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Sample records for genetic mutation

  1. Genetic mutations associated with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, M; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary search of the literature aimed at identifying the genetic mutations reported to be strongly associated with status epilepticus. Genetic mutations were selected for inclusion if status epilepticus was specifically mentioned as a consequence of the mutation in standard genetic databases or in a case report or review article. Mutations in 122 genes were identified. The genetic mutations identified were found in only rare conditions (sometimes vanishingly rare) and mostly in infants and young children with multiple other handicaps. Most of the genetic mutations can be subdivided into those associated with cortical dysplasias, inborn errors of metabolism, mitochondrial disease, or epileptic encephalopathies and childhood syndromes. There are no identified 'pure status epilepticus genes'. The range of genes underpinning status epilepticus differs in many ways from the range of genes underpinning epilepsy, which suggests that the processes underpinning status epilepticus differ from those underpinning epilepsy. It has been frequently postulated that status epilepticus is the result of a failure of 'seizure termination mechanisms', but the wide variety of genes affecting very diverse biochemical pathways identified in this survey makes any unitary cause unlikely. The genetic influences in status epilepticus are likely to involve a wide range of mechanisms, some related to development, some to cerebral energy production, some to diverse altered biochemical pathways, some to transmitter and membrane function, and some to defects in networks or systems. The fact that many of the identified genes are involved with cerebral development suggests that status epilepticus might often be a system or network phenomenon. To date, there are very few genes identified which are associated with adult-onset status epilepticus (except in those with preexisting neurological damage), and this is disappointing as the cause of many adult

  2. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

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    Muthumula Daneswari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  3. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-07-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  4. GENE MUTATIONS, GENETIC DISEASE AND PHARMACOGENETIC GENES DISORDER

    OpenAIRE

    Ishak

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell mutation is able to create genetic variance in a cell population and can induce cancer and tumor when gene mutations took place at repressor gene in controlling cell cycles such as p53 gene. Whereas germline cell mutation can cause genetic disease such as sickle cell anemia, breast cancer, thalassemia, parkinson’s as well as defect of biochemical pathway that influence drug-receptor interaction, which has negative effect and lead to hospitalized of patient. Most of reports mentio...

  5. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon.

  6. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum.

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    Nathaniel P Sharp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health.

  7. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Nathaniel P.; Agrawal, Aneil F.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health. PMID:27015430

  8. A Mutation Model from First Principles of the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorvaldsen, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a neutral Codons Probability Mutations (CPM) model of molecular evolution and genetic decay of an organism. The CPM model uses a Markov process with a 20-dimensional state space of probability distributions over amino acids. The transition matrix of the Markov process includes the mutation rate and those single point mutations compatible with the genetic code. This is an alternative to the standard Point Accepted Mutation (PAM) and BLOcks of amino acid SUbstitution Matrix (BLOSUM). Genetic decay is quantified as a similarity between the amino acid distribution of proteins from a (group of) species on one hand, and the equilibrium distribution of the Markov chain on the other. Amino acid data for the eukaryote, bacterium, and archaea families are used to illustrate how both the CPM and PAM models predict their genetic decay towards the equilibrium value of 1. A family of bacteria is studied in more detail. It is found that warm environment organisms on average have a higher degree of genetic decay compared to those species that live in cold environments. The paper addresses a new codon-based approach to quantify genetic decay due to single point mutations compatible with the genetic code. The present work may be seen as a first approach to use codon-based Markov models to study how genetic entropy increases with time in an effectively neutral biological regime. Various extensions of the model are also discussed.

  9. Point mutations as a source of de novo genetic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligt, J. de; Veltman, J.A.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Family-based next generation sequencing (NGS) has recently pointed to an important role for de novo germline point mutations in both rare and common genetic disorders associated with reduced fitness. In this review we highlight the impact of the mutational target size on the frequency of diseases ca

  10. Semiclassical genetic algorithm with quantum crossover and mutation operations

    CERN Document Server

    SaiToh, Akira; Nakahara, Mikio

    2012-01-01

    In order for finding a good individual for a given fitness function in the context of evolutionary computing, we introduce a novel semiclassical quantum genetic algorithm. It has both of quantum crossover and quantum mutation procedures unlike conventional quantum genetic algorithms. A complexity analysis shows a certain improvement over its classical counterpart.

  11. FLG mutations in ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic eczema: spectrum of mutations and population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, M

    2010-03-01

    Filaggrin is a key protein involved in skin barrier function. Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) have been identified as the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris and have been shown to be major predisposing factors for atopic eczema (AE), initially in European populations. Subsequently, FLG mutations were identified in Japanese, Chinese, Taiwanese and Korean populations. It was demonstrated that FLG mutations are closely associated with AE in the Japanese population. Notably, the same FLG mutations identified in the European population were rarely found in Asians. These results exemplify differences in filaggrin population genetics between Europe and Asia. For mutation screening, background information needs to be obtained on prevalent FLG mutations for each geographical population. It is therefore important to establish the global population genetics maps for FLG mutations. Mutations at any site within FLG, even mutations in C-terminal imperfect filaggrin repeats, cause significant reductions in amounts of profilaggrin/filaggrin peptide in patient epidermis as the C-terminal region is essential for proper processing of profilaggrin into filaggrin. Thus, no genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed in patients with FLG mutations. A restoration of the barrier function seems a feasible and promising strategy for treatment and prevention in individuals with filaggrin deficiency.

  12. Distinguishing Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Associated Mutations from Background Genetic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Bos, J. Martijn; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significant progress that has been made in identifying disease-associated mutations, the utility of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) genetic test is limited by a lack of understanding of the background genetic variation inherent to these sarcomeric genes in seemingly healthy subjects. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of genetic variation in 427 ostensibly healthy individuals for the HCM genetic test using the “Gold Standard” Sanger sequencing method validating the background rate identified in the publically available exomes. While mutations are clearly over-represented in disease, a background rate as high as ~5% among healthy individuals prevents diagnostic certainty. To this end, we have identified a number of estimated predictive value-based associations including gene-specific, topology, and conservation methods generating an algorithm aiding in the probabilistic interpretation of an HCM genetic test. PMID:24510615

  13. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Somatic Mutations and Candidate Genetic Risk Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Katie M O'Brien; Irene Orlow; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Karla Ballman; Linda McCall; Ronald DeMatteo; Engel, Lawrence S.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated w...

  14. BRCA mutation genetic testing implications in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Soley; Arun, Banu

    2017-02-01

    BRCA mutation carriers have a very high risk of breast and ovarian cancer by age 70, in the ranges 47%-66% and 40%-57%, respectively. Additionally, women with BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer also have an elevated risk of other or secondary malignancies. Fortunately, the breast and ovarian cancer outcome for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers is at least as good as for non-carriers with chemoprevention, prophylactic surgeries and appropriate use of therapies. Therefore, identification of those who might have a mutation is important so that genetic counseling, testing, screening and prevention strategies can be applied in a timely manner. This article reviews the impact of genetic testing in general, timing of genetic testing after diagnosis and prior knowledge of mutation status in BRCA carriers with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Additionally, risk-reducing surgeries including the prophylactic contralateral mastectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and the sensitivity of BRCA-defective breast cancer cell lines to differential chemotherapeutic agents will be discussed.

  15. Identification of Germline Genetic Mutations in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E.; O’Reilly, Eileen; Kelsen, David; Ashraf, Asad M.; Lowery, Maeve; Yu, Kenneth; Reidy, Diane; Epstein, Andrew S.; Lincoln, Anne; Saldia, Amethyst; Jacobs, Lauren M.; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Zhang, Liying; Kurtz, Robert; Saltz, Leonard; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Stadler, Zsofia K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is part of several cancer predisposition syndromes; however, indications for genetic counseling/testing are not well-defined. We sought to determine mutation prevalence and characteristics that predict for inherited predisposition to PAC. Methods We identified 175 consecutive PAC patients who underwent clinical genetics assessment at Memorial Sloan Kettering between 2011–2014. Clinical data, family history, and germline results were evaluated. Results Among 159 PAC patients who pursued genetic testing, 24 pathogenic mutations were identified (15.1%; 95%CI, 9.5%–20.7%), including BRCA2(n=13), BRCA1(n=4), p16(n=2), PALB2(n=1), and Lynch syndrome(n=4). BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence was 13.7% in Ashkenazi Jewish(AJ) (n=95) and 7.1% in non-AJ(n=56) patients. In AJ patients with strong, weak, or absent family history of BRCA-associated cancers, mutation prevalence was 16.7%, 15.8%, and 7.4%, respectively. Mean age at diagnosis in all mutation carriers was 58.5y(range 45–75y) compared to 64y(range 27–87y) in non-mutation carriers(P=0.02). Although BRCA2 was the most common mutation identified, no patients with early-onset PAC(≤50y) harbored a BRCA2 mutation and the mean age at diagnosis in BRCA2 carriers was equivalent to non-mutation carriers(P=0.34). Mutation prevalence in early-onset patients(n=21) was 28.6%, including BRCA1(n=2), p16(n=2), MSH2(n=1) and MLH1(n=1). Conclusion Mutations in BRCA2 account for over 50% of PAC patients with an identified susceptibility syndrome. AJ patients had high BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence regardless of personal/family history, suggesting that ancestry alone indicates a need for genetic evaluation. With the exception of BRCA2-associated PAC, inherited predisposition to PAC is associated with earlier age at PAC diagnosis suggesting that this subset of patients may also represent a population warranting further evaluation. PMID:26440929

  16. Revertant mutation releases confined lethal mutation, opening Pandora's box: a novel genetic pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When two mutations, one dominant pathogenic and the other "confining" nonsense, coexist in the same allele, theoretically, reversion of the latter may elicit a disease, like the opening of Pandora's box. However, cases of this hypothetical pathogenic mechanism have never been reported. We describe a lethal form of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome caused by the reversion of the GJB2 nonsense mutation p.Tyr136X that would otherwise have confined the effect of another dominant lethal mutation, p.Gly45Glu, in the same allele. The patient's mother had the identical misssense mutation which was confined by the nonsense mutation. The biological relationship between the parents and the child was confirmed by genotyping of 15 short tandem repeat loci. Haplotype analysis using 40 SNPs spanning the >39 kbp region surrounding the GJB2 gene and an extended SNP microarray analysis spanning 83,483 SNPs throughout chromosome 13 in the family showed that an allelic recombination event involving the maternal allele carrying the mutations generated the pathogenic allele unique to the patient, although the possibility of coincidental accumulation of spontaneous point mutations cannot be completely excluded. Previous reports and our mutation screening support that p.Gly45Glu is in complete linkage disequilibrium with p.Tyr136X in the Japanese population. Estimated from statisitics in the literature, there may be approximately 11,000 p.Gly45Glu carriers in the Japanese population who have this second-site confining mutation, which acts as natural genetic protection from the lethal disease. The reversion-triggered onset of the disesase shown in this study is a previously unreported genetic pathogenesis based on Mendelian inheritance.

  17. Revertant mutation releases confined lethal mutation, opening Pandora's box: a novel genetic pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When two mutations, one dominant pathogenic and the other "confining" nonsense, coexist in the same allele, theoretically, reversion of the latter may elicit a disease, like the opening of Pandora's box. However, cases of this hypothetical pathogenic mechanism have never been reported. We describe a lethal form of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome caused by the reversion of the GJB2 nonsense mutation p.Tyr136X that would otherwise have confined the effect of another dominant lethal mutation, p.Gly45Glu, in the same allele. The patient's mother had the identical misssense mutation which was confined by the nonsense mutation. The biological relationship between the parents and the child was confirmed by genotyping of 15 short tandem repeat loci. Haplotype analysis using 40 SNPs spanning the >39 kbp region surrounding the GJB2 gene and an extended SNP microarray analysis spanning 83,483 SNPs throughout chromosome 13 in the family showed that an allelic recombination event involving the maternal allele carrying the mutations generated the pathogenic allele unique to the patient, although the possibility of coincidental accumulation of spontaneous point mutations cannot be completely excluded. Previous reports and our mutation screening support that p.Gly45Glu is in complete linkage disequilibrium with p.Tyr136X in the Japanese population. Estimated from statisitics in the literature, there may be approximately 11,000 p.Gly45Glu carriers in the Japanese population who have this second-site confining mutation, which acts as natural genetic protection from the lethal disease. The reversion-triggered onset of the disesase shown in this study is a previously unreported genetic pathogenesis based on Mendelian inheritance.

  18. Mutation@A Glance : an integrative web application for analysing mutations from human genetic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijikata, A.; Raju, R.; Keerthikumar, S.; Ramabadran, S.; Balakrishnan, L.; Ramadoss, S.K.; Pandey, A.; Mohan, S.; Ohara, O.

    2010-01-01

    Although mutation analysis serves as a key part in making a definitive diagnosis about a genetic disease, it still remains a time-consuming step to interpret their biological implications through integration of various lines of archived information about genes in question. To expedite this evaluatio

  19. Solving TSP Using Advanced Crossover & Mutating Operators of Genetic Algorithm

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    Shruti Sharma

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develops a new crossover and mutating operator, Round crossover (RX and Round mutating (RM operator, for a genetic algorithm that generates high quality solutions to the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP. The round crossover operator constructs an offspring from a pair of parents in a circular way using better edges on the basis of their values that may be present in the parents’ structure maintaining the sequence of nodes in the parent chromosomes. The round mutation applied to the resultant chromosome after crossover by selecting a random cut point and then joining the remaining substring to first substring in circular way. The efficiency of the RX is compared as against some existing crossover operators; namely, edge recombination crossover (ERX, Order crossover (OX and partially Matched crossover (PMX for some benchmark TSPLIB instances. Experimental results show that the new crossover operator is better than the PMX, ERX and OX

  20. Hereditary hemochromatosis: HFE mutation analysis in Greeks reveals genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, G; Politou, M; Terpos, E; Fourlemadis, S; Sakellaropoulos, N; Loukopoulos, D

    2000-04-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is common among Caucasians; reported disease frequencies vary from 0.3 to 0.8%. Identification of a candidate HFE gene in 1996 was soon followed by the description of two ancestral mutations, i.e., c.845G-->A (C282Y) and c.187C-->G (H63D). To these was recently added the mutation S65C, which may represent a simple polymorphism. The incidence of HH in Greece is unknown but clinical cases are rare. Also unknown is the carrier frequency of the two mutant alleles. A first estimate of the latter is given in the present report. It is based on data from the genetic analysis of 10 unrelated patients of Greek origin who were referred to our center for genotyping and 158 unselected male blood donors. The allele frequencies for the C282Y and H63D mutations were 0.003 and 0.145, respectively. The C282Y allele was detected in 50% of HH patients. This is considerably lower than the frequencies reported for HH patients in the U.S.A. (82%) and France (91 %) and closer to that reported in Italy (64%). Five patients did not carry any known HFE mutation; three may represent cases of juvenile hemochromatosis, given their early onset with iron overload, hypogonadism, and heart disease. We suggest that genetic heterogeneity is more prominent in Southern Europe. It is also possible that the penetrance of the responsible genes is different across the Mediterranean.

  1. G protein-coupled receptor mutations and human genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Miles D; Hendy, Geoffrey N; Percy, Maire E; Bichet, Daniel G; Cole, David E C

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes (GPCRs) disrupt GPCR function in a wide variety of human genetic diseases. In vitro strategies and animal models have been used to identify the molecular pathologies underlying naturally occurring GPCR mutations. Inactive, overactive, or constitutively active receptors have been identified that result in pathology. These receptor variants may alter ligand binding, G protein coupling, receptor desensitization and receptor recycling. Receptor systems discussed include rhodopsin, thyrotropin, parathyroid hormone, melanocortin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRHR), adrenocorticotropic hormone, vasopressin, endothelin-β, purinergic, and the G protein associated with asthma (GPRA or neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1)). The role of activating and inactivating calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) mutations is discussed in detail with respect to familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) and autosomal dominant hypocalemia (ADH). The CASR mutations have been associated with epilepsy. Diseases caused by the genetic disruption of GPCR functions are discussed in the context of their potential to be selectively targeted by drugs that rescue altered receptors. Examples of drugs developed as a result of targeting GPCRs mutated in disease include: calcimimetics and calcilytics, therapeutics targeting melanocortin receptors in obesity, interventions that alter GNRHR loss from the cell surface in idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and novel drugs that might rescue the P2RY12 receptor congenital bleeding phenotype. De-orphanization projects have identified novel disease-associated receptors, such as NPSR1 and GPR35. The identification of variants in these receptors provides genetic reagents useful in drug screens. Discussion of the variety of GPCRs that are disrupted in monogenic Mendelian disorders provides the basis for examining the significance of common

  2. Portal Vein Embolization: Impact of Chemotherapy and Genetic Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deipolyi, Amy R.; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Khademhosseini, Ali; Naidu, Sailendra; Borad, Mitesh; Sahin, Burcu; Mathur, Amit K.; Oklu, Rahmi

    2017-01-01

    We characterized the effect of systemic therapy given after portal vein embolization (PVE) and before hepatectomy on hepatic tumor and functional liver remnant (FLR) volumes. All 76 patients who underwent right PVE from 2002–2016 were retrospectively studied. Etiologies included colorectal cancer (n = 44), hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 17), cholangiocarcinoma (n = 10), and other metastases (n = 5). Imaging before and after PVE was assessed. Chart review revealed systemic therapy administration, SNaPshot genetic profiling, and comorbidities. Nine patients received systemic therapy; 67 did not. Tumor volume increased 28% in patients who did not receive and decreased −24% in patients who did receive systemic therapy (p = 0.026), with no difference in FLR growth (28% vs. 34%; p = 0.645). Among 30 patients with genetic profiling, 15 were wild type and 15 had mutations. Mutations were an independent predictor of tumor growth (p = 0.049), but did not impact FLR growth (32% vs. 28%; p = 0.93). Neither cirrhosis, hepatic steatosis, nor diabetes impacted changes in tumor or FLR volume (p > 0.20). Systemic therapy administered after PVE before hepatic lobectomy had no effect on FLR growth; however, it was associated with decreasing tumor volumes. Continuing systemic therapy until hepatectomy may be warranted, particularly in patients with genetic mutations. PMID:28257031

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Katie M; Orlow, Irene; Antonescu, Cristina R; Ballman, Karla; McCall, Linda; DeMatteo, Ronald; Engel, Lawrence S

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836) and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836). CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively). Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic origins and

  4. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie M O'Brien

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT. Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836 and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836. CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively. Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic

  5. Recent trends on crop genetic improvement using mutation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Siyong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    The radiation breeding technology has been significantly achieved on creation of mutation genetic resources of plants for commercial cultivation and genomic study since 1920s. According to the FAO-IAEA Mutant Variety Database, more than 2600 varieties have been released in the world. Induction of mutations with radiation has been the most frequently used by sources of X-ray and gamma ray, but in recent Japanese scientist have been used the heavy ion beam as a new radiation sources. And China has been made remarkable outcomes in the mutant creation using new space breeding technology since 1990s. In Korea, more about 40 varieties have been developed by using the mutation breeding method since the mid-1960s. Most of the released mutant varieties in Korea were food and oil seed crops, especially for improving agronomic traits such as yield, lodging tolerance, maturity, and functional compounds. Currently the mutation breeding program in Korea has assigned more resources to develop high functional crops and ornamental plants. These functional and ornamental plants are ideal systems for a mutation breeding. A research program for the development of potential varieties of flowering and ornamental crops as rose, chrysanthemum, lily, carnation, orchids, and wild flowers was started with financial support from the Bio green 21 project of Korean government. The potential outcomes from the program will be new highly valued-added varieties which will provide greater money gains to Korean farmers and lots of valued mutants used for a gene isolation of interest and reverse genetics or functional genomic. Scientific interest in mutation breeding has drastically be ed focused to the field of functional genomic. Scientific interest in mutation breeding has drastically be ed focused to the field of functional genomic after a completion of genome sequencing of some model plant species. A direct approach of discovering the function of a novel gene is to use a mutant which has altered

  6. Human embryonic stem cells carrying mutations for severe genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumkin, Tsvia; Malcov, Mira; Telias, Michael; Gold, Veronica; Schwartz, Tamar; Azem, Foad; Amit, Ami; Yaron, Yuval; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2010-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) carrying specific mutations potentially provide a valuable tool for studying genetic disorders in humans. One preferable approach for obtaining these cell lines is by deriving them from affected preimplantation genetically diagnosed embryos. These unique cells are especially important for modeling human genetic disorders for which there are no adequate research models. They can be further used to gain new insights into developmentally regulated events that occur during human embryo development and that are responsible for the manifestation of genetically inherited disorders. They also have great value for the exploration of new therapeutic protocols, including gene-therapy-based treatments and disease-oriented drug screening and discovery. Here, we report the establishment of 15 different mutant human embryonic stem cell lines derived from genetically affected embryos, all donated by couples undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis in our in vitro fertilization unit. For further information regarding access to HESC lines from our repository, for research purposes, please email dalitb@tasmc.health.gov.il.

  7. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K.; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  8. The genetic basis of familial hypercholesterolemia: inheritance, linkage, and mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel De Castro-Orós

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Isabel De Castro-Orós1, Miguel Pocoví2, Fernando Civeira11Lipid Unit and Laboratorio de Investigación Molecular, Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, Instituto Aragonés de Ciencias de la Salud (I+CS, Zaragoza, Spain; 2Departamento. Bioquímica y Biología Molecular y Celular. Universidad de Zaragoza, Instituto Aragonés de Ciencias de la Salud (I+CS, Zaragoza, Spain and Ciber de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, SpainAbstract: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is a genetic disorder of lipoprotein metabolism characterized by high plasma concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc, tendon xanthomas, and increased risk of premature coronary heart disease. FH is one of the most common inherited disorders; there are 10,000,000 people with FH worldwide, mainly heterozygotes. The most common FH cause is mutations along the entire gene that encode for LDL receptor (LDLR protein, but it has been also described that mutations in apolipoprotein B (APOB and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 genes produce this phenotype. About 17%–33% of patients with a clinical diagnosis of monogenic hypercholesterolemia do not harbor any genetic cause in the known loci. Because FH has been considered as a public health problem, it is very important for an early diagnosis and treatment. Recent studies have ­demonstrated the influence of the LDLR mutation type in the FH phenotype, associating a more severe clinical phenotype and worse advanced carotid artherosclerosis in patients with null than those with receptor-defective mutations. Since 2004, a molecular FH diagnosis based on a genetic ­diagnostic platform (Lipochip®; Progenika-Biopharma, Derio, Spain has been developed. This analysis completes the adequate clinical diagnosis made by physicians. Our group has recently proposed new FH guidelines with the intention to facilitate the FH diagnosis. The treatment for this disease is based on the benefit of

  9. Influence of a Small Fraction of Individuals with Enhanced Mutations on a Population Genetic Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrat, S.; Stauffer, D.

    It has been observed that a higher mutation load could be introduced into the genomes of children conceived by assisted reproduction technology (fertilization in-vitro). This generates two effects — slightly higher mutational pressure on the whole genetic pool of population and inhomogeneity of mutation distributions in the genetic pool. Computer simulations of the Penna ageing model suggest that already a small fraction of births with enhanced number of new mutations can negatively influence the whole population.

  10. [Paternal GNAS mutations: Which phenotypes? What genetic counseling?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Marie-Laure

    2015-05-01

    Parental imprinting and the type of the genetic alteration play a determinant role in the phenotype expression of GNAS locus associated to pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP). GNAS locus gives rise to several different messenger RNA transcripts that are derived from the paternal allele, the maternal allele, or both and can be either coding or non-coding. As a consequence, GNAS mutations lead to a wide spectrum of phenotypes. An alteration in the coding sequence of the gene leads to a haplo-insufficiency and a dysmorphic phenotype (Albright's syndrome or AHO). AHO is a clinical syndrome defined by specific physical features including short stature, obesity, round-shaped face, subcutaneous ossifications, brachymetarcapy (mainly of the 4th and 5th ray). If the alteration is on the maternal allele, there is a hormonal resistance to the PTH at the kidney level and to the TSH at the thyroid level. The phenotype is known as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a). If the alteration is on the paternal allele, there are few clinical signs with no hormonal resistance and the phenotype is known as pseudopseudo hypoparathyroidism (pseudo-PPHP). Heterozygous GNAS mutations on the paternal GNAS allele were associated with intra uterin growth retardation (IUGR). Moreover, birth weights were lower with paternal GNAS mutations affecting exon 2-13 than with exon 1/intron 1 mutations suggesting a role for loss of function XLαs. Progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH) is a rare disease of ectopic bone formation, characterized by cutaneous and subcutaneous ossifications progressing towards deep connective and muscular tissues. POH is caused by a heterozygous GNAS inactivating mutation and has been associated with paternal inheritance. However, genotype/phenotype correlations suggest that there is no direct correlation between the ossifying process and parental origin, as there is high variability in heterotopic ossification. Clinical heterogeneity makes genetic counseling a very delicate

  11. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stattin Eva-Lena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Methods Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT. Results In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52% index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%, whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. Conclusion In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the

  12. An adaptive genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation and its global convergence property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李枚毅; 蔡自兴; 孙国荣

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation, which combines adaptive probabilities of crossover and mutation was proposed. By means of homogeneous finite Markov chains, it is proved that adaptive genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation and genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation converge to the global optimum if they maintain the best solutions, and the convergence of adaptive genetic algorithms with adaptive probabilities of crossover and mutation was studied. The performances of the above algorithms in optimizing several unimodal and multimodal functions were compared. The results show that for multimodal functions the average convergence generation of the adaptive genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation is about 900 less than that of adaptive genetic algorithm with adaptive probabilities and genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation, and the adaptive genetic algorithm with diversity-guided mutation does not lead to premature convergence. It is also shown that the better balance between overcoming premature convergence and quickening convergence speed can be gotten.

  13. Genetical study of mutation in maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhong-qing; Hu, Feng-lan; Cheng, Qiong; Hao, Jian-hua; Zhang, Jian-hua; Lin, Xue-na; Zheng, Bao; Fa, Ping-ping; Yu, Su-yan; Hu, Li-hua

    2015-04-01

    This study looked into a family involving a rare mother-child ABO blood type inconsistency and explored its genetic and molecular basis. In the family, the mother had type AB blood and the father was blood type B and they gave birth to a baby of blood type O. Their blood types were phenotypically identified by using different techniques, including micro-column gel test, immune inhibition test, absorption and elution tests. The sequences of all 7 exons of ABO allele from the core family members were determined by using PCR and clone-based sequencing. The loci of mutated gene were compared against normal human genes. The result showed that the mother's erythrocytes were agglutinable with monoclonal anti-A antibody (2+) and had agglutination reaction with anti-B antibody (4+). The mother's serum registered agglutination action with standard blood type A cells. The findings showed an ABO inconsistency. When domestic antibodies were used, the mother's erythrocytes yielded agglutination reaction with humanized anti-B serum (4+) and anti-B monoclonal antibody but were non-agglutinable with humanized anti-A serum and anti-A monoclonal antibody. Upon absorption and elution, the titer of anit-A antibody was 128 both before and after the absorption test, with no significant difference found between pre- and post-absorption values. Our results confirmed that the mother's allelic gene was type B and contained type A. The father's blood type was type B, and son's blood type was type O. Clone-based sequencing revealed that the mother carried a heterozygous gene of B101.01 (ntA640→G)/O01, which contained an M214→V mutation that could express a weak expression of antigen A, resulting in blood type AB. However, their son did not have the M214→V mutation, which yielded a false ABO-inconsistency between him and his mother. We were led to conclude that type B gene with a M214→V mutation can encode both antigen B and weak antigen B that can lead to false ABO-inconsistencies.

  14. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations, a genetic cause for familial recurrent neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi V Yaliwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene mutations have been implicated as risk factors for neural tube defects (NTDs. The best-characterized MTHFR genetic mutation 677C→T is associated with a 2-4 fold increased risk of NTD if patient is homozygous for this mutation. This risk factor is modulated by folate levels in the body. A second mutation in the MTHFR gene is an A→C transition at position 1298. The 1298A→C mutation is also a risk factor for NTD, but with a smaller relative risk than 677C→T mutation. Under conditions of low folate intake or high folate requirements, such as pregnancy, this mutation could become of clinical importance. We present a case report with MTHFR genetic mutation, who presented with recurrent familial pregnancy losses due to anencephaly/NTDs.

  15. A multiparametric computational algorithm for comprehensive assessment of genetic mutations in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugrinov, Krastyu G; Freed, Stefan D; Thomas, Clayton L; Lee, Shaun W

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS-IIIA, Sanfilippo syndrome) is a Lysosomal Storage Disease caused by cellular deficiency of N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH). Given the large heterogeneity of genetic mutations responsible for the disease, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms by which these mutations affect enzyme function is needed to guide effective therapies. We developed a multiparametric computational algorithm to assess how patient genetic mutations in SGSH affect overall enzyme biogenesis, stability, and function. 107 patient mutations for the SGSH gene were obtained from the Human Gene Mutation Database representing all of the clinical mutations documented for Sanfilippo syndrome. We assessed each mutation individually using ten distinct parameters to give a comprehensive predictive score of the stability and misfolding capacity of the SGSH enzyme resulting from each of these mutations. The predictive score generated by our multiparametric algorithm yielded a standardized quantitative assessment of the severity of a given SGSH genetic mutation toward overall enzyme activity. Application of our algorithm has identified SGSH mutations in which enzymatic malfunction of the gene product is specifically due to impairments in protein folding. These scores provide an assessment of the degree to which a particular mutation could be treated using approaches such as chaperone therapies. Our multiparametric protein biogenesis algorithm advances a key understanding in the overall biochemical mechanism underlying Sanfilippo syndrome. Importantly, the design of our multiparametric algorithm can be tailored to many other diseases of genetic heterogeneity for which protein misfolding phenotypes may constitute a major component of disease manifestation.

  16. APPLICATION OF GENETIC DEAFNESS GENE CHIP FOR DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION OF DEAFNESS IN PREGNANT WOMEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Liang; ZHONG Su; ZHAO Nan; LIU Ping; ZHAO Yangyu; QIAO Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study is to identify the carrier rate of common deafness mutation in Chinese pregnant women via detecting deafness gene mutations with gene chip. Methods The pregnant women in obstetric clinic without hearing impairment and hearing disorders family history were selected. The informed consent was signed. Peripheral blood was taken to extract genom-ic DNA. Application of genetic deafness gene chip for detecting 9 mutational hot spot of the most common 4 Chinese deafness genes, namely GJB2 (35delG,176del16bp, 235delC, 299delAT), GJB3 (C538T) ,SLC26A4 ( IVS72A>G, A2168G) and mito-chondrial DNA 12S rRNA (A1555G, C1494T) . Further genetic testing were provided to the spouses and newborns of the screened carriers. Results Peripheral blood of 430 pregnant women were detected,detection of deafness gene mutation carri-ers in 24 cases(4.2%), including 13 cases of the GJB2 heterozygous mutation, 3 cases of SLC26A4 heterozygous mutation, 1 cases of GJB3 heterozygous mutation, and 1 case of mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation. 18 spouses and 17 newborns took fur-ther genetic tests, and 6 newborns inherited the mutation from their mother. Conclusion The common deafness genes muta-tion has a high carrier rate in pregnant women group,235delC and IVS7-2A>G heterozygous mutations are common.

  17. The Genetic Equidistance Result of Molecular Evolution is Independent of Mutation Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi

    2008-12-26

    The well-established genetic equidistance result shows that sister species are approximately equidistant to a simpler outgroup as measured by DNA or protein dissimilarity. The equidistance result is the most direct evidence, and remains the only evidence, for the constant mutation rate interpretation of this result, known as the molecular clock. However, data independent of the equidistance result have steadily accumulated in recent years that often violate a constant mutation rate. Many have automatically inferred non-equidistance whenever a non-constant mutation rate was observed, based on the unproven assumption that the equidistance result is an outcome of constant mutation rate. Here it is shown that the equidistance result remains valid even when different species can be independently shown to have different mutation rates. A random sampling of 50 proteins shows that nearly all proteins display the equidistance result despite the fact that many proteins have non-constant mutation rates. Therefore, the genetic equidistance result does not necessarily mean a constant mutation rate. Observations of different mutation rates do not invalidate the genetic equidistance result. New ideas are needed to explain the genetic equidistance result that must grant different mutation rates to different species and must be independently testable.

  18. Spontaneous mutations and the origin and maintenance of quantitative genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen; Lyman, Richard F; Lyman, Rachel A; Carbone, Mary Anna; Harbison, Susan T; Magwire, Michael M; Mackay, Trudy Fc

    2016-05-23

    Mutation and natural selection shape the genetic variation in natural populations. Here, we directly estimated the spontaneous mutation rate by sequencing new Drosophila mutation accumulation lines maintained with minimal natural selection. We inferred strong stabilizing natural selection on quantitative traits because genetic variation among wild-derived inbred lines was much lower than predicted from a neutral model and the mutational effects were much larger than allelic effects of standing polymorphisms. Stabilizing selection could act directly on the traits, or indirectly from pleiotropic effects on fitness. However, our data are not consistent with simple models of mutation-stabilizing selection balance; therefore, further empirical work is needed to assess the balance of evolutionary forces responsible for quantitative genetic variation.

  19. [CHEK2-mutation in Dutch breast cancer families: expanding genetic testing for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adank, M.A.; Hes, F.J.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Tol, M.P. van den; Seynaeve, C.; Oosterwijk, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    - In the majority of breast cancer families, DNA testing does not show BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and the genetic cause of breast cancer remains unexplained. - Routine testing for the CHEK2*1100delC mutation has recently been introduced in breast cancer families in the Netherlands. - The 1100delC muta

  20. Genetic testing in familial AD and FTD: mutation and phenotype spectrum in a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, S G; Schwartz, M; Batbayli, M

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal dominantly transmitted Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are genetically heterogeneous disorders. To date, three genes have been identified in which mutations cause early-onset autosomal dominant inherited AD: APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2. Mutations in two genes...

  1. Genetic mosaicism of a frameshift mutation in the RET gene in a family with Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Charlotte M; Haase, Michael G; Kemnitz, Ivonne; Fitze, Guido

    2014-05-10

    Mutations and polymorphisms in the RET gene are a major cause of Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Theoretically, all true heterozygous patients with a new manifestation of a genetically determined disease must have parents with a genetic mosaicism of some extent. However, no genetic mosaicism has been described for the RET gene in HSCR yet. Therefore, we analyzed families with mutations in the RET gene for genetic mosaicism in the parents of the patients. Blood samples were taken from patients with HSCR and their families/parents to sequence the RET coding region. Among 125 families with HSCR, 33 families with RET mutations were analyzed. In one family, we detected a frameshift mutation due to a loss of one in a row of four cytosines in codon 117/118 of the RET gene (c.352delC) leading to a frameshift mutation in the protein (p.Leu118Cysfs*105) that affected two siblings. In the blood sample of the asymptomatic father we found a genetic mosaicism of this mutation which was confirmed in two independent samples of saliva and hair roots. Quantification of peak-heights and comparison with different mixtures of normal and mutated plasmid DNA suggested that the mutation occurred in the early morula stadium of the founder, between the 4- and 8-cell stages. We conclude that the presence of a RET mutation leading to loss of one functional allele in 20 to 25% of the cells is not sufficient to cause HSCR. The possibility of a mosaicism has to be kept in mind during genetic counseling for inherited diseases.

  2. Mass genetics study of rhodopsin point mutations in retinitis pigmentosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-li; YIN Zheng-qin; ZHANG Xue; FU Wei-ling

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence and pattern of rhodopsin (RHO) mutations in Chinese patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods: Conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) and direct DNA sequencing were applied to detect point mutations that occurred in the five coding exous and splice sites of RHO gene in 98 index patients with RP. Results: Four patients of one ADRP family were found to have a missense mutation at codon 347, Pro347Leu. One late-onset RP patient and her daughter, without clinical expression at present, were discovered to have a novel frameshift mutation at codon 327, Pro327 ( 1-bp del). Neither of the two mutations was found in 100 normal controls. Ala299Ser was found in one RP patient. Two control subjects also had Ala299Ser, suggesting its nonpathogenicity and just single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Conclusion: Two RP patients had rhodopsin mutations, thus the expected frequency of RHO mutations in RP is about 2.0% (95% confidence interval: 0.3% - 4.4% ). A highly conserved C-terminal sequence QVS (A)PA was altered due to Pro347Leu and thereby misdirecting rhodopsin to incorrect subcellular location. Loss of all phosphorylation sites at the C-terminus and a highly conserved sequence QVS(A)PA may occur because of Pro327( 1-bp del). To elucidate the predominant biochemical defects in such mutant, transgenic mice and transfected culture cells carrying Pro327( 1-bp del) would be of great value.

  3. Mutations in the PAH gene: A Tool for population genetics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković Maja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU, an inborn error of metabolism, is caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH gene. In the Serbian population, 19 different PAH mutations have been identified. We used PAH mutations as molecular markers for population genetics study. The low homozygosity value of the PAH gene (0.10 indicates that PKU in Serbia is heterogeneous, reflecting numerous migrations throughout Southeast Europe. The strategy for molecular diagnostics of PKU was designed accordingly. To elucidate the origin of the most common (L48S PKU mutation in Serbia, we performed haplotype analysis by PCR-RFLP. Our results suggest that the L48S mutation was imported into Serbia from populations with different genetic backgrounds.

  4. Neuropsychological manifestations of the genetic mutation for Huntington's disease in presymptomatic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Jason; Shpritz, Barnett; Codori, Ann Marie; Margolis, Russell; Rosenblatt, Adam

    2002-11-01

    A triplet repeat (CAG) expansion mutation in the huntingtin gene on chromosome 4 is responsible for Huntington's disease (HD). Presymptomatic genetic testing for this mutation has identified clinically normal persons who are virtually certain to develop this dementing illness if they live a normal lifespan. The present study sought to determine whether these "mutation-positive" persons have impairments in cognitive functioning. Seventy-five mutation-positive persons did not differ from 128 mutation-negative persons on tests selected for their sensitivity to early-stage HD. Interestingly, however, those with the mutation viewed themselves as more likely to develop HD than did those without the mutation. Among mutation-positive subjects, having a longer CAG repeat mutation was likewise not associated with cognitive impairment. However, being closer to estimated disease onset (a product of repeat length and parent's age at onset) was associated with selected cognitive impairments. When viewed in light of previous studies showing atrophy of the caudate nucleus and putamen in mutation-carriers who are close to onset but not those far from onset, these results suggest that subtle changes in brain and behavior may be detected shortly before subjects with the HD mutation develop sufficient signs and symptoms for diagnosis. Conceptual and methodological problems associated with the search for presymptomatic cognitive and behavioral indicators of dementing illness are discussed.

  5. Genetic basis of congenital erythrocytosis: mutation update and online databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Celeste; Percy, Melanie J; Gardie, Betty; Maia, Tabita Magalhães; van Wijk, Richard; Perrotta, Silverio; Della Ragione, Fulvio; Almeida, Helena; Rossi, Cedric; Girodon, François; Aström, Maria; Neumann, Drorit; Schnittger, Susanne; Landin, Britta; Minkov, Milen; Randi, Maria Luigia; Richard, Stéphane; Casadevall, Nicole; Vainchenker, William; Rives, Susana; Hermouet, Sylvie; Ribeiro, M Leticia; McMullin, Mary Frances; Cario, Holger; Chauveau, Aurelie; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Altindirek, Didem; Lorenzo, Felipe; Lambert, Frederic; Dan, Harlev; Gad-Lapiteau, Sophie; Catarina Oliveira, Ana; Rossi, Cédric; Fraga, Cristina; Taradin, Gennadiy; Martin-Nuñez, Guillermo; Vitória, Helena; Diaz Aguado, Herrera; Palmblad, Jan; Vidán, Julia; Relvas, Luis; Ribeiro, Maria Leticia; Luigi Larocca, Maria; Luigia Randi, Maria; Pedro Silveira, Maria; Percy, Melanie; Gross, Mor; Marques da Costa, Ricardo; Beshara, Soheir; Ben-Ami, Tal; Ugo, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Congenital erythrocytosis (CE), or congenital polycythemia, represents a rare and heterogeneous clinical entity. It is caused by deregulated red blood cell production where erythrocyte overproduction results in elevated hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. Primary congenital familial erythrocytosis is associated with low erythropoietin (Epo) levels and results from mutations in the Epo receptor gene (EPOR). Secondary CE arises from conditions causing tissue hypoxia and results in increased Epo production. These include hemoglobin variants with increased affinity for oxygen (HBB, HBA mutations), decreased production of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate due to BPGM mutations, or mutations in the genes involved in the hypoxia sensing pathway (VHL, EPAS1, and EGLN1). Depending on the affected gene, CE can be inherited either in an autosomal dominant or recessive mode, with sporadic cases arising de novo. Despite recent important discoveries in the molecular pathogenesis of CE, the molecular causes remain to be identified in about 70% of the patients. With the objective of collecting all the published and unpublished cases of CE the COST action MPN&MPNr-Euronet developed a comprehensive Internet-based database focusing on the registration of clinical history, hematological, biochemical, and molecular data (http://www.erythrocytosis.org/). In addition, unreported mutations are also curated in the corresponding Leiden Open Variation Database.

  6. Molecular genetics of cystinuria: Identification of four new mutations and seven polymorphisms, and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparini, P.; Bisceglia, L.; Notarangelo, A. [Servizio di Genetica Medica, San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    A cystinuria disease gene (rBAT) has been recently identified, and some mutations causing the disease have been described. The frequency of these mutations has been investigated in a large sample of 51 Italian and Spanish cystinuric patients. In addition, to identify new mutated alleles, genomic DNA has been analyzed by an accurate and sensitive method able to detect nucleotide changes. Because of the lack of information available on the genomic structure of rBAT gene, the study was carried out using the sequence data so far obtained by us. More than 70% of the entire coding sequence and 8 intron-exon boundaries have been analyzed. Four new mutations and seven intragenic polymorphisms have been detected. All mutations so far identified in rBAT belong only to cystinuria type I alleles, accounting for {approximately} 44% of all type I cystinuric chromosomes. Mutation M467T is the most common mutated allele in the Italian and Spanish populations. After analysis of 70% of the rBAT coding region, we have detected normal sequences in cystinuria type II and type III chromosomes. The presence of rBAT mutated alleles only in type I chromosomes of homozygous (type I/I) and heterozygous (type I/III) patients provides evidence for genetic heterogeneity where rBAT would be responsible only for type I cystinuria and suggests a complementation mechanism to explain the intermediate type I/type III phenotype. 25 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Detecting novel genetic mutations in Chinese Usher syndrome families using next-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ling-Hui; Jin, Xin; Xu, Hai-Wei; Li, Shi-Ying; Yin, Zheng-Qin

    2015-02-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most common cause of combined blindness and deafness inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Molecular diagnosis is of great significance in revealing the molecular pathogenesis and aiding the clinical diagnosis of this disease. However, molecular diagnosis remains a challenge due to high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity in USH. This study explored an approach for detecting disease-causing genetic mutations in candidate genes in five index cases from unrelated USH families based on targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Through systematic data analysis using an established bioinformatics pipeline and segregation analysis, 10 pathogenic mutations in the USH disease genes were identified in the five USH families. Six of these mutations were novel: c.4398G > A and EX38-49del in MYO7A, c.988_989delAT in USH1C, c.15104_15105delCA and c.6875_6876insG in USH2A. All novel variations segregated with the disease phenotypes in their respective families and were absent from ethnically matched control individuals. This study expanded the mutation spectrum of USH and revealed the genotype-phenotype relationships of the novel USH mutations in Chinese patients. Moreover, this study proved that targeted NGS is an accurate and effective method for detecting genetic mutations related to USH. The identification of pathogenic mutations is of great significance for elucidating the underlying pathophysiology of USH.

  8. (Genetics and molecular biology of Robertson's Mutator: A workshop series): Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckner, B.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of the Workshop Series on the Genetics and Molecular Biology of Robertson's Mutator were to assess and consolidate interpretations of current Mutator research and to recognize and honor the outstanding contributions of Donald S. Robertson. To this end, a program of lectures, workshops, posters and opportunities for informal interaction was planned and carried out as indicated in the enclosed registration booklet. Within the context of the workshops, several topics were discussed. These discussions are summarized in abstract form.

  9. Kohlschütter–Tönz Syndrome: Mutations in ROGDI and Evidence of Genetic Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Arianna; Kara, Eleanna; Schossig, Anna; Wolf, Nicole I.; Plagnol, Vincent; Fawcett, Katherine; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro; Moore, Matthew; Hernandez, Dena; Musumeci, Sebastiano; Tennison, Michael; Hennekam, Raoul; Palmeri, Silvia; Malandrini, Alessandro; Raskin, Salmo; Donnai, Dian; Hennig, Corina; Tzschach, Andreas; Hordijk, Roel; Bast, Thomas; Wimmer, Katharina; Lo, Chien-Ning; Shorvon, Simon; Mefford, Heather; Eichler, Evan E.; Hall, Roger; Hayes, Ian; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Zschocke, Johannes; Houlden, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Kohlschütter–Tönz syndrome (KTS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by amelogenesis imperfecta, psychomotor delay or regression and seizures starting early in childhood. KTS was established as a distinct clinical entity after the first report by Kohlschütter in 1974, and to date, only a total of 20 pedigrees have been reported. The genetic etiology of KTS remained elusive until recently when mutations in ROGDI were independently identified in three unrelated families and in five likely related Druze families. Herein, we report a clinical and genetic study of 10 KTS families. By using a combination of whole exome sequencing, linkage analysis, and Sanger sequencing, we identify novel homozygous or compound heterozygous ROGDI mutations in five families, all presenting with a typical KTS phenotype. The other families, mostly presenting with additional atypical features, were negative for ROGDI mutations, suggesting genetic heterogeneity of atypical forms of the disease. PMID:23086778

  10. Genetic screening and functional characterization of PDGFRB mutations associated with Basal Ganglia Calcification of Unknown Etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Baker, Matthew C.; Finch, NiCole A.; Nicholson, Alexandra; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Three causal genes for Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification (IBGC) have been identified. Most recently, mutations in PDGFRB, encoding a member of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor family type β, and PDGFB, encoding PDGF-B, the specific ligand of PDGFRβ, were found implicating the PDGF-B/PDGFRβ pathway in abnormal brain calcification. In this study we aimed to identify and study mutations in PDGFRB and PDGFB in a series of 26 patients from the Mayo Clinic Florida Brain Bank with moderate to severe basal ganglia calcification (BCG) of unknown etiology. No mutations in PDGFB were found. However, we identified one mutation in PDGFRB, p.R695C located in the tyrosine kinase domain, in one BGC patient. We further studied the function of p.R695C mutant PDGFRβ and two previously reported mutants, p.L658P and p.R987W PDGFRβ in cell culture. We show that, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation, the p.L658P mutation completely suppresses PDGFRβ autophosphorylation whereas the p.R695C mutation results in partial loss of autophosphorylation. For the p.R987W mutation, our data suggest a different mechanism involving reduced protein levels. These genetic and functional studies provide the first insight into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with PDGFRB mutations and provide further support for a pathogenic role of PDGFRB mutations in BGC. PMID:24796542

  11. The genetic basis of Brugada syndrome: a mutation update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Jørgensen, Poul; Schlamowitz, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a condition characterized by a distinct ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads of the electrocardiogram and, clinically, by an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death. The condition predominantly exhibits an autosomal dominant pattern of inherit......Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a condition characterized by a distinct ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads of the electrocardiogram and, clinically, by an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death. The condition predominantly exhibits an autosomal dominant pattern...... of inheritance with an average prevalence of 5:10,000 worldwide. Currently, more than 100 mutations in seven genes have been associated with BrS. Loss-of-function mutations in SCN5A, which encodes the alpha-subunit of the Na(v)1.5 sodium ion channel conducting the depolarizing I(Na) current, causes 15-20% of Br......S cases. A few mutations have been described in GPD1L, which encodes glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-1 like protein; CACNA1C, which encodes the alpha-subunit of the Ca(v)1.2 ion channel conducting the depolarizing I(L,Ca) current; CACNB2, which encodes the stimulating beta2-subunit of the Ca(v)1.2 ion...

  12. A hybrid genetic algorithm based on mutative scale chaos optimization strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to avoid such problems as low convergent speed and local optimal solution in simple genetic algorithms, a new hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed. In this algorithm, a mutative scale chaos optimization strategy is operated on the population after a genetic operation. And according to the searching process, the searching space of the optimal variables is gradually diminished and the regulating coefficient of the secondary searching process is gradually changed which will lead to the quick evolution of the population. The algorithm has such advantages as fast search, precise results and convenient using etc. The simulation results show that the performance of the method is better than that of simple genetic algorithms.

  13. Clinical Grade “SNaPshot” Genetic Mutation Profiling in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth O'Donnell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequencing studies have identified several oncogenic mutations in multiple myeloma (MM. As MM progresses, it evolves genetically underscoring the need to have tools for rapid detection of targetable mutations to optimize individualized treatment. Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH has developed a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA-approved, high-throughput, genotyping platform to determine the mutation status of a panel of known oncogenes. Sequence analysis using SNaPshot on DNA extracted from bone marrow and extramedullary plasmacytomas is feasible and leads to the detection of potentially druggable mutations. Screening MM patients for somatic mutations in oncogenes may provide novel targets leading to additional therapies for this patient population.

  14. Biology of lung cancer: genetic mutation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    At present, most cases of unresectable cancer cannot be cured. Genetic mutations, EMT, and cancer stem cells are three major issues linked to poor prognosis in such cases, all connected by inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity. Issues on inter-/intra-tumor heterogeneity of genetic mutation could be resolved with recent and future technologies of deep sequencers, whereas, regarding such issues as the "same genome, different epigenome/phenotype", we expect to solve many of these problems in the future through further research in stem cell biology. We herein review and discuss the three major issues in the biology of cancers, especially from the standpoint of stem cell biology.

  15. Angiomyolipoma have common mutations in TSC2 but no other common genetic events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qin

    Full Text Available Renal angiomyolipoma are part of the PEComa family of neoplasms, and occur both in association with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC and independent of that disorder. Previous studies on the molecular genetic alterations that occur in angiomyolipoma are very limited. We evaluated 9 angiomyolipoma for which frozen tissue was available from a consecutive surgical series. Seven of 8 samples subjected to RT-PCR-cDNA sequencing showed mutations in TSC2; none showed mutations in TSC1 or RHEB. Six of the seven mutations were deletions. We searched for 983 activating and inactivating mutations in 115 genes, and found none in these tumors. Similarly analysis for genomic regions of loss or gain, assessed by Affymetrix SNP6.0 analysis, showed no abnormalities. Loss of heterozygosity in the TSC2 region was commonly seen, except in patients with low frequency TSC2 mutations. We conclude that sporadic renal angiomyolipoma usually have mutations in TSC2, but not TSC1 or RHEB, and have no other common genomic events, among those we searched for. However, chromosomal translocations and gene fusion events were not assessed here. TSC2 inactivation by mutation is a consistent and likely necessary genetic event in the pathogenesis of most angiomyolipoma.

  16. K-ras genetic mutation and influencing factor analysis for Han and Uygur nationality colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eli, Mayinur; Mollayup, Ablikim; Muattar; Liu, Chao; Zheng, Chao; Bao, Yong-Xing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the K-ras genetic mutation status in colorectal cancer patients, compare the difference of K-ras genetic mutation rate in Han and Uygur nationality and analyze the influencing factor. 91 cases (52 cases of Han nationality and 39 cases of Uygur nationality) of colorectal biopsy or surgical ablation pathology specimen from the first affiliated hospital of Xinjiang Medical University during January, 2010 to March, 2013 were collected to detect the 12th and 13th code mutation status of K-ras gene exon 2 with pyrosequencing method and compare the difference of K-ras gene mutation rate between Han and Uygur nationality patients. Single factor analysis and multiple factor logistic regression analysis were utilized to analyze the influencing factor for K-ras genetic mutation. 33 cases of patients with K-ras genetic mutation were found from the 91 cases colorectal cancer patients and the total mutation rate was 36.3%. Among them, 24 cases (72.7%) were found with mutation only in the 12th code, 9 cases (27.3%) were found with mutation only in the 13th code and no one case was found with mutation in both the two codes. Mutation rate of the 12th code in the Uygur nationality was significantly higher than that in the Han nationality (P0.05). There were no associativity (P>0.05) between the K-ras genetic mutation and sex, age, smoking history, drinking history, tumor location, macropathology type, differentiation level, staging, invasive depth, lymph nodes transferring and metastasis in colorectal cancer patients (P>0.05). K-ras genetic mutation rate is high in colorectal cancer patients. The mutation rate of 12th code in Uygur nationality is higher than that in Han nationality. There is no significant associativity between K-ras genetic mutation rate and patients' clinical pathology characteristic.

  17. Genetic and Molecular Analysis of Suppressors of Ras Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    fication of vulval cell fates have defined many of the genes necessary for normal vulval differentiation (Korn- feld 1997; Stemberg and Han 1998... Stemberg . 1993. C. e]- egans Un-45 raf gene participates in let-60 ros-stimulated vulval differentiation. Nature 363: 133-140. Horvitz, H.R. and P.W... Stemberg , P.W. and M. Han. 1998. Genetics of Ras signaling in C. elegazss. Tiettds Genet. 14:466-472. Stewart, S., M. Sundaram, Y. Zhang, J. Lee, Y

  18. Genetic evolution of nevus of Ota reveals clonal heterogeneity acquiring BAP1 and TP53 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Ana; Caratú, Ginevra; Matito, Judit; Muñoz, Eva; Ferrer, Berta; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Bodet, Domingo; Pérez-Alea, Mileidys; Cortés, Javier; Garcia-Patos, Vicente; Recio, Juan A

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma presents molecular alterations based on its anatomical location and exposure to environmental factors. Due to its intrinsic genetic heterogeneity, a simple snapshot of a tumor's genetic alterations does not reflect the tumor clonal complexity or specific gene-gene cooperation. Here, we studied the genetic alterations and clonal evolution of a unique patient with a Nevus of Ota that developed into a recurring uveal-like dermal melanoma. The Nevus of Ota and ulterior lesions contained GNAQ mutations were c-KIT positive, and tumors showed an increased RAS pathway activity during progression. Whole-exome sequencing of these lesions revealed the acquisition of BAP1 and TP53 mutations during tumor evolution, thereby unmasking clonal heterogeneity and allowing the identification of cooperating genes within the same tumor. Our results highlight the importance of studying tumor genetic evolution to identify cooperating mechanisms and delineate effective therapies.

  19. Ovarian fibromatosis and sotos syndrome with a new genetic mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurdeley, M; Sabourin, J C; Drouin-Garraud, V; Liard, A; Bachy, B; Vivier, P H

    2013-04-01

    Sotos syndrome is one the most common overgrowth conditions, after Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. As with other overgrowth syndromes, Sotos syndrome can be associated with an increased risk of tumors. We describe a young girl with Sotos syndrome and ovarian fibromatosis with a new mutation not reported before in the literature. Development of ovarian tumor in Sotos syndrome has been poorly documented. Ovarian fibromatosis is a very rare non neoplastic disease. Management is guided by the benignity of the lesion and consists of surgical excision of the fibroma. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. LRRK2 mutations and Parkinson's disease in Sardinia--A Mediterranean genetic isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Giovanni; van Doeselaar, Marina; Deriu, Marcello; Melis, Maurizio; Molari, Andrea; Di Fonzo, Alessio; Oostra, Ben A; Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2007-02-01

    The Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) Gly2019Ser mutation is frequent among Parkinson's disease (PD) patients from the Arab, Jewish, and Iberian populations, while another mutation, Arg1441Gly, is common in the Basque population. We studied the prevalence of these mutations in Sardinia, a Mediterranean genetic isolate with peculiar structure and similarities with the Basque population. Among 98 Sardinian PD probands we detected one heterozygous Gly2019Ser carrier. This mutation was also found in one of 55 Sardinian controls, an 85-year-old man, later shown to have a positive family history of parkinsonism. No carriers of Arg1441Gly, Arg1441Cys, or Arg1441His mutations were found among cases and controls. Our results suggest that the "Basque"LRRK2 mutation is absent or very rare in Sardinia. The Gly2019Ser mutation is present but its frequency is lower than that in Iberian, Arab, or Jewish populations. The identification of an 85-year-old, healthy Gly2019Ser carrier supports the concept that this mutation displays incomplete penetrance.

  1. Complex molecular genetic abnormalities involving three or more genetic mutations are important prognostic factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, S; Yamaguchi, H; Ueki, T; Usuki, K; Kurosawa, S; Kobayashi, Y; Kawata, E; Tajika, K; Gomi, S; Koizumi, M; Fujiwara, Y; Yui, S; Fukunaga, K; Ryotokuji, T; Hirakawa, T; Arai, K; Kitano, T; Kosaka, F; Tamai, H; Nakayama, K; Fukuda, T; Inokuchi, K

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a comprehensive analysis of 28 recurrently mutated genes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 271 patients with de novo AML. Co-mutations were frequently detected in the intermediate cytogenetic risk group, at an average of 2.76 co-mutations per patient. When assessing the prognostic impact of these co-mutations in the intermediate cytogenetic risk group, overall survival (OS) was found to be significantly shorter (P=0.0006) and cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) significantly higher (P=0.0052) in patients with complex molecular genetic abnormalities (CMGAs) involving three or more mutations. This trend was marked even among patients aged ⩽65 years who were also FLT3-ITD (FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplications)-negative (OS: P=0.0010; CIR: P=0.1800). Moreover, the multivariate analysis revealed that CMGA positivity was an independent prognostic factor associated with OS (P=0.0007). In stratification based on FLT3-ITD and CEBPA status and 'simplified analysis of co-mutations' using seven genes that featured frequently in CMGAs, CMGA positivity retained its prognostic value in transplantation-aged patients of the intermediate cytogenetic risk group (OS: P=0.0002. CIR: Pmutation analysis to have clinical usefulness and applicability.

  2. Genetic Heterogeneity of Beta Globin Mutations among Asian-Indians and Importance in Genetic Counselling and Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravindra; Singh, Kritanjali; Panigrahi, Inusha; Agarwal, Sarita

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 45 million carriers of β-thalassemia trait and about 12,000-15,000 infants with β-thalassemia major are born every year in India. Thalassemia major constitutes a significant burden on the health care system. The burden of thalassemia major can be decreased by premarital screening and prenatal diagnosis. The success of prenatal diagnosis requires proper knowledge of spectrum of β-thalassemia mutations. In present study, β-thalassemia mutations were characterized in 300 thalassemia cases from 2007 to 2010 using ARMS-PCR and DNA sequencing. The five most common mutations accounted 78.9% of the studied chromosomes that includes IVS1-5(G>C), Cod 41-42(-TCTT), Cod8-9(+G), Cod16(-C) and 619bp del. Though IVS1-5(G>C) is most common mutation in all the communities, the percentage prevalence were calculated on sub caste basis and found that IVS1-5(G>C) percentage prevalence varied from 25 to 60 in Aroras & Khatris and Thakur respectively. Interestingly Cod41-42(-TCTT) mutation which is the second commonest among the mutations reported was totally absent in Kayasthas and Muslim community. These findings have implications for providing molecular diagnosis, genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis to high risk couples of β-thalassemia.

  3. Delayed mutation as a cause of retinoblastoma: application to genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, J

    1976-01-01

    The genealogic and genetic data on retinoblastoma were reviewed and interpreted according to the model of delayed mutation; then applications of the model to specific situations in genetic counseling were considered. Patients with multiple congenital abnormalities and systemic chromosome aberrations are regarded as belonging to a different category of retinoblastoma cases than the more common patients without such abnormalities. The model of delayed mutation is considered for the latter group of patients. According to the model, mutation at the retinoblastoma locus can be delayed or complete and can occur during meiotic or mitotic cell division. Genotypically, three clases of individuals can be identified in retinoblastoma families: homozygous normal, heterozygous for the premutated allele, and heterozygous for the (fully) mutated allele; the other possible combinations of individuals have apparently not been observed. There is to date no evidence to suggest incomplete penetrance of the mutant allele, but 14% of individuals who have the mutant gene are "only" unilaterally affected. Carriers produce normal, affected and carrier offspring in the empiric proportion of, respectively, 54.5%, 36.4% and 9.1%. Most difficulties in genetic counseling arise because affected individuals may have inherited the premutated or the mutated allele and because unaffected individuals may have inherited the normal or the premutated allele. These aspects were considered for individuals presenting as sporadic-unilateral, sporadic-bilateral, familial-unilateral and familial-bilateral cases, and the empiric risk figures for various situations were quoted from the literature.

  4. A quantum genetic algorithm with quantum crossover and mutation operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    SaiToh, Akira; Rahimi, Robabeh; Nakahara, Mikio

    2013-11-01

    In the context of evolutionary quantum computing in the literal meaning, a quantum crossover operation has not been introduced so far. Here, we introduce a novel quantum genetic algorithm that has a quantum crossover procedure performing crossovers among all chromosomes in parallel for each generation. A complexity analysis shows that a quadratic speedup is achieved over its classical counterpart in the dominant factor of the run time to handle each generation.

  5. Mobile genetic elements and cancer. From mutations to gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozeretska, I A; Demydov, S V; Ostapchenko, L I

    2011-12-01

    In the present review, an association between cancer and the activity of the non-LTR retroelements L1, Alu, and SVA, as well as endogenous retroviruses, in the human genome, is analyzed. Data suggesting that transposons have been involved in embryogenesis and malignization processes, are presented. Events that lead to the activation of mobile elements in mammalian somatic cells, as well as the use of mobile elements in genetic screening and cancer gene therapy, are reviewed.

  6. Cumulative BRCA mutation analysis in the Greek population confirms that homogenous ethnic background facilitates genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigginou, Alexandra; Vlachopoulos, Fotios; Arzimanoglou, Iordanis; Zagouri, Flora; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Screening for BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations has long moved from the research lab to the clinic as a routine clinical genetic testing. BRCA molecular alteration pattern varies among ethnic groups which makes it already a less straightforward process to select the appropriate mutations for routine genetic testing on the basis of known clinical significance. The present report comprises an in depth literature review of the so far reported BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 molecular alterations in Greek families. Our analysis of Greek cumulative BRCA 1 and 2 molecular data, produced by several independent groups, confirmed that six recurrent deleterious mutations account for almost 60 % and 70 % of all BRCA 1 and 2 and BRCA 1 mutations, respectively. As a result, it makes more sense to perform BRCA mutation analysis in the clinic in two sequential steps, first conventional analysis for the six most prevalent pathogenic mutations and if none identified, a second step of New Generation Sequencing-based whole genome or whole exome sequencing would follow. Our suggested approach would enable more clinically meaningful, considerably easier and less expensive BRCA analysis in the Greek population which is considered homogenous.

  7. Relationship between clinical findings and genetic mutations in patients with familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ayse; Varkal, Muhammet Ali; Durmus, Mehmet Sait; Yildiz, Ismail; Yıldırım, Zeynep Nagihan Yürük; Turunc, Gorkem; Oguz, Fatma; Sidal, Mujgan; Omeroglu, Rukiye Eker; Emre, Sevinc; Yilmaz, Yasin; Kelesoglu, Fatih Mehmet; Gencay, Genco Ali; Temurhan, Sonay; Aydin, Filiz; Unuvar, Emin

    2015-12-12

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is one of the most frequent genetic diseases encountered in the Mediterranean region. We aimed to investigate the correlation between genetic mutations and the clinical findings in 562 patients with FMF. In this retrospective cross-sectional study conducted with patients' files between 2006, and 2013, reverse hybridization assay for MEFV gene mutations was used and the 12 most frequent mutations were screened. Mutation types and clinical findings were compared with variance analysis. The mean age was 6.9 ± 3.4 years (range, 1.8-11.6 years). The most common symptom was fever (97.3%). Thirty-four of the patients (6.04%) were admitted with periodic fever only. Of these patients, M694V was the most common mutation type (73.5%). The percentage of the patients predominantly presenting with recurrent abdominal pain was 77.78% and the most frequent mutations were M694V and E148Q. The rate of arthritis and arthralgia was significantly higher in patients with M694V and E148Q mutations. Chest pain was reported more often in patients homozygous for M694V (61.4%). Pericardial effusion was documented in the echocardiography of 10.9% of the 229 children with chest pain. Some patients had both FMF and Henoch Schönlein purpura (HSP), and were more likely to harbor either homozygote M694V or E148Q mutations. The frequency of episodes was higher in patients with homozygous M694V mutations (number of attacks = 4.4 ± 1.6/month). Proteinuria was detected in 106 patients of cases (29.2%), at an average of 854 ± 145 mg/L. Most of the patients with proteinuria and elevated serum amyloid-A had homozygous M694V mutation. The most common mutation in children in Turkey with FMF is the M694V mutation. Recurrent abdominal pain, arthritis or arthralgia, chest pain, and pericarditis were commonly seen in patients with M694V and E148Q mutations.

  8. Shifting gears: Thermodynamics of genetic information storage suggest stress-dependence of mutation rate, which can accelerate adaptation

    CERN Document Server

    Hilbert, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    Background: Acceleration of adaptation dynamics by stress-induced hypermutation has been found experimentally. Evolved evolvability is a prominent explanation. We investigate a more generally applicable explanation by a physical constraint. Methods and Results: A generic thermodynamical analysis of genetic information storage obviates physical constraints on the integrity of genetic information. The capability to employ metabolic resources is found as a major determinant of mutation probability in stored genetic information. Incorporation into a non-recombinant, asexual adaptation toy model predicts cases of markedly accelerated adaptation, driven by a transient increase of mutation rate. No change in the mutation rate as a genetic trait is required. The mutation rate of one and the same genotype varies dependent on stress level. Implications: Stress-dependent mutation rates are physically necessary and challenge a condition-independent genotype to mutation rate mapping. This holds implications for evolutiona...

  9. [Retrotransposon MDG4 and its role in genetic instability of a mutator strain of Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liubomirskaia, N V; Kim, A I; Il'in, Iu V

    2003-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a ten-year study of genetic instability of a mutator strain of Drosophila melanogaster caused by transposition of the gypsy retrotransposon. The results of other authors working with an analogous system are analyzed. Possible mechanisms are suggested for the interaction of gypsy with the cell gene flamenco that participates in transposition control of this mobile element.

  10. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case Study in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G

    2011-01-01

    Summary Genetic anticipation, described by earlier age of onset (AOO) and more aggressive symptoms in successive generations, is a phenomenon noted in certain hereditary diseases. Its extent may vary between families and/or between mutation subtypes known to be associated with the disease phenoty...

  11. OncoSimulR: genetic simulation with arbitrary epistasis and mutator genes in asexual populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Uriarte, Ramon

    2017-06-15

    OncoSimulR implements forward-time genetic simulations of biallelic loci in asexual populations with special focus on cancer progression. Fitness can be defined as an arbitrary function of genetic interactions between multiple genes or modules of genes, including epistasis, restrictions in the order of accumulation of mutations, and order effects. Mutation rates can differ among genes, and can be affected by (anti)mutator genes. Also available are sampling from simulations (including single-cell sampling), plotting the genealogical relationships of clones and generating and plotting fitness landscapes. Implemented in R and C ++, freely available from BioConductor for Linux, Mac and Windows under the GNU GPL license. Version 2.5.9 or higher available from: http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/devel/bioc/html/OncoSimulR.html . GitHub repository at: https://github.com/rdiaz02/OncoSimul. ramon.diaz@iib.uam.es. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. A Semantic Web-based System for Mining Genetic Mutations in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Sambhawa; Jiang, Guoqian; Dasari, Surendra; Zimmermann, Michael T; Wang, Chen; Heflin, Jeff; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Textual eligibility criteria in clinical trial protocols contain important information about potential clinically relevant pharmacogenomic events. Manual curation for harvesting this evidence is intractable as it is error prone and time consuming. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based system that captures and manages mutation evidences and related contextual information from cancer clinical trials. The system has 2 main components: an NLP-based annotator and a Semantic Web ontology-based annotation manager. We evaluated the performance of the annotator in terms of precision and recall. We demonstrated the usefulness of the system by conducting case studies in retrieving relevant clinical trials using a collection of mutations identified from TCGA Leukemia patients and Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology. In conclusion, our system using Semantic Web technologies provides an effective framework for extraction, annotation, standardization and management of genetic mutations in cancer clinical trials.

  13. Genetic studies of Polish migraine patients: screening for causative mutations in four migraine-associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrz, Izabela; Kosiorek, Michalina; Żekanowski, Cezary; Kamińska, Anna

    2016-01-08

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder, affecting approximately 12 % of the adult population worldwide, caused by both environmental and genetic factors. Three causative genes have been identified in familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) families: CACNA1A, ATP1A2, and SCNA1A. Recently, several mutations in KCNK18 have also been found as causative factors in migraine development. The aim of our study was to identify the genetic background of migraine in the Polish population. Sixty patients with migraine without aura (MO) or with different types of migraine with aura (MA), including sporadic hemiplegic, familial hemiplegic, and probable familial hemiplegic, were screened for mutations in the four genes previously linked with different types of migraine (ATP1A2, CACNA1A, SCN1A, and KCNK18). Two missense mutations were found. One novel mutation in SCN1A, encoding α subunit of sodium channel, causing amino acid change M1500V localized to a region encoding inactivation loop between transmembrane domains III and IV of the channel, was detected in a female FHM patient. The M1500V mutation was absent in a group of 62 controls, as well as in the ExAC database. The second, already known missense mutation S231P in KCNK18 was found in a female MA patient. Additionally, a novel intronic polymorphism possibly affecting alternative splicing of SCN1A, at chr2:16685249, g.77659T>C, and c.4581+32A>G, located between exons 24 and 25, in a region encoding the inactivation loop of the sodium channel was found in a female MO patient. No mutations in ATP1A2 or CACNA1A were found in the study group. The presence of SCN1A mutations and absence of mutations in ATP1A2 or CACNA1A suggest that the Polish patients represent FHM type 3. On the other hand, the presence of KCNK18 mutation indicated another FHM subtype. It could be speculated that contrary to other European populations, the genetic basis of migraine in the Polish population involves mutations in genes not included in the

  14. Genetic mutations in early-onset Parkinson's disease Mexican patients: molecular testing implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Jaramillo, Nancy; Guerrero-Camacho, Jorge Luis; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; Boll-Woehrlen, Marie-Catherine; Yescas-Gómez, Petra; Alonso-Vilatela, María Elisa; López-López, Marisol

    2014-04-01

    Mutations in PARK2, PINK1, and DJ-1 have been associated with autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease. Here, we report the prevalence of sequence and structural mutations in these three main recessive genes in Mexican Mestizo patients. The complete sequences of these three genes were analyzed by homo/heteroduplex DNA formation and direct sequencing; exon dosage was determined by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and real-time PCR in 127 patients belonging to 122 families and 120 healthy Mexican Mestizo controls. All individuals had been previously screened for the three most common LRRK2 mutations. The presence of two mutations in compound heterozygous or homozygous genotypes was found in 16 unrelated patients, 10 had mutations in PARK2, six in PINK1, and none in DJ-1. Two PARK2-PINK1 and one PARK2-LRRK2 digenic cases were observed. Novel mutations were identified in PARK2 and PINK1 genes, including PINK1 duplication for the first time. Exon dosage deletions were the most frequent mutations in PARK2 (mainly in exons 9 and 12), followed by those in PINK1. The high prevalence of heterozygous mutations in PARK2 (12.3%) and the novel heterozygous and homozygous point mutations in PINK1 observed in familial and sporadic cases from various states of Mexico support the concept that single heterozygous mutations in recessive Parkinson's disease genes play a pathogenic role. These data have important implications for genetic counseling of Mexican Mestizo patients with early-onset Parkinson's disease. The presence of digenic inheritance underscores the importance of studying several genes in this disease. A step-ordered strategy for molecular diagnosis is proposed.

  15. Genetic analysis of LRRK2 mutations in patients with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hao; Le, WeiDong; Guo, Yi; Hunter, Christine B; Xie, WenJie; Huang, MaoSheng; Jankovic, Joseph

    2006-12-21

    In addition to the G2019S mutation in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2), which is particularly frequent in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish and Northern African origin, three amino acid substitutions (R1441C, R1441G, and R1441H), all at the same residue (R1441), have been identified as important genetic causes of Parkinson disease (PD). To evaluate the frequency of R1441C/G/H and G2019S mutations in the LRRK2 gene in North American patients with PD and to explore genotype-phenotype correlations, we screened 496 PD patients from North America. One Hispanic female was heterozygous for the LRRK2 R1441G mutation, and six other cases including 2 non-Jewish/non-Hispanic whites, 3 Ashkenazi Jewish, and 1 Hispanic, were found to be heterozygous for the LRRK2 G2019S mutation. G2019S mutation in the LRRK2 gene is a common mutation associated with PD in a North American population, especially in Jewish PD patients (10.7%), while the R1441C/G/H mutation occurs at a relatively low frequency in North Americans except possibly in Hispanics for R1441G. All six G2019S carriers shared a common haplotype with that observed in Europeans and North Africans. The clinical features of all seven cases with LRRK2 mutation were quite broad and included early and late disease onset. These finding may provide new insights into the cause and diagnosis of PD and have implications for genetic counseling.

  16. Clinical, genetic, neurophysiological and functional study of new mutations in episodic ataxia type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Susan Elizabeth; Rajakulendran, Sanjeev; Tan, Stella Veronica; Graves, Tracey Dawn; Bamiou, Doris-Eva; Labrum, Robyn W; Burke, David; Sue, Carolyn M; Giunti, Paola; Schorge, Stephanie; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Hanna, Michael G

    2013-10-01

    Heterozygous mutations in KCNA1 cause episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1), an ion channel disorder characterised by brief paroxysms of cerebellar dysfunction and persistent neuromyotonia. This paper describes four previously unreported families with EA1, with the aim of understanding the phenotypic spectrum associated with different mutations. 15 affected individuals from four families underwent clinical, genetic and neurophysiological evaluation. The functional impact of new mutations identified in the KCNA1 gene was investigated with in vitro electrophysiology and immunocytochemistry. Detailed clinical documentation, dating back to 1928 in one family, indicates that all patients manifested episodic ataxia of varying severity. Four subjects from three families reported hearing impairment, which has not previously been reported in association with EA1. New mutations (R167M, C185W and I407M) were identified in three out of the four families. When expressed in human embryonic kidney cells, all three new mutations resulted in a loss of K(v)1.1 channel function. The fourth family harboured a previously reported A242P mutation, which has not been previously described in association with ataxia. The genetic basis of EA1 in four families is established and this report presents the earliest documented case from 1928. All three new mutations caused a loss of K(v)1.1 channel function. The finding of deafness in four individuals raises the possibility of a link between K(v)1.1 dysfunction and hearing impairment. Our findings broaden the phenotypic range associated with mutations in KCNA1.

  17. Effect of mutation and genetic background on drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Fenner, Lukas; Egger, Matthias; Bodmer, Thomas; Altpeter, Ekkehardt; Zwahlen, Marcel; Jaton, Katia; Pfyffer, Gaby E; Borrell, Sonia; Dubuis, Olivier; Bruderer, Thomas; Siegrist, Hans H; Furrer, Hansjakob; Calmy, Alexandra; Fehr, Jan; Stalder, Jesica Mazza; Ninet, Béatrice; Böttger, Erik C; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2012-06-01

    Bacterial factors may contribute to the global emergence and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). Only a few studies have reported on the interactions between different bacterial factors. We studied drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from a nationwide study conducted from 2000 to 2008 in Switzerland. We determined quantitative drug resistance levels of first-line drugs by using Bactec MGIT-960 and drug resistance genotypes by sequencing the hot-spot regions of the relevant genes. We determined recent transmission by molecular methods and collected clinical data. Overall, we analyzed 158 isolates that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, or ethambutol, 48 (30.4%) of which were multidrug resistant. Among 154 isoniazid-resistant strains, katG mutations were associated with high-level and inhA promoter mutations with low-level drug resistance. Only katG(S315T) (65.6% of all isoniazid-resistant strains) and inhA promoter -15C/T (22.7%) were found in molecular clusters. M. tuberculosis lineage 2 (includes Beijing genotype) was associated with any drug resistance (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7 to 5.6; P mutations (OR, 6.4; 95% CI, 2.0 to 20.7; P = 0.002). We found that the genetic strain background influences the level of isoniazid resistance conveyed by particular mutations (interaction tests of drug resistance mutations across all lineages; P tuberculosis drug resistance mutations were associated with various levels of drug resistance and transmission, and M. tuberculosis lineages were associated with particular drug resistance-conferring mutations and phenotypic drug resistance. Our study also supports a role for epistatic interactions between different drug resistance mutations and strain genetic backgrounds in M. tuberculosis drug resistance.

  18. Combined Mutation Operators of Genetic Algorithm for the Travelling Salesman Problem

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    Kusum Deep

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study two combined mutation operators have been developed to increase the performance of Genetic Algorithm that helps to find the minimum cost in the known Travelling Salesman problem (TSP.In order to do this the combined mutation operators which are named as Inverted Exchange and Inverted Displacement are compared with four existing mutation operators. These are programmed in C++ and algorithms, ten bench mark test problems and five variations of order crossover are used. Based implemented on a set of benchmark test problems taken from the TSPLIB.The crossover operator used here is the order crossover using two of its existing and three of its new variations. In general six mutation on the numerical and graphical analysis it indicates that the Inverted Displacement has a definite supremacy over the existing four mutations except for few instances considered here. The Inversion mutation is second best performer. All optimal values found in the six mutations are obtained when the new variations of order crossover are used.

  19. Genetic and molecular analysis of chlorambucil-induced germ-line mutations in the mouse

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    Rinchik, E.M.; Bangham, J.W.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Russell, L.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Kwon, B.S. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (USA)); Jackson, I.J. (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (England))

    1990-02-01

    Eighteen variants recovered from specific locus mutation rate experiments involving the mutagen chlorambucil were subjected to several genetic and molecular analyses. Most mutations were found to be homozygous lethal. Because lethality is often presumptive evidence for multilocus-deletion events, 10 mutations were analyzed by Southern blot analysis with probes at, or closely linked to, several of the specific locus test markers, namely, albino (c), brown (b), and dilute (d). All eight mutations (two c; three b; two d; and one dilute-short ear (Df(d se))) that arose in post-spermatogonial germ cells were deleted for DNA sequences. No evidence for deletion of two d-se region probes was obtained for the remaining two d mutations that arose in stem-cell spermatogonia. Six of the primary mutants also produced low litter sizes (semisterility). Karyotypic analysis has, to date, confirmed the presence of reciprocal translocations in four of the six. The high frequency of deletions and translocations among the mutations induced in post-spermatogonial stages by chlorambucil, combined with its overall high efficiency in inducing mutations in these stages, should make chlorambucil mutagenesis useful for generating experimentally valuable germ-line deletions throughout the mouse genome.

  20. Genetic testing in familial AD and FTD: mutation and phenotype spectrum in a Danish cohort.

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    Lindquist, S G; Schwartz, M; Batbayli, M; Waldemar, G; Nielsen, J E

    2009-08-01

    Autosomal dominantly transmitted Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are genetically heterogeneous disorders. To date, three genes have been identified in which mutations cause early-onset autosomal dominant inherited AD: APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2. Mutations in two genes on chromosome 17, the MAPT and the PGRN genes, are associated with autosomal dominant inherited FTD. The aim of this study was to characterize the mutation spectrum and describe genotype-phenotype correlations in families with inherited dementia. The identification of novel mutations and/or atypical genotype-phenotype correlations contributes to further characterizing the disorders. DNA-samples from the 90 index cases from a Danish referral-based cohort representing families with presumed autosomal dominant inherited AD or FTD were screened for mutations in the known genes with sequencing, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) techniques. Seven presumed pathogenic mutations (two PSEN1, one PSEN2, one APP, one MAPT, and two PGRN) were identified, including a novel PSEN2 mutation (V393M). No dosage aberrations were identified.

  1. Constitutive RB1 mutation in a child conceived by in vitro fertilization: implications for genetic counseling

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    Lucena Evandro

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to identify mutations associated with bilateral retinoblastoma in a quadruplet conceived by in vitro fertilization, and to trace the parental origin of mutations in the four quadruplets and their father. Methods Mutational screening was carried out by sequencing. Genotyping was carried out for determining quadruplet zygosity. Results The proband was a carrier of a novel RB1 constitutive mutation (g.2056C>G which was not detected in her father or her unaffected sisters, and of two other mutations (g.39606 C>T and g.174351T>A also present in two monozygotic sisters. The novel mutation probably occurred de novo while the others were of likely maternal origin. The novel mutation, affecting the Kozak consensus at the 5'UTR of RB1 and g.174351T>A were likely associated to retinoblastoma in the proband. Conclusion Molecular diagnosis of retinoblastoma requires genotypic data of the family for determining hereditary transmission. In the case of children generated by IVF with oocytes from an anonymous donor which had been stored in a cell repository, this might not be successfully accomplished, making precise diagnosis impracticable for genetic counseling.

  2. PTEN mutation analysis in two genetic subtypes of high-grade oligodendroglial tumors. PTEN is only occasionally mutated in one of the two genetic subtypes.

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    Jeuken, J W; Nelen, M R; Vermeer, H; van Staveren, W C; Kremer, H; van Overbeeke, J J; Boerman, R H

    2000-05-01

    We recently identified two genetic subtypes of high-grade oligodendroglial tumors (HG-OT): 1p-/19q- HG-OT are characterized by a loss of chromosome 1p32-36 (del(1)(p32-p36) and/or a del(19)(q13. 3); whereas +7/-10 HG-OT harbor a gain of chromosome 7 (+7) and/or a -10 without a loss of 1p32-36 and 19q13.3. Because a -10 and a +7 are most frequently detected in glioblastomas (GBM), the genotype of +7/-10 HG-OT suggests that these tumors are GBM with a prominent oligodendroglial phenotype rather than anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene, located at 10q23.3, which is involved in tumor progression of GBM and other neoplasms. In this study, we screened for PTEN mutations in six low-grade oligodendroglial tumors (LG-OT), five 1p-/19q- HG-OT, seven +7/-10 HG-OT, and nine xenografted GBM. PTEN mutations were detected in none of the LG-OT and 1p-/19q- HG-OT, once in +7/-10 HG-OT, and frequently in GBM. As one of the +7/-10 HG-OT harbored a PTEN mutation, this demonstrates that PTEN can be involved in the oncogenesis of this genetic subtype of HG-OT. The lower frequency of PTEN mutations in +7/-10 HG-OT compared to GBM suggests that these tumors are of a distinct tumor type rather than GBM. Published by Elsevier Science Inc.

  3. GENETIC HETEROGENEITY OF BETA GLOBIN MUTATIONS AMONG ASIAN-INDIANS AND IMPORTANCE IN GENETIC COUNSELLING AND DIAGNOSIS

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    Ravindra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are an estimated 45 million carriers of β-thalassemia trait and about 12,000-15,000 infants with β-thalassemia major are born every year in India. The consanguinity rates are higher in India, and thalassemia major constitutes a significant burden on the health care system. In present study, β-thalassemia mutations were characterized in 300 thalassemia cases from 2007 to 2010 using ARMS-PCR and DNA sequencing. The five most common mutations accounted 79.3% of the studied chromosomes that includes IVS1-5(G>C, Cod 41-42(-TCTT, Cod8-9(+G, Cod16(-C and 619bp del. Though IVS1-5(G>C is most common mutation when all the communities were included, the percentage prevalence were calculated on sub caste basis and found that IVS1-5(G>C percentage prevalence varied from 25 to 60 in Aroras & Khatris and Thakur respectively. Interestingly Cod41-42(-TCTT mutation which is the second commonest among the mutations reported was totally absent in Kayasthas and Muslim community. These findings have implications for providing molecular diagnosis, genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis to high risk couples of β-thalassemia.

  4. Genetic mutation analysis of human gastric adenocarcinomas using ion torrent sequencing platform.

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    Zhi Xu

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the one of the major causes of cancer-related death, especially in Asia. Gastric adenocarcinoma, the most common type of gastric cancer, is heterogeneous and its incidence and cause varies widely with geographical regions, gender, ethnicity, and diet. Since unique mutations have been observed in individual human cancer samples, identification and characterization of the molecular alterations underlying individual gastric adenocarcinomas is a critical step for developing more effective, personalized therapies. Until recently, identifying genetic mutations on an individual basis by DNA sequencing remained a daunting task. Recent advances in new next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, such as the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent sequencing platform, makes DNA sequencing cheaper, faster, and more reliable. In this study, we aim to identify genetic mutations in the genes which are targeted by drugs in clinical use or are under development in individual human gastric adenocarcinoma samples using Ion Torrent sequencing. We sequenced 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes in 238 human gastric adenocarcinoma samples using the Ion Torrent Ampliseq Cancer Panel. The sequencing analysis revealed a high occurrence of mutations along the TP53 locus (9.7% in our sample set. Thus, this study indicates the utility of a cost and time efficient tool such as Ion Torrent sequencing to screen cancer mutations for the development of personalized cancer therapy.

  5. Role of genetic mutations in folate-related enzyme genes on Male Infertility

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    Liu, Kang; Zhao, Ruizhe; Shen, Min; Ye, Jiaxin; Li, Xiao; Huang, Yuan; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Several studies showed that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes might be associated with male infertility; however, the results were still inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G mutations and the MTHFR haplotype with the risk of male infertility. Overall, a total of 37 studies were selected. Our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T mutation was a risk factor for male infertility in both azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients, especially in Asian population. Men carrying the MTHFR TC haplotype were most liable to suffer infertility while those with CC haplotype had lowest risk. On the other hand, the MTHFR A1298C mutation was not related to male infertility. MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G were potential candidates in the pathogenesis of male infertility, but more case-control studies were required to avoid false-positive outcomes. All of these results were confirmed by the trial sequential analysis. Finally, our meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis proved that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes played a significant role in male infertility. PMID:26549413

  6. Novel APC mutations in Czech and Slovak FAP families: clinical and genetic aspects

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    Vesela Kamila

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis gene (APC result in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. FAP is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder predisposing to colorectal cancer. Typical FAP is characterized by hundreds to thousands of colorectal adenomatous polyps and by several extracolonic manifestations. An attenuated form of polyposis (AFAP is characterized by less than 100 adenomas and later onset of the disease. Methods Here, we analyzed the APC gene for germline mutations in 59 Czech and 15 Slovak FAP patients. In addition, 50 apparently APC mutation negative Czech probands and 3 probands of Slovak origin were screened for large deletions encompassing the APC gene. Mutation screening was performed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and/or protein truncation test. DNA fragments showing an aberrant electrophoretic banding pattern were sequenced. Screening for large deletions was performed by multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification. The extent of deletions was analyzed using following microsatellite markers: D5S299, D5S82, D5S134 and D5S346. Results In the set of Czech and Slovak patients, we identified 46 germline mutations among 74 unrelated probands. Total mutation capture is 62,2% including large deletions. Thirty seven mutations were detected in 49 patients presenting a classical FAP phenotype (75,5% and 9 mutations in 25 patients with attenuated FAP (36%. We report 20 novel germline APC mutations and 3 large deletions (6% encompassing the whole-gene deletions and/or exon 14 deletion. In the patients with novel mutations, correlations of the mutation localization are discussed in context of the classical and/or attenuated phenotype of the disease. Conclusion The results of the molecular genetic testing are used both in the establishment of the predictive diagnosis and in the clinical management of patients. In some cases this study has also shown the difficulty to classify clinically

  7. Role of key genetic mutations on increasing migration of brain cancer cells through confinement.

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    Bui, Loan; Bhuiyan, Sayem H; Hendrick, Alissa; Chuong, Cheng-Jen; Kim, Young-Tae

    2017-09-01

    Uncontrolled invasive cancer cell migration is among the major challenges for the treatment and management of brain cancer. Although the genetic profiles of brain cancer cells have been well characterized, the relationship between the genetic mutations and the cells' mobility has not been clearly understood. In this study, using microfluidic devices that provide a wide range of physical confinements from 20 × 5 μm(2) to 3 × 5 μm(2) in cross sections, we studied the effect of physical confinement on the migratory capacity of cell lines with different types of mutations. Human glioblastoma and genetically modified mouse astrocytes were used. Human glioblastoma cells with EGFRvIII mutation were found to exhibit high degree of migratory capacity in narrow confinement. From mouse astrocytes, cells with triple mutations (p53-/- PTEN-/- BRAF) were found to exhibit the highest level of migratory capacity in narrow confinement compared to both double (p53-/- PTEN-/-) and single (p53-/-) mutant cells. Furthermore, when treating the triple mutant astrocytes with AZD-6244, an inhibitor of the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway, we found significant reduction in migration through the confined channels when compared to that of controls (83% decrease in 5 × 5 μm(2) and 86% in 3 × 5 μm(2) channels). Our data correlate genetic mutations from different cell lines to their motility in different degrees of confinement. Our results also suggest a potential therapeutic target such as BRAF oncogene for inhibition of brain cancer invasion.

  8. Advances in Human Mitochondrial Diseases Molecular Genetic Analysis of Pathogenic mtDNA Mutations.

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    Davidson, E; King, M P

    1997-01-01

    The mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that have been defined by specific morphological alterations in muscle and by deficits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The morphological hallmarks of these diseases include ragged-red fibers (an extensive proliferation of mitochondria in muscle fibers) and abnormal paracrystalline inclusions and membrane structures in mitochondria. The identification of pathogenic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has resulted in a genetic classification of mitochondrial diseases. Investigations are being conducted to understand the molecular basis for the biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria associated with mtDNA mutations. © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:16-24).

  9. Swarm satellite mission scheduling & planning using Hybrid Dynamic Mutation Genetic Algorithm

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    Zheng, Zixuan; Guo, Jian; Gill, Eberhard

    2017-08-01

    Space missions have traditionally been controlled by operators from a mission control center. Given the increasing number of satellites for some space missions, generating a command list for multiple satellites can be time-consuming and inefficient. Developing multi-satellite, onboard mission scheduling & planning techniques is, therefore, a key research field for future space mission operations. In this paper, an improved Genetic Algorithm (GA) using a new mutation strategy is proposed as a mission scheduling algorithm. This new mutation strategy, called Hybrid Dynamic Mutation (HDM), combines the advantages of both dynamic mutation strategy and adaptive mutation strategy, overcoming weaknesses such as early convergence and long computing time, which helps standard GA to be more efficient and accurate in dealing with complex missions. HDM-GA shows excellent performance in solving both unconstrained and constrained test functions. The experiments of using HDM-GA to simulate a multi-satellite, mission scheduling problem demonstrates that both the computation time and success rate mission requirements can be met. The results of a comparative test between HDM-GA and three other mutation strategies also show that HDM has outstanding performance in terms of speed and reliability.

  10. Genetic analysis and SOD1 mutation screening in Iranian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

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    Alavi, Afagh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Rohani, Mohammad; Zamani, Babak; Sedighi, Behnaz; Shamshiri, Hosein; Fan, Jian-Bing; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2013-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease, and the most common in European populations. Results of genetic analysis and mutation screening of SOD1 in a cohort of 60 Iranian ALS patients are here reported. Initially, linkage analysis in 4 families identified a disease-linked locus that included the known ALS gene, SOD1. Screening of SOD1 identified homozygous p.Asp90Ala causing mutations in all the linked families. Haplotype analysis suggests that the p.Asp90Ala alleles in the Iranian patients might share a common founder with the renowned Scandinavian recessive p.Asp90Ala allele. Subsequent screening in all the patients resulted in identification of 3 other mutations in SOD1, including p.Leu84Phe in the homozygous state. Phenotypic features of the mutation-bearing patients are presented. SOD1 mutations were found in 11.7% of the cohort, 38.5% of the familial ALS probands, and 4.25% of the sporadic ALS cases. SOD1 mutations contribute significantly to ALS among Iranians.

  11. Clinical phenotype and genetic mutation of fatty acid hydroxylase - associated neurodegeneration: analysis of four cases

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    Xiao-jun HUANG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To report 4 cases of fatty acid hydroxylase - associated neurodegeneration (FAHN and to summarize the clinical and genetic characteristics of FAHN by literatures review.  Methods Four cases of FAHN patients' clinical and family data were collected in detail. The gDNA of patients and their parents were extracted from peripheral blood. FA2H gene was conducted and followed by Sanger sequencing.  Results Among the 4 cases, 3 cases (Case 2, Case 3, Case 4 presented typical manifestations of FAHN while the other (Case 1 was atypical. Genetic sequencing showed FA2H gene mutation in all affected patients. Compound heterozygous mutation c.461G > A (p.Arg154His and c.794T > G (p.Phe265Cys were seen in Case 1. In Case 2, only one documented heterozygous mutation c.703C > T (p.Arg235Cys was found, and dificit mutation was not found in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP chip test of the patient and her mother. Compound heterozygous mutation c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys and insertion mutation c.172_173insGGGCCAGGAC (p.Ile58ArgfsX47 were presented in Case 3. In Case 4, compound heterozygous mutation c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys, c.968C > A (p.Pro323Gln and c.976G > A (p. Gly326Asp were seen, while his father was the carrier of c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys mutation and his mother was the carrier of c.968C > A (p.Pro323Gln and c.976G > A (p.Gly326Asp mutation. According to the standard of American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG, c.461G > A (p.Arg154His and c.794T > G (p.Phe265Cys in Case 1, and c.703C > T (p.Arg235Cys in Case 2 were considered as "likely pathogenic", while FA2H gene compound heterozygous mutation c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys, insertion mutation c.172_173insGGGCCAGGAC (p.Ile58ArgfsX47 in Case 3 was as "pathogenic", and in Case 4, the FA2H gene mutation c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys and c.968C > A (p.Pro323Gln were "pathogenic" and c.976G > A (p.Gly326Asp was "likely pathogenic".  Conclusions FAHN has highly clinical and genetic

  12. Clinical-genetic correlations in familial Alzheimer's disease caused by presenilin 1 mutations.

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    Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Barquero, Sagrario; Barón, Manuel; Gil-Neciga, Eulogio; Castellanos, Fernando; Zurdo, Martín; Manzano, Sagrario; Muñoz, David G; Jiménez-Huete, Adolfo; Rábano, Alberto; Sainz, M José; Guerrero, Rosa; Gobernado, Isabel; Pérez-Pérez, Julián; Jiménez-Escrig, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    We describe the clinical phenotype of nine kindred with presenile Alzheimer's disease (AD) caused by different presenilin 1 (PS1) point mutations, and compare them with reported families with mutations in the same codons. Mutations were in exon 4 (Phe105Val), exon 5 (Pro117Arg, Glu120Gly), exon 6 (His163Arg), exon 7 (Leu226Phe), exon 8 (Val261Leu, Val272Ala, Leu282Arg), and exon 12 (Ile439Ser). Three of these amino acid changes (Phe105Val, Glu120Gly, and Ile439Ser) had not been previously reported. Distinct clinical features, including age of onset, symptoms and signs associated with the cortical-type dementia and aggressiveness of the disease, characterized the different mutations and were quite homogeneous across family members. Age of onset fell within a consistent range: some mutations caused the disease in the thirties (P117R, L226F, V272A), other in the forties (E120G, H163R, V261L, L282R), and other in the fifties (F105V, I439S). Associated features also segregated with specific mutations: early epileptic activity (E120G), spastic paraparesis (V261L), subcortical dementia and parkinsonism (V272A), early language impairment, frontal signs, and myoclonus (L226F), and late myoclonus and seizures (H163R, L282R). Neurological deterioration was particularly aggressive in PS1 mutations with earlier age of onset such as P117R, L226F, and E120G. With few exceptions, a similar clinical phenotype was found in families reported to have either the same mutation or different amino acid changes in the same codons. This series points to a strong influence of the specific genetic defect in the development of the clinical phenotype.

  13. Mutations in Soviet public health science: post-Lysenko medical genetics, 1969-1991.

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    Bauer, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    This paper traces the integration of human genetics with Soviet public health science after the Lysenko era. For nearly three decades, USSR biology pursued its own version of anti-bourgeois, Soviet 'creative Darwinism', departing from western, post-WWII scientific developments. After Lysenko was suspended, research niches of immunology, biophysics and mutation research formed the basis of new departments at the Institute of Medical Genetics, which was founded in 1969 as part of the Soviet Academy of Medical Sciences. Focussing on early research activities and collaborations at the institute, I show how the concept of mutagenesis, a pivotal issue during the Cold War, became mobilized from Drosophila genetics to human heredity and to society as a whole. This mode of scaling up and down through population studies shaped not only Soviet human biology and genetics; it also brought about changes in clinical practice and public health as well as in the monitoring and regulation of mutagenic agents in the environment.

  14. Counterselection employing mutated pheS for markerless genetic deletion in Bacteroides species.

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    Kino, Yasuhiro; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Fujita, Masashi; Tada, Ayano; Yoneda, Saori; Murakami, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Masahito; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Okazaki, Katsuichiro; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-12-01

    Markerless gene deletion is necessary for multiple gene disruptions due to the limited number of antibiotic resistant markers for some bacteria. However, even in transformable strains, obtaining the expected mutation without a marker requires laborious screening of a large number of colonies. Previous studies had success in various bacteria with a counter-selection system where a conditional lethal gene was incorporated into the vector. We examined the efficacy of the mutated pheS gene (pheS*) as a counter-selective marker for gene deletion in Bacteroides. This mutation produces an amino acid substitution (A303G) in the alpha subunit of Bacteroides phenylalanyl tRNA synthetase, which in E. coli alters the specificity of the tRNA synthetase resulting in a conditional lethal mutation due to the incorporation of p-chloro-phenylalanine (p-Cl-Phe) into protein. B. fragilis YCH46 and B. thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 transformed with a pheS*-harboring shuttle vector were clearly growth-inhibited in the presence of >5 mM p-Cl-Phe in liquid defined minimal media (DMM) and on DMM agar plates. A targeting plasmid was constructed to delete the genetic region for capsular polysaccharide PS2 in B. fragilis or PS1 in B. thetaiotaomicron. After counterselection, p-Cl-Phe-resistant colonies were generated at a frequency of 8.1 × 10(-3) for B. fragilis and 1.7 × 10(-3) for B. thetaiotaomicron. Of the p-Cl-Phe-resistant colonies, 4.2% and 72% harbored the correct genetic deletion for B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron, respectively. These results indicate that mutated pheS is a useful counter-selective gene to construct markerless genetic deletions in Bacteroides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Persistence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance mutations associated with fitness costs and viral genetic backgrounds.

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    Wan-Lin Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of drug-resistant pathogens presents an almost-universal challenge for fighting infectious diseases. Transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM can persist in the absence of drugs for considerable time. It is generally believed that differential TDRM-persistence is caused, at least partially, by variations in TDRM-fitness-costs. However, in vivo epidemiological evidence for the impact of fitness costs on TDRM-persistence is rare. Here, we studied the persistence of TDRM in HIV-1 using longitudinally-sampled nucleotide sequences from the Swiss-HIV-Cohort-Study (SHCS. All treatment-naïve individuals with TDRM at baseline were included. Persistence of TDRM was quantified via reversion rates (RR determined with interval-censored survival models. Fitness costs of TDRM were estimated in the genetic background in which they occurred using a previously published and validated machine-learning algorithm (based on in vitro replicative capacities and were included in the survival models as explanatory variables. In 857 sequential samples from 168 treatment-naïve patients, 17 TDRM were analyzed. RR varied substantially and ranged from 174.0/100-person-years;CI=[51.4, 588.8] (for 184V to 2.7/100-person-years;[0.7, 10.9] (for 215D. RR increased significantly with fitness cost (increase by 1.6[1.3,2.0] per standard deviation of fitness costs. When subdividing fitness costs into the average fitness cost of a given mutation and the deviation from the average fitness cost of a mutation in a given genetic background, we found that both components were significantly associated with reversion-rates. Our results show that the substantial variations of TDRM persistence in the absence of drugs are associated with fitness-cost differences both among mutations and among different genetic backgrounds for the same mutation.

  16. The spectrum of mutations controlling complex traits and the genetics of fitness in plants.

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    Falke, K Christin; Glander, Shirin; He, Fei; Hu, Jinyong; de Meaux, Juliette; Schmitz, Gregor

    2013-12-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis of natural variation in complex traits is the key for their effective management in crops or natural systems. This review focuses on plant variation. It will first, show that genetic modifications causing major alterations in polygenic phenotypes often hit targets within an array of 'candidate genes', second, present new methods that include mutations of all effect sizes, and help exhaustively describe the molecular systems underlying complex traits, and third, discuss recent findings regarding the role of epigenetic variants, which in plants are often maintained through both mitosis and meiosis. Exploring the whole spectrum of mutations controlling complex traits is made possible by the combination of genetic, genomic and epigenomic approaches.

  17. Genetic screening of the inherited Ichtyosis causative mutation in Chianina cattle

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    Luciano Molteni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited Ichthyosis, Chianina, Causative mutation, Genetic screening.Inherited Ichthyosis is a genetic disorder reported in both humans and animals, including bovines. Two inherited forms were reported in cattle and both are transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner: Ichthyosis Fetalis (IF and Ichthyosis Congenita (IC. A causative mutation of IF in Chianina cattle was recently indentified in the ABC12 gene. This work reports the first genetic screening using this recently available genetic test on Chianina cattle. Tests were performed on both the population of farm breeding selected young bulls (131 samples randomly chosen and high breeding value sires (16 samples. Results confirm a low total prevalence of carriers in the selected sire population (2/131; 1.5% and the presence of the disease allele among the high value selected sires (1/16; 6.3%. This result strengthens the importance to continue the genetic screening program, particularly in performance tested bulls approved for use in AI or natural service.

  18. First systematic experience of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for de-novo mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechitsky, Svetlana; Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Pakhalchuk, Tatiana; Pauling, Dana; Verlinsky, Oleg; Kuliev, Anver

    2011-04-01

    Standard preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) cannot be applied for de-novo mutations (DNM), because neither origin nor relevant haplotypes are available for testing in single cells. PGD strategies were developed for 80 families with 38 genetic disorders, determined by 33 dominant, three recessive and two X-linked DNM. All three recessive mutations were of paternal origin, while of 93 dominant mutations, 40 were paternal, 46 maternal and seven detected in affected children. The development of specific PGD strategy for each couple involved DNA analysis of the parents and affected children prior to PGD, including a mutation verification, polymorphic marker evaluation, whole and single sperm testing to establish the normal and mutant haplotypes and PGD by polar body analysis and/or embryo biopsy. Overall, 151 PGD cycles were performed for 80 families, for which a specific PGD design has been established. The application of these protocols resulted in pre-selection and transfer of 219 (1.72 per cycle) DNM-free embryos in 127 (84.1%) PGD cycles, yielding 63 (49.6%) unaffected pregnancies and birth of 59 (46.5%) healthy children, confirmed to be free of DNM. The data show feasibility of PGD for DNM, which may routinely be performed with accuracy of over 99%, using the established PGD strategy.

  19. Diagnostic criteria, specific mutations, and genetic predisposition in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Bachet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Baptiste Bachet1,2, Jean-François Emile1,31EA4340 “Epidémiologie et oncogènes des tumeurs digestives”, Faculté de médecine PIFO, UVSQ, Guyancourt, France; 2Service de Gastroentérologie et Oncologie Digestive, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, APHP, Boulogne, France; 3Service d’Anatomo-cyto-pathologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, APHP, Boulogne, FranceAbstract: In 1998, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST emerged as a distinct oncogenetic entity and subsequently became a paradigm of targeted therapies in solid tumors. Diagnosis of GIST relies on both histology and immunohistochemistry. Ninety-five percent of GISTs express either KIT or DOG-1. Approximately 80%–90% of GISTs harbor gain-of-function mutations of either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha polypeptide (PDGFRA receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK. More than 100 different mutations have been described, some of which are associated with specific clinical and/or histological characteristics. Detection of KIT or PDGFRA mutations is recommended in advanced GISTs because they are highly predictive of tumor response to RTK inhibitors, as well as in KIT-negative cases to confirm diagnosis. In most cases, GISTs are sporadic, but in rare cases, they are related with genetic predisposition, such as neurofibromatosis type 1, Carney triad, Carney–Stratakis syndrome, and inherited KIT or PDGFRA germline mutations.Keywords: gastrointestinal stromal tumors, KIT, PDGFRA, genetic predispositions, imatinib

  20. Rapid sensitive analysis of IDH1 mutation in lower-grade gliomas by automated genetic typing involving a quenching probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimoto, Michihiro; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Aoki, Kosuke; Ohka, Fumiharu; Kondo, Goro; Motomura, Kazuya; Iijima, Kentaro; Yamamichi, Akane; Ranjit, Melissa; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Kimura, Shinya; Natsume, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The authors recently found that 80% of lower-grade gliomas (LGGs) harbored a mutation in IDH1. Intraoperative detection of the mutated IDH1 helps not only differentiate LGGs from other type of brain tumors, but determine the resection border. In the current study, the authors have applied an automated genetic typing involving a quenching probe to detect the mutated IDH1. If tumor cells with the mutated IDH1 contained 10% or more in the mixture of normal and tumor cells, the device could detect it sensitively. The intraoperative assessment of IDH1 mutation is useful in brain tumor surgeries.

  1. ‘My funky genetics’: BRCA1/2 mutation carriers’ understanding of genetic inheritance and reproductive merger in the context of new repro-genetic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Doyle, Maya; Stern, Rikki; Savin, Katie; Hurley, Karen; Sagi, Michal

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Deleterious mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes elevate lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Each child of a mutation-positive parent has a 50% chance of inheriting it. Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) permits prospective parents to avoid transmitting a BRCA1/2 mutation to a child, introducing predictability into a process historically defined by chance. This investigation explored how BRCA1/2 mutation carriers understand genetic inheritance and consider a child’s inheritance of a BRCA1/2 mutation, given the opportunities that exist to pursue PGD. METHOD 39 female and male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers of reproductive age were recruited from urban cancer and reproductive medical centers. Participants completed a standardized educational presentation on PGD and prenatal diagnosis, with pre- and post-test assessments. An interdisciplinary team of qualitative researchers analyzed data using grounded theory techniques. FINDINGS Participants expressed the belief that reproduction yields children with unique genetic strengths and challenges, including the BRCA1/2 mutation, family traits for which predictive tests do not exist, and hypothetical genetic risks. Participants expressed preference for biologically-related children, yet stated their genetically ‘well’ partner’s lineage would be marred through reproductive merger, requiring the well partner to assume the burden of the BRCA1/2 mutation via their children. Participants expressed diverse views of genetically ‘well’ partners’ participation in family planning and risk management decisions. DISCUSSION Pressure to use reprogenetic technology may grow as genetic susceptibility testing becomes more widely available. Work with individuals and couples across the disease spectrum must be attuned to they ways beliefs about genetic inheritance play into reproductive decision making. PMID:22709328

  2. A Novel WRN Frameshift Mutation Identified by Multiplex Genetic Testing in a Family with Multiple Cases of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Wang, Guosheng; Zhao, Xinyi; Ye, Song; Shen, Peng; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology allows simultaneous analysis of multiple susceptibility genes for clinical cancer genetics. In this study, multiplex genetic testing was conducted in a Chinese family with multiple cases of cancer to determine the variations in cancer predisposition genes. The family comprises a mother and her five daughters, of whom the mother and the eldest daughter have cancer and the secondary daughter died of cancer. We conducted multiplex genetic testing of 90 cancer susceptibility genes using the peripheral blood DNA of the mother and all five daughters. WRN frameshift mutation is considered a potential pathogenic variation according to the guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics. A novel WRN frameshift mutation (p.N1370Tfs*23) was identified in the three cancer patients and in the youngest unaffected daughter. Other rare non-synonymous germline mutations were also detected in DICER and ELAC2. Functional mutations in WRN cause Werner syndrome, a human autosomal recessive disease characterized by premature aging and associated with genetic instability and increased cancer risk. Our results suggest that the WRN frameshift mutation is important in the surveillance of other members of this family, especially the youngest daughter, but the pathogenicity of the novel WRN frameshift mutation needs to be investigated further. Given its extensive use in clinical genetic screening, multiplex genetic testing is a promising tool in clinical cancer surveillance.

  3. Genetic Correlations Greatly Increase Mutational Robustness and Can Both Reduce and Enhance Evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam F Greenbury

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutational neighbourhoods in genotype-phenotype (GP maps are widely believed to be more likely to share characteristics than expected from random chance. Such genetic correlations should strongly influence evolutionary dynamics. We explore and quantify these intuitions by comparing three GP maps-a model for RNA secondary structure, the HP model for protein tertiary structure, and the Polyomino model for protein quaternary structure-to a simple random null model that maintains the number of genotypes mapping to each phenotype, but assigns genotypes randomly. The mutational neighbourhood of a genotype in these GP maps is much more likely to contain genotypes mapping to the same phenotype than in the random null model. Such neutral correlations can be quantified by the robustness to mutations, which can be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the null model, and crucially, above the critical threshold for the formation of large neutral networks of mutationally connected genotypes which enhance the capacity for the exploration of phenotypic novelty. Thus neutral correlations increase evolvability. We also study non-neutral correlations: Compared to the null model, i If a particular (non-neutral phenotype is found once in the 1-mutation neighbourhood of a genotype, then the chance of finding that phenotype multiple times in this neighbourhood is larger than expected; ii If two genotypes are connected by a single neutral mutation, then their respective non-neutral 1-mutation neighbourhoods are more likely to be similar; iii If a genotype maps to a folding or self-assembling phenotype, then its non-neutral neighbours are less likely to be a potentially deleterious non-folding or non-assembling phenotype. Non-neutral correlations of type i and ii reduce the rate at which new phenotypes can be found by neutral exploration, and so may diminish evolvability, while non-neutral correlations of type iii may instead facilitate evolutionary exploration

  4. Genetic Correlations Greatly Increase Mutational Robustness and Can Both Reduce and Enhance Evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, Sam F; Schaper, Steffen; Ahnert, Sebastian E; Louis, Ard A

    2016-03-01

    Mutational neighbourhoods in genotype-phenotype (GP) maps are widely believed to be more likely to share characteristics than expected from random chance. Such genetic correlations should strongly influence evolutionary dynamics. We explore and quantify these intuitions by comparing three GP maps-a model for RNA secondary structure, the HP model for protein tertiary structure, and the Polyomino model for protein quaternary structure-to a simple random null model that maintains the number of genotypes mapping to each phenotype, but assigns genotypes randomly. The mutational neighbourhood of a genotype in these GP maps is much more likely to contain genotypes mapping to the same phenotype than in the random null model. Such neutral correlations can be quantified by the robustness to mutations, which can be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the null model, and crucially, above the critical threshold for the formation of large neutral networks of mutationally connected genotypes which enhance the capacity for the exploration of phenotypic novelty. Thus neutral correlations increase evolvability. We also study non-neutral correlations: Compared to the null model, i) If a particular (non-neutral) phenotype is found once in the 1-mutation neighbourhood of a genotype, then the chance of finding that phenotype multiple times in this neighbourhood is larger than expected; ii) If two genotypes are connected by a single neutral mutation, then their respective non-neutral 1-mutation neighbourhoods are more likely to be similar; iii) If a genotype maps to a folding or self-assembling phenotype, then its non-neutral neighbours are less likely to be a potentially deleterious non-folding or non-assembling phenotype. Non-neutral correlations of type i) and ii) reduce the rate at which new phenotypes can be found by neutral exploration, and so may diminish evolvability, while non-neutral correlations of type iii) may instead facilitate evolutionary exploration and so

  5. Construction and genetic analysis of mutator insertion mutant population in maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wenting; GAO Youjun; TENG Feng; SHI Qing; ZHENG Yonglian

    2006-01-01

    A total of 26718 M1 plants were obtained by crossing the active mutator transposon donor parents (Q105, WW51, 115F, V26-2 and 919J)with the recipient parents (Hz85,W328 with Bz gene and S-Mo17Rf3Rf3). The phenotypes of M1 plants were observed in the field. M1 plants were self-pollinated to develop the mutator insertion-mutagenized M2 seeds. The transposition frequency of the mutator in the genome was calculated based on the spotted aleurone phenotype of the M2 seeds. The results showed that: (1) the mutation frequency of M1 phenotypes in the field was 0.07 in the population of W328×Mu; (2) the mutation frequency of spotted aleurone seeds on the M2 ears was 0.122 in the population of W328×Mu; (3) five S-cytoplasm male-sterile plants were found among 22500 M1 plants of S-Mo17Rf3Rf3×Mu, with the transposition frequency about 2.2×10-4 per locus. 99 flanking sequences of mutator transposition were amplified by the modified MuTAIL-PCR, and 59 non-redundant sequences with length around 400 bp were obtained.After bioinformatic analysis, 27 sequences of them could be annotated, using non-redundant nucleotide database of maize, rice, and Arabidopsis. 36 sequences of them were located on the genetic map of maize by comparative genomics, and several flanking sequences of mutator insertion were mapped on the single marker locus. Hotspot sequences of mutator transposition were revealed by comparing the homologies between the 9-bp target site duplication of the mutator insertion. The putative functions of 8 flanking sequences of rnutator transposition had identity with the functions of their corresponding marker. The constructed mutator insertion mutant population in maize will facilitate the new gene discovery and functional genomics study in maize.

  6. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk inBRCA1andBRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); A. Rudolph (Anja); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); R. Eeles (Rosalind); D.F. Easton (Douglas); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Wilkening (Stefan); B. Chen (Bowang); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka K.); F.H. Van Der Baan (Frederieke H.); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); L.C. Walker (Logan); F. Lose (Felicity); A.-T. Maia (Ana-Teresa); M. Montagna (Marco); L. Matricardi (Laura); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); E.B.G. Garcia; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Karlan; S. Orsulic (Sandra); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Y.C. Ding (Yuan Chun); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A.-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); L. Jønson (Lars); A. Osorio (Ana); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); J. Benítez (Javier); E.E. Conway (Edye E.); K.R. Blazer (Kathleen R.); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); M. Barile (Monica); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Papi (Laura); A. Martayan (Aline); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Vratimos (Athanassios); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); T. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); B. Buecher (Bruno); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Piedmonte (Marion); M.L. Friedlander (Michael L.); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L.J. Copeland (Larry J.); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Perez-Segura (Pedro); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); N. Hoogerbrugqe (N.); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); H.C. van Doorn (Helena); J.M. Collee (Margriet); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); L. Feliubadaló (L.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); X. Wang (X.); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Corines (Marina); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M.E. Robson (Mark E.); L. Zhang (Lingling); V. Joseph (Vijai); A. Berger (Andreas); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); Å. Borg (Åke); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul D.P.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); E. Friedman (Eitan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying

  7. Molecular genetics and phenotypic characteristics of MODY caused by hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha mutations in a large European collection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, E.R.; Pruhova, S.; Tack, C.J.J.; Johansen, A.; Castleden, H.A.; Lumb, P.J.; Wierzbicki, A.S.; Clark, P.M.; Lebl, J.; Pedersen, O.; Ellard, S.; Hansen, T.; Hattersley, A.T.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Heterozygous mutations in the gene of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF-4alpha) are considered a rare cause of MODY with only 14 mutations reported to date. The description of the phenotype is limited to single families. We investigated the genetics and

  8. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Moysich, K.B.; Rudolph, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Simard, J.; Soucy, P.; Eeles, R.A.; Easton, D.F.; Hamann, U.; Wilkening, S.; Chen, B.; Rookus, M.A.; Schmidt, M.K.; Baan, F.H. van der; Spurdle, A.B.; Walker, L.C.; Lose, F.; Maia, A.T.; Montagna, M.; Matricardi, L.; Lubinski, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Garcia, E.B.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Orsulic, S.; Lester, J.; Chung, W.K.; Miron, A.; Southey, M.C.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Ding, Y.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Hansen, T.V.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jonson, L.; Osorio, A.; Martinez-Bouzas, C.; Benitez, J.; Conway, E.E.; Blazer, K.R.; Weitzel, J.N.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Barile, M.; Ficarazzi, F.; Mariette, F.; Fortuzzi, S.; Viel, A.; Giannini, G.; Papi, L.; Martayan, A.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Radice, P.; Vratimos, A.; Fostira, F.; Garber, J.E.; Donaldson, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Brady, A.; Cook, J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Walker, L.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.V.; Ellis, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Claes, K.; Maerken, T. Van; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In thi

  9. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In ...

  10. Candidate Genetic Modifiers for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, MarjankaK.; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jonson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martinez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Perez Segura, Pedro; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collee, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Ake; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Ligtenberg, Jakobus J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In thi

  11. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk inBRCA1andBRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); A. Rudolph (Anja); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); R. Eeles (Rosalind); D.F. Easton (Douglas); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Wilkening (Stefan); B. Chen (Bowang); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka K.); F.H. Van Der Baan (Frederieke H.); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); L.C. Walker (Logan); F. Lose (Felicity); A.-T. Maia (Ana-Teresa); M. Montagna (Marco); L. Matricardi (Laura); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); E.B.G. Garcia; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Karlan; S. Orsulic (Sandra); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Y.C. Ding (Yuan Chun); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A.-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); L. Jønson (Lars); A. Osorio (Ana); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); J. Benítez (Javier); E.E. Conway (Edye E.); K.R. Blazer (Kathleen R.); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); M. Barile (Monica); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Papi (Laura); A. Martayan (Aline); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Vratimos (Athanassios); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); T. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); B. Buecher (Bruno); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Piedmonte (Marion); M.L. Friedlander (Michael L.); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L.J. Copeland (Larry J.); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Perez-Segura (Pedro); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); N. Hoogerbrugqe (N.); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); H.C. van Doorn (Helena); J.M. Collee (Margriet); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); L. Feliubadaló (L.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); X. Wang (X.); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Corines (Marina); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M.E. Robson (Mark E.); L. Zhang (Lingling); V. Joseph (Vijai); A. Berger (Andreas); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); Å. Borg (Åke); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul D.P.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); E. Friedman (Eitan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying fac

  12. Genetic uptake in BRCA-mutation families is related to emotional and behavioral communication characteristics of index patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landsbergen, K.M.; Verhaak, C.M.; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carriers of a hereditary mutation in BRCA are at high risk for breast and ovarian cancer. The first person from a family known to carry the mutation, the index person, has to share genetic information with relatives. This study is aimed at determining the number of relatives tested for

  13. More breast cancer patients prefer BRCA-mutation testing without prior face-to-face genetic counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, A.S.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Spruijt, L.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Brunner, H.G.; Prins, J.B.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, most breast cancer (BC) patients receive face-to-face genetic counseling (DNA-intake) prior to BRCA-mutation testing, with generic information regarding hereditary BC and BRCA-mutation testing. This prospective study evaluated a novel format: replacing the intake consultation with telepho

  14. Mutational analysis of the human mitochondrial genome branches into the realm of bacterial genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, N. [Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This is shaping up as a vintage year for studies of the genetics and evolution of the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). In a theoretical and experimental tour de force, Shenkar et al. (1996), on pages 772-780 of this issue, derive the mutation rate of the 4,977-bp (or {open_quotes}common{close_quotes}) deletion in the human mtDNA through refinement and extension of fluctuation analysis, a technique that was first used >50 years ago. Shenkar et al., in essence, have solved or bypassed many of the difficulties that are inherent in the application of fluctuation analysis to human mitochondrial gene mutations. Their study is important for two principal reasons. In the first place, high levels of this deletion cause a variety of pathological disorders, including Kearns-Sayre syndrome and chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Their current report, therefore, is a major step in the elucidation of the molecular genetic pathogenesis of this group of mitochondrial disorders. For example, it now may be feasible to analyze the effects of selection on transmission and segregation of this deletion and, perhaps, other mtDNA mutations as well. Second, and at a broader level, the approach of Shenkar et al. should find widespread applicability to the study of other mtDNA mutations. It has been recognized for several years that mammalian mtDNA mutates much more rapidly than nuclear DNA, a phenomenon with potentially profound evolutionary implications. It is exciting and useful, both experimentally and theoretically, that this {open_quotes}old{close_quotes} approach can be used for {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} applications. 56 refs.

  15. The Human Gene Mutation Database: building a comprehensive mutation repository for clinical and molecular genetics, diagnostic testing and personalized genomic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, Peter D; Mort, Matthew; Ball, Edward V; Shaw, Katy; Phillips, Andrew; Cooper, David N

    2014-01-01

    The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD®) is a comprehensive collection of germline mutations in nuclear genes that underlie, or are associated with, human inherited disease. By June 2013, the database contained over 141,000 different lesions detected in over 5,700 different genes, with new mutation entries currently accumulating at a rate exceeding 10,000 per annum. HGMD was originally established in 1996 for the scientific study of mutational mechanisms in human genes. However, it has since acquired a much broader utility as a central unified disease-oriented mutation repository utilized by human molecular geneticists, genome scientists, molecular biologists, clinicians and genetic counsellors as well as by those specializing in biopharmaceuticals, bioinformatics and personalized genomics. The public version of HGMD (http://www.hgmd.org) is freely available to registered users from academic institutions/non-profit organizations whilst the subscription version (HGMD Professional) is available to academic, clinical and commercial users under license via BIOBASE GmbH.

  16. Novel genetic linkage of rat Sp6 mutation to Amelogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muto Taro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is an inherited disorder characterized by abnormal formation of tooth enamel. Although several genes responsible for AI have been reported, not all causative genes for human AI have been identified to date. AMI rat has been reported as an autosomal recessive mutant with hypoplastic AI isolated from a colony of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat strain, but the causative gene has not yet been clarified. Through a genetic screen, we identified the causative gene of autosomal recessive AI in AMI and analyzed its role in amelogenesis. Methods cDNA sequencing of possible AI-candidate genes so far identified using total RNA of day 6 AMI rat molars identified a novel responsible mutation in specificity protein 6 (Sp6. Genetic linkage analysis was performed between Sp6 and AI phenotype in AMI. To understand a role of SP6 in AI, we generated the transgenic rats harboring Sp6 transgene in AMI (Ami/Ami + Tg. Histological analyses were performed using the thin sections of control rats, AMI, and Ami/Ami + Tg incisors in maxillae, respectively. Results We found the novel genetic linkage between a 2-bp insertional mutation of Sp6 gene and the AI phenotype in AMI rats. The position of mutation was located in the coding region of Sp6, which caused frameshift mutation and disruption of the third zinc finger domain of SP6 with 11 cryptic amino acid residues and a stop codon. Transfection studies showed that the mutant protein can be translated and localized in the nucleus in the same manner as the wild-type SP6 protein. When we introduced the CMV promoter-driven wild-type Sp6 transgene into AMI rats, the SP6 protein was ectopically expressed in the maturation stage of ameloblasts associated with the extended maturation stage and the shortened reduced stage without any other phenotypical changes. Conclusion We propose the addition of Sp6 mutation as a new molecular diagnostic criterion for the

  17. HIV-1 Genetic Diversity and Drug Resistance Mutations Among Treatment-Naive Adult Patients in Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoel Wahid, Firoz; Sno, Rachel; Darcissac, Edith; Lavergne, Anne; Adhin, Malti R; Lacoste, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    The molecular epidemiologic profile of HIV-1 in Suriname was determined through protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences obtained from HIV-1 strains collected from 100 drug-naive HIV-1-infected persons. Subtype determination revealed that most viruses were of subtype B (94.9%) in both PR and RT genomic regions, followed by B/D recombinants (5.1%). Analysis of drug resistance mutations showed only one transmitted dug resistance mutation (TDRM) (V75M) in a single strain. The genetic data obtained can serve as a baseline for Suriname to monitor emerging mutations. This study reveals that the HIV-1 epidemic in Suriname is still characterized by a low TDRM rate (1%) and a low level of subtype diversity. However, both genes display a high genetic polymorphism. This high polymorphism may ultimately lead to drug resistance. Continuous monitoring of the baseline resistance is therefore a prerequisite to safeguard effective long-term treatment for people living with HIV-1 in Suriname.

  18. Cardiac sodium channelopathy associated with SCN5A mutations: electrophysiological, molecular and genetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remme, Carol Ann

    2013-09-01

    Over the last two decades, an increasing number of SCN5A mutations have been described in patients with long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3), Brugada syndrome, (progressive) conduction disease, sick sinus syndrome, atrial standstill, atrial fibrillation, dilated cardiomyopathy, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Combined genetic, electrophysiological and molecular studies have provided insight into the dysfunction and dysregulation of the cardiac sodium channel in the setting of SCN5A mutations identified in patients with these inherited arrhythmia syndromes. However, risk stratification and patient management is hindered by the reduced penetrance and variable disease expressivity in sodium channelopathies. Furthermore, various SCN5A-related arrhythmia syndromes are known to display mixed phenotypes known as cardiac sodium channel overlap syndromes. Determinants of variable disease expressivity, including genetic background and environmental factors, are suspected but still largely unknown. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that sodium channel function and regulation is more complicated than previously assumed, and the sodium channel may play additional, as of yet unrecognized, roles in cardiac structure and function. Development of cardiac structural abnormalities secondary to SCN5A mutations has been reported, but the clinical relevance and underlying mechanisms are unclear. Increased insight into these issues would enable a major next step in research related to cardiac sodium channel disease, ultimately enabling improved diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment strategies.

  19. Age-specific Parkinson disease risk in GBA mutation carriers: information for genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Huma Q; Balwani, Manisha; Bier, Louise; Alcalay, Roy N

    2013-02-01

    We sought to estimate age-specific risk of Parkinson disease in relatives of patients with Gaucher disease, who are obligate carriers of GBA mutations and who were not ascertained by family history of Parkinson disease. A validated family history of Parkinson disease questionnaire was administered to 119 patients with Gaucher disease who were evaluated at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine from 2009 to 2012; the ages of their parents, siblings, and children, history of Parkinson disease, age at onset of Parkinson disease, and ethnic background were obtained. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to estimate age-specific Parkinson disease penetrance among parents of patients with Gaucher disease, who are obligatory GBA mutation carriers. Two participants with Gaucher disease were affected by Parkinson disease (5.4% of those who were 60 years or older). Of the 224 informative parents of patients with Gaucher disease, 11 had Parkinson disease (4.9%). Among the parents (obligatory carriers), cumulative risk of Parkinson disease by ages 65 and 85 was estimated to be 2.2% ±2.1% and 10.9% ±7.2%, respectively. We provide useful age-specific estimates of Parkinson disease penetrance in patients with Gaucher disease and GBA heterozygous carriers for genetic counseling. Although GBA mutations may increase the risk for PD, the vast majority of patients with Gaucher disease and heterozygotes may not develop the disease. Further studies are needed to identify what modifies the risk of Parkinson disease in GBA mutation carriers.

  20. Exact Markov chain and approximate diffusion solution for haploid genetic drift with one-way mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hössjer, Ola; Tyvand, Peder A; Miloh, Touvia

    2016-02-01

    The classical Kimura solution of the diffusion equation is investigated for a haploid random mating (Wright-Fisher) model, with one-way mutations and initial-value specified by the founder population. The validity of the transient diffusion solution is checked by exact Markov chain computations, using a Jordan decomposition of the transition matrix. The conclusion is that the one-way diffusion model mostly works well, although the rate of convergence depends on the initial allele frequency and the mutation rate. The diffusion approximation is poor for mutation rates so low that the non-fixation boundary is regular. When this happens we perturb the diffusion solution around the non-fixation boundary and obtain a more accurate approximation that takes quasi-fixation of the mutant allele into account. The main application is to quantify how fast a specific genetic variant of the infinite alleles model is lost. We also discuss extensions of the quasi-fixation approach to other models with small mutation rates.

  1. Alleles versus mutations: Understanding the evolution of genetic architecture requires a molecular perspective on allelic origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, David L

    2015-12-01

    Perspectives on the role of large-effect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the evolution of complex traits have shifted back and forth over the past few decades. Different sets of studies have produced contradictory insights on the evolution of genetic architecture. I argue that much of the confusion results from a failure to distinguish mutational and allelic effects, a limitation of using the Fisherian model of adaptive evolution as the lens through which the evolution of adaptive variation is examined. A molecular-based perspective reveals that allelic differences can involve the cumulative effects of many mutations plus intragenic recombination, a model that is supported by extensive empirical evidence. I discuss how different selection regimes could produce very different architectures of allelic effects under a molecular-based model, which may explain conflicting insights on genetic architecture from studies of variation within populations versus between divergently selected populations. I address shortcomings of genome-wide association study (GWAS) practices in light of more suitable models of allelic evolution, and suggest alternate GWAS strategies to generate more valid inferences about genetic architecture. Finally, I discuss how adopting more suitable models of allelic evolution could help redirect research on complex trait evolution toward addressing more meaningful questions in evolutionary biology. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. Bayesian modeling for genetic anticipation in presence of mutational heterogeneity: a case study in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Nilbert, Mef; Moreno, Victor; Gruber, Stephen B

    2011-12-01

    Genetic anticipation, described by earlier age of onset (AOO) and more aggressive symptoms in successive generations, is a phenomenon noted in certain hereditary diseases. Its extent may vary between families and/or between mutation subtypes known to be associated with the disease phenotype. In this article, we posit a Bayesian approach to infer genetic anticipation under flexible random effects models for censored data that capture the effect of successive generations on AOO. Primary interest lies in the random effects. Misspecifying the distribution of random effects may result in incorrect inferential conclusions. We compare the fit of four-candidate random effects distributions via Bayesian model fit diagnostics. A related statistical issue here is isolating the confounding effect of changes in secular trends, screening, and medical practices that may affect time to disease detection across birth cohorts. Using historic cancer registry data, we borrow from relative survival analysis methods to adjust for changes in age-specific incidence across birth cohorts. Our motivating case study comes from a Danish cancer register of 124 families with mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes known to cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome (LS). We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this article. Our model predicts family-level anticipation effects that are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high-risk families.

  3. Receipt of genetic counseling recommendations among black women at high risk for BRCA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Hayley S; Sussner, Katarina; Schwartz, Marc D; Edwards, Tiffany; Forman, Andrea; Jandorf, Lina; Brown, Karen; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B

    2012-11-01

    Low use of BRCA counseling and testing services among black women has been reported in several studies, even though such services may play an important role in reducing racial disparities in breast cancer. Surprisingly, little is known about the extent to which black women at high risk for BRCA mutations actually receive recommendations for BRCA counseling. Thus, a primary goal of the current study was to identify sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with the receipt of physician recommendation for genetic counseling based on the self-report of black women at high risk for BRCA mutations. In this cross-sectional study, participants were 125 black women with a family history suggestive of a hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer syndrome. Participants were asked about their receipt of genetic counseling recommendation or referral. Physician recommendation was reported by over two-thirds of the sample. Multivariate analyses revealed that older age and study recruitment source, specifically community-based recruitment, were significantly and independently associated with lower likelihood of physician recommendation. Findings highlight the need for additional research to identify subgroups of high-risk black women among whom physician recommendation of genetic counseling is low but would benefit from such counseling.

  4. Performance impact of mutation operators of a subpopulation-based genetic algorithm for multi-robot task allocation problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun; Kroll, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Multi-robot task allocation determines the task sequence and distribution for a group of robots in multi-robot systems, which is one of constrained combinatorial optimization problems and more complex in case of cooperative tasks because they introduce additional spatial and temporal constraints. To solve multi-robot task allocation problems with cooperative tasks efficiently, a subpopulation-based genetic algorithm, a crossover-free genetic algorithm employing mutation operators and elitism selection in each subpopulation, is developed in this paper. Moreover, the impact of mutation operators (swap, insertion, inversion, displacement, and their various combinations) is analyzed when solving several industrial plant inspection problems. The experimental results show that: (1) the proposed genetic algorithm can obtain better solutions than the tested binary tournament genetic algorithm with partially mapped crossover; (2) inversion mutation performs better than other tested mutation operators when solving problems without cooperative tasks, and the swap-inversion combination performs better than other tested mutation operators/combinations when solving problems with cooperative tasks. As it is difficult to produce all desired effects with a single mutation operator, using multiple mutation operators (including both inversion and swap) is suggested when solving similar combinatorial optimization problems.

  5. Diagnostic Genetics at a Distance: Von Hippel-Lindau Disease and a Novel Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Brookes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic testing at a distance is commonplace where members of a family with a segregating germline mutation are geographically separated. For the most part, this challenge is addressed through the intervention of health professionals in taking and/or processing blood samples for subsequent couriering of DNA to a referral laboratory. In some circumstances, however, the collecting of pivotal clinical material may involve direct patient involvement. We describe such a situation where noninvasive saliva samples were provided by members of a family manifesting Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease. The analysis identified a novel mutation in the VHL gene that was used to exclude other family members as being at risk of VHL disease.

  6. Genetic Algorithm Based on New Evaluation Function and Mutation Model for Training of BPNN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周祥; 何小荣; 陈丙珍

    2002-01-01

    A local minimum is frequently encountered in the training of back propagation neural networks (BPNN), which sharply slows the training process. In this paper, an analysis of the formation of local minima is presented, and an improved genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced to overcome local minima. The Sigmoid function is generally used as the activation function of BPNN nodes. It is the flat characteristic of the Sigmoid function that results in the formation of local minima. In the improved GA, pertinent modifications are made to the evaluation function and the mutation model. The evaluation of the solution is associated with both the training error and gradient. The sensitivity of the error function to network parameters is used to form a self-adapting mutation model. An example of industrial application shows the advantage of the improved GA to overcome local minima.

  7. The Impact on Genetic Testing of Mutational Patterns of CFTR Gene in Different Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina M; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Testino, Giancarlo; Truglio, Gessica; Strom, Roberto; Quattrucci, Serena

    2016-07-01

    More than 2000 sequence variations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene are known. The marked genetic heterogeneity, poor functional characterization of the vast majority of sequence variations, and an uncertain genotype-phenotype relationship complicate the definition of mutational search strategies. We studied the effect of the marked genetic heterogeneity detected in a case series comprising 610 patients of cystic fibrosis (CF), grouped in different clinical macrocategories, on the operative characteristics of the genetic test designed to fully characterize CF patients. The detection rate in each clinical macrocategory and at each mutational step was found to be influenced by genetic heterogeneity. The definition of a single mutational panel that is suitable for all clinical macrocategories proved impossible. Only for classic CF with pancreas insufficiency did a reduced number of mutations yield a detection rate of diagnostic value. All other clinical macrocategories required an extensive genetic search. The search for specific mutational classes appears to be useful only in specific CF clinical forms. A flowchart defining a mutational search that may be adopted for different CF clinical forms, optimized in respect to those already available, is proposed. The findings also have consequences for carrier screening strategies.

  8. Direct detection of common and rare inversion mutations in the genetic diagnosis of severe hemophilia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windsor, A.S.; Lillicrap, D.P.; Taylor, S.A.M. [Queen`s Univ., Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 50% of the cases of severe hemophilia A (factor VIII:C < 0.01 units/ml) may be due to gross rearrangements of the factor VIII gene. The mutation involves homologous sequences upstream of the factor VIII locus and within intron 22 in an intrachromosomal recombination, inversion, event. The rearrangements can readily be detected on a Southern blot using a probe that is complementary to sequences from within intron 22. We describe here the analysis of this mutation in 71 severe hemophilia A patients. Thirty two of the patients (45%) showed evidence of a rearrangement. Five different patterns of rearrangements were seen, two of which have previously been described and account for the majority of cases (pattern 1, 70% and pattern 2, 16%). Three other abnormal patterns were observed. The inversion mechanism does not usually result in the loss or gain of any genetic material, but in one patient, in whom a unique rearrangement pattern was observed (pattern 3), we have previously documented a gross deletion which removes exons 1-22 of the factor VII gene as well as sequences 5{prime} to the gene. In another individual a fourth pattern in which an extra 19.0 kb band is present was detected. In this case it is unclear as to whether the rearrangement is responsible for the disease or is simply coincident normal variation. A fifth pattern, in which an extra 16.0 kb band was detected, was observed in a family with a new mutation causing hemophilia A. The affected individual and his mother inherited a de novo rearrangement of the factor VIII gene from his unaffected grandfather, implicating it as the cause of the disease. In conclusion, testing for the factor VIII inversion mutation was positive in approximately 45% of severe hemophiliacs, 72% of whom were isolated cases, and as such should constitute the initial stage in the genetic testing protocol for these patients` families.

  9. Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Nicole A; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel genes cause several types of human epilepsies. Often, individuals with the same sodium channel mutation exhibit diverse phenotypes. This suggests that factors beyond the primary mutation influence disease severity, including genetic modifiers. Mouse epilepsy models with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations exhibit strain-dependent phenotype variability, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn2a(Q54) (Q54) mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Q54 mice on the C57BL/6J (B6) strain exhibit delayed seizure onset and improved survival compared to [B6xSJL/J]F1.Q54 mice. We previously mapped two dominant modifier loci that influence Q54 seizure susceptibility and identified Hlf (hepatic leukemia factor) as a candidate modifier gene at one locus. Hlf and other PAR bZIP transcription factors had previously been associated with spontaneous seizures in mice thought to be caused by down-regulation of the pyridoxine pathway. An Hlf targeted knockout mouse model was used to evaluate the effect of Hlf deletion on Q54 phenotype severity. Hlf(KO/KO);Q54 double mutant mice exhibited elevated frequency and reduced survival compared to Q54 controls. To determine if direct modulation of the pyridoxine pathway could alter the Q54 phenotype, mice were maintained on a pyridoxine-deficient diet for 6 weeks. Dietary pyridoxine deficiency resulted in elevated seizure frequency and decreased survival in Q54 mice compared to control diet. To determine if Hlf could modify other epilepsies, Hlf(KO/+) mice were crossed with the Scn1a(KO/+) Dravet syndrome mouse model to examine the effect on premature lethality. Hlf(KO/+);Scn1a(KO/+) offspring exhibited decreased survival compared to Scn1a(KO/+) controls. Together these results demonstrate that Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations and that modulation of the pyridoxine pathway can also influence phenotype

  10. Genetic Testing for TMEM154 Mutations Associated with Lentivirus Susceptibility in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrik, Dustin T.; Simpson, Barry; Kijas, James W.; Clawson, Michael L.; Chitko-McKown, Carol G.; Harhay, Gregory P.; Leymaster, Kreg A.

    2013-01-01

    In sheep, small ruminant lentiviruses cause an incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative disease that affects millions of animals worldwide. Known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in the U.S., and Visna/Maedi virus (VMV) elsewhere, these viruses reduce an animal’s health, productivity, and lifespan. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154) has been previously associated with OPPV infection in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the ancestral TMEM154 haplotype encoding glutamate (E) at position 35, and either form of an N70I variant, were highly-susceptible compared to sheep homozygous for the K35 missense mutation. Our current overall aim was to characterize TMEM154 in sheep from around the world to develop an efficient genetic test for reduced susceptibility. The average frequency of TMEM154 E35 among 74 breeds was 0.51 and indicated that highly-susceptible alleles were present in most breeds around the world. Analysis of whole genome sequences from an international panel of 75 sheep revealed more than 1,300 previously unreported polymorphisms in a 62 kb region containing TMEM154 and confirmed that the most susceptible haplotypes were distributed worldwide. Novel missense mutations were discovered in the signal peptide (A13V) and the extracellular domains (E31Q, I74F, and I102T) of TMEM154. A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) assay was developed to detect these and six previously reported missense and two deletion mutations in TMEM154. In blinded trials, the call rate for the eight most common coding polymorphisms was 99.4% for 499 sheep tested and 96.0% of the animals were assigned paired TMEM154 haplotypes (i.e., diplotypes). The widespread distribution of highly-susceptible TMEM154 alleles suggests that genetic testing and selection may improve the health and productivity of infected flocks. PMID:23408992

  11. Genetic testing for TMEM154 mutations associated with lentivirus susceptibility in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Heaton

    Full Text Available In sheep, small ruminant lentiviruses cause an incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative disease that affects millions of animals worldwide. Known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV in the U.S., and Visna/Maedi virus (VMV elsewhere, these viruses reduce an animal's health, productivity, and lifespan. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154 has been previously associated with OPPV infection in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the ancestral TMEM154 haplotype encoding glutamate (E at position 35, and either form of an N70I variant, were highly-susceptible compared to sheep homozygous for the K35 missense mutation. Our current overall aim was to characterize TMEM154 in sheep from around the world to develop an efficient genetic test for reduced susceptibility. The average frequency of TMEM154 E35 among 74 breeds was 0.51 and indicated that highly-susceptible alleles were present in most breeds around the world. Analysis of whole genome sequences from an international panel of 75 sheep revealed more than 1,300 previously unreported polymorphisms in a 62 kb region containing TMEM154 and confirmed that the most susceptible haplotypes were distributed worldwide. Novel missense mutations were discovered in the signal peptide (A13V and the extracellular domains (E31Q, I74F, and I102T of TMEM154. A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS assay was developed to detect these and six previously reported missense and two deletion mutations in TMEM154. In blinded trials, the call rate for the eight most common coding polymorphisms was 99.4% for 499 sheep tested and 96.0% of the animals were assigned paired TMEM154 haplotypes (i.e., diplotypes. The widespread distribution of highly-susceptible TMEM154 alleles suggests that genetic testing and selection may improve the health and productivity of infected flocks.

  12. Genetic code evolution reveals the neutral emergence of mutational robustness, and information as an evolutionary constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Steven E

    2015-04-24

    The standard genetic code (SGC) is central to molecular biology and its origin and evolution is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology, the elucidation of which promises to reveal much about the origins of life. In addition, we propose that study of its origin can also reveal some fundamental and generalizable insights into mechanisms of molecular evolution, utilizing concepts from complexity theory. The first is that beneficial traits may arise by non-adaptive processes, via a process of "neutral emergence". The structure of the SGC is optimized for the property of error minimization, which reduces the deleterious impact of point mutations. Via simulation, it can be shown that genetic codes with error minimization superior to the SGC can emerge in a neutral fashion simply by a process of genetic code expansion via tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase duplication, whereby similar amino acids are added to codons related to that of the parent amino acid. This process of neutral emergence has implications beyond that of the genetic code, as it suggests that not all beneficial traits have arisen by the direct action of natural selection; we term these "pseudaptations", and discuss a range of potential examples. Secondly, consideration of genetic code deviations (codon reassignments) reveals that these are mostly associated with a reduction in proteome size. This code malleability implies the existence of a proteomic constraint on the genetic code, proportional to the size of the proteome (P), and that its reduction in size leads to an "unfreezing" of the codon - amino acid mapping that defines the genetic code, consistent with Crick's Frozen Accident theory. The concept of a proteomic constraint may be extended to propose a general informational constraint on genetic fidelity, which may be used to explain variously, differences in mutation rates in genomes with differing proteome sizes, differences in DNA repair capacity and genome GC content between organisms, a

  13. Genetic Code Evolution Reveals the Neutral Emergence of Mutational Robustness, and Information as an Evolutionary Constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E. Massey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The standard genetic code (SGC is central to molecular biology and its origin and evolution is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology, the elucidation of which promises to reveal much about the origins of life. In addition, we propose that study of its origin can also reveal some fundamental and generalizable insights into mechanisms of molecular evolution, utilizing concepts from complexity theory. The first is that beneficial traits may arise by non-adaptive processes, via a process of “neutral emergence”. The structure of the SGC is optimized for the property of error minimization, which reduces the deleterious impact of point mutations. Via simulation, it can be shown that genetic codes with error minimization superior to the SGC can emerge in a neutral fashion simply by a process of genetic code expansion via tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase duplication, whereby similar amino acids are added to codons related to that of the parent amino acid. This process of neutral emergence has implications beyond that of the genetic code, as it suggests that not all beneficial traits have arisen by the direct action of natural selection; we term these “pseudaptations”, and discuss a range of potential examples. Secondly, consideration of genetic code deviations (codon reassignments reveals that these are mostly associated with a reduction in proteome size. This code malleability implies the existence of a proteomic constraint on the genetic code, proportional to the size of the proteome (P, and that its reduction in size leads to an “unfreezing” of the codon – amino acid mapping that defines the genetic code, consistent with Crick’s Frozen Accident theory. The concept of a proteomic constraint may be extended to propose a general informational constraint on genetic fidelity, which may be used to explain variously, differences in mutation rates in genomes with differing proteome sizes, differences in DNA repair capacity and genome

  14. Implementation of Adaptive Multiple Bit Mutation Genetic Algorithm%自适应多位变异遗传算法的实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王基一; 吴燕仙

    2003-01-01

    Genetic algorithm is a widely used optimization method. Crossover and mutation are two Basicl operatorsof the genetic algorithm. On the basis of analyzing the principles of simple genetic algorithm and discussing its exist-ing problems of crossover point and mutation bit, this paper presents a way of the adaptive multiple bit mutation ge-netic algorithm , which not only can keep the population diversity but also has quicker convergence speed. The resultsof the multi-modal function optimization show that the adaptive multiple bit mutation genetic algorithm is practicaland efficient.

  15. The genetic basis of long QT and short QT syndromes: a mutation update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Jørgensen, Poul; Schlamowitz, Sarah;

    2009-01-01

    Long QT and short QT syndromes (LQTS and SQTS) are cardiac repolarization abnormalities that are characterized by length perturbations of the QT interval as measured on electrocardiogram (ECG). Prolonged QT interval and a propensity for ventricular tachycardia of the torsades de pointes (TdP) type...... are characteristic of LQTS, while SQTS is characterized by shortened QT interval with tall peaked T-waves and a propensity for atrial fibrillation. Both syndromes represent a high risk for syncope and sudden death. LQTS exists as a congenital genetic disease (cLQTS) with more than 700 mutations described in 12 genes...

  16. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

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    Pamela eLachance-Touchette

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X that were found in a cohort of families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1-/- GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  17. Intelligent Music Composition using Genetic Algorithm based on Motif Uniform Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria Nassiri-Mofakham

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, fields of music and artificial intelligence are closer together through research in both areas. Music composition using artificial intelligence (AI solutions has created a challenging research area. Automatic music composition will not only help researchers understand human’s musical thinking, but also helps composers and musicians improve music theory significantly by using the computing power of computers. In this study, an automatic music composition is presented. The system is implemented by using Markov chain and Lindenmayer systems as well as genetic algorithm. Fitness evaluation of the generated music is achord-based. The evaluations show the fast evolution of the results by genetic algorithm using uniform mutation. Creativity in music composition is beyond the present borders of AI and much work is still ahead in this field.

  18. Cancer Is to Embryology as Mutation Is to Genetics: Hypothesis of the Cancer as Embryological Phenomenon

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    Jaime Cofre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous advances in cell biology, genetics, and developmental biology, cancer origin has been attributed to genetic mechanisms primarily involving mutations. Embryologists have expressed timidly cancer embryological origin with little success in leveraging the discussion that cancer could involve a set of conventional cellular processes used to build the embryo during morphogenesis. Thus, this “cancer process” allows the harmonious and coherent construction of the embryo structural base, and its implementation as the embryonic process involves joint regulation of differentiation, proliferation, cell invasion, and migration, enabling the human being recreation of every generation. On the other hand, “cancer disease” is the representation of an abnormal state of the cell that might happen in the stem cells of an adult person, in which the mechanism for joint gene regulating of differentiation, proliferation, cell invasion, and migration could be reactivated in an entirely inappropriate context.

  19. Reproductive Endocrinologists' Utilization of Genetic Counselors for Oncofertility and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) Treatment of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetsch, Allison L; Wicklund, Catherine; Clayman, Marla L; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2016-06-01

    Genetic counselors believe fertility preservation and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) discussions to be a part of their role when counseling BRCA1/2 mutation-positive patients. This study is the first to explore reproductive endocrinologists' (REI) practices and attitudes regarding involvement of genetic counselors in the care of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers seeking fertility preservation and PGD. A survey was mailed to 1000 REIs from Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility (SREI), an American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) affiliate group. A 14.5 % response rate was achieved; data was analyzed using SPSS software. The majority of participating REIs were found to recommend genetic counseling to cancer patients considering fertility preservation (82 %) and consult with a genetic counselor regarding PGD for hereditary cancer syndromes (92 %). Additionally, REIs consult genetic counselors regarding PGD patient counseling (88 %), genetic testing (78 %), and general genetics questions (66 %). Two areas genetic counselors may further aid REIs are: elicitation of family history, which is useful to determine fertility preservation and PGD intervention timing (32 % of REIs utilize a cancer family history to determine intervention timing); and, interpretation of variants of uncertain significance (VOUS) as cancer panel genetic testing becomes more common (36 % of REIs are unfamiliar with VOUS). Given our findings, the Oncofertility Consortium® created an online resource for genetic counselors focused on fertility preservation education and communication strategies.

  20. Clinical, histological and genetic characterization of reducing body myopathy caused by mutations in FHL1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schessl, Joachim; Taratuto, Ana L.; Sewry, Caroline; Battini, Roberta; Chin, Steven S.; Maiti, Baijayanta; Dubrovsky, Alberto L.; Erro, Marcela G.; Espada, Graciela; Robertella, Monica; Saccoliti, Maria; Olmos, Patricia; Bridges, Leslie R.; Standring, Peter; Hu, Ying; Zou, Yaqun; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Scavina, Mena; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Mitchell, Christina A.; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Muntoni, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified the X-chromosomal four and a half LIM domain gene FHL1 as the causative gene for reducing body myopathy, a disorder characterized by progressive weakness and intracytoplasmic aggregates in muscle that exert reducing activity on menadione nitro-blue-tetrazolium (NBT). The mutations detected in FHL1 affected highly conserved zinc coordinating residues within the second LIM domain and lead to the formation of aggregates when transfected into cells. Our aim was to define the clinical and morphological phenotype of this myopathy and to assess the mutational spectrum of FHL1 mutations in reducing body myopathy in a larger cohort of patients. Patients were ascertained via the detection of reducing bodies in muscle biopsy sections stained with menadione-NBT followed by clinical, histological, ultrastructural and molecular genetic analysis. A total of 11 patients from nine families were included in this study, including seven sporadic patients with early childhood onset disease and four familial cases with later onset. Weakness in all patients was progressive, sometimes rapidly so. Respiratory failure was common and scoliosis and spinal rigidity were significant in some of the patients. Analysis of muscle biopsies confirmed the presence of aggregates of FHL1 positive material in all biopsies. In two patients in whom sequential biopsies were available the aggregate load in muscle sections appeared to increase over time. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that cytoplasmic bodies were regularly seen in conjunction with the reducing bodies. The mutations detected were exclusive to the second LIM domain of FHL1 and were found in both sporadic as well as familial cases of reducing body myopathy. Six of the nine mutations affected the crucial zinc coordinating residue histidine 123. All mutations in this residue were de novo and were associated with a severe clinical course, in particular in one male patient (H123Q). Mutations in the zinc coordinating residue

  1. A Genotypic-Oriented View of CFTR Genetics Highlights Specific Mutational Patterns Underlying Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina Maria; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Stamato, Antonella; Narzi, Fabiana; Amato, Annalisa; Cimino, Giuseppe; Bertasi, Serenella; Quattrucci, Serena; Strom, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic disease caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The genotype–phenotype relationship in this disease is still unclear, and diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic challenges persist. We enrolled 610 patients with different forms of CF and studied them from a clinical, biochemical, microbiological and genetic point of view. Overall, there were 125 different mutated alleles (11 with novel mutations and 10 with complex mutations) and 225 genotypes. A strong correlation between mutational patterns at the genotypic level and phenotypic macrocategories emerged. This specificity appears to largely depend on rare and individual mutations, as well as on the varying prevalence of common alleles in different clinical macrocategories. However, 19 genotypes appeared to underlie different clinical forms of the disease. The dissection of the pathway from the CFTR mutated genotype to the clinical phenotype allowed to identify at least two components of the variability usually found in the genotype–phenotype relationship. One component seems to depend on the genetic variation of CFTR, the other component on the cumulative effect of variations in other genes and cellular pathways independent from CFTR. The experimental dissection of the overall biological CFTR pathway appears to be a powerful approach for a better comprehension of the genotype–phenotype relationship. However, a change from an allele-oriented to a genotypic-oriented view of CFTR genetics is mandatory, as well as a better assessment of sources of variability within the CFTR pathway. PMID:25910067

  2. Human teratogens and genetic phenocopies. Understanding pathogenesis through human genes mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassina, Matteo; Cagnoli, Giulia A; Zuccarello, Daniela; Di Gianantonio, Elena; Clementi, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to teratogenic drugs during pregnancy is associated with a wide range of embryo-fetal anomalies and sometimes results in recurrent and recognizable patterns of malformations; however, the comprehension of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of drug-induced birth defects is difficult, since teratogenesis is a multifactorial process which is always the result of a complex interaction between several environmental factors and the genetic background of both the mother and the fetus. Animal models have been extensively used to assess the teratogenic potential of pharmacological agents and to study their teratogenic mechanisms; however, a still open issue concerns how the information gained through animal models can be translated to humans. Instead, significant information can be obtained by the identification and analysis of human genetic syndromes characterized by clinical features overlapping with those observed in drug-induced embryopathies. Until now, genetic phenocopies have been reported for the embryopathies/fetopathies associated with prenatal exposure to warfarin, leflunomide, mycophenolate mofetil, fluconazole, thalidomide and ACE inhibitors. In most cases, genetic phenocopies are caused by mutations in genes encoding for the main targets of teratogens or for proteins belonging to the same molecular pathways. The aim of this paper is to review the proposed teratogenic mechanisms of these drugs, by the analysis of human monogenic disorders and their molecular pathogenesis.

  3. Life insurance and genetic test results: a mutation carrier's fight to achieve full cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Louise A; Otlowski, Margaret F A

    2013-09-01

    Currently, there is debate about life insurance companies' use of genetic information for assessing applicants. In his early 20s, James (pseudonym) was denied full life insurance cover because he revealed that he had discussed genetic testing with a genetic counsellor. He was later tested and found to carry a mutation in the MSH6 gene; after disclosing this, he was denied cover for cancer by two other life insurance companies. Unsatisfied with the insurance companies' risk assessments, and based on his understanding that regular colonoscopy significantly reduced his risk of cancer, James made a complaint to the Australian Human Rights Commission. After informing the third insurance company that he had done so, he was offered full coverage, which suggests that the company did not have actuarial data to justify its decision. This case provides evidence of the high level of initiative and proactivity required for a consumer to achieve a fair result. Few Australians would be in a position to pursue the level of research and advocacy undertaken by James (a professional with scientific training). We call on a collaborative approach between industry, government and researchers to address the issues that James's case raises about genetic testing and life insurance.

  4. Induced Mutations Unleash the Potentials of Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikelu Mba

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The options for increasing food production by at least 70% over the next four decades so as to keep pace with a rapidly increasing human population are bedeviled by erratic climatic conditions, depleted arable lands, dwindling water resources and by the significant environmental and health costs for increasing the use of agrochemicals. Enhanced productivities through “smart” crop varieties that yield more with fewer inputs is a viable option. However, the genetic similarities amongst crop varieties—which render entire cropping systems vulnerable to the same stresses—coupled with unvarying parental materials limit the possibilities for uncovering novel alleles of genes and, hence, assembling new gene combinations to break yield plateaux and enhance resilience. Induced mutation unmasks novel alleles that are harnessed to breed superior crop varieties. The historical antecedents, theoretical and practical considerations, and the successes of induced mutations in crop improvement are reviewed along with how induced mutagenesis underpins plant functional genomics. The roles of cell and molecular biology techniques in enhancing the efficiencies for the induction, detection and deployment of mutation events are also reviewed. Also, the integration of phenomics into induced mutagenesis and the use of pre-breeding for facilitating the incorporation of mutants into crop improvement are advocated.

  5. Genetics and epigenetics of glioblastoma: applications and overall incidence of IDH1 mutation

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    Xuan eZong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most fatal brain cancer found in humans. Patients suffering from glioblastoma have a dismal prognosis, with a median survival of 15 months. The tumor may develop rapidly de novo in older patients or through progression from anaplastic astrocytomas in younger patients if glioblastoma is primary or secondary, respectively. During the past decade, significant advances have been made in the understanding of processes leading to glioblastoma, and several important genetic defects that appear to be important for the development and progression of this tumor have been identified. Particularly, the discovery of recurrent mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1 gene has shed new light on the molecular landscape in glioblastoma. Indeed, emerging research on the consequences of mutant IDH1 protein expression suggests that its neomorphic enzymatic activity catalyzing the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate influences a range of cellular programs that affect the epigenome and contribute to glioblastoma development. One of the exciting observations is the presence of IDH1 mutation in the vast majority of secondary glioblastoma, while it is almost absent in primary glioblastoma. Growing data indicate that this particular mutation has clinical and prognostic importance and will become a critical early distinction in diagnosis of glioblastoma.

  6. Mutation extraction tools can be combined for robust recognition of genetic variants in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimeno Yepes, Antonio; Verspoor, Karin

    2014-01-01

    As the cost of genomic sequencing continues to fall, the amount of data being collected and studied for the purpose of understanding the genetic basis of disease is increasing dramatically. Much of the source information relevant to such efforts is available only from unstructured sources such as the scientific literature, and significant resources are expended in manually curating and structuring the information in the literature. As such, there have been a number of systems developed to target automatic extraction of mutations and other genetic variation from the literature using text mining tools. We have performed a broad survey of the existing publicly available tools for extraction of genetic variants from the scientific literature. We consider not just one tool but a number of different tools, individually and in combination, and apply the tools in two scenarios. First, they are compared in an intrinsic evaluation context, where the tools are tested for their ability to identify specific mentions of genetic variants in a corpus of manually annotated papers, the Variome corpus. Second, they are compared in an extrinsic evaluation context based on our previous study of text mining support for curation of the COSMIC and InSiGHT databases. Our results demonstrate that no single tool covers the full range of genetic variants mentioned in the literature. Rather, several tools have complementary coverage and can be used together effectively. In the intrinsic evaluation on the Variome corpus, the combined performance is above 0.95 in F-measure, while in the extrinsic evaluation the combined recall performance is above 0.71 for COSMIC and above 0.62 for InSiGHT, a substantial improvement over the performance of any individual tool. Based on the analysis of these results, we suggest several directions for the improvement of text mining tools for genetic variant extraction from the literature.

  7. Evaluation of the genetic parameters and mutation analysis of 22 STR loci in the central Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongdan, Wang; Bing, Kang; Ning, Su; Miao, He; Bo, Zhang; Yuxin, Guo; Bofeng, Zhu; Shixiu, Liao; Zhaoshu, Zeng

    2017-01-01

    At present, the Han nationality is China's main ethnic group and also the most populous nation in the world. This is a great resource to study microsatellite mutations and for the study of ethnogeny. The aim of this study is to investigate the genetic polymorphisms and mutations of 22 autosomal STR loci in 2475 individuals from Henan province, China. DNA is amplified and genotyped using PowerPlex™24 system. The gene frequencies, forensic parameters, and the mutation rate of the 22 STR loci are analyzed. A total of 295 alleles are observed in this Henan Han population, and the allelic frequencies ranged from 0.0003 to 0.5036. In order to investigate the genetic relationships between the Henan Han and the other 14 different populations, our present data were compared with previously published data for the same 15 STR loci. The results indicated that the Henan Han had closer genetic relationships the groups including Minnan Han, Maonan, Yi and Guangdong Han groups while the South morocco population, the Moroccan population, the Malay group, and the Uigur stand away from Henan Han. Except of D2S441, D13S317, PentaE, D2S1338, D5S818, TPOX and D19S433, the mutation events are found in the other 15 STR loci. A total of 40 mutation events are observed in the 15 STR loci. The mutation rates are ranged from 0 to 4.85 × 10(-3). In this study, 39 mutations are single-step mutations, and only one at FGA comprised two steps. STR mutation is commonly existed in paternity testing, while there are no STR mutation studies of the 22 STR loci in the Henan Han population. It is of great importance in forensic individual discrimination and paternal testing.

  8. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinić Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome microdelations as potential causes of male infertility in Serbian patients, as well as to test the hypothesis that CFTR mutations in infertile men are predominantly located in the several last exons of the gene. Methods. This study has encompassed 33 men with oligo- or azoospermia. The screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region was performed by multiplex PCR analysis. The screening of the CFTR gene was performed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method. Results. Deletions on Y chromosome were detected in four patients, predominantly in AZFc region (four of total six deletions. Mutations in the CFTR gene were detected on eight out of 66 analyzed chromosomes of infertile men. The most common mutation was F508del (six of total eight mutations. Conclusion. This study confirmed that both Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations played important role in etiology of male infertility in Serbian infertile men. Genetic testing for Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations has been introduced in routine diagnostics and offered to couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques. Considering that both the type of Y chromosome microdeletion and the type of CFTR mutation have a prognostic value, it is recommended that AZF and CFTR genotyping should not only be performed in patients with reduced sperm quality before undergoing assisted reproduction, but also for the purpose of preimplantation and

  9. Genetic mutations of avian leukosis virus subgroup J strains extended their host range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanwei; Cai, Liming; Wang, Yanming; Wei, Rongrong; He, Menglian; Wang, Shanhui; Wang, Guihua; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2014-03-01

    The genetic diversity of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is determined not only by the env gene, but also by its 3' UTR and 3' LTR. They all play important roles in extending the host range and tumour development. In the present study, one ALV-J strain (ZB110604-6) from Black-Bone Silky Fowl (BSF) and three ALV-J strains (ZB110604-3/4/5) from grey partridge (GP), which bore multiple tumours and breed in one house of Farm A, were demonstrated extending their host to GP, while two other ALV-J strains (LC110515-3/4) from BSF of Farm B could not infect the embryo fibroblast of GP. The BSF is a unique species of chicken in China, while the GP is a close relative of the pheasant that previously demonstrated resistance to ALV-J. Histopathology showed that various tumours were induced by ALV-J in the two species. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the isolates from Farms A and B, rather than species, belong to two different clusters of ALV-J. Genetic mutations analysis revealed that the isolates obtained from Farm A showed a higher frequency of mutation in the hypervariable region 2 domain than in other variable regions of the gp85 gene. From the nucleotide alignment of the 3' UTR and 3' LTR gene, and the spectrum of tumours observed in this study, we speculate that the deletions or mutations in the redundant transmembrane region, E element and U3 (CAAT boxes, CArG box and Y box) might associate with tumour formation and development. The extension of the host range of ALV-J to the GP suggested that housing different species together provides more opportunities for ALV-J to evolve rapidly.

  10. Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia due to Mutations in an Armadillo Repeat Containing 5 (ARMC5) Gene: A Clinical and Genetic Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucz, Fabio R.; Zilbermint, Mihail; Lodish, Maya B.; Szarek, Eva; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Sinaii, Ninet; Berthon, Annabel; Libé, Rossella; Assié, Guillaume; Espiard, Stéphanie; Drougat, Ludivine; Ragazzon, Bruno; Bertherat, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Context: Inactivating germline mutations of the probable tumor suppressor gene, armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5), have recently been identified as a genetic cause of macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (MAH). Objective: We searched for ARMC5 mutations in a large cohort of patients with MAH. The clinical phenotype of patients with and without ARMC5 mutations was compared. Methods: Blood DNA from 34 MAH patients was genotyped using Sanger sequencing. Diurnal serum cortisol measurements, plasma ACTH levels, urinary steroids, 6-day Liddle's test, adrenal computed tomography, and weight of adrenal glands at adrenalectomy were assessed. Results: Germline ARMC5 mutations were found in 15 of 34 patients (44.1%). In silico analysis of the mutations indicated that seven (20.6%) predicted major implications for gene function. Late-night cortisol levels were higher in patients with ARMC5-damaging mutations compared with those without and/or with nonpathogenic mutations (14.5 ± 5.6 vs 6.7 ± 4.3, P < .001). All patients carrying a pathogenic ARMC5 mutation had clinical Cushing's syndrome (seven of seven, 100%) compared with 14 of 27 (52%) of those without or with mutations that were predicted to be benign (P = .029). Repeated-measures analysis showed overall higher urinary 17-hydroxycorticosteroids and free cortisol values in the patients with ARMC5-damaging mutations during the 6-day Liddle's test (P = .0002). Conclusions: ARMC5 mutations are implicated in clinically severe Cushing's syndrome associated with MAH. Knowledge of a patient's ARMC5 status has important clinical implications for the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome and genetic counseling of patients and their families. PMID:24601692

  11. Sensitivity of the distribution of mutational fitness effects to environment, genetic background, and adaptedness: a case study with Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alethea D; Sharp, Nathaniel P; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2014-03-01

    Heterogeneity in the fitness effects of individual mutations has been found across different environmental and genetic contexts. Going beyond effects on individual mutations, how is the distribution of selective effects, f(s), altered by changes in genetic and environmental context? In this study, we examined changes in the major features of f(s) by estimating viability selection on 36 individual mutations in Drosophila melanogaster across two different environments in two different genetic backgrounds that were either adapted or nonadapted to the two test environments. Both environment and genetic background affected selection on individual mutations. However, the overall distribution f(s) appeared robust to changes in genetic background but both the mean, E(s), and the variance, V(s) were dependent on the environment. Between these two properties, V(s) was more sensitive to environmental change. Contrary to predictions of fitness landscape theory, the match between genetic background and assay environment (i.e., adaptedness) had little effect on f(s).

  12. Centronuclear myopathy related to dynamin 2 mutations: Clinical, morphological, muscle imaging and genetic features of an Italian cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Catteruccia, Michela; Fattori, Fabiana; Codemo, Valentina; Ruggiero, Lucia; Maggi, Lorenzo; Tasca, Giorgio; Fiorillo, Chiara; Pane, Marika; Berardinelli, Angela; Verardo, Margherita; BRAGATO, CINZIA; Mora, Marina; MORANDI, LUCIA; Bruno, Claudio; Santoro, Lucio

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in dynamin 2 (DNM2) gene cause autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy and occur in around 50% of patients with centronuclear myopathy. We report clinical, morphological, muscle imaging and genetic data of 10 unrelated Italian patients with centronuclear myopathy related to DNM2 mutations. Our results confirm the clinical heterogeneity of this disease, underlining some peculiar clinical features, such as severe pulmonary impairment and jaw contracture that should be considered in ...

  13. Selected AGXT gene mutations analysis provides a genetic diagnosis in 28% of Tunisian patients with primary hyperoxaluria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achour Abdellatif

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary hyperoxaluria type I (PH1 is a rare genetic disorder characterized by allelic and clinical heterogeneity. Four mutations (G170R, 33_34insC, I244T and F152I account for more than 50% of PH1 alleles and form the basis for diagnostic genetic screening for PH1. We aimed to analyze the prevalence of these specific mutations causing PH1, and to provide an accurate tool for diagnosis of presymptomatic patients as well as for prenatal diagnosis in the affected families. Methods Polymerase chain reaction/Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, were used to detect the four mutations in the AGXT gene in DNA samples from 57 patients belonging to 40 families. Results Two mutations causing PH1 were detected in 24 patients (42.1%, with a predominance of the I244T mutation (68% of patients and 33_34insC (in the remaining 32%. In 92% of cases, mutated alleles were in homozygous state. The presented clinical features were similar for the two mutations. The age of onset was heterogeneous with a higher frequency of the pediatric age. In 58.3% of cases, the presentation corresponded to advanced renal disease which occurred early ( Conclusion Limited mutation analysis can provide a useful first line investigation for PH1. I244T and 33_34insC presented 28.2% of identified mutations causing disease in our cohort. This identification could provide an accurate tool for prenatal diagnosis in the affected families, for genetic counselling and for detection of presymptomatic individuals.

  14. A specific superoxide dismutase mutation is on the same genetic background in sporadic and familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayward, C.; Brock, D.J.H. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Swingler, R.J. [Dundee Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative disease of motor neurons, causing progressive muscular atrophy, weakness, and death from respiratory failure, often within 2-3 years. Although most cases are sporadic, some 5%-10% are inherited as autosomal dominants with age-dependent penetrance. An ALS locus has been mapped to chromosome 21q, and causative mutations identified in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene. A majority of SOD1 mutations have been found in cases with a clear family history of ALS. However, we and others have also described SOD1 mutations in patients where the disease appears to be sporadic. This is especially true for the missense mutation in codon 113 of the SOD1 gene, which substitutes threonine for isoleucine (I113T). One explanation for this finding is that this codon is a mutational hot spot with sporadic cases representing new mutations. Another is that the inherited nature of the cases is disguised by the reduced penetrance of this specific mutation. We have now shown that each of six unrelated cases of I113T mutation that we have collected in the Scottish population occurs on the same genetic background. Association analysis of multiple flanking loci on chromosome 21q supports the conclusion of a founder effect, with the original mutational event occurring {ge}10 generations ago. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Selected AGXT gene mutations analysis provides a genetic diagnosis in 28% of Tunisian patients with primary hyperoxaluria

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary hyperoxaluria type I (PH1) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by allelic and clinical heterogeneity. Four mutations (G170R, 33_34insC, I244T and F152I) account for more than 50% of PH1 alleles and form the basis for diagnostic genetic screening for PH1. We aimed to analyze the prevalence of these specific mutations causing PH1, and to provide an accurate tool for diagnosis of presymptomatic patients as well as for prenatal diagnosis in the affected families. ...

  16. RUNX1 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia are associated with distinct clinico-pathologic and genetic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidzik, V I; Teleanu, V; Papaemmanuil, E; Weber, D; Paschka, P; Hahn, J; Wallrabenstein, T; Kolbinger, B; Köhne, C H; Horst, H A; Brossart, P; Held, G; Kündgen, A; Ringhoffer, M; Götze, K; Rummel, M; Gerstung, M; Campbell, P; Kraus, J M; Kestler, H A; Thol, F; Heuser, M; Schlegelberger, B; Ganser, A; Bullinger, L; Schlenk, R F; Döhner, K; Döhner, H

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated the frequency, genetic architecture, clinico-pathologic features and prognostic impact of RUNX1 mutations in 2439 adult patients with newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). RUNX1 mutations were found in 245 of 2439 (10%) patients; were almost mutually exclusive of AML with recurrent genetic abnormalities; and they co-occurred with a complex pattern of gene mutations, frequently involving mutations in epigenetic modifiers (ASXL1, IDH2, KMT2A, EZH2), components of the spliceosome complex (SRSF2, SF3B1) and STAG2, PHF6, BCOR. RUNX1 mutations were associated with older age (16-59 years: 8.5%; ⩾60 years: 15.1%), male gender, more immature morphology and secondary AML evolving from myelodysplastic syndrome. In univariable analyses, RUNX1 mutations were associated with inferior event-free (EFS, P<0.0001), relapse-free (RFS, P=0.0007) and overall survival (OS, P<0.0001) in all patients, remaining significant when age was considered. In multivariable analysis, RUNX1 mutations predicted for inferior EFS (P=0.01). The effect of co-mutation varied by partner gene, where patients with the secondary genotypes RUNX1(mut)/ASXL1(mut) (OS, P=0.004), RUNX1(mut)/SRSF2(mut) (OS, P=0.007) and RUNX1(mut)/PHF6(mut) (OS, P=0.03) did significantly worse, whereas patients with the genotype RUNX1(mut)/IDH2(mut) (OS, P=0.04) had a better outcome. In conclusion, RUNX1-mutated AML is associated with a complex mutation cluster and is correlated with distinct clinico-pathologic features and inferior prognosis.

  17. Genetic mapping and biochemical characterization of suppressor mutations sukA and sukB for a dnaK7(Ts) mutation of Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itikawa, H; Mishina, Y; Wada, M; Fujita, H

    1992-02-01

    Temperature-resistant pseudorevertants were isolated from a dnaK7(Ts) mutant of Escherichia coli K-12. Two of these pseudorevertants were shown to carry suppressor mutations, sukA and sukB, respectively. Genetic mapping by conjugation and P1-transduction revealed that these suppressor mutations were located at two distinct sites between 76 and 77 min close to the suhA and rpoH genes. Labeled cellular proteins were extracted from suppressor mutants grown at various temperatures and subjected to SDS-gel electrophoresis. Autoradiograms of the gels indicated that these suppressor mutations each resulted in increased synthesis of the heat shock protein Lon (an ATP-dependent protease, La) at both permissive and nonpermissive temperatures.

  18. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case Study in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G;

    2011-01-01

    inferential conclusions. We compare the fit of four-candidate random effects distributions via Bayesian model fit diagnostics. A related statistical issue here is isolating the confounding effect of changes in secular trends, screening, and medical practices that may affect time to disease detection across...... to cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome (LS). We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this article. Our model predicts family-level anticipation effects that are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high-risk families....... birth cohorts. Using historic cancer registry data, we borrow from relative survival analysis methods to adjust for changes in age-specific incidence across birth cohorts. Our motivating case study comes from a Danish cancer register of 124 families with mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes known...

  19. Pharmacologically regulated induction of silent mutations (PRISM): combined pharmacological and genetic approaches for learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankland, Paul W; Ohno, Masuo; Takahashi, Eiki; Chen, Adele R; Costa, Rui M; Kushner, Steven A; Silva, Alcino J

    2003-04-01

    Mouse transgenic and knock-out approaches have made fundamental contributions to our understanding of the molecular and cellular bases of learning and memory. These approaches have successfully identified a large number of molecules with either a central or modulatory role in learning and memory. However, there are limitations associated with first-generation mutant mice, which include, for example, the lack of temporal control over the mutation. Recent technical developments have started to address some of these shortcomings. Here, the authors review a newly developed inducible approach that takes advantage of synergistic interactions between subthreshold genetic and pharmacological manipulations. This approach is easily set up and can be used to study the functional interactions between molecules in signaling pathways.

  20. Establishment and application of a multiplex genetic mutation-detection method of lung cancer based on MassARRAY platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xia Tian; Xu-Chao Zhang; Zhen Wang; Jian-Guang Chen; Shi-Liang Chen; Wei-Bang Guo; Yi-Long Wu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:This study aims to establish a method for highly parallel multiplexed detection of genetic mutations in Chinese lung cancer samples through Agena iPLEX chemistry and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis on MassARRAY mass spectrometry platform. Methods:We reviewed the related literature and data on lung cancer treatments. We also identified 99 mutation hot spots in 13 target genes closely related to the pathogenesis, drug resistance, and metastasis of lung cancer. A total of 297 primers, composed of 99 paired forward and reverse amplification primers and 99 matched extension primers, were designed using Assay Design software. The detection method was established by analyzing eight cell lines and six lung cancer specimens. The proposed method was then validated through comparisons by using a LungCartaTM kit. The sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method were evaluated by directly sequencingEGFR andKRAS genes in 100 lung cancer cases. Results:The proposed method was able to detect multiplex genetic mutations in lung cancer cell lines. This finding was consistent with the observations on previously reported mutations. The proposed method can also detect such mutations in clinical lung cancer specimens. This result was consistent with the observations with LungCartaTM kit. However, anFGFR2 mutation was detected only through the proposed method. The measured sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 96.3%, respectively. Conclusions:The proposed MassARRAY technology-based multiplex method can detect genetic mutations in Chinese lung cancer patients. Therefore, the proposed method can be applied to detect mutations in other cancer tissues.

  1. Drug resistance mutations and genetic diversity in adults treated for HIV type 1 infection in Mauritania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall-Malick, F-Zahra; Tchiakpé, Edmond; Ould Soufiane, Sid'Ahmed; Diop-Ndiaye, Halimatou; Mouhamedoune Baye, Abderrahmane; Ould Horma Babana, Abdallah; Touré Kane, Coumba; Lo, Baidy; Mboup, Souleymane

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the drug resistance mutationprofile observed in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy with virological failure and to document the HIV-1 genetic diversity in Mauritania. Eighty-six subjects were included and 65 samples were amplified successfully and sequenced. HIV-1 genotyping was performed using the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA AC11 resistance procedure. The median treatment duration was 32 months (range: 6-88) and the median viral load, 5 log10 copies/ml (range: 3.13-7). Fifty-nine patients (90.8%) were on first line regimens including 32.0% (19/59) on triomune fixed-dose and six on second-line therapy with NonNucleoside Reverse Transcriptase plus a protease inhibitor. Forty-seven patients (72.3%) had at least one drug resistance mutation including 73.0% (43/59) on first-line therapy. For the second-line, one out of six patients presented resistance mutations and only one presented PI DRM. Overall, the most common DRMs detected were M184V/I (n = 32; 49.2%), K103N (n = 28; 43%), and Y181C (n = 13; 20%). Thymidine Analog Mutations (TAMs) were found in 26.0% (n = 17) of strains and the most common was T215Y (n = 11, 16.9%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed 17 HIV-1 variants with the predominance of CRF02_AG (n = 42; 64.6%). A high rate of DRM was found in this study and shows the potential need for a structured virological surveillance including viral load quantification and genotyping. Further studies may also be needed in regards to the great variability of HIV-1 strains in Mauritania. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mutations in complement regulatory proteins predispose to preeclampsia: a genetic analysis of the PROMISSE cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E Salmon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or antiphospholipid antibodies (APL Ab--autoimmune conditions characterized by complement-mediated injury--is associated with increased risk of preeclampsia and miscarriage. Our previous studies in mice indicate that complement activation targeted to the placenta drives angiogenic imbalance and placental insufficiency. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We use PROMISSE, a prospective study of 250 pregnant patients with SLE and/or APL Ab, to test the hypothesis in humans that impaired capacity to limit complement activation predisposes to preeclampsia. We sequenced genes encoding three complement regulatory proteins--membrane cofactor protein (MCP, complement factor I (CFI, and complement factor H (CFH--in 40 patients who had preeclampsia and found heterozygous mutations in seven (18%. Five of these patients had risk variants in MCP or CFI that were previously identified in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease characterized by endothelial damage. One had a novel mutation in MCP that impairs regulation of C4b. These findings constitute, to our knowledge, the first genetic defects associated with preeclampsia in SLE and/or APL Ab. We confirmed the association of hypomorphic variants of MCP and CFI in a cohort of non-autoimmune preeclampsia patients in which five of 59 were heterozygous for mutations. CONCLUSION: The presence of risk variants in complement regulatory proteins in patients with SLE and/or APL Ab who develop preeclampsia, as well as in preeclampsia patients lacking autoimmune disease, links complement activation to disease pathogenesis and suggests new targets for treatment of this important public health problem. STUDY REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00198068.

  3. [Mutations in a Large Pedigree with Y-STR Genetic Markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shan; Liu, Chao; Wang, Ying; Li, Yue; Zhang, Chu-chu; Hong, Li; Ou, Xue-ling; Sun, Hong-yu

    2015-04-01

    To explore the mutation of Y-STR loci in meiotic allelic transmission in a large pedigree. The oral swabs of 163 male individuals were collected from a Lin pedigree. Twenty-two Y-STR genetic markers were typed with AGCU Y24 fluorescent detection kit (AGCU Y24 system), which also contained 16 Y-STR markers included in Yfiler multiple amplification kit (Yfiler system). The genotyping results of Y-STR loci were compared between each two males in the pedigree. There were 20 and 30 kinds of haplotypes obtained with Yfiler and AGCU Y24 systems in 163 male individuals from the Lin pedigree, respectively. The rates referred to haplotype differences (RRHD) of these two typing systems between male pairs were 0.910 5 and 0.922 7, respectively. The average number of marker differences were 6.582 1 and 9.824 8, respectively. The RRHD increased along with the incidents of meiosis. Y-STR mutation leads to different Y-STR haplotypes among the male members in a paternal pedigree and the rate of difference increases along with the incidents of meiosis.

  4. Genetic Screening of Mutations Associated with Fabry Disease in a Nationwide Cohort of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Maria J.; Mourão, Ana F.; Martinho, António; Simões, Olívia; Melo-Gomes, José; Salgado, Manuel; Estanqueiro, Paula; Ribeiro, Célia; Brito, Iva; Fonseca, João E.; Canhão, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Fabry’s disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with an alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. The prevalence of FD among juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients with established diagnosis is unknown, but as musculoskeletal pain may be an important complaint at presentation, misdiagnosed cases are anticipated. With this study, we aim to calculate the frequency of FD-associated mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. Children with JIA from a national cohort were selected. Clinical and laboratorial information was recorded in the Portuguese rheumatic diseases register (http://Reuma.pt). Molecular genetic testing to detect GLA gene mutations was performed. After the multiplex polymerase chain reactions technique for DNA amplification, direct sequencing of the complete sequence of GLA gene was completed. From a cohort of 292 patients with JIA (188 females, 104 males), mutations were identified in 5 patients (all female). Four patients had the mutation D313Y, a rare GLA variant, which is associated with low enzymatic levels in plasma, but normal lysosomal levels. One patient presented the missense mutation R118C, which was previously described in Mediterranean patients with FD. This is the first screening of FD mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. No “classic” pathogenic FD mutations were reported. The late-onset FD-associated mutation, R118C, was found in a frequency of 0.34% (1/292). PMID:28299312

  5. New insights into fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: functional genetic analysis of gyrA and gyrB mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidu Malik

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are among the most potent second-line drugs used for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB, and resistance to this class of antibiotics is one criterion for defining extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB. Fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been associated with modification of the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR of gyrA. Recent studies suggest that amino acid substitutions in gyrB may also play a crucial role in resistance, but functional genetic studies of these mutations in M. tuberculosis are lacking. In this study, we examined twenty six mutations in gyrase genes gyrA (seven and gyrB (nineteen to determine the clinical relevance and role of these mutations in fluoroquinolone resistance. Transductants or clinical isolates harboring T80A, T80A+A90G, A90G, G247S and A384V gyrA mutations were susceptible to all fluoroquinolones tested. The A74S mutation conferred low-level resistance to moxifloxacin but susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and ofloxacin, and the A74S+D94G double mutation conferred cross resistance to all the fluoroquinolones tested. Functional genetic analysis and structural modeling of gyrB suggest that M330I, V340L, R485C, D500A, D533A, A543T, A543V and T546M mutations are not sufficient to confer resistance as determined by agar proportion. Only three mutations, N538D, E540V and R485C+T539N, conferred resistance to all four fluoroquinolones in at least one genetic background. The D500H and D500N mutations conferred resistance only to levofloxacin and ofloxacin while N538K and E540D consistently conferred resistance to moxifloxacin only. Transductants and clinical isolates harboring T539N, T539P or N538T+T546M mutations exhibited low-level resistance to moxifloxacin only but not consistently. These findings indicate that certain mutations in gyrB confer fluoroquinolone resistance, but the level and pattern of resistance varies

  6. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  7. Does your gene need a background check? How genetic background impacts the analysis of mutations, genes, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Christopher H; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-06-01

    The premise of genetic analysis is that a causal link exists between phenotypic and allelic variation. However, it has long been documented that mutant phenotypes are not a simple result of a single DNA lesion, but are instead due to interactions of the focal allele with other genes and the environment. Although an experimentally rigorous approach focused on individual mutations and isogenic control strains has facilitated amazing progress within genetics and related fields, a glimpse back suggests that a vast complexity has been omitted from our current understanding of allelic effects. Armed with traditional genetic analyses and the foundational knowledge they have provided, we argue that the time and tools are ripe to return to the underexplored aspects of gene function and embrace the context-dependent nature of genetic effects. We assert that a broad understanding of genetic effects and the evolutionary dynamics of alleles requires identifying how mutational outcomes depend upon the 'wild type' genetic background. Furthermore, we discuss how best to exploit genetic background effects to broaden genetic research programs.

  8. The genetic difference between Western and Chinese urothelial cell carcinomas: infrequent FGFR3 mutation in Han Chinese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Liu, Tiantian; Ge, Nan; Kong, Feng; Yang, Liu; Björkholm, Magnus; Fan, Yidong; Zhao, Shengtian; Xu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    Urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) includes urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC), renal pelvic carcinoma (RPC) and ureter carcinoma (UC), and its incidence varies dependent on geographical areas and tumor locations, which indicates different oncogenic mechanisms and/or different genetic susceptibility/environment exposure. The activating mutations of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter are the most frequent genetic events in UCCs. These mutations have clinical utilities in UCC initial diagnostics, prognosis, recurrence monitoring and management. However, the vast majority of the results are obtained from studies of UCC patients in Western countries, and little has been known about these in Han Chinese patients. In the present study, we screened the FGFR3 gene and TERT promoter for mutations in 116 UBC, 91 RPC and 115 UC tumors from Han Chinese patients by using Sanger Sequencing. TERT promoter mutations occurred at a high frequency in these UCC patients, comparable with that seen in Western patients, however, the FGFR3 mutation was surprisingly lower, only 9.4% for UBCs, 8.8% for RPCs and 2.6% for UCs, respectively. Taken together, the FGFR3 gene is an infrequent target in the pathogenesis of Han Chinese UCCs, and its mutation detection and targeted therapy have limited clinical utility in these patients. Our results underscore the need for extensive characterization of cancer genomes from diverse patient populations, thereby contributing to precision medicine for cancer treatment and prevention. PMID:27029078

  9. Genetic characterization of T-PLL reveals two major biologic subgroups and JAK3 mutations as prognostic marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Anna; Kern, Wolfgang; Zenger, Melanie; Perglerová, Karolína; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare post-thymic T-cell neoplasm with aggressive clinical course and short overall survival. So far, due to the rareness of this disease, genetic data are available only from individual cases or small cohorts. In our study, we aimed at performing a comprehensive cytogenetic and molecular genetic characterization of T-PLL comprising the largest cohort of patients with T-PLL analyzed so far, including correlations between the respective markers and their impact on prognosis. Genetic abnormalities were found in all 51 cases with T-PLL, most frequently involving the TCRA/D locus (86%). Deletions were detected for ATM (69%) and TP53 (31%), whereas i(8)(q10) was observed in 61% of cases. Mutations in ATM, TP53, JAK1, and JAK3 were detected in 73, 14, 6, and 21% of patients, respectively. Additionally, BCOR mutations were observed for the first time in a lymphoid malignancy (8%). Two distinct genetic subgroups of T-PLL were identified: A large subset (86% of patients) showed abnormalities involving the TCRA/D locus activating the proto-oncogenes TCL1 or MTCP1, while the second group was characterized by a high frequency of TP53 mutations (4/7 cases). Further, analyses of overall survival identified JAK3 mutations as important prognostic marker, showing a significant negative impact. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. "Sickle Cell Anemia: Tracking down a Mutation": An Interactive Learning Laboratory That Communicates Basic Principles of Genetics and Cellular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Kevin; Williams, Mary; Horn, Spencer; Radford, David; Wyss, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation" is a full-day, inquiry-based, biology experience for high school students enrolled in genetics or advanced biology courses. In the experience, students use restriction endonuclease digestion, cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis, and microscopy to discover which of three putative patients…

  11. "Sickle Cell Anemia: Tracking down a Mutation": An Interactive Learning Laboratory That Communicates Basic Principles of Genetics and Cellular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Kevin; Williams, Mary; Horn, Spencer; Radford, David; Wyss, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation" is a full-day, inquiry-based, biology experience for high school students enrolled in genetics or advanced biology courses. In the experience, students use restriction endonuclease digestion, cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis, and microscopy to discover which of three putative patients…

  12. Multidisciplinary investigation links backward-speech trait and working memory through genetic mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prekovic, Stefan; Đurđević, Dušica Filipović; Csifcsák, Gábor; Šveljo, Olivera; Stojković, Oliver; Janković, Milica; Koprivšek, Katarina; Covill, Laura E; Lučić, Milos; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Helsen, Christine; Ceroni, Fabiola; Claessens, Frank; Newbury, Dianne F

    2016-02-03

    Case studies of unusual traits can provide unique snapshots of the effects of modified systems. In this study, we report on an individual from a Serbian family with the ability to rapidly, accurately and voluntarily speak backwards. We consider psychological, neural and genetic correlates of this trait to identify specific relevant neural mechanisms and new molecular pathways for working memory and speech-related tasks. EEG data suggest that the effect of word reversal precedes semantic integration of visually presented backward-words, and that event-related potentials above the frontal lobe are affected by both word reversal and the maintenance of backward-words in working memory. fMRI revealed that the left fusiform gyrus may facilitate the production of backward-speech. Exome sequencing identified three novel coding variants of potential significance in the RIC3, RIPK1 and ZBED5 genes. Taken together, our data suggest that, in this individual, the ability to speak backwards is afforded by an extraordinary working memory capacity. We hypothesise that this is served by cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain to the frontal cortex and supported by visual semantic loops within the left fusiform gyrus and that these neural processes may be mediated by a genetic mutation in RIC3; a chaperone for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  13. NGS-Based Assay for the Identification of Individuals Carrying Recessive Genetic Mutations in Reproductive Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulí, Anna; Boada, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Coroleu, Buenaventura; Veiga, Anna; Armengol, Lluís; Barri, Pedro N; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the capacity of carrier screening in gamete donation (GD) programs. We have developed and validated an NGS carrier-screening test (qCarrier test) that includes 200 genes associated with 368 disorders (277 autosomal recessive and 37 X-linked). Carrier screening is performed on oocyte donation candidates and the male partner of oocyte recipient. Carriers of X-linked conditions are excluded from the GD program, whereas donors are chosen who do not carry mutations for the same gene/disease as the recipients. The validation phase showed a high sensitivity (>99% sensitivity) detecting all single-nucleotide variants, 13 indels, and 25 copy-number variants included in the validation set. A total of 1,301 individuals were analysed with the qCarrier test, including 483 candidate oocyte donors and 635 receptor couples, 105 females receiving sperm donation, and 39 couples seeking pregnancy. We identified 56% of individuals who are carriers for at least one genetic condition and 1.7% of female donors who were excluded from the program due to a carrier state of X-linked conditions. Globally, 3% of a priori assigned donations had a high reproductive risk that could be minimized after testing. Genetic counselling at different stages is essential for helping to facilitate a successful and healthy pregnancy.

  14. Evolution of Escherichia coli to 42 °C and Subsequent Genetic Engineering Reveals Adaptive Mechanisms and Novel Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Troy E.; Pedersen, Margit; LaCroix, Ryan A.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) has emerged as a valuable method by which to investigate microbial adaptation to a desired environment. Here, we performed ALE to 42 °C of ten parallel populations of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 grown in glucose minimal media. Tightly controlled experimental...... conditions allowed selection based on exponential-phase growth rate, yielding strains that uniformly converged toward a similar phenotype along distinct genetic paths. Adapted strains possessed as few as 6 and as many as 55 mutations, and of the 144 genes that mutated in total, 14 arose independently across...... reaffirmed the impact of the key mutations on the growth rate at 42 °C. Interestingly, most of the identified key gene targets differed significantly from those found in similar temperature adaptation studies, highlighting the sensitivity of genetic evolution to experimental conditions and ancestral genotype...

  15. More breast cancer patients prefer BRCA-mutation testing without prior face-to-face genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sie, Aisha S; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A G; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Brunner, Han G; Prins, Judith B; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2014-06-01

    Currently, most breast cancer (BC) patients receive face-to-face genetic counseling (DNA-intake) prior to BRCA-mutation testing, with generic information regarding hereditary BC and BRCA-mutation testing. This prospective study evaluated a novel format: replacing the intake consultation with telephone, written and digital information sent home, and face-to-face contact following BRCA-mutation testing (DNA-direct). From August 2011 to February 2012, 161 of 233 eligible BC patients referred to our Human Genetics department chose between DNA-direct (intervention) or DNA-intake (control). Exclusion criteria were psychological problems (n = 33), difficulty with Dutch text (n = 5), known BRCA-family (n = 3), non-BRCA-referral (n = 1). 30 declined genetic counseling or study participation. Participants received questionnaires including satisfaction and psychological distress. 59 % chose DNA-direct (p = 0.03), of whom 90 % were satisfied and would choose DNA-direct again (including 6/8 BRCA-mutation carriers); although 27 % hesitated to recommend DNA-direct to other patients. General distress (GHQ-12, p = 0.001) and heredity-specific distress (IES, p = 0.02) scored lower in DNA-direct than DNA-intake, both at baseline and follow-up 2 weeks after BRCA-result disclosure; all scores remained below clinical relevance. DNA-direct participants reported higher website use (53 vs. 32 %, p = 0.01), more referrer information about personal consequences (41 vs. 20 %, p = 0.004) and lower decisional conflict (median 20 [0-88] vs. 25 [0-50], p = 0.01). Processing time in DNA-direct was reduced by 1 month. Mutation detection rate was 8 % in both groups. All BRCA-mutation carriers fulfilled current testing criteria. In conclusion, more BC patients preferred DNA-direct over intake consultation prior to BRCA-mutation testing, the majority being strongly to moderately satisfied with the procedure followed, without increased distress.

  16. Mutational breeding and genetic engineering in the development of high grain protein content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenefrida, Ida; Utomo, Herry S; Linscombe, Steve D

    2013-12-04

    Cereals are the most important crops in the world for both human consumption and animal feed. Improving their nutritional values, such as high protein content, will have significant implications, from establishing healthy lifestyles to helping remediate malnutrition problems worldwide. Besides providing a source of carbohydrate, grain is also a natural source of dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, specific oils, and other disease-fighting phytocompounds. Even though cereal grains contain relatively little protein compared to legume seeds, they provide protein for the nutrition of humans and livestock that is about 3 times that of legumes. Most cereal seeds lack a few essential amino acids; therefore, they have imbalanced amino acid profiles. Lysine (Lys), threonine (Thr), methionine (Met), and tryptophan (Trp) are among the most critical and are a limiting factor in many grain crops for human nutrition. Tremendous research has been put into the efforts to improve these essential amino acids. Development of high protein content can be outlined in four different approaches through manipulating seed protein bodies, modulating certain biosynthetic pathways to overproduce essential and limiting amino acids, increasing nitrogen relocation to the grain through the introduction of transgenes, and exploiting new genetic variance. Various technologies have been employed to improve protein content including conventional and mutational breeding, genetic engineering, marker-assisted selection, and genomic analysis. Each approach involves a combination of these technologies. Advancements in nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics continue to improve public knowledge at a rapid pace on the importance of specific aspects of food nutrition for optimum fitness and health. An understanding of the molecular basis for human health and genetic predisposition to certain diseases through human genomes enables individuals to personalize their nutritional requirements. It is critically important

  17. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Górski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A; Vreeswijk, Maaike P; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Os, Theo A; Asperen, Christi J; Blok, Marinus J; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Side, Lucy E; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valérie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S; Hopper, John L; Daly, Mary B; John, Esther M; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas v O; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V C; Przybylo, Jennifer A; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lázaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2011-01-19

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-wide association study recently identified an association between the rare allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3814113 (ie, the C allele) at 9p22.2 and decreased risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated the association of this SNP with ovarian cancer risk among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers by use of data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. We genotyped rs3814113 in 10,029 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 5837 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Associations with ovarian and breast cancer were assessed with a retrospective likelihood approach. All statistical tests were two-sided. The minor allele of rs3814113 was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer among BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.72 to 0.85; P = 4.8 × 10(-9)) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 0.90; P = 5.5 × 10(-4)). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk among either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. BRCA1 mutation carriers with the TT genotype at SNP rs3814113 were predicted to have an ovarian cancer risk to age 80 years of 48%, and those with the CC genotype were predicted to have a risk of 33%. Common genetic variation at the 9p22.2 locus was associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer for carriers of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

  18. Structural and functional characterization of pathogenic non- synonymous genetic mutations of human insulin-degrading enzyme by in silico methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Noor A; Kaleemuddin, Mohammed; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Khan, Fazal; Shaik, Nazia S; Ajabnoor, Ghada; Al-Harthi, Sameer E; Bondagji, Nabeel; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a key protease involved in degrading insulin and amyloid peptides in human body. Several non-synonymous genetic mutations of IDE gene have been recently associated with susceptibility to both diabetes and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the consequence of these mutations on the structure of IDE protein and its substrate binding characteristics is not well elucidated. The computational investigation of genetic mutation consequences on structural level of protein is recently found to be an effective alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. Hence, by using a combination of empirical rule and support vector machine based in silico algorithms, this study was able to identify that the pathogenic nonsynonymous genetic mutations corresponding to p.I54F, p.P122T, p.T533R, p.P581A and p.Y609A have more potential role in structural and functional deviations of IDE activity. Moreover, molecular modeling and secondary structure analysis have also confirmed their impact on the stability and secondary properties of IDE protein. The molecular docking analysis of IDE with combinational substrates has revealed that peptide inhibitors compared to small non-peptide inhibitor molecules possess good inhibitory activity towards mutant IDE. This finding may pave a way to design novel potential small peptide inhibitors for mutant IDE. Additionally by un-translated region (UTR) scanning analysis, two regulatory pathogenic genetic mutations i.e., rs5786997 (3' UTR) and rs4646954 (5' UTR), which can influence the translation pattern of IDE gene through sequence alteration of upstream-Open Reading Frame and Internal Ribosome Entry Site elements were identified. Our findings are expected to help in narrowing down the number of IDE genetic variants to be screened for disease association studies and also to select better competitive inhibitors for IDE related diseases.

  19. Genetic and molecular analyses of UV radiation-induced mutations in the fem-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, P.S.; De Wilde, D.; Dwarakanath, V.N. [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1995-06-01

    The utility of a new target gene (fem-3) is described for investigating the molecular nature of mutagenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. As a principal attribute, this system allows for the selection, maintenance and molecular analysis of any type of mutation that disrupts the gene, including deletions. In this study, 86 mutant strains were isolated, of which 79 proved to have mutations in fem-3. Twenty of these originally tested as homozygous inviable. Homozygous inviability was expected, as Stewart and coworkers had previously observed that, unlike in other organisms, most UV radiation-induced mutations in C. elegans are chromosomal rearrangements of deficiencies (Mutat. Res 249, 37-54, 1991). However, additional data, including Southern blot analyses on 49 of the strains, indicated that most of the UV radiation-induced fem-3 mutations were not deficiencies, as originally inferred from their homozygous inviability. Instead, the lethals were most likely ``coincident mutations`` in linked, essential genes that were concomitantly induced. As such, they were lost owing to genetic recombination during stock maintenance. As in mammalian cells, yeast and bacteria, the frequency of coincident mutations was much higher than would be predicted by chance. (Author).

  20. [Prevalence of common genetic mutations and clinical characteristics analysis in patients at different ages with nonsyndromic hearing impairment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chu-Qin; Chen, Bo-Bei; Chen, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xue-Jun; Zheng, Jing; Gao, Jin-Jian; Huang, Sai-Yu; Nan, Ben-Yu; Zhang, Yu-Yao; Yu, Xiao; Guan, Min-Xin

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the correlation between genetic mutations and the age in nonsyndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) and the clinical characteristics of NSHI, 215 patients with NSHI were enrolled between April 2006 and April 2012. All patients were divided into four groups according to ages of hearing loss onset and clinic presentation (0-3, 3-6, 6-18 and 18+ years). The mutations of GJB2 and mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) 1555G/C1494T were screened from peripheral blood samples in each age group. The prevalence of mutations and the age ratio were obtained. The study showed that 18.14% of all patients were found to have GJB2 mutations and 11.16% were found to have mtDNA A1555G/C1494T mutations. The prevalence of GJB2 mutation in adult group (5.26%) was lower than juvenile group who sought medical attention at 0-18 years of age (22.36%), while the prevalence of mtDNA A1555G/C1494T in adult group (31.48%) was higher than juvenile group (4.97%). Significant differences in the prevalence of GJB2 (χ2=7.108, P=0.008) and mtDNA A1555G/C1494T (χ2=20.852, P=0.000) were observed in both of two groups. The prevalence of GJB2 mutations between adult and juvenile groups according to ages of hearing loss onset was statistically significant different (0%, 20.10%, respectively, and P=0.023), while the prevalence of mtDNA A1555G/C1494T mutations was not different (14.29%, 11.34%, respectively, and P=0.698). The onset age of 66.67% of patients with GJB2 mutations was less than 1 year old, while the onset of patients with mtDNA A1555G/C1494T mutations could be found at any age group. Different standardizations of hearing loss could also show different results. These data strongly suggest that most of GJB2 mutations are found in congenital deafness and mtDNA A1555G/C1494T mutations mainly represent acquired deafness, which can be induced or aggravated by aminoglycoside antibiotics in all age groups and should be tested mainly ranging from 4 kHz to 8 kHz. Both newborn hearing screening and genetic

  1. Germline Stem Cell Competition, Mutation Hot Spots, Genetic Disorders, and Older Fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnheim, Norman; Calabrese, Peter

    2016-08-31

    Some de novo human mutations arise at frequencies far exceeding the genome average mutation rate. Examples include the common mutations at one or a few sites in the genes that cause achondroplasia, Apert syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B, and Noonan syndrome. These mutations are recurrent, provide a gain of function, are paternally derived, and are more likely to be transmitted as the father ages. Recent experiments have tested whether the high mutation frequencies are due to an elevated mutation rate per cell division, as expected, or to an advantage of the mutant spermatogonial stem cells over wild-type stem cells. The evidence, which includes the surprising discovery of testis mutation clusters, rules out the former model but not the latter. We propose how the mutations might alter spermatogonial stem cell function and discuss how germline selection contributes to the paternal age effect, the human mutational load, and adaptive evolution.

  2. Unlocking the bottleneck in forward genetics using whole-genome sequencing and identity by descent to isolate causative mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine R Bull

    Full Text Available Forward genetics screens with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU provide a powerful way to illuminate gene function and generate mouse models of human disease; however, the identification of causative mutations remains a limiting step. Current strategies depend on conventional mapping, so the propagation of affected mice requires non-lethal screens; accurate tracking of phenotypes through pedigrees is complex and uncertain; out-crossing can introduce unexpected modifiers; and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes is inefficient. Here we show how these problems can be efficiently overcome using whole-genome sequencing (WGS to detect the ENU mutations and then identify regions that are identical by descent (IBD in multiple affected mice. In this strategy, we use a modification of the Lander-Green algorithm to isolate causative recessive and dominant mutations, even at low coverage, on a pure strain background. Analysis of the IBD regions also allows us to calculate the ENU mutation rate (1.54 mutations per Mb and to model future strategies for genetic screens in mice. The introduction of this approach will accelerate the discovery of causal variants, permit broader and more informative lethal screens to be used, reduce animal costs, and herald a new era for ENU mutagenesis.

  3. Genetic diagnosis of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy using next-generation sequencing: validation analysis of DMD mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Mariko; Minami, Narihiro; Goto, Kanako; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited neuromuscular disease. The genetic diagnosis is not easily made because of the large size of the dystrophin gene, complex mutational spectrum and high number of tests patients undergo for diagnosis. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been used as the initial diagnostic test of choice. Although MLPA can diagnose 70% of DMD/BMD patients having deletions/duplications, the remaining 30% of patients with small mutations require further analysis, such as Sanger sequencing. We applied a high-throughput method using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing technology and diagnosed 92% of patients with DMD/BMD in a single analysis. We designed a multiplex primer pool for DMD and sequenced 67 cases having different mutations: 37 with deletions/duplications and 30 with small mutations or short insertions/deletions in DMD, using an Ion PGM sequencer. The results were compared with those from MLPA or Sanger sequencing. All deletions were detected. In contrast, 50% of duplications were correctly identified compared with the MLPA method. Small insertions in consecutive bases could not be detected. We estimated that Ion Torrent sequencing could diagnose ~92% of DMD/BMD patients according to the mutational spectrum of our cohort. Our results clearly indicate that this method is suitable for routine clinical practice providing novel insights into comprehensive genetic information for future molecular therapy. PMID:26911353

  4. TERT promoter mutations: a genetic signature of benign and malignant thyroid tumours occurring in the context of tinea capitis irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Paula; Batista, Rui; Pestana, Ana; Reis, Marta; Mendes, Adélia; Eloy, Catarina; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency and molecular characteristics of TERTp mutations in thyroid adenomas and carcinomas occurring in the low-dose radiation exposure tinea capitis setting. Twenty-seven patients with 34 well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas and 28 patients with 29 follicular adenomas diagnosed in a Portuguese tinea capitis cohort were studied. Blood samples were obtained from all the patients. Screening for TERTp mutations was performed by PCR amplification followed by Sanger sequencing. A series of 33 sporadic thyroid adenomas was used as control. TERTp mutations were detected in six of the 28 patients with adenoma (21.4%) and in four of the 27 patients with carcinoma (14.8%). Three tumours (two carcinomas and one adenoma) had the tandem mutation -124/-125 GG>AA (30.0%), whereas the remaining seven had the -124G > A. The 20.7% frequency of TERTp mutations in adenomas contrasts with the absence of mutations in the adenomas from the control group and from most series on record, whereas the one found in carcinomas (11.8%) is similar to those reported in the literature for sporadic carcinomas. TERTp mutations, including the tandem mutation -124/-125 GG>AA not described previously in thyroid tumours, appear to represent a genetic signature for thyroid tumours in patients submitted to low-dose X-ray irradiation. The high frequency of TERTp mutations in the adenomas of our cohort contrasts with their absence in sporadically occurring, as well as in adenomas of the Chernobyl series. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  5. Utilization of a quantitative mammalian cell mutation system, CHO/HGPRT, in experimental mutagenesis and genetic toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsie, A. W.; Couch, D. B.; O' Neill, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Development of the CHO/HGPRT system is described and a host-mediated CHO/HGPRT assay is discussed. The following topics are discussed: evidence for the genetic origin of mutation induction in the CHO/HGPRT system; dose-response relationship for EMS-mediated mutation induction and cell lethality; apparent dosimetry of EMS-induced mutagenesis; structure-activity relationship of alkylating agents and ICR compounds; mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of congeners of two classes of nitrosi compounds; and preliminary validation of the CHO/HGPRT assay in predicting chemical carcinogenicity. (HLW)

  6. Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma: Review of perioperative management of blood pressure and update on genetic mutations associated with pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Lauren; Orlowski, Robert; Cohen, Debbie

    2013-06-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are rare tumors with high morbidity rates caused by excessive catecholamine secretion, even though the majority of tumors are benign. The use of perioperative blockade regimens, together with improved surgical techniques, has greatly impacted the perioperative morbidity associated with these tumors. The old dogma of the "tumor of tens" no longer holds true. For example, at least one third of all pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are hereditary, with mutations in 1 of 10 well-characterized susceptibility genes, and one quarter of all tumors are malignant. This review focuses on the perioperative management of pheochromocytoma and paragangliomas and the clinical implications of the associated genetic mutations.

  7. Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma: Review of perioperative management of blood pressure and update on genetic mutations associated with pheochromocytoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Lauren; Orlowski, Robert; Cohen, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are rare tumors with high morbidity, due to excessive catecholamine secretion, even though the majority of tumors are benign. The use of perioperative blockade regimens, together with improved surgical techniques, has greatly impacted the perioperative morbidity associated with these tumors. The old dogma of the “tumor of tens” no longer holds true. For example, at least one-third of all pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are hereditary with mutations in one of ten well characterized susceptibility genes, and one-quarter of all tumors are malignant. This review will focus on the perioperative management of pheochromocytoma and paragangliomas and the clinical implications of the associated genetic mutations. PMID:23730992

  8. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Drenth, J.P.H.; Waxman, S G

    2007-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pain disorders. Gain-of-function missense mutations in Na(v)1.7 have been shown to cause primary erythermalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, while nonsense mutations in Na(v)1.7 result in los...

  9. Maternal genetic mutations as gestational and early life influences in producing psychiatric disease-like phenotypes in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia eGleason

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors for psychiatric disorders have traditionally been classified as genetic or environmental. Risk (candidate genes, although typically possessing small effects, represent a clear starting point to elucidate downstream cellular/molecular pathways of disease. Environmental effects, especially during development, can also lead to altered behavior and increased risk for disease. An important environmental factor is the mother, demonstrated by the negative effects elicited by maternal gestational stress and altered maternal care. These maternal effects can also have a genetic basis (e.g. maternal genetic variability and mutations. The focus of this review is maternal genotype effects that influence the emotional development of the offspring resulting in life-long psychiatric disease-like phenotypes. We have recently found that genetic inactivation of the serotonin1A receptor (5-HT1AR and the fmr-1 gene (encoding the fragile X mental retardation protein in mouse dams results in psychiatric disease-like phenotypes in their genetically unaffected offspring. 5-HT1AR deficiency in dams results in anxiety and increased stress responsiveness in their offspring. Mice with 5-HT1AR deficient dams display altered development of the hippocampus, which could be linked to their anxiety-like phenotype. Maternal inactivation of fmr-1, like its inactivation in the offspring, results in a hyperactivity-like condition and is associated with receptor alterations in the striatum. These data indicate a high sensitivity of the offspring to maternal mutations and suggest that maternal genotype effects can increase the impact of genetic risk factors in a population by increasing the risk of the genetically normal offspring as well as by enhancing the effects of offspring mutations.

  10. Family matters: examining a multi-family group intervention for women with BRCA mutations in the scope of genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Alvaro; Chiquelho, Raquel; Santos, Teresa Almeida; Sousa, Liliana

    2010-12-01

    The availability of family-centred services for women genetically at-risk for breast and ovarian cancer (BRCA) due to deleterious genetic mutations is still scarce, despite the distress that these women and their families may experience. This study describes a multi-family group intervention for women who tested positive for BRCA mutations and their families. Methods include a time-limited psycho-educational programme involving educational and support components and consisting of four semi-structured multi-family sessions. Three families (a total of nine people) attended the programme in genetic counselling for hereditary cancers at a Portuguese public hospital. A focus group interview was performed 1 month after the last session to assess both the practical and the psychosocial impacts and to collect suggestions from participants. The present paper focuses on the practical aspects of the intervention, its development and its evaluation. Participants reported that the programme is well-structured and that responds to the needs of patients and their families by improving coping skills and medical awareness in the adaptation to genetic illness. Results reinforce the need to integrate psychosocial and family-oriented interventions in genetic counselling, addressing the holistic experience of hereditary disease. Recommendations for enhancing the services available are provided. The multi-family discussion group, combining educative and supportive services with a family focus, can be successfully adapted in genetic counselling protocols.

  11. RET and EDNRB mutation screening in patients with Hirschsprung disease: Functional studies and its implications for genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widowati, Titis; Melhem, Shamiram; Patria, Suryono Y; de Graaf, Bianca M; Sinke, Richard J; Viel, Martijn; Dijkhuis, Jos; Sadewa, Ahmad H; Purwohardjono, Rochadi; Soenarto, Yati; Hofstra, Robert Mw; Sribudiani, Yunia

    2016-06-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a major cause of chronic constipation in children. HSCR can be caused by germline mutations in RET and EDNRB. Defining causality of the mutations identified is difficult and almost exclusively based on in silico predictions. Therefore, the reported frequency of pathogenic mutations might be overestimated. We combined mutation analysis with functional assays to determine the frequencies of proven pathogenic RET and EDNRB mutations in HSCR. We sequenced RET and EDNRB in 57 HSCR patients. The identified RET-coding variants were introduced into RET constructs and these were transfected into HEK293 cells to determine RET phosphorylation and activation via ERK. An exon trap experiment was performed to check a possible splice-site mutation. We identified eight rare RET-coding variants, one possible splice-site variant, but no rare EDNRB variants. Western blotting showed that three coding variants p.(Pr270Leu), p.(Ala756Val) and p.(Tyr1062Cys) resulted in lower activation of RET. Moreover, only two RET variants (p.(Ala756Val) and p.(Tyr1062Cys)) resulted in reduced ERK activation. Splice-site assays on c.1880-11A>G could not confirm its pathogenicity. Our data suggest that indeed almost half of the identified rare variants are proven pathogenic and that, hence, functional studies are essential for proper genetic counseling.

  12. Frequency and Significance of Abnormal Pancreatic Imaging in Patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genetic Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Chahla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is typically diagnosed in advanced stages resulting in a significant reduction in the number of patients who are candidates for surgical resection. Although the majority of cases are believed to occur sporadically, about 10% show familial clustering and studies have identified an increased frequency of BRCA germline mutations. The role of screening for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in these populations is unclear. Our study aims to identify the abnormal pancreatic imaging findings in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods. A retrospective review of patient medical records with known BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations was conducted. Data was collected and all available abdominal imaging studies were reviewed. Results. A total of 66 patients were identified, 36 with BRCA1 and 30 with BRCA2 mutations. Only 20/66 (30% had abdominal imaging (14 BRCA1 and 6 BRCA2 patients. Of those patients with abdominal imaging, abnormal pancreatic imaging findings were detected in 7/20 (35% cases. Conclusion. Our study shows a high incidence of abnormal pancreatic imaging findings in patients with BRCA genetic mutations (35%. Larger studies are needed to further define the role of pancreatic cancer screening and the significance of abnormal imaging findings in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  13. Use of Nystatin-Resistant Mutations in Parasexual Genetic Analysis in DICTYOSTELIUM DISCOIDEUM

    OpenAIRE

    Kasbekar, Durgadas P.; Madigan, Sanford; Katz, Eugene R.

    1983-01-01

    Nystatin-resistant mutations exhibit extreme sensitivity to 1.3 mm coumarin. The mutations fall into three complementation groups so it is possible to select for nonallelic mutations conferring sensitivity to coumarin by selection on nystatin-containing nutrient agar plates. Complementation between such coumarin-sensitive mutations allows the selection of diploids on coumarin-containing nutrient agar. Two of the nystatin resistance genes, nysB and nysC, have been mapped tentatively to the pr...

  14. Genetic and chemical characterization of an EMS induced mutation in Cucumis melo CRTISO gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galpaz, Navot; Burger, Yosi; Lavee, Tamar; Tzuri, Galil; Sherman, Amir; Melamed, Tal; Eshed, Ravit; Meir, Ayala; Portnoy, Vitaly; Bar, Einat; Shimoni-Shor, Einav; Feder, Ari; Saar, Yuval; Saar, Uzi; Baumkoler, Fabian; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Schaffer, Arthur A; Katzir, Nurit; Tadmor, Yaakov

    2013-11-15

    In order to broaden the available genetic variation of melon, we developed an ethyl methanesulfonate mutation library in an orange-flesh 'Charentais' type melon line that accumulates β-carotene. One mutagenized M2 family segregated for a novel recessive trait, a yellow-orange fruit flesh ('yofI'). HPLC analysis revealed that 'yofI' accumulates pro-lycopene (tetra-cis-lycopene) as its major fruit pigment. The altered carotenoid composition of 'yofI' is associated with a significant change of the fruit aroma since cleavage of β-carotene yields different apocarotenoids than the cleavage of pro-lycopene. Normally, pro-lycopene is further isomerized by CRTISO (carotenoid isomerase) to yield all-trans-lycopene, which is further cyclized to β-carotene in melon fruit. Cloning and sequencing of 'yofI' CRTISO identified two mRNA sequences which lead to truncated forms of CRTISO. Sequencing of the genomic CRTISO identified an A-T transversion in 'yofI' which leads to a premature STOP codon. The early carotenoid pathway genes were up regulated in yofI fruit causing accumulation of other intermediates such as phytoene and ζ-carotene. Total carotenoid levels are only slightly increased in the mutant. Mutants accumulating pro-lycopene have been reported in both tomato and watermelon fruits, however, this is the first report of a non-lycopene accumulating fruit showing this phenomenon.

  15. Genetic Mutations Associated with Pesticide Resistance in Rhipicephalus microplus and Haematobia irritans

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of gene mutation in various arthropods have been found to be associated with pesticide resistance. Some of these mutations have been found in the two cattle pests, Rhipicephalus microplus and Haematobia irritans. Sodium channel gene mutations have been associated with pyrethroid resistance ...

  16. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in North Egyptian population: implications for the genetic diagnosis in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Seedy, A; Pasquet, M C; Shafiek, H; Morsi, T; Kitzis, A; Ladevèze, V

    2016-11-30

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) occurrence in Arab populations is not common and still remains underidentified. Furthermore, the lack of disease awareness and diagnosis facilities have mislead the identification of cystic fibrosis for decades. The knowledge about cystic fibrosis (CF) in Egypt is very limited, and a few reports have drawn attention to the existence of CF or CFTR-related disorders (CFTR-RDs) in the Egyptian population. Therefore a comprehensive genetic analysis of the CFTR gene was realized in patients of North Egypt. DNA samples of 56 Egyptian patients were screened for the CFTR gene mutations. The 27 exons and their flanking regions of the CFTR gene were amplified by PCR, using the published primer pairs, and were studied by automated direct DNA sequencing to detect disease-causing mutations. Moreover, large duplication/deletion was analysed by MLPA technique. CFTR screening revealed the identification of thirteen mutations including four novel ones: c.92G>A (p.Arg31His), c.2782G>C (p.Ala928Pro), c.3718-24G>A, c.4207A>G (p.Arg1403Gly) and nine previously reported mutations: c.454A>T (p.Met152Leu), c.902A>G (p.Tyr301Cys), c.1418delG, c.2620-15C>G, c.2997_3000delAATT, c.3154T>G (p.Phe1052Val), c.3872A>G (p.Gln1291Arg), c.3877G>A (p.Val1293Ile), c.4242+10T>C. Furthermore, eight polymorphisms were found: c.743+40A>G, c.869+11C>T, c.1408A>G, c.1584G>A, c.2562T>G, c.3870A>G, c.4272C>T, c.4389G>A. These mutations and polymorphisms were not previously described in the Egyptian population except for the c.1408A>G polymorphism. Here we demonstrate the importance of the newly discovered mutations in Egyptian patients and the presence of CF, whereas the p.Phe508del mutation is not detected. The identification of CFTR mutations will become increasingly important in undocumented populations. The current findings will help us expand the mutational spectrum of CF and establish the first panel of the CFTR gene mutations in the Egyptian population and design an appropriate

  17. Spectrum of cognitive impairment in Korean ALS patients without known genetic mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-il Oh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment is associated with a negative prognosis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, as well as with clinical specificity. We investigate neuropsychological function in ALS patients without known genetic mutations in a Korean tertiary clinic. METHODS: Three hundred and eighteen patients were enrolled in a prospective longitudinal cohort from September 2008 to February 2012. At the time of diagnosis of sporadic ALS, we carried out genetic and comprehensive neuropsychological tests on all patients, and collected demographic and clinical characteristics. Six cognitive domains, namely executive function, attention, language, calculation, visuospatial function and memory were evaluated. ANOVA and t-tests were used to assess differences in clinical characteristics and neuropsychological parameters between sporadic ALS patients. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard model were used for survival analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-six patients were categorized into five subtypes: normal cognition (ALS pure, cognitive impairment (ALSci, behavioral impairment (ALSbi, frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD, and other types of dementia. Seventy patients (70/166, 42.2% were cognitively or behaviorally impaired. Among the impaired patients, eight (8/166, 4.8% had FTD-type dementia and one (1/166, 0.6% was Alzheimer's disease-type. The ALS patients with cognitive impairment (ALSci and with FTD (ALS-FTD were more severely impaired in executive function, attention, language and memory than the cognitively intact ALS patients (ALS pure. In a survival analysis, ALSci (β = 1.925, p = 0.025 and ALS-FTD groups (β = 4.150, p = 0.019 tended to have shorter survival than the ALS pure group. CONCLUSIONS: About half of ALS patients without known genetic variation have cognitive or behavioral impairment. ALS patients with cognitive abnormalities, especially FTD, have a poorer prognosis than those without cognitive impairment. In

  18. Mediator complex subunit 12 exon 2 mutation analysis in different subtypes of smooth muscle tumors confirms genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, Marieke A; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Szuhai, Károly; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2013-08-01

    Recently, heterozygous mutations in exon 2 of the mediator complex subunit 12 gene have been described in 50% to 70% of uterine leiomyomas; the recurrent nature of these mutations suggests an important role in their pathogenesis. Mediator complex subunit 12 is involved in regulation of transcription and Wnt signaling. So far, little is known about the pathogenesis of the different subtypes of extrauterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. We performed mutation analysis of mediator complex subunit 12 and immunohistochemistry for β-catenin, using 69 tumors of 64 patients including 19 uterine leiomyomas, 6 abdominal leiomyomas, 9 angioleiomyomas, 5 piloleiomyomas, and 7 uterine and 23 soft tissue leiomyosarcomas. In line with previous observations, 58% of uterine leiomyomas carried a mediator complex subunit 12 mutation. However, all other extrauterine leiomyomas were negative with the exception of 1 abdominal leiomyoma with a likely primary uterine origin. Of the 30 leiomyosarcomas, only 1 uterine tumor harbored a mutation. A new observation is the identification of 3 tumors with a homozygous mutation; a monosomy X or interstitial deletion was excluded. β-Catenin immunohistochemistry showed nuclear positivity in only 55% of the mediator complex subunit 12-mutated uterine leiomyomas, suggesting the involvement of pathways other than canonical Wnt signaling in tumorigenesis. Interestingly, 80% of mediator complex subunit 12 wild-type sporadic piloleiomyomas displayed nuclear β-catenin positivity, indicating its involvement in this leiomyoma subtype. The lack of mediator complex subunit 12 mutations in extrauterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas indicates that these tumors arise through a different pathway, emphasizing the genetic heterogeneity of smooth muscle tumors.

  19. The spectrum of FMF mutations and genotypes in the referrals to molecular genetic laboratory at Kirikkale University in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunel-Ozcan, Aysen; Sayin, Derya Beyza; Misirlioğlu, Emine Dibek; Güliter, Sefa; Yakaryilmaz, Fahri; Ensari, Cuneyt

    2009-04-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterised by recurrent and self-limited abdominal pain, synovitis and pleuritis. MEFV gene mutations are responsible from the disease and its protein product, pyrin or marenostrin, plays an essential role in the regulation of the inflammatory reactions. MEFV gene contains 10 exons and most of the mutations have been found on the last exon. Up to date, 152 mutations and polymorpisms have been reported inwhere V726A, M694V, M694I, M680I and E148Q are the most common mutations. In this study, MEFV allele frequencies of 136 individuals (60 from Pediatry, 76 from Internal Medicine) have been evaluated, and compared with each other. Asymptomatic individuals with FMF family history (4 from Pediatry, 6 from Internal Medicine) were excluded from the analysis. The prominent mutations indicated in the Pediatry group are V726A, M694V and M680I (G/C) and with the allele frequency of 0.06, 0.05 and 0.04 respectively while they were E148Q, M694V, M680I (G/C) in the Internal Medicine group with the allele frequency of 0.12, 0.08 and 0.04. The E148Q mutation is significantly overrepresented in the adult referrals (P = 0.02). Mutation on both alleles was observed in only 12% of cases. Overall mutation frequency was low, seen in 26.2% (66/252). However, when only diagnosed patients were analyzed it is 72.7% (16/22). It is also interesting that 63% of individuals are female that there may be sex influence on FMF phenotype.

  20. Development of a Tool to Guide Parents Carrying a BRCA1/2 Mutation Share Genetic Results with Underage Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santerre-Theil, Ariane; Bouchard, Karine; St-Pierre, Dominique; Drolet, Anne-Marie; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Dorval, Michel

    2016-11-02

    Although most parents carrying a BRCA1/2 genetic mutation share their test result with their underage children, they report needing support to decide if, when, and how to share risk information and what reactions to expect from their children. We developed a tool to guide parents carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation share their genetic result with underage children. Here, we report on the development of this tool using a qualitative methodology. A tool prototype was developed based on the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaboration framework. Content was assessed using feedback from focus groups, individual interviews, and a 12-item reading grid. Participants were nine BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with underage children and three cancer genetics health professionals. Thematic content analysis was conducted on interview transcripts. The tool was developed using an iterative process until saturation of data. An independent advisory committee was involved in all steps of tool development until reaching consensus. Rather than a decision aid per se (to communicate or not), the parents wanted a more comprehensive tool to help them communicate genetic test result to their children. To meet parents' needs, a communication guidance booklet was developed, setting out the pros and cons of communication, steps to prepare sharing the test result, communication tips, and parents' testimonies. This communication tool responds to a significant unmet need faced by parents carrying a genetic predisposition to cancer. Future studies are needed to assess how the information from the parent's genetic test result impacts the child's development, health behaviors, and relationship with the parent.

  1. Genetic mapping of ada and adc mutations affecting the adaptive response of Escherichia coli to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, B

    1982-05-01

    The adaptive response to alkylating agents is an inducible repair system which protects Escherichia coli against the mutagenicity and toxicity of these agents. Four mutations, ada-3, ada-5, ada-6, and adc-1, which confer differing phenotypes as regards this response, were shown to be cotransducible with gyrA, and were located at 47 min on the E. coli genetic map. A mutation already shown on the map at 47 min as tag (B. J. Bachmann and K. B. Low, Microbiol. Rev. 44:1--56, 1980; Karran et al., J. Mol. Biol. 140:101--127, 1980) is now known to be an ada mutation (G. Evensen and E. Seeberg, personal communication).

  2. Pedigree and genetic analysis of a novel mutation carrier patient suffering from hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miklós Tanyi; László Damjanovich; Judith Olasz; Géza Lukács; Orsolya Csuka; László Tóth; Zoltán Szentirmay; Zsuzsa Ress; Zsolt Barta; János L Tanyi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To screen a suspected Hungarian HNPCC family to find specific mutations and to evaluate their effect on the presentation of the disease.METHODS: The family was identified by applying the Amsterdam and Bethesda Criteria. Immunohistoche-mistry was performed, and DNA samples isolated from tumor tissue were evaluated for microsatellite instability.The identification of possible mutations was carried out by sequencing the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes.RESULTS: Two different mutations were observed in the index patient and in his family members. The first mutation was located in exon 7, codon 422 of hMSH2,and caused a change from Glu to STOP codon. No other report of such a mutation has been published, as far as we could find in the international databases. The second mutation was found in exon 3 codon 127 of the hMSH2 gene, resulting in Asp→Ser substitution. The second mutation was already published, as a non-pathogenic allelic variation.CONCLUSION: The pedigree analysis suggested that the newly detected nonsense mutation in exon 7 of the hMSH2 gene might be responsible for the development of colon cancers. Tn family members where the exon 7mutation is not coupled with this missense mutation, colon cancer appears after the age of 40. The association of these two mutations seems to decrease the age of manifestation of the disease into the early thirties.

  3. [Mutational Analysis of Hemophilia B in Russia: Molecular-Genetic Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surin, V L; Demidova, E Yu; Selivanova, D S; Luchinina, Yu A; Salomashkina, V V; Pshenichnikova, O S; Likhacheva, E A

    2016-04-01

    Hemophilia B is a hereditary X-linked coagulation disorder. This pathology is caused by various defects in the factor IX gene, which is, being about 34 kb long and consisting of eight exons, localized in the Xq27 locus of the. X-chromosome long arm. Mutations were revealed in 56 unrelated patients with hemophilia B in this study by using direct sequencing of factor IX gene functionally important fragments. Forty-six mutations were found with prevailing missense mutations (n = 30). The rest of the mutations were nonsense (n = 4) and splicing (n = 4) mutations, large deletions (n = 3), microdeletions (n = 2), microinsertions (n = 2), and promoter mutations (n = 1). Eleven of 46 mutations were previously unknown for human populations.

  4. Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by a hitherto unknown genetic mutation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashizaki Fumihiro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease that causes arterial spurting, intestinal perforation, uterine rupture and hemopneumothorax due to decreased production of type III collagen. The average age at death is 48 years old, and it is considered to be the most severe form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report the case of a 64-year-old Japanese woman and her 38-year-old daughter who were diagnosed with this disease. Case presentation A 64-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital because of right anterior chest pain following cough and pharyngeal discomfort. Pleurisy was suspected due to the presence of right pleural effusion, so the next day she was referred to our department, where a detailed examination led to the diagnosis of hemothorax. The bleeding that caused the right hemothorax was difficult to control, so our patient was transferred to the Department of Thoracic Surgery for hemostasis control. Our patient’s personal history of uterine hemorrhage and skin ulcers, as well as the finding of skin fragility during surgery, were indicative of a weak connective tissue disease; therefore, after improvement of the hemothorax, a genetic analysis was performed. This revealed a heterozygous missense mutation in COL3A1, c.2411 G>T p.Gly804Val (exon 36. A detailed investigation conducted at a later date revealed that her daughter also had the same genetic mutation. This led to the diagnosis of vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by a new gene mutation. Conclusion We report a new genetic mutation associated with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We present the clinical and imaging findings, and the disease and treatment course in this patient. We believe this information will be important in treating future cases of vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in patients with this mutation.

  5. "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation": an interactive learning laboratory that communicates basic principles of genetics and cellular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Kevin; Williams, Mary; Horn, Spencer; Radford, David; Wyss, J Michael

    2016-03-01

    "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation" is a full-day, inquiry-based, biology experience for high school students enrolled in genetics or advanced biology courses. In the experience, students use restriction endonuclease digestion, cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis, and microscopy to discover which of three putative patients have the sickle cell genotype/phenotype using DNA and blood samples from wild-type and transgenic mice that carry a sickle cell mutation. The inquiry-based, problem-solving approach facilitates the students' understanding of the basic concepts of genetics and cellular and molecular biology and provides experience with contemporary tools of biotechnology. It also leads to students' appreciation of the causes and consequences of this genetic disease, which is relatively common in individuals of African descent, and increases their understanding of the first principles of genetics. This protocol provides optimal learning when led by well-trained facilitators (including the classroom teacher) and carried out in small groups (6:1 student-to-teacher ratio). This high-quality experience can be offered to a large number of students at a relatively low cost, and it is especially effective in collaboration with a local science museum and/or university. Over the past 15 yr, >12,000 students have completed this inquiry-based learning experience and demonstrated a consistent, substantial increase in their understanding of the disease and genetics in general. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  6. Genetic heterogeneity of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, due to TWIST and FGFR mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paznekas, W A; Cunningham, M L; Howard, T D; Korf, B R; Lipson, M H; Grix, A W; Feingold, M; Goldberg, R; Borochowitz, Z; Aleck, K; Mulliken, J; Yin, M; Jabs, E W

    1998-06-01

    Thirty-two unrelated patients with features of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, a common autosomal dominant condition of craniosynostosis and limb anomalies, were screened for mutations in TWIST, FGFR2, and FGFR3. Nine novel and three recurrent TWIST mutations were found in 12 families. Seven families were found to have the FGFR3 P250R mutation, and one individual was found to have an FGFR2 VV269-270 deletion. To date, our detection rate for TWIST or FGFR mutations is 68% in our Saethre-Chotzen syndrome patients, including our five patients elsewhere reported with TWIST mutations. More than 35 different TWIST mutations are now known in the literature. The most common phenotypic features, present in more than a third of our patients with TWIST mutations, are coronal synostosis, brachycephaly, low frontal hairline, facial asymmetry, ptosis, hypertelorism, broad great toes, and clinodactyly. Significant intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability is present for either TWIST mutations or FGFR mutations. The overlap in clinical features and the presence, in the same genes, of mutations for more than one craniosynostotic condition-such as Saethre-Chotzen, Crouzon, and Pfeiffer syndromes-support the hypothesis that TWIST and FGFRs are components of the same molecular pathway involved in the modulation of craniofacial and limb development in humans.

  7. A genetic screen of the mutations in the Korean patients with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An SS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Seong Soo An,1,* Sun Ah Park,2,* Eva Bagyinszky,1 Sun Oh Bae,1 Yoon-Jeong Kim,2 Ji Young Im,2 Kyung Won Park,3 Kee Hyung Park,4 Eun-Joo Kim,5 Jee Hyang Jeong,6 Jong Hun Kim,7 Hyun Jeong Han,8 Seong Hye Choi,9 SangYun Kim10 1Department of Bionano Technology, Gachon University, Seongnam-si, 2Department of Neurology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, 3Department of Neurology, Dong-A University College of Medicine and Institute of Convergence Bio-Health, Busan, 4Department of Neurology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, 5Department of Neurology, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, 6Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, 7Department of Neurology, Ilsan Hospital, National Health Insurance Corporation, 8Department of Neurology, Myongii Hospital, Goyang, 9Department of Neurology, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, 10Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine & Neurocognitive Behavior Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD has distinct clinical characteristics in comparison to late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD. The genetic contribution is suggested to be more potent in EOAD. However, the frequency of causative mutations in EOAD could be variable depending on studies. Moreover, no mutation screening study has been performed yet employing large population in Korea. Previously, we reported that the rate of family history of dementia in EOAD patients was 18.7% in a nationwide hospital-based cohort study, the Clinical Research Center for Dementia of South Korea (CREDOS study. This rate is much lower than in other countries and is even comparable to the frequency of LOAD patients in our country. To understand the genetic characteristics of EOAD in Korea, we screened the common Alzheimer’s disease (AD

  8. A genome-editing strategy to treat β-hemoglobinopathies that recapitulates a mutation associated with a benign genetic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxler, Elizabeth A; Yao, Yu; Wang, Yong-Dong; Woodard, Kaitly J; Kurita, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio; Hughes, Jim R; Hardison, Ross C; Blobel, Gerd A; Li, Chunliang; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2016-09-01

    Disorders resulting from mutations in the hemoglobin subunit beta gene (HBB; which encodes β-globin), mainly sickle cell disease (SCD) and β-thalassemia, become symptomatic postnatally as fetal γ-globin expression from two paralogous genes, hemoglobin subunit gamma 1 (HBG1) and HBG2, decreases and adult β-globin expression increases, thereby shifting red blood cell (RBC) hemoglobin from the fetal (referred to as HbF or α2γ2) to adult (referred to as HbA or α2β2) form. These disorders are alleviated when postnatal expression of fetal γ-globin is maintained. For example, in hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH), a benign genetic condition, mutations attenuate γ-globin-to-β-globin switching, causing high-level HbF expression throughout life. Co-inheritance of HPFH with β-thalassemia- or SCD-associated gene mutations alleviates their clinical manifestations. Here we performed CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing of human blood progenitors to mutate a 13-nt sequence that is present in the promoters of the HBG1 and HBG2 genes, thereby recapitulating a naturally occurring HPFH-associated mutation. Edited progenitors produced RBCs with increased HbF levels that were sufficient to inhibit the pathological hypoxia-induced RBC morphology found in SCD. Our findings identify a potential DNA target for genome-editing-mediated therapy of β-hemoglobinopathies.

  9. [Genetic analysis of a pedigree affected with inherited thrombocytopenia caused by a novel mutation of MYH9 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenjun; Luo, Xiaocheng; Zhang, Xue; Chen, Ping; Wu, Huayu; Shu, Wei; Yuan, Zhigang

    2017-06-10

    To study genetic mutations and clinical features of a pedigree affected with MYH9-related disorders from Guangxi. Blood platelets were counted with a hemocytometer. Blood smear was carried out to detect the inclusion body in peripheral blood neutrophils. DNA and mRNA samples were extracted from blood samples from the members of the pedigree. Fragments of the MYH9 gene were amplified with PCR and directly sequenced. The affected individuals presented with a triad of giant platelets, decreased platelet count and inclusion bodies in the neutrophils with variable expressivity. A heterozygous deletional mutation (c.5803delG) in exon 41 of the MYH9 gene was found in all of the 8 affected individuals, which led to a frame-shift and change of 26 amino acids at the C-end of the tail domain of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) (p.Ala1935Profs*12). The same mutation was not found among healthy members of the pedigree. The c.5803delG mutation probably underlies the MYH9-related disorders in this pedigree. The mutation has altered the C-end of the tail domain of the NMMHC-IIA protein, resulting in mild clinical symptoms in the affected individuals.

  10. Cochlear Implant Outcomes and Genetic Mutations in Children with Ear and Brain Anomalies

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    Micol Busi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Specific clinical conditions could compromise cochlear implantation outcomes and drastically reduce the chance of an acceptable development of perceptual and linguistic capabilities. These conditions should certainly include the presence of inner ear malformations or brain abnormalities. The aims of this work were to study the diagnostic value of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in children with sensorineural hearing loss who were candidates for cochlear implants and to analyse the anatomic abnormalities of the ear and brain in patients who underwent cochlear implantation. We also analysed the effects of ear malformations and brain anomalies on the CI outcomes, speculating on their potential role in the management of language developmental disorders. Methods. The present study is a retrospective observational review of cochlear implant outcomes among hearing-impaired children who presented ear and/or brain anomalies at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. Furthermore, genetic results from molecular genetic investigations (GJB2/GJB6 and, additionally, in selected cases, SLC26A4 or mitochondrial-DNA mutations on this study group were herein described. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis was conducted using statistical tests. Results. Between January 1, 1996 and April 1, 2012, at the ENT-Audiology Department of the University Hospital of Ferrara, 620 cochlear implantations were performed. There were 426 implanted children at the time of the present study (who were <18 years. Among these, 143 patients (64 females and 79 males presented ear and/or brain anomalies/lesions/malformations at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. The age of the main study group (143 implanted children ranged from 9 months and 16 years (average = 4.4; median = 3.0. Conclusions. Good outcomes with cochlear implants are possible in patients who present with inner ear or brain abnormalities

  11. Guided macro-mutation in a graded energy based genetic algorithm for protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mahmood A; Iqbal, Sumaiya; Khatib, Firas; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Sattar, Abdul

    2016-04-01

    Protein structure prediction is considered as one of the most challenging and computationally intractable combinatorial problem. Thus, the efficient modeling of convoluted search space, the clever use of energy functions, and more importantly, the use of effective sampling algorithms become crucial to address this problem. For protein structure modeling, an off-lattice model provides limited scopes to exercise and evaluate the algorithmic developments due to its astronomically large set of data-points. In contrast, an on-lattice model widens the scopes and permits studying the relatively larger proteins because of its finite set of data-points. In this work, we took the full advantage of an on-lattice model by using a face-centered-cube lattice that has the highest packing density with the maximum degree of freedom. We proposed a graded energy-strategically mixes the Miyazawa-Jernigan (MJ) energy with the hydrophobic-polar (HP) energy-based genetic algorithm (GA) for conformational search. In our application, we introduced a 2 × 2 HP energy guided macro-mutation operator within the GA to explore the best possible local changes exhaustively. Conversely, the 20 × 20 MJ energy model-the ultimate objective function of our GA that needs to be minimized-considers the impacts amongst the 20 different amino acids and allow searching the globally acceptable conformations. On a set of benchmark proteins, our proposed approach outperformed state-of-the-art approaches in terms of the free energy levels and the root-mean-square deviations.

  12. The conditional nature of genetic interactions: the consequences of wild-type backgrounds on mutational interactions in a genome-wide modifier screen.

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    Sudarshan Chari

    Full Text Available The phenotypic outcome of a mutation cannot be simply mapped onto the underlying DNA variant. Instead, the phenotype is a function of the allele, the genetic background in which it occurs and the environment where the mutational effects are expressed. While the influence of genetic background on the expressivity of individual mutations is recognized, its consequences on the interactions between genes, or the genetic network they form, is largely unknown. The description of genetic networks is essential for much of biology; yet if, and how, the topologies of such networks are influenced by background is unknown. Furthermore, a comprehensive examination of the background dependent nature of genetic interactions may lead to identification of novel modifiers of biological processes. Previous work in Drosophila melanogaster demonstrated that wild-type genetic background influences the effects of an allele of scalloped (sd, with respect to both its principal consequence on wing development and its interactions with a mutation in optomotor blind. In this study we address whether the background dependence of mutational interactions is a general property of genetic systems by performing a genome wide dominant modifier screen of the sd(E3 allele in two wild-type genetic backgrounds using molecularly defined deletions. We demonstrate that ~74% of all modifiers of the sd(E3 phenotype are background-dependent due in part to differential sensitivity to genetic perturbation. These background dependent interactions include some with qualitative differences in the phenotypic outcome, as well as instances of sign epistasis. This suggests that genetic interactions are often contingent on genetic background, with flexibility in genetic networks due to segregating variation in populations. Such background dependent effects can substantially alter conclusions about how genes influence biological processes, the potential for genetic screens in alternative wild

  13. Genetic instability and increased mutational load: which diagnostic tool best direct patients with cancer to immunotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Giuseppe; Colombino, Maria; Cossu, Antonio; Marchetti, Antonio; Botti, Gerardo; Ascierto, Paolo A

    2017-01-21

    The occurrence of high rates of somatic mutations in cancer is believed to correspond to increased frequency of neo-epitope formation and tumor immunogenicity. Thus, classification of patients with cancer according to degree a somatic hyper-mutational status could be proposed as a predictive biomarker of responsiveness to immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Here, we discuss the suitable and reliable tests easily adoptable in clinical practice to assess somatic mutational status in patients with advanced cancer.

  14. Ionizing radiation and genetic risks. VIII. The concept of mutation component and its use in risk estimation for multifactorial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denniston, C; Chakraborty, R; Sankaranarayanan, K

    1998-08-31

    Multifactorial diseases, which include the common congenital abnormalities (incidence: 6%) and chronic diseases with onset predominantly in adults (population prevalence: 65%), contribute substantially to human morbidity and mortality. Their transmission patterns do not conform to Mendelian expectations. The model most frequently used to explain their inheritance and to estimate risks to relatives is a Multifactorial Threshold Model (MTM) of disease liability. The MTM assumes that: (i) the disease is due to the joint action of a large number of genetic and environmental factors, each of which contributing a small amount of liability, (ii) the distribution of liability in the population is Gaussian and (iii) individuals whose liability exceeds a certain threshold value are affected by the disease. For most of these diseases, the number of genes involved or the environmental factors are not fully known. In the context of radiation exposures of the population, the question of the extent to which induced mutations will cause an increase in the frequencies of these diseases has remained unanswered. In this paper, we address this problem by using a modified version of MTM which incorporates mutation and selection as two additional parameters. The model assumes a finite number of gene loci and threshold of liability (hence, the designation, Finite-Locus Threshold Model or FLTM). The FLTM permits one to examine the relationship between broad-sense heritability of disease liability and mutation component (MC), the responsiveness of the disease to a change in mutation rate. Through the use of a computer program (in which mutation rate, selection, threshold, recombination rate and environmental variance are input parameters and MC and heritability of liability are output estimates), we studied the MC-heritability relationship for (i) a permanent increase in mutation rate (e.g., when the population sustains radiation exposure in every generation) and (ii) a one-time increase

  15. Somatic point mutations in mtDNA control region are influenced by genetic background and associated with healthy aging: a GEHA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Giuseppina; Romeo, Giuseppe; Dato, Serena

    2010-01-01

    Tissue specific somatic mutations occurring in the mtDNA control region have been proposed to provide a survival advantage. Data on twins and on relatives of long-lived subjects suggested that the occurrence/accumulation of these mutations may be genetically influenced. To further investigate con...

  16. Imprints from genetic drift and mutation imply relative divergence times across marine transition zones in a Pan European small pelagic fish (Sprattus sprattus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Morten; Hanel, R.; Debes, P.;

    2012-01-01

    by distance and a complex population structure across the species0 distribution (overall yST¼0.038, Po0.01). Across transition zones markers indicated larger effects of genetic drift over mutations in the northern distribution of sprat contrasting a stronger relative impact of mutation in the species...

  17. Heterogeneous Phenotype of Long QT Syndrome Caused by the KCNH2-H562R Mutation: Importance of Familial Genetic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Esparza, Carmen; García-Molina, Esperanza; Salar-Alcaraz, Mariela; Peñafiel-Verdú, Pablo; Sánchez-Muñoz, Juan J; Martínez Sánchez, Juan; Cabañas-Perianes, Valentín; Valdés Chávarri, Mariano; García Alberola, Arcadio; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan R

    2015-10-01

    Long QT syndrome is an inherited ion channelopathy that leads to syncope and sudden death. Because of the heterogeneous phenotype of this disease, genetic testing is fundamental to detect individuals with concealed long QT syndrome. In this study, we determined the features of a family with 13 carriers of the KCNH2-H562R missense mutation, which affects the pore region of the HERG channel. We identified the KCNH2-H562R mutation in a 65-year-old man with a prolonged QTc interval who had experienced an episode of torsade de pointes. Subsequently, a total of 13 mutation carriers were identified in the family. Carriers (age 48 [26] years; 46% males) underwent clinical evaluation, electrocardiography and echocardiography. The mean (standard deviation) QTc in carriers was 493 (42) ms (3 [23%] showed normal QTc); 6 (46%) had symptoms (4, syncope; 1, sudden death; 1, aborted sudden death [proband]). While under treatment with beta-blockers, 11 of 12 carriers (92%) remained asymptomatic at 5 years of follow-up (1 patient required left cardiac sympathectomy). The QTc shortening with beta-blockers was 50 (37) ms. There was 1 sudden death in a patient who refused treatment. Family study is essential in the interpretation of a genetic testing result. This article describes the heterogeneous and variable phenotype of a large family with the KCNH2-H562R mutation and highlights the role of genetic study for the appropriate identification of at-risk individuals who would benefit from treatment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Computational Simulation and Analysis of Mutations: Nucleotide Fixation, Allelic Age and Rare Genetic Variations in Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shuhao

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the complexity of mutations, a computational approach named Genome Evolution by Matrix Algorithms ("GEMA") has been implemented. GEMA models genomic changes, taking into account hundreds of mutations within each individual in a population. By modeling of entire human chromosomes, GEMA precisely mimics real…

  19. TP53 germline mutations in Portugal and genetic modifiers of age at cancer onset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinto, Carla; Veiga, Isabel; Pinheiro, Manuela; Peixoto, Ana; Pinto, Armando; Lopes, Jose M.; Reis, Rui M.; Oliveira, Carla; Baptista, Manuela; Roque, Lucia; Regateiro, Fernando; Cirnes, Luis; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Seruca, Raquel; Castedo, Sergio; Teixeira, Manuel R.

    2009-01-01

    The Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare, autosomal dominant disease caused by TP53 germline mutations. This study aimed to characterize the TP53 mutational spectrum in patients suspected to have LFS in Portugal and to evaluate the influence of the MDM2-SNP309 and TP53-72Arg variants and of telomere

  20. Computational Simulation and Analysis of Mutations: Nucleotide Fixation, Allelic Age and Rare Genetic Variations in Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shuhao

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the complexity of mutations, a computational approach named Genome Evolution by Matrix Algorithms ("GEMA") has been implemented. GEMA models genomic changes, taking into account hundreds of mutations within each individual in a population. By modeling of entire human chromosomes, GEMA precisely mimics real…

  1. Genetic basis of cystinosis in Tunisian patients: Identification of novel mutation in CTNS gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifa Chkioua

    2015-09-01

    This study expands the mutational and population spectrum of NC, representing the first molecular diagnosis of NC in Tunisian population. The mutation screening of the CTNS gene was used for prenatal diagnosis to prevent and/or limit this inheritable disease in our country where the families are particularly large and have a high rate of consanguinity.

  2. SDH Subunit Mutation Status in Saliva : Genetic Testing in Patients with Pheochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osinga, T E; Xekouki, P; Nambuba, J; Faucz, F R; de la Luz Sierra, M; Links, T P; Kema, I P; Adams, K; Stratakis, C A; van der Horst-Schrivers, A N A; Pacak, K

    Germline mutations occur in up to 30-40% of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, with mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits B (SDHB) and D (SDHD) being the most common. Blood samples are favored for obtaining high quality DNA, however, leukocytes can also be obtained by collecting

  3. Label-free and high-sensitive detection for genetic point mutation based on hyperspectral interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rongxin; Li, Qi; Zhang, Junqi; Wang, Ruliang; Lin, Xue; Xue, Ning; Su, Ya; Jiang, Kai; Huang, Guoliang

    2016-10-01

    Label free point mutation detection is particularly momentous in the area of biomedical research and clinical diagnosis since gene mutations naturally occur and bring about highly fatal diseases. In this paper, a label free and high sensitive approach is proposed for point mutation detection based on hyperspectral interferometry. A hybridization strategy is designed to discriminate a single-base substitution with sequence-specific DNA ligase. Double-strand structures will take place only if added oligonucleotides are perfectly paired to the probe sequence. The proposed approach takes full use of the inherent conformation of double-strand DNA molecules on the substrate and a spectrum analysis method is established to point out the sub-nanoscale thickness variation, which benefits to high sensitive mutation detection. The limit of detection reach 4pg/mm2 according to the experimental result. A lung cancer gene point mutation was demonstrated, proving the high selectivity and multiplex analysis capability of the proposed biosensor.

  4. Large family with both parents affected by distinct BRCA1 mutations: implications for genetic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolenko Anna P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although the probability of both parents being affected by BRCA1 mutations is not negligible, such families have not been systematically described in the literature. Here we present a large breast-ovarian cancer family, where 3 sisters and 1 half-sister inherited maternal BRCA1 5382insC mutation while the remaining 2 sisters carried paternal BRCA1 1629delC allele. No BRCA1 homozygous mutations has been detected, that is consistent with the data on lethality of BRCA1 knockout mice. This report exemplifies that the identification of a single cancer-predisposing mutation within the index patient may not be sufficient in some circumstances. Ideally, all family members affected by breast or ovarian tumor disease have to be subjected to the DNA testing, and failure to detect the mutation in any of them calls for the search of the second cancer-associated allele.

  5. Large family with both parents affected by distinct BRCA1 mutations: implications for genetic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolenko, Anna P; Voskresenskiy, Dmitry A; Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Bit-Sava, Elena M; Gutkina, Nadezhda I; Anisimenko, Maxim S; Yu Sherina, Nathalia; Mitiushkina, Nathalia V; Ulibina, Yulia M; Yatsuk, Olga S; Zaitseva, Olga A; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Togo, Alexandr V; Pospelov, Valery A; Kovalenko, Sergey P; Semiglazov, Vladimir F; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2009-01-01

    Although the probability of both parents being affected by BRCA1 mutations is not negligible, such families have not been systematically described in the literature. Here we present a large breast-ovarian cancer family, where 3 sisters and 1 half-sister inherited maternal BRCA1 5382insC mutation while the remaining 2 sisters carried paternal BRCA1 1629delC allele. No BRCA1 homozygous mutations has been detected, that is consistent with the data on lethality of BRCA1 knockout mice. This report exemplifies that the identification of a single cancer-predisposing mutation within the index patient may not be sufficient in some circumstances. Ideally, all family members affected by breast or ovarian tumor disease have to be subjected to the DNA testing, and failure to detect the mutation in any of them calls for the search of the second cancer-associated allele. PMID:19338681

  6. PIK3CA Mutation in Colorectal Cancer: Relationship with Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Nosho

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Somatic PIK3CA mutations are often present in colorectal cancer. Mutant PIK3CA activates AKT signaling, which up-regulates fatty acid synthase (FASN. Microsatellite instability (MSI and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP are important molecular classifiers in colorectal cancer. However, the relationship between PIK3CA mutation, MSI and CIMP remains uncertain. Using Pyrosequencing technology, we detected PIK3CA mutations in 91 (15% of 590 population-based colorectal cancers. To determine CIMP status, we quantified DNA methylation in eight CIMP-specific promoters [CACNA1G, CDKN2A (p16, CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1] by real-time polymerase chain reaction (MethyLight. PIK3CA mutation was significantly associated with mucinous tumors [P = .0002; odds ratio (OR = 2.44], KRAS mutation (P < .0001; OR = 2.68, CIMP-high (P = .03; OR = 2.08, phospho–ribosomal protein S6 expression (P = .002; OR = 2.19, and FASN expression (P = .02; OR = 1.85 and inversely with p53 expression (P = .01; OR = 0.54 and β-catenin (CTNNB1 alteration (P = .004; OR = 0.43. In addition, PIK3CA G-to-A mutations were associated with MGMT loss (P = .001; OR = 3.24 but not with MGMT promoter methylation. In conclusion, PIK3CA mutation is significantly associated with other key molecular events in colorectal cancer, and MGMT loss likely contributes to the development of PIK3CA G>A mutation. In addition, Pyrosequencing is useful in detecting PIK3CA mutation in archival paraffin tumor tissue. PIK3CA mutational data further emphasize heterogeneity of colorectal cancer at the molecular level.

  7. Identification and Genetic Analysis of a Factor IX Gene Intron 3 Mutation in a Hemophilia B Pedigree in China

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    Dong Hua Cao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hemophilia B is caused by coagulation defects in the factor IX gene located in Xq27.1 on the X chromosome. A wide range of mutations, showing extensive molecular heterogeneity, have been described in hemophilia B patients. Our study was aimed at genetic analysis and prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia B in order to further elucidate the pathogenesis of the hemophilia B pedigree in China. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of all the coding regions was conducted in hemophilia B patients and carriers. Prenatal diagnosis of the proband was conducted at 20 weeks. RESULTS: We identified the novel point mutation 10.389 A>G, located upstream of the intron 3 acceptor site in hemophilia B patients. The fetus of the proband’s cousin was identified as a carrier. CONCLUSION: Our identification of a novel mutation in the F9 gene associated with hemophilia B provides novel insight into the pathogenesis of this genetically inherited disorder and also represents the basis of prenatal diagnosis.

  8. Characterization of a New DGKE Intronic Mutation in Genetically Unsolved Cases of Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Caterina; Lemaire, Mathieu; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Piras, Rossella; Bresin, Elena; Bettoni, Serena; Bick, David; Helbling, Daniel; Veith, Regan; Valoti, Elisabetta; Donadelli, Roberta; Murer, Luisa; Neunhäuserer, Maria; Breno, Matteo; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Lifton, Richard; Noris, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Genetic and acquired abnormalities causing dysregulation of the complement alternative pathway contribute to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a rare disorder characterized by thrombocytopenia, nonimmune microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute kidney failure. However, in a substantial proportion of patients the disease-associated alterations are still unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing were performed in two unrelated families with infantile recessive aHUS. Sequencing of cDNA from affected individuals was used to test for the presence of aberrant mRNA species. Expression of mutant diacylglycerol kinase epsilon (DGKE) protein was evaluated with western blotting. Results Whole-exome sequencing analysis with conventional variant filtering parameters did not reveal any obvious candidate mutation in the first family. The report of aHUS-associated mutations in DGKE, encoding DGKE, led to re-examination of the noncoding DGKE variants obtained from next-generation sequencing, allowing identification of a novel intronic DGKE mutation (c.888+40A>G) that segregated with disease. Sequencing of cDNA from affected individuals revealed aberrant forms of DGKE mRNA predicted to cause profound abnormalities in the protein catalytic site. By whole-genome sequencing, the same mutation was found in compound heterozygosity with a second nonsense DGKE mutation in all affected siblings of another unrelated family. Homozygous and compound heterozygous patients presented similar clinical features, including aHUS presentation in the first year of life, multiple relapsing episodes, and proteinuria, which are prototypical of DGKE-associated aHUS. Conclusions This is the first report of a mutation located beyond the exon-intron boundaries in aHUS. Intronic mutations such as these are underreported because conventional filtering parameters used to process next-generation sequencing data routinely

  9. Proliferation and survival molecules implicated in the inhibition of BRAF pathway in thyroid cancer cells harbouring different genetic mutations

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    Seca Hugo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid carcinomas show a high prevalence of mutations in the oncogene BRAF which are inversely associated with RAS or RET/PTC oncogenic activation. The possibility of using inhibitors on the BRAF pathway as became an interesting therapeutic approach. In thyroid cancer cells the target molecules, implicated on the cellular effects, mediated by inhibition of BRAF are not well established. In order to fill this lack of knowledge we studied the proliferation and survival pathways and associated molecules induced by BRAF inhibition in thyroid carcinoma cell lines harbouring distinct genetic backgrounds. Methods Suppression of BRAF pathway in thyroid cancer cell lines (8505C, TPC1 and C643 was achieved using RNA interference (RNAi for BRAF and the kinase inhibitor, sorafenib. Proliferation analysis was performed by BrdU incorporation and apoptosis was accessed by TUNEL assay. Levels of protein expression were analysed by western-blot. Results Both BRAF RNAi and sorafenib inhibited proliferation in all the cell lines independently of the genetic background, mostly in cells with BRAFV600E mutation. In BRAFV600E mutated cells inhibition of BRAF pathway lead to a decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 levels and an increase in p27Kip1. Specific inhibition of BRAF by RNAi in cells with BRAFV600E mutation had no effect on apoptosis. In the case of sorafenib treatment, cells harbouring BRAFV600E mutation showed increase levels of apoptosis due to a balance of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2. Conclusion Our results in thyroid cancer cells, namely those harbouring BRAFV600Emutation showed that BRAF signalling pathway provides important proliferation signals. We have shown that in thyroid cancer cells sorafenib induces apoptosis by affecting Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 in BRAFV600E mutated cells which was independent of BRAF. These results suggest that sorafenib may prove useful in the treatment of thyroid carcinomas, particularly

  10. From molecular genetics to phylodynamics: evolutionary relevance of mutation rates across viruses.

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    Rafael Sanjuán

    Full Text Available Although evolution is a multifactorial process, theory posits that the speed of molecular evolution should be directly determined by the rate at which spontaneous mutations appear. To what extent these two biochemical and population-scale processes are related in nature, however, is largely unknown. Viruses are an ideal system for addressing this question because their evolution is fast enough to be observed in real time, and experimentally-determined mutation rates are abundant. This article provides statistically supported evidence that the mutation rate determines molecular evolution across all types of viruses. Properties of the viral genome such as its size and chemical composition are identified as major determinants of these rates. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis reveals that, as expected, evolution rates increase linearly with mutation rates for slowly mutating viruses. However, this relationship plateaus for fast mutating viruses. A model is proposed in which deleterious mutations impose an evolutionary speed limit and set an extinction threshold in nature. The model is consistent with data from replication kinetics, selection strength and chemical mutagenesis studies.

  11. From molecular genetics to phylodynamics: evolutionary relevance of mutation rates across viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Although evolution is a multifactorial process, theory posits that the speed of molecular evolution should be directly determined by the rate at which spontaneous mutations appear. To what extent these two biochemical and population-scale processes are related in nature, however, is largely unknown. Viruses are an ideal system for addressing this question because their evolution is fast enough to be observed in real time, and experimentally-determined mutation rates are abundant. This article provides statistically supported evidence that the mutation rate determines molecular evolution across all types of viruses. Properties of the viral genome such as its size and chemical composition are identified as major determinants of these rates. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis reveals that, as expected, evolution rates increase linearly with mutation rates for slowly mutating viruses. However, this relationship plateaus for fast mutating viruses. A model is proposed in which deleterious mutations impose an evolutionary speed limit and set an extinction threshold in nature. The model is consistent with data from replication kinetics, selection strength and chemical mutagenesis studies.

  12. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of Von Hippel-Lindau disease cancer syndrome by combined mutation and segregation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denilce R. Sumita

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease is an autosomal dominant cancer syndrome, associated with the development of tumors and cysts in multiple organ systems, whose expression and age of onset are highly variable. The VHL disease tumor suppressor gene (VHL maps to 3p25-p26 and mutations ranging from a single base change to large deletions have been detected in patients with VHL disease. We developed a single cell PCR protocol for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD of VHL disease to select unaffected embryos on the basis of the detection of the specific mutation and segregation analysis of polymorphic linked markers. Multiplex-nested PCR using single buccal cells of an affected individual were performed in order to test the accuracy and reliability of this single-cell protocol. For each locus tested, amplification efficiency was 83% to 87% and allelic drop-out rates ranged from 12% to 8%. Three VHL disease PGD cycles were performed on cells from a couple with paternal transmission of a 436delC mutation in exon 2 of the VHL gene, leading to the identification of three unaffected embryos. Independent of the mutation present, this general PGD protocol for the diagnosis of VHL disease can be used in families informative for either the D3S1038 or D3S1317 microsatellite markers.

  13. Mutation-based learning to improve student autonomy and scientific inquiry skills in a large genetics laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinlu

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory education can play a vital role in developing a learner's autonomy and scientific inquiry skills. In an innovative, mutation-based learning (MBL) approach, students were instructed to redesign a teacher-designed standard experimental protocol by a "mutation" method in a molecular genetics laboratory course. Students could choose to delete, add, reverse, or replace certain steps of the standard protocol to explore questions of interest to them in a given experimental scenario. They wrote experimental proposals to address their rationales and hypotheses for the "mutations"; conducted experiments in parallel, according to both standard and mutated protocols; and then compared and analyzed results to write individual lab reports. Various autonomy-supportive measures were provided in the entire experimental process. Analyses of student work and feedback suggest that students using the MBL approach 1) spend more time discussing experiments, 2) use more scientific inquiry skills, and 3) find the increased autonomy afforded by MBL more enjoyable than do students following regimented instructions in a conventional "cookbook"-style laboratory. Furthermore, the MBL approach does not incur an obvious increase in labor and financial costs, which makes it feasible for easy adaptation and implementation in a large class.

  14. [Influence of genetic mutations on clinical presentation of subretinal neovascularization. Report 2: The impact of HTRA and VEGF genes polymorphism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinskaia, M V; Pogoda, T V; Strelkova, I D; Chikun, E A; Shchegoleva, I V; Kazarian, É É; Galoian, N S

    2011-01-01

    A detailed analysis of influence of HTRA (serine peptidase) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) genes mutations is presented. The presence of one gene copy with allele of A- polymorphism rs1120638 of HTRA1 gen, T- polymorphism rs10490924 and de11443in54 of ARMS2 gene increases the risk of CNV in patients with AMD. The feature of clinical presentation in patients with CNV associated with (-625) A mutation of promoter region of HTRA1 gene in two chromosomes was fulminant course of the disease from exudative to scarring processes with fibrous tissue formation not just with sub-, but also intra- and preretinal localization. Genetic screening showed that combination of studied mutations (402H, (-625) A and (-251) A in both gene copies of CFH, HTRA and IL-8) results in the most severe and rapidly progressing form of the disease. Two new mutations were revealed in promoter region of VEGF gene: G > A replacement in position of (-72) nucleotide from transcription start and G > A replacement in 5'-nontranslated region of the 1st gene exon in position of (+31) nucleotide from transcription start.

  15. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) in Lebanon and Jordan: a population genetics study and report of three novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlej-Hashim, Myrna; Serre, Jean-Louis; Corbani, Sandra; Saab, Odile; Jalkh, Nadine; Delague, Valérie; Chouery, Eliane; Salem, Nabiha; Loiselet, Jacques; Lefranc, Gérard; Mégarbané, André

    2005-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease mostly frequent in Mediterranean populations. Over 50 mutations have been identified in the gene responsible for the disease, MEFV. The present study reports the frequencies of MEFV mutations in 558 Lebanese and 55 Jordanian FMF patients and points out the severity of the M694V frequently observed mutation among these patients. Three novel mutations, T177I, S108R and E474K were also identified in the Lebanese group. An excess of homozygotes and a deficit of heterozygotes were observed in both samples when compared to the expected number of observed genotypes under the Hardy-Weinberg hypothesis. Homozygotes for M694V and M694I were still in excess in the Lebanese group of patients, even after consanguinous homozygotes were removed, or population structure was considered. This excess is therefore neither due to consanguinity nor to subgroups in the Lebanese population, but rather to more remote consanguinity or to a selection bias favoring the census of these genotypes. The fact that FMF female patients were less censed than male patients may be due to the greater resistance of females to pain and to the possibility of confusing abdominal and gynecological pain. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the FMF could then originate both from genetic causes like allelic heterogeneity or modulating genes, and cultural background facing the physiological consequences of genotypes at risk.

  16. Assessment of BRCA 1,2 gene mutation as genetic risk factor for ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    MAMARASULOVA DILFUZAHON ZAKIRJANOVNA; MAMADALIEVA YASHNAR SOLIEVNA; ERGASHEVA ZUMRAD ABDUKAUMOVNA; AZIZOV URYI DALIMOVICH

    2016-01-01

    The analysis was conducted pathological preparations 204 patients with verified diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Prevailed 5382insC mutation (BRCA1) 4.0 % of the sample of breast cancer patients, 11.6 % of the sample of patients with ovarian cancer, which is consistent with the data of numerous works of domestic and foreign authors, which have been shown the prevalence of mutations 5382insC gene BRCA1 in various areas of Andizhan region. Five mutations 4153delA, 5382insC, Cys61Gly, 2080delA, 3819...

  17. Distinguishing Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy/Dysplasia-Associated Mutations From Background Genetic Noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Pollevick, Guido D.; Tester, David J.; Cox, Moniek G. P. J.; Bhuiyan, Zahir; Bikker, Hennie; Wiesfeld, Ans C. P.; Hauer, Richard N. W.; van Tintelen, J. Peter; Jongbloed, Jan D. H.; Calkins, Hugh; Judge, Daniel P.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to determine the spectrum and prevalence of "background genetic noise" in the arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC) genetic test and to determine genetic associations that can guide the interpretation of a positive test result. Backgr

  18. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case-Study in Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Philip S.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M. G.; Nilbert, Mef; Moreno, Victor M.; Gruber, Stephen B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Genetic anticipation, described by earlier age of onset (AOO) and more aggressive symptoms in successive generations, is a phenomenon noted in certain hereditary diseases. Its extent may vary between families and/or between mutation sub-types known to be associated with the disease phenotype. In this paper, we posit a Bayesian approach to infer genetic anticipation under flexible random effects models for censored data that capture the effect of successive generations on AOO. Primary interest lies in the random effects. Misspecifying the distribution of random effects may result in incorrect inferential conclusions. We compare the fit of four candidate random effects distributions via Bayesian model fit diagnostics. A related statistical issue here is isolating the confounding effect of changes in secular trends, screening and medical practices that may affect time to disease detection across birth cohorts. Using historic cancer registry data, we borrow from relative survival analysis methods to adjust for changes in age-specific incidence across birth cohorts. Our motivating case-study comes from a Danish cancer register of 124 families with mutations in mismatch repair genes known to cause hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome. We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this study. Our model predicts family level anticipation effects which are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high risk families. PMID:21627626

  19. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenth, Joost P H; Waxman, Stephen G

    2007-12-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pain disorders. Gain-of-function missense mutations in Na(v)1.7 have been shown to cause primary erythermalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, while nonsense mutations in Na(v)1.7 result in loss of Na(v)1.7 function and a condition known as channelopathy-associated insensitivity to pain, a rare disorder in which affected individuals are unable to feel physical pain. This review highlights these recent developments and discusses the critical role of Na(v)1.7 in pain sensation in humans.

  20. De-novo mutations and genetic variation in the SCN1A gene in Malaysian patients with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Emmilia Husni; Razak, Salmi Abdul; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul Aziz

    2012-12-01

    Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) comprises a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous epilepsy syndrome. Here, we provide the first report of clinical presentation and mutational analysis of SCN1A gene in 36 Malaysian GEFS+ patients. Mutational analysis of SCN1A gene revealed twenty seven sequence variants (missense mutation and silent polymorphism also intronic polymorphism), as well as 2 novel de-novo mutations were found in our patients at coding regions, c.5197A>G (N1733D) and c.4748A>G (H1583R). Our findings provide potential genetic insights into the pathogenesis of GEFS+ in Malaysian populations concerning the SCN1A gene mutations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Glucocerebrosidase L444P Mutation Confers Genetic Risk for Parkinson’s Disease in Central China

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mutations of the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene have reportedly been associated with Parkinson disease (PD) in various ethnic populations such as Singaporean, Japanese, Formosan, Canadian, American, Portuguese, Greek, Brazilian, British, Italian, Ashkenazi Jewish, southern and southwestern Chinese. The purpose of this study is to determine in central China whether or not the reported GBA mutations remain associated with PD. Methods In this project, we conducted a controlled...

  2. The genetic basis of Cowden's syndrome: three novel mutations in PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, H C; Ping, X L; Xie, X X; Gruener, A C; Zhang, H; Nini, R; Swisshelm, K; Sybert, V; Diamond, T M; Sutphen, R; Peacocke, M

    1998-04-01

    Cowden's syndrome (CS) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with an increased risk of developing benign and malignant tumors in a variety of tissues, including the skin, thyroid, breast and brain. Women with CS are felt to have an increased risk of developing breast cancer, and virtually all women with CS develop bilateral fibrocystic disease of the breast. Recently, a series of germline mutations have been identified from CS families in a gene known as PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1. In this study, we used heteroduplex analysis and direct sequencing analysis and identified three novel germline mutations in the PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1 coding sequence from unrelated individuals with CS. We report a de novo transition (T-->C) at nucleotide 335 in exon 5. This missense mutation resulted in a leucine to proline (CTA to CCA) change at codon 112. We also describe a novel splice site mutation (801+2T-->G) in intron 7 that caused exon skipping in PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1 mRNA. The third mutation we report is a missense mutation, consisting of a transition (T-->C) at nucleotide 202 in exon 3, resulting in a tyrosine to histidine (TAC to CAC) change at codon 68. Finally, we also detected a rare polymorphism in exon 7 of the PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1 coding sequence. These data confirm the observation that mutations of the PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1 coding sequence are responsible for at least some cases of CS, and further define the spectrum of mutations in this autosomal dominant disorder.

  3. Chemogenomic landscape of RUNX1-mutated AML reveals importance of RUNX1 allele dosage in genetics and glucocorticoid sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laura; Lavallée, Vincent-Philippe; Bordeleau, Marie-Eve; Krosl, Jana; Baccelli, Irene; Boucher, Geneviève; Lehnertz, Bernhard; Chagraoui, Jalila; MacRae, Tara; Ruel, Réjean; Chantigny, Yves A; Lemieux, Sébastien; Marinier, Anne; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2017-08-30

    RUNX1-mutated (RUNX1mut) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is associated with adverse outcome, highlighting the urgent need for a better genetic characterization of this AML subgroup and for the design of efficient therapeutic strategies for this disease. Towards this goal, we further dissected the mutational spectrum and gene expression profile of RUNX1mut AML and correlated these results to drug sensitivity to identify novel compounds targeting this AML subgroup. RNA-sequencing of 47 RUNX1mut primary AML specimens was performed and sequencing results were compared to those of RUNX1 wild-type samples. Chemical screens were also conducted using RUNX1mut specimens to identify compounds selectively affecting the viability of RUNX1mut AML. We show that samples with no remaining RUNX1 wild-type allele are clinically and genetically distinct and display a more homogeneous gene expression profile. Chemical screening revealed that most RUNX1mut specimens are sensitive to glucocorticoids (GCs) and we confirmed that GCs inhibit AML cell proliferation through their interaction with the Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR). We observed that specimens harboring RUNX1 mutations expected to result in low residual RUNX1 activity are most sensitive to GCs, and that co-associating mutations as well as that GR levels contribute to GC sensitivity. Accordingly, acquired glucocorticoid sensitivity was achieved by negatively regulating RUNX1 expression in human AML cells. Our findings show the profound impact of RUNX1 allele dosage on gene expression profile and glucocorticoid sensitivity in AML, thereby opening opportunities for preclinical testing which may lead to drug repurposing and improved disease characterization. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. [Aspect of brain MRI in mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency. A diagnostic algorithm of the most common mitochondrial genetic mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaux-Bricout, M; Grévent, D; Lebre, A-S; Rio, M; Desguerre, I; De Lonlay, P; Valayannopoulos, V; Brunelle, F; Rötig, A; Munnich, A; Boddaert, N

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are due to deficiency of the respiratory chain and are characterized by a broad clinical and genetic heterogeneity that makes diagnosis difficult. Some clinical presentations are highly suggestive of given gene mutations, allowing rapid genetic diagnosis. However, owing to the wide pattern of symptoms in mitochondrial disorders and the constantly growing number of disease genes, their genetic diagnosis is frequently difficult and genotype/phenotype correlations remain elusive. For this reason, brain MRI appears as a useful tool for genotype/phenotype correlations. Here, we report the most frequent neuroradiological signs in mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency and we propose a diagnostic algorithm based on neuroimaging features, so as to direct molecular genetic tests in patients at risk of mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency. This algorithm is based on the careful analysis of five areas on brain MRI: (1) basal ganglia (hyperintensities on T2 or calcifications); (2) cerebellum (hyperintensities on T2 or atrophy); (3) brainstem (hyperintensities on T2 or atrophy); (4) white matter (leukoencephalopathy); (5) cortex (sub-tentorial atrophy); (6) stroke-like episodes. We believe that the combination of brain MRI features is of value to support respiratory chain deficiency and direct molecular genetic tests.

  5. INS-gene mutations: from genetics and beta cell biology to clinical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Sun, Jinhong; Cui, Jinqiu; Chen, Wei; Guo, Huan; Barbetti, Fabrizio; Arvan, Peter

    2015-04-01

    A growing list of insulin gene mutations causing a new form of monogenic diabetes has drawn increasing attention over the past seven years. The mutations have been identified in the untranslated regions of the insulin gene as well as the coding sequence of preproinsulin including within the signal peptide, insulin B-chain, C-peptide, insulin A-chain, and the proteolytic cleavage sites both for signal peptidase and the prohormone convertases. These mutations affect a variety of different steps of insulin biosynthesis in pancreatic beta cells. Importantly, although many of these mutations cause proinsulin misfolding with early onset autosomal dominant diabetes, some of the mutant alleles appear to engage different cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie beta cell failure and diabetes. In this article, we review the most recent advances in the field and discuss challenges as well as potential strategies to prevent/delay the development and progression of autosomal dominant diabetes caused by INS-gene mutations. It is worth noting that although diabetes caused by INS gene mutations is rare, increasing evidence suggests that defects in the pathway of insulin biosynthesis may also be involved in the progression of more common types of diabetes. Collectively, the (pre)proinsulin mutants provide insightful molecular models to better understand the pathogenesis of all forms of diabetes in which preproinsulin processing defects, proinsulin misfolding, and ER stress are involved.

  6. Uptake of Genetic Testing and Pre-Test Levels of Mental Distress in Norwegian Families with Known BRCA1 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon G. Reichelt

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available 232 family members from 27 Norwegian families with BRCAl mutations were offered genetic testing. 180/232 (78% chose to be tested, 14/232 (6% have not yet decided and 38/232 (16% declined. All 232 persons were invited to fill in the following questionnaires when offered testing: Impact of Event Scale (IES, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 and Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS. 207/232 (89% responded to the questionnaires. Of those declining to be tested 23/38 (61% answered the questionnaires compared to 170/180 (94% of those wanting the test (p < 0.0001.

  7. Analysis of clinical phenotype and genetic mutation with outcome evaluation in one family of vitamin B12-dependent methylmalonic aciduria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jing

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical features, genetic mutation and vitamin B12 therapeutive effectiveness in vitamin B12-dependent methylmalonic acidemia (MMA. Methods Clinical data in a pedigree of 4 members with vitamin B12-dependent MMA was collected. Peripheral blood samples were collected for plasma amino acids and acylcarnitines and gene muatation analysis. The therapeutic efficacy of vitamin B12 was evaluated.  Results The initial presentations of the proband were underachievement and personality changes in 12-year old, and accompanied by visual hallucinations and weakness of lower limbs during the course of disease. The younger brother of the proband presented with bad-temper and lower acheivement. The analysis of plasma amino acid and acylcarnitine showed that proband and his younger brother's plasma propionylcarnitine and propionylcarnitine/acetylcarnitine ratio, and the level of methylmalonic acid in urine were increased significantly. Compound heterozygeous mutation of c.482G > A (p.Arg161Gln and c.609G > A (p.Trp203X in MMACHC gene were seen in the proband and her younger brother. Her father carried MMACHC gene missense mutation c.482G > A (p.Arg161Gln, while her mother carried MMACHC gene nonsense mutation c.609G > A (p.Trp203X. Symptoms of the proband were improved after vitamin B12 therapy.   Conclusions The late - onset vitamin B12 -dependent MMA is caused by compound heterozygote mutation of MMACHC gene. It had good responsive to vitamin B12 therapy. Early diagnosis and timely treatment may play a critical role for the outcomes of patients with this disease. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.07.009

  8. Genomic Characteristics of Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients with V180I Mutation and Associations with Other Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sol Moe Lee

    Full Text Available Inherited prion diseases (IPDs, including genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD, account for 10-15% of cases of prion diseases and are associated with several pathogenic mutations, including P102L, V180I, and E200K, in the prion protein gene (PRNP. The valine to isoleucine substitution at codon 180 (V180I of PRNP is the most common pathogenic mutation causing gCJD in East Asian patients. In this study, we conducted follow-up analyses to identify candidate factors and their associations with disease onset. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS data of five gCJD patients with V180I mutation and 145 healthy individuals were used to identify genomic differences. A total of 18,648,850 candidate variants were observed in only the patient group, 29 of them were validated as variants. Four of these validated variants were nonsense mutations, six were observed in genes directly or indirectly related to neurodegenerative disorders (NDs, such as LPA, LRRK2, and FGF20. More than half of validated variants were categorized in Gene Ontology (GO terms of binding and/or catalytic activity. Moreover, we found differential genome variants in gCJD patients with V180I mutation, including one uniquely surviving 10 years after diagnosis of the disease. Elucidation of the relationships between gCJD and Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease at the genomic level will facilitate further advances in our understanding of the specific mechanisms mediating the pathogenesis of NDs and gold standard therapies for NDs.

  9. SDH Subunit Mutation Status in Saliva: Genetic Testing in Patients with Pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinga, T E; Xekouki, P; Nambuba, J; Faucz, F R; de la Luz Sierra, M; Links, T P; Kema, I P; Adams, K; Stratakis, C A; van der Horst-Schrivers, A N A; Pacak, K

    2016-04-01

    Germline mutations occur in up to 30-40% of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, with mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits B (SDHB) and D (SDHD) being the most common. Blood samples are favored for obtaining high quality DNA, however, leukocytes can also be obtained by collecting saliva. The aim of this study was to determine whether SDHB and SDHD gene mutations in patients with pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma could be determined using a salivary sample. Paired blood and salivary samples were collected from 30 patients: 9 SDHB mutation positive, 13 with a SDHD mutation, and 8 without any SDHx mutations. The Oragene DISCOVER kit was used to collect and extract DNA from saliva. Blood DNA was extracted from EDTA blood samples. The DNA purification and concentration were measured by spectrophotometry. The 8 exons of SDHB and the 4 exons of SDHD were amplified and sequenced by PCR-based bidirectional Sanger sequencing. Total DNA yields from blood DNA were similar to those obtained from saliva DNA [mean (±SD) saliva vs. blood DNA concentration 514.6 (±580.8) ng/µl vs. 360.9 (±262.7) ng/µl; p=0.2)]. The purity of the saliva DNA samples was lower than that of blood [mean OD260/OD280 ratio 1.78 (±0.13) vs. 1.87 (±0.04); p=0.001, respectively], indicating more protein contamination in the saliva-extracted DNA. This study shows that salivary DNA collected from patients with pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma is a good alternative for extraction of genomic DNA for its high DNA concentration and acceptable purity and can be used as an alternative to blood derived DNA in screening for SDHB and SDHD mutations.

  10. Novel Genetic Diversity Through Somatic Mutations: Fuel for Adaptation of Reef Corals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J. Howells

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation of reef corals to climate change is an issue of much debate, and often viewed as too slow a process to be of relevance over decadal time scales. This notion is based on the long sexual generation times typical for some coral species. However, the importance of somatic mutations during asexual reproduction and growth on evolution and adaptation (i.e., cell lineage selection is rarely considered. Here we review the existing literature on cell lineage selection and show that the scope for somatic mutations to arise in the coral animal and associated Symbiodinium is large. For example, we estimate that ~100 million somatic mutations can arise within a branching Acropora coral colony of average size. Similarly, the large population sizes and rapid turn-over times of in hospite Symbiodinium likely result in considerable numbers of somatic mutations. While the fate of new mutations depends on many factors, including ploidy level and force and direction of selection, we argue that they likely play a key role in the evolution of reef corals.

  11. Phosphatase and Tensin Homologue Genetic Polymorphisms and their Interactions with Viral Mutations on the Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Du; Yu-Wei Zhang; Rui Pu; Xue Han; Jian-Ping Hu; Hong-Wei Zhang; Hong-Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the major cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Some HBV mutants and dysregulation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) may promote the development of HCC synergistically.We aimed to test the effects of PTEN genetic polymorphisms and their interactions with important HBV mutations on the development of HCC in HBV-infected subjects.Methods:Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was applied to genotype PTEN polymorphisms (rs1234220,rs2299939,rs1234213) in 1012 healthy controls,302 natural clearance subjects,and 2011 chronic HBV-infected subjects including 1021 HCC patients.HBV mutations were determined by sequencing.The associations of PTEN polymorphisms and their interactions with HBV mutations with HCC risk were assessed using multivariate logistic regression analysis.Results:Rs 1234220 C allele was significantly associated with HCC risk compared to healthy controls (adjusted odds ratio [A OR] =1.35,95% confidence interval [CI] =1.07-1.69) and HCC-free HBV-infected subjects (AOR =1.27,95% CI =1.01-1.57).rs1234220 C allele was significantly associated with increased frequencies of HCC-risk A 1652G,C 1673T,and C 1730G mutations in genotype B HBV-infected subjects.Rs2299939 GT genotype was inversely associated with HCC risk in HBV-infected patients (AOR =0.75,95% CI =0.62-0.92).The interaction of rs2299939 variant genotypes (GT+TT) with A3054T mutation significantly increased HCC risk (AOR =2.41,95% CI =1.08-5.35);whereas its interaction with C3116T mutation significantly reduced HCC risk (AOR =0.34,95% CI =0.18-0.66).These significant effects were only evident in males after stratification.Conclusions:PTEN polymorphisms and their interactions with HBV mutations may contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis in males.The host-virus interactions are important in identifying HBV-infected subjects who are more likely to develop HCC.

  12. Detection of genetic mutations associated with macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Eun Oh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The aim of this study was to identify mutations associated with macrolide resistance in Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP and to establish a cultural method to determine antimicrobial susceptibility. Methods : Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs were collected from 62 children diagnosed with MP pneumonia by a serologic method or polymerase chain reaction. The 23S rRNA and L4 ribosomal protein genes of MP were amplified and sequenced. To identify mutations in these 2 genes, their nucleotide sequences were compared to those of the reference strain M129. MP cultivation was carried out for 32 (28 frozen and 5 refrigerated NPAs and M129 strain using Chanock’s glucose broth and agar plate in a 5% CO2 incubator at 37?#608;and examined at 2-3 day intervals for 6 weeks. Results : Among the 62 specimens, 17 had M144V mutations in ribosomal protein L4. The A2064G mutation was observed in 1 specimen; its 23S rRNA gene was successfully sequenced. Culture for MP was successful from the M129 strain and 2 of the 5 NPAs that were refrigerated for no longer than 3 days. However, MP did not grow from the 28 NPAs that were kept frozen at -80?#608;since 2003. Conclusion : We found the M144V mutation of L4 protein to be common and that of domain V of 23S rRNA gene was relatively rare among MP. Studies on the prevalence of macrolide-resistant MP and the relationship between the mutations of 23S rRNA gene and ribosomal protein L4 will aid in understanding the mechanism of macrolide resistance in MP.

  13. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of androgen receptor gene mutations in patients with androgen insensitivity syndromes: Application for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiort, O. (Medizinische Universitaet zu Luebeck (Germany) Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)); Huang, Q. (Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA (United States)); Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Kruse, K. (Medizinische Universitaet zu Luebeck (Germany)); Sadeghi-Nejad, A.; Wolfe, H.J. (Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)); Yandell, D.W. (Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA (United States))(Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that mutations in the androgen receptor gene are associated with androgen insensitivity syndromes, a heterogeneous group of related disorders involving defective sexual differentiation in karyotypic males. In this report, the authors address the possibility of rapid mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene for initial diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular subclassification of affected patients and their families. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of six patients from five families with various degrees of androgen insensitivity was studied. Exons 2 to 8 of the androgen receptor gene were analyzed using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Female family members were also studied to identify heterozygote carriers. Point mutations in the AR gene were identified in all six patients, and all mutations caused amino acid substitutions. One patient with incomplete androgen insensitivity was a mosaic for the mutation. Four of the five mothers, as well as a young sister of one patient, were carriers of the mutation present in the affected child. The data show that new mutations may occur in the androgen receptor gene leading to sporadic androgen insensitivity syndrome. Molecular genetic characterization of the variant allele can serve as a primary tool for diagnosis and subsequent therapy, and can provide a basis for distinguishing heterozygous carriers in familial androgen resistance. The identification of carriers is of substantial clinical importance for genetic counseling. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Phenotypic features and genetic characterization of male breast cancer families: identification of two recurrent BRCA2 mutations in north-east of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miolo GianMaria

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer in men is an infrequent occurrence, accounting for ~1% of all breast tumors with an incidence of about 1:100,000. The relative rarity of male breast cancer (MBC limits our understanding of the epidemiologic, genetic and clinical features of this tumor. Methods From 1997 to 2003, 10 MBC patients were referred to our Institute for genetic counselling and BRCA1/2 testing. Here we report on the genetic and phenotypic characterization of 10 families with MBC from the North East of Italy. In particular, we wished to assess the occurrence of specific cancer types in relatives of MBC probands in families with and without BRCA2 predisposing mutations. Moreover, families with recurrent BRCA2 mutations were also characterized by haplotype analysis using 5 BRCA2-linked dinucleotide repeat markers and 8 intragenic BRCA2 polymorphisms. Results Two pathogenic mutations in the BRCA2 gene were observed: the 9106C>T (Q2960X and the IVS16-2A>G (splicing mutations, each in 2 cases. A BRCA1 mutation of uncertain significance 4590C>G (P1491A was also observed. In families with BRCA2 mutations, female breast cancer was more frequent in the first and second-degree relatives compared to the families with wild type BRCA1/2 (31.9% vs. 8.0% p = 0.001. Reconstruction of the chromosome phasing in three families and the analysis of three isolated cases with the IVS16-2A>G BRCA2 mutation identified the same haplotype associated with MBC, supporting the possibility that this founder mutation previously detected in Slovenian families is also present in the North East of our Country. Moreover, analysis of one family with the 9106C>T BRCA2 mutation allowed the identification of common haplotypes for both microsatellite and intragenic polymorphisms segregating with the mutation. Three isolated cases with the same mutation shared the same intragenic polymorphisms and three 5' microsatellite markers, but showed a different haplotype for 3' markers

  15. Molecular genetic mutation analysis in Menkes-disease with prenatal diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    László, Aranka; Endreffy, Emoke; Tümer, Zeynep

    2010-01-01

    from MD and prenatal diagnosis was done in this MD loaded family. METHOD: The 12th exon of ATP7A gene has been analyzed by dideoxy-finger printing (DDF), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), direct sequencing of exon 12. The specific mutation was screened from chorionic villi of the maternal aunt at the 14...

  16. Genetic screening of the FLCN gene identify six novel variants and a Danish founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Maria; Albrechtsen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) tumor suppressor gene predispose to Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a rare disease characterized by the development of cutaneous hamartomas (fibrofolliculomas), multiple lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothoraces and renal cell cancer. In this study...

  17. Genetics and Molecular Modeling of New Mutations of Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis in a Single Italian Center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Giovannoni

    Full Text Available Familial intrahepatic cholestases (FICs are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. Three distinct forms are described: FIC1 and FIC2, associated with low/normal GGT level in serum, which are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein and defects in ABCB11 encoding bile salt export pump protein, respectively; FIC3, linked to high GGT level, involves impaired biliary phospholipid secretion due to defects in ABCB4, encoding multidrug resistance 3 protein. Different mutations in these genes may cause either a progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC or a benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC. For the purposes of the present study we genotyped 27 children with intrahepatic cholestasis, diagnosed on either a clinical or histological basis. Two BRIC, 23 PFIC and 2 BRIC/PFIC were identified. Thirty-four different mutations were found of which 11 were novel. One was a 2Mb deletion (5'UTR- exon 18 in ATP8B1. In another case microsatellite analysis of chromosome 2, including ABCB11, showed uniparental disomy. Two cases were compound heterozygous for BRIC/PFIC2 mutations. Our results highlight the importance of the pathogenic role of novel mutations in the three genes and unusual modes of their transmission.

  18. Genetics and Molecular Modeling of New Mutations of Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis in a Single Italian Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, Isabella; Callea, Francesco; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Torre, Giuliano; De Ville De Goyet, Jean; Francalanci, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Familial intrahepatic cholestases (FICs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. Three distinct forms are described: FIC1 and FIC2, associated with low/normal GGT level in serum, which are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein and defects in ABCB11 encoding bile salt export pump protein, respectively; FIC3, linked to high GGT level, involves impaired biliary phospholipid secretion due to defects in ABCB4, encoding multidrug resistance 3 protein. Different mutations in these genes may cause either a progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) or a benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC). For the purposes of the present study we genotyped 27 children with intrahepatic cholestasis, diagnosed on either a clinical or histological basis. Two BRIC, 23 PFIC and 2 BRIC/PFIC were identified. Thirty-four different mutations were found of which 11 were novel. One was a 2Mb deletion (5’UTR- exon 18) in ATP8B1. In another case microsatellite analysis of chromosome 2, including ABCB11, showed uniparental disomy. Two cases were compound heterozygous for BRIC/PFIC2 mutations. Our results highlight the importance of the pathogenic role of novel mutations in the three genes and unusual modes of their transmission. PMID:26678486

  19. Insights into the biochemical and genetic basis of glucokinase activation from naturally occurring hypoglycemia mutations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gloyn, A.L.; Noordam, C.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Ellard, S.; Lam, W.W.; Campbell, I.W.; Midgley, P.; Shiota, C.; Buettger, C.; Magnuson, M.A.; Matschinsky, F.M.; Hattersley, A.T.

    2003-01-01

    Glucokinase (GCK) is a key regulatory enzyme in the pancreatic beta-cell and catalyzes the rate-limiting step for beta-cell glucose metabolism. We report two novel GCK mutations (T65I and W99R) that have arisen de novo in two families with familial hypoglycemia. Insulin levels, although inappropriat

  20. Emergence of Tetracycline Resistance in Helicobacter pylori: Multiple Mutational Changes in 16S Ribosomal DNA and Other Genetic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailidiene, Daiva; Bertoli, M. Teresita; Miciuleviciene, Jolanta; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Dailide, Giedrius; Pascasio, Mario Alberto; Kupcinskas, Limas; Berg, Douglas E.

    2002-01-01

    Tetracycline is useful in combination therapies against the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We found 6 tetracycline-resistant (Tetr) strains among 159 clinical isolates (from El Salvador, Lithuania, and India) and obtained the following four results: (i) 5 of 6 Tetr isolates contained one or two nucleotide substitutions in one part of the primary tetracycline binding site in 16S rRNA (AGA965-967 [Escherichia coli coordinates] changed to gGA, AGc, guA, or gGc [lowercase letters are used to represent the base changes]), whereas the sixth (isolate Ind75) retained AGA965-967; (ii) PCR products containing mutant 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) alleles transformed recipient strains to Tetr phenotypes, but transformants containing alleles with single substitutions (gGA and AGc) were less resistant than their Tetr parents; (iii) each of 10 Tetr mutants of reference strain 26695 (in which mutations were induced with metronidazole, a mutagenic anti-H. pylori agent) contained the normal AGA965-967 sequence; and (iv) transformant derivatives of Ind75 and of one of the Tetr 26695 mutants that had acquired mutant rDNA alleles were resistant to tetracycline at levels higher than those to which either parent strain was resistant. Thus, tetracycline resistance in H. pylori results from an accumulation of changes that may affect tetracycline-ribosome affinity and/or other functions (perhaps porins or efflux pumps). We suggest that the rarity of tetracycline resistance among clinical isolates reflects this need for multiple mutations and perhaps also the deleterious effects of such mutations on fitness. Formally equivalent mutations with small but additive effects are postulated to contribute importantly to traits such as host specificity and virulence and to H. pylori's great genetic diversity. PMID:12435699

  1. Molecular Analysis of Collagen XVIII Reveals Novel Mutations, Presence of a Third Isoform, and Possible Genetic Heterogeneity in Knobloch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, O. T.; Sertié, A. L.; Der Kaloustian, V. M.; Kok, F.; Carpenter, M.; Murray, J.; Czeizel, A. E.; Kliemann, S. E.; Rosemberg, S.; Monteiro, M.; Olsen, B. R.; Passos-Bueno, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome (KS) is a rare disease characterized by severe ocular alterations, including vitreoretinal degeneration associated with retinal detachment and occipital scalp defect. The responsible gene, COL18A1, has been mapped to 21q22.3, and, on the basis of the analysis of one family, we have demonstrated that a mutation affecting only one of the three COL18A1 isoforms causes this phenotype. We report here the results of the screening of both the entire coding region and the exon-intron boundaries of the COL18A1 gene (which includes 43 exons), in eight unrelated patients with KS. Besides 20 polymorphic changes, we identified 6 different pathogenic changes in both alleles of five unrelated patients with KS (three compound heterozygotes and two homozygotes). All are truncating mutations leading to deficiency of one or all collagen XVIII isoforms and endostatin. We have verified that, in exon 41, the deletion c3514-3515delCT, found in three unrelated alleles, is embedded in different haplotypes, suggesting that this mutation has occurred more than once. In addition, our results provide evidence of nonallelic genetic heterogeneity in KS. We also show that the longest human isoform (NC11-728) is expressed in several tissues (including the human eye) and that lack of either the short variant or all of the collagen XVIII isoforms causes similar phenotypes but that those patients who lack all forms present more-severe ocular alterations. Despite the small sample size, we found low endostatin plasma levels in those patients with mutations leading to deficiency of all isoforms; in addition, it seems that absence of all collagen XVIII isoforms causes predisposition to epilepsy. PMID:12415512

  2. Analysis of thrombophilic genetic mutations in patients with Sheehan's syndrome: is thrombophilia responsible for the pathogenesis of Sheehan's syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokalp, Deniz; Tuzcu, Alpaslan; Bahceci, Mithat; Ayyildiz, Orhan; Yurt, Murat; Celik, Yusuf; Alpagat, Gulistan

    2011-06-01

    The gene mutations of Factor V R506Q (FV-Leiden), prothrombin (FII G20210A), methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1298C and PAI-1 4G/5G are well-established risk factors for thrombosis. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of these gene mutations and their possible impact on the development of pathogenesis in patients with Sheehan's syndrome (SS). 40 female patients with SS compared to a control group of 45 healthy women. The presence of FV-Leiden, FII G20210A, MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C and PAI-1 4G/5G gene mutations were assessed by polymerase chain reaction analysis with a light cycler analyzer. An odds ratio of greater than one is considered to increase the risk of SS disease as found in Factor V Leiden, FII G20210A, MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism, as follows respectively: 1.13, 1.85, 6.00, 8.14 and 1.45. MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C polymorphism were found significantly higher in SS patients than the control group (P0.05). The level of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) was significantly higher in patients with SS than in the control group (P<0.001). We suggest that the genetic mutations of FV-Leiden, FII G20210A, MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C and PAI-1 4G/5G increase the risk of SS. Also, high plasma tHcy levels may be a risk factor for the development of SS.

  3. A novel pseudoderivative-based mutation operator for real-coded adaptive genetic algorithms [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1td

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxinder S Kanwal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent development of large databases, especially those in genetics and proteomics, is pushing the development of novel computational algorithms that implement rapid and accurate search strategies. One successful approach has been to use artificial intelligence and methods, including pattern recognition (e.g. neural networks and optimization techniques (e.g. genetic algorithms. The focus of this paper is on optimizing the design of genetic algorithms by using an adaptive mutation rate that is derived from comparing the fitness values of successive generations. We propose a novel pseudoderivative-based mutation rate operator designed to allow a genetic algorithm to escape local optima and successfully continue to the global optimum. Once proven successful, this algorithm can be implemented to solve real problems in neurology and bioinformatics. As a first step towards this goal, we tested our algorithm on two 3-dimensional surfaces with multiple local optima, but only one global optimum, as well as on the N-queens problem, an applied problem in which the function that maps the curve is implicit. For all tests, the adaptive mutation rate allowed the genetic algorithm to find the global optimal solution, performing significantly better than other search methods, including genetic algorithms that implement fixed mutation rates.

  4. Reduced Penetrance and Variable Expression of SCN5A Mutations and the Importance of Co-inherited Genetic Variants: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Robyns, MD.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the SCN5A gene are responsible for multiple phenotypical presentations including Brugada syndrome, long QT syndrome, progressive familial heart block, sick sinus syndrome, dilated cardiomyopathy, lone atrial fibrillation and multiple overlap syndromes. These different phenotypic expressions of a mutation in a single gene can be explained by variable expression and reduced penetrance. One of the possible explanations of these phenomena is the co-inheritance of genetic variants. We describe a family where the individuals exhibit a compound heterozygosity in the SCN5A gene including a mutation (R1632H and a new variant (M858L. Individuals with both the mutation and new variant present with a more severe phenotype including spontaneous atrial tachyarrhythmia at young age. We give an overview of the different phenotypes of "SCN5A disease" and discuss the importance of co-inherited genetic variants in the expression of SCN5A disease.

  5. Mutations enabling displacement of tryptophan by 4-fluorotryptophan as a canonical amino acid of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Allen Chi-Shing; Yim, Aldrin Kay-Yuen; Mat, Wai-Kin; Tong, Amy Hin-Yan; Lok, Si; Xue, Hong; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Wong, J Tze-Fei; Chan, Ting-Fung

    2014-03-01

    The 20 canonical amino acids of the genetic code have been invariant over 3 billion years of biological evolution. Although various aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases can charge their cognate tRNAs with amino acid analogs, there has been no known displacement of any canonical amino acid from the code. Experimental departure from this universal protein alphabet comprising the canonical amino acids was first achieved in the mutants of the Bacillus subtilis QB928 strain, which after serial selection and mutagenesis led to the HR23 strain that could use 4-fluorotryptophan (4FTrp) but not canonical tryptophan (Trp) for propagation. To gain insight into this displacement of Trp from the genetic code by 4FTrp, genome sequencing was performed on LC33 (a precursor strain of HR23), HR23, and TR7 (a revertant of HR23 that regained the capacity to propagate on Trp). Compared with QB928, the negative regulator mtrB of Trp transport was found to be knocked out in LC33, HR23, and TR7, and sigma factor sigB was mutated in HR23 and TR7. Moreover, rpoBC encoding RNA polymerase subunits were mutated in three independent isolates of TR7 relative to HR23. Increased expression of sigB was also observed in HR23 and in TR7 growing under 4FTrp. These findings indicated that stabilization of the genetic code can be provided by just a small number of analog-sensitive proteins, forming an oligogenic barrier that safeguards the canonical amino acids throughout biological evolution.

  6. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  7. Nucleophosmin (NPM1) Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: An Ongoing (Cytoplasmic) Tale of Dueling Mutations and Duality of Molecular Genetic Testing Methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This Commentary highlights two articles that focus on molecular techniques to identify mutations in nucleophosmin (NPM1), which is the most frequently mutated gene in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML)

  8. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  9. Properties of a genetic algorithm extended by a random self-learning operator and asymmetric mutations: A convergence study for a task of powder-pattern indexing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszkowicz, Wojciech [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, PL-02-668 Warsaw (Poland)]. E-mail: paszk@ifpan.edu.pl

    2006-04-27

    Genetic algorithms represent a powerful global-optimisation tool applicable in solving tasks of high complexity in science, technology, medicine, communication, etc. The usual genetic-algorithm calculation scheme is extended here by introduction of a quadratic self-learning operator, which performs a partial local search for randomly selected representatives of the population. This operator is aimed as a minor deterministic contribution to the (stochastic) genetic search. The population representing the trial solutions is split into two equal subpopulations allowed to exhibit different mutation rates (so called asymmetric mutation). The convergence is studied in detail exploiting a crystallographic-test example of indexing of powder diffraction data of orthorhombic lithium copper oxide, varying such parameters as mutation rates and the learning rate. It is shown through the averaged (over the subpopulation) fitness behaviour, how the genetic diversity in the population depends on the mutation rate of the given subpopulation. Conditions and algorithm parameter values favourable for convergence in the framework of proposed approach are discussed using the results for the mentioned example. Further data are studied with a somewhat modified algorithm using periodically varying mutation rates and a problem-specific operator. The chance of finding the global optimum and the convergence speed are observed to be strongly influenced by the effective mutation level and on the self-learning level. The optimal values of these two parameters are about 6 and 5%, respectively. The periodic changes of mutation rate are found to improve the explorative abilities of the algorithm. The results of the study confirm that the applied methodology leads to improvement of the classical genetic algorithm and, therefore, it is expected to be helpful in constructing of algorithms permitting to solve similar tasks of higher complexity.

  10. Fanconi anaemia, BRCA2 mutations and childhood cancer: a developmental perspective from clinical and epidemiological observations with implications for genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefan; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chandler, Kate; Gillespie, Alan; Birch, Jillian M; Evans, D Gareth

    2014-02-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an inherited condition characterised by congenital and developmental abnormalities and a strong cancer predisposition. In around 3-5% of cases FA is caused by biallelic mutations in the BRCA2 gene. Individuals heterozygous for BRCA2 mutations have an increased risk of inherited breast and ovarian cancer. We reviewed the mutation spectrum in BRCA2-associated FA, and the spectrum and frequency of BRCA2 mutations in distinct populations. The rarity of FA due to biallelic BRCA2 mutations supports a fundamental role of BRCA2 for prevention of malignant transformation during development. The spectrum of malignancies seen associated with FA support the concept of a tissue selectivity of BRCA2 mutations for development of FA-associated cancers. This specificity is illustrated by the distinct FA-associated BRCA2 mutations that appear to predispose to specific brain or haematological malignancies. For some populations, the number of FA-patients with biallelic BRCA2 disruption is smaller than that expected from the carrier frequency, and this implies that some pregnancies with biallelic BRCA2 mutations do not go to term. The apparent discrepancy between expected and observed incidence of BRCA2 mutation-associated FA in high-frequency carrier populations has important implications for the genetic counselling of couples with recurrent miscarriages from high-risk populations.

  11. GENETIC MUTATIONS AND NATURAL SELECTION – STEPS ON THE PATH OF EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Mihaela Balan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available It is nowadays considered that mutation is one o the most important sources of variety existent in nature. We may therefore consider that the diversity of the living world is the result of a long process of successive adaptations to the actions of the environment and that these adaptations were defined by natural selection as morphological and functional features of both animal and vegetal species.

  12. Mosaicism: The embryo as a target for induction of mutations leading to cancer and genetic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohrenweiser, H.; Zingg, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Mosaicismhas been observed in both germinal and somatic tissues of several species, including humans. Mutational events occurring during early embryogenesis can give rise to an organism with a significant number of cells with the mutant genotype in one or more tissues. In the F{sub 1} generation, this event will usually be perceived as a de novo germinal mutation rather than a transmitted variant allele, unless significant effort is directed toward detecting the mosaicism. Similarly, mutations in oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes in proliferating somatic cells can generate populations of cells that are at increased risk of transforming into tumor cells. The number of potential preneoplastic cells is larger when the mutagenic event occurs in early development than if it occurs in the mature adult. Experimental data confirm that treatment of the developing embryo or fetus with carcinogenic and mutagenic agents increases the cancer incidence in these animals and the frequency of mutations in the offspring of the animals that were exposed in utero. The available data are conclusive that the developing organism is at risk from exposure to mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. However, the data are insufficient to estimate the level of risk associated with similar exposures to the adult organism. The potential risk from exposure of the developing embryo is increased relative to the risk from adult exposure if the sensitivity of the individual cells to damage in the adult and the embryo are equivalent. It seems apparent that the potential risks of cancer and heritable disease following in utero exposure are sufficient to warrant additional attention. It is important to obtain data for estimating the relative contribution of in utero exposure to mutagenic and carcinogenic agents to the total health burden and for the subsequent development of appropriate regulations. 60 refs., 2 figs.

  13. GBA2 Mutations Cause a Marinesco-Sjögren-Like Syndrome: Genetic and Biochemical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugarvoll, Kristoffer; Johansson, Stefan; Rodriguez, Carlos E.; Boman, Helge; Haukanes, Bjørn Ivar; Bruland, Ove; Roque, Francisco; Jonassen, Inge; Blomqvist, Maria; Telstad, Wenche; Månsson, Jan-Eric

    2017-01-01

    Background With the advent new sequencing technologies, we now have the tools to understand the phenotypic diversity and the common occurrence of phenocopies. We used these techniques to investigate two Norwegian families with an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with cataracts and mental retardation. Methods and Results Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip analysis followed by Exome sequencing identified a 2 bp homozygous deletion in GBA2 in both families, c.1528_1529del [p.Met510Valfs*17]. Furthermore, we report the biochemical characterization of GBA2 in these patients. Our studies show that a reduced activity of GBA2 is sufficient to elevate the levels of glucosylceramide to similar levels as seen in Gaucher disease. Furthermore, leucocytes seem to be the proper enzyme source for in vitro analysis of GBA2 activity. Conclusions We report GBA2 mutations causing a Marinesco-Sjögren-like syndrome in two Norwegian families. One of the families was originally diagnosed with Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome based on an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with cataracts and mental retardation. Our findings highlight the phenotypic variability associated with GBA2 mutations, and suggest that patients with Marinesco-Sjögren-like syndromes should be tested for mutations in this gene. PMID:28052128

  14. Expression of Drosophila mushroom body mutations in alternative genetic backgrounds: a case study of the mushroom body miniature gene (mbm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Belle, J S; Heisenberg, M

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in 12 genes regulating Drosophila melanogaster mushroom body (MB) development were each studied in two genetic backgrounds. In all cases, brain structure was qualitatively or quantitatively different after replacement of the "original" genetic background with that of the Canton Special wild-type strain. The mushroom body miniature gene (mbm) was investigated in detail. mbm supports the maintenance of MB Kenyon cell fibers in third instar larvae and their regrowth during metamorphosis. Adult mbm1 mutant females are lacking many or most Kenyon cell fibers and are impaired in MB-mediated associative odor learning. We show here that structural defects in mbm1 are apparent only in combination with an X-linked, dosage-dependent modifier (or modifiers). In the Canton Special genetic background, the mbm1 anatomical phenotype is suppressed, and MBs develop to a normal size. However, the olfactory learning phenotype is not fully restored, suggesting that submicroscopic defects persist in the MBs. Mutant mbm1 flies with full-sized MBs have normal retention but show a specific acquisition deficit that cannot be attributed to reductions in odor avoidance, shock reactivity, or locomotor behavior. We propose that polymorphic gene interactions (in addition to ontogenetic factors) determine MB size and, concomitantly, the ability to recognize and learn odors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8790424

  15. Genetic Characterization of a French Cohort of GNE-mutation negative inclusion body myopathy patients with exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerino, Mathieu; Gorokhova, Svetlana; Laforet, Pascal; Ben Yaou, Rabah; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Pouget, Jean; Attarian, Shahram; Eymard, Bruno; Deleuze, Jean-François; Boland, Anne; Behin, Anthony; Stojkovic, Tanya; Bonne, Gisele; Levy, Nicolas; Bartoli, Marc; Krahn, Martin

    2017-03-03

    Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (hIBM) refers to a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases. The overlapping histochemical features of hIBM with other genetic disorders lead to low diagnostic rates with targeted single-gene sequencing. This is true for the most prevalent form of hIBM, GNEpathy. Therefore, we used whole-exome sequencing (WES) to determine whether a cohort of clinically suspected GNEpathy patients undiagnosed by targeted GNE analysis could be genetically characterized. Twenty patients with hIBM but undiagnosed by targeted GNE sequencing were analyzed by WES before data filtering on 306 genes associated with neuromuscular disorders. Seven patients out of 20 were found to have disease-causing mutations in genes associated with hIBM or genes allowing for hIBM in the differential diagnosis or associated with unexpected diagnosis. Next-generation sequencing is an efficient strategy in the context of hIBM, resulting in a molecular diagnosis for 35% of the patients initially undiagnosed by targeted GNE analysis. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Expression of Drosophila mushroom body mutations in alternative genetic backgrounds: a case study of the mushroom body miniature gene (mbm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Belle, J S; Heisenberg, M

    1996-09-03

    Mutations in 12 genes regulating Drosophila melanogaster mushroom body (MB) development were each studied in two genetic backgrounds. In all cases, brain structure was qualitatively or quantitatively different after replacement of the "original" genetic background with that of the Canton Special wild-type strain. The mushroom body miniature gene (mbm) was investigated in detail. mbm supports the maintenance of MB Kenyon cell fibers in third instar larvae and their regrowth during metamorphosis. Adult mbm1 mutant females are lacking many or most Kenyon cell fibers and are impaired in MB-mediated associative odor learning. We show here that structural defects in mbm1 are apparent only in combination with an X-linked, dosage-dependent modifier (or modifiers). In the Canton Special genetic background, the mbm1 anatomical phenotype is suppressed, and MBs develop to a normal size. However, the olfactory learning phenotype is not fully restored, suggesting that submicroscopic defects persist in the MBs. Mutant mbm1 flies with full-sized MBs have normal retention but show a specific acquisition deficit that cannot be attributed to reductions in odor avoidance, shock reactivity, or locomotor behavior. We propose that polymorphic gene interactions (in addition to ontogenetic factors) determine MB size and, concomitantly, the ability to recognize and learn odors.

  17. Clinical Features and Genetic Analysis of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex in a Chinese Family Caused by c.2677-2678del Mutation on TSC2 Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Lai-shun; JIANG Hua; QU Xiu-xiu; ZHENG De-quan; WU Xin-yu; LU Wu-sheng

    2016-01-01

    The clinical data of patients from a Chinese family with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) were collected and the gene mutation type of TSC2 of proband in pedigree one was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct genes sequencing. There were 2 cases with TSC in the family, both of whom had facial angioifbromas, one case with ungual ifbromas, the other with mental retardation. The MRI and CT showed multiple intracranial nodules together. What’s more, gene mutation analysis of TSC2 demonstrated the c.2677-2678del mutation in both and the genetic manner deduced with autosomal dominant inheritance.

  18. Clinical and genetic investigation of a large Tunisian family with complete achromatopsia: identification of a new nonsense mutation in GNAT2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouechtati, Farah; Merdassi, Ahlem; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Largueche, Leila; Derouiche, Kaouther; Ouragini, Houyem; Nouira, Sonia; Tiab, Leila; Baklouti, Karim; Rebai, Ahmed; Schorderet, Daniel F; Munier, Francis L; Zografos, Leonidas; Abdelhak, Sonia; El Matri, Leila

    2011-01-01

    Complete achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disease associated with CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2 and PDE6C mutations. This retinal disorder is characterized by complete loss of color discrimination due to the absence or alteration of the cones function. The purpose of the present study was the clinical and the genetic characterization of achromatopsia in a large consanguineous Tunisian family. Ophthalmic evaluation included a full clinical examination, color vision testing and electroretinography. Linkage analysis using microsatellite markers flanking CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2 and PDE6C genes was performed. Mutations were screened by direct sequencing. A total of 12 individuals were diagnosed with congenital complete achromatopsia. They are members of six nuclear consanguineous families belonging to the same large consanguineous family. Linkage analysis revealed linkage to GNAT2. Mutational screening of GNAT2 revealed three intronic variations c.119-69G>C, c.161+66A>T and c.875-31G>C that co-segregated with a novel mutation p.R313X. An identical GNAT2 haplotype segregating with this mutation was identified, indicating a founder mutation. All patients were homozygous for the p.R313X mutation. This is the first report of the clinical and genetic investigation of complete achromatopsia in North Africa and the largest family with recessive achromatopsia involving GNAT2; thus, providing a unique opportunity for genotype-phenotype correlation for this extremely rare condition.

  19. Genetic adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis: strong and weak mutators with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds emerge in mucA and/or lasR mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    During the chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods due to adaptive evolution mediated by genetic variation. Hypermutability is considered to play an important role in this adaptive evolution and it has been demonstrated tha...... evolutionary pathways concordant with adaptive radiation were observed in different clonal lineages of P. aeruginosa from CF patients.......During the chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods due to adaptive evolution mediated by genetic variation. Hypermutability is considered to play an important role in this adaptive evolution and it has been demonstrated...... that mutator populations are amplified in the CF lung by hitchhiking with adaptive mutations. Two of the genes that are frequently mutated in isolates from chronic infection are mucA and lasR. Loss-of-function mutations in these genes determine the phenotypic switch to mucoidy and loss of quorum sensing, which...

  20. Genetic and proteomic characterization of rpoB mutations and their effect on nematicidal activity in Photorhabdus luminescens LN2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehong Qiu

    Full Text Available Rifampin resistant (Rif(R mutants of the insect pathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens LN2 from entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica LN2 were genetically and proteomically characterized. The Rif(R mutants showed typical phase one characters of Photorhabdus bacteria, and insecticidal activity against Galleria mellonella larvae, but surprisingly influenced their nematicidal activity against axenic infective juveniles (IJs of H. bacteriophora H06, an incompatible nematode host. 13 out of 34 Rif(R mutants lost their nematicidal activity against H06 IJs but supported the reproduction of H06 nematodes. 7 nematicidal-producing and 7 non-nematicidal-producing Rif(R mutants were respectively selected for rpoB sequence analysis. rpoB mutations were found in all 14 Rif(R mutants. The rpoB (P564L mutation was found in all 7 mutants which produced nematicidal activity against H06 nematodes, but not in the mutants which supported H06 nematode production. Allelic exchange assays confirmed that the Rif-resistance and the impact on nematicidal activity of LN2 bacteria were conferred by rpoB mutation(s. The non-nematicidal-producing Rif(R mutant was unable to colonize in the intestines of H06 IJs, but able to colonize in the intestines of its indigenous LN2 IJs. Proteomic analysis revealed different protein expression between wild-type strain and Rif(R mutants, or between nematicidal-producing and non nematicidal-producing mutants. At least 7 putative proteins including DsbA, HlpA, RhlE, RplC, NamB (a protein from T3SS, and 2 hypothetical proteins (similar to unknown protein YgdH and YggE of Escherichia coli respectively were probably involved in the nematicidal activity of LN2 bacteria against H06 nematodes. This hypothesis was further confirmed by creating insertion-deletion mutants of three selected corresponding genes (the downregulated rhlE and namB, and upregulated dsbA. These results indicate that the rpoB mutations greatly influence the

  1. Effectors of epidermal growth factor receptor pathway: the genetic profiling ofKRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, NRAS mutations in colorectal cancer characteristics and personalized medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinchen Shen

    Full Text Available Mutations in KRAS oncogene are recognized biomarkers that predict lack of response to anti- epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR antibody therapies. However, some patients with KRAS wild-type tumors still do not respond, so other downstream mutations in BRAF, PIK3CA and NRAS should be investigated. Herein we used direct sequencing to analyze mutation status for 676 patients in KRAS (codons 12, 13 and 61, BRAF (exon 11 and exon 15, PIK3CA (exon 9 and exon 20 and NRAS (codons12, 13 and 61. Clinicopathological characteristics associations were analyzed together with overall survival (OS of metastatic colorectal cancer patients (mCRC. We found 35.9% (242/674 tumors harbored a KRAS mutation, 6.96% (47/675 harbored a BRAF mutation, 9.9% (62/625 harbored a PIK3CA mutation and 4.19% (26/621 harbored a NRAS mutation. KRAS mutation coexisted with BRAF, PIK3CA and NRAS mutation, PIK3CA exon9 mutation appeared more frequently in KRAS mutant tumors (P = 0.027 while NRAS mutation almost existed in KRAS wild-types (P<0.001. Female patients and older group harbored a higher KRAS mutation (P = 0.018 and P = 0.031, respectively; BRAF (V600E mutation showed a higher frequency in colon cancer and poor differentiation tumors (P = 0.020 and P = 0.030, respectively; proximal tumors appeared a higher PIK3CA mutation (P<0.001 and distant metastatic tumors shared a higher NRAS mutation (P = 0.010. However, in this study no significant result was found between OS and gene mutation in mCRC group. To our knowledge, the first large-scale retrospective study on comprehensive genetic profile which associated with anti-EGFR MoAbs treatment selection in East Asian CRC population, appeared a specific genotype distribution picture, and the results provided a better understanding between clinicopathological characteristics and gene mutations in CRC patients.

  2. Social contract theory and just decision making: lessons from genetic testing for the BRCA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Jones, Bryn; Burgess, Michael M

    2004-06-01

    Decisions about funding health services are crucial to controlling costs in health care insurance plans, yet they encounter serious challenges from intellectual property protection--e.g., patents--of health care services. Using Myriad Genetics' commercial genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast cancer (BRCA testing) in the context of the Canadian health insurance system as a case study, this paper applies concepts from social contract theory to help develop more just and rational approaches to health care decision making. Specifically, Daniel's and Sabin's "accountability for reasonableness" is compared to broader notions of public consultation, demonstrating that expert assessments in specific decisions must be transparent and accountable and supplemented by public consultation.

  3. Identification of C7orf11 (TTDN1) Gene Mutations and Genetic Heterogeneity in Nonphotosensitive Trichothiodystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We have identified C7orf11, which localizes to the nucleus and is expressed in fetal hair follicles, as the first disease gene for nonphotosensitive trichothiodystrophy (TTD). C7orf11 maps to chromosome 7p14, and the disease locus has been designated “TTDN1” (TTDnonphotosensitive 1). Mutations were found in patients with Amish brittle-hair syndrome and in other nonphotosensititive TTD cases with mental retardation and decreased fertility but not in patients with Sabinas syndrome or Pollitt sy...

  4. Blue Genes: An Integrative Laboratory to Differentiate Genetic Transformation from Gene Mutation for Underclassmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, Kevin T.; Chang, Ming-Mei; Simon, Robert D.; Lazatin, Justine C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of students to understand the relationship between genotype and phenotype, and the mechanisms by which genotypes and phenotypes can change is essential for students studying genetics. To this end, we have developed a four-week laboratory called Blue Genes, which is designed to help novice students discriminate between two mechanisms by…

  5. Genetic counseling and cardiac care in predictively tested hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers: The patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; Van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be d

  6. Genetic counseling and cardiac care in predictively tested hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers: The patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; Van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be

  7. Genetic testing for TMEM154 mutations associated with lentivirus susceptibility in sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovine lentiviruses cause incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative diseases that affect millions of sheep worldwide. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154) has been recently associated with lentivirus infections in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the two most common TMEM1...

  8. Molecular identification of collagen 17a1 as a major genetic modifier of laminin gamma 2 mutation-induced junctional epidermolysis bullosa in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Sproule

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB encompasses a spectrum of mechanobullous disorders caused by rare mutations that result in structural weakening of the skin and mucous membranes. While gene mutated and types of mutations present are broadly predictive of the range of disease to be expected, a remarkable amount of phenotypic variability remains unaccounted for in all but the most deleterious cases. This unexplained variance raises the possibility of genetic modifier effects. We tested this hypothesis using a mouse model that recapitulates a non-Herlitz form of junctional EB (JEB owing to the hypomorphic jeb allele of laminin gamma 2 (Lamc2. By varying normally asymptomatic background genetics, we document the potent impact of genetic modifiers on the strength of dermal-epidermal adhesion and on the clinical severity of JEB in the context of the Lamc2(jeb mutation. Through an unbiased genetic approach involving a combination of QTL mapping and positional cloning, we demonstrate that Col17a1 is a strong genetic modifier of the non-Herlitz JEB that develops in Lamc2(jeb mice. This modifier is defined by variations in 1-3 neighboring amino acids in the non-collagenous 4 domain of the collagen XVII protein. These allelic variants alter the strength of dermal-epidermal adhesion in the context of the Lamc2(jeb mutation and, consequentially, broadly impact the clinical severity of JEB. Overall the results provide an explanation for how normally innocuous allelic variants can act epistatically with a disease causing mutation to impact the severity of a rare, heritable mechanobullous disorder.

  9. Molecular identification of collagen 17a1 as a major genetic modifier of laminin gamma 2 mutation-induced junctional epidermolysis bullosa in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproule, Thomas J; Bubier, Jason A; Grandi, Fiorella C; Sun, Victor Z; Philip, Vivek M; McPhee, Caroline G; Adkins, Elisabeth B; Sundberg, John P; Roopenian, Derry C

    2014-02-01

    Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) encompasses a spectrum of mechanobullous disorders caused by rare mutations that result in structural weakening of the skin and mucous membranes. While gene mutated and types of mutations present are broadly predictive of the range of disease to be expected, a remarkable amount of phenotypic variability remains unaccounted for in all but the most deleterious cases. This unexplained variance raises the possibility of genetic modifier effects. We tested this hypothesis using a mouse model that recapitulates a non-Herlitz form of junctional EB (JEB) owing to the hypomorphic jeb allele of laminin gamma 2 (Lamc2). By varying normally asymptomatic background genetics, we document the potent impact of genetic modifiers on the strength of dermal-epidermal adhesion and on the clinical severity of JEB in the context of the Lamc2(jeb) mutation. Through an unbiased genetic approach involving a combination of QTL mapping and positional cloning, we demonstrate that Col17a1 is a strong genetic modifier of the non-Herlitz JEB that develops in Lamc2(jeb) mice. This modifier is defined by variations in 1-3 neighboring amino acids in the non-collagenous 4 domain of the collagen XVII protein. These allelic variants alter the strength of dermal-epidermal adhesion in the context of the Lamc2(jeb) mutation and, consequentially, broadly impact the clinical severity of JEB. Overall the results provide an explanation for how normally innocuous allelic variants can act epistatically with a disease causing mutation to impact the severity of a rare, heritable mechanobullous disorder.

  10. Genetic analysis of a novel tubulin mutation that redirects synaptic vesicle targeting and causes neurite degeneration in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Min Hsu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cargos are differentially targeted to either axons or dendrites, and this polarized cargo targeting critically depends on the interaction between microtubules and molecular motors. From a forward mutagenesis screen, we identified a gain-of-function mutation in the C. elegans α-tubulin gene mec-12 that triggered synaptic vesicle mistargeting, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration in the touch receptor neurons. This missense mutation replaced an absolutely conserved glycine in the H12 helix with glutamic acid, resulting in increased negative charges at the C-terminus of α-tubulin. Synaptic vesicle mistargeting in the mutant neurons was suppressed by reducing dynein function, suggesting that aberrantly high dynein activity mistargeted synaptic vesicles. We demonstrated that dynein showed preference towards binding mutant microtubules over wild-type in microtubule sedimentation assay. By contrast, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration were independent of dynein and could be ameliorated by genetic paralysis of the animal. This suggests that mutant microtubules render the neurons susceptible to recurrent mechanical stress induced by muscle activity, which is consistent with the observation that microtubule network was disorganized under electron microscopy. Our work provides insights into how microtubule-dynein interaction instructs synaptic vesicle targeting and the importance of microtubule in the maintenance of neuronal structures against constant mechanical stress.

  11. The genetic, morphological, and physiological characterization of a dark larval cuticle mutation in the butterfly, Bicyclus anynana.

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    Ashley Bear

    Full Text Available Studies on insect melanism have greatly contributed to our understanding of natural selection and the ultimate factors influencing the evolution of darkly pigmented phenotypes. Research on several species of melanic lepidopteran larvae have found that low levels of circulating juvenile hormone (JH titers are associated with a melanic phenotype, suggesting that genetic changes in the JH biosynthetic pathway give rise to increased deposition of melanin granules in the cuticle in this group. But does melanism arise through different molecular mechanisms in different species? The present study reports on a Bicyclus anynana (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae dark larvae single locus mutation, in which larvae exhibit a darker cuticle relative to wild type. Unlike other lepidopteran melanic larvae mutations, this one is autosomal recessive and does not appear to involve a deficiency in JH titers. Unlike JH deficiency mutants, dark larvae mutants display similar growth rates and sexual behaviors as wild type, and topical application of a JH analogue failed to rescue the wild type cuticular coloration. Finally, transmission electron microscopy showed that sclerotization or deposition of diffuse melanin, rather than deposition of melanin granules, produces the dark coloration found in the cuticle of this species. We conclude that different molecular mechanisms underlie larval melanism in different species of Lepidoptera.

  12. Characterization of spermatogonial stem cells lacking intercellular bridges and genetic replacement of a mutation in spermatogonial stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Iwamori

    Full Text Available Stem cells have a potential of gene therapy for regenerative medicine. Among various stem cells, spermatogonial stem cells have a unique characteristic in which neighboring cells can be connected by intercellular bridges. However, the roles of intercellular bridges for stem cell self-renewal, differentiation, and proliferation remain to be elucidated. Here, we show not only the characteristics of testis-expressed gene 14 (TEX14 null spermatogonial stem cells lacking intercellular bridges but also a trial application of genetic correction of a mutation in spermatogonial stem cells as a model for future gene therapy. In TEX14 null testes, some genes important for undifferentiated spermatogonia as well as some differentiation-related genes were activated. TEX14 null spermatogonial stem cells, surprisingly, could form chain-like structures even though they do not form stable intercellular bridges. TEX14 null spermatogonial stem cells in culture possessed both characteristics of undifferentiated and differentiated spermatogonia. Long-term culture of TEX14 null spermatogonial stem cells could not be established likely secondary to up-regulation of CDK4 inhibitors and down-regulation of cyclin E. These results suggest that intercellular bridges are essential for both maintenance of spermatogonial stem cells and their proliferation. Lastly, a mutation in Tex14(+/- spermatogonial stem cells was successfully replaced by homologous recombination in vitro. Our study provides a therapeutic potential of spermatogonial stem cells for reproductive medicine if they can be cultured long-term.

  13. Characterization of Spermatogonial Stem Cells Lacking Intercellular Bridges and Genetic Replacement of a Mutation in Spermatogonial Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamori, Naoki; Iwamori, Tokuko; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells have a potential of gene therapy for regenerative medicine. Among various stem cells, spermatogonial stem cells have a unique characteristic in which neighboring cells can be connected by intercellular bridges. However, the roles of intercellular bridges for stem cell self-renewal, differentiation, and proliferation remain to be elucidated. Here, we show not only the characteristics of testis-expressed gene 14 (TEX14) null spermatogonial stem cells lacking intercellular bridges but also a trial application of genetic correction of a mutation in spermatogonial stem cells as a model for future gene therapy. In TEX14 null testes, some genes important for undifferentiated spermatogonia as well as some differentiation-related genes were activated. TEX14 null spermatogonial stem cells, surprisingly, could form chain-like structures even though they do not form stable intercellular bridges. TEX14 null spermatogonial stem cells in culture possessed both characteristics of undifferentiated and differentiated spermatogonia. Long-term culture of TEX14 null spermatogonial stem cells could not be established likely secondary to up-regulation of CDK4 inhibitors and down-regulation of cyclin E. These results suggest that intercellular bridges are essential for both maintenance of spermatogonial stem cells and their proliferation. Lastly, a mutation in Tex14+/− spermatogonial stem cells was successfully replaced by homologous recombination in vitro. Our study provides a therapeutic potential of spermatogonial stem cells for reproductive medicine if they can be cultured long-term. PMID:22719986

  14. Genetic diversity and mutation of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (Newcastle disease virus) in wild birds and evidence for intercontinental spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew B.; Ogawa, Haruko; Ip, Hon S.; Imai, Kunitoshi; Bui, V. N.; Yamaguchi, Emi; Silko, N. Y.; Afonso, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1), or Newcastle disease virus, is the causative agent of Newcastle disease, one of the most economically important diseases for poultry production worldwide and a cause of periodic epizootics in wild birds in North America. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity of APMV-1 isolated from migratory birds sampled in Alaska, Japan, and Russia and assessed the evidence for intercontinental virus spread using phylogenetic methods. Additionally, we predicted viral virulence using deduced amino acid residues for the fusion protein cleavage site and estimated mutation rates for the fusion gene of class I and class II migratory bird isolates. All 73 isolates sequenced as part of this study were most closely related to virus genotypes previously reported for wild birds; however, five class II genotype I isolates formed a monophyletic clade exhibiting previously unreported genetic diversity, which met criteria for the designation of a new sub-genotype. Phylogenetic analysis of wild-bird isolates provided evidence for intercontinental virus spread, specifically viral lineages of APMV-1 class II genotype I sub-genotypes Ib and Ic. This result supports migratory bird movement as a possible mechanism for the redistribution of APMV-1. None of the predicted deduced amino acid motifs for the fusion protein cleavage site of APMV-1 strains isolated from migratory birds in Alaska, Japan, and Russia were consistent with those of previously identified virulent viruses. These data therefore provide no support for these strains contributing to the emergence of avian pathogens. The estimated mutation rates for fusion genes of class I and class II wild-bird isolates were faster than those reported previously for non-virulent APMV-1 strains. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into the diversity, spread, and evolution of APMV-1 in wild birds.

  15. Genetic diversity and mutation of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (Newcastle disease virus) in wild birds and evidence for intercontinental spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andrew M; Reeves, Andrew B; Ogawa, Haruko; Ip, Hon S; Imai, Kunitoshi; Bui, Vuong Nghia; Yamaguchi, Emi; Silko, Nikita Y; Afonso, Claudio L

    2013-12-01

    Avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1), or Newcastle disease virus, is the causative agent of Newcastle disease, one of the most economically important diseases for poultry production worldwide and a cause of periodic epizootics in wild birds in North America. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity of APMV-1 isolated from migratory birds sampled in Alaska, Japan, and Russia and assessed the evidence for intercontinental virus spread using phylogenetic methods. Additionally, we predicted viral virulence using deduced amino acid residues for the fusion protein cleavage site and estimated mutation rates for the fusion gene of class I and class II migratory bird isolates. All 73 isolates sequenced as part of this study were most closely related to virus genotypes previously reported for wild birds; however, five class II genotype I isolates formed a monophyletic clade exhibiting previously unreported genetic diversity, which met criteria for the designation of a new sub-genotype. Phylogenetic analysis of wild-bird isolates provided evidence for intercontinental virus spread, specifically viral lineages of APMV-1 class II genotype I sub-genotypes Ib and Ic. This result supports migratory bird movement as a possible mechanism for the redistribution of APMV-1. None of the predicted deduced amino acid motifs for the fusion protein cleavage site of APMV-1 strains isolated from migratory birds in Alaska, Japan, and Russia were consistent with those of previously identified virulent viruses. These data therefore provide no support for these strains contributing to the emergence of avian pathogens. The estimated mutation rates for fusion genes of class I and class II wild-bird isolates were faster than those reported previously for non-virulent APMV-1 strains. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into the diversity, spread, and evolution of APMV-1 in wild birds.

  16. Low-mutation-rate, reduced-genome Escherichia coli: an improved host for faithful maintenance of engineered genetic constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csörgő Bálint

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular mechanisms generating genetic variation provide the basis for evolution and long-term survival of a population in a changing environment. In stable, laboratory conditions, the variation-generating mechanisms are dispensable, as there is limited need for the cell to adapt to adverse conditions. In fact, newly emerging, evolved features might be undesirable when working on highly refined, precise molecular and synthetic biological tasks. Results By constructing low-mutation-rate variants, we reduced the evolutionary capacity of MDS42, a reduced-genome E. coli strain engineered to lack most genes irrelevant for laboratory/industrial applications. Elimination of diversity-generating, error-prone DNA polymerase enzymes involved in induced mutagenesis achieved a significant stabilization of the genome. The resulting strain, while retaining normal growth, showed a significant decrease in overall mutation rates, most notably under various stress conditions. Moreover, the error-prone polymerase-free host allowed relatively stable maintenance of a toxic methyltransferase-expressing clone. In contrast, the parental strain produced mutant clones, unable to produce functional methyltransferase, which quickly overgrew the culture to a high ratio (50% of clones in a 24-h induction period lacked functional methyltransferase activity. The surprisingly large stability-difference observed between the strains was due to the combined effects of high stress-induced mutagenesis in the parental strain, growth inhibition by expression of the toxic protein, and selection/outgrowth of mutants no longer producing an active, toxic enzyme. Conclusions By eliminating stress-inducible error-prone DNA-polymerases, the genome of the mobile genetic element-free E. coli strain MDS42 was further stabilized. The resulting strain represents an improved host in various synthetic and molecular biological applications, allowing more stable production of

  17. A multicenter experience on the prevalence of ARMC5 mutations in patients with primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia: from genetic characterization to clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiger, N M; Regazzo, D; Rubin, B; Ferrara, A M; Rizzati, S; Taschin, E; Ceccato, F; Arnaldi, G; Pecori Giraldi, F; Stigliano, A; Cerquetti, L; Grimaldi, F; De Menis, E; Boscaro, M; Iacobone, M; Occhi, G; Scaroni, C

    2017-03-01

    ARMC5 mutations have recently been identified as a common genetic cause of primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PBMAH). We aimed to assess the prevalence of ARMC5 germline mutations and correlate genotype with phenotype in a large cohort of PBMAH patients. A multicenter study was performed, collecting patients from different endocrinology units in Italy. Seventy-one PBMAH patients were screened for small mutations and large rearrangements in the ARMC5 gene: 53 were cortisol-secreting (two with a family history of adrenal hyperplasia) and 18 were non-secreting cases of PBMAH. Non-mutated and mutated patients' clinical phenotypes were compared and related to the type of mutation. A likely causative germline ARMC5 mutation was only identified in cortisol-secreting PBMAH patients (one with a family history of adrenal hyperplasia and ten apparently sporadic cases). Screening in eight first-degree relatives of three index cases revealed four carriers of an ARMC5 mutation. Evidence of a second hit at somatic level was identified in five nodules. Mutated patients had higher cortisol levels (p = 0.062), and more severe hypertension and diabetes (p < 0.05). Adrenal glands were significantly larger, with a multinodular phenotype, in the mutant group (p < 0.01). No correlation emerged between type of mutation and clinical parameters. ARMC5 mutations are frequent in cortisol-secreting PBMAH and seem to be associated with a particular pattern of the adrenal masses. Their identification may have implications for the clinical care of PBMAH cases and their relatives.

  18. Comprehensive genetic screening of KCNQ4 in a large autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss cohort: genotype-phenotype correlations and a founder mutation.

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    Takehiko Naito

    Full Text Available The present study of KCNQ4 mutations was carried out to 1 determine the prevalence by unbiased population-based genetic screening, 2 clarify the mutation spectrum and genotype/phenotype correlations, and 3 summarize clinical characteristics. In addition, a review of the reported mutations was performed for better understanding of this deafness gene. The screening using 287 probands from unbiased Japanese autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL families identified 19 families with 7 different disease causing mutations, indicating that the frequency is 6.62% (19/287. While the majority were private mutations, one particular recurrent mutation, c.211delC, was observed in 13 unrelated families. Haplotype analysis in the vicinity of c.211delC suggests existence of a common ancestor. The majority of the patients showed all frequency, but high-frequency predominant, sensorineural hearing loss. The present study adds a new typical audiogram configuration characterized by mid-frequency predominant hearing loss caused by the p.V230E mutation. A variant at the N-terminal site (c. 211delC showed typical ski-slope type audiogram configuration. Concerning clinical features, onset age was from 3 to 40 years old, and mostly in the teens, and hearing loss was gradually progressive. Progressive nature is a common feature of patients with KCNQ4 mutations regardless of the mutation type. In conclusion, KCNQ4 mutations are frequent among ADNSHL patients, and therefore screening of the gene and molecular confirmation of these mutations have become important in the diagnosis of these conditions.

  19. POLE and POLD1 mutations in 529 kindred with familial colorectal cancer and/or polyposis: review of reported cases and recommendations for genetic testing and surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Fernando; Pineda, Marta; Aiza, Gemma; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Navarro, Matilde; Puente, Diana A.; Pons, Tirso; González, Sara; Iglesias, Silvia; Darder, Esther; Piñol, Virginia; Soto, José Luís; Valencia, Alfonso; Blanco, Ignacio; Urioste, Miguel; Brunet, Joan; Lázaro, Conxi; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S.; Valle, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Germ-line mutations in the exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 have been recently associated with polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. Here, we aimed to gain a better understanding of the phenotypic characteristics of this syndrome to establish specific criteria for POLE and POLD1 mutation screening and to help define the clinical management of mutation carriers. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Methods: The exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 were studied in 529 kindred, 441 with familial nonpolyposis CRC and 88 with polyposis, by using pooled DNA amplification and massively parallel sequencing. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Results: Seven novel or rare genetic variants were identified. In addition to the POLE p.L424V recurrent mutation in a patient with polyposis, CRC and oligodendroglioma, six novel or rare POLD1 variants (four of them, p.D316H, p.D316G, p.R409W, and p.L474P, with strong evidence for pathogenicity) were identified in nonpolyposis CRC families. Phenotypic data from these and previously reported POLE/POLD1 carriers point to an associated phenotype characterized by attenuated or oligo-adenomatous colorectal polyposis, CRC, and probably brain tumors. In addition, POLD1 mutations predispose to endometrial and breast tumors. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Conclusion: Our results widen the phenotypic spectrum of the POLE/POLD1-associated syndrome and identify novel pathogenic variants. We propose guidelines for genetic testing and surveillance recommendations. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. PMID:26133394

  20. Mutation in a sex-determinig gene in rainbow trout: detection and genetic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), the acknowledged sex-determining system is genetic sex determination (GSD) with female homogamety (_XX-_XY). Subsequently, mitotic gynogens are all expected to be females. Unexpected maleness was fortuitously observed in a mitotic gynogenetic family of rainbow trout (13 males out of 27). An equal ratio of males and females suggested the possible segregation of some Mendelian sex-influencing factor. In order to perform a comprehensive analysis of the inh...

  1. Multilocus mutation scanning for the analysis of genetic variation within Malassezia (Basidiomycota: Malasseziales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Otranto, Domenico; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Guillot, Jacques; Gasser, Robin B

    2007-04-01

    Members of the genus Malassezia are budding yeasts, characterized by a thick cell wall. Recently, these yeasts have received attention as emerging pathogens. They are common commensals on the skin of animals and can become pathogenic under the influence of various predisposing factors. Central to studying their taxonomy, systematics, and ecology and to diagnosis is the accurate identification of species or operational taxonomic units. To overcome the limitations of current phenotypic and biochemical methods of identification, a PCR-coupled SSCP approach, utilizing sequence variation (0.4-33.5%) in short regions (approximately 250-270 bp) of the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) of nuclear ribosomal DNA and the chitin synthase-2 gene (chs-2), was assessed for the identification and differentiation of different species/genotypes of Malassezia, characterized previously by DNA sequencing. Genomic DNA samples (n = 30) from Malassezia isolates cultured from canine skin scrapings were assessed by SSCP analysis of the two different genetic loci, and unequivocal delineation between genotypes and species was achieved. This SSCP approach is considered to provide a practical tool for the rapid and reliable genetic characterization of Malassezia genotypes/species from dogs and for investigating their population genetics and ecology. It will also provide a powerful tool for studies of Malassezia isolates from other animal species.

  2. DFNB59 Gene Mutation Screening Using PCR-SSCP/HA Technique in Non-syndromic Genetic Hearing Loss in Bushehr Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Azadegan Dehkordi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hearing impairment (HI is the most prevalent Neurosensory disorder which is heterogenous and can also occur due to environmental causes. The majority of hearing deficiencies are of genetic origin affecting about 60% of the HI cases. A novel gene DFNB59 encodes pejvakin has been recently shown to cause deafness. This study aims to determine the frequency of DFNB59 gene mutations in coding region the gene in Bushehr province. Methods: In this descriptive experimental study, we investigated the presence of DFNB59 gene mutations in Exons (2-7 of the gene in 80 deaf subjects. DNA was extracted using standard phenol –chloroform method. The screening of gene mutations was performed by PCR-SSCP/HA procedure. Finally, the possible mutations were confirmed by direct sequencing. Results: In all, 9 polymorphisms 793C>G were found in 80 non-syndromic, genetic hearing loss subjects studied. However no DFNB59 gene mutation was identified. Conclusion: We conclude that the association of DFNB59 gene mutations with hearing loss is very low in samples studies

  3. APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 mutations in early-onset Alzheimer disease: A genetic screening study of familial and sporadic cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanoiselée, Hélène-Marie; Nicolas, Gaël; Wallon, David; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Lacour, Morgane; Rousseau, Stéphane; Richard, Anne-Claire; Pasquier, Florence; Rollin-Sillaire, Adeline; Martinaud, Olivier; Quillard-Muraine, Muriel; de la Sayette, Vincent; Boutoleau-Bretonniere, Claire; Etcharry-Bouyx, Frédérique; Chauviré, Valérie; Sarazin, Marie; le Ber, Isabelle; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Jonveaux, Thérèse; Rouaud, Olivier; Ceccaldi, Mathieu; Félician, Olivier; Godefroy, Olivier; Formaglio, Maite; Croisile, Bernard; Auriacombe, Sophie; Chamard, Ludivine; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Sauvée, Mathilde; Marelli-Tosi, Cecilia; Gabelle, Audrey; Ozsancak, Canan; Pariente, Jérémie; Paquet, Claire; Hannequin, Didier; Campion, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Background Amyloid protein precursor (APP), presenilin-1 (PSEN1), and presenilin-2 (PSEN2) mutations cause autosomal dominant forms of early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD-EOAD). Although these genes were identified in the 1990s, variant classification remains a challenge, highlighting the need to colligate mutations from large series. Methods and findings We report here a novel update (2012–2016) of the genetic screening of the large AD-EOAD series ascertained across 28 French hospitals from 1993 onwards, bringing the total number of families with identified mutations to n = 170. Families were included when at least two first-degree relatives suffered from early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) with an age of onset (AOO) ≤65 y in two generations. Furthermore, we also screened 129 sporadic cases of Alzheimer disease with an AOO below age 51 (44% males, mean AOO = 45 ± 2 y). APP, PSEN1, or PSEN2 mutations were identified in 53 novel AD-EOAD families. Of the 129 sporadic cases screened, 17 carried a PSEN1 mutation and 1 carried an APP duplication (13%). Parental DNA was available for 10 sporadic mutation carriers, allowing us to show that the mutation had occurred de novo in each case. Thirteen mutations (12 in PSEN1 and 1 in PSEN2) identified either in familial or in sporadic cases were previously unreported. Of the 53 mutation carriers with available cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, 46 (87%) had all three CSF biomarkers—total tau protein (Tau), phospho-tau protein (P-Tau), and amyloid β (Aβ)42—in abnormal ranges. No mutation carrier had the three biomarkers in normal ranges. One limitation of this study is the absence of functional assessment of the possibly and probably pathogenic variants, which should help their classification. Conclusions Our findings suggest that a nonnegligible fraction of PSEN1 mutations occurs de novo, which is of high importance for genetic counseling, as PSEN1 mutational screening is currently performed in familial cases only

  4. Molecular genetic and functional association of Brugada and early repolarization syndromes with S422L missense mutation in KCNJ8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Martínez, Hector; Hu, Dan; Ferrer, Tania; Onetti, Carlos G; Wu, Yuesheng; Burashnikov, Elena; Boyle, Madalene; Surman, Tyler; Urrutia, Janire; Veltmann, Christian; Schimpf, Rainer; Borggrefe, Martin; Wolpert, Christian; Ibrahim, Bassiema B; Sánchez-Chapula, José Antonio; Winters, Stephen; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2012-04-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium cardiac channels consist of inward-rectifying channel subunits Kir6.1 or Kir6.2 (encoded by KCNJ8 or KCNJ11) and the sulfonylurea receptor subunits SUR2A (encoded by ABCC9). To examine the association of mutations in KCNJ8 with Brugada syndrome (BrS) and early repolarization syndrome (ERS) and to elucidate the mechanism underlying the gain of function of ATP-sensitive potassium channel current. Direct sequencing of KCNJ8 and other candidate genes was performed on 204 BrS and ERS probands and family members. Whole-cell and inside-out patch-clamp methods were used to study mutated channels expressed in TSA201 cells. The same missense mutation, p.Ser422Leu (c.1265C>T) in KCNJ8, was identified in 3 BrS and 1 ERS probands but was absent in 430 alleles from ethnically matched healthy controls. Additional genetic variants included CACNB2b-D601E. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed a 2-fold gain of function of glibenclamide-sensitive ATP-sensitive potassium channel current when KCNJ8-S422L was coexpressed with SUR2A-wild type. Inside-out patch-clamp evaluation yielded a significantly greater half maximal inhibitory concentration for ATP in the mutant channels (785.5 ± 2 vs 38.4 ± 3 μM; n = 5; P <.01), pointing to incomplete closing of the ATP-sensitive potassium channels under normoxic conditions. Patients with a CACNB2b-D601E polymorphism displayed longer QT/corrected QT intervals, likely owing to their effect to induce an increase in L-type calcium channel current (I(Ca-L)). Our results support the hypothesis that KCNJ8 is a susceptibility gene for BrS and ERS and point to S422L as a possible hotspot mutation. Our findings suggest that the S422L-induced gain of function in ATP-sensitive potassium channel current is due to reduced sensitivity to intracellular ATP. Copyright © 2012 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel reverse-genetic approach (SIMF) identifies Mutator insertions in new Myb genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowicz, P D; Grotewold, E

    2000-11-01

    We have developed a new strategy designated SIMF (Systematic Insertional Mutagenesis of Families), to identify DNA insertions in many members of a gene family simultaneously. This method requires only a short amino acid sequence conserved in all members of the family to make a degenerate oligonucleotide, and a sequence from the end of the DNA insertion. The SIMF strategy was successfully applied to the large maize R2R3 Myb family of regulatory genes, and Mutator insertions in several novel Myb genes were identified. Application of this technique to identify insertions in other large gene families could significantly decrease the effort involved in screening at the same time for insertions in all members of groups of genes that share a limited sequence identity.

  6. Genetic screening for von Hippel-Lindau gene mutations in non-syndromic pheochromocytoma: low prevalence and false-positives or misdiagnosis indicate a need for caution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenhofer, G.; Vocke, C.D.; Elkahloun, A.; Huynh, T.T.; Prodanov, T.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Benhammou, J.N.; Linehan, W.M.; Pacak, K.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic testing of tumor susceptibility genes is now recommended in most patients with pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma (PPGL), even in the absence of a syndromic presentation. Once a mutation is diagnosed there is rarely follow-up validation to assess the possibility of misdiagnosis. This study

  7. Genetic Testing and Post-Testing Decision Making among BRCA-Positive Mutation Women: A Psychosocial Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene; An, Chen

    2016-10-01

    Through an analysis of an online survey of women who tested positive for the BRCA genetic mutation for breast cancer, this research uses a social constructionist and feminist standpoint lens to understand the decision-making process that leads BRCA-positive women to choose genetic testing. Additionally, this research examines how they socially construct and understand their risk for developing breast cancer, as well as which treatment options they undergo post-testing. BRCA-positive women re-frame their statistical medical risk for developing cancer and their post-testing treatment choices through a broad psychosocial context of engagement that also includes their social networks. Important psychosocial factors drive women's medical decisions, such as individual feelings of guilt and vulnerability, and the degree of perceived social support. Women who felt guilty and fearful that they might pass the BRCA gene to their children were more likely to undergo risk reducing surgery. Women with at least one daughter and women without children were more inclined toward the risk reducing surgery compared to those with only sons. These psychosocial factors and social network engagements serve as a "nexus of decision making" that does not, for the most part, mirror the medical assessments of statistical odds for hereditary cancer development, nor the specific treatment protocols outlined by the medical establishment.

  8. Experimental evolution, genetic analysis and genome re-sequencing reveal the mutation conferring artemisinin resistance in an isogenic lineage of malaria parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Hunt, Paul

    2010-09-16

    Background: Classical and quantitative linkage analyses of genetic crosses have traditionally been used to map genes of interest, such as those conferring chloroquine or quinine resistance in malaria parasites. Next-generation sequencing technologies now present the possibility of determining genome-wide genetic variation at single base-pair resolution. Here, we combine in vivo experimental evolution, a rapid genetic strategy and whole genome re-sequencing to identify the precise genetic basis of artemisinin resistance in a lineage of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi. Such genetic markers will further the investigation of resistance and its control in natural infections of the human malaria, P. falciparum.Results: A lineage of isogenic in vivo drug-selected mutant P. chabaudi parasites was investigated. By measuring the artemisinin responses of these clones, the appearance of an in vivo artemisinin resistance phenotype within the lineage was defined. The underlying genetic locus was mapped to a region of chromosome 2 by Linkage Group Selection in two different genetic crosses. Whole-genome deep coverage short-read re-sequencing (IlluminaSolexa) defined the point mutations, insertions, deletions and copy-number variations arising in the lineage. Eight point mutations arise within the mutant lineage, only one of which appears on chromosome 2. This missense mutation arises contemporaneously with artemisinin resistance and maps to a gene encoding a de-ubiquitinating enzyme.Conclusions: This integrated approach facilitates the rapid identification of mutations conferring selectable phenotypes, without prior knowledge of biological and molecular mechanisms. For malaria, this model can identify candidate genes before resistant parasites are commonly observed in natural human malaria populations. 2010 Hunt et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  9. Mutation Scanning in a Single and a Stacked Genetically Modified (GM Event by Real-Time PCR and High Resolution Melting (HRM Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina-Elisabeth Ben Ali

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic mutations must be avoided during the production and use of seeds. In the European Union (EU, Directive 2001/18/EC requires any DNA construct introduced via transformation to be stable. Establishing genetic stability is critical for the approval of genetically modified organisms (GMOs. In this study, genetic stability of two GMOs was examined using high resolution melting (HRM analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR employing Scorpion primers for amplification. The genetic variability of the transgenic insert and that of the flanking regions in a single oilseed rape variety (GT73 and a stacked maize (MON88017 × MON810 was studied. The GT73 and the 5' region of MON810 showed no instabilities in the examined regions. However; two out of 100 analyzed samples carried a heterozygous point mutation in the 3' region of MON810 in the stacked variety. These results were verified by direct sequencing of the amplified PCR products as well as by sequencing of cloned PCR fragments. The occurrence of the mutation suggests that the 5' region is more suitable than the 3' region for the quantification of MON810. The identification of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in a stacked event is in contrast to the results of earlier studies of the same MON810 region in a single event where no DNA polymorphism was found.

  10. Does the globally invasive marine angiosperm, Halophila stipulacea, have high genetic diversity or unique mutations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiquillo, K.; Campese, L.; Barber, P. H.; Willette, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    Seagrasses are important primary producers in many marine ecosystems, and support a wide diversity of marine life. However, invasive seagrasses like Halophila stipulacea can have pronounced negative impacts on an ecosystem by displacing native seagrasses and changing the community composition of the reef. Endemic to the Red Sea, Persian Gulf and Indian Ocean, Halophila stipulacea has become invasive in the Mediterranean and Caribbean Seas, presumably as a result of the opening of the Suez Canal and international ship traffic. However, it is unclear why this marine angiosperm has become invasive in parts of its range and not others. It is hypothesized that invasive forms may have evolved rapidly in response to natural selection in new and novel environments. Alternatively, genetic variation of introduced populations may be uniquely suited to thrive in regions where it is invasive. In this study, we use RAD next-generation sequencing to screen thousands of SNPs to investigate the genetic basis of adaptation in both native and invasive populations. We test whether genes under selection in the native range are the same as in the invasive range, or whether new genes have arisen with the invasion of each marine basin. The comparison of SNP frequencies unique among basins and environmental variables will aid in predicting new areas of invasion, assisting in improved management strategies to combat this invasive seagrass.

  11. Clinical outcomes of EGFR-TKI treatment and genetic heterogeneity in lung adenocarcinoma patients with EGFR mutations on exons 19 and 21

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-Yong Yu; Si-Fan Yu; Shu-Hang Wang; Hua Bai; Jun Zhao; Tong-Tong An; Jian-Chun Duan; Jie Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, including a known exon 19 deletion (19 del) and exon 21 L858R point mutation (L858R mutation), are strong predictors of the response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibi‑tor (EGFR‑TKI) treatment in lung adenocarcinoma. However, whether patients carrying EGFR 19 del and L858R muta‑tions exhibit different responsiveness to EGFR‑TKIs and what are the potential mechanism for this difference remain controversial. This study aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes of EGFR‑TKI treatment in patients with EGFR 19 del and L858R mutations and explore the genetic heterogeneity of tumors with the two mutation subtypes. Methods: Of 1127 patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma harboring EGFR 19 del or L858R mutations, 532 received EGFR‑TKI treatment and were included in this study. EGFR 19 del and L858R mutations were detected by using denaturing high‑performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). T790M mutation, which is a common resistant mutation on exon 20 of EGFR, was detected by amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS). Next‑generation sequencing (NGS) was used to explore the genetic heterogeneity of tumors with EGFR 19 del and L858R mutations. Results: Of the 532 patients, 319 (60.0%) had EGFR 19 del, and 213 (40.0%) had L858R mutations. The patients with EGFR 19 del presented a significantly higher overall response rate (ORR) for EGFR‑TKI treatment (55.2% vs. 43.7%, P = 0.017) and had a longer progression‑free survival (PFS) after first‑line EGFR‑TKI treatment (14.4 vs. 11.4 months,P= 0.034) compared with those with L858R mutations. However, no statistically significant difference in overall survival (OS) was observed between the two groups of patients. T790M mutation status was analyzed in 88 patients before EGFR‑TKI treatment and 134 after EGFR‑TKI treatment, and there was no significant difference in the co‑exist‑ence of T790M mutation with EGFR 19 del and L858R mutations

  12. Genetics of dementias, Part 4: A spectrum of mutations responsible for the familial autosomal dominant form of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kowalska

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fifty years ago it was demonstrated that some patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD had an autosomal dominant Mendelian pattern of disease inheritance. Familial and early-onset cases (familial Alzheimer’s disease, FAD are rather rare and account for only a few percent of the total population of patients. Mutations of the genes for amyloid precursor protein (APP, presenilin 1 (PSEN1, and presenilin 2 (PSEN2 are responsible for development of the disease in 50 percent of patients with FAD. The identification of mutations in FAD genes leads to a better understand of the molecular basis of the cellular pathways leading to neurodegeneration. With the detection of genetic defects responsible for FAD, there is considerable interest in the application of this genetic information in medical practice through genetic testing and counseling for families with Alzheimer’s disease.

  13. Genetic and pharmacological suppression of oncogenic mutations in RAS genes of yeast and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, W.R.; Sterne, R.; Thorner, J.; Rine, J.; Kim, R.; Kim, S.H. (Lawrece Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-07-28

    The activity of an oncoprotein and the secretion of a pheromone can be affected by an unusual protein modification. Specifically, posttranslational modification of yeast-a-factor and Ras protein requires an intermediate of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. This modification is apparently essential for biological activity. Studies of yeast mutants blocked in sterol biosynthesis demonstrated that the membrane association and biological activation of the yeast Ras2 protein require mevalonate, a precursor of sterols and other isoprenes such as farnesyl pyrophosphate. Furthermore, drugs that inhibit mevalonate biosynthesis blocked the in vivo action of oncogenic derivatives of human Ras protein in the Xenopus oocyte assay. The same drugs and mutations also prevented the posttranslational processing and secretion of yeast a-factor, a peptide that is farnesylated. Thus, the mevalonate requirement for Ras activation may indicate that attachment of a mevalonate-derived (isoprenoid) moiety to Ras proteins is necessary for membrane association and biological function. These observations establish a connection between the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway and transformation by the ras oncogene and offer a novel pharmacological approach to investigating, and possibly controlling, ras-mediated malignant transformations. 50 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Fine genetic mapping of the Hyp mutation on mouse chromosome X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Lisheng; Desbarats, M.; Cornibert, S.; Malo, D.; Ecarot, B. [McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada)

    1996-03-01

    The hypophosphatemic (Hyp) mouse is the murine homolog of hypophosphatemic vitamin-D-resistant rickets (HYP) in human. Despite extensive investigations in the Hyp mouse, the pathophysiology of this X-linked dominant disorder remains unclear. As a first step toward cloning the Hyp gene, we have generated a high-resolution linkage map in the vicinity of the Hyp locus using two independent backcross panels segregating the Hyp mutation, one generated from an interspecific mating between C57BL/6J-Hyp/Hyp and Mus spretus and the other from an intrasubspecific mating between C57BL/6J-Hyp/Hyp and Mus musculus castaneus. Linkage analyses in 1101 backcross progeny using a total of 23 DNA markers favor the following gene order from the centromere: DXMit13-(DXMit11, DXMit34)-(DXMit36, Alas2)-(Hyp, DXMit80)-DXMit98-(DXMit28, DXMit33, DXMit70)-Pdhal-DXMit20. This study has localized Hyp to a region of approximately 1 cM flanked by the proximal markers DXMit36 and Alas2 and the distal marker DSMit98. One microsatellite marker, DXMit80, was found to be very tightly linked to Hyp, as it was nonrecombinant with Hyp among all the progeny of both backcrosses corresponding to 1101 meioses. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic mutations from dynamic DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard R Sinden; Vladimir N Potaman; Elena A Oussatcheva; Christopher E Pearson; Yuri L Lyubchenko; Luda S Shlyakhtenko

    2002-02-01

    Fourteen genetic neurodegenerative diseases and three fragile sites have been associated with the expansion of (CTG)n•(CAG)n, (CGG)n•(CCG)n, or (GAA)n•(TTC)n repeat tracts. Different models have been proposed for the expansion of triplet repeats, most of which presume the formation of alternative DNA structures in repeat tracts. One of the most likely structures, slipped strand DNA, may stably and reproducibly form within triplet repeat sequences. The propensity to form slipped strand DNA is proportional to the length and homogeneity of the repeat tract. The remarkable stability of slipped strand DNA may, in part, be due to loop-loop interactions facilitated by the sequence complementarity of the loops and the dynamic structure of three-way junctions formed at the loop-outs.

  16. Spectrum of genetic changes in patients with non-syndromic hearing impairment and extremely high carrier frequency of 35delG GJB2 mutation in Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilenko, Nina; Merkulava, Elena; Siniauskaya, Marina; Olejnik, Olga; Levaya-Smaliak, Anastasia; Kushniarevich, Alena; Shymkevich, Andrey; Davydenko, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    The genetic nature of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) has so far been studied for many ethnic groups in various parts of the world. The single-nucleotide guanine deletion (35delG) of the GJB2 gene coding for connexin 26 was shown to be the main genetic cause of autosomal recessive deafness among Europeans. Here we present the results of the first study of GJB2 and three mitochondrial mutations among two groups of Belarusian inhabitants: native people with normal hearing (757 persons) and 391 young patients with non-syndromic SNHL. We have found an extremely high carrier frequency of 35delG GJB2 mutation in Belarus -5.7%. This point deletion has also been detected in 53% of the patients with SNHL. The 312del14 GJB2 was the second most common mutation in the Belarus patient cohort. Mitochondrial A1555G mt-RNR1 substitution was found in two SNHL patients (0.55%) but none were found in the population cohort. No individuals carried the A7445G mutation of mitochondrial mt-TS1. G7444A as well as T961G substitutions were detected in mitochondrial mt-RNR1 at a rate of about 1% both in the patient and population cohorts. A possible reason for Belarusians having the highest mutation carrier frequency in Europe 35delG is discussed.

  17. Mutations at KCNQ1 and an unknown locus cause long QT syndrome in a large Australian family: implications for genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Kim M; Bokil, Nilesh J; Lu, Foong Teng; Low, Jiun Tsuen; Baisden, John M; Duffy, David; Radford, Dorothy J

    2010-03-01

    A large Australian family affected with long QT syndrome (LQTS) was studied. The medical characteristics of the 16 clinically affected members were consistent with LQT1. A previously identified mutation in KCNQ1 was found in 12 affected individuals and 1 unaffected infant but absent in 4 affected family members. A haplotype consisting of specific alleles for microsatellites flanking in KCNQ1 was associated with the mutation. This was absent from the four affected individuals without the mutation, who had three different haplotypes in this region, indicating that LQTS is unlikely to be segregating with KCNQ1 in these anomalous family members. A genome scan revealed 12 regions where all four of these individuals shared alleles. One region on chromosome 21 contained the KCNE1, KCNE2, KCNJ6, and KCNJ15 genes. A common variant of KCNE1 was segregating in the family but did not explain the anomalous cases. A candidate region on chromosome 7 contained the AKAP9 and KCND2 genes. A previously reported mutation in the N-terminal Yotiao region of AKAP9 was absent from the family. No evidence was found implicating any other known or suspected LQTS gene. This family shows that there remain unidentified genetic causes of LQTS which are clinically significant and highlights the difficulties associated with genetic testing in LQTS, since we cannot rule out risk in individuals who are negative for the known mutation in KCNQ1 without knowing the second disease locus.

  18. Targeted genetic dependency screen facilitates identification of actionable mutations in FGFR4, MAP3K9, and PAK5 in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawdar, Shameem; Trotter, Eleanor W; Li, Yaoyong; Stephenson, Natalie L; Hanke, Franziska; Marusiak, Anna A; Edwards, Zoe C; Ientile, Sara; Waszkowycz, Bohdan; Miller, Crispin J; Brognard, John

    2013-07-23

    Approximately 70% of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer present with late-stage disease and have limited treatment options, so there is a pressing need to develop efficacious targeted therapies for these patients. This remains a major challenge as the underlying genetic causes of ~50% of non-small-cell lung cancers remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that a targeted genetic dependency screen is an efficient approach to identify somatic cancer alterations that are functionally important. By using this approach, we have identified three kinases with gain-of-function mutations in lung cancer, namely FGFR4, MAP3K9, and PAK5. Mutations in these kinases are activating toward the ERK pathway, and targeted depletion of the mutated kinases inhibits proliferation, suppresses constitutive activation of downstream signaling pathways, and results in specific killing of the lung cancer cells. Genomic profiling of patients with lung cancer is ushering in an era of personalized medicine; however, lack of actionable mutations presents a significant hurdle. Our study indicates that targeted genetic dependency screens will be an effective strategy to elucidate somatic variants that are essential for lung cancer cell viability.

  19. Identification of two mutations that cause defects in the ligninolytic system through an efficient forward genetics in the white-rot agaricomycete Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Takehito; Izuno, Ayako; Kodera, Rina; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Masahiro; Isagi, Yuji; Honda, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    White-rot fungi play an important role in the global carbon cycle because they are the species that almost exclusively biodegrade wood lignin in nature. Lignin peroxidases (LiPs), manganese peroxidases (MnPs) and versatile peroxidases (VPs) are considered key players in the ligninolytic system. Apart from LiPs, MnPs and VPs, however, only few other factors involved in the ligninolytic system have been investigated using molecular genetics, implying the existence of unidentified elements. By combining classical genetic techniques with next-generation sequencing technology, they successfully showed an efficient forward genetics approach to identify mutations causing defects in the ligninolytic system of the white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus. In this study, they identified two genes - chd1 and wtr1 - mutations in which cause an almost complete loss of Mn(2+) -dependent peroxidase activity. The chd1 gene encodes a putative chromatin modifier, and wtr1 encodes an agaricomycete-specific protein with a putative DNA-binding domain. The chd1-1 mutation and targeted disruption of wtr1 hamper the ability of P. ostreatus to biodegrade wood lignin. Examination of the effects of the aforementioned mutation and disruption on the expression of certain MnP/VP genes suggests that a complex mechanism underlies the ligninolytic system in P. ostreatus. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Activating mutations in FGFR3 and HRAS reveal a shared genetic origin for congenital disorders and testicular tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goriely, Anne; Hansen, Ruth M S; Taylor, Indira B;

    2009-01-01

    cells that show a paternal age effect. Screening of 30 spermatocytic seminomas for oncogenic mutations in 17 genes identified 2 mutations in FGFR3 (both 1948A>G, encoding K650E, which causes thanatophoric dysplasia in the germline) and 5 mutations in HRAS. Massively parallel sequencing of sperm DNA...... showed that levels of the FGFR3 mutation increase with paternal age and that the mutation spectrum at the Lys650 codon is similar to that observed in bladder cancer. Most spermatocytic seminomas show increased immunoreactivity for FGFR3 and/or HRAS. We propose that paternal age-effect mutations activate...

  1. BRCA Genetic Screening in Middle Eastern and North African: Mutational Spectrum and Founder BRCA1 Mutation (c.798_799delTT) in North African

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelilah Laraqui; Nancy Uhrhammer; Hicham EL Rhaffouli; Yassine Sekhsokh; Idriss Lahlou-Amine; Tahar Bajjou; Farida Hilali; Jamila El Baghdadi; Abderrahmane Al Bouzidi; Youssef Bakri; Said Amzazi; Yves-Jean Bignon

    2015-01-01

    Background. The contribution of BRCA1 mutations to both hereditary and sporadic breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) has not yet been thoroughly investigated in MENA. Methods. To establish the knowledge about BRCA1 mutations and their correlation with the clinical aspect in diagnosed cases of HBOC in MENA populations. A systematic review of studies examining BRCA1 in BC women in Cyprus, Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia was conducted. Results. Thirteen relevant references were...

  2. The first family with Tay-Sachs disease in Cyprus: Genetic analysis reveals a nonsense (c.78G>A) and a silent (c.1305C>T) mutation and allows preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Theodoros; Christopoulos, George; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Hadjiloizou, Stavros; Cregeen, David; Jackson, Marie; Mavrikiou, Gavriella; Kleanthous, Marina; Drousiotou, Anthi

    2014-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in β-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) deficiency and neuronal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. We describe the first patient with Tay-Sachs disease in the Cypriot population, a juvenile case which presented with developmental regression at the age of five. The diagnosis was confirmed by measurement of HEXA activity in plasma, peripheral leucocytes and fibroblasts. Sequencing the HEXA gene resulted in the identification of two previously described mutations: the nonsense mutation c.78G>A (p.Trp26X) and the silent mutation c.1305C>T (p.=). The silent mutation was reported once before in a juvenile TSD patient of West Indian origin with an unusually mild phenotype. The presence of this mutation in another juvenile TSD patient provides further evidence that it is a disease-causing mutation. Successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and prenatal follow-up were provided to the couple.

  3. Identification and genetic analysis of sbcC mutations in commonly used recBC sbcB strains of Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, R G; Buckman, C

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented to show that Escherichia coli JC7618, JC7621, and JC7623, previously regarded as having a recB recC sbcB genotype, carry an additional mutation in a new gene designated sbcC at minute 9 on the standard genetic map. In the absence of the sbcC mutation these strains are sensitive to mitomycin C and have a reduced efficiency of recombination. Cultures of recBC sbcB (sbcC+) strains grow slowly, contain many inviable cells, and rapidly accumulate fast-growing variants due to ...

  4. The strains recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471) can be certified as non-genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Yamada, Masami; Awogi, Takumi; Hakura, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial reverse mutation test, commonly called Ames test, is used worldwide. In Japan, the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are regulated under the Cartagena Domestic Law, and organisms obtained by self-cloning and/or natural occurrence would be exempted from the law case by case. The strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471), have been considered as non-GMOs because they can be constructed by self-cloning or naturally occurring bacterial strains, or do not disturb the biological diversity. The present article explains the reasons why these tester strains should be classified as non-GMOs.

  5. Mutation rates among RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, John W.; Holland, John J.

    1999-01-01

    The rate of spontaneous mutation is a key parameter in modeling the genetic structure and evolution of populations. The impact of the accumulated load of mutations and the consequences of increasing the mutation rate are important in assessing the genetic health of populations. Mutation frequencies are among the more directly measurable population parameters, although the information needed to convert them into mutation rates is often lacking. A previous analysis of mutation rates in RNA viru...

  6. Somatic mosaicism for a SLC2A1 mutation: implications for genetic counseling for GLUT1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Matsufuji, M; Yonee, C; Tsuru, H; Sano, N; Oguni, H

    2017-06-01

    A heterozygous SLC2A1 mutation in the severely affected child was inherited from his less severely affected mother who was mosaic for the mutation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Incidence and mutation rates of Huntington's disease in Spain: experience of 9 years of direct genetic testing

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Arroyo, M; Moreno, S.; Valiente, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Prior to the discovery of the Huntington's disease (HD) mutation, the prevalence, incidence, and new mutation rates for this disease were based on the presence of progressive choreic movements and a positive family history.

  8. Relationship between genetic mutation variations and acute-phase reactants in the attack-free period of children diagnosed with familial Mediterranean fever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosan, C. [Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Cayir, A.; Turan, M.I. [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2013-09-18

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a periodic autoinflammatory disease characterized by chronic inflammation. This study investigated the relationship between acute-phase reactants and gene mutations in attack-free periods of childhood FMF. Patients diagnosed with FMF were divided into four groups based on genetic features: no mutation, homozygous, heterozygous, and compound heterozygous. These groups were monitored for 2 years, and blood samples were collected every 6 months during attack-free periods. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and white blood cell count were measured. A disease severity score was determined for each patient. Mean values for erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fibrinogen were significantly different in the homozygous group. White blood cell count and C-reactive protein were similar between the groups. Disease severity score was higher in patients with the M694V mutation than in individuals without the mutation, as well as in those with other mutation groups. Periodic follow-up of patients with FMF MEFV mutations in subjects with acute-phase reactants may be useful in the prevention of morbidity.

  9. Relationship between genetic mutation variations and acute-phase reactants in the attack-free period of children diagnosed with familial Mediterranean fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosan, C.; Cayir, A.; Turan, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a periodic autoinflammatory disease characterized by chronic inflammation. This study investigated the relationship between acute-phase reactants and gene mutations in attack-free periods of childhood FMF. Patients diagnosed with FMF were divided into four groups based on genetic features: no mutation, homozygous, heterozygous, and compound heterozygous. These groups were monitored for 2 years, and blood samples were collected every 6 months during attack-free periods. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and white blood cell count were measured. A disease severity score was determined for each patient. Mean values for erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fibrinogen were significantly different in the homozygous group. White blood cell count and C-reactive protein were similar between the groups. Disease severity score was higher in patients with the M694V mutation than in individuals without the mutation, as well as in those with other mutation groups. Periodic follow-up of patients with FMF MEFV mutations in subjects with acute-phase reactants may be useful in the prevention of morbidity. PMID:24141617

  10. Relationship between genetic mutation variations and acute-phase reactants in the attack-free period of children diagnosed with familial Mediterranean fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kosan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is a periodic autoinflammatory disease characterized by chronic inflammation. This study investigated the relationship between acute-phase reactants and gene mutations in attack-free periods of childhood FMF. Patients diagnosed with FMF were divided into four groups based on genetic features: no mutation, homozygous, heterozygous, and compound heterozygous. These groups were monitored for 2 years, and blood samples were collected every 6 months during attack-free periods. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and white blood cell count were measured. A disease severity score was determined for each patient. Mean values for erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fibrinogen were significantly different in the homozygous group. White blood cell count and C-reactive protein were similar between the groups. Disease severity score was higher in patients with the M694V mutation than in individuals without the mutation, as well as in those with other mutation groups. Periodic follow-up of patients with FMF MEFV mutations in subjects with acute-phase reactants may be useful in the prevention of morbidity.

  11. UNUSUAL SPECTRUM OF GENETIC PATHOLOGIES AND NOVEL MUTATIONS IN PWS AND AS PATIENTS DETECTED BY A WIDE CLUSTER OF METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Kotysova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes are clinically distinct neurodevelopmental genetic disorders that map to 15q11.2-q13 locus. The common phenotypes are attributable to loss of expression of parentally specific imprinted genes inside this region, where the gene function is dependent on parental origin. Initial diagnosis was proved for the years by methylation pattern analyses of the SNRPN exon 1/promoter region within the PWS/AS critical domain. Apart from unifying methylation-specific PCR and allele specific real-time PCR with melt-curve analysis as the fundamental methods for suspected diagnosis confirmation, we combined several specifically methods used to clarify the molecular cause. In our study we had identified and genotyped 24 PWS and AS patients from 450 suspected. Applied cluster of methods-microsatellite analysis of SNPs within the chromosome 15, Methylation-specific Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MS-MLPA and UBE3A gene sequence analysis, enable us to determined atypical deletion that does not include common breakpoints, novel highly likely to be pathologic UBE3A mutation, uniparental heterodisomy together with partial isodisomy and epimutation without any deletions in the imprinting centre. We present genotype-phenotype correlation of all positive cases. In addition, we estimate the incidence for Slovakian population at 1 in 20,000 for PWS and 1 in 40,000 for AS.

  12. Crossover versus Mutation: A Comparative Analysis of the Evolutionary Strategy of Genetic Algorithms Applied to Combinatorial Optimization Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Osaba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their first formulation, genetic algorithms (GAs have been one of the most widely used techniques to solve combinatorial optimization problems. The basic structure of the GAs is known by the scientific community, and thanks to their easy application and good performance, GAs are the focus of a lot of research works annually. Although throughout history there have been many studies analyzing various concepts of GAs, in the literature there are few studies that analyze objectively the influence of using blind crossover operators for combinatorial optimization problems. For this reason, in this paper a deep study on the influence of using them is conducted. The study is based on a comparison of nine techniques applied to four well-known combinatorial optimization problems. Six of the techniques are GAs with different configurations, and the remaining three are evolutionary algorithms that focus exclusively on the mutation process. Finally, to perform a reliable comparison of these results, a statistical study of them is made, performing the normal distribution z-test.

  13. Crossover versus mutation: a comparative analysis of the evolutionary strategy of genetic algorithms applied to combinatorial optimization problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaba, E; Carballedo, R; Diaz, F; Onieva, E; de la Iglesia, I; Perallos, A

    2014-01-01

    Since their first formulation, genetic algorithms (GAs) have been one of the most widely used techniques to solve combinatorial optimization problems. The basic structure of the GAs is known by the scientific community, and thanks to their easy application and good performance, GAs are the focus of a lot of research works annually. Although throughout history there have been many studies analyzing various concepts of GAs, in the literature there are few studies that analyze objectively the influence of using blind crossover operators for combinatorial optimization problems. For this reason, in this paper a deep study on the influence of using them is conducted. The study is based on a comparison of nine techniques applied to four well-known combinatorial optimization problems. Six of the techniques are GAs with different configurations, and the remaining three are evolutionary algorithms that focus exclusively on the mutation process. Finally, to perform a reliable comparison of these results, a statistical study of them is made, performing the normal distribution z-test.

  14. Crossover versus Mutation: A Comparative Analysis of the Evolutionary Strategy of Genetic Algorithms Applied to Combinatorial Optimization Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaba, E.; Carballedo, R.; Diaz, F.; Onieva, E.; de la Iglesia, I.; Perallos, A.

    2014-01-01

    Since their first formulation, genetic algorithms (GAs) have been one of the most widely used techniques to solve combinatorial optimization problems. The basic structure of the GAs is known by the scientific community, and thanks to their easy application and good performance, GAs are the focus of a lot of research works annually. Although throughout history there have been many studies analyzing various concepts of GAs, in the literature there are few studies that analyze objectively the influence of using blind crossover operators for combinatorial optimization problems. For this reason, in this paper a deep study on the influence of using them is conducted. The study is based on a comparison of nine techniques applied to four well-known combinatorial optimization problems. Six of the techniques are GAs with different configurations, and the remaining three are evolutionary algorithms that focus exclusively on the mutation process. Finally, to perform a reliable comparison of these results, a statistical study of them is made, performing the normal distribution z-test. PMID:25165731

  15. Prevalence of BRCA1 mutations among 403 women with triple-negative breast cancer: implications for genetic screening selection criteria: a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostira, Florentia; Tsitlaidou, Marianthi; Papadimitriou, Christos; Pertesi, Maroulio; Timotheadou, Eleni; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Glentis, Stavros; Bournakis, Evangelos; Bobos, Mattheos; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Papakostas, Pavlos; Pentheroudakis, George; Gogas, Helen; Skarlos, Pantelis; Samantas, Epaminontas; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Kosmidis, Paris A; Koutras, Angelos; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fountzilas, George

    2012-07-01

    In spite the close association of the triple-negative breast cancer immunophenotype with hereditary breast cancers and the BRCA1 pathway, there is a lack of population studies that determine the frequency of BRCA1 mutations among triple-negative breast cancer patients. To address this, we have screened a large sample of 403 women diagnosed with triple-negative invasive breast cancer, independently of their age or family history, for germline BRCA1 mutations. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 20-83). The overall prevalence of triple-negative cases among the initial patient group with invasive breast cancer was 8%. BRCA1 was screened by direct DNA sequencing in all patients, including all exons where a mutation was previously found in the Greek population (exons 5, 11, 12, 16, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24-77% of the BRCA1 coding region), including diagnostic PCRs to detect the three Greek founder large genomic rearrangements. Sixty-five deleterious BRCA1 mutations were identified among the 403 triple-negative breast cancer patients (16%). Median age of onset for mutation carriers was 39 years. Among a total of 106 women with early-onset triple-negative breast cancer (<40 years), 38 (36%) had a BRCA1 mutation, while 27% of women with triple-negative breast cancer diagnosed before 50 years (56/208) had a BRCA1 mutation. A mutation was found in 48% (50/105) of the triple-negative breast cancer patients with family history of breast or ovarian cancer. It is noteworthy, however, that of the 65 carriers, 15 (23%) had no reported family history of related cancers. All but one of the carriers had grade III tumors (98%). These results indicate that women with early-onset triple-negative breast cancer, and ideally all triple-negative breast cancer patients, are candidates for BRCA1 genetic testing even in the absence of a family history of breast or ovarian cancer.

  16. Direct Measurements of Human Colon Crypt Stem Cell Niche Genetic Fidelity: The Role of Chance in Non-Darwinian Mutation Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haeyoun eKang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Perfect human stem cell genetic fidelity would prevent aging and cancer. However, perfection would be difficult to achieve, and aging is universal and cancers common. A hypothesis is that because mutations are inevitable over a human lifetime, downstream mechanisms have evolved to manage the deleterious effects of beneficial and lethal mutations. In the colon, a crypt stem cell architecture reduces the number of mitotic cells at risk for mutation accumulation, and multiple niche stem cells ensure that a lethal mutation within any single stem cell does not lead to crypt death. In addition, the architecture of the colon crypt stem cell niche may harness probability or chance to randomly discard many beneficial mutations that might lead to cancer. An analysis of somatic chromosome copy number alterations (CNAs reveals a lack of perfect fidelity in individual normal human crypts, with age-related increases and higher frequencies in ulcerative colitis, a proliferative, inflammatory disease. The age-related increase in somatic CNAs appears consistent with relatively normal replication error and cell division rates. Surprisingly, and similar to point mutations in cancer genomes, the types of crypt mutations were more consistent with random fixation rather than selection. In theory, a simple non-Darwinian way to nullify selection is to reduce the size of the reproducing population. Fates are more determined by chance rather than selection in very small populations, and therefore selection may be minimized within small crypt niches. The desired effect is that many beneficial mutations that might lead to cancer are randomly lost by drift rather than fixed by selection. The subdivision of the colon into multiple very small stem cell niches may trade Darwinian evolution for non-Darwinian somatic cell evolution, capitulating to aging but reducing cancer risks.

  17. Development of Genetic Testing for Fragile X Syndrome and Associated Disorders, and Estimates of the Prevalence of FMR1 Expansion Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N. Macpherson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of a trinucleotide (CGG expansion as the chief mechanism of mutation in Fragile X syndrome in 1991 heralded a new chapter in molecular diagnostic genetics and generated a new perspective on mutational mechanisms in human genetic disease, which rapidly became a central paradigm (“dynamic mutation” as more and more of the common hereditary neurodevelopmental disorders were ascribed to this novel class of mutation. The progressive expansion of a CGG repeat in the FMR1 gene from “premutation” to “full mutation” provided an explanation for the “Sherman paradox,” just as similar expansion mechanisms in other genes explained the phenomenon of “anticipation” in their pathogenesis. Later, FMR1 premutations were unexpectedly found associated with two other distinct phenotypes: primary ovarian insufficiency and tremor-ataxia syndrome. This review will provide a historical perspective on procedures for testing and reporting of Fragile X syndrome and associated disorders, and the population genetics of FMR1 expansions, including estimates of prevalence and the influence of AGG interspersions on the rate and probability of expansion.

  18. Breast cancer in women at high risk: the role of rapid genetic testing for BRCA1 and -2 mutations and the consequences for treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francken, Anne Brecht; Schouten, Philip C; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Linn, Sabine C; Rutgers, Emiel J Th

    2013-10-01

    Specific clinical questions rise when patients, who are diagnosed with breast cancer, are at risk of carrying a mutation in BRCA1 and -2 gene due to a strong family history or young age at diagnosis. These questions concern topics such as 1. Timing of genetic counseling and testing, 2. Choices to be made for BRCA1 or -2 mutation carriers in local treatment, contralateral treatment, (neo)adjuvant systemic therapy, and 3. The psychological effects of rapid testing. The knowledge of the genetic status might have several advantages for the patient in treatment planning, such as the choice whether or not to undergo mastectomy and/or prophylactic contralateral mastectomy. The increased risk of developing a second breast cancer in the ipsilateral breast in mutation carriers, is only slightly higher after primary cancer treatment, than in the general population. Prophylactic contralateral mastectomy provides a substantial reduction of contralateral breast cancer, although only a small breast cancer specific survival benefit. Patients should be enrolled in clinical trials to investigate (neo)-adjuvant drug regimens, that based on preclinical and early clinical evidence might be targeting the homologous recombination defect, such as platinum compounds and PARP inhibitors. If rapid testing is performed, the patient can make a well-balanced decision. Although rapid genetic counseling and testing might cause some distress, most women reported this approach to be worthwhile. In this review the literature regarding these topics is evaluated. Answers and suggestions, useful in clinical practice are discussed.

  19. Ovarian cancer patients at high risk of BRCA mutation: the constitutional genetic characterization does not change prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Renaud; Lavit, Elise; Moretta, Jessica; Lambaudie, Eric; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Cherau, Elisabeth; Provansal, Magali; Livon, Doriane; Rabayrol, Laetitia; Popovici, Cornel; Charaffe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Sobol, Hagay; Viens, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Ovarian neoplasms secondary to germline BRCA mutations had been described to have a more favourable survival. There is only few data concerning the prognosis of non mutated patients presenting clinical features evocative of BRCA alterations. We retrospectively collected data from patients treated in our institution for an invasive ovarian carcinoma between 1995 and 2011. Patients considered at high risk of BRCA mutation were tested for BRCA1/2 germline mutations. We described clinical, pathological and therapeutic features and compared prognosis of BRCA mutation carriers and non-mutated patients. Out of 617 ovarian cancer patients, we identified 104 patients who were considered at high risk of mutation. The 33 mutated patients were more likely to present a personal (33 vs. 10 %, p = 0.003) or a family (42 vs. 24 %, p = 0.06) history of breast/ovarian cancers. BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and wild type patients displayed similar prognosis: median progression-free survival (PFS) of 20.9 versus 37.7 months (p = 0.21); median overall survival (OS) of 151.2 versus 122.5 months (p = 0.52). Personal history of breast cancer increased both PFS [HR = 0.45 (95CI 0.25-0.81)] and OS [HR = 0.35 (95CI 0.16-0.75)]. In multivariate analysis, this parameter was an independent prognostic feature, whereas the identification of a BRCA1/2 mutation was not. In our cohort, all patients at high risk of BRCA mutation share a similar prognosis, whatever is their germline mutation status. Prognosis seems to be more influenced by clinical history than by germline mutations identification. If it is confirmed in larger and independent series, this result suggests that the hypothesis of other BRCA pathway alterations (BRCAness phenotype) deserves to be deeply explored.

  20. Combination of genetic screening and molecular dynamics as a useful tool for identification of disease-related mutations: ZASP PDZ domain G54S mutation case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratev, Filip; Mihaylova, Elina; Pajeva, Ilza

    2014-05-27

    Cypher/ZASP (LDB3 gene) is known to interact with a network of proteins. It binds to α-actinin and the calcium voltage channels (LTCC) via its PDZ domain. Here we report the identification of a highly conserved ZASP G54S mutation classified as a variant of unknown significance in a sample of an adult with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The initial bioinformatics calculations strongly evaluated G54S as damaging. Furthermore, we employed accelerated and classical molecular dynamics and free energy calculations to study the structural impact of this mutation on the ZASP apo form and to address the question of whether it can be linked to HCM. Seventeen independent MD runs and simulations of 2.5 μs total were performed and showed that G54S perturbs the α2 helix position via destabilization of the adjacent loop linked to the β5 sheet. This also leads to the formation of a strong H-bond between peptide target residues Leu17 and Gln66, thus restricting both the α-actinin2 and LTCC C-terminal peptides to access their natural binding site and reducing in this way their binding capacity. On the basis of these observations and the adult's clinical data, we propose that ZASP(G54S) and presumably other ZASP PDZ domain mutations can cause HCM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported ZASP PDZ domain mutation that might be linked to HCM. The integrated workflow used in this study can be applied for the identification and description of other mutations that might be related to particular diseases.

  1. Reverse genetic screen for loss-of-function mutations uncovers a frameshifting deletion in the melanophilin gene accountable for a distinctive coat color in Belgian Blue cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanbo; Sartelet, Arnaud; Tamma, Nico; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Charlier, Carole

    2016-02-01

    In the course of a reverse genetic screen in the Belgian Blue cattle breed, we uncovered a 10-bp deletion (c.87_96del) in the first coding exon of the melanophilin gene (MLPH), which introduces a premature stop codon (p.Glu32Aspfs*1) in the same exon, truncating 94% of the protein. Recessive damaging mutations in the MLPH gene are well known to cause skin, hair, coat or plumage color dilution phenotypes in numerous species, including human, mice, dog, cat, mink, rabbit, chicken and quail. Large-scale array genotyping undertaken to identify p.Glu32Aspfs*1 homozygous mutant animals revealed a mutation frequency of 5% in the breed and allowed for the identification of 10 homozygous mutants. As expression of a colored coat requires at least one wild-type allele at the co-dominant Roan locus encoded by the KIT ligand gene (KITLG), homozygous mutants for p.Ala227Asp corresponding with the missense mutation were excluded. The six remaining colored calves displayed a distinctive dilution phenotype as anticipated. This new coat color was named 'cool gray'. It is the first damaging mutation in the MLPH gene described in cattle and extends the already long list of species with diluted color due to recessive mutations in MLPH and broadens the color palette of gray in this breed.

  2. A genetic study of Factor V Leiden (G1691A) mutation in young ischemic strokes with large vessel disease in a South Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadure, Ravi; Christopher, Rita; Nagaraja, Dindagur; Narayanan, Coimbatore

    2017-10-01

    Factor V Leiden (FVL) has been, by far, the most investigated gene mutation, with 26 studies to date, on its role in arterial strokes. Overall, a meta-analysis of all these studies taken together showed that carriers of the Factor V Leiden allele were 1.33times more likely to develop arterial strokes when compared to controls. We subjected a highly select subset of young strokes, with large vessel infarcts, to genetic analysis for FVL mutation and compared them with matched healthy controls to look for a statistically significant association. In this prospective study, 6/120 cases (5%) and 2/120 controls (1.6%) were positive for heterozygous FVL (G1691A) mutation. The higher prevalence of FVL mutation in cases (5%) compared to controls (1.6%) did not show statistical significance with a Pearson's Chi square P value of 0.15. The Odds Ratio (OR) for risk of large vessel disease in FVL positive cases was 3.10 (95% CI of 0.61-15.7). FVL mutation (G1691A) in young Indian subjects with ischemic strokes does not seem to be significantly associated with large vessel disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic evolution of low pathogenecity H9N2 Avian influenza viruses in Tunisia: acquisition of new mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tombari Wafa

    2011-10-01

    and (V, that haven't been previously reported, were identified in the polymerase and matrix proteins, respectively. Nucleoprotein and non-structural protein carried some substitutions similar to H5N1 strains. Conclusion Considering these new mutations, the molecular basis of tropism, host responses and enhanced virulence will be defined and studied. Otherwise, Continuous monitoring of viral genetic changes throughout the year is warranted to monitor variations of Influenza viruses in the field.

  4. Genetic diversity of hepatitis B virus and mutations associated to hepatocellular carcinoma in patients from Venezuela, with different stages of liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puche, Mary L; Kay-Valero, Sharon; Michelli, Pedro; Oropeza, Maria D; Loureiro, Carmen L; Devesa, Marisol; Dagher, Lucy; Pujol, Flor H

    2016-03-01

    Globally, about 50% of liver cancer originates as a result of long term infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), and some genotypes and mutations have been associated with an increased severity of infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity of HBV in patients from Venezuela, with chronic infection, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to compare the occurrence of mutations in all patient groups. Samples from patients with different pathologies of the liver, associated with HBV infection, were collected. The HBV S region was analyzed for genotype determination and, when available, the whole genome sequence was examined for mutations analysis. Genotype F was the most common genotype (87%). While the HBV subgenotype F3 was the most frequent genotype in the whole group of samples (44%), the subgenotype F2 predominated in HCC patients (56%). Mutations were more common in HCC and cirrhosis cases (p=0.01). The A1762T mutation was significantly associated with the advanced stage of liver disease (p=0.008). Additionally, mutations were more common in early stages of liver disease in HBV subgenotype F2-infected patients, and a significant association between this subgenotype and the emergence of T 1753C, A1762T, A1762T/G1764A (p=0.04) and C1773T (p=0.001) mutations in chronic patients was found, when compared to the HBV subgenotype F3. By comparing F2 with all other HBV subgenotypes, a positive association for the three basal core promoter (BCP) mutants (A1762T, A1762T/G1764A p=0.01, G1764A p=0.04) was found. These results suggest that the HBV subgenotype F2 might be associated to more severe forms of liver disease in comparison with the HBV subgenotype F3.

  5. Effects of genetic mutations and chemical exposures on Caenorhabditis elegans feeding: evaluation of a novel, high-throughput screening assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windy A Boyd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Government agencies have defined a need to reduce, refine or replace current mammalian-based bioassays with testing methods that use alternative species. Invertebrate species, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, provide an attractive option because of their short life cycles, inexpensive maintenance, and high degree of evolutionary conservation with higher eukaryotes. The C. elegans pharynx is a favorable model for studying neuromuscular function, and the effects of chemicals on neuromuscular activity, i.e., feeding. Current feeding methodologies, however, are labor intensive and only semi-quantitative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here a high-throughput assay is described that uses flow cytometry to measure C. elegans feeding by determining the size and intestinal fluorescence of hundreds of nematodes after exposure to fluorescent-labeled microspheres. This assay was validated by quantifying fluorescence in feeding-defective C. elegans (eat mutants, and by exposing wild-type nematodes to the neuroactive compounds, serotonin and arecoline. The eat mutations previously determined to cause slow pumping rates exhibited the lowest feeding levels with our assay. Concentration-dependent increases in feeding levels after serotonin exposures were dependent on food availability, while feeding levels decreased in arecoline-exposed nematodes regardless of the presence of food. The effects of the environmental contaminants, cadmium chloride and chlorpyrifos, on wild-type C. elegans feeding were then used to demonstrate an application of the feeding assay. Cadmium exposures above 200 microM led to a sharp drop in feeding levels. Feeding of chlorpyrifos-exposed nematodes decreased in a concentration-dependent fashion with an EC(50 of 2 microM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The C. elegans fluorescence microsphere feeding assay is a rapid, reliable method for the assessment of neurotoxic effects of pharmaceutical drugs, industrial chemicals or

  6. Mutations in NFKB2 and potential genetic heterogeneity in patients with DAVID syndrome, having variable endocrine and immune deficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    Brue, Thierry; Quentien, Marie-Hélène; Khetchoumian, Konstantin; Bensa, Marco; Capo-Chichi, José-Mario; Delemer, Brigitte; Balsalobre, Aurelio; Nassif, Christina; Papadimitriou, Dimitris T; Pagnier, Anne; Hasselmann, Caroline; Patry, Lysanne; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Souchon, Pierre-François; Takayasu, Shinobu

    2014-01-01

    Background DAVID syndrome is a rare condition combining anterior pituitary hormone deficiency with common variable immunodeficiency. NFKB2 mutations have recently been identified in patients with ACTH and variable immunodeficiency. A similar mutation was previously found in Nfkb2 in the immunodeficient Lym1 mouse strain, but the effect of the mutation on endocrine function was not evaluated. Methods We ascertained six unrelated DAVID syndrome families. We performed whole exome and traditional...

  7. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  8. Ionizing radiation and genetic risks. Part VIII. The concept of mutation component and its use in risk estimation for multifactorial diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denniston, C. [Laboratory of Genetics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison (United States); Chakraborty, R. [Human Genetics Center, University of Texas School of Public Health, P.O. Box 20334, Houston, TX (United States); Sankaranarayanan, K. [Department of Radiation Genetics and Chemical Mutagenesis, Sylvius Laboratories, Leiden University Medical Centre, Wassenaarseweg 72, 2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands)

    1998-08-31

    Multifactorial diseases, which include the common congenital abnormalities (incidence: 6%) and chronic diseases with onset predominantly in adults (population prevalence: 65%), contribute substantially to human morbidity and mortality. Their transmission patterns do not conform to Mendelian expectations. The model most frequently used to explain their inheritance and to estimate risks to relatives is a Multifactorial Threshold Model (MTM) of disease liability. The MTM assumes that: (1) the disease is due to the joint action of a large number of genetic and environmental factors, each of which contributing a small amount of liability, (2) the distribution of liability in the population is Gaussian and (3) individuals whose liability exceeds a certain threshold value are affected by the disease. For most of these diseases, the number of genes involved or the environmental factors are not fully known. In the context of radiation exposures of the population, the question of the extent to which induced mutations will cause an increase in the frequencies of these diseases has remained unanswered. In this paper, we address this problem by using a modified version of MTM which incorporates mutation and selection as two additional parameters. The model assumes a finite number of gene loci and threshold of liability (hence, the designation, Finite-Locus Threshold Model or FLTM). The FLTM permits one to examine the relationship between broad-sense heritability of disease liability and mutation component (MC), the responsiveness of the disease to a change in mutation rate. Through the use of a computer program (in which mutation rate, selection, threshold, recombination rate and environmental variance are input parameters and MC and heritability of liability are output estimates), we studied the MC-heritability relationship for (1) a permanent increase in mutation rate (e.g., when the population sustains radiation exposure in every generation) and (2) a one-time increase in

  9. Genetic and Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Gene Silencing Are Distinct Molecular Phenotypes Driven by Growth Promoting Mutations in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen J. Marsit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Both genetic and epigenetic alterations characterize human nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, but the biological processes that create or select these alterations remain incompletely investigated. Our hypothesis posits that a roughly reciprocal relationship between the propensity for promoter hypermethylation and a propensity for genetic deletion leads to distinct molecular phenotypes of lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we examined promoter hypermethylation of 17 tumor suppressor genes, as a marker of epigenetic alteration propensity, and deletion events at the 3p21 region, as a marker of genetic alteration. To model the complex biology between these somatic alterations, we utilized an item response theory model. We demonstrated that tumors exhibiting LOH at greater than 30% of informative alleles in the 3p21 region have a significantly reduced propensity for hypermethylation. At the same time, tumors with activating KRAS mutations showed a significantly increased propensity for hypermethylation of the loci examined, a result similar to what has been observed in colon cancer. These data suggest that NSCLCs have distinct epigenetic or genetic alteration phenotypes acting upon tumor suppressor genes and that mutation of oncogenic growth promoting genes, such as KRAS, is associated with the epigenetic phenotype.

  10. Genetic selection for context-dependent stochastic phenotypes: Sp1 and TATA mutations increase phenotypic noise in HIV-1 gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Miller-Jensen

    Full Text Available The sequence of a promoter within a genome does not uniquely determine gene expression levels and their variability; rather, promoter sequence can additionally interact with its location in the genome, or genomic context, to shape eukaryotic gene expression. Retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV, integrate their genomes into those of their host and thereby provide a biomedically-relevant model system to quantitatively explore the relationship between promoter sequence, genomic context, and noise-driven variability on viral gene expression. Using an in vitro model of the HIV Tat-mediated positive-feedback loop, we previously demonstrated that fluctuations in viral Tat-transactivating protein levels generate integration-site-dependent, stochastically-driven phenotypes, in which infected cells randomly 'switch' between high and low expressing states in a manner that may be related to viral latency. Here we extended this model and designed a forward genetic screen to systematically identify genetic elements in the HIV LTR promoter that modulate the fraction of genomic integrations that specify 'Switching' phenotypes. Our screen identified mutations in core promoter regions, including Sp1 and TATA transcription factor binding sites, which increased the Switching fraction several fold. By integrating single-cell experiments with computational modeling, we further investigated the mechanism of Switching-fraction enhancement for a selected Sp1 mutation. Our experimental observations demonstrated that the Sp1 mutation both impaired Tat-transactivated expression and also altered basal expression in the absence of Tat. Computational analysis demonstrated that the observed change in basal expression could contribute significantly to the observed increase in viral integrations that specify a Switching phenotype, provided that the selected mutation affected Tat-mediated noise amplification differentially across genomic contexts. Our study

  11. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Ramus (Susan); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); S.A. Gayther (Simon); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); J. Beesley (Jonathan); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Roversi (Gaia); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); A. Allavena (Anna); L. Ottini (Laura); L. Papi (Laura); V. Gismondi (Viviana); F. Capra (Fabio); P. Radice (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.A. Kruse (Torben); D. Cruger (Dorthe); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); H. Olsson (Hkan); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); P. Karlsson (Per); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); Å. Borg (Åke); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); B. Górski (Bohdan); C. Cybulski (Cezary); T. Dbniak (Tadeusz); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Durán (Mercedes); M.-I. Tejada; J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); M.A. Rookus (Matti); S. Verhoef; M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); D. Bodmer (Danielle); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); M.J. Blok (Marinus); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D.G. Evans (Gareth); R. Eeles (Rosalind); G. Pichert (Gabriella); T.J. Cole (Trevor); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); C. Brewer (Carole); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); L. Side (Lucy); A. Donaldson (Alan); H. Gregory (Helen); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); L. Castera (Laurent); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); V. Bonadona (Valérie); D. Leroux (Dominique); L. Faivre (Laurence); R. Lidereau (Rosette); C. Nogues (Catherine); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); F. Prieur (Fabienne); M.-A. Collonge-Rame; L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); S. Fert-Ferrer (Sandra); A. Miron (Alexander); S.S. Buys (Saundra); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); E.M. John (Esther); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); D. Goldgar (David); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); K. Offit (Kenneth); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); J. Vijai (Joseph); A. Dutra-Clarke (Ana); J.A. Przybylo (Jennifer); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Casella (Cinzia); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); M.S. Beattie (Mary); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); B. Fiebig (Britta); C. Sutter (Christian); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Deissler (Helmut); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); K. Kast (Karin); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); H. Holland (Helene); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); C.J. van Asperen (Christi)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer suscep

  12. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-w...

  13. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility....

  14. Genetic Variation at 9p22.2 and Ovarian Cancer Risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Gorski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Debniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Asperen, Christi J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valerie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnes; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jonson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V. C.; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A

  15. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Ramus (Susan); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); S.A. Gayther (Simon); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); J. Beesley (Jonathan); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Roversi (Gaia); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); A. Allavena (Anna); L. Ottini (Laura); L. Papi (Laura); V. Gismondi (Viviana); F. Capra (Fabio); P. Radice (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.A. Kruse (Torben); D. Cruger (Dorthe); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); H. Olsson (Hkan); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); P. Karlsson (Per); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); Å. Borg (Åke); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); B. Górski (Bohdan); C. Cybulski (Cezary); T. Dbniak (Tadeusz); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Durán (Mercedes); M.-I. Tejada; J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); M.A. Rookus (Matti); S. Verhoef; M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); D. Bodmer (Danielle); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); M.J. Blok (Marinus); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D.G. Evans (Gareth); R. Eeles (Rosalind); G. Pichert (Gabriella); T.J. Cole (Trevor); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); C. Brewer (Carole); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); L. Side (Lucy); A. Donaldson (Alan); H. Gregory (Helen); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); L. Castera (Laurent); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); V. Bonadona (Valérie); D. Leroux (Dominique); L. Faivre (Laurence); R. Lidereau (Rosette); C. Nogues (Catherine); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); F. Prieur (Fabienne); M.-A. Collonge-Rame; L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); S. Fert-Ferrer (Sandra); A. Miron (Alexander); S.S. Buys (Saundra); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); E.M. John (Esther); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); D. Goldgar (David); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); K. Offit (Kenneth); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); J. Vijai (Joseph); A. Dutra-Clarke (Ana); J.A. Przybylo (Jennifer); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Casella (Cinzia); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); M.S. Beattie (Mary); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); B. Fiebig (Britta); C. Sutter (Christian); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Deissler (Helmut); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); K. Kast (Karin); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); H. Holland (Helene); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); C.J. van Asperen (Christi)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer

  16. Genetic Inhibition of the Ubiquitin Ligase Rnf5 Attenuates Phenotypes Associated to F508del Cystic Fibrosis Mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Tomati (Valeria); E. Sondo (Elvira); A. Armirotti (Andrea); E. Caci (Emanuela); E. Pesce (Emanuela); M. Marini (Monica); A. Gianotti (Ambra); Y. Ju Jeon (Young); M. Cilli (Michele); A. Pistorio (Angela); L. Mastracci (Luca); R. Ravazzolo (Roberto); B.J. Scholte (Bob); Z. Ronai (Ze'ev); L.J.V. Galietta (Luis J. V.); N. Pedemonte (Nicoletta)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CFTR chloride channel. Deletion of phenylalanine 508 (F508del), the most frequent CF mutation, impairs CFTR trafficking and gating. F508del-CFTR mistrafficking may be corrected by acting directly on mutant CFTR itself or by modulating ex

  17. Genetic Variation at 9p22.2 and Ovarian Cancer Risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Gorski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Debniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Asperen, Christi J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valerie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnes; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jonson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V. C.; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A

  18. Integrated genetic and epigenetic analysis of bladder cancer reveals an additive diagnostic value of FGFR3 mutations and hypermethylation events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, Reza R; Ralfkiaer, Ulrik; Steven, Kenneth;

    2011-01-01

    screened FGFR3, PIK3CA, TP53, HRAS, NRAS and KRAS for mutations and quantitatively assessed the methylation status of APC, ARF, DBC1, INK4A, RARB, RASSF1A, SFRP1, SFRP2, SFRP4, SFRP5 and WIF1 in a prospective series of tumor biopsies (N = 105) and urine samples (N = 113) from 118 bladder tumor patients. We...... sensitivities of 72% and 70%, respectively. In urine samples, the sensitivity was 70% for all markers, 50% for mutation markers and 52% for methylation markers. FGFR3 mutations occurred more frequently in tumors with no methylation events than in tumors with one or more methylation events (78% vs. 33%; p ....0001). FGFR3 mutation in combination with three methylation markers (APC, RASSF1A and SFRP2) provided a sensitivity of 90% in tumors and 62% in urine with 100% specificity. These results suggest an inverse correlation between FGFR3 mutations and hypermethylation events, which may be used to improve...

  19. Genetic Mutation of Vitamin K-dependent Gamma-glutamyl Car-boxylase Domain in Patients with Calcium Oxalate Urolithiasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiankun QIAO; Tao WANG; Jun YANG; Jihong LIU; Xiaoxin GONG; Xiaolin GUO; Shaogang WANG; Zhangqun YE

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the exon mutation of vitamin K-dependent gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX or VKDC) in patients with calcium oxalate urolithasis, renal cortex and peripheral blood sam-ples were obtained from severe hydronephrosis patients (with or without calculi), and renal tumor pa-tients undergoing nephrectomy. GGCX mutations in all 15 exons were examined in 44 patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis (COU) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denatured high pressure liquid chromatography (DHPLC), and confirmed by sequencing. Mutation was not found in all COU samples compared to the controls. These data demonstrated that functional GGCX mutations in all 15 exons do not occur in most COU patients. It was suggested that there may be no significant association between the low activity and mutation of GGCX in COU.

  20. Hierarchical clustering of genetic diversity associated to different levels of mutation and recombination in Escherichia coli: a study based on Mexican isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-González, Andrea; Sánchez-Reyes, Luna L; Delgado Sapien, Gabriela; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli occur as either free-living microorganisms, or within the colons of mammals and birds as pathogenic or commensal bacteria. Although the Mexican population of intestinal E. coli maintains high levels of genetic diversity, the exact mechanisms by which this occurs remain unknown. We therefore investigated the role of homologous recombination and point mutation in the genetic diversification and population structure of Mexican strains of E. coli. This was explored using a multi locus sequence typing (MLST) approach in a non-outbreak related, host-wide sample of 128 isolates. Overall, genetic diversification in this sample appears to be driven primarily by homologous recombination, and to a lesser extent, by point mutation. Since genetic diversity is hierarchically organized according to the MLST genealogy, we observed that there is not a homogeneous recombination rate, but that different rates emerge at different clustering levels such as phylogenetic group, lineage and clonal complex (CC). Moreover, we detected clear signature of substructure among the A+B1 phylogenetic group, where the majority of isolates were differentiated into four discrete lineages. Substructure pattern is revealed by the presence of several CCs associated to a particular life style and host as well as to different genetic diversification mechanisms. We propose these findings as an alternative explanation for the maintenance of the clear phylogenetic signal of this species despite the prevalence of homologous recombination. Finally, we corroborate using both phylogenetic and genetic population approaches as an effective mean to establish epidemiological surveillance tailored to the ecological specificities of each geographic region.

  1. Trends in lignin modification: a comprehensive analysis of the effects of genetic manipulations/mutations on lignification and vascular integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of lignin configuration in transgenic and mutant plants is long overdue. This review thus undertook the systematic analysis of trends manifested through genetic and mutational manipulations of the various steps associated with monolignol biosynthesis; this included consideration of the downstream effects on organized lignin assembly in the various cell types, on vascular function/integrity, and on plant growth and development. As previously noted for dirigent protein (homologs), distinct and sophisticated monolignol forming metabolic networks were operative in various cell types, tissues and organs, and form the cell-specific guaiacyl (G) and guaiacyl-syringyl (G-S) enriched lignin biopolymers, respectively. Regardless of cell type undergoing lignification, carbon allocation to the different monolignol pools is apparently determined by a combination of phenylalanine availability and cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/"p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase" (C4H/C3H) activities, as revealed by transcriptional and metabolic profiling. Downregulation of either phenylalanine ammonia lyase or cinnamate-4-hydroxylase thus predictably results in reduced lignin levels and impaired vascular integrity, as well as affecting related (phenylpropanoid-dependent) metabolism. Depletion of C3H activity also results in reduced lignin deposition, albeit with the latter being derived only from hydroxyphenyl (H) units, due to both the guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) pathways being blocked. Apparently the cells affected are unable to compensate for reduced G/S levels by increasing the amounts of H-components. The downstream metabolic networks for G-lignin enriched formation in both angiosperms and gymnosperms utilize specific cinnamoyl CoA O-methyltransferase (CCOMT), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) isoforms: however, these steps neither affect carbon allocation nor H/G designations, this being determined by C4H/C3H

  2. Trends in lignin modification: a comprehensive analysis of the effects of genetic manipulations/mutations on lignification and vascular integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of lignin configuration in transgenic and mutant plants is long overdue. This review thus undertook the systematic analysis of trends manifested through genetic and mutational manipulations of the various steps associated with monolignol biosynthesis; this included consideration of the downstream effects on organized lignin assembly in the various cell types, on vascular function/integrity, and on plant growth and development. As previously noted for dirigent protein (homologs), distinct and sophisticated monolignol forming metabolic networks were operative in various cell types, tissues and organs, and form the cell-specific guaiacyl (G) and guaiacyl-syringyl (G-S) enriched lignin biopolymers, respectively. Regardless of cell type undergoing lignification, carbon allocation to the different monolignol pools is apparently determined by a combination of phenylalanine availability and cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/"p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase" (C4H/C3H) activities, as revealed by transcriptional and metabolic profiling. Downregulation of either phenylalanine ammonia lyase or cinnamate-4-hydroxylase thus predictably results in reduced lignin levels and impaired vascular integrity, as well as affecting related (phenylpropanoid-dependent) metabolism. Depletion of C3H activity also results in reduced lignin deposition, albeit with the latter being derived only from hydroxyphenyl (H) units, due to both the guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) pathways being blocked. Apparently the cells affected are unable to compensate for reduced G/S levels by increasing the amounts of H-components. The downstream metabolic networks for G-lignin enriched formation in both angiosperms and gymnosperms utilize specific cinnamoyl CoA O-methyltransferase (CCOMT), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) isoforms: however, these steps neither affect carbon allocation nor H/G designations, this being determined by C4H/C3H

  3. Genetic mutation analysis of HBV covalently closed circular DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from chronic hepatitis B patients with nucleos(tide analog-resistant mutations in serum virions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-bin LI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To analyze the characteristics of genetic mutations in reverse-transcriptase (RT domain of HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained from chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients with drug-resistant mutations in serum virions during nucleoside/nucleotide analog (NA therapy. Methods  A total of 30 CHB patients admitted to 302 Hospital of PLA from July 2010 to August 2011 were included in this study. All the patients were confirmed to harbor the drug-resistant mutations in serum virions during an NA therapy longer than 6 months. Total DNA was extracted from PBMCs isolated from 30 whole blood samples at the same time point as that of serum analysis. Plasmid-safe ATP-dependent DNase (PSAD digestion in combination with rolling circle amplification and gap-spanning semi-nested PCR were used to amplify the RT region of HBV cccDNA. NA-resistant-associated mutations were analyzed at nine sites. Results  HBV cccDNA was efficiently amplified in 16 out of 30 (53.3% PBMC samples, and the detection rate was not correlated with HBeAg-positive rate, serum ALT level or HBV DNA load. Five of 16 (31.3% patients were sustained to have genotype B HBV infection, and 11 of 16 (68.8% were of genotype C HBV infection, and the result was consistent with the genotyping results using serum HBV. Different from drug-resistant mutations detected in the serum virions, the viruses detected in HBV cccDNA of 16 PBMC samples were all wild-type viruses without NA-resistant-associated mutations in RT region. Conclusions  During NA antiviral treatment, if drug-resistant mutations occur in serum HBV DNA of CHB patients, the dominant species of HBV cccDNA in PBMCs from the same patient is still the original wild-type strains. It is speculated that PBMCs might be the potential "repository" of HBV wild-type strain in vivo.

  4. Overexpression and mutation as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from human immunodeficiency virus patients in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosana, Yeva; Yasmon, Andi; Lestari, Delly Chipta

    2015-09-01

    Fluconazole is the standard treatment for oropharyngeal candidiasis, which is the third most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS patients in Indonesia. Overuse of this drug could lead to the emergence of resistance. The objective of this study was to analyse the role of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 gene overexpression and mutations in the ERG11 gene as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia. Overexpression of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 was analysed by real-time reverse transcription PCR, while ERG11 gene mutation analysis was performed using sequencing methods. Seventeen isolates out of 92 strains of C. albicans isolated from 108 HIV patients were found to be resistant to azole antifungals. The highest gene overexpression of ERG11 was found in C. albicans resistant to single fluconazole, while the highest gene overexpression of CDR2 was detected in all isolates of C. albicans resistant to multiple azoles. Amino acid substitutions were observed at six positions, i.e. D116E, D153E, I261V, E266D, V437I and V488I. The amino acid substitution I261V was identified in this study and was probably associated with fluconazole resistance. The combination of overexpression of CDR2 and ERG11 and mutation in the ERG11 gene was found to be a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in C. albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia.

  5. SM2PH-db: an interactive system for the integrated analysis of phenotypic consequences of missense mutations in proteins involved in human genetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Anne; Garnier, Nicolas; Gagnière, Nicolas; Nguyen, Hoan; Albou, Laurent-Philippe; Biancalana, Valérie; Bettler, Emmanuel; Deléage, Gilbert; Lecompte, Odile; Muller, Jean; Moras, Dino; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Toursel, Thierry; Moulinier, Luc; Poch, Olivier

    2010-02-01

    Understanding how genetic alterations affect gene products at the molecular level represents a first step in the elucidation of the complex relationships between genotypic and phenotypic variations, and is thus a major challenge in the postgenomic era. Here, we present SM2PH-db (http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/sm2ph), a new database designed to investigate structural and functional impacts of missense mutations and their phenotypic effects in the context of human genetic diseases. A wealth of up-to-date interconnected information is provided for each of the 2,249 disease-related entry proteins (August 2009), including data retrieved from biological databases and data generated from a Sequence-Structure-Evolution Inference in Systems-based approach, such as multiple alignments, three-dimensional structural models, and multidimensional (physicochemical, functional, structural, and evolutionary) characterizations of mutations. SM2PH-db provides a robust infrastructure associated with interactive analysis tools supporting in-depth study and interpretation of the molecular consequences of mutations, with the more long-term goal of elucidating the chain of events leading from a molecular defect to its pathology. The entire content of SM2PH-db is regularly and automatically updated thanks to a computational grid data federation facilities provided in the context of the Decrypthon program.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms and mutation rates of 27 Y-chromosomal STRs in a Han population from Guangdong Province, Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yong-Ji; Zhang, Chu-chu; Li, Ran; Yang, Yang; Ou, Xue-Ling; Tong, Da-yue; Sun, Hong-Yu

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we collected blood samples from 1033 father-son pairs of a Han population from Guangdong Province, Southern China, of which 1007 fathers were unrelated male individuals. All together, 2040 male individuals were analyzed at 27 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) with Yfiler(®) Plus system. A total of 1003 different haplotypes were observed among 1007 unrelated fathers, with the overall haplotype diversity (HD) 0.999992 and discrimination capacity (DC) 0.996. The gene diversity (GD) values for the 27 Y-STR loci ranged from 0.4400 at DYS438 to 0.9597 at DYS385a/b. 11 off-ladder alleles and 25 copy number variants were detected in 1007 males. Population relationships were analyzed by comparison with 19 other worldwide populations. With 27,920 allele transfers in 1033 father-son pairs, 124 mutation events occurred, of which 118 were one-step mutations and 6 were two-step mutations. Eleven father-son pairs were found to have mutations at two loci, while one pair at three loci. The estimated locus-specific mutation rates varied from 0 to 1.74×10(-2), with an average estimated mutation rate 4.4×10(-3) (95%CI: 3.7×10(-3) to 5.3×10(-3)). Mutations were most frequently observed at three rapidly mutating Y-STRs (RM Y-STRs), DYS576, DYS518 and DYS627. However, at DYS570, DYS449 and DYF387S1 loci, which were also described as RM Y-STRs, the mutation rates in Guangdong Han population were not as high as estimated in other populations.

  7. Hidden Genetic Variation in LCA9-Associated Congenital Blindness Explained by 5'UTR Mutations and Copy-Number Variations of NMNAT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppieters, Frauke; Todeschini, Anne Laure; Fujimaki, Takuro; Baert, Annelot; De Bruyne, Marieke; Van Cauwenbergh, Caroline; Verdin, Hannah; Bauwens, Miriam; Ongenaert, Maté; Kondo, Mineo; Meire, Françoise; Murakami, Akira; Veitia, Reiner A; Leroy, Bart P; De Baere, Elfride

    2015-12-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe autosomal-recessive retinal dystrophy leading to congenital blindness. A recently identified LCA gene is NMNAT1, located in the LCA9 locus. Although most mutations in blindness genes are coding variations, there is accumulating evidence for hidden noncoding defects or structural variations (SVs). The starting point of this study was an LCA9-associated consanguineous family in which no coding mutations were found in the LCA9 region. Exploring the untranslated regions of NMNAT1 revealed a novel homozygous 5'UTR variant, c.-70A>T. Moreover, an adjacent 5'UTR variant, c.-69C>T, was identified in a second consanguineous family displaying a similar phenotype. Both 5'UTR variants resulted in decreased NMNAT1 mRNA abundance in patients' lymphocytes, and caused decreased luciferase activity in human retinal pigment epithelial RPE-1 cells. Second, we unraveled pseudohomozygosity of a coding NMNAT1 mutation in two unrelated LCA patients by the identification of two distinct heterozygous partial NMNAT1 deletions. Molecular characterization of the breakpoint junctions revealed a complex Alu-rich genomic architecture. Our study uncovered hidden genetic variation in NMNAT1-associated LCA and emphasized a shift from coding to noncoding regulatory mutations and repeat-mediated SVs in the molecular pathogenesis of heterogeneous recessive disorders such as hereditary blindness.

  8. Quality of life, fatigue and mental health in patients with the m.3243A > G mutation and its correlates with genetic characteristics and disease manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaak, Christianne; de Laat, Paul; Koene, Saskia; Tibosch, Marijke; Rodenburg, Richard; de Groot, Imelda; Knoop, Hans; Janssen, Mirian; Smeitink, Jan

    2016-03-18

    Mitochondrial disorders belong to the most prevalent inherited metabolic diseases with the m.3243A > G mutation reflecting being one of the most common mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Previous studies showed little relationship between mitochondrial genetics and disease manifestation. Relationship between genotype and disease manifestation with patient reported quality of life and other patient reported outcomes is still unexplored. Seventy-two out of the 122 invited adult patients with m.3243A > G mutation completed online standardized questionnaires on quality of life, functional impairment, fatigue and mental health as assessed by the RAND-SF36, the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS). Data were related to clinical manifestation reflected by the Newcastle Mitochondrial Disease Adult Scale (NMDAS) score and heteroplasmy levels of the mutation in urine epithelial cells. Patients reported impaired quality of life. Sixty percent showed severe levels of fatigue, and 37% showed clinical relevant mental health problems, which was significantly more than healthy norms. These patient reported health outcomes showed negligible relationship with levels of heteroplasmy (r = life, fatigue and mental health problems, are only partly reflected by clinical assessments. In order to support patients more effectively, integration of patient reported outcomes, alongside symptoms of their disease, in clinical practice is warranted.

  9. Chip-based mtDNA mutation screening enables fast and reliable genetic diagnosis of OXPHOS patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G.E. van Eijsden (Rudy); E. Briem (Egill); V. Tiranti (Valeria); H.J.M. Smeets (Hubert); M. Gerards (Mike); L.M.T. Eijssen (Lars); A. Hendrickx (Alexandra); R.J.E. Jongbloed (Roselie); J.H.J. Wokke (John); R.Q. Hintzen (Rogier); M.E. Rubio-Gozalbo (Estela); I.F.M. de Coo (René)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Oxidative phosphorylation is under dual genetic control of the nuclear and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Oxidative phosphorylation disorders are clinically and genetically heterogeneous, which makes it difficult to determine the genetic defect, and symptom-based protocols which

  10. Genetic subgroup of small ruminant lentiviruses that infects sheep homozygous for TMEM154 frameshift deletion mutation A4delta53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small Ruminant Lentivirus (SRLV) infections of sheep are influenced by genetics on both the host and pathogen sides. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane 154 (TMEM154) gene associates with infection susceptibility, and distinct SRLV genetic subtypes infect sheep in association with their TM...

  11. Genetic analysis of allelic variants, single-step mutations, three allelic variants of the 15 STR loci in the population of Northeast Bosnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadžiavdić Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of nuclear DNA microsatellite markers were analyzed in a reference sample of the population of northeast Bosnia. 437 samples taken from unrelated individuals were processed and three samples of paternity proof were shown. Detection effectiveness profile of the research, points to a valid choice of method of extraction, amplification and genotyping STR loci with PowerPlextm16. Genetic analysis of allelic variants of the 15 STR loci detected 17 samples determined as microvariants. Samples were divided into 15 different allelic variants at 7 different loci, and are: in locus D7S820, D16S539, D3S1358, D18S51, PENTA D, PENTA E and in locus vWA. Genetic analysis of mutations in cases of paternity determined three examples of single-step mutations in the loci FGA, Penta D and D3S1358. Genetic analysis of observed STR loci detected three allelic variant of genotype combination 7/10/11.3 in locus D7S820 Type II.

  12. Novel ETHE1 mutation in a carrier couple having prior offspring affected with ethylmalonic encephalopathy: Genetic analysis, clinical management and reproductive outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, David J

    2010-03-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is an autosomally recessive inherited disorder with a relentlessly progressive decline in neurological function, usually fatal by the age of ten. It is characterised by generalised hypotonia, psychomotor regression, spastic tetraparesis, dystonia, seizures and, eventually, global neurological failure. Approximately 50 reports have been published worldwide describing this devastating disease, most involving patients of Mediterranean or Arab origin. The fundamental defect in EE likely involves the impairment of a mitochondrial sulphur dioxygenase coded by the ETHE1 gene responsible for the catabolism of sulphide, which subsequently accumulates to toxic levels. A diagnosis of EE should initiate careful genetic evaluation and counselling, particularly if the parents intend to have additional offspring. The present report describes the diagnosis of EE in a reproductive endocrinology context, where both members of a non-consanguineous couple were confirmed to be carriers of an identical A↷G mutation. This previously unknown mutation at nucleotide position c.494 resulted in an amino acid substitution, p.Asp165Gly. Although consideration was given to in vitro fertilisation, embryo biopsy and single gene pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, the couple decided to first utilise a less aggressive therapeutic approach with donor sperm insemination. Pregnancy with a low risk of EE was indeed achieved; however, the infant was affected with a different anomaly (hypoplastic left heart). As this case demonstrates, prior to the initiation of fertility therapy, genetic analysis may be used to provide a confirmatory diagnosis when EE is suspected.

  13. Genetic mutations associated with chemical resistance in the cytochrome P450 genes of invasive and native Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) populations in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Li Qiu; Li Liu; Xiao-Xi Li; Vartika Mathur; Zhen-Qiang Qin; Shun-Xiang Ren

    2009-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is a species complex, and its two most damaging biotypes B and Q are globally distributed pests. Despite increasing biological and economic impacts, little is known about the evolutionary mechanisms that favor their competfion with native populations. Here, we investigated the genetic mutations in the P450 gene of the invasive B, Q biotypes and the native Cv population. Four mutations associated with chemical resistance, Pro-Leu, Ala-Ser, Ser-Phe and Trp-Leu, were found in the cytochrome P450 CYP6C and CYP9F genes of the B and Q biotypes. Bioassay results also revealed that both the B and Q biotypes have about 12-47 times more resistance to acephate, betacypermethrin, methomyl, and 5-7 times more resistance to imidacloprid insecticide than Cv population. Our results provide a molecular approach for better understanding and monitoring the pesticide resistances of invasive and native B. tabaci populations in China.

  14. [Influence of genetic mutations on clinical presentation of subretinal neovascularization. Report 1: The impact of CFH and IL-8 genes polymorphism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinskaia, M V; Pogoda, T V; Generozov, É V; Chikun, E A; Shchegoleva, I V; Kazarian, É É; Galoian, N S

    2011-01-01

    Genetic analysis was performed in patients with subretinal neovascularization (CNV). The results showed significant association of CFH (compliment factor H) gene polymorphism with increase (rs1061170, rs514943 and rs380390) or decrease (rs529825, rs7524776, rs1831281, rs2274700, rs1576340, rs12144939, rs7540032) of CNV development risk. The incidence of IL-8 gene mutation was significantly (p = 0.008) higher in patients after chorioretinitis. Apparently -125 > A polymorphism in patients with chorioretinitis increases risk of CNV development, thus promoting raise of proangiogenic factors concentration in eyes with inflammatory background. The clinical presentation in patients with AMD and myopic disease associated with (-125) A mutation of promoter region of IL-8 gene was similar to that of patients with chorioretinitis. The features are the following: focal pattern, no drusen and RPE detachment, predominantly classic form of CNV (without occult pattern), formation of well-organized newly developed vessels.

  15. Mutations in THAP1 (DYT6) and generalised dystonia with prominent spasmodic dysphonia: a genetic screening study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djarmati, Ana; Schneider, Susanne A; Lohmann, Katja

    2009-01-01

    on to develop generalised dystonia. Thus, two of three patients with early-onset generalised dystonia with orobulbar involvement had mutations in THAP1. One of the identified patients with DYT6 dystonia had two family members with subtle motor signs who also carried the same mutation. A rare substitution...... increase the risk of dystonia. FUNDING: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft; Volkswagen Foundation; Dystonia Medical Research Foundation; University of Lübeck....

  16. Point mutations in the murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene: Animalmodels for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aponte, Jennifer [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sega, Gary A [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Dhar, Madhu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Withrow, Catherine [ORNL; Carpenter, D A [ORNL; Rinchik, Eugene M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Culiat, Cymbeline T [ORNL; Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL

    2001-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease associated with point mutations in the human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) gene that disrupt tyrosine catabolism. An acute form of HT1 results in death during the first months of life because of hepatic failure, whereas a chronic form leads to gradual development of liver disease often accompanied by renal dysfunction, childhood rickets, neurological crisis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mice homozygous for certain chromosome 7 deletions of the albino Tyr; c locus that also include Fah die perinatally as a result of liver dysfunction and exhibit a complex syndrome characterized by structural abnormalities and alterations in gene expression in the liver and kidney. Here we report that two independent, postnatally lethal mutations induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and mapped near Tyr are alleles of Fah. The Fah6287SB allele is a missense mutation in exon 6, and Fah5961SB is a splice mutation causing loss of exon 7, a subsequent frameshift in the resulting mRNA, and a severe reduction of Fah mRNA levels. Increased levels of the diagnostic metabolite succinylacetone in the urine of the Fah6287SB and Fah5961SB mutants indicate that these mutations cause a decrease in Fah enzymatic activity. Thus, the neonatal phenotype present in both mutants is due to a deficiency in Fah caused by a point mutation, and we propose Fah5961SB and Fah6287SB as mouse models for acute and chronic forms of human HT1, respectively.

  17. Genetic heterogeneity in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: mutations in both the CBP and EP300 genes cause disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelfsema, Jeroen H; White, Stefan J; Ariyürek, Yavuz; Bartholdi, Deborah; Niedrist, Dunja; Papadia, Francesco; Bacino, Carlos A; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Breuning, Martijn H; Hennekam, Raoul C; Peters, Dorien J M

    2005-04-01

    CREB-binding protein and p300 function as transcriptional coactivators in the regulation of gene expression through various signal-transduction pathways. Both are potent histone acetyl transferases. A certain level of CREB-binding protein is essential for normal development, since inactivation of one allele causes Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS). There is a direct link between loss of acetyl transferase activity and RSTS, which indicates that the disorder is caused by aberrant chromatin regulation. We screened the entire CREB-binding protein gene (CBP) for mutations in patients with RSTS by using methods that find point mutations and larger rearrangements. In 92 patients, we were able to identify a total of 36 mutations in CBP. By using multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification, we found not only several deletions but also the first reported intragenic duplication in a patient with RSTS. We extended the search for mutations to the EP300 gene and showed that mutations in EP300 also cause this disorder. These are the first mutations identified in EP300 for a congenital disorder.

  18. LPAC syndrome associated with deletion of the full exon 4 in a ABCB4 genetic mutation in a patient with hepatitis C

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Low-phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis syndrome (LPAC) is associated with ABCB4 genetic mutation. ABCB4 encodes MDR3 protein, involved in biliary phosphatidylcholine excretion. Higher prevalence in women, biliary symptoms in young adults and ursodesoxycholic acid (UDCA) response are the main features. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with hepatitis C, genotype 1b, fibrosis F3, null responder to Peg-IFNα2b/ribavirin and nephritic colic. In 2011 he developed jaundice, pruritus and ep...

  19. High-Throughput Genetic Screening of 51 Pediatric Cataract Genes Identifies Causative Mutations in Inherited Pediatric Cataract in South Eastern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shari Javadiyan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cataract is a leading cause of childhood blindness. This study aimed to determine the genetic cause of pediatric cataract in Australian families by screening known disease-associated genes using massively parallel sequencing technology. We sequenced 51 previously reported pediatric cataract genes in 33 affected individuals with a family history (cases with previously known or published mutations were excluded using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Variants were prioritized for validation if they were predicted to alter the protein sequence and were absent or rare with minor allele frequency 60% of familial pediatric cataract in Australia, indicating that still more causative genes remain to be identified.

  20. LPAC syndrome associated with deletion of the full exon 4 in a ABCB4 genetic mutation in a patient with hepatitis C

    OpenAIRE

    Blanca Fombuena; Javier Ampuero; Luis Álvarez; Reyes Aparcero; Rocío Llorca; Raquel Millán; Helena Pastor-Ramírez; Sara Andueza; Veronique Barbu; Manuel Romero-Gómez

    2014-01-01

    Low-phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis syndrome (LPAC) is associated with ABCB4 genetic mutation. ABCB4 encodes MDR3 protein, involved in biliary phosphatidylcholine excretion. Higher prevalence in women, biliary symptoms in young adults and ursodesoxycholic acid (UDCA) response are the main features. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with hepatitis C, genotype 1b, fibrosis F3, null responder to Peg-IFNα2b/ribavirin and nephritic colic. In 2011 he developed jaundice, pruritus and ep...

  1. Clinical significance of genetic mutation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy%肥厚型心肌病基因突变的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张咏梅; 董林波

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary cardiac disorder characterized by the thickening of myocardi -al, especially thickening of the left ventricular wall, fiber hypertrophy and arrangement of myocardial, and it is one of the most common cause of sudden death in the young and athletes. This disease is usually inherited as a Mendelian autosomal dominant trait. There are cardiac sarcomere gene mutations, mitochondrial DNA mutations and modifying gene mutations, more than 900 types of mutations, related to the progress and clinical phenotype of HCM. This review has focused on the correlations between HCM genetic mutation and progression and clinical phenotype of HCM in recent years.%肥厚型心肌病(hypertrophic cardiomyopathy,HCM)是以心肌肥厚尤其是左心室不对称性心肌肥厚、心肌纤维肥大、排列紊乱为病理特征的原发性心肌病,是目前年轻人和运动员常见的猝死原因之一.目前HCM通常被认为是一种基因突变所导致的常染色体疾病,呈显性遗传.最近研究发现心脏肌节蛋白基因以及相关的线粒体基因与修饰基因的基因突变,超过900种不同的基因突变类型与HCM发生发展以及临床表型有关.本文主要就近年来关于HCM常见的基因突变与其临床意义的研究作一综述.

  2. Molecular genetic characterization of p53 mutated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cells transformed with human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji-Eun; Kim, Jeong-Oh; Shin, Jung-Young; Zhang, Xiang-Hua; Won, Hye-Sung; Chun, Sang-Hoon; Jung, Chan-Kwon; Park, Won-Sang; Nam, Suk-Woo; Eun, Jung-Woo; Kang, Jin-Hyoung

    2013-08-01

    Patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer show better tumor response to radiation or chemotherapy than patients with HPV-negative cancer. HPV oncoprotein E6 binds and degrades a typically wild-type p53 protein product. However, HPV16 infection and p53 mutation infrequently coexist in a subset of HNSCCs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms through which tumor biology and molecular genetic mechanisms change when two HPV-negative, p53-mutated oropharyngeal cell lines (YD8, non-disruptive p53 mutation; YD10B, disruptive p53 mutation) derived from patients with a history of heavy smoking are transfected with HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes in vitro. Transfection with HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes in YD8, reduced the abundance of proteins encoded by tumor suppressor genes, such as p-p53 and p-Rb. Cell proliferative activity was increased in the cells transfected with E6E7 compared to cells transfected with vector alone (P=0.09), whereas the invasiveness of E6E7-transfected cells was significantly reduced (P=0.02). cDNA microarray of the transfected cells with E6E7 showed significant changes in mRNA expression in several signaling pathways, including focal adhesion, JAK-STAT signaling pathway, cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway. Regarding the qPCR array for the p53 signaling pathway, the mRNA expression of STAT1 was remarkably upregulated by 6.47-fold (Pcell carcinoma cases with non-disruptive p53 mutations.

  3. Using peripheral blood circulating DNAs to detect CpG global methylation status and genetic mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iriyama, Chisako [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Tomita, Akihiro, E-mail: atomita@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Hoshino, Hideaki; Adachi-Shirahata, Mizuho [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Furukawa-Hibi, Yoko; Yamada, Kiyofumi [Department of Neuropsychopharmacology and Hospital Pharmacy, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Circulating DNAs (CDs) can be used to detect genetic/epigenetic abnormalities in MDS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epigenetic changes can be detected more sensitively when using plasma DNA than PBMNC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutation ratio in CDs may reflect the ratio in stem cell population in bone marrow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using CDs can be a safer alternate strategy compared to bone marrow aspiration. -- Abstract: Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a hematopoietic stem cell disorder. Several genetic/epigenetic abnormalities are deeply associated with the pathogenesis of MDS. Although bone marrow (BM) aspiration is a common strategy to obtain MDS cells for evaluating their genetic/epigenetic abnormalities, BM aspiration is difficult to perform repeatedly to obtain serial samples because of pain and safety concerns. Here, we report that circulating cell-free DNAs from plasma and serum of patients with MDS can be used to detect genetic/epigenetic abnormalities. The plasma DNA concentration was found to be relatively high in patients with higher blast cell counts in BM, and accumulation of DNA fragments from mono-/di-nucleosomes was confirmed. Using serial peripheral blood (PB) samples from patients treated with hypomethylating agents, global methylation analysis using bisulfite pyrosequencing was performed at the specific CpG sites of the LINE-1 promoter. The results confirmed a decrease of the methylation percentage after treatment with azacitidine (days 3-9) using DNAs from plasma, serum, and PB mono-nuclear cells (PBMNC). Plasma DNA tends to show more rapid change at days 3 and 6 compared with serum DNA and PBMNC. Furthermore, the TET2 gene mutation in DNAs from plasma, serum, and BM cells was quantitated by pyrosequencing analysis. The existence ratio of mutated genes in plasma and serum DNA showed almost equivalent level with that in the CD34+/38- stem cell population in BM. These data suggest that genetic

  4. Genetic Brain Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  5. Detecting drug resistant genetic mutation among pneumoconiosis patients complicated with tuberculosis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-forms application of PCR-SSCP technique in Huainan mining district

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Lu; Shan Jiang; Song Ye; Chaopin Li

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between drug resistant genetic mutation and drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-form, discuss the internal relationship between drug resistances and drug-resistant related genes and explore the value of PCRSSCP to clinical application. Methods: A total of 52 clinically isolated strains of tuberculosis L-form were collected among 97pneumoconiosis patients complicated with tuberculosis. The gene mutations of katG, rpoB and rpsL were detected by PCR-SSCP,and the results were compared with those analyzed by traditional antimicrobial susceptibility test(AST). Results: The gene mutation rates of katG, rpoB and rpsL by PCR-SSCP were respectively 57.70% (30/52), 65.38% (32/52) and 40.38% (21/52). The rate of reversion was 78.85%(41/52) and the result of drug-resistant genes was invariable. The results of AST showed that there were 40 (76.92%) multi-drug resistant strains in 52 clinically isolated strains. The number for three-drug resistant strain was 21(40.38%) and that of two-drug resistant was 19(36.54%), but only 12 (23.08%) strains were one drug resistant. The rate of total drug-resistance was 100%, but there were 15 strains of allied mutation of three genes, 16 of two mutations and 6 of only one by PCR-SSCP. The coincidences were respectively 71.43%, 84.12% and 50.00%. Then there was no significant difference between the allied mutations of multi-drug resistant gene and the mutations of only one drug resistant gene (P > 0.05). Conclusion: PCRSSCP technique has a higher sensibility and specificity to detect the genes of katG, rpoB and rpsL in tuberculosis L-form among pneumoconiosis complicated with tuberculosis,and the detecting rate of two drug resistant strains and three drug resistant strains was higher. The combined application of PCR-SSCP and AST has advantages at earlier diagnosis and guidance of clinical medications.

  6. Genetic and structural analyses suggest that a novel SPG3A mutation causes severe phenotypes of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Suqin; ZHOU Yan; LI Xunhua; Labu; HUANG Shuang; HUANG Weijun; ZHOU Chunlong; liu; WANG Yiming

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a group of neurodegenerative diseases. The genotypes and phenotypes of HSP are extremely heterogenous. SPG3A is one of the identified genes underlying HSP, and codes for a GTPase, atlastin. Mutations in SPG3A are currently believed to be associated with early onset and mild phenotypes. And most structural predictions could not detect gross changes in the mutant protein. However, in a severely affected HSP family we have identified a novel SPG3A mutation, c.1228G>A (p.G410R), in a Tibetan kindred. The mutation occurred at the highly conserved nucleotide and co-segregated with the disease, and was absent in the control subjects. Structural predictions showed that the Tibetan mutation occurred at the linking part between the guanylate-binding protein domain (GB, the ball region) and the transmembrane helices (TM, the rod region) at the start point of an α-helix, which may disrupt the helix, and cause changes in the overall structure of the transmembrane region of the molecule. Our results indicate that severe phenotypes can also arise from SPG3A mutations and the linking part of the guanylate-binding protein domain and the transmembrane helices might be crucial in determining the severity of the disease. This paper not only presents the first SPG3A mutational report from the Chinese population, but also provides potential evidence for a possible correlation between the severity of the phenotypes of HSP with the extension of the changes in the protein structures of atlastin.

  7. Clinical and Biologic Significance of MYC Genetic Mutations in De Novo Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Deng, Qipan; Manyam, Ganiraju C

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: MYC is a critical driver oncogene in many cancers, and its deregulation in the forms of translocation and overexpression has been implicated in lymphomagenesis and progression of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The MYC mutational profile and its roles in DLBCL are unknown. This st......PURPOSE: MYC is a critical driver oncogene in many cancers, and its deregulation in the forms of translocation and overexpression has been implicated in lymphomagenesis and progression of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The MYC mutational profile and its roles in DLBCL are unknown...

  8. Mutations in THAP1 (DYT6) and generalised dystonia with prominent spasmodic dysphonia: a genetic screening study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djarmati, Ana; Schneider, Susanne A; Lohmann, Katja; Winkler, Susen; Pawlack, Heike; Hagenah, Johann; Brüggemann, Norbert; Zittel, Simone; Fuchs, Tania; Raković, Aleksandar; Schmidt, Alexander; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Wilcox, Robert; Kostić, Vladimir S; Siebner, Hartwig; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münchau, Alexander; Ozelius, Laurie J; Klein, Christine

    2009-05-01

    DYT6 is a primary, early-onset torsion dystonia; however, unlike in DYT1 dystonia, the symptoms of DYT6 dystonia frequently involve the craniocervical region. Recently, two mutations in THAP1, the gene that encodes THAP (thanatos-associated protein) domain-containing apoptosis-associated protein 1 (THAP1), have been identified as a cause of DYT6 dystonia. We screened THAP1 by sequence analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 160 white patients of European ancestry who had dystonia with an early age at onset (n=64), generalised dystonia (n=35), a positive family history of dystonia (n=56), or facial or laryngeal dystonia. Another 160 patients with dystonia were screened for reported and novel variants in THAP1. 280 neurologically healthy controls were screened for the newly identified and previously reported changes in THAP1 and these and an additional 75 controls were screened for a rare non-coding mutation. We identified two mutations in THAP1 (388_389delTC and 474delA), respectively, in two (1%) German patients from the 160 patients with dystonia. Both mutation carriers had laryngeal dystonia that started in childhood and both went on to develop generalised dystonia. Thus, two of three patients with early-onset generalised dystonia with orobulbar involvement had mutations in THAP1. One of the identified patients with DYT6 dystonia had two family members with subtle motor signs who also carried the same mutation. A rare substitution in the 5'untranslated region (-236_235GA-->TT) was found in 20 of 320 patients and in seven of 355 controls (p=0.0054). Although mutations in THAP1 might have only a minor role in patients with different, but mainly focal, forms of dystonia, they do seem to be associated with early-onset generalised dystonia with spasmodic dysphonia. This combination of symptoms might be a characteristic feature of DYT6 dystonia and could be useful in the differential diagnosis of DYT1, DYT4, DYT12, and DYT17 dystonia. In

  9. Assessment of genetic mutations in the XRCC2 coding region by high resolution melting curve analysis and the risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Fayaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is the major pathway for repairing double strand breaks (DSBs in eukaryotes and XRCC2 is an essential component of the HR repair machinery. To evaluate the potential role of mutations in gene repair by HR in individuals susceptible to differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC we used high resolution melting (HRM analysis, a recently introduced method for detecting mutations, to examine the entire XRCC2 coding region in an Iranian population. HRM analysis was used to screen for mutations in three XRCC2 coding regions in 50 patients and 50 controls. There was no variation in the HRM curves obtained from the analysis of exons 1 and 2 in the case and control groups. In exon 3, an Arg188His polymorphism (rs3218536 was detected as a new melting curve group (OR: 1.46; 95%CI: 0.432-4.969; p = 0.38 compared with the normal melting curve. We also found a new Ser150Arg polymorphism in exon 3 of the control group. These findings suggest that genetic variations in the XRCC2 coding region have no potential effects on susceptibility to DTC. However, further studies with larger populations are required to confirm this conclusion.

  10. Identification of novel hypomorphic and null mutations in Klf1 derived from a genetic screen for modifiers of α-globin transgene variegation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorolla, Anabel; Tallack, Michael R; Oey, Harald; Harten, Sarah K; Daxinger, Lucia Clemens-; Magor, Graham W; Combes, Alex N; Ilsley, Melissa; Whitelaw, Emma; Perkins, Andrew C

    2015-02-01

    Position-effect variegation of transgene expression is sensitive to the chromatin state. We previously reported a forward genetic screen in mice carrying a variegated α-globin GFP transgene to find novel genes encoding epigenetic regulators. We named the phenovariant strains "Mommes" for modifiers of murine metastable epialleles. Here we report positional cloning of mutations in two Momme strains which result in suppression of variegation. Both strains harbour point mutations in the erythroid transcription factor, Klf1. One (D11) generates a stop codon in the zinc finger domain and a homozygous null phenotype. The other (D45) generates an amino acid transversion (H350R) within a conserved linker between zinc fingers two and three. Homozygous MommeD45 mice have chronic microcytic anaemia which models the phenotype in a recently described family. This is the first genetic evidence that the linkers between the zinc fingers of transcription factors have a function beyond that of a simple spacer. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mutational meltdown in laboratory yeast populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeyl, C.; Mizesko, M.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    In small or repeatedly bottlenecked populations, mutations are expected to accumulate by genetic drift, causing fitness declines. In mutational meltdown models, such fitness declines further reduce population size, thus accelerating additional mutation accumulation and leading to extinction. Because

  12. Incongruent nuclear and mitochondrial genetic structure of new world screwworm fly populations due to positive selection of mutations associated with dimethyl- and diethyl-organophosphates resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamo, Luana Walravens; Fresia, Pablo; Azeredo-Espin, Ana Maria L

    2015-01-01

    Livestock production is an important economic activity in Brazil, which has been suffering significant losses due to the impact of parasites. The New World screwworm (NWS) fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, is an ectoparasite and one of the most important myiasis-causing flies endemic to the Americas. The geographic distribution of NWS has been reduced after the implementation of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), being eradicated in North America and part of Central America. In South America, C. hominivorax is controlled by chemical insecticides, although indiscriminate use can cause selection of resistant individuals. Previous studies have associated the Gly137Asp and Trp251Leu mutations in the active site of carboxylesterase E3 to resistance of diethyl and dimethyl-organophosphates insecticides, respectively. Here, we have sequenced a fragment of the carboxylesterase E3 gene (ChαE7), comprising part of intron iII, exon eIII, intron iIII and part of exon eIV, and three mitochondrial gene sequences (CR, COI and COII), of NWS flies from 21 locations in South America. These markers were used for population structure analyses and the ChαE7 gene was also investigated to gain insight into the selective pressures that have shaped its evolution. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and pairwise FST analysis indicated an increased genetic structure between locations in the ChαE7 compared to the concatenated mitochondrial genes. Discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC) and spatial analysis of molecular variance (SAMOVA) indicated different degrees of genetic structure for all markers, in agreement with the AMOVA results, but with low correlation to geographic data. The NWS fly is considered a panmitic species based on mitochondrial data, while it is structured into three groups considering the ChαE7 gene. A negative association between the two mutations related to organophosphate resistance and Fay & Wu's H significant negative values for the exons, suggest

  13. Serum microRNAs in patients with genetic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and pre-manifest mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freischmidt, Axel; Müller, Kathrin; Zondler, Lisa; Weydt, Patrick; Volk, Alexander E; Božič, Anže Lošdorfer; Walter, Michael; Bonin, Michael; Mayer, Benjamin; von Arnim, Christine A F; Otto, Markus; Dieterich, Christoph; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Andersen, Peter M; Ludolph, Albert C; Danzer, Karin M; Weishaupt, Jochen H

    2014-11-01

    Knowledge about the nature of pathomolecular alterations preceding onset of symptoms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is largely lacking. It could not only pave the way for the discovery of valuable therapeutic targets but might also govern future concepts of pre-manifest disease modifying treatments. MicroRNAs are central regulators of transcriptome plasticity and participate in pathogenic cascades and/or mirror cellular adaptation to insults. We obtained comprehensive expression profiles of microRNAs in the serum of patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, asymptomatic mutation carriers and healthy control subjects. We observed a strikingly homogenous microRNA profile in patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis that was largely independent from the underlying disease gene. Moreover, we identified 24 significantly downregulated microRNAs in pre-manifest amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mutation carriers up to two decades or more before the estimated time window of disease onset; 91.7% of the downregulated microRNAs in mutation carriers overlapped with the patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a consensus sequence motif present in the vast majority of downregulated microRNAs identified in this study. Our data thus suggest specific common denominators regarding molecular pathogenesis of different amyotrophic lateral sclerosis genes. We describe the earliest pathomolecular alterations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mutation carriers known to date, which provide a basis for the discovery of novel therapeutic targets and strongly argue for studies evaluating presymptomatic disease-modifying treatment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  14. Genetic Prion Disease Caused by PRNP Q160X Mutation Presenting with an Orbitofrontal Syndrome, Cyclic Diarrhea, and Peripheral Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Jamie C.; Rojas, Julio C.; Bang, Jee; Legati, Andrea; Rankin, Katherine P.; Forner, Sven; Miller, Zachary A.; Karydas, Anna M.; Coppola, Giovanni; Grouse, Carrie K.; Ralph, Jeffrey; Miller, Bruce L.; Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with pathogenic truncating mutations in the prion gene (PRNP) usually present with prolonged disease courses with severe neurofibrillary tangle and cerebral amyloidosis pathology, but more atypical phenotypes also occur, including those with dysautonomia and peripheral neuropathy. We describe the neurological, cognitive, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological features of a 31-year-old man presenting with an orbitofrontal syndrome, gastrointestinal symptoms, and peripheral neuropathy ...

  15. Genetic linkage analyses and Cx50 mutation detection in a large multiplex Chinese family with hereditary nuclear cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Li, Xin; Chen, Jiajing; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Feng; Dai, Qiushi; Cui, Hao; Wang, Duen-Mei; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian; Lu, Shan

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the underlying mutation in a large multiplex Chinese family with hereditary nuclear cataract. A 6-generation Chinese family having hereditary nuclear cataract was recruited and clinically verified. Blood DNA samples were obtained from 53 available family members. Linkage analyses were performed on the known candidate regions for hereditary cataract with 36 polymorphic microsatellite markers. To identify mutations related to cataract, a direct sequencing approach was applied to a candidate gene residing in our linkage locus. A linkage locus was identified with a maximum 2-point LOD score of 4.31 (recombination fraction = 0) at marker D1S498 and a maximum multipoint LOD score of 5.7 between markers D1S2344 and D1S498 on chromosome 1q21.1, where the candidate gene Cx50 is located. Direct sequencing of Cx50 showed a 139 G to A transition occurred in all affected family members. This transitional mutation resulted in a replacement of aspartic acid by asparagine at residue 47 (D47N) and led to a loss-of-function of the protein. The D47N mutation of Cx50 causes the hereditary nuclear cataract in this family in an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance.

  16. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. METHODS: Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast...

  17. Novel mutations in TNFRSF7/CD27 : Clinical, immunologic, and genetic characterization of human CD27 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkhairy, Omar K.; Perez-Becker, Ruy; Driessen, Gertjan J.; Abolhassani, Hassan; van Montfrans, JM; Borte, Stephan; Choo, Sharon; Wang, Ning; Tesselaar, Kiki; Fang, Mingyan; Bienemann, Kirsten; Boztug, Kaan; Daneva, Ana; Mechinaud, Francoise; Wiesel, Thomas; Becker, Christian; Duckers, Gregor; Siepermann, Kathrin; van Zelm, Menno C.; Rezaei, Nima; van der Burg, Mirjam; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Seidel, Markus G.; Niehues, Tim; Hammarstrom, Lennart

    Background: The clinical and immunologic features of CD27 deficiency remain obscure because only a few patients have been identified to date. Objective: We sought to identify novel mutations in TNFRSF7/CD27 and to provide an overview of clinical, immunologic, and laboratory phenotypes in patients

  18. Toward an improved definition of the genetic and tumor spectrum associated with SDH germ-line mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evenepoel, Lucie; Papathomas, Thomas G.; Krol, Niels; Korpershoek, Esther; De Krijger, Ronald R.; Persu, Alexandre; Dinjens, Winand N M

    2015-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid, or Krebs, cycle is central to the cellular metabolism of sugars, lipids, and amino acids; it fuels the mitochondrial respiratory chain for energy generation. In the past decade, mutations in the Krebs-cycle enzymes succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and isocitrate

  19. Diagnosis of Japanese patients with HHH syndrome by molecular genetic analysis: a common mutation, R179X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, T; Kanazawa, N; Kato, S; Kawakami, M; Inoue, Y; Kuhara, T; Inoue, T; Takeshita, K; Tsujino, S

    2001-01-01

    Patients with mitochondrial ornithine transporter deficiency (or HHH syndrome) present with various neurological symptoms, including mental retardation, spastic paraparesis with pyramidal signs, cerebellar ataxia, and episodic disturbance of consciousness or coma due to hyperammonemia. We previously described three novel mutations in the ORNT1 gene in Japanese patients with HHH syndrome. In this article, we report a new patient with HHH syndrome, a 52-year-old woman, who had the typical clinical features, except for an absence of mental retardation. When we screened this patient, as well as a previously described Japanese patient, for mutations in the ORNT1 gene, we found that both were homozygous for a nonsense mutation (R179X). Furthermore, reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of fibroblast RNA from one patient showed exon 4 skipping, as had been observed in a previously reported patient with R179X. These results, together with the findings in our previous report, show that, in three of our five reported Japanese HHH patients (six of ten alleles), R179X is present, suggesting that this is a common mutation in Japanese patients with HHH syndrome.

  20. CRTAP mutations in lethal and severe osteogenesis imperfecta: the importance of combining biochemical and molecular genetic analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, F.S. Van; Nesbitt, I.M.; Nikkels, P.G.J.; Dalton, A.; Bongers, E.M.H.F.; Kamp, J.M. van de; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Y.; Hollander, N.S. den; Lachmeijer, A.M.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Tan-Sindhunata, G.M.; Rijn, R.R. van; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Cobben, J.M.; Pals, G.

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal recessive lethal and severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is caused by the deficiency of cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP) and prolyl-3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) because of CRTAP and LEPRE1 mutations. We analyzed five families in which 10 individuals had a clinical diagnosis of lethal and sev

  1. CRTAP mutations in lethal and severe osteogenesis imperfecta : the importance of combining biochemical and molecular genetic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, Fleur S.; Nesbitt, Isabel M.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; Dalton, Ann; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; de Kamp, Jiddeke M. van; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne; Den Hollander, Nicolette S.; Lachmeijer, Augusta M. A.; Marcelis, Carlo L.; Tan-Sindhunata, Gita M. B.; van Rijn, Rick R.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Cobben, Jan M.; Pals, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal recessive lethal and severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is caused by the deficiency of cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP) and prolyl-3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) because of CRTAP and LEPRE1 mutations. We analyzed five families in which 10 individuals had a clinical diagnosis of lethal and sev

  2. Genetic alterations in uncommon low-grade neuroepithelial tumors: BRAF, FGFR1, and MYB mutations occur at high frequency and align with morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Orisme, Wilda; Wen, Ji; Santiago, Teresa; Gupta, Kirti; Dalton, James D; Tang, Bo; Haupfear, Kelly; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Easton, John; Mulder, Heather; Boggs, Kristy; Shao, Ying; Rusch, Michael; Becksfort, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Wang, Shuoguo; Lee, Ryan P; Brat, Daniel; Peter Collins, V; Dahiya, Sonika; George, David; Konomos, William; Kurian, Kathreena M; McFadden, Kathryn; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Nickols, Hilary; Perry, Arie; Shurtleff, Sheila; Gajjar, Amar; Boop, Fredrick A; Klimo, Paul D; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Baker, Suzanne J; Zhang, Jinghui; Wu, Gang; Downing, James R; Tatevossian, Ruth G; Ellison, David W

    2016-06-01

    Low-grade neuroepithelial tumors (LGNTs) are diverse CNS tumors presenting in children and young adults, often with a history of epilepsy. While the genetic profiles of common LGNTs, such as the pilocytic astrocytoma and 'adult-type' diffuse gliomas, are largely established, those of uncommon LGNTs remain to be defined. In this study, we have used massively parallel sequencing and various targeted molecular genetic approaches to study alterations in 91 LGNTs, mostly from children but including young adult patients. These tumors comprise dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNETs; n = 22), diffuse oligodendroglial tumors (d-OTs; n = 20), diffuse astrocytomas (DAs; n = 17), angiocentric gliomas (n = 15), and gangliogliomas (n = 17). Most LGNTs (84 %) analyzed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) were characterized by a single driver genetic alteration. Alterations of FGFR1 occurred frequently in LGNTs composed of oligodendrocyte-like cells, being present in 82 % of DNETs and 40 % of d-OTs. In contrast, a MYB-QKI fusion characterized almost all angiocentric gliomas (87 %), and MYB fusion genes were the most common genetic alteration in DAs (41 %). A BRAF:p.V600E mutation was present in 35 % of gangliogliomas and 18 % of DAs. Pathogenic alterations in FGFR1/2/3, BRAF, or MYB/MYBL1 occurred in 78 % of the series. Adult-type d-OTs with an IDH1/2 mutation occurred in four adolescents, the youngest aged 15 years at biopsy. Despite a detailed analysis, novel genetic alterations were limited to two fusion genes, EWSR1-PATZ1 and SLMAP-NTRK2, both in gangliogliomas. Alterations in BRAF, FGFR1, or MYB account for most pathogenic alterations in LGNTs, including pilocytic astrocytomas, and alignment of these genetic alterations and cytologic features across LGNTs has diagnostic implications. Additionally, therapeutic options based upon targeting the effects of these alterations are already in clinical trials.

  3. Genetic variation and drug resistance mutation of influenza virus during 2013-2014 in Beijing, China: a report of 37 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao LIAO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the evolutionary characteristics of H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A and B viruses, and investigate the drug-resistant mutation of influenza viruses to amantadine and neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs during 2013-2014 episode in Beijing. Methods  RNA was extracted from pharyngeal or nasal swab samples from 37 influenza virus-infected patients and viral genotype/subgenotype were analyzed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. All influenza A viruses were further directly sequenced for NA and M2 matrix protein (M2 genes, and all influenza B viruses were further sequenced for NA and hemagglutinin (HA genes. The drug-resistant mutations and genetic evolution were analyzed by Vector NTI software and phylogenetic trees were plotted using Mega software. Results  Influenza A viruses were identified in 29 patients, including 23 with H1N1 and 6 with H3N2 viruses. Influenza B viruses were identified in 8 patients. M2 gene of all 29 patients with influenza A virus infection were detected with S31N amantadine-resistant mutation. NAIs-resistant mutations were not detected in all 37 patients with influenza A and B virus infection. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HA genes from 5 influenza B virus strains were identified as the B-Yamagata lineage, while NA genes from the corresponding strains were identified as B-Victoria lineage. Conclusions  Among Beijing Influenza B virus strains reassortants derived from B-Yamagata lineage and B-Victoria lineage were found. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.02.05

  4. Mutations of the aurora kinase C gene causing macrozoospermia are the most frequent genetic cause of male infertility in Algerian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Ounis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome and Y-chromosomal microdeletion analyses were once the only two genetic tests offered to infertile men. Analyses of aurora kinase C (AURKC and DPY19L2 are now recommended for patients presenting macrozoospermia and globozoospermia, respectively, two rare forms of teratozoospermia particularly frequent among North African men. We carried out genetic analyses on Algerian patients, to evaluate the prevalence of these syndromes in this population and to compare it with the expected frequency of Klinefelter syndrome and Y-microdeletions. We carried out a retrospective study on 599 consecutive patients consulting for couple infertility at the assisted reproduction unit of the Ibn Rochd Clinique, Constantine, Algeria. Abnormal sperm parameters were observed in 404 men. Fourteen and seven men had typical macrozoospermia and globozoospermia profiles, respectively. Molecular diagnosis was carried out for these patients, for the AURKC and DPY19L2 genes. Eleven men with macrozoospermia had a homozygous AURKC mutation (79%, corresponding to 2.7% of all patients with abnormal spermograms. All the men with globozoospermia studied (n = 5, corresponding to 1.2% of all infertile men, presented a homozygous DPY19L2 deletion. By comparison, we would expect 1.6% of the patients in this cohort to have Klinefelter syndrome and 0.23% to have Y-microdeletion. Our findings thus indicate that AURKC mutations are more frequent than Klinefelter syndrome and constitute the leading genetic cause of infertility in North African men. Furthermore, we estimate that AURKC and DPY19L2 molecular defects are 10 and 5 times more frequent, respectively, than Y-microdeletions.

  5. Environmental Exposures, Genetic Polymorphisms and p53 Mutational Spectra in a Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase converts (n = 315) who reported smoking at least 5 cigarettes a phenylalanine to dopamine and is a rate limiting day for at least I...180 APPENDIX R - Lack of association of tyrosine hydroxylase genetic polymorphism with cigarette sm oking...Shields, P. G., Main, D., Audrain, J., Roth, J., Boyd, N. R. and Caporaso, N. E.: Lack of association of tyrosine hydroxylase genetic polymorphism with

  6. Functional Validation of an Alpha-Actinin-4 Mutation as a Potential Cause of an Aggressive Presentation of Adolescent Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis: Implications for Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Julia M.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Birrane, Gabriel; Pollak, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic testing in the clinic and research lab is becoming more routinely used to identify rare genetic variants. However, attributing these rare variants as the cause of disease in an individual patient remains challenging. Here, we report a patient who presented with nephrotic syndrome and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) with collapsing features at age 14. Despite treatment, her kidney disease progressed to end-stage within a year of diagnosis. Through genetic testing, an Y265H variant with unknown clinical significance in alpha-actinin-4 gene (ACTN4) was identified. This variant has not been seen previously in FSGS patients nor is it present in genetic databases. Her clinical presentation is different from previous descriptions of ACTN4 mediated FSGS, which is characterized by sub-nephrotic proteinuria and slow progression to end stage kidney disease. We performed in vitro and cellular assays to characterize this novel ACTN4 variant before attributing causation. We found that ACTN4 with either Y265H or K255E (a known disease-causing mutation) increased the actin bundling activity of ACTN4 in vitro, was associated with the formation of intracellular aggregates, and increased podocyte contractile force. Despite the absence of a familial pattern of inheritance, these similar biological changes caused by the Y265H and K255E amino acid substitutions suggest that this new variant is potentially the cause of FSGS in this patient. Our studies highlight that functional validation in complement with genetic testing may be required to confirm the etiology of rare disease, especially in the setting of unusual clinical presentations. PMID:27977723

  7. Patterns of human genetic variation inferred from comparative analysis of allelic mutations in blood group antigen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Santosh Kumar; Blumenfeld, Olga O

    2011-03-01

    Comparative analysis of allelic variation of a gene sheds light on the pattern and process of its diversification at the population level. Gene families for which a large number of allelic forms have been verified by sequencing provide a useful resource for such studies. In this regard, human blood group-encoding genes are unique in that differences of cell surface traits among individuals and populations can be readily detected by serological screening, and correlation between the variant cell surface phenotype and the genotype is, in most cases, unequivocal. Here, we perform a comprehensive analysis of allelic forms, compiled in the Blood Group Antigen Gene Mutation database, of ABO, RHD/CE, GYPA/B/E and FUT1/2 gene families that encode the ABO, RH, MNS, and H/h blood group system antigens, respectively. These genes are excellent illustrative examples showing distinct mutational patterns among the alleles, and leading to speculation on how their origin may have been driven by recurrent but different molecular mechanisms. We illustrate how alignment of alleles of a gene may provide an additional insight into the DNA variation process and its pathways, and how this approach may serve to catalog alleles of a gene, simplifying the task and content of mutation databases.

  8. Prothrombin G20210A mutation is associated with young-onset stroke: the genetics of early-onset stroke study and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Baijia; Ryan, Kathleen A; Hamedani, Ali; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J; Koontz, Deborah; Bean, Christopher J; Gallagher, Margaret; Hooper, W Craig; McArdle, Patrick F; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stine, O Colin; Wozniak, Marcella A; Stern, Barney J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J; Cole, John W

    2014-04-01

    Although the prothrombin G20210A mutation has been implicated as a risk factor for venous thrombosis, its role in arterial ischemic stroke is unclear, particularly among young adults. To address this issue, we examined the association between prothrombin G20210A and ischemic stroke in a white case-control population and additionally performed a meta-analysis. From the population-based Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study, we identified 397 individuals of European ancestry aged 15 to 49 years with first-ever ischemic stroke and 426 matched controls. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) in the entire population and for subgroups stratified by sex, age, oral contraceptive use, migraine, and smoking status. A meta-analysis of 17 case-control studies (n=2305 cases <55 years) was also performed with and without GEOS data. Within GEOS, the association of the prothrombin G20210A mutation with ischemic stroke did not achieve statistical significance (OR=2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.9-6.5; P=0.07). However, among adults aged 15 to 42 years (younger than median age), cases were significantly more likely than controls to have the mutation (OR=5.9; 95% CI=1.2-28.1; P=0.03), whereas adults aged 42 to 49 years were not (OR=1.4; 95% CI=0.4-5.1; P=0.94). In our meta-analysis, the mutation was associated with significantly increased stroke risk in adults ≤55 years (OR=1.4; 95% CI=1.1-1.9; P=0.02), with significance increasing with addition of the GEOS results (OR=1.5; 95% CI=1.1-2.0; P=0.005). The prothrombin G20210A mutation is associated with ischemic stroke in young adults and may have an even stronger association among those with earlier onset strokes. Our finding of a stronger association in the younger young adult population requires replication.

  9. Death in bathtub revisited with molecular genetics: a victim with suicidal traits and a LQTS gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunetta, P; Levo, A; Männikkö, A; Penttilä, A; Sajantila, A

    2002-12-04

    A 44-year-old woman with a medical history of mental disorders and previous suicidal behaviour was found in a bathtub and pronounced death few minutes later despite of resuscitation attempts. After police investigation and on the basis of autopsy findings, the death was classified as suicide drowning. Retrospective examination of clinical data revealed, a prolonged rate-corrected QT-interval (QTc: 468 ms) 3 months before death. Post-mortem (PM) DNA analysis disclosed KCNH2(FIN) mutation for the long-QT syndrome (LQTS). The value of PM molecular screening for LQTS is emphasised, especially for victims of putative drowning.

  10. Digging for known genetic mutations underlying inherited bone and cartilage characteristics and disorders in the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Bianca; Mazrier, Hamutal; Wade, Claire M

    2016-07-19

    Gene mapping projects for many traits in both dogs and cats have yielded new knowledge. Both researchers and the public alike have been fascinated by the inheritance of breed characteristic phenotypes and sporadic disorders. It has been proposed that selective breeding practices have on occasion generated alterations in structure that might be harmful. In this review, simply inherited disorders and characteristics affecting bone and cartilage for which a putative mutation is known are collected. A better understanding of the known inherited basis of skeletal conditions and disorders will assist veterinarians to improve their diagnoses and increase their effectiveness on advising clients on the prevention, management, prognosis and possible treatment of the conditions.

  11. Genetic background for development of resistance mutations within the HCV NS3 protease-helicase in direct acting antiviral naive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikos, Georgios; Jabara, Cassandra B; Ahmad, Monazza Q; Herrmann, Eva; Zeuzem, Stefan; Welsch, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Subtype-specific response to ketoamide NS3 protease inhibitors is observed in patients with genotype 1 HCV infection. Whether the genetic diversity in the molecular target site of ketoamide compounds prior to treatment plays a role for resistance development and lower treatment response in subtype 1a is poorly understood. Using a public database, we retrieved worldwide NS3-sequence information of 581 dominant HCV variants from patients chronically infected with genotype 1 that were naive to direct-acting antivirals. We applied measures from phylogeny to study the pretreatment genetic diversity and complexity in NS3 full-length as well as the protease-helicase interface for subtype 1a and 1b, respectively. We found polymorphic sites more frequently in variants of subtype 1b than subtype 1a. Moreover, a significantly higher number of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions were found in subtype 1b (P<0.001). Transitions were more frequent than transversions, most notably in subtype 1a, whereas the higher average number of nucleotide differences per site was found in subtype 1b. A comparison of NS3 full-length versus domain interface residues for both subtypes revealed a significant difference only for synonymous substitutions (P<0.001). Our study suggests that the nature of a mismatch nucleotide exchange in NS3 may constitute an important viral genetic factor for response to ketoamide protease inhibitors. Our analysis further suggests that the subtype-specific pace of resistance development seen in clinical trials is not primarily related to differences in genetic diversity in the direct acting antiviral naive population, but rather appears to correlate with the natural frequency of transition mutations characteristic of each subtype.

  12. Range of genetic mutations associated with severe non-syndromic sporadic intellectual disability: an exome sequencing study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauch, A.; Wieczorek, D.; Graf, E.; Wieland, T.; Endele, S.; Schwarzmayr, T.; Albrecht, B.; Bartholdi, D.; Beygo, J.; Donato, N. di; Dufke, A.; Cremer, K.; Hempel, M.; Horn, D.; Hoyer, J.; Joset, P.; Ropke, A.; Moog, U.; Riess, A.; Thiel, C.T.; Tzschach, A.; Wiesener, A.; Wohlleber, E.; Zweier, C.; Ekici, A.B.; Zink, A.M.; Rump, A.; Meisinger, C.; Grallert, H.; Sticht, H.; Schenck, A.; Engels, H.; Rappold, G.; Schrock, E.; Wieacker, P.; Riess, O.; Meitinger, T.; Reis, A.; Strom, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The genetic cause of intellectual disability in most patients is unclear because of the absence of morphological clues, information about the position of such genes, and suitable screening methods. Our aim was to identify de-novo variants in individuals with sporadic non-syndromic intell

  13. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, J.P.H.; Waxman, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pa

  14. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, J.P.H.; Waxman, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pa

  15. The Prothrombin G20210A Mutation is Associated with Young-Onset Stroke: The Genetics of Early Onset Stroke Study and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Baijia; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Hamedani, Ali; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J.; Koontz, Deborah; Bean, Christopher J.; Gallagher, Margaret; Hooper, W. Craig; McArdle, Patrick F.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Stine, O. Colin; Wozniak, Marcella A.; Stern, Barney J.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Kittner, Steven J.; Cole, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the prothrombin G20210A mutation has been implicated as a risk factor for venous thrombosis, its role in arterial ischemic stroke is unclear, particularly among young-adults. To address this issue, we examined the association between prothrombin G20210A and ischemic stroke in a Caucasian case-control population and additionally performed a meta-analysis Methods From the population-based Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study we identified 397 individuals of European ancestry aged 15-49 years with first-ever ischemic stroke and 426 matched-controls. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios in the entire population and for subgroups stratified by gender, age, oral contraceptive use, migraine and smoking status. A meta-analysis of 17 case-control studies (n=2305 cases stroke did not achieve statistical significance (OR=2.5,95%CI=0.9-6.5,p=0.07). However, among adults aged 15-42 (younger than median age), cases were significantly more likely than controls to have the mutation (OR=5.9,95%CI=1.2-28.1,p=0.03), whereas adults ages 42-49 were not (OR=1.4,95%CI=0.4-5.1,p=0.94). In our meta-analysis, the mutation was associated with significantly increased stroke risk in adults stroke in young-adults and may have an even stronger association among those with earlier onset strokes. Our finding of a stronger association in the younger-young adult population requires replication. PMID:24619398

  16. In situ genetic correction of the sickle cell anemia mutation in human induced pluripotent stem cells using engineered zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiano, Vittorio; Maeder, Morgan L; Angstman, James F; Haddad, Bahareh; Khayter, Cyd; Yeo, Dana T; Goodwin, Mathew J; Hawkins, John S; Ramirez, Cherie L; Batista, Luis F Z; Artandi, Steven E; Wernig, Marius; Joung, J Keith

    2011-11-01

    The combination of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and targeted gene modification by homologous recombination (HR) represents a promising new approach to generate genetically corrected, patient-derived cells that could be used for autologous transplantation therapies. This strategy has several potential advantages over conventional gene therapy including eliminating the need for immunosuppression, avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis by therapeutic vectors, and maintaining expression of the corrected gene by endogenous control elements rather than a constitutive promoter. However, gene targeting in human pluripotent cells has remained challenging and inefficient. Recently, engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have been shown to substantially increase HR frequencies in human iPSCs, raising the prospect of using this technology to correct disease causing mutations. Here, we describe the generation of iPSC lines from sickle cell anemia patients and in situ correction of the disease causing mutation using three ZFN pairs made by the publicly available oligomerized pool engineering method (OPEN). Gene-corrected cells retained full pluripotency and a normal karyotype following removal of reprogramming factor and drug-resistance genes. By testing various conditions, we also demonstrated that HR events in human iPSCs can occur as far as 82 bps from a ZFN-induced break. Our approach delineates a roadmap for using ZFNs made by an open-source method to achieve efficient, transgene-free correction of monogenic disease mutations in patient-derived iPSCs. Our results provide an important proof of principle that ZFNs can be used to produce gene-corrected human iPSCs that could be used for therapeutic applications.

  17. A protocol for genetic evaluation of patients with multiple colorectal adenomas and without evidence of APC gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Guy; Rozen, Paul; Bercovich, Dani; Shochat, Chen; Solar, Irit; Strul, Hana; Kariv, Revital; Halpern, Zamir

    2010-09-01

    Patients with multiple (Jewish individuals with 5 to > or = 40 colonic adenomas who did not fulfill Amsterdam (clinical) criteria for Lynch syndrome. Analyses included completion of APC gene exon 16 sequencing, analysis for APC gene copy number variations (deletions or duplications), MUTYH gene sequencing, and microsatellite instability in CRC patients fulfilling "Bethesda" (laboratory investigation) criteria for Lynch syndrome. Completion of APC gene exon 16 sequencing revealed one patient with the E1317Q polymorphism. All were normal by APC multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis. Pathogenic MUTYH mutations were found in three patients, all of North African origin; two additional patients had variants of unknown significance. One of six patients with Bethesda-positive criteria was MSI-High with immunohistology consistent with MLH1 mutation. Based on this small but well-characterized cohort with multiple colorectal adenomas, Lynch syndrome needs to be excluded if there are compatible criteria; otherwise MUTYH sequencing is probably the first step in evaluating APC-negative patients, especially for Jews of North African descent. Completing APC exon 16 sequencing and copy number variations analysis should probably be the last evaluations.

  18. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  19. p53 and H-ras mutations and microsatellite instability in renal pelvic carcinomas of NON / Shi mice treated with N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine: different genetic alteration from urinary bladder carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gen, H; Yamamoto, S; Morimura, K; Min, W; Mitsuhashi, M; Murai, T; Mori, S; Hosono, M; Oohara, T; Makino, S; Wanibuchi, H; Fukushima, S

    2001-12-01

    We previously reported p53 mutations to be frequent (greater than 70%), whereas both H-ras mutations and microsatellite instability (MSI) were infrequent (about 10%), in urinary bladder carcinomas (UBCs) and their metastatic foci in the N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN)-induced mouse urothelial carcinogenesis model. In the present study, an analysis of p53 and H-ras mutations as well as MSI was performed on 12 renal pelvic carcinomas (RPCs) and 8 metastatic or invading foci produced by the same experimental procedure. Histologically, 10 of the RPCs were transitional cell carcinomas and the remaining 2 were squamous cell carcinomas. p53 mutations were infrequent and only found in one primary RPC (8%), its metastatic foci and an invading lesion in another animal (in a total 2 of 12; 17%). H-ras mutations were slightly more frequent (found in 3 of 12 animals; 25%), 4 of 5 involving codon 44, GTG to GCG, not a hot-spot reported for human cancers. In two cases, H-ras mutations were confined to lung metastasis and not detectable in their primary RPCs. MSI analysis was available for 6 pairs of primary RPCs and their metastatic foci, and 4 animals (67%) had MSI at one or more microsatellite loci. Overall, the distribution of genetic alterations differed from that in UBCs produced by the same experimental protocol. The results thus suggest that different genetic pathways may participate in carcinogenesis of the upper and lower urinary tract due to BBN.

  20. Genetic mutations in live infectious bronchitis vaccine viruses following single or dual in vitro infection of tracheal organ cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Christopher; Bennett, Sarah; Forrester, Anne; Ganapathy, Kannan

    2016-12-01

    Despite regular co-vaccination of two different strains of live infectious bronchitis vaccine viruses, little is known about possible mutations in these viruses following vaccination. As an alternative to chicks, this study used an in vitro infection model to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the part-S1 gene of two live infectious bronchitis virus vaccine strains (793B and Massachusetts) following single or dual inoculation onto tracheal organ cultures. Results indicate that viral titres reduced over the duration of the study; conversely, the amount of detected infectious bronchitis virus genome increased. Results demonstrate a greater number of non-synonymous SNPs in both vaccine strains when they are co-inoculated, compared with the single inoculations. The influence of the increased SNP and hydrophobic properties of the translated proteins on the vaccine viruses' virulence is unknown.

  1. A molecular genetic analysis of carotenoid biosynthesis and the effects of carotenoid mutations on other photosynthetic genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    The nine known R. capsulatus carotenoid genes are contained within the 46 kilobase (kb) photosynthesis gene cluster. An 11 kb subcluster containing eight of these genes has been cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. A new gene, crtK, has been located in the middle of the subcluster. The carotenoid gene cluster contains sequences homologous to Escherichia coli ..omega../sup 70/ promoters, rho-independent transcription terminators, and prokaryotic transcriptional factor binding sites. The phenotypes and genotypes of ten transposon Tn5.7 insertion mutations within the carotenoid gene cluster have been analyzed, by characterization of the carotenoids accumulated and high resolution mapping of the Tn5.7 insertions. The enzymatic blockages in previously uncharacterized early carotenoid mutants have been determined using a new in vitro synthesis system, suggesting specific roles for the CrtB and CrtE gene products. The expression of six of the eight carotenoid genes in the cluster is induced upon the shift from dark chemoheterotrophic to anaerobic photosynthetic growth. The magnitude of the induction is equivalent to that of genes encoding structural photosynthesis polypeptides, although the carotenoid genes are induced earlier after the growth shift. Different means of regulating photosynthesis genes in R. capsulatus are discussed, and a rationale for the temporal pattern of expression of the carotenoid genes during photosynthetic adaptation is presented. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the two dehydrogenases of the R. capsulatus carotenoid biosynthesis pathway reveals two regions of strong similarity. The effect of carotenoid mutations on the photosynthetic phenotype has been studied by examining growth rates, pigments, pigment-protein complexes and gene expression for a complete set of carotenoid mutants. 161 refs.

  2. Method for Optimal Sensor Deployment on 3D Terrains Utilizing a Steady State Genetic Algorithm with a Guided Walk Mutation Operator Based on the Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unaldi, Numan; Temel, Samil; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most critical issues of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) is the deployment of a limited number of sensors in order to achieve maximum coverage on a terrain. The optimal sensor deployment which enables one to minimize the consumed energy, communication time and manpower for the maintenance of the network has attracted interest with the increased number of studies conducted on the subject in the last decade. Most of the studies in the literature today are proposed for two dimensional (2D) surfaces; however, real world sensor deployments often arise on three dimensional (3D) environments. In this paper, a guided wavelet transform (WT) based deployment strategy (WTDS) for 3D terrains, in which the sensor movements are carried out within the mutation phase of the genetic algorithms (GAs) is proposed. The proposed algorithm aims to maximize the Quality of Coverage (QoC) of a WSN via deploying a limited number of sensors on a 3D surface by utilizing a probabilistic sensing model and the Bresenham's line of sight (LOS) algorithm. In addition, the method followed in this paper is novel to the literature and the performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with the Delaunay Triangulation (DT) method as well as a standard genetic algorithm based method and the results reveal that the proposed method is a more powerful and more successful method for sensor deployment on 3D terrains. PMID:22666078

  3. Retrospective genetic study of germinative mutations in Str loci of individuals potentially exposed to ionizing radiation;Estudo genetico retrospectivo de mutacoes germinativas em Loci Str de individuos potencialmente expostos a radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Emilia Oliveira Alves

    2010-07-01

    The Brazilian radiological accident that occurred in 1987, in Goiania, it was a terrible radiation episode. As a consequence, hundreds of people were contaminated due to the Cesium-137 radiation. Recently, many studies had shown that genome instabilities, such as, mutations, chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei formation and micro satellite instability and a delay on cellular death are usually reported on mammal cells exposed to ionizing radiation, being considered as a manly risk to humans. Mutations can be spontaneous, and the occurrence is dependent on the organism, or, induced, being associated to mutagenic exposition. Ionizing radiations are an example of physical and mutagenic agents that could harm the cell repair and could cause the development of many types of cancer. The evaluation of the biological effects of the ionizing radiation, in somatic and germ line cells, with a consequent determination of the radio-induced mutations, it is extremely important to estimate the genetic risks, manly in population exposed to radiation. The analyses of repetitive DNA sequences have been demonstrated that such sequences are prone to high rates of spontaneous mutations. The minisatellites and microsatellites have been used to demonstrate the induction of germ line mutation rates on mouse, humans, among others organisms. The aim of the present study was to analyze the frequency of microsatellite alterations to determine the mutation rates occurred in germ cells of the parents exposed to the ionizing radiation of the Cesium-137. The studied group was constitute of 10 families of individuals accidentally exposed to Cesium-137 and by the control group constituted by 645 healthy individuals who carried out paternity tests on 2009. We found only one mutation of paternal origin in the D8S1179 locus on the exposed group, being the mutation rate of 0.002. In the control group, we found 01 mutation on D16S539 loei and on D3S1358; 02 mutations on Penta E loeus; 04 mutations on D

  4. Mutation and premating isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  5. [A case report of early-onset Alzheimer's disease with multiple psychotic symptoms, finally diagnosed as APPV717I mutation by genetic testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Takashi; Ochi, Shinichiro; Matsumoto, Teruhisa; Yoshida, Taku; Abe, Masao; Toyota, Yasutaka; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Tanimukai, Satoshi; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to confirm a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) because patients sometimes have non-specific cortical features, such as psychiatric symptoms, executive functional impairment, and pyramidal symptoms, along with typical symptoms, such as recent memory impairment and disorientation. We encountered a patient with multiple psychotic symptoms, finally diagnosed with EOAD on genetic testing. A right-handed sixty-year-old man, whose mother was suspected of having dementia, developed memory impairment at the age of fifty, disorientation at the age of fifty-six, and both visual hallucination and dressing apraxia at the age of fifty-nine. After admission to a psychiatric hospital for treatment, his symptoms disappeared with antipsychotic medication. However, his ADL were declining and so he was referred to our university hospital. He had frontal lobe symptoms, pyramidal signs, and extrapyramidal signs with severe dementia. Neuropsychological examinations were not possible because of sedation. On brain MRI, he showed diffuse atrophy of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. HMPO-SPECT showed hypoperfusion of cerebral cortices diffusely. We decided to perform genetic testing because he had both family and alcohol abuse histories. He showed EOAD with V717I mutation of the amyloid precursor protein gene. After the discontinuation of antipsychotics, excessive sedation and extrapyramidal signs disappeared. A dose of 10 mg of donepezil was effective to improve motivation and activity, and his mini mental examination score was calculable after recovery. The case supports usefulness of applying genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease to patients with early onset dementia, even when they do not have a family history.

  6. Precise localization of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia and pseudoachondroplasia mutations by genetic and physical mapping of chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, R.G.; Cekleniak, J.A. [Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cohn, D.H. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1), a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia resulting in peripheral joint deformities and premature osteoarthritis, and pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), a more severe disorder associated with short-limbed dwarfism, have recently been mapped to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 19. Chondrocytes from some PSACH patients accumulate lamellar deposits in the endoplasmic reticulum that are immunologically cross-reactive with aggrecan. However, neither aggrecan nor any known candidate gene maps to the EDM1/PSACH region of chromosome 19. Genetic linkage mapping in two lage families had placed the disease locus between D19S215 (19p12) and D19S212 (19p13.1), an interval of about 3.5 Mb. With at least five potentially informative cross-overs within this interval, recombination mapping at greater resolution was undertaken. From cosmids assigned to the region by fluorescence in situ hybridization and contig assembly, dinucleotide repeat tracts were identified for use as polymorphic genetic markers. Linkage data from three new dinucleotide repeat markers from cosmids mapped between D19S212 and D19S215 limit the EDM1/PSACH locus to an interval spanning approximately 2 Mb.

  7. The lld mutation in Pisum sativum used as a genetic tool to discern the plant leaflet/leaf developmental process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vishakha; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-06-01

    Leaves of P. sativum the double mutant genotype tendril-less (tl) leaflet-development (lld), due to the action of lld mutation, produce many leaflets that are aborted at different stages of development. Morphological, vein pattern and histological observations showed that aborted leaflets became cup/bell/trumpet (cup) shaped because of segmental differentiation in the leaflet primordium. Cup's inside lamina surface was adaxial and outer surfaces of cup and its stem were abaxial. The lld cups were phenotypically homologous to aborted leaves described in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, angustifolia and those which underexpressed the HD-ZIP III proteins. Leaflet primordium was found to grow and establish three dimensional polarities apex-downwards. Primordium produced lateral outgrowth on one side of midvein. Differentiation, in the outgrowth of secondary veins, whose xylem tissues faced each other, established the adaxial-abaxial polarity. Lateral outgrowth then developed a cavity which got bounded by future adaxial epidermis. Further growth, veinlet formation, differentiation of palisade parenchyma and spongy parenchyma followed. Opening of lateral outgrowth at its outer midline produced a flat leaflet with lateral lamina spans. The structural and functional correspondence between leaflet and simple leaves suggested commonality between leaf and leaflet development mechanisms. A molecular model for the lld led leaflet abortion was also provided.

  8. MutAid: Sanger and NGS Based Integrated Pipeline for Mutation Identification, Validation and Annotation in Human Molecular Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ram Vinay; Pabinger, Stephan; Kriegner, Albert; Weinhäusel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Sanger sequencing as well as Next-Generation Sequencing have been used for the identification of disease causing mutations in human molecular research. The majority of currently available tools are developed for research and explorative purposes and often do not provide a complete, efficient, one-stop solution. As the focus of currently developed tools is mainly on NGS data analysis, no integrative solution for the analysis of Sanger data is provided and consequently a one-stop solution to analyze reads from both sequencing platforms is not available. We have therefore developed a new pipeline called MutAid to analyze and interpret raw sequencing data produced by Sanger or several NGS sequencing platforms. It performs format conversion, base calling, quality trimming, filtering, read mapping, variant calling, variant annotation and analysis of Sanger and NGS data under a single platform. It is capable of analyzing reads from multiple patients in a single run to create a list of potential disease causing base substitutions as well as insertions and deletions. MutAid has been developed for expert and non-expert users and supports four sequencing platforms including Sanger, Illumina, 454 and Ion Torrent. Furthermore, for NGS data analysis, five read mappers including BWA, TMAP, Bowtie, Bowtie2 and GSNAP and four variant callers including GATK-HaplotypeCaller, SAMTOOLS, Freebayes and VarScan2 pipelines are supported. MutAid is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/mutaid.

  9. Genetic and functional analyses of SHANK2 mutations suggest a multiple hit model of autism spectrum disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire S Leblond

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders with a complex inheritance pattern. While many rare variants in synaptic proteins have been identified in patients with ASD, little is known about their effects at the synapse and their interactions with other genetic variations. Here, following the discovery of two de novo SHANK2 deletions by the Autism Genome Project, we identified a novel 421 kb de novo SHANK2 deletion in a patient with autism. We then sequenced SHANK2 in 455 patients with ASD and 431 controls and integrated these results with those reported by Berkel et al. 2010 (n = 396 patients and n = 659 controls. We observed a significant enrichment of variants affecting conserved amino acids in 29 of 851 (3.4% patients and in 16 of 1,090 (1.5% controls (P = 0.004, OR = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.23-4.70. In neuronal cell cultures, the variants identified in patients were associated with a reduced synaptic density at dendrites compared to the variants only detected in controls (P = 0.0013. Interestingly, the three patients with de novo SHANK2 deletions also carried inherited CNVs at 15q11-q13 previously associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. In two cases, the nicotinic receptor CHRNA7 was duplicated and in one case the synaptic translation repressor CYFIP1 was deleted. These results strengthen the role of synaptic gene dysfunction in ASD but also highlight the presence of putative modifier genes, which is in keeping with the "multiple hit model" for ASD. A better knowledge of these genetic interactions will be necessary to understand the complex inheritance pattern of ASD.

  10. Genetic and Functional Analyses of SHANK2 Mutations Suggest a Multiple Hit Model of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblond, Claire S.; Heinrich, Jutta; Delorme, Richard; Proepper, Christian; Betancur, Catalina; Huguet, Guillaume; Konyukh, Marina; Chaste, Pauline; Ey, Elodie; Rastam, Maria; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Nygren, Gudrun; Gillberg, I. Carina; Melke, Jonas; Toro, Roberto; Regnault, Beatrice; Fauchereau, Fabien; Mercati, Oriane; Lemière, Nathalie; Skuse, David; Poot, Martin; Holt, Richard; Monaco, Anthony P.; Järvelä, Irma; Kantojärvi, Katri; Vanhala, Raija; Curran, Sarah; Collier, David A.; Bolton, Patrick; Chiocchetti, Andreas; Klauck, Sabine M.; Poustka, Fritz; Freitag, Christine M.; Waltes, Regina; Kopp, Marnie; Duketis, Eftichia; Bacchelli, Elena; Minopoli, Fiorella; Ruta, Liliana; Battaglia, Agatino; Mazzone, Luigi; Maestrini, Elena; Sequeira, Ana F.; Oliveira, Barbara; Vicente, Astrid; Oliveira, Guiomar; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen W.; Zelenika, Diana; Delepine, Marc; Lathrop, Mark; Bonneau, Dominique; Guinchat, Vincent; Devillard, Françoise; Assouline, Brigitte; Mouren, Marie-Christine; Leboyer, Marion; Gillberg, Christopher; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders with a complex inheritance pattern. While many rare variants in synaptic proteins have been identified in patients with ASD, little is known about their effects at the synapse and their interactions with other genetic variations. Here, following the discovery of two de novo SHANK2 deletions by the Autism Genome Project, we identified a novel 421 kb de novo SHANK2 deletion in a patient with autism. We then sequenced SHANK2 in 455 patients with ASD and 431 controls and integrated these results with those reported by Berkel et al. 2010 (n = 396 patients and n = 659 controls). We observed a significant enrichment of variants affecting conserved amino acids in 29 of 851 (3.4%) patients and in 16 of 1,090 (1.5%) controls (P = 0.004, OR = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.23–4.70). In neuronal cell cultures, the variants identified in patients were associated with a reduced synaptic density at dendrites compared to the variants only detected in controls (P = 0.0013). Interestingly, the three patients with de novo SHANK2 deletions also carried inherited CNVs at 15q11–q13 previously associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. In two cases, the nicotinic receptor CHRNA7 was duplicated and in one case the synaptic translation repressor CYFIP1 was deleted. These results strengthen the role of synaptic gene dysfunction in ASD but also highlight the presence of putative modifier genes, which is in keeping with the “multiple hit model” for ASD. A better knowledge of these genetic interactions will be necessary to understand the complex inheritance pattern of ASD. PMID:22346768

  11. Genetic and mechanistic evaluation for the weak A phenotype in Ael blood type with IVS6 + 5G>A ABO gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D-P; Sun, C-F; Ning, H-C; Peng, C-T; Wang, W-T; Tseng, C-P

    2015-01-01

    Ael is a rare blood type that is characterized by weak agglutination of RBCs when reacts with anti-A antibody in adsorption-elution test. Although IVS6 + 5G→A mutation is known to associate with the Ael blood type, genetic and mechanistic evaluation for the weak agglutination of Ael with IVS6 + 5G→A mutation has not yet been completely addressed. In this study, five cases of confirmed Ael individuals were analysed. The cDNAs for the A(el) alleles were obtained by cloning method for sequence analyses. The erythroleukemia K562 cells were used as the cell study model and were transfected with the A(el) expression construct. Flow cytometry analysis was then performed to determine the levels of surface antigen expression. The results indicated that IVS6 + 5G→A attributes to all cases of Ael . RT-PCR analyses revealed the presence of at least 10 types of aberrant A(el) splicing transcripts. Most of the transcripts caused early termination and produced non-functional protein during translation. Nevertheless, the transcript without exons 5-6 was predicted to generate functional Ael glycosyltransferase lacking 57 amino acids at the N-terminal segment. When the exons 5-6 deletion transcript was stably expressed in the K562 cells, weak agglutination of the cells can be induced by adding anti-A antibody followed by adsorption-elution test. This study demonstrates that aberrant splicing of A transcripts contributes to weak A expression and the weak agglutination of Ael -RBCs, adding to the complexity for the regulatory mechanisms of ABO gene expression. © 2014 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  12. 结直肠腺癌BRAF基因突变对临床治疗和预后的意义%The Significance of BRAF Genetic Mutations for the Clinical Treatment and Prognosis of Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍洁

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the significance of BRAF genetic mutations for clinical treatment and prognosis of colorectal cancer patients. Methods 161 specimens of rectal adenocarcinoma and 61 normal tissues near the cancer from diagnose and surgery of the pathology department during January 2009 and December 2009 were selected. BRAF genetic mutations were detected by PCR-DNA sequencing. The pathological data was recorded and the follow-up of 60-months-survival rate was performed. Results 1. In the rectal adenocarcinoma, BRAF genetic mutations rate was 9.04% and BRAF-V600E was the most common type, and no mutations was found in the normal tissues near the cancer. 2. The mutations rate was higher in patients in lower histological grade than those in higher histological grade, in patients with lymphatic metastasis than those without lymphatic metastasis, and the differences were statistically significant (P0.05). 3. The survival rates of patients with BRAF Mutation were lower than those with wild type BRAF, and the difference in survival curves was statistically significant(P0.05)。③癌组织为BRAF突变型的患者生存率较野生型的低,两条生存曲线明显分开差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论结直肠癌患者中,癌组织BRAF基因突变率明显高于癌旁正常组织与分化程度、淋巴转移有相关性,与患者生存率成负相关提示预后不良。

  13. Genetic diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets in a cohort study: Tubular reabsorption of phosphate and 1,25(OH2D serum levels are associated with PHEX mutation type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Miñaur Sixto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic Hypophosphatemic Rickets (HR is a group of diseases characterized by renal phosphate wasting with inappropriately low or normal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH2D serum levels. The most common form of HR is X-linked dominant HR (XLHR which is caused by inactivating mutations in the PHEX gene. The purpose of this study was to perform genetic diagnosis in a cohort of patients with clinical diagnosis of HR, to perform genotype-phenotype correlations of those patients and to compare our data with other HR cohort studies. Methods Forty three affected individuals from 36 non related families were analyzed. For the genetic analysis, the PHEX gene was sequenced in all of the patients and in 13 cases the study was complemented by mRNA sequencing and Multiple Ligation Probe Assay. For the genotype-phenotype correlation study, the clinical and biochemical phenotype of the patients was compared with the type of mutation, which was grouped into clearly deleterious or likely causative, using the Mann-Whitney and Fisher's exact test. Results Mutations in the PHEX gene were identified in all the patients thus confirming an XLHR. Thirty four different mutations were found distributed throughout the gene with higher density at the 3' end. The majority of the mutations were novel (69.4%, most of them resulted in a truncated PHEX protein (83.3% and were family specific (88.9%. Tubular reabsorption of phosphate (TRP and 1,25(OH2D serum levels were significantly lower in patients carrying clearly deleterious mutations than in patients carrying likely causative ones (61.39 ± 19.76 vs. 80.14 ± 8.80%, p = 0.028 and 40.93 ± 30.73 vs. 78.46 ± 36.27 pg/ml, p = 0.013. Conclusions PHEX gene mutations were found in all the HR cases analyzed, which was in contrast with other cohort studies. Patients with clearly deleterious PHEX mutations had lower TRP and 1,25(OH2D levels suggesting that the PHEX type of mutation might predict the XLHR

  14. Common genetic variation at BARD1 is not associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Marquart, Louise; McGuffog, Lesley;

    2011-01-01

    Inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve breast cancer risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers may improve personalized cancer prevention strategies.......Inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve breast cancer risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers may improve personalized cancer prevention strategies....

  15. Brugada综合征致病关联基因突变研究进展%Research progression on genetic mutations associated with Brugada syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高娟; 白亚娜; 程宁; 胡晓斌

    2011-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is a hereditary disease. 10 genes have been associated with Brugada syndrome, which respectively encodes sodium ion channel, calcium ion channel and potassium ion channel proteins. SCN5A, GPD1L, SCN1B and SCN3B are genes of the sodium ion channel. These genes of CACNA1C, CACNB2, CACNA2D1 encode the protein of calcium ion channel. These genes of HCN4, KCNE3 and KCNH2 encode the protein of potassium ion channel. The research progression on genetic mutations of Brugada syndrome are reviewed.%Brugada综合征是一种遗传性心脏病,目前已发现10种导致Brugada综合征的致病基因,分为编码钠离子通道、钙离子通道和钾离子通道蛋白的基因.编码钠离子通道的基因有SCN5A基因、GPD1L基因、SCN1B基因、SCN3B基因;编码钙离子通道的基因有CACNA1C基因、CACNB2基因、CACNA2D1基因;编码钾离子通道的基因有HCN4基因、KCNE3基因和KCNH2基因.

  16. LPAC syndrome associated with deletion of the full exon 4 in a ABCB4 genetic mutation in a patient with hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fombuena, Blanca; Ampuero, Javier; Álvarez, Luis; Aparcero, Reyes; Llorca, Rocío; Millán, Raquel; Pastor, Helena; Andueza, Sara; Barbu, Veronique; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    Low-phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis syndrome (LPAC) is associated with ABCB4 genetic mutation. ABCB4 encodes MDR3 protein, involved in biliary phosphatidylcholine excretion.Higher prevalence in women, biliary symptoms in young adults and ursodesoxycholic acid (UDCA) response are the main features. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with hepatitis C, genotype 1b, fibrosis F3, null responder to Peg-IFN-alpha-2b/ribavirin and nephritic colic. In 2011 he developed jaundice, pruritus and epigastric pain.He showed increased serum levels of AST, ALT, GGT, bilirubin and alpha-fetoprotein, and viral load (14,600,000 IU/mL). Pancreatic- CT, endoscopic ultrasonography and echo-Doppler showed noncirrhotic chronic liver disease. The episode resolved spontaneously and one year later he suffered a similar episode. UDCA was started with excellent response. An immunohistochemistry study and sequencing of ABCB4 did not find alteration. MLPA® technique detected heterozygous deletion of the full exon 4 confirming LPAC syndrome diagnosis.

  17. The natural history of a genetic subtype of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy caused by a p.S358L mutation in TMEM43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, K A; Connors, S P; Merner, N; Haywood, A; Young, T-L; McKenna, W J; Gallagher, B; Curtis, F; Bassett, A S; Parfrey, P S

    2013-04-01

    To determine the phenotype and natural history of a founder genetic subtype of autosomal dominant arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) caused by a p.S358L mutation in TMEM43. The age of onset of cardiac symptoms, clinical events and test abnormalities were studied in 412 subjects (258 affected and 154 unaffected), all of which occurred in affected males significantly earlier and more often than unaffected males. Affected males were hospitalized four times more often than affected females (p ≤ 0.0001) and died younger (p ≤ 0.001). The temporal sequence from symptoms onset to death was prolonged in affected females by 1-2 decades. The most prevalent electrocardiogram (ECG) manifestation was poor R wave progression (PRWP), with affected males twice as likely to develop PRWP as affected females (p ≤ 0.05). Left ventricular enlargement (LVE) occurred in 43% of affected subjects, with 11% fulfilling criteria for dilated cardiomyopathy. Ventricular ectopy on Holter monitor was common and occurred early: the most diagnostically useful clinical test. No symptom or test could rule out diagnosis. This ARVC subtype is a sex-influenced lethal arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, with a unique ECG finding, LV dilatation, heart failure and early death, where molecular pre-symptomatic diagnosis has the greatest clinical utility. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. LPAC syndrome associated with deletion of the full exon 4 in a ABCB4 genetic mutation in a patient with hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Fombuena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis syndrome (LPAC is associated with ABCB4 genetic mutation. ABCB4 encodes MDR3 protein, involved in biliary phosphatidylcholine excretion. Higher prevalence in women, biliary symptoms in young adults and ursodesoxycholic acid (UDCA response are the main features. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with hepatitis C, genotype 1b, fibrosis F3, null responder to Peg-IFNα2b/ribavirin and nephritic colic. In 2011 he developed jaundice, pruritus and epigastric pain. He showed increased serum levels of AST, ALT, GGT, bilirubin and alpha-fetoprotein, and viral load (14,600,000IU/mL. Pancreatic-CT, endoscopic ultrasonography and echo-Doppler showed non-cirrhotic chronic liver disease. The episode resolved spontaneously and one year later he suffered a similar episode. UDCA was started with excellent response. An immunohistochemistry study and sequencing of ABCB4 did not find alteration. MLPA® technique detected heterozygous deletion of the full exon 4 confirming LPAC syndrome diagnosis.

  19. A regimen combining the Wee1 inhibitor AZD1775 with HDAC inhibitors targets human acute myeloid leukemia cells harboring various genetic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L; Zhang, Y; Chen, S; Kmieciak, M; Leng, Y; Lin, H; Rizzo, K A; Dumur, C I; Ferreira-Gonzalez, A; Dai, Y; Grant, S

    2015-04-01

    AZD1775 targets the cell cycle checkpoint kinase Wee1 and potentiates genotoxic agent cytotoxicity through p53-dependent or -independent mechanisms. Here, we report that AZD1775 interacted synergistically with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs, for example, Vorinostat), which interrupt the DNA damage response, to kill p53-wild type (wt) or -deficient as well as FLT3-ITD leukemia cells in association with pronounced Wee1 inhibition and diminished cdc2/Cdk1 Y15 phosphorylation. Similarly, Wee1 shRNA knockdown significantly sensitized cells to HDACIs. Although AZD1775 induced Chk1 activation, reflected by markedly increased Chk1 S296/S317/S345 phosphorylation leading to inhibitory T14 phosphorylation of cdc2/Cdk1, these compensatory responses were sharply abrogated by HDACIs. This was accompanied by premature mitotic entry, multiple mitotic abnormalities and accumulation of early S-phase cells displaying increased newly replicated DNA, culminating in robust DNA damage and apoptosis. The regimen was active against patient-derived acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells harboring either wt or mutant p53 and various next-generation sequencing-defined mutations. Primitive CD34(+)/CD123(+)/CD38(-) populations enriched for leukemia-initiating progenitors, but not normal CD34(+) hematopoietic cells, were highly susceptible to this regimen. Finally, combining AZD1775 with Vorinostat in AML murine xenografts significantly reduced tumor burden and prolonged animal survival. A strategy combining Wee1 with HDACI inhibition warrants further investigation in AML with poor prognostic genetic aberrations.

  20. Common genetic variation at BARD1 is not associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spurdle, A.B.; Marquart, L.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Sinilnikova, O.; Wan, F.; Chen, X.; Beesley, J.; Singer, C.F.; Dressler, A.C.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Blum, J.L.; Tung, N.; Weitzel, J.; Lynch, H.; Garber, J.; Easton, D.F.; Peock, S.; Cook, M.; Oliver, C.T.; Frost, D.; Conroy, D.; Evans, D.G.; Lalloo, F.; Eeles, R.; Izatt, L.; Davidson, R.; Chu, C.; Eccles, D.; Selkirk, C.G.; Daly, M.; Isaacs, C.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Buecher, B.; Belotti, M.; Mazoyer, S.; Barjhoux, L.; Verny-Pierre, C.; Lasset, C.; Dreyfus, H.; Pujol, P.; Collonge-Rame, M.A.; Rookus, M.A.; Verhoef, S.; Kriege, M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M.G.; Os, T.A. van; Wijnen, J.; Devilee, P.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Blok, M.J.; Heikkinen, T.; Nevanlinna, H.; Jakubowska, A.; Lubinski, J.; Huzarski, T.; Byrski, T.; Durocher, F.; Couch, F.J.; Lindor, N.M.; Wang, X.; Thomassen, M.; Domchek, S.; Nathanson, K.; Caligo, M.; Jernstrom, H.; Liljegren, A.; Ehrencrona, H.; Karlsson, P.; Ganz, P.A.; Olopade, O.I.; Tomlinson, G.; Neuhausen, S.; Antoniou, A.C.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Rebbeck, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve breast cancer risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers may improve personalized cancer prevention strategies. METHODS: A cohort of 5,546 BRCA1 and 2,865 BRCA2 mutat

  1. Phenotype comparison of MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers in a cohort of 1,914 individuals undergoing clinical genetic testing in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Kastrinos (Fay); E.M. Stoffel (Elena); J. Balmana (Judith); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); R. Mercado (Rowena); S. Syngal (Sapna)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Aims: Lynch syndrome is caused by germ-line mismatch repair gene mutations. We examined the phenotypic differences between MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutation carriers and whether mutation type (point versus large rearrangement) affected phenotypic expression. Methods: This is a

  2. Developing Universal Genetic Tools for Rapid and Efficient Deletion Mutation in Vibrio Species Based on Suicide T-Vectors Carrying a Novel Counterselectable Marker, vmi480.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Luo

    Full Text Available Despite that Vibrio spp. have a significant impact on the health of humans and aquatic animals, the molecular basis of their pathogenesis is little known, mainly due to the limited genetic tools for the functional research of genes in Vibrio. In some cases, deletion of target DNAs in Vibrio can be achieved through the use of suicide vectors. However, these strategies are time-consuming and lack universality, and the widely used counterselectable gene sacB does not work well in Vibrio cells. In this study, we developed universal genetic tools for rapid and efficient deletion mutations in Vibrio species based on suicide T-Vectors carrying a novel counterselectable marker, vmi480. We explored two uncharacterized genes, vmi480 and vmi470, in a genomic island from Vibrio mimicus VM573 and confirmed that vmi480 and vmi470 constitute a two-component toxin-antitoxin system through deletion and expression of vmi480 and vmi470. The product of vmi480 exhibited strong toxicity to Escherichia coli cells. Based on vmi480 and the PBAD or PTAC promoter system, we constructed two suicide T-vectors, pLP11 and pLP12, and each of these vectors contained a multiple cloning region with two AhdI sites. Both vectors linearized by AhdI digestion could be stored and directly ligated with purified PCR products without a digestion step. By using pLP11 and pLP12 coupled with a highly efficient conjugation system provided by E. coli β2163, six genes from four representative Vibrio species were easily deleted. By using the counterselective marker vmi480, we obtained 3-12 positive colonies (deletion mutants among no more than 20 colonies randomly selected on counterselection plates. The strategy does not require the digestion of PCR products and suicide vectors every time, and it avoids large-scale screening colonies on counterselective plates. These results demonstrate that we successfully developed universal genetic tools for rapid and efficient gene deletion in Vibrio

  3. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing...... of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs. RESULTS: We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3...... probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies...

  4. Biochemical evidence for a mitochondrial genetic modifier in the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pingping; Liang, Min; Zhang, Chaofan; Zhao, Xiaoxu; He, Qiufen; Cui, Limei; Liu, Xiaoling; Sun, Yan-Hong; Fu, Qun; Ji, Yanchun; Bai, Yidong; Huang, Taosheng; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-08-15

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disease. Mitochondrial modifiers are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of primary LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. In this study, we demonstrated that the LHON susceptibility allele (m.14502T > C, p. 58I > V) in the ND6 gene modulated the phenotypic expression of primary LHON-associated m.11778G > A mutation. Twenty-two Han Chinese pedigrees carrying m.14502T > C and m.11778G > A mutations exhibited significantly higher penetrance of optic neuropathy than those carrying only m.11778G > A mutation. We performed functional assays using the cybrid cell models, generated by fusing mtDNA-less ρ(o) cells with enucleated cells from LHON patients carrying both m.11778G > A and m.14502T > C mutations, only m.14502T > C or m.11778G > A mutation and a control belonging to the same mtDNA haplogroup. These cybrids cell lines bearing m.14502T > C mutation exhibited mild effects on mitochondrial functions compared with those carrying only m.11778G > A mutation. However, more severe mitochondrial dysfunctions were observed in cell lines bearing both m.14502T > C and m.11778G > A mutations than those carrying only m.11778G > A or m.14502T > C mutation. In particular, the m.14502T > C mutation altered assemble of complex I, thereby aggravating the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G > A mutation, resulted in a more defective complex I. Furthermore, more reductions in the levels of mitochondrial ATP and increasing production of reactive oxygen species were also observed in mutant cells bearing both m.14502T > C and m.11778G > A mutation than those carrying only 11778G > A mutation. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between primary and secondary mtDNA mutations.

  5. Clinical, functional and genetic analysis of twenty-four patients with chronic granulomatous disease - identification of eight novel mutations in CYBB and NCF2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Cécile; Mollin, Michelle; Beaumel, Sylvain; Brion, Jean Paul; Coutton, Charles; Satre, Véronique; Vieville, Gaëlle; Callanan, Mary; Lefebvre, Christine; Salmon, Alexandra; Pagnier, Anne; Plantaz, Dominique; Bost-Bru, Cécile; Eitenschenck, Laurence; Durieu, Isabelle; Floret, Daniel; Galambrun, Claire; Chambost, Hervé; Michel, Gérard; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Hermine, Olivier; Blanche, Stéphane; Blot, Nathalie; Rubié, Hervé; Pouessel, Guillaume; Drillon-Haus, Stephanie; Conrad, Bernard; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M; Havlicekova, Zuzana; Voskresenky-Baricic, Tamara; Jadranka, Kelecic; Arriazu, Maria Cristina; Garcia, Luis Alberto; Sfaihi, Lamia; Mansour, Lamia Sfaihi Ben; Bordigoni, Pierre; Stasia, Marie José

    2012-10-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is an inherited disorder in which phagocytes lack a functional NADPH oxidase and cannot produce superoxide anions. The most common form is caused by mutations in CYBB encoding gp91phox. We investigated 24 CGD patients and their families. Twenty-one mutations in CYBB were classified as X91(0), X91(+) or X91(-) variants according to cytochrome b (558) expression. Point mutations in encoding regions represented 50 % of the mutations found in CYBB, splice site mutations 27 %, deletions and insertions 23 %. Eight mutations in CYBB were novel leading to X91(0)CGD cases. Two of these were point mutations: c493G>T and a double mutation c625C>G in exon 6 and c1510C>T in exon 12 leading to a premature stop codon at Gly165 in gp91phox and missense mutations His209Arg/Thr503Ile respectively. Two novel splice mutations in 5'intronic regions of introns 1 and 6 were found. A novel deletion/insertion c1024_1026delCTG/insT results in a frameshift introducing a stop codon at position 346 in gp91phox. The last novel mutation was the insertion of a T at c1373 leading to a frameshift and a premature stop codon at position 484 in gp91phox. For the first time the precise size of two large mutations in CYBB was determined by array-comparative genomic hybridization and carriers' status were evaluated by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay. No clear correlation between clinical severity and CYBB mutations could be established. Of three mutations in CYBA, NCF1 and NCF2 leading to rare autosomal recessive CGD, one nonsense mutation c29G>A in exon 1 of NCF2 was new.

  6. Molecular genetic analysis of the calcium sensing receptor gene in patients clinically suspected to have familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia: phenotypic variation and mutation spectrum in a Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter H; Christensen, Signe E; Heickendorff, Lene

    2007-01-01

    hyperparathyroidism and is caused by inactivating mutations in the calcium sensing receptor (CASR) gene. OBJECTIVE: We sought to define the mutation spectrum of the CASR gene in a Danish FHH population and to establish genotype-phenotype relationships regarding the different mutations. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS...... calcium concentrations moderately above the upper reference limit, to calcium levels more than 20% above the upper reference limit. Furthermore, the mean plasma PTH concentration was within the normal range in eight of 11 studied mutations, but mild to moderately elevated in families with the mutations p...

  7. Mutations determining mitomycin resistance in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, V N

    1966-12-01

    Iyer, V. N. (Microbiology Research Institute, Canada Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada). Mutations determining mitomycin resistance in Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1663-1669. 1966.-The pattern of development of genetic resistance in Bacillus subtilis to mitomycin C was studied, and spontaneous single and multistep mutants were obtained. The transmission and expression of these mutations in sensitive strains proved possible by means of genetic transformation. The mutations were genetically studied in relation to a chromosomal mutation, mac-1, which confers resistance to the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin and which has been previously localized in the early-replicating segment of the B. subtilis chromosome. The results indicate that all of three primary mutations studied in this manner, as well as a secondary and tertiary mutation derived from one of the primary mutations, are clustered in this early-replicating segment. It appears that the secondary and tertiary mutations enhance the resistance conferred by the primary mutation, apparently without themselves conferring any resistance.

  8. Associations of hypomelanotic skin disorders with autism: Do they reflect the effects of genetic mutations and epigenetic factors on vitamin-D metabolism in individuals at risk for autism?

    OpenAIRE

    Bakare, Muideen O.; Munir, Kerim M.; Kinney, Dennis K.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D is crucial for full functioning in many genes, and vitamin-D deficiency interferes with many processes, including brain development and DNA repair. Several lines of evidence suggest that prenatal and early postnatal vitamin-D deficiency increases risk for autism, probably through multiple effects that include impaired brain development and increased de novo mutations. High rates of autism in several genetically based hypomelanotic skin disorders present a puzzle, because ultraviolet...

  9. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of nucleic acid-based devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and the genetic mutations associated with antibiotic resistance. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-22

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB-complex) and the genetic mutations associated with MTB-complex antibiotic resistance in respiratory specimens devices into class II (special controls). The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) because special controls, in addition to general controls, will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  10. Postmortem Genetic Testing for Conventional Autopsy–Negative Sudden Unexplained Death: An Evaluation of Different DNA Extraction Protocols and the Feasibility of Mutational Analysis From Archival Paraffin-Embedded Heart Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Carturan, Elisa; David J. Tester; Brost, Brian C.; Basso, Cristina; Thiene, Gaetano; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    One third of autopsy-negative sudden unexplained deaths (SUDs) can be attributed to a cardiac channelopathy. Typically, paraffin-embedded tissue (PET) is the only source of DNA available for genetic analyses. We examined different DNA extraction procedures, involving 2 deparaffinization methods, 2 digestion methods, 4 laboratory-based purification methods, and 5 commercial kits. Mutational analysis involving 25 RYR2 exons was performed on PET DNA from 35 SUD cases to evaluate the feasibility ...

  11. Genetics of flowering time in bread wheat Triticum aestivum: complementary interaction between vernalization-insensitive and photoperiod-insensitive mutations imparts very early flowering habit to spring wheat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushil Kumar; Vishakha Sharma; Swati Chaudhary; Anshika Tyagi; Poonam Mishra; Anupama Priyadarshini; Anupam Singh

    2011-04-01

    Time to flowering in the winter growth habit bread wheat is dependent on vernalization (exposure to cold conditions) and exposure to long days (photoperiod). Dominant Vrn-1 (Vrn-A1, Vrn-B1 and Vrn-D1) alleles are associated with vernalization-independent spring growth habit. The semidominant Ppd-D1a mutation confers photoperiod-insensitivity or rapid flowering in wheat under short day and long day conditions. The objective of this study was to reveal the nature of interaction between Vrn-1 and Ppd-D1a mutations (active alleles of the respective genes vrn-1 and Ppd-D1b). Twelve Indian spring wheat cultivars and the spring wheat landrace Chinese Spring were characterized for their flowering times by seeding them every month for five years under natural field conditions in New Delhi. Near isogenic Vrn-1 Ppd-D1 and Vrn-1 Ppd-D1a lines constructed in two genetic backgrounds were also phenotyped for flowering time by seeding in two different seasons. The wheat lines of Vrn-A1a Vrn-B1 Vrn-D1 Ppd-D1a, Vrn-A1a Vrn-B1 Ppd-D1a and Vrn-A1a Vrn-D1 Ppd-D1a (or Vrn-1 Ppd-D1a) genotypes flowered several weeks earlier than that of Vrn-A1a Vrn-B1 Vrn-D1 Ppd-D1b, Vrn-A1b Ppd-D1b and Vrn-D1 Ppd-D1b (or Vrn-1 Ppd-D1b) genotypes. The flowering time phenotypes of the isogenic vernalization-insensitive lines confirmed that Ppd-D1a hastened flowering by several weeks. It was concluded that complementary interaction between Vrn-1 and Ppd-D1a active alleles imparted super/very-early flowering habit to spring wheats. The early and late flowering wheat varieties showed differences in flowering time between short day and long day conditions. The flowering time in Vrn-1 Ppd-D1a genotypes was hastened by higher temperatures under long day conditions. The ambient air temperature and photoperiod parameters for flowering in spring wheat were estimated at 25°C and 12 h, respectively.

  12. Postmortem genetic testing for conventional autopsy-negative sudden unexplained death: an evaluation of different DNA extraction protocols and the feasibility of mutational analysis from archival paraffin-embedded heart tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carturan, Elisa; Tester, David J; Brost, Brian C; Basso, Cristina; Thiene, Gaetano; Ackerman, Michael J

    2008-03-01

    One third of autopsy-negative sudden unexplained deaths (SUDs) can be attributed to a cardiac channelopathy. Typically, paraffin-embedded tissue