment throughout their life. For instance the ambient temperature is usually not constant and many species are exposed to a diverse range of anthropogenic stressors like toxic compounds. Moreover, individuals are prone to genetic changes du

  1. Organization of Mitochondrial Gene Expression in Two Distinct Ribosome-Containing Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Kehrein

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria contain their own genetic system that provides subunits of the complexes driving oxidative phosphorylation. A quarter of the mitochondrial proteome participates in gene expression, but how all these factors are orchestrated and spatially organized is currently unknown. Here, we established a method to purify and analyze native and intact complexes of mitochondrial ribosomes. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed extensive interactions of ribosomes with factors involved in all the steps of posttranscriptional gene expression. These interactions result in large expressosome-like assemblies that we termed mitochondrial organization of gene expression (MIOREX complexes. Superresolution microscopy revealed that most MIOREX complexes are evenly distributed throughout the mitochondrial network, whereas a subset is present as nucleoid-MIOREX complexes that unite the whole spectrum of organellar gene expression. Our work therefore provides a conceptual framework for the spatial organization of mitochondrial protein synthesis that likely developed to facilitate gene expression in the organelle.

  2. Comprehensive primer design for analysis of population genetics in non-sequenced organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Tezuka

    Full Text Available Nuclear sequence markers are useful tool for the study of the history of populations and adaptation. However, it is not easy to obtain multiple nuclear primers for organisms with poor or no genomic sequence information. Here we used the genomes of organisms that have been fully sequenced to design comprehensive sets of primers to amplify polymorphic genomic fragments of multiple nuclear genes in non-sequenced organisms. First, we identified a large number of candidate polymorphic regions that were flanked on each side by conserved regions in the reference genomes. We then designed primers based on these conserved sequences and examined whether the primers could be used to amplify sequences in target species, montane brown frog (Rana ornativentris, anole lizard (Anolis sagrei, guppy (Poecilia reticulata, and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster, for population genetic analysis. We successfully obtained polymorphic markers for all target species studied. In addition, we found that sequence identities of the regions between the primer sites in the reference genomes affected the experimental success of DNA amplification and identification of polymorphic loci in the target genomes, and that exonic primers had a higher success rate than intronic primers in amplifying readable sequences. We conclude that this comparative genomic approach is a time- and cost-effective way to obtain polymorphic markers for non-sequenced organisms, and that it will contribute to the further development of evolutionary ecology and population genetics for non-sequenced organisms, aiding in the understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation.

  3. Comprehensive primer design for analysis of population genetics in non-sequenced organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, Ayumi; Matsushima, Noe; Nemoto, Yoriko; Akashi, Hiroshi D; Kawata, Masakado; Makino, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear sequence markers are useful tool for the study of the history of populations and adaptation. However, it is not easy to obtain multiple nuclear primers for organisms with poor or no genomic sequence information. Here we used the genomes of organisms that have been fully sequenced to design comprehensive sets of primers to amplify polymorphic genomic fragments of multiple nuclear genes in non-sequenced organisms. First, we identified a large number of candidate polymorphic regions that were flanked on each side by conserved regions in the reference genomes. We then designed primers based on these conserved sequences and examined whether the primers could be used to amplify sequences in target species, montane brown frog (Rana ornativentris), anole lizard (Anolis sagrei), guppy (Poecilia reticulata), and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), for population genetic analysis. We successfully obtained polymorphic markers for all target species studied. In addition, we found that sequence identities of the regions between the primer sites in the reference genomes affected the experimental success of DNA amplification and identification of polymorphic loci in the target genomes, and that exonic primers had a higher success rate than intronic primers in amplifying readable sequences. We conclude that this comparative genomic approach is a time- and cost-effective way to obtain polymorphic markers for non-sequenced organisms, and that it will contribute to the further development of evolutionary ecology and population genetics for non-sequenced organisms, aiding in the understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation.

  4. Learning from small fry: the zebrafish as a genetic model organism for aquaculture fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, Ralf; Geisler, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the zebrafish has become one of the most prominent vertebrate model organisms used to study the genetics underlying development, normal body function, and disease. The growing interest in zebrafish research was paralleled by an increase in tools and methods available to study zebrafish. While zebrafish research initially centered on mutagenesis screens (forward genetics), recent years saw the establishment of reverse genetic methods (morpholino knock-down, TILLING). In addition, increasingly sophisticated protocols for generating transgenic zebrafish have been developed and microarrays are now available to characterize gene expression on a near genome-wide scale. The identification of loci underlying specific traits is aided by genetic, physical, and radiation hybrid maps of the zebrafish genome and the zebrafish genome project. As genomic resources for aquacultural species are increasingly being generated, a meaningful interaction between zebrafish and aquacultural research now appears to be possible and beneficial for both sides. In particular, research on nutrition and growth, stress, and disease resistance in the zebrafish can be expected to produce results applicable to aquacultural fish, for example, by improving husbandry and formulated feeds. Forward and reverse genetics approaches in the zebrafish, together with the known conservation of synteny between the species, offer the potential to identify and verify candidate genes for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) to be used in marker-assisted breeding. Moreover, some technologies from the zebrafish field such as TILLING may be directly transferable to aquacultural research and production.

  5. Genetics of sputum gene expression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Weiliang; Cho, Michael H; Riley, John H; Anderson, Wayne H; Singh, Dave; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Litonjua, Augusto A; Lomas, David A; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Celli, Bartolome R; Rennard, Stephen; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Fox, Steven M; Silverman, Edwin K; Hersh, Craig P

    2011-01-01

    Previous expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have performed genetic association studies for gene expression, but most of these studies examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from non-diseased individuals. We examined the genetics of gene expression in a relevant disease tissue from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to identify functional effects of known susceptibility genes and to find novel disease genes. By combining gene expression profiling on induced sputum samples from 131 COPD cases from the ECLIPSE Study with genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, we found 4315 significant cis-eQTL SNP-probe set associations (3309 unique SNPs). The 3309 SNPs were tested for association with COPD in a genomewide association study (GWAS) dataset, which included 2940 COPD cases and 1380 controls. Adjusting for 3309 tests (p<1.5e-5), the two SNPs which were significantly associated with COPD were located in two separate genes in a known COPD locus on chromosome 15: CHRNA5 and IREB2. Detailed analysis of chromosome 15 demonstrated additional eQTLs for IREB2 mapping to that gene. eQTL SNPs for CHRNA5 mapped to multiple linkage disequilibrium (LD) bins. The eQTLs for IREB2 and CHRNA5 were not in LD. Seventy-four additional eQTL SNPs were associated with COPD at p<0.01. These were genotyped in two COPD populations, finding replicated associations with a SNP in PSORS1C1, in the HLA-C region on chromosome 6. Integrative analysis of GWAS and gene expression data from relevant tissue from diseased subjects has located potential functional variants in two known COPD genes and has identified a novel COPD susceptibility locus.

  6. Genetics of sputum gene expression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiliang Qiu

    Full Text Available Previous expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL studies have performed genetic association studies for gene expression, but most of these studies examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from non-diseased individuals. We examined the genetics of gene expression in a relevant disease tissue from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients to identify functional effects of known susceptibility genes and to find novel disease genes. By combining gene expression profiling on induced sputum samples from 131 COPD cases from the ECLIPSE Study with genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data, we found 4315 significant cis-eQTL SNP-probe set associations (3309 unique SNPs. The 3309 SNPs were tested for association with COPD in a genomewide association study (GWAS dataset, which included 2940 COPD cases and 1380 controls. Adjusting for 3309 tests (p<1.5e-5, the two SNPs which were significantly associated with COPD were located in two separate genes in a known COPD locus on chromosome 15: CHRNA5 and IREB2. Detailed analysis of chromosome 15 demonstrated additional eQTLs for IREB2 mapping to that gene. eQTL SNPs for CHRNA5 mapped to multiple linkage disequilibrium (LD bins. The eQTLs for IREB2 and CHRNA5 were not in LD. Seventy-four additional eQTL SNPs were associated with COPD at p<0.01. These were genotyped in two COPD populations, finding replicated associations with a SNP in PSORS1C1, in the HLA-C region on chromosome 6. Integrative analysis of GWAS and gene expression data from relevant tissue from diseased subjects has located potential functional variants in two known COPD genes and has identified a novel COPD susceptibility locus.

  7. Organization and expression of photosynthesis genes and operons in anoxygenic photosynthetic proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotenberg, Sylviane; Steunou, Anne-Soisig; Picaud, Martine; Reiss-Husson, Françoise; Astier, Chantal; Ouchane, Soufian

    2008-09-01

    Genes belonging to the same metabolic route are usually organized in operons in microbial genomes. For instance, most genes involved in photosynthesis were found clustered and organized in operons in photosynthetic Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria. The discovery of Gammaproteobacteria with a conserved photosynthetic gene cluster revives the questions on the role and the maintenance of such organization in proteobacteria. In this paper, we report the analysis of the structure and expression of the 14 kb cluster (crtEF-bchCXYZ-pufBALMC-crtADC) in the photosynthetic betaproteobacterium Rubrivivax gelatinosus, with the purpose of understanding the reasons and the biological constraints that might have led to the clustering of photosynthesis genes. The genetic analyses are substantiated by reverse transcription-PCR data which reveal the presence of a transcript encompassing the 14 genes and provide evidence of a polycistronic 'super-operon' organization starting at crtE and ending 14 kb downstream at the crtC gene. Furthermore, genetic analyses suggest that one of the selection pressures that may have driven and maintained the photosynthesis operons/super-operons in proteobacteria could very likely be the coexpression and regulation of the clustered genes/operon.

  8. Possible effects of (trans)gene flow from crops on the genetic diversity from landraces and wild relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gepts, Paul; Papa, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Gene flow is a potential concern associated with the use of transgenic crops because it could affect genetic diversity of related landraces and wild relatives. This concern has taken on added importance with the looming introduction of transgenic crops in centers of crop domestication (Mexico, China) and those producing pharmaceutical compounds. For gene flow to take place among cultivars and their wild relatives, several steps have to be fulfilled, including the presence of cultivars or wild relatives within pollen or seed dispersal range, the ability to produce viable and fertile hybrids, at least partial overlap in flowering time, actual gene flow by pollen or seed, and the establishment of crop genes in the domesticated or wild recipient populations. In contrast with domestication genes, which often make crops less adapted to natural ecosystems, transgenes frequently represent gains of function, which might release wild relatives from constraints that limit their fitness. In most sexually reproducing organisms, the chromosomal region affected by selection of a single gene amounts to a small percentage of the total genome size. Because of gene flow, the level of genetic diversity present in the domesticated gene pool becomes a crucial factor affecting the genetic diversity of the wild gene pool. For some crops, such as cotton and maize, the introduction of transgenic technologies has led to a consolidation of the seed industry and a reduction in the diversity of the elite crop gene pool. Thus, diversity in improved varieties grown by farmers needs to be monitored. Several areas deserve further study, such as the actual magnitude of gene flow and its determinants in different agroecosystems, the long-term effects of gene flow on genetic diversity both across gene pools and within genomes, the expression of transgenes in new genetic backgrounds, and the effects of socio-economic factors on genetic diversity.

  9. Informational structure of genetic sequences and nature of gene splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, E. N.

    1991-10-01

    Only about 1/20 of DNA of higher organisms codes for proteins, by means of classical triplet code. The rest of DNA sequences is largely silent, with unclear functions, if any. The triplet code is not the only code (message) carried by the sequences. There are three levels of molecular communication, where the same sequence ``talks'' to various bimolecules, while having, respectively, three different appearances: DNA, RNA and protein. Since the molecular structures and, hence, sequence specific preferences of these are substantially different, the original DNA sequence has to carry simultaneously three types of sequence patterns (codes, messages), thus, being a composite structure in which one had the same letter (nucleotide) is frequently involved in several overlapping codes of different nature. This multiplicity and overlapping of the codes is a unique feature of the Gnomic, language of genetic sequences. The coexisting codes have to be degenerate in various degrees to allow an optimal and concerted performance of all the encoded functions. There is an obvious conflict between the best possible performance of a given function and necessity to compromise the quality of a given sequence pattern in favor of other patterns. It appears that the major role of various changes in the sequences on their ``ontogenetic'' way from DNA to RNA to protein, like RNA editing and splicing, or protein post-translational modifications is to resolve such conflicts. New data are presented strongly indicating that the gene splicing is such a device to resolve the conflict between the code of DNA folding in chromatin and the triplet code for protein synthesis.

  10. Gene cloning: exploring cotton functional genomics and genetic improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diqiu LIU; Xianlong ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Cotton is the most important natural fiber plant in the world. The genetic improvement of the quality of the cotton fiber and agricultural productivity is imperative under the situation of increasing consumption and rapid development of textile technology. Recently, the study of cotton molecular biology has progressed greatly. A lot of specifically or preferentially expressed cotton fiber genes were cloned and analyzed. On the other hand, identification of stress response genes expressed in cotton was performed by other research groups. The major stress factors were studied including the wilt pathogens Verticillium dahliae, Fusarium oxy-sporum f. sp. vasinfectum, bacterial blight, root-knot nematode, drought, and salt stress. What is more, a few genes related to the biosynthesis of gossypol, other sesquiterpene phytoalexins and the major seed oil fatty acids were isolated from cotton. In the present review, we focused on the major advances in cotton gene cloning and expression profiling in the recent years.

  11. Powerful tools for genetic modification: Advances in gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Erica A; Drumm, Mitchell L

    2017-09-27

    Recent discoveries and technical advances in genetic engineering, methods called gene or genome editing, provide hope for repairing genes that cause diseases like cystic fibrosis (CF) or otherwise altering a gene for therapeutic benefit. There are both hopes and hurdles with these technologies, with new ideas emerging almost daily. Initial studies using intestinal organoid cultures carrying the common, F508del mutation have shown that gene editing by CRISPR/Cas9 can convert cells lacking CFTR function to cells with normal channel function, providing a precedent that this technology can be harnessed for CF. While this is an important precedent, the challenges that remain are not trivial. A logistical issue for this and many other genetic diseases is genetic heterogeneity. Approximately, 2000 mutations associated with CF have been found in CFTR, the gene responsible for CF, and thus a feasible strategy that would encompass all individuals affected by the disease is particularly difficult to envision. However, single strategies that would be applicable to all subjects affected by CF have been conceived and are being investigated. With all of these approaches, efficiency (the proportion of cells edited), accuracy (how often other sites in the genome are affected), and delivery of the gene editing components to the desired cells are perhaps the most significant, impending hurdles. Our understanding of each of these areas is increasing rapidly, and while it is impossible to predict when a successful strategy will reach the clinic, there is every reason to believe it is a question of "when" and not "if." © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Hypertension and genetic variation in endothelial-specific genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Larsson

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies usually detect common genetic variants with low-to-medium effect sizes. Many contributing variants are not revealed, since they fail to reach significance after strong correction for multiple comparisons. The WTCCC study for hypertension, for example, failed to identify genome-wide significant associations. We hypothesized that genetic variation in genes expressed specifically in the endothelium may be important for hypertension development. Results from the WTCCC study were combined with previously published gene expression data from mice to specifically investigate SNPs located within endothelial-specific genes, bypassing the requirement for genome-wide significance. Six SNPs from the WTCCC study were selected for independent replication in 5205 hypertensive patients and 5320 population-based controls, and successively in a cohort of 16,537 individuals. A common variant (rs10860812 in the DRAM (damage-regulated autophagy modulator locus showed association with hypertension (P = 0.008 in the replication study. The minor allele (A had a protective effect (OR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.88-0.98 per A-allele, which replicates the association in the WTCCC GWA study. However, a second follow-up, in the larger cohort, failed to reveal an association with blood pressure. We further tested the endothelial-specific genes for co-localization with a panel of newly discovered SNPs from large meta-GWAS on hypertension or blood pressure. There was no significant overlap between those genes and hypertension or blood pressure loci. The result does not support the hypothesis that genetic variation in genes expressed in endothelium plays an important role for hypertension development. Moreover, the discordant association of rs10860812 with blood pressure in the case control study versus the larger Malmö Preventive Project-study highlights the importance of rigorous replication in multiple large independent studies.

  13. Genes confer similar robustness to environmental, stochastic, and genetic perturbations in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Lehner

    Full Text Available Gene inactivation often has little or no apparent consequence for the phenotype of an organism. This property-enetic (or mutational robustness-is pervasive, and has important implications for disease and evolution, but is not well understood. Dating back to at least Waddington, it has been suggested that mutational robustness may be related to the requirement to withstand environmental or stochastic perturbations. Here I show that global quantitative data from yeast are largely consistent with this idea. Considering the effects of mutations in all nonessential genes shows that genes that confer robustness to environmental or stochastic change also buffer the effects of genetic change, and with similar efficacy. This means that selection during evolution for environmental or stochastic robustness (also referred to as canalization may frequently have the side effect of increasing genetic robustness. A dynamic environment may therefore promote the evolution of phenotypic complexity. It also means that "hub" genes in genetic interaction (synthetic lethal networks are generally genes that confer environmental resilience and phenotypic stability.

  14. Studying human disease genes in Caenorhabditis elegans: a molecular genetics laboratory project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Paulson, Elisabeth A; Grana, Theresa M; Harris, Michelle A; Batzli, Janet M

    2012-01-01

    Scientists routinely integrate information from various channels to explore topics under study. We designed a 4-wk undergraduate laboratory module that used a multifaceted approach to study a question in molecular genetics. Specifically, students investigated whether Caenorhabditis elegans can be a useful model system for studying genes associated with human disease. In a large-enrollment, sophomore-level laboratory course, groups of three to four students were assigned a gene associated with either breast cancer (brc-1), Wilson disease (cua-1), ovarian dysgenesis (fshr-1), or colon cancer (mlh-1). Students compared observable phenotypes of wild-type C. elegans and C. elegans with a homozygous deletion in the assigned gene. They confirmed the genetic deletion with nested polymerase chain reaction and performed a bioinformatics analysis to predict how the deletion would affect the encoded mRNA and protein. Students also performed RNA interference (RNAi) against their assigned gene and evaluated whether RNAi caused a phenotype similar to that of the genetic deletion. As a capstone activity, students prepared scientific posters in which they presented their data, evaluated whether C. elegans was a useful model system for studying their assigned genes, and proposed future directions. Assessment showed gains in understanding genotype versus phenotype, RNAi, common bioinformatics tools, and the utility of model organisms.

  15. Molecular population genetics of the NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) gene in Anopheles minimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Hemlata; Huong, Ngo Thi; Arunyawat, Uraiwan; Das, Aparup

    2014-08-01

    Development of insecticide resistance (IR) in mosquito vectors is a primary huddle to malaria control program. Since IR has genetic basis, and genes constantly evolve with response to environment for adaptation to organisms, it is important to know evolutionary pattern of genes conferring IR in malaria vectors. The mosquito Anopheles minimus is a major malaria vector of the Southeast (SE) Asia and India and is susceptible to all insecticides, and thus of interest to know if natural selection has shaped variations in the gene conferring IR. If not, the DNA fragment of such a gene could be used to infer population structure and demography of this species of malaria vector. We have therefore sequenced a ~569 bp DNA segment of the NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) gene (widely known to confer IR) in 123 individuals of An. minimus collected in 10 different locations (eight Indian, one Thai and one Vietnamese). Two Indian population samples were completely mono-morphic in the CPR gene. In general, low genetic diversity was found with no evidence of natural selection in this gene. The data were therefore analyzed to infer population structure and demography of this species. The 10 populations could be genetically differentiated into four different groups; the samples from Thailand and Vietnam contained high nucleotide diversity. All the 10 populations conform to demographic equilibrium model with signature of past population expansion in four populations. The results in general indicate that the An. minimus mosquitoes sampled in the two SE Asian localities contain several genetic characteristics of being parts of the ancestral population.

  16. Chaotic genetic algorithm for gene selection and classification problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Li-Yeh; Yang, Cheng-San; Li, Jung-Chike; Yang, Cheng-Hong

    2009-10-01

    Pattern recognition techniques suffer from a well-known curse, the dimensionality problem. The microarray data classification problem is a classical complex pattern recognition problem. Selecting relevant genes from microarray data poses a formidable challenge to researchers due to the high-dimensionality of features, multiclass categories being involved, and the usually small sample size. The goal of feature (gene) selection is to select those subsets of differentially expressed genes that are potentially relevant for distinguishing the sample classes. In this paper, information gain and chaotic genetic algorithm are proposed for the selection of relevant genes, and a K-nearest neighbor with the leave-one-out crossvalidation method serves as a classifier. The chaotic genetic algorithm is modified by using the chaotic mutation operator to increase the population diversity. The enhanced population diversity expands the GA's search ability. The proposed approach is tested on 10 microarray data sets from the literature. The experimental results show that the proposed method not only effectively reduced the number of gene expression levels, but also achieved lower classification error rates than other methods.

  17. Mapping the genetic architecture of gene expression in human liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric E Schadt

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variants that are associated with common human diseases do not lead directly to disease, but instead act on intermediate, molecular phenotypes that in turn induce changes in higher-order disease traits. Therefore, identifying the molecular phenotypes that vary in response to changes in DNA and that also associate with changes in disease traits has the potential to provide the functional information required to not only identify and validate the susceptibility genes that are directly affected by changes in DNA, but also to understand the molecular networks in which such genes operate and how changes in these networks lead to changes in disease traits. Toward that end, we profiled more than 39,000 transcripts and we genotyped 782,476 unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in more than 400 human liver samples to characterize the genetic architecture of gene expression in the human liver, a metabolically active tissue that is important in a number of common human diseases, including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. This genome-wide association study of gene expression resulted in the detection of more than 6,000 associations between SNP genotypes and liver gene expression traits, where many of the corresponding genes identified have already been implicated in a number of human diseases. The utility of these data for elucidating the causes of common human diseases is demonstrated by integrating them with genotypic and expression data from other human and mouse populations. This provides much-needed functional support for the candidate susceptibility genes being identified at a growing number of genetic loci that have been identified as key drivers of disease from genome-wide association studies of disease. By using an integrative genomics approach, we highlight how the gene RPS26 and not ERBB3 is supported by our data as the most likely susceptibility gene for a novel type 1 diabetes locus recently identified in a large

  18. Gene Prioritization for Imaging Genetics Studies Using Gene Ontology and a Stratified False Discovery Rate Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sejal; Park, Min Tae M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Knight, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an emerging field in which the association between genes and neuroimaging-based quantitative phenotypes are used to explore the functional role of genes in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology in the context of healthy function and neuropsychiatric disorders. The main obstacle for researchers in the field is the high dimensionality of the data in both the imaging phenotypes and the genetic variants commonly typed. In this article, we develop a novel method that utilizes Gene Ontology, an online database, to select and prioritize certain genes, employing a stratified false discovery rate (sFDR) approach to investigate their associations with imaging phenotypes. sFDR has the potential to increase power in genome wide association studies (GWAS), and is quickly gaining traction as a method for multiple testing correction. Our novel approach addresses both the pressing need in genetic research to move beyond candidate gene studies, while not being overburdened with a loss of power due to multiple testing. As an example of our methodology, we perform a GWAS of hippocampal volume using both the Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA2) and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative datasets. The analysis of ENIGMA2 data yielded a set of SNPs with sFDR values between 10 and 20%. Our approach demonstrates a potential method to prioritize genes based on biological systems impaired in a disease.

  19. Mobile genetic elements and cancer. From mutations to gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozeretska, I A; Demydov, S V; Ostapchenko, L I

    2011-12-01

    In the present review, an association between cancer and the activity of the non-LTR retroelements L1, Alu, and SVA, as well as endogenous retroviruses, in the human genome, is analyzed. Data suggesting that transposons have been involved in embryogenesis and malignization processes, are presented. Events that lead to the activation of mobile elements in mammalian somatic cells, as well as the use of mobile elements in genetic screening and cancer gene therapy, are reviewed.

  20. Neuromuscular disorders: genes, genetic counseling and therapeutic trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayana Zatz

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuromuscular disorders (NMD are a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions, with autosomal dominant, recessive, or X-linked inheritance. They are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. Here, we are presenting our major contributions to the field during the past 30 years. We have mapped and identified several novel genes responsible for NMD. Genotype-phenotype correlations studies enhanced our comprehension on the effect of gene mutations on related proteins and their impact on clinical findings. The search for modifier factors allowed the identification of a novel "protective"; variant which may have important implication on therapeutic developments. Molecular diagnosis was introduced in the 1980s and new technologies have been incorporated since then. Next generation sequencing greatly improved our capacity to identify disease-causing mutations with important benefits for research and prevention through genetic counseling of patients' families. Stem cells researches, from and for patients, have been used as tools to study human genetic diseases mechanisms and for therapies development. The clinical effect of preclinical trials in mice and canine models for muscular dystrophies are under investigation. Finally, the integration of our researches and genetic services with our post-graduation program resulted in a significant output of new geneticists, spreading out this expertise to our large country.

  1. Working Group report 3: sensitivity to organic dusts--atopy and gene polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kline, JN; Doekes, G; Bønløkke, Jakob

    2004-01-01

    Working Group 3 (Sensitivity to Organic Dusts-Atopy and Gene Polymorphisms) was convened to review the current understanding of how effects of inhaled organic dust may be modified by genetic factors-both those that increase as well as those that may reduce susceptibility. Furthermore, the group...... was asked to suggest areas that require more investigation in this field. The discussion focused on individual sensitivity to inhaled agents as the most important determinant of inter-individual heterogeneiety in responses to exposures. Genetic modifiers are known for a number of pathologic conditions...

  2. Population genetics of fungal and oomycete effectors involved in gene-for-gene interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukenbrock, Eva H; McDonald, Bruce A

    2009-04-01

    Antagonistic coevolution between plants and pathogens has generated a broad array of attack and defense mechanisms. In the classical avirulence (Avr) gene-for-gene model, the pathogen gene evolves to escape host recognition while the host resistance (R) gene evolves to track the evolving pathogen elicitor. In the case of host-specific toxins (HST), the evolutionary arms race may be inverted, with the gene encoding the pathogen toxin evolving to maintain recognition of the host sensitivity target while the host sensitivity gene evolves to escape binding with the toxin. Pathogen effector genes, including those encoding Avr elicitors and HST, often show elevated levels of polymorphism reflecting the coevolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. However, selection can also eliminate variation in the coevolved gene and its neighboring regions when advantageous alleles are swept to fixation. The distribution and diversity of corresponding host genes will have a major impact on the distribution and diversity of effectors in the pathogen population. Population genetic analyses including both hosts and their pathogens provide an essential tool to understand the diversity and dynamics of effector genes. Here, we summarize current knowledge about the population genetics of fungal and oomycete effector genes, focusing on recent studies that have used both spatial and temporal collections to assess the diversity and distribution of alleles and to monitor changes in allele frequencies over time. These studies illustrate that effector genes exhibit a significant degree of diversity at both small and large sampling scales, suggesting that local selection plays an important role in their evolution. They also illustrate that Avr elicitors and HST may be recognizing the same R genes in plants, leading to evolutionary outcomes that differ for necrotrophs and biotrophs while affecting the evolution of the corresponding R genes. Under this scenario, the optimal number of R genes

  3. Quantitative control of organ shape by combinatorial gene activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Long Cui

    Full Text Available The development of organs with particular shapes, like wings or flowers, depends on regional activity of transcription factors and signalling molecules. However, the mechanisms that link these molecular activities to the morphogenetic events underlying shape are poorly understood. Here we describe a combination of experimental and computational approaches that address this problem, applying them to a group of genes controlling flower shape in the Snapdragon (Antirrhinum. Four transcription factors are known to play a key role in the control of floral shape and asymmetry in Snapdragon. We use quantitative shape analysis of mutants for these factors to define principal components underlying flower shape variation. We show that each transcription factor has a specific effect on the shape and size of regions within the flower, shifting the position of the flower in shape space. These shifts are further analysed by generating double mutants and lines that express some of the genes ectopically. By integrating these observations with known gene expression patterns and interactions, we arrive at a combinatorial scheme for how regional effects on shape are genetically controlled. We evaluate our scheme by incorporating the proposed interactions into a generative model, where the developing flower is treated as a material sheet that grows according to how genes modify local polarities and growth rates. The petal shapes generated by the model show a good quantitative match with those observed experimentally for each petal in numerous genotypes, thus validating the hypothesised scheme. This article therefore shows how complex shapes can be accounted for by combinatorial effects of transcription factors on regional growth properties. This finding has implications not only for how shapes develop but also for how they may have evolved through tinkering with transcription factors and their targets.

  4. Detection of genetically modified organisms by electrochemiluminescence PCR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Xing, Da; Shen, Xingyan; Zhu, Debin

    2004-10-15

    With the development of biotechnology, more and more genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have entered commercial market. Because of the safety concerns, detection and characterization of GMOs have attracted much attention recently. In this study, electrochemiluminescence polymerase chain reaction (ECL-PCR) combined with hybridization technique was applied to detect the GMOs in genetically modified (GM) soybeans and papayas for the first time. Whether the soybeans and the papayas contain GM components was discriminated by detecting the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter. The experiment results show that the detection limit for CaMV35S promoter is 100 fmol, and the GM components can be clearly identified in GM soybeans and papayas. The technique may provide a new means in GMOs detection due to its simplicity and high efficiency.

  5. Gene deletion of cytosolic ATP: citrate lyase leads to altered organic acid production in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijer, Susan Lisette; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    With the availability of the genome sequence of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger, the use of targeted genetic modifications has become feasible. This, together with the fact that A. niger is well established industrially, makes this fungus an attractive micro-organism for creating a cell...... factory platform for production of chemicals. Using molecular biology techniques, this study focused on metabolic engineering of A. niger to manipulate its organic acid production in the direction of succinic acid. The gene target for complete gene deletion was cytosolic ATP: citrate lyase (acl), which...... the acl gene. Additionally, the total amount of organic acids produced in the deletion strain was significantly increased. Genome-scale stoichiometric metabolic model predictions can be used for identifying gene targets. Deletion of the acl led to increased succinic acid production by A. niger....

  6. A genetic strategy to measure circulating Drosophila insulin reveals genes regulating insulin production and secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangbin; Alfa, Ronald W; Topper, Sydni M; Kim, Grace E S; Kockel, Lutz; Kim, Seung K

    2014-08-01

    Insulin is a major regulator of metabolism in metazoans, including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) suggest a genetic basis for reductions of both insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion, phenotypes commonly observed in humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To identify molecular functions of genes linked to T2DM risk, we developed a genetic tool to measure insulin-like peptide 2 (Ilp2) levels in Drosophila, a model organism with superb experimental genetics. Our system permitted sensitive quantification of circulating Ilp2, including measures of Ilp2 dynamics during fasting and re-feeding, and demonstration of adaptive Ilp2 secretion in response to insulin receptor haploinsufficiency. Tissue specific dissection of this reduced insulin signaling phenotype revealed a critical role for insulin signaling in specific peripheral tissues. Knockdown of the Drosophila orthologues of human T2DM risk genes, including GLIS3 and BCL11A, revealed roles of these Drosophila genes in Ilp2 production or secretion. Discovery of Drosophila mechanisms and regulators controlling in vivo insulin dynamics should accelerate functional dissection of diabetes genetics.

  7. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V; King, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be clarif......Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet......, it is clear that large patient cohorts and open-access repositories will be essential to further advance the field. To that end, the large multicenter Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study was established. The goal of the TIC Genetics study is to undertake a comprehensive gene...... discovery effort, focusing both on familial genetic variants with large effects within multiply affected pedigrees and on de novo mutations ascertained through the analysis of apparently simplex parent-child trios with non-familial tics. The clinical data and biomaterials (DNA, transformed cell lines, RNA...

  8. Pathways of Genetic Code Evolution in Ancient and Modern Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Supratim; Higgs, Paul G

    2015-06-01

    There have been two distinct phases of evolution of the genetic code: an ancient phase--prior to the divergence of the three domains of life, during which the standard genetic code was established--and a modern phase, in which many alternative codes have arisen in specific groups of genomes that differ only slightly from the standard code. Here we discuss the factors that are most important in these two phases, and we argue that these are substantially different. In the modern phase, changes are driven by chance events such as tRNA gene deletions and codon disappearance events. Selection acts as a barrier to prevent changes in the code. In contrast, in the ancient phase, selection for increased diversity of amino acids in the code can be a driving force for addition of new amino acids. The pathway of code evolution is constrained by avoiding disruption of genes that are already encoded by earlier versions of the code. The current arrangement of the standard code suggests that it evolved from a four-column code in which Gly, Ala, Asp, and Val were the earliest encoded amino acids.

  9. Genetic polymorphisms in CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and COMT genes in Greenlandic Inuit and Europeans

    OpenAIRE

    Ghisari, Mandana; Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2013-01-01

    Background. The Indigenous Arctic population is of Asian descent, and their genetic background is different from the Caucasian populations. Relatively little is known about the specific genetic polymorphisms in genes involved in the activation and detoxification mechanisms of environmental contaminants in Inuit and its relation to health risk. The Greenlandic Inuit are highly exposed to legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pes...

  10. Analysis of genetic interaction networks shows that alternatively spliced genes are highly versatile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, David; Sheoran, Ritika; Lovell, Simon C

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing has the potential to increase the diversity of the transcriptome and proteome. Where more than one transcript arises from a gene they are often so different that they are quite unlikely to have the same function. However, it remains unclear if alternative splicing generally leads to a gene being involved in multiple biological processes or whether it alters the function within a single process. Knowing that genetic interactions occur between functionally related genes, we have used them as a proxy for functional versatility, and have analysed the sets of genes of two well-characterised model organisms: Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Using network analyses we find that few genes are functionally homogenous (only involved in a few functionally-related biological processes). Moreover, there are differences between alternatively spliced genes and genes with a single transcript; specifically, genes with alternatively splicing are, on average, involved in more biological processes. Finally, we suggest that factors other than specific functional classes determine whether a gene is alternatively spliced.

  11. High Genetic Diversity of Microbial Cellulase and Hemicellulase Genes in the Hindgut of Holotrichia parallela Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used a culture-independent method based on library construction and sequencing to analyze the genetic diversity of the cellulase and hemicellulase genes of the bacterial community resident in the hindgut of Holotrichia parallela larvae. The results indicate that there is a large, diverse set of bacterial genes encoding lignocellulose hydrolysis enzymes in the hindgut of H. parallela. The total of 101 distinct gene fragments (similarity <95% of glycosyl hydrolase families including GH2 (24 genes, GH8 (27 genes, GH10 (19 genes, GH11 (14 genes and GH36 (17 genes families was retrieved, and certain sequences of GH2 (10.61%, GH8 (3.33%, and GH11 (18.42% families had <60% identities with known sequences in GenBank, indicating their novelty. Based on phylogenetic analysis, sequences from hemicellulase families were related to enzymes from Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Fragments from cellulase family were most associated with the phylum of Proteobacteria. Furthermore, a full-length endo-xylanase gene was obtained, and the enzyme exhibited activity over a broad range of pH levels. Our results indicate that there are large number of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria in the hindgut of H. parallela larvae, and these symbiotic bacteria play an important role in the degradation of roots and other organic matter for the host insect.

  12. Environmental Considerations Concerning the Release of Genetically Modified Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PANDEY P.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The current paper reviews on genetically modified crops and its impact on environment. The need forscreening and testing increases as more changes are made, and "second-generation" GMs will require more testing. Todate no adverse health effects caused by products approved for sale have been documented, although two productsfailed initial safety testing and were discontinued, due to allergic reactions. Most feeding trials have observed no toxiceffects and saw that GM foods were equivalent in nutrition to unmodified foods, although a few reports attributephysiological changes to GM food. However, some scientists and advocacy groups such as Greenpeace and WorldWildlife Fund consider that the available data do not prove that GM food does not pose risks to health, and call foradditional and more rigorous testing before marketing genetically engineered food [3]. Therefore, before a crop isdeclared environment friendly safety assessment is recommended. If any safety concern is identified, the risk associatedwith it should be characterized to determine effect on human health. Subsequent assessments should consider factorssuch as toxicity, allergenicitY, antinutrients and metabolites, the stability of the inserted gene and nutritionalmodification associated with genetic modification. If the entire assessment of these factors concludes that the GM foodin question is as safe as its conventional counterpart, the food is then considered safe to eat.

  13. [The lack of information on genetically modified organisms in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Isabelle Geoffroy; Marin, Victor Augustus

    2012-02-01

    This article presents a review about the labeling of products that have Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO), also called transgenic elements in their composition. It addresses the conventions, laws and regulations relating to such products currently governing the market, the adequacy of these existing standards and their acceptance by society. It also examines the importance of the cautionary principle when assessing the application of new technologies or technologies where little is known or where there is no relevant scientific knowledge about the potential risks to the environment, human health and society.

  14. Safety assessment and detection methods of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rong; Zheng, Zhe; Jiao, Guanglian

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs), are gaining importance in agriculture as well as the production of food and feed. Along with the development of GMOs, health and food safety concerns have been raised. These concerns for these new GMOs make it necessary to set up strict system on food safety assessment of GMOs. The food safety assessment of GMOs, current development status of safety and precise transgenic technologies and GMOs detection have been discussed in this review. The recent patents about GMOs and their detection methods are also reviewed. This review can provide elementary introduction on how to assess and detect GMOs.

  15. The genetic basis of aminoglycoside ototoxicity: The search for susceptibility genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezant, T.R.; Fischel-Ghodsian, F. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity appears to be genetically determined. Recently we identified a mutation in the small ribosomal RNA gene of the mitochondrial DNA that can cause deafness after aminoglycoside treatment in families with maternally-inherited susceptibility to the ototoxic effect of these antibiotics. The mutation produces a structural change in the 12S rRNA, which allows increased binding of aminoglycosides, mistranslation of mitochondrial proteins, decreased energy production, and cell death. Because only a minority of sporadic patients have mutations in the 12S rRNA gene, we anticipate the involvement of other genes in ototoxic deafness. We have developed a model system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to functionally identify genes whose products interact with aminoglycosides. Besides its small genome size and well-developed genetic tools, a unique advantage of using this haploid organism is that recessive drug-responsive mutations will not be missed. An additional advantage is that yeast can be grown in either fermentative or respiratory media, allowing the functional categorization of mutants. Over 100 antibiotic-resistant mutants have now been isolated. The majority of these mutations (69%) are dominant and are being sorted by segregation tests. The 31% of mutations that are recessive have been sorted into two major complementation groups, indicating that two genes appear to be responsible for most of the recessive cases. Our strategy is to isolate the yeast genes that most commonly acquire mutations, clone the human homologs, and screen patients for susceptibility mutations.

  16. Gene ontology analysis of pairwise genetic associations in two genome-wide studies of sporadic ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Nora

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is increasingly clear that common human diseases have a complex genetic architecture characterized by both additive and nonadditive genetic effects. The goal of the present study was to determine whether patterns of both additive and nonadditive genetic associations aggregate in specific functional groups as defined by the Gene Ontology (GO. Results We first estimated all pairwise additive and nonadditive genetic effects using the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method that makes few assumptions about the underlying genetic model. Statistical significance was evaluated using permutation testing in two genome-wide association studies of ALS. The detection data consisted of 276 subjects with ALS and 271 healthy controls while the replication data consisted of 221 subjects with ALS and 211 healthy controls. Both studies included genotypes from approximately 550,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Each SNP was mapped to a gene if it was within 500 kb of the start or end. Each SNP was assigned a p-value based on its strongest joint effect with the other SNPs. We then used the Exploratory Visual Analysis (EVA method and software to assign a p-value to each gene based on the overabundance of significant SNPs at the α = 0.05 level in the gene. We also used EVA to assign p-values to each GO group based on the overabundance of significant genes at the α = 0.05 level. A GO category was determined to replicate if that category was significant at the α = 0.05 level in both studies. We found two GO categories that replicated in both studies. The first, ‘Regulation of Cellular Component Organization and Biogenesis’, a GO Biological Process, had p-values of 0.010 and 0.014 in the detection and replication studies, respectively. The second, ‘Actin Cytoskeleton’, a GO Cellular Component, had p-values of 0.040 and 0.046 in the detection and replication studies, respectively. Conclusions Pathway

  17. Confirming candidate genes for longevity in Drosophila melanogaster using two different genetic backgrounds and selection methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wit, Janneke; Frydenberg, Jane; Sarup, Pernille Merete

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating genes that affect life span or that can be used as biomarkers for ageing has received attention in diverse studies in recent years. Using model organisms and various approaches several genes have been linked to the longevity phenotype. For Drosophila melanogaster those studies have...... usually focussed on one sex and on flies originating from one genetic background, and results from different studies often do not overlap. Using D. melanogaster selected for increased longevity we aimed to find robust longevity related genes by examining gene expression in both sexes of flies originating...... from different genetic backgrounds. Further, we compared expression changes across three ages, when flies were young, middle aged or old, to examine how candidate gene expression changes with the onset of ageing. We selected 10 genes based on their expression differences in prior microarray studies...

  18. Genetic Distance and Genetic Identity between Hindu and Muslim populations of Barak Valley for ABO and Rh genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyo CHAKRABORTY

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A genetic study was carried out in two endogamous populations namely Hindus and Muslims in the Barak Valley Zone of Assam in India. Nei�s genetic distance and genetic identity between two populations were calculated on the basis of estimated allele frequencies of ABO and Rh blood group genes. The genetic distance between Hindus and Muslims was 0.12% for ABO gene and 0.10% for Rh gene. The genetic identity between two populations was estimated as 99.88% for ABO gene and 99.90% for Rh gene suggesting very high genetic similarity between these two populations. Observed heterozygosity estimate was higher in Hindus (0.5598 for ABO gene and 0.2822 for Rh gene than Muslims (0.5346 for ABO gene and 0.2408 for Rh gene indicating lesser inbreeding in Hindus than Muslims. Fixation index was lower in Hindus (16.02% for ABO gene and 43.56% for Rh gene than Muslims (19.80% for ABO gene and 51.84% for Rh gene. Panmictic index was higher in Hindus than Muslims for both the genes. Fixation and panmictic indices revealed that during evolutionary process the Hindus maintained more outbreeding feature than the Muslims in the valley. In this study, the concepts of genetic load of a population and genotype fitness were extended to alleles to estimate the magnitude of allele genetic load (GL and allele fitness for 3 alleles in ABO gene and for 2 alleles in Rh gene in two populations. The genetic load for O, A and B alleles were lower in Hindus than Muslims. Similar results for genetic load were found for the alleles of Rh gene in the comparison of two populations. The fitness estimates of O, A and B alleles for ABO gene and D and d alleles for Rh gene were higher in Hindus than Muslims. A population with low allele genetic load (GL and high allele fitness (AF might have greater survival advantage in nature in the absence of heterozygote advantage and higher adaptive value of the allele with increased frequency.

  19. Combining classifiers generated by multi-gene genetic programming for protein fold recognition using genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardsiri, Mahshid Khatibi; Eftekhari, Mahdi; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this study the problem of protein fold recognition, that is a classification task, is solved via a hybrid of evolutionary algorithms namely multi-gene Genetic Programming (GP) and Genetic Algorithm (GA). Our proposed method consists of two main stages and is performed on three datasets taken from the literature. Each dataset contains different feature groups and classes. In the first step, multi-gene GP is used for producing binary classifiers based on various feature groups for each class. Then, different classifiers obtained for each class are combined via weighted voting so that the weights are determined through GA. At the end of the first step, there is a separate binary classifier for each class. In the second stage, the obtained binary classifiers are combined via GA weighting in order to generate the overall classifier. The final obtained classifier is superior to the previous works found in the literature in terms of classification accuracy.

  20. Estimating the Exogenous Genes Copy Number of Genetically Modified Organisms by Droplet Digital PCR%利用微滴数字PCR分析转基因生物外源基因拷贝数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜羽; 胡佳莹; 杨立桃

    2014-01-01

    微滴数字PCR(droplet digital PCR,ddPCR)是一种基于泊松分布原理的核酸分子绝对定量技术,在核酸分子的绝对计数/定量领域具有极大的应用潜力.本研究基于ddPCR平台,以转基因水稻(Oryza sativa)T1c-19和转人乳铁蛋白基因基因山羊(Capra hircus) 134为例,建立了转基因生物(genetically modified organisms,GMOs)外源基因拷贝数分析方法,并比较了其与传统的实时荧光定量PCR(quantitative real-time PCR,qRT-PCR)和Southern blot方法的准确性.实验数据表明,T1c-19的杀虫晶体蛋白基因(insecticidal crystal protein,Cry1C*)在qRT-PCR和ddPCR测定结果比较一致,约为2拷贝,但已报道的Southern blot分析结果为1拷贝;ddPCR对bar基因的分析结果高于qRT-PCR,分别为2.09拷贝和1.51拷贝.转人乳铁蛋白基因(human lactoferrin,HLF)山羊134在qRT-PCR和ddPCR的分析结果基本一致,均测得含有l拷贝的HLF基因.研究结果表明,微滴数字PCR方法是一种经济、快速和准确的外源基因拷贝数分析新方法,灵敏度和准确性高,将会在拷贝数分析中广泛应用.

  1. I Have a Dream: Organic Movements Include Gene Manipulation to Improve Sustainable Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhart U. Ryffel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Several papers in a Special Issue of Sustainability have recently discussed various aspects to evaluate whether organic farming and gene manipulation are compatible. A special emphasis was given to new plant breeding techniques (NPBTs. These new approaches allow the most predictable genetic alterations of crop plants in ways that the genetically modified plant is identical to a plant generated by conventional breeding. The articles of the Special Issue present the arguments pro and contra the inclusion of the plants generated by NPBTs in organic farming. Organic movements have not yet made a final decision whether some of these techniques should be accepted or banned. In my view these novel genetically manipulated (GM crops could be used in such a way as to respect the requirements for genetically manipulated organisms (GMOs formulated by the International Federation of Organic Movements (IFOAM. Reviewing the potential benefits of disease-resistant potatoes and bananas, it seems possible that these crops support organic farming. To this end, I propose specific requirements that the organic movements should proactively formulate as their standards to accept specific GM crops.

  2. Investigating Novice and Expert Conceptions of Genetically Modified Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Lisa M.; Bissonnette, Sarah A.; Knight, Jonathan D.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2017-01-01

    The aspiration of biology education is to give students tools to apply knowledge learned in the classroom to everyday life. Genetic modification is a real-world biological concept that relies on an in-depth understanding of the molecular behavior of DNA and proteins. This study investigated undergraduate biology students’ conceptions of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) when probed with real-world, molecular and cellular, and essentialist cues, and how those conceptions compared across biology expertise. We developed a novel written assessment tool and administered it to 120 non–biology majors, 154 entering biology majors, 120 advanced biology majors (ABM), and nine biology faculty. Results indicated that undergraduate biology majors rarely included molecular and cellular rationales in their initial explanations of GMOs. Despite ABM demonstrating that they have much of the biology knowledge necessary to understand genetic modification, they did not appear to apply this knowledge to explaining GMOs. Further, this study showed that all undergraduate student populations exhibited evidence of essentialist thinking while explaining GMOs, regardless of their level of biology training. Finally, our results suggest an association between scientifically accurate ideas and the application of molecular and cellular rationales, as well as an association between misconceptions and essentialist rationales. PMID:28821537

  3. APPLICATION OF GENETIC DEAFNESS GENE CHIP FOR DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION OF DEAFNESS IN PREGNANT WOMEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Liang; ZHONG Su; ZHAO Nan; LIU Ping; ZHAO Yangyu; QIAO Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study is to identify the carrier rate of common deafness mutation in Chinese pregnant women via detecting deafness gene mutations with gene chip. Methods The pregnant women in obstetric clinic without hearing impairment and hearing disorders family history were selected. The informed consent was signed. Peripheral blood was taken to extract genom-ic DNA. Application of genetic deafness gene chip for detecting 9 mutational hot spot of the most common 4 Chinese deafness genes, namely GJB2 (35delG,176del16bp, 235delC, 299delAT), GJB3 (C538T) ,SLC26A4 ( IVS72A>G, A2168G) and mito-chondrial DNA 12S rRNA (A1555G, C1494T) . Further genetic testing were provided to the spouses and newborns of the screened carriers. Results Peripheral blood of 430 pregnant women were detected,detection of deafness gene mutation carri-ers in 24 cases(4.2%), including 13 cases of the GJB2 heterozygous mutation, 3 cases of SLC26A4 heterozygous mutation, 1 cases of GJB3 heterozygous mutation, and 1 case of mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation. 18 spouses and 17 newborns took fur-ther genetic tests, and 6 newborns inherited the mutation from their mother. Conclusion The common deafness genes muta-tion has a high carrier rate in pregnant women group,235delC and IVS7-2A>G heterozygous mutations are common.

  4. Genetically modified organisms in the United States: implementation, concerns, and public perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeschger, Max P; Silva, Catherine E

    2007-01-01

    We examine the state of biotechnology with respect to genetically modified (GM) organisms in agriculture. Our focus is on the USA, where there has been significant progress and implementation but where, to date, the matter has drawn little attention. GM organisms are the result of lateral gene transfers, the transfer of genes from one species to another, or sometimes, from one kingdom to another. The introduction of foreign genes makes some people very uncomfortable, and a small group of activists have grave concerns about the technology. Attempts by activists to build concern in the general public have garnered little attention; however, the producers of GM organisms have responded to their concerns and established extensive testing programs to be applied to each candidate organism that is produced. In the meantime, GM varieties of corn, cotton, soybean and rapeseed have been put into agricultural production and are now extensively planted. These crops, and the other, newer GM crops, have produced no problems and have pioneered a silent agricultural revolution in the USA.

  5. Matching genetics with oceanography: directional gene flow in a Mediterranean fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunter, C; Carreras-Carbonell, J; Macpherson, E; Tintoré, J; Vidal-Vijande, E; Pascual, A; Guidetti, P; Pascual, M

    2011-12-01

    Genetic connectivity and geographic fragmentation are two opposing mechanisms determining the population structure of species. While the first homogenizes the genetic background across populations the second one allows their differentiation. Therefore, knowledge of processes affecting dispersal of marine organisms is crucial to understand their genetic distribution patterns and for the effective management of their populations. In this study, we use genetic analyses of eleven microsatellites in combination with oceanographic satellite and dispersal simulation data to determine distribution patterns for Serranus cabrilla, a ubiquitous demersal broadcast spawner, in the Mediterranean Sea. Pairwise population F(ST) values ranged between -0.003 and 0.135. Two genetically distinct clusters were identified, with a clear division located between the oceanographic discontinuities at the Ibiza Channel (IC) and the Almeria-Oran Front (AOF), revealing an admixed population in between. The Balearic Front (BF) also appeared to dictate population structure. Directional gene flow on the Spanish coast was observed as S. cabrilla dispersed from west to east over the AOF, from north to south on the IC and from south of the IC towards the Balearic Islands. Correlations between genetic and oceanographic data were highly significant. Seasonal changes in current patterns and the relationship between ocean circulation patterns and spawning season may also play an important role in population structure around oceanographic fronts. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Surveying genetic variants and molecular phylogeny of cerebral cavernous malformation gene, CCM3/PDCD10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Goswami, Chandan

    2014-12-01

    The three cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) genes namely CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10 have been identified for which mutations cause cerebral cavernous malformations. However, the protein products of these genes involved in forming CCM signaling, are still poorly understood imposing an urgent need to understand these genes and their signaling processes in details. So far involvement of CCM3/PDCD10 in the cavernous angioma has been characterized from biochemical and biophysical analyses. However, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history and comprehensive genetic variants of CCM3/PDCD10. Herein, we explored the phylogenetic history and genetic variants of CCM3/PDCD10 gene. Synteny analyses revealed that CCM3/PDCD10 gene shared same genomic loci from Drosophila to human and the gene structure of CCM3/PDCD10 is conserved from human to Branchiostoma floridae for about 500 MYs with some changes in sea urchin and in insects. The conserved CCM3/PDCD10 is characterized by presence of indels in the N-terminal dimerization domain. We identified 951 CCM3/PDCD10 variants by analysis of 1092 human genomes with top three variation classes belongs to 84% SNPs, 6.9% insertions and 6.2% deletions. We identified 22 missense mutations in the human CCM3/PDCD10 protein and out of which three mutations are deleterious. We also identified four stop-codon gaining mutations at the positions E34*, E68*, E97* and E140*, respectively. This study is the first comprehensive analysis of the CCM3/PDCD10 gene based on phylogenetic origin and genetic variants. This study corroborates that the evolution of CCM proteins with tubular organization evolvements by endothelial cells.

  7. Functional evolution of ADAMTS genes: Evidence from analyses of phylogeny and gene organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Meir Erwin G

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ADAMTS (A Disintegrin-like and Metalloprotease with Thrombospondin motifs proteins are a family of metalloproteases with sequence similarity to the ADAM proteases, that contain the thrombospondin type 1 sequence repeat motifs (TSRs common to extracellular matrix proteins. ADAMTS proteins have recently gained attention with the discovery of their role in a variety of diseases, including tissue and blood disorders, cancer, osteoarthritis, Alzheimer's and the genetic syndromes Weill-Marchesani syndrome (ADAMTS10, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (ADAMTS13, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIIC (ADAMTS2 in humans and belted white-spotting mutation in mice (ADAMTS20. Results Phylogenetic analysis and comparison of the exon/intron organization of vertebrate (Homo, Mus, Fugu, chordate (Ciona and invertebrate (Drosophila and Caenorhabditis ADAMTS homologs has elucidated the evolutionary relationships of this important gene family, which comprises 19 members in humans. Conclusions The evolutionary history of ADAMTS genes in vertebrate genomes has been marked by rampant gene duplication, including a retrotransposition that gave rise to a distinct ADAMTS subfamily (ADAMTS1, -4, -5, -8, -15 that may have distinct aggrecanase and angiogenesis functions.

  8. Blue Genes: An Integrative Laboratory to Differentiate Genetic Transformation from Gene Mutation for Underclassmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, Kevin T.; Chang, Ming-Mei; Simon, Robert D.; Lazatin, Justine C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of students to understand the relationship between genotype and phenotype, and the mechanisms by which genotypes and phenotypes can change is essential for students studying genetics. To this end, we have developed a four-week laboratory called Blue Genes, which is designed to help novice students discriminate between two mechanisms by…

  9. Gene Editing and Genetic Lung Disease. Basic Research Meets Therapeutic Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapati, Deepthi; Morrisey, Edward E

    2017-03-01

    Although our understanding of the genetics and pathology of congenital lung diseases such as surfactant protein deficiency, cystic fibrosis, and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is extensive, treatment options are lacking. Because the lung is a barrier organ in direct communication with the external environment, targeted delivery of gene corrective technologies to the respiratory system via intratracheal or intranasal routes is an attractive option for therapy. CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing technology is a promising approach to repairing or inactivating disease-causing mutations. Recent reports have provided proof of concept by using CRISPR/Cas9 to successfully repair or inactivate mutations in animal models of monogenic human diseases. Potential pulmonary applications of CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing include gene correction of monogenic diseases in pre- or postnatal lungs and ex vivo gene editing of patient-specific airway stem cells followed by autologous cell transplant. Strategies to enhance gene-editing efficiency and eliminate off-target effects by targeting pulmonary stem/progenitor cells and the assessment of short-term and long-term effects of gene editing are important considerations as the field advances. If methods continue to advance rapidly, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing may provide a novel opportunity to correct monogenic diseases of the respiratory system.

  10. Transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone: The case of antibiotic resistance genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to material and energy flows, the dynamics and functions of the Earth's critical zone are intensively mediated by biological actions performed by diverse organisms. These biological actions are modulated by the expression of functional genes and their translation into enzymes that catalyze geochemical reactions, such as nutrient turnover and pollutant biodegradation. Although geobiology, as an interdisciplinary research area, is playing and vital role in linking biological and geochemical processes at different temporal and spatial scales, the distribution and transport of functional genes have rarely been investigated from the Earth's critical zone perspectives. To illustrate the framework of studies on the transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone, antibiotic resistance is taken as an example. Antibiotic resistance genes are considered as a group of emerging contaminants, and their emergence and spread within the critical zone on one hand are induced by anthropogenic activities, and on other hand are threatening human health worldwide. The transport and transformation of antibiotic resistance genes are controlled by both horizontal gene transfer between bacterial cells and the movement of bacteria harboring antibiotic resistance genes. In this paper, the fate and behavior of antibiotic resistance genes will be discussed in the following aspects: 1) general overview of environmental antibiotic resistance; 2) high through quantification of the resistome in various environmental media; 3) pathways of resistance gene flow within the critical zone; and 4) potential strategies in mitigating antibiotic resistance, particularly from the critical zone perspectives.

  11. Systematic genetic analysis identifies Cis-eQTL target genes associated with glioblastoma patient survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Rong Chen

    Full Text Available Prior expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL studies have demonstrated heritable variation determining differences in gene expression. The majority of eQTL studies were based on cell lines and normal tissues. We performed cis-eQTL analysis using glioblastoma multiforme (GBM data sets obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA to systematically investigate germline variation's contribution to tumor gene expression levels. We identified 985 significant cis-eQTL associations (FDR<0.05 mapped to 978 SNP loci and 159 unique genes. Approximately 57% of these eQTLs have been previously linked to the gene expression in cell lines and normal tissues; 43% of these share cis associations known to be associated with functional annotations. About 25% of these cis-eQTL associations are also common to those identified in Breast Cancer from a recent study. Further investigation of the relationship between gene expression and patient clinical information identified 13 eQTL genes whose expression level significantly correlates with GBM patient survival (p<0.05. Most of these genes are also differentially expressed in tumor samples and organ-specific controls (p<0.05. Our results demonstrated a significant relationship of germline variation with gene expression levels in GBM. The identification of eQTLs-based expression associated survival might be important to the understanding of genetic contribution to GBM cancer prognosis.

  12. The genetic alteration of retinoblastoma gene in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Il; Shim, Yung Mok; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Retinoblastoma(RB) gene is the prototype of tumor suppressor gene and it`s alteration have been frequently observed in a large number of human tumors. To investigate the role of RB in esophageal cancer, we studied 36 esophageal cancer tissues with Southern blot analysis to detect gross LOH and PCR-SSCP method to find minute LOH and mutation, if any. In the cases with abnormalities, the nucleotide sequence analysis was performed. Allelic loss of chromosome 13q14 occurred in 20 out of 32 informative cases (62.5%) by Southern analysis. Furthermore, PCR-LOH added three positive cases. Mobility shift by PCR-SSCP was observed in one case at exon 22, which showed 1 bp deletion in codon 771 of RB gene resulting in frame shift mutation. Besides, nine PCR-band alteration in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue were observed in exon 14 and 22, but mutation was not found on sequencing analysis suggesting the epigenetic alteration in tumor tissue. Analysis of the clinical data did not show any difference depending upon RB alteration. However, the total incidence of RB gene may play an important role in the development of esophageal cancer. The main genetic alteration of RB gene was deletion detected by Southern blot and one bp deletion leading to frame shift was also observed. 8 figs, 5 tabs. (Author).

  13. Fossils, Genes and The Origin of Organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shubin, Neil (University of Chicago)

    2011-04-20

    A toolkit of experimental and comparative biology can be applied to understand the great transformations in the history of life. Expeditionary paleontology can be used to target key nodes of the tree of life for which new fossils can provide insights into major morphological transformations. These fossils often have intermediate conditions that allow extant creatures to be compared in new ways. The tools of developmental genetics can then be used to explore these new comparisons to understand the genetic basis for macroevolutionary change. These different approaches can be used to predict new discoveries and this is only possible because of the empirical content of the tree of life.

  14. Genetic determinants of swimming motility in the squid light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Caitlin A; Mandel, Mark J; Gyllborg, Mattias C; Thomasgard, Krista A; Ruby, Edward G

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial flagellar motility is a complex cellular behavior required for the colonization of the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, by the beneficial bioluminescent symbiont Vibrio fischeri. We characterized the basis of this behavior by performing (i) a forward genetic screen to identify mutants defective in soft-agar motility, as well as (ii) a transcriptional analysis to determine the genes that are expressed downstream of the flagellar master regulator FlrA. Mutants with severe defects in soft-agar motility were identified due to insertions in genes with putative roles in flagellar motility and in genes that were unexpected, including those predicted to encode hypothetical proteins and cell division-related proteins. Analysis of mutants for their ability to enter into a productive symbiosis indicated that flagellar motility mutants are deficient, while chemotaxis mutants are able to colonize a subset of juvenile squid to light-producing levels. Thirty-three genes required for normal motility in soft agar were also downregulated in the absence of FlrA, suggesting they belong to the flagellar regulon of V. fischeri. Mutagenesis of putative paralogs of the flagellar motility genes motA, motB, and fliL revealed that motA1, motB1, and both fliL1 and fliL2, but not motA2 and motB2, likely contribute to soft-agar motility. Using these complementary approaches, we have characterized the genetic basis of flagellar motility in V. fischeri and furthered our understanding of the roles of flagellar motility and chemotaxis in colonization of the juvenile squid, including identifying 11 novel mutants unable to enter into a productive light-organ symbiosis. © 2013 The Authors. Microbiology Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Standing genetic variation and compensatory evolution in transgenic organisms: a growth-enhanced salmon simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Robert N M; Devlin, Robert H

    2011-06-01

    Genetically modified strains usually are generated within defined genetic backgrounds to minimize variation for the engineered characteristic in order to facilitate basic research investigations or for commercial application. However, interactions between transgenes and genetic background have been documented in both model and commercial agricultural species, indicating that allelic variation at transgene-modifying loci are not uncommon in genomes. Engineered organisms that have the potential to allow entry of transgenes into natural populations may cause changes to ecosystems via the interaction of their specific phenotypes with ecosystem components and services. A transgene introgressing through natural populations is likely to encounter a range of natural genetic variation (among individuals or sub-populations) that could result in changes in phenotype, concomitant with effects on fitness and ecosystem consequences that differ from that seen in the progenitor transgenic strain. In the present study, using a growth hormone transgenic salmon example, we have modeled selection of modifier loci (single and multiple) in the presence of a transgene and have found that accounting for genetic background can significantly affect the persistence of transgenes in populations, potentially reducing or reversing a "Trojan gene" effect. Influences from altered life history characteristics (e.g., developmental timing, age of maturation) and compensatory demographic/ecosystem controls (e.g., density dependence) also were found to have a strong influence on transgene effects. Further, with the presence of a transgene in a population, genetic backgrounds were found to shift in non-transgenic individuals as well, an effect expected to direct phenotypes away from naturally selected optima. The present model has revealed the importance of understanding effects of selection for background genetics on the evolution of phenotypes in populations harbouring transgenes.

  16. New multiplex PCR methods for rapid screening of genetically modified organisms in foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly eDatukishvili

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present novel multiplex PCR methods for rapid and reliable screening of genetically modified organisms (GMOs. New designed PCR primers targeting four frequently used GMO specific sequences permitted identification of new DNA markers, in particular 141 bp fragment of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV 35S promoter, 224 bp fragment of Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase (NOS terminator, 256 bp fragment of 5-enolppyruvylshikimate-phosphate synthase (epsps gene and 258 bp fragment of Cry1Ab delta-endotoxin (cry1Ab gene for GMO screening. The certified reference materials containing Roundup Ready soybean (RRS and maize MON 810 were applied for the development and optimization of uniplex and multiplex PCR systems. Evaluation of amplification products by agarose gel electrophoresis using negative and positive controls confirmed high specificity and sensitivity at 0.1% GMO for both RRS and MON 810. The fourplex PCR was developed and optimized that allows simultaneous detection of three common transgenic elements, such as: CaMV 35S promoter, NOS terminator, epsps gene together with soybean-specific lectin gene. The triplex PCR developed enables simultaneous identification of transgenic elements, such as: 35S promoter and cry1Ab gene together with maize zein gene. The analysis of different processed foods demonstrated that multiplex PCR methods developed in this study are useful for accurate and fast screening of GM food products.

  17. New multiplex PCR methods for rapid screening of genetically modified organisms in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datukishvili, Nelly; Kutateladze, Tamara; Gabriadze, Inga; Bitskinashvili, Kakha; Vishnepolsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    We present novel multiplex PCR methods for rapid and reliable screening of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). New designed PCR primers targeting four frequently used GMO specific sequences permitted identification of new DNA markers, in particular 141 bp fragment of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, 224 bp fragment of Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase (NOS) terminator, 256 bp fragment of 5-enolppyruvylshikimate-phosphate synthase (epsps) gene and 258 bp fragment of Cry1Ab delta-endotoxin (cry1Ab) gene for GMO screening. The certified reference materials containing Roundup Ready soybean (RRS) and maize MON 810 were applied for the development and optimization of uniplex and multiplex PCR systems. Evaluation of amplification products by agarose gel electrophoresis using negative and positive controls confirmed high specificity and sensitivity at 0.1% GMO for both RRS and MON 810. The fourplex PCR was developed and optimized that allows simultaneous detection of three common transgenic elements, such as: CaMV 35S promoter, NOS terminator, epsps gene together with soybean-specific lectin gene. The triplex PCR developed enables simultaneous identification of transgenic elements, such as: 35S promoter and cry1Ab gene together with maize zein gene. The analysis of different processed foods demonstrated that multiplex PCR methods developed in this study are useful for accurate and fast screening of GM food products.

  18. Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Molecular Genetics Division, Ohio State University. For reporting purpose, the ’Smad2’ sign indicates a disabled copy of ’Smad2’ gene while the ’+’ sign...skeletal mass in third- and fourth-grade children : Effects of age, gender, ethnicity and body composition. Bone 20:73-78. 18. Thomas, T. and Burguera, B...strand buffer mix (250 mM Tris HCI (pH 8.3 at RT), 375 mM KCI, 15 mM MgCI, I ul of 0.1 M DTT and 1 ul of RNAse Out, recombinant RNAse inhibitor

  19. From biophysics to evolutionary genetics: statistical aspects of gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lässig Michael

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is an introductory review on how genes interact to produce biological functions. Transcriptional interactions involve the binding of proteins to regulatory DNA. Specific binding sites can be identified by genomic analysis, and these undergo a stochastic evolution process governed by selection, mutations, and genetic drift. We focus on the links between the biophysical function and the evolution of regulatory elements. In particular, we infer fitness landscapes of binding sites from genomic data, leading to a quantitative evolutionary picture of regulation.

  20. A Review for Detecting Gene-Gene Interactions Using Machine Learning Methods in Genetic Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Lee Koo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the greatest statistical computational challenge in genetic epidemiology is to identify and characterize the genes that interact with other genes and environment factors that bring the effect on complex multifactorial disease. These gene-gene interactions are also denoted as epitasis in which this phenomenon cannot be solved by traditional statistical method due to the high dimensionality of the data and the occurrence of multiple polymorphism. Hence, there are several machine learning methods to solve such problems by identifying such susceptibility gene which are neural networks (NNs, support vector machine (SVM, and random forests (RFs in such common and multifactorial disease. This paper gives an overview on machine learning methods, describing the methodology of each machine learning methods and its application in detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Lastly, this paper discussed each machine learning method and presents the strengths and weaknesses of each machine learning method in detecting gene-gene interactions in complex human disease.

  1. Perceptions and understanding of genetics and genetic eye disease and attitudes to genetic testing and gene therapy in a primary eye care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganne, Pratyusha; Garrioch, Robert; Votruba, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Genetic eye pathology represents a significant percentage of the causes of blindness in industrialized countries. This study explores the level of understanding and perceptions of genetics and inherited eye diseases and the attitudes to genetic testing and gene therapy. The study was conducted in two parts. Participant groups included were: undergraduate students of optometry, primary eye care professionals and members of the general public. A preliminary study aimed to understand perceptions and to explore the level of knowledge about genetics in general, eye genetics and gene therapy. A second survey was designed to explore attitudes to genetic testing and gene therapy. The majority of participants (82%) perceived genetics as an important science. However, none of them showed a high level of understanding of genetics and inherited eye diseases. Undergraduate students and primary eye care professionals were better informed about inherited eye diseases than the general public (p = 0.001). The majority (80%) across all three groups had a positive attitude to genetic testing and gene therapy. There was a lack of knowledge about the genetic services available among all groups of participants. This calls for serious thinking about the level of dissemination of information about genetics and inherited eye diseases. It shows a broadly supportive attitude to genomic medicine among the public. Improving public awareness and education in inherited eye diseases can improve the utility of genetic testing and therapy.

  2. Three-generation reproduction toxicity study of genetically modified rice with insect resistant genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yichun; Zhuo, Qin; Gong, Zhaolong; Piao, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we evaluated the three generation reproductive toxicity of the genetically modified rice with insectresistant cry1Ac and sck genes. 120 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into three groups which were fed with genetically modified rice diet (GM group), parental control rice diet (PR group) and AIN-93 control diet (both used as negative control) respectively. Bodyweight, food consumption, reproductive data, hematological parameters, serum chemistry, relative organ weights and histopathology for each generation were examined respectively. All the hematology and serum chemistry parameters, organ/body weight indicators were within the normal range or no change to the adverse direction was observed, although several differences in hematology and serum chemistry parameters (WBC, BUN, LDH of male rat, PLT, PCT, MPV of female rats), reproductive data (rate of morphologically abnormal sperm) were observed between GM rice group and two control groups. No macroscopic or histological adverse effects were found or considered as treatment-related, either. Overall, the three generation study of genetically modified rice with cry1Ac and sck genes at a high level showed no unintended adverse effects on rats's reproductive system. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Origins of gene, genetic code, protein and life: comprehensive view of life systems from a GNC-SNS primitive genetic code hypothesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Ikehara

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the origin of genes, the genetic code, proteins and life using six indices (hydropathy, -helix, -sheet and -turn formabilities, acidic amino acid content and basic amino acid content) necessary for appropriate three-dimensional structure formation of globular proteins. From the analysis of microbial genes, we have concluded that newly-born genes are products of nonstop frames (NSF) on antisense strands of microbial GC-rich genes [GC-NSF(a)] and from SNS repeating sequences [(SNS)n] similar to the GC-NSF(a) (S and N mean G or C and either of four bases, respectively). We have also proposed that the universal genetic code used by most organisms on the earth presently could be derived from a GNC-SNS primitive genetic code. We have further presented the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis of the origin of life as well as a hypothesis of protein production, suggesting that proteins were originally produced by random peptide formation of amino acids restricted in specific amino acid compositions termed as GNC-, SNS- and GC-NSF(a)-0th order structures of proteins. The [GADV]-protein world hypothesis is primarily derived from the GNC-primitive genetic code hypothesis. It is also expected that basic properties of extant genes and proteins could be revealed by considerations based on the scenario with four stages.

  4. Genetic variants in telomere-maintenance genes and bladder cancer risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyuan Gu; Yao Zhu; Dingwei Ye

    2013-01-01

    Telomere maintenance genes play an important role in maintaining the integrity of the telomere structure that protects chromosome ends, and telomere dysfunction may lead to tumorigenesis. Genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes has been confirmed. Cumulative evidence shows that the dif erence of telomere length and stability among the indi-vidual depends on the genetic variants of telomere maintenance genes. Genetic variants in telomere maintenance genes may af ect telomere length and stability, thus the increased cancer risk. This review intends to summarize the association of genetic variants in telomere maintenance genes with bladder cancer risk.

  5. Detection and traceability of genetically modified organisms in the food production chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miraglia, M.; Berdal, K.G.; Brera, C.; Corbisier, P.; Holst - Jensen, A.; Kok, E.J.; Marvin, H.J.P.; Schimmel, H.; Rentsch, J.; Rie, van J.P.P.F.; Zagon, J.

    2004-01-01

    Both labelling and traceability of genetically modified organisms are current issues that are considered in trade and regulation. Currently, labelling of genetically modified foods containing detectable transgenic material is required by EU legislation. A proposed package of legislation would extend

  6. Detection and traceability of genetically modified organisms in the food production chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miraglia, M.; Berdal, K.G.; Brera, C.; Corbisier, P.; Holst - Jensen, A.; Kok, E.J.; Marvin, H.J.P.; Schimmel, H.; Rentsch, J.; Rie, van J.P.P.F.; Zagon, J.

    2004-01-01

    Both labelling and traceability of genetically modified organisms are current issues that are considered in trade and regulation. Currently, labelling of genetically modified foods containing detectable transgenic material is required by EU legislation. A proposed package of legislation would extend

  7. [Approach to depressogenic genes from genetic analyses of animal models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    Human depression or mood disorder is defined as a complex disease, making positional cloning of susceptibility genes a formidable task. We have undertaken genetic analyses of three different animal models for depression, comparing our results with advanced database resources. We first performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis on two mouse models of "despair", namely, the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), and detected multiple chromosomal loci that control immobility time in these tests. Since one QTL detected on mouse chromosome 11 harbors the GABA A receptor subunit genes, we tested these genes for association in human mood disorder patients. We obtained significant associations of the alpha 1 and alpha 6 subunit genes with the disease, particularly in females. This result was striking, because we had previously detected an epistatic interaction between mouse chromosomes 11 and X that regulates immobility time in these animals. Next, we performed genome-wide expression analyses using a rat model of depression, learned helplessness (LH). We found that in the frontal cortex of LH rats, a disease implicated region, the LIM kinase 1 gene (Limk 1) showed greatest alteration, in this case down-regulation. By combining data from the QTL analysis of FST/TST and DNA microarray analysis of mouse frontal cortex, we identified adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP protein 1 (Cap 1) as another candidate gene for depression susceptibility. Both Limk 1 and Cap 1 are key players in the modulation of actin G-F conversion. In summary, our current study using animal models suggests disturbances of GABAergic neurotransmission and actin turnover as potential pathophysiologies for mood disorder.

  8. Identification of susceptibility genes and genetic modifiers of human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Kenneth; Kammerer, Stefan; Hoyal, Carolyn; Reneland, Rikard; Marnellos, George; Nelson, Matthew R.; Braun, Andreas

    2005-03-01

    The completion of the human genome sequence enables the discovery of genes involved in common human disorders. The successful identification of these genes is dependent on the availability of informative sample sets, validated marker panels, a high-throughput scoring technology, and a strategy for combining these resources. We have developed a universal platform technology based on mass spectrometry (MassARRAY) for analyzing nucleic acids with high precision and accuracy. To fuel this technology, we generated more than 100,000 validated assays for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering virtually all known and predicted human genes. We also established a large DNA sample bank comprised of more than 50,000 consented healthy and diseased individuals. This combination of reagents and technology allows the execution of large-scale genome-wide association studies. Taking advantage of MassARRAY"s capability for quantitative analysis of nucleic acids, allele frequencies are estimated in sample pools containing large numbers of individual DNAs. To compare pools as a first-pass "filtering" step is a tremendous advantage in throughput and cost over individual genotyping. We employed this approach in numerous genome-wide, hypothesis-free searches to identify genes associated with common complex diseases, such as breast cancer, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis, and genes involved in quantitative traits like high density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-c) levels and central fat. Access to additional well-characterized patient samples through collaborations allows us to conduct replication studies that validate true disease genes. These discoveries will expand our understanding of genetic disease predisposition, and our ability for early diagnosis and determination of specific disease subtype or progression stage.

  9. Family genetic algorithms based on gene exchange and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jianhua; Ding Xiangqian; Wang Sunan; Yu Qing

    2006-01-01

    Genetic Algorithms (GA) are a search techniques based on mechanics of nature selection and have already been successfully applied in many diverse areas. However, increasing samples show that GA's performance is not as good as it was expected to be. Criticism of this algorithm includes the slow speed and premature result during convergence procedure. In order to improve the performance, the population size and individuals' space is emphatically described. The influence of individuals' space and population size on the operators is analyzed. And a novel family genetic algorithm (FGA) is put forward based on this analysis. In this novel algorithm, the optimum solution families closed to quality individuals is constructed, which is exchanged found by a search in the world space. Search will be done in this microspace. The family that can search better genes in a limited period of time would win a new life. At the same time, the best gene of this micro space with the basic population in the world space is exchanged. Finally, the FGA is applied to the function optimization and image matching through several experiments. The results show that the FGA possessed high performance.

  10. The genetic organization of the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis region of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroya

    2015-05-01

    The genetic organization of the gene involved in the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 14 has been determined. The DNA region for the CPS biosynthesis of serotype 14 (cps14) comprised 9 open reading frames, designated as cps14AB1B2B3CDEFG genes, encoding Cps14A to Cps14G protein, respectively. Cps14A was similar to CpsA of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4 and 12; the Cps14B1 and Cps14B2 were similar to CpsB of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4 and 12, suggesting that CPS structure of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 14 would belong to Group I including A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4, 12 and 15. Surprisingly, the overall nucleotide sequence, deduced amino acid sequence, and the genetic organization of the cps14 were nearly identical to those of Actinobacillus suis. This study will provide the molecular basic knowledge for development of diagnostics and vaccine of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 14.

  11. The genetic organization of the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis region of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroya; Sueyoshi, Masuo

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide sequence determination and analysis of the cps gene involved in the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 15 revealed the presence of three open reading frames, designated as cps15ABC genes. At the protein level, Cps15A and Cps15B showed considerably high homology to CpsA (67.0 to 68.7%) and CpsB (31.7 to 36.8%), respectively, of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4 and 12, revealing the common genetic organization of the cps among serotypes 1, 4, 12 and 15. However, Cps15C showed no homology to any proteins of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes, indicating that cps15C may be specific to serotype 15. This study will provide the basic molecular knowledge necessary for the development of diagnostics and a vaccine for A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 15.

  12. Gene therapy in glaucoma-part 2: Genetic etiology and gene mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdy, Mohamed Abdel-Monem Soliman

    2010-05-01

    Glaucoma diagnosis, identification of people at risk, initiation of treatment and timing of surgical intervention remains a problem. Despite new and improving diagnostic and therapeutic options for glaucoma, blindness from glaucoma is increasing and glaucoma remains a major public health problem. The role of heredity in ocular disease is attracting greater attention as the knowledge and recent advances of Human Genome Project and the HapMap Project have made genetic analysis of many human disorders possible.Glaucoma offers a variety of potential targets for gene therapy. All risk factors for glaucoma and their underlying causes are potentially susceptible to modulation by gene transfer.The discovery of genes responsible for glaucoma has led to the development of new methods of Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based diagnosis and treatment. As genetic defects responsible for glaucoma are identified and the biochemical mechanisms underlying the disease are recognized, new methods of therapy can be developed. It is of utmost importance for the ophthalmologists and glaucoma specialists to be familiar with and understand the basic molecular mechanisms, genes responsible for glaucoma and the ways of genetic treatment. METHOD OF LITERATURE SEARCH: The literature was searched on the Medline database, using the PubMed interface.

  13. 转基因豆粕对崂山奶山羊生长性能、肌肉营养成分及组织器官中外源基因转移的影响%Effects of Genetically Modified Soybean Meal on Growth Performance, Meat Nutrient Composition, and Exogenous Gene Transformation to Tissues and Organs of Laoshan Dairy Goats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘斌; 秦志华; 黄娟; 张廷荣; 刘文达; 王述柏

    2014-01-01

    In order to analyze the effects of genetically modified soybean meal on growth performance, meat nutrient composition, and exogenous gene transformation to tissues and organs of Laoshan dairy goats, thirty 50-day-old Laoshan dairy goats were randomly divided into two groups with three replicates in each group and five goats per replicate. Goats in different groups were fed concentrates containing non-genetically modified soybean meal and genetically modified soybean meal ( MON89788 and GTS40-3-2 ) , respectively, and were fed the same roughage ( Chinese wildrye) . The experiment lasted for 150 days. The results showed as fol-lows: average daily feed intake, average daily gain and feed to gain ratio in the two groups were not signifi-cantly different (P>0. 05); the contents of dry matter, ether extract, crude protein, ash, calcium and phos-phorus in muscle of dairy goats were not significantly different either ( P >0 . 05 ) . Moreover, no gene rag-ments of genetically modified soybean meal were detected from muscle, liver, pancreas, kidney, spleen, thy-mus, lung, heart, abomasum and small intestine of dairy goats by real-time quantification PCR. The results suggest that genetically modified soybean meal ( MON89788 and GTS40-3-2 ) had no significant effects on growth performance and muscle quality of Laoshan dairy goats, and no genetic horizontal transformation is ob-served in tissues and organs.%本试验旨在研究转基因豆粕对崂山奶山羊生长性能、肌肉营养成分及组织器官中外源基因转移的影响。选取30只50日龄崂山奶山羊随机分为2组,每组3个重复,每个重复5只。精饲料分别以非转基因豆粕和转基因豆粕( MON89788和GTS40-3-2)配制,粗饲料均为干草。试验期150 d。结果表明:2组奶山羊平均日采食量、平均日增重和料重比均无显著差异( P >0.05);奶山羊肌肉的干物质、粗脂肪、粗蛋白质、粗灰分、钙、磷含量2组间亦均无显著差异( P>0

  14. Screening genetically modified organisms using multiplex-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Miao, Haizhen; Wu, Houfei; Huang, Wensheng; Tang, Rong; Qiu, Minyan; Wen, Jianguo; Zhu, Shuifang; Li, Yao

    2006-07-15

    In this research, we developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (multiplex-PCR) coupled with a DNA microarray system simultaneously aiming at many targets in a consecutive reaction to detect a genetically modified organism (GMO). There are a total of 20 probes for detecting a GMO in a DNA microarray which can be classified into three categories according to their purpose: the first for screening GMO from un-transgenic plants based on the common elements such as promoter, reporter and terminator genes; the second for specific gene confirmation based on the target gene sequences such as herbicide-resistance or insect-resistance genes; the third for species-specific genes which the sequences are unique for different plant species. To ensure the reliability of this method, different kinds of positive and negative controls were used in DNA microarray. Commercial GM soybean, maize, rapeseed and cotton were identified by means of this method and further confirmed by PCR analysis and sequencing. The results indicate that this method discriminates between the GMOs very quickly and in a cost-saving and more time efficient way. It can detect more than 95% of currently commercial GMO plants and the limits of detection are 0.5% for soybean and 1% for maize. This method is proved to be a new method for routine analysis of GMOs.

  15. Organization and Differential Regulation of a Cluster of Lignin Peroxidase Genes of Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Philip; Cullen, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The lignin peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium are encoded by a minimum of 10 closely related genes. Physical and genetic mapping of a cluster of eight lip genes revealed six genes occurring in pairs and transcriptionally convergent, suggesting that portions of the lip family arose by gene duplication events. The completed sequence of lipG and lipJ, together with previously published sequences, allowed phylogenetic and intron/exon classifications, indicating two main branches within the lip family. Competitive reverse transcription-PCR was used to assess lip transcript levels in both carbon- and nitrogen-limited media. Transcript patterns showed differential regulation of lip genes in response to medium composition. No apparent correlation was observed between genomic organization and transcript levels. Both constitutive and upregulated transcripts, structurally unrelated to peroxidases, were identified within the lip cluster. PMID:10348854

  16. Genetically modified organisms: do the benefits outweigh the risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this literature review is to analyze the implications of using genetically modified organisms (GMOs) as well as international and European position regarding such organisms. Review of international and European legal requirements and ethical guidelines and relevant publications, found and accessed with the help of PubMed and Lund University Library databases. The article discusses the main application areas of GMOs, the expansion of using GMOs in the world as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the implications of their usage. It further provides an overview of the suggested ways to tackle or avoid the GMO-related risks. The international and European positions regarding the application of GMOs are discussed and European Directives, Regulations, and ethical guidelines are overviewed. The article further presents the public attitudes towards GMOs in Europe as well as overviews surveys conducted at the national level. Suggested steps to tackle the challenge of developing and managing biotechnology for the benefit of public health and the environment are presented.

  17. Adrenal glucocorticoids regulate adipsin gene expression in genetically obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelman, B M; Lowell, B; Napolitano, A; Dubuc, P; Barton, D; Francke, U; Groves, D L; Cook, K S; Flier, J S

    1989-01-25

    Adipsin expression at the protein and mRNA levels is greatly reduced in several distinct syndromes of obesity in the mouse: genetic obesity due to the db/db and ob/ob genes, and a chemically induced model secondary to neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate. We considered first the possibility that the adipsin gene might be identical to the db or ob locus and the lowered expression of this protein might result from a mutation in this gene. We show here that the adipsin structural gene is located on chromosome 10 and hence is physically distinct from any obesity genes so far identified in the mouse. A major role for the adrenal gland and adrenal glucocorticoids in the aberrant regulation of adipsin in these models of obesity is indicated by several experiments. Adrenalectomy of the ob/ob mouse raises the circulating levels of adipsin protein and the amount of this mRNA in epididymal fat pads (5-fold), although neither is increased to the levels seen in lean controls. Exogenous administration of corticosterone completely blocks the effects of adrenalectomy on adipsin, suggesting that the effect of this endocrine ablation is through reduction of adrenal glucocorticoids. Corticosterone administration also causes suppression in the levels of adipsin mRNA and protein in lean mice, although this decrease is never as severe as that seen in obese mice. The effect of exogenous corticosterone in lean mice occurs within 2 days and hence is not secondary to the obesity which these hormones eventually elicit. These results indicate that glucocorticoids can regulate adipsin expression in vivo and strongly suggest that the hyperglucocorticoid state seen in certain obese models plays a significant role in lowering adipsin mRNA and protein levels. Quantitative analysis of these experiments suggests that other as yet unknown neuroendocrine factors also function to suppress adipsin in obesity.

  18. Physical and genetic map of the major nif gene cluster from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, M R; Brigle, K E; Bennett, L T; Setterquist, R A; Wilson, M S; Cash, V L; Beynon, J; Newton, W E; Dean, D R

    1989-02-01

    Determination of a 28,793-base-pair DNA sequence of a region from the Azotobacter vinelandii genome that includes and flanks the nitrogenase structural gene region was completed. This information was used to revise the previously proposed organization of the major nif cluster. The major nif cluster from A. vinelandii encodes 15 nif-specific genes whose products bear significant structural identity to the corresponding nif-specific gene products from Klebsiella pneumoniae. These genes include nifH, nifD, nifK, nifT, nifY, nifE, nifN, nifX, nifU, nifS, nifV, nifW, nifZ, nifM, and nifF. Although there are significant spatial differences, the identified A. vinelandii nif-specific genes have the same sequential arrangement as the corresponding nif-specific genes from K. pneumoniae. Twelve other potential genes whose expression could be subject to nif-specific regulation were also found interspersed among the identified nif-specific genes. These potential genes do not encode products that are structurally related to the identified nif-specific gene products. Eleven potential nif-specific promoters were identified within the major nif cluster, and nine of these are preceded by an appropriate upstream activator sequence. A + T-rich regions were identified between 8 of the 11 proposed nif promoter sequences and their upstream activator sequences. Site-directed deletion-and-insertion mutagenesis was used to establish a genetic map of the major nif cluster.

  19. Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in Aggressiveness of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    occupation, and smoking . 2. To examine the modifying effect of genetic variants in ITC-metabolizing genes on the associations between cruciferous...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0453 TITLE: Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in Aggressiveness of...COVERED 15 Sep 2014 - 14 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in

  20. A Gene-Pool Based Genetic Algorithm for TSP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Hui; Kang Li-shan; Chen Yu-ping

    2003-01-01

    Based on the analysis of previous genetic algo rithms (GAs) for TSP, a novel method called Ge GA is proposed. It combines gene pool and GA so as to direct the evo lution of the whole population. The core of Ge GA is the construction of gene pool and how to apply it to GA. Different from standard GAs, Ge-GA aims to enhance the ability of exploration and exploitation by incorporating global search with local search. On one hand a local search called Ge LocalSearch operator is proposed to improve the solution quality, on the other hand the modified Inver-Over operator called Ge InverOver is considered as a global search mechanism to expand solution space of local minimal. Both of these operators are based on the gene pool. Our algorithm is applied to 11 well-known traveling salesman problems whose numbers of cities are from 70 to 1577 cities. The experiments results indicate that Ge GA has great robustness for TSP. For each test instance, the average value of solution quality, found in accepted time, stays within 0. 001 % from the optimum.

  1. Entomic Resistance Genes for Genetic Engineering in Agricultural Furtherance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic engineering for insect pest’s management in crop plants offers the potential of a user-friendly, environmentfriendly and consumer-friendly method of crop protection to meet the demands of sustainable agriculture. Food and energy insecurities are currently two foremost problems being faced worldwide. Losses due to pests and diseases have been estimated to be around 37% of the agricultural production worldwide, with 13% due to insects. Engineering insect resistance in transgenic plants has been achieved through the use of insect control protein genes of Bacillus thuringiensis. Till now, researchers have focused on the introduction of genes for expression of modified Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxins. Successful results on the control of Bt-susceptible pests have been achieved in the laboratory and finally in the field and now commercialized Bt transgenic crops are used worldwide. Other alternative methods exploit plant-derived insect control genes with promising results. Today insect-resistance transgenes, whether of plant, bacterial or other origin, can be introduced in to plants to increase the level of insect resistance so as to contribute to sustainable agricultural practices.

  2. Genetic transformation with the gfp gene of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolates from coffee with blister spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armesto, Cecilia; Maia, Fernanda Gonçalves Martins; de Abreu, Mário Sobral; Figueira, Antonia Dos Reis; da Silva, Bruno Marques; Monteiro, Fernando Pereira

    2012-07-01

    Blister spot (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) is now widespread in most coffee producing states of Brazil, becoming a limiting factor for production. The lack of data relating to the reproduction of typical symptoms (light green, oily patches) leaves a gap within the pathosystem, forcing the search for new methodologies for monitoring the disease. Monitoring of genetically modified organisms has proven to be an effective tool in understanding the host × pathogen interactions. Thus, the present study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of two systems of genetic transformation in obtaining mutants using the gfp reporter gene. Using the two transformation systems (PEG and electroporation) revealed the efficiency of both, confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and resistance to the antibiotic hygromycin-B, when incorporated into the culture medium. The fungus maintained its cultural and morphological characteristics when compared to wild strains. When inoculated on coffee seedlings, it was found that the pathogenicity of the processed isolates had not changed.

  3. Genetic transformation with the gfp gene of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolates from coffee with blister spot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Armesto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Blister spot (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is now widespread in most coffee producing states of Brazil, becoming a limiting factor for production. The lack of data relating to the reproduction of typical symptoms (light green, oily patches leaves a gap within the pathosystem, forcing the search for new methodologies for monitoring the disease. Monitoring of genetically modified organisms has proven to be an effective tool in understanding the host x pathogen interactions. Thus, the present study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of two systems of genetic transformation in obtaining mutants using the gfp reporter gene. Using the two transformation systems (PEG and electroporation revealed the efficiency of both, confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and resistance to the antibiotic hygromycin-B, when incorporated into the culture medium. The fungus maintained its cultural and morphological characteristics when compared to wild strains. When inoculated on coffee seedlings, it was found that the pathogenicity of the processed isolates had not changed.

  4. Genetic Fingerprinting of Wheat and Its Progenitors by Mitochondrial Gene orf256

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M. Elseehy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available orf256 is a wheat mitochondrial gene associated with cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS that has different organization in various species. This study exploited the orf256 gene as a mitochondrial DNA marker to study the genetic fingerprint of Triticum and Aegilops species. PCR followed by sequencing of common parts of the orf256 gene were employed to determine the fingerprint and molecular evolution of Triticum and Aegilops species. Although many primer pairs were used, two pairs of orf256 specific primers (5:-94/C: 482, 5:253/C: 482, amplified DNA fragments of 576 bp and 230 bp respectively in all species were tested. A common 500 bp of nine species of Triticum and Aegilops were aligned and showed consistent results with that obtained from other similar chloroplast or nuclear genes. Base alignment showed that there were various numbers of base substitutions in all species compared to S. cereal (Sc (the outgroup species. Phylogenetic relationship revealed similar locations and proximity on phylogenetic trees established using plastid and nuclear genes. The results of this study open a good route to use unknown function genes of mitochondria in studying the molecular relationships and evolution of wheat and complex plant genomes.

  5. Genetic organization and molecular characterization of secA2 locus in Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Krishna K; Mendonca, Marcelo; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Burkholder, Kristin M; Bhunia, Arun K

    2011-12-10

    The translocation of proteins across the bacterial cell wall is carried out by the general secretory (Sec) system. Most bacteria have a single copy of the secA gene, with the exception of a few Gram-positive bacteria, which have an additional copy of secA, designated secA2. secA2 is present in Listeria monocytogenes and is responsible for secretion and translocation of several proteins including virulence factors; however, little is known about the secA2 gene and its genetic organization in nonpathogenic members of the genus Listeria. The goal of this study was to determine the presence of secA2 locus and analyze the genetic relatedness among pathogenic and nonpathogenic Listeria species. Cloning experiments revealed that secA2 is present in all analyzed pathogenic (L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii) and nonpathogenic (L. welshimeri, L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. grayi and L. marthii) Listeria species except L. rocourtiae. Likewise, SecA2 transcripts were also detected in all species. Sequence analysis further revealed that 2331 nucleotides (776 amino acids) are conserved in L. monocytogenes, L. welshimeri, L. innocua and L. marthii. Three nucleotides are deleted in L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri and six in L. grayi, resulting in amino acid counts of 775, 775 and 774, respectively. secA2 is flanked upstream by iap (encoding p60) and downstream by a putative membrane protein (lmo0583, lmo f2365_0613) in all analyzed Listeria species, demonstrating conserved genetic organization of the secA2 locus in pathogenic and nonpathogenic species. Deletion of secA2 in L. innocua impaired accumulation of SecA2 substrate, N-acetyl muramidase (NamA) in the cell wall, providing evidence for the presence of functional SecA2 in nonpathogenic Listeria.

  6. Genome organization and long-range regulation of gene expression by enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Andrea; Ren, Bing

    2013-06-01

    It is now well accepted that cell-type specific gene regulation is under the purview of enhancers. Great strides have been made recently to characterize and identify enhancers both genetically and epigenetically for multiple cell types and species, but efforts have just begun to link enhancers to their target promoters. Mapping these interactions and understanding how the 3D landscape of the genome constrains such interactions is fundamental to our understanding of mammalian gene regulation. Here, we review recent progress in mapping long-range regulatory interactions in mammalian genomes, focusing on transcriptional enhancers and chromatin organization principles. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Genetic analysis of Ras genes in epidermal development and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Lechuga, Carmen G; Barbacid, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes are tightly controlled to ensure proper development and homeostasis of the epidermis. The Ras family of small GTPases has emerged as a central node in the coordination of cell proliferation in the epidermis. Recent genetic evidence from mouse models has revealed that the intensity of Ras signaling modulates the proliferative capacity of epidermal keratinocytes. Interfering with Ras signaling either by combined elimination of the 3 Ras genes from the basal layer of the epidermis or by overexpression of dominant-negative Ras isoforms caused epidermal thinning due to hypoproliferation of keratinocytes. In contrast, overexpression of oncogenic Ras mutants in different epidermal cell layers led to hyperproliferative phenotypes including the development of papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Here, we discuss the value of loss- and gain-of-function studies in mouse models to assess the role of Ras signaling in the control of epidermal proliferation.

  8. Genetic analysis of Ras genes in epidermal development and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Lechuga, Carmen G; Barbacid, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes are tightly controlled to ensure proper development and homeostasis of the epidermis. The Ras family of small GTPases has emerged as a central node in the coordination of cell proliferation in the epidermis. Recent genetic evidence from mouse models has revealed that the intensity of Ras signaling modulates the proliferative capacity of epidermal keratinocytes. Interfering with Ras signaling either by combined elimination of the 3 Ras genes from the basal layer of the epidermis or by overexpression of dominant-negative Ras isoforms caused epidermal thinning due to hypoproliferation of keratinocytes. In contrast, overexpression of oncogenic Ras mutants in different epidermal cell layers led to hyperproliferative phenotypes including the development of papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Here, we discuss the value of loss- and gain-of-function studies in mouse models to assess the role of Ras signaling in the control of epidermal proliferation. PMID:24150175

  9. Gene diversity and genetic variation in lung flukes (genus Paragonimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, David; Nawa, Yukifumi; Mitreva, Makedonka; Doanh, Pham Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    Paragonimiasis caused by lung flukes (genus Paragonimus) is a neglected disease occurring in Asia, Africa and the Americas. The genus is species-rich, ancient and widespread. Genetic diversity is likely to be considerable, but investigation of this remains confined to a few populations of a few species. In recent years, studies of genetic diversity have moved from isoenzyme analysis to molecular phylogenetic analysis based on selected DNA sequences. The former offered better resolution of questions relating to allelic diversity and gene flow, whereas the latter is more suitable for questions relating to molecular taxonomy and phylogeny. A picture is emerging of a highly diverse taxon of parasites, with the greatest diversity found in eastern and southern Asia where ongoing speciation might be indicated by the presence of several species complexes. Diversity of lung flukes in Africa and the Americas is very poorly sampled. Functional molecules that might be of value for immunodiagnosis, or as targets for medical intervention, are of great interest. Characterisation of these from Paragonimus species has been ongoing for a number of years. However, the imminent release of genomic and transcriptomic data for several species of Paragonimus will dramatically increase the rate of discovery of such molecules, and illuminate their diversity within and between species.

  10. Expression and function of the empty spiracles gene in olfactory sense organ development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sonia; Hartmann, Beate; Reichert, Heinrich; Rodrigues, Veronica

    2010-11-01

    In Drosophila, the cephalic gap gene empty spiracles plays key roles in embryonic patterning of the peripheral and central nervous system. During postembryonic development, it is involved in the development of central olfactory circuitry in the antennal lobe of the adult. However, its possible role in the postembryonic development of peripheral olfactory sense organs has not been investigated. Here, we show that empty spiracles acts in a subset of precursors that generate the olfactory sense organs of the adult antenna. All empty spiracles-expressing precursor cells co-express the proneural gene amos and the early patterning gene lozenge. Moreover, the expression of empty spiracles in these precursor cells is dependent on both amos and lozenge. Functional analysis reveals two distinct roles of empty spiracles in the development of olfactory sense organs. Genetic interaction studies in a lozenge-sensitized background uncover a requirement of empty spiracles in the formation of trichoid and basiconic olfactory sensilla. MARCM-based clonal mutant analysis reveals an additional role during axonal targeting of olfactory sensory neurons to glomeruli within the antennal lobe. Our findings on empty spiracles action in olfactory sense organ development complement previous studies that demonstrate its requirement in olfactory interneurons and, taken together with studies on the murine homologs of empty spiracles, suggest that conserved molecular genetic programs might be responsible for the formation of both peripheral and central olfactory circuitry in insects and mammals.

  11. The genetic basis of alcoholism: multiple phenotypes, many genes, complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Tatiana V; Goldman, David; Mackay, Trudy F C; Anholt, Robert R H

    2012-02-20

    Alcoholism is a significant public health problem. A picture of the genetic architecture underlying alcohol-related phenotypes is emerging from genome-wide association studies and work on genetically tractable model organisms.

  12. The genetic basis of alcoholism: multiple phenotypes, many genes, complex networks

    OpenAIRE

    Morozova, Tatiana V.; Goldman, David; Mackay, Trudy FC; Anholt, Robert RH

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholism is a significant public health problem. A picture of the genetic architecture underlying alcohol-related phenotypes is emerging from genome-wide association studies and work on genetically tractable model organisms.

  13. Detection methods and performance criteria for genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertheau, Yves; Diolez, Annick; Kobilinsky, André; Magin, Kimberly

    2002-01-01

    Detection methods for genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are necessary for many applications, from seed purity assessment to compliance of food labeling in several countries. Numerous analytical methods are currently used or under development to support these needs. The currently used methods are bioassays and protein- and DNA-based detection protocols. To avoid discrepancy of results between such largely different methods and, for instance, the potential resulting legal actions, compatibility of the methods is urgently needed. Performance criteria of methods allow evaluation against a common standard. The more-common performance criteria for detection methods are precision, accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, which together specifically address other terms used to describe the performance of a method, such as applicability, selectivity, calibration, trueness, precision, recovery, operating range, limit of quantitation, limit of detection, and ruggedness. Performance criteria should provide objective tools to accept or reject specific methods, to validate them, to ensure compatibility between validated methods, and be used on a routine basis to reject data outside an acceptable range of variability. When selecting a method of detection, it is also important to consider its applicability, its field of applications, and its limitations, by including factors such as its ability to detect the target analyte in a given matrix, the duration of the analyses, its cost effectiveness, and the necessary sample sizes for testing. Thus, the current GMO detection methods should be evaluated against a common set of performance criteria.

  14. Consumer perception of genetically modified organisms and sources of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Shahla; Gatto, Kelsey A

    2015-11-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been available for commercial purchase since the 1990s, allowing producers to increase crop yields through bioengineering that creates herbicide-resistant and insect-resistant varieties. However, consumer knowledge about GMOs has not increased at the same rate as the adoption of GMO crops. Consumers worldwide are displaying limited understanding, misconceptions, and even unfamiliarity with GMO food products. Many consumers report that they receive information about GMO food products from the media, Internet, and other news sources. These sources may be less reliable than scientific experts whom consumers trust more to present the facts. Although many in the United States support mandatory GMO labeling (similar to current European standards), consumer awareness of current GMO labeling is low. A distinction must also be made between GMO familiarity and scientific understanding, because those who are more familiar with it tend to be more resistant to bioengineering, whereas those with higher scientific knowledge scores tend to have less negative attitudes toward GMOs. This brings to question the relation between scientific literacy, sources of information, and overall consumer knowledge and perception of GMO foods.

  15. Evaluation of three herbicide resistance genes for use in genetic transformations and for potential crop protection in algae production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggeman, Andrew J; Kuehler, Daniel; Weeks, Donald P

    2014-09-01

    Genes conferring resistance to the herbicides glyphosate, oxyfluorfen and norflurazon were developed and tested for use as dominant selectable markers in genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and as potential tools for the protection of commercial-scale algal production facilities against contamination by organisms sensitive to these broad-spectrum herbicides. A synthetic glyphosate acetyltransferase (GAT) gene, when fitted with a strong Chlamydomonas promoter, conferred a 2.7×-fold increase in tolerance to the EPSPS inhibitor, glyphosate, in transgenic cells compared with progenitor WT cells. A mutant Chlamydomonas protoporphyrinogen oxidase (protox, PPO) gene previously shown to produce an enzyme insensitive to PPO-inhibiting herbicides, when genetically engineered, generated transgenic cells able to tolerate up to 136× higher levels of the PPO inhibitor, oxyfluorfen, than nontransformed cells. Genetic modification of the Chlamydomonas phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene-based gene sequences found in various norflurazon-resistant organisms allowed production of transgenic cells tolerant to 40× higher levels of norflurazon than nontransgenic cells. The high efficiency of all three herbicide resistance genes in producing transgenic cells demonstrated their suitability as dominant selectable markers for genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas and, potentially, other eukaryotic algae. However, the requirement for high concentrations of glyphosate and its associated negative effects on cell growth rates preclude its consideration for use in large-scale production facilities. In contrast, only low doses of norflurazon and oxyfluorfen (~1.5 μm and ~0.1 μm, respectively) are required for inhibition of cell growth, suggesting that these two herbicides may prove effective in large-scale algal production facilities in suppressing growth of organisms sensitive to these herbicides.

  16. MORPHIN: a web tool for human disease research by projecting model organism biology onto a human integrated gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Eiru; Yang, Sunmo; Marcotte, Edward M; Lee, Insuk

    2014-07-01

    Despite recent advances in human genetics, model organisms are indispensable for human disease research. Most human disease pathways are evolutionally conserved among other species, where they may phenocopy the human condition or be associated with seemingly unrelated phenotypes. Much of the known gene-to-phenotype association information is distributed across diverse databases, growing rapidly due to new experimental techniques. Accessible bioinformatics tools will therefore facilitate translation of discoveries from model organisms into human disease biology. Here, we present a web-based discovery tool for human disease studies, MORPHIN (model organisms projected on a human integrated gene network), which prioritizes the most relevant human diseases for a given set of model organism genes, potentially highlighting new model systems for human diseases and providing context to model organism studies. Conceptually, MORPHIN investigates human diseases by an orthology-based projection of a set of model organism genes onto a genome-scale human gene network. MORPHIN then prioritizes human diseases by relevance to the projected model organism genes using two distinct methods: a conventional overlap-based gene set enrichment analysis and a network-based measure of closeness between the query and disease gene sets capable of detecting associations undetectable by the conventional overlap-based methods. MORPHIN is freely accessible at http://www.inetbio.org/morphin.

  17. Systems toxicology from genes to organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, John; Wambaugh, John; Shah, Imran

    2013-01-01

    This unique overview of systems toxicology methods and techniques begins with a brief account of systems thinking in biology over the last century. We discuss how systems biology and toxicology continue to leverage advances in computational modeling, informatics, large-scale computing, and biotechnology. Next, we chart the genesis of systems toxicology from previous work in physiologically based models, models of early development, and more recently, molecular systems biology. For readers interested in further details this background provides useful linkages to the relevant literature. It also lays the foundations for new ideas in systems toxicology that could translate laboratory measurements of molecular responses from xenobiotic perturbations to adverse organ level effects in humans. By providing innovative solutions across disciplinary boundaries and highlighting key scientific gaps, we believe this chapter provides useful information about the current state, and valuable insight about future directions in systems toxicity.

  18. Immortalized Rat Astrocyte Strain Genetically Modified by Rat Preprogalanin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To construct an immortalized rat astrocyte strain genetically modified by rat preprogalanin gene (IAST/GAL) and detect its galanin (GAL) expression and secretion, a cDNA fragment of rat GAL in plasmid of pBS KS(+)-GAL was inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+) by DNA recombinant technology, then the restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing were carried out to evaluate the recombinant. The pcDNA3.1 (+)-GAL and pcDNA3.1 (+) construct were transfected into immortalized rat astrocyte strain (IAST) by lipofectamine and the population of cells which stably integrated the construct was selected with 600 μg/mL G418. Individual clones were screened and expanded into clonal cell strains. Detection of Neo gene was used to validate the success of the transfection. Immunocytochemical staining, RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay were used to detect the expression and secretion level of GAL. The recombinant had been successfully constructed by restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing. Detection of Neo gene showed that the pcDNA3.1 (+)-GAL and pcDNA3.1 (+) have been successfully transfected into IAST. After selection by using G418, IAST/GAL and IAST/Neo cell strains were obtained.IAST/GAL, IAST/Neo and IAST were immunostained positively for GAL, but the GAL average optical density of IAST/GAL was significantly higher than that of IAST/Neo and IAST (P<0.01). The level of GAL mRNA expression and the supernatant concentration of GAL in cultured IAST/GAL were significantly higher than those of IAST and IAST/Neo (P<0.01), but no significant differences were found between the IAST and IAST/Neo (P>0.05). It was concluded that IAST/GAL strain was constructed successfully and it might provide a basis for the further study of pain therapy.

  19. Genomic organization and sequences of immunoglobulin light chain genes in a primitive vertebrate suggest coevolution of immunoglobulin gene organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamblott, M J; Litman, G W

    1989-01-01

    The genomic organization and sequence of immunoglobulin light chain genes in Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate, have been characterized. Light chain variable (VL) and joining (JI) segments are separated by 380 nucleotides and together with the single constant region exon (CI), occupy less than 2.7 kb, the closest linkage described thus far for a rearranging gene system. The VL segment is flanked by a characteristic recombination signal sequence possessing a 12 nucleotide spacer; the recombination signal sequence flanking the JL segment is 23 nucleotides. The VL genes, unlike heavy chain genes, possess a typical upstream regulatory octamer as well as conserved enhancer core sequences in the intervening sequence separating JL and CL. Restriction mapping and genomic Southern blotting are consistent with the presence of multiple light chain gene clusters. There appear to be considerably fewer light than heavy chain genes. Heavy and light chain clusters show no evidence of genomic linkage using field inversion gel electrophoresis. The findings of major differences in the organization and functional rearrangement properties of immunoglobulin genes in species representing different levels of vertebrate evolution, but consistent similarity in the organization of heavy and light chain genes within a species, suggests that these systems may be coevolving. Images PMID:2511000

  20. Organization of the human keratin type II gene cluster at 12q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, S.J.; LeBlanc-Straceski, J.; Krauter, K. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    Keratin proteins constitute intermediate filaments and are the major differentiation products of mammalian epithelial cells. The epithelial keratins are classified into two groups, type I and type II, and one member of each group is expressed in a given epithelial cell differentiation stage. Mutations in type I and type II keratin genes have now been implicated in three different human genetic disorders, epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, and epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. Members of the type I keratins are mapped to human chromosome 17, and the type II keratin genes are mapped to chromosome 12. To understand the organization of the type II keratin genes on chromosome 12, we isolated several yeast artificial chromosomes carrying these keratin genes and examined them in detail. We show that eight already known type II keratin genes are located in a cluster at 12q13, and their relative organization reflects their evolutionary relationship. We also determined that a type I keratin gene, KRT8, is located next to its partner, KRT18, in this cluster. Careful examination of the cluster also revealed that there may be a number of additional keratin genes at this locus that have not been described previously. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. What Risk Assessments of Genetically Modified Organisms Can Learn from Institutional Analyses of Public Health Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ravi Rajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large.

  2. What risk assessments of genetically modified organisms can learn from institutional analyses of public health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, S Ravi; Letourneau, Deborah K

    2012-01-01

    The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT) as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large.

  3. Alkane biosynthesis genes in cyanobacteria and their transcriptional organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan eKlähn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In cyanobacteria, alkanes are synthesized from a fatty acyl-ACP by two enzymes, acyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (AAR and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO. Despite the great interest in the exploitation for biofuel production, nothing is known about the transcriptional organization of their genes or the physiological function of alkane synthesis. The comparison of 115 microarray datasets indicates the relatively constitutive expression of aar and ado genes. The analysis of 181 available genomes showed that in 90% of the genomes both genes are present, likely indicating their physiological relevance. In 61% of them they cluster together with genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxyl transferase and a short chain dehydrogenase, strengthening the link to fatty acid metabolism and in 76% of the genomes they are located in tandem, suggesting constraints on the gene arrangement. However, contrary to the expectations for an operon, we found in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 specific promoters for the two genes, sll0208 (ado and sll0209 (aar, that give rise to monocistronic transcripts. Moreover, the upstream located ado gene is driven by a proximal as well as a second, distal, promoter, from which a third transcript, the ~160 nt sRNA SyR9 is transcribed. Thus, the transcriptional organization of the alkane biosynthesis genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is of substantial complexity. We verified all three promoters to function independently from each other and show a similar promoter arrangement also in the more distant Nodularia spumigena, Trichodesmium erythraeum, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Prochlorococcus MIT9313 and MED4. The presence of separate regulatory elements and the dominance of monocistronic mRNAs suggest the possible autonomous regulation of ado and aar. The complex transcriptional organization of the alkane synthesis gene cluster has possible metabolic implications and should be considered when manipulating the expression of these genes in

  4. Unraveling the regulatory mechanisms underlying tissue-dependent genetic variation of gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, Jingyuan; Wolfs, Marcel G M; Deelen, Patrick; Westra, Harm Jan; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; te Meerman, Gerhardus; Buurman, Wim A; Rensen, Sander S M; Groen, Hendricus; Weersma, Rinse K; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan; Ophoff, Roel A; Snieder, Harold; van Heel, David; Jansen, Ritsert C; Hofker, Marten H; Wijmenga, Cisca; Franke, Lude

    2012-01-01

    It is known that genetic variants can affect gene expression, but it is not yet completely clear through what mechanisms genetic variation mediate this expression. We therefore compared the cis-effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on gene expression between blood samples from 1,240 human

  5. Identification of new genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer through consideration of gene-environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,47...

  6. The evolution of gene expression levels in mammalian organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brawand, David; Soumillon, Magali; Necsulea, Anamaria

    2011-01-01

    and chromosomes, owing to differences in selective pressures: transcriptome change was slow in nervous tissues and rapid in testes, slower in rodents than in apes and monotremes, and rapid for the X chromosome right after its formation. Although gene expression evolution in mammals was strongly shaped......Changes in gene expression are thought to underlie many of the phenotypic differences between species. However, large-scale analyses of gene expression evolution were until recently prevented by technological limitations. Here we report the sequencing of polyadenylated RNA from six organs across...... ten species that represent all major mammalian lineages (placentals, marsupials and monotremes) and birds (the evolutionary outgroup), with the goal of understanding the dynamics of mammalian transcriptome evolution. We show that the rate of gene expression evolution varies among organs, lineages...

  7. Gene set analyses for interpreting microarray experiments on prokaryotic organisms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tintle, Nathan; Best, Aaron; Dejongh, Matthew; VanBruggen, Dirk; Heffron, Fred; Porwollik, Steffen; Taylor, Ronald C.

    2008-11-05

    Background: Recent advances in microarray technology have brought with them the need for enhanced methods of biologically interpreting gene expression data. Recently, methods like Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and variants of Fisher’s exact test have been proposed which utilize a priori biological information. Typically, these methods are demonstrated with a priori biological information from the Gene Ontology. Results: Alternative gene set definitions are presented based on gene sets inferred from the SEED: open-source software environment for comparative genome annotation and analysis of microbial organisms. Many of these gene sets are then shown to provide consistent expression across a series of experiments involving Salmonella Typhimurium. Implementation of the gene sets in an analysis of microarray data is then presented for the Salmonella Typhimurium data. Conclusions: SEED inferred gene sets can be naturally defined based on subsystems in the SEED. The consistent expression values of these SEED inferred gene sets suggest their utility for statistical analyses of gene expression data based on a priori biological information

  8. Gene-gene interactions among genetic variants from obesity candidate genes for nonobese and obese populations in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Eugene; Pei, Dee; Huang, Yi-Jen; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that obesity may play a key role in modulating genetic predispositions to type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study examines the main effects of both single-locus and multilocus interactions among genetic variants in Taiwanese obese and nonobese individuals to test the hypothesis that obesity-related genes may contribute to the etiology of T2D independently and/or through such complex interactions. We genotyped 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms for 10 obesity candidate genes including adrenergic beta-2-receptor surface, adrenergic beta-3-receptor surface, angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein beta polypeptide 3 (GNB3), interleukin 6 receptor, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1), uncoupling protein 1, uncoupling protein 2, and uncoupling protein 3. There were 389 patients diagnosed with T2D and 186 age- and sex-matched controls. Single-locus analyses showed significant main effects of the GNB3 and PCSK1 genes on the risk of T2D among the nonobese group (p = 0.002 and 0.047, respectively). Further, interactions involving GNB3 and PCSK1 were suggested among the nonobese population using the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction method (p = 0.001). In addition, interactions among angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, GNB3, and uncoupling protein 3 genes were found in a significant four-locus generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction model among the obese population (p = 0.001). The results suggest that the single nucleotide polymorphisms from the obesity candidate genes may contribute to the risk of T2D independently and/or in an interactive manner according to the presence or absence of obesity.

  9. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Changbing; Gao, Jing; Sheng, Yujun; Dou, Jinfa; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ko, Randy; Tang, Xianfa; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Sun, Liangdan; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association studies and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Recently, our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wid...

  10. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    OpenAIRE

    Chang eShen; Jing eGao; Yu Jun Sheng; Jinfa eDou; Fusheng eZhou; Xiaodong eZheng; Randy eKo; Xianfa eTang; Caihong Hong Zhu; Xianyong Yong Yin; Liangdan Dan Sun; Yong eCui; Xue Jun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association stud...

  11. Molecular toolbox for the identification of unknown genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttink, Tom; Demeyer, Rolinde; Van Gulck, Elke; Van Droogenbroeck, Bart; Querci, Maddalena; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc

    2010-03-01

    Competent laboratories monitor genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and products derived thereof in the food and feed chain in the framework of labeling and traceability legislation. In addition, screening is performed to detect the unauthorized presence of GMOs including asynchronously authorized GMOs or GMOs that are not officially registered for commercialization (unknown GMOs). Currently, unauthorized or unknown events are detected by screening blind samples for commonly used transgenic elements, such as p35S or t-nos. If (1) positive detection of such screening elements shows the presence of transgenic material and (2) all known GMOs are tested by event-specific methods but are not detected, then the presence of an unknown GMO is inferred. However, such evidence is indirect because it is based on negative observations and inconclusive because the procedure does not identify the causative event per se. In addition, detection of unknown events is hampered in products that also contain known authorized events. Here, we outline alternative approaches for analytical detection and GMO identification and develop new methods to complement the existing routine screening procedure. We developed a fluorescent anchor-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for the identification of the sequences flanking the p35S and t-nos screening elements. Thus, anchor-PCR fingerprinting allows the detection of unique discriminative signals per event. In addition, we established a collection of in silico calculated fingerprints of known events to support interpretation of experimentally generated anchor-PCR GM fingerprints of blind samples. Here, we first describe the molecular characterization of a novel GMO, which expresses recombinant human intrinsic factor in Arabidopsis thaliana. Next, we purposefully treated the novel GMO as a blind sample to simulate how the new methods lead to the molecular identification of a novel unknown event without prior knowledge of its transgene

  12. Genetic characterization of Bagarius species using cytochrome c oxidase I and cytochrome b genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Muniyandi; Raja, Manikam; Vikram, Potnuru

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we first inferred the genetic variability of two Bagarius bagarius populations collected from Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers of India using two mtDNA markers. Sequence analysis of COI gene did not show significant differences between two populations whereas cytochrome b gene showed significant differences between two populations. Followed by, genetic relationship of B. bagarius and B. yarrielli was analyzed using COI and cytochrome b gene and the results showed a higher level genetic variation between two species. The present study provides support for the suitability of COI and cytochrome b genes for the identification of B. bagarius and B. yarrielli.

  13. GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS – A SOLUTION TO WORLD HUNGER?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, GM crops were grown on 160 million hectares spread over 29 countries, on all continents, marking a 94-fold increase in the area since their first commercialization in 1996, and making it the fastest adopted crop technology in recent history. Main reasons for this expansion are, by the proponents of GM food, its safety, potential to revolutionize agriculture and benefit the farmers and consumers alike. On the other hand, there are indications that GMOs are harmful to the biodiversity and become eco-contaminants, and can, especially in the long terms, negatively affect the human health. Authors think that patenting of living organisms by the multinational companies is unacceptable and unfair from the bioethical perspective, not only because they tend to hold monopolies in production and trade of GM plants, but also because of their efforts to gain domination over the very life. Finally, analyses made by many scientists show that the thesis that "Gene Revolution" will resolve the problem of hunger in the world was not justified in the previous decade.

  14. Organ-specific gene expression in maize: The P-wr allele. Final report, August 15, 1993--August 14, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, T.A.

    1997-06-01

    The ultimate aim of our work is to understand how a regulatory gene produces a specific pattern of gene expression during plant development. Our model is the P-wr gene of maize, which produces a distinctive pattern of pigmentation of maize floral organs. We are investigating this system using a combination of classical genetic and molecular approaches. Mechanisms of organ-specific gene expression are a subject of intense research interest, as it is the operation of these mechanisms during eukaryotic development which determine the characteristics of each organism Allele-specific expression has been characterized in only a few other plant genes. In maize, organ-specific pigmentation regulated by the R, B, and Pl genes is achieved by differential transcription of functionally conserved protein coding sequences. Our studies point to a strikingly different mechanism of organ-specific gene expression, involving post-transcriptional regulation of the regulatory P gene. The novel pigmentation pattern of the P-wr allele is associated with differences in the encoded protein. Furthermore, the P-wr gene itself is present as a unique tandemly amplified structure, which may affect its transcriptional regulation.

  15. Precise and in situ genetic humanization of 6 Mb of mouse immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Lynn E; Karow, Margaret; Stevens, Sean; Auerbach, Wojtek; Poueymirou, William T; Yasenchak, Jason; Frendewey, David; Valenzuela, David M; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Alt, Frederick W; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J

    2014-04-01

    Genetic humanization, which involves replacing mouse genes with their human counterparts, can create powerful animal models for the study of human genes and diseases. One important example of genetic humanization involves mice humanized for their Ig genes, allowing for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice) and also providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human antibodies as therapeutics. However, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which they were genetically humanized. Heretofore, most genetic humanizations have involved disruption of the endogenous mouse gene with simultaneous introduction of a human transgene at a new and random location (so-called KO-plus-transgenic humanization). More recent efforts have attempted to replace mouse genes with their human counterparts at the same genetic location (in situ humanization), but such efforts involved laborious procedures and were limited in size and precision. We describe a general and efficient method for very large, in situ, and precise genetic humanization using large compound bacterial artificial chromosome-based targeting vectors introduced into mouse ES cells. We applied this method to genetically humanize 3-Mb segments of both the mouse heavy and κ light chain Ig loci, by far the largest genetic humanizations ever described. This paper provides a detailed description of our genetic humanization approach, and the companion paper reports that the humoral immune systems of mice bearing these genetically humanized loci function as efficiently as those of WT mice.

  16. Molecular genetic and molecular evolutionary studies on the bacteriochlorophyll synthesis genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke-Agueero, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus, purple bacterium capable of either aerobic or photosynthetic growth, has proven to be very useful in genetic studies of photosynthesis. Forty-four genes clustered together within a 46 kilobase region are required to establish photosynthetic ability in R. capsulatus. Approximately twenty of these genes are involved in bacteriochlorophyll synthesis of which eight bch'' genes are the subject of this thesis. Six of these genes were found to code for the two ring reductases. The first converts protochlorophyllide (PChlide) into a chlorin, the immediate precursor to chlorophyll a, and then into a bacteriochlorin. Each reductase is shown to be made up of three subunits. PChlide reductase is coded by the genes bchN, bchB, and bchL. Proteins with amino acid sequences markedly similar to those of bchN and bchL have been shown in other organisms to be required for chlorophyll synthesis; hence, their designation as chlN and chlB. A third chloroplast-encoded gene of heretofore unknown function shares amino acid identities with bchB and is probably the third subunit of the plant PChlide reductase. The bchA locus, which encodes the chlorin reductase, is found to be made up of three separate, translationally coupled genes, referred to as bchX, bchY, and bchZ. Amino acid similarities between bchX, bchL, and the nitrogenase reductase protein nifH suggest that all three classes of proteins share certain three-dimensional structural features, including elements that are central to the enzymatic mechanism of nifH. PChlide reductase and chlorin reductase are clearly derived from a common ancestor. Several lines of analysis suggests the ancestor of both enzyme systems reduced PChlide twice to produce bacteriochlorophyll supporting the concept bacteriochlorophyll as the ancestral reaction center pigment.

  17. Molecular genetic and molecular evolutionary studies on the bacteriochlorophyll synthesis genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke-Agueero, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus, purple bacterium capable of either aerobic or photosynthetic growth, has proven to be very useful in genetic studies of photosynthesis. Forty-four genes clustered together within a 46 kilobase region are required to establish photosynthetic ability in R. capsulatus. Approximately twenty of these genes are involved in bacteriochlorophyll synthesis of which eight ``bch`` genes are the subject of this thesis. Six of these genes were found to code for the two ring reductases. The first converts protochlorophyllide (PChlide) into a chlorin, the immediate precursor to chlorophyll a, and then into a bacteriochlorin. Each reductase is shown to be made up of three subunits. PChlide reductase is coded by the genes bchN, bchB, and bchL. Proteins with amino acid sequences markedly similar to those of bchN and bchL have been shown in other organisms to be required for chlorophyll synthesis; hence, their designation as chlN and chlB. A third chloroplast-encoded gene of heretofore unknown function shares amino acid identities with bchB and is probably the third subunit of the plant PChlide reductase. The bchA locus, which encodes the chlorin reductase, is found to be made up of three separate, translationally coupled genes, referred to as bchX, bchY, and bchZ. Amino acid similarities between bchX, bchL, and the nitrogenase reductase protein nifH suggest that all three classes of proteins share certain three-dimensional structural features, including elements that are central to the enzymatic mechanism of nifH. PChlide reductase and chlorin reductase are clearly derived from a common ancestor. Several lines of analysis suggests the ancestor of both enzyme systems reduced PChlide twice to produce bacteriochlorophyll supporting the concept bacteriochlorophyll as the ancestral reaction center pigment.

  18. Succinate dehydrogenase gene mutations are strongly associated with paraganglioma of the organ of Zuckerkandl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya B; Adams, Karen T; Huynh, Thanh T; Prodanov, Tamara; Ling, Alex; Chen, Clara; Shusterman, Suzanne; Jimenez, Camilo; Merino, Maria; Hughes, Marybeth; Cradic, Kendall W; Milosevic, Dragana; Singh, Ravinder J; Stratakis, Constantine A; Pacak, Karel

    2010-09-01

    Organ of Zuckerkandl paragangliomas (PGLs) are rare neuroendocrine tumors that are derived from chromaffin cells located around the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery extending to the level of the aortic bifurcation. Mutations in the genes encoding succinate dehydrogenase subunits (SDH) B, C, and D (SDHx) have been associated with PGLs, but their contribution to PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl PGLs is not known. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation of patients with PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl and investigate the prevalence of SDHx mutations and other genetic defects among them. The clinical characteristics of 14 patients with PGL of the organ of Zuckerkandl were analyzed retrospectively; their DNA was tested for SDHx mutations and deletions. Eleven out of 14 (79%) patients with PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl were found to have mutations in the SDHB (9) or SDHD (2) genes; one patient was found to have the Carney-Stratakis syndrome (CSS), and his PGL was discovered during surgery for gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Our results show that SDHx mutations are prevalent in pediatric and adult PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl. Patients with PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl should be screened for SDHx mutations and the CSS; in addition, asymptomatic carriers of an SDHx mutation among the relatives of affected patients may benefit from tumor screening for early PGL detection.

  19. Genetic linkage map and expression analysis of genes expressed in the lamellae of the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Kyu; Peñas, María M; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G

    2006-05-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is an industrially cultivated basidiomycete with nutritional and environmental applications. Its genome contains 35 Mbp organized in 11 chromosomes. There is currently available a genetic linkage map based predominantly on anonymous molecular markers complemented with the mapping of QTLs controlling growth rate and industrial productivity. To increase the saturation of the existing linkage maps, we have identified and mapped 82 genes expressed in the lamellae. Their manual annotation revealed that 34.1% of the lamellae-expressed and 71.5% of the lamellae-specific genes correspond to previously unknown sequences or to hypothetical proteins without a clearly established function. Furthermore, the expression pattern of some genes provides an experimental basis for studying gene regulation during the change from vegetative to reproductive growth. Finally, the identification of various differentially regulated genes involved in protein metabolism suggests the relevance of these processes in fruit body formation and maturation.

  20. Immunotoxicological Evaluation of Wheat Genetically Modified with TaDREB4 Gene on BALB/c Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Chun Lai; ZHANG Xiao Peng; SONG Yan; JIA Xu Dong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the immunotoxicological effects of genetically modified wheat with TaDREB4 gene in female BALB/c mice. Methods Female mice weighing 18-22 g were divided into five groups (10 mice/group), which were set as negative control group, common wheat group, parental wheat group, genetically modified wheat group and cyclophosphamide positive control group, respectively. Mice in negative control group and positive control group were fed with AIN93G diet, mice in common wheat group, non-genetically modified parental wheat group and genetically modified wheat group were fed with feedstuffs added corresponding wheat (the proportion is 76%) for 30 days, then body weight, absolute and relative weight of spleen and thymus, white blood cell count, histological examination of immune organ, peripheral blood lymphocytes phenotyping, serum cytokine, serum immunoglobulin, antibody plaque-forming cell, serum half hemolysis value, mitogen-induced splenocyte proliferation, delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and phagocytic activities of phagocytes were detected. Results No immunotoxicological effects related to the consumption of the genetically modified wheat were observed in BALB/c mice when compared with parental wheat group, common wheat group and negative control group. Conclusion From the immunotoxicological point of view, results from this study demonstrate that genetically modified wheat with TaDREB4 gene is as safe as the parental wheat.

  1. A Preliminary Genetic Analysis of Complement 3 Gene and Schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianliang Ni

    Full Text Available Complement pathway activation was found to occur frequently in schizophrenia, and complement 3 (C3 plays a major role in this process. Previous studies have provided evidence for the possible role of C3 in the development of schizophrenia. In this study, we hypothesized that the gene encoding C3 (C3 may confer susceptibility to schizophrenia in Han Chinese. We analyzed 7 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of C3 in 647 schizophrenia patients and 687 healthy controls. Peripheral C3 mRNA expression level was measured in 23 drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia and 24 controls. Two SNPs (rs1047286 and rs2250656 that deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were excluded for further analysis. Among the remaining 5 SNPs, there was no significant difference in allele and genotype frequencies between the patient and control groups. Logistic regression analysis showed no significant SNP-gender interaction in either dominant model or recessive model. There was no significant difference in the level of peripheral C3 expression between the drug-naïve schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. In conclusion, the results of this study do not support C3 as a major genetic susceptibility factor in schizophrenia. Other factors in AP may have critical roles in schizophrenia and be worthy of further investigation.

  2. Genetics of Poultry Meat Production in Organic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    Organic Meat Production and Processing describes the challenges of production, processing and food safety of organic meat. The editors and international collection of authors explore the trends in organic meats and how the meat industry is impacted. Commencing with chapters on the economics, market...... and regulatory aspects of organic meats, coverage then extends to management issues for organically raised and processed meat animals. Processing, sensory and human health aspects are covered in detail, as are the incidences of foodborne pathogens in organic beef, swine, poultry and other organic meat species...

  3. Genetics of Poultry Meat Production in Organic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    Organic Meat Production and Processing describes the challenges of production, processing and food safety of organic meat. The editors and international collection of authors explore the trends in organic meats and how the meat industry is impacted. Commencing with chapters on the economics, market....... The book concludes by describing pre-harvest control measures for assuring the safety of organic meats. Organic Meat Production and Processing serves as a unique resource for fully understanding the current and potential issues associated with organic meats...... and regulatory aspects of organic meats, coverage then extends to management issues for organically raised and processed meat animals. Processing, sensory and human health aspects are covered in detail, as are the incidences of foodborne pathogens in organic beef, swine, poultry and other organic meat species...

  4. Structure and organization of Marchantia polymorpha chloroplast genome. I. Cloning and gene identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, K; Fukuzawa, H; Kohchi, T; Sano, T; Sano, S; Shirai, H; Umesono, K; Shiki, Y; Takeuchi, M; Chang, Z

    1988-09-20

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of chloroplast DNA from a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha, using a clone bank of chloroplast DNA fragments. The circular genome consists of 121,024 base-pairs and includes two large inverted repeats (IRA and IRB, each 10,058 base-pairs), a large single-copy region (LSC, 81,095 base-pairs), and a small single-copy region (SSC, 19,813 base-pairs). The nucleotide sequence was analysed with a computer to deduce the entire gene organization, assuming the universal genetic code and the presence of introns in the coding sequences. We detected 136 possible genes. 103 gene products of which are related to known stable RNA or protein molecules. Stable RNA genes for four species of ribosomal RNA and 32 species of tRNA were located, although one of the tRNA genes may be defective. Twenty genes encoding polypeptides involved in photosynthesis and electron transport were identified by comparison with known chloroplast genes. Twenty-five open reading frames (ORFs) show structural similarities to Escherichia coli RNA polymerase subunits, 19 ribosomal proteins and two related proteins. Seven ORFs are comparable with human mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase genes. A computer-aided homology search predicted possible chloroplast homologues of bacterial proteins; two ORFs for bacterial 4Fe-4S-type ferredoxin, two for distinct subunits of a protein-dependent transport system, one ORF for a component of nitrogenase, and one for an antenna protein of a light-harvesting complex. The other 33 ORFs, consisting of 29 to 2136 codons, remain to be identified, but some of them seem to be conserved in evolution. Detailed information on gene identification is presented in the accompanying papers. We postulated that there were 22 introns in 20 genes (8 tRNA genes and 12 ORFs), which may be classified into the groups I and II found in fungal mitochondrial genes. The structural gene for ribosomal protein S12 is trans-split on the opposite DNA strand

  5. Allergenicity assessment of genetically-modified tobacco expressing salt tolerance cbl gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Tuteja, Narendra; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2014-09-01

    It is mandatory to assess the allergenic potential of genetically modified (GM) crops before their commercialization. Recently, a transgene [Calcineurin B-like (CBL) protein] has been introduced into tobacco plant to make the crop salt resistance. Therefore, it was felt necessary to assess the allergenic potential of the cbl gene product, which was introduced and expressed in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plant and compared the allergenic effects with the wild-type (WT) counterpart. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that there was no significant sequence homology with known allergens. Also, no difference between the protein digestibility profiles of GM and WT tobacco was found. Rapid digestion of CBL protein (Mol Wt 35 kDa) by simulated gastric fluid (SGF) indicated reduced chances of this protein to induce allergenicity. In addition, BALB/c mice sensitized by intraperitoneal administration of WT and GM tobacco protein showed comparable levels of clinical score, specific IgE, IgG1, histamine level, similar effect on different organs as well as IgE binding proteins. These findings indicate that insertion of cbl gene in tobacco did not cause any additional allergic risk to consumer and the GM and native tobacco proteins behave similarly in both in vitro and in vivo situations even after genetic modification.

  6. Mammalian Reverse Genetics without Crossing Reveals Nr3a as a Short-Sleeper Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Genshiro A; Sumiyama, Kenta; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Perrin, Dimitri; Fujishima, Hiroshi; Ukai, Hideki; Nishimura, Osamu; Shi, Shoi; Ohno, Rei-ichiro; Narumi, Ryohei; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Tone, Daisuke; Ode, Koji L; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2016-01-26

    The identification of molecular networks at the system level in mammals is accelerated by next-generation mammalian genetics without crossing, which requires both the efficient production of whole-body biallelic knockout (KO) mice in a single generation and high-performance phenotype analyses. Here, we show that the triple targeting of a single gene using the CRISPR/Cas9 system achieves almost perfect KO efficiency (96%-100%). In addition, we developed a respiration-based fully automated non-invasive sleep phenotyping system, the Snappy Sleep Stager (SSS), for high-performance (95.3% accuracy) sleep/wake staging. Using the triple-target CRISPR and SSS in tandem, we reliably obtained sleep/wake phenotypes, even in double-KO mice. By using this system to comprehensively analyze all of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor family members, we found Nr3a as a short-sleeper gene, which is verified by an independent set of triple-target CRISPR. These results demonstrate the application of mammalian reverse genetics without crossing to organism-level systems biology in sleep research.

  7. Genetic variations and haplotype diversity of the UGT1 gene cluster in the Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    Full Text Available Vertebrates require tremendous molecular diversity to defend against numerous small hydrophobic chemicals. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs are a large family of detoxification enzymes that glucuronidate xenobiotics and endobiotics, facilitating their excretion from the body. The UGT1 gene cluster contains a tandem array of variable first exons, each preceded by a specific promoter, and a common set of downstream constant exons, similar to the genomic organization of the protocadherin (Pcdh, immunoglobulin, and T-cell receptor gene clusters. To assist pharmacogenomics studies in Chinese, we sequenced nine first exons, promoter and intronic regions, and five common exons of the UGT1 gene cluster in a population sample of 253 unrelated Chinese individuals. We identified 101 polymorphisms and found 15 novel SNPs. We then computed allele frequencies for each polymorphism and reconstructed their linkage disequilibrium (LD map. The UGT1 cluster can be divided into five linkage blocks: Block 9 (UGT1A9, Block 9/7/6 (UGT1A9, UGT1A7, and UGT1A6, Block 5 (UGT1A5, Block 4/3 (UGT1A4 and UGT1A3, and Block 3' UTR. Furthermore, we inferred haplotypes and selected their tagSNPs. Finally, comparing our data with those of three other populations of the HapMap project revealed ethnic specificity of the UGT1 genetic diversity in Chinese. These findings have important implications for future molecular genetic studies of the UGT1 gene cluster as well as for personalized medical therapies in Chinese.

  8. The genetics of reproductive organ morphology in two Petunia species with contrasting pollination syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Katrin; Klahre, Ulrich; Venail, Julien; Brandenburg, Anna; Kuhlemeier, Cris

    2015-05-01

    Switches between pollination syndromes have happened frequently during angiosperm evolution. Using QTL mapping and reciprocal introgressions, we show that changes in reproductive organ morphology have a simple genetic basis. In animal-pollinated plants, flowers have evolved to optimize pollination efficiency by different pollinator guilds and hence reproductive success. The two Petunia species, P. axillaris and P. exserta, display pollination syndromes adapted to moth or hummingbird pollination. For the floral traits color and scent, genetic loci of large phenotypic effect have been well documented. However, such large-effect loci may be typical for shifts in simple biochemical traits, whereas the evolution of morphological traits may involve multiple mutations of small phenotypic effect. Here, we performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of floral morphology, followed by an in-depth study of pistil and stamen morphology and the introgression of individual QTL into reciprocal parental backgrounds. Two QTLs, on chromosomes II and V, are sufficient to explain the interspecific difference in pistil and stamen length. Since most of the difference in organ length is caused by differences in cell number, genes underlying these QTLs are likely to be involved in cell cycle regulation. Interestingly, conservation of the locus on chromosome II in a different P. axillaris subspecies suggests that the evolution of organ elongation was initiated on chromosome II in adaptation to different pollinators. We recently showed that QTLs for pistil and stamen length on chromosome II are tightly linked to QTLs for petal color and volatile emission. Linkage of multiple traits will enable major phenotypic change within a few generations in hybridizing populations. Thus, the genomic architecture of pollination syndromes in Petunia allows for rapid responses to changing pollinator availability.

  9. Organization and expression of immunoglobulin genes in fetal liver hybridomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R P; Kelley, D E; Coleclough, C; Kearney, J F

    1981-01-01

    The organization and expression of immunoglobulin genes were studied in a series of six hybridomas derived from the fusion of a nonproducing myeloma cell with cells from mouse fetal liver. These hybridomas, which exhibit several phenotypic characteristics of immature B lymphocytes, all have productively rearranged mu heavy chain genes and produce both the membrane and secreted forms of mu mRNA in a ratio of about 1:10. Significantly, none of the hybridomas has an unrearranged (germ line) allelic mu gene. Examination of the kappa light chain genes revealed that all six of the hybridomas contain unrearranged kappa loci and produce 8.4-kilobase transcripts containing kappa constant region sequences. None of the five hybridomas that exhibit a mu-only phenotype contains a rearranged kappa gene other than that derived from the myeloma parent. One hybridoma, which actively secretes kappa immunoglobulin, contains a rearranged kappa gene of fetal liver origin and synthesizes a distinctive kappa mRNA precursor in addition to the 8.4-kilobase transcript. These results demonstrate that rearrangement of heavy chain immunoglobulin genes normally occurs prior to that of light chain genes and further indicate that the transcriptional competence of the kappa constant region locus is established prior to the time of its rearrangement.

  10. Genetically modified organisms in light of domestic and world regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolić Zorica; Milošević Mirjana; Vujaković Milka; Ignjatov Maja

    2007-01-01

    At the same time as development and registration of new genetic modification of plant species have intensified, the number of countries in which they are grown has also increased considerably. Genetically modified crops were grown in 22 countries in 2006, six of which were in European Union. Protocol on Biosafety, known as Cartagena protocol was adopted at the international level in February, 2000. Presence, but not growing of GMO in food is allowed in many countries, while in some others lab...

  11. Genetic correlations between brain volumes and the WAIS-III dimensions of verbal comprehension, working memory, perceptual organization, and processing speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posthuma, Daniëlle; Baare, Wim F.C.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.;

    2003-01-01

    to cerebellar volume. Verbal Comprehension was not related to any of the three brain volumes. It is concluded that brain volumes are genetically related to intelligence which suggests that genes that influence brain volume may also be important for intelligence. It is also noted however, that the direction......We recently showed that the correlation of gray and white matter volume with full scale IQ and the Working Memory dimension are completely mediated by common genetic factors (Posthuma et al., 2002). Here we examine whether the other WAIS III dimensions (Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization...... to Working Memory capacity (r = 0.27). This phenotypic correlation is completely due to a common underlying genetic factor. Processing Speed was genetically related to white matter volume (r(g) = 0.39). Perceptual Organization was both genetically (r(g) = 0.39) and environmentally (r(e) = -0.71) related...

  12. Identification and Expression of Floral Organ Homeotic Genes from Alpinia oblongifolia (Zingiberaceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Mei Xia; Xue-Mei Gao; Qing-Jun Li

    2009-01-01

    Current understanding of the classical ABC model of floral development has provided a new set of characters to evaluate floral evolution. However, what is still lacking is a clear assessment of this genetic program across monocots. Here, to investigate the evolution of members of class A and B genes in monocots, we report the sequence characteristic and transcript expression of three new MADS-box genes in Atpinia oblongifolia Hayata. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis reveals that these genes are FUL-like and AP3-like. Therefore, they were termed AoFL1, AoFL2 and AoAP3. AoFL1 contains the FUL motif, but AoFL2 lacks this motif. Their expression revealed by in situ hybridization may reflect the ancestral function of FUL-like genes in the specification of inflorescence and floral meristems. The AoAP3 gene contains two conserved motifs, the Pl-derived and paleoAP3 motifs. The AoAP3 transcripts located to the corolla and stamen, and hybridization signals were detected in the central whorl. These expression patterns suggest that the functions of homologous organ identity genes are diversified in A. oblongifolia. The implications of these findings on the conservation of homologous gene function are discussed.

  13. Comparison of LAIR-1 genetic pathways in murine vs human internal organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuqiu; Jiao, Yan; Wei, Wei; Postlethwaite, Arnold E; Gu, Weikuan; Sun, Dianjun

    2014-11-15

    Growing evidence suggests that defective expression or dysfunction of LAIR-1, a novel immunoinhibitory receptor for collagen, is closely associated with some autoimmune diseases, cancers, as well as viral infections. We analyzed the variation of LAIR-1 genetic pathways in murine versus human internal organs, including the lung and brain. The results showed that, under physiological conditions, LAIR-1 links more closely to the common genes in mouse than in human, which poses tissue specificity. It means that mice experimental data in relation to the role of LAIR-1 immune regulation may be overestimated when applied to assess human conditions. Moreover, we found that the in vivo interaction of LAIR-1 with LAIR-2 rarely occurs, implying that the species difference in LAIR-1 genetic pathways could not be primarily attributed to the existence of human LAIR-2. In summary, this study opens the door for insight into LAIR-1 functions inside the human body, and raises concern as to extrapolative credibility of the murine model in biomedical research.

  14. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Xia Tian

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs constitute a superfamily of NAD(P+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  15. Genetics, Gene Flow, and Glaciation: The Case of the South American Limpet Nacella mytilina

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Wevar, Claudio A.; Rosenfeld, Sebastián; Segovia, Nicolás I.; Hüne, Mathias; Gérard, Karin; Ojeda, Jaime; Mansilla, Andrés; Brickle, Paul; Díaz, Angie; Poulin, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Glacial episodes of the Quaternary, and particularly the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) drastically altered the distribution of the Southern-Hemisphere biota, principally at higher latitudes. The irregular coastline of Patagonia expanding for more than 84.000 km constitutes a remarkable area to evaluate the effect of Quaternary landscape and seascape shifts over the demography of near-shore marine benthic organisms. Few studies describing the biogeographic responses of marine species to the LGM have been conducted in Patagonia, but existing data from coastal marine species have demonstrated marked genetic signatures of post-LGM recolonization and expansion. The kelp-dweller limpet Nacella mytilina is broadly distributed along the southern tip of South America and at the Falkland/Malvinas Islands. Considering its distribution, abundance, and narrow bathymetry, N. mytilina represents an appropriate model to infer how historical and contemporary processes affected the distribution of intraspecific genetic diversity and structure along the southern tip of South America. At the same time, it will be possible to determine how life history traits and the ecology of the species are responsible for the current pattern of gene flow and connectivity across the study area. We conducted phylogeographic and demographic inference analyses in N. mytilina from 12 localities along Pacific Patagonia (PP) and one population from the Falkland/Malvinas Islands (FI). Analyses of the mitochondrial gene COI in 300 individuals of N. mytilina revealed low levels of genetic polymorphism and the absence of genetic differentiation along PP. In contrast, FI showed a strong and significant differentiation from Pacific Patagonian populations. Higher levels of genetic diversity were also recorded in the FI population, together with a more expanded genealogy supporting the hypothesis of glacial persistence of the species in these islands. Haplotype genealogy, and mismatch analyses in the FI population

  16. Genes Predisposing to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections: Associated Phenotypes, Gene-Specific Management, and Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewicz, Dianna M.; Carlson, Alicia A.; Regalado, Ellen S.

    2011-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to type A dissections (TAAD) are the major diseases affecting the aorta. A genetic predisposition for TAAD can occur as part of a genetic syndrome, as is the case for Marfan syndrome, due to mutations in FBN1, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, which results from mutations in either TGFBR1 or TGFBR2. A predisposition to TAAD in the absence of syndromic features can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with decreased penetrance and variable expression, termed familial TAAD. Familial TAAD exhibits clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Genetic heterogeneity for familial TAAD has been demonstrated by the identification of four genes leading to TAAD, including TGFBR2 and TGFBR1, MYH11, and ACTA2. The phenotype and management of patients harboring mutations in these genes, along with genetic testing, will be addressed in this review. PMID:20452526

  17. GeneAnalytics Pathway Analysis and Genetic Overlap among Autism Spectrum Disorder, Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen S. Khanzada

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BPD and schizophrenia (SCH show similar neuropsychiatric behavioral disturbances, including impaired social interaction and communication, seen in autism spectrum disorder (ASD with multiple overlapping genetic and environmental influences implicated in risk and course of illness. GeneAnalytics software was used for pathway analysis and genetic profiling to characterize common susceptibility genes obtained from published lists for ASD (792 genes, BPD (290 genes and SCH (560 genes. Rank scores were derived from the number and nature of overlapping genes, gene-disease association, tissue specificity and gene functions subdivided into categories (e.g., diseases, tissues or functional pathways. Twenty-three genes were common to all three disorders and mapped to nine biological Superpathways including Circadian entrainment (10 genes, score = 37.0, Amphetamine addiction (five genes, score = 24.2, and Sudden infant death syndrome (six genes, score = 24.1. Brain tissues included the medulla oblongata (11 genes, score = 2.1, thalamus (10 genes, score = 2.0 and hypothalamus (nine genes, score = 2.0 with six common genes (BDNF, DRD2, CHRNA7, HTR2A, SLC6A3, and TPH2. Overlapping genes impacted dopamine and serotonin homeostasis and signal transduction pathways, impacting mood, behavior and physical activity level. Converging effects on pathways governing circadian rhythms support a core etiological relationship between neuropsychiatric illnesses and sleep disruption with hypoxia and central brain stem dysfunction.

  18. Gene-based SNP discovery and genetic mapping in pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu, Anoop; Ramsay, Larissa; Sanderson, Lacey-Anne; Stonehouse, Robert; Li, Rong; Condie, Janet; Shunmugam, Arun S K; Liu, Yong; Jha, Ambuj B; Diapari, Marwan; Burstin, Judith; Aubert, Gregoire; Tar'an, Bunyamin; Bett, Kirstin E; Warkentin, Thomas D; Sharpe, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    Gene-based SNPs were identified and mapped in pea using five recombinant inbred line populations segregating for traits of agronomic importance. Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is one of the world's oldest domesticated crops and has been a model system in plant biology and genetics since the work of Gregor Mendel. Pea is the second most widely grown pulse crop in the world following common bean. The importance of pea as a food crop is growing due to its combination of moderate protein concentration, slowly digestible starch, high dietary fiber concentration, and its richness in micronutrients; however, pea has lagged behind other major crops in harnessing recent advances in molecular biology, genomics and bioinformatics, partly due to its large genome size with a large proportion of repetitive sequence, and to the relatively limited investment in research in this crop globally. The objective of this research was the development of a genome-wide transcriptome-based pea single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker platform using next-generation sequencing technology. A total of 1,536 polymorphic SNP loci selected from over 20,000 non-redundant SNPs identified using deep transcriptome sequencing of eight diverse Pisum accessions were used for genotyping in five RIL populations using an Illumina GoldenGate assay. The first high-density pea SNP map defining all seven linkage groups was generated by integrating with previously published anchor markers. Syntenic relationships of this map with the model legume Medicago truncatula and lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) maps were established. The genic SNP map establishes a foundation for future molecular breeding efforts by enabling both the identification and tracking of introgression of genomic regions harbouring QTLs related to agronomic and seed quality traits.

  19. Analysis of genetic distribution and population genetic structure of the MyoD gene in 10 pig breeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li ZHU; Xuewei LI; Surong SHUAI; Mingzhou LI; Fangqiong LI; Lei CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) data was applied to analyze the distribution of the MyoD gene in 10 pig breeds and pig breed crosses.The population genetic information about genetic distribution,variation,and heterozygosity of the MyoD gene in different breed populations were analyzed.Based on the allele frequency,genetic distance and evolution distance among each breed populations were calculated and Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic mean (UPGMA) phylogenetic tree was gained based on the evolution distances between populations.The results indicated that the distribution of the MyoD genotype kept in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in most tested groups but not in Duroc (D) and Duroc × (Landrance × Yorkshire)(DLY) population.Generally,the genetic diversity of the MyoD gene was abundant and these tested breed populations had high genetic variations.The evolution of the MyoD gene was under natural selection pressure.On the phylogenetic tree,10 pig breeds were divided into 4 clusters.The first cluster consisted of four breeds developed from Landrace.The second cluster was two indigenous Chinese pig breeds.The third cluster was three breeds developed from Duroc.The fourth cluster was a Tibetan pig breed.The constitution of the topology of the phylogenetic tree was consistent with the breeding history of each pig breed.From this experiment,we can conclude that some RFLP data obtained from functional gene can be used in the genetic deviation research between some closely related species or between different populations in certain species.

  20. Abiotic Stress Tolerance: From Gene Discovery in Model Organisms to Crop Improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ray Bressan; Hans Bohnert; Jian-Kang Zhu

    2009-01-01

    Productive and sustainable agriculture necessitates growing plants in sub-optimal environments with less input of precious resources such as fresh water. For a better understanding and rapid improvement of abiotic stress tolerance, it is important to link physiological and biochemical work to molecular studies in genetically tractable model organisms. With the use of several technologies for the discovery of stress tolerance genes and their appropriate alleles,transgenic approaches to improving stress tolerance in crops remarkably parallels breeding principles with a greatly expanded germplasm base and will succeed eventually.

  1. Genetically Engineering Bacillus subtilis with a Heat-Resistant Arsenite Methyltransferase for Bioremediation of Arsenic-Contaminated Organic Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Chen, Chuan; Shen, Qirong; Rosen, Barry P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2015-10-01

    Organic manures may contain high levels of arsenic (As) due to the use of As-containing growth-promoting substances in animal feed. To develop a bioremediation strategy to remove As from organic waste, Bacillus subtilis 168, a bacterial strain which can grow at high temperature but is unable to methylate and volatilize As, was genetically engineered to express the arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase gene (CmarsM) from the thermophilic alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. The genetically engineered B. subtilis 168 converted most of the inorganic As in the medium into dimethylarsenate and trimethylarsine oxide within 48 h and volatized substantial amounts of dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine. The rate of As methylation and volatilization increased with temperature from 37 to 50°C. When inoculated into an As-contaminated organic manure composted at 50°C, the modified strain significantly enhanced As volatilization. This study provides a proof of concept of using genetically engineered microorganisms for bioremediation of As-contaminated organic waste during composting.

  2. Gene therapy during cardiac surgery: role of surgical technique to minimize collateral organ gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Michael G; Swain, JaBaris D; Fargnoli, Anthony S; Bridges, Charles R

    2010-12-01

    Effective gene therapy for heart failure has not yet been achieved clinically. The aim of this study is to quantitatively assess the cardiac isolation efficiency of the molecular cardiac surgery with recirculating delivery (MCARD™) and to evaluate its efficacy as a means to limit collateral organ gene expression. 10(14) genome copies (GC) of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector 6 encoding green fluorescent protein under control of the cytomegalovirus promoter was delivered to the nine arrested sheep hearts. Blood samples were assessed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT QPCR). Collateral organ gene expression was assessed at four-weeks using immunohistochemical staining. The blood vector GC concentration in the cardiac circuit during complete isolation trended from 9.59±0.73 to 9.05±0.65 (log GC/cm(3)), and no GC were detectable in the systemic circuit (P800-fold (P99% isolation efficiency. Conversely, incomplete isolation resulted in equalization of vector GC concentration in the circuits, leading to robust collateral organ gene expression. MCARD™ is an efficient, clinically translatable myocardial delivery platform for cardiac specific gene therapy. The cardiac surgical techniques utilized are critically important to limit collateral organ gene expression.

  3. Experimental Population Genetics in the Introductory Genetics Laboratory Using "Drosophila" as a Model Organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald; Kennon, Tillman

    2009-01-01

    Hypotheses of population genetics are derived and tested by students in the introductory genetics laboratory classroom as they explore the effects of biotic variables (physical traits of fruit flies) and abiotic variables (island size and distance) on fruit fly populations. In addition to this hypothesis-driven experiment, the development of…

  4. Experimental Population Genetics in the Introductory Genetics Laboratory Using "Drosophila" as a Model Organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald; Kennon, Tillman

    2009-01-01

    Hypotheses of population genetics are derived and tested by students in the introductory genetics laboratory classroom as they explore the effects of biotic variables (physical traits of fruit flies) and abiotic variables (island size and distance) on fruit fly populations. In addition to this hypothesis-driven experiment, the development of…

  5. How scary! An analysis of visual communication concerning genetically modified organisms in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Vera; Frisio, Dario G; Ferrazzi, Giovanni; Siletti, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Several studies provide evidence of the role of written communication in influencing public perception towards genetically modified organisms, whereas visual communication has been sparsely investigated. This article aims to evaluate the exposure of the Italian population to scary genetically modified organism-related images. A set of 517 images collected through Google are classified considering fearful attributes, and an index that accounts for the scary impact of these images is built. Then, through an ordinary least-squares regression, we estimate the relationship between the Scary Impact Index and a set of variables that describes the context in which the images appear. The results reveal that the first (and most viewed) Google result images contain the most frightful contents. In addition, the agri-food sector in Italy is strongly oriented towards offering a negative representation of genetically modified organisms. Exposure to scary images could be a factor that affects the negative perception of genetically modified organisms in Italy.

  6. Effects of Genetic Drift and Gene Flow on the Selective Maintenance of Genetic Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Star, Bastiaan; Spencer, Hamish G.

    2013-01-01

    Explanations for the genetic variation ubiquitous in natural populations are often classified by the population–genetic processes they emphasize: natural selection or mutation and genetic drift. Here we investigate models that incorporate all three processes in a spatially structured population, using what we call a construction approach, simulating finite populations under selection that are bombarded with a steady stream of novel mutations. As expected, the amount of genetic variation compa...

  7. A review of animal models used to evaluate potential allergenicity of genetically modified organisms (GMOs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsteller, Nathan; Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Goodman, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Food safety regulators request prediction of allergenicity for newly expressed proteins in genetically modified (GM) crops and in novel foods. Some have suggested using animal models to assess potential allergenicity. A variety of animal models have been used in research to evaluate sensitisation...... of genetically modified organisms (GMOs)....

  8. Capillary electrophoresis with electrochemiluminescent detection for highly sensitive assay of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Longhua; Yang, Huanghao; Qiu, Bin; Xiao, Xueyang; Xue, Linlin; Kim, Donghwan; Chen, Guonan

    2009-12-01

    A capillary electrophoresis coupled with electrochemiluminescent detection system (CE-ECL) was developed for the detection of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons. The ECL luminophore, tris(1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) (Ru(phen)(3)(2+)), was labeled to the PCR primers before amplification. Ru(phen)(3)(2+) was then introduced to PCR amplicons by PCR amplification. Eventually, the PCR amplicons were separated and detected by the homemade CE-ECL system. The detection of a typical genetically modified organism (GMO), Roundup Ready Soy (RRS), was shown as an example to demonstrate the reliability of the proposed approach. Four pairs of primers were amplified by multiple PCR (MPCR) simultaneously, three of which were targeted on the specific sequence of exogenous genes of RRS, and another was targeted on the endogenous reference gene of soybean. Both the conditions for PCR amplification and CE-ECL separation and detection were investigated in detail. Results showed that, under the optimal conditions, the proposed method can accurately identifying RRS. The corresponding limit of detection (LOD) was below 0.01% with 35 PCR cycles.

  9. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome: objectives and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V; King, Robert A; State, Matthew W; Tischfield, Jay A; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Heiman, Gary A

    2015-02-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be clarified fully. There is now mounting evidence that the genetic risks for TS include both common and rare variants and may involve complex multigenic inheritance or, in rare cases, a single major gene. Based on recent progress in many other common disorders with apparently similar genetic architectures, it is clear that large patient cohorts and open-access repositories will be essential to further advance the field. To that end, the large multicenter Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study was established. The goal of the TIC Genetics study is to undertake a comprehensive gene discovery effort, focusing both on familial genetic variants with large effects within multiply affected pedigrees and on de novo mutations ascertained through the analysis of apparently simplex parent-child trios with non-familial tics. The clinical data and biomaterials (DNA, transformed cell lines, RNA) are part of a sharing repository located within the National Institute for Mental Health Center for Collaborative Genomics Research on Mental Disorders, USA, and will be made available to the broad scientific community. This resource will ultimately facilitate better understanding of the pathophysiology of TS and related disorders and the development of novel therapies. Here, we describe the objectives and methods of the TIC Genetics study as a reference for future studies from our group and to facilitate collaboration between genetics consortia in the field of TS.

  10. EXTERNALITIES AND THE SIX FACETS MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT: GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS IN AGRIBUSINESS

    OpenAIRE

    STEPHEN R. LUXMORE; CLYDE EIRÍKUR HULL

    2010-01-01

    The Six Facets Model of technology management has previously only been applied to process innovation at the firm and the industry level. In this article, the model is applied to product innovation for the first time. In the context of genetically-modified organisms in the agribusiness industry, we examine radical product innovation through the Six Facets Model. We propose, based on the history of genetically-modified organisms in agribusiness, that when applied to product innovation the Six F...

  11. Public engagement in Japanese policy-making: A history of the genetically modified organisms debate

    OpenAIRE

    SHINEHA, Ryuma; Kato, Kazuto

    2009-01-01

    New laws regulating the use of genetically modified organisms have recently been enacted in Japan, and there were many stakeholders involved in the development of this policy. Our review of the history and the debates held in the course of policy development regarding genetically modified organisms in Japan shows that the current regulatory system was developed taking past national and international regulatory contexts into consideration. The turning point in Japanese policy-making occurred e...

  12. Reasonable Foreseeability and Liability in Relation to Genetically Modified Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Lara; Smyth, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    This article examines problems that may arise when addressing liability resulting from the genetic modification of microbes, animals, and plants. More specifically, it evaluates how uncertainties relating to the outcomes of these biotechnological innovations affect--or may affect--the courts' application of the reasonable foreseeability…

  13. The Coexistence of Genetically Modified, Organic and Conventional Foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalaitzandonakes, N.; Phillips, P.W.B.; Wesseler, J.H.H.; Smyth, S.J.

    2016-01-01

    Since their commercial introduction in 1996, genetically modified (GM) crops have been adopted by farmers around the world at impressive rates. In 2011, 180 million hectares of GM crops were cultivated by more than 15 million farmers in 29 countries. In the next decade, global adoption is expected t

  14. Genetic Determinants for Promoter Hypermethylation in the Lungs of Smokers: A Candidate Gene-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Leng, Shuguang; Stidley, Christine A.; Liu, Yushi; Edlund, Christopher K.; Willink, Randall P.; Han, Younghun; Landi, Maria Teresa; Thun, Michael; Picchi, Maria A.; Bruse, Shannon E.; Crowell, Richard E.; Van Den Berg, David; Neil E Caporaso; Amos, Christopher I.; Siegfried, Jill M.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of tumor suppressor gene promoter methylation in sputum-derived exfoliated cells predicts early lung cancer. Here we identified genetic determinants for this epigenetic process and examined their biological effects on gene regulation. A two-stage approach involving discovery and replication was employed to assess the association between promoter hypermethylation of a 12-gene panel and common variation in 40 genes involved in carcinogen metabolism, regulation of methylation, and ...

  15. Genetic organization of Streptococcus salivarius 24SMBc blp-like bacteriocin locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagati, Maria; Scillato, Marina; Stefani, Stefania

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we describe, for the first time, the genetic organization of the blpU-like cassette in Streptococcus salivarius24SMBc by entire genome sequencing. This strain has recently been found useful and widely applied as an oral probiotic in the prevention of recurrent otitis media. The 24SMBc blpU-like cassette  is 8,023 bp in length, organized in 11 orfs,of which orf8 encodes for the pore-forming peptide bacteriocin, belonging to class IIc, with a double-glycine leader peptide. The first characterization of blplocus was described inStreptococcus pneumoniae, showing a crucial role in interspecies competition within the nasopharynx. The salivarius blpU-like cassette is inserted upstream of the pepX gene in the chromosome. A hypervariable region between pepXand orf1 was found and used as a specific target able to distinguishS. salivarius 24SMBc from all other streptococci. All orfscarried by the blp-like cassette are functionally expressed (qPCR assays). Our results contribute to elucidate the microbial interactions in the nasopharynx, underlining the potential role of  the blp locus in human nasopharyngeal colonization.

  16. Self-Organization of Embryonic Genetic Oscillators into Spatiotemporal Wave Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiairis, Charisios D.; Aulehla, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Summary In vertebrate embryos, somites, the precursor of vertebrae, form from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM), which is composed of cells displaying signaling oscillations. Cellular oscillatory activity leads to periodic wave patterns in the PSM. Here, we address the origin of such complex wave patterns. We employed an in vitro randomization and real-time imaging strategy to probe for the ability of cells to generate order from disorder. We found that, after randomization, PSM cells self-organized into several miniature emergent PSM structures (ePSM). Our results show an ordered macroscopic spatial arrangement of ePSM with evidence of an intrinsic length scale. Furthermore, cells actively synchronize oscillations in a Notch-signaling-dependent manner, re-establishing wave-like patterns of gene activity. We demonstrate that PSM cells self-organize by tuning oscillation dynamics in response to surrounding cells, leading to collective synchronization with an average frequency. These findings reveal emergent properties within an ensemble of coupled genetic oscillators. PMID:26871631

  17. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the [beta]-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novel regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. [beta]-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for [beta]-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

  18. Enzyme diversity and mosaic gene organization in denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumft, W G; Körner, H

    1997-02-01

    Denitrification is a main branch of the global nitrogen cycle. In the past ten years unravelling the underlying biochemistry and genetics has proceeded at an increasing pace. Fungal denitrification has become a new field. The biochemical investigation of denitrification has culminated in the description of the crystal structures of the two types of nitrite reductases. The N2O reductase shares with cytochrome c oxidase the CuA center as a structurally novel metal site. The cytochrome b subunit of NO reductase has a striking conservation of heme-binding transmembrane segments versus the subunit I of cytochrome c oxidase. Another putative denitrification gene product shows structural relation to the subunit III of the oxidase. N2O reductase and NO reductase may be ancestors of energy-conserving enzymes of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily. More than 30 genes for denitrification are located in a > 30-kb cluster in Pseudomonas stutzeri, and comparable gene clusters have been identified in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Paracoccus denitrificans. Genes necessary for nitrite reduction and NO reduction have a mosaic arrangement with very few conserved locations within these clusters and relative to each other.

  19. Genetic improvement of livestock for organic farming systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelling, D.; Groen, A.F.; Soerensen, P.; Madsen, P.; Jensen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Organic farming which experienced a constant rise over the last two decades is a system based on sustainability and on a concept tending towards functional integrity. Legislation as well as the wish to produce separately from conventional farming raise the question whether organic farming should be

  20. Genetic improvement of livestock for organic farming systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelling, D.; Groen, A.F.; Soerensen, P.; Madsen, P.; Jensen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Organic farming which experienced a constant rise over the last two decades is a system based on sustainability and on a concept tending towards functional integrity. Legislation as well as the wish to produce separately from conventional farming raise the question whether organic farming should be

  1. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals Organization, Function and Evolution of ars Genes in Pantoea spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liying; Wang, Jin; Jing, Chuanyong

    2017-01-01

    Numerous genes are involved in various strategies to resist toxic arsenic (As). However, the As resistance strategy in genus Pantoea is poorly understood. In this study, a comparative genome analysis of 23 Pantoea genomes was conducted. Two vertical genetic arsC-like genes without any contribution to As resistance were found to exist in the 23 Pantoea strains. Besides the two arsC-like genes, As resistance gene clusters arsRBC or arsRBCH were found in 15 Pantoea genomes. These ars clusters were found to be acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from sources related to Franconibacter helveticus, Serratia marcescens, and Citrobacter freundii. During the history of evolution, the ars clusters were acquired more than once in some species, and were lost in some strains, producing strains without As resistance capability. This study revealed the organization, distribution and the complex evolutionary history of As resistance genes in Pantoea spp.. The insights gained in this study improved our understanding on the As resistance strategy of Pantoea spp. and its roles in the biogeochemical cycling of As. PMID:28377759

  2. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals Organization, Function and Evolution of ars Genes in Pantoea spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liying; Wang, Jin; Jing, Chuanyong

    2017-01-01

    Numerous genes are involved in various strategies to resist toxic arsenic (As). However, the As resistance strategy in genus Pantoea is poorly understood. In this study, a comparative genome analysis of 23 Pantoea genomes was conducted. Two vertical genetic arsC-like genes without any contribution to As resistance were found to exist in the 23 Pantoea strains. Besides the two arsC-like genes, As resistance gene clusters arsRBC or arsRBCH were found in 15 Pantoea genomes. These ars clusters were found to be acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from sources related to Franconibacter helveticus, Serratia marcescens, and Citrobacter freundii. During the history of evolution, the ars clusters were acquired more than once in some species, and were lost in some strains, producing strains without As resistance capability. This study revealed the organization, distribution and the complex evolutionary history of As resistance genes in Pantoea spp.. The insights gained in this study improved our understanding on the As resistance strategy of Pantoea spp. and its roles in the biogeochemical cycling of As.

  3. Potential of gene drives with genome editing to increase genetic gain in livestock breeding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Serap; Jenko, Janez; Gorjanc, Gregor; Mileham, Alan J; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Hickey, John M

    2017-01-04

    This paper uses simulation to explore how gene drives can increase genetic gain in livestock breeding programs. Gene drives are naturally occurring phenomena that cause a mutation on one chromosome to copy itself onto its homologous chromosome. We simulated nine different breeding and editing scenarios with a common overall structure. Each scenario began with 21 generations of selection, followed by 20 generations of selection based on true breeding values where the breeder used selection alone, selection in combination with genome editing, or selection with genome editing and gene drives. In the scenarios that used gene drives, we varied the probability of successfully incorporating the gene drive. For each scenario, we evaluated genetic gain, genetic variance [Formula: see text], rate of change in inbreeding ([Formula: see text]), number of distinct quantitative trait nucleotides (QTN) edited, rate of increase in favourable allele frequencies of edited QTN and the time to fix favourable alleles. Gene drives enhanced the benefits of genome editing in seven ways: (1) they amplified the increase in genetic gain brought about by genome editing; (2) they amplified the rate of increase in the frequency of favourable alleles and reduced the time it took to fix them; (3) they enabled more rapid targeting of QTN with lesser effect for genome editing; (4) they distributed fixed editing resources across a larger number of distinct QTN across generations; (5) they focussed editing on a smaller number of QTN within a given generation; (6) they reduced the level of inbreeding when editing a subset of the sires; and (7) they increased the efficiency of converting genetic variation into genetic gain. Genome editing in livestock breeding results in short-, medium- and long-term increases in genetic gain. The increase in genetic gain occurs because editing increases the frequency of favourable alleles in the population. Gene drives accelerate the increase in allele frequency

  4. Alpha tubulin genes from Leishmania braziliensis: genomic organization, gene structure and insights on their expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, César A; Requena, José M; Puerta, Concepción J

    2013-07-06

    Alpha tubulin is a fundamental component of the cytoskeleton which is responsible for cell shape and is involved in cell division, ciliary and flagellar motility and intracellular transport. Alpha tubulin gene expression varies according to the morphological changes suffered by Leishmania in its life cycle. However, the objective of studying the mechanisms responsible for the differential expression has resulted to be a difficult task due to the complex genome organization of tubulin genes and to the non-conventional mechanisms of gene regulation operating in Leishmania. We started this work by analyzing the genomic organization of α-tubulin genes in the Leishmania braziliensis genome database. The genomic organization of L. braziliensis α-tubulin genes differs from that existing in the L. major and L. infantum genomes. Two loci containing α-tubulin genes were found in the chromosomes 13 and 29, even though the existence of sequence gaps does not allow knowing the exact number of genes at each locus. Southern blot assays showed that α-tubulin locus at chromosome 13 contains at least 8 gene copies, which are tandemly organized with a 2.08-kb repetition unit; the locus at chromosome 29 seems to contain a sole α-tubulin gene. In addition, it was found that L. braziliensis α-tubulin locus at chromosome 13 contains two types of α-tubulin genes differing in their 3' UTR, each one presumably containing different regulatory motifs. It was also determined that the mRNA expression levels of these genes are controlled by post-transcriptional mechanisms tightly linked to the growth temperature. Moreover, the decrease in the α-tubulin mRNA abundance observed when promastigotes were cultured at 35°C was accompanied by parasite morphology alterations, similar to that occurring during the promastigote to amastigote differentiation. Information found in the genome databases indicates that α-tubulin genes have been reorganized in a drastic manner along Leishmania

  5. Digital Gene Expression Analysis Based on De Novo Transcriptome Assembly Reveals New Genes Associated with Floral Organ Differentiation of the Orchid Plant Cymbidium ensifolium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengxi Yang

    Full Text Available Cymbidium ensifolium belongs to the genus Cymbidium of the orchid family. Owing to its spectacular flower morphology, C. ensifolium has considerable ecological and cultural value. However, limited genetic data is available for this non-model plant, and the molecular mechanism underlying floral organ identity is still poorly understood. In this study, we characterize the floral transcriptome of C. ensifolium and present, for the first time, extensive sequence and transcript abundance data of individual floral organs. After sequencing, over 10 Gb clean sequence data were generated and assembled into 111,892 unigenes with an average length of 932.03 base pairs, including 1,227 clusters and 110,665 singletons. Assembled sequences were annotated with gene descriptions, gene ontology, clusters of orthologous group terms, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, and the plant transcription factor database. From these annotations, 131 flowering-associated unigenes, 61 CONSTANS-LIKE (COL unigenes and 90 floral homeotic genes were identified. In addition, four digital gene expression libraries were constructed for the sepal, petal, labellum and gynostemium, and 1,058 genes corresponding to individual floral organ development were identified. Among them, eight MADS-box genes were further investigated by full-length cDNA sequence analysis and expression validation, which revealed two APETALA1/AGL9-like MADS-box genes preferentially expressed in the sepal and petal, two AGAMOUS-like genes particularly restricted to the gynostemium, and four DEF-like genes distinctively expressed in different floral organs. The spatial expression of these genes varied distinctly in different floral mutant corresponding to different floral morphogenesis, which validated the specialized roles of them in floral patterning and further supported the effectiveness of our in silico analysis. This dataset generated in our study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms

  6. Genetic synthetic lethality screen at the single gene level in cultured human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Simons, Arnold H.; Dafni, Naomi; Dotan, Iris; Oron, Yoram; Canaani, Dan

    2001-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated the feasibility of a chemical synthetic lethality screen in cultured human cells. We now demonstrate the principles for a genetic synthetic lethality screen. The technology employs both an immortalized human cell line deficient in the gene of interest, which is complemented by an episomal survival plasmid expressing the wild-type cDNA for the gene of interest, and the use of a novel GFP-based double-label fluorescence system. Dominant negative genetic suppressor elem...

  7. Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer: Mapping and Cloning Genes Other Than BRCAl

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    predispose to breast cancer . These mutations are always in the context of Cowden’s Syndrome, and do not appear in families with brest cancer in the...AD AWARD NUMBER DAMD17-94-J-4307 TITLE: Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer : Mapping and Cloning Genes Other Than BRCA1 PRINCIPAL...Aug97-) Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer : Mapping and Cloning Genes Other than BRCA1 6. AUTHOR{S) Mary-Clair King, Ph.D. 7

  8. A Promising Approach to Gene Confinement and Breeding for Genetically Modified Bioenergy Crops

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Advanced genetic and biotechnology tools will be required to realize the full potential of food and bioenergy crops. Given current regulatory concerns, many transgenic traits might never be deregulated for commercial release without a robust gene confinement strategy in place. The potential for transgene flow from genetically modified (GM) crops is widely known. Pollen-mediated transfer is a major component of gene flow in flowering plants and therefore a potential avenue for the escape of tr...

  9. Genetic investigation of 100 heart genes in sudden unexplained death victims in a forensic setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie Lindgren; Hertz, Christin Løth; Ferrero, Laura

    2016-01-01

    indicate that broad genetic investigation of SUD victims increases the diagnostic outcome, and the investigation should comprise genes involved in both cardiomyopathies and cardiac channelopathies.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 21 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2016.118....

  10. Functional complementation studies identify candidate genes and common genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra; Ramus, Susan J;

    2009-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation and/or somatic alterations in tumours may be associated with survival in women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The successful identification of genetic associations relies on a suitable strategy for identifying and testing candidate genes. We used microcell-mediat...

  11. Does your gene need a background check? How genetic background impacts the analysis of mutations, genes, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Christopher H; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-06-01

    The premise of genetic analysis is that a causal link exists between phenotypic and allelic variation. However, it has long been documented that mutant phenotypes are not a simple result of a single DNA lesion, but are instead due to interactions of the focal allele with other genes and the environment. Although an experimentally rigorous approach focused on individual mutations and isogenic control strains has facilitated amazing progress within genetics and related fields, a glimpse back suggests that a vast complexity has been omitted from our current understanding of allelic effects. Armed with traditional genetic analyses and the foundational knowledge they have provided, we argue that the time and tools are ripe to return to the underexplored aspects of gene function and embrace the context-dependent nature of genetic effects. We assert that a broad understanding of genetic effects and the evolutionary dynamics of alleles requires identifying how mutational outcomes depend upon the 'wild type' genetic background. Furthermore, we discuss how best to exploit genetic background effects to broaden genetic research programs.

  12. Identification of genes important for cutaneous function revealed by a large scale reverse genetic screen in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTommaso, Tia; Jones, Lynelle K; Cottle, Denny L; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Vancollie, Valerie E; Watt, Fiona M; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P; Sundberg, John P; White, Jacqueline K; Smyth, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP). A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1), while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1). The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation.

  13. Identification of genes important for cutaneous function revealed by a large scale reverse genetic screen in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tia DiTommaso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP. A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1, while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1. The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation.

  14. Genetic architecture for human aggression: A study of gene-phenotype relationship in OMIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang-James, Yanli; Faraone, Stephen V

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies of human aggression have mainly focused on known candidate genes and pathways regulating serotonin and dopamine signaling and hormonal functions. These studies have taught us much about the genetics of human aggression, but no genetic locus has yet achieved genome-significance. We here present a review based on a paradoxical hypothesis that studies of rare, functional genetic variations can lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying complex multifactorial disorders such as aggression. We examined all aggression phenotypes catalogued in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), an Online Catalog of Human Genes and Genetic Disorders. We identified 95 human disorders that have documented aggressive symptoms in at least one individual with a well-defined genetic variant. Altogether, we retrieved 86 causal genes. Although most of these genes had not been implicated in human aggression by previous studies, the most significantly enriched canonical pathways had been previously implicated in aggression (e.g., serotonin and dopamine signaling). Our findings provide strong evidence to support the causal role of these pathways in the pathogenesis of aggression. In addition, the novel genes and pathways we identified suggest additional mechanisms underlying the origins of human aggression. Genome-wide association studies with very large samples will be needed to determine if common variants in these genes are risk factors for aggression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Specific genetic modifications of domestic animals by gene targeting and animal cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Zhou, Jiangfeng

    2003-11-13

    The technology of gene targeting through homologous recombination has been extremely useful for elucidating gene functions in mice. The application of this technology was thought impossible in the large livestock species until the successful creation of the first mammalian clone "Dolly" the sheep. The combination of the technologies for gene targeting of somatic cells with those of animal cloning made it possible to introduce specific genetic mutations into domestic animals. In this review, the principles of gene targeting in somatic cells and the challenges of nuclear transfer using gene-targeted cells are discussed. The relevance of gene targeting in domestic animals for applications in bio-medicine and agriculture are also examined.

  16. PHYSIOLOGY AND GENETIC ASPECTS OF THE REGULATION OF EXPRESSION MILK PROTEIN GENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Bulla

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For the genetic improvement of milk composition and milk yield, both the typing of different protein variants and knowledge about the regulation of expression of the different milk protein genes are important. Some of the processing properties of milk are dependent on the milk composition. Information about the DNA sequence and genes involved in the expression of the milk protein genes,therefore,is big importance for genetic improvement of these traits in animals breeding programmes.In recent years more data has become available concerning the regulation of expression of the milk protein genes and as might have been expected from the complex multihormonal control of these genes it appears to be rather complex. Although several mammary gland specific factors that play a role in expression of some of these genes have been identified,none of these factors has been shown to be involved in the expression of all or the majority of the milk protein genes.

  17. Late multiple organ surge in interferon-regulated target genes characterizes staphylococcal enterotoxin B lethality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela A Ferreyra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial superantigens are virulence factors that cause toxic shock syndrome. Here, the genome-wide, temporal response of mice to lethal intranasal staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB challenge was investigated in six tissues. RESULTS: The earliest responses and largest number of affected genes occurred in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, spleen, and lung tissues with the highest content of both T-cells and monocyte/macrophages, the direct cellular targets of SEB. In contrast, the response of liver, kidney, and heart was delayed and involved fewer genes, but revealed a dominant genetic program that was seen in all 6 tissues. Many of the 85 uniquely annotated transcripts participating in this shared genomic response have not been previously linked to SEB. Nine of the 85 genes were subsequently confirmed by RT-PCR in every tissue/organ at 24 h. These 85 transcripts, up-regulated in all tissues, annotated to the interferon (IFN/antiviral-response and included genes belonging to the DNA/RNA sensing system, DNA damage repair, the immunoproteasome, and the ER/metabolic stress-response and apoptosis pathways. Overall, this shared program was identified as a type I and II interferon (IFN-response and the promoters of these genes were highly enriched for IFN regulatory matrices. Several genes whose secreted products induce the IFN pathway were up-regulated at early time points in PBMCs, spleen, and/or lung. Furthermore, IFN regulatory factors including Irf1, Irf7 and Irf8, and Zbp1, a DNA sensor/transcription factor that can directly elicit an IFN innate immune response, participated in this host-wide SEB signature. CONCLUSION: Global gene-expression changes across multiple organs implicated a host-wide IFN-response in SEB-induced death. Therapies aimed at IFN-associated innate immunity may improve outcome in toxic shock syndromes.

  18. Genetic architecture of gene expression in the chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The annotation of many genomes is limited, with a large proportion of identified genes lacking functional assignments. The construction of gene co-expression networks is a powerful approach that presents a way of integrating information from diverse gene expression datasets into a unified analysis which allows inferences to be drawn about the role of previously uncharacterised genes. Using this approach, we generated a condition-free gene co-expression network for the chicken using data from 1,043 publically available Affymetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome Arrays. This data was generated from a diverse range of experiments, including different tissues and experimental conditions. Our aim was to identify gene co-expression modules and generate a tool to facilitate exploration of the functional chicken genome. Results Fifteen modules, containing between 24 and 473 genes, were identified in the condition-free network. Most of the modules showed strong functional enrichment for particular Gene Ontology categories. However, a few showed no enrichment. Transcription factor binding site enrichment was also noted. Conclusions We have demonstrated that this chicken gene co-expression network is a useful tool in gene function prediction and the identification of putative novel transcription factors and binding sites. This work highlights the relevance of this methodology for functional prediction in poorly annotated genomes such as the chicken.

  19. The potential of genetically-engineered pigs in providing an alternative source of organs and cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David K C; Hara, Hidetaka; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo; Phelps, Carol; Ayares, David; Dai, Yifan

    2013-07-01

    There is a critical shortage of organs, cells, and corneas from deceased human donors worldwide. There are also shortages of human blood for transfusion. A potential solution to all of these problems is the transplantation of organs, cells, and corneas from a readily available animal species, such as the pig, and the transfusion of red blood cells from pigs into humans. However, to achieve these ends, major immunologic and other barriers have to be overcome. Considerable progress has been made in this respect by the genetic modification of pigs to protect their tissues from the primate immune response and to correct several molecular incompatibilities that exist between pig and primate. These have included knockout of genes responsible for the expression of major antigenic targets for primate natural anti-pig antibodies, insertion of human complement- and coagulation-regulatory transgenes, and knockdown of swine leukocyte antigens that stimulate the primate's adaptive immune response. As a result of these manipulations, the administration of novel immunosuppressive agents, and other innovations, pig hearts have now functioned in baboons for 6-8 months, pig islets have maintained normoglycemia in diabetic monkeys for > 1 year, and pig corneas have maintained transparency for several months. Clinical trials of pig islet transplantation are already in progress. Future developments will involve further genetic manipulations of the organ-source pig, with most of the genes that are likely to be beneficial already identified.

  20. Multivariate analysis of complex gene expression and clinical phenotypes with genetic marker data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Joseph; Tritchler, David; Bull, Shelley B; Cartier, Kevin C; Jonasdottir, Gudrun; Kraja, Aldi T; Li, Na; Nock, Nora L; Parkhomenko, Elena; Rao, J Sunil; Stein, Catherine M; Sutradhar, Rinku; Waaijenborg, Sandra; Wang, Ke-Sheng; Wang, Yuanjia; Wolkow, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes contributions to group 12 of the 15th Genetic Analysis Workshop. The papers in this group focused on multivariate methods and applications for the analysis of molecular data including genotypic data as well as gene expression microarray measurements and clinical phenotypes. A range of multivariate techniques have been employed to extract signals from the multi-feature data sets that were provided by the workshop organizers. The methods included data reduction techniques such as principal component analysis and cluster analysis; latent variable models including structural equations and item response modeling; joint multivariate modeling techniques as well as multivariate visualization tools. This summary paper categorizes and discusses individual contributions with regard to multiple classifications of multivariate methods. Given the wide variety in the data considered, the objectives of the analysis and the methods applied, direct comparison of the results of the various papers is difficult. However, the group was able to make many interesting comparisons and parallels between the various approaches. In summary, there was a consensus among authors in group 12 that the genetic research community should continue to draw experiences from other fields such as statistics, econometrics, chemometrics, computer science and linear systems theory.

  1. GENETICALLY MODIFIED ATHLETES: BIOMEDICAL ETHICS, GENE DOPING AND SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Miah

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses the extremely important issue of modifying athletes genetically in order to develop elite sportsmen. He sheds light on various aspects of bioethics and their implications for the practices and management of sport in general.

  2. Condensin-mediated chromosome organization and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Christine Lau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In many organisms sexual fate is determined by a chromosome-based method which entails a difference in sex chromosome-linked gene dosage. Consequently, a gene regulatory mechanism called dosage compensation equalizes X-linked gene expression between the sexes. Dosage compensation initiates as cells transition from pluripotency to differentiation. In C. elegans, dosage compensation is achieved by the dosage compensation complex (DCC binding to both X chromosomes in hermaphrodites to downregulate gene expression by two fold. The DCC contains a subcomplex (condensin IDC similar to the evolutionarily conserved condensin complexes which play a fundamental role in chromosome dynamics during mitosis. Therefore, mechanisms related to mitotic chromosome condensation are hypothesized to mediate dosage compensation. Consistent with this hypothesis, monomethylation of histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20 is increased, whereas acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16 is decreased, both on mitotic chromosomes and on interphase dosage compensated X chromosomes in worms. These observations suggest that interphase dosage compensated X chromosomes maintain some characteristics associated with condensed mitotic chromosome. This chromosome state is stably propagated from one cell generation to the next. In this review we will speculate on how the biochemical activities of condensin can achieve both mitotic chromosome compaction and gene repression.

  3. Do Organic Consumers Oppose Genetically Modified Food Stronger than Others? Results of a Consumer Research in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Wirthgen, Antje

    2007-01-01

    The majority of consumers, in particular European consumers oppose genetic modifi-cation of food. Although consumers oppose strongly genetic modification of food, genetically modified food production increases world wide. The co-existence of both, genetically modified food production and food production free of genetic modification cannot be ensured. There is always a risk that non-genetically modified food gets contaminated despite safety regulations. Thus, even organic production, which is ...

  4. Human gene therapy: a brief overview of the genetic revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sanjukta

    2013-02-01

    Advances in biotechnology have brought gene therapy to the forefront of medical research. The prelude to successful gene therapy i.e. the efficient transfer and expression of a variety of human gene into target cells has already been accomplished in several systems. Safe methods have been devised to do this, using several viral and no-viral vectors. Two main approaches emerged: in vivo modification and ex vivo modification. Retrovirus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus are suitable for gene therapeutic approaches which are based on permanent expression of the therapeutic gene. Non-viral vectors are far less efficient than viral vectors, but they have advantages due to their low immunogenicity and their large capacity for therapeutic DNA. To improve the function of non-viral vectors, the addition of viral functions such as receptor mediated uptake and nuclear translocation of DNA may finally lead to the development of an artificial virus. Gene transfer protocols have been approved for human use in inherited diseases, cancers and acquired disorders. In 1990, the first successful clinical trial of gene therapy was initiated for adenosine deaminase deficiency. Since then, the number of clinical protocols initiated worldwide has increased exponentially. Although preliminary results of these trials are somewhat disappointing, but human gene therapy dreams of treating diseases by replacing or supplementing the product of defective or introducing novel therapeutic genes. So definitely human gene therapy is an effective addition to the arsenal of approaches to many human therapies in the 21st century.

  5. SYBR® Green qPCR Screening Methods for Detection of Anti-herbicide Genes in Genetically Modiifed Processed Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Zhen; Lv Wei; Tang Zhi-fen; Liu Ying; Ao Jin-xia; Yuan Xiao-han; Zhang Ming-hui; Qiu You-wen; Gao Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    The use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) as food products becomes more and more widespread. The European Union has implemented a set of very strict procedures for the approval to grow, import and/or utilize GMOs as food or food ingredients. Thus, analytical methods for detection of GMOs are necessary in order to verify compliance with labelling requirements. There are few effective screening methods for processed GM (genetically modified) products. Three anti-herbicide genes (CP4-EPSPS,BAR andPAT) are common exogenous genes used in commercialized transgenic soybean, maize and rice. In the present study, a new SYBR® Green qPCR screening method was developed to simultaneously detect the three exogenous anti-herbicide genes and one endogenous gene in a run. We tested seven samples of representative processed products (soya lecithin, soya protein powder, chocolate beverage, infant rice cereal, maize protein powder, maize starch, and maize jam) using the developed method, and amplicons of endogenous gene and transgenic fragments were obtained from all the processed products, and the sensitivity was 0.1%. These results indicated that SYBR® Green qPCR screening method was appropriate for qualitative detection of transgenic soybean, maize and rice in processed products.

  6. Plant genetics: gene transfer from parasitic to host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, Jeffrey P; Stefanović, Sasa; Young, Gregory J; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2004-11-11

    Plant mitochondrial genes are transmitted horizontally across mating barriers with surprising frequency, but the mechanism of transfer is unclear. Here we describe two new cases of horizontal gene transfer, from parasitic flowering plants to their host flowering plants, and present phylogenetic and biogeographic evidence that this occurred as a result of direct physical contact between the two. Our findings complement the discovery that genes can be transferred in the opposite direction, from host to parasite plant.

  7. Big screens with small RNAs : loss of function genetic screens to identify novel cancer genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullenders, J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis described the construction and screening of one of the first large scale RNAi libraries for use in human cells. Functional genetic screens with this library have led to the identification of novel cancer genes. These cancer genes function in several pathways including the p53 tumor suppr

  8. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jim, Heather S L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovari...

  9. [Polymorphism of connexin 40 gene-- a novel genetic marker of the sick sinus node syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernova, A A; Nikulina, S Iu; Shul'man, V A; Kukushkina, T S; Voevoda, M I; Maksimov, V N

    2011-01-01

    In this work we have demonstrated for the first time on the clinico-genetic material association between hereditary sick sinus node syndrome and connexin 40 gene polymorphism. We have revealed that heterozygous variant of connexin 40 gene variant is more frequent among patients with sick sinus node syndrome and their healthy relatives than in persons of control group.

  10. Haplotype sharing analysis with SNPs in candidate genes : The genetic analysis workshop 12 example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, C; Beckmann, L; Majoram, P; Meerman, GT; Chang-Claude, J

    2003-01-01

    Haplotype sharing analysis was used to investigate the association of affection status with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes within candidate gene 1 in one sample each from the isolated and the general population of Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 12 simulated data. Gene 1 has direct

  11. Genetic recombination in bacteria: horizon of the beginnings of sexuality in living organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahela Carpa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The current paper reviews the bacterian genetic recombination. Bacteria can transfergenes from one strain to another by three different mechanisms: transformation, conjugation andtransduction, these events showing the universality of sexuality in the living world. Besides geneticrecombination in bacteria, recent evidences of genetic recombination in some superior animals (suchas: fish, birds, mammals and humans at the sex-chromosomes level support the ‘gene concept ofsexuality’ as a general view of sexuality.

  12. Genetically modified organisms in light of domestic and world regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Zorica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available At the same time as development and registration of new genetic modification of plant species have intensified, the number of countries in which they are grown has also increased considerably. Genetically modified crops were grown in 22 countries in 2006, six of which were in European Union. Protocol on Biosafety, known as Cartagena protocol was adopted at the international level in February, 2000. Presence, but not growing of GMO in food is allowed in many countries, while in some others labeling of food origination from GMO is obligatory. Labeling is obligatory in European Union, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Norway, Switzerland and some others. In our country the Law on GMO and sub-law acts were conceived according to EU regulative. The terms for limited use, production, trade of GMO and GMO products have been prescribed. Validation and standardization of GMO testing methods are now being implemented. It is expected that the analytical GMO methods will soon be harmonized at the international level. .

  13. Gene prediction using the Self-Organizing Map: automatic generation of multiple gene models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Terry J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many current gene prediction methods use only one model to represent protein-coding regions in a genome, and so are less likely to predict the location of genes that have an atypical sequence composition. It is likely that future improvements in gene finding will involve the development of methods that can adequately deal with intra-genomic compositional variation. Results This work explores a new approach to gene-prediction, based on the Self-Organizing Map, which has the ability to automatically identify multiple gene models within a genome. The current implementation, named RescueNet, uses relative synonymous codon usage as the indicator of protein-coding potential. Conclusions While its raw accuracy rate can be less than other methods, RescueNet consistently identifies some genes that other methods do not, and should therefore be of interest to gene-prediction software developers and genome annotation teams alike. RescueNet is recommended for use in conjunction with, or as a complement to, other gene prediction methods.

  14. Emotional attitudes of young people completing secondary schools towards genetic modification of organisms (GMO) and genetically modified foods (GMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkiewicz, Anna; Zagórski, Jerzy; Bujak, Franciszek; Lachowski, Stanisław; Florek-Łuszczki, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was recognition of the opinions of adolescents completing secondary schools concerning genetically modified organisms and genetically modified food, especially the respondents' emotional attitude towards scientific achievements in the area of live genetically modified organisms. The study covered a group of 500 school adolescents completing secondary school at the level of maturity examination. The study was conducted by the method of a diagnostic survey using a self-designed questionnaire form. Knowledge concerning the possible health effects of consumption of food containing GMO among adolescents competing secondary schools is on a relatively low level; the adolescents examined 'know rather little' or 'very little know' about this problem. In respondents' opinions the results of reliable studies pertaining to the health effects of consumption of GMO 'rather do not exist'. The respondents are against the cultivation of GM plants and breeding of GM animals on own farm in the future. Secondary school adolescents considered that the production of genetically modified food means primarily the enrichment of biotechnological companies, higher income for food producers, and not the elimination of hunger in the world or elimination of many diseases haunting humans.

  15. Emotional attitudes of young people completing secondary schools towards genetic modification of organisms (GMO and genetically modified foods (GMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jurkiewicz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of the study was recognition of the opinions of adolescents completing secondary schools concerning genetically modified organisms and genetically modified food, especially the respondents’ emotional attitude towards scientific achievements in the area of live genetically modified organisms. Material and method. The study covered a group of 500 school adolescents completing secondary school at the level of maturity examination. The study was conducted by the method of a diagnostic survey using a self-designed questionnaire form. Results. Knowledge concerning the possible health effects of consumption of food containing GMO among adolescents competing secondary schools is on a relatively low level; the adolescents examined ‘know rather little’ or ‘very little know’ about this problem. In respondents’ opinions the results of reliable studies pertaining to the health effects of consumption of GMO ‘rather do not exist’. The respondents are against the cultivation of GM plants and breeding of GM animals on own farm in the future. Secondary school adolescents considered that the production of genetically modified food means primarily the enrichment of biotechnological companies, higher income for food producers, and not the elimination of hunger in the world or elimination of many diseases haunting humans.

  16. Sequence and organization of pMAC, an Acinetobacter baumannii plasmid harboring genes involved in organic peroxide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Caleb W; Tomaras, Andrew P; Actis, Luis A

    2006-09-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii 19606 harbors pMAC, a 9540-bp plasmid that contains 11 predicted open-reading frames (ORFs). Cloning and transformation experiments using Acinetobacter calcoaceticus BD413 mapped replication functions within a region containing four 21-bp direct repeats (ori) and ORF 1, which codes for a predicted replication protein. Subcloning and tri-parental mating experiments mapped mobilization functions to the product of ORF 11 and an adjacent predicted oriT. Three ORFs code for proteins that share similarity to hypothetical proteins encoded by plasmid genes found in other bacteria, while the predicted products of three others do not match any known sequence. The product of ORF 8 is similar to Ohr, a hydroperoxide reductase responsible for organic peroxide detoxification and resistance in bacteria. This ORF is immediately upstream of a coding region whose product is related to the MarR family of transcriptional regulators. Disk diffusion assays showed that A. baumannii 19606 is resistant to the organic peroxide-generating compounds cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), although to levels lower than those detected in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Cloning and introduction of the ohr and marR ORFs into Escherichia coli was associated with an increase in resistance to CHP and t-BHP. This appears to be the first case in which the genetic determinants involved in organic peroxide resistance are located in an extrachromosomal element, a situation that can facilitate the horizontal transfer of genetic elements coding for a function that protects bacterial cells from oxidative damage.

  17. Attitudes to genetically modified food over time: How trust in organizations and the media cycle predict support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Mathew D; Critchley, Christine R; Walshe, Jarrod

    2015-07-01

    This research examined public opinion toward genetically modified plants and animals for food, and how trust in organizations and media coverage explained attitudes toward these organisms. Nationally representative samples (N=8821) over 10 years showed Australians were less positive toward genetically modified animals compared to genetically modified plants for food, especially in years where media coverage was high. Structural equation modeling found that positive attitudes toward different genetically modified organisms for food were significantly associated with higher trust in scientists and regulators (e.g. governments), and with lower trust in watchdogs (e.g. environmental movement). Public trust in scientists and watchdogs was a stronger predictor of attitudes toward the use of genetically modified plants for food than animals, but only when media coverage was low. Results are discussed regarding the moral acceptability of genetically modified organisms for food, the media's role in shaping public opinion, and the role public trust in organizations has on attitudes toward genetically modified organisms.

  18. DMPD: Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1757110 Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Bl... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Pubmed...ID 1757110 Title Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gen

  19. Candidate genes detected in transcriptome studies are strongly dependent on genetic background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille Sarup

    Full Text Available Whole genome transcriptomic studies can point to potential candidate genes for organismal traits. However, the importance of potential candidates is rarely followed up through functional studies and/or by comparing results across independent studies. We have analysed the overlap of candidate genes identified from studies of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster using similar technical platforms. We found little overlap across studies between putative candidate genes for the same traits in the same sex. Instead there was a high degree of overlap between different traits and sexes within the same genetic backgrounds. Putative candidates found using transcriptomics therefore appear very sensitive to genetic background and this can mask or override effects of treatments. The functional importance of putative candidate genes emerging from transcriptome studies needs to be validated through additional experiments and in future studies we suggest a focus on the genes, networks and pathways affecting traits in a consistent manner across backgrounds.

  20. Defining a new candidate gene for amelogenesis imperfecta: from molecular genetics to biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzúa, Blanca; Ortega-Pinto, Ana; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2011-02-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic conditions that affect the structure and clinical appearance of tooth enamel. The types (hypoplastic, hypocalcified, and hypomature) are correlated with defects in different stages of the process of enamel synthesis. Autosomal dominant, recessive, and X-linked types have been previously described. These disorders are considered clinically and genetically heterogeneous in etiology, involving a variety of genes, such as AMELX, ENAM, DLX3, FAM83H, MMP-20, KLK4, and WDR72. The mutations identified within these causal genes explain less than half of all cases of amelogenesis imperfecta. Most of the candidate and causal genes currently identified encode proteins involved in enamel synthesis. We think it is necessary to refocus the search for candidate genes using biochemical processes. This review provides theoretical evidence that the human SLC4A4 gene (sodium bicarbonate cotransporter) may be a new candidate gene.

  1. [Analysis of genetic models and gene effects on main agronomy characters in rapeseed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Qiu, J; Tang, Z; Shen, L

    1992-01-01

    According to four different genetic models, the genetic patterns of 8 agronomy traits were analysed by using the data of 24 generations which included positive and negative cross of 81008 x Tower, both of the varieties are of good quality. The results showed that none of 8 characters could fit in with additive-dominance models. Epistasis was found in all of these characters, and it has significant effect on generation means. Seed weight/plant and some other main yield characters are controlled by duplicate interaction genes. The interaction between triple genes or multiple genes needs to be utilized in yield heterosis.

  2. A genetic similarity algorithm for searching the Gene Ontology terms and annotating anonymous protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Razib M; Deris, Safaai; Illias, Rosli M

    2008-02-01

    A genetic similarity algorithm is introduced in this study to find a group of semantically similar Gene Ontology terms. The genetic similarity algorithm combines semantic similarity measure algorithm with parallel genetic algorithm. The semantic similarity measure algorithm is used to compute the similitude strength between the Gene Ontology terms. Then, the parallel genetic algorithm is employed to perform batch retrieval and to accelerate the search in large search space of the Gene Ontology graph. The genetic similarity algorithm is implemented in the Gene Ontology browser named basic UTMGO to overcome the weaknesses of the existing Gene Ontology browsers which use a conventional approach based on keyword matching. To show the applicability of the basic UTMGO, we extend its structure to develop a Gene Ontology -based protein sequence annotation tool named extended UTMGO. The objective of developing the extended UTMGO is to provide a simple and practical tool that is capable of producing better results and requires a reasonable amount of running time with low computing cost specifically for offline usage. The computational results and comparison with other related tools are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm and tools.

  3. Genetics of coronary heart disease with reference to ApoAICⅡI-AIV gene region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suraksha; Agrawal; Sarabjit; Mastana

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are affected by multiple factors like genetic as well as environmental hence they reveal factorial nature. The evidences that genetic factors are susceptible for developing cardiovascular diseases come from twin studies and familial aggregation. Different ethnic populations reveal differences in the prevalence coronary artery disease(CAD) pointing towards the genetic susceptibility. With progression in molecular techniques different developments have been made to comprehend the disease physiology. Molecular markers have also assisted to recognize genes that may provide evidences to evaluate the role of genetic factors in causation of susceptibility towards CAD. Numerous studies suggest the contribution of specific "candidate genes", which correlate with various roles/pathways that are involved in the coronary heart disease. Different studies have revealed that there are large numbers of genes which are involved towards the predisposition of CAD. However, these reports are not consistent. One of the reasons could be weak contribution of genetic susceptibility of these genes. Genome wide associations show different chromosomal locations which dock, earlier unknown, genes which may attribute to CAD. In the present review different ApoAI-CⅡI-AIV gene clusters have been discussed.

  4. Reverse engineering gene networks: Integrating genetic perturbations with dynamical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegnér, Jesper; Yeung, M. K. Stephen; Hasty, Jeff; Collins, James J.

    2003-01-01

    While the fundamental building blocks of biology are being tabulated by the various genome projects, microarray technology is setting the stage for the task of deducing the connectivity of large-scale gene networks. We show how the perturbation of carefully chosen genes in a microarray experiment can be used in conjunction with a reverse engineering algorithm to reveal the architecture of an underlying gene regulatory network. Our iterative scheme identifies the network topology by analyzing the steady-state changes in gene expression resulting from the systematic perturbation of a particular node in the network. We highlight the validity of our reverse engineering approach through the successful deduction of the topology of a linear in numero gene network and a recently reported model for the segmentation polarity network in Drosophila melanogaster. Our method may prove useful in identifying and validating specific drug targets and in deconvolving the effects of chemical compounds. PMID:12730377

  5. Advances in molecular techniques for the detection and quantification of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elenis, Dimitrios S; Kalogianni, Despina P; Glynou, Kyriaki; Ioannou, Penelope C; Christopoulos, Theodore K

    2008-10-01

    Progress in genetic engineering has led to the introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) whose genomes have been altered by the integration of a novel sequence conferring a new trait. To allow consumers an informed choice, many countries require food products to be labeled if the GMO content exceeds a certain threshold. Consequently, the development of analytical methods for GMO screening and quantification is of great interest. Exponential amplification by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) remains a central step in molecular methods of GMO detection and quantification. In order to meet the challenge posed by the continuously increasing number of GMOs, various multiplex assays have been developed for the simultaneous amplification and/or detection of several GMOs. Classical agarose gel electrophoresis is being replaced by capillary electrophoresis (CE) systems, including CE chips, for the rapid and automatable separation of amplified fragments. Microtiter well-based hybridization assays allow high-throughput analysis of many samples in a single plate. Microarrays have been introduced in GMO screening as a technique for the simultaneous multianalyte detection of amplified sequences. Various types of biosensors, including surface plasmon resonance sensors, quartz crystal microbalance piezoelectric sensors, thin-film optical sensors, dry-reagent dipstick-type sensors and electrochemical sensors were introduced in GMO screening because they offer simplicity and lower cost. GMO quantification is performed by real-time PCR (rt-QPCR) and competitive PCR. New endogenous reference genes have been validated. rt-QPCR is the most widely used approach. Multiplexing is another trend in this field. Strategies for high-throughput multiplex competitive quantitative PCR have been reported.

  6. A statistical approach to quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMO) using frequency distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Lars; Busch, Ulrich; Pecoraro, Sven

    2014-12-14

    According to Regulation (EU) No 619/2011, trace amounts of non-authorised genetically modified organisms (GMO) in feed are tolerated within the EU if certain prerequisites are met. Tolerable traces must not exceed the so-called 'minimum required performance limit' (MRPL), which was defined according to the mentioned regulation to correspond to 0.1% mass fraction per ingredient. Therefore, not yet authorised GMO (and some GMO whose approvals have expired) have to be quantified at very low level following the qualitative detection in genomic DNA extracted from feed samples. As the results of quantitative analysis can imply severe legal and financial consequences for producers or distributors of feed, the quantification results need to be utterly reliable. We developed a statistical approach to investigate the experimental measurement variability within one 96-well PCR plate. This approach visualises the frequency distribution as zygosity-corrected relative content of genetically modified material resulting from different combinations of transgene and reference gene Cq values. One application of it is the simulation of the consequences of varying parameters on measurement results. Parameters could be for example replicate numbers or baseline and threshold settings, measurement results could be for example median (class) and relative standard deviation (RSD). All calculations can be done using the built-in functions of Excel without any need for programming. The developed Excel spreadsheets are available (see section 'Availability of supporting data' for details). In most cases, the combination of four PCR replicates for each of the two DNA isolations already resulted in a relative standard deviation of 15% or less. The aims of the study are scientifically based suggestions for minimisation of uncertainty of measurement especially in -but not limited to- the field of GMO quantification at low concentration levels. Four PCR replicates for each of the two DNA isolations

  7. Genetics of human longevity with emphasis on the relevance of HSP70 as candidate genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvrå, Steen; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2007-01-01

    Human longevity is determined to a certain extent by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied for their association with human longevity, but the data collected so far are inconclusive. One of the reasons is the choice of the candidate genes in addition to the choice of an appro......Human longevity is determined to a certain extent by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied for their association with human longevity, but the data collected so far are inconclusive. One of the reasons is the choice of the candidate genes in addition to the choice...... been significantly associated with human longevity and survival. We have also provided some functional evidence for these genetic associations by showing that isolated peripheral blood cells from those genotypes which are negatively associated with human longevity also have less ability to respond...

  8. Genetic differentiation of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase C subunit I gene in genus Paramecium (Protista, Ciliophora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene is being used increasingly for evaluating inter- and intra-specific genetic diversity of ciliated protists. However, very few studies focus on assessing genetic divergence of the COI gene within individuals and how its presence might affect species identification and population structure analyses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the genetic variation of the COI gene in five Paramecium species for a total of 147 clones derived from 21 individuals and 7 populations. We identified a total of 90 haplotypes with several individuals carrying more than one haplotype. Parsimony network and phylogenetic tree analyses revealed that intra-individual diversity had no effect in species identification and only a minor effect on population structure. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the COI gene is a suitable marker for resolving inter- and intra-specific relationships of Paramecium spp.

  9. Genetic differentiation of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase C subunit I gene in genus Paramecium (Protista, Ciliophora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Gentekaki, Eleni; Yi, Zhenzhen; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene is being used increasingly for evaluating inter- and intra-specific genetic diversity of ciliated protists. However, very few studies focus on assessing genetic divergence of the COI gene within individuals and how its presence might affect species identification and population structure analyses. We evaluated the genetic variation of the COI gene in five Paramecium species for a total of 147 clones derived from 21 individuals and 7 populations. We identified a total of 90 haplotypes with several individuals carrying more than one haplotype. Parsimony network and phylogenetic tree analyses revealed that intra-individual diversity had no effect in species identification and only a minor effect on population structure. Our results suggest that the COI gene is a suitable marker for resolving inter- and intra-specific relationships of Paramecium spp.

  10. Large-scale genetic perturbations reveal regulatory networks and an abundance of gene-specific repressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmeren, Patrick; Sameith, Katrin; van de Pasch, Loes A L; Benschop, Joris J; Lenstra, Tineke L; Margaritis, Thanasis; O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Apweiler, Eva; van Wageningen, Sake; Ko, Cheuk W; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; Kashani, Mehdi M; Ampatziadis-Michailidis, Giannis; Brok, Mariel O; Brabers, Nathalie A C H; Miles, Anthony J; Bouwmeester, Diane; van Hooff, Sander R; van Bakel, Harm; Sluiters, Erik; Bakker, Linda V; Snel, Berend; Lijnzaad, Philip; van Leenen, Dik; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Holstege, Frank C P

    2014-04-24

    To understand regulatory systems, it would be useful to uniformly determine how different components contribute to the expression of all other genes. We therefore monitored mRNA expression genome-wide, for individual deletions of one-quarter of yeast genes, focusing on (putative) regulators. The resulting genetic perturbation signatures reflect many different properties. These include the architecture of protein complexes and pathways, identification of expression changes compatible with viability, and the varying responsiveness to genetic perturbation. The data are assembled into a genetic perturbation network that shows different connectivities for different classes of regulators. Four feed-forward loop (FFL) types are overrepresented, including incoherent type 2 FFLs that likely represent feedback. Systematic transcription factor classification shows a surprisingly high abundance of gene-specific repressors, suggesting that yeast chromatin is not as generally restrictive to transcription as is often assumed. The data set is useful for studying individual genes and for discovering properties of an entire regulatory system.

  11. Characterization of new bacterial catabolic genes and mobile genetic elements by high throughput genetic screening of a soil metagenomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Franqueville, Laure; Ausec, Luka; Xu, Zhuofei; Delmont, Tom O; Dunon, Vincent; Cagnon, Christine; Mandic-Mulec, Ines; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

    2014-11-20

    A mix of oligonucleotide probes was used to hybridize soil metagenomic DNA from a fosmid clone library spotted on high density membranes. The pooled radio-labeled probes were designed to target genes encoding glycoside hydrolases GH18, dehalogenases, bacterial laccases and mobile genetic elements (integrases from integrons and insertion sequences). Positive hybridizing spots were affiliated to the corresponding clones in the library and the metagenomic inserts were sequenced. After assembly and annotation, new coding DNA sequences related to genes of interest were identified with low protein similarity against the closest hits in databases. This work highlights the sensitivity of DNA/DNA hybridization techniques as an effective and complementary way to recover novel genes from large metagenomic clone libraries. This study also supports that some of the identified catabolic genes might be associated with horizontal transfer events.

  12. Disease-aging network reveals significant roles of aging genes in connecting genetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiguang; Zhang, Shihua; Wang, Yong; Chen, Luonan; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2009-09-01

    One of the challenging problems in biology and medicine is exploring the underlying mechanisms of genetic diseases. Recent studies suggest that the relationship between genetic diseases and the aging process is important in understanding the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. Although some intricate associations have been investigated for a long time, the studies are still in their early stages. In this paper, we construct a human disease-aging network to study the relationship among aging genes and genetic disease genes. Specifically, we integrate human protein-protein interactions (PPIs), disease-gene associations, aging-gene associations, and physiological system-based genetic disease classification information in a single graph-theoretic framework and find that (1) human disease genes are much closer to aging genes than expected by chance; and (2) diseases can be categorized into two types according to their relationships with aging. Type I diseases have their genes significantly close to aging genes, while type II diseases do not. Furthermore, we examine the topological characters of the disease-aging network from a systems perspective. Theoretical results reveal that the genes of type I diseases are in a central position of a PPI network while type II are not; (3) more importantly, we define an asymmetric closeness based on the PPI network to describe relationships between diseases, and find that aging genes make a significant contribution to associations among diseases, especially among type I diseases. In conclusion, the network-based study provides not only evidence for the intricate relationship between the aging process and genetic diseases, but also biological implications for prying into the nature of human diseases.

  13. The relevance of gene transfer to the safety of food and feed derived from genetically modified (GM) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Eede, G; Aarts, H; Buhk, H-J; Corthier, G; Flint, H J; Hammes, W; Jacobsen, B; Midtvedt, T; van der Vossen, J; von Wright, A; Wackernagel, W; Wilcks, A

    2004-07-01

    In 2000, the thematic network ENTRANSFOOD was launched to assess four different topics that are all related to the testing or assessment of food containing or produced from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Each of the topics was linked to a European Commission (EC)-funded large shared cost action (see http://www.entransfood.com). Since the exchange of genetic information through horizontal (lateral) gene transfer (HGT) might play a more important role, in quantity and quality, than hitherto imagined, a working group dealing with HGT in the context of food and feed safety was established. This working group was linked to the GMOBILITY project (GMOBILITY, 2003) and the results of the deliberations are laid down in this review paper. HGT is reviewed in relation to the potential risks of consuming food or feed derived from transgenic crops. First, the mechanisms for obtaining transgenic crops are described. Next, HGT mechanisms and its possible evolutionary role are described. The use of marker genes is presented in detail as a special case for genes that may pose a risk. Furthermore, the exposure to GMOs and in particular to genetically modified (GM) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is discussed as part of the total risk assessment. The review finishes off with a number of conclusions related to GM food and feed safety. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview to assist risk assessors as well as regulators and the general public in understanding the safety issues related to these mechanisms.

  14. Genetic diversity and prevalence of CCR2-CCR5 gene polymorphisms in the Omani population

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the regulatory region of the CCR5 gene affect protein expression and modulate the progress of HIV-1 disease. Because of this prominent role, variations in this gene have been under differential pressure and their frequencies vary among human populations. The CCR2V64I mutation is tightly linked to certain polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene. The current Omani population is genetically diverse, a reflection of their history as traders who ruled extensive regions around the Indian Oc...

  15. Genetic diversity and prevalence of CCR2-CCR5 gene polymorphisms in the Omani population

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the regulatory region of the CCR5 gene affect protein expression and modulate the progress of HIV-1 disease. Because of this prominent role, variations in this gene have been under differential pressure and their frequencies vary among human populations. The CCR2V64I mutation is tightly linked to certain polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene. The current Omani population is genetically diverse, a reflection of their history as traders who ruled extensive regions around the Indian Oc...

  16. Genetic Syndromes and Genes Involved in the Development of the Female Reproductive Tract: A Possible Role for Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Mt; Owen, Cm; Segars, Jh

    2013-01-01

    Müllerian and vaginal anomalies are congenital malformations of the female reproductive tract resulting from alterations in the normal developmental pathway of the uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, and vagina. The most common of the Müllerian anomalies affect the uterus and may adversely impact reproductive outcomes highlighting the importance of gaining understanding of the genetic mechanisms that govern normal and abnormal development of the female reproductive tract. Modern molecular genetics with study of knock out animal models as well as several genetic syndromes featuring abnormalities of the female reproductive tract have identified candidate genes significant to this developmental pathway. Further emphasizing the importance of understanding female reproductive tract development, recent evidence has demonstrated expression of embryologically significant genes in the endometrium of adult mice and humans. This recent work suggests that these genes not only play a role in the proper structural development of the female reproductive tract but also may persist in adults to regulate proper function of the endometrium of the uterus. As endometrial function is critical for successful implantation and pregnancy maintenance, these recent data suggest a target for gene therapy. Future research will be needed to determine if gene therapy may improve reproductive outcomes for patients with demonstrated deficient endometrial expression related to abnormal gene expression.

  17. Characterization of Genetic Structures of the QepA3 Gene in Clinical Isolates of Enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongguo eWang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available QepA is one of the genes that confer quinolone resistance in bacteria. The aim of this study was to analyze the genetic structures of plasmids that carry a qepA3, a recently discovered allele of qepA in Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates. 656 non-redundant Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates were screened for the qepA3 gene and five isolated were identified to carry the gene. Plasmids were isolated from these isolates and were found to increase antibiotic resistance once the plasmids were transferred to Escherichia coli. These plasmids were subcloned and sequenced to analyze the genetic structures surrounding the the qepA3 gene. The results showed that the five plasmids had different genetic structures; one of qepA3-containning isolates had either the blaCTX-M-14 or blaTEM-12 gene in place of the blaTEM-1 gene. The structures of both pKP3764 and pECL3786 have not been previously described. In comparison with pHPA, there were a number of changes in DNA sequences up- and down-stream the qepA3 gene. These findings provide better understanding of the genetic variations in qepA3 and would be useful for diagnosis and control of quinolone resistance in clinical settings.

  18. Characterization of genetic structures of the QepA3 gene in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongguo; Huang, Xitian; Chen, Jiayu; Mou, Yonghua; Li, Haijun; Yang, Liqin

    2015-01-01

    QepA is one of the genes that confer quinolone resistance in bacteria. The aim of this study was to analyze the genetic structures of plasmids that carry a qepA3, a recently discovered allele of qepA in Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates. 656 non-redundant Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates were screened for the qepA3 gene and five isolates were identified to carry the gene. Plasmids were isolated from these isolates and were found to increase antibiotic resistance once the plasmids were transferred to Escherichia coli. These plasmids were subcloned and sequenced to analyze the genetic structures surrounding the qepA3 gene. The results showed that the five plasmids had different genetic structures; two of the qepA3-containning isolates had either the blaCTX-M-14 or blaTEM-12 gene instead of the blaTEM-1 gene. The structures of both pKP3764 and pECL3786 have not been previously described. In comparison with pHPA, there were a number of changes in DNA sequences up- and down-stream of the qepA3 gene. These findings provide better understanding of the genetic variations in qepA3 and would be useful for diagnosis and control of quinolone resistance in clinical settings. PMID:26528280

  19. Testing of chemicals for genetic activity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a report of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Gene-Tox Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, F.K.; von Borstel, R.C.; von Halle, E.S.; Parry, J.M.; Siebert, D.; Zetterberg, G.; Barale, R.; Loprieno, N.

    1984-01-01

    This review article with over 200 references summarizes the results of mutation screening tests with 492 chemicals using saccharomyces cerevisiae as the test organism. In addition, an extensive description of S. cerevisiae as a test organism is given. Yeast can be used to study genetic effects both in mitotic and in meiotic cells because it can be cultured as a stable haploid or a stable diploid. The most commonly used genetic endpoint has been mitotic recombination either as mitotic crossing-over or mitotic gene conversion. Data were available on tests with 492 chemicals, of which 249 were positive, as reported in 173 articles or reports. The genetic test/carcinogenicity accuracy was 0.74, based on the carcinogen listing established in the gene-tox program. The yeast tests supplement the bacterial tests for detecting agents that act via radical formation, antibacterial drugs, and other chemicals interfering with chromosome segregation and recombination processes.

  20. Genetic analysis of the regulation of TCH gene expression, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braam, Janet

    2008-10-28

    multiple XTH::GUS genes suggesting that XTHs may contribute to morphogenesis at every developmental stage and in every plant organ. Different XTHs have remarkably diverse and distinct expression patterns indicating that paralogous genes have evolved differential expression regulation perhaps contributing to the maintenance of the large gene family. Extensive overlap in XTH expression patterns is evident; thus, XTHs may act combinatorially in determining wall properties of specific tissues or organs. Knowledge of gene-specific expression among family members yields evidence of where and when gene products may function and provides insights to guide rational approaches to investigate function through reverse genetics.

  1. An event-specific DNA microarray to identify genetically modified organisms in processed foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Su-Youn; Lee, Hyungjae; Kim, Young-Rok; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2010-05-26

    We developed an event-specific DNA microarray system to identify 19 genetically modified organisms (GMOs), including two GM soybeans (GTS-40-3-2 and A2704-12), thirteen GM maizes (Bt176, Bt11, MON810, MON863, NK603, GA21, T25, TC1507, Bt10, DAS59122-7, TC6275, MIR604, and LY038), three GM canolas (GT73, MS8xRF3, and T45), and one GM cotton (LLcotton25). The microarray included 27 oligonucleotide probes optimized to identify endogenous reference targets, event-specific targets, screening targets (35S promoter and nos terminator), and an internal target (18S rRNA gene). Thirty-seven maize-containing food products purchased from South Korean and US markets were tested for the presence of GM maize using this microarray system. Thirteen GM maize events were simultaneously detected using multiplex PCR coupled with microarray on a single chip, at a limit of detection of approximately 0.5%. Using the system described here, we detected GM maize in 11 of the 37 food samples tested. These results suggest that an event-specific DNA microarray system can reliably detect GMOs in processed foods.

  2. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang eShen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association studies (GWASs. More than 40 robust susceptible loci have been identified and confirmed to be associated with vitiligo by using GWASs. Most of these associated genes participate in important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo, such as immunoregulatory function, melanocyte regulation and so on. A number of susceptible loci with unknown functions in the pathogenesis of vitiligo have also been identified, indicating that additional molecular mechanisms may contribute to the risk of developing vitiligo. In this review, we summarize the key loci that are of genome-wide significance, which have been shown to influence vitiligo risk. These genetic loci may help build the foundation for genetic diagnosis and personalize treatment for patients with vitiligo in the future. However, substantial additional studies, including gene-targeted and functional studies, are required to confirm the causality of the genetic variants and their biological relevance in vitiligo development.

  3. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Changbing; Gao, Jing; Sheng, Yujun; Dou, Jinfa; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ko, Randy; Tang, Xianfa; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Sun, Liangdan; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association studies and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Recently, our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association study (GWAS). More than 40 robust susceptible loci have been identified and confirmed to be associated with vitiligo by using GWAS. Most of these associated genes participate in important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Many susceptible loci with unknown functions in the pathogenesis of vitiligo have also been identified, indicating that additional molecular mechanisms may contribute to the risk of developing vitiligo. In this review, we summarize the key loci that are of genome-wide significance, which have been shown to influence vitiligo risk. These genetic loci may help build the foundation for genetic diagnosis and personalize treatment for patients with vitiligo in the future. However, substantial additional studies, including gene-targeted and functional studies, are required to confirm the causality of the genetic variants and their biological relevance in the development of vitiligo.

  4. Selfish Gene Algorithm Vs Genetic Algorithm: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariff, Norharyati Md; Khalid, Noor Elaiza Abdul; Hashim, Rathiah; Noor, Noorhayati Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Evolutionary algorithm is one of the algorithms inspired by the nature. Within little more than a decade hundreds of papers have reported successful applications of EAs. In this paper, the Selfish Gene Algorithms (SFGA), as one of the latest evolutionary algorithms (EAs) inspired from the Selfish Gene Theory which is an interpretation of Darwinian Theory ideas from the biologist Richards Dawkins on 1989. In this paper, following a brief introduction to the Selfish Gene Algorithm (SFGA), the chronology of its evolution is presented. It is the purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the concepts of Selfish Gene Algorithm (SFGA) as well as its opportunities and challenges. Accordingly, the history, step involves in the algorithm are discussed and its different applications together with an analysis of these applications are evaluated.

  5. Genetic diversity and elite gene introgression reveal the japonica rice breeding in northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dan; WANG Jia-yu; WANG Xiao-xue; YANG Xian-li; SUN Jian; CHEN Wen-fu

    2015-01-01

    Abundant genetic diversity and rational population structure of germplasm beneift crop breeding greatly. To investigate genetic variation among geographical y diverse set of japonica germplasm, we analyzed 233 japonica rice cultivars col-lected from Liaoning, Jilin and Heilongjiang provinces of China, which were released from 1970 to 2011 by using 62 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and 8 functional gene tags related to yield. A total of 195 al eles (Na) were detected with an average of 3.61 per locus, indicating a low level of genetic diversity level among al individuals. The genetic diversity of the cultivars from Jilin Province was the highest among the three geographic distribution zones. Moreover, the genetic diversity was increased slightly with the released period of cultivars from 1970 to 2011. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that genetic differentiation was more diverse within the populations than that among the populations. The neighbor-joining (NJ) tree indicated that cultivar clusters based on geographic distribution represented three independent groups, among which the cluster of cultivars from Heilongjiang is distinctly different to the cluster of cultivars from Liaoning. For the examined functional genes, two or three al elic variations for each were detected, except for IPA1 and GW2, and most of elite genes had been introgressed in modern japonica rice varieties. These results provide a valuable evaluation for genetic backgrounds of current japonica rice and wil be used directly for japonica rice breeding in future.

  6. A candidate gene approach identifies an IL33 genetic variant as a novel genetic risk factor for GCA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Márquez

    Full Text Available Increased expression of IL-33 and its receptor ST2, encoded by the IL1RL1 gene, has been detected in the inflamed arteries of giant cell arteritis (GCA patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL33 and IL1RL1 loci on GCA predisposition.A total of 1,363 biopsy-proven GCA patients and 3,908 healthy controls from four European cohorts (Spain, Italy, Germany and Norway were combined in a meta-analysis. Six genetic variants: rs3939286, rs7025417 and rs7044343, within the IL33 gene, and rs2058660, rs2310173 and rs13015714, within the IL1RL1 gene, previously associated with immune-related diseases, were genotyped using predesigned TaqMan assays.A consistent association between the rs7025417 polymorphism and GCA was evident in the overall meta-analysis, under both allele (P(MH = 0.041, OR = 0.88, CI 95% 0.78-0.99 and recessive (P(MH = 3.40E-03, OR = 0.53, CI 95% 0.35-0.80 models. No statistically significant differences between allele or genotype frequencies for the other IL33 and IL1RL1 genetic variants were detected in this pooled analysis.Our results clearly evidenced the implication of the IL33 rs7025417 polymorphism in the genetic network underlying GCA.

  7. Electrochemiluminescence-PCR detection of genetically modified organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Xing, Da; Shen, Xingyan; Zhu, Debin

    2005-01-01

    The detection methods for genetically modified (GM) components in foods have been developed recently. But many of them are complicated and time-consuming; some of them need to use the carcinogenic substance, and can"t avoid false-positive results. In this study, an electrochemiluminescence polymerase chain reaction (ECL-PCR) method for detection GM tobaccos is proposed. The Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter was amplified by PCR, Then hybridized with a Ru(bpy)32+ (TBR)-labeled and a biotinylated probe. The hybridization products were captured onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads, and detected by measuring the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal of the TBR label. Whether the tobaccos contain GM components was discriminated by detecting the ECL signal of CaMV35S promoter. The experiment results show that the detection limit for CaMV35S promoter is 100 fmol, and the GM components can be clearly identified in GM tobaccos. The ECL-PCR method provide a new means in GMOs detection due to its safety, simplicity and high efficiency.

  8. A Content-Centric Organization of the Genetic Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Yu

    2007-01-01

    The codon table for the canonical genetic code can be rearranged in such a way that the code is divided into four quarters and two halves according to the variability of their GC and purine contents, respectively. For prokaryotic genomes, when the genomic GC content increases, their amino acid contents tend to be restricted to the GC-rich quarter and the purine-content insensitive half, where all codons are fourfold degenerate and relatively mutation-tolerant. Conversely, when the genomic GC content decreases, most of the codons retract to the AU-rich quarter and the purine-content sensitive half; most of the codons not only remain encoding physicochemically diversified amino acids but also vary when transversion (between purine and pyrimidine) happens. Amino acids with sixfolddegenerate codons are distributed into all four quarters and across the two halves; their fourfold-degenerate codons are all partitioned into the purine-insensitive half in favorite of robustness against mutations. The features manifested in the rearranged codon table explain most of the intrinsic relationship between protein coding sequences (the informational content) and amino acid compositions (the functional content). The renovated codon table is useful in predicting abundant amino acids and positioning the amino acids with related or distinct physicochemical properties.

  9. Scheduling of Automated Guided Vehicle and Flexible Jobshop using Jumping Genes Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Paul Pandian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Now a day’s many researchers try Genetic algorithm based optimization to find near optimal solution for flexible job shop. It is a global search. In Our study in the GA, some changes are made to search locally and globally by adding jumping genes operation. A typical flexible job shop model is considered for this research study. For that layout, five different example problems are formulated for purpose of evaluation. The material flow time for different shop types, processing times of products, waiting times of products, sequences of products are created and given in tabular form. Approach: The one of best evolutionary approach i.e., genetic algorithm with jumping genes operation is applied in this study, to optimize AGV flow time and the performance measures of Flexible Job shop manufacturing system. The non dominated sorting approach is used. Genetic algorithm with jumping genes operator is used to evaluate the method. Results: The AGV flow sequence is found out. Using this flow sequence make span, flow time of products with AGV, completion of the products is minimized. The position of the shop types are calculated for all products. The effectiveness of the proposed method is proved by comparing with Hamed Fazlollahtabar method. Conclusion: It is found that jumping genes genetic algorithm delivered good solutions as like as other evolutionary algorithms. Jumping genes genetic algorithm may applied to Multi objective optimization techniques in future.

  10. Genetic factors for individual administration of immunosuppressants in organ transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song-Feng Yu; Li-Hua Wu; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The immunosuppressive drugs used worldwide have a narrow therapeutic index, which results in a need to individualize the dose regimen for different recipients. The oxidative enzymes cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A and the drug eflfux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are two potential factors in the processes of metabolism. Pharmacogenetic study of immunosuppressive drugs has focused on these two enzymes. This review was undertaken to assess the role of single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) of these two enzymes in the individual administration of immunosuppressive drugs. DATA SOURCES: An English-language literature search was made using MEDLINE for articles on CYP3A and P-gp in organ transplantation. RESULTS: The SNPs of CYP3A and P-gp are closely correlated to the large variations of cyclosporine and tacrolimus dosage between different patients, although conlficting results were obtained by some authors. CONCLUSIONS: More studies should be conducted to elucidate further the pharmacogenetics of immuno-suppressive drugs in organ transplantation, a deep understanding of which would provide an important step toward drug regimen individualization in the posttransplant therapy.

  11. Model organisms for genetics in the domain Archaea: methanogens, halophiles, Thermococcales and Sulfolobales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, John A; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Atomi, Haruyuki; Allers, Thorsten

    2011-07-01

    The tree of life is split into three main branches: eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea. Our knowledge of eukaryotic and bacteria cell biology has been built on a foundation of studies in model organisms, using the complementary approaches of genetics and biochemistry. Archaea have led to some exciting discoveries in the field of biochemistry, but archaeal genetics has been slow to get off the ground, not least because these organisms inhabit some of the more inhospitable places on earth and are therefore believed to be difficult to culture. In fact, many species can be cultivated with relative ease and there has been tremendous progress in the development of genetic tools for both major archaeal phyla, the Euryarchaeota and the Crenarchaeota. There are several model organisms available for methanogens, halophiles, and thermophiles; in the latter group, there are genetic systems for Sulfolobales and Thermococcales. In this review, we present the advantages and disadvantages of working with each archaeal group, give an overview of their different genetic systems, and direct the neophyte archaeologist to the most appropriate model organism.

  12. Multiple genetic interaction experiments provide complementary information useful for gene function prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Michaut

    Full Text Available Genetic interactions help map biological processes and their functional relationships. A genetic interaction is defined as a deviation from the expected phenotype when combining multiple genetic mutations. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, most genetic interactions are measured under a single phenotype - growth rate in standard laboratory conditions. Recently genetic interactions have been collected under different phenotypic readouts and experimental conditions. How different are these networks and what can we learn from their differences? We conducted a systematic analysis of quantitative genetic interaction networks in yeast performed under different experimental conditions. We find that networks obtained using different phenotypic readouts, in different conditions and from different laboratories overlap less than expected and provide significant unique information. To exploit this information, we develop a novel method to combine individual genetic interaction data sets and show that the resulting network improves gene function prediction performance, demonstrating that individual networks provide complementary information. Our results support the notion that using diverse phenotypic readouts and experimental conditions will substantially increase the amount of gene function information produced by genetic interaction screens.

  13. Genetic contribution to aging: deleterious and helpful genes define life expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, J I; Montoriol, C; Morer, I; Beyer, K

    2005-12-01

    For the best understanding of aging, we must consider a genetic pool in which genes with negative effects (deleterious genes that shorten the life span) interact with genes with positive effects (helpful genes that promote longevity) in a constant epistatic relationship that results in a modulation of the final expression under particular environmental influences. Examples of deleterious genes affecting aging (predisposition to early-life pathology and disease) are those that confer risk for developing vascular disease in the heart, brain, or peripheral vessels (APOE, ACE, MTFHR, and mutation at factor II and factor V genes), a gene associated with sporadic late-onset Alzheimer's disease (APOE E4), a polymorphism (COLIA1 Sp1) associated with an increased fracture risk, and several genetic polymorphisms involved in hormonal metabolism that affect adverse reactions to estrogen replacement in postmenopausal women. In summary, the process of aging can be regarded as a multifactorial trait that results from an interaction between stochastic events and sets of epistatic alleles that have pleiotropic age-dependent effects. Lacking those alleles that predispose to disease and having the longevity-enabling genes (those beneficial genetic variants that confer disease resistance) are probably both important to such a remarkable survival advantage.

  14. A genetic variant near olfactory receptor genes influences cilantro preference

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Nicholas; Wu, Shirley; Do, Chuong B.; Kiefer, Amy K.; Joyce Y Tung; Mountain, Joanna L.; Hinds, David A.; Francke, Uta

    2012-01-01

    The leaves of the Coriandrum sativum plant, known as cilantro or coriander, are widely used in many cuisines around the world. However, far from being a benign culinary herb, cilantro can be polarizing---many people love it while others claim that it tastes or smells foul, often like soap or dirt. This soapy or pungent aroma is largely attributed to several aldehydes present in cilantro. Cilantro preference is suspected to have a genetic component, yet to date nothing is known about specific ...

  15. Expression of chromatin modification genes in organs of cloned cattle that died within hours after birth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shijie; LIAN Zhengxing; LI Dongjie; YU Shuyang; ZHANG Lei; DAI Yunping; LI Rong; FEI Jing; LI Ning

    2006-01-01

    Cloning by somatic nuclear transfer is an inefficient process in which many of the cloned animals died shortly after birth and displayed organ abnormalities. In an effort to determine the possible genetic causes of neonatal death and organ abnormalities, we have examined expression patterns of four genes that modified chromatin (DNMT1, PCAF,MeCP2 and EED) in six organs (heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney and brain) of both neonatal death cloned bovines (n=9) and normal control calves produced by artificial insemination (AI) using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. The effect of the age of the fibroblast donor cell on the gene expression profiles was also investigated. Aberrant expressions of DNMT1 and PCAF were found in some studied tissues, but the expression of MeCP2 and EED had similar levels to those of the normal controls. The expression of DNMT1 showed a higher level in heart, liver and brain of both cloned bovines. A higher expression level of PCAF was seen in heart and liver of both cloned bovines, but a lower level was seen only in spleen of adult fibroblast (AF) cell-derived clones. Our results suggest that aberrant expression in gene that modified chromatins were found in cloned bovine tissues of neonatal death. Because DNMT1 and PCAF play an important role in DNA methylation and histone acetylation on nuclear chromatin respectively, and normal expression of DNMT1 and PCAF is needed for precious reprogramming of donor nuclear, the aberrant transcription patterns of DNMT1 and PCAF in these clones 5 contribute to the defects of organs reported in neonatal death of clones.

  16. Network-based gene prediction for Plasmodium falciparum malaria towards genetics-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Xu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is the most deadly parasitic infectious disease. Existing drug treatments have limited efficacy in malaria elimination, and the complex pathogenesis of the disease is not fully understood. Detecting novel malaria-associated genes not only contributes in revealing the disease pathogenesis, but also facilitates discovering new targets for anti-malaria drugs. In this study, we developed a network-based approach to predict malaria-associated genes. We constructed a cross-species network to integrate human-human, parasite-parasite and human-parasite protein interactions. Then we extended the random walk algorithm on this network, and used known malaria genes as the seeds to find novel candidate genes for malaria. We validated our algorithms using 77 known malaria genes: 14 human genes and 63 parasite genes were ranked averagely within top 2% and top 4%, respectively among human and parasite genomes. We also evaluated our method for predicting novel malaria genes using a set of 27 genes with literature supporting evidence. Our approach ranked 12 genes within top 1% and 24 genes within top 5%. In addition, we demonstrated that top-ranked candied genes were enriched for drug targets, and identified commonalities underlying top-ranked malaria genes through pathway analysis. In summary, the candidate malaria-associated genes predicted by our data-driven approach have the potential to guide genetics-based anti-malaria drug discovery.

  17. Genetic variants in epigenetic genes and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrian, Arancha; Pharoah, Paul D; Ahmed, Shahana; Ropero, Santiago; Fraga, Mario F; Smith, Paula L; Conroy, Don; Luben, Robert; Perkins, Barbara; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; Esteller, Manel; Ponder, Bruce A J

    2006-08-01

    Epigenetic events, resulting changes in gene expression capacity, are important in tumour progression, and variation in genes involved in epigenetic mechanisms might therefore be important in cancer susceptibility. To evaluate this hypothesis, we examined common variants in 12 genes coding for DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetyltransferases, histone methyltrasferases and methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, for association with breast cancer in a large case-control study (N cases = 4474 and N controls = 4580). We identified 63 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that efficiently tag all the known common variants in these genes, and are also expected to tag any unknown SNP in each gene. We found some evidence for association for six SNPs: DNMT3b-c31721t [P (2 df) = 0.007], PRDM2-c99243 t [P (2 df) = 0.03] and t105413c [P-recessive = 0.05], EHMT1-g-9441a [P (2df) = 0.05] and g41451t (P-trend = 0.04), and EHMT2-S237S [P (2df) = 0.04]. The most significant result was for DNMT3b-c31721t (P-trend = 0.124 after adjusting for multiple testing). However, there were three other results with P variants in histone methyltransferases, and warrant the design of larger epidemiological and biochemical studies to establish the true meaning of these findings.

  18. Genetic screening of new genes responsible for cellular adaptation to hypoxia using a genome-wide shRNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Seiko; Hara, Toshiro; Weng, Jane S; Takahashi, Yuka; Seiki, Motoharu; Sakamoto, Takeharu

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen is a vital requirement for multi-cellular organisms to generate energy and cells have developed multiple compensatory mechanisms to adapt to stressful hypoxic conditions. Such adaptive mechanisms are intricately interconnected with other signaling pathways that regulate cellular functions such as cell growth. However, our understanding of the overall system governing the cellular response to the availability of oxygen remains limited. To identify new genes involved in the response to hypoxic stress, we have performed a genome-wide gene knockdown analysis in human lung carcinoma PC8 cells using an shRNA library carried by a lentiviral vector. The knockdown analysis was performed under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions to identify shRNA sequences enriched or lost in the resulting selected cell populations. Consequently, we identified 56 candidate genes that might contribute to the cellular response to hypoxia. Subsequent individual knockdown of each gene demonstrated that 13 of these have a significant effect upon oxygen-sensitive cell growth. The identification of BCL2L1, which encodes a Bcl-2 family protein that plays a role in cell survival by preventing apoptosis, validates the successful design of our screen. The other selected genes have not previously been directly implicated in the cellular response to hypoxia. Interestingly, hypoxia did not directly enhance the expression of any of the identified genes, suggesting that we have identified a new class of genes that have been missed by conventional gene expression analyses to identify hypoxia response genes. Thus, our genetic screening method using a genome-wide shRNA library and the newly-identified genes represent useful tools to analyze the cellular systems that respond to hypoxic stress.

  19. Physical and genetic map of the major nif gene cluster from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, M R; Brigle, K E; Bennett, L T; Setterquist, R A; Wilson, M. S.; Cash, V L; Beynon, J.; Newton, W.E.; Dean, D R

    1989-01-01

    Determination of a 28,793-base-pair DNA sequence of a region from the Azotobacter vinelandii genome that includes and flanks the nitrogenase structural gene region was completed. This information was used to revise the previously proposed organization of the major nif cluster. The major nif cluster from A. vinelandii encodes 15 nif-specific genes whose products bear significant structural identity to the corresponding nif-specific gene products from Klebsiella pneumoniae. These genes include ...

  20. Physical and genetic map of the major nif gene cluster from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, M. R.; Brigle, K E; Bennett, L T; Setterquist, R. A.; Wilson, M S; Cash, V L; Beynon, J; Newton, W E; Dean, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    Determination of a 28,793-base-pair DNA sequence of a region from the Azotobacter vinelandii genome that includes and flanks the nitrogenase structural gene region was completed. This information was used to revise the previously proposed organization of the major nif cluster. The major nif cluster from A. vinelandii encodes 15 nif-specific genes whose products bear significant structural identity to the corresponding nif-specific gene products from Klebsiella pneumoniae. These genes include ...

  1. Organization of nif gene cluster in Frankia sp. EuIK1 strain, a symbiont of Elaeagnus umbellata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang Jae; Kim, Ho Bang; Kim, Jitae; Kim, Won Jin; Lee, Hyoungseok; An, Chung Sun

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 20.5-kb genomic region harboring nif genes was determined and analyzed. The fragment was obtained from Frankia sp. EuIK1 strain, an indigenous symbiont of Elaeagnus umbellata. A total of 20 ORFs including 12 nif genes were identified and subjected to comparative analysis with the genome sequences of 3 Frankia strains representing diverse host plant specificities. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences showed highest levels of identity with orthologous genes from an Elaeagnus-infecting strain. The gene organization patterns around the nif gene clusters were well conserved among all 4 Frankia strains. However, characteristic features appeared in the location of the nifV gene for each Frankia strain, depending on the type of host plant. Sequence analysis was performed to determine the transcription units and suggested that there could be an independent operon starting from the nifW gene in the EuIK strain. Considering the organization patterns and their total extensions on the genome, we propose that the nif gene clusters remained stable despite genetic variations occurring in the Frankia genomes.

  2. Romanian Gene Bank: Perspectives and Aspects for Farm Animal Genetic Resources Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelior Iacob

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Many European countries set up gene banks for farm animal genetic resources (FAnGR. This paper describes the current status of animal genetic resources cryobanking and the perspectives for in vitro conservation of endangered livestock breeds and populations. Conservation efforts in Romania are done by the National Agency for Animal Husbandry ``Prof. dr. G.K. Constantinescu``, which implements activities to aid the farm animal genetic resources conservation and to develop a gene bank. Following the examples provided by other European countries, some improvements in FAnGR management are needed, focusing on aspects and approaches such as genetic and genomic studies, assisted reproduction techniques (ART's and by strengthening collaboration with RD institutions and universities from Romania. The aim of the paper is to give a general overview on current the situation of ex situ conservation efforts of FAnGR in Romania.

  3. Genetic variants in hormone-related genes and risk of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Clendenen

    Full Text Available Sex hormones play a key role in the development of breast cancer. Certain polymorphic variants (SNPs and repeat polymorphisms in hormone-related genes are associated with sex hormone levels. However, the relationship observed between these genetic variants and breast cancer risk has been inconsistent. We conducted a case-control study nested within two prospective cohorts to assess the relationship between specific genetic variants in hormone-related genes and breast cancer risk. In total, 1164 cases and 2111 individually-matched controls were included in the study. We did not observe an association between potential functional genetic polymorphisms in the estrogen pathway, SHBG rs6259, ESR1 rs2234693, CYP19 rs10046 and rs4775936, and UGT1A1 rs8175347, or the progesterone pathway, PGR rs1042838, with the risk of breast cancer. Our results suggest that these genetic variants do not have a strong effect on breast cancer risk.

  4. The role of international organizations in the spread of genetically modified food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papić-Brankov Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous international organizations on the direct or indirect way influence the diffusion of genetically modified (GM food. Particularly important role in this process play a World Bank (WB, World Trade Organization (WTO, Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research (CGIAR, the Organization for Food and Agriculture United Nations (FAO UN, various international foundations, universities and other scientific institutions. The paper concludes that taking in consideration, inequality of diffusion recognizing GM plant culture, ignoring the interests of poor farmers and countries, restrictions on technology transfer and general domination of the private sector, certain international organizations are trying to reconcile interest of multinational companies and the needs of the poor.

  5. Genetic distance as an alternative to physical distance for definition of gene units in association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fontenla, Cristina; Calaza, Manuel; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2014-05-28

    Some association studies, as the implemented in VEGAS, ALIGATOR, i-GSEA4GWAS, GSA-SNP and other software tools, use genes as the unit of analysis. These genes include the coding sequence plus flanking sequences. Polymorphisms in the flanking sequences are of interest because they involve cis-regulatory elements or they inform on untyped genetic variants trough linkage disequilibrium. Gene extensions have customarily been defined as ±50 Kb. This approach is not fully satisfactory because genetic relationships between neighbouring sequences are a function of genetic distances, which are only poorly replaced by physical distances. Standardized recombination rates (SRR) from the deCODE recombination map were used as units of genetic distances. We searched for a SRR producing flanking sequences near the ±50 Kb offset that has been common in previous studies. A SRR≥2 was selected because it led to gene extensions with median length=45.3 Kb and the simplicity of an integer value. As expected, boundaries of the genes defined with the ±50 Kb and with the SRR≥2 rules were rarely concordant. The impact of these differences was illustrated with the interpretation of top association signals from two large studies including many hits and their detailed analysis based in different criteria. The definition based in genetic distance was more concordant with the results of these studies than the based in physical distance. In the analysis of 18 top disease associated loci form the first study, the SRR≥2 genes led to a fully concordant interpretation in 17 loci; the ±50 Kb genes only in 6. Interpretation of the 43 putative functional genes of the second study based in the SRR≥2 definition only missed 4 of the genes, whereas the based in the ±50 Kb definition missed 10 genes. A gene definition based on genetic distance led to results more concordant with expert detailed analyses than the commonly used based in physical distance. The genome coordinates for each

  6. Genetic variation in V gene of class II Newcastle disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Huafang; Chen, Shengli; Liu, Peng; Ren, Shanhui; Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Xinglong; Zhang, Shuxia; Yang, Zengqi

    2016-01-01

    The genetic variation and molecular evolution of the V gene of the class II Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates with genotypes I-XVIII were determined using bioinformatics. Results indicated that low homology existed in different genotype viruses, whereas high homology often for the same genotypes, exception may be existed within genotypes I, V, VI, and XII. Sequence analysis showed that the genetic variation of V protein was consistent with virus genotype, and specific signatures on the V protein for nine genotypes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the phylogenetic trees were highly consistent between the V and F genes, with slight discrepancies in the sub-genotypes. Evolutionary rate analyses based on V and F genes revealed the evolution rates varied in genotypes. These data indicate that the genetic variation of V protein is genotype-related and will help in elucidating the molecular evolution of NDV.

  7. Gene × Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia: Evidence from Genetic Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Julia; Bock, Gavin; Desbonnet, Lieve; Waddington, John

    2016-01-01

    The study of gene × environment, as well as epistatic interactions in schizophrenia, has provided important insight into the complex etiopathologic basis of schizophrenia. It has also increased our understanding of the role of susceptibility genes in the disorder and is an important consideration as we seek to translate genetic advances into novel antipsychotic treatment targets. This review summarises data arising from research involving the modelling of gene × environment interactions in schizophrenia using preclinical genetic models. Evidence for synergistic effects on the expression of schizophrenia-relevant endophenotypes will be discussed. It is proposed that valid and multifactorial preclinical models are important tools for identifying critical areas, as well as underlying mechanisms, of convergence of genetic and environmental risk factors, and their interaction in schizophrenia. PMID:27725886

  8. The relevance of gene transfer to the safety of food and feed derived from genetically modified (GM) plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Eede, G.; Aarts, H. J.; Buhk, H. J.

    2004-01-01

    In 2000, the thematic network ENTRANSFOOD was launched to assess four different topics that are all related to the testing or assessment of food containing or produced from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Each of the topics was linked to a European Commission (EC)-funded large shared cost...... action (see http://www.entransfood.com). Since the exchange of genetic information through horizontal (lateral) gene transfer (HGT) might play a more important role, in quantity and quality, than hitherto imagined, a working group dealing with HGT in the context of food and feed safety was established....... This working group was linked to the GMOBILITY project (GMOBILITY, 2003) and the results of the deliberations are laid down in this review paper. HGT is reviewed in relation to the potential risks of consuming food or feed derived from transgenic crops. First, the mechanisms for obtaining transgenic crops...

  9. Exome sequencing identifies a novel gene, WNK1, for susceptibility to pelvic organ prolapse (POP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shuquan; Lang, Jinghe; Zhu, Lan; Chen, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a common gynecological disorder; however, the genetic components remain largely unidentified. Exome sequencing has been widely used to identify pathogenic gene mutations of several diseases because of its high chromosomal coverage and accuracy. In this study, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES), for the first time, on 8 peripheral blood DNA samples from representative POP cases. After filtering the sequencing data from the dbSNP database (build 138) and the 1000 Genomes Project, 2 missense variants in WNK1, c.2668G > A (p.G890R) and c.6761C> T (p.P2254L), were identified and further validated via Sanger sequencing. In validation stage, the c.2668G > A (p.G890R) variant and 8 additional variants were detected in 11 out of 161 POP patients. All these variants were absent in 231 healthy controls. Functional experiments showed that fibroblasts from the utero-sacral ligaments of POP with WNK1 mutations exhibited loose and irregular alignment compared with fibroblasts from healthy controls. In sum, our study identified a novel gene, WNK1, for POP susceptibility, expanded the causal mutation spectrums of POP, and provided evidence for the genetic diagnosis and medical management of POP in the future.

  10. Sequencing, physical organization and kinetic expression of the patulin biosynthetic gene cluster from Penicillium expansum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, Joanna; El Khoury, Rhoda; Snini, Selma P; Lippi, Yannick; El Khoury, André; Atoui, Ali; Lteif, Roger; Oswald, Isabelle P; Puel, Olivier

    2014-10-17

    Patulin is a polyketide-derived mycotoxin produced by numerous filamentous fungi. Among them, Penicillium expansum is by far the most problematic species. This fungus is a destructive phytopathogen capable of growing on fruit, provoking the blue mold decay of apples and producing significant amounts of patulin. The biosynthetic pathway of this mycotoxin is chemically well-characterized, but its genetic bases remain largely unknown with only few characterized genes in less economic relevant species. The present study consisted of the identification and positional organization of the patulin gene cluster in P. expansum strain NRRL 35695. Several amplification reactions were performed with degenerative primers that were designed based on sequences from the orthologous genes available in other species. An improved genome Walking approach was used in order to sequence the remaining adjacent genes of the cluster. RACE-PCR was also carried out from mRNAs to determine the start and stop codons of the coding sequences. The patulin gene cluster in P. expansum consists of 15 genes in the following order: patH, patG, patF, patE, patD, patC, patB, patA, patM, patN, patO, patL, patI, patJ, and patK. These genes share 60-70% of identity with orthologous genes grouped differently, within a putative patulin cluster described in a non-producing strain of Aspergillus clavatus. The kinetics of patulin cluster genes expression was studied under patulin-permissive conditions (natural apple-based medium) and patulin-restrictive conditions (Eagle's minimal essential medium), and demonstrated a significant association between gene expression and patulin production. In conclusion, the sequence of the patulin cluster in P. expansum constitutes a key step for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to patulin production in this fungus. It will allow the role of each gene to be elucidated, and help to define strategies to reduce patulin production in apple-based products.

  11. Making genetic biodiversity measurable : a review of statistical multivariate methods to study variability at gene level

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Measures of agro-ecosystems genetic variability are essential to sustain scientific-based actions and policies tending to protect the ecosystem services they provide. To build the genetic variability datum it is necessary to deal with a large number and different types of variables. Molecular marker data is highly dimensional by nature, and frequently additional types of information are obtained, as morphological and physiological traits. This way, gene...

  12. The Effect of Genetic and Environmental Variation on Metabolic Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Cinda P Scott; Williams, Dean A; Crawford, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    What is the relationship between genetic or environmental variation and the variation in mRNA expression? To address this, microarrays were used to examine the effect of genetic and environmental variation on cardiac mRNA expression for metabolic genes in three groups of Fundulus heteroclitus: (1) individuals sampled in the field (field), (2) field individuals acclimated for six months to laboratory conditions (acclimated) or (3) individuals bred for ten successive generations in a laboratory...

  13. MOLECULAR GENETIC DISORDERS IN THE VHL GENE AND METHYLATION OF SOME SUPPRESSOR GENES IN SPORADIC CLEAR-CELL RENAL CARCINOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Mikhailenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Renal carcinoma (RC is one of ten most common malignancies in adults and an urgent problem of modern oncology. The purpose of the study was to make a molecular genetic analysis of a number of suppressor genes in RC, which was aimed at searching for and characterizing the potential markers of the disease. Two hundred and nine RC samples were examined, of them there were 192 clear-cell carcinomas. VHL gene mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequence analyses while the methylation of suppressor genes was by the methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction. Somatic VHL mutations were determined in 35.4% of cases of clear-cell RC (CCRC. VHL gene disorders were found in 53.7% of patients with Stage 1, which counts in favor of VHL inactivation in early-stage CCRC. The methylation of the VHL, RASSF1, FHIT, and CDH1 genes was identified in 12, 56, 58.4, and 46.4% of primary tumors, respectively; that of at least one gene was in 84.1% of the samples. The hypermethylation of the RASSF1 gene was associated with late stages (p = 0.015 and the presence of metastases (p = 0.036; that of the CDH1 gene was related to the progression, invasion, and dissemination of primary tumors (p = 0.009, 0.039, and 0.002, respectively. The findings show it possible to use an analysis of abnormalities in the VHL gene and the methylation of the RASSF1 and CDH1 genes to develop a system of molecular genetic markers of RC.

  14. Detection of nonauthorized genetically modified organisms using differential quantitative polymerase chain reaction: application to 35S in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankar, Katarina; Chauvensy-Ancel, Valérie; Fortabat, Marie-Noelle; Gruden, Kristina; Kobilinsky, André; Zel, Jana; Bertheau, Yves

    2008-05-15

    Detection of nonauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has always presented an analytical challenge because the complete sequence data needed to detect them are generally unavailable although sequence similarity to known GMOs can be expected. A new approach, differential quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), for detection of nonauthorized GMOs is presented here. This method is based on the presence of several common elements (e.g., promoter, genes of interest) in different GMOs. A statistical model was developed to study the difference between the number of molecules of such a common sequence and the number of molecules identifying the approved GMO (as determined by border-fragment-based PCR) and the donor organism of the common sequence. When this difference differs statistically from zero, the presence of a nonauthorized GMO can be inferred. The interest and scope of such an approach were tested on a case study of different proportions of genetically modified maize events, with the P35S promoter as the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus common sequence. The presence of a nonauthorized GMO was successfully detected in the mixtures analyzed and in the presence of (donor organism of P35S promoter). This method could be easily transposed to other common GMO sequences and other species and is applicable to other detection areas such as microbiology.

  15. Genetic and Functional Analysis of Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractNuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are intermediary factors through which extracellular signals regulate expression of genes that are involved in homeostasis, development, and differentiation (Beato et al. '995, Mangelsdorf and Evans 1995). These receptors are characterized by a modular st

  16. Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Therapy 9:991-999. 2. Tischer E, Mitchell R, Hartman T, Silva M, Gospodarowicz D, Fiddes JC, Abraham JA (1991) The human gene for vascular endothelial...8463-71. fibers. J Virol 1998;72(5):4212-23. 178. Zufferey R, Dull T, Mandel RJ, Bukovsky A, Quiroz 192. Clark KR. Recent advances in recombinant

  17. Using new genetic tools to identify potato resistance genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant diseases present a burden to agriculture through yield losses due to plant stress, costs associated with disease control, and efforts to detect infections and limit disease epidemics. Plant breeders are interested in the identification and incorporation of simply inherited genes that confer ro...

  18. Optimal Design and Analysis of Genetic Studies on Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, Jingyuan; Jansen, Ritsert C.

    2006-01-01

    Whole-genome profiling of gene expression in a segregating population has the potential to identify the regulatory consequences of natural allelic variation. Costs of such studies are high and require that resources—microarrays and population—are used as efficiently as possible. We show that current

  19. Genetic influences on adolescent sexual behavior: Why genes matter for environmentally oriented researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, K Paige

    2014-03-01

    There are dramatic individual differences among adolescents in how and when they become sexually active adults, and early sexual activity is frequently cited as a cause of concern for scientists, policymakers, and the general public. Understanding the causes and developmental impact of adolescent sexual activity can be furthered by considering genes as a source of individual differences. Quantitative behavioral genetics (i.e., twin and family studies) and candidate gene association studies now provide clear evidence for the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in adolescent sexual behavior and related phenotypes. Genetic influences on sexual behavior may operate through a variety of direct and indirect mechanisms, including pubertal development, testosterone levels, and dopaminergic systems. Genetic differences may be systematically associated with exposure to environments that are commonly treated as causes of sexual behavior (gene-environment correlation). Possible gene-environment correlations pose a serious challenge for interpreting the results of much behavioral research. Multivariate, genetically informed research on adolescent sexual behavior compares twins and family members as a form of quasi experiment: How do twins who differ in their sexual experiences differ in their later development? The small but growing body of genetically informed research has already challenged dominant assumptions regarding the etiology and sequelae of adolescent sexual behavior, with some studies indicating possible positive effects of teenage sexuality. Studies of Gene × Environment interaction may further elucidate the mechanisms by which genes and environments combine to shape the development of sexual behavior and its psychosocial consequences. Overall, the existence of heritable variation in adolescent sexual behavior has profound implications for environmentally oriented theory and research.

  20. Genetic Influences on Adolescent Sexual Behavior: Why Genes Matter for Environmentally-Oriented Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, K. Paige

    2013-01-01

    There are dramatic individual differences among adolescents in how and when they become sexually active adults, and “early” sexual activity is frequently cited as a cause of concern for scientists, policymakers, and the general public. Understanding the causes and developmental impact of adolescent sexual activity can be furthered by considering genes as a source of individual differences. Quantitative behavioral genetics (i.e., twin and family studies) and candidate gene association studies now provide clear evidence for the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in adolescent sexual behavior and related phenotypes. Genetic influences on sexual behavior may operate through a variety of direct and indirect mechanisms, including pubertal development, testosterone levels, and dopaminergic systems. Genetic differences may be systematically associated with exposure to environments that are commonly treated as causes of sexual behavior (gene-environment correlation). Possible gene-environment correlations pose a serious challenge for interpreting the results of much behavioral research. Multivariate, genetically-informed research on adolescent sexual behavior compares twins and family members as a form of “quasi-experiment”: How do twins who differ in their sexual experiences differ in their later development? The small but growing body of genetically-informed research has already challenged dominant assumptions regarding the etiology and sequelae of adolescent sexual behavior, with some studies indicating possible positive effects of teenage sexuality. Studies of gene × environment interaction may further elucidate the mechanisms by which genes and environments combine to shape the development of sexual behavior and its psychosocial consequences. Overall, the existence of heritable variation in adolescent sexual behavior has profound implications for environmentally-oriented theory and research. PMID:23855958

  1. Genomic organization and evolution of the ULBP genes in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Joshua H; Marron, Brandy M; Beever, Jonathan E; Roe, Bruce A; Lewin, Harris A

    2006-09-05

    The cattle UL16-binding protein 1 (ULBP1) and ULBP2 genes encode members of the MHC Class I superfamily that have homology to the human ULBP genes. Human ULBP1 and ULBP2 interact with the NKG2D receptor to activate effector cells in the immune system. The human cytomegalovirus UL16 protein is known to disrupt the ULBP-NKG2D interaction, thereby subverting natural killer cell-mediated responses. Previous Southern blotting experiments identified evidence of increased ULBP copy number within the genomes of ruminant artiodactyls. On the basis of these observations we hypothesized that the cattle ULBPs evolved by duplication and sequence divergence to produce a sufficient number and diversity of ULBP molecules to deliver an immune activation signal in the presence of immunogenic peptides. Given the importance of the ULBPs in antiviral immunity in other species, our goal was to determine the copy number and genomic organization of the ULBP genes in the cattle genome. Sequencing of cattle bacterial artificial chromosome genomic inserts resulted in the identification of 30 cattle ULBP loci existing in two gene clusters. Evidence of extensive segmental duplication and approximately 14 Kbp of novel repetitive sequences were identified within the major cluster. Ten ULBPs are predicted to be expressed at the cell surface. Substitution analysis revealed 11 outwardly directed residues in the predicted extracellular domains that show evidence of positive Darwinian selection. These positively selected residues have only one residue that overlaps with those proposed to interact with NKG2D, thus suggesting the interaction with molecules other than NKG2D. The ULBP loci in the cattle genome apparently arose by gene duplication and subsequent sequence divergence. Substitution analysis of the ULBP proteins provided convincing evidence for positive selection on extracellular residues that may interact with peptide ligands. These results support our hypothesis that the cattle ULBPs

  2. Genomic organization and evolution of the ULBP genes in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Harris A

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cattle UL16-binding protein 1 (ULBP1 and ULBP2 genes encode members of the MHC Class I superfamily that have homology to the human ULBP genes. Human ULBP1 and ULBP2 interact with the NKG2D receptor to activate effector cells in the immune system. The human cytomegalovirus UL16 protein is known to disrupt the ULBP-NKG2D interaction, thereby subverting natural killer cell-mediated responses. Previous Southern blotting experiments identified evidence of increased ULBP copy number within the genomes of ruminant artiodactyls. On the basis of these observations we hypothesized that the cattle ULBPs evolved by duplication and sequence divergence to produce a sufficient number and diversity of ULBP molecules to deliver an immune activation signal in the presence of immunogenic peptides. Given the importance of the ULBPs in antiviral immunity in other species, our goal was to determine the copy number and genomic organization of the ULBP genes in the cattle genome. Results Sequencing of cattle bacterial artificial chromosome genomic inserts resulted in the identification of 30 cattle ULBP loci existing in two gene clusters. Evidence of extensive segmental duplication and approximately 14 Kbp of novel repetitive sequences were identified within the major cluster. Ten ULBPs are predicted to be expressed at the cell surface. Substitution analysis revealed 11 outwardly directed residues in the predicted extracellular domains that show evidence of positive Darwinian selection. These positively selected residues have only one residue that overlaps with those proposed to interact with NKG2D, thus suggesting the interaction with molecules other than NKG2D. Conclusion The ULBP loci in the cattle genome apparently arose by gene duplication and subsequent sequence divergence. Substitution analysis of the ULBP proteins provided convincing evidence for positive selection on extracellular residues that may interact with peptide ligands. These

  3. [Gene geography of Chile: regional distribution of American, European and African genetic contributions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Macarena; Pulgar, Iván; Gallo, Carla; Bortolini, María-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Bedoya, Gabriel; González-José, Rolando; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Rothhammer, Francisco

    2014-03-01

    The geographical distribution of genes plays a key role in genetic epidemiology. The Chilean population has three major stem groups (Native American, European and African). To estimate the regional rate of American, European and African admixture of the Chilean population. Forty single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP´s) which exhibit substantially different frequencies between Amerindian populations (ancestry-informative markers or AIM´s), were genotyped in a sample of 923 Chilean participants to estimate individual genetic ancestry. The American, European and African individual average admixture estimates for the 15 Chilean Regions were relatively homogeneous and not statistically different. However, higher American components were found in northern and southern Chile and higher European components were found in central Chile. A negative correlation between African admixture and latitude was observed. On the average, American and European genetic contributions were similar and significantly higher than the African contribution. Weighted mean American, European and African genetic contributions of 44.34% ± 3 9%, 51.85% ± 5.44% and 3.81% ± 0.45%, were estimated. Fifty two percent of subjects harbor African genes. Individuals with Aymara and Mapuche surnames have an American admixture of 58.64% and 68.33%, respectively. Half of the Chilean population harbors African genes. Participants with Aymara and Mapuche surnames had a higher American genetic contribution than the general Chilean population. These results confirm the usefulness of surnames as a first approximation to determine genetic ancestry.

  4. Three autism candidate genes: a synthesis of human genetic analysis with other disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Christopher W; Gharani, Neda; Millonig, James H; Brzustowicz, Linda M

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a particularly complex disorder when considered from virtually any methodological framework, including the perspective of human genetics. We first present a review of the genetic analysis principles relevant for discussing autism genetics research. From this body of work we highlight results from three candidate genes, REELIN (RELN), SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER (5HTT), and ENGRAILED 2 (EN2) and discuss the relevant neuroscience, molecular genetics, and statistical results that suggest involvement of these genes in autism susceptibility. As will be shown, the statistical results from genetic analysis, when considered alone, are in apparent conflict across research groups. We use these three candidate genes to illustrate different problems in synthesizing results from non-overlapping research groups examining the same problem. However, when basic genetic principles and results from other scientific disciplines are incorporated into a unified theoretical framework, at least some of the difficulties with interpreting results can be understood and potentially overcome as more data becomes available to the field of autism research. Integrating results from several scientific frameworks provides new hypotheses and alternative data collection strategies for future work.

  5. [Recent progress in gene mapping through high-throughput sequencing technology and forward genetic approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cairui; Zou, Changsong; Song, Guoli

    2015-08-01

    Traditional gene mapping using forward genetic approaches is conducted primarily through construction of a genetic linkage map, the process of which is tedious and time-consuming, and often results in low accuracy of mapping and large mapping intervals. With the rapid development of high-throughput sequencing technology and decreasing cost of sequencing, a variety of simple and quick methods of gene mapping through sequencing have been developed, including direct sequencing of the mutant genome, sequencing of selective mutant DNA pooling, genetic map construction through sequencing of individuals in population, as well as sequencing of transcriptome and partial genome. These methods can be used to identify mutations at the nucleotide level and has been applied in complex genetic background. Recent reports have shown that sequencing mapping could be even done without the reference of genome sequence, hybridization, and genetic linkage information, which made it possible to perform forward genetic study in many non-model species. In this review, we summarized these new technologies and their application in gene mapping.

  6. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), a knowledgebase of human genes and genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamosh, Ada; Scott, Alan F; Amberger, Joanna S; Bocchini, Carol A; McKusick, Victor A

    2005-01-01

    Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive, authoritative and timely knowledgebase of human genes and genetic disorders compiled to support human genetics research and education and the practice of clinical genetics. Started by Dr Victor A. McKusick as the definitive reference Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/) is now distributed electronically by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, where it is integrated with the Entrez suite of databases. Derived from the biomedical literature, OMIM is written and edited at Johns Hopkins University with input from scientists and physicians around the world. Each OMIM entry has a full-text summary of a genetically determined phenotype and/or gene and has numerous links to other genetic databases such as DNA and protein sequence, PubMed references, general and locus-specific mutation databases, HUGO nomenclature, MapViewer, GeneTests, patient support groups and many others. OMIM is an easy and straightforward portal to the burgeoning information in human genetics.

  7. A Forward Genetic Screening for Prostate Cancer Progression Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    melanoma. Nature 436, 117‐122 (2005). 26. J.C. Cronin et al. Frequent mutations in the MITF pathway in melanoma.  Pigment   Cell Melanoma Res. 22, 435‐444... bacterial genetics. J Mol Biol 116: 125–159. 3. Ding S, Wu X, Li G, Han M, Zhuang Y, et al. (2005) Efficient transposition of the piggyBac (PB) transposon

  8. [Role of meristem-specific genes of plants in formation of genetic tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutova, L A; Dodueva, I E

    2007-01-01

    In higher plants, homeobox genes of the KNOX and WOX subfamilies plays a key role in maintenance of the pool of stem cells, regulate proliferation, and prevent cell differentiation. It has been shown that meristem-specific genes are regulated by phytohormones and affect their metabolism, specifically that of cytokinins. Plant tumors are widely used as a model for studying the genetic control of cell division and differentiation. The tumors induced by pathogens and genetic tumors, whose development depends on the plant genotype, are distinguished. The changes in the levels of expression of genes--regulators of cell cycle, meristem-specific genes, and genes controlling metabolism and transmission of the signal of phytohormones were described on tumors of different origin. The mechanisms underlying tumor formation in plants and animals were shown to be similar, specifically as concerns the relationship between the genes--cell cycle regulators and tumorigenesis. In plants, transcriptional factors of the subfamily KNOX have similarity in structure and, supposedly, common origin with transcriptional factors MEIS in animals, which are very active in neoplastic cells. The review presents the characteristics of KNOX and WOX transcriptional factors, their functions in meristem development, and interaction with the plant hormonal system. The role of homeodomain-containing transcriptional factors in tumorigenesis in plants and animals is discussed. The role of meristem-specific genes and phytohormones in tumorigenesis is discussed on the example of genetic tumors obtained by mutagenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana and tumors in the radish inbred lines.

  9. Genetic variants of CC chemokine genes in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ockinger, J; Stridh, P; Beyeen, A D

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disorder of the central nervous system, causing inflammation, demyelination and axonal damage. A limited number of genetic risk factors for MS have been identified, but the etiology of the disease remains largely unknown. For the identification of genes regula...... further identified association to rheumatoid arthritis in CCL2, CCL8 and CCL13, indicating common regulatory mechanisms for complex diseases.......Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disorder of the central nervous system, causing inflammation, demyelination and axonal damage. A limited number of genetic risk factors for MS have been identified, but the etiology of the disease remains largely unknown. For the identification of genes...

  10. An epitaph for the gene. An obituary for genetics. An adieu for heredity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari M

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern medicine has been researching on cancer cell, cancer, hypertension, heart attack and so on without once defining any of these clearly. It swears by these terms much like mankind swears by sunset and sunrise, which are just not there. It is possible that the pet hobbyhorses of modern times, namely, gene, genetics, and heredity may belong to the above mythical group-entities that are logically absent, but whose illogic is strong enough to sustain research and publication world over. Gene, genetics and heredity have outlived their utility and must be replaced in near future by new concepts and terms.

  11. Optimal in silico target gene deletion through nonlinear programming for genetic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chung-Chien; Song, Mingzhou

    2010-02-24

    Optimal selection of multiple regulatory genes, known as targets, for deletion to enhance or suppress the activities of downstream genes or metabolites is an important problem in genetic engineering. Such problems become more feasible to address in silico due to the availability of more realistic dynamical system models of gene regulatory and metabolic networks. The goal of the computational problem is to search for a subset of genes to knock out so that the activity of a downstream gene or a metabolite is optimized. Based on discrete dynamical system modeling of gene regulatory networks, an integer programming problem is formulated for the optimal in silico target gene deletion problem. In the first result, the integer programming problem is proved to be NP-hard and equivalent to a nonlinear programming problem. In the second result, a heuristic algorithm, called GKONP, is designed to approximate the optimal solution, involving an approach to prune insignificant terms in the objective function, and the parallel differential evolution algorithm. In the third result, the effectiveness of the GKONP algorithm is demonstrated by applying it to a discrete dynamical system model of the yeast pheromone pathways. The empirical accuracy and time efficiency are assessed in comparison to an optimal, but exhaustive search strategy. Although the in silico target gene deletion problem has enormous potential applications in genetic engineering, one must overcome the computational challenge due to its NP-hardness. The presented solution, which has been demonstrated to approximate the optimal solution in a practical amount of time, is among the few that address the computational challenge. In the experiment on the yeast pheromone pathways, the identified best subset of genes for deletion showed advantage over genes that were selected empirically. Once validated in vivo, the optimal target genes are expected to achieve higher genetic engineering effectiveness than a trial

  12. Optimal in silico target gene deletion through nonlinear programming for genetic engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Chien Hong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optimal selection of multiple regulatory genes, known as targets, for deletion to enhance or suppress the activities of downstream genes or metabolites is an important problem in genetic engineering. Such problems become more feasible to address in silico due to the availability of more realistic dynamical system models of gene regulatory and metabolic networks. The goal of the computational problem is to search for a subset of genes to knock out so that the activity of a downstream gene or a metabolite is optimized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on discrete dynamical system modeling of gene regulatory networks, an integer programming problem is formulated for the optimal in silico target gene deletion problem. In the first result, the integer programming problem is proved to be NP-hard and equivalent to a nonlinear programming problem. In the second result, a heuristic algorithm, called GKONP, is designed to approximate the optimal solution, involving an approach to prune insignificant terms in the objective function, and the parallel differential evolution algorithm. In the third result, the effectiveness of the GKONP algorithm is demonstrated by applying it to a discrete dynamical system model of the yeast pheromone pathways. The empirical accuracy and time efficiency are assessed in comparison to an optimal, but exhaustive search strategy. SIGNIFICANCE: Although the in silico target gene deletion problem has enormous potential applications in genetic engineering, one must overcome the computational challenge due to its NP-hardness. The presented solution, which has been demonstrated to approximate the optimal solution in a practical amount of time, is among the few that address the computational challenge. In the experiment on the yeast pheromone pathways, the identified best subset of genes for deletion showed advantage over genes that were selected empirically. Once validated in vivo, the optimal target genes are

  13. Genetic polymorphisms in milk protein genes and their impact on milk composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovc, P

    2000-01-01

    About 40 different genetic variants are present at bovine milk protein loci and considerable differences in allele frequencies were observed among breeds. Advanced electrophoretic methods and recently, the DNA technology have been applied for identification and characterisation of milk protein genetic variants. Mutations with impact on gene expression have been identified. The influence of lactoprotein genetic variants on milk composition and cheese making ability has been studied extensively. The most prominent effects have been found for beta-LG A/B and kappa-CN A/B in cattle and alpha s1-CN E in goat.

  14. Organization of a resistance gene cluster linked to rhizomania resistance in sugar beet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic resistance to rhizomania has been in use for over 40 years. Characterization of the molecular basis for susceptibility and resistance has proved challenging. Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NB-LRR) genes have been implicated in numerous gene-for-gene resistance interaction...

  15. Comparative analysis of the Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum GM508D genome reveals subrogation of phase-variable contingency genes and a novel integrated genetic element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Michael J; Foecking, Mark F

    2015-08-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capricolum is both a pathogen of small ruminants and a model recipient organism for gene transplantation and synthetic biology. With the availability of the complete genome of the type strain California kid (released in 2005), a draft genome of strain GM508D was determined to investigate genomic variation in this subspecies. Differences in mobile genetic element location and complement, catabolic pathway genes, contingency loci, surface antigen genes and type II restriction-modification systems highlight the plasticity and diversity within this taxon.

  16. [Collaborative study on regulatory science for facilitating clinical development of gene therapy products for genetic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Eriko; Igarashi, Yuka; Sato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy products are expected as innovative medicinal products for intractable diseases such as life-threatening genetic diseases and cancer. Recently, clinical developments by pharmaceutical companies are accelerated in Europe and the United States, and the first gene therapy product in advanced countries was approved for marketing authorization by the European Commission in 2012. On the other hand, more than 40 clinical studies for gene therapy have been completed or ongoing in Japan, most of them are conducted as clinical researches by academic institutes, and few clinical trials have been conducted for approval of gene therapy products. In order to promote the development of gene therapy products, revision of the current guideline and/or preparation of concept paper to address the evaluation of the quality and safety of gene therapy products are necessary and desired to clearly show what data should be submitted before First-in-Human clinical trials of novel gene therapy products. We started collaborative study with academia and regulatory agency to promote regulatory science toward clinical development of gene therapy products for genetic diseases based on lentivirus and adeno-associated virus vectors; National Center for Child Health and Development (NCCHD), Nippon Medical School and PMDA have been joined in the task force. At first, we are preparing pre-draft of the revision of the current gene therapy guidelines in this project.

  17. Detection and traceability of genetically modified organisms in the food production chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraglia, M; Berdal, K G; Brera, C; Corbisier, P; Holst-Jensen, A; Kok, E J; Marvin, H J P; Schimmel, H; Rentsch, J; van Rie, J P P F; Zagon, J

    2004-07-01

    Both labelling and traceability of genetically modified organisms are current issues that are considered in trade and regulation. Currently, labelling of genetically modified foods containing detectable transgenic material is required by EU legislation. A proposed package of legislation would extend this labelling to foods without any traces of transgenics. These new legislations would also impose labelling and a traceability system based on documentation throughout the food and feed manufacture system. The regulatory issues of risk analysis and labelling are currently harmonised by Codex Alimentarius. The implementation and maintenance of the regulations necessitates sampling protocols and analytical methodologies that allow for accurate determination of the content of genetically modified organisms within a food and feed sample. Current methodologies for the analysis of genetically modified organisms are focused on either one of two targets, the transgenic DNA inserted- or the novel protein(s) expressed- in a genetically modified product. For most DNA-based detection methods, the polymerase chain reaction is employed. Items that need consideration in the use of DNA-based detection methods include the specificity, sensitivity, matrix effects, internal reference DNA, availability of external reference materials, hemizygosity versus homozygosity, extrachromosomal DNA, and international harmonisation. For most protein-based methods, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with antibodies binding the novel protein are employed. Consideration should be given to the selection of the antigen bound by the antibody, accuracy, validation, and matrix effects. Currently, validation of detection methods for analysis of genetically modified organisms is taking place. In addition, new methodologies are developed, including the use of microarrays, mass spectrometry, and surface plasmon resonance. Challenges for GMO detection include the detection of transgenic material in materials

  18. Gene networks associated with conditional fear in mice identified using a systems genetics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskin Eleazar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of the genetic basis of learning and memory remains shrouded in mystery. To explore the genetic networks governing the biology of conditional fear, we used a systems genetics approach to analyze a hybrid mouse diversity panel (HMDP with high mapping resolution. Results A total of 27 behavioral quantitative trait loci were mapped with a false discovery rate of 5%. By integrating fear phenotypes, transcript profiling data from hippocampus and striatum and also genotype information, two gene co-expression networks correlated with context-dependent immobility were identified. We prioritized the key markers and genes in these pathways using intramodular connectivity measures and structural equation modeling. Highly connected genes in the context fear modules included Psmd6, Ube2a and Usp33, suggesting an important role for ubiquitination in learning and memory. In addition, we surveyed the architecture of brain transcript regulation and demonstrated preservation of gene co-expression modules in hippocampus and striatum, while also highlighting important differences. Rps15a, Kif3a, Stard7, 6330503K22RIK, and Plvap were among the individual genes whose transcript abundance were strongly associated with fear phenotypes. Conclusion Application of our multi-faceted mapping strategy permits an increasingly detailed characterization of the genetic networks underlying behavior.

  19. Mapping the genetic architecture of gene regulation in whole blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Schramm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess whether whole blood expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs with effects in cis and trans are robust and can be used to identify regulatory pathways affecting disease susceptibility. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed whole-genome eQTL analyses in 890 participants of the KORA F4 study and in two independent replication samples (SHIP-TREND, N = 976 and EGCUT, N = 842 using linear regression models and Bonferroni correction. RESULTS: In the KORA F4 study, 4,116 cis-eQTLs (defined as SNP-probe pairs where the SNP is located within a 500 kb window around the transcription unit and 94 trans-eQTLs reached genome-wide significance and overall 91% (92% of cis-, 84% of trans-eQTLs were confirmed in at least one of the two replication studies. Different study designs including distinct laboratory reagents (PAXgene™ vs. Tempus™ tubes did not affect reproducibility (separate overall replication overlap: 78% and 82%. Immune response pathways were enriched in cis- and trans-eQTLs and significant cis-eQTLs were partly coexistent in other tissues (cross-tissue similarity 40-70%. Furthermore, four chromosomal regions displayed simultaneous impact on multiple gene expression levels in trans, and 746 eQTL-SNPs have been previously reported to have clinical relevance. We demonstrated cross-associations between eQTL-SNPs, gene expression levels in trans, and clinical phenotypes as well as a link between eQTLs and human metabolic traits via modification of gene regulation in cis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that whole blood is a robust tissue for eQTL analysis and may be used both for biomarker studies and to enhance our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying gene-disease associations.

  20. Expressing PHB synthetic genes through chloroplast genetic engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Chloroplast integration and expression vector containing expression cassettes for phbB, phbA, phbC and aadA genes was constructed and bombarded into the tobacco chloroplast genome. Transplastomic plants were analyzed with PCR and Southern blot. Their homoplastomy was also judged. Northern dot and RT-PCR analysis were employed to investigate transgene expression at transcriptional level. The results indicate that the chloroplast transformation system is compatible for poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production.

  1. Genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes in relation to ovarian cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Holly R; Vivo, Immaculata De; Titus, Linda J; Vitonis, Allison F; Wong, Jason Y Y; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres are repetitive non-coding DNA sequences at the ends of chromosomes that provide protection against chromosomal instability. Telomere length and stability are influenced by proteins, including telomerase which is partially encoded by the TERT gene. Genetic variation in the TERT gene is associated with ovarian cancer risk, and predicts survival in lung cancer and glioma. We investigated whether genetic variation in five telomere maintenance genes was associated with survival among 1480 cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer in the population-based New England Case-Control Study. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Overall we observed no significant associations between SNPs in telomere maintenance genes and mortality using a significance threshold of p=0.001. However, we observed some suggestive associations in subgroup analyses. Future studies with larger populations may further our understanding of what role telomeres play in ovarian cancer survival.

  2. OncoSimulR: genetic simulation with arbitrary epistasis and mutator genes in asexual populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Uriarte, Ramon

    2017-06-15

    OncoSimulR implements forward-time genetic simulations of biallelic loci in asexual populations with special focus on cancer progression. Fitness can be defined as an arbitrary function of genetic interactions between multiple genes or modules of genes, including epistasis, restrictions in the order of accumulation of mutations, and order effects. Mutation rates can differ among genes, and can be affected by (anti)mutator genes. Also available are sampling from simulations (including single-cell sampling), plotting the genealogical relationships of clones and generating and plotting fitness landscapes. Implemented in R and C ++, freely available from BioConductor for Linux, Mac and Windows under the GNU GPL license. Version 2.5.9 or higher available from: http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/devel/bioc/html/OncoSimulR.html . GitHub repository at: https://github.com/rdiaz02/OncoSimul. ramon.diaz@iib.uam.es. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. Genetic variation in genes of the fatty acid synthesis pathway and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campa, Daniele; McKay, James; Sinilnikova, Olga

    2009-01-01

    -binding protein), which is induced by glucose, and SREBP-1 (sterol response element-binding protein-1), which is stimulated by insulin through the PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway. We investigated whether the genetic variability of the genes encoding for ChREBP, SREBP and FAS (respectively, MLXIPL, SREBF1...... and FASN) is related to breast cancer risk and body-mass index (BMI) by studying 1,294 breast cancer cases and 2,452 controls from the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC). We resequenced the FAS gene and combined information of SNPs found by resequencing and SNPs from public databases....... Using a tagging approach and selecting 20 SNPs, we covered all the common genetic variation of these genes. In this study we were not able to find any statistically significant association between the SNPs in the FAS, ChREBP and SREPB-1 genes and an increased risk of breast cancer overall...

  4. PTEN Gene: A Model for Genetic Diseases in Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Romano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available PTEN gene is considered one of the most mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancer, and it’s likely to become the first one in the near future. Since 1997, its involvement in tumor suppression has smoothly increased, up to the current importance. Germline mutations of PTEN cause the PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS, which include the past-called Cowden, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba, Proteus, Proteus-like, and Lhermitte-Duclos syndromes. Somatic mutations of PTEN have been observed in glioblastoma, prostate cancer, and brest cancer cell lines, quoting only the first tissues where the involvement has been proven. The negative regulation of cell interactions with the extracellular matrix could be the way PTEN phosphatase acts as a tumor suppressor. PTEN gene plays an essential role in human development. A recent model sees PTEN function as a stepwise gradation, which can be impaired not only by heterozygous mutations and homozygous losses, but also by other molecular mechanisms, such as transcriptional regression, epigenetic silencing, regulation by microRNAs, posttranslational modification, and aberrant localization. The involvement of PTEN function in melanoma and multistage skin carcinogenesis, with its implication in cancer treatment, and the role of front office in diagnosing PHTS are the main reasons why the dermatologist should know about PTEN.

  5. Application of Genetic Programming in Predicting Infinite Dilution Activity Coefficients of Organic Compounds in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Lin CAO; Huan Ying LI

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we calculated 37 structural descriptors of 174 organic compounds. The154 molecules were used to derive quantitative structure-infinite dilution activity coefficientrelationship by genetic programming, the other 20 compounds were used to test the model. Theresult showed that molecular partition property and three-dimensional structural descriptors havesignificant influence on the infinite dilution activity coefficients.

  6. Off-Label Prescription of Genetically Modified Organism Medicines in Europe : Emerging Conflicts of Interest?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, Frederik H. E.; Hoeben, Rob C.; Hospers, Geke A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the first human medicine containing a genetically modified organism (GMO medicine) was authorized for use in the European market. Just as any medicinal product, the market authorization for a GMO medicine contains a precise description of the therapeutic use for which the medicinal product

  7. Knowledge of adolescents completing secondary schools concerning genetically modified organisms (GMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florek-Łuszczki Magdalena

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the conducted analyses is the evaluation of the level of knowledge concerning the scope of problems related with genetically modified organism (GMO amongst adolescents completing secondary schools and the determination of the relationship between the level of this knowledge and the selected demographic traits of the adolescents examined.

  8. Off-Label Prescription of Genetically Modified Organism Medicines in Europe : Emerging Conflicts of Interest?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, Frederik H. E.; Hoeben, Rob C.; Hospers, Geke A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the first human medicine containing a genetically modified organism (GMO medicine) was authorized for use in the European market. Just as any medicinal product, the market authorization for a GMO medicine contains a precise description of the therapeutic use for which the medicinal product

  9. Genetically modified organisms (GMO in opinions completing secondary schools in Lublin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachowski Stanisław

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the conducted analysis is the opinion of adolescents completing secondary schools concerning genetically modified organisms (GMO and determination of the relationship between the level of knowledge concerning GMO, and evaluation of the safety of their use in industry and agriculture.

  10. Organic rice disease management using genetic resistance, cover crop and organic fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The strong market demand for organic rice has driven the continued increase of organic rice production in the US. However, growers still lack effective tools to manage narrow brown leaf spot (NBLS) caused by Cercospora janseana and brown spot caused by Cochliobolus miyabeanus, two common diseases af...

  11. A high-resolution gene expression atlas of epistasis between gene-specific transcription factors exposes potential mechanisms for genetic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sameith, Katrin; Amini, Saman; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; van Leenen, Dik|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817236; Brok, Mariel; Brabers, Nathalie; Lijnzaad, Philip|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311462197; van Hooff, Sander R; Benschop, Joris J.; Lenstra, Tineke L.; Apweiler, Eva; van Wageningen, Sake; Snel, Berend; Holstege, Frank C P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/149308035; Kemmeren, Patrick|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817228

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genetic interactions, or non-additive effects between genes, play a crucial role in many cellular processes and disease. Which mechanisms underlie these genetic interactions has hardly been characterized. Understanding the molecular basis of genetic interactions is crucial in deciphering

  12. The Effect of Genetic and Environmental Variation on Metabolic Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Cinda P.; Williams, Dean A.; Crawford, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    What is the relationship between genetic or environmental variation and the variation in mRNA expression? To address this, microarrays were used to examine the effect of genetic and environmental variation on cardiac mRNA expression for metabolic genes in three groups of Fundulus heteroclitus: (1) individuals sampled in the field (field), (2) field individuals acclimated for six months to laboratory conditions (acclimated) or (3) individuals bred for ten successive generations in a laboratory environment (G10). The G10 individuals have significantly less genetic variation than individuals obtained in the field and had a significantly lower variation in mRNA expression across all genes in comparison to the other two groups (p ≤ 0.001). When examining the gene specific variation, twenty-two genes had variation in expression that was significantly different among groups with lower variation in G10 individuals than in acclimated individuals. Additionally, there were fewer genes with significant differences in expression among G10 individuals versus either acclimated or field individuals: 66 genes have statistically different levels of expression versus 107 or 97 for Acclimated or Field groups. Based on the permutation of the data, these differences in the number of genes with significant differences among individuals within a group are unlikely to occur by chance (p < 0.01). Surprisingly, variation in mRNA expression in field individuals is lower than in acclimated individuals. Relative to the variation among individual within a group, few genes have significant differences in expression among groups (seven, 2.3%) and none of these are different between acclimated and field individuals. The results support the concept that genetic variation affects variation in mRNA expression and also suggests that temporal environmental variation associated with estuarine environments does not increase the variation among individuals or add to the differences among groups. PMID

  13. Host factors and genetic susceptibility to infections due to intracellular bacteria and fastidious organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, S A; Morré, S A; Bochud, P-Y; Greub, G

    2014-12-01

    While genetic polymorphisms play a paramount role in tuberculosis (TB), less is known about their contribution to the severity of diseases caused by other intracellular bacteria and fastidious microorganisms. We searched electronic databases for observational studies reporting on host factors and genetic predisposition to infections caused by intracellular fastidious bacteria published up to 30 May 2014. The contribution of genetic polymorphisms was documented for TB. This includes genetic defects in the mononuclear phagocyte/T helper cell type 1 (Th1) pathway contributing to disseminated TB disease in children and genome-wide linkage analysis (GWAS) in reactivated pulmonary TB in adults. Similarly, experimental studies supported the role of host genetic factors in the clinical presentation of illnesses resulting from other fastidious intracellular bacteria. These include IL-6 -174G/C or low mannose-binding (MBL) polymorphisms, which are incriminated in chronic pulmonary conditions triggered by C. pneumoniae, type 2-like cytokine secretion polymorphisms, which are correlated with various clinical patterns of M. pneumoniae infections, and genetic variation in the NOD2 gene, which is an indicator of tubal pathology resulting from Chamydia trachomatis infections. Monocyte/macrophage migration and T lymphocyte recruitment defects are corroborated to ineffective granuloma formation observed among patients with chronic Q fever. Similar genetic polymorphisms have also been suggested for infections caused by T. whipplei although not confirmed yet. In conclusion, this review supports the paramount role of genetic factors in clinical presentations and severity of infections caused by intracellular fastidious bacteria. Genetic predisposition should be further explored through such as exome sequencing.

  14. Nonhuman genetics. Genomic basis for the convergent evolution of electric organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Jason R; Traeger, Lindsay L; Volkening, Jeremy D; Moffett, Howell; Chen, Po-Hao; Novina, Carl D; Phillips, George N; Anand, Rene; Wells, Gregg B; Pinch, Matthew; Güth, Robert; Unguez, Graciela A; Albert, James S; Zakon, Harold H; Samanta, Manoj P; Sussman, Michael R

    2014-06-27

    Little is known about the genetic basis of convergent traits that originate repeatedly over broad taxonomic scales. The myogenic electric organ has evolved six times in fishes to produce electric fields used in communication, navigation, predation, or defense. We have examined the genomic basis of the convergent anatomical and physiological origins of these organs by assembling the genome of the electric eel (Electrophorus electricus) and sequencing electric organ and skeletal muscle transcriptomes from three lineages that have independently evolved electric organs. Our results indicate that, despite millions of years of evolution and large differences in the morphology of electric organ cells, independent lineages have leveraged similar transcription factors and developmental and cellular pathways in the evolution of electric organs. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Genetic Architecture of MAPT Gene Region in Parkinson Disease Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Esterina; Di Battista, Maria Elena; Rubino, Alfonso; Purcaro, Carlo; Valente, Marcella; Fattapposta, Francesco; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Meco, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) region has been conceptualized as a model of the interaction between genetics and functional disease outcomes in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson disease (PD). Indeed, haplotype-specific differences in expression and alternative splicing of MAPT transcripts affect cellular functions at different levels, increasing susceptibility to a range of neurodegenerative processes. In order to evaluate a possible link between MAPT variants, PD risk and PD motor phenotype, we analyzed the genetic architecture of MAPT in a cohort of PD patients. We observed a statistically significant association between the H1 haplotype and PD risk (79.5 vs 69.5%; χ(2) = 9.9; OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4; p = 0.002). The effect was more evident in non tremor dominant (TD) PD subjects (NTD-PD) (82 vs 69.5%; χ(2) = 13.6; OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.4-3; p = 0.0003), while no difference emerged between PD subgroup of tremor dominant patients (TD-PD) and control subjects. Examination of specific intra-H1 variations showed that the H1h subhaplotype was overrepresented in NTD-PD patients compared with controls (p = 0.007; OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3-6.3). Although we cannot exclude that MAPT variation may be associated with ethnicity, our results may support the hypothesis that MAPT H1 clade and a specific H1 subhaplotype influence the risk of PD and modulate the clinical expression of the disease, including motor phenotype.

  16. Allele mining in barley genetic resources reveals genes of race-nonspecific powdery mildew resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika eSpies

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Race-nonspecific, or quantitative, pathogen resistance is of high importance to plant breeders due to its expected durability. However, it is usually controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL and therefore difficult to handle in practice. Knowing the genes that underlie race-nonspecific resistance would allow its exploitation in a more targeted manner. Here, we performed an association-genetic study in a customized worlwide collection of spring barley accessions for candidate genes of race-nonspecific resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh and combined data with results from QTL-mapping- as well as functional-genomics approaches. This led to the idenfication of 11 associated genes with converging evidence for an important role in race-nonspecific resistance in the presence of the Mlo-gene for basal susceptibility. Outstanding in this respect was the gene encoding the transcription factor WRKY2. The results suggest that unlocking plant genetic resources and integrating functional-genomic with genetic approaches accelerates the discovery of genes underlying race-nonspecific resistance in barley and other crop plants.

  17. Genetic Analysis and Gene Mapping of Light Brown Spotted Leaf Mutant in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Bao-hua; YANG Yang; SHI Yong-feng; LIN Lu; CHEN Jie; WEI Yan-lin; Hei LEUNG

    2013-01-01

    A light brown spotted-leaf mutant of rice was isolated from an ethane methyl sulfonate (EMS)induced IR64 mutant bank.The mutant,designated as Ibsl1 (light brown spotted-leaf 1),displayed light brown spot in the whole growth period from the first leaf to the flag leaf under natural summer field conditions.Agronomic traits including plant height,growth duration,number of filled grains per panicle,seed-setting rate and 1000-grain weight of the mutant were significantly affected.Genetic analysis showed that the mutation was controlled by a single recessive gene,tentatively named Ibsl1(t),which was mapped to the short arm of chromosome 6.By developing simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers,the gene was finally delimited to an interval of 130 kb between markers RM586 and RM588.The Ibsl1(t) gene is likely a novel rice spotted-leaf gene since no other similar genes have been identified near the chromosomal region.The genetic data and recombination populations provided will facilitate further fine-mapping and cloning of the gene.

  18. Genetic Dissection of Morphometric Traits Reveals That Phytochrome B Affects Nucleus Size and Heterochromatin Organization in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basten L. Snoek

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Microscopically visible chromatin is partitioned into two major components in Arabidopsis thaliana nuclei. On one hand, chromocenters are conspicuous foci of highly condensed “heterochromatic” domains that contain mostly repeated sequences. On the other hand, less condensed and gene-rich “euchromatin” emanates from these chromocenters. This differentiation, together with the dynamic nature of chromatin compaction in response to developmental and environmental stimuli, makes Arabidopsis a powerful system for studying chromatin organization and dynamics. Heterochromatin dynamics can be monitored by measuring the Heterochromatin Index, i.e., the proportion of nuclei displaying well-defined chromocenters, or the DNA fraction of chromocenters (relative heterochromatin fraction. Both measures are composite traits, thus their values represent the sum of effects of various underlying morphometric properties. We exploited genetic variation between natural occurring accessions to determine the genetic basis of individual nucleus and chromocenter morphometric parameters (area, perimeter, density, roundness, and heterogeneity that together determine chromatin compaction. Our novel reductionist genetic approach revealed quantitative trait loci (QTL for all measured traits. Genomic colocalization among QTL was limited, which suggests a complex genetic regulation of chromatin compaction. Yet genomic intervals of QTL for nucleus size (area and perimeter both overlap with a known QTL for heterochromatin compaction that is explained by natural polymorphism in the red/far-red light and temperature receptor Phytochrome B. Mutant analyses and genetic complementation assays show that Phytochrome B is a negative regulator of nucleus size, revealing that perception of climatic conditions by a Phytochrome-mediated hub is a major determinant for coordinating nucleus size and heterochromatin compaction.

  19. Specific genetic modifications of domestic animals by gene targeting and animal cloning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiangfeng

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The technology of gene targeting through homologous recombination has been extremely useful for elucidating gene functions in mice. The application of this technology was thought impossible in the large livestock species until the successful creation of the first mammalian clone "Dolly" the sheep. The combination of the technologies for gene targeting of somatic cells with those of animal cloning made it possible to introduce specific genetic mutations into domestic animals. In this review, the principles of gene targeting in somatic cells and the challenges of nuclear transfer using gene-targeted cells are discussed. The relevance of gene targeting in domestic animals for applications in bio-medicine and agriculture are also examined.

  20. Genetics of human longevity with emphasis on the relevance of HSP70 as candidate genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvrå, Steen; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2007-01-01

    Human longevity is determined to a certain extent by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied for their association with human longevity, but the data collected so far are inconclusive. One of the reasons is the choice of the candidate genes in addition to the choice...... of an appropriate study design and methodology. Since aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of molecular damage and an attenuation of the cellular defense mechanisms, the focus of studies on human longevity association with genes has now shifted to the pathways of cellular maintenance and repair...... mechanisms. One such pathway includes the battery of stress response genes, especially the heat shock protein HSP70 genes. Three such genes, HSPA1A, HSPA1B and HSPA1L, are present within the MHC-III region on the short arm of chromosome 6. We and others have found alleles, genotypes and haplotypes which have...

  1. A systems genetics approach identifies genes and pathways for type 2 diabetes in human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taneera, Jalal; Lang, Stefan; Sharma, Amitabh;

    2012-01-01

    Close to 50 genetic loci have been associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but they explain only 15% of the heritability. In an attempt to identify additional T2D genes, we analyzed global gene expression in human islets from 63 donors. Using 48 genes located near T2D risk variants, we identified...... gene coexpression and protein-protein interaction networks that were strongly associated with islet insulin secretion and HbA(1c). We integrated our data to form a rank list of putative T2D genes, of which CHL1, LRFN2, RASGRP1, and PPM1K were validated in INS-1 cells to influence insulin secretion...... of genes potentially involved in T2D....

  2. A New Method Of Gene Coding For A Genetic Algorithm Designed For Parametric Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu BELEA

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In a parametric optimization problem the genes code the real parameters of the fitness function. There are two coding techniques known under the names of: binary coded genes and real coded genes. The comparison between these two is a controversial subject since the first papers about parametric optimization have appeared. An objective analysis regarding the advantages and disadvantages of the two coding techniques is difficult to be done while different format information is compared. The present paper suggests a gene coding technique that uses the same format for both binary coded genes and for the real coded genes. After unifying the real parameters representation, the next criterion is going to be applied: the differences between the two techniques are statistically measured by the effect of the genetic operators over some random generated fellows.

  3. Genetic characterisation of CSN2 gene in Girgentana goat breed

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Among calcium sensitive caseins, β-casein is the most abundant in goat milk, representing up to 50% of total casein content. The goat β-casein locus has been widely investigated and at least ten alleles have been identified in different goat breeds. The aim of this work was to investigate the polymorphisms of β-casein gene in Girgentana dairy goat breed in order to assess the genotype distribution and evaluate how frequencies have changed during the last 10 years, as genotype is known to infl...

  4. Genetics of human longevity with emphasis on the relevance of HSP70 as candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kolvraa, Steen; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2007-05-01

    Human longevity is determined to a certain extent by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied for their association with human longevity, but the data collected so far are inconclusive. One of the reasons is the choice of the candidate genes in addition to the choice of an appropriate study design and methodology. Since aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of molecular damage and an attenuation of the cellular defense mechanisms, the focus of studies on human longevity association with genes has now shifted to the pathways of cellular maintenance and repair mechanisms. One such pathway includes the battery of stress response genes, especially the heat shock protein HSP70 genes. Three such genes, HSPA1A, HSPA1B and HSPA1L, are present within the MHC-III region on the short arm of chromosome 6. We and others have found alleles, genotypes and haplotypes which have been significantly associated with human longevity and survival. We have also provided some functional evidence for these genetic associations by showing that isolated peripheral blood cells from those genotypes which are negatively associated with human longevity also have less ability to respond to heat shock. Stress response genes, particularly HSP70, are now the major candidates in the gene-longevity association studies.

  5. A Candidate Gene Approach Identifies an IL33 Genetic Variant as a Novel Genetic Risk Factor for GCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Ana; Solans, Roser; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, Maria C.; Castañeda, Santos; Ramentol, Marc; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Narváez, Javier; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Palm, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Braun, Niko; Moosig, Frank; Witte, Torsten; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Vaglio, Augusto; Salvarani, Carlo; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Increased expression of IL-33 and its receptor ST2, encoded by the IL1RL1 gene, has been detected in the inflamed arteries of giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL33 and IL1RL1 loci on GCA predisposition. Methods A total of 1,363 biopsy-proven GCA patients and 3,908 healthy controls from four European cohorts (Spain, Italy, Germany and Norway) were combined in a meta-analysis. Six genetic variants: rs3939286, rs7025417 and rs7044343, within the IL33 gene, and rs2058660, rs2310173 and rs13015714, within the IL1RL1 gene, previously associated with immune-related diseases, were genotyped using predesigned TaqMan assays. Results A consistent association between the rs7025417 polymorphism and GCA was evident in the overall meta-analysis, under both allele (PMH = 0.041, OR = 0.88, CI 95% 0.78–0.99) and recessive (PMH = 3.40E-03, OR = 0.53, CI 95% 0.35–0.80) models. No statistically significant differences between allele or genotype frequencies for the other IL33 and IL1RL1 genetic variants were detected in this pooled analysis. Conclusions Our results clearly evidenced the implication of the IL33 rs7025417 polymorphism in the genetic network underlying GCA. PMID:25409453

  6. Genetic homogeneity in the commercial pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis revealed by COI barcoding gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, S. S. A.; Terossi, M.; Costa, R. C.; Mantelatto, F. L.

    2015-12-01

    The pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis is one of the most commercially exploited species in Brazil's South and Southeastern regions. Specific information about the status of its genetic variation is necessary to promote more effective management procedures. The genetic variation of the population of F. paulensis was investigated in five localities along southern and southeastern coast of Brazil. Sampling was performed with a commercial fishing boat. Total genomic DNA was extracted from abdominal muscle tissues and was used to DNA amplification by PCR. The COI gene was used as a DNA barcoding marker. The 570 bp COI gene sequences were obtained from all 45 individuals. The haplotype network showed no genetic variability among the population stocks, which was confirmed by Molecular Variance Analysis. The final alignment showed that inside species there is haplotype sharing among the sampled localities, since one haplotype is shared by 38 individuals belonging to all the five sampled regions, with no biogeographic pattern. This result is reasonable since there are no geographical barriers or habitat disjunction that might serve as a barrier to gene flow among the sampled localities. Possible reasons and consequences of the genetic homogeneity found are discussed. The results complement ecological studies concerning the offseason: since it is a single stock, the same protection strategy can be applied. However, the genetic homogeneity found in this study combined with the intensive fishery effort and the species biology can result in severe consequences for the F. paulensis.

  7. Current status and prospects for the study of Nicotiana genomics, genetics, and nicotine biosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2015-02-01

    Nicotiana, a member of the Solanaceae family, is one of the most important research model plants, and of high agricultural and economic value worldwide. To better understand the substantial and rapid research progress with Nicotiana in recent years, its genomics, genetics, and nicotine gene studies are summarized, with useful web links. Several important genetic maps, including a high-density map of N. tabacum consisting of ~2,000 markers published in 2012, provide tools for genetics research. Four whole genome sequences are from allotetraploid species, including N. benthamiana in 2012, and three N. tabacum cultivars (TN90, K326, and BX) in 2014. Three whole genome sequences are from diploids, including progenitors N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis in 2013 and N. otophora in 2014. These and additional studies provide numerous insights into genome evolution after polyploidization, including changes in gene composition and transcriptome expression in N. tabacum. The major genes involved in the nicotine biosynthetic pathway have been identified and the genetic basis of the differences in nicotine levels among Nicotiana species has been revealed. In addition, other progress on chloroplast, mitochondrial, and NCBI-registered projects on Nicotiana are discussed. The challenges and prospects for genomic, genetic and application research are addressed. Hence, this review provides important resources and guidance for current and future research and application in Nicotiana.

  8. Genetic characterisation of CSN2 gene in Girgentana goat breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Tortorici

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Among calcium sensitive caseins, β-casein is the most abundant in goat milk, representing up to 50% of total casein content. The goat β-casein locus has been widely investigated and at least ten alleles have been identified in different goat breeds. The aim of this work was to investigate the polymorphisms of β-casein gene in Girgentana dairy goat breed in order to assess the genotype distribution and evaluate how frequencies have changed during the last 10 years, as genotype is known to influence technological and nutritional milk properties. Sequencing analysis and alignment of the obtained sequences of β-casein exon 7, showed the presence of C, C1, and A strong alleles, and 0' null allele, with frequencies of 0.597, 0.326, 0.023, and 0.054, respectively. Seven genotypic classes were found in Girgentana goat breed and the most frequent genotype was CC1 (0.423 followed by CC (0.326, C1C1 (0.110, and C0' (0.096. No AA nor 0'0' homozygous individuals were found. The presence of strong alleles at CSN2 gene in Girgentana goat breed could be useful for the production of milk with high protein content and good cheese-making properties. Moreover, food business operators should consider the possibility of reviving interest in Girgentana goat milk using weak and null genotypes at CSN2 locus to make peculiar food products, such as drinking milk.

  9. Genetic organization of plasmid-mediated Qnr determinants in cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacter cloacae isolates in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Eun Sil; Jeong, Jin-Yong

    2010-11-01

    Because of the strong association between qnr genes and plasmids carrying β-lactamase genes, we screened 176 clinical isolates of Enterobacter cloacae with cefotaxime MICs of ≥16 μg/mL for qnr genes. The qnrA, qnrB, and qnrS genes were detected in 18 (10.2%), 11 (6.2%), and 1 (0.56%) of the isolates, respectively. The genetic environments of the plasmids encoding these qnr genes were analyzed.

  10. Optimization of digital droplet polymerase chain reaction for quantification of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Lars; Iwobi, Azuka; Busch, Ulrich; Pecoraro, Sven

    2016-03-01

    Digital PCR in droplets (ddPCR) is an emerging method for more and more applications in DNA (and RNA) analysis. Special requirements when establishing ddPCR for analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in a laboratory include the choice between validated official qPCR methods and the optimization of these assays for a ddPCR format. Differentiation between droplets with positive reaction and negative droplets, that is setting of an appropriate threshold, can be crucial for a correct measurement. This holds true in particular when independent transgene and plant-specific reference gene copy numbers have to be combined to determine the content of GM material in a sample. Droplets which show fluorescent units ranging between those of explicit positive and negative droplets are called 'rain'. Signals of such droplets can hinder analysis and the correct setting of a threshold. In this manuscript, a computer-based algorithm has been carefully designed to evaluate assay performance and facilitate objective criteria for assay optimization. Optimized assays in return minimize the impact of rain on ddPCR analysis. We developed an Excel based 'experience matrix' that reflects the assay parameters of GMO ddPCR tests performed in our laboratory. Parameters considered include singleplex/duplex ddPCR, assay volume, thermal cycler, probe manufacturer, oligonucleotide concentration, annealing/elongation temperature, and a droplet separation evaluation. We additionally propose an objective droplet separation value which is based on both absolute fluorescence signal distance of positive and negative droplet populations and the variation within these droplet populations. The proposed performance classification in the experience matrix can be used for a rating of different assays for the same GMO target, thus enabling employment of the best suited assay parameters. Main optimization parameters include annealing/extension temperature and oligonucleotide concentrations. The

  11. Germline Genetic Variation in an Organic Anion Transporter Polypeptide Associated With Methotrexate Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Lisa R.; Shimasaki, Noriko; Yang, Wenjian; Panetta, John C.; Cheng, Cheng; Pei, Deqing; Chan, Diana; Sparreboom, Alex; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Methotrexate plasma concentration is related to its clinical effects. Our aim was to identify the genetic basis of interindividual variability in methotrexate pharmacokinetics in children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients and Methods We performed a genome-wide analysis of 500,568 germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify how inheritance affects methotrexate plasma disposition among 434 children with ALL who received 3,014 courses of methotrexate at 2 to 5 g/m2. SNPs were validated in an independent cohort of 206 patients. Results Adjusting for age, race, sex, and methotrexate regimen, the most significant associations were with SNPs in the organic anion transporter polypeptide, SLCO1B1. Two SNPs in SLCO1B1, rs11045879 (P = 1.7 × 10−10) and rs4149081 (P = 1.7 × 10−9), were in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with each other (r2 = 1) and with a functional polymorphism in SLCO1B1, T521C (rs4149056; r2 > 0.84). rs11045879 and rs4149081 were validated in an independent cohort of 206 patients (P = .018 and P = .017), as were other SLCO1B1 SNPs residing in different LD blocks. SNPs in SLCO1B1 were also associated with GI toxicity (odds ratio, 15.3 to 16.4; P = .03 to .004). Conclusion A genome-wide interrogation identified inherited variations in a plausible, yet heretofore low-priority candidate gene, SLCO1B1, as important determinants of methotrexate's pharmacokinetics and clinical effects. PMID:19901119

  12. Current PCR Methods for the Detection, Identification and Quantification of Genetically Modified Organisms(GMOs: a Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadani F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytical methods based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR technology are increasingly used for the detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequences associated with genetically modified organisms (GMOs. In the European Union and Switzerland, mandatory labeling of novel foods and food ingredients consisting of, or containing GMOs is required according to food regulations and is triggered by the presence of newly introduced foreign DNA sequences, or newly expressed proteins. In order to meet regulatory and consumer demand, numerous PCR-based methods have been developed which can detect, identify and quantify GMOs in agricultural crops, food and feed. Moreover, the determination of genetic identity allows for segregation and traceability (identity preservation throughout the supply chain of GM crops that have been enhanced with value-added quality traits. Prerequisites for GMO detection include a minimum amount of the target gene and prior knowledge of the type of genetic modification, such as virus or insect resistance traits, including controlling elements (promoters and terminators. Moreover, DNA extraction and purification is a critical step for the preparation of PCR-quality samples, particularly for processed agricultural crops such as tobacco. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of PCR-based method development for the qualitative and quantitative determination and identification of GMOs, and includes a short summary of official and validated GMO detection methods.

  13. Obcells as proto-organisms: membrane heredity, lithophosphorylation, and the origins of the genetic code, the first cells, and photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2001-01-01

    I attempt to sketch a unified picture of the origin of living organisms in their genetic, bioenergetic, and structural aspects. Only selection at a higher level than for individual selfish genes could power the cooperative macromolecular coevolution required for evolving the genetic code. The protein synthesis machinery is too complex to have evolved before membranes. Therefore a symbiosis of membranes, replicators, and catalysts probably mediated the origin of the code and the transition from a nucleic acid world of independent molecular replicators to a nucleic acid/protein/lipid world of reproducing organisms. Membranes initially functioned as supramolecular structures to which different replicators attached and were selected as a higher-level reproductive unit: the proto-organism. I discuss the roles of stereochemistry, gene divergence, codon capture, and selection in the code's origin. I argue that proteins were primarily structural not enzymatic and that the first biological membranes consisted of amphipathic peptidyl-tRNAs and prebiotic mixed lipids. The peptidyl-tRNAs functioned as genetically-specified lipid analogues with hydrophobic tails (ancestral signal peptides) and hydrophilic polynucleotide heads. Protoribosomes arose from two cooperating RNAs: peptidyl transferase (large subunit) and mRNA-binder (small subunit). Early proteins had a second key role: coupling energy flow to the phosphorylation of gene and peptide precursors, probably by lithophosphorylation by membrane-anchored kinases scavenging geothermal polyphosphate stocks. These key evolutionary steps probably occurred on the outer surface of an 'inside out-cell' or obcell, which evolved an unambiguous hydrophobic code with four prebiotic amino acids and proline, and initiation by isoleucine anticodon CAU; early proteins and nucleozymes were all membrane-attached. To improve replication, translation, and lithophosphorylation, hydrophilic substrate-binding and catalytic domains were later

  14. Integrated transcriptome catalogue and organ-specific profiling of gene expression in fertile garlic (Allium sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenetsky, Rina; Faigenboim, Adi; Shemesh Mayer, Einat; Ben Michael, Tomer; Gershberg, Chen; Kimhi, Sagie; Esquira, Itzhak; Rohkin Shalom, Sarit; Eshel, Dani; Rabinowitch, Haim D; Sherman, Amir

    2015-01-22

    Garlic is cultivated and consumed worldwide as a popular condiment and green vegetable with medicinal and neutraceutical properties. Garlic cultivars do not produce seeds, and therefore, this plant has not been the subject of either classical breeding or genetic studies. However, recent achievements in fertility restoration in a number of genotypes have led to flowering and seed production, thus enabling genetic studies and breeding in garlic. A transcriptome catalogue of fertile garlic was produced from multiplexed gene libraries, using RNA collected from various plant organs, including inflorescences and flowers. Over 32 million 250-bp paired-end reads were assembled into an extensive transcriptome of 240,000 contigs. An abundant transcriptome assembled separately from 102,000 highly expressed contigs was annotated and analyzed for gene ontology and metabolic pathways. Organ-specific analysis showed significant variation of gene expression between plant organs, with the highest number of specific reads in inflorescences and flowers. Analysis of the enriched biological processes and molecular functions revealed characteristic patterns for stress response, flower development and photosynthetic activity. Orthologues of key flowering genes were differentially expressed, not only in reproductive tissues, but also in leaves and bulbs, suggesting their role in flower-signal transduction and the bulbing process. More than 100 variants and isoforms of enzymes involved in organosulfur metabolism were differentially expressed and had organ-specific patterns. In addition to plant genes, viral RNA of at least four garlic viruses was detected, mostly in the roots and cloves, whereas only 1-4% of the reads were found in the foliage leaves. The de novo transcriptome of fertile garlic represents a new resource for research and breeding of this important crop, as well as for the development of effective molecular markers for useful traits, including fertility and seed production

  15. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogelman, Lisette J. A.; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete; Franke, Lude; Kadarmideen, Haja N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about the

  16. Systematic evaluation of genes and genetic variants associated with type 1 diabetes susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ram, Ramesh; Mehta, Munish; Nguyen, Tri Quang

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have found >60 loci that confer genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D). Many of these are defined only by anonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms: the underlying causative genes, as well as the molecular bases by which they mediate susceptibility, are no...

  17. Sonic Hedgehog: A Good Gene Gone Bad? Detection and Treatment of Genetic Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaich, Lauren E.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a case of a baby born with the genetic condition holoprosencephaly in which students explore the "Sonic hedgehog" gene, signal transduction, and the ethics of body and tissue donation. Presents a two-part assignment that features students writing an informed consent document that explains the science behind this congenital abnormality,…

  18. TRACKING GENE FLOW FROM A GENETICALLY MODIFIED CREEPING BENTGRASS -- METHODS, MEASURES AND LESSONS LEARNED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creeping bentgrass (CBG) expressing an engineered gene for resistance to glyphosate herbicide is one of the first genetically modified (GM) perennial crops to undergo regulatory review for commercial release by the US Department of Agriculture Animal Plant Health and Inspection S...

  19. The STAT4 gene influences the genetic predisposition to systemic sclerosis phenotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueda, B.; Broen, J.; Simeon, C.; Hesselstrand, R.; Diaz, B.; Suarez, H.; Ortego-Centeno, N.; Riemekasten, G.; Fonollosa, V.; Vonk, M.C.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Sanchez-Roman, J.; Aguirre-Zamorano, M.A.; Garcia-Portales, R.; Pros, A.; Camps, M.T.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Coenen, M.J.H.; Airo, P.; Beretta, L.; Scorza, R.; Laar, J. van; Gonzalez-Escribano, M.F.; Nelson, J.L.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Martin, J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of STAT4 gene in the genetic predisposition to systemic sclerosis (SSc) susceptibility or clinical phenotype. A total of 1317 SSc patients [896 with limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc) and 421 with diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc)] and 3113 healthy c

  20. Hybrid Deterministic Views about Genes in Biology Textbooks: A Key Problem in Genetics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Vanessa Carvalho; Joaquim, Leyla Mariane; El-Hani, Charbel Nino

    2012-01-01

    A major source of difficulties in promoting students' understanding of genetics lies in the presentation of gene concepts and models in an inconsistent and largely ahistorical manner, merely amalgamated in hybrid views, as if they constituted linear developments, instead of being built for different purposes and employed in specific contexts. In…

  1. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogelman, Lisette J. A.; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete; Franke, Lude; Kadarmideen, Haja N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about the tr

  2. DNA repair in human cells: from genetic complementation to isolation of genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bootsma (Dirk); A. Westerveld (Andries); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) demonstrates the association between defective repair of DNA lesions and cancer. Complementation analysis performed on XP cell strains and on repair deficient rodent cell lines has revealed that at least nine and possibly more than 13 genes

  3. Semiconservative replication, genetic repair, and many-gened genomes: Extending the quasispecies paradigm to living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2005-12-01

    Quasispecies theory has emerged as an important tool for modeling the evolutionary dynamics of biological systems. We review recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the quasispecies dynamics of semiconservatively replicating genomes. Applications to cancer and adult stem cell growth are discussed. Additional topics, such as genetic repair and many-gene genomes, are covered as well.

  4. An evaluation of mitochondrial tRNA gene evolution and its relation to the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, R J

    1982-04-01

    Extensive sequence data on mitochondrial (mt) tRNAs give for the first time an opportunity to evaluate tRNA gene evolution in this organelle. Deductions from these gene structures relate to the evolution of tRNA genes in other cellular systems and to the origin of the genetic code. Mt tRNAs, in contrast to the prokaryotic nature of chloroplastic tRNA structure, can not at the present time be definitely related to either prokaryotic or eukaryotic tRNAs, probably because of a higher mutation rate in mitochondria. Fungal mt tRNAs having the same anticodon and function are generally similar enough to be considered homologous. Comparisons af all mt tRNA sequences contained in the same mitochondrion indicate that some tRNAs originated by duplication of a prototypic gene which, after divergence, led to tRNAs having different amino acid specificities. The deviant mt genetic code, although admittedly permitting a simpler decoding mechanism, is not useful in determining whether the origin of mitochondria had preceded or was derived from prokaryotes or eukaryotes, since the genetic code is variable even among mitochondria. Variants of the mt genetic code lead to speculation on the nature of the primordial code and its relation to the present "universal" code.

  5. The STAT4 gene influences the genetic predisposition to systemic sclerosis phenotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueda, B.; Broen, J.; Simeon, C.; Hesselstrand, R.; Diaz, B.; Suarez, H.; Ortego-Centeno, N.; Riemekasten, G.; Fonollosa, V.; Vonk, M.C.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Sanchez-Roman, J.; Aguirre-Zamorano, M.A.; Garcia-Portales, R.; Pros, A.; Camps, M.T.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Coenen, M.J.H.; Airo, P.; Beretta, L.; Scorza, R.; Laar, J. van; Gonzalez-Escribano, M.F.; Nelson, J.L.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Martin, J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of STAT4 gene in the genetic predisposition to systemic sclerosis (SSc) susceptibility or clinical phenotype. A total of 1317 SSc patients [896 with limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc) and 421 with diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc)] and 3113 healthy

  6. DNA repair in human cells: from genetic complementation to isolation of genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bootsma (Dirk); A. Westerveld (Andries); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) demonstrates the association between defective repair of DNA lesions and cancer. Complementation analysis performed on XP cell strains and on repair deficient rodent cell lines has revealed that at least nine and possibly more than 13 genes

  7. Identification and genetic mapping of four novel genes that regulate leaf development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and genetic characterizations of mutants have led to a better understanding of many developmental processes in the model system Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the leaf development that is specific to plants has been little studied. With the aim of contributing to the genetic dissection of leaf development, we have performed a large-scare screening for mutants with abnormal leaves. Among a great number of leaf mutants we have generated by T-DNA and transposon tagging and ethylmethae sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis, four independent mutant lines have been identified and studied genetically. Phenotypes of these mutant lines represent the defects of four novel nuclear genes designated LL1 (LOTUS LEAF 1), LL2 (LOTUS LEAF 2), URO (UPRIGHT ROSETTE), and EIL (ENVIRONMENTCONDITION INDUCED LESION). The phenotypic analysis indicates that these genes play important roles during leaf development. For the further genetic analysis of these genes and the map-based cloning of LL1 and LL2, we have mapped these genes to chromosome regions with an efficient and rapid mapping method.

  8. Identification and genetic mapping of four novel genes that regulate leaf development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNYUE; YingLiGuo; 等

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and genetic characterizations of mutants have led to a better understanding of many developmental processes in the model system Arabidopsis thaliana.However,the leaf development that is specific to plants has been little studies.With the aim of contributing to the genetic dissection of leaf development,we have performed a large-scare screening for mutants with abnormal leaves.Among a great number of leaf mutants we have generated by T-DNA and transposon tagging and ethylmethae sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis,four independent mutant lines have been identified and studied genetically.Phenotypes of these mutant lines represent the defects of four novel muclear genes designated LL1(LOTUS LEAF 1),LL2(LOTUS LEAF2),URO(UPRIGHT ROSETTE),and EIL(ENVIRONMENT CONDITION INDUCED LESION).The phenotypic analysis indicates that these genes play important roles during leaf development.For the further genetic analysis of these genes and the map-based cloning of LL1 and LL2,we have mapped these genes to chromosome regions with an efficient and rapid mapping method.

  9. Effects of common germ-line genetic variation in cell cycle genes on ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, H.; Hogdall, E.; Ramus, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Somatic alterations have been shown to correlate with ovarian cancer prognosis and survival, but less is known about the effects on survival of common inherited genetic variation. Of particular interest are genes involved in cell cycle pathways, which regulate cell division and could pla...

  10. Fine genetic mapping of target leaf spot resistance gene cca-3 in cucumber, Cucumis sativus L

    Science.gov (United States)

    The target leaf spot (TLS) is a very important fungal disease in cucumber. In this study, we conducted fine genetic mapping of a recessively inherited resistance gene, cca-2 against TLS with 1,083 F2 plants derived from the resistant cucumber inbred line D31 and the susceptible line D5. Initial mapp...

  11. Genetic control of lithium sensitivity and regulation of inositol biosynthetic genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason King

    Full Text Available Lithium (Li(+ is a common treatment for bipolar mood disorder, a major psychiatric illness with a lifetime prevalence of more than 1%. Risk of bipolar disorder is heavily influenced by genetic predisposition, but is a complex genetic trait and, to date, genetic studies have provided little insight into its molecular origins. An alternative approach is to investigate the genetics of Li(+ sensitivity. Using the social amoeba Dictyostelium, we previously identified prolyl oligopeptidase (PO as a modulator of Li(+ sensitivity. In a link to the clinic, PO enzyme activity is altered in bipolar disorder patients. Further studies demonstrated that PO is a negative regulator of inositol(1,4,5trisphosphate (IP(3 synthesis, a Li(+ sensitive intracellular signal. However, it was unclear how PO could influence either Li(+ sensitivity or risk of bipolar disorder. Here we show that in both Dictyostelium and cultured human cells PO acts via Multiple Inositol Polyphosphate Phosphatase (Mipp1 to control gene expression. This reveals a novel, gene regulatory network that modulates inositol metabolism and Li(+ sensitivity. Among its targets is the inositol monophosphatase gene IMPA2, which has also been associated with risk of bipolar disorder in some family studies, and our observations offer a cellular signalling pathway in which PO activity and IMPA2 gene expression converge.

  12. Hybrid Deterministic Views about Genes in Biology Textbooks: A Key Problem in Genetics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Vanessa Carvalho; Joaquim, Leyla Mariane; El-Hani, Charbel Nino

    2012-01-01

    A major source of difficulties in promoting students' understanding of genetics lies in the presentation of gene concepts and models in an inconsistent and largely ahistorical manner, merely amalgamated in hybrid views, as if they constituted linear developments, instead of being built for different purposes and employed in specific contexts. In…

  13. Genetic variants of CC chemokine genes in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ockinger, J; Stridh, P; Beyeen, A D

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disorder of the central nervous system, causing inflammation, demyelination and axonal damage. A limited number of genetic risk factors for MS have been identified, but the etiology of the disease remains largely unknown. For the identification of genes regula...

  14. Genetic dissection of acute ethanol responsive gene networks in prefrontal cortex: functional and mechanistic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron R Wolen

    Full Text Available Individual differences in initial sensitivity to ethanol are strongly related to the heritable risk of alcoholism in humans. To elucidate key molecular networks that modulate ethanol sensitivity we performed the first systems genetics analysis of ethanol-responsive gene expression in brain regions of the mesocorticolimbic reward circuit (prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and ventral midbrain across a highly diverse family of 27 isogenic mouse strains (BXD panel before and after treatment with ethanol.Acute ethanol altered the expression of ~2,750 genes in one or more regions and 400 transcripts were jointly modulated in all three. Ethanol-responsive gene networks were extracted with a powerful graph theoretical method that efficiently summarized ethanol's effects. These networks correlated with acute behavioral responses to ethanol and other drugs of abuse. As predicted, networks were heavily populated by genes controlling synaptic transmission and neuroplasticity. Several of the most densely interconnected network hubs, including Kcnma1 and Gsk3β, are known to influence behavioral or physiological responses to ethanol, validating our overall approach. Other major hub genes like Grm3, Pten and Nrg3 represent novel targets of ethanol effects. Networks were under strong genetic control by variants that we mapped to a small number of chromosomal loci. Using a novel combination of genetic, bioinformatic and network-based approaches, we identified high priority cis-regulatory candidate genes, including Scn1b, Gria1, Sncb and Nell2.The ethanol-responsive gene networks identified here represent a previously uncharacterized intermediate phenotype between DNA variation and ethanol sensitivity in mice. Networks involved in synaptic transmission were strongly regulated by ethanol and could contribute to behavioral plasticity seen with chronic ethanol. Our novel finding that hub genes and a small number of loci exert major influence over the ethanol

  15. Genetic Dissection of Acute Ethanol Responsive Gene Networks in Prefrontal Cortex: Functional and Mechanistic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolen, Aaron R.; Phillips, Charles A.; Langston, Michael A.; Putman, Alex H.; Vorster, Paul J.; Bruce, Nathan A.; York, Timothy P.; Williams, Robert W.; Miles, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Individual differences in initial sensitivity to ethanol are strongly related to the heritable risk of alcoholism in humans. To elucidate key molecular networks that modulate ethanol sensitivity we performed the first systems genetics analysis of ethanol-responsive gene expression in brain regions of the mesocorticolimbic reward circuit (prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and ventral midbrain) across a highly diverse family of 27 isogenic mouse strains (BXD panel) before and after treatment with ethanol. Results Acute ethanol altered the expression of ∼2,750 genes in one or more regions and 400 transcripts were jointly modulated in all three. Ethanol-responsive gene networks were extracted with a powerful graph theoretical method that efficiently summarized ethanol's effects. These networks correlated with acute behavioral responses to ethanol and other drugs of abuse. As predicted, networks were heavily populated by genes controlling synaptic transmission and neuroplasticity. Several of the most densely interconnected network hubs, including Kcnma1 and Gsk3β, are known to influence behavioral or physiological responses to ethanol, validating our overall approach. Other major hub genes like Grm3, Pten and Nrg3 represent novel targets of ethanol effects. Networks were under strong genetic control by variants that we mapped to a small number of chromosomal loci. Using a novel combination of genetic, bioinformatic and network-based approaches, we identified high priority cis-regulatory candidate genes, including Scn1b, Gria1, Sncb and Nell2. Conclusions The ethanol-responsive gene networks identified here represent a previously uncharacterized intermediate phenotype between DNA variation and ethanol sensitivity in mice. Networks involved in synaptic transmission were strongly regulated by ethanol and could contribute to behavioral plasticity seen with chronic ethanol. Our novel finding that hub genes and a small number of loci exert major influence

  16. Co-expression network analysis and genetic algorithms for gene prioritization in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera, Eduardo; Bernardes, João; Rebelo, Irene

    2013-11-12

    In this study, we explored the gene prioritization in preeclampsia, combining co-expression network analysis and genetic algorithms optimization approaches. We analysed five public projects obtaining 1,146 significant genes after cross-platform and processing of 81 and 149 microarrays in preeclamptic and normal conditions, respectively. After co-expression network construction, modular and node analysis were performed using several approaches. Moreover, genetic algorithms were also applied in combination with the nearest neighbour and discriminant analysis classification methods. Significant differences were found in the genes connectivity distribution, both in normal and preeclampsia conditions pointing to the need and importance of examining connectivity alongside expression for prioritization. We discuss the global as well as intra-modular connectivity for hubs detection and also the utility of genetic algorithms in combination with the network information. FLT1, LEP, INHA and ENG genes were identified according to the literature, however, we also found other genes as FLNB, INHBA, NDRG1 and LYN highly significant but underexplored during normal pregnancy or preeclampsia. Weighted genes co-expression network analysis reveals a similar distribution along the modules detected both in normal and preeclampsia conditions. However, major differences were obtained by analysing the nodes connectivity. All models obtained by genetic algorithm procedures were consistent with a correct classification, higher than 90%, restricting to 30 variables in both classification methods applied.Combining the two methods we identified well known genes related to preeclampsia, but also lead us to propose new candidates poorly explored or completely unknown in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia, which may have to be validated experimentally.

  17. The system of molecular-genetic triggers as self--organizing computing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Profir

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is shown, that the system of molecular-genetic triggers can solve the SAT problem. The molecular-genetic trigger represents the self-organizing structure and has attractors. The signal from one attractor is transmitted to other attractor, from the first level to the second level of the system. Molecular-genetic triggers work separately. The system of molecular-genetic triggers represents an example of parallel computing system. Suppose, that the system can receive two types of signals. In the first case, the system switches with the help of signals of a molecular nature (concentration of activators x1, x>sub>2, x3, x4. In the second case, the signals of wave nature of a resonant frequency can be utilized. It is possible to show, that the molecular--genetic system, can recognize images encoded by 2-dimensional vectors. Thus, the cells can be considered as parallel self-organizing system producing, receiving and transmitting the information.

  18. Social Organization of Crop Genetic Diversity. The G × E × S Interaction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geo Coppens d’Eeckenbrugge

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A better knowledge of factors organizing crop genetic diversity in situ increases the efficiency of diversity analyses and conservation strategies, and requires collaboration between social and biological disciplines. Four areas of anthropology may contribute to our understanding of the impact of social factors on crop diversity: ethnobotany, cultural, cognitive and social anthropology. So far, most collaborative studies have been based on ethnobotanical methods, focusing on farmers’ individual motivations and actions, and overlooking the effects of farmer’s social organization per se. After reviewing common shortcomings in studies on sorghum and maize, this article analyzes how social anthropology, through the analysis of intermarriage, residence and seed inheritance practices, can contribute to studies on crop genetic diversity in situ. Crop varieties are thus considered social objects and socially based sampling strategies can be developed. Such an approach is justified because seed exchange is built upon trust and as such seed systems are embedded in a pre-existing social structure and centripetally oriented as a function of farmers’ social identity. The strong analogy between farmers’ cultural differentiation and crop genetic differentiation, both submitted to the same vertical transmission processes, allows proposing a common methodological framework for social anthropology and crop population genetics, where the classical interaction between genetic and environmental factors, G × E, is replaced by a three-way interaction G × E × S, where “S” stands for the social differentiation factors.

  19. Gene and genetic diagnostic method patent claims: a comparison under current European and US patent law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Isabelle; Van Overwalle, Geertrui; Matthijs, Gert

    2011-10-01

    The paper focuses on the fundamental debate that is going on in Europe and the United States about whether genes and genetic diagnostic methods are to be regarded as inventions or subject matter eligible for patent protection, or whether they are discoveries or principles of nature and thus excluded from patentability. The study further explores some possible scenarios of American influences on European patent applications with respect to genetic diagnostic methods. Our analysis points out that patent eligibility for genes and genetic diagnostic methods, as discussed in the United States in the Association of Molecular Pathology versus US Patent and Trademark Office decision, is based on a different reasoning compared with the European Patent Convention.

  20. Genetic Analysis and Mapping of Dominant Minute Grain Gene Mi3(t) in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming-wei; LIU Yong; WANG Shi-quan; DENG Qi-ming; LI Ping

    2005-01-01

    Grain size, determined chiefly by grain Iength, is one of the main factors affecting the grain yield in rice production. To study the trait of rice grain size, F1 and F2 populations were developed from crosses Shuhui 881/Y34 and Shuhui 527/Y34, and genetic analysis for minute grain was performed. The F1 populations showed minute grains, and grain size segregations in the two F2 populations were both in accordance with the ratio of 3:1, indicating that minute grain in Y34 was controlled by a completely dominant gene. By using the F2 population from Shuhui 881/Y34, this dominant gene, tentatively designated as Mi3(t), was mapped based on SSR markers in the interval between RM282 (genetic distance of 5.1 cM) and RM6283 (genetic distance of 0.9 cM) on the short arm of chromosome 3.

  1. Gene set analyses for interpreting microarray experiments on prokaryotic organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Heffron Fred; Van Bruggen Dirk; DeJongh Matthew; Best Aaron A; Tintle Nathan L; Porwollik Steffen; Taylor Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite the widespread usage of DNA microarrays, questions remain about how best to interpret the wealth of gene-by-gene transcriptional levels that they measure. Recently, methods have been proposed which use biologically defined sets of genes in interpretation, instead of examining results gene-by-gene. Despite a serious limitation, a method based on Fisher's exact test remains one of the few plausible options for gene set analysis when an experiment has few replicates, ...

  2. Genetically modified crops for biomass increase. Genes and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Cristian Antonio; Hemerly, Adrianna Silva; Ferreira, Paulo Cavalcanti Gomes

    2010-01-01

    Genetically modified crops (GMCs) have been developed to accelerate the creation of new varieties with improved characteristics such as disease resistance, stress tolerance and higher quality composition. However, agriculture, without minimizing its role in food, feed and fiber source, has become important for the energy matrix of many countries. GMCs are also attractive systems that could fulfill the requirements for these new necessities. An increase of crop yields in an environmental friendly system is a new goal for plant biology research in the twenty-first century. In particular, biomass yield improvement is needed to render the use of biofuels economically feasible. In this context, research directed toward increasing biomass production has attracted much attention and a considerable effort is being made to reach new goals. Nonetheless, in some cases differentiated strategies are needed, as biomass improvement requires approaches other than those employed with traditional crops. This review summarizes the various approaches applied so far to modulate plant growth applying molecular biology-based strategies and increase biomass production, and it highlights several outstanding issues about the developmental constraints that must be addressed.

  3. Genetic transformation of Begonia tuberhybrida by Ri rol genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, S; Kikuchi, Y; Kamada, H; Harada, H

    1996-04-01

    We have developed an Agrobacterium -mediated transformation system for commercial Begonia species. The leaf explants of Begonia semperflorens, Begonia x hiemalis and B. tuberhybrida were inoculated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404 harboring a binary vector pBI121 which contains rolA, B and C genes of an agropine type Ri plasmid (pRiA4b). Kanamycin resistant shoots of B. tuberhybrida were obtained on MS agar medium supplemented with 0.1 mg/l NAA, 0.5 mg/l BA, 500 mg/l claforan and 100 mg/l kanamycin. These shoots exhibited GUS activity and Southern analysis showed a single copy insertion into the genome. When the transgenic plants were transferred to soil, they displayed the phenotype specific to the transgenic plants by A. rhizogenes such as dwarfness, delay of flowering, and wrinkled leaves and petals.

  4. Genetic and epigenetic changes of genes on chromosome 3 in human urogenital tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordiyuk V. V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous disorders of genes and alterations of their expression are observed on a short arm of human chromosome 3, particularly in 3p14, 3p21, 3p24 compact regions in epithelial tumors. These aberrations affect the key biological processes specific for cancerogenesis. Such genes or their products could be used for diagnostics and prognosis of cancer. Genetical and epigenetical changes of a number of genes on chromosome 3 in human urogenital cancer, their role in cellular processes and signal pathways and perspectives as molecular markers of cancer diseases are analyzed in the review

  5. Early host gene expression responses to a Salmonella infection in the intestine of chickens with different genetic background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, van S.; Hoekman, A.J.W.; Smith, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    So far the responses of chickens to Salmonella have not been studied in vivo on a whole genome-wide scale. Furthermore, the influence of the host genetic background on gene expression responses is unknown. In this study gene expression profiles in the chicken (Gallus gallus) intestine of two genetic

  6. Genetic mosaicism of a frameshift mutation in the RET gene in a family with Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Charlotte M; Haase, Michael G; Kemnitz, Ivonne; Fitze, Guido

    2014-05-10

    Mutations and polymorphisms in the RET gene are a major cause of Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Theoretically, all true heterozygous patients with a new manifestation of a genetically determined disease must have parents with a genetic mosaicism of some extent. However, no genetic mosaicism has been described for the RET gene in HSCR yet. Therefore, we analyzed families with mutations in the RET gene for genetic mosaicism in the parents of the patients. Blood samples were taken from patients with HSCR and their families/parents to sequence the RET coding region. Among 125 families with HSCR, 33 families with RET mutations were analyzed. In one family, we detected a frameshift mutation due to a loss of one in a row of four cytosines in codon 117/118 of the RET gene (c.352delC) leading to a frameshift mutation in the protein (p.Leu118Cysfs*105) that affected two siblings. In the blood sample of the asymptomatic father we found a genetic mosaicism of this mutation which was confirmed in two independent samples of saliva and hair roots. Quantification of peak-heights and comparison with different mixtures of normal and mutated plasmid DNA suggested that the mutation occurred in the early morula stadium of the founder, between the 4- and 8-cell stages. We conclude that the presence of a RET mutation leading to loss of one functional allele in 20 to 25% of the cells is not sufficient to cause HSCR. The possibility of a mosaicism has to be kept in mind during genetic counseling for inherited diseases.

  7. Developmental genetics and new sequencing technologies: the rise of nonmodel organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Beth A; Weigel, Detlef; Koenig, Daniel

    2011-07-19

    Much of developmental biology in the past decades has been driven by forward genetic studies in a few model organisms. We review recent work with relatives of these species, motivated by a desire to understand the evolutionary and ecological context for morphological innovation. Unfortunately, despite a number of shining examples, progress in nonmodel systems has often been slow. The current revolution in DNA sequencing has, however, enormous potential in extending the reach of genetics. We discuss how developmental biology will benefit from these advances, particularly by increasing the universe of study species.

  8. Synthetic alienation of microbial organisms by using genetic code engineering: Why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubyshkin, Vladimir; Budisa, Nediljko

    2017-08-01

    The main goal of synthetic biology (SB) is the creation of biodiversity applicable for biotechnological needs, while xenobiology (XB) aims to expand the framework of natural chemistries with the non-natural building blocks in living cells to accomplish artificial biodiversity. Protein and proteome engineering, which overcome limitation of the canonical amino acid repertoire of 20 (+2) prescribed by the genetic code by using non-canonic amino acids (ncAAs), is one of the main focuses of XB research. Ideally, estranging the genetic code from its current form via systematic introduction of ncAAs should enable the development of bio-containment mechanisms in synthetic cells potentially endowing them with a "genetic firewall" i.e. orthogonality which prevents genetic information transfer to natural systems. Despite rapid progress over the past two decades, it is not yet possible to completely alienate an organism that would use and maintain different genetic code associations permanently. In order to engineer robust bio-contained life forms, the chemical logic behind the amino acid repertoire establishment should be considered. Starting from recent proposal of Hartman and Smith about the genetic code establishment in the RNA world, here the authors mapped possible biotechnological invasion points for engineering of bio-contained synthetic cells equipped with non-canonical functionalities. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Market organization and animal genetic resource management: a revealed preference analysis of sheep pricing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindano, K; Moula, N; Leroy, P; Traoré, A; Antoine-Moussiaux, N

    2017-10-01

    Farm animal genetic resources are threatened worldwide. Participation in markets, while representing a crucial way out of poverty for many smallholders, affects genetic management choices with associated sustainability concerns. This paper proposes a contextualized study of the interactions between markets and animal genetic resources management, in the case of sheep markets in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. It focusses on the organization of marketing chains and the valuation of genetic characteristics by value chain actors. Marketing chain characterization was tackled through semi-structured interviews with 25 exporters and 15 butchers, both specialized in sheep. Moreover, revealed preference methods were applied to analyse the impact of animals' attributes on market pricing. Data were collected from 338 transactions during three different periods: Eid al-Adha, Christmas and New Year period, and a neutral period. The neutral period is understood as a period not close to any event likely to influence the demand for sheep. The results show that physical characteristics such as live weight, height at withers and coat colour have a strong influence on the animals' prices. Live weight has also had an increasing marginal impact on price. The different markets (local butcher, feasts, export market, sacrifices) represent distinct demands for genetic characteristics, entailing interesting consequences for animal genetic resource management. Any breeding programme should therefore take this diversity into account to allow this sector to contribute better to a sustainable development of the country.

  10. THE ROLE OF ORGANIC AGRICULTURE IN THE CONSERVATION OF GENETIC RESOURCES AND INCREASING AGRODIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana ROLJEVIC

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic agriculture is an ecological form of production that promotes natural processes and biological diversity, legallyregulated and is subject to inspection, which guarantees quality and health safety of food produced. Except producing healthyand quality food, the adoption of organic agriculture in recent decades has been indirectly established for saving species andvarieties of cultivated plants which is due to lack of use threat disappearance.This paper analyzes the state of the global andnational soil area under organic agriculture, as well as state of soil under organic production of grain crops as crucial for thefood security of almost all countries in the world.Furthermore, paper work presents the state of genetic resources of cereals andshow importance that organic agriculture has in process of preservation agro-diversity.

  11. Natural Genetic Variation and Candidate Genes for Morphological Traits in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Paula Carreira

    Full Text Available Body size is a complex character associated to several fitness related traits that vary within and between species as a consequence of environmental and genetic factors. Latitudinal and altitudinal clines for different morphological traits have been described in several species of Drosophila and previous work identified genomic regions associated with such variation in D. melanogaster. However, the genetic factors that orchestrate morphological variation have been barely studied. Here, our main objective was to investigate genetic variation for different morphological traits associated to the second chromosome in natural populations of D. melanogaster along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in Argentina. Our results revealed weak clinal signals and a strong population effect on morphological variation. Moreover, most pairwise comparisons between populations were significant. Our study also showed important within-population genetic variation, which must be associated to the second chromosome, as the lines are otherwise genetically identical. Next, we examined the contribution of different candidate genes to natural variation for these traits. We performed quantitative complementation tests using a battery of lines bearing mutated alleles at candidate genes located in the second chromosome and six second chromosome substitution lines derived from natural populations which exhibited divergent phenotypes. Results of complementation tests revealed that natural variation at all candidate genes studied, invected, Fasciclin 3, toucan, Reticulon-like1, jing and CG14478, affects the studied characters, suggesting that they are Quantitative Trait Genes for morphological traits. Finally, the phenotypic patterns observed suggest that different alleles of each gene might contribute to natural variation for morphological traits. However, non-additive effects cannot be ruled out, as wild-derived strains differ at myriads of second chromosome loci that may

  12. Genetic similarity between cancers and comorbid Mendelian diseases identifies candidate driver genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Rachel D; Emmett, Kevin J; Madubata, Chioma; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Rabadan, Raul

    2015-04-30

    Despite large-scale cancer genomics studies, key somatic mutations driving cancer, and their functional roles, remain elusive. Here, we propose that analysis of comorbidities of Mendelian diseases with cancers provides a novel, systematic way to discover new cancer genes. If germline genetic variation in Mendelian loci predisposes bearers to common cancers, the same loci may harbour cancer-associated somatic variation. Compilations of clinical records spanning over 100 million patients provide an unprecedented opportunity to assess clinical associations between Mendelian diseases and cancers. We systematically compare these comorbidities against recurrent somatic mutations from more than 5,000 patients across many cancers. Using multiple measures of genetic similarity, we show that a Mendelian disease and comorbid cancer indeed have genetic alterations of significant functional similarity. This result provides a basis to identify candidate drivers in cancers including melanoma and glioblastoma. Some Mendelian diseases demonstrate 'pan-cancer' comorbidity and shared genetics across cancers.

  13. Genetic distances between Chinese populations calculated on gene frequencies of 38 loci

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜若甫; 肖春杰; L. L. Cavalli-Sforza

    1997-01-01

    Genetic distances were calculated for Han subpopulations in different provinces, cities and au-tonomous regions and ethnic minorities in China by using gene frequency data of 38 loci, and genetic trees were con-structed. The results showed that, among both Han and ethnic minorities, there were two types, i.e. southern and northern Mongoloids, with Yangtze River as boundary. Therefore, both African origin theory and local origin theory about the modern man should answer the question; when did these two types separate and how did they develop. This paper also conclusively proved genetically that the Han subpopulations in different regions are genetically close to the lo-cal ethnic minorities, which indicates that much blood of ethnic minorities has mixed into Han, at the same time, some blood of Han also has mixed into the local ethnic minorities.

  14. Genetic Analysis and Molecular Mapping of a Novel Chlorophyll-Deficit Mutant Gene in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiao-qun; WANG Ping-rong; ZHAO Hai-xin; DENG Xiao-jian

    2008-01-01

    A rice etiolation mutant 824ys featured with chlorophyll deficiency was identified from a normal green rice variety 824B.It showed whole green-yellow plant from the seedling stage,reduced number of tillers and longer growth duration.The contents of chlorophyll,chlorophyll a,chlorophyll b and net photosynthetic rate in leaves of the mutant obviously decreased,as well as the number of spikelets per panicle,seed setting rate and 1000-grain weight compared with its wild-type parent.Genetic analyses on F1 and F2 generetions of 824ys crossed with three normal green varieties showed that the chlorophyll-deficit mutant character was controlled by a pair of recessive nuclear gene.Genetic mapping of the mutant gene was conducted by using microsatellite markers and F2 mapping population of 495R/824ys,and the mutant gene of 824ys was mapped on the shon arm of rice chromosome 3.The genetic distances from the target gene to the markers RM218,RM282 and RM6959 were 25.6 cM,5.2 cM and 21.8 cM,respectively.It was considered to be a now chlorophyll-deficit mutant gene and tentatively named as chl11(t).

  15. Molecular genetic, diagnosis, prevention and gene therapy in prostatic cancer: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noori Daloii MR

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nThe prostate is a small gland located below the bladder and upper part of the urethra. In developed countries prostate cancer is the second common cancer (after skin cancer, and also the second leading cause of cancer death (after lung cancer among men. The several studies have been shown prostate cancer familial aggregation. The main reason for this aggregation is inheritance included genes. The family history is an important risk factor for developing the disease. The genes AR, CYP17, SRD5A2, HSD3B1 and HSD3B2 are all intimately involved in androgen metabolism and cell proliferation in the prostate. Each shows intraspecific polymorphism and variation among racial-ethnic groups that is associated with the risk of prostate cancer. Some of genes expressed in the prostate are in association with the production of seminal fluid and also with prostate cancer. Epigenetic modifications, specifically DNA hypermethylation, are believed to play an important role in the down-regulation of genes important for protection against prostate cancer. In prostate cancer numerous molecular and genetic aberrations have been described. It is now well established that cancer cells exhibit a number of genetic defects in apoptotic pathways. In this review article, the most recent data in molecular genetic, prevention and especially gene therapy in prostate cancer are introduced.

  16. GeneLink: a database to facilitate genetic studies of complex traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfsberg Tyra G

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to gene-mapping studies of simple Mendelian disorders, genetic analyses of complex traits are far more challenging, and high quality data management systems are often critical to the success of these projects. To minimize the difficulties inherent in complex trait studies, we have developed GeneLink, a Web-accessible, password-protected Sybase database. Results GeneLink is a powerful tool for complex trait mapping, enabling genotypic data to be easily merged with pedigree and extensive phenotypic data. Specifically designed to facilitate large-scale (multi-center genetic linkage or association studies, GeneLink securely and efficiently handles large amounts of data and provides additional features to facilitate data analysis by existing software packages and quality control. These include the ability to download chromosome-specific data files containing marker data in map order in various formats appropriate for downstream analyses (e.g., GAS and LINKAGE. Furthermore, an unlimited number of phenotypes (either qualitative or quantitative can be stored and analyzed. Finally, GeneLink generates several quality assurance reports, including genotyping success rates of specified DNA samples or success and heterozygosity rates for specified markers. Conclusions GeneLink has already proven an invaluable tool for complex trait mapping studies and is discussed primarily in the context of our large, multi-center study of hereditary prostate cancer (HPC. GeneLink is freely available at http://research.nhgri.nih.gov/genelink.

  17. Defining genes using "blueprint" versus "instruction" metaphors: effects for genetic determinism, response efficacy, and perceived control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne; Smith, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    Evidence supports mixed attributions aligned with personal and/or clinical control and gene expression for health in this era of genomic science and health care. We consider variance in these attributions and possible relationships to individual mind sets associated with essentialist beliefs that genes determine health versus threat beliefs that genes increase susceptibility for disease and severity linked to gene-environment interactions. Further, we contribute to theory and empirical research to evaluate the use of metaphors to define genes. Participants (N = 324) read a message that varied the introduction by providing a definition of genes that used either an "instruction" metaphor or a "blueprint" metaphor. The "instruction" metaphor compared to the "blueprint" metaphor promoted stronger threat perceptions, which aligned with both belief in the response efficacy of genetic research for health and perceived behavioral control linked to genes and health. The "blueprint" metaphor compared to the "instruction" metaphor promoted stronger essentialist beliefs, which aligned with more intense positive regard for the efficacy of genetic research and human health. Implications for health communicators include societal effects aligned with stigma and discrimination that such findings portend.

  18. Phenotypic effects of genetic variability in human clock genes on circadian and sleep parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malcolm Von Schantz

    2008-12-01

    Circadian rhythms and sleep are two separate but intimately related processes. Circadian rhythms are generated through the precisely controlled, cyclic expression of a number of genes designated clock genes. Genetic variability in these genes has been associated with a number of phenotypic differences in circadian as well as sleep parameters, both in mouse models and in humans. Diurnal preferences as determined by the selfreported Horne–Östberg (HÖ) questionnaire, has been associated with polymorphisms in the human genes CLOCK, PER1, PER2 and PER3. Circadian rhythm-related sleep disorders have also been associated with mutations and polymorphisms in clock genes, with the advanced type cosegrating in an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with mutations in the genes PER2 and CSNK1D, and the delayed type associating without discernible Mendelian inheritance with polymorphisms in CLOCK and PER3. Several mouse models of clock gene null alleles have been demonstrated to have affected sleep homeostasis. Recent findings have shown that the variable number tandem polymorphism in PER3, previously linked to diurnal preference, has profound effects on sleep homeostasis and cognitive performance following sleep loss, confirming the close association between the processes of circadian rhythms and sleep at the genetic level.

  19. Effects of cis and trans genetic ancestry on gene expression in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkes L Price

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Variation in gene expression is a fundamental aspect of human phenotypic variation. Several recent studies have analyzed gene expression levels in populations of different continental ancestry and reported population differences at a large number of genes. However, these differences could largely be due to non-genetic (e.g., environmental effects. Here, we analyze gene expression levels in African American cell lines, which differ from previously analyzed cell lines in that individuals from this population inherit variable proportions of two continental ancestries. We first relate gene expression levels in individual African Americans to their genome-wide proportion of European ancestry. The results provide strong evidence of a genetic contribution to expression differences between European and African populations, validating previous findings. Second, we infer local ancestry (0, 1, or 2 European chromosomes at each location in the genome and investigate the effects of ancestry proximal to the expressed gene (cis versus ancestry elsewhere in the genome (trans. Both effects are highly significant, and we estimate that 12+/-3% of all heritable variation in human gene expression is due to cis variants.

  20. [Research progress on the cloning of Mendel's gene in pea (Pisum sativum L.) and its application in genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng-Hua; Zhu, Bi-Yan; Gao, Feng; Li, Shao-Shan; Li, Niang-Hui

    2013-07-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago, Gregor Mendel investigated the segregation of seven traits in pea (Pisum sativum) and established the law of segregation and the law of independent assortment in genetics. After the two laws of genetics were rediscovered in 1900, the seven traits have been extensively investigated in the fields of plant physiology and biochemistry as well as in the cell and molecular levels. Recently, with the development of molecular technology in genetics, four genes for seed shape (R), stem length (Le), cotyledon colour (I), and flower colour (A) have been cloned and sequenced; and another three genes for immature pod colour (Gp), fasciation (Fa) and pod form (V) have been located in the linkage groups, respectively. The identification and cloning of the four Mendel's genes will help deeply understand the basic concept of gene in many respects: like the diversity of gene function, the different origins for gene mutation in molecular level, and the molecular nature of a dominant gene or a recessive gene. In teaching of genetics, the introduction of most recent research advancements of cloning of Mendel's genes to the students and the interpretation of the Mendel's laws in molecular level will help students promote their learning interests in genetics and help students grasp the whole content from classical genetics to molecular genetics and the developmental direction of this subject.