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Sample records for genetic lesions considered

  1. Dermatitis Herpetiformis: From the Genetics to the Development of Skin Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diletta Bonciani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH is a rare autoimmune disease linked to gluten sensitivity with a chronic-relapsing course. It is currently considered to be the specific cutaneous manifestation of celiac disease (CD. Both conditions are mediated by the IgA class of autoantibodies, and the diagnosis of DH is dependent on the detection of granular deposits of IgA in the skin. There is an underlying genetic predisposition to the development of DH, but environmental factors are also important. This paper describes these different factors and discusses the known mechanism that lead to the development of skin lesions.

  2. White Matter Lesion Progression: Genome-Wide Search for Genetic Influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Hofer (Edith); M. Cavalieri (Margherita); J.C. Bis (Joshua); C. DeCarli (Charles); M. Fornage (Myriam); S. Sigurdsson (Sigurdur); V. Srikanth (Velandai); S. Trompet (Stella); B.F.J. Verhaaren (Benjamin); C. Wolf (Christiane); Q. Yang (Qiong Fang); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); P. Amouyel (Philippe); A. Beiser (Alexa); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); M. Callisaya (Michele); G. Chauhan (Ganesh); A.J.M. De Craen (Anton J. M.); C. Dufouil (Carole); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); I. Ford; P. Freudenberger (Paul); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); G. Heiss (Gerardo); A. Hofman (Albert); T. Lumley (Thomas); O. Martinez (Oliver); B. Mazoyer (Bernard); C. Moran (Chris); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); T.G. Phan (Thanh); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); C.L. Satizabal (Claudia L.); N. Sattar (Naveed); S. Schilling (Sabrina); D.K. Shibata (Dean); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); G.D. Smith; D.J. Stott (David. J.); K.D. Taylor (Kent); R. Thomson (Russell); A.M. Töglhofer (Anna Maria); C. Tzourio (Christophe); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); J. Wang (Jing); R.G.J. Westendorp (Rudi); B. Gwen Windham; M.W. Vernooij (Meike); A.P. Zijdenbos; R.J. Beare (Richard); S. Debette (Stéphanie); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); L.J. Launer (Lenore); W.T. Longstreth Jr; T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); S. Seshadri (Sudha); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); R. Schmidt (Reinhold)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Purpose-White matter lesion (WML) progression on magnetic resonance imaging is related to cognitive decline and stroke, but its determinants besides baseline WML burden are largely unknown. Here, we estimated heritability of WML progression, and sought common genetic

  3. Genetic Heterogeneity of Benign Thyroid Lesions

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    O. Ferrer-Roca

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The present series includes 75 thyroid lesions (38 goiters, 30 adenomas, 3 follicullo‐papillary encapsulated carcinomas and 4 normal thyroid that were studied by static and flow cytometry. Four cases were also analyzed by in situ hybridization (centromeric probes for chromosomes 1 and 17 and 10 cases by G‐banding cytogenetics. Results demonstrate a polymorphysm and genetic instability in the thyroid tissue that may be related to the spontaneous polyploidization of their cells. The most consistent finding in cytometry was the presence of two clones associated with clinical or histological hyperactivity (46% versus 23% in non‐functioning cases; X2 distribution with a p < 0.05.

  4. Spontaneous chromosome aberrations in cancer cells. Evidence of existence of hidden genetic lesions in genetic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poryadkova-Luchnik, N.A.; Kuz'mina, E.G.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations spontaneously observed in cancer cells were quantitively studied under the effect of non-mutagenic (suboptimal temperature, low content of propilgallate and caffeine) and mutagenic (ionizing radiation) factors. Human larynx cancer cells during several years or gamma-irradiation were used to carry out experiments. The experiments linked with cloning of the initial population and investigation into chromosome aberrations in 22 clones demonstrated persuasively the occurrence of latent genetic lesions in cancer cells

  5. Considering genetic characteristics in German Holstein breeding programs.

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    Segelke, D; Täubert, H; Reinhardt, F; Thaller, G

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several research groups have demonstrated that several haplotypes may cause embryonic loss in the homozygous state. Up to now, carriers of genetic disorders were often excluded from mating, resulting in a decrease of genetic gain and a reduced number of sires available for the breeding program. Ongoing research is very likely to identify additional genetic defects causing embryonic loss and calf mortality by genotyping a large proportion of the female cattle population and sequencing key ancestors. Hence, a clear demand is present to develop a method combining selection against recessive defects (e.g., Holstein haplotypes HH1-HH5) with selection for economically beneficial traits (e.g., polled) for mating decisions. Our proposed method is a genetic index that accounts for the allele frequencies in the population and the economic value of the genetic characteristic without excluding carriers from breeding schemes. Fertility phenotypes from routine genetic evaluations were used to determine the economic value per embryo lost. Previous research has shown that embryo loss caused by HH1 and HH2 occurs later than the loss for HH3, HH4, and HH5. Therefore, an economic value of € 97 was used against HH1 and HH2 and € 70 against HH3, HH4, and HH5. For polled, € 7 per polled calf was considered. Minor allele frequencies of the defects ranged between 0.8 and 3.3%. The polled allele has a frequency of 4.1% in the German Holstein population. A genomic breeding program was simulated to study the effect of changing the selection criteria from assortative mating based on breeding values to selecting the females using the genetic index. Selection for a genetic index on the female path is a useful method to control the allele frequencies by reducing undesirable alleles and simultaneously increasing economical beneficial characteristics maintaining most of the genetic gain in production and functional traits. Additionally, we applied the genetic index to real data and

  6. A weighted U statistic for association analyses considering genetic heterogeneity.

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    Wei, Changshuai; Elston, Robert C; Lu, Qing

    2016-07-20

    Converging evidence suggests that common complex diseases with the same or similar clinical manifestations could have different underlying genetic etiologies. While current research interests have shifted toward uncovering rare variants and structural variations predisposing to human diseases, the impact of heterogeneity in genetic studies of complex diseases has been largely overlooked. Most of the existing statistical methods assume the disease under investigation has a homogeneous genetic effect and could, therefore, have low power if the disease undergoes heterogeneous pathophysiological and etiological processes. In this paper, we propose a heterogeneity-weighted U (HWU) method for association analyses considering genetic heterogeneity. HWU can be applied to various types of phenotypes (e.g., binary and continuous) and is computationally efficient for high-dimensional genetic data. Through simulations, we showed the advantage of HWU when the underlying genetic etiology of a disease was heterogeneous, as well as the robustness of HWU against different model assumptions (e.g., phenotype distributions). Using HWU, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of nicotine dependence from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environments dataset. The genome-wide analysis of nearly one million genetic markers took 7h, identifying heterogeneous effects of two new genes (i.e., CYP3A5 and IKBKB) on nicotine dependence. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Points to consider for prioritizing clinical genetic testing services

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    Severin, Franziska; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-01-01

    Given the cost constraints of the European health-care systems, criteria are needed to decide which genetic services to fund from the public budgets, if not all can be covered. To ensure that high-priority services are available equitably within and across the European countries, a shared set...... testing services available in the next decade. Ethically and economically reflected prioritization criteria are needed. Prioritization should be based on considerations of medical benefit, health need and costs. Medical benefit includes evidence of benefit in terms of clinical benefit, benefit......, following the principles of accountability for reasonableness. We provide points to consider to stimulate this debate across the EU and to serve as a reference for improving patient management.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 24 September 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.190....

  8. Ascorbic acid deficiency aggravates stress-induced gastric mucosal lesions in genetically scorbutic ODS rats.

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    Ohta, Y; Chiba, S; Imai, Y; Kamiya, Y; Arisawa, T; Kitagawa, A

    2006-12-01

    We examined whether ascorbic acid (AA) deficiency aggravates water immersion restraint stress (WIRS)-induced gastric mucosal lesions in genetically scorbutic ODS rats. ODS rats received scorbutic diet with either distilled water containing AA (1 g/l) or distilled water for 2 weeks. AA-deficient rats had 12% of gastric mucosal AA content in AA-sufficient rats. AA-deficient rats showed more severe gastric mucosal lesions than AA-sufficient rats at 1, 3 or 6 h after the onset of WIRS, although AA-deficient rats had a slight decrease in gastric mucosal AA content, while AA-sufficient rats had a large decrease in that content. AA-deficient rats had more decreased gastric mucosal nonprotein SH and vitamin E contents and increased gastric mucosal lipid peroxide content than AA-sufficient rats at 1, 3 or 6 h of WIRS. These results indicate that AA deficiency aggravates WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions in ODS rats by enhancing oxidative damage in the gastric mucosa.

  9. Genetic ablation of soluble TNF does not affect lesion size and functional recovery after moderate spinal cord injury in mice

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    Ellman, Ditte Gry; Degn, Matilda; Lund, Minna Christiansen

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is followed by an instant increase in expression of the microglial-derived proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) within the lesioned cord. TNF exists both as membrane-anchored TNF (mTNF) and as cleaved soluble TNF (solTNF). We previously demonstra......, and MHCII), lesion size, and functional outcome after moderate SCI were comparable between genotypes. Collectively, our data demonstrate that genetic ablation of solTNF does not significantly modulate postlesion outcome after SCI....

  10. Confidentiality, privacy, and security of genetic and genomic test information in electronic health records: points to consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Amy L; Fisher, Rebecca; Cusenza, Paul; Hudson, Kathy; Rothstein, Mark A; McGraw, Deven; Matteson, Stephen; Glaser, John; Henley, Douglas E

    2008-07-01

    As clinical genetics evolves, and we embark down the path toward more personalized and effective health care, the amount, detail, and complexity of genetic/genomic test information within the electronic health record will increase. This information should be appropriately protected to secure the trust of patients and to support interoperable electronic health information exchange. This article discusses characteristics of genetic/genomic test information, including predictive capability, immutability, and uniqueness, which should be considered when developing policies about information protection. Issues related to "genetic exceptionalism"; i.e., whether genetic/genomic test information should be treated differently from other medical information for purposes of data access and permissible use, are also considered. These discussions can help guide policy that will facilitate the biological and clinical resource development to support the introduction of this information into health care.

  11. Genetic Ablation of Soluble TNF Does Not Affect Lesion Size and Functional Recovery after Moderate Spinal Cord Injury in Mice

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    Ditte Gry Ellman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI is followed by an instant increase in expression of the microglial-derived proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF within the lesioned cord. TNF exists both as membrane-anchored TNF (mTNF and as cleaved soluble TNF (solTNF. We previously demonstrated that epidural administration of a dominant-negative inhibitor of solTNF, XPro1595, to the contused spinal cord resulted in changes in Iba1 protein expression in microglia/macrophages, decreased lesion volume, and improved locomotor function. Here, we extend our studies using mice expressing mTNF, but no solTNF (mTNFΔ/Δ, to study the effect of genetic ablation of solTNF on SCI. We demonstrate that TNF levels were significantly decreased within the lesioned spinal cord 3 days after SCI in mTNFΔ/Δ mice compared to littermates. This decrease did, however, not translate into significant changes in other pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-5, IL-2, CXCL1, CCL2, or CCL5, despite a tendency towards increased IL-10 and decreased IL-1β, TNFR1, and TNFR2 levels in mTNFΔ/Δ mice. In addition, microglial and leukocyte infiltration, activation state (Iba1, CD11b, CD11c, CD45, and MHCII, lesion size, and functional outcome after moderate SCI were comparable between genotypes. Collectively, our data demonstrate that genetic ablation of solTNF does not significantly modulate postlesion outcome after SCI.

  12. Beliefs about Cancer and Diet among Those Considering Genetic Testing for Colon Cancer

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    Palmquist, Aunchalee E. L.; Upton, Rachel; Lee, Seungjin; Panter, Abby T.; Hadley, Don W.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess beliefs about the role of diet in cancer prevention among individuals considering genetic testing for Lynch Syndrome. Design: Family-centered, cascade recruitment; baseline assessment of a longitudinal study. Setting: Clinical research setting. Participants: Participants were 390 persons, ages 18 and older, including persons…

  13. Characteristics and genetic mapping of a lesion mimic mutant pl(t) in japonica rice variety zhejing 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Pingping; Zhang Xiaoming; Ye Shenghai; Zhao Ningchun; Lu Yanting; Liu Heqin; Jin Qingsheng; Yang Ling

    2010-01-01

    A lesion mimic mutant,obtained by radiation mutagenesis on the seeds of a japonica rice variety Zhejing 22, exhibited a lesion mimic phenotype during the whole growth stage under different environments. Genetic analysis indicated that the mutant trait was controlled by a single recessive gene named spl (t). Relying on simple sequence repeat (SSR) and recessive class analysis method to map the spl (t) gene with a F 2 population was constructed by crossing the mutant spl (t) with Zhenshan 97B.spl (t) was mapped in the interval of 0.8cM between RM7195 and RM27929 near centromere region on the short arm of chromosome 12.Blue trypan dye analyses indicated that the lesion mimic trait of the mutant was caused by the programmer cell death. Further study showed that the programmer cell death was caused by H 2 O 2 oxidative burst. By inoculation of bacterial leaf blight and blast strains, the resistances of the mutant were similar to the wild variety Zhejing 22. (authors)

  14. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 1, benign lesions

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    Bell, W.C. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Klein, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Pitt, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Siegal, G.P. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Departments of Pathology, Cell Biology, and Surgery, and the Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2006-11-15

    This two-part review presents an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. This first part presents a brief review of methods in molecular pathology along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. Malignant chondroid neoplasms will be considered in the second part of this review. (orig.)

  15. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 1, benign lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, W.C.; Klein, M.J.; Pitt, M.J.; Siegal, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    This two-part review presents an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. This first part presents a brief review of methods in molecular pathology along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. Malignant chondroid neoplasms will be considered in the second part of this review. (orig.)

  16. Tracing the origin of glomerular extracapillary lesions from parietal epithelial cells.

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    Smeets, Bart; Uhlig, Sandra; Fuss, Astrid; Mooren, Fieke; Wetzels, Jack F M; Floege, Jürgen; Moeller, Marcus J

    2009-12-01

    Cellular lesions form in Bowman's space in both crescentic glomerulonephritis and collapsing glomerulopathy. The pathomechanism and origin of the proliferating cells in these lesions are unknown. In this study, we examined proliferating cells by lineage tracing of either podocytes or parietal epithelial cells (PECs) in the nephrotoxic nephritis model of inflammatory crescentic glomerulonephritis. In addition, we traced the fate of genetically labeled PECs in the Thy-1.1 transgenic mouse model of collapsing glomerulopathy. In both models, cellular bridges composed of PECs were observed between Bowman's capsule and the glomerular tuft. Genetically labeled PECs also populated larger, more advanced cellular lesions. In these lesions, we detected de novo expression of CD44 in activated PECs. In contrast, we rarely identified genetically labeled podocytes within the cellular lesions of crescentic glomerulonephritis. In conclusion, PECs constitute the majority of cells that compose early extracapillary proliferative lesions in both crescentic glomerulonephritis and collapsing glomerulopathy, suggesting similar pathomechanisms in both diseases.

  17. Molecular - and genetic aspects of the repair of the lesions induced by the furocoumarin photoaddition in Sacharomyces cerevisiae : role of the PSO genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, J.A.P.

    1982-01-01

    Experiences with strains of Sacharomyces cerevisiae with the aim to obtain informations about molecular steps and genetic control of the DNA photo-induced lesion repair by furocoumarins are described. (M.A.) [pt

  18. Histologic and molecular-genetic characteristics of precancerous lesions in chronic gastritis

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    Nina Zidar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic gastritis is an inflammatory condition of the gastric mucosa, which may include glandular alterations. It is most frequently caused by infection with Helicobacter pylori, a smaller proportion is related to chemical agents and autoimmune mechanisms. Chronic gastritis may lead to the development of gastric adenocarcinoma, depending on environmental factors, bacterial strain and host immune response. The vast majority of gastric adenocarcinomas are the final step in a complex cascade process of cancerogenesis involving sequential steps of precancerous lesions – atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia.The process of cancerogenesis is associated with progressive genetic and epigenetic alterations, these being more frequent in dysplasia than in atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Despite extensive research of gastric cancerogenesis, there are no molecular markers to be used for detecting patients at risk for cancer development.Biopsy remains among the most reliable ways of detecting gastric precancerous lesions. Apart from the correct histologic diagnosis, the assessment of topography is important. Biopsies must be taken according to the updated Sydney protocol. For further classifying patients at risk for gastric cancer, two systems have been developed: OLGA (Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment and OLGIM (Operative Link for Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia Assessment.Slovenian Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and Slovenian Society for Pathology and Forensic Medicine have accepted guidelines for endoscopic and histologic management of patients with gastric precancerosis. The aim of these recommendations is to diagnose gastric cancer at an early stage and to improve survival of patients with gastric cancer in Slovenia.

  19. Heritability and prevalence of selected osteochondrosis lesions in yearling Thoroughbred horses.

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    Russell, J; Matika, O; Russell, T; Reardon, R J M

    2017-05-01

    Osteochondrosis is considered multifactorial in origin, with factors such as nutrition, conformation, body size, trauma and genetics thought to contribute to its pathogenesis. Few studies have investigated the effects of genetic variability of osteochondrosis in Thoroughbreds. To describe the prevalence and genetic variability of a subset of osteochondrosis lesions in a group of Thoroughbred yearlings. Retrospective cohort study. Radiographs of 1962 Thoroughbred yearlings were retrieved from clinical records obtained between 2005 and 2013. Pedigree information was obtained from the Australian Stud Book. Osteochondrosis lesions were documented in selected joints and estimates of heritability were obtained by fitting linear mixed models in ASREML software. The overall prevalence of osteochondrosis was 23%. Osteochondrosis was identified in 10% of stifle joints, 6% of hock joints and 8% of fetlock joints. The heritability estimates ranged from 0 to 0.21. The largest estimates were 0.10, 0.14, 0.16 and 0.21 for lesions of the distal intermediate ridge of the tibia, dorso-proximal proximal phalanx (P1), any stifle osteochondrosis, and lesions of the lateral trochlear ridge of the distal femur, respectively. Although calculated heritability estimates had high standard errors, meta-analyses combining the present results with published estimates were significant at 0.10, 0.17, 0.15 and 0.20 for stifle, tarsal, fetlock and these joints combined, respectively. In addition, there was a permanent environment attributable to the dam effect. Inclusion criteria were based on radiographic findings in specific joints at a specific age range in Thoroughbreds. The present results indicate that only a proportion of osteochondrosis in Thoroughbreds is heritable. The permanent environment effects of the dam were observed to have effects on some categories of osteochondrosis. © 2016 The Authors. Equine Veterinary Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of EVJ Ltd.

  20. Lesion progression in post-treatment persistent endodontic lesions.

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    Yu, Victoria Soo Hoon; Messer, Harold Henry; Shen, Liang; Yee, Robert; Hsu, Chin-ying Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Radiographic lesions related to root-filled teeth may persist for long periods after treatment and are considered to indicate failure of initial treatment. Persistent lesions are found in a proportion of cases, but information on lesion progression is lacking. This study examined the incidence of lesion improvement, remaining unchanged, and deterioration among persistent lesions in a group of patients recruited from a university-based clinic and identified potential predictors for lesion progression. Patients of a university clinic with persistent endodontic lesions at least 4 years since treatment and with original treatment radiographs available were recruited with informed consent. Data were obtained by interview and from dental records and clinical and radiographic examinations. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were carried out by using SPSS (version 19). One hundred fifty-one persistent lesions were identified in 114 patients. A majority of the lesions (107, 70.9%) received treatment between 4 and 5 years prior. Eighty-six lesions (57.0%) improved, 18 (11.9%) remained unchanged, and 47 (31.1%) deteriorated since treatment. Potential predictors for lesions that did not improve included recall lesion size, pain on biting at recall examination, history of a postobturation flare-up, and a non-ideal root-filling length (P < .05). Lesions that had persisted for a longer period appeared less likely to be improving (relative risk, 1.038; 95% confidence interval, 1.000-1.077). A specific time interval alone should not be used to conclude that a lesion will not resolve without intervention. This study identified several clinical factors that are associated with deteriorating persistent lesions, which should aid in identifying lesions that require further intervention. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reliability–redundancy allocation problem considering optimal redundancy strategy using parallel genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heungseob; Kim, Pansoo

    2017-01-01

    To maximize the reliability of a system, the traditional reliability–redundancy allocation problem (RRAP) determines the component reliability and level of redundancy for each subsystem. This paper proposes an advanced RRAP that also considers the optimal redundancy strategy, either active or cold standby. In addition, new examples are presented for it. Furthermore, the exact reliability function for a cold standby redundant subsystem with an imperfect detector/switch is suggested, and is expected to replace the previous approximating model that has been used in most related studies. A parallel genetic algorithm for solving the RRAP as a mixed-integer nonlinear programming model is presented, and its performance is compared with those of previous studies by using numerical examples on three benchmark problems. - Highlights: • Optimal strategy is proposed to solve reliability redundancy allocation problem. • The redundancy strategy uses parallel genetic algorithm. • Improved reliability function for a cold standby subsystem is suggested. • Proposed redundancy strategy enhances the system reliability.

  2. From sexless to sexy: Why it is time for human genetics to consider and report analyses of sex.

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    Powers, Matthew S; Smith, Phillip H; McKee, Sherry A; Ehringer, Marissa A

    2017-01-01

    Science has come a long way with regard to the consideration of sex differences in clinical and preclinical research, but one field remains behind the curve: human statistical genetics. The goal of this commentary is to raise awareness and discussion about how to best consider and evaluate possible sex effects in the context of large-scale human genetic studies. Over the course of this commentary, we reinforce the importance of interpreting genetic results in the context of biological sex, establish evidence that sex differences are not being considered in human statistical genetics, and discuss how best to conduct and report such analyses. Our recommendation is to run stratified analyses by sex no matter the sample size or the result and report the findings. Summary statistics from stratified analyses are helpful for meta-analyses, and patterns of sex-dependent associations may be hidden in a combined dataset. In the age of declining sequencing costs, large consortia efforts, and a number of useful control samples, it is now time for the field of human genetics to appropriately include sex in the design, analysis, and reporting of results.

  3. Genetic predisposition syndromes: when should they be considered in the work-up of MDS?

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    Babushok, Daria V; Bessler, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by cytopenias, ineffective hematopoiesis, myelodysplasia, and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). While sporadic MDS is primarily a disease of the elderly, MDS in children and young and middle-aged adults is frequently associated with underlying genetic predisposition syndromes. In addition to the classic hereditary bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) such as Fanconi Anemia and Dyskeratosis Congenita, in recent years there has been an increased awareness of non-syndromic familial MDS/AML predisposition syndromes such as those caused by mutations in GATA2, RUNX1, CEBPA, and SRP72 genes. Here, we will discuss the importance of recognizing an underlying genetic predisposition syndrome a patient with MDS, will review clinical scenarios when genetic predisposition should be considered, and will provide a practical overview of the common BMFS and familial MDS/AML syndromes which may be encountered in adult patients with MDS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic evaluation of claw health traits accounting for potential preselection of cows to be trimmed.

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    Croué, Iola; Fikse, Freddy; Johansson, Kjell; Carlén, Emma; Thomas, Gilles; Leclerc, Hélène; Ducrocq, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    Claw lesions are one of the most important health issues in dairy cattle. Although the frequency of claw lesions depends greatly on herd management, the frequency can be lowered through genetic selection. A genetic evaluation could be developed based on trimming records collected by claw trimmers; however, not all cows present in a herd are usually selected by the breeder to be trimmed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the importance of the preselection of cows for trimming, to account for this preselection, and to estimate genetic parameters of claw health traits. The final data set contained 25,511 trimming records of French Holstein cows. Analyzed claw lesion traits were digital dermatitis, heel horn erosion, interdigital hyperplasia, sole hemorrhage circumscribed, sole hemorrhage diffused, sole ulcer, and white line fissure. All traits were analyzed as binary traits in a multitrait linear animal model. Three scenarios were considered: including only trimmed cows in a 7-trait model (scenario 1); or trimmed cows and contemporary cows not trimmed but present at the time of a visit (considering that nontrimmed cows were healthy) in a 7-trait model (scenario 2); or trimmed cows and contemporary cows not trimmed but present at the time of a visit (considering lesion records for trimmed cows only), in an 8-trait model, including a 0/1 trimming status trait (scenario 3). For scenario 3, heritability estimates ranged from 0.02 to 0.09 on the observed scale. Genetic correlations clearly revealed 2 groups of traits (digital dermatitis, heel horn erosion, and interdigital hyperplasia on the one hand, and sole hemorrhage circumscribed, sole hemorrhage diffused, sole ulcer, and white line fissure on the other hand). Heritabilities on the underlying scale did not vary much depending on the scenario: the effect of the preselection of cows for trimming on the estimation of heritabilities appeared to be negligible. However, including untrimmed cows as healthy

  5. Improved Genetic Algorithm-Based Unit Commitment Considering Uncertainty Integration Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Hyung Jo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In light of the dissemination of renewable energy connected to the power grid, it has become necessary to consider the uncertainty in the generation of renewable energy as a unit commitment (UC problem. A methodology for solving the UC problem is presented by considering various uncertainties, which are assumed to have a normal distribution, by using a Monte Carlo simulation. Based on the constructed scenarios for load, wind, solar, and generator outages, a combination of scenarios is found that meets the reserve requirement to secure the power balance of the power grid. In those scenarios, the uncertainty integration method (UIM identifies the best combination by minimizing the additional reserve requirements caused by the uncertainty of power sources. An integration process for uncertainties is formulated for stochastic unit commitment (SUC problems and optimized by the improved genetic algorithm (IGA. The IGA is composed of five procedures and finds the optimal combination of unit status at the scheduled time, based on the determined source data. According to the number of unit systems, the IGA demonstrates better performance than the other optimization methods by applying reserve repairing and an approximation process. To account for the result of the proposed method, various UC strategies are tested with a modified 24-h UC test system and compared.

  6. The Decision-Making Process of Genetically At-Risk Couples Considering Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: Initial Findings from a Grounded Theory Study

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    Hershberger, Patricia E.; Gallo, Agatha M.; Kavanaugh, Karen; Olshansky, Ellen; Schwartz, Alan; Tur-Kaspa, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Exponential growth in genomics has led to public and private initiatives worldwide that have dramatically increased the number of procreative couples who are aware of their ability to transmit genetic disorders to their future children. Understanding how couples process the meaning of being genetically at risk for their procreative life lags far behind the advances in genomic and reproductive sciences. Moreover, society, policy makers, and clinicians are not aware of the experiences and nuances involved when modern couples are faced with using Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD). The purpose of this study was to discover the decision-making process of genetically at-risk couples as they decide whether to use PGD to prevent the transmission of known single-gene or sex-linked genetic disorders to their children. A qualitative, grounded theory design guided the study in which 22 couples (44 individual partners) from the USA, who were actively considering PGD, participated. Couples were recruited from June 2009 to May 2010 from the Internet and from a large PGD center and a patient newsletter. In-depth semi-structured interviews were completed with each individual partner within the couple dyad, separate from their respective partner. We discovered that couples move through four phases (Identify, Contemplate, Resolve, Engage) of a complex, dynamic, and iterative decision-making process where multiple, sequential decisions are made. In the Identify phase, couples acknowledge the meaning of their at-risk status. Parenthood and reproductive options are explored in the Contemplate phase, where 41% of couples remained for up to 36 months before moving into the Resolve phase. In Resolve, one of three decisions about PGD use is reached, including: Accepting, Declining, or Oscillating. Actualizing decisions occur in the Engage phase. Awareness of the decision-making process among genetically at-risk couples provides foundational work for understanding critical processes

  7. Variability of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Lesions Is Not Associated with Genetic Diversity of Leishmania tropica in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nazma Habib; Llewellyn, Martin S; Schönian, Gabriele; Sutherland, Colin J

    2017-11-01

    Leishmania tropica is the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Pakistan. Here, intraspecific diversity of L. tropica from northern Pakistan was investigated using multilocus microsatellite typing. Fourteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were typed in 34 recently collected L. tropica isolates from Pakistan along with 158 archival strains of diverse Afro-Eurasian origins. Previously published profiles for 145 strains of L. tropica originating from different regions of Africa, Central Asia, Iran, and Middle East were included for comparison. Six consistently well-supported genetic groups were resolved: 1) Asia, 2) Morroco A, 3) Namibia and Kenya A, 4) Kenya B/Tunisia and Galilee, 5) Morocco B, and 6) Middle East. Strains from northern Pakistan were assigned to Asian cluster except for three that were placed in a geographically distant genetic group; Morocco A. Lesion variability among these Pakistani strains was not associated with specific L. tropica genetic profile. Pakistani strains showed little genetic differentiation from strains of Iraq, Afghanistan, and Syria (F ST = 0.00-0.06); displayed evidence of modest genetic flow with India (F ST = 0.14). Furthermore, genetic structuring within these isolates was not geographically defined. Pak-Afghan cluster was in significant linkage disequilibrium (I A = 1.43), had low genetic diversity, and displayed comparatively higher heterozygosity (F IS = -0.62). Patterns of genetic diversity observed suggest dominance of a minimally diverse clonal lineage within northern Pakistan. This is surprising as a wide clinical spectrum was observed in patients, suggesting the importance of host and other factors. Further genotyping studies of L. tropica isolates displaying different clinical phenotypes are required to validate this potentially important observation.

  8. Incorporating Social Media into your Support Tool Box: Points to Consider from Genetics-Based Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Heather Mae; Savatt, Juliann M; Riggs, Erin Rooney; Wagner, Jennifer K; Faucett, W Andrew; Martin, Christa Lese

    2018-04-01

    Patients with newly-described or rare genetic findings are turning to social media to find and connect with others. Blogs, Facebook groups, and Twitter have all been reported as tools for patients to connect with one another. However, the preferences for social media use and privacy among patients, their families, and these communities have not been well characterized. To explore preferences about privacy and membership guidelines, an online survey was administered to two web-based patient registries, Simons Variation in Individuals Project ( www.simonsvipconnect.org ) and GenomeConnect ( www.genomeconnect.org ). Over a three-month period, invitations were sent to 2524 individuals and 103 responses (4%) were received and analyzed. Responses indicate that Facebook is the most popular resource accessed within this sample population (99%). Participants used social media to look for information about their diagnosis or test results (83%), read posts from rare disease groups or organizations (73%), participate in conversations about their diagnosis (67%), and connect with others to find support (58%). Focusing on privacy issues in social media, respondents indicate that membership and access impact the level of comfort in sharing personal or medical information. Nearly 60% of respondents felt uncomfortable sharing photos or medical information within a public Facebook group, whereas only 12% of respondents felt uncomfortable sharing in private group targeted to families alone. Using this preliminary data concerning social media use and privacy, we developed points for genetic counselors to incorporate when discussing available support resources for patients with a new, or rare, genetic diagnosis or genetic test result. Genetic counselors are trained to provide anticipatory guidance to families adapting to new genetic information, and are well-equipped to help patients consider their preferences about using social media as a source of information and support.

  9. A Systematic Review of Genetic Testing and Lifestyle Behaviour Change: Are We Using High-Quality Genetic Interventions and Considering Behaviour Change Theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Justine; Madill, Janet; O'Connor, Colleen; Shelley, Jacob; Gilliland, Jason

    2018-04-10

    behaviour change theories, these theories were generally mentioned briefly, and were not thoroughly incorporated into the study design or analyses. The genetic interventions provided to participants were overall of "poor" quality. However, a separate analysis of studies using controlled intervention research methods demonstrated the use of higher-quality genetic interventions (overall rated to be "fair"). The provision of actionable recommendations informed by genetic testing was more likely to facilitate behaviour change than the provision of genetic information without actionable lifestyle recommendations. Several studies of good quality demonstrated changes in lifestyle habits arising from the provision of genetic interventions. The most promising lifestyle changes were changes in nutrition. It is possible to facilitate behaviour change using genetic testing as the catalyst. Future research should ensure that high-quality genetic interventions are provided to participants, and should consider validated theories such as the TPB in their study design and analyses. Further recommendations for future research are provided. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Impact of Lesion Length on Functional Significance in Intermediate Coronary Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Safi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study aimed at assessing the role of lesion length in predicting Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR value for physiological evaluation of intermediate coronary lesions.Methods: In the current study, 68 patients with 83 coronary lesions were enrolled. All of the patients in this study underwent routine coronary angiography, according to appropriate indications. To evaluate physiologically significant intermediate coronary stenosis (defined between 40% and 70% on visual estimation, the Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR study was performed and the Quantitative Coronary Angiography (QCA data were also assessed for measurement of lesion length. The correlation between QCA data and FFR values was also examined.Results: Eighty-three lesions were evaluated from 68 patients. Stenosis was considered physiologically significant when FFR was lower than 0.75. The FFR was significant in twelve lesions (14.5%. There was a negative correlation between FFR value and lesion length (r = -0.294 and P = 0.013. Moreover, lesion length in physiologically significant FFR group (21.07  ± 6.9 was greater than that of the non-significant FFR group (15.23 ± 6.5 (P value < 0.05. Furthermore, the correlation between QCA data and FFR values was also investigated, yet, there was only a positive correlation between FFR and Minimum Luminal Diameter (MLD values (r = 0.248 and P value = 0.04. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve analysis for predicting the significant FFR value demonstrated that a lesion length greater than 17.5 mm was the best cut-off point for prediction of the significant FFR value with acceptable sensitivity and specificity of 83.3% and 68.8%, respectively.Conclusions: There is a negative correlation between lesion length and FFR value in intermediate coronary lesions. In addition, a lesion length greater than 17.5 mm is the best cut- off point for prediction of significant FFR values.

  11. Characterization and mapping of complementary lesion-mimic genes lm1 and lm2 in common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qin; Zhou, Ronghua; Fu, Tihua; Wu, Weiren; Zhu, Zhendong; Li, Aili; Jia, Jizeng

    2009-10-01

    A lesion-mimic phenotype appeared in a segregating population of common wheat cross Yanzhan 1/Zaosui 30. The parents had non-lesion normal phenotypes. Shading treatment and histochemical analyses showed that the lesions were caused by light-dependent cell death and were not associated with pathogens. Studies over two cropping seasons showed that some lines with more highly expressed lesion-mimic phenotypes exhibited significantly lower grain yields than those with the normal phenotype, but there were no significant effects in the lines with weakly expressed lesion-mimic phenotypes. Among yield traits, one-thousand grain weight was the most affected by lesion-mimic phenotypes. Genetic analysis indicated that this was a novel type of lesion mimic, which was caused by interaction of recessive genes derived from each parent. The lm1 (lesion mimic 1) locus from Zaosui 30 was flanked by microsatellite markers Xwmc674 and Xbarc133/Xbarc147 on chromosome 3BS, at genetic distances of 1.2 and 3.8 cM, respectively, whereas lm2 from Yanzhan 1 was mapped between microsatellite markers Xgwm513 and Xksum154 on chromosome 4BL, at genetic distances of 1.5 and 3 cM, respectively. The linked microsatellite makers identified in this study might be useful for evaluating whether potential parents with normal phenotype are carriers of lesion-mimic alleles.

  12. Hybrid Odontogenic Lesion: A Rare Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Imani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid tumors are very rare tumors composed of two different tumor entities, each of which conforms to an exactly defined tumor category. A 14-year-old boy was referred for an intraosseous painless lesion with a histopathological feature of multiple odontogenic lesions including calcifying odontogenic cyst, complex odontoma and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma. The final diagnosis considered to be a hybrid odontogenic lesion.

  13. Unilateral Lesion of Dopamine Neurons Induces Grooming Asymmetry in the Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Assunta; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Hervé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Grooming behaviour is the most common innate behaviour in animals. In rodents, it consists of sequences of movements organized in four phases, executed symmetrically on both sides of the animal and creating a syntactic chain of behavioural events. The grooming syntax can be altered by stress and novelty, as well as by several mutations and brain lesions. Grooming behaviour is known to be affected by alterations of the dopamine system, including dopamine receptor modulation, dopamine alteration in genetically modified animals, and after brain lesion. While a lot is known about the initiation and syntactic modifications of this refined sequence of movements, effects of unilateral lesion of dopamine neurons are unclear particularly regarding the symmetry of syntactic chains. In the present work we studied grooming in mice unilaterally lesioned in the medial forebrain bundle by 6-hydroxydopamine. We found a reduction in completion of grooming bouts, associated with reduction in number of transitions between grooming phases. The data also revealed the development of asymmetry in grooming behaviour, with reduced tendency to groom the contralateral side to the lesion. Symmetry was recovered following treatment with L-DOPA. Thus, the present work shows that unilateral lesion of dopamine neurons reduces self-grooming behaviour by affecting duration and numbers of events. It produces premature discontinuation of grooming chains but the sequence syntax remains correct. This deficient grooming could be considered as an intrinsic symptom of Parkinson's disease in animal models and could present some similarities with abnormalities of motor movement sequencing seen in patients. Our study also suggests grooming analysis as an additional method to screen parkinsonism in animal models.

  14. Enamel lesions in development, classification in Costa Rican families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murillo Knudsen, Gina; Berrocal Salazar, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Enamel lesions in development were identified and classified in patients of Llano Grande de Cartago, examined at the Facultad de Odontologia of the Universidad de Costa Rica. A guide is provided over the topic. 15 children and 2 Costa Rican adults were selected. Clinical examinations, radiographs and clinical photographs were used as data collection method. Dental defects of the enamel were classified according to the possible genetic causes and without genetic causes. Imperfect Amelogenesis (IA) was diagnosed in 10 of patients. Hypoplastic IA was determined in 3 siblings with autosomal recessive inheritance, for 16% of the total sample. Hypomineralized IA was identified in an adult and two of his sons, with autosomal dominant inheritance. The remaining 4 cases of IA have been sporadic. Lesions of dental fluorosis were determined in the Horowitz index in 4 individuals, from 2 unrelated families. Other defects unspecified of the enamel or hypoplasias were found in 3 individuals. Enamel lesions in development should be classified with precision, for the purpose to inform to patients affected about their condition, origin, prognosis and appropriate treatment. The basis are established to implement reliability in the construction of family genealogy, identification and classification of enamel lesions, as well as the probabilities of future generations to express the lesions in the enamel of temporary or permanent dentition [es

  15. Molecular genetic researches on the radiation genetics of Drosophila in JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'eva, K.P.; Aleksandrova, M.V.; Aleksandrov, I.D.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies of radiation-induced heritable DNA lesions are carried out by the genetic group of Laboratory of nuclear problem in Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The first results of molecular analysis of γ –ray- and neutron-induced vestigial mutations using PCR and sequencing will be presented. (authors)

  16. Fruit self-thinning: a trait to consider for genetic improvement of apple tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celton, Jean-Marc; Kelner, Jean-Jacques; Martinez, Sébastien; Bechti, Abdel; Khelifi Touhami, Amina; James, Marie José; Durel, Charles-Eric; Laurens, François; Costes, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    In apple (Malus×domestica Borkh), as in many fruiting crops, fruit maintenance vs abscission is a major criteria for production profitability. Growers routinely make use of chemical thinning agents to control total fruit load. However, serious threats for the environment lead to the demand for new apple cultivars with self-thinning properties. In this project, we studied the genetic determinism of this trait using a F1 progeny derived from the cross between the hybrid INRA X3263, assumed to possess the self-thinning trait, and the cultivar 'Belrène'. Both counting and percentage variables were considered to capture the fruiting behaviour on different shoot types and over three consecutive years. Besides low to moderate but significant genetic effects, mixed models showed considerable effects of the year and the shoot type, as well as an interaction effect. Year effect resulted mainly from biennial fruiting. Eight Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) were detected on several linkage groups (LG), either independent or specific of the year of observation or the shoot type. The QTL with highest LOD value was located on the top third of LG10. The screening of three QTL zones for candidate genes revealed a list of transcription factors and genes involved in fruit nutrition, xylem differentiation, plant responses to starvation and organ abscission that open new avenues for further molecular investigations. The detailed phenotyping performed revealed the dependency between the self-thinning trait and the fruiting status of the trees. Despite a moderate genetic control of the self-thinning trait, QTL and candidate genes were identified which will need further analyses involving other progenies and molecular investigations.

  17. Premalignant Lesions in the Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziva Kirkali

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most malignant urologic disease. Different lesions, such as dysplasia in the tubules adjacent to RCC, atypical hyperplasia in the cyst epithelium of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and adenoma have been described for a number of years as possible premalignant changes or precursor lesions of RCC. In two recent papers, kidneys adjacent to RCC or removed from other causes were analyzed, and dysplastic lesions were identified and defined in detail. Currently renal intraepithelial neoplasia (RIN is the proposed term for classification. The criteria for a lesion to be defined as premalignant are (1 morphological similarity; (2 spatial association; (3 development of microinvasive carcinoma; (4 higher frequency, severity, and extent then invasive carcinoma; (5 progression to invasive cancer; and (6 similar genetic alterations. RIN resembles the neoplastic cells of RCC. There is spatial association. Progression to invasive carcinoma is described in experimental cancer models, and in some human renal tumors. Similar molecular alterations are found in some putative premalignant changes. The treatment for RCC is radical or partial nephrectomy. Preneoplastic lesions may remain in the renal remnant in patients treated by partial nephrectomy and may be the source of local recurrences. RIN seems to be a biologic precursor of some RCCs and warrants further investigation. Interpretation and reporting of these lesions would reveal important resources for the biological nature and clinical significance. The management of RIN diagnosed in a renal biopsy and partial nephrectomy needs to be answered.

  18. Post-radiotherapeutic heart lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testart, F.M.

    1979-05-01

    Heart structures have traditionally been considered radioresistant. In fact all tissues subjected to radiotherapy can develop lesions. Possible damage includes: - pericardiac fibrosis, the commonest and best individualized, associated with a constriction this leads to a stoppage pattern usually occurring late, around the 18th month. Its frequency depends directly on the total radiation dose; - fibrous myocarditis by direct damage to the heart muscle; - stenosis type lesions of the large coronary trunks; - in exceptional cases lesions of the aorta: hyperplastic degenerescence of the intima and adventitia or of the aortic sigmoid valvules and the mitral valves. Three observations are reported, concerning a coronary, a pericardiac and a coronary, myocardiac and pericardiac lesion. Following this account the irradiation techniques and main experimental data are reviewed and the prophylactic and therapeutic consequences to be derived from our observations and those of the literature are examined [fr

  19. White matter lesion progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofer, Edith; Cavalieri, Margherita; Bis, Joshua C

    2015-01-01

    10 cohorts. To assess the relative contribution of genetic factors to progression of WML, we compared in 7 cohorts risk models including demographics, vascular risk factors plus single-nucleotide polymorphisms that have been shown to be associated cross-sectionally with WML in the current......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter lesion (WML) progression on magnetic resonance imaging is related to cognitive decline and stroke, but its determinants besides baseline WML burden are largely unknown. Here, we estimated heritability of WML progression, and sought common genetic variants...... associated with WML progression in elderly participants from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium. METHODS: Heritability of WML progression was calculated in the Framingham Heart Study. The genome-wide association study included 7773 elderly participants from...

  20. Giant cell lesion of the jaw as a presenting feature of Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Bridget P; Patel, Maya

    2018-05-30

    This is a case of a 20-year-old woman who presented with a left jaw mass which was resected and found to be a giant cell granuloma of the mandible. Her history and physical examination were suggestive for Noonan syndrome which was confirmed with genetic testing and the finding of a PTPN11 gene mutation which has rarely been associated with giant cell lesions of the jaw. Given her particular genetic mutation and the presence of a giant cell lesion, we present a case of Noonan-like/multiple giant cell lesion syndrome. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Genetic mouse models relevant to schizophrenia: taking stock and looking forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Paul J; Pritchett, David; Stumpenhorst, Katharina; Betts, Jill F; Nissen, Wiebke; Schweimer, Judith; Lane, Tracy; Burnet, Philip W J; Lamsa, Karri P; Sharp, Trevor; Bannerman, David M; Tunbridge, Elizabeth M

    2012-03-01

    Genetic mouse models relevant to schizophrenia complement, and have to a large extent supplanted, pharmacological and lesion-based rat models. The main attraction is that they potentially have greater construct validity; however, they share the fundamental limitations of all animal models of psychiatric disorder, and must also be viewed in the context of the uncertain and complex genetic architecture of psychosis. Some of the key issues, including the choice of gene to target, the manner of its manipulation, gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, and phenotypic characterization, are briefly considered in this commentary, illustrated by the relevant papers reported in this special issue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the “point of no return” and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions. PMID:24833876

  3. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the "point of no return" and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions.

  4. Sensitivity of rCBF to focal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsey, J.H. Jr.; Nakai, K.; Wariyar, B.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of the 133Xenon inhalation method to lateralize cerebral infarctions visible on CT scan was tested in 39 patients. At each of 7 hemispheric regions the flow rate in the lesioned hemisphere was divided by that in the unaffected hemisphere and this ratio was compared with the corresponding ratio for normal subjects. The fast compartment relative flow f1 correctly lateralized the lesion in only 6 patients with no false lateralizations. If the fast compartment relative weight w1 was also considered, the correct lateralizations were increased to about 50%. With the less well-known ISI and the Fractional Flow considered together, the laterality of the lesion was identified correctly in 85% of cases, with no false lateralizations

  5. Familial cerebral cavernous haemangioma diagnosed in an infant with a rapidly growing cerebral lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, B.H.K.; Pereira, J.K.; Ghedia, S.; Pinner, J.; Mowat, D.; Vonau, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas of the central nervous system are vascular malformations best imaged by MRI. They may present at any age, but to our knowledge only 39 cases in the first year of life have previously been reported. A familial form has been described and some of the underlying genetic mutations have recently been discovered. We present the clinical features and serial MRI findings of an 8-week-old boy who presented with subacute intracranial haemorrhage followed by rapid growth of a surgically proven cavernous haemangioma, mimicking a tumour. He also developed new lesions. A strong family history of neurological disease was elucidated. A familial form of cavernous haemangioma was confirmed by identification of a KRIT 1 gene mutation and cavernous haemangiomas in the patient and other family members. We stress the importance of considering cavernous haemangiomas in the context of intracerebral haemorrhage and in the differential diagnosis of rapidly growing lesions in this age group. The family history is also important in screening for familial disease

  6. Histomorphological spetrum of breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, S; Koirala, U; Khatri, R; Acharya, L; Suwal, A

    2011-04-01

    Cancer of the breast is the second most common cause of cancer in women. Mass in the breast, whether benign or malignant is a cause of anxiety to the patients and the family members. All breast lumps are considered to be carcinomas until proved otherwise and are the causes of concern both for the patient and surgeon. This is a retrospective study conducted in Kathmandu Model Hospital for a total duration of three years from August 2007 to August 2010. 114 sample of breast tissue sent for histopathology were studied. Peak incidence of benign lesion was in between 21-30 years and malignant lesions in between 31-50 years. No breast lesions were seen in the first decade of life. Cancer of the breast was seen in 12.28% of cases. Fibroadenoma and fibrocystic disease were the commonest benign lesion and infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the commonest malignant lesion. Specimens from 10 male breasts were received. Gynaecomastia was the most common lesion encountered in males. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was seen in a 70 year old male. Breast cancer is one of the commonest causes of breast lump particularly in women and is growing public health problem in Nepal.

  7. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences

  8. Heterogeneity of mammary lesions represent molecular differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namba, Ruria; Gregg, Jeffrey P; Maglione, Jeannie E; Davis, Ryan R; Baron, Colin A; Liu, Stephenie; Carmack, Condie E; Young, Lawrence JT; Borowsky, Alexander D; Cardiff, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    Human breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, histopathologically, molecularly and phenotypically. The molecular basis of this heterogeneity is not well understood. We have used a mouse model of DCIS that consists of unique lines of mammary intraepithelial neoplasia (MIN) outgrowths, the premalignant lesion in the mouse that progress to invasive carcinoma, to understand the molecular changes that are characteristic to certain phenotypes. Each MIN-O line has distinguishable morphologies, metastatic potentials and estrogen dependencies. We utilized oligonucleotide expression arrays and high resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to investigate whole genome expression patterns and whole genome aberrations in both the MIN-O and tumor from four different MIN-O lines that each have different phenotypes. From the whole genome analysis at 35 kb resolution, we found that chromosome 1, 2, 10, and 11 were frequently associated with whole chromosome gains in the MIN-Os. In particular, two MIN-O lines had the majority of the chromosome gains. Although we did not find any whole chromosome loss, we identified 3 recurring chromosome losses (2F1-2, 3E4, 17E2) and two chromosome copy number gains on chromosome 11. These interstitial deletions and duplications were verified with a custom made array designed to interrogate the specific regions at approximately 550 bp resolution. We demonstrated that expression and genomic changes are present in the early premalignant lesions and that these molecular profiles can be correlated to phenotype (metastasis and estrogen responsiveness). We also identified expression changes associated with genomic instability. Progression to invasive carcinoma was associated with few additional changes in gene expression and genomic organization. Therefore, in the MIN-O mice, early premalignant lesions have the major molecular and genetic changes required and these changes have important phenotypic significance. In contrast, the changes

  9. Abfraction lesions reviewed: current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Fátima Vasconcelos Pereira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-carious cervical lesions are characterized by structural loss near the cementoenamel junction, without the presence of caries. Anumber of theories have arisen to explain the etiology of such lesions, although the real causes remain obscure, as is reflected by the contradictory terminology used in the literature. In addition to describing acidic and abrasive processes documented as etiological factors, attention is given to the role of mechanical stress from occlusal load, which is the most accepted theory for the development of abfraction lesions. Considering that tensile stress leads to the failure of restorations in the cervical region and that this is a fruitful area for future research, the present study has highlighted diagnosis, prognosis and the criteria for treatment.

  10. Pathological criteria and practical issues in papillary lesions of the breast - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yun-Bi; Tse, Gary M

    2016-01-01

    Papillary lesions of the breast include a broad spectrum of lesions, ranging from benign papilloma, papilloma with atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to papillary carcinoma. The accurate diagnosis of mammary papillary lesions is a challenge for pathologists, owing to the overlapping features among these lesions. In this review, some of the diagnostic criteria of papillary lesions are discussed, with special emphasis on some key morphological features, namely fibrovascular cores, epithelial proliferation in a solid pattern, intraductal papilloma complicated by ADH or DCIS, and invasion and its mimics. The roles of immunohistochemistry, and the interpretation of myoepithelial cell markers, hormone receptors, and high molecular weight cytokeratin, are addressed. Finally, novel biomarkers and genetic aberrations in papillary lesions are summarized. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Fiber tract-specific white matter lesion severity Findings in late-life depression and by AGTR1 A1166C genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Warren D; Zhao, Zheen; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Payne, Martha E; Steffens, David C; Krishnan, Ranga R; Hauser, Elizabeth; MacFall, James R

    2013-02-01

    Past work demonstrated that late-life depression is associated with greater severity of ischemic cerebral hyperintense white matter lesions, particularly frontal lesions. However, these lesions are also associated with other neuropsychiatric deficits, so these clinical relationships may depend on which fiber tracts are damaged. We examined the ratio of lesion to nonlesioned white matter tissue within multiple fiber tracts between depressed and nondepressed elders. We also sought to determine if the AGTR1 A1166C and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms contributed to vulnerability to lesion development in discrete tracts. The 3T structural MR images and blood samples for genetic analyses were acquired on 54 depressed and 37 nondepressed elders. Lesion maps were created through an automated tissue segmentation process and applied to a probabilistic white matter fiber tract atlas allowing for identification of the fraction of the tract occupied by lesion. The depressed cohort exhibited a significantly greater lesion ratio only in the left upper cingulum near the cingulate gyrus (F((1,86)) = 4.62, P = 0.0344), supporting past work implicating cingulate dysfunction in the pathogenesis of depression. In the 62 Caucasian subjects with genetic data, AGTR1 C1166 carriers exhibited greater lesion ratios across multiple tracts including the anterior thalamic radiation and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. In contrast, BDNF Met allele carriers exhibited greater lesion ratios only in the frontal corpus callosum. Although these findings did not survive correction for multiple comparisons, this study supports our hypothesis and provides preliminary evidence that genetic differences related to vascular disease may increase lesion vulnerability differentially across fiber tracts. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Localized lesions in secondary syphillis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasid, N.; Syphilis, S.

    2008-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of secondary syphilis are variable and can mimic many skin diseases, mostly being generalized and symmetrical in distribution. Localized lesions of secondary syphilis are rarely seen in dermatology clinics. We report an unusual presentation wherein a patient had localized lesions over face and soles only. There is a need for increased awareness on the part of physicians to recognize new patterns of syphilitic infection, together with a willingness to consider the diagnosis of syphilis in patients with unusual clinical features. (author)

  13. Minimizing shell-and-tube heat exchanger cost with genetic algorithms and considering maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildi-Tremblay, P.; Gosselin, L. [Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada). Dept. de genie mecanique

    2007-07-15

    This paper presents a procedure for minimizing the cost of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger based on genetic algorithms (GA). The global cost includes the operating cost (pumping power) and the initial cost expressed in terms of annuities. Eleven design variables associated with shell-and-tube heat exchanger geometries are considered: tube pitch, tube layout patterns, number of tube passes, baffle spacing at the centre, baffle spacing at the inlet and outlet, baffle cut, tube-to-baffle diametrical clearance, shell-to-baffle diametrical clearance, tube bundle outer diameter, shell diameter, and tube outer diameter. Evaluations of the heat exchangers performances are based on an adapted version of the Bell-Delaware method. Pressure drops constraints are included in the procedure. Reliability and maintenance due to fouling are taken into account by restraining the coefficient of increase of surface into a given interval. Two case studies are presented. Results show that the procedure can properly and rapidly identify the optimal design for a specified heat transfer process. (author)

  14. Lesions in the wingless gene of the Apollo butterfly (Parnassius apollo, Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) individuals with deformed or reduced wings, coming from the isolated population in Pieniny (Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukasiewicz, Kinga; Sanak, Marek; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2016-02-01

    Parnassius apollo (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) is a butterfly species which was common in Europe in 19th century, but now it is considered as near threatened. Various programs devoted to protect and save P. apollo have been established, between others the one in Pieniny National Park (Poland). An isolated population of this butterfly has been restored there from a small group of 20-30 individuals in early 1990s. However, deformations or reductions of wings occur in this population in a relatively large number of insects, and the cause of this phenomenon is not known. In this report, the occurrence of lesions in the wingless (wg) gene is demonstrated in most of tested butterflies with deformed or reduced wings, but not in normal insects. Although the analyses indicated that wg lesion(s) cannot be the sole cause of the deformed or reduced wings in the population of P. apollo from Pieniny, the discovery that this genetic defect occurs in most of malformed individuals, can be considered as an important step in understanding this phenomenon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic analysis of Enterobius vermicularis isolated from a chimpanzee with lethal hemorrhagic colitis and pathology of the associated lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, Yuji; Okabayashi, Sachi; Abe, Niichiro; Masatou, Haruhisa; Iida, Shinya; Teramoto, Isao; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Shibahara, Tomoyuki

    2014-11-01

    Human pinworms, Enterobius vermicularis, are normally recognized as minor pathogens. However, a fatal case of human pinworm infection has been reported in a nonhuman primate, a zoo reared chimpanzee. Here, we histopathologically examined the lesions in tissues from the deceased chimpanzee and genetically characterized the isolated worms to investigate the pathogenicity and determine the phylogeny. We identified ulcers deep in the submucosa where many parasites were found to have invaded the lamina propria mucosa or submucous tissue. An inflammatory reaction consisting mainly of neutrophils and lymphocytes but not eosinophils was observed around the parasites, and intense hemorrhage in the lamina propria was confirmed. The parasites were morphologically similar to E. vermicularis based on the shape of the copulatory spicules. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene products were amplified from worm DNA by PCR and were genetically identified as E. vermicularis based on >98.7% similarity of partial sequences. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the sequences clustered together with other chimpanzee E. vermicularis isolates in a group which has been referred to as type C and which differs from human isolates (type A). The samples were negative for bacterial pathogens and Entamoeba histolytica indicating that E. vermicularis could be pathogenic in chimpanzees. Phylogenetic clustering of the isolates indicated that the parasite may be host specific.

  16. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 2, malignant lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, W.C.; Klein, M.J.; Pitt, M.J.; Siegal, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-part review presenting an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. The first part presented a brief review of modern methods in molecular pathology, along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. This second part reviews the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in malignant chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. (orig.)

  17. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 2, malignant lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, W.C. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Klein, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Pitt, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Siegal, G.P. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Departments of Pathology, Cell Biology, and Surgery, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2006-12-15

    This is the second part of a two-part review presenting an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. The first part presented a brief review of modern methods in molecular pathology, along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. This second part reviews the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in malignant chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. (orig.)

  18. Morbidity and mortality after liver resection for benign and malignant hepatobiliary lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdogan, Deha; Busch, Olivier R. C.; Gouma, Dirk J.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Although most partial liver resections are performed for malignant lesions, an increasing contingent of benign lesions is also considered for surgery. The aim was to assess post-operative morbidity and mortality after liver resection for benign hepatobiliary lesions in comparison with outcome

  19. Children with severe early childhood caries: streptococci genetic strains within carious and white spot lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Kenneth; Joseph, Raphael; Vo, Alex; Patel, Trusha; Chaudhry, Samiya; Nguyen, Uyen; Trevor, Amy; Robinson, Erica; Campbell, Margaret; McLennan, John; Houran, Farielle; Wong, Tristan; Flann, Kendra; Wages, Melissa; Palmer, Elizabeth A; Peterson, John; Engle, John; Maier, Tom; Machida, Curtis A

    2014-01-01

    Mutans streptococci (MS) are one of the major microbiological determinants of dental caries. The objectives of this study are to identify distinct MS and non-MS streptococci strains that are located at carious sites and non-carious enamel surfaces in children with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC), and assess if cariogenic MS and non-cariogenic streptococci might independently exist as primary bacterial strains on distinct sites within the dentition of individual children. Dental plaque from children (N=20; aged 3-6) with S-ECC was collected from carious lesions (CLs), white spot lesions (WSLs) and non-carious enamel surfaces. Streptococcal isolates (N=10-20) from each site were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify MS, and arbitrarily primed-PCR for assignment of genetic strains. Primary strains were identified as ≥50% of the total isolates surveyed at any site. In several cases, strains were characterized for acidurity using ATP-driven bioluminescence and subjected to PCR-determination of potential MS virulence products. Identification of non-MS was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Sixty-four independent MS or non-MS streptococcal strains were identified. All children contained 1-6 strains. In many patients (N=11), single primary MS strains were identified throughout the dentition. In other patients (N=4), primary MS strains were identified within CLs that were distinct from primary strains found on enamel. Streptococcus gordonii strains were identified as primary strains on enamel or WSLs in four children, and in general were less aciduric than MS strains. Many children with S-ECC contained only a single primary MS strain that was present in both carious and non-carious sites. In some cases, MS and non-cariogenic S. gordonii strains were found to independently exist as dominant strains at different locations within the dentition of individual children, and the aciduric potential of these strains may influence susceptibility in the

  20. Children with severe early childhood caries: streptococci genetic strains within carious and white spot lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Gilbert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Mutans streptococci (MS are one of the major microbiological determinants of dental caries. The objectives of this study are to identify distinct MS and non-MS streptococci strains that are located at carious sites and non-carious enamel surfaces in children with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC, and assess if cariogenic MS and non-cariogenic streptococci might independently exist as primary bacterial strains on distinct sites within the dentition of individual children. Design: Dental plaque from children (N=20; aged 3–6 with S-ECC was collected from carious lesions (CLs, white spot lesions (WSLs and non-carious enamel surfaces. Streptococcal isolates (N=10–20 from each site were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR to identify MS, and arbitrarily primed-PCR for assignment of genetic strains. Primary strains were identified as ≥50% of the total isolates surveyed at any site. In several cases, strains were characterized for acidurity using ATP-driven bioluminescence and subjected to PCR-determination of potential MS virulence products. Identification of non-MS was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results: Sixty-four independent MS or non-MS streptococcal strains were identified. All children contained 1–6 strains. In many patients (N=11, single primary MS strains were identified throughout the dentition. In other patients (N=4, primary MS strains were identified within CLs that were distinct from primary strains found on enamel. Streptococcus gordonii strains were identified as primary strains on enamel or WSLs in four children, and in general were less aciduric than MS strains. Conclusions: Many children with S-ECC contained only a single primary MS strain that was present in both carious and non-carious sites. In some cases, MS and non-cariogenic S. gordonii strains were found to independently exist as dominant strains at different locations within the dentition of individual children, and

  1. Factors Motivating Individuals to Consider Genetic Testing for Type 2 Diabetes Risk Prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Wessel

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes and perceptions of willingness to participate in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes (T2D risk prediction in the general population. Adults (n = 598 were surveyed on attitudes about utilizing genetic testing to predict future risk of T2D. Participants were recruited from public libraries (53%, online registry (37% and a safety net hospital emergency department (10%. Respondents were 37 ± 11 years old, primarily White (54%, female (69%, college educated (46%, with an annual income ≥$25,000 (56%. Half of participants were interested in genetic testing for T2D (52% and 81% agreed/strongly agreed genetic testing should be available to the public. Only 57% of individuals knew T2D is preventable. A multivariate model to predict interest in genetic testing was adjusted for age, gender, recruitment location and BMI; significant predictors were motivation (high perceived personal risk of T2D [OR = 4.38 (1.76, 10.9]; family history [OR = 2.56 (1.46, 4.48]; desire to know risk prior to disease onset [OR = 3.25 (1.94, 5.42]; and knowing T2D is preventable [OR = 2.11 (1.24, 3.60], intention (if the cost is free [OR = 10.2 (4.27, 24.6]; and learning T2D is preventable [OR = 5.18 (1.95, 13.7] and trust of genetic testing results [OR = 0.03 (0.003, 0.30]. Individuals are interested in genetic testing for T2D risk which offers unique information that is personalized. Financial accessibility, validity of the test and availability of diabetes prevention programs were identified as predictors of interest in T2D testing.

  2. Incidentally Detected Enhancing Breast Lesions on Chest Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wen Chiung; Hsu, Hsian He; Yu, Jyh Cherng; Hsu, Giu Cheng; Yu, Cheng Ping; Chang, Tsun Hou; Huang, Guo Shu; Li, Chao Shiang

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the nature and imaging appearance of incidental enhancing breast lesions detected on a routine contrast-enhanced chest CT. Twenty-three patients with incidental enhancing breast lesions on contrast-enhanced chest CT were retrospectively reviewed. The breast lesions were reviewed by unenhanced and enhanced CT, and evaluated by observing the shapes, margins, enhancement patterns and backgrounds of breast lesions. A histopathologic diagnosis or long-term follow-up served as reference standard. Sixteen (70%) patients had malignant breast lesions and seven (30%) had benign lesions. In 10 patients, the breast lesions were exclusively detected on contrast-enhanced CT. Using unenhanced CT, breast lesions with fi broglandular backgrounds were prone to be obscured (p < 0.001). Incidental primary breast cancer showed an non-significant trend of a higher percentage irregular margin (p = 0.056). All of the four incidental breast lesions with non-mass-like enhancement were proven to be malignant. Routine contrast-enhanced chest CT can reveal sufficient details to allow for the detection of unsuspected breast lesions, in which some cases may be proven as malignant. An irregular margin of incidental enhancing breast lesion can be considered a suggestive sign of malignancy

  3. Supine breast US: how to correlate breast lesions from prone MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegrafo, Michele; Rella, Leonarda; Stabile Ianora, Amato A; Angelelli, Giuseppe; Moschetta, Marco

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate spatial displacement of breast lesions from prone MR to supine ultrasound positions, and to determine whether the degree of displacement may be associated with breast density and lesion histotype. 380 patients underwent breast MR and second-look ultrasound. The MR and ultrasound lesion location within the breast gland, distances from anatomical landmarks (nipple, skin and pectoral muscle), spatial displacement (distance differences from the landmarks within the same breast region) and region displacement (breast region change) were prospectively evaluated. Differences between MR and ultrasound measurements, association between the degree of spatial displacement and both breast density and lesion histotypes were calculated. In 290/380 (76%) patients, 300 MR lesions were detected. 285/300 (95%) lesions were recognized on ultrasound. By comparing MR and ultrasound, spatial displacement occurred in 183/285 (64.3%) cases while region displacement in 102/285 (35.7%) cases with a circumferential movement along an arc centred on the nipple, having supine ultrasound as the reference standard. A significant association between the degree of lesion displacement and breast density was found (p < 0.00001) with a significant higher displacement in case of fatty breasts. No significant association between the degree of displacement and lesion histotype was found (p = 0.1). Lesion spatial displacement from MRI to ultrasound may occur especially in adipose breasts. Lesion-nipple distance and circumferential displacement from the nipple need to be considered for ultrasound lesion detection. Second-look ultrasound breast lesion detection could be improved by calculating the lesion-nipple distance and considering that spatial displacement from MRI occurs with a circumferential movement along an arc centred on the nipple.

  4. Roles of Vascular and Metabolic Components in Cognitive Dysfunction of Alzheimer disease: Short- and Long-term Modification by Non-genetic Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki eSato

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that a specific set of genetic and non-genetic risk factors contributes to the onset of Alzheimer disease (AD. Non-genetic risk factors include diabetes, hypertension in mid-life, and probably dyslipidemia in mid-life. This review focuses on the vascular and metabolic components of non-genetic risk factors. The mechanisms whereby non-genetic risk factors modify cognitive dysfunction are divided into four components, short- and long-term effects of vascular and metabolic factors. These consist of 1 compromised vascular reactivity, 2 vascular lesions, 3 hypo/hyperglycemia, and 4 exacerbated AD histopathological features, respectively. Vascular factors compromise cerebrovascular reactivity in response to neuronal activity and also cause irreversible vascular lesions. On the other hand, representative short-term effects of metabolic factors on cognitive dysfunction occur due to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Non-genetic risk factors also modify the pathological manifestations of AD in the long-term. Therefore, vascular and metabolic factors contribute to aggravation of cognitive dysfunction in AD through short-term and long-term effects. Beta-amyloid could be involved in both vascular and metabolic components. It might be beneficial to support treatment in AD patients by appropriate therapeutic management of non-genetic risk factors, considering the contributions of these four elements to the manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in individual patients, though all components are not always present. It should be clarified how these four components interact with each other. To answer this question, a clinical prospective study that follows up clinical features with respect to these four components: 1 functional MRI or SPECT for cerebrovascular reactivity, 2 MRI for ischemic lesions and atrophy, 3 clinical episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, 4 amyloid-PET and tau-PET for pathological features of AD, would be required.

  5. Roles of vascular and metabolic components in cognitive dysfunction of Alzheimer disease: short- and long-term modification by non-genetic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoyuki; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-11-05

    It is well known that a specific set of genetic and non-genetic risk factors contributes to the onset of Alzheimer disease (AD). Non-genetic risk factors include diabetes, hypertension in mid-life, and probably dyslipidemia in mid-life. This review focuses on the vascular and metabolic components of non-genetic risk factors. The mechanisms whereby non-genetic risk factors modify cognitive dysfunction are divided into four components, short- and long-term effects of vascular and metabolic factors. These consist of (1) compromised vascular reactivity, (2) vascular lesions, (3) hypo/hyperglycemia, and (4) exacerbated AD histopathological features, respectively. Vascular factors compromise cerebrovascular reactivity in response to neuronal activity and also cause irreversible vascular lesions. On the other hand, representative short-term effects of metabolic factors on cognitive dysfunction occur due to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Non-genetic risk factors also modify the pathological manifestations of AD in the long-term. Therefore, vascular and metabolic factors contribute to aggravation of cognitive dysfunction in AD through short-term and long-term effects. β-amyloid could be involved in both vascular and metabolic components. It might be beneficial to support treatment in AD patients by appropriate therapeutic management of non-genetic risk factors, considering the contributions of these four elements to the manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in individual patients, though all components are not always present. It should be clarified how these four components interact with each other. To answer this question, a clinical prospective study that follows up clinical features with respect to these four components: (1) functional MRI or SPECT for cerebrovascular reactivity, (2) MRI for ischemic lesions and atrophy, (3) clinical episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, (4) amyloid-PET and tau-PET for pathological features of AD, would be required.

  6. Genetic autonomic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B

    2013-03-01

    Genetic disorders affecting the autonomic nervous system can result in abnormal development of the nervous system or they can be caused by neurotransmitter imbalance, an ion-channel disturbance or by storage of deleterious material. The symptoms indicating autonomic dysfunction, however, will depend upon whether the genetic lesion has disrupted peripheral or central autonomic centers or both. Because the autonomic nervous system is pervasive and affects every organ system in the body, autonomic dysfunction will result in impaired homeostasis and symptoms will vary. The possibility of genetic confirmation by molecular testing for specific diagnosis is increasing but treatments tend to remain only supportive and directed toward particular symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubitschek, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies on the nature and action of lethal and mutagenic lesions in DNA and the mechanisms by which these are produced in bacteria by ionizing radiation or by decay of radioisotopes incorporated in DNA. Studies of radioisotope decay provide the advantages that the original lesion is localized in the genetic material and the immediate physical and chemical changes that occur at decay are known. Specific types of DNA damage were related to characteristic decay properties of several radioisotopes. Incorporated 125 I, for example, induces a double-stranded break in DNA with almost every decay, but causes remarkably little damage of any other kind to the DNA. (U.S.)

  8. Genetics of allergy and allergic sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Sparks, Rachel; Waage, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    information about shared genetics between allergy, related phenotypes and autoimmunity. Studies of monogenic diseases have elucidated critical cellular pathways and protein functions responsible for allergy. These complementary approaches imply genetic mechanisms involved in Th2 immunity, T......Our understanding of the specific genetic lesions in allergy has improved in recent years due to identification of common risk variants from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and studies of rare, monogenic diseases. Large-scale GWAS have identified novel susceptibility loci and provided...

  9. Reproducibility analysis of the stability and treatment of vertebral metastatic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael de Rezende Pratali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the reproducibility among spine surgeons in defining the treatment of vertebral metastatic lesions, taking into account the mechanical stability of injuries. METHODS: Twenty cases of isolated vertebral metastatic lesions were presented to ten experts. Their opinion was then asked about the stability of the lesion, as well as their treatment option. RESULTS: The interobserver Kappa coefficient obtained both for stability analysis as to the decision of the treatment was poor (0.334 and 0.248, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Poor interobserver reproducibility was observed in deciding the treatment of vertebral metastatic lesions when considering the stability of the lesions.

  10. Candida spp. in oral cancer and oral precancerous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Francesca; Colella, Giuseppe; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Rossiello, Raffaele; Angelillo, Italo Francesco; Liguori, Giorgio

    2013-07-01

    To assess the presence of Candida spp. in lesions of the oral cavity in a sample of patients with precancer or cancer of the mouth and evaluate the limitations and advantages of microbiological and histological methods, 103 subjects with precancerous or cancerous lesions and not treated were observed between 2007 and 2009. The presence of Candida in the lesions was analyzed by microbiological and histological methods. Cohen's k statistic was used to assess the agreement between culture method and staining techniques. Forty-eight (47%) patients had cancer and 55 (53%) patients had precancerous lesions. Candida spp. were isolated from 31 (30%) patients with cancerous lesions and 33 (32%) with precancerous lesions. C. albicans was the most frequent species isolated in the lesions. The k value showed a fair overall agreement for comparisons between culture method and PAS (0.2825) or GMS (0.3112). This study supports the frequent presence of Candida spp. in cancer and precancerous lesions of the oral cavity. Both microbiological investigations and histological techniques were reliable for detection of Candida spp. It would be desirable for the two techniques to be considered complementary in the detection of yeast infections in these types of lesions.

  11. Acquired IFNγ resistance impairs anti-tumor immunity and gives rise to T-cell-resistant melanoma lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucker, Antje; Zhao, Fang; Pieper, Natalia; Heeke, Christina; Maltaner, Raffaela; Stadtler, Nadine; Real, Birgit; Bielefeld, Nicola; Howe, Sebastian; Weide, Benjamin; Gutzmer, Ralf; Utikal, Jochen; Loquai, Carmen; Gogas, Helen; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Zeschnigk, Michael; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Trilling, Mirko; Horn, Susanne; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Griewank, Klaus G.; Paschen, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma treatment has been revolutionized by antibody-based immunotherapies. IFNγ secretion by CD8+ T cells is critical for therapy efficacy having anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on tumour cells. Our study demonstrates a genetic evolution of IFNγ resistance in different melanoma patient models. Chromosomal alterations and subsequent inactivating mutations in genes of the IFNγ signalling cascade, most often JAK1 or JAK2, protect melanoma cells from anti-tumour IFNγ activity. JAK1/2 mutants further evolve into T-cell-resistant HLA class I-negative lesions with genes involved in antigen presentation silenced and no longer inducible by IFNγ. Allelic JAK1/2 losses predisposing to IFNγ resistance development are frequent in melanoma. Subclones harbouring inactivating mutations emerge under various immunotherapies but are also detectable in pre-treatment biopsies. Our data demonstrate that JAK1/2 deficiency protects melanoma from anti-tumour IFNγ activity and results in T-cell-resistant HLA class I-negative lesions. Screening for mechanisms of IFNγ resistance should be considered in therapeutic decision-making. PMID:28561041

  12. Genetic similarity of polyploids - A new version of the computer program POPDIST (ver. 1.2.0) considers intraspecific genetic differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomiuk, Jürgen; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Loeschcke, Volker

    2009-01-01

    For evolutionary studies of polyploid species estimates of the genetic identity between species with different degrees of ploidy are particularly required because gene counting in samples of polyploid individuals often cannot be done, e.g., in triploids the phenotype AB can be genotypically either...... ABB or AAB. We recently suggested a genetic distance measure that is based on phenotype counting and made available the computer program POPDIST. The program provides maximum-likelihood estimates of the genetic identities and distances between polyploid populations, but this approach...

  13. Genetic polymorphisms of miR-146a and miR-27a, H. pylori infection, and risk of gastric lesions in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-yang Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in various human diseases. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in inflammation-related miRNA may play an important role in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori-induced gastric lesions. To evaluate the associations between miRNA SNPs, H. pylori and gastric lesions, a population-based study was conducted in Linqu County, China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on serum miRNA array conducted in this population, two SNP loci (miR-146a rs2910164: G>C and miR-27a rs895819: T>C were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 2,380 participants with diverse gastric lesions. Using participants with superficial gastritis and mild chronic atrophic gastritis as the reference group, we found that rs2910164 CC carriers had a significantly increased risk of intestinal metaplasia [adjusted odds ratio (OR, 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.03-1.97] and dysplasia (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.05-2.25 compared to GG carriers, whereas no significant association was observed for rs895819. Stratified analysis by H. pylori infection indicated that rs2910164 C allele was associated with an increased risk of intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia only among individuals infected with H. pylori (CC vs. GG: OR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.12-2.08, P for trend = 0.004. Participants who simultaneously carried variant alleles and H. pylori infection were more likely to develop intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia, although the interaction between genetic variants and H. pylori infection was not significant (P for interaction = 0.35 for rs2910164 and 0.92 for rs895819. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphism may contribute to the evolution of H. pylori-associated gastric lesions in this high-risk population.

  14. Significance of localization of nonpalpable breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Ki Keun; Choi, Hyun Ju [Yongdong Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    As mammography has become more popular for the evaluation of breast symptoms and for the screening of asymptomatic women, the smaller lesions are being detected before they become palpable, therefore preoperative localization became necessary. This has led to the development of several methods for preoperative localization of nonpalpable lesions. Authors analyzed 50 cases with preoperative localization in 45 patients which had abnormal findings on film mammogram or ultrasonomammogram since October 1985 through March 1990 at Yongdong Severance Hospital, College of Medicine, Yonsei University. The results were as follows: 1. Techniques of localization were spot method in 8 cases, conventional needle localization method in 38 cases and Kopan's needle localization method in 4 cases. 2. The most common mammographic indication for localization was focal calcifications in 29 cases(58%), which was followed by a newly developed mass in 25 cases(50%). 3. Outcome of pathologically confirmed diagnosis put into benign lesions in 37 cases(74%) and malignant lesions in 13 cases(26%). 4. Among the cases with localization of lesions which has suggested as benign lesions in film and ultrasonomammogram,all cases(100%) were confirmed in benign lesions pathologically. Among the cases with localization of lesions which has suggested as malignant lesions in film and ultrasonomammogram, pathologic malignant has been proved of 44% and possible histopathologic precursor of malignant was resulted in 25% such as atypical hyperplasia and adenosis. Conclusively, authors consider that the abnormal areas should be removed in their entirety with the sacrifice of minimum volume of contiguous normal breast tissue through the preoperative localization, hence our preoperative localization has contributed favorable prognosis based on material lesions in early stage breast cancer.

  15. Significance of localization of nonpalpable breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Ki Keun; Choi, Hyun Ju

    1990-01-01

    As mammography has become more popular for the evaluation of breast symptoms and for the screening of asymptomatic women, the smaller lesions are being detected before they become palpable, therefore preoperative localization became necessary. This has led to the development of several methods for preoperative localization of nonpalpable lesions. Authors analyzed 50 cases with preoperative localization in 45 patients which had abnormal findings on film mammogram or ultrasonomammogram since October 1985 through March 1990 at Yongdong Severance Hospital, College of Medicine, Yonsei University. The results were as follows: 1. Techniques of localization were spot method in 8 cases, conventional needle localization method in 38 cases and Kopan's needle localization method in 4 cases. 2. The most common mammographic indication for localization was focal calcifications in 29 cases(58%), which was followed by a newly developed mass in 25 cases(50%). 3. Outcome of pathologically confirmed diagnosis put into benign lesions in 37 cases(74%) and malignant lesions in 13 cases(26%). 4. Among the cases with localization of lesions which has suggested as benign lesions in film and ultrasonomammogram,all cases(100%) were confirmed in benign lesions pathologically. Among the cases with localization of lesions which has suggested as malignant lesions in film and ultrasonomammogram, pathologic malignant has been proved of 44% and possible histopathologic precursor of malignant was resulted in 25% such as atypical hyperplasia and adenosis. Conclusively, authors consider that the abnormal areas should be removed in their entirety with the sacrifice of minimum volume of contiguous normal breast tissue through the preoperative localization, hence our preoperative localization has contributed favorable prognosis based on material lesions in early stage breast cancer

  16. The molecular genetics of inflammatory, autoimmune, and infectious diseases of the sinonasal tract: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montone, Kathleen T

    2014-06-01

    The sinonasal tract is frequently affected by a variety of nonneoplastic inflammatory disease processes that are often multifactorial in their etiology but commonly have a molecular genetic component. To review the molecular genetics of a variety of nonneoplastic inflammatory diseases of the sinonasal tract. Inflammatory lesions of the sinonasal tract can be divided into 3 main categories: (1) chronic rhinosinusitis, (2) infectious diseases, and (3) autoimmune diseases/vasculitides. The molecular diagnosis and pathways of a variety of these inflammatory lesions are currently being elucidated and will shed light on disease pathogenesis and treatment. The sinonasal tract is frequently affected by inflammatory lesions that arise through complex interactions of environmental, infectious, and genetic factors. Because these lesions are all inflammatory in nature, the molecular pathology surrounding them is most commonly due to upregulation and down-regulation of genes that affect inflammatory responses and immune regulation.

  17. MRI of bone and soft tissue tumors and tumorlike lesions. Differential diagnosis and atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, S.P. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). School of Medicine and Dentistry

    2008-07-01

    The book is devided into three main sections: the introduction presents a detailed overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of muscoskeletal tumors and tumorlike lesions and includes multiple tables regarding teh WHO classification of bone and soft tissue tumors, their relative frequencies and pertinent immunohistochemical and genetic data. The second part contains 20 tables of differential diagnosis of lesions based on anatomic locations and/or specific MRI features. Pertinent radiographic and CT findings and key clinical data are summarized. The third part contains 77 Atlas chapters organized into a routine format that enables the efficient acquisition of specific information regarding each lesion. For the majority of the Atlas chapters multiple MRI images are provided to demonstrate the range of imaging findings and locations associated with the lesions.

  18. CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESION IN YOUNG PATIENTS

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    N. V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the incidence of atherosclerotic lesions in the carotid and vertebral arteries of young patients from Doppler ultrasound data and to compare the quantitatively assessed traditional risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD with severe extracranial artery atherosclerotic lesion.Subjects and methods. Doppler ultrasound was carried out evaluating structural changes in the aortic arch branches in 1563 railway transport workers less than 45 years of age. A separate sample consisted of 68 young people with carotid atherosclerotic changes, in whom traditional risk factors for CHD were studied, so were in a control group of individuals without atherosclerotic changes (n = 38.Results. Among the examinees, carotid atherosclerotic lesion was detected in 112 (7.1 % cases, the increase in the rate of atherosclerotic plaques in patients aged 35–45 years being 9.08 %; that in the rate of local intima-media thickness in those aged 31–40 years being 5.1 %. Smoking (particularly that along with hypercholesterolemia and a family history of cardiovascular diseases, obesity (along with low activity, and emotional overstrain were defined as important risk factors in the young patients. Moreover, factor analysis has shown that smoking,hypertension, and early cardiovascular pathology in the next of kin makes the greatest contribution to the development of carotid atherosclerotic lesion.Conclusion. Among the patients less than 45 years of age, carotid and vertebral artery atherosclerotic changes were found in 112 (7.1 % cases, which were more pronounced in male patients. Smoking, particularly along with hypercholesterolemia and genetic predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, was a risk factor that had the highest impact on the degree of atherosclerotic lesion in the aortic arch branches of the young patients.

  19. Central Lesions With Selective Semicircular Canal Involvement Mimicking Bilateral Vestibulopathy

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    Luke Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral vestibulopathy (BVP, which is due to peripheral lesions, may selectively involve certain semicircular canal (SCC. Recent eye movement recordings with search coil and video head impulse test (HIT have provided insight in central lesions that can cause bilateral and selective SCC deficit mimicking BVP. Since neurological signs or ocular motor deficits maybe subtle or absent, it is critical to recognize central lesions correctly since there is prognostic and treatment implication. Acute floccular lesions cause bilateral horizontal SCC (HC impairment while leaving vertical SCC function unaffected. Vestibular nuclear lesions affect bilateral HC and posterior SCC (PC function, but anterior SCC (AC function is spared. When both eyes are recorded, medial longitudinal fasciculus lesions cause horizontal dysconjugacy in HC function and catch-up saccades, as well as selective deficiency of PC over AC function. Combined peripheral and central lesions may be difficult to distinguish from BVP. Anterior inferior cerebellar artery stroke causes two types of deficits: 1. ipsilateral pan-SCC deficits and contralateral HC deficit and 2. bilateral HC deficit with vertical SCC sparing. Metabolic disorders such as Wernicke encephalopathy characteristically involve HC but not AC or PC function. Gaucher disease causes uniform loss of all SCC function but with minimal horizontal catch-up saccades. Genetic cerebellar ataxias and cerebellar-ataxia neuropathy vestibular areflexia syndrome typically do not spare AC function. While video HIT does not replace the gold-standard, search coil HIT, clinicians are now able to rapidly and accurately identify specific pattern of SCC deficits, which can aid differentiation of central lesions from BVP.

  20. Post-traumatic contrast enhancing brain lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Jung; Kim, Hyun Sook; Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Deok Ryeong; Cho, Young Kwon; Choi, Yun Sun

    2014-01-01

    Only a few studies have been reported on the MR contrast enhancement and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) findings of the post-traumatic lesion of the brain. We report a case of the venous ischemia in the left frontal lobe observed in the MRI obtained one day after the incidence of trauma. Considering the presented slight increase in the ADC, the vasogenic edema was thought to be the major mechanism of the venous ischemia and excitotoxic injury. In spite of a slight increase in the ADC, the hyperintensity in the diffusion weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced areas eventually changed into hemorrhagic lesions.

  1. Post-traumatic contrast enhancing brain lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Jung; Kim, Hyun Sook; Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Deok Ryeong; Cho, Young Kwon; Choi, Yun Sun [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Only a few studies have been reported on the MR contrast enhancement and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) findings of the post-traumatic lesion of the brain. We report a case of the venous ischemia in the left frontal lobe observed in the MRI obtained one day after the incidence of trauma. Considering the presented slight increase in the ADC, the vasogenic edema was thought to be the major mechanism of the venous ischemia and excitotoxic injury. In spite of a slight increase in the ADC, the hyperintensity in the diffusion weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced areas eventually changed into hemorrhagic lesions.

  2. Maxillomandibular giant osteosclerotic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantino LEDESMA-MONTES

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Giant Osteosclerotic Lesions (GOLs are a group of rarely reported intraosseous lesions. Their precise diagnosis is important since they can be confused with malignant neoplasms. Objective This retrospective study aimed to record and analyze the clinical and radiographic Giant Osteosclerotic Lesions (GOLs detected in the maxillomandibular area of patients attending to our institution. Materials and Methods: Informed consent from the patients was obtained and those cases of 2.5 cm or larger lesions with radiopaque or mixed (radiolucid-radiopaque appearance located in the maxillofacial bones were selected. Assessed parameters were: age, gender, radiographic aspect, shape, borders, size, location and relations to roots. Lesions were classified as radicular, apical, interradicular, interradicular-apical, radicular-apical or located in a previous teeth extraction area. Additionally, several osseous and dental developmental alterations (DDAs were assessed. Results Seventeen radiopacities in 14 patients were found and were located almost exclusively in mandible and were two types: idiopathic osteosclerosis and condensing osteitis. GOLs were more frequent in females, and in the anterior and premolar zones. 94.2% of GOLs were qualified as idiopathic osteosclerosis and one case was condensing osteitis. All studied cases showed different osseous and dental developmental alterations (DDAs. The most common were: Microdontia, hypodontia, pulp stones, macrodontia and variations in the mental foramina. Conclusions GOLs must be differentiated from other radiopaque benign and malignant tumors. Condensing osteitis, was considered an anomalous osseous response induced by a chronic low-grade inflammatory stimulus. For development of idiopathic osteosclerosis, two possible mechanisms could be related. The first is modification of the normal turnover with excessive osseous deposition. The second mechanism will prevent the normal bone resorption, arresting the

  3. Concordance between clinical and histopathologic diagnoses of oral mucosal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kush J; De Silva, Harsha L; Tong, Darryl C; Love, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    To study the epidemiology of oral soft tissue lesions in New Zealand from 2002 to 2006 and to determine the concordance between the clinical diagnosis and the definitive histopathologic diagnosis achieved by general dental practitioners and by specialists. The details from biopsy referrals and the corresponding histopathologic reports of oral soft tissue lesions were recorded into a statistical software package, and the concordance between the clinical diagnosis and histopathologic diagnosis was determined for all the lesions. Most biopsies were benign lesions, and both clinician groups achieved a high diagnostic concordance for these lesions. However, when considering all lesion types, the overall concordance for both groups was a moderate 50.6%, with little difference between specialists and general dental practitioners, although specialists were more accurate in diagnosing a malignant or premalignant lesion. The clinical and histopathologic concordance achieved by oral health practitioners in New Zealand appears to be moderate. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. DENTAL LESIONS IN THE LOWLAND TAPIR (TAPIRUS TERRESTRIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjørnelund, Karen B; Jonsson, Lena M; Kortegaard, Hanne; Arnbjerg, Jens; Nielsen, Søren S; Bertelsen, Mads F

    2015-06-01

    Dental ailments, mandibular swelling, and dentoalveolar abscesses are common in tapirs, but knowledge about prevalence or etiology of these lesions in the Tapiridae family in general, and in lowland tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) in particular, is scarce. A recent study identified resorptive lesions of unknown etiology as a common problem in the Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus). In order to investigate the type and prevalence of dental lesions occurring in lowland tapirs, and to compare these with findings with the Malayan tapir, skulls and teeth from 46 deceased lowland tapirs were visually and radiographically examined. The specimens were divided into subpopulations according to age (juveniles, young adults, adults) and origin (free-range or captive). Dental lesions were identified in 24% (11/46) of the study population. The most common pathologic findings were complicated dental fractures with associated periapical reaction (15%) and periapical reactions of various degrees without associated detectable dental pathology (13%). All these lesions likely originated from dental trauma. As in Malayan tapirs, juveniles had significantly fewer lesions than adults. This study shows that dental lesions present frequent problems for lowland tapirs, occurring both in captive and in free-ranging individuals, and indicates that increasing age should be considered a risk factor for the development of these lesions. Notably, the predominant dental problems in lowland tapirs and Malayan tapirs are not the same.

  5. Pérdida de la expresión antigénica ABH en pacientes con lesiones orales precancerosas y cancerosas Loss of ABH antigenic expression in patients with precancerous and cancerous oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Campi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Los antígenos ABH, productos de la interacción de 2 sistemas genéticos, Hh y ABO, están sujetos a leyes de herencia y pueden estar localizados no sólo en los eritrocitos, sino también en la mayoría de las células humanas. El objetivo del este trabajo fue investigar la expresión de antígenos ABH en pacientes con lesiones orales premalignas y malignas orales. Se trabajó con muestras incluidas en tacos de parafina de pacientes con lesiones orales (n= 57. Los pacientes fueron clasificados en 2 grupos: a lesiones premalignas y malignas diagnosticadas clínica y anatopatológicamente y b lesiones benignas (n=93. Se investigaron los antígenos ABH por la técnica de inmunoadherencia específica modificada. Se utilizó la adherencia al tejido vascular como control positivo y al tejido adiposo como control negativo. Los resultados fueron semicuantificados desde adherencia fuertemente positiva a negativa. Se observó una significativa relación entre la expresión antigénica ABH y el grado de malignidad de las lesiones analizadas (P Yates= 0,005. La pérdida de reactividad ABH en los sitios de mayor invasividad tumoral se correlaciona con el grado del desarrollo del tumor, el grado histológico y su malignidad.The ABH antigens, which are produced by the interaction of 2 genetic systems, Hh and ABO, are subjected to laws of heredity and may be located not only in the erythrocytes, but also in most of the human cells. The objective of this paper was to investigate the expression of ABH antigens in patients with premalignant and malignant oral lesions. Work was done with samples included in paraffin plugs in patients with oral lesions (n= 57. The patients were classified into 2 groups: a clinical and anatomopathologically diagnosed premalignant and malignant lesions, and b benign lesions (n=93. The ABH antigens were investigated by the modified specific immunoadherence technique. Adherence to the vascular tissue was used as a positive control

  6. Honey bees consider larval nutritional status rather than genetic relatedness when selecting larvae for emergency queen rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagili, Ramesh R; Metz, Bradley N; Lucas, Hannah M; Chakrabarti, Priyadarshini; Breece, Carolyn R

    2018-05-16

    In honey bees and many other social insects, production of queens is a vital task, as colony fitness is dependent on queens. The factors considered by honey bee workers in selecting larvae to rear new queens during emergency queen rearing are poorly understood. Identifying these parameters is critical, both in an evolutionary and apicultural context. As female caste development in honey bees is dependent on larval diet (i.e. nutrition), we hypothesized that larval nutritional state is meticulously assessed and used by workers in selection of larvae for queen rearing. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of experiments manipulating the nutritional status of one day old larvae by depriving them of brood food for a four-hour period, and then allowing workers to choose larvae for rearing queens from nutritionally deprived and non-deprived larvae. We simultaneously investigated the role of genetic relatedness in selection of larvae for queen rearing. In all the experiments, significantly greater numbers of non-deprived larvae than deprived larvae were selected for queen rearing irrespective of genetic relatedness. Our results demonstrate that honey bees perceive the nutritional state of larvae and use that information when selecting larvae for rearing queens in the natural emergency queen replacement process.

  7. Design and rationale for examining neuroimaging genetics in ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Anne-Katrin; Schirmer, Markus D.; Donahue, Kathleen L.; Cloonan, Lisa; Irie, Robert; Winzeck, Stefan; Bouts, Mark J.R.J.; McIntosh, Elissa C.; Mocking, Steven J.; Dalca, Adrian V.; Sridharan, Ramesh; Xu, Huichun; Frid, Petrea; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Holmegaard, Lukas; Roquer, Jaume; Wasselius, Johan; Cole, John W.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Broderick, Joseph P.; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jern, Christina; Kissela, Brett M.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; Lemmens, Robin; Lindgren, Arne; Meschia, James F.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Thijs, Vincent; Woo, Daniel; Worrall, Bradford B.; Kittner, Steven J.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Rosand, Jonathan; Golland, Polina; Wu, Ona

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe the design and rationale for the genetic analysis of acute and chronic cerebrovascular neuroimaging phenotypes detected on clinical MRI in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) within the scope of the MRI–GENetics Interface Exploration (MRI-GENIE) study. Methods: MRI-GENIE capitalizes on the existing infrastructure of the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN). In total, 12 international SiGN sites contributed MRIs of 3,301 patients with AIS. Detailed clinical phenotyping with the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke (CCS) system and genome-wide genotyping data were available for all participants. Neuroimaging analyses include the manual and automated assessments of established MRI markers. A high-throughput MRI analysis pipeline for the automated assessment of cerebrovascular lesions on clinical scans will be developed in a subset of scans for both acute and chronic lesions, validated against gold standard, and applied to all available scans. The extracted neuroimaging phenotypes will improve characterization of acute and chronic cerebrovascular lesions in ischemic stroke, including CCS subtypes, and their effect on functional outcomes after stroke. Moreover, genetic testing will uncover variants associated with acute and chronic MRI manifestations of cerebrovascular disease. Conclusions: The MRI-GENIE study aims to develop, validate, and distribute the MRI analysis platform for scans acquired as part of clinical care for patients with AIS, which will lead to (1) novel genetic discoveries in ischemic stroke, (2) strategies for personalized stroke risk assessment, and (3) personalized stroke outcome assessment. PMID:28852707

  8. Communication skills and thalamic lesion: Strategies of rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaddii, Luisa; Centorrino, Santi; Cambi, Jacopo; Passali, Desiderio

    2014-01-01

    To describe the speech rehabilitation history of patients with thalamic lesions. Thalamic lesions can affect speech and language according to diverse thalamic nuclei involved. Because of the strategic functional position of the thalamus within the cognitive networks, its lesion can also interfere with other cognitive processes, such as attention, memory and executive functions. Alterations of these cognitive domains contribute significantly to language deficits, leading to communicative inefficacy. This fact must be considered in the rehabilitation efforts. Whereas evaluation of cognitive functions and communicative efficiency is different from that of aphasic disorder, treatment should also be different. The treatment must be focused on specific cognitive deficits with belief in the regaining of communicative ability, as well as it occurs in therapy of pragmatic disorder in traumatic brain injury: attention process training, mnemotechnics and prospective memory training. According to our experience: (a) there is a close correlation between cognitive processes and communication skills; (b) alterations of attention, memory and executive functions cause a loss of efficiency in the language use; and (c) appropriate cognitive treatment improves pragmatic competence and therefore the linguistic disorder. For planning a speech-therapy it is important to consider the relationship between cognitive functions and communication. The cognitive/behavioral treatment confirms its therapeutic efficiency for thalamic lesions. Copyright © 2014 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. [The treatment of decubitus lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugazza, G; Moroni, S; Bona, F

    1995-01-01

    The authors present a plan for pharmacological treatment of pressure sores in patients affected by neurological pathologies: cerebrovascular accidents, head injuries, spinal cord injuries. This plan is easily applicable to all pressure sores included between first and third degree of the Reuler and Cooney classification. Authors identified some drugs specifically usefull in different cutaneous lesion degrees. Skin lesions and employed medicines are described as follows: Erythema: semi occlusive bandage with porous adsorbing membrane. This dressing must be left in for five days at least. Excoriation: bactericidal or bacteriostatic medicines if it's situated in a non pressed area while the same dressing utilized for erythema if it's localized in a pressed area. Pressure sores: if there is local infection cleanse the wound from bacterial defilement using topic antibiotics apply compresses with vitamin C if the cutaneous lesion is larger than deeper, Cadexomero lodico if it's deeper than larger. Fistulas: wadding with tablets of collagen. Necrobiosis: complete or partial surgical removal of eschar preceded by the use of enzymatic drugs when eschar is firmly adherent to subcutaneous tissues. The first group collects 9 patients with stroke and head injury: 8 with sacral and 1 with heel pressure sores. First degree pressure sores heal within 45 days and third degree lesions within 160 days. The second group collects 10 spinal cord injury patients mostly with complete lesion among which: 7 sacral, 1 heel, 1 ischiatic and 1 malleolar lesions. First degree pressure sores heal within 30 days, third degree pressure sores heal within 200 days. Healing time are considered acceptable. Pressure sores recovery swiftness can be related to different factors such as pressure sores sterness, neurological pathology and arising of clinical complication (hyperthermia, infections, low serum albumin values, etc).

  10. Ulcerated Lesion of the Tongue as Manifestation of Systemic Coccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Mendez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic mycoses and their oral manifestations are very rare. We present a case of a 60-year-old man with an ulcerated lesion on the lateral border of the tongue. Histologic studies revealed a granulomatous fungal infection by Coccidioides immitis. After pharmacological treatment, the lesion resolved. Recently, northern Mexico has been reported to be an endemic zone of C. immitis infections; therefore it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mouth lesions. A comprehensive clinical history, physical exploration, and complementary studies are essential for an accurate diagnosis.

  11. Ulcerated Lesion of the Tongue as Manifestation of Systemic Coccidioidomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Sergio A.; Martinez, Ricardo; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2017-01-01

    Systemic mycoses and their oral manifestations are very rare. We present a case of a 60-year-old man with an ulcerated lesion on the lateral border of the tongue. Histologic studies revealed a granulomatous fungal infection by Coccidioides immitis. After pharmacological treatment, the lesion resolved. Recently, northern Mexico has been reported to be an endemic zone of C. immitis infections; therefore it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mouth lesions. A comprehensive clinical history, physical exploration, and complementary studies are essential for an accurate diagnosis. PMID:28386282

  12. Induction of atherosclerosis in mice and hamsters without germline genetic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørklund, Martin Mæng; Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Hagensen, Mette Kallestrup

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Atherosclerosis can be achieved in animals by germline genetic engineering, leading to hypercholesterolemia, but such models are constrained to few species and strains, and they are difficult to combine with other powerful techniques involving genetic manipulation or variation. OBJECTIVE......: To develop a method for induction of atherosclerosis without germline genetic engineering. METHODS AND RESULTS: Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors were engineered to encode gain-of-function proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 mutants, and mice were given a single intravenous vector...... injection followed by high-fat diet feeding. Plasma proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 and total cholesterol increased rapidly and were maintained at high levels, and after 12 weeks, mice had atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta. Histology of the aortic root showed progression of lesions...

  13. Unilateral giant cell lesion of the jaw in Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyselbergs, M; Vanhoenacker, F; Hintjens, J; Dom, M; Devriendt, K; Van Dijck, H

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an etiologically heterogeneous disorder caused by mutations in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Noonan-Like/Multiple Giant Cell Lesion (NL/MGCL) syndrome is initially described as the occurrence of multiple gnathic giant cell lesions in patients with phenotypic features of NS. Nowadays, NS/MGCL syndrome is considered a variant of the NS spectrum rather than a distinct entity. We report the case of a 14-year-old female patient carrying a SOS1 mutation with a unilateral giant cell lesion of the right mandible. Cross-sectional imaging such as CT and MRI are not specific for the diagnosis of oral giant cell lesions. Nonetheless, intralesional scattered foci of low SI on T2-WI, corresponding to hemosiderin deposits due to hemorrhage, can help the radiologist in narrowing down the differential diagnosis of gnathic lesions in patients with NS.

  14. Rationale, Design, and Methodological Aspects of the BUDAPEST-GLOBAL Study (Burden of Atherosclerotic Plaques Study in Twins-Genetic Loci and the Burden of Atherosclerotic Lesions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Tárnoki, Dávid L; Tárnoki, Ádám D; Horváth, Tamás; Jermendy, Ádám L; Kolossváry, Márton; Szilveszter, Bálint; Voros, Viktor; Kovács, Attila; Molnár, Andrea Á; Littvay, Levente; Lamb, Hildo J; Voros, Szilard; Jermendy, György; Merkely, Béla

    2015-12-01

    The heritability of coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden, coronary geometry, and phenotypes associated with increased cardiometabolic risk are largely unknown. The primary aim of the Burden of Atherosclerotic Plaques Study in Twins-Genetic Loci and the Burden of Atherosclerotic Lesions (BUDAPEST-GLOBAL) study is to evaluate the influence of genetic and environmental factors on the burden of coronary artery disease. By design this is a prospective, single-center, classical twin study. In total, 202 twins (61 monozygotic pairs, 40 dizygotic same-sex pairs) were enrolled from the Hungarian Twin Registry database. All twins underwent non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) for the detection and quantification of coronary artery calcium and for the measurement of epicardial fat volumes. In addition, a single non-contrast-enhanced image slice was acquired at the level of L3-L4 to assess abdominal fat distribution. Coronary CT angiography was used for the detection and quantification of plaque, stenosis, and overall coronary artery disease burden. For the primary analysis, we will assess the presence and volume of atherosclerotic plaques. Furthermore, the 3-dimensional coronary geometry will be assessed based on the coronary CT angiography datasets. Additional phenotypic analyses will include per-patient epicardial and abdominal fat quantity measurements. Measurements obtained from monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs will be compared to evaluate the genetic or environmental effects of the given phenotype. The BUDAPEST-GLOBAL study provides a unique framework to shed some light on the genetic and environmental influences of cardiometabolic disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Proposing Innovative Genetic Algorithms Model to Solve the Problem of the Professors' Educational Planning Considering Students' Opinions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Asgari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Timing of curriculum planning for students and faculty could be done using diverse methods. The present research concerns with curriculum planning for professors considering the students' opinions. In doing so, the courses and the timing are determined based on the professors' common timetable, the professors' intensive courses timing and the class limitations. To achieve this goal, the genetic algorithm methodology was used in two steps. In the first stage, single-point cutting operator was used and in the second stage of the algorithm, a new intelligent operator called cyclic reverse list (RIL was used provided that gold, silver and bronze time types were used for different courses. The advantages of this algorithm are using a new appropriate function (hot rolled, as well as new criteria and a new operator (RIL. Unlike conventional methods, in this method the appropriateness is considered in proportion with the whole population and we try to remove the impossible solutions. The optimal solution is chosen from among a multitude of provided responses. Therefore, it was found that we can reach the optimal solutions with regard to a better appropriateness.

  16. Lesions causing freezing of gait localize to a cerebellar functional network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alfonso; Laganiere, Simon E.; Lam, Susy; Fox, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Freezing of gait is a disabling symptom in Parkinson’s disease and related disorders, but the brain regions involved in symptom generation remain unclear. Here we analyze brain lesions causing acute onset freezing of gait to identify regions causally involved in symptom generation. Methods Fourteen cases of lesion-induced freezing of gait were identified from the literature and lesions were mapped to a common brain atlas. Because lesion-induced symptoms can come from sites connected to the lesion location, not just the lesion location itself, we also identified brain regions functionally connected to each lesion location. This technique, termed lesion network mapping, has been recently shown to identify regions involved in symptom generation across a variety of lesion-induced disorders. Results Lesion location was heterogeneous and no single region could be considered necessary for symptom generation. However, over 90% (13/14) of lesions were functionally connected to a focal area in the dorsal medial cerebellum. This cerebellar area overlapped previously recognized regions that are activated by locomotor tasks, termed the cerebellar locomotor region. Connectivity to this region was specific to lesions causing freezing of gait compared to lesions causing other movement disorders (hemichorea or asterixis). Interpretation Lesions causing freezing of gait are located within a common functional network characterized by connectivity to the cerebellar locomotor region. These results based on causal brain lesions complement prior neuroimaging studies in Parkinson’s disease patients, advancing our understanding of the brain regions involved in freezing of gait. PMID:28009063

  17. Measurement of some biophysical parameters in skin lesions of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Gupta

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Transepidermal water loss (TEWL, high frequency electrical conductance (HFC and the hydration state index (HSI were measured in sldn lesions of 30 paucibacillary leprosy patients and compared with the contralateral uninvolved skin. While the TEWL, HFC and HSI all showed lower values in the lesion site, as compared to the contralateral skin sites, the differences between the two sets of values significant in HFC and. HSI only at 2% and 1% level respectively. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.69 was found to eidst between these two parameters. The parameters correlate well with the known reduced sweating in skin lesions of TT and BT leprosy and may therefore be considered as good objective parameters to confirm hypohydrosis in suspected skin lesions ofleprosy.

  18. The genetic effects of radio-activity in man and other organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parry, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The changes that occur in the chromosomal information and which give rise to observable genetic effects stem from the induction by radiation of a number of lesions within the DNA. The relative frequencies of single and double strand breaks induced in DNA is dependent upon the type of radiation exposure given. Radiation sensitivity of a variety of different species of bacteria irradiated with gamma rays in air are given. The effect of dose rate upon radiation induced genetic damage indicates that at low dose rates the cells are capable of handling or repairing a higher proportion of the radiation induced DNA lesions before they undergo the events leading to chromosome and chromatid aberration. The radiation quality, expressed in terms of LET (linear energy transfer) also influence the induction of genetic damage. (U.K.)

  19. Dose-effect relationships for malignancy in cells with different genetic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, K.H.; Leenhouts, H.P.

    1978-01-01

    By combining the proposals that malignancy behaves as a recessive genetic character, that a somatic mutation is an important step in the development of cancer, and that radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks are the critical lesions which may lead to cell death, mutation and chromosomal aberrations, considerations can be made and equations derived for the incidence of malignancy in cells having different genotypes. Equations are derived for diploid carrier cells and tetraploid carrier cells, and are compared with data in literature on cell transformation. It is shown that some differences in experimental results could be due to the different genetic character of the cells used. The theoretical considerations are extended to the population which is considered to be constituted of 'carriers' and 'non-carriers' of the recessive malignant genotype. The possible influence of radiation on 'non-carriers' is discussed as are the implications of the presence of two groups within the population for the estimation of risk to low doses of radiation. (author)

  20. Prevalence of ciliated epithelium in apical periodontitis lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricucci, Domenico; Loghin, Simona; Siqueira, José F; Abdelsayed, Rafik A

    2014-04-01

    This article reports on the morphologic features and the frequency of ciliated epithelium in apical cysts and discusses its origin. The study material consisted of 167 human apical periodontitis lesions obtained consecutively from patients presenting for treatment during a period of 12 years in a dental practice operated by one of the authors. All of the lesions were obtained still attached to the root apices of teeth with untreated (93 lesions) or treated canals (74 lesions). The former were obtained by extraction and the latter by extraction or apical surgery. Specimens were processed for histopathologic and histobacteriologic analyses. Lesions were classified, and the type of epithelium, if present, was recorded. Of the lesions analyzed, 49 (29%) were diagnosed as cysts. Of these, 26 (53%) were found in untreated teeth, and 23 (47%) related to root canal-treated teeth. Ciliated columnar epithelium was observed partially or completely lining the cyst wall in 4 cysts, and all of them occurred in untreated maxillary molars. Three of these lesions were categorized as pocket cysts, and the other was a true cyst. Ciliated columnar epithelium-lined cysts corresponded to approximately 2% of the apical periodontitis lesions and 8% of the cysts of endodontic origin in the population studied. This epithelium is highly likely to have a sinus origin in the majority of cases. However, the possibility of prosoplasia or upgraded differentiation into ciliated epithelium from the typical cystic lining squamous epithelium may also be considered. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Lesion Detection in CT Images Using Deep Learning Semantic Segmentation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinovsky, A.; Liauchuk, V.; Tarasau, A.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of automatic detection of tuberculosis lesion on 3D lung CT images is considered as a benchmark for testing out algorithms based on a modern concept of Deep Learning. For training and testing of the algorithms a domestic dataset of 338 3D CT scans of tuberculosis patients with manually labelled lesions was used. The algorithms which are based on using Deep Convolutional Networks were implemented and applied in three different ways including slice-wise lesion detection in 2D images using semantic segmentation, slice-wise lesion detection in 2D images using sliding window technique as well as straightforward detection of lesions via semantic segmentation in whole 3D CT scans. The algorithms demonstrate superior performance compared to algorithms based on conventional image analysis methods.

  2. Endodontic-periodontic bifurcation lesions: a novel treatment option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaul; Tillinger, Gabriel; Zuckerman, Offer

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this preliminary clinical report is to suggest a novel treatment modality for periodontal bifurcation lesions of endodontic origin. The study consisted of 11 consecutive patients who presented with periodontal bifurcation lesions of endodontic origin (endo-perio lesions). All patients were followed-up for at least 12 months. Treatment included calcium hydroxide with iodine-potassium iodide placed in the root canals for 90 days followed by canal sealing with gutta-percha and cement during a second stage. Dentin bonding was used to seal the furcation floor to prevent the ingress of bacteria and their by-products to the furcation root area through the accessory canals. A radiographic examination showed complete healing of the periradicular lesion in all patients. Probing periodontal pocket depths decreased to 2 to 4 mm (mean 3.5 mm), and resolution of the furcation involvement was observed in post-operative clinical evaluations. The suggested treatment of endo-perio lesions may result in complete healing. Further studies are warranted. This treatment method improves both the disinfection of the bifurcation area and the healing process in endodontically treated teeth considered to be hopeless.

  3. Assessing Heterogeneity of Osteolytic Lesions in Multiple Myeloma by 1H HR-MAS NMR Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurette Tavel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a malignancy of plasma cells characterized by multifocal osteolytic bone lesions. Macroscopic and genetic heterogeneity has been documented within MM lesions. Understanding the bases of such heterogeneity may unveil relevant features of MM pathobiology. To this aim, we deployed unbiased 1H high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR metabolomics to analyze multiple biopsy specimens of osteolytic lesions from one case of pathological fracture caused by MM. Multivariate analyses on normalized metabolite peak integrals allowed clusterization of samples in accordance with a posteriori histological findings. We investigated the relationship between morphological and NMR features by merging morphological data and metabolite profiling into a single correlation matrix. Data-merging addressed tissue heterogeneity, and greatly facilitated the mapping of lesions and nearby healthy tissues. Our proof-of-principle study reveals integrated metabolomics and histomorphology as a promising approach for the targeted study of osteolytic lesions.

  4. [Congenital "kissing" lesions: Nevus or "café au lait" spot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durazzo, A; Boccara, O; Fraitag, S; Fusade, T; Picard, A; Kadlub, N

    2016-12-01

    "Café au lait" spots (CLS) are pigmented skin lesions principally located at the trunk and the limbs. Histologically, CLSs consist in an excessive pigmentation of the epidermis, with no risk of malignant transformation. The "kissing" nevus is a rare pigmented congenital nevus affecting both lower and upper eyelids in a mirror layout. As other nevi, it presents a theoretical risk of malignant transformation. These two pigmented lesions are responsible for aesthetic discomfort when affecting the face. Three patients presenting with a congenital pigmented lesion affecting the two eyelids in a mirror layout are presented. In two cases, the lesions, initially considered as "kissing" nevi, were classified as CLSs. The diagnosis of CLS was made on a biopsy in one patient and after surgery in the other one. Pigmented mirror layout lesions, called "kissing" lesions, are exclusively described for the nevi. We describe two cases of CLSs affecting the eyelids in a mirror layout. Difficulties in diagnostic are exposed and the possible treatments are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid Recombination Mapping for High-Throughput Genetic Screens in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Sapiro, Anne L.; Ihry, Robert J.; Buhr, Derek L.; Konieczko, Kevin M.; Ives, Sarah M.; Engstrom, Anna K.; Wleklinski, Nicholas P.; Kopish, Kristin J.; Bashirullah, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Mutagenesis screens are a staple of classical genetics. Chemical-induced mutations, however, are often difficult and time-consuming to identify. Here, we report that recombination analysis with pairs of dominant visible markers provides a rapid and reliable strategy to map mutations in Drosophila melanogaster. This method requires only two generations and a total of six crosses in vials to estimate the genetic map position of the responsible lesion with high accuracy. This genetic map positio...

  6. Ring-shaped lesions in the CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazner, E.; Steinhoff, H.; Wende, S.; Mauersberger, W.

    1978-01-01

    Computerised tomography has really opened new dimensions for the diagnosis of various intracranial space-occupying lesions. However, during the last years we had to learn how difficult it can be to evaluate a certain CT finding correctly. Especially the group of ring-type lesions still pose some unsolved problems even if clinical information available in the individual case is considered. The ring blush is a nonspecific finding which occurs in primary and metastatic neoplasms, abscess, infarction, certain stages of intracerebral hematomas and even after neurosurgical operations. The ring blush is caused partly by breakdown of the blood brain barrier, partly by hypervascular pathologic tissue or by both factors. (orig.) [de

  7. Assessment of cavitation in artificial approximal dental lesions with near-IR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Bitewing radiography is still considered state-of-the-art diagnostic technology for assessing cavitation within approximal carious dental lesions, even though radiographs cannot resolve cavitated surfaces but instead are used to measure lesion depth in order to predict cavitation. Clinicians need new technologies capable of determining whether approximal carious lesions have become cavitated because not all lesions progress to cavitation. Assessing lesion cavitation from near-infrared (NIR) imaging methods holds great potential due to the high transparency of enamel in the NIR region from λ=1300-1700-nm, which allows direct visualization and quantified measurements of enamel demineralization. The objective of this study was to measure the change in lesion appearance between non-cavitated and cavitated lesions in artificially generated lesions using NIR imaging modalities (two-dimensional) at λ=1300-nm and λ=1450-nm and cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) (thee-dimensional) λ=1300-nm. Extracted human posterior teeth with sound proximal surfaces were chosen for this study and imaged before and after artificial lesions were made. A high speed dental hand piece was used to create artificial cavitated proximal lesions in sound samples and imaged. The cavitated artificial lesions were then filled with hydroxyapatite powder to simulate non-cavitated proximal lesions.

  8. Ultrastructural researches on rabbit myxomatosis. Lymphnodal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcato, P S; Simoni, P

    1977-07-01

    Ultrastructural examination of head and neck lymph nodes in rabbits with spontaneous subacute myxomatosis showed fusion of immature reticuloendothelial cells which lead to the formation of polykarocytes. There was no ultrastructural evidence of viral infection of these polykaryocytes. Histiosyncytial lymphadenitis can be considered a specific lesion of myxomatosis.

  9. An Integrated Multi-Echelon Supply Chain Network Design Considering Stochastic Demand: A Genetic Algorithm Based Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nakhjirkan

    2017-09-01

    in green supply chain. Vehicle routing between distribution centres and customers has been considered in the model. Establishment place of distribution centres among potential places is determined by the model. The distributors use continuous review policy (r, Q to control the inventory. The proposed model object is to find an optimal supply chain with minimum costs. To validate the proposed model and measure its compliance with real world problems, GAMS IDE/Cplex has been used. In order to measure the efficiency of the proposed model in large scale problems, a genetic algorithm has been used. The results confirm the efficiency of the proposed model as a practical tool for decision makers to solve location-inventory-routing problems in green supply chain. The proposed GA could reduce the solving time by 85% while reaching on the average 97% of optimal solution compared with exact method.

  10. Evaluation of the Significance of Incidental Breast Lesions Detected by Chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Chang, Yun Woo; Hwang, Jung Hwa; Kim, Hyung Hwan; Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Seung Boo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of incidentally detected breast lesions on a chest CT scan. Thirty-six incidental breast lesions in 26 patients were detected on a chest CT scan and were correlated with breast sonography, retrospectively. Among them, twenty-four breast lesions in 20 patients that were correlated with chest CT and sonography were available to pathology or follow up sonography. The CT findings were compared with sonographic findings according to the pathologic results. Incidentally detected breast lesions on a chest CT scan were correlated with sonography in 86% (31/36). Among 24 lesions that were available to pathology or follow up sonography, seven (29.2%) lesions were malignant and 17 (70.8%) lesions were benign. CT revealed a significant difference between benign and malignant lesions in terms of shape and margin (p = 0.007; p = 0.008, respectively). The CT findings were well correlated with sonographic findings in shape and margin (p = 0.001, respectively). Incidentally detected breast lesions on chest CT can be correlated with sonography. An irregular shape or a non-circumscribed margin of breast lesions on a CT scan can be considered as a suggestive sign of malignancy.

  11. Coexistence of two types of clinical lesions in childhood-onset mastocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Pérez-Pérez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of mastocytosis appear in childhood, urticaria pigmentosa (UP and mastocytomas being the most common types. Terms such as "xanthelasmoid mastocytosis", "pseudoxanthomatous mastocytosis" or "nodular mastocytosis" have been introduced in the literature to describe the presence of yellowish papular or nodular lesions. We describe two children with cutaneous mastocytosis showing yellowish lesions in combination with other skin lesions. A 10-year-old girl presented with asymptomatic lesions in her vulva at birth, and developed brownish macules on her trunk years after. An eight- year-old boy presented with multiple yellowish papular lesions on his trunk, neck and limbs coexisting with a few clinically anetodermic lesions. No systemic involvement was found and the skin biopsy confirmed a cutaneous mastocytosis in both cases. The two patients are currently asymptomatic and are being periodically followed up. Mastocytoses may show a variety of clinical lesions, sometimes leading to misdiagnosis. Although there are previous reports, involvement of the mucosae and secondary anetoderma are not common findings in cutaneous mastocytoses. We consider that cutaneous manifestations of mastocytoses compose a clinical spectrum, thus explaining the coexistence of different clinical lesions and the development of uncommon presentations.

  12. How to approach breast lesions in children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yiming, E-mail: yiminggao@gmail.com [New York University Langone Medical Center, 221 Lexington Ave., New York, NY 10016 (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Saksena, Mansi A.; Brachtel, Elena F.; Meulen, Deborah C. ter; Rafferty, Elizabeth A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Recognize why the diagnostic approach to the developing breast differs from that to the adult breast. • Review of embryology, early breast development, and later pubescent breast development. • Learn the spectrum of common and uncommon pediatric breast lesions. • Develop an algorithm for diagnostic evaluation and management of pediatric breast lesions. - Abstract: Assessment of a pediatric breast lesion always starts with clinical evaluation. When imaging of a pediatric breast is indicated, ultrasound is the mainstay. The vast majority of pediatric breast complaints are of benign etiology, therefore the diagnostic/management approach emphasizes “first do no harm”. Correlation with age and clinical history helps to direct diagnosis. It is essential to be familiar with the imaging appearance of the normal developing breast at various Tanner stages, in order to diagnose physiologic breast findings and to minimize unnecessary biopsies in young breasts vulnerable to injury. Normal anatomic structures, developmental conditions, benign neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions are common causes of breast complaints in children. Uncommon benign masses and rarely, secondary more than primary malignancies may present in a pediatric breast. Chest wall masses such as Ewing's sarcoma or rhabdomyosarcoma occur in children and may involve the breast via contiguous growth or locoregional metastasis. In addition, special attention should be given to any breast lesion in a child with risk factors predisposing to breast cancer, such as known extramammary malignancy, genetic mutations, prior mantle irradiation, or strong family history of breast cancer, which usually requires biopsy to exclude the possibility of malignancy. Conclusion: The developing breast is vulnerable to injury, and because breast malignancy is uncommon in children, diagnostic and management approach emphasizes “first do no harm”. Understanding normal breast development and the

  13. Classic metaphyseal lesion following external cephalic version and cesarean section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lysack, John T.; Soboleski, Don [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Queen' s University, Kingston General Hospital, 76 Stuart Street, K7L 2V7, Kingston, Ont. (Canada)

    2003-06-01

    We report a case of an otherwise healthy neonate diagnosed at birth with a classic metaphyseal lesion of the proximal tibia following external cephalic version for frank breech presentation and a subsequent urgent cesarean section. Although the classic metaphyseal lesion is considered highly specific for infant abuse, this case demonstrates the importance of obtaining a history of obstetric trauma for neonates presenting to the imaging department for suspected non-accidental injury. (orig.)

  14. Classic metaphyseal lesion following external cephalic version and cesarean section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysack, John T.; Soboleski, Don

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of an otherwise healthy neonate diagnosed at birth with a classic metaphyseal lesion of the proximal tibia following external cephalic version for frank breech presentation and a subsequent urgent cesarean section. Although the classic metaphyseal lesion is considered highly specific for infant abuse, this case demonstrates the importance of obtaining a history of obstetric trauma for neonates presenting to the imaging department for suspected non-accidental injury. (orig.)

  15. Morgellons Disease Presenting As an Eyelid Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Rasanamar K; Steele, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Morgellons disease is characterized by complaints of uncomfortable skin sensations and fibers emanating from nonhealing skin lesions. Morgellons disease is well-known in the dermatology and psychiatry literature, where it is typically considered a subtype of delusional parasitosis, but it has not yet been described in the ophthalmology literature. A patient with self-reported Morgellons disease is presented, who was referred for evaluation of left lower eyelid ectropion. She reported that her skin was infested with fibers that were "trying to get down into the eyelid." On examination, she had ectropion of the left lower eyelid, broken cilia, and an ulcerated left upper eyelid lesion concerning for carcinoma. Biopsy of the lesion was consistent with excoriation. Treatment of her ectropion was deferred out of concern for wound dehiscence, given the patient's aggressive excoriation behavior. This case is presented to make the ophthalmologist aware of this disorder and to highlight the appropriate clinical management.

  16. Differential contribution of right and left temporo-occipital and anterior temporal lesions to face recognition disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido eGainotti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the study of prosopagnosia, several issues (such as the specific or non-specific manifestations of prosopagnosia, the unitary or non-unitary nature of this syndrome and the mechanisms underlying face recognition disorders are still controversial. Two main sources of variance partially accounting for these controversies could be the qualitative differences between the face recognition disorders observed in patients with prevalent lesions of the right or left hemisphere and in those with lesions encroaching upon the temporo-occipital or the (right anterior temporal cortex.Results of our review seem to confirm these suggestions. Indeed, they show that (a the most specific forms of prosopagnosia are due to lesions of a right posterior network including the OFA and the FFA, whereas (b the face identification defects observed in patients with left temporo-occipital lesions seem due to a semantic defect impeding access to person-specific semantic information from the visual modality. Furthermore, face recognition defects resulting from right anterior temporal lesions can usually be considered as part of a multimodal people recognition disorder.The implications of our review are, therefore, the following: (1 to consider the components of visual agnosia often observed in prosopagnosic patients with bilateral temporo-occipital lesions as part of a semantic defect, resulting from left-sided lesions (and not from prosopagnosia proper; (2 to systematically investigate voice recognition disorders in patients with right anterior temporal lesions to determine whether the face recognition defect should be considered a form of ‘associative prosopagnosia’ or a form of the ‘multimodal people recognition disorder’.

  17. Photoacoustic discrimination of vascular and pigmented lesions using classical and Bayesian methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Jennifer A.; Holan, Scott H.; Feldman, Mary M.; Viator, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Discrimination of pigmented and vascular lesions in skin can be difficult due to factors such as size, subungual location, and the nature of lesions containing both melanin and vascularity. Misdiagnosis may lead to precancerous or cancerous lesions not receiving proper medical care. To aid in the rapid and accurate diagnosis of such pathologies, we develop a photoacoustic system to determine the nature of skin lesions in vivo. By irradiating skin with two laser wavelengths, 422 and 530 nm, we induce photoacoustic responses, and the relative response at these two wavelengths indicates whether the lesion is pigmented or vascular. This response is due to the distinct absorption spectrum of melanin and hemoglobin. In particular, pigmented lesions have ratios of photoacoustic amplitudes of approximately 1.4 to 1 at the two wavelengths, while vascular lesions have ratios of about 4.0 to 1. Furthermore, we consider two statistical methods for conducting classification of lesions: standard multivariate analysis classification techniques and a Bayesian-model-based approach. We study 15 human subjects with eight vascular and seven pigmented lesions. Using the classical method, we achieve a perfect classification rate, while the Bayesian approach has an error rate of 20%.

  18. Dieulafoy's Lesions of the Rectum: A Rare Cause of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Enns

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Dieulafoy's lesions located outside of the stomach are rare occurrences. Lesions found within the colon typically present with painless, massive hematochezia (ie, greater than 5 U. If they can be accurately located, endoscopic therapy in the form of adrenaline injection, sclerotherapy or cauterization appears to have long term success. The present report details the case of a 72-year-old man who presented with massive hematochezia and who was discovered to have a Dieulafoy's lesion within the rectum. The lesion was located just distal to a previous surgical anastomosis, and was successfully treated with adrenaline and electrocautery. Colonic Dieulafoy's lesions are rare but should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of massive hematochezia, because endoscopic therapy appears to result in complete cessation of bleeding.

  19. Laser induced biostimulation: A possible healing prospect in endo-perio lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithra N Hegde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The health of the tooth is governed by both endodontic tissue and periodontal apparatus. "Endo-perio lesion" is the term used to describe the lesions in which inflammatory products involves both pulpal and periodontal tissues in varying degrees. The disease of endodontium may lead to the involvement of the periodontium and vice versa. Endo-perio lesions are the clinical conditions that are often difficult to diagnose and persistent if not treated appropriately. Lasers have been used successfully in endodontic as well as periodontal procedures. With endodontic treatment alone, only part of the lesion will heal to the level of the secondary periodontal lesion. Overall prognosis depends upon the severity of periodontal damage and the efficacy of the periodontal treatment. Laser can be considered as an efficacious tool and an adjunct to conventional periodontal therapy both for its decontaminating and biostimulating effects.

  20. Canine Choroid Plexus Tumor with Intracranial Dissemination Presenting as Multiple Cystic Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisha J. Oura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A Miniature Pinscher developed acute blindness and behavioral changes. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, there were multiple small intra-axial cystic lesions, and primary differential diagnoses included primary or metastatic neoplasia and neurocysticercosis. These cystic lesions were subsequently diagnosed histopathologically as disseminated choroid plexus carcinoma. This is only the second documented description of this diagnosis in a dog, but both patients had very similar MRI findings. This patient adds to the literature about the MRI characteristics of choroid plexus tumors and indicates that choroid plexus tumor should be considered as a possible cause of small multifocal intra-axial cystic brain lesions in dogs, regardless of whether a primary intraventricular lesion is visible.

  1. Radioguided breast surgery for occult lesion localization – correlation between two methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutfilen Bianca

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of sub-clinical breast lesions has increased with screening mammography. Biopsy techniques can offer precision and agility in its execution, as well as patient comfort. This trial compares radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL and wire-guided localization (WL of breast lesions. We investigate if a procedure at the ambulatorial level (ROLL could lead to a better aesthetic result and less postoperative pain. In addition, we intend to demonstrate the efficacy of radioguided localization and removal of occult breast lesions using radiopharmaceuticals injected directly into the lesions and correlate radiological and histopathological findings. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were randomized into two groups (59 WL and 61 ROLL. The patients were requested to score the cosmetic appearance of their breast after surgery, and a numerical rating scale was used to measure pain on the first postoperative day. Clearance margins were considered at ≥ 10 mm for invasive cancer, ≥ 5 mm for ductal carcinoma in situ, and ≥ 1 mm for benign disease. Patients were subsequently treated according to the definitive histological result. When appropriate, different statistical tests were used in order to test the significance between the two groups, considering a P value Results WL and ROLL located all the occult breast lesions successfully. In the ROLL group, the specimen volume was smaller and there were more cases with clear margins (P Conclusion ROLL is an effective method for the excision of non-palpable breast lesions. It enables more careful planning of the cutaneous incision, leading to better aesthetic results, less postoperative symptoms, and smaller volumes of excised tissue.

  2. Usefulness of MRI and SPECT studies in evaluating the lesion of aphasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Arai, Hisayuki; Hatano, Nobuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko; Katsunuma, Hideyo (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    Since the introduction of CT scanning, correlations between neuropsychological findings and anatomical lesions have been studied. Anatomical studies by CT scans may, however, be misleading in delineating the extent of lesions in aphasia. We have carried out MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and SPECT (single photon emission CT) examinations in 15 aphasic patients with cerebrovascular disease and discussed the usefulness of these studies. Compared to CT scan, MRI or SPECT studies were considered to be very useful in 8 of 15 patients. The useful points of these studies were: (1) easy detection of lesions with undetectable damages on CT, (2) demonstration of functional abnormalities in areas adjacent or distant from cerebrovascular lesions, and (3) precise definition of topographical abnormalities because of the three-dimensional imaging capability of MRI. As MRI or SPECT may define the actual extent of lesions and show areas of functional abnormality, these studies are useful and necessary in the assessment of lesions causing aphasia. (author).

  3. Usefulness of MRI and SPECT studies in evaluating the lesion of aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Arai, Hisayuki; Hatano, Nobuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko; Katsunuma, Hideyo

    1990-01-01

    Since the introduction of CT scanning, correlations between neuropsychological findings and anatomical lesions have been studied. Anatomical studies by CT scans may, however, be misleading in delineating the extent of lesions in aphasia. We have carried out MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and SPECT (single photon emission CT) examinations in 15 aphasic patients with cerebrovascular disease and discussed the usefulness of these studies. Compared to CT scan, MRI or SPECT studies were considered to be very useful in 8 of 15 patients. The useful points of these studies were: 1) easy detection of lesions with undetectable damages on CT, 2) demonstration of functional abnormalities in areas adjacent or distant from cerebrovascular lesions, and 3) precise definition of topographical abnormalities because of the three-dimensional imaging capability of MRI. As MRI or SPECT may define the actual extent of lesions and show areas of functional abnormality, these studies are useful and necessary in the assessment of lesions causing aphasia. (author)

  4. Skin lesions caused by orthopoxvirus infection in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K C; Bennett, M; Garrett, D C

    1999-10-01

    A seven-year-old male dobermann was presented for examination of a non-pruritic ulcerated lesion occurring at the site of a suspected rat bite on the muzzle. Biopsy revealed focal ulcerative dermatitis, with cells in the epidermis, follicular infundibula and interposed sebaceous glands undergoing ballooning degeneration and containing large acidophilic intracytoplasmic structures resembling poxvirus inclusion bodies. The diagnosis of orthopoxvirus infection was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. The biopsy site healed uneventfully, without evidence of recurrence or development of further cutaneous or internal lesions, and a serum sample collected eight weeks after first presentation had a low titre of poxvirus antibodies. This report demonstrates that orthopoxvirus infection should be considered as a cause of ulcerative skin lesions in dogs, particularly if there has been recent contact with rodents or other small mammals.

  5. Human papillomavirus in oral lesions Virus papiloma humano en lesiones orales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín V. Gónzalez

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests a role for human papillomavirus (HPV in oral cancer; however its involvement is still controversial. This study evaluates the frequency of HPV DNA in a variety of oral lesions in patients from Argentina. A total of 77 oral tissue samples from 66 patients were selected (cases; the clinical-histopathological diagnoses corresponded to: 11 HPV- associated benign lesions, 8 non-HPV associated benign lesions, 33 premalignant lesions and 25 cancers. Sixty exfoliated cell samples from normal oral mucosa were used as controls. HPV detection and typing were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using primers MY09, 11, combined with RFLP or alternatively PCR using primers GP5+, 6+ combined with dot blot hybridization. HPV was detected in 91.0% of HPV- associated benign lesions, 14.3% of non-HPV associated benign lesions, 51.5% of preneoplasias and 60.0% of cancers. No control sample tested HPV positive. In benign HPV- associated lesions, 30.0% of HPV positive samples harbored high-risk types, while in preneoplastic lesions the value rose to 59.9%. In cancer lesions, HPV detection in verrucous carcinoma was 88.9% and in squamous cell carcinoma 43.8%, with high-risk type rates of 75.5% and 85.6%, respectively. The high HPV frequency detected in preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions supports an HPV etiological role in at least a subset of oral cancers.Crecientes evidencias sugieren que el virus Papiloma humano (HPV tiene un rol en el cáncer oral; sin embargo su participación es todavía controvertida. Este estudio evalúa la frecuencia de ADN de HPV en una variedad de lesiones orales de pacientes de Argentina. Se seleccionaron 77 muestras de tejido oral de 66 pacientes (casos; el diagnóstico histo-patológico correspondió a: 11 lesiones benignas asociadas a HPV, 8 lesiones benignas no asociadas a HPV, 33 lesiones premalignas y 25 cánceres. Como controles se usaron 60 muestras de células exfoliadas de mucosa oral normal. La

  6. Giant cell lesions with a Noonan-like phenotype: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancino, Claudia Marcela H; Gaião, Léonilson; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel; Oliveira, Flavio Augusto Marsiaj

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a case of multiple giant cell lesions of the mandible that occurred in a 14-year-old girl with phenotypic characteristics associated with Noonan Syndrome (NS). NS is a dysmorphic disorder characterized by hypertelorism, short stature, congenital heart defects, short and webbed neck, skeletal anomalies, and bleeding diathesis. A 14-year-old girl with a previous diagnosis of NS (sporadic case) presented with multiple radiolucent lesions in the body and ramus of her mandible. In terms of clinical behavior and the described radiographic characteristics, giant cells lesions with Noonan-like phenotype can be considered a form of cherubism. Therefore, surgical intervention is not necessary, but radiographic follow-up and observation is very important during the control and gradual regression of the lesions.

  7. The role of thymus-dependent T cells in hexachlorobenzene-induced inflammatory skin and lung lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, CCPPC; Bloksma, N; Klatter, FA; Rozing, J; Vos, JG; van Dijk, JE

    1999-01-01

    The involvement of thymus-dependent T cells in the inflammatory skin and lung lesions and spleen effects induced by hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was investigated by using genetically athymic and euthymic WAG/Rij rats and Brown Norway (BN) rats with or without depletion of T cells by adult thymectomy,

  8. Unilateral giant cell lesion of the jaw in Noonan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Eyselbergs, M; Vanhoenacker, F; Hintjens, J; Dom, M; Devriendt, K; Dijck, H Van

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an etiologically heterogeneous disorder caused by mutations in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Noonan-Like/Multiple Giant Cell Lesion (NL/MGCL) syndrome is initially described as the occurrence of multiple gnathic giant cell lesions in patients with phenotypic features of NS. Nowadays, NS/MGCL syndrome is considered a variant of the NS spectrum rather than a distinct entity. We report the case of a 14-year-old female patient carrying a SOS1 mutation with a unilateral g...

  9. Genetic testing in the epilepsies—Report of the ILAE Genetics Commission

    OpenAIRE

    Ottman, Ruth; Hirose, Shinichi; Jain, Satish; Lerche, Holger; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Serratosa, José; Zara, Federico; Scheffer, Ingrid E.

    2010-01-01

    In this report, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Genetics Commission discusses essential issues to be considered with regard to clinical genetic testing in the epilepsies. Genetic research on the epilepsies has led to the identification of more than 20 genes with a major effect on susceptibility to idiopathic epilepsies. The most important potential clinical application of these discoveries is genetic testing: the use of genetic information, either to clarify the diagnosis in ...

  10. Genetic counseling and the ethical issues around direct to consumer genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Alice K; Ho, Anita

    2012-06-01

    Over the last several years, direct to consumer(DTC) genetic testing has received increasing attention in the public, healthcare and academic realms. DTC genetic testing companies face considerable criticism and scepticism,particularly from the medical and genetic counseling community. This raises the question of what specific aspects of DTC genetic testing provoke concerns, and conversely,promises, for genetic counselors. This paper addresses this question by exploring DTC genetic testing through an ethic allens. By considering the fundamental ethical approaches influencing genetic counseling (the ethic of care and principle-based ethics) we highlight the specific ethical concerns raised by DTC genetic testing companies. Ultimately,when considering the ethics of DTC testing in a genetic counseling context, we should think of it as a balancing act. We need careful and detailed consideration of the risks and troubling aspects of such testing, as well as the potentially beneficial direct and indirect impacts of the increased availability of DTC genetic testing. As a result it is essential that genetic counselors stay informed and involved in the ongoing debate about DTC genetic testing and DTC companies. Doing so will ensure that the ethical theories and principles fundamental to the profession of genetic counseling are promoted not just in traditional counseling sessions,but also on a broader level. Ultimately this will help ensure that the public enjoys the benefits of an increasingly genetic based healthcare system.

  11. Intraosseous osteolytic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, C.P.; Wenz, W.

    1981-10-01

    Any pathological damage occurring in a bone will produce either an osteolytic or osteosclerotic lesion which can be seen in the macroscopic specimen as well as in the roentgenogram. Various bone lesions may lead to local destructions of the bone. An osteoma or osteoplastic osteosarcoma produces an osteosclerotic lesion showing a dense mass in the roentgenogram; a chondroblastoma or an osteoclastoma, on the other hand, induces an osteolytic focal lesion. This paper presents examples of different osteolytic lesions of the humerus. An osteolytic lesion seen in the roentgenogram may be either produced by an underlying non-ossifying fibroma of the bone, by fibrous dysplasia, osteomyelitis or Ewing's sarcoma. Differential diagnostic considerations based on the radiological picture include eosinophilic bone granuloma, juvenile or aneurysmal bone cyst, multiple myeloma or bone metastases. Serious differential diagnostic problems may be involved in case of osteolytic lesions occurring in the humerus. Cases of this type involving complications have been reported and include the presence of an teleangiectatic osteosarcoma as well as that of a hemangiosarcoma of the bone.

  12. Advances in the genetically complex autoinflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombrello, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Monogenic diseases usually demonstrate Mendelian inheritance and are caused by highly penetrant genetic variants of a single gene. In contrast, genetically complex diseases arise from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors. The concept of autoinflammation originally emerged from the identification of individual, activating lesions of the innate immune system as the molecular basis of the hereditary periodic fever syndromes. In addition to these rare, monogenic forms of autoinflammation, genetically complex autoinflammatory diseases like the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), Behçet's disease, and systemic arthritis also fulfill the definition of autoinflammatory diseases-namely, the development of apparently unprovoked episodes of inflammation without identifiable exogenous triggers and in the absence of autoimmunity. Interestingly, investigations of these genetically complex autoinflammatory diseases have implicated both innate and adaptive immune abnormalities, blurring the line between autoinflammation and autoimmunity. This reinforces the paradigm of concerted innate and adaptive immune dysfunction leading to genetically complex autoinflammatory phenotypes.

  13. Periodontal bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, L.W.J. van der.

    1985-01-01

    In the course of life the periodontum is subject to changes which may be physiological or pathological. Intraoral radiographs give insight into the hard structures of the dentomaxillar region and provides information on lesions in the bone of the periodontum in that they show radiopacities and radiolucencies caused by such lesions. In this thesis the relation is investigated between the true shape and dimensions of periodontal bone lesions and their radiographic images. A method is developed and tested of making standardized and reproducible radiographs suitable for longitudinal studies of periodontal lesions. Also the possibility is demonstrated of an objective and reproducible interpretation of radiographic characteristics of periodontal bone lesions. (Auth.)

  14. Percutaneous drainage of Morel-Lavallée lesions when the diagnosis is delayed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Biao; Zhang, Chi; Luo, Cong-feng

    2014-10-01

    Morel-Lavallée lesions are a closed internal degloving, and open débridement can damage the only remaining blood supply to the skin. We performed percutaneous draining and débridement to treat 8 patients in whom the diagnosis of Morel-Lavallée lesions was delayed more than 1 week. Here we discuss our treatment procedures and the outcomes in these 8 patients. We consider percutaneous drainage to be an effective treatment for patients with delayed diagnosis of Morel-Lavallée lesions.

  15. Genetic testing and its implications: human genetics researchers grapple with ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabino, Isaac

    2003-01-01

    To better understand ethical issues involved in the field of human genetics and promote debate within the scientific community, the author surveyed scientists who engage in human genetics research about the pros, cons, and ethical implications of genetic testing. This study contributes systematic data on attitudes of scientific experts. The survey finds respondents are highly supportive of voluntary testing and the right to know one's genetic heritage. The majority consider in utero testing and consequent pregnancy termination acceptable for cases involving likelihood of serious disease but disapprove for genetic reasons they consider arbitrary, leaving a gray area of distinguishing between treatment of disorders and enhancement still to be resolved. While safeguarding patient confidentiality versus protecting at-risk third parties (kin, reproductive partners) presents a dilemma, preserving privacy from misuse by institutional third parties (employers, insurers) garners strong consensus for legislation against discrimination. Finally, a call is made for greater genetic literacy.

  16. TH-E-BRF-08: Subpopulations of Similarly-Responding Lesions in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C; Harmon, S; Perk, T; Jeraj, R

    2014-01-01

    population- and patient-level clustering, indicating that PET-based response features may be used to quantify disease heterogeneity in advanced metastatic disease. This method for categorizing lesion response could help in identifying lesions with similar phenotypic- or genetic-based resistances to therapy. Research Supported by the Prostate Cancer Foundation

  17. Morel-Lavallee Lesion in the Upper Extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Grant K; Hanna, Kathryn H

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Morel-Lavallee lesion (MLL) is a closed internal degloving injury that results from shearing of the skin and subcutaneous tissue from the underlying fascia. Disruption of the perforating blood vessels and lymphatics results in a lesion filled with serosanguinous fluid and necrotized fat. MLLs are most commonly described in association with pelvic and lower extremity trauma, and there are limited reports of these lesions in other locations. Methods: This case report describes a 58-year-old male referred from his primary care physician with a soft tissue mass in the upper arm. Careful history discovered prior trauma with extensive bruising and MRI revealed a large encapsulated mass consistent with MLL. Results: An open debridement with excision of pseudocapsule was performed. Meticulous closure over a drain was performed and the patient healed without complication or recurrence. Intra-operative cultures were negative and pathology was consistent with MLL. Conclusion: MLL should always be considered in the setting of previous trauma regardless the location. In the chronic setting an open approach with excision of pseudocapsule can have an acceptable result.

  18. Intensity dependence of focused ultrasound lesion position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Paul M.; Cahill, Mark D.; ter Haar, Gail R.

    1998-04-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution of intensity loss from an ultrasonic beam is critical to predicting lesion formation in focused ultrasound surgery. To date most models have used linear propagation models to predict the intensity profiles needed to compute the temporally varying temperature distributions. These can be used to compute thermal dose contours that can in turn be used to predict the extent of thermal damage. However, these simulations fail to adequately describe the abnormal lesion formation behavior observed for in vitro experiments in cases where the transducer drive levels are varied over a wide range. For these experiments, the extent of thermal damage has been observed to move significantly closer to the transducer with increasing transducer drive levels than would be predicted using linear propagation models. The simulations described herein, utilize the KZK (Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov) nonlinear propagation model with the parabolic approximation for highly focused ultrasound waves, to demonstrate that the positions of the peak intensity and the lesion do indeed move closer to the transducer. This illustrates that for accurate modeling of heating during FUS, nonlinear effects must be considered.

  19. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-03-07

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses.

  20. Renal lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantopoulou, Charikleia; Maniatis, Petros; Siafas, Ioannis; Papailiou, John; Malachias, George; Anastopoulos, John

    2010-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by IgG4-positive plasma cells. Recent evidence suggests that it is a systemic disease affecting various organs. Tubulointerstitial nephritis has been reported in association with AIP. Purpose: To investigate the incidence and types of renal involvement in patients with AIP. Material and Methods: Eighteen patients with no history of renal disease and a diagnosis of AIP (on the basis of histopathologic findings or a combination of characteristic imaging features, increased serum IgG4 levels, and response to steroid treatment) were included. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging and follow-up ranged from 6 months to 2 years. CT images were reviewed for the presence of renal lesions. Results: Seven patients had renal involvement (38.8%). None of the lesions was visible on non-contrast-enhanced CT scan. Parenchymal lesions appeared as multiple nodules showing decreased enhancement (four cases). Pyelonephritis, lymphoma, and metastases were considered in the differential diagnosis. An ill-defined low-attenuation mass-like lesion was found in one patient, while diffuse thickening of the renal pelvis wall was evident in the last two cases. Renal lesions regressed in all patients after steroid treatment, the larger one leaving a fibrous cortical scar. Conclusion: Different types of renal lesions in patients with AIP are relatively common, appearing as multiple nodules with decreased enhancement. These findings support the proposed concept of an IgG4-related systemic disease. Autoimmune disease should be suspected in cases of renal involvement in association with pancreatic focal or diffuse enlargement.

  1. Renal lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triantopoulou, Charikleia; Maniatis, Petros; Siafas, Ioannis; Papailiou, John (CT and Radiology Dept., ' Konstantopouleion' General Hospital, Athens (Greece)), e-mail: ctriantopoulou@gmail.com; Malachias, George; Anastopoulos, John (Radiology Dept., ' Sismanogleio' General Hospital, Athens (Greece))

    2010-07-15

    Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by IgG4-positive plasma cells. Recent evidence suggests that it is a systemic disease affecting various organs. Tubulointerstitial nephritis has been reported in association with AIP. Purpose: To investigate the incidence and types of renal involvement in patients with AIP. Material and Methods: Eighteen patients with no history of renal disease and a diagnosis of AIP (on the basis of histopathologic findings or a combination of characteristic imaging features, increased serum IgG4 levels, and response to steroid treatment) were included. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging and follow-up ranged from 6 months to 2 years. CT images were reviewed for the presence of renal lesions. Results: Seven patients had renal involvement (38.8%). None of the lesions was visible on non-contrast-enhanced CT scan. Parenchymal lesions appeared as multiple nodules showing decreased enhancement (four cases). Pyelonephritis, lymphoma, and metastases were considered in the differential diagnosis. An ill-defined low-attenuation mass-like lesion was found in one patient, while diffuse thickening of the renal pelvis wall was evident in the last two cases. Renal lesions regressed in all patients after steroid treatment, the larger one leaving a fibrous cortical scar. Conclusion: Different types of renal lesions in patients with AIP are relatively common, appearing as multiple nodules with decreased enhancement. These findings support the proposed concept of an IgG4-related systemic disease. Autoimmune disease should be suspected in cases of renal involvement in association with pancreatic focal or diffuse enlargement.

  2. Managing Carious Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwendicke, F; Frencken, J E; Bjørndal, L

    2016-01-01

    should be prioritized, while in shallow or moderately deep lesions, restoration longevity becomes more important. For teeth with shallow or moderately deep cavitated lesions, carious tissue removal is performed according toselective removal to firm dentine.In deep cavitated lesions in primary......The International Caries Consensus Collaboration undertook a consensus process and here presents clinical recommendations for carious tissue removal and managing cavitated carious lesions, including restoration, based on texture of demineralized dentine. Dentists should manage the disease dental...

  3. Design and rationale for examining neuroimaging genetics in ischemic stroke: The MRI-GENIE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Anne-Katrin; Schirmer, Markus D; Donahue, Kathleen L; Cloonan, Lisa; Irie, Robert; Winzeck, Stefan; Bouts, Mark J R J; McIntosh, Elissa C; Mocking, Steven J; Dalca, Adrian V; Sridharan, Ramesh; Xu, Huichun; Frid, Petrea; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Holmegaard, Lukas; Roquer, Jaume; Wasselius, Johan; Cole, John W; McArdle, Patrick F; Broderick, Joseph P; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jern, Christina; Kissela, Brett M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Lemmens, Robin; Lindgren, Arne; Meschia, James F; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Thijs, Vincent; Woo, Daniel; Worrall, Bradford B; Kittner, Steven J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Rosand, Jonathan; Golland, Polina; Wu, Ona; Rost, Natalia S

    2017-10-01

    To describe the design and rationale for the genetic analysis of acute and chronic cerebrovascular neuroimaging phenotypes detected on clinical MRI in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) within the scope of the MRI-GENetics Interface Exploration (MRI-GENIE) study. MRI-GENIE capitalizes on the existing infrastructure of the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN). In total, 12 international SiGN sites contributed MRIs of 3,301 patients with AIS. Detailed clinical phenotyping with the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke (CCS) system and genome-wide genotyping data were available for all participants. Neuroimaging analyses include the manual and automated assessments of established MRI markers. A high-throughput MRI analysis pipeline for the automated assessment of cerebrovascular lesions on clinical scans will be developed in a subset of scans for both acute and chronic lesions, validated against gold standard, and applied to all available scans. The extracted neuroimaging phenotypes will improve characterization of acute and chronic cerebrovascular lesions in ischemic stroke, including CCS subtypes, and their effect on functional outcomes after stroke. Moreover, genetic testing will uncover variants associated with acute and chronic MRI manifestations of cerebrovascular disease. The MRI-GENIE study aims to develop, validate, and distribute the MRI analysis platform for scans acquired as part of clinical care for patients with AIS, which will lead to (1) novel genetic discoveries in ischemic stroke, (2) strategies for personalized stroke risk assessment, and (3) personalized stroke outcome assessment.

  4. Human papillomavirus in oral lesions Virus papiloma humano en lesiones orales

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquín V. Gónzalez; Rafael A. Gutiérrez; Alicia Keszler; Maria Del Carmen Colacino; Lidia V. Alonio; Angélica R. Teyssie; Maria Alejandra Picconi

    2007-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral cancer; however its involvement is still controversial. This study evaluates the frequency of HPV DNA in a variety of oral lesions in patients from Argentina. A total of 77 oral tissue samples from 66 patients were selected (cases); the clinical-histopathological diagnoses corresponded to: 11 HPV- associated benign lesions, 8 non-HPV associated benign lesions, 33 premalignant lesions and 25 cancers. Sixty exfoliated cell ...

  5. Diagnosis of SLAP lesions with Grashey-view arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H. Edmund; Van Raalte, Vanessa; Malian, Vartan

    2003-01-01

    To examine the accuracy of Grashey views obtained during shoulder arthrography in the diagnosis of clinically relevant superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions. Grashey views obtained during diagnostic arthrography (conventional and MR) were used to examine the superior labrum. Twenty-eight of 118 shoulder arthrograms obtained during a 27-month period fulfilled study criteria and were correlated for accuracy using arthroscopically confirmed grade 2-4 SLAP lesions as the standard of reference. Arthrograms were graded using the consensus method. Prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 21%, 50%, 86%, and 79%. The appearance of the superior labrum on the Grashey view was compared subjectively with MR arthrography. Sources of errors were analyzed. Grashey views obtained during shoulder arthrography can diagnose clinically relevant SLAP lesions with moderately high specificity, moderate accuracy, and limited sensitivity. Findings on the Grashey view closely resemble those seen on coronal oblique MR arthrography. Grashey views should be considered in patients undergoing shoulder arthrography. (orig.)

  6. Diagnosis of SLAP lesions with Grashey-view arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.H. Edmund [Radiological Associates of Sacramento Medical Group, Inc., 1500 Expo Parkway, Sacramento, CA 95815 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Suite 3100, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Van Raalte, Vanessa; Malian, Vartan [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Suite 3100, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States)

    2003-07-01

    To examine the accuracy of Grashey views obtained during shoulder arthrography in the diagnosis of clinically relevant superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions. Grashey views obtained during diagnostic arthrography (conventional and MR) were used to examine the superior labrum. Twenty-eight of 118 shoulder arthrograms obtained during a 27-month period fulfilled study criteria and were correlated for accuracy using arthroscopically confirmed grade 2-4 SLAP lesions as the standard of reference. Arthrograms were graded using the consensus method. Prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 21%, 50%, 86%, and 79%. The appearance of the superior labrum on the Grashey view was compared subjectively with MR arthrography. Sources of errors were analyzed. Grashey views obtained during shoulder arthrography can diagnose clinically relevant SLAP lesions with moderately high specificity, moderate accuracy, and limited sensitivity. Findings on the Grashey view closely resemble those seen on coronal oblique MR arthrography. Grashey views should be considered in patients undergoing shoulder arthrography. (orig.)

  7. [Microsatellite instability and human papilloma virus genotypes in preneoplastic and neoplastic uterine cervix lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa S, Juan Carlos; Martínez S, Ricardo; Montenegro, Sonia; Roa E, Iván; Capurro V, Italo; Ibacache S, Gilda; Melo A, Angélica

    2007-01-01

    The association between some specific human papilloma virus (HPV) types and cervix cancer is well known. However, the genetic conditions that favor the development of cervical cancer are less well known. To determine the presence of satellite instability (MSI) in preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions of the cervix and correlate these findings with HPV genotypes. Biopsy samples of cervical lesions were studied. Sixteen had low grade lesions, 22 had high grade lesions and 28 had an epidermoid cancer. Viral types were identified with polymerase chain reaction, dot-blot hybridization and restriction fragment length polymorphism. MSI was determined using a panel of eight highly informative microsatellites. Microsatellite instability in at least one locus was observed in 91, 56 and 69% of low grade lesions, high grade lesions and epidermoid carcinomas, respectively. MSI-High grade, MSI-Low grade instability and microsatellite stability were observed in 5, 60 and 46% of samples, respectively. Two of three samples with high grade instability had HPV 52 genotype. Other viral subtypes had frequencies that ranged from 78% to 100%, with the exception of HPV16 that was present in only 53% of samples with low grade instability. Two thirds of biopsy samples from cervical lesions had MSI, mechanism that can be involved in the first stages of cervical carcinogenesis. The low frequency of high grade instability, its association with HPV52 and the low frequency of HPV16 in samples with low grade instability, suggest different coadjutant mechanisms in cervical carcinogenesis.

  8. Ultrasound-guided, vacuum-assisted biopsy in evaluation of breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luczynska, E.; Kocurek, A.; Dyczek, S.; Skotnicki, P.; Stelmach, A.; Herman, K.

    2008-01-01

    Aim. Evaluation of the efficacy of ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy for the verification of breast lesions. Introduction. Ultrasound breast examination is a noninvasive method of breast imaging. It is adjunct to mammography and physical examination and, in women under 30 years of age, pregnant and lactating, it is the basic examination used for the detection and diagnosing of breast diseases. It allows also to obtain cells or tissue samples with such minimally invasive techniques as fine-needle biopsy, core needle biopsy or vacuum-assisted biopsy. Material and methods. The study group consisted of 138 women, aged from 20 to 76 years, who underwent ultrasound guided vacuum-assisted biopsy between March and December 2006. Because double lesions were diagnosed in 6 patients, this resulted in 144 performed procedures. Each patient underwent ultrasound examination, performed with a 10-12 MHz transducer. Biopsies were guided by a 12 MHz transducer and performed with the Mammotome System using an 11G or an 8G needle, depending upon the size and site of the lesion. Obtained data were compared using the Chi-square test; p values of less than 0.05 were considered indicative of a significant difference. Results. The average size of the biopted lesions was estimated as 11±3,8 mm (range: 4-30 mm). However, lesions described by radiologists as apparently suspicious were not qualified for the vacuum-assisted biopsy, in the tested material 4 lesions appeared to be carcinomas (3 were invasive breast carcinomas and 1 was ductal carcinoma in situ). When compared with other changes, these lesions were most frequently equivocal (3 vs 1 determined as benign, p=0.014). There was no statistically significant difference in echogenicity (3 hypoechoic vs 1 with mixed echogenicity) nor in the shape (1 oval change, 2 lobulated and 1 irregular). Pathological examination revealed 86 cases of fibroadenoma within the tested material. Those lesions were mostly benign (77 vs 9 equivocal

  9. Verrucous lesions arising in lymphedema and diabetic neuropathy: Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa or verrucous skin lesions on the feet of patients with diabetic neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Eri; Asai, Jun; Okuzawa, Yasutaro; Hanada, Keiji; Nomiyama, Tomoko; Takenaka, Hideya; Katoh, Norito

    2016-03-01

    Verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy (VSLDN) develop in areas with sensory loss in diabetic patients. Although various types of chronic stimulation, such as pressure or friction, are considered an important factor in the development of such lesions, the precise pathogenesis of VSLDN remains obscure, and there is currently no established treatment for this disease. Here, we present a case of VSLDN on the dorsum of the right foot. However, because lymphedema was also observed at the same site, this lesion could also be diagnosed as elephantiasis nostras verrucosa arising in diabetic neuropathy. The lesion was successfully treated with a combination of elastic stocking and mixed killed bacterial suspension and hydrocortisone ointment, which suggested that VSLDN might have been exacerbated by the pre-existing lymphedema. Because various types of chronic stimulation can trigger VSLDN, treatment plans should be devised on a case-by-case basis. Therefore, it is important to investigate the presence of factors that can induce or exacerbate chronic inflammatory stimulation, such as lymphedema in our case, in each patient with VSLDN. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, SangIk; Shin, Yong Moon; Won, Hyung Jin; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions. This retrospective study included 30 patients who underwent percutaneous core needle biopsy of their splenic lesions using 18- or 20-gauge needles between January 2001 and July 2016 in a single tertiary care center. The characteristics of the splenic lesions were determined by reviewing the ultrasound and computed tomography examinations. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were calculated, using pathologic results of the splenectomy specimen, clinical course and/or imaging follow-up as a reference standard. Post-procedure complications were identified from electronic medical records, laboratory findings and computed tomography images. Seventy-three specimens were obtained from the 30 patients and splenectomy was performed in 2 patients. Twenty-nine of the 30 patients had focal splenic lesions, while the remaining patient had homogeneous splenomegaly. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were 80.0% (24/30) and 76.7% (23/30), respectively. Perisplenic hemorrhage without hemodynamic instability developed in one patient. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions is a safe method for achieving a histopathologic diagnosis and can be considered as an alternative to splenectomy in patients with a high risk of splenectomy-related complications.

  11. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, SangIk; Shin, Yong Moon; Won, Hyung Jin; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions. This retrospective study included 30 patients who underwent percutaneous core needle biopsy of their splenic lesions using 18- or 20-gauge needles between January 2001 and July 2016 in a single tertiary care center. The characteristics of the splenic lesions were determined by reviewing the ultrasound and computed tomography examinations. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were calculated, using pathologic results of the splenectomy specimen, clinical course and/or imaging follow-up as a reference standard. Post-procedure complications were identified from electronic medical records, laboratory findings and computed tomography images. Seventy-three specimens were obtained from the 30 patients and splenectomy was performed in 2 patients. Twenty-nine of the 30 patients had focal splenic lesions, while the remaining patient had homogeneous splenomegaly. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were 80.0% (24/30) and 76.7% (23/30), respectively. Perisplenic hemorrhage without hemodynamic instability developed in one patient. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions is a safe method for achieving a histopathologic diagnosis and can be considered as an alternative to splenectomy in patients with a high risk of splenectomy-related complications

  12. Molecular biomarkers have the potential to improve the diagnostic work-up of pancreatic cystic lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plougmann, Julie Isabelle; Klausen, Pia; Karstensen, John Gásdal

    2017-01-01

    of diagnostic tools are used to predict the malignant potential of these cysts, but specificity and sensitivity are limited. Thus, many patients undergo unnecessary operations for benign cysts. Balancing the risks of watchful waiting with those of operative management is key in managing these lesions. During...... the last decade, genetic changes of pancreatic cysts have been examined extensively to estimate their malignant potential. In this review, we provide an overview of the latest molecular and genetic aspects of pancreatic cysts and how they may contribute to the differential diagnosis in patients...

  13. Clinical studies on the visualization of gastric lesions using virtual CT endoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hideki; Takashima, Sumio; Kaminou, Toshio; Hayashi, Seisyo; Nishida, Norifumi; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Kenji; Yamada, Ryusaku

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical usefulness of virtual CT gastro endoscopy (VCTGE). The subjects were 124 patients with endoscopically identified gastric lesions. VCTGE images were obtained using a GE-Navigator. We evaluated VCTGE in the visualization of gastric lesions for their presence and morphology. The detection rate of all gastric lesions by VCTGE was 76% (94 of 124 patients). The smallest detectable early gastric cancer was II c measuring 10 x 8 mm. The detection rates of each gastric lesion by VCTGE were 73% in early gastric cancer, and 90% in advanced gastric cancer. VCTGE imaging in the advanced gastric cancer was good in 12 (30%), fair in 25 (60%) and poor in 4 (10%). VCTGE imaging in early gastric cancer was good in 20 (46%), fair in 12 (27%) and poor in 12 (27%). The significance P level was 0.005 between the evaluation of the imaging of advanced and early gastric cancer. VCTGE visualized the characteristics of diverse gastric lesions and was considered useful for the detection and the diagnosis of these lesions. (author)

  14. Two cases of actinic keratosis-like lesions due to grenz rays-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimoto, Kazue; Nishimoto, Masayoshi; Numahara, Toshihiko; Nakashima, Kuniyuki; Isobe, Tomoko; Takaiwa, Takashi (Kagawa Medical School, Miki (Japan))

    1994-02-01

    One patient was a 71-year-old man who had been treated with radiation therapy mainly using grenz rays for 8 years since 1976 for pustulosis on the bilateral planta pedis. The other was a 47-year-old woman who had received it for 3 months during summer time for 5 years since 1973. In both patients, histological examination of the epidermis showed actinic keratosis (AK)-like lesions, presumabley being bowenoid type. Malignant transformation of chronic radiation dermatitis is considered attributable to lesions analogous to AK, and AK lesions are frequently associated with Bowen's disease arising in chronic radiation dermatitis. Thus AK-like lesions of bowenoid type, as seen in these two patients, seems to be sometimes confused with Bowen's disease attributable to chronic radiation dermatitis. (N.K.).

  15. Two cases of actinic keratosis-like lesions due to grenz rays-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Kazue; Nishimoto, Masayoshi; Numahara, Toshihiko; Nakashima, Kuniyuki; Isobe, Tomoko; Takaiwa, Takashi

    1994-01-01

    One patient was a 71-year-old man who had been treated with radiation therapy mainly using grenz rays for 8 years since 1976 for pustulosis on the bilateral planta pedis. The other was a 47-year-old woman who had received it for 3 months during summer time for 5 years since 1973. In both patients, histological examination of the epidermis showed actinic keratosis (AK)-like lesions, presumabley being bowenoid type. Malignant transformation of chronic radiation dermatitis is considered attributable to lesions analogous to AK, and AK lesions are frequently associated with Bowen's disease arising in chronic radiation dermatitis. Thus AK-like lesions of bowenoid type, as seen in these two patients, seems to be sometimes confused with Bowen's disease attributable to chronic radiation dermatitis. (N.K.)

  16. Ultrasonography and computed tomography in the study of orbital tumors and pseudo-tumoral lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marins, J.L.C.; Pereira, R.M.; Prando, A.; Selos Moreira, A.R. de

    1987-01-01

    The computerized tomography and the ultrasonography in the ocular and orbital patologies were considered as complementary each other. the ultrasonography method as choice for the detection of the eye lesions in the adult, particularly of vascular origin and in the follow-up of inflammatory and pseudo-tumoral lesions was chosen. (L.M.J.) [pt

  17. Added diagnostic value of respiratory-gated 4D 18F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of liver lesions. A multicenter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crivellaro, Cinzia; Landoni, Claudio; Guerra, Luca [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); De Ponti, Elena; Morzenti, Sabrina [San Gerardo Hospital, Medical Physics, Monza (Italy); Elisei, Federica [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); Picchio, Maria; Bettinardi, Valentino [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Versari, Annibale [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Fioroni, Federica [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital IRCCS, Medical Physics, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Dziuk, Miroslaw; Tkaczewski, Konrad [Military Institute of Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Ahond-Vionnet, Renee; Nodari, Guillaume [Hopital Pierre Beregovoy, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Nevers (France); Todde, Sergio [University of Milan-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Monza (Italy)

    2018-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the added diagnostic value of respiratory-gated 4D18F-FDG PET/CT in liver lesion detection and characterization in a European multicenter retrospective study. Fifty-six oncological patients (29 males and 27 females, mean age, 61.2 ± 11.2 years) from five European centers, submitted to standard 3D-PET/CT and liver 4D-PET/CT were retrospectively evaluated. Based on visual analysis, liver PET/CT findings were scored as positive, negative, or equivocal both in 3D and 4D PET/CT. The impact of 4D-PET/CT on the confidence in classifying liver lesions was assessed. PET/CT findings were compared to histology and clinical follow-up as standard reference and diagnostic accuracy was calculated for both techniques. At semi-quantitative analysis, SUVmax was calculated for each detected lesion in 3D and 4D-PET/CT. Overall, 72 liver lesions were considered for the analysis. Based on visual analysis in 3D-PET/CT, 32/72 (44.4%) lesions were considered positive, 21/72 (29.2%) negative, and 19/72 (26.4%) equivocal, while in 4D-PET/CT 48/72 (66.7%) lesions were defined positive, 23/72 (31.9%) negative, and 1/72 (1.4%) equivocal. 4D-PET/CT findings increased the confidence in lesion definition in 37/72 lesions (51.4%). Considering 3D equivocal lesions as positive, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 88.9, 70.0, and 83.1%, respectively, while the same figures were 67.7, 90.0, and 73.8% if 3D equivocal findings were included as negative. 4D-PET/CT sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 97.8, 90.0, and 95.4%, respectively, considering equivocal lesions as positive and 95.6, 90.0, and 93.8% considering equivocal lesions as negative. The SUVmax of the liver lesions in 4D-PET (mean ± SD, 6.9 ± 3.2) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than SUVmax in 3D-PET (mean ± SD, 5.2 ± 2.3). Respiratory-gated PET/CT technique is a valuable clinical tool in diagnosing liver lesions, reducing 3D undetermined findings, improving diagnostic

  18. Benign fibroosseous lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Köseoğlu Seçgin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Benign fibroosseous lesions represent a group of lesions that share the same basic evolutive mechanism and are characterized by replacement of normal bone with a fibrous connective tissue that gradually undergoes mineralization. These lesions are presented by a variety of diseases including developmental, reactive-dysplastic processes and neoplasms. Depending on the nature and amount of calcified tissue, they can be observed as radiolucent, mixed or radiopaque. Their radiographic features could be well-defined or indistinguishable from the surrounding bone tissue. They can be asymptomatic as in osseous dysplasias and can be detected incidentally on radiographs, or they can lead to expansion in the affected bone as in ossifying fibroma. All fibroosseous lesions seen in the jaws and face are variations of the same histological pattern. Therefore, detailed clinical and radiographic evaluation in differential diagnosis is important. In this review, fibroosseous benign lesions are classified as osseous dysplasia, fibrous dysplasia and fibroosseous tumors; and radiographic features and differential diagnosis of these lesions are reviewed taking into account this classification.

  19. Standard guidelines of care: Lasers for tattoos and pigmented lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurangabadkar Sanjeev

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lasers have revolutionized the treatment of pigmentary disorders and have become the mainstay of therapy for many of them. Machines: Though different laser machines are used, Quality-switched (QS lasers are considered as the gold standard for treatment of pigmented lesions. Proper knowledge of the physics of laser machine, methodology, dosage schedules, etc., is mandatory. Physician Qualification: Laser may be administered by a dermatologist, who has received adequate background training in lasers during postgraduation or later at a center that provides education and training in lasers, or in focused workshops which provide such trainings. He should have adequate knowledge of the machines, parameters, cooling systems, and aftercare. Facility: The procedure may be performed in the physician′s minor procedure room. Indications: Epidermal lesions: Cafι au lait macules (CALM, lentigines, freckles, solar lentigo, nevus spilus, pigmented seborrheic keratosis, dermatosis papulosa nigra (DPN. Dermal lesions: Nevus of Ota, Blue nevus, Hori′s nevus (acquired bilateral nevus of Ota-like macules. Tattoos: Amateur, professional, cosmetic, medicinal, and traumatic. Mixed epidermal and dermal lesions: Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH, nevus spilus, periorbital and perioral pigmentation, acquired melanocytic nevi (moles, melasma and Becker′s Nevus. Contraindications: Absolute: Active local infection, photo-aggravated skin diseases and medical conditions, tattoo granuloma, allergic reactions to tattoo pigment, unstable vitiligo and psoriasis. Relative: Keloid and keloidal tendencies, patient on isotretinoin, history of herpes simplex, patient who is not co-operative or has unrealistic expectation. Patient selection: Proper patient selection is important. Investigations to identify any underlying cause for pigmentation are important; concurrent topical and systemic drug therapy may be needed. History of scarring, response to previous

  20. Complex neurological investigations of space-occupying lesions in the spinal canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, H; Besel, R; Schumann, E; Usbeck, W

    1981-03-01

    Problems of early diagnosis of space-occupying intraspinal lesions are discussed in relation to 335 patients on whom surgery had been carried out. Advances in neuroradiological methods are considered. The development of new contrast media has resulted in a reduction of the risk of invasive procedures and this should lead to diagnosis of space-occupying spinal lesions at a very early stage. It is now possible to diagnose small tumours before they cause compression of the cord or of nerve roots.

  1. Relationship of DNA lesions and their repair to chromosomal aberration production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    Recent work on the roles of specific kinds of DNA lesions and their enzymatic repair systems in the production of chromosomal aberrations seems consistent with a simple molecular model of chromosomal aberrations formation. Evidence from experiments with the human repair-deficient genetic diseases xeroderma pigmentosom, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fanconi's anemia is reviewed in the light of the contributions to aberration production of single and double polynucleotide strand breaks, base damage, polynucleotide strand crosslinks, and pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers

  2. Relationship of DNA lesions and their repair to chromosomal aberration production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    Recent work on the roles of specific kinds of DNA lesions and their enzymatic repair systems in the production of chromosomal aberrations seems consistent with a simple molecular model of chromosomal aberrations formation. Evidence from experiments with the human repair-deficient genetic diseases xeroderma pigmentosom, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fanconi's anemia is reviewed in the light of the contributions to aberration production of single and double polynucleotide strand breaks, base damage, polynucleotide strand crosslinks, and pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers.

  3. Lesions of juxtacortical origin (surface lesions of bone)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenan, S.; Abdelwahab, I.F.; Klein, M.J.; Hermann, G.; Lewis, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    A large variety of tumor and tumor-like conditions have been shown to originate from the surface of bone. Most surface lesions are associated with periosteal reaction. The periosteum is a multipotential membrane. Its cellular composition may give rise to a variety of both neoplasms and tumor-like conditions. To avoid misinterpretation, the orthopedist, radiologist, and pathologist should be familiar with the entire spectrum of surface lesions. A better understanding of the natural history and biological behavior at different lesional maturity stages and correlation of the history with the radiographic and pathological findings is essential to establish the correct diagnosis. A history of injury of blunt trauma is very important. A stress fracture may produce a periosteal reaction acd callus that can be difficult to distinguish from osteosarcoma. In this review article, the authors wish to describe and define each term by its anatomy and radiographic features while discussing the entire spectrum of surface lesions. All the illustrative cases in this review article have been proven histologically. (orig.)

  4. Canine susceptibility to visceral leishmaniasis: A systematic review upon genetic aspects, considering breed factors and immunological concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcelos, Tassia Cristina Bello; Furtado, Marina Carvalho; Belo, Vínicus Silva; Morgado, Fernanda Nazaré; Figueiredo, Fabiano Borges

    2017-10-05

    Dogs have different susceptibility degrees to leishmaniasis; however, genetic research on this theme is scarce, manly on visceral form. The aims of this systematic review were to describe and discuss the existing scientific findings on genetic susceptibility to canine leishmaniasis, as well as to show the gaps of the existing knowledge. Twelve articles were selected, including breed immunological studies, genome wide associations or other gene polymorphism or gene sequencing studies, and transcription approaches. As main results of literature, there was a suggestion of genetic clinical resistance background for Ibizan Hound dogs, and alleles associated with protection or susceptibility to visceral leishmaniasis in Boxer dogs. Genetic markers can explain phenotypic variance in both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and in cellular immune responses, including antigen presentation. Many gene segments are involved in canine visceral leishmaniasis phenotype, with Natural Resistance Associated Macrophage Protein 1 (NRAMP1) as the most studied. This was related to both protection and susceptibility. In comparison with murine and human genetic approaches, lack of knowledge in dogs is notorious, with many possibilities for new studies, revealing a wide field to be assessed on canine leishmaniasis susceptibility research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Computer-aided classification of lesions by means of their kinetic signatures in dynamic contrast-enhanced MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twellmann, Thorsten; ter Haar Romeny, Bart

    2008-03-01

    The kinetic characteristics of tissue in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data are an important source of information for the differentiation of benign and malignant lesions. Kinetic curves measured for each lesion voxel allow to infer information about the state of the local tissue. As a whole, they reflect the heterogeneity of the vascular structure within a lesion, an important criterion for the preoperative classification of lesions. Current clinical practice in analysis of tissue kinetics however is mainly based on the evaluation of the "most-suspect curve", which is only related to a small, manually or semi-automatically selected region-of-interest within a lesion and does not reflect any information about tissue heterogeneity. We propose a new method which exploits the full range of kinetic information for the automatic classification of lesions. Instead of breaking down the large amount of kinetic information to a single curve, each lesion is considered as a probability distribution in a space of kinetic features, efficiently represented by its kinetic signature obtained by adaptive vector quantization of the corresponding kinetic curves. Dissimilarity of two signatures can be objectively measured using the Mallows distance, which is a metric defined on probability distributions. The embedding of this metric in a suitable kernel function enables us to employ modern kernel-based machine learning techniques for the classification of signatures. In a study considering 81 breast lesions, the proposed method yielded an A z value of 0.89+/-0.01 for the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions in a nested leave-one-lesion-out evaluation setting.

  6. Surgical management of metastatic lesions at the cervicothoracic junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F Baker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The cervicothoracic junction (CTJ represents a transition from the semirigid thoracic spine to the mobile subaxial cervical spine. Pathologic lesions are prone to kyphotic deformity. The aim of this study was to review our experience with surgical stabilization of metastatic lesions affecting the CTJ (C7-T2. Materials and Methods: We reviewed all surgical stabilizations of metastatic spine lesions over the preceding 4 years in our institution. A total of 14 patients with CTJ lesions were identified. Case notes and radiology were reviewed to determine the presentation, outcomes, and specific complications. Results: The mean survival was 405 days (standard deviation [s.d.] 352. 8/14 died at a mean time from surgery of 193 days (s.d. 306. Most cases were a result of either lung or breast primary tumors. Half were stabilized with an anterior only approach and two had staged anterior-posterior. There were no cases of neurologic deterioration in this cohort as a result of surgery. There were two cases of deep surgical site infection and two documented cases of pulmonary embolus. There were no reported construct failures over the follow-up period. Conclusion: Patients with cervicothoracic metastatic lesions can be treated with either anterior or posterior approaches or a combination after considering each individual′s potential instability and disease burden.

  7. Complexity of the ultraviolet mutation frequency response curve in Escherichia coli B/r: SOS induction, one-lesion and two-lesion mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doudney, C.O.

    1976-01-01

    Three distinct sections of the ultraviolet mutation frequency response (MFR) curve toward tryptophan prototrophy have been demonstrated in Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trp thy and its uvrA derivative in log-phase growth in minimal medium. The initial section, which appears fluence-squared, may reflect the necessity, if mutation is to result, for induction of two lesions, one located within the potentially mutated genetic locus and the other damaging deoxyribonucleic acid replication and resulting in induction of the error-prone SOS repair function. A second linear section is ascribed to the continued induction, after exposure above that sufficient for complete SOS expression, of isolated lesions which lead to mutation in potentially mutated loci. The third section demonstrates an increased rate of mutagenesis and suggests the induction of two lesions in proximity which result in additional mutations. Split-exposure studies support the inducible nature of the SOS function and suggest that mutation frequency decline (MFD) is due to excision resulting from or related to the prevention of SOS induction by inhibition of protein synthesis. Preirradiation tryptophan starvation of the uvr + strain for 30 min decreases MFR in the first and second sections of the curve. Reduction of MFR in the third section requires more prestarvation time and is blocked by nalidixic acid. The decreased MFR of the first and second sections is ascribed to promotion of postirradiation MFD based on excision and that of the third section to completion of the chromosome during the prestarvation period

  8. DESTRUCTIVE LESIONS OF BONES AS A RESULT OF MYCOBACTERIAL PROCESS IN CHILDREN WITH INITIAL IMMUNODEFICIENCIES (CLINICAL, DIAGNOSTICAL AND TACTIC PECULIARITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yu. Mushkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial immunodeficiencies are genetically conditioned defects of immune system; they are the basis for generalized infections including those induced by mycobacteria of tuberculosis complex. The lesions of skeleton in those patients are of different types depending on the kind of immunodeficiency. The article presents the results of clinical observation, conservative and surgical treatment of 12 children with mycobacterial lesions of skeleton on the ground different initial immunodeficiencies — severe combined immune deficiency, chronic granulematosis and insufficiency of interferon and interleukin 12.Key words: children, initial immunodeficiency, mycobacterial infection, bone lesions, surgical treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (3: 60–64

  9. Management of Preinvasive Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrono, Maria G; Corzo, Camila; Iniesta, Maria; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2017-12-01

    Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma is considered the precursor lesion of high-grade serous carcinoma, and found in both low-risk and high-risk populations. Isolated serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas in patients with BRCA1/2 mutations are detected in ∼2% of patients undergoing risk-reducing bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and even with removal of the tubes and ovaries the rate of developing primary peritoneal carcinoma following remains up to 7.5%. Postoperative recommendations after finding incidental STICs remain unclear and surgical staging, adjuvant chemotherapy, or observation have been proposed. Discovery of STIC should prompt consideration of hereditary cancer program referral for BRCA1/2 mutation screening.

  10. Jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth: A radiographic diagnostic guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motazavi, Hamed; Bharvand, Maryam [Dept. of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This review article aimed to introduce a category of jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth. General search engines and specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Science Direct, Scopus, and well-recognized textbooks were used to find relevant studies using keywords such as 'jaw lesion', 'jaw disease', 'impacted tooth', and 'unerupted tooth'. More than 250 articles were found, of which approximately 80 were broadly relevant to the topic. We ultimately included 47 articles that were closely related to the topic of interest. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 lesions were identified as having a relationship with impacted tooth: dentigerous cysts, calcifying odontogenic cysts, unicystic (mural) ameloblastomas, ameloblastomas, ameloblastic fibromas, adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, keratocystic odontogenic tumors, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors, ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, and odontomas. When clinicians encounter a lesion associated with an impacted tooth, they should first consider these entities in the differential diagnosis. This will help dental practitioners make more accurate diagnoses and develop better treatment plans based on patients' radiographs.

  11. Jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth: A radiographic diagnostic guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motazavi, Hamed; Bharvand, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    This review article aimed to introduce a category of jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth. General search engines and specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Science Direct, Scopus, and well-recognized textbooks were used to find relevant studies using keywords such as 'jaw lesion', 'jaw disease', 'impacted tooth', and 'unerupted tooth'. More than 250 articles were found, of which approximately 80 were broadly relevant to the topic. We ultimately included 47 articles that were closely related to the topic of interest. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 lesions were identified as having a relationship with impacted tooth: dentigerous cysts, calcifying odontogenic cysts, unicystic (mural) ameloblastomas, ameloblastomas, ameloblastic fibromas, adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, keratocystic odontogenic tumors, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors, ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, and odontomas. When clinicians encounter a lesion associated with an impacted tooth, they should first consider these entities in the differential diagnosis. This will help dental practitioners make more accurate diagnoses and develop better treatment plans based on patients' radiographs

  12. Localization of lesions in aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, Kei; Watanabe, Shunzo; Tasaki, Hiroichi; Sato, Tokijiro; Metoki, Hirobumi.

    1984-01-01

    Using a microcomputer, the locus and extent of the lesions, as demonstrated by computed tomography for 127 cases with various types of aphasia were superimposed onto standardized marices. The relationship between the foci of the lesions and the types of aphasia was investigated. Broca aphasics (n=39) : Since the accumulated site of the lesions highly involved the deep structures of the lower part of the precentral gyrus as well as the insula and lenticular nucleus, only 60% of the Broca aphasics had lesions on these areas. This finding has proved to have little localizing value. Wernicke aphasics (n=23) : The size of the lesion was significantly smaller than Broca's aphasia. At least 70% of the patients had the superior temporal lesions involving Wernicke's area and subcortical lesions of the superior and middle temporal gyri. Amnestic aphasics (n=18) : The size of the lesion was smaller than any other types. While there was some concentration of the lesions (maximum 40%) in the area of the subcortical region of the anterior temporal gyrus adjacent to Wernicke's area and the lenticular nucleus, the lesions were distributed throughout the left hemisphere. Amnestic aphasia was thought to be the least localizable. Conduction aphasics (n=11) : The lesions were relatively small in size. Many patients had posterior speech area lesions involving at least partially Wernicke's area. In particular, more than 80% of the conduction aphasics had lesions of the supramarginal gyrus and it's adjacent deep structures. Global aphasics (n=36) : In general, the size of the lesion was very large and 70% of the global aphasics had extensive lesions involving both Broca's and Wernicke's areas. However, there were observations showing that the lesions can be small and confined. (J.P.N.)

  13. Canine Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Dissemination and Tissue Tropism of Genetically Distinct Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Marx de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known regarding the internal dissemination of initial cutaneous lesions and tissue tropism of Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis populations in naturally infected dogs. The aim of this study was to investigate genetic polymorphisms of L. (V. braziliensis populations in different anatomic sites of naturally infected dogs by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and low-stringency single specific primer-PCR (LSSP-PCR techniques. The amplified products were analyzed by LSSP-PCR to investigate the genetic variability of the parasite populations present in different anatomical sites. Twenty-three out of the 52 samples gave PCR-positive results. The existence of L. (V. braziliensis strains that remained restricted to cutaneous lesions and others showing characteristics of dissemination to internal organs and healthy skin was observed. LSSP-PCR and numerical analyses revealed that parasite populations that do not disseminate were genetically similar and belonged to a separate phenetic cluster. In contrast, populations that showed spreading to internal organs displayed a more polymorphic genetic profile. Despite the heterogeneity, L. (V. braziliensis populations with identical genetic profiles were observed in popliteal and cervical lymph nodes of the same animal. Our results indicate that infection in dogs can be manifested by dissemination and tissue tropism of genetically distinct populations of L. (V. braziliensis.

  14. Analysis of pulmonary coin lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, O; Kim, K. H.; Oh, K. K.; Park, C. Y.

    1979-01-01

    For A long time the solitary pulmonary nodule has remained a difficult problem to solve and has attracted a great deal of attension in recent years. Circumscribed coin lesions of the lung were generally peripheral in location with respect to the pulmonary hilus. Because of this, important clinical problem in management and diagnosis arise. Such a lesion is discovered through roentgenologic examination. So the roentgenologists is the first be in a position to offer advise. This presentation is an attempt to correlate a useful diagnosis with roentgenologic findings of pulmonary coin lesion which enables us to get differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lesion. Histologically proven 120 cases of the pulmonary coin lesion during the period of 8 years were reviewed through plain film, tomogram, bronchoscopy, variable laboratory findings, and clinical history. The results are as follows: 1. Male to female sex ratio was 3 : 1. In age distribution, most of the malignant pulmonary coin lesion appeared in 6th decade (39%) and 5th decade (27%). In benign lesion, the most cases were in 3 rd decade. 2. Pathological cell type are as follows: Primary bronchogenic cancer 43.3%, tuberculoma 25.8%, inflammatory lesion 17.5%, benign tumor 10%, and bronchial adenoma, harmartoma, A.V. malformation, mesothelioma, are 1 case respectively. As a result benign and malignant lesion showed equal distribution (49.1% : 50.3%). 3. In symptom analysis ; cough is the most common (43.5%) symptom in malignant lesion, next follows hemoptysis (20.9%) and chest pain (14.5%). In benign lesion, most of the patient (32.7%) did not complain any symptom. 4. In malignant lesion, the most common nodular size was 4 cm (32.3%), and in benign lesion 2 cm sized coin was most common (39.3%). 5. In general, margin of nodule was very sharp and well demarcated in benign lesion (83.3%), and in malignant lesion that was less demarcated and poorly defined. 6. Most case of calcification (82.7%) was seen in benign

  15. Genetics & sport: bioethical concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Andy

    2012-12-01

    This paper provides an overview of the ethical issues pertaining to the use of genetic insights and techniques in sport. Initially, it considers a range of scientific findings that have stimulated debate about the ethical issues associated with genetics applied to sport. It also outlines some of the early policy responses to these discoveries from world leading sports organizations, along with knowledge about actual use of gene technologies in sport. Subsequently, it considers the challenges with distinguishing between therapeutic use and human enhancement within genetic science, which is a particularly important issue for the world of sport. Next, particular attention is given to the use of genetic information, which raises questions about the legitimacy and reliability of genetic tests, along with the potential public value of having DNA databanks to economize in health care. Finally, the ethics of gene transfer are considered, inviting questions into the values of sport and humanity. It argues that, while gene modification may seem conceptually similar to other forms of doping, the requirements upon athletes are such that new forms of enhancement become increasingly necessary to discover. Insofar as genetic science is able to create safer, more effective techniques of human modification, then it may be an appealing route through which to modify athletes to safeguard the future of elite sports as enterprises of human excellence.

  16. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  17. Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging of Unusual White Matter Lesion in a Patient with Menkes Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Shin; Ryoo, Jae Wook; Choi, Dae Seob; Cho, Jae Min; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Shin, Hee Suk

    2007-01-01

    We report here on the diffusion-weighted imaging of unusual white matter lesions in a case of Menkes disease. On the initial MR imaging, the white matter lesions were localized in the deep periventricular white matter in the absence of diffuse cortical atrophy. The lesion showed diffuse high signal on the diffusion weighted images and diffuse progression and persistent hyperintensity on the follow up imaging. Our case suggests that the white matter lesion may precede diffuse cortical atrophy in a patient with Menkes disease. Menkes disease is an X-linked disorder that's caused by impaired intracellular transport of copper. We describe here the DWI findings of unusual and progressive white matter lesions in a case of Menkes disease. Menkes disease is an X-linked recessive disorder, and it is due to an inborn error of copper metabolism. The cause of Menkes disease has been isolated to a genetic defect in copper-transporting adenosine triphosphatase, and this results in low levels of intracellular copper. It is characterized clinically by failure to thrive, retarded mental and motor development, clonic seizure and peculiarly coarse, sparse and colorless scalp hair. These clinical findings can be explained by a dysfunction of the copper-dependent enzymes

  18. Diagnostic imaging costs before and after digital tomosynthesis implementation in patient management after detection of suspected thoracic lesions on chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaia, Emilio; Grisi, Guido; Baratella, Elisa; Cuttin, Roberto; Poillucci, Gabriele; Kus, Sara; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate diagnostic imaging costs before and after DTS implementation in patients with suspected thoracic lesions on CXR. Four hundred sixty-five patients (263 male, 202 female; age, 72.47 ± 11.33 years) with suspected thoracic lesion(s) after CXR underwent DTS. Each patient underwent CT when a pulmonary non-calcified lesion was identified by DTS while CT was not performed when a benign pulmonary or extrapulmonary lesion or pseudolesion was identified. The average per-patient imaging cost was calculated by normalising the costs before and after DTS implementation. In 229/465 patients who underwent DTS after suspicious CXR, DTS showed 193 pulmonary lesions and 36 pleural lesions, while in the remaining 236/465 patients, lesions were ruled out as pseudolesions of CXR. Chest CT examination was performed in 127/465 (27 %) patients while in the remaining 338/465 patients (73 %) CXR doubtful findings were resolved by DTS. The average per-patient costs of CXR, DTS and CT were 15.15, 41.55 and 113.66. DTS allowed an annual cost saving of 8,090.2 considering unenhanced CT and 19,298.12 considering contrast-enhanced CT. Considering a DTS reimbursement rate of 62.7 the break even point corresponds to 479 DTS examinations. Per-patient diagnostic imaging costs decreased after DTS implementation in patients with suspected thoracic lesions. • Digital tomosynthesis improves the diagnostic accuracy and confidence in chest radiography • Digital tomosynthesis reduces the need for CT for a suspected pulmonary lesion • Digital tomosynthesis requires a dose level equivalent to that of around two chest radiographies • Digital tomosynthesis produces a significant per-patient saving in diagnostic imaging costs.

  19. Histological diagnosis of ultrasound-visible breast lesions by large core needle biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchis-Querol, E.; Valeros, O.; Collado, A.; Gimenez, J.; Yanguas, C.

    1999-01-01

    We present our experience in the histological diagnosis of breast lesions using ultrasound-guided large core needle biopsy (LCNB), assessing its utility as an alternative to excisional biopsy. We have studied retrospectively a series of 146 cases involving the performance of LCNB. The results were comparable with those of FNAB in 59 cases and with those of surgical aspiration biopsy in 105. Of the 113 lesions identified as malignant by percutaneous large core needle aspiration biopsy, 96 were resected. Surgical aspiration biopsy agreed with LCNB in 100% of cases. Of the 33 lesions identified as benign by LCNB, surgical biopsy detected malignancy in 5. The results obtained establish a specificity for LCNB of 100% and a sensitivity of 96%, both of which are superior to the values for FNAB. Thus, this technique can be considered valid for preoperative diagnosis. LCNB is useful in the preoperative diagnosis of breast lesions, making FNAB and surgical biopsy unnecessary. Moreover, it constitutes a significant change in the management of patients with malignant or undetermined breast lesions. (Author) 8 refs

  20. Impact of diversity of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strains on lung lesions in slaughter pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, Annelies; Vranckx, Katleen; Piepers, Sofie; Del Pozo Sacristán, Rubén; Arsenakis, Ioannis; Boyen, Filip; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Maes, Dominiek

    2017-01-17

    The importance of diversity of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) strains is not yet fully known. This study investigated the genetic diversity of M. hyopneumoniae strains in ten pig herds, and assessed associations between the presence of different strains of M. hyopneumoniae and lung lesions at slaughter. Within each herd, three batches of slaughter pigs were investigated. At slaughter, from each batch, 20 post mortem bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were collected for multiple locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and lung lesions (Mycoplasma-like lesions, fissures) were examined. Multivariable analyses including potential risk factors for respiratory disease were performed to assess associations between the number of different strains per batch (three categories: one strain, two-six strains, ≥seven strains), and the lung lesions as outcome variables. In total, 135 different M. hyopneumoniae strains were found. The mean (min.-max.) number of different strains per batch were 7 (1-13). Batches with two-six strains or more than six strains had more severe Mycoplasma-like lesions (P = 0.064 and P = 0.012, respectively), a higher prevalence of pneumonia [odds ratio (OR): 1.30, P = 0.33 and OR: 2.08, P = 0.012, respectively], and fissures (OR = 1.35, P = 0.094 and OR = 1.70, P = 0.007, respectively) compared to batches with only one strain. In conclusion, many different M. hyopneumoniae strains were found, and batches of slaughter pigs with different M. hyopneumoniae strains had a higher prevalence and severity of Mycoplasma-like lung lesions at slaughter, implying that reducing the number of different strains may lead to less lung lesions at slaughter and better respiratory health of the pigs.

  1. Detection of early lung cancer lesions in surgical resections and in bronchial and transbronchial biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rott, T.; Jerse, M.; Tercelj, M.; Erzen, J.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Overall bad prognosis of lung cancer is mostly due to too late detection of early lung cancer, which may be treated with good success. Therefore, different diagnostic methods are developing for more efficient detection of early lung cancer: besides modern radiological, bronchoscopic methods with additional fluorescence techniques, quantitative cytological investigations, also histological and molecular investigations are included. Histology may reveal early preinvasive lung cancer lesions, associated early during multistep lung carcinogenesis with molecular genetic changes. Patients and methods. Preinvasive epithelial lung cancer lesions we searched in two groups of patients. In the first group of 316 patients from the period March 2003 - August 2006, 498 bronchial and transbronchial biopsies were examined for squamous metaplasia and dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, and invasive tumours. In the second group of 238 patients from the period January 2004 - August 2006, resected primary lung tumours were analysed for preinvasive and invasive neuroendocrine tumours and atypical adenomatous hyperplasia. Results. The most frequent changes in bronchial and transbronchial biopsies were squamous metaplasia (46.5%), simple or goblet cell hyperplasia of the bronchial epithelium (44.3%), malignant tumours (20.66%) and squamous dysplasia (16.1%), but rare carcinoma in situ (0.63%). Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia was found in 15 (6.3%) cases in the vicinity of 238 resected lung cancer specimens, carcinoid in 12 patients (5%), and mostly combined large cell neuroendocrine cancer in 21 patients (8.8%). Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia was found in 2 patients. Conclusions. Classical histological analysis should be focused on detection of early preinvasive epithelial lung cancer lesions. Additional available molecular investigations may reveal gradual genetic changes characteristic for a series of the preinvasive epithelial histological changes

  2. New Perspectives on the Brain Lesion Approach - Implications for Theoretical Models of Human Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irish, Muireann; van Kesteren, Marlieke T R

    2018-03-15

    Human lesion studies represent the cornerstone of modern day neuropsychology and provide an important adjunct to functional neuroimaging methods. The study of human lesion groups with damage to distinct regions of the brain permits the identification of underlying mechanisms and structures not only associated with, but essential for, complex cognitive processes. Here, we consider a recent review by McCormick et al., 2018 in which the power of the lesion model approach is elegantly presented with respect to a host of sophisticated cognitive endeavors, including autobiographical memory, future thinking, spatial navigation, and decision-making. By comparing profiles of loss and sparing in hippocampal (HC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) lesion groups, the authors provide new insights into the underlying neuroarchitecture of these diverse cognitive functions. Building on this framework, we consider how vmPFC and HC degeneration, in the context of large-scale network dysfunction in dementia, impacts discrete facets of memory and social cognition. Notably, we find remarkable concordance between the available evidence in dementia and that of the HC and vmPFC lesion literature. We further assess the role of the prefrontal cortex in modulating aspects of spatial navigation and discuss the role of schema-related processing in the service of memory more broadly. Far from being obsolete, we contend that human lesion work occupies a crucial position in cognitive neuroscience and offers an array of exciting areas for future study within this field. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [The theory of cardiac lesions from blunt chest injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumanov, E V; Sokolova, Z Iu

    2010-01-01

    The main theories of myocardial lesions associated with a blunt chest injury proposed starting from the XIXth century till the present time are considered based on the overview of the literature data. It is shown that the theory of selective mechanical activation of ATP-dependent K+ channels is most promising for further investigations into the mechanisms of myocardial dysfunction resulting from blunt chest injuries. The authors emphasize the absence of the universally accepted theory explaining the mechanism behind traumatic cardiac troubles and its fatal outcome despite numerous studies of cardiac lesions in patients with a blunt chest injury. It dictates the necessity of further research, both clinical and experimental, for a deeper insight into the problem.

  4. The DinB•RecA complex of Escherichia coli mediates an efficient and high-fidelity response to ubiquitous alkylation lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarelli, Tiziana M; Rands, Thomas J; Godoy, Veronica G

    2014-03-01

    Alkylation DNA lesions are ubiquitous, and result from normal cellular metabolism as well as from treatment with methylating agents and chemotherapeutics. DNA damage tolerance by translesion synthesis DNA polymerases has an important role in cellular resistance to alkylating agents. However, it is not yet known whether Escherichia coli (E. coli) DNA Pol IV (DinB) alkylation lesion bypass efficiency and fidelity in vitro are similar to those inferred by genetic analyses. We hypothesized that DinB-mediated bypass of 3-deaza-3-methyladenine, a stable analog of 3-methyladenine, the primary replication fork-stalling alkylation lesion, would be of high fidelity. We performed here the first kinetic analyses of E. coli DinB•RecA binary complexes. Whether alone or in a binary complex, DinB inserted the correct deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) opposite either lesion-containing or undamaged template; the incorporation of other dNTPs was largely inefficient. DinB prefers undamaged DNA, but the DinB•RecA binary complex increases its catalytic efficiency on lesion-containing template, perhaps as part of a regulatory mechanism to better respond to alkylation damage. Notably, we find that a DinB derivative with enhanced affinity for RecA, either alone or in a binary complex, is less efficient and has a lower fidelity than DinB or DinB•RecA. This finding contrasts our previous genetic analyses. Therefore, mutagenesis resulting from alkylation lesions is likely limited in cells by the activity of DinB•RecA. These two highly conserved proteins play an important role in maintaining genomic stability when cells are faced with ubiquitous DNA damage. Kinetic analyses are important to gain insights into the mechanism(s) regulating TLS DNA polymerases. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Impact of cavitation on lesion formation induced by high intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Pengfei; Jie Yu; Yang Xin; Tu Juan; Guo Xiasheng; Zhang Dong; Huang Pintong

    2017-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has shown a great promise in noninvasive cancer therapy. The impact of acoustic cavitation on the lesion formation induced by HIFU is investigated both experimentally and theoretically in transparent protein-containing gel and ex vivo liver tissue samples. A numerical model that accounts for nonlinear acoustic propagation and heat transfer is used to simulate the lesion formation induced by the thermal effect. The results showed that lesions could be induced in the samples exposed to HIFU with various acoustic pressures and pulse lengths. The measured areas of lesions formed in the lateral direction were comparable to the simulated results, while much larger discrepancy was observed between the experimental and simulated data for the areas of longitudinal lesion cross-section. Meanwhile, a series of stripe-wiped-off B-mode pictures were obtained by using a special imaging processing method so that HIFU-induced cavitation bubble activities could be monitored in real-time and quantitatively analyzed as the functions of acoustic pressure and pulse length. The results indicated that, unlike the lateral area of HIFU-induced lesion that was less affected by the cavitation activity, the longitudinal cross-section of HIFU-induced lesion was significantly influenced by the generation of cavitation bubbles through the temperature elevation resulting from HIFU exposures. Therefore, considering the clinical safety in HIFU treatments, more attention should be paid on the lesion formation in the longitudinal direction to avoid uncontrollable variation resulting from HIFU-induced cavitation activity. (paper)

  6. Genetic testing in the epilepsies—Report of the ILAE Genetics Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottman, Ruth; Hirose, Shinichi; Jain, Satish; Lerche, Holger; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Serratosa, José; Zara, Federico; Scheffer, Ingrid E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In this report, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Genetics Commission discusses essential issues to be considered with regard to clinical genetic testing in the epilepsies. Genetic research on the epilepsies has led to the identification of more than 20 genes with a major effect on susceptibility to idiopathic epilepsies. The most important potential clinical application of these discoveries is genetic testing: the use of genetic information, either to clarify the diagnosis in people already known or suspected to have epilepsy (diagnostic testing), or to predict onset of epilepsy in people at risk because of a family history (predictive testing). Although genetic testing has many potential benefits, it also has potential harms, and assessment of these potential benefits and harms in particular situations is complex. Moreover, many treating clinicians are unfamiliar with the types of tests available, how to access them, how to decide whether they should be offered, and what measures should be used to maximize benefit and minimize harm to their patients. Because the field is moving rapidly, with new information emerging practically every day, we present a framework for considering the clinical utility of genetic testing that can be applied to many different syndromes and clinical contexts. Given the current state of knowledge, genetic testing has high0020clinical utility in few clinical contexts, but in some of these it carries implications for daily clinical practice. PMID:20100225

  7. Computed tomography - guided cutting needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Shin Yu; Deheinzelin, Daniel; Younes, Riad N.; Chojniak, Rubens

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the experience of a radiology department in the use of computed tomography-guided cutting needle biopsy of pulmonary nodules, by evaluating diagnostic yield and incidence of complications. This is a retrospective analysis of 52 consecutive patients who underwent lung lesion biopsy guided by computed tomography, performed between May 1997 and May 2000. Thirty-five patients were male and 17 were female, with ages ranging from 5 to 85 years (median, 62 years). The size of the lesions ranged from 1.8 to 15 cm (median, 5.4 cm). In a total of 52 biopsies of lung lesions, 51 biopsies (98.1%) supplied appropriate material for histopathological diagnosis, with 9 diagnosed (17.3%) as benign and 42 (80.8%) as malignant lesions. Specific diagnosis was obtained in 44 (84.6%) biopsies: 4 benign (9.1%) and 40 (90.9%) malignant lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the cutting needle biopsies for determining presence of malignancy were 96.8%, 100%, and 97.2%, respectively. Complications occurred in 9 cases (17.3%), including 6 cases (11.5%) of small pneumothorax, 1 (1.9%) of hemoptysis, 1 (1.9%) of pulmonary hematoma, and 1 (1.9%) of thoracic wall hematoma. All had spontaneous resolution. There were no complications requiring subsequent intervention. The high sensitivity and specificity of the method and the low rate of complications have established cutting needle biopsy as an efficient and safe tool for the diagnosis of lung lesions. In our hospital, cutting needle biopsy is considered a reliable procedure for the evaluation of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. (author)

  8. Mammotome biopsy under ultrasound control in the diagnostics and treatment of nodular breast lesions - own experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibil, Wojciech; Hodorowicz-Zaniewska, Diana; Kulig, Jan

    2012-05-01

    Mammotome biopsy is an effective, minimally invasive, novel technique used in the verification of breast lesions.The aim of the study was to assess the value of ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted core needle biopsy (mammotome biopsy) in the diagnostics and treatment of nodular breast lesions, considering own data.Material and methods. Analysis comprised 1183 mammotome biopsies under ultrasound control performed in 1177 female patients during the period between 2000 and 2010, at the Regional Clinic for Early Diagnostics and Treatment of Breast Lesions, I Chair and Department of General Surgery, Jagiellonian University, Collegium Medicum.Results. The average patient age amounted to 41.7 years. The size of the investigated lesions ranged between 4 and 65 mm (mean - 12 mm). The histopathological examination result was as follows: fibrocystic lesions (n=285), adenofibroma (n=477), adenosis sclerosans (n=188), hyperplasia without atypy (n=58), phyllode tumor (n=2), papilloma (n=14), hamartoma (n=1), atypical hyperplasia (n=25), in situ ductal carcinoma (n=4), in situ lobular carcinoma (n=5), infiltrating ductal carcinoma (n=114), infiltrating lobular carcinoma (n=4), non-diagnostic result (n=6). The histopathological diagnosis was obtained in 99.5% of cases. Patients diagnosed with atypical hyperplasia or cancer were qualified for surgery, according to accepted standards. The presence of a hematoma was the most common complication after the biopsy, observed in 16.5% of patients.Conclusions. The obtained results confirmed the high value of ultrasound-guided biopsies in the diagnostics of nodular breast lesions. The method is safe, minimally invasive, with few complications, providing a good cosmetic effect. In case of benign lesions with a diameter of less than 15 mm the mammotome biopsy enables to completely excise the lesions, being an alternative to open surgical biopsies. The mammotome biopsy should become the method of choice considering the diagnostics of nodular

  9. Selfish genetic elements, genetic conflict, and evolutionary innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werren, John H

    2011-06-28

    Genomes are vulnerable to selfish genetic elements (SGEs), which enhance their own transmission relative to the rest of an individual's genome but are neutral or harmful to the individual as a whole. As a result, genetic conflict occurs between SGEs and other genetic elements in the genome. There is growing evidence that SGEs, and the resulting genetic conflict, are an important motor for evolutionary change and innovation. In this review, the kinds of SGEs and their evolutionary consequences are described, including how these elements shape basic biological features, such as genome structure and gene regulation, evolution of new genes, origin of new species, and mechanisms of sex determination and development. The dynamics of SGEs are also considered, including possible "evolutionary functions" of SGEs.

  10. Automated Breast Ultrasound Lesions Detection using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Moi Hoon; Pons, Gerard; Marti, Joan; Ganau, Sergi; Sentis, Melcior; Zwiggelaar, Reyer; Davison, Adrian K; Marti, Robert

    2017-08-07

    Breast lesion detection using ultrasound imaging is considered an important step of Computer-Aided Diagnosis systems. Over the past decade, researchers have demonstrated the possibilities to automate the initial lesion detection. However, the lack of a common dataset impedes research when comparing the performance of such algorithms. This paper proposes the use of deep learning approaches for breast ultrasound lesion detection and investigates three different methods: a Patch-based LeNet, a U-Net, and a transfer learning approach with a pretrained FCN-AlexNet. Their performance is compared against four state-of-the-art lesion detection algorithms (i.e. Radial Gradient Index, Multifractal Filtering, Rule-based Region Ranking and Deformable Part Models). In addition, this paper compares and contrasts two conventional ultrasound image datasets acquired from two different ultrasound systems. Dataset A comprises 306 (60 malignant and 246 benign) images and Dataset B comprises 163 (53 malignant and 110 benign) images. To overcome the lack of public datasets in this domain, Dataset B will be made available for research purposes. The results demonstrate an overall improvement by the deep learning approaches when assessed on both datasets in terms of True Positive Fraction, False Positives per image, and F-measure.

  11. Ghost cell lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms.

  12. Molecular and genetic mechanisms of environmental mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubitschek, H.E.; Derstine, P.L.; Griego, V.M.; Matsushita, T.; Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.; Reynolds, P.R.; Webb, R.B.; Williams-Hill, D.

    1981-01-01

    This program is primarily concerned with elucidation of the nature of DNA lesions produced by environmental and energy related mutagens, their mechanisms of action, and their repair. The main focus is on actions of chemical mutagens and electromagnetic radiations. Synergistic interactions between mutagens and the mutational processes that lead to synergism are being investigated. Mutagens are chosen for study on the basis of their potential for analysis of mutation (as genetic probes), for development of procedures for reducing mutational damage, for their potential importance to risk assessment, and for development of improved mutagen testing systems. Bacterial cells are used because of the rapidity and clarity of scientific results that can be obtained, the detailed genetic maps, and the many well-defined mutand strains available. The conventional tools of microbial and molecular genetics are used, along with intercomparison of genetically related strains. Advantage is taken of tcollective dose commitment will result in more attention being paid to potential releases of radionuclides at relatively short times after disposal

  13. Breast MRI: Are T2 IR sequences useful in the evaluation of breast lesions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesio, Laura [Department of Radiological Sciences, Umberto I Hospital, ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Viale Del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Savelli, Sara [Department of Radiological Sciences, Umberto I Hospital, ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Viale Del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: sarasavelli@hotmail.it; Angeletti, Marco; Porfiri, Lucio Maria; D' Ambrosio, Ilaria; Maggi, Claudia; Castro, Elisabetta Di; Bennati, Paolo; Fanelli, Gloria Pasqua [Department of Radiological Sciences, Umberto I Hospital, ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Viale Del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Vestri, Anna Rita [Department of Experimental Medicine, Umberto I Hospital, ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Viale Del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Manganaro, Lucia [Department of Radiological Sciences, Umberto I Hospital, ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Viale Del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2009-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the potential role of signal intensities calculated in T2 images as an adjunctive parameter in the analysis of mass-like enhancements classified as BIRADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) assessment categories 2, 3, 4 or 5 with the standard T1 criteria. Materials and methods: After a retrospective review of 338-breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) performed for the evaluation of a suspicious lesion we selected a group of 65 mass-like enhancements ranging from 5 to 20 mm, classified as BIRADS assessment categories 2, 3, 4 or 5, histologically proved. In all cases we calculated the ratio between the signal intensity (SI) of the nodule and the pectoralis major muscle (LMSIR, lesion to muscle signal intensity ratio) with a multiROIs (region of interest) analysis on T2 images. A ROC analysis was performed to test the ability of the two diagnostic parameters separately considered (BIRADS and LMSIR) and combined in a new mono-dimensional variable obtained by a computerized discriminant function. Results: Histological examination assessed 34 malignant lesions (52.3%) and 31 benign lesions (47.7%). The evaluation of ROC curves gave the following results: BIRADS area under the curve (AUC) 0.913, S.E. 0.0368, LMSIR AUC 0.854, S.E. 0.0487, combined BIRADS-LMSIR AUC 0.965, S.E. 0.0191 with a definitive increase in the AUC between the overall ROC area and those of the two diagnostic modalities separately considered. Discussion: T2-weighted SI assessment with LMSIR measurement improves the diagnostic information content of standard breast MRI and can be considered a promising potential tool in the differential diagnosis of mass-like enhancements judged as borderline lesions (BIRADS 3 and 4)

  14. The impact of precise robotic lesion length measurement on stent length selection: ramifications for stent savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Paul T; Kruse, Kevin R; Kroll, Christopher R; Patterson, Janet Y; Esposito, Michele J

    2015-09-01

    Coronary stent deployment outcomes can be negatively impacted by inaccurate lesion measurement and inappropriate stent length selection (SLS). We compared visual estimate of these parameters to those provided by the CorPath 200® Robotic PCI System. Sixty consecutive patients who underwent coronary stent placement utilizing the CorPath System were evaluated. The treating physician assessed orthogonal images and provided visual estimates of lesion length and SLS. The robotic system was then used for the same measures. SLS was considered to be accurate when visual estimate and robotic measures were in agreement. Visual estimate SLSs were considered to be "short" or "long" if they were below or above the robotic-selected stents, respectively. Only 35% (21/60) of visually estimated lesions resulted in accurate SLS, whereas 33% (20/60) and 32% (19/60) of the visually estimated SLSs were long and short, respectively. In 5 cases (8.3%), 1 less stent was placed based on the robotic lesion measurement being shorter than the visual estimate. Visual estimate assessment of lesion length and SLS is highly variable with 65% of the cases being inaccurately measured when compared to objective measures obtained from the robotic system. The 32% of the cases where lesions were visually estimated to be short represents cases that often require the use of extra stents after the full lesion is not covered by 1 stent [longitudinal geographic miss (LGM)]. Further, these data showed that the use of the robotic system prevented the use of extra stents in 8.3% of the cases. Measurement of lesions with robotic PCI may reduce measurement errors, need for extra stents, and LGM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral White Lesions: Presentation and Comparison of Oral Submucous Fibrosis with Other Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqsood, A.; Aman, N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare oral submucous fibrosis with other white oral lesions for presentation and associated factors. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The Departments of Oral Medicine and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ibad Institute of Oral Health Sciences (DIKIOHS), Karachi, from May 2008 to May 2009. Methodology: Patients presenting with oral white lesions were selected by consecutive non-purposive sampling and clinico-demographic data was collected. For patients with oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), additional information like duration of habits, maximal incisal opening (MIO), presence of any other associated lesion were noted. OSF was compared with other white lesions for any association between characteristic of subjects. Chi-square and independent t-tests for determining the statistical significance at p < 0.05. Results: OSF was present in 59.6% (n = 106) of the 178 patients; other white lesions were 40.4% (n = 72). The mean age of patients with OSF was 34 +- 12.7 years and 45.81 +- 16.2 years in patients with other white lesions, (p < 0.0001). Items containing areca nut were consumed more by patients with OSF, with a significant (p < 0.0001) compared to patients with other white lesions. Conclusion: OSF was the predominant white lesion in patients examined at DIKIOHS. Areca nut was found to be chewed more by patients with OSF and still longer by patients with SCC. (author)

  16. Role of genetics in the etiopathogenesis of genetic generalized epilepsy: A review of current literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Balarabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE was believed to be of presumed genetic etiology with no identifiable genetic mutation or demonstrable epigenetic abnormality. A wide range of epileptic disorders has clue for an inherited susceptibility. Monogenic disorders associated with epilepsy mental retardation and structural brain lesion typified by heterotopias, tuberous sclerosis, and progressive myoclonus epilepsies account for about 1% of epilepsies. This review focuses on the role of genetic mutations and epigenetic rearrangements in the pathophysiologic mechanism of GGE. To achieve this; PubMed, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were systematically and comprehensively searched using keywords (“epilepsy” “juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME,” “typical absences,” “idiopathic generalized epilepsy,” “JME,” “juvenile absence epilepsy,” “childhood absence epilepsy” “generalized tonic-clonic seizure” “GTCS”. Most GGE has evidence of underlying genetic inheritance. Recent animal studies have shown that early detection and treatment of genetic generalized epilepsies can alter the phenotypic presentation in rodents. These findings suggest a critical period in epileptogenesis, during which spike-and-wave seizures can be suppressed, leading to chronic changes in the brain (epileptogenesis and the preceding dysfunctions may, therefore, be targeted using therapeutic approaches that may either delay or inhibit the transition to active epileptic attack. The interplay between genetic mutations and epigenetic rearrangements play important roles in the development of GCE and that this process, especially at crucial developmental periods, is very susceptible to environmental modulations.

  17. Clinical Significance of Focal Breast Lesions Incidentally Identified by 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Seok; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Su Jin; Hyun, Seung Hyup; Lee, Ji Young; Choi, Yong; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the incidence and malignant risk of focal breast lesions incidentally detected by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Various PET/CT findings of the breast lesions were also analyzed to improve the differentiation between benign from malignant focal breast lesions. The subjects were 3,768 consecutive 18 F-FDG PET/CT exams performed in adult females without a history of breast cancer. A focal breast lesion was defined as a focal 18 F-FDG uptake or a focal nodular lesion on CT image irrespective of 18 F-FDG uptake in the breasts. The maximum SUV and CT pattern of focal breast lesions were evaluated, and were compared with final diagnosis. The incidence of focal breast lesions on PET/CT in adult female subjects was 1.4% (58 lesions in 53 subjects). In finally confirmed 53 lesions of 48 subjects, 11 lesions of 8 subjects (20.8%) were proven to be malignant. When the PET/CT patterns suggesting benignancy (maximum attenuation value > 75 HU or 20) were added as diagnostic criteria of PET/CT to differentiate benign from malignant breast lesions along with maximum SUV, the area under ROC curve of PET/CT was significantly increased compared with maximum SUV alone (0.680±0.093 vs. 0.786±0.076, p 18 F-FDG PET/CT is not low, deserving further diagnostic confirmation. Image interpretation considering both 18 F-FDG uptake and PET/CT pattern may be helpful to improve the differentiation from malignant and benign focal breast lesion

  18. Genetic characteristics of mitochondrial DNA was associated with colorectal carcinogenesis and its prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Ho Lee

    Full Text Available Clinical value of mitochondrial DNA has been described in colorectal cancer (CRC. To clarify its role in colorectal carcinogenesis, mitochondrial microsatellite instability (mtMSI and other markers were investigated in CRCs and their precancerous lesions, as a multitier genetic study. DNA was isolated from paired normal and tumoral tissues in 78 tubular adenomas (TAs, 34 serrated polyps (SPs, and 100 CRCs. mtMSI, nucleus microsatellite instability (nMSI, KRAS mutation, and BRAF mutation were investigated in these tumors and their statistical analysis was performed. mtMSI was found in 30% of CRCs and 21.4% of precancerous lesions. Mitochondrial copy number was higher in SPs than TAs and it was associated with mtMSI in low grade TAs. KRAS and BRAF mutations were mutually exclusive in TAs and SPs. CRCs with mtMSI showed shorter overall survival times than the patients without mtMSI. In CRCs without nMSI or BRAF mutation, mtMSI was a more accurate marker for predicting prognosis. The genetic change of mitochondrial DNA is an early and independent event in colorectal precancerous lesions and mtMSI and mitochondrial contents are associated with the tubular adenoma-carcinoma sequence, resulting in poor prognosis. This result suggested that the genetic change in mitochondrial DNA appears to be a possible prognosis marker in CRC.

  19. Conservative approach to preneoplastic cervical lesions in postmenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrano, Giuseppe; Aleandri, Vincenzo; Ciolli, Paola; Scardamaglia, Paola; Pacchiarotti, Arianna; Verrico, Monica; Carboni, Simona; Corosu, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the recurrence rate of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in postmenopausal women previously submitted to laser CO2 conization and the role of persistent oncogenic HPV types. Fifty-five patients with a cytological diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions were triaged with a standard colposcopy. Hormonal replacement therapy was considered as significative in influencing cervical trophism. Vaginal smears for microbiological examination were obtained. H-R HPV test was performed by PCR. The follow-up checks including cytology, colposcopy and HVP test were performed for a minimum of 5 years. Histological analysis revealed 19 CIN2 (cervical intraepithelial lesions) and 36 CIN3 lesions. The cumulative failure rate at first treatment was 14%. HPV test was positive for HPV 16 type in all patients. Forty-two patients during the follow up checks resulted negative to cytology, colposcopy and HR HPV test. At the one-year follow-up check, 7 patients revealed normal cytological and abnormal colposcopical findings and persistent positive HR HPV test. At the five-year follow-up check, 14 patients with a normal cytological smear had a recurrence of CIN2/3 and positive HR HPV test. In postmenopause, the correct management of H-R squamous intraepithelial lesions is still debated. However, a satisfactory follow-up is the main requirement for the conservative management. HPV typing in the follow-up is important to detect persistent types to identify women at risk of developing cervical abnormalities. The incidence of cervical neoplasia does not decrease with increasing age. Since HPV positivity predicted subsequent infection, testing postmenopausal patients for the virus may be a cost-effective method of disease prevention.

  20. Ultrasonographic findings of breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, In Sung; Kim, Yang Soo; Suh, Hyoung Sim

    1990-01-01

    Authors retrospectively analyzed ultrasonographic findings of 61 cases of breast lesions which were proven pathologically at Daerim St. Mary's Hospital from May 1987 to February 1990. The results were as follows : 1. Of all 61 cases, there were 27 fibroadenomas, 13 fibrocystic diseases, 11 carcinomas, 8 abscesses, 1 sclerosing adenosis, and 1 intraductal papilloma. 2. Findings suggesting benignancy were smooth contour, round or oval shape, homogeneously echolucent internal echo, echogenic boundary echo, and posterior enhancement. In the cases of abscess, the findings were rather irregular contour, strong posterior enhancement, and dirty, inhomogeneous internal echo. While irregular and lobulated shape, inhomogeneous and mixed internal echo and pectoral muscle invasion were suggested for malignancy. 3. The sensitivity was 98% and the specificity 58% in benign mass excluding abscesses, 63% and 98% in abscesses, and 55% and 98% in carcinomas. In conclusion, ultrasonography is one of the excellent imaging modality for detecting breast lesions larger than 5 mm in size, but unfortunately some of the malignant tumors simulated benignancy, thus we considered fine needle aspiration biopsy and adjunctive imaging modalities such as film mammography must be followed for better detection of breast cancer

  1. Ultrasonographic findings of breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, In Sung; Kim, Yang Soo; Suh, Hyoung Sim [College of Medicine, Daerim St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Authors retrospectively analyzed ultrasonographic findings of 61 cases of breast lesions which were proven pathologically at Daerim St. Mary's Hospital from May 1987 to February 1990. The results were as follows : 1. Of all 61 cases, there were 27 fibroadenomas, 13 fibrocystic diseases, 11 carcinomas, 8 abscesses, 1 sclerosing adenosis, and 1 intraductal papilloma. 2. Findings suggesting benignancy were smooth contour, round or oval shape, homogeneously echolucent internal echo, echogenic boundary echo, and posterior enhancement. In the cases of abscess, the findings were rather irregular contour, strong posterior enhancement, and dirty, inhomogeneous internal echo. While irregular and lobulated shape, inhomogeneous and mixed internal echo and pectoral muscle invasion were suggested for malignancy. 3. The sensitivity was 98% and the specificity 58% in benign mass excluding abscesses, 63% and 98% in abscesses, and 55% and 98% in carcinomas. In conclusion, ultrasonography is one of the excellent imaging modality for detecting breast lesions larger than 5 mm in size, but unfortunately some of the malignant tumors simulated benignancy, thus we considered fine needle aspiration biopsy and adjunctive imaging modalities such as film mammography must be followed for better detection of breast cancer.

  2. Imaging review of lipomatous musculoskeletal lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burt Ashley M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipomatous lesions are common musculoskeletal lesions that can arise within the soft tissues, bone, neurovascular structures, and synovium. The majority of these lesions are benign, and many of the benign lesions can be diagnosed by radiologic evaluation. However, radiologic differences between benign and malignant lipomatous lesions may be subtle and pathologic correlation is often needed. The use of sonography, computed tomography (CT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is useful not only in portraying fat within the lesion, but also for evaluating the presence and extent of soft tissue components. Lipomas make up most soft tissue lipomatous lesions, but careful evaluation must be performed to distinguish these lesions from a low-grade liposarcoma. In addition to the imaging appearance, the location of the lesion and the patient demographics can be utilized to help diagnose other soft tissue lipomatous lesions, such as elastofibroma dorsi, angiolipoma, lipoblastoma, and hibernoma. Osseous lipomatous lesions such as a parosteal lipoma and intraosseous lipoma occur less commonly as their soft tissue counterpart, but are also benign. Neurovascular and synovial lipomatous lesions are much rarer lesions but demonstrate more classic radiologic findings, particularly on MRI. A review of the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic characteristics of these lesions is presented.

  3. The PASTA Bridge: A Technique for the Arthroscopic Repair of PASTA Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirahara, Alan M; Andersen, Wyatt J

    2017-10-01

    PASTA (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) lesions of greater than 50% thickness are usually repaired, whereas those of less than 50% thickness receive subacromial decompression and debridement. However, tears of greater than 25% thickness of the tendon result in increased strain of the adjacent, intact tendon fibers. Re-creating the tendon footprint at the greater tuberosity is the goal of a repair. Transtendon repairs have been considered the gold standard in repair but have shown varying outcomes and are technically difficult procedures. This report details the PASTA bridge-a technique for the arthroscopic, percutaneous repair of PASTA lesions. The PASTA bridge uses a spinal needle to ensure the repair includes the leading edge of the good tissue and is at the appropriate angle and area. Most procedures use a knife or trocar blindly to access the joint to place anchors, which has the potential to damage surrounding tissues and result in poor anchor and suture placement. The PASTA bridge is a safe, reliable procedure that is easily reproducible and appropriate for surgeons of all experience levels and should be strongly considered when repairing PASTA lesions.

  4. Hock lesions and free-stall design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weary, D M; Taszkun, I

    2000-04-01

    We compared the prevalence and severity of skin lesions on the hocks of lactating dairy cows in southern British Columbia, comparing 20 farms using three common bedding surfaces: sawdust, sand, and geotextile mattresses. Skin lesions were scored at five positions on the hock. For each position we noted if the lesion showed inflammatory attributes, and then assigned a severity score. Of the 1752 lactating cows scored, 1267 cows (73%) had at least one hock lesion. Of those cows with lesions, 87% had lesions on both legs, 76% had lesions on more than one location on the hock, and 78% had a lesion of at least moderate severity (i.e., evidence of skin breakage or an area of hair loss >10 cm2). Lesions were most prevalent on farms that used geotextile mattresses (91% of cows) and least common on farms that used sand (24% of cows). Moreover, lesions on cows from farms using mattresses were more numerous and more severe than those on cows from sand-bedded farms. The prevalence and severity of lesions on farms using sawdust was intermediate. Lesions also varied in relation to location on the hock. For farms using geotextile mattresses, lesions were more common and more severe on the lateral surfaces of both the tuber calcis and the tarsal joint. On farms using sawdust, lesions were common on the dorsal surface of the tuber calcis and the lateral surfaces of both the tuber calcis and the tarsal joint. Lesions were rare on all five positions for cows from sand-bedded farms. Among the 10 farms sampled using sawdust, we found a significant negative relationship between the length of the stall and severity of lesions. For cows with lesions, the number and severity of lesions increased with age.

  5. Unifying diseases from a genetic point of view: the example of the genetic theory of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrason, Marie

    2013-08-01

    In the contemporary biomedical literature, every disease is considered genetic. This extension of the concept of genetic disease is usually interpreted either in a trivial or genocentrist sense, but it is never taken seriously as the expression of a genetic theory of disease. However, a group of French researchers defend the idea of a genetic theory of infectious diseases. By identifying four common genetic mechanisms (Mendelian predisposition to multiple infections, Mendelian predisposition to one infection, and major gene and polygenic predispositions), they attempt to unify infectious diseases from a genetic point of view. In this article, I analyze this explicit example of a genetic theory, which relies on mechanisms and is applied only to a specific category of diseases, what we call "a regional genetic theory." I have three aims: to prove that a genetic theory of disease can be devoid of genocentrism, to consider the possibility of a genetic theory applied to every disease, and to introduce two hypotheses about the form that such a genetic theory could take by distinguishing between a genetic theory of diseases and a genetic theory of Disease. Finally, I suggest that network medicine could be an interesting framework for a genetic theory of Disease.

  6. Genetic Counseling in Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Peter

    The task of the genetic counselor who identifies genetic causes of mental retardation and assists families to understand risk of recurrence is described. Considered are chromosomal genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome, inherited disorders such as Tay-Sachs disease, identification by testing the amniotic fluid cells (amniocentresis) in time…

  7. Topological characteristics of brainstem lesions in clinically definite and clinically probable cases of multiple sclerosis: An MRI-study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brainin, M.; Omasits, M.; Reisner, T.; Neuhold, A.; Wicke, L.

    1987-01-01

    Disseminated lesions in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres and confluent lesions at the borders of the lateral ventricles as seen on MRI are both considered acceptable paraclinical evidence for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Similar changes are, however, also found in vascular diseases of the brain. We therefore aimed at identifying those additional traits in the infratentorial region, which in our experience are not frequently found in cerebrovascular pathology. We evaluated MR brain scans of 68 patients and found pontine lesions in 71% of cases with a clinically definite diagnosis (17 out of 24) and in 33% of cases with a probable diagnosis (14 out of 43). Lesions in the medulla oblongata were present in 50% and 16%, respectively, and in the midbrain in 25% and 7%, respectively. With rare exceptions all brainstem lesions were contiguous with the cisternal or ventricular cerebrospinal fluid spaces. In keeping with post-mortem reports the morphological spectrum ranged from large confluent patches to solitary, well delineated paramedian lesions or discrete linings of the cerebrospinal fluid border zones and were most clearly depicted from horizontal and sagittal T2 weighted SE-sequences. If there is a predilection for the outer or inner surfaces of the brainstem, such lesions can be considered an additional typical feature of multiple sclerosis and can be more reliably weighted as paraclinical evidence for a definite diagnosis. (orig.)

  8. Benign submucosal lesions of the stomach and duodenum: Imaging characteristics with endoscopic and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jong Young; Nam, Kyung Jin; Choi, Jong Cheol; Cho, Jin Han; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Choi, Sun Seob; Kwon, Hee Jin; Yoon, Jung Hee; Kim, Su Jin

    2008-01-01

    Benign submucosal lesions of the stomach and duodenum are occasionally encountered during endoscopy. But endoscopy has its limitations in the diagnosis and differentiation of these lesions, because submucosal lesions are often difficult to visualize at endoscopy due to minimal change of the overlying mucosa. Furthermore, endoscopic biopsy may not always yield adequate tissue for diagnosis due to the submucosal location of the lesions. For this reason, the role of radiologic imaging is important in the diagnosis of submucosal lesions of the stomach and duodenum. Recent advances in computed tomography (CT) and sonographic technology are helpful in narrowing the differential diagnosis of gastroduodenal submucosal lesions. In contrast to endoscopy and barium studies, CT or ultrasonography (US) provides information about both the gastric wall and the extragastric extent of the disease. Arterial phase contrast enhanced CT enables us to discriminate a mass of submucosal from that of a mucosal origin in the differential diagnosis of gastric or duodenal lesions. Although endoscopic sonography has been considered the better modality in the diagnosis of gastroduodenal submucosal lesions, transabdominal sonography can still be an alternative method to endoscopic sonography in assessing of the origin and character of the submucosal lesions. Some gastroduodenal submucosal lesions have similar radiologic findings that make differentiation difficult. But despite overlaps in radiologic findings, some lesions have characteristic radiologic features that may suggest a specific diagnosis. Knowledge of the differential diagnosis of benign submucosal lesions in the stomach and duodenum may promote correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment

  9. Incidental enhancing lesions found on preoperative breast MRI: management and role of second-look ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, M L; Pediconi, F; Telesca, M; Vasselli, F; Casali, V; Miglio, E; Passariello, R; Catalano, C

    2011-09-01

    This study prospectively assessed second-look ultrasound (US) for the evaluation of incidental enhancing lesions identified on preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Between 2004 and 2007, 182 patients with malignant breast lesions detected on US and/or X-ray mammography and confirmed by cytology/histology underwent preoperative breast contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI. Patients with incidental lesions on breast MRI underwent second-look high-resolution US directed at the site of the incidental finding. Diagnosis of incidental lesions was based on biopsy or 24-month follow-up. Breast MRI detected 55 additional lesions in 46/182 (25.2%) patients. Forty-two of 55 (76.3%) lesions were detected on second-look US in 38/46 (82.6%) patients. Malignancy was confirmed for 24/42 (57.1%) correlate lesions compared with 7/13 (53.8%) noncorrelate lesions. Second-look US depicted 8/9 (88.8%) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 5, 16/22 (72.7%) BI-RADS 4 and 18/24 (75%) BI-RADS 3 lesions. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and positive and negative predictive values for lesion detection/diagnosis was 100%, 88.9%, 94.6%, 90.3% and 100% for MRI and 64.3%, 70.4%, 67.3%, 69.2% and 65.5% for second-look US. Improved performance for US was obtained when masslike lesions only were considered. Second-look US is a confirmatory method for incidental findings on breast MRI, particularly for mass-like lesions.

  10. Oropharynx lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as papilloma) Fungal infections (such as candida) Histoplasmosis Oral lichen planus Precancerous sore (leukoplakia) Viral infections (such as Herpes simplex) Risks Risks of the procedure may ... Throat lesion biopsy; Biopsy - mouth or throat; Mouth lesion biopsy; Oral cancer - biopsy ...

  11. Inter-algorithm lesion volumetry comparison of real and 3D simulated lung lesions in CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Marthony; Solomon, Justin; Hoye, Jocelyn; Smith, Taylor; Ebner, Lukas; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish volumetric exchangeability between real and computational lung lesions in CT. We compared the overall relative volume estimation performance of segmentation tools when used to measure real lesions in actual patient CT images and computational lesions virtually inserted into the same patient images (i.e., hybrid datasets). Pathologically confirmed malignancies from 30 thoracic patient cases from Reference Image Database to Evaluate Therapy Response (RIDER) were modeled and used as the basis for the comparison. Lesions included isolated nodules as well as those attached to the pleura or other lung structures. Patient images were acquired using a 16 detector row or 64 detector row CT scanner (Lightspeed 16 or VCT; GE Healthcare). Scans were acquired using standard chest protocols during a single breath-hold. Virtual 3D lesion models based on real lesions were developed in Duke Lesion Tool (Duke University), and inserted using a validated image-domain insertion program. Nodule volumes were estimated using multiple commercial segmentation tools (iNtuition, TeraRecon, Inc., Syngo.via, Siemens Healthcare, and IntelliSpace, Philips Healthcare). Consensus based volume comparison showed consistent trends in volume measurement between real and virtual lesions across all software. The average percent bias (+/- standard error) shows -9.2+/-3.2% for real lesions versus -6.7+/-1.2% for virtual lesions with tool A, 3.9+/-2.5% and 5.0+/-0.9% for tool B, and 5.3+/-2.3% and 1.8+/-0.8% for tool C, respectively. Virtual lesion volumes were statistically similar to those of real lesions (.05 in most cases. Results suggest that hybrid datasets had similar inter-algorithm variability compared to real datasets.

  12. Histopathological Study of Central Nervous System Lesions: Emphasizing Association of Neoplasms with ABO Blood Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarguru, B N; Pallavi, P; Sunila; Manjunath, G V; Vasan, T S; Rajalakshmi, B R

    2017-04-01

    The Central Nervous System (CNS) lesions show considerable geographic and racial variations with respect to the incidence and the pattern of distribution of lesions. The ABO blood status is a readily accessible factor in genetic constitution of the patients. It has been shown to be associated with many diseases. But the influence of blood group status on the pathogenesis of brain tumours is still unclear. To study various histopathological patterns of CNS lesions and to evaluate the association of CNS tumours with the distribution of ABO blood groups in documented cases. In the present study, 147 cases were analyzed. It was an analytical type of study, done at JSS Medical College, Mysore, over a period of 2 years and 8 months from January 2009 to August 2011. Histopathology slides were routinely stained by Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain. Special stains were performed in selected cases. Blood group of the patients and the control group were documented. Blood group distribution pattern was assessed in relation to histopathological diagnosis of various CNS tumours. Histopathological diagnosis of 147 cases included neoplastic lesions (84.35%) and non-neoplastic lesions (15.64%). Neoplastic lesions (84.35%) constituted the majority, which included neuroepithelial tumours (29.25%) as predominant pattern. Non-neoplastic lesions constituted only 15.64%, which included inflammatory lesion (8.16%) as the predominant pattern. ABO blood group data was available in 92 cases (84.4%) of neoplastic lesions, which included 71 cases (48.29%) of primary CNS neoplasms categorized according to WHO grades. The control group constituted 21,067 healthy voluntary donors. Blood group O was the most frequent blood group in neoplastic lesions (40.21%) and primary CNS neoplasms categorized according to WHO grades (45.07%). The association between the CNS neoplasms and ABO blood groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.055). But a definite change in the pattern of distribution of ABO

  13. The effects of iterative reconstruction in CT on low-contrast liver lesion volumetry: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Berman, Benjamin P.; Schumacher, Justin; Liang, Yongguang; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Yang, Hao; Zhao, Binsheng; Petrick, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    Tumor volume measured from computed tomography images is considered a biomarker for disease progression or treatment response. The estimation of the tumor volume depends on the imaging system parameters selected, as well as lesion characteristics. In this study, we examined how different image reconstruction methods affect the measurement of lesions in an anthropomorphic liver phantom with a non-uniform background. Iterative statistics-based and model-based reconstructions, as well as filtered back-projection, were evaluated and compared in this study. Statistics-based and filtered back-projection yielded similar estimation performance, while model-based yielded higher precision but lower accuracy in the case of small lesions. Iterative reconstructions exhibited higher signal-to-noise ratio but slightly lower contrast of the lesion relative to the background. A better understanding of lesion volumetry performance as a function of acquisition parameters and lesion characteristics can lead to its incorporation as a routine sizing tool.

  14. Refining and defining riverscape genetics: How rivers influence population genetic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanté D. Davis; Clinton W. Epps; Rebecca L. Flitcroft; Michael A. Banks

    2018-01-01

    Traditional analysis in population genetics evaluates differences among groups of individuals and, in some cases, considers the effects of distance or potential barriers to gene flow. Genetic variation of organisms in complex landscapes, seascapes, or riverine systems, however, may be shaped by many forces. Recent research has linked habitat heterogeneity and landscape...

  15. Processing closely spaced lesions during Nucleotide Excision Repair triggers mutagenesis in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isogawa, Asako; Fujii, Shingo

    2017-01-01

    It is generally assumed that most point mutations are fixed when damage containing template DNA undergoes replication, either right at the fork or behind the fork during gap filling. Here we provide genetic evidence for a pathway, dependent on Nucleotide Excision Repair, that induces mutations when processing closely spaced lesions. This pathway, referred to as Nucleotide Excision Repair-induced Mutagenesis (NERiM), exhibits several characteristics distinct from mutations that occur within the course of replication: i) following UV irradiation, NER-induced mutations are fixed much more rapidly (t ½ ≈ 30 min) than replication dependent mutations (t ½ ≈ 80–100 min) ii) NERiM specifically requires DNA Pol IV in addition to Pol V iii) NERiM exhibits a two-hit dose-response curve that suggests processing of closely spaced lesions. A mathematical model let us define the geometry (infer the structure) of the toxic intermediate as being formed when NER incises a lesion that resides in close proximity of another lesion in the complementary strand. This critical NER intermediate requires Pol IV / Pol II for repair, it is either lethal if left unrepaired or mutation-prone when repaired. Finally, NERiM is found to operate in stationary phase cells providing an intriguing possibility for ongoing evolution in the absence of replication. PMID:28686598

  16. [Mechanistic modelling allows to assess pathways of DNA lesion interactions underlying chromosome aberration formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eĭdel'man, Iu A; Slanina, S V; Sal'nikov, I V; Andreev, S G

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of radiation-induced chromosomal aberration (CA) mechanisms is required in many fields of radiation genetics, radiation biology, biodosimetry, etc. However, these mechanisms are yet to be quantitatively characterised. One of the reasons is that the relationships between primary lesions of DNA/chromatin/chromosomes and dose-response curves for CA are unknown because the pathways of lesion interactions in an interphase nucleus are currently inaccessible for direct experimental observation. This article aims for the comparative analysis of two principally different scenarios of formation of simple and complex interchromosomal exchange aberrations: by lesion interactions at chromosome territories' surface vs. in the whole space of the nucleus. The analysis was based on quantitative mechanistic modelling of different levels of structures and processes involved in CA formation: chromosome structure in an interphase nucleus, induction, repair and interactions of DNA lesions. It was shown that the restricted diffusion of chromosomal loci, predicted by computational modelling of chromosome organization, results in lesion interactions in the whole space of the nucleus being impossible. At the same time, predicted features of subchromosomal dynamics agrees well with in vivo observations and does not contradict the mechanism of CA formation at the surface of chromosome territories. On the other hand, the "surface mechanism" of CA formation, despite having certain qualities, proved to be insufficient to explain high frequency of complex exchange aberrations observed by mFISH technique. The alternative mechanism, CA formation on nuclear centres is expected to be sufficient to explain frequent complex exchanges.

  17. CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy in deep seated musculoskeletal lesions: a prospective study of 128 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, A.; Shingade, V.U.; Agarwal, M.G.; Anchan, C.; Juvekar, S.; Desai, S.; Jambhekar, N.A.

    2006-01-01

    Although large lesions of the limbs can easily be biopsied without image guidance, lesions in the spine, paraspinal area and pelvis are difficult to target, and benefit from CT guidance to improve the accuracy of targeting the lesion for biopsy purposes. A prospective study of CT-guided core needle biopsies for deep-seated musculoskeletal lesions was conducted at a referral cancer institute over a 4-year period with the aim of assessing the safety and efficacy of the procedure. From January 2000 to December 2003, 136 consecutive CT-guided biopsy sessions were undertaken for musculoskeletal lesions in 128 patients comprising 73 males and 55 females. The following data was recorded in all patients: demographic data, suspected clinicoradiological diagnosis, data related to core biopsy session (date, site, approach, total time required in minutes, number of cores, surgeon satisfaction with adequacy of cores), patient discomfort, complications, histopathology report and number of further sessions if material obtained during the first biopsy session was not confirmatory. The sample obtained during the biopsy session was considered inconclusive if, in the opinion of the pathologist, inadequate or non-representative tissue had been obtained. The diagnosis was considered inaccurate if the final histopathological diagnosis did not match with the biopsy diagnosis, or if subsequent clinicoradiological evaluation at follow up did not correlate with the biopsy diagnosis in those patients who were treated with modalities other than surgery. In 121 patients, a single session was sufficient to obtain representative material, whilst for six patients two sessions, and for one patient three sessions were necessary. The time taken for biopsy, including the pre-biopsy CT examination time, varied from 15 min to 60 min (median 30 min). For 110 bony lesions 116 sessions were required, and for 18 soft-tissue lesions 20 sessions were required. 108 biopsy sessions yielded a diagnosis, whilst

  18. Perspectives on the treatment of claw lesions in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shearer JK

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jan K Shearer,1 Paul J Plummer,1,2 Jennifer A Schleining11Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 2Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USAAbstract: Lameness is a leading cause of welfare and culling issues in cattle, with claw lesions accounting for the majority of these issues. Although the treatment of claw lesions in cattle is a daily activity for hoof trimmers, veterinarians, and livestock producers, there is surprisingly little information in the peer-reviewed literature on which to base strong evidence-based conclusions. As a consequence, many treatment modalities used are empirical and, in some cases, may be counterproductive to rapid lesion healing. Furthermore, many of these empirical treatment modalities fail to fully consider the underlying pathogenesis of the disease process and the implications that it has on lesion healing. For example, sole ulcers are largely a consequence of metabolic disorders and mechanical overloading. Therapeutic interventions that fail to address the weight-bearing issues are unlikely to be successful. Likewise, white line disease is believed to be predisposed by rumen acidosis and laminitis, and interventions need to include in them appropriate measures to prevent further cases through nutritional management. The goal of this review paper is to review the pathogenesis of claw lesions in the context of the published literature and allow the reader to arrive at rational treatment interventions based on the best available information. The use of an orthopedic block applied to the healthy claw of a lame foot, judicious use of bandage or wrap, careful selection of parenteral or topical therapy, and a treatment protocol to manage pain and promote recovery are key components of responsible management of lameness disorders in cattle.Keywords: lameness

  19. CT-guided transthoracic core needle biopsy for small pulmonary lesions: diagnostic performance and adequacy for molecular testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Panwen; Wang, Ye; Li, Lei; Zhou, Yongzhao; Luo, Wenxin; Li, Weimin

    2017-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic needle biopsy is a well-established, minimally invasive diagnostic tool for pulmonary lesions. Few large studies have been conducted on the diagnostic performance and adequacy for molecular testing of transthoracic core needle biopsy (TCNB) for small pulmonary lesions. This study included CT-guided TCNB with 18-gauge cutting needles in 560 consecutive patients with small (≤3 cm) pulmonary lesions from January 2012 to January 2015. There were 323 males and 237 females, aged 51.8±12.7 years. The size of the pulmonary lesions was 1.8±0.6 cm. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and complications of the biopsies were investigated. The risk factors of diagnostic failure were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. The sample's adequacy for molecular testing of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was analyzed. The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for diagnosis of malignancy were 92.0% (311/338), 98.6% (219/222), and 94.6% (530/560), respectively. The incidence of bleeding complications was 22.9% (128/560), and the incidence of pneumothorax was 10.4% (58/560). Logistic multivariate regression analysis showed that the independent risk factors for diagnostic failure were a lesion size ≤1 cm [odds ratio (OR), 3.95; P=0.007], lower lobe lesions (OR, 2.83; P=0.001), and pneumothorax (OR, 1.98; P=0.004). Genetic analysis was successfully performed on 95.45% (168/176) of specimens diagnosed as NSCLC. At least 96.8% of samples with two or more passes from a lesion were sufficient for molecular testing. The diagnostic yield of small pulmonary lesions by CT-guided TCNB is high, and the procedure is relatively safe. A lesion size ≤1 cm, lower lobe lesions, and pneumothorax are independent risk factors for biopsy diagnostic failure. TCNB specimens could provide adequate tissues for molecular testing.

  20. Label-Free Imaging of Female Genital Tract Melanocytic Lesions With Pump-Probe Microscopy: A Promising Diagnostic Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Francisco E; Deb, Sanghamitra; Fischer, Martin C; Warren, Warren S; Selim, Maria Angelica

    2017-04-01

    Melanomas of the female genital tract present a unique clinical challenge. Not only are these lesions in an anatomically sensitive area, but also they tend to be multifocal and have high recurrence rates. Furthermore, several benign melanocytic proliferations resemble early-stage melanoma clinically and/or histopathologically. Thus, there is a significant need for additional tools that can help correctly diagnose and stage these lesions. Here, we quantitatively and nondestructively analyze the chemical composition of melanin in excised pigmented lesions of the female genital tract using pump-probe microscopy, a high-resolution optical imaging technique that is sensitive to many biochemical properties of melanin. Thirty-one thin (~5 μm) tissue sections previously excised from female genital tract melanocytic lesions were imaged with pump-probe microscopy and analyzed. We find significant quantitative differences in melanin type and structure between melanoma and nonmalignant melanocytic proliferations. Our analysis also suggests a link between the molecular signatures of melanins and lesion-specific genetic mutations. Finally, significant differences are found between metastatic and nonmetastatic melanomas. The limitations of this work include the fact that molecular information is restricted to melanin pigment and the sample size is relatively small. Pump-probe microscopy provides unique information regarding the biochemical composition of genital tract melanocytic lesions, which can be used to improve the diagnosis and staging of vulvar melanomas.

  1. A New Classification of Endodontic-Periodontal Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid S. Al-Fouzan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interrelationship between periodontal and endodontic disease has always aroused confusion, queries, and controversy. Differentiating between a periodontal and an endodontic problem can be difficult. A symptomatic tooth may have pain of periodontal and/or pulpal origin. The nature of that pain is often the first clue in determining the etiology of such a problem. Radiographic and clinical evaluation can help clarify the nature of the problem. In some cases, the influence of pulpal pathology may cause the periodontal involvement and vice versa. The simultaneous existence of pulpal problems and inflammatory periodontal disease can complicate diagnosis and treatment planning. An endo-perio lesion can have a varied pathogenesis which ranges from simple to relatively complex one. The differential diagnosis of endodontic and periodontal diseases can sometimes be difficult, but it is of vital importance to make a correct diagnosis for providing the appropriate treatment. This paper aims to discuss a modified clinical classification to be considered for accurately diagnosing and treating endo-perio lesion.

  2. A new classification of endodontic-periodontal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fouzan, Khalid S

    2014-01-01

    The interrelationship between periodontal and endodontic disease has always aroused confusion, queries, and controversy. Differentiating between a periodontal and an endodontic problem can be difficult. A symptomatic tooth may have pain of periodontal and/or pulpal origin. The nature of that pain is often the first clue in determining the etiology of such a problem. Radiographic and clinical evaluation can help clarify the nature of the problem. In some cases, the influence of pulpal pathology may cause the periodontal involvement and vice versa. The simultaneous existence of pulpal problems and inflammatory periodontal disease can complicate diagnosis and treatment planning. An endo-perio lesion can have a varied pathogenesis which ranges from simple to relatively complex one. The differential diagnosis of endodontic and periodontal diseases can sometimes be difficult, but it is of vital importance to make a correct diagnosis for providing the appropriate treatment. This paper aims to discuss a modified clinical classification to be considered for accurately diagnosing and treating endo-perio lesion.

  3. Lesion activity assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, K R; Zero, D T; Martignon, S

    2009-01-01

    in response to cariogenic plaque as well as lesion arrest. Based on this understanding, different clinical scoring systems have been developed to assess the severity/depth and activity of lesions. A recent system has been devised by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System Committee...

  4. Comparison of diagnostic yield of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology and cell block in solid lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Bhat Balekuduru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA is a procedure of choice for the diagnostic evaluation of submucosal and periluminal lesions. Tissue sample can be obtained by EUS-FNA cytology (FNAC or cell block (CB. The aim of the present study is to compare diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA CB and cytology in the absence of onsite pathologist following a protocol-based EUS-FNA approach in solid lesions. Patients and Methods: Participants who underwent EUS-FNA at our center for solid submucosal or periluminal lesions (pancreas, lymph node, and liver between 2014 and 2016 were included, retrospectively. The indication for the procedure along with the clinical and other investigation details and the final etiological diagnosis were recorded on uniform structured data forms. The diagnostic yield of cytology and CB were compared using McNemar's test. The P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: EUS-FNA for solid lesion was performed in 130 lesions in 101 patients during the study period. Their mean age was 52.5 ± 12 years and 42.5% were female. Pancreatic masses were the most common lesions (37.7% followed by lymph nodes (36.9%. Submucosal lesions (17.7% and liver lesions (7.7% accounted for rest of the cases. The overall diagnostic yield for EUS-FNAC (70% and CB (74.6% was not significantly different (P = 0.3 and their combined yield was 85.3%. For the 23 patients with submucosal lesion, diagnostic yield of CB (82.6% was significantly better than cytology (47.8%, P = 0.04. Conclusions: EUS-guided CB has better yield compared to cytology in gastrointestinal submucosal lesions. The combination of CB with cytology improves the overall yield of the procedure; and hence, they should be considered complimentary rather than alternatives.

  5. Whole exome sequencing in 342 congenital cardiac left sided lesion cases reveals extensive genetic heterogeneity and complex inheritance patterns

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    Alexander H. Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Left-sided lesions (LSLs account for an important fraction of severe congenital cardiovascular malformations (CVMs. The genetic contributions to LSLs are complex, and the mutations that cause these malformations span several diverse biological signaling pathways: TGFB, NOTCH, SHH, and more. Here, we use whole exome sequence data generated in 342 LSL cases to identify likely damaging variants in putative candidate CVM genes. Methods Using a series of bioinformatics filters, we focused on genes harboring population-rare, putative loss-of-function (LOF, and predicted damaging variants in 1760 CVM candidate genes constructed a priori from the literature and model organism databases. Gene variants that were not observed in a comparably sequenced control dataset of 5492 samples without severe CVM were then subjected to targeted validation in cases and parents. Whole exome sequencing data from 4593 individuals referred for clinical sequencing were used to bolster evidence for the role of candidate genes in CVMs and LSLs. Results Our analyses revealed 28 candidate variants in 27 genes, including 17 genes not previously associated with a human CVM disorder, and revealed diverse patterns of inheritance among LOF carriers, including 9 confirmed de novo variants in both novel and newly described human CVM candidate genes (ACVR1, JARID2, NR2F2, PLRG1, SMURF1 as well as established syndromic CVM genes (KMT2D, NF1, TBX20, ZEB2. We also identified two genes (DNAH5, OFD1 with evidence of recessive and hemizygous inheritance patterns, respectively. Within our clinical cohort, we also observed heterozygous LOF variants in JARID2 and SMAD1 in individuals with cardiac phenotypes, and collectively, carriers of LOF variants in our candidate genes had a four times higher odds of having CVM (odds ratio = 4.0, 95% confidence interval 2.5–6.5. Conclusions Our analytical strategy highlights the utility of bioinformatic resources, including human

  6. Comparative analysis of MR sequences to detect structural brain lesions in tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto Gama, Hugo Pereira; Campos Meirelles, Rogerio Goncalves de; Mendonca do Rego, Jose Iram; Rocha, Antonio Jose da; Silva, Carlos Jorge da; Braga, Flavio Tulio; Martins Maia, Antonio Carlos; Lederman, Henrique Manoel

    2006-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is a neurocutaneous genetically inherited disease with variable penetrance characterized by dysplasias and hamartomas affecting multiple organs. MR is the imaging method of choice to demonstrate structural brain lesions in TS. To compare MR sequences and determine which is most useful for the demonstration of each type of brain lesion in TS patients. We reviewed MR scans of 18 TS patients for the presence of cortical tubers, white matter lesions (radial bands), subependymal nodules, and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SGCA) on the following sequences: (1) T1-weighted spin-echo (T1 SE) images before and after gadolinium (Gd) injection; (2) nonenhanced T1 SE sequence with an additional magnetization transfer contrast medium pulse on resonance (T1 SE/MTC); and (3) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence. Cortical tubers were found in significantly (P<0.05) larger numbers and more conspicuously in FLAIR and T1 SE/MTC sequences. The T1 SE/MTC sequence was far superior to other methods in detecting white matter lesions (P<0.01). There was no significant difference between the T1 SE/MTC and T1 SE (before and after Gd injection) sequences in the detection of subependymal nodules; FLAIR sequence showed less sensitivity than the others in identifying the nodules. T1 SE sequences after Gd injection demonstrated better the limits of the SGCA. We demonstrated the importance of appropriate MRI sequences for diagnosis of the most frequent brain lesions in TS. Our study reinforces the fact that each sequence has a particular application according to the type of TS lesion. Gd injection might be useful in detecting SGCA; however, the parameters of size and location are also important for a presumptive diagnosis of these tumors. (orig.)

  7. Diagnosis of Peripheral Lung Lesions via Conventional Flexible Bronchoscopy with Multiplanar CT Planning

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    Marianne Anastasia De Roza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conventional flexible bronchoscopy has limited sensitivity in the diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions and is dependent on lesion size. However, advancement of CT imaging offers multiplanar reconstruction facilitating enhanced preprocedure planning. This study aims to report efficacy and safety while considering the impact of patient selection and multiplanar CT planning. Method. Prospective case series of patients with peripheral lung lesions suspected of having lung cancer who underwent flexible bronchoscopy (forceps biopsy and lavage. Endobronchial lesions were excluded. Patients with negative results underwent CT-guided transthoracic needle aspiration, surgical biopsy, or clinical-radiological surveillance to establish the final diagnosis. Results. 226 patients were analysed. The diagnostic yield of bronchoscopy was 80.1% (181/226 with a sensitivity of 84.2% and specificity of 100%. In patients with a positive CT-Bronchus sign, the diagnostic yield was 82.4% compared to 72.8% with negative CT-Bronchus sign (p=0.116. Diagnostic yield was 84.9% in lesions > 20 mm and 63.0% in lesions ≤ 20 mm (p=0.001. Six (2.7% patients had transient hypoxia and 2 (0.9% had pneumothorax. There were no serious adverse events. Conclusion. Flexible bronchoscopy with appropriate patient selection and preprocedure planning is more efficacious in obtaining a diagnosis in peripheral lung lesions compared to historical data. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01374542.

  8. MALIGNANCY IN LARGE COLORECTAL LESIONS

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    Carlos Eduardo Oliveira dos SANTOS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context The size of colorectal lesions, besides a risk factor for malignancy, is a predictor for deeper invasion Objectives To evaluate the malignancy of colorectal lesions ≥20 mm. Methods Between 2007 and 2011, 76 neoplasms ≥20 mm in 70 patients were analyzed Results The mean age of the patients was 67.4 years, and 41 were women. Mean lesion size was 24.7 mm ± 6.2 mm (range: 20 to 50 mm. Half of the neoplasms were polypoid and the other half were non-polypoid. Forty-two (55.3% lesions were located in the left colon, and 34 in the right colon. There was a high prevalence of III L (39.5% and IV (53.9% pit patterns. There were 72 adenomas and 4 adenocarcinomas. Malignancy was observed in 5.3% of the lesions. Thirty-three lesions presented advanced histology (adenomas with high-grade dysplasia or early adenocarcinoma, with no difference in morphology and site. Only one lesion (1.3% invaded the submucosa. Lesions larger than 30 mm had advanced histology (P = 0.001. The primary treatment was endoscopic resection, and invasive carcinoma was referred to surgery. Recurrence rate was 10.6%. Conclusions Large colorectal neoplasms showed a low rate of malignancy. Endoscopic treatment is an effective therapy for these lesions.

  9. The Noonan Syndrome--A Review of the Clinical and Genetic Features of 27 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Edith; Turner, Gillian

    1973-01-01

    Reviewed were clinical and genetic features of 27 cases of the Noonan Syndrome, a condition with characteristics such as webbing of the neck, short stature, frequent congential heart lesions, and chromosomal irregularities. (DB)

  10. Multiple organ histopathological changes in broiler chickens fed on genetically modified organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cîrnatu, Daniela; Jompan, A; Sin, Anca Ileana; Zugravu, Cornelia Aurelia

    2011-01-01

    Diet can influence the structural characteristics of internal organs. An experiment involving 130 meat broilers was conducted during 42 days (life term for a meat broiler) to study the effect of feed with protein from genetically modified soy. The 1-day-old birds were randomly allocated to five study groups, fed with soy, sunflower, wheat, fish flour, PC starter. In the diet of each group, an amount of protein from soy was replaced with genetically modified soy (I - 0%, II - 25%, III - 50%, IV - 75%, V - 100% protein from genetically modified soy). The level of protein in soy, either modified, or non-modified, was the same. Organs and carcass weights were measured at about 42 days of age of the birds and histopathology exams were performed during May-June 2009. No statistically significant differences were observed in mortality, growth performance variables or carcass and organ yields between broilers consuming diets produced with genetically modified soybean fractions and those consuming diets produced with near-isoline control soybean fractions. Inflammatory and degenerative liver lesions, muscle hypertrophy, hemorrhagic necrosis of bursa, kidney focal tubular necrosis, necrosis and superficial ulceration of bowel and pancreatic dystrophies were found in tissues from broilers fed on protein from genetically modified soy. Different types of lesions found in our study might be due to other causes (parasites, viral) superimposed but their presence exclusively in groups fed with modified soy raises some serious questions about the consequences of use of this type of feed.

  11. CT diagnosis of sellar and juxtasellar lesions, 3. Non-tumorous lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1982-08-01

    A study is made of the usefulness and limitations of the CT diagnosis of sellar and juxtasellar lesions other than tumors. This study is based on 112 verified cases at Nagoya University Hospital from October, 1976, to December, 1981. The lesions included in this study are classified into four groups: vascular, inflammatory, traumatic lesion, and congenital anomaly. Although cerebral angiography is the cardinal method for the diagnosis of vascular lesions, CT is useful for the evaluation of a giant aneurysm, the localization of bleeding, or infarction by a ruptured aneurysm. Radiation brain necrosis, a special form of vascular lesion, can also be diagnosed if the critical analysis is made after previous irradiation. CT findings are helpful for the local diagnosis of acute inflammatory lesions, such as basal meningitis or abscess, but specific diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical signs and CSF study. Abnormal CT findings are obtained from a chronic inflammatory process, such as arachnoiditis adhesiva, glanuloma, or mucocele. Differential diagnosis is necessary with brain tumors. The CT findings of an arachnoid cyst are often diagnostic. Metrizamide or air cisternography, either combined with CT or without it, is important for the diagnosis of basal meningoencephalocele and hypothalamic hamaroma. Pneumocephalus and an intracranial foreign body resulting from a head injury can be diagnosed by plain skull and CT. The diagnosis of CSF leakage or prolapse cerebri associated with a skull-base fracture has been most difficult, but even it is possible by a combination of polytomography and high-resolution CT with metrizamide cisternography.

  12. MR imaging of the breast. Localization of focal breast lesions with the magnetom open at 0.2 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sittek, H.; Perlet, C.; Herrmann, K.; Linsmeier, E.; Kessler, M.; Reiser, M.; Kolem, H.; Untch, M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To answer the following questions: Whether reliable detection of lesions is possible in low-field-MRI-system (Magnetom Open 0.2 T) equipped with currently available hard- and software components in comparison to high field system (Magnetom Impact 1.0 T). Furthermore, whether localization of lesions suspect in MR-mammography can be realized in MR system of low field (Magnetom Open 0.2 T). Patients and Methods: In 11 patients, suspect lesions were diagnosed in diagnostic MR-mammography acquired with high field system (Magnetom Impact 1.0 T) and were compared to low field MR-mammographies of 0.2 T (Magnetom Open 0.2 T). In six of the 11 patients a suspect lesion was localized using wire marking. Results: All lesions considered suspect in diagnostic MR-mammography (Magnetom Impact 1.0 T) were also clearly identified in the 0.2 T system (Magnetom Open). In six cases wire marking was performed without any complications and with an accuracy of≤0.5 cm distance to the lesion. Conclusion: Although studies in the 0.2 T system clearly showed inferior SNR (34.6 vs. 83.1) and CNR (14.6 vs. 43.5) compared to studies with the high field system, all lesions considered suspect in diagnostic MR-mammography were reliably identified also in 0.2 T studies. Due to its open construction permitting permanent access to the breast and due to sufficient image quality, the Magnetom Open is suitable for interventions on the breast. (orig.) [de

  13. Osteochondral lesions of the humeral trochlea in the young athlete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Kelley W. [Pediatric Radiology of America, Roanoke, VA (United States); Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite, Atlanta, GA (United States); Children' s Diagnostic Imaging of Atlanta, P.C., Marietta, GA (United States); Marshall, David L.; Busch, Michael T. [Children' s Orthopaedics of Atlanta, P.C., Atlanta, GA (United States); Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite, Atlanta, GA (United States); Williams, Joseph P. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite, Atlanta, GA (United States); Children' s Diagnostic Imaging of Atlanta, P.C., Marietta, GA (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the variety of osteochondral abnormalities of the humeral trochlea in the pediatric athlete. Patients with trochlear abnormalities were identified through keyword search of radiology dictations from 1999 to 2007. The patient's medical record, imaging studies, and surgical reports were reviewed. The osteochondral lesions were categorized based on the imaging appearance. Surgical results were reviewed in conjunction with the imaging findings. Eighteen patients were identified. Trochlear lesions were stratified into two imaging groups: Osteochondral injury/osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) vs. avascular necrosis (AVN). The osteochondral injury group was stratified into medial and lateral trochlear abnormalities. The medial lesions (n=3) were small (<6 mm) and were located on the posterior articular surface of the medial trochlea. The lateral lesions (n=10) were larger (10-14 mm), circumscribed, and were located on the posterior inferior aspect of the lateral trochlea. Trochlear AVN (n=5) affected development of the lateral trochlea (type A) or both the medial and lateral aspects of the trochlea (type B). AVN occurred exclusively in athletes with history of remote distal humeral fracture. Seven of the 18 patients underwent elbow arthroscopy. Surgical findings and treatment regimens are summarized. Trochlear lesions should be considered in throwing athletes presenting with medial elbow pain and flexion contracture/extension block. Medial trochlear osteochondral injuries may result from posteromedial olecranon abutment. Lateral OCD lesions occur in a characteristic vascular watershed zone resulting from the unique blood supply of the trochlea. Trochlear AVN may be unmasked years following treated distal humeral fracture when the athletic demands upon the adolescent elbow increase, revealing the altered growth and biomechanics. (orig.)

  14. Osteochondral lesions of the humeral trochlea in the young athlete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Kelley W.; Marshall, David L.; Busch, Michael T.; Williams, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the variety of osteochondral abnormalities of the humeral trochlea in the pediatric athlete. Patients with trochlear abnormalities were identified through keyword search of radiology dictations from 1999 to 2007. The patient's medical record, imaging studies, and surgical reports were reviewed. The osteochondral lesions were categorized based on the imaging appearance. Surgical results were reviewed in conjunction with the imaging findings. Eighteen patients were identified. Trochlear lesions were stratified into two imaging groups: Osteochondral injury/osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) vs. avascular necrosis (AVN). The osteochondral injury group was stratified into medial and lateral trochlear abnormalities. The medial lesions (n=3) were small (<6 mm) and were located on the posterior articular surface of the medial trochlea. The lateral lesions (n=10) were larger (10-14 mm), circumscribed, and were located on the posterior inferior aspect of the lateral trochlea. Trochlear AVN (n=5) affected development of the lateral trochlea (type A) or both the medial and lateral aspects of the trochlea (type B). AVN occurred exclusively in athletes with history of remote distal humeral fracture. Seven of the 18 patients underwent elbow arthroscopy. Surgical findings and treatment regimens are summarized. Trochlear lesions should be considered in throwing athletes presenting with medial elbow pain and flexion contracture/extension block. Medial trochlear osteochondral injuries may result from posteromedial olecranon abutment. Lateral OCD lesions occur in a characteristic vascular watershed zone resulting from the unique blood supply of the trochlea. Trochlear AVN may be unmasked years following treated distal humeral fracture when the athletic demands upon the adolescent elbow increase, revealing the altered growth and biomechanics. (orig.)

  15. Surgical treatment of patients with single and dual pathology: relevance of lesion and of hippocampal atrophy to seizure outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L M; Cendes, F; Watson, C; Andermann, F; Fish, D R; Dubeau, F; Free, S; Olivier, A; Harkness, W; Thomas, D G; Duncan, J S; Sander, J W; Shorvon, S D; Cook, M J; Arnold, D L

    1997-02-01

    Modern neuroimaging can disclose epileptogenic lesions in many patients with partial epilepsy and, at times, display the coexistence of hippocampal atrophy in addition to an extrahippocampal lesion (dual pathology). We studied the postoperative seizure outcome of 64 patients with lesional epilepsy (median follow-up, 30 months) and considered separately the surgical results in the 51 patients with a single lesion and in the 13 who had dual pathology. In patients with a single lesion, 85% were seizure free or significantly improved (Engel's class I-II) when the lesion was totally removed compared with only 40% when there was incomplete resection (p dual pathology who had both the lesion and the atrophic hippocampus removed became seizure free. In contrast, only 2 of the 10 patients with dual pathology undergoing surgery aimed at the lesion or at the hippocampus alone became seizure free (p dual pathology, surgery should, if possible, include resection of both the lesion and the atrophic hippocampus.

  16. Decompression Device Using a Stainless Steel Tube and Wire for Treatment of Odontogenic Cystic Lesions: A Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eun-Joo; Baek, Jin-A; Leem, Dae-Ho

    2014-11-01

    Decompression is considered an effective treatment for odontogenic cystic lesions in the jaw. A variety of decompression devices are successfully used for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts, and ameloblastoma. The purpose of these devices is to keep an opening between the cystic lesion and the oral environment during treatment. The aim of this report is to describe an effective decompression tube using a stainless steel tube and wire for treatment of jaw cystic lesions.

  17. The Pleiotropic Phenotype of Apc Mutations in the Mouse: Allele Specificity and Effects of the Genetic Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberg, Richard B.; Chen, Xiaodi; Amos-Landgraf, James M.; White, Alanna; Rasmussen, Kristin; Clipson, Linda; Pasch, Cheri; Sullivan, Ruth; Pitot, Henry C.; Dove, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a human cancer syndrome characterized by the development of hundreds to thousands of colonic polyps and extracolonic lesions including desmoid fibromas, osteomas, epidermoid cysts, and congenital hypertrophy of the pigmented retinal epithelium. Afflicted individuals are heterozygous for mutations in the APC gene. Detailed investigations of mice heterozygous for mutations in the ortholog Apc have shown that other genetic factors strongly influence the phenotype. Here we report qualitative and quantitative modifications of the phenotype of Apc mutants as a function of three genetic variables: Apc allele, p53 allele, and genetic background. We have found major differences between the Apc alleles Min and 1638N in multiplicity and regionality of intestinal tumors, as well as in incidence of extracolonic lesions. By contrast, Min mice homozygous for either of two different knockout alleles of p53 show similar phenotypic effects. These studies illustrate the classic principle that functional genetics is enriched by assessing penetrance and expressivity with allelic series. The mouse permits study of an allelic gene series on multiple genetic backgrounds, thereby leading to a better understanding of gene action in a range of biological processes. PMID:18723878

  18. Post-stroke hemiparesis: Does chronicity, etiology, and lesion side are associated with gait pattern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Gabriela Lopes; Larissa, Coutinho de Lucena; Brasileiro, Ana Carolina de Azevedo Lima; Silva, Emília Márcia Gomes de Souza; Galvão, Élida Rayanne Viana Pinheiro; Maciel, Álvaro Cavalcanti; Lindquist, Ana Raquel Rodrigues

    2017-07-01

    Studies that evaluate gait rehabilitation programs for individuals with stroke often consider time since stroke of more than six months. In addition, most of these studies do not use lesion etiology or affected cerebral hemisphere as study factors. However, it is unknown whether these factors are associated with post-stroke motor performance after the spontaneous recovery period. To investigate whether time since stroke onset, etiology, and lesion side is associated with spatiotemporal and angular gait parameters of individuals with chronic stroke. Fifty individuals with chronic hemiparesis (20 women) were evaluated. The sample was stratified according to time since stroke (between 6 and 12 months, between 13 and 36 months, and over 36 months), affected cerebral hemisphere (left or right) and lesion etiology (ischemic and hemorrhagic). The participants were evaluated during overground walking at self-selected gait speed, and spatiotemporal and angular gait parameters were calculated. Results Differences between gait speed, stride length, hip flexion, and knee flexion were observed in subgroups stratified based on lesion etiology. Survivors of a hemorrhagic stroke exhibited more severe gait impairment. Subgroups stratified based on time since stroke only showed intergroup differences for stride length, and subgroups stratified based on affected cerebral hemisphere displayed between-group differences for swing time symmetry ratio. In order to recruit a more homogeneous sample, more accurate results were obtained and an appropriate rehabilitation program was offered, researchers and clinicians should consider that gait pattern might be associated with time since stroke, affected cerebral hemisphere and lesion etiology.

  19. A rationalized approach to the imaging of space-occupying lesions in the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelbrecht, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    A rational approach to the imaging of mass lesions within the liver has been presented. An attempt has been made to advocate a philosophy which emphasizes the importance of considering pathological, biochemical, clinical and likely management criteria in each case before selecting a first-line imaging procedure. The subject is presented under three headings: i) What That is, clinical and pathological criteria for assesing the nature of a suspected space-occupying lesion in the liver; ii) Why That is a projection of the likely practical value of the result; iii) How That is determination of a logical imaging program depending on the assesment of criteria under the first two headings. The following examples of active treatment are discussed: partial hepotectomy, highly vascular lesions, toxaemia and pyrexia. The following factors influence the decision of the imaging procedure to be used: the accuracy of the modality in relation to the suspected lesion, local availability of equipment and expentise, invasive versus non-invasive aspects and cost-effectiveness

  20. Comparison of Two Base Materials Regarding Their Effect on Root Canal Treatment Success in Primary Molars with Furcation Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Arikan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to compare MTA with another base material, IRM, which is generally used on pulpal floor after root canal treatment, regarding their effect on the success of root canal treatment of primary teeth with furcation lesions. Materials and Methods. Fifty primary teeth with furcation lesions were divided into 2 groups. Following root canal treatment, the pulpal floor was coated with MTA in the experimental group and with IRM in the control group. Teeth were followed up considering clinical (pain, pathological mobility, tenderness to percussion and palpation, and any soft tissue pathology and sinus tract and radiographical (pathological root resorption, reduced size or healing of existing lesion, and absence of new lesions at the interradicular or periapical area criteria for 18 months. For the statistical analysis, Fisher’s exact test and Pearson’s chi-square tests were used and a p value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results. Although there were no statistically significant differences between two groups in terms of treatment success, lesions healed significantly faster in the MTA group. Conclusion. In primary teeth with furcation lesions, usage of MTA on the pulpal floor following root canal treatment can be a better alternative since it induced faster healing.

  1. Signing with harpoon of mammary lesions not palpable demonstrated by mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patino P, Jairo Hernando; Correa R, Ramiro; Hincapie U, Ana Lucia; Munera G, Felipe

    1993-01-01

    It was done a pre-surgery mark with harpoon of 61 non-palpable mammary lesions. They were classified by mammography as indeterminate probably benign (IBP) 39 injuries (63.9%) and the remaining 22 injuries as indeterminate probably malign. 12 malign lesions were found. The positive and predictive value of the marked injuries was of 19.7%, the sensitivity of 83.3%, the specificity of 75.5%, with a high significance statistics (p=0.0003). We can conclude according to the results obtained that in the group of injuries classified, as IBP should be considered the use of other complementary diagnostic methods or the periodical mammographic follow-up

  2. Breast lesion characterization using whole-lesion histogram analysis with stretched-exponential diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunling; Wang, Kun; Li, Xiaodan; Zhang, Jine; Ding, Jie; Spuhler, Karl; Duong, Timothy; Liang, Changhong; Huang, Chuan

    2018-06-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been studied in breast imaging and can provide more information about diffusion, perfusion and other physiological interests than standard pulse sequences. The stretched-exponential model has previously been shown to be more reliable than conventional DWI techniques, but different diagnostic sensitivities were found from study to study. This work investigated the characteristics of whole-lesion histogram parameters derived from the stretched-exponential diffusion model for benign and malignant breast lesions, compared them with conventional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and further determined which histogram metrics can be best used to differentiate malignant from benign lesions. This was a prospective study. Seventy females were included in the study. Multi-b value DWI was performed on a 1.5T scanner. Histogram parameters of whole lesions for distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC), heterogeneity index (α), and ADC were calculated by two radiologists and compared among benign lesions, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and invasive carcinoma confirmed by pathology. Nonparametric tests were performed for comparisons among invasive carcinoma, DCIS, and benign lesions. Comparisons of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed to show the ability to discriminate malignant from benign lesions. The majority of histogram parameters (mean/min/max, skewness/kurtosis, 10-90 th percentile values) from DDC, α, and ADC were significantly different among invasive carcinoma, DCIS, and benign lesions. DDC 10% (area under curve [AUC] = 0.931), ADC 10% (AUC = 0.893), and α mean (AUC = 0.787) were found to be the best metrics in differentiating benign from malignant tumors among all histogram parameters derived from ADC and α, respectively. The combination of DDC 10% and α mean , using logistic regression, yielded the highest sensitivity (90.2%) and specificity (95.5%). DDC 10% and α mean derived from

  3. Comparison of MRI pulse sequences for investigation of lesions of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campi, A.; Pontesilli, S.; Gerevini, S.; Scotti, G.

    2000-01-01

    Small spinal cord lesions, even if clinically significant, can be due to the low sensitivity of some pulse sequences. We compared T2-weighted fast (FSE), and conventional (CSE) spin-echo and short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR)-FSE overlooked on MRI sequences to evaluate their sensitivity to and specificity for lesions of different types. We compared the three sequences in MRI of 57 patients with cervical spinal symptoms. The image sets were assessed by two of us individually for final diagnosis, lesion detectability and image quality. Both readers arrived at the same final diagnoses with all sequences, differentiating four groups of patients. Group 1 (30 patients, 53 %), with a final diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Demyelinating lesions were better seen on STIR-FSE images, on which the number of lesions was significantly higher than on FSE, while the FSE and CSE images showed approximately equal numbers of lesions; additional lesions were found in 9 patients. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 17 demyelinating lesions was significantly higher on STIR-FSE images than with the other sequences. Group 2, 19 patients (33 %) with cervical pain, 15 of whom had disc protrusion or herniation: herniated discs were equally well delineated with all sequences, with better myelographic effect on FSE. In five patients with intrinsic spinal cord abnormalities, the conspicuity and demarcation of the lesions were similar with STIR-FSE and FSE. Group 3, 4 patients (7 %) with acute myelopathy of unknown aetiology. In two patients, STIR-FSE gave better demarcation of lesions and in one a questionable additional lesions. Group 4, 4 patients (7 %) with miscellaneous final diagnoses. STIR-FSE had high sensitivity to demyelinating lesions, can be considered quite specific and should be included in spinal MRI for assessment of suspected demyelinating disease. (orig.)

  4. Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising from an Oral Lichenoid Lesion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taghavi Zenouz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Lichenoid reactions represent a family of lesions with different etiologic factors and a common clinical and histologic appearance. Lichen planus is included with lichenoid reactions and is a relatively common chronic mucocutaneous disorder. The most important complication of lichenoid reactions is the possibility of malignant transformation. That is why it has been considered a precancerous condition. Although the malignant transformation rate varies widely in the literature, from 0.4 to 6.5 percent, in most studies it does not exceed 1%. The aim of this paper is to report a rare case of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC arising within an oral lichenoid lesion in a 17-year-old woman, where SCC is very uncommon. The patient did not have any risk factors and was healthy. The lesion was located on the border of the tongue. In view of the common occurrence of OLP (oral lichen planus and the unresolved issues regarding its premalignant potential, this case report illustrates the need for histologic confirmation and a close follow-up of clinical lesions with lichenoid features.

  5. Role of multidetector computed tomography in evaluating incidentally detected breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetta, Marco; Scardapane, Arnaldo; Lorusso, Valentina; Rella, Leonarda; Telegrafo, Michele; Serio, Gabriella; Angelelli, Giuseppe; Ianora, Amato Antonio Stabile

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) does not represent the primary method for the evaluation of breast lesions; however, it can detect breast abnormalities, even when performed for other reasons related to thoracic structures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of 320-row multidetector CT (MDCT) in evaluating and differentiating incidentally detected breast lesions by using vessel probe and 3D analysis software with net enhancement value. Sixty-two breast lesions in 46 patients who underwent 320-row chest CT examination were retrospectively evaluated. CT scans were assessed searching for the presence, location, number, morphological features, and density of breast nodules. Net enhancement was calculated by subtracting precontrast density from the density obtained by postcontrast values. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy of CT were calculated for morphological features and net enhancement. Thirty of 62 lesions were found to be malignant at histological examination and 32 were found to be benign. When morphological features were considered, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV of CT were 87%, 100%, 88%, 100%, and 50%, respectively. Based on net enhancement, CT reached a sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV of 100%, 94%, 97%, 94%, and 100%, respectively. MDCT allows to recognize and characterize breast lesions based on morphological features. Net enhancement can be proposed as an additional accurate feature of CT.

  6. Oral mucosal lesions and immune status in HIV-infected Indian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Priya; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-04-01

    Pediatric HIV is growing at an alarming rate in developing countries. Due to their compromised immune status, children infected with HIV are prone to a number of opportunistic infections. Oral manifestations are the first signs of the disease in many of them. To assess the oral mucosal status of Indian children with HIV, based on their CD4 cell counts. Two hundred and twenty one HIV infected children aged 6-18 years from various HIV centers, were divided into three groups, based on their CD4 cell counts; Group 1: ≥500, Group 2: 201-499 and Group 3: ≤200 cells. The children in each group were further considered as 'prior to antiretroviral treatment (ART)' and 'on ART'. Oral mucosal examination was done based on presumptive criteria given by Ramos-Gomez for diagnosis of oro-facial lesions commonly associated with HIV infection in children. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. Angular cheilitis and pseudomembranous candidiasis were the frequently seen oral lesions. Children with CD4 cell count ≥500 had significantly fewer oral lesions each. A high percentage of HIV-infected children were affected with oral mucosal lesions. There was a significant association between immune status and frequency of oral lesions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Concordance between fine-needle aspiration and core biopsies for osseous lesions by lesion imaging appearance and CT attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, John; Weissberg, Zoe; Bevilacqua, Thomas A; Yu, Gordon; Weber, Kristy; Sebro, Ronnie

    2018-04-01

    To compare the concordance between fine-needle aspiration and core biopsies for osseous lesions by lesion imaging appearance and CT attenuation. Retrospective review of 215 FNAs of osseous lesions performed in conjunction with core biopsy at our institution over a 6-year period (2011-2016). FNAs were interpreted independently of core biopsies. We assessed if FNA in conjunction with core biopsy increased diagnostic accuracy compared to core biopsy alone. We also calculated the concordance between FNA and core biopsy by lesion appearance, lesion CT attenuation, lesion histology, lesion location and FNA needle gauge size. Core biopsy alone provided the diagnosis in 207/215 cases (96.3%), however, the FNA provided the diagnosis in the remaining 8/215 cases (3.7%) where the core biopsy was non-diagnostic. There were 154 (71.6%) lytic lesions, 21 (9.8%) blastic lesions, 25 (11.6%) mixed lytic and blastic lesions and 15 (7.0%) lesions that were neither lytic nor blastic. The concordance between FNA and core biopsy for lytic osseous lesions (136/154 cases, 88.3%) was statistically significantly higher than that for blastic osseous lesions (13/21 cases, 61.9%) [P = 4.2 × 10 -3 ; 95% CI (0.02, 0.50)]. The concordance between FNA and core biopsy was higher for low-attenuation- (110/126) than high-attenuation (58/77) lesions (P = 0.028). The concordance between FNA and core biopsy was also higher for metastases (102/119 cases, 85.7%) than non-metastases (78/96, 81.3%) [P = 0.487; 95% CI (- 0.15, 0.065)]. There was no difference in the rate of concordance between FNA and core biopsy by lesion location or FNA needle gauge size (P > 0.05). FNA with core biopsy increases diagnostic rate compared to core biopsy alone or FNA alone. The concordance between FNA and core biopsy is higher for lytic lesions than for blastic lesions; and higher for low-attenuation lesions than for high-attenuation lesions.

  8. Epidermal hydrogen peroxide is not increased in lesional and non-lesional skin of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zailaie, Mohammad Z

    2017-01-01

    It is widely believed that the loss of the epidermal melanocytes in vitiligo is basically due to excessive oxidative stress. Previous research work described abnormal elevation of the absolute concentration of the epidermal hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) in lesional and non-lesional skin of vitiligo. Based on this finding, our primary research objective was to use this feature as a screening marker in individuals at a great risk of developing vitiligo. Ninety-six patients of non-segmental vitiligo (NSV) of varying durations, skin phototypes, and treatment modalities (psoralen UVA-, narrow band UVB-treated) were recruited for this study. Raman spectroscopic measurements, using an external probehead, of the lesional and non-lesional skin were obtained, and the resulting spectra were analyzed using the Opus software package of the MultiRam spectrometer and the intensity of the peak at 875 cm -1 that represents the absolute concentration of H 2 O 2 was calculated. Contrary to previous reports, in patients of skin phototype IV, the absolute concentrations of H 2 O 2 in non-lesional and lesional NSV of all groups were non-significantly decreased compared to normal control. In patients of NSV of skin phototype V, the decrease in the absolute concentrations of H 2 O 2 was not significant in the untreated group, and a slight non-significant increase in the NBUVB-treated group was noted. However, in the PUVA-treated group, the non-lesional skin demonstrated significant increase in the absolute concentration of H 2 O 2 , whereas the lesional skin showed only a slight non-significant increase compared to normal control. In NSV patients of skin phototype VI who were previously treated with PUVA, the non-lesional skin showed a slight non-significant increase in the absolute concentration of H 2 O 2 ; however, the lesional skin showed a marked significant decrease compared to normal control and the non-lesional skin. Thereof, one can conclude that the epidermal H 2 O 2 is not

  9. FLAIR lesion segmentation: Application in patients with brain tumors and acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artzi, Moran; Aizenstein, Orna; Jonas-Kimchi, Tali; Myers, Vicki; Hallevi, Hen; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lesion size in fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is an important clinical parameter for patient assessment and follow-up. Although manual delineation of lesion areas considered as ground truth, it is time-consuming, highly user-dependent and difficult to perform in areas of indistinct borders. In this study, an automatic methodology for FLAIR lesion segmentation is proposed, and its application in patients with brain tumors undergoing therapy; and in patients following stroke is demonstrated. Materials and methods: FLAIR lesion segmentation was performed in 57 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets obtained from 44 patients: 28 patients with primary brain tumors; 5 patients with recurrent-progressive glioblastoma (rGB) who were scanned longitudinally during anti-angiogenic therapy (18 MRI scans); and 11 patients following ischemic stroke. Results: FLAIR lesion segmentation was obtained in all patients. When compared to manual delineation, a high visual similarity was observed, with an absolute relative volume difference of 16.80% and 20.96% and a volumetric overlap error of 24.87% and 27.50% obtained for two raters: accepted values for automatic methods. Quantitative measurements of the segmented lesion volumes were in line with qualitative radiological assessment in four patients who received anti-anogiogenic drugs. In stroke patients the proposed methodology enabled identification of the ischemic lesion and differentiation from other FLAIR hyperintense areas, such as pre-existing disease. Conclusion: This study proposed a replicable methodology for FLAIR lesion detection and quantification and for discrimination between lesion of interest and pre-existing disease. Results from this study show the wide clinical applications of this methodology in research and clinical practice

  10. FLAIR lesion segmentation: Application in patients with brain tumors and acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Moran, E-mail: artzimy@gmail.com [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Aizenstein, Orna, E-mail: ornaaize@gmail.com [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Jonas-Kimchi, Tali, E-mail: talijk@tlvmc.gov.il [Radiology Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Myers, Vicki, E-mail: vicki_myers@hotmail.com [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hallevi, Hen, E-mail: hen.hallevi@gmail.com [Neurology Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Ben Bashat, Dafna, E-mail: dafnab@tlvmc.gov.il [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2013-09-15

    Background: Lesion size in fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is an important clinical parameter for patient assessment and follow-up. Although manual delineation of lesion areas considered as ground truth, it is time-consuming, highly user-dependent and difficult to perform in areas of indistinct borders. In this study, an automatic methodology for FLAIR lesion segmentation is proposed, and its application in patients with brain tumors undergoing therapy; and in patients following stroke is demonstrated. Materials and methods: FLAIR lesion segmentation was performed in 57 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets obtained from 44 patients: 28 patients with primary brain tumors; 5 patients with recurrent-progressive glioblastoma (rGB) who were scanned longitudinally during anti-angiogenic therapy (18 MRI scans); and 11 patients following ischemic stroke. Results: FLAIR lesion segmentation was obtained in all patients. When compared to manual delineation, a high visual similarity was observed, with an absolute relative volume difference of 16.80% and 20.96% and a volumetric overlap error of 24.87% and 27.50% obtained for two raters: accepted values for automatic methods. Quantitative measurements of the segmented lesion volumes were in line with qualitative radiological assessment in four patients who received anti-anogiogenic drugs. In stroke patients the proposed methodology enabled identification of the ischemic lesion and differentiation from other FLAIR hyperintense areas, such as pre-existing disease. Conclusion: This study proposed a replicable methodology for FLAIR lesion detection and quantification and for discrimination between lesion of interest and pre-existing disease. Results from this study show the wide clinical applications of this methodology in research and clinical practice.

  11. Orbital Epidermoid Cysts: A Diagnosis to Consider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania A. Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Orbital epidermoids form a rare pathological entity that is separate from dermoid cysts. They have variable clinical and radiological presentations and they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of orbital cystic lesions. This work describes the various clinical and radiological presentations of 17 cases of epidermoid cysts and the surgical outcome. Method. A prospective interventional study was conducted on 17 patients diagnosed with epidermoid cysts. Patients’ symptoms and signs were recorded; CT scan was done for all patients. All lesions were removed through anterior orbitotomy and histopathological diagnosis confirmed. Results. Mean age of patients was 16.3 years ±  10.54. Main complaints were lid swelling, masses, ocular dissimilarity, chronic pain, and ocular protrusion. Clinical signs varied from lid swelling and masses in all cases to proptosis, globe displacement, limitation of ocular motility, and scars. Radiological findings ranged from homogenous hypodense masses (58.8% to homogenous radiolucent (17.6% and heterogenous masses (23.5%. No recurrences following surgeries were reported throughout the follow-up (mean 18.8 months ±  0.72. Conclusion. Deep orbital epidemoid cysts are a separate entity that can behave like deep orbital epidermoid; however, they usually present at a relatively older age. They can be associated with increased orbital volume but not necessarily related to bony sutures.

  12. The synthesis paradigm in genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, William R

    2014-02-01

    Experimental genetics with model organisms and mathematically explicit genetic theory are generally considered to be the major paradigms by which progress in genetics is achieved. Here I argue that this view is incomplete and that pivotal advances in genetics--and other fields of biology--are also made by synthesizing disparate threads of extant information rather than generating new information from experiments or formal theory. Because of the explosive expansion of information in numerous "-omics" data banks, and the fragmentation of genetics into numerous subdisciplines, the importance of the synthesis paradigm will likely expand with time.

  13. Safety and effectiveness of percutaneous biopsy of focal splenic lesions under ultrasonographic guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hyun Young; Kim, Joo Heon [Eulji University College of Medicine, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Sook [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic yield and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle biopsy for the diagnosis of focal splenic lesions. US guided, automated needle biopsy using an 18-gauge cutting needle was performed in 11 patients, consisted of nine men and two women (mean age=49 years), with focal splenic lesions detected on the CT or US. Six patients (55%) had multiple lesions while five (45%) had a single lesion. Two of eleven patients had splenomegaly. None of 11 patients had the prior diagnosis of extrasplenic or hematopoietic malignancies. The biopsy was considered successful if a specific pathological diagnosis was possible. The diagnostic yield and frequency of complication were retrospectively analyzed. Tissue adequate for histological diagnosis was obtained in nine (82%) of 11 patients, and no complications other than mild, localized discomfort occurred. Multifocal splenic lesions without splenomegaly in five patients were confirmed as Hodgkin's disease (n=2), tuberculosis (n=1), infarction (n=1), and hemangioma (n=1). All single lesion in four patients were proven as benign conditions including hamartoma (n=2), lymphangioma (n=1) and chronic organizing abscess (n=1), and only of them with a large hamartoma received splenectomy while others did not receive further treatment. Although in two (18%) patients with multiple lesions and splenomegaly, no specific diagnosis was established by US-guided biopsy, malignant lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease were confirmed by surgery. US-guided automated needle biopsy is a safe and valuable procedure that can provides a specific diagnosis in patients with splenic lesions.

  14. Left-sided congenital heart lesions in mosaic Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouayed Abdelmoula, Nouha; Abdelmoula, Balkiss; Smaoui, Walid; Trabelsi, Imen; Louati, Rim; Aloulou, Samir; Aloulou, Wafa; Abid, Fatma; Kammoun, Senda; Trigui, Khaled; Bedoui, Olfa; Denguir, Hichem; Mallek, Souad; Ben Aziza, Mustapha; Dammak, Jamila; Kaabi, Oldez; Abdellaoui, Nawel; Turki, Fatma; Kaabi, Asma; Kamoun, Wafa; Jabeur, Jihen; Ltaif, Wided; Chaker, Kays; Fourati, Haytham; M'rabet, Samir; Ben Ameur, Hedi; Gouia, Naourez; Mhiri, Mohamed Nabil; Rebai, Tarek

    2018-04-01

    In the era of the diseasomes and interactome networks, linking genetics with phenotypic traits in Turner syndrome should be studied thoroughly. As a part of this stratagem, mosaicism of both X and Y chromosome which is a common finding in TS and an evaluation of congenital heart diseases in the different situations of mosaic TS types, can be helpful in the identification of disturbed sex chromosomes, genes and signaling pathway actors. Here we report the case of a mosaic TS associated to four left-sided CHD, including BAV, COA, aortic aneurysms and dissections at an early age. The mosaicism included two cell lines, well-defined at the cytogenetic and molecular levels: a cell line which is monosomic for Xp and Xq genes (45,X) and another which is trisomic for pseudoautosomal genes that are present on the X and Y chromosomes and escape X inactivation: 45,X[8]/46,X,idic(Y)(pter→q11.2::q11.2→pter)[42]. This case generates two hypotheses about the contribution of genes linked to the sex chromosomes and the signaling pathways involving these genes, in left-sided heart diseases. The first hypothesis suggests the interaction between X chromosome and autosomal genes or loci of aortic development, possibly dose-dependent, and which could be in the framework of TGF-β-SMAD signaling pathways. The second implies that left-sided congenital heart lesions involve sex chromosomes loci. The reduced dosage of X chromosome gene(s), escaping X inactivation during development, contributes to this type of CHD. Regarding our case, these X chromosome genes may have homologues at the Y chromosome, but the process of inactivation of the centromeres of the isodicentric Y spreads to the concerned Y chromosome genes. Therefore, this case emerges as an invitation to consider the mosaics of Turner syndrome and to study their phenotypes in correlation with their genotypes to discover the underlying developmental and genetic mechanisms, especially the ones related to sex chromosomes.

  15. Necrotic Ulcerated Lesion in a Young Boy Caused by Cowpox Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Favier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The case presented here points towards the fact that skin lesion observed with a cowpox virus is a rare event but should be considered more as the number of cases has increased in the last years. Cowpox virus (CPXV belongs to the Poxviridae family. The transmission of CPXV to humans is caused by wild rodents or mostly by domestic animals and pet rats. In humans, CPXV is responsible for localized skin lesions regularly accompanied by lymphadenopathy. The lesions remain localized but self-inoculation from the primary lesions could occur. Then physicians have to be vigilant concerning bandages. In this case report, a necrotic and ulcerated lesion of a CPXV infection in a young boy is reported. The CPXV was possibly transmitted by wild rodents. The importance of performing the diagnosis is also pointed out. Virus information was obtained from phylogenetic analyses showing that the CPXV isolate was distinct from outbreaks of human cowpox which occurred in 2009 in France and Germany but was close to the CPXV Brighton Red strain. For several years, cases of viral zoonosis caused by CPXV have increased and physicians should be made aware that people could be infected without history of direct contact with animals.

  16. How accurate can we diagnose breast lesion by fine needle aspiration cytology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Toshihiro; Ito, Kenichi; Uehara, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNA) is performed firstly in the diagnosis of breast lesion, as the FNA is less-invasive diagnostic procedure. Depending on the results obtained by the FNA, we subsequently perform core needle biopsy or Mammotome biopsy to determine the histological finding of the breast lesion. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the accuracy and limitation of diagnosis of breast lesion by FNA. The clinical data of 528 patients who underwent an operation for the breast lesion in the Shinshu University hospital from April 2004 to March 2009 were analyzed. Of 528 breast lesions, 488 were breast cancers, and 40 benign breast lesions. Of 528 breast lesions, 94 cases were excluded because CNB or MMT was performed firstly. In these cases, some were scheduled for the preoperative chemotherapy, and others were highly suspected to be ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), which was expected to be difficult to be diagnosed by FNA. Two hundreds and ninety two cases of 488 (59.8%) breast cancers and 21 of 40 (52.2%) benign lesions were diagnosed by FNA, respectively. Three of 299 cases (1%) determined to be 'malignant' by FNA were diagnosed as benign in the postoperative pathological diagnosis. 40 of 40 'suspicious for malignancy,' 40 of 46 'indeterminate,' 12 of 38 'normal or benign,' and 10 of 11 'inadequate' cases were finally diagnosed as cancer, in which scirrhous carcinoma, DCIS, small papillo-tubular carcinoma and lobular carcinoma were observed. It is speculated that enough specimens for diagnosis might not be obtained from these tumors by FNA, and that diagnosis by cytology itself might be difficult for these tumors. Although FNA is useful in the diagnosis of breast lesions, some lesions are very difficult to be diagnosed by FNA alone. We have to be careful in considering the conformity of the findings of image diagnoses with the cytological findings. Furthermore, when there is a lack of conformity between them, we should not to hesitate to perform CNB

  17. Genetic effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.

    1981-01-01

    The mutagenic effects of ionising radiation on germ cells with resulting genetic abnormalities in subsequent generations, are considered. Having examined a simple model to explain the interaction of ionising radiation with genetic material and discussed its limitations, the methods whereby mutations are transmitted are discussed. Methods of estimating genetic risks and the results of such studies are examined. (U.K.)

  18. Improved efficiency in clinical workflow of reporting measured oncology lesions via PACS-integrated lesion tracking tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevenster, Merlijn; Travis, Adam R; Ganesh, Rajiv K; Liu, Peng; Kose, Ursula; Peters, Joost; Chang, Paul J

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. Imaging provides evidence for the response to oncology treatment by the serial measurement of reference lesions. Unfortunately, the identification, comparison, measurement, and documentation of several reference lesions can be an inefficient process. We tested the hypothesis that optimized workflow orchestration and tight integration of a lesion tracking tool into the PACS and speech recognition system can result in improvements in oncologic lesion measurement efficiency. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. A lesion management tool tightly integrated into the PACS workflow was developed. We evaluated the effect of the use of the tool on measurement reporting time by means of a prospective time-motion study on 86 body CT examinations with 241 measureable oncologic lesions with four radiologists. RESULTS. Aggregated measurement reporting time per lesion was 11.64 seconds in standard workflow, 16.67 seconds if readers had to register measurements de novo, and 6.36 seconds for each subsequent follow-up study. Differences were statistically significant (p workflow-integrated lesion management tool, especially for patients with multiple follow-up examinations, reversing the onetime efficiency penalty at baseline registration.

  19. Genetic Issues in Mental Retardation, 1996-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic Issues in Mental Retardation, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of the first six issues of a newsletter, which discusses current knowledge about and concerns related to genetics and mental retardation. The second issue addresses the problem of genetic discrimination. The third issue considers genetic testing, screening, and counseling. The fourth issue addresses genetic privacy issues.…

  20. Is Chronic Low Back Pain Associated with the Prevalence of Coronary Heart Disease when Genetic Susceptibility Is Considered?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Matt; Ordoñana, Juan R; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the chronic low back pain and coronary heart disease relationship, after adjusting for relevant confounders, including genetics. METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, 2148 twins were recruited from the Murcia Twin Registry, Spain. The exposure was chronic LBP...... twin pairs discordant for chronic LBP utilised, separated for zygosity-dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) pairs, which adjusted for shared familial factors, including genetics. RESULTS: Chronic LBP pain is associated with lifetime myocardial infarction [odds ratio (OR) = 2.69, 95% confidence interval...... of the association remained or increased in the co-twin control analyses, none reached statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Chronic LBP is associated with a higher prevalence of myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease. It is possible that this association remains even when controlling for genetics...

  1. A disappearing neonatal skin lesion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hawkes, Colin Patrick

    2012-01-31

    A preterm baby girl was noted at birth to have a firm, raised, non-tender skin lesion located over her right hip. She developed three similar smaller lesions on her ear, buttock and right knee. All lesions had resolved by 2 months of age.

  2. Diffuse cavitary lung lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunzke, Mindy; Garrington, Timothy [University of Colorado Denver, Department of Pediatrics, Aurora, CO (United States); The Children' s Hospital, Rick Wilson Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Aurora, CO (United States); Hayes, Kari [The Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Bourland, Wendy [Children' s Hospital at St. Francis, Warren Clinic, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2010-02-15

    An 11-year-old girl presented with a 2-month history of progressively worsening cough, daily fevers, and weight loss. A chest radiograph revealed multiple cystic cavitary lung lesions. An extensive infectious work-up was negative. Chest CT verified multiple cavitary lung lesions bilaterally, and [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography with CT (PET/CT) showed increased uptake in the lung lesions as well as regional lymph nodes. Subsequent biopsy of an involved lymph node confirmed classical Hodgkin lymphoma, nodular sclerosis type. This case represents an unusual presentation for a child with Hodgkin lymphoma and demonstrates a role for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in evaluating a child with cavitary lung lesions. (orig.)

  3. Diffuse cavitary lung lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunzke, Mindy; Garrington, Timothy; Hayes, Kari; Bourland, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    An 11-year-old girl presented with a 2-month history of progressively worsening cough, daily fevers, and weight loss. A chest radiograph revealed multiple cystic cavitary lung lesions. An extensive infectious work-up was negative. Chest CT verified multiple cavitary lung lesions bilaterally, and [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography with CT (PET/CT) showed increased uptake in the lung lesions as well as regional lymph nodes. Subsequent biopsy of an involved lymph node confirmed classical Hodgkin lymphoma, nodular sclerosis type. This case represents an unusual presentation for a child with Hodgkin lymphoma and demonstrates a role for 18 F-FDG PET/CT in evaluating a child with cavitary lung lesions. (orig.)

  4. A case of hemiballism presenting atypical, responsive lesion by CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahata, Nobuya; Honda, Masao.

    1983-01-01

    Hemiballism of the right limbs developed after cerebral infarction in an 83-year-old female patient. On admission, examination revealed hemiballism of the right limbs, monologia, disorientation of thought and motor skills, irritability and the absence of DTR in the right upper limb. Without aggressive treatment, however, involuntary movement disappeared after 18 days, and she was discharged on her own power. CT scan demonstrated a low density area in the left fronto-parietal lobe. However, no obvious abnormality in bilateral subthalamic nuclei was observed. Although the contralateral subthalamic body of Luys is involved in most instances, lesions have been reported to exist in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, corpus striatum, internal capsule and brain stem in some cases. The prognosis for this disease has been generally considered to be fatal. However, this case demonstrated an atypical lesion in CT scan, and spontaneous recovery from hemiballism took place within three weeks. Previous reports on hemiballism were reviewed, and responsive lesions and the prognosis for this case were discussed. (author)

  5. Vertebral hemangioma: an important differential in the evaluation of locally aggressive spinal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Justin; Meir, Adam; Vrodos, Nikitas; Yau, Yun-Hom

    2010-08-15

    A case report and a discussion of recent published data. To highlight the importance of vertebral hemangioma (VH) as a differential diagnosis in the evaluation of locally aggressive spinal lesions. VH commonly occur as incidental findings, however, locally aggressive VH have been described. Difficulties in diagnosing these lesions are well reported and relate to changes in fat content causing uncharacteristic appearances on imaging. The management options for these lesions include a combination of observation, embolization, sclerotherapy, surgical decompression, or stabilization and radiotherapy. A 45-year-old patient who was previously well presented with back pain and rapidly progressive paraparesis. Imaging confirmed the presence of an extensive lesion centered within the right T3 vertebral pedicle with intrusion into the spinal canal. Urgent surgical decompression was undertaken and was complicated by extensive intraoperative hemorrhage requiring massive transfusion. Histologically, the lesion was shown to be a cavernous VH with no evidence of malignancy. Following radiation oncology review, he was offered adjuvant radiotherapy to minimize the risks of recurrence. He achieved a near full neurologic recovery within 2 weeks and had a full recovery by 12 months. VH should be considered in the evaluation of locally aggressive spinal lesions. Angiography is a useful adjunct in the evaluation of these lesions, both as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool. After diagnosed correctly a wide range of treatment options exist that may prevent the patient from undergoing major surgical resection and reconstruction procedures, which may be associated with high rates of morbidity.

  6. To die or not to die? Lessons from lesion mimic mutants

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2015-01-30

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a ubiquitous genetically regulated process consisting in an activation of finely controlled signaling pathways that lead to cellular suicide. Although some aspects of PCD control appear evolutionary conserved between plants, animals and fungi, the extent of conservation remains controversial. Over the last decades, identification and characterization of several lesion mimic mutants (LMM) has been a powerful tool in the quest to unravel PCD pathways in plants. Thanks to progress in molecular genetics, mutations causing the phenotype of a large number of LMM and their related suppressors were mapped, and the identification of the mutated genes shed light on major pathways in the onset of plant PCD such as (i) the involvements of chloroplasts and light energy, (ii) the roles of sphingolipids and fatty acids, (iii) a signal perception at the plasma membrane that requires efficient membrane trafficking, (iv) secondary messengers such as ion fluxes and ROS and (v) the control of gene expression as the last integrator of the signaling pathways.

  7. Spectrum of rectal radiation lesions in cases of cancer cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, V.K.; Rohatgi, V.K.; Gupta, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The study was carried out in 70 cases of carcinoma cervix uteri, showing varying degree of proctitis following radiotherapy treatment for cervical cancer. Grossly, the rectal mucosa showed oedema, congestion, granular proctitis, ulceration, and microscopically stromal connective tissue as well as epithelial changes. The stromal changes have been emphasised as useful diagnostic criteria of radiation reaction. The familarity of these changes is considered necessary because it is imperative to know categorically that a given lesion is entirely or in part due to radiation or due to extension of adjacent tumour in the cervix. Further, this issue is very important in management of cases of cancer cervix. The criteria of distinguishing the lesions in the rectal tissue have been laid down. (auth.)

  8. Yellow and orange in cutaneous lesions: clinical and dermoscopic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuls, J; Arribas, P; Berbegal, L; DeLeón, F J; Francés, L; Zaballos, P

    2015-12-01

    Colour of the lesions is clue for the clinical and dermoscopic diagnosis. Nevertheless, we have detected in the literature an uneven relevance of the colours as a diagnostic criterion. Thus, while red, brown and blue have taken important role in dermoscopic descriptions, other like yellow and orange have been given much less importance. This article reviews those lesions in which the yellow and orange colours have been considered constitutive or essential for diagnosis, and on the other hand it emphasizes the entities in which may appear these colours and are not well reflected in the literature. We believe that organize all this information will help us in a better understanding of these pathologies. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  9. A single-strand specific lesion drives MMS-induced hyper-mutability at a double-strand break in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Resnick, Michael A

    2010-08-05

    Localized hyper-mutability (LHM) can be important in evolution, immunity, and genetic diseases. We previously reported that single-strand DNA (ssDNA) can be an important source of damage-induced LHM in yeast. Here, we establish that the generation of LHM by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) during repair of a chromosomal double-strand break (DSB) can result in over 0.2 mutations/kb, which is approximately 20,000-fold higher than the MMS-induced mutation density without a DSB. The MMS-induced mutations associated with DSB repair were primarily due to substitutions via translesion DNA synthesis at damaged cytosines, even though there are nearly 10 times more MMS-induced lesions at other bases. Based on this mutation bias, the promutagenic lesion dominating LHM is likely 3-methylcytosine, which is single-strand specific. Thus, the dramatic increase in mutagenesis at a DSB is concluded to result primarily from the generation of non-repairable lesions in ssDNA associated with DSB repair along with efficient induction of highly mutagenic ssDNA-specific lesions. These findings with MMS-induced LHM have broad biological implications for unrepaired damage generated in ssDNA and possibly ssRNA. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Studies on improvement of diagnosis of neurosurgical lesions by computed tomography, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Toshifumi

    1980-01-01

    CT findings of low-density in brain tumor cases were classified into the following 2 groups. (a) low-density lesions within brain tumor, masses. (b) low-density lesions surrounding brain tumors. Group (a) represented either fluid-containing cysts, necrotic masses or low-density tumor parenchyme, as confirmed by operative findings. it was impossible to diagnose pathological nature of low-density lesions merely by analyzing their Hounsfield No. (H-No.), excepting epidermoid, teratoma and arachnoid cyst, in which H-No. was essential for diagnosis. Group (b) was classified into 4 subgroups (grade 0 to III) by modifying Kazner's CT classification of brain edema. In most of malignant tumors (such as glioblastomas, metastatic tumors), wide peritumoral low-density lesions were observed. For example, peritumoral low-density lesions of grade III or II were observed in 87% of glioblastoma cases. But, peritumoral low-density lesions of grade II or III were observed also in benign tumor cases, i.e. in 50% of meningioma cases. In a case of astrocytoma, it was impossible to detect the border of the tumor and perifocal edema, even by means of contrast enhancement. It was confirmed by operative findings, that peritumoral low-density lesions could be caused not only brain edema, but also by enlarged peritumoral subarachnoid space or brain demyelinization due to compression by the tumor. In clinical cases, showing brain edema by CT, and in dogs, in which brain edema was produced by cold injury, the author observed that mean values of H-No. in the region of interest on the lesion side significantly increased after intravenous administration of 10% glycerol solution. It was considered that the observed increase in H-No. was caused by dehydration of the edematous brain and increase in regional cerebral blood volume. (author)

  11. Diagnostic features of quantitative comb-push shear elastography for breast lesion differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Mahdi; Denis, Max; Gregory, Adriana; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Kumar, Viksit; Meixner, Duane; Fazzio, Robert T; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra

    2017-01-01

    Lesion stiffness measured by shear wave elastography has shown to effectively separate benign from malignant breast masses. The aim of this study was to evaluate different aspects of Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE) performance in differentiating breast masses. With written signed informed consent, this HIPAA- compliant, IRB approved prospective study included patients from April 2014 through August 2016 with breast masses identified on conventional imaging. Data from 223 patients (19-85 years, mean 59.93±14.96 years) with 227 suspicious breast masses identifiable by ultrasound (mean size 1.83±2.45cm) were analyzed. CUSE was performed on all patients. Three regions of interest (ROI), 3 mm in diameter each, were selected inside the lesion on the B-mode ultrasound which also appeared in the corresponding shear wave map. Lesion elasticity values were measured in terms of the Young's modulus. In correlation to pathology results, statistical analyses were performed. Pathology revealed 108 lesions as malignant and 115 lesions as benign. Additionally, 4 lesions (BI-RADS 2 and 3) were considered benign and were not biopsied. Average lesion stiffness measured by CUSE resulted in 84.26% sensitivity (91 of 108), 89.92% specificity (107 of 119), 85.6% positive predictive value, 89% negative predictive value and 0.91 area under the curve (P 0.21). CUSE was able to distinguish between benign and malignant breast masses with high sensitivity and specificity. Continuity of stiffness maps allowed for choosing multiple quantification ROIs which covered large areas of lesions and resulted in similar diagnostic performance based on average and maximum elasticity. The overall results of this study, highlights the clinical value of CUSE in differentiation of breast masses based on their stiffness.

  12. Diagnostic features of quantitative comb-push shear elastography for breast lesion differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Bayat

    Full Text Available Lesion stiffness measured by shear wave elastography has shown to effectively separate benign from malignant breast masses. The aim of this study was to evaluate different aspects of Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE performance in differentiating breast masses.With written signed informed consent, this HIPAA- compliant, IRB approved prospective study included patients from April 2014 through August 2016 with breast masses identified on conventional imaging. Data from 223 patients (19-85 years, mean 59.93±14.96 years with 227 suspicious breast masses identifiable by ultrasound (mean size 1.83±2.45cm were analyzed. CUSE was performed on all patients. Three regions of interest (ROI, 3 mm in diameter each, were selected inside the lesion on the B-mode ultrasound which also appeared in the corresponding shear wave map. Lesion elasticity values were measured in terms of the Young's modulus. In correlation to pathology results, statistical analyses were performed.Pathology revealed 108 lesions as malignant and 115 lesions as benign. Additionally, 4 lesions (BI-RADS 2 and 3 were considered benign and were not biopsied. Average lesion stiffness measured by CUSE resulted in 84.26% sensitivity (91 of 108, 89.92% specificity (107 of 119, 85.6% positive predictive value, 89% negative predictive value and 0.91 area under the curve (P 0.21.CUSE was able to distinguish between benign and malignant breast masses with high sensitivity and specificity. Continuity of stiffness maps allowed for choosing multiple quantification ROIs which covered large areas of lesions and resulted in similar diagnostic performance based on average and maximum elasticity. The overall results of this study, highlights the clinical value of CUSE in differentiation of breast masses based on their stiffness.

  13. Aneuploidy in benign tumors and nonneoplastic lesions of musculoskeletal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, A; Skjeldal, S; Pettersen, E O; Melvik, J E; Larsen, T E

    1994-02-15

    Aneuploidy in DNA flow cytometry (FCM) of musculoskeletal tumors is generally considered to be a sign of malignancy. Previously, giant cell tumor of the bone has been reported to contain aneuploid (near-diploid) DNA stemlines. Otherwise, only spordic cases have been reported. The authors wanted to study the relationships among DNA FCM, histology, and clinical course of nonmalignant musculoskeletal lesions. Twenty-eight histologically benign tumors and seven nonneoplastic lesions were subjected to DNA FCM: After tissue preparation mechanically and with ribonuclease and trypsin, the isolated nuclei were stained with propidium iodine using chicken and rainbow trout erythrocytes as controls. In the DNA FCM histograms, ploidy and cell cycle fractions were determined using a computerized mathematical model. The histologic diagnoses were made without knowledge of the DNA FCM results. Aneuploidy was found in eight lesions. A shoulder in the diploid peak, suggesting a diploid and a near-diploid population, was found in DNA histograms of a condensing osteitis of the clavicle (a benign inflammatory process) and of a giant cell tumor of bone. The latter lesion also had a tetraploid population. Six benign tumors--two enchondromas, one osteochondroma, one subcutaneous and one intramuscular lipoma, and a calcifying aponeurotic fibroma--showed clear aneuploidy with separate peaks. The S-phase fraction was less than 10% in all cases. The highest aneuploid population, DNA index = 1.70, in a subcutaneous lipoma, was small, with an undetectable S phase. Despite nonradical operations in seven lesions, no recurrences were observed during a median follow-up of 49 months (range, 28-73 months). Small aneuploid populations with low DNA synthetic activity may be compatible with a benign histologic picture and uneventful clinical course of the musculoskeletal lesion.

  14. Cervical pre-malignant lesions in HIV infected women attending Care and Treatment Centre in a tertiary hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandya, Belinda S; Pembe, Andrea B; Mwakyoma, Henry A

    2011-09-01

    The aims of this study was to determine proportion of HIV infected women with cervical pre-malignant lesions; and compare the use of Visual Inspection of the cervix after application of Acetic acid (VIA) and Papanicolau (Pap) smear in screening for cervical premalignant lesions in HIV positive women attending Care and Treatment Centre (CTC) at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A total of 316 women aged 18-70 years had a Pap smear taken for cytology, followed by spraying onto the cervix with 4% acetic acid and then inspecting it. Cytology was considered negative when there was no Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) lesion reported from the Pap smear taken, and positive if CIN lesion 1, 2 or 3 was reported. Detection of a well-defined, opaque acetowhite lesion close to the squamocolumnar junction or close to the external cervical os constituted a positive VIA. Out of 316 women, 132 women had acetowhite lesions on VIA, making the proportion of abnormal cervical lesions to be 42.4%. One hundred and one out of 312 women (32.4%) had CIN lesions detected on Pap smear. The proportion of agreement between these two tests was 0.3. The proportion of agreement was moderate in women with advanced WHO HIV clinical stage of the disease and in women not on ART (Anti Retroviral Therapy). Women with CD-4 count less than 200 cells/mm3 had more abnormal cervical lesions. There is considerable proportion of HIV positive women with premalignant lesions of the cervix. Considering the proportion of HIV women with abnormal lesions and the difficulty in logistics of doing Pap smear in low resource settings, these results supports the recommendation to introduce screening of premalignant lesions of the cervix using VIA to all HIV infected women.

  15. Surgical management of degenerative meniscus lesions: the 2016 ESSKA meniscus consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, Ph; Becker, R; Kopf, S; Englund, M; Verdonk, R; Ollivier, M; Seil, R

    2017-02-01

    A degenerative meniscus lesion is a slowly developing process typically involving a horizontal cleavage in a middle-aged or older person. When the knee is symptomatic, arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been practised for a long time with many case series reporting improved patient outcomes. Since 2002, several randomised clinical trials demonstrated no additional benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy compared to non-operative treatment, sham surgery or sham arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. These results introduced controversy in the medical community and made clinical decision-making challenging in the daily clinical practice. To facilitate the clinical decision-making process, a consensus was developed. This initiative was endorsed by ESSKA. A degenerative meniscus lesion was defined as a lesion occurring without any history of significant acute trauma in a patient older than 35 years. Congenital lesions, traumatic meniscus tears and degenerative lesions occurring in young patients, especially in athletes, were excluded. The project followed the so-called formal consensus process, involving a steering group, a rating group and a peer-review group. A total of 84 surgeons and scientists from 22 European countries were included in the process. Twenty questions, their associated answers and an algorithm based on extensive literature review and clinical expertise, were proposed. Each question and answer set was graded according to the scientific level of the corresponding literature. The main finding was that arthroscopic partial meniscectomy should not be proposed as a first line of treatment for degenerative meniscus lesions. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy should only be considered after a proper standardised clinical and radiological evaluation and when the response to non-operative management has not been satisfactory. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee is typically not indicated in the first-line work-up, but knee radiography should be used as

  16. Surgical Management of Degenerative Meniscus Lesions: The 2016 ESSKA Meniscus Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, P; Becker, R; Kopf, S; Englund, M; Verdonk, R; Ollivier, M; Seil, R

    2017-06-01

    Purpose  A degenerative meniscus lesion is a slowly developing process typically involving a horizontal cleavage in a middle-aged or older person. When the knee is symptomatic, arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been practised for a long time with many case series reporting improved patient outcomes. Since 2002, several randomised clinical trials demonstrated no additional benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy compared to non-operative treatment, sham surgery or sham arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. These results introduced controversy in the medical community and made clinical decision-making challenging in the daily clinical practice. To facilitate the clinical decision-making process, a consensus was developed. This initiative was endorsed by ESSKA. Methods  A degenerative meniscus lesion was defined as a lesion occurring without any history of significant acute trauma in a patient older than 35 years. Congenital lesions, traumatic meniscus tears and degenerative lesions occurring in young patients, especially in athletes, were excluded. The project followed the so-called formal consensus process, involving a steering group, a rating group and a peer-review group. A total of 84 surgeons and scientists from 22 European countries were included in the process. Twenty questions, their associated answers and an algorithm based on extensive literature review and clinical expertise, were proposed. Each question and answer set was graded according to the scientific level of the corresponding literature. Results  The main finding was that arthroscopic partial meniscectomy should not be proposed as a first line of treatment for degenerative meniscus lesions. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy should only be considered after a proper standardised clinical and radiological evaluation and when the response to non-operative management has not been satisfactory. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee is typically not indicated in the first-line work-up, but

  17. Imaging inflammatory acne: lesion detection and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cula, Gabriela O.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    It is known that effectiveness of acne treatment increases when the lesions are detected earlier, before they could progress into mature wound-like lesions, which lead to scarring and discoloration. However, little is known about the evolution of acne from early signs until after the lesion heals. In this work we computationally characterize the evolution of inflammatory acne lesions, based on analyzing cross-polarized images that document acne-prone facial skin over time. Taking skin images over time, and being able to follow skin features in these images present serious challenges, due to change in the appearance of skin, difficulty in repositioning the subject, involuntary movement such as breathing. A computational technique for automatic detection of lesions by separating the background normal skin from the acne lesions, based on fitting Gaussian distributions to the intensity histograms, is presented. In order to track and quantify the evolution of lesions, in terms of the degree of progress or regress, we designed a study to capture facial skin images from an acne-prone young individual, followed over the course of 3 different time points. Based on the behavior of the lesions between two consecutive time points, the automatically detected lesions are classified in four categories: new lesions, resolved lesions (i.e. lesions that disappear completely), lesions that are progressing, and lesions that are regressing (i.e. lesions in the process of healing). The classification our methods achieve correlates well with visual inspection of a trained human grader.

  18. Solitary sternal lesions in breast cancer. Lesiones esternales unicas en cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, R; Cano, R; Mendoza, G [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima (Peru); Guzman, C; Cotrina, M; Aguilar, C [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas, Lima (Peru)

    1993-12-01

    In a retrospective review of bone scans performed in 1740 patients with breast cancer from January 1988 to April 1993, twenty had a solitary sternal lesion. Etiology was found correlating this finding with pathology, x-rays and/or final outcome. Nineteen lesions were due to metastases and one to infection. This experience suggests that solitary sternal lesions in breast cancer patients are uncommon and are most frequently (95%) associated with malignant etiology. (Authors). 10 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Evaluation of mast cell counts and microvessel density in reactive lesions of the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Kouhsoltani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Reliable immunohistochemical assays to assess the definitive role of mast cells (MCs and angiogenesis in the pathogenesis of oral reactive lesions are generally not available. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mast cell counts (MCC and microvessel density (MVD in oral reactive lesions and determine the correlation between MCC and MVD. Methods. Seventy-five cases of reactive lesions of the oral cavity, including pyogenic granuloma, fibroma, peripheral giant cell granuloma, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, peripheral ossifying fibroma (15 for each category were immunohisto-chemically stained with MC tryptase and CD31. Fifteen cases of normal gingival tissue were considered as the control group. The mean MCC and MVD in superficial and deep connective tissues were assessed and total MCC and MVD was computed for each lesion. Results. Statistically significant differences were observed in MCC and MVD between the study groups (P < 0.001. MC tryptase and CD31 expression increased in the superficial connective tissue of each lesion in comparison to the deep con-nective tissue. A significant negative correlation was not found between MCC and MVD in oral reactive lesions (P < 0.001, r = -0.458. Conclusion. Although MCs were present in the reactive lesions of the oral cavity, a direct correlation between MCC and MVD was not found in these lesions. Therefore, a significant interaction between MCs and endothelial cells and an active role for MCs in the growth of oral reactive lesions was not found in this study.

  20. Genetic Disruption of the Core Circadian Clock Impairs Hippocampus-Dependent Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlaw, Sarah M.; Phan, Trongha X.; Saraf, Amit; Chen, Xuanmao; Storm, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Perturbing the circadian system by electrolytically lesioning the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) or varying the environmental light:dark schedule impairs memory, suggesting that memory depends on the circadian system. We used a genetic approach to evaluate the role of the molecular clock in memory. Bmal1[superscript -/-] mice, which are arrhythmic…

  1. Early-enhancing non-neoplastic lesions on gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, M. E-mail: masa-gif@umin.ac.jp; Kondo, H.; Semelka, R.C.; Matsuo, M.; Goshima, S.; Hoshi, H.; Moriyama, N.; Itai, Y

    2003-10-01

    T2-weighted images. On MR images the non-neoplastic nature of the EN lesion was often ascertained. Radiologists should not overcall EN lesions as malignant as the patients involved would be inappropriately considered inoperable. In problematic cases, further investigation with angiographic CT or follow-up imaging studies should be performed.

  2. Global low perfusion and latent ischemic lesions desclosed by PET and MRI in polycythermia hypertonica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kiyoshi; Kameyama, Masakuni; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Nabatame, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    Polycythemia hypertonica was first reported by Geisboeck in 1905 (Geisboeck's syndrome), which has been well known to accompany a high risk for cerebrovascular disorders, and relatively poor prognosis. We performed PET and MRI study on two patients with Geisboeck's syndrome. In both cases, PET study revealed that there were no focal abnormalities in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), but global CBF and CMRO2 decreased to low levels. On MRI study, we also found multiple small ischemic lesions in the deep structures in the cerebral hemisphere as well as brain stem, which were considered to be coincided with the perfusion territories of perforating arteries. Many of the lesions revealed by MRI were not apparent on X-ray CT scan, and were asymptomatic clinically. We consider that global low perfusion and many small latent ischemic lesions are characteristic for Geisboeck's syndrome. Therefore, it is necessary to control high hematocrit values and hypertension from an early stage of the patients with Geisboeck's syndrome. (author)

  3. Global low perfusion and latent ischemic lesions desclosed by PET and MRI in polycythemia hypertonica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, K.; Kameyama, M.; Akiguchi, I.; Fukuyama, H.; Nabatame, H.

    1987-04-01

    Polycythemia hypertonica, first reported by Geisboeck in 1905 (Geisboeck's syndrome), has been known for an accompanying high risk of cerebrovascular disorders and relatively poor prognosis. We performed PET and MRI study on two patients with Geisboeck's syndrome. In both cases, PET study revealed that there were no focal abnormalities in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO/sub 2/), but global CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ decreased to low levels. On MRI study, we also found multiple small ischemic lesions in the deep structures in the cerebral hemisphere as well as brain stem, which were considered to be coincided with the perfusion territories of perforating arteries. Many of the lesions revealed by MRI were not apparent on X-ray CT scan, and were asymptomatic clinically. We consider that global low perfusion and many small latent ischemic lesions are characteristic of Geisboeck's syndrome. Therefore, it is necessary to control high hematocrit values and hypertension from an early stage of the patients with Geisboeck's syndrome.

  4. Selective impairment of subcategories of long-term memory in mice with hippocampal lesions accessed by the olfactory tubing maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillan, F A; Marchetti, E; Soumireu-Mourat, B; Roman, F S

    2005-03-30

    A new apparatus, the olfactory tubing maze for mice, was developed recently to study learning and memory processes in mice in regard to their ethological abilities. As in humans, BALB/c mice with selective bilateral lesions of the hippocampal formation showed selective impairment of subcategories of long-term memory when tested with the olfactory tubing maze. After three learning sessions, control mice reached a high percentage of correct responses. They consistently made the olfactory-reward associations, but antero-dorsal and postero-ventral hippocampal-lesioned mice did not. However, all lesioned mice learned the paradigm and the timing of the task as fast and as well as control mice. These data suggest that the olfactory tubing maze can be used to study subcategories of memory, such as declarative and non-declarative memory, which are similar in some respects to those observed in humans. Consequently, possible memory effects of classical approaches (i.e., pharmacological or lesion studies) or genetic modifications in transgenic or gene-targeting mice can be effectively analyzed using this new apparatus.

  5. Clinical relevance of studies on the accuracy of visual inspection for detecting caries lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimenez, Thais; Piovesan, Chaiana; Braga, Mariana M

    2015-01-01

    Although visual inspection is the most commonly used method for caries detection, and consequently the most investigated, studies have not been concerned about the clinical relevance of this procedure. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review in order to perform a critical evaluation considering...... the clinical relevance and methodological quality of studies on the accuracy of visual inspection for assessing caries lesions. Two independent reviewers searched several databases through July 2013 to identify papers/articles published in English. Other sources were checked to identify unpublished literature...... to clinical relevance and the methodological quality of the studies were evaluated. 96 of the 5,578 articles initially identified met the inclusion criteria. In general, most studies failed in considering some clinically relevant aspects: only 1 included study validated activity status of lesions, no study...

  6. Usefulness of serum CA-15.3 in the management of benign breast lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Hari Pada; Roy, Himanshu; Mondal, Palash; Saha, Mita; Basu, Nandita

    2012-04-01

    Benign breast lesion is an important risk factor for breast cancer and elevated CA-15.3 in serum is a well established marker of breast cancer. Core-needle biopsy is now the method of choice to sample non-palpable mammographic abnormality and as well as clinically palpable lesion. To asses relationship of serum CA-15.3 with different histologic entities of benign breast lesion and usefulness of this marker in predicting breast cancer in this high risk group, a study was conducted among 140 patients who had a diagnosis of benign breast lesion and malignancy following fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) at department of surgery, Medical College, Kolkata between 2007 and 2009. We prospectively estimated serum CA-15.3 level in all patients. Different histologic entities of benign breast lesion, who showed serum CA-15.3 level >30U/ml underwent tru-cut biopsy to detect malignancy. Of 140 patients studied, 50 were stamped as malignancy and 90 as benign after FNAC of which 20 patients had fibroadenoma, 25 had fibro-adenoma with fibrocystic disease, 20 had fibrocystic disease with epitheliosis and 25 had fibrocystic disease with atypia. All breast cancer patients and 10 each from fibro-adenoma with fibrocystic disease, fibrocystic disease with epitheliosis and fibrocystic disease with atypia had serum CA -15.3 level>30U/ml. Thirty patients with benign breast lesion who had raised CA-15.3 underwent core-needle biopsy. Fifteen patients were detected to have intraductal carcinoma, mostly with fibrocystic disease with atypia. Clinical applicability of serum CA-15.3 to detect breast cancer should be strongly considered in management of patients with benign breast lesion and tru-cut biopsy than FNAC be done before benign breast lesion being stamped as benign. Biopsy results that are not concordant with the targeted lesion require surgical biopsy.

  7. Dynamic multislice helical CT of maxillomandibular lesions. Distinction of ameloblastomas from other cystic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Fukuda, Kunihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of dynamic multislice helical CT in differentiating ameloblastoma from other cystic lesions in cases of maxillomandibular cystic lesions. The study included 32 patients with maxillomandibular cystic lesions (ameloblastoma [n=6], myxofibroma [n=1], odontogenic keratocyst [n=3], dentigerous cyst [n=11], radicular cyst [n=11], and paradental cyst [n=2]). Dynamic study was performed before and 30 sec, and 90 sec after intravenous contrast medium administration. CT density values and percentage of density increase were calculated at 30 and 90 sec. In five cases of ameloblastoma, a rapidly enhancing area was detected within the cystic lesions at 30 sec, while no apparent rapid enhancement was seen in the other cystic lesions. Three cysts showed gradual enhancement in the marginal area at 90 sec. Comparing ameloblastoma and other kinds of cysts, we found significant differences in the percentage of density increase at 30 sec (p<0.01) and 90 sec (p<0.05). Dynamic multislice helical CT is useful in the diagnosis of cystic lesions of the maxillomandibular region, especially in the detection of neovascularities in ameloblastoma. (author)

  8. Dynamic multislice helical CT of maxillomandibular lesions. Distinction of ameloblastomas from other cystic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of dynamic multislice helical CT in differentiating ameloblastoma from other cystic lesions in cases of maxillomandibular cystic lesions. The study included 32 patients with maxillomandibular cystic lesions (ameloblastoma [n=6], myxofibroma [n=1], odontogenic keratocyst [n=3], dentigerous cyst [n=11], radicular cyst [n=11], and paradental cyst [n=2]). Dynamic study was performed before and 30 sec, and 90 sec after intravenous contrast medium administration. CT density values and percentage of density increase were calculated at 30 and 90 sec. In five cases of ameloblastoma, a rapidly enhancing area was detected within the cystic lesions at 30 sec, while no apparent rapid enhancement was seen in the other cystic lesions. Three cysts showed gradual enhancement in the marginal area at 90 sec. Comparing ameloblastoma and other kinds of cysts, we found significant differences in the percentage of density increase at 30 sec (p<0.01) and 90 sec (p<0.05). Dynamic multislice helical CT is useful in the diagnosis of cystic lesions of the maxillomandibular region, especially in the detection of neovascularities in ameloblastoma. (author)

  9. Genetic alterations during the progression of squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersemaekers, A. M.; van de Vijver, M. J.; Kenter, G. G.; Fleuren, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    Most cervical carcinomas appear to arise from cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesions. In addition to infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses, which is indicative of an increased risk of progression, alterations of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes play a role. Genetic studies

  10. MRI detection of hypointense brain lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis: T1 spin-echo vs. gradient-echo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Sheena L.; Tauhid, Shahamat; Kim, Gloria; Chu, Renxin; Tummala, Subhash [Departments of Neurology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Laboratory for Neuroimaging Research, Partners MS Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hurwitz, Shelley [Departments of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Bakshi, Rohit, E-mail: rbakshi@bwh.harvard.edu [Departments of Neurology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Laboratory for Neuroimaging Research, Partners MS Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Departments of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Compared T1SE and T1GE in detecting hypointense brain lesions in MS patients. • T1GE detected a higher cerebral lesion volume and number than T1SE. • T1SE correlated significantly with disability, while T1GE did not. • Hypointense lesions on T1SE and T1GE are not interchangeable in patients with MS. - Abstract: Objective: Compare T1 spin-echo (T1SE) and T1 gradient-echo (T1GE) sequences in detecting hypointense brain lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). Background: Chronic hypointense lesions on T1SE MRI scans are a surrogate of severe demyelination and axonal loss in MS. The role of T1GE images in the detection of such lesions has not been clarified. Design/methods: In 45 patients with MS [Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score (mean ± SD) 3.5 ± 2.0; 37 relapsing-remitting (RR); 8 secondary progressive (SP)], cerebral T1SE, T1GE, and T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images were acquired on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Images were re-sampled to axial 5 mm slices before directly comparing lesion detectability using Jim (v.7, Xinapse Systems). Statistical methods included Wilcoxon signed rank tests to compare sequences and Spearman correlations to test associations. Results: Considering the entire cohort, T1GE detected a higher lesion volume (5.90 ± 6.21 vs. 4.17 ± 4.84 ml, p < 0.0001) and higher lesion number (27.82 ± 20.66 vs. 25.20 ± 20.43, p < 0.05) than T1SE. Lesion volume differences persisted when considering RR and SP patients separately (both p < 0.01). A higher lesion number by T1GE was seen only in the RR group (p < 0.05). When comparing correlations between lesion volume and overall neurologic disability (EDSS score), T1SE correlated with EDSS (Spearman r = 0.29, p < 0.05) while T1GE (r = 0.23, p = 0.13) and FLAIR (r = 0.24, p = 0.12) did not. Conclusion: Our data suggest that hypointense lesions on T1SE and T1GE are not interchangeable in patients with MS. Based on these results, we hypothesize that T1GE

  11. MRI detection of hypointense brain lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis: T1 spin-echo vs. gradient-echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuy, Sheena L.; Tauhid, Shahamat; Kim, Gloria; Chu, Renxin; Tummala, Subhash; Hurwitz, Shelley; Bakshi, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Compared T1SE and T1GE in detecting hypointense brain lesions in MS patients. • T1GE detected a higher cerebral lesion volume and number than T1SE. • T1SE correlated significantly with disability, while T1GE did not. • Hypointense lesions on T1SE and T1GE are not interchangeable in patients with MS. - Abstract: Objective: Compare T1 spin-echo (T1SE) and T1 gradient-echo (T1GE) sequences in detecting hypointense brain lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). Background: Chronic hypointense lesions on T1SE MRI scans are a surrogate of severe demyelination and axonal loss in MS. The role of T1GE images in the detection of such lesions has not been clarified. Design/methods: In 45 patients with MS [Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score (mean ± SD) 3.5 ± 2.0; 37 relapsing-remitting (RR); 8 secondary progressive (SP)], cerebral T1SE, T1GE, and T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images were acquired on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Images were re-sampled to axial 5 mm slices before directly comparing lesion detectability using Jim (v.7, Xinapse Systems). Statistical methods included Wilcoxon signed rank tests to compare sequences and Spearman correlations to test associations. Results: Considering the entire cohort, T1GE detected a higher lesion volume (5.90 ± 6.21 vs. 4.17 ± 4.84 ml, p < 0.0001) and higher lesion number (27.82 ± 20.66 vs. 25.20 ± 20.43, p < 0.05) than T1SE. Lesion volume differences persisted when considering RR and SP patients separately (both p < 0.01). A higher lesion number by T1GE was seen only in the RR group (p < 0.05). When comparing correlations between lesion volume and overall neurologic disability (EDSS score), T1SE correlated with EDSS (Spearman r = 0.29, p < 0.05) while T1GE (r = 0.23, p = 0.13) and FLAIR (r = 0.24, p = 0.12) did not. Conclusion: Our data suggest that hypointense lesions on T1SE and T1GE are not interchangeable in patients with MS. Based on these results, we hypothesize that T1GE

  12. Extracolic-infiltrative lesions of the sigmoid colon and recto-sigmoid junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestin, G.P.; Beyer, D.; Lorenz, R.

    1983-06-01

    The problems of extracolic-infiltrative lesions of the sigmoid colon and recto-sigmoid junction are discussed, based on representative case studies. Because of the localisation of these bowel segments in the lower peritoneal cavity, they can be reached by direct infiltration of contiguous tumors - especially carcinoma of the ovary - or by seeding into the pouch of Douglas and the sigmoid mesocolon. In many cases characteristic roentgen-morphologic features indicate a secondary infiltration, but inflammatory and malignant lesions have to be differentiated. The differential-diagnosis must consider also diverticulitis, endometriosis and extracolic growth of colonic carcinoma. Additional ultrasonography and computed tomography may help to clear topographical relations and to detect direct and indirect signs of peritoneal carcinomatosis and abscess.

  13. Extracolic-infiltrative lesions of the sigmoid colon and recto-sigmoid junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestin, G.P.; Beyer, D.; Lorenz, R.

    1983-01-01

    The problems of extracolic-infiltrative lesions of the sigmoid colon and recto-sigmoid junction are discussed, based on representative case studies. Because of the localisation of these bowel segments in the lower peritoneal cavity, they can be reached by direct infiltration of contiguous tumors - especially carcinoma of the ovary - or by seading into the pouch of Douglas and the sigmoid mesocolon. In many cases characteristic roentgen-morphologic features indicate a secondary infiltration, but inflammatory and malignant lesions have to be differentiated. The differential-diagnosis must consider also diverticulitis, endometriosis and extracolic growth of colonic carcinoma. Additional ultrasonography and computed tomography may help to clear topographical relations and to detect direct and indirect signs of peritoneal carcinomatosis and abscess. (orig.)

  14. FFA STUDY OF MACULAR LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vinayagamurthy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Macula is an important portion of retina that occupies the posterior pole of retina. Any disease that affects macula results in significant loss of central vision, form vision and colour vision to an extent. Macular lesions can be hereditary as well as acquired. Macular lesions occur in both younger and older individuals. Anatomically, a macular lesions can vary from a simple lesion like an RPF defect to a vision-threatening lesions like choroidal neovascular membrane. Many screening tests that are sensitive and specific are available to assess the functioning of macula called as ‘macular function test’. But, the greater understanding of the retinal vascular led to the usage of fluorescein angiogram in the detection and screening of macular, retinovascular and optic disc lesions. Through fundus fluorescein angiogram is a thirty-year-old procedure; it is still in vogue in almost all parts of the world. It has its own merits. The aim of the study is to study the role of fluorescein angiography in the evaluation of macular lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A hospital-based prospective randomised study was done, which included 50 patients. Detailed patient history was taken and thorough ocular and systemic examination was done. All patients were examined by ophthalmoscopy (direct and indirect and slit-lamp examination with 90D followed by fluorescein angiography. Ophthalmoscopic and fluorescein angiography findings were analysed and categorised. Patients were advised proper ocular and systemic treatment and follow up. RESULTS 50 cases with macular lesions were analysed and categorised into conditions like ARMD, CSR, macular oedema, CME, degenerations and dystrophies and miscellaneous conditions. FFA altered the diagnosis in 8% cases and categorised the cases in all cases. 16% patients developed adverse reactions like allergy, vomiting and nausea. On statistical analysis, FFA proved to be cheap and superior diagnostic tool in confirming

  15. Cancer of the prostate presenting with diffuse osteolytic metastatic bone lesions: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segamwenge Innocent Lule

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men and the fifth most common cancer worldwide. In the USA it is more common in African-American men than in Caucasian men. Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone and the lesions appear osteoblastic on radiographs. Presentation with diffuse osteolytic bone lesions is rare. We describe an unusual presentation of metastatic prostate cancer with diffuse osteolytic bone lesions. Case presentation A 65-year-old Namibian man presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia and worsening back pains. In addition he had complaints of effort intolerance, palpitations, dysuria and mild symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction. On examination he was found to be anemic, had a swollen tender right shoulder joint and spine tenderness to percussion. On digital rectal examination he had asymmetrical enlargement of the prostate which felt nodular and hard with diffuse firmness in some parts. His prostate-specific antigen was greater than 100ng/mL and he had diffuse osteolytic lesions involving the right humerus, and all vertebral, femur and pelvic bones. His screen for multiple myeloma was negative and the prostate biopsy confirmed prostate cancer. Conclusion Prostate cancer rarely presents with diffuse osteolytic bone lesions and should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating male patients with osteolytic bone lesions.

  16. Liposarcoma or lipoma: Does genetics change classic imaging criteria?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidault, F.; Vanel, D.; Terrier, Ph.; Jalaguier, A.; Bonvalot, S.; Pedeutour, F.; Couturier, J.M.; Dromain, C.

    2009-01-01

    Differentiating benign from malignant fatty tumours has always been very difficult for both radiologists and pathologists. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses provide complementary tools for differentiating soft tissue tumours. Our objective was to compare imaging criteria of malignancy with a new diagnostic gold standard, namely, pathological analysis combined with cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses. Nineteen patients with a fatty tumour were included. All had computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging examination before any biopsy or surgery. All had histopathological and cytogenetic and/or molecular genetic analyses. The imaging diagnosis of benign or malignant lesions was accurate in 15 cases, with 4 false positives for malignancy. Erroneous criteria were a large size (4 cases), and a mass that was not purely fatty. In conclusion, the main pitfall for a false positive radiological diagnosis of liposarcoma is certainly a large-sized tumour. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses contribute to the diagnosis and can be performed at the same time with a core biopsy.

  17. Does decompression of odontogenic cysts and cystlike lesions change the histologic diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlieve, Thomas; Miloro, Michael; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the histopathologic findings after postdecompression definitive treatment of odontogenic cystlike lesions and determine whether the diagnosis was consistent with the pretreatment diagnosis, thereby answering the clinical question: does decompression change the histologic diagnosis? The authors implemented a retrospective cohort study from a sample of patients diagnosed with a benign odontogenic cystlike lesion and who underwent decompression followed by definitive surgery as part of their treatment. The predictor variable was treatment by decompression and the dependent variable was change in histologic diagnosis. Age, gender, and lesion location were included as variables. The χ(2) test was used for statistical analysis of the categorical data and P values less than .05 were considered statistically significant. Twenty-five cysts and cystlike lesions in 25 patients were treated with decompression followed by enucleation and curettage. The mean age was 34 years (range, 13 to 80 yr) and 56% (14) were male patients. Lesions were located in the mandible in 76% (19 of 25) of patients. Postdecompression histologic examination at the time of definitive surgical treatment was consistent with the preoperative biopsy diagnosis in 91% (10 of 11) of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, 67% (2 of 3) of glandular odontogenic cysts, 75% (3 of 4) of dentigerous cysts, and 100% (7 of 7) of cystic ameloblastomas. The histologic diagnosis at time of definitive treatment by enucleation and curettage is consistent with the predecompression diagnosis. Therefore, all lesions should be definitively treated after decompression based on the initial lesion diagnosis, with all patients placed on appropriate follow-up protocols. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  18. Important considerations in lesion-symptom mapping: Illustrations from studies of word comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Hinna; Sebastian, Rajani; Schnur, Tatiana T; Hanayik, Taylor; Wright, Amy; Tippett, Donna C; Fridriksson, Julius; Rorden, Chris; Hillis, Argye E

    2017-06-01

    Lesion-symptom mapping is an important method of identifying networks of brain regions critical for functions. However, results might be influenced substantially by the imaging modality and timing of assessment. We tested the hypothesis that brain regions found to be associated with acute language deficits depend on (1) timing of behavioral measurement, (2) imaging sequences utilized to define the "lesion" (structural abnormality only or structural plus perfusion abnormality), and (3) power of the study. We studied 191 individuals with acute left hemisphere stroke with MRI and language testing to identify areas critical for spoken word comprehension. We use the data from this study to examine the potential impact of these three variables on lesion-symptom mapping. We found that only the combination of structural and perfusion imaging within 48 h of onset identified areas where more abnormal voxels was associated with more severe acute deficits, after controlling for lesion volume and multiple comparisons. The critical area identified with this methodology was the left posterior superior temporal gyrus, consistent with other methods that have identified an important role of this area in spoken word comprehension. Results have implications for interpretation of other lesion-symptom mapping studies, as well as for understanding areas critical for auditory word comprehension in the healthy brain. We propose that lesion-symptom mapping at the acute stage of stroke addresses a different sort of question about brain-behavior relationships than lesion-symptom mapping at the chronic stage, but that timing of behavioral measurement and imaging modalities should be considered in either case. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2990-3000, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. OK-432 sclerotherapy for benign cystic head and neck lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Rho, Myung Ho; Lee, Sang Wook

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of OK-432 solution for slerotheraphy of cystic lesions of the head and neck. Nineteen cystic lesions comprising ten plunging ranulas, three simple ranulas, three cystic lymphangiomas, one first branchial cleft cyst and two unknown supraclavicular cysts considered to be lymphangiomas were treated by sucking out as much liquid content as possible and then injecting the same volume of OK-432 solution under ultrasound guidance. Patients were followed up clinically and radiologically. Follow-up sonography or CT- performed after a mean interval of nine months showed total or near-total shrinkage of four plunging ranulas. However, six such lesions recurred in spite of more than one (mean, two) sclerotherapy sessions. In cases involving two simple ranulas at the floor of the mouth, failure resulted from extracystic leakage of OK-432 solution via the puncture site. Two unilocular cystic lymphangiomas completely regressed during the follow-up period (mean, seven months), but the multiocular type showed a 65% volume reduction after 12 months. A first branchial cleft cyst was markedly reduced in size, with only a small cystic portion remaining after eight months, follow-up. Two supraclavicular cysts with straw-color fluid did not respond to sclerotherapy. OK-432 sclerotherapy of macrocystic lymphangiomas is an effective and promising alternative to surgery. For other cysts, however, including plunging ranula, efficacy, varied, and 64% of such lesions recurred

  20. OK-432 sclerotherapy for benign cystic head and neck lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Rho, Myung Ho; Lee, Sang Wook [Masan Samsung Hospital, Masan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of OK-432 solution for slerotheraphy of cystic lesions of the head and neck. Nineteen cystic lesions comprising ten plunging ranulas, three simple ranulas, three cystic lymphangiomas, one first branchial cleft cyst and two unknown supraclavicular cysts considered to be lymphangiomas were treated by sucking out as much liquid content as possible and then injecting the same volume of OK-432 solution under ultrasound guidance. Patients were followed up clinically and radiologically. Follow-up sonography or CT- performed after a mean interval of nine months showed total or near-total shrinkage of four plunging ranulas. However, six such lesions recurred in spite of more than one (mean, two) sclerotherapy sessions. In cases involving two simple ranulas at the floor of the mouth, failure resulted from extracystic leakage of OK-432 solution via the puncture site. Two unilocular cystic lymphangiomas completely regressed during the follow-up period (mean, seven months), but the multiocular type showed a 65% volume reduction after 12 months. A first branchial cleft cyst was markedly reduced in size, with only a small cystic portion remaining after eight months, follow-up. Two supraclavicular cysts with straw-color fluid did not respond to sclerotherapy. OK-432 sclerotherapy of macrocystic lymphangiomas is an effective and promising alternative to surgery. For other cysts, however, including plunging ranula, efficacy, varied, and 64% of such lesions recurred.

  1. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Jan 19,2018 ... with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address your ...

  2. Nonsurgical healing of large periradicular lesions using a triple antibiotic paste: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali Taneja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The infection of the root canal system is considered to be a polymicrobial infection, consisting of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Because of the complexity of the root canal infection, it is unlikely that any single antibiotic could result in effective sterilization of the canal. A combination of antibiotic drugs (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and minocycline is used to eliminate target bacteria, which are possible sources of endodontic lesions. Three case reports describe the nonsurgical endodontic treatment of teeth with large periradicular lesions. A triple antibiotic paste was used for 3 months. After 3 months, teeth were asymptomatic and were obturated. The follow-up radiograph of all the three cases showed progressive healing of periradicular lesions. The results of these cases show that when most commonly used medicaments fail in eliminating the symptoms then a triple antibiotic paste can be used clinically in the treatment of teeth with large periradicular lesions.

  3. Study of cloisonne kidney lesion frequency in slaughtered sheeps of Tabriz and Rashta slaughterhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Khaki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cloisonne kidney is an accidental finding of the kidneys observed in abattoir. The lesion caused by the thickening of the proximal and sometimes distal convoluted tubules basement membranes due to iron pigmentation is so far reported in goats, sheep and horses. Renal cortex is brown but the condition does not involve the medulla. The lesion brings about no impairment of the renal normal function and affected animals are clinically normal. Although the exact cause of this condition remains unknown but intravascular hemolysis is considered to have a role. The following study was undertaken to determine sheep cloisonne kidney frequency rate in Tabriz and Rasht abattoir. A number of 10000 sheep carcasses in Rasht slaughterhouse and 8600 carcasses in Tabriz slaughterhouse were randomly examined and tissue samples were stained with H&E. Only eleven cases were diagnosed with the cloisonne kidney lesion. Thus the frequency rate of the lesion was estimated at 0.059% in sheep of these cities.

  4. Quantitative angiography methods for bifurcation lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collet, Carlos; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Cavalcante, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Bifurcation lesions represent one of the most challenging lesion subsets in interventional cardiology. The European Bifurcation Club (EBC) is an academic consortium whose goal has been to assess and recommend the appropriate strategies to manage bifurcation lesions. The quantitative coronary...... angiography (QCA) methods for the evaluation of bifurcation lesions have been subject to extensive research. Single-vessel QCA has been shown to be inaccurate for the assessment of bifurcation lesion dimensions. For this reason, dedicated bifurcation software has been developed and validated. These software...

  5. Retrospective analysis of nonendodontic periapical lesions misdiagnosed as endodontic apical periodontitis lesions in a population of Taiwanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsun-Yu; Chen, Yuk-Kwan; Ko, Edward Cheng-Chuan; Chuang, Fu-Hsiung; Chen, Ping-Ho; Chen, Ching-Yi; Wang, Wen-Chen

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to evaluate nonendodontic periapical lesions clinically misdiagnosed as endodontic periapical pathoses in a population of Taiwanese patients. Cases (2000-2014) of histopathological diagnoses of nonendodontic periapical lesions were retrieved from all cases with a clinical diagnosis of radicular cyst, apical granuloma, or apical periodontitis in the institution. These cases were regarded as misdiagnosed nonendodontic periapical lesions, of which the types and frequencies, in addition to the demographic data, were determined. Four thousand and four specimens were clinically diagnosed as endodontically associated pathoses, of which 118 cases (2.95%) received a histopathological diagnosis of a nonendodontic pathologic entity, the most frequent lesion being keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT, n = 38, 32.20%), followed by fibro-osseous lesion (n = 18, 15.25%), and dentigerous cyst (n = 13, 11.02%). Nine malignant lesions in the periapical area [squamous cell carcinoma (n = 7, 5.93%), adenoid cystic carcinoma (n = 1, 0.85%), and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (n = 1, 0.85%)] were also noted. A wide variety of histopathological diagnoses, including benign odontogenic and non-odontogenic cystic and tumorous lesions and infectious diseases, as well as malignant lesions, was noted in these 118 cases of nonendodontic periapical lesions. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most predominant malignancy of nonendodontic periapical lesions misdiagnosed as apical periodontitis lesions from imaging examination overlooking the clinical findings. The current data form a useful basis for clinicopathological investigation and educational teaching regarding nonendodontic periapical lesions misdiagnosed as endodontic apical periodontitis lesions.

  6. Removable denture-related oral mucosal lesions: descriptive clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçen Akçiçek

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a relationship between removable denture-related oral mucosal lesions and denture type, and demographic characteristics. Materials and Method: The age, sex, denture type, systemic condition and medication use, presence of denture-related oral mucosal lesions (DROML, their locations and patients’ awareness of above mentioned lesions were recorded for 199 patients. Pearson chi-square test was used to analyse the relationship between the DROML and denture type, and demographic characteristics of the patients. Results: Among the patients included to the study, 122 (61.3% were female and 77 (38.7% were male. Ninety-six patients (48.2% exhibited DROML, whereas 103 patients (51.8% had no DROML. No relationship was detected between DROML and age, and sex (p>0.05. The most commonly detected DROML was denture stomatitis (34.7%. Denture stomatitis was significantly more frequently seen in partial denture wearers (p<0.05, while epulis fissuratum and flabby ridge were statistically more frequent in complete denture wearers (p<0.001. Traumatic ulcer was more frequently found in mandibular complete denture wearers (p<0.05, while epulis fissuratum and flabby ridge were significantly more common in maxillary complete denture wearers (p<0.001. Among the patients with DROML, 57.3% stated that they were unaware of these lesions. Conclusion: In this study sample, the rate of DROML was high in patients wearing removable dentures (48.2%, and more than half of the patients with DROML were not aware of these lesions. Upon these findings, it is considered that removable denture wearers should follow the denture usage instructions and should be informed about the importance of periodic controls.

  7. Atherosclerotic Plaque Characteristics by CT Angiography Identify Coronary Lesions That Cause Ischemia: a Direct Comparison to Fractional Flow Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung-Bok; Heo, Ran; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Cho, Iksung; Gransar, Heidi; Nakazato, Ryo; Leipsic, Jonathon; Mancini, G.B. John; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Otake, Hiromasa; Budoff, Matthew J.; Berman, Daniel S.; Erglis, Andrejs; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the association between atherosclerotic plaque characteristics (APCs) by coronary CT angiography (CT) and lesion ischemia by fractional flow reserve (FFR). Background FFR is the gold standard for determining lesion ischemia. While APCs by CT—including aggregate plaque volume % (%APV), positive remodeling (PR), low attenuation plaque (LAP) and spotty calcification (SC)—are associated with future coronary syndromes, their relationship to lesion ischemia is unclear. Methods 252 patients (17 centers, 5 countries) [mean age 63 years, 71% males] underwent CT, with FFR performed for 407 coronary lesions. CT was interpreted for 50% stenosis, with the latter considered obstructive. APCs by CT were defined as: (1) PR, lesion diameter/reference diameter >1.10; (2) LAP, any voxel 50% but not for 50%. PMID:25592691

  8. Convergence Analysis of Micro-Lesions (CAML: An approach to mapping of diffuse lesions from carotid revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson C. Rosen

    Full Text Available Carotid revascularization (endarterectomy, stenting prevents stroke; however, procedure-related embolization is common and results in small brain lesions easily identified by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI. A crucial barrier to understanding the clinical significance of these lesions has been the lack of a statistical approach to identify vulnerable brain areas. The problem is that the lesions are small, numerous, and non-overlapping. Here we address this problem with a new method, the Convergence Analysis of Micro-Lesions (CAML technique, an extension of the Anatomic Likelihood Analysis (ALE. The method combines manual lesion tracing, constraints based on known lesion patterns, and convergence analysis to represent regions vulnerable to lesions as probabilistic brain atlases. Two studies were conducted over the course of 12 years in an active, vascular surgery clinic. An analysis in an initial group of 126 patients at 1.5 T MRI was cross-validated in a second group of 80 patients at 3T MRI. In CAML, lesions were manually defined and center points identified. Brains were aligned according to side of surgery since this factor powerfully determines lesion distribution. A convergence based analysis, was performed on each of these groups. Results indicated the most consistent region of vulnerability was in motor and premotor cortex regions. Smaller regions common to both groups included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial parietal regions. Vulnerability of motor cortex is consistent with previous work showing changes in hand dexterity associated with these procedures. The consistency of CAML also demonstrates the feasibility of this new approach to characterize small, diffuse, non-overlapping lesions in patients with multifocal pathologies. Keywords: Embolization, DWI, ALE

  9. Localization of lesions in aphasia, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, Kei; Watanabe, Shunzo; Tasaki, Hiroichi; Sato, Tokijiro; Metoki, Hirofumi.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the focus and the extent of the lesions and the various symptoms was investigated. 1. Broca aphasics: More than 80% of the group with obvious anarthric components had lesions of the third frontal gyrus involving Broca's area and the lower part of the precental gyrus as well as opercular and insular regions. The size of the lesions of this group was significantly larger than that of the group without marked anarthric components, and the latter was proved to have little localizing value. 2. Wernicke aphasics: The group with poor reading comprehension had cortical and/or subcortical lesions, involving posterior parts of both superior and middle temporal gyri as well as the supramarginal gyrus. On the other hand, lesions of the group with poor auditory comprehension were more anteriorly located and localized in the deep structures. Lesions of the group with poor Token test scores were large and scattered more anteriorly and/or posteriorly compared with those of the group with good Token test scores. 3. Amnestic aphaiscs: The group with poor naming scores had somewhat larger lesions than the group with good naming scores, and the lesions were scattered about the left hemisphere. The finding has proved that both groups had little localizing value. 4. Conduction aphasics: Lesions of the non-fluent type were significantly larger than those of the fluent type and distributed more anteriorly. However, highly involved lesions were located in the supramarginal gyrus and posterior parts of superior and/or middle temporal gyri. 5. Global aphasics: Lesions of the group with good articulation and prosody were observed to distribute more posteriorly in comparison with those of the other global aphasics. (J.P.N.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in perinatal brain injury: clinical presentation, lesions and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Mary; Ward, Phil; Allsop, Joanna; Counsell, Serena [Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, Robert Steiner MR Unit, Imaging Sciences Department, Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); Srinivasan, Latha; Dyet, Leigh; Cowan, Frances [Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Imaging Sciences Department, Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    Neonatal MR imaging is invaluable in assessing the term born neonate who presents with an encephalopathy. Successful imaging requires adaptations to both the hardware and the sequences used for adults. The perinatal and postnatal details often predict the pattern of lesions sustained and are essential for correct interpretation of the imaging findings, but additional or alternative diagnoses in infants with apparent hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy should always be considered. Perinatally acquired lesions are usually at their most obvious between 1 and 2 weeks of age. Very early imaging (<3 days) may be useful to make management decisions in ventilated neonates, but abnormalities may be subtle at that stage. Diffusion-weighted imaging is clinically useful for the early identification of ischaemic white matter in the neonatal brain but is less reliable in detecting lesions within the basal ganglia and thalami. The pattern of lesions seen on MRI can predict neurodevelopmental outcome. Additional useful information may be obtained by advanced techniques such as MR angiography, venography and perfusion-weighted imaging. Serial imaging with quantification of both structure size and tissue damage provides invaluable insights into perinatal brain injury. (orig.)

  11. [Differentiation between moisture lesions and pressure ulcers using photographs in a critical area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Matarín, Josefa; Del Cotillo-Fuente, Mercedes; Pujol-Vila, María; Ribal-Prior, Rosa; Sandalinas-Mulero, Inmaculada

    2016-01-01

    To identify difficulties for nurses in differentiating between moisture lesions and pressure ulcers, proper classification of pressure ulcers to assess the adequate classification of the Grupo Nacional para el Estudio y Asesoramiento de Úlceras por Presión y Heridas Crónicas (GNEAUPP) and the degree of agreement in the correct assessment by type and category of injury. Cross-sectional study in a critical area during 2014. All nurses who agreed to participate were included. They performed a questionnaire with 14 photographs validated by experts of moisture lesions or pressure ulcers in the sacral area and buttocks, with 6 possible answers: Pressure ulcer category I, II, III, IV, moisture lesions and unknown. Demographics and knowledge of the classification system of the pressure ulcers were collected according to GNEAUPP. It involved 98% of the population (n=56); 98.2% knew the classification system of the GNEAUPP; 35.2% of moisture lesions were considered as pressure ulcers, most of them as a category II (18.9%). The 14.8% of the pressure ulcers photographs were identified as moisture lesions and 16.1% were classified in another category. The agreement between nurses earned a global Kappa index of .38 (95% CI: .29-.57). There are difficulties differentiating between pressure ulcers and moisture lesions, especially within initial categories. Nurses have the perception they know the pressure ulcers classification, but they do not classify them correctly. The degree of concordance in the diagnosis of skin lesions was low. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Nora's lesion, a distinct radiological entity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhondt, E.; Oudenhoven, L.; Khan, S.; Kroon, H.M.; Hogendoorn, P.C.; Nieborg, A.; Bloem, J.L.; Schepper, A. de

    2006-01-01

    To describe the radiological findings of ''Bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation''(BPOP) - otherwise known as Nora's lesion, to describe the natural evolution of BPOP and to assess radiologically if BPOP is indeed part of a spectrum of reactive lesions including florid reactive periostitis and turret exostosis. Four experienced musculoskeletal radiologists studied plain radiographs and other imaging documents of histologically-proven Nora's lesions, looking for soft-tissue changes, periosteal reaction/calcification and calcified/ossified pseudotumours, and compared those findings with findings on pathology reviewed by a peer group of pathologists. Twenty-four Nora's lesions originating from a series of 200 consecutive, histologically-verified bone (pseudo)tumours of the hand, seen by the ''Netherlands Committee on Bone Tumours'' for review and second opinion. Nora's lesions have a recognised presentation on radiographs without specific MR characteristics. Natural evolution could be assessed retrospectively in four cases. Recurrent lesions were seen in seven cases and are difficult to differentiate from primary Lesions. (orig.)

  13. Genetics Home Reference: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individual is considered to have a fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) if the liver contains more than 5 to ... Resources Genetic Testing (2 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic 1 Genetic Testing Registry: Fatty liver ...

  14. Fracture-associated and idiopathic subchondral vertebral lesions: a magnetic resonance study in autopsy specimens with histologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, C.A.; Berg, B.C. vande; Lecouvet, F.E.; Malghem, J.; Galand, C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the magnetic resonance (MR) and histological appearance of subchondral vertebral lesions that are idiopathic or that develop with vertebral fractures. T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images and radiographs were obtained in 81 cadaveric spine specimens. All subchondral vertebral lesions that were considered to be idiopathic or associated with vertebral end plate fractures were selected. Lesions due to growth disturbance were excluded. Radiographs and MR images were analyzed in consensus by two radiologists, and sampled specimens were analyzed by a pathologist. Eleven idiopathic and ten fracture-associated vertebral lesions were available. On T1-weighted images, all lesion signal intensity was low and homogeneous. On T2-weighted images, all idiopathic lesions showed a heterogeneous signal with a central low or intermediate signal component and a peripheral high or intermediate component. All but one fracture-related lesions showed a homogeneous intermediate to high signal intensity. Histological analysis of idiopathic lesions showed a central acellular fibrous connective tissue in all cases surrounded by loose connective tissue in nine cases. Herniated disk material and cartilage metaplasia were found in one lesion only. Fracture-associated lesions contained herniated disk material, necrotic tissue, and loose connective tissue with a peripheral component of loose fibrovascular connective tissue in four cases only. MR and histological appearance of idiopathic and fracture-associated subchondral vertebral lesions differ, suggesting that they might have a different origin. (orig.)

  15. Genetic Selection to Enhance Animal Welfare Using Meat Inspection Data from Slaughter Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Pramod K; Vogelzang, Roos; Mulder, Herman A; Knol, Egbert F

    2018-01-24

    Animal health and welfare are monitored during meat inspection in many slaughter plants around the world. Carcasses are examined by meat inspectors and remarks are made with respect to different diseases, injuries, and other abnormalities. This is a valuable data resource for disease prevention and enhancing animal welfare, but it is rarely used for this purpose. Records on carcass remarks on 140,375 finisher pigs were analyzed to investigate the possibility of genetic selection to reduce the risk of the most prevalent diseases and indicators of suboptimal animal welfare. As part of this, effects of some non-genetic factors such as differences between farms, sexes, and growth rates were also examined. The most frequent remarks were pneumonia (15.4%), joint disorders (9.8%), pleuritis (4.7%), pericarditis (2.3%), and liver lesions (2.2%). Joint disorders were more frequent in boars than in gilts. There were also significant differences between farms. Pedigree records were available for 142,324 pigs from 14 farms and were used for genetic analysis. Heritability estimates for pneumonia, pleuritis, pericarditis, liver lesions, and joint disorders were 0.10, 0.09, 0.14, 0.24, and 0.17 on the liability scale, respectively, suggesting the existence of substantial genetic variation. This was further confirmed though genome wide associations using deregressed breeding values as phenotypes. The genetic correlations between these remarks and finishing traits were small but mostly negative, suggesting the possibility of enhancing pig health and welfare simultaneously with genetic improvement in finishing traits. A selection index based on the breeding values for these traits and their economic values was developed. This index is used to enhance animal welfare in pig farms.

  16. [Hematotoxic lesions caused by non-steroidal antirheumatic agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobbe, H; Hüge, W

    1980-12-01

    Among the lesions of haematopoiesis conditioned by medicaments the lesions by non-steroidal antirheumatic drugs occupy the first place. They get their significance by the fact that they are not so infrequently irreparable and thus show an unfavourable prognosis. On principle in pathogenetic respect lesions by immunologic reactions which vastly do not depend on the dosage, are to be demarcated from the toxically conditioned side-effects which depend on dosage. Conditioned by drugs aplastic syndromes of the bone marrow are not in every case strongly depending on dosage. For this is to be assumed an individual, particular sensitivity of the haematopoietic stem cells (stem cell defect). Of the anti-rheumatic drugs used for the basic therapy chloroquine derivations, gold, D-penicillamine, immunosuppressives and levamisol may effect disturbances of the haematopoiesis, for which facts are examples are given. This concerns also the symptomatically acting antirheumatic drugs. An overestimation of rare side-effects of drugs should not block the application of certain medicaments, however, they should be given only in such a high dosage as it is necessary. In combinations of antirheumatic drugs every individual drug is considered as causative factor. Interactions are particularly be taken into consideration. Control programmes, particularly with certain laboratory parameters, give the early recognition of side-effects and render possible to avoid severe effects.

  17. GLP-1 improves neuropathology after murine cold lesion brain trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DellaValle, Brian; Hempel, Casper; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    2014-01-01

    brain trauma. METHODS: Severe trauma was induced with a stereotactic cryo-lesion in mice and thereafter treated with vehicle, liraglutide, or liraglutide + GLP-1 receptor antagonist. A therapeutic window was established and lesion size post-trauma was determined. Reactive oxygen species were visualized......-neurodegenerative proteins increased with Lira-driven CREB activation. INTERPRETATION: These results show that Lira has potent effects after experimental trauma in mice and thus should be considered a candidate for critical care intervention post-injury. Moreover, activation of CREB in the brain by Lira - described......OBJECTIVES: In this study, we address a gap in knowledge regarding the therapeutic potential of acute treatment with a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist after severe brain trauma. Moreover, it remains still unknown whether GLP-1 treatment activates the protective, anti...

  18. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping of stroke lesions underlying somatosensory deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Meyer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between stroke lesion location and the resulting somatosensory deficit. We studied exteroceptive and proprioceptive somatosensory symptoms and stroke lesions in 38 patients with first-ever acute stroke. The Erasmus modified Nottingham Sensory Assessment was used to clinically evaluate somatosensory functioning in the arm and hand within the first week after stroke onset. Additionally, more objective measures such as the perceptual threshold of touch and somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded. Non-parametric voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping was performed to investigate lesion contribution to different somatosensory deficits in the upper limb. Additionally, structural connectivity of brain areas that demonstrated the strongest association with somatosensory symptoms was determined, using probabilistic fiber tracking based on diffusion tensor imaging data from a healthy age-matched sample. Voxels with a significant association to somatosensory deficits were clustered in two core brain regions: the central parietal white matter, also referred to as the sensory component of the superior thalamic radiation, and the parietal operculum close to the insular cortex, representing the secondary somatosensory cortex. Our objective recordings confirmed findings from clinical assessments. Probabilistic tracking connected the first region to thalamus, internal capsule, brain stem, postcentral gyrus, cerebellum, and frontal pathways, while the second region demonstrated structural connections to thalamus, insular and primary somatosensory cortex. This study reveals that stroke lesions in the sensory fibers of the superior thalamocortical radiation and the parietal operculum are significantly associated with multiple exteroceptive and proprioceptive deficits in the arm and hand.

  19. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping of stroke lesions underlying somatosensory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sarah; Kessner, Simon S; Cheng, Bastian; Bönstrup, Marlene; Schulz, Robert; Hummel, Friedhelm C; De Bruyn, Nele; Peeters, Andre; Van Pesch, Vincent; Duprez, Thierry; Sunaert, Stefan; Schrooten, Maarten; Feys, Hilde; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz; Thijs, Vincent; Verheyden, Geert

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between stroke lesion location and the resulting somatosensory deficit. We studied exteroceptive and proprioceptive somatosensory symptoms and stroke lesions in 38 patients with first-ever acute stroke. The Erasmus modified Nottingham Sensory Assessment was used to clinically evaluate somatosensory functioning in the arm and hand within the first week after stroke onset. Additionally, more objective measures such as the perceptual threshold of touch and somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded. Non-parametric voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping was performed to investigate lesion contribution to different somatosensory deficits in the upper limb. Additionally, structural connectivity of brain areas that demonstrated the strongest association with somatosensory symptoms was determined, using probabilistic fiber tracking based on diffusion tensor imaging data from a healthy age-matched sample. Voxels with a significant association to somatosensory deficits were clustered in two core brain regions: the central parietal white matter, also referred to as the sensory component of the superior thalamic radiation, and the parietal operculum close to the insular cortex, representing the secondary somatosensory cortex. Our objective recordings confirmed findings from clinical assessments. Probabilistic tracking connected the first region to thalamus, internal capsule, brain stem, postcentral gyrus, cerebellum, and frontal pathways, while the second region demonstrated structural connections to thalamus, insular and primary somatosensory cortex. This study reveals that stroke lesions in the sensory fibers of the superior thalamocortical radiation and the parietal operculum are significantly associated with multiple exteroceptive and proprioceptive deficits in the arm and hand.

  20. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Markers of Aberrantly Activated Innate Immunity in Vitiligo Lesional and Non-Lesional Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanshen; Wang, Yang; Yu, Jie; Gao, Min; Levings, Megan; Wei, Shencai; Zhang, Shengquan; Xu, Aie; Su, Mingwan; Dutz, Jan; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhou, Youwen

    2012-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is characterized by the death of melanocytes in the skin. This is associated with the presence of T cell infiltrates in the lesional borders. However, at present, there is no detailed and systematic characterization on whether additional cellular or molecular changes are present inside vitiligo lesions. Further, it is unknown if the normal appearing non-lesional skin of vitiligo patients is in fact normal. The purpose of this study is to systematically characterize the molecular and cellular characteristics of the lesional and non-lesional skin of vitiligo patients. Methods and Materials Paired lesional and non-lesional skin biopsies from twenty-three vitiligo patients and normal skin biopsies from sixteen healthy volunteers were obtained with informed consent. The following aspects were analyzed: (1) transcriptome changes present in vitiligo skin using DNA microarrays and qRT-PCR; (2) abnormal cellular infiltrates in vitiligo skin explant cultures using flow cytometry; and (3) distribution of the abnormal cellular infiltrates in vitiligo skin using immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Compared with normal skin, vitiligo lesional skin contained 17 genes (mostly melanocyte-specific genes) whose expression was decreased or absent. In contrast, the relative expression of 13 genes was up-regulated. The up-regulated genes point to aberrant activity of the innate immune system, especially natural killer cells in vitiligo. Strikingly, the markers of heightened innate immune responses were also found to be up-regulated in the non-lesional skin of vitiligo patients. Conclusions and Clinical Implications As the first systematic transcriptome characterization of the skin in vitiligo patients, this study revealed previously unknown molecular markers that strongly suggest aberrant innate immune activation in the microenvironment of vitiligo skin. Since these changes involve both lesional and non-lesional skin, our results suggest that therapies targeting

  1. Abrogation of genetically controlled resistance of mice to Treponema pallidum by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.R.; Monjan, A.A.; Hardy, P.H. Jr.; Cole, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    On intradermal infection, transient primary lesions, characteristic of those seen in naturally acquired human syphilis, can be produced regularly in some strains of mice but not others, indicating a genetic basis for host susceptibility. However strains of mice which normally fail to develop lesions, do so after exposure to ionising radiation. Here the importance of an intact immune system in the outcome of local infection is illustrated by the use of radiation-induced immunosuppression. The mice were exposed to lethal doses of total body irradiation from a 137 Ce source (137 rad per min), 850-1,050 rad depending on mouse strain. (UK)

  2. Silent ischemic brain lesions after transcatheter aortic valve replacement : lesion distribution and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samim, Mariam; Hendrikse, Jeroen; van der Worp, H. Bart; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Nijhoff, Freek; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stella, Pieter R.

    Silent ischemic brain lesions and ischemic stroke are known complications of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We aimed to investigate the occurrence and distribution of TAVR-related silent ischemic brain lesions using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). Consecutive

  3. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehusen, Frauke; Al-Azreg, Seham A; Raddatz, Barbara B; Haist, Verena; Puff, Christina; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Ulrich, Reiner; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL), histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease.

  4. Neonatal deep white matter venous infarction and liquefaction: a pseudo-abscess lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruess, Lynne; Rusin, Jerome A.; Dent, Carly M.; Tiarks, Hailey J.; Yoshida, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Deep white matter hemorrhagic venous infarction with subsequent cavitation due to necrosis and liquefaction has been described in neonates and may be associated with infection and meningitis. In our experience, the MRI pattern of these lesions is confused with the pattern seen with cerebral abscesses. The purpose of our study was to characterize the MRI findings of post infarction necrosis and liquefaction after hemorrhagic deep white matter venous infarction in infants and to distinguish these lesions from cerebral abscesses. An institutional review board approved a retrospective review of imaging records to identify all patients with cerebral venous infarction at a children's hospital during a 10-year period. Nine infants had deep white matter hemorrhagic venous infarction with white matter fluid signal cavitary lesions. A diagnosis of cerebral abscess was considered in all. The imaging and laboratory findings in these patients are reviewed and compared to descriptions of abscesses found in the literature. There were six female and three male infants. The mean age at presentation was 20 days (range: 0-90 days), while the corrected age at presentation was less than 30 days for all patients. Seven patients presented with seizures and signs of infection; one infant presented with lethargy and later proved to have protein C deficiency. MRI was performed 0-12 days from presentation in these eight patients. Another patient with known protein C deficiency underwent MRI at 30 days for follow-up of screening US abnormalities. There were a total of 38 deep cerebral white matter fluid signal cavitary lesions: 25 frontal, 9 parietal, 2 temporal, 2 occipital. Larger lesions had dependent debris. All lesions had associated hemorrhage and many lesions had evidence of adjacent small vessel venous thrombosis. Lesions imaged after gadolinium showed peripheral enhancement. Three lesions increased in size on follow-up imaging. Three patients, two with meningitis confirmed via

  5. Neonatal deep white matter venous infarction and liquefaction: a pseudo-abscess lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruess, Lynne; Rusin, Jerome A. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); The Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, Columbus, OH (United States); Dent, Carly M.; Tiarks, Hailey J.; Yoshida, Michelle A. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Deep white matter hemorrhagic venous infarction with subsequent cavitation due to necrosis and liquefaction has been described in neonates and may be associated with infection and meningitis. In our experience, the MRI pattern of these lesions is confused with the pattern seen with cerebral abscesses. The purpose of our study was to characterize the MRI findings of post infarction necrosis and liquefaction after hemorrhagic deep white matter venous infarction in infants and to distinguish these lesions from cerebral abscesses. An institutional review board approved a retrospective review of imaging records to identify all patients with cerebral venous infarction at a children's hospital during a 10-year period. Nine infants had deep white matter hemorrhagic venous infarction with white matter fluid signal cavitary lesions. A diagnosis of cerebral abscess was considered in all. The imaging and laboratory findings in these patients are reviewed and compared to descriptions of abscesses found in the literature. There were six female and three male infants. The mean age at presentation was 20 days (range: 0-90 days), while the corrected age at presentation was less than 30 days for all patients. Seven patients presented with seizures and signs of infection; one infant presented with lethargy and later proved to have protein C deficiency. MRI was performed 0-12 days from presentation in these eight patients. Another patient with known protein C deficiency underwent MRI at 30 days for follow-up of screening US abnormalities. There were a total of 38 deep cerebral white matter fluid signal cavitary lesions: 25 frontal, 9 parietal, 2 temporal, 2 occipital. Larger lesions had dependent debris. All lesions had associated hemorrhage and many lesions had evidence of adjacent small vessel venous thrombosis. Lesions imaged after gadolinium showed peripheral enhancement. Three lesions increased in size on follow-up imaging. Three patients, two with meningitis confirmed via

  6. Sonographic Findings of Morel-Lavalle'e Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yu Jin; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Jung, Ah Young; Jeh, Su Kyung

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the sonographic features of Morel-Lavalle'e lesions by correlating the US image findings with a lesion's age. We obtained the sonography reports of 20 Morel-Lavalle'e lesions of the hip and extremities from 18 patients with a history of trauma. The US images were reviewed to characterize the echogenicity, shape, homogeneity, margins, location and size of the lesions. The results were correlated with the age of the lesions and the clinical histories. All the Morel-Lavalle'e lesions were hypoechoic or anechoic fluid collections located between the subcutaneous fat and the underlying fascia. Regarding the shape of the fluid collections, the lobular shaped lesions were all less than 21 days for the lesion's age, and the flat fluid collections were all greater than 1 month of age. Regarding the homogeneity, the heterogeneous fluid collections were all less than 25 days of age, and the homogeneous fluid collections were all greater than 1 month of age. A Morel-Lavalle'e lesion is seen as a posttraumatic fluid collection in the potential space between the subcutaneous fat and the underlying fascia on an ultrasound examination. Acute Morel-Lavalle'e lesions tended to be heterogeneous and lobular, and they became more homogeneous and flat in shape as the lesions evolved. Awareness of these imaging findings will help us to properly diagnose Morel- Lavalle'e lesions

  7. 'Emotional Intelligence': Lessons from Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeveen, J; Salvi, C; Grafman, J

    2016-10-01

    'Emotional intelligence' (EI) is one of the most highly used psychological terms in popular nomenclature, yet its construct, divergent, and predictive validities are contentiously debated. Despite this debate, the EI construct is composed of a set of emotional abilities - recognizing emotional states in the self and others, using emotions to guide thought and behavior, understanding how emotions shape behavior, and emotion regulation - that undoubtedly influence important social and personal outcomes. In this review, evidence from human lesion studies is reviewed in order to provide insight into the necessary brain regions for each of these core emotional abilities. Critically, we consider how this neuropsychological evidence might help to guide efforts to define and measure EI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Solitary lucent epiphyseal lesions in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, D.J.; Azouz, E.M.

    1988-10-01

    We evaluated retrospectively the varying radiographic appearances of 15 solitary lucent epiphyseal lesions occurring in children. Imaging modalities used included plain films, conventional tomography, nuclear scintigraphy, and computed tomography. 40% of the lesions (6) were due to osteomyelitis. The remaining lesions included tuberculosis (1), foreign body granuloma (1), chondroblastoma (2), chondromyoxid fibroma (1), enchondroma (1), osteoid osteoma (2), and eosinophilic granuloma (1). Although the radiographic appearances of such lesions may be particularly characteristic, pathologic correlation is frequently necessary. The high incidence of osteomyelitis in our cases emphasizes its importance as a cause for a lucent epiphyseal lesion.

  9. Claudin-4-targeted optical imaging detects pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neesse, Albrecht; Hahnenkamp, Anke; Griesmann, Heidi; Buchholz, Malte; Hahn, Stefan A; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Fendrich, Volker; Ring, Janine; Sipos, Bence; Tuveson, David A; Bremer, Christoph; Gress, Thomas M; Michl, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    Novel imaging methods based on specific molecular targets to detect both established neoplasms and their precursor lesions are highly desirable in cancer medicine. Previously, we identified claudin-4, an integral constituent of tight junctions, as highly expressed in various gastrointestinal tumours including pancreatic cancer. Here, we investigate the potential of targeting claudin-4 with a naturally occurring ligand to visualise pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions in vitro and in vivo by near-infrared imaging approaches. A non-toxic C-terminal fragment of the claudin-4 ligand Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE) was labelled with a cyanine dye (Cy5.5). Binding of the optical tracer was analysed on claudin-4 positive and negative cells in vitro, and tumour xenografts in vivo. In addition, two genetically engineered mouse models for pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and pancreatic cancer were used for in vivo validation. Optical imaging studies were conducted using 2D planar fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) technology and 3D fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT). In vitro, the peptide-dye conjugate showed high binding affinity to claudin-4 positive CAPAN1 cells, while claudin-4 negative HT1080 cells revealed little or no fluorescence. In vivo, claudin-4 positive tumour xenografts, endogenous pancreatic tumours, hepatic metastases, as well as preinvasive PanIN lesions, were visualised by FRI and FMT up to 48 h after injection showing a significantly higher average of fluorochrome concentration as compared with claudin-4 negative xenografts and normal pancreatic tissue. C-CPE-Cy5.5 combined with novel optical imaging methods enables non-invasive visualisation of claudin-4 positive murine pancreatic tumours and their precursor lesions, representing a promising modality for early diagnostic imaging.

  10. Petrous apex lesions in the pediatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Son, Hwa Jung [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Koch, Bernadette L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-03-15

    A variety of abnormal imaging findings of the petrous apex are encountered in children. Many petrous apex lesions are identified incidentally while images of the brain or head and neck are being obtained for indications unrelated to the temporal bone. Differential considerations of petrous apex lesions in children include ''leave me alone'' lesions, infectious or inflammatory lesions, fibro-osseous lesions, neoplasms and neoplasm-like lesions, as well as a few rare miscellaneous conditions. Some lesions are similar to those encountered in adults, and some are unique to children. Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and primary and metastatic pediatric malignancies such as neuroblastoma, rhabomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma are more likely to be encountered in children. Lesions such as petrous apex cholesterol granuloma, cholesteatoma and chondrosarcoma are more common in adults and are rarely a diagnostic consideration in children. We present a comprehensive pictorial review of CT and MRI appearances of pediatric petrous apex lesions. (orig.)

  11. First International Consensus Conference on lesions of uncertain malignant potential in the breast (B3 lesions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rageth, Christoph J; O'Flynn, Elizabeth Am; Comstock, Christopher; Kurtz, Claudia; Kubik, Rahel; Madjar, Helmut; Lepori, Domenico; Kampmann, Gert; Mundinger, Alexander; Baege, Astrid; Decker, Thomas; Hosch, Stefanie; Tausch, Christoph; Delaloye, Jean-François; Morris, Elisabeth; Varga, Zsuzsanna

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to obtain a consensus for the therapy of B3 lesions. The first International Consensus Conference on lesions of uncertain malignant potential in the breast (B3 lesions) including atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), flat epithelial atypia (FEA), classical lobular neoplasia (LN), papillary lesions (PL), benign phyllodes tumors (PT), and radial scars (RS) took place in January 2016 in Zurich, Switzerland organized by the International Breast Ultrasound School and the Swiss Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsy group-a subgroup of the Swiss Society of Senology. Consensus recommendations for the management and follow-up surveillance of these B3 lesions were developed and areas of research priorities were identified. The consensus recommendation for FEA, LN, PL, and RS diagnosed on core needle biopsy or vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) is to therapeutically excise the lesion seen on imaging by VAB and no longer by open surgery, with follow-up surveillance imaging for 5 years. The consensus recommendation for ADH and PT is, with some exceptions, therapeutic first-line open surgical excision. Minimally invasive management of selected B3 lesions with therapeutic VAB is acceptable as an alternative to first-line surgical excision.

  12. Morel-Lavallee lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Fangjie; Lei, Guanghua

    2014-01-01

    To review current knowledge of the Morel-Lavallee lesion (MLL) to help clinicians become familiar with this entity. Familiarization may decrease missed diagnoses and misdiagnoses. It could also help steer the clinician to the proper treatment choice. A search was performed via PubMed and EMBASE from 1966 to July 2013 using the following keywords: Morel-Lavallee lesion, closed degloving injury, concealed degloving injury, Morel-Lavallee effusion, Morel-Lavallee hematoma, posttraumatic pseudocyst, posttraumatic soft tissue cyst. Chinese and English language literatures relevant to the subject were collected. Their references were also reviewed. Morel-Lavallee lesion is a relatively rare condition involving a closed degloving injury. It is characterized by a filled cystic cavity created by separation of the subcutaneous tissue from the underlying fascia. Apart from the classic location over the region of the greater trochanter, MLLs have been described in other parts of the body. The natural history of MLL has not yet been established. The lesion may decrease in volume, remain stable, enlarge progressively or show a recurrent pattern. Diagnosis of MLL was often missed or delayed. Ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have great value in the diagnosis of MLL. Treatment of MLL has included compression, local aspiration, open debridement, and sclerodesis. No standard treatment has been established. A diagnosis of MLL should be suspected when a soft, fluctuant area of skin or chronic recurrent fluid collection is found in a region exposed to a previous shear injury. Clinicians and radiologists should be aware of both the acute and chronic appearances to make the correct diagnosis. Treatment decisions should base on association with fractures, the condition of the lesion, symptom and desire of the patient.

  13. Confronting Science: The Dilemma of Genetic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallen, Doris T.

    1997-01-01

    Considers the opportunities and ethical issues involved in genetic testing. Reviews the history of genetics from the first discoveries of Gregor Mendel, through the spurious pseudo-science of eugenics, and up to the discovery of DNA by James Watson and Francis Crick. Explains how genetic tests are done. (MJP)

  14. Management of digestive lesions associated to congenital epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Chahed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital epidermolysis bullosa (CEB is a rare genodermatosis. The digestive system is very frequently associated with skin manifestations. Pyloric atresia (PA and oesophageal stenosis (OS are considered the most serious digestive lesions to occur.The aim of this work is to study the management and the outcome of digestive lesions associated to CEB in four children and to compare our results to the literature. Patients and Methods: A retrospective study of four observations: Two cases of PA and two cases of OS associated to CEB managed in the Paediatric Surgery Department of Fattouma Bourguiba Teaching Hospital in Monastir, Tunisia. Results: Four patients, two of them are 11 and 8 years old, diagnosed as having a dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa since the neonatal period. They were admitted for the investigation of progressive dysphagia. Oesophageal stenosis was confirmed by an upper contrast study. Pneumatic dilation was the advocated therapeutic method for both patients with afavourable outcome. The two other patients are newborns, diagnosed to have a CEB because of association of PA with bullous skin lesions with erosive scars. Both patients had a complete diaphragm excision with pyloroplasty. They died at the age of 4 and 3 months of severe diarrhoea resistant to medical treatment. Conclusion: Digestive lesions associated to CEB represent an aggravating factor of a serious disease. OS complicating CEB is severe with difficult management. Pneumatic dilatation is the gold standard treatment method. However, the mortality rate in PA with CEB is high. Prenatal diagnosis of PA is possible, and it can help avoiding lethal forms.

  15. Correlation of the SLAP lesion with lesions of the medial sheath of the biceps tendon and intra-articular subscapularis tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett William

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP lesions have been well described in the literature and are thought to be secondary to traction injuries to the biceps anchor and/or falls on the outstretched arm. The pulley has recently been described as a structure that aids in the prevention of biceps instability. The intra-articular subscapularis insertion (IASS has been noted to contribute to the robust nature of the medial sheath. The purpose of the study was to determine a potential correlation of SLAP lesions and pulley lesions with/without IASS lesions, (hereafter referred to as medial sheath as forces that can disrupt the biceps anchor and may also disrupt structures of the medial sheath or vice-versa. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and sixteen consecutive shoulder arthroscopies performed by one surgeon were reviewed retrospectively. Operative reports and arthroscopic pictures were carefully reviewed with particular attention paid to the labral and pulley pathology. Selection bias was noted as the author had never operated primarily for a Type 1 SLAP lesion. Following, however, and as such, the exclusion criteria, was a Type 1 SLAP. Results: There were a total of 30 SLAP lesions and a total of 126 medial sheath lesions. There were 13 patients who had both SLAP and medial sheath lesions. There were 17 patients who had a SLAP lesion without a medial sheath lesion. There were 96 medial sheath lesions without a SLAP. A comparison of rates between patients who had a medial sheath lesion with a SLAP and those who had a medial sheath lesion without a SLAP, for the 316 patients, and when tested with a Fisher exact test revealed that there was no statistical significance, P = 0.673. The prevalence of SLAP lesions in this population of 316 patients was 9.4%, Buford 1%, medial sheath lesions 39%, and SLAP and medial sheath lesions 4%. Interestingly, there were three Buford complexes, all associated with a SLAP and one Buford complex

  16. Nail lesions as a main manifestation of lichen nitidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Sobjanek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Lichen nitidus (LN is a rare, chronic, inflammatory dermatosis usually affecting children and young adults. Nails involvement is very rare. Until now, 7 cases of LN with nail involvement have been described. Objective. To present a rare case of childhood lichen nitidus where trachyonychia was the main manifestation of the disease. Case report. A 7-year-old, Caucasian, previously healthy boy presented thumbnail longitudinal ridges, distal splitting and subungual hyperkeratosis for 7 months. Numerous mycological and bacteriological examinations were negative. Dermatological examination also revealed erythematous lesions on the proximal nail fold as well as small skin-pigmented papules on the thumb. Similar papules grouped into patches were also observed on the upper limbs, trunk and forehead. Treatment was not recommended. Conclusions . Lichen nitidus may rarely affect nails and should be considered as a possible cause of nail lesions in childhood.

  17. Electromagnetic navigation diagnostic bronchoscopy for small peripheral lung lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, D; Scherpereel, A; Leroy, S; Bouchindhomme, B; Faivre, J-B; Remy, J; Ramon, P; Marquette, C-H

    2007-06-01

    The present study prospectively evaluated the diagnostic yield and safety of electromagnetic navigation-guided bronchoscopy biopsy, for small peripheral lung lesions in patients where standard techniques were nondiagnostic. The study was conducted in a tertiary medical centre on 40 consecutive patients considered unsuitable for straightforward surgery or computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy, due to comorbidities. The lung lesion diameter was mean+/-sem 23.5+/-1.5 mm and the depth from the visceral-costal pleura was 14.9+/-2 mm. Navigation was facilitated by an electromagnetic tracking system which could detect a position sensor incorporated into a flexible catheter advanced through a bronchoscope. Information obtained during bronchoscopy was superimposed on previously acquired CT data. Divergence between CT data and data obtained during bronchoscopy was calculated by the system's software as a measure of navigational accuracy. All but one of the target lesions was reached and the overall diagnostic yield was 62.5% (25-40). Diagnostic yield was significantly affected by CT-to-body divergence; yield was 77.2% when estimated divergence was drainage was required in one case. Electromagnetic navigation-guided bronchoscopy has the potential to improve the diagnostic yield of transbronchial biopsies without additional fluoroscopic guidance, and may be useful in the early diagnosis of lung cancer, particularly in nonoperable patients.

  18. A contrast enhancement method for improving the segmentation of breast lesions on ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Wilfrido Gómez; Pereira, Wagner Coelho de Albuquerque

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive contrast enhancement method based on sigmoidal mapping function (SACE) used for improving the computerized segmentation of breast lesions on ultrasound. First, from the original ultrasound image an intensity variation map is obtained, which is used to generate local sigmoidal mapping functions related to distinct contextual regions. Then, a bilinear interpolation scheme is used to transform every original pixel to a new gray level value. Also, four contrast enhancement techniques widely used in breast ultrasound enhancement are implemented: histogram equalization (HEQ), contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE), fuzzy enhancement (FEN), and sigmoid based enhancement (SEN). In addition, these contrast enhancement techniques are considered in a computerized lesion segmentation scheme based on watershed transformation. The performance comparison among techniques is assessed in terms of both the quality of contrast enhancement and the segmentation accuracy. The former is quantified by the measure, where the greater the value, the better the contrast enhancement, whereas the latter is calculated by the Jaccard index, which should tend towards unity to indicate adequate segmentation. The experiments consider a data set with 500 breast ultrasound images. The results show that SACE outperforms its counterparts, where the median values for the measure are: SACE: 139.4, SEN: 68.2, HEQ: 64.1, CLAHE: 62.8, and FEN: 7.9. Considering the segmentation performance results, the SACE method presents the largest accuracy, where the median values for the Jaccard index are: SACE: 0.81, FEN: 0.80, CLAHE: 0.79, HEQ: 77, and SEN: 0.63. The SACE method performs well due to the combination of three elements: (1) the intensity variation map reduces intensity variations that could distort the real response of the mapping function, (2) the sigmoidal mapping function enhances the gray level range where the transition between lesion and background

  19. Ten good reasons to consider biological processes in prevention and intervention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchaine, Theodore P; Neuhaus, Emily; Brenner, Sharon L; Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Most contemporary accounts of psychopathology acknowledge the importance of both biological and environmental influences on behavior. In developmental psychopathology, multiple etiological mechanisms for psychiatric disturbance are well recognized, including those operating at genetic, neurobiological, and environmental levels of analysis. However, neuroscientific principles are rarely considered in current approaches to prevention or intervention. In this article, we explain why a deeper understanding of the genetic and neural substrates of behavior is essential for the next generation of preventive interventions, and we outline 10 specific reasons why considering biological processes can improve treatment efficacy. Among these, we discuss (a) the role of biomarkers and endophenotypes in identifying those most in need of prevention; (b) implications for treatment of genetic and neural mechanisms of homotypic comorbidity, heterotypic comorbidity, and heterotypic continuity; (c) ways in which biological vulnerabilities moderate the effects of environmental experience; (d) situations in which Biology x Environment interactions account for more variance in key outcomes than main effects; and (e) sensitivity of neural systems, via epigenesis, programming, and neural plasticity, to environmental moderation across the life span. For each of the 10 reasons outlined we present an example from current literature and discuss critical implications for prevention.

  20. Ten good reasons to consider biological processes in prevention and intervention research

    Science.gov (United States)

    BEAUCHAINE, THEODORE P.; NEUHAUS, EMILY; BRENNER, SHARON L.; GATZKE-KOPP, LISA

    2009-01-01

    Most contemporary accounts of psychopathology acknowledge the importance of both biological and environmental influences on behavior. In developmental psychopathology, multiple etiological mechanisms for psychiatric disturbance are well recognized, including those operating at genetic, neurobiological, and environmental levels of analysis. However, neuroscientific principles are rarely considered in current approaches to prevention or intervention. In this article, we explain why a deeper understanding of the genetic and neural substrates of behavior is essential for the next generation of preventive interventions, and we outline 10 specific reasons why considering biological processes can improve treatment efficacy. Among these, we discuss (a) the role of biomarkers and endophenotypes in identifying those most in need of prevention; (b) implications for treatment of genetic and neural mechanisms of homotypic comorbidity, heterotypic comorbidity, and heterotypic continuity; (c) ways in which biological vulnerabilities moderate the effects of environmental experience; (d) situations in which Biology×Environment interactions account for more variance in key outcomes than main effects; and (e) sensitivity of neural systems, via epigenesis, programming, and neural plasticity, to environmental moderation across the life span. For each of the 10 reasons outlined we present an example from current literature and discuss critical implications for prevention. PMID:18606030

  1. Genetic diversity, phylogroup distribution and virulence gene profile of pks positive Escherichia coli colonizing human intestinal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarshar, Meysam; Scribano, Daniela; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Aprea, Maria Rita; Aleandri, Marta; Pronio, Annamaria; Longhi, Catia; Nicoletti, Mauro; Zagaglia, Carlo; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Conte, Maria Pia

    2017-11-01

    Some Escherichia coli strains of phylogroup B2 harbor a (pks) pathogenicity island that encodes a polyketide-peptide genotoxin called colibactin. It causes DNA double-strand breaks and megalocytosis in eukaryotic cells and it may contribute to cancer development. Study of bacterial community that colonizes the adenomatous polyp lesion, defined as precancerous lesions, could be helpful to assess if such pathogenic bacteria possess a role in the polyp progression to cancer. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 1500 E. coli isolates were obtained from biopsies of patients presenting adenomatous colon polyps, the normal tissues adjacent to the polyp lesion and patients presenting normal mucosa. pks island frequency, phylogenetic grouping, fingerprint genotyping, and virulence gene features of pks positive (pks + ) E. coli isolates were performed. We found pks + E. coli strongly colonize two patients presenting polypoid lesions and none were identified in patients presenting normal mucosa. Predominant phylogroups among pks + E. coli isolates were B2, followed by D. Clustering based on fragment profiles of composite analysis, typed the pks + isolates into 5 major clusters (I-V) and 17 sub-clusters, demonstrating a high level of genetic diversity among them. The most prevalent virulence genes were fimH and fyuA (100%), followed by vat (92%), hra and papA (69%), ibeA (28%), and hlyA (25%). Our results revealed that pks + E. coli can colonize the precancerous lesions, with a high distribution in both the polyp lesions and in normal tissues adjacent to the lesion. The high differences in fingerprinting patterns obtained indicate that pks + E. coli strains were genetically diverse, possibly allowing them to more easily adapt to environmental variations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Simple Bone Cyst of Metacarpal: Rare Lesion with Unique Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Sandeep; Shah, Kunal; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Simple bone cyst or unicameral bone cyst (UBC) are benign cystic lesions commonly found in femur and humerus. However hand is a very rare site of occurrence. Treatment described for UBC of hand commonly involves curettage and bone grafting. Case Report: A 7 year old right hand dominant girl presented to us with chief complaints of pain and swelling in right 4th metacarpal since 2 month. On imaging, plain radiographs of right hand showed expansile lytic lesion on Metaphyseal-diaphyseal region of 4th metacarpal with pathological fracture. MRI showed cystic lesions with internal loculations and fluid-fluid levels (Fig 2). There was minimal soft tissue extension. We performed aspiration which showed serosanguinous fluid with haemorrhagic tinge. With the diagnosis of unicameral bone cyst in mind we performed and closed intramedullary nail with k wire. The cyst healed up completely within 2 months. There was no recurrence at 18 month follow up. Conclusion: In conclusion simple bone cyst is very rare in metacarpal bone. However it should be considered as important differential since it warrants simple treatment and extensive procedures should be avoided. PMID:27298987

  3. Respiratory gated PET/CT in a European multicentre retrospective study: added diagnostic value in detection and characterization of lung lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Luca; Elisei, Federica [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); De Ponti, Elena [San Gerardo Hospital, Medical Physics, Monza (Italy); Bettinardi, Valentino; Picchio, Maria [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy); Landoni, Claudio [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Gilardi, Maria Carla [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Milan (Italy); Versari, Annibale [Scientific Institute Santa Maria Nuova Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Fioroni, Federica [Scientific Institute Santa Maria Nuova Hospital, Medical Physics, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Dziuk, Miroslaw [Masovian PET-CT Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Military Institute of Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Koza, Magdalena [Masovian PET-CT Centre, Euromedic Diagnostic, Warsaw (Poland); Ahond-Vionnet, Renee; Collin, Bertrand [Hopital Pierre Beregovoy, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Nevers (France); Messa, Cristina [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Milan (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of our work is to evaluate the added diagnostic value of respiratory gated (4-D) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in lung lesion detection/characterization in a large patient population of a multicentre retrospective study. The data of 155 patients (89 men, 66 women, mean age 63.9 {+-} 11.1 years) from 5 European centres and submitted to standard (3-D) and 4-D PET/CT were retrospectively analysed. Overall, 206 lung lesions were considered for the analysis (mean {+-} SD lesions dimension 14.7 {+-} 11.8 mm). Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) and lesion detectability were assessed for both 3-D and 4-D PET/CT studies; 3-D and 4-D PET/CT findings were compared to clinical follow-up as standard reference. Mean {+-} SD 3-D and 4-D SUV{sub max} values were 5.2 {+-} 5.1 and 6.8 {+-} 6.1 (p < 0.0001), respectively, with an average percentage increase of 30.8 %. In 3-D PET/CT, 86 of 206 (41.7 %) lesions were considered positive, 70 of 206 (34 %) negative and 50 of 206 (24.3 %) equivocal, while in 4-D PET/CT 117 of 206 (56.8 %) lesions were defined as positive, 80 of 206 (38.8 %) negative and 9 of 206 (4.4 %) equivocal. In 34 of 50 (68 %) 3-D equivocal lesions follow-up data were available and the presence of malignancy was confirmed in 21 of 34 (61.8 %) lesions, while in 13 of 34 (38.2 %) was excluded. In 31 of these 34 controlled lesions, 20 of 34 (58.8 %) and 11 of 34 (32.4 %) were correctly classified by 4-D PET/CT as positive and negative, respectively; 3 of 34 (8.8 %) remained equivocal. With equivocal lesions classified as positive, the overall accuracy of 3-D and 4-D was 85.7 and 92.8 %, respectively, while the same figures were 80.5 and 94.2 % when equivocal lesions were classified as negative. The respiratory gated PET/CT technique is a valuable clinical tool in diagnosing lung lesions, improving quantification and confidence in reporting, reducing 3-D undetermined findings and increasing the overall accuracy in lung

  4. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions: rate of diagnostic success and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, Macello Jose Sampaio; Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard; Chung, Wu Tu; Chojniak, Rubens

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the rates of diagnostic success and complications of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions suspected for malignancy. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study including 186 cases of CT-guided percutaneous biopsies of bone lesions in the period from January, 2010 to December, 2012. All the specimens were obtained with 8-10 gauge needles. The following data were collected: demographics, previous history of malignancy, data related to the lesion, to the procedure, and to histological results. Results: Most patients were women (57%), and the mean age was 53.0 ± 16.4 years. In 139 cases (74.6%), there was diagnostic suspicion of metastasis and the most common primary tumors were breast (32.1%) and prostate (11.8%). The bones most commonly involved were spine (36.0%), hip (32.8%) and long bones (18.3%). Complications occurred in only three cases (1.6%) including bone fracture, paraesthesia with functional impairment, and needle breakage requiring surgical removal. The specimens collected from 183 lesions (98.4%) were considered appropriate for diagnosis. Malignant results were more frequently found in patients who had a suspected secondary lesion and history of known malignancy (p < 0.001), and in patients who underwent PET/CT-guided procedures (p = 0.011). Conclusion: CT-guided percutaneous biopsy is a safe and effective procedure for the diagnosis of suspicious bone lesions. (author)

  5. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions: rate of diagnostic success and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, Macello Jose Sampaio; Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard; Chung, Wu Tu; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: macellomaciel@me.com [A.C.Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: To determine the rates of diagnostic success and complications of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions suspected for malignancy. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study including 186 cases of CT-guided percutaneous biopsies of bone lesions in the period from January, 2010 to December, 2012. All the specimens were obtained with 8-10 gauge needles. The following data were collected: demographics, previous history of malignancy, data related to the lesion, to the procedure, and to histological results. Results: Most patients were women (57%), and the mean age was 53.0 ± 16.4 years. In 139 cases (74.6%), there was diagnostic suspicion of metastasis and the most common primary tumors were breast (32.1%) and prostate (11.8%). The bones most commonly involved were spine (36.0%), hip (32.8%) and long bones (18.3%). Complications occurred in only three cases (1.6%) including bone fracture, paraesthesia with functional impairment, and needle breakage requiring surgical removal. The specimens collected from 183 lesions (98.4%) were considered appropriate for diagnosis. Malignant results were more frequently found in patients who had a suspected secondary lesion and history of known malignancy (p < 0.001), and in patients who underwent PET/CT-guided procedures (p = 0.011). Conclusion: CT-guided percutaneous biopsy is a safe and effective procedure for the diagnosis of suspicious bone lesions. (author)

  6. Evaluation of capsule endoscopy to detect mucosal lesions associated with gastrointestinal bleeding in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davignon, D L; Lee, A C Y; Johnston, A N; Bowman, D D; Simpson, K W

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the utility of capsule endoscopy to detect mucosal abnormalities in dogs with gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Capsules were administered to 2 healthy controls and 8 patients with gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Images were evaluated for quality, gastric emptying time, small intestinal transit time and presence of lesions. There were no adverse effects of capsule endoscopy in dogs weighing from 7·7 to 58 kg. The capsule traversed the entire gastrointestinal tract in 5 of 8 patients, with high quality images obtained in the stomach and small intestine. Gastric emptying time and small intestinal transit time ranged from 1 to 270 and 15 to 180 minutes, respectively. In 3 of 8 patients, the capsule remained in the stomach despite pro-kinetics. Gastric lesions included mild haemorrhage and pinpoint erosion (4 of 8), a mass (1) and thickened bleeding pyloric mucosa (2). Two of 3 dogs with capsule retention had gastric lesions. Intestinal lesions included a healing duodenal ulcer, abnormal villi, ileal ulceration and colonic bleeding. Lesions identified by capsule endoscopy were considered a significant source of haemorrhage in 4 of 7 dogs with active bleeding. The relevance of pinpoint gastric mucosal erosions to blood loss is unclear. Capsule endoscopy can enable the non-invasive detection of gastric and small intestinal mucosal lesions in dogs presenting for evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  7. Duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection for benign cystic neoplastic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Hans G; Schwarz, Michael; Poch, Bertram

    2012-11-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are diagnosed frequently due to early use of abdominal imaging techniques. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, mucinous cystic neoplasm, and serous pseudopapillary neoplasia are considered pre-cancerous lesions because of frequent transformation to cancer. Complete surgical resection of the benign lesion is a pancreatic cancer preventive treatment. The application for a limited surgical resection for the benign lesions is increasingly used to reduce the surgical trauma with a short- and long-term benefit compared to major surgical procedures. Duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection introduced for inflammatory tumors in the pancreatic head transfers to the patient with a benign cystic lesion located in the pancreatic head, the advantages of a minimalized surgical treatment. Based on the experience of 17 patients treated for cystic neoplastic lesions with duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection, the surgical technique of total pancreatic head resection for adenoma, borderline tumors, and carcinoma in situ of cystic neoplasm is presented. A segmental resection of the peripapillary duodenum is recommended in case of suspected tissue ischemia of the peripapillary duodenum. In 305 patients, collected from the literature by PubMed search, in about 40% of the patients a segmental resection of the duodenum and 60% a duodenum and common bile duct-preserving total pancreatic head resection has been performed. Hospital mortality of the 17 patients was 0%. In 305 patients collected, the hospital mortality was 0.65%, 13.2% experienced a delay of gastric emptying and a pancreatic fistula in 18.2%. Recurrence of the disease was 1.5%. Thirty-two of 175 patients had carcinoma in situ. Duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection for benign cystic neoplastic lesions is a safe surgical procedure with low post-operative morbidity and mortality.

  8. Lesion complexity drives the cost of superficial femoral artery endovascular interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen L.; Nolan, Brian W.; Columbo, Jesse A.; Rzucidlo, Eva M.; Goodney, Philip P.; Walsh, Daniel B.; Atkinson, Benjamin J.; Powell, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Patients who undergo endovascular treatment of superficial femoral artery (SFA) disease vary greatly in lesion complexity and treatment options. This study examined the association of lesion severity and cost of SFA stenting and to determine if procedure cost affects primary patency at 1 year. Methods A retrospective record review identified patients undergoing initial SFA stenting between January 1, 2010, and February 1, 2012. Medical records were reviewed to collect data on demographics, comorbidities, indication for the procedure, TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) II severity, and primary patency. The interventional radiology database and hospital accounting database were queried to determine cost drivers of SFA stenting. Procedure supply cost included any item with a bar code used for the procedure. Associations between cost drivers and lesion characteristics were explored. Primary patency was determined using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and a log-rank test. Results During the study period, 95 patients underwent stenting in 98 extremities; of these, 61% of SFA stents were performed for claudication, with 80% of lesions classified as TASC II A or B. Primary patency at 1 year was 79% for the entire cohort. The mean total cost per case was $10,333. Increased procedure supply cost was associated with adjunct device use, the number of stents, and TASC II severity. Despite higher costs of treating more complex lesions, primary patency at 1 year was similar at 80% for high-cost (supply cost >$4000) vs 78% for low-cost (supply cost <$4000) interventions. Conclusions SFA lesion complexity, as defined by TASC II severity, drives the cost of endovascular interventions but does not appear to disadvantage patency at 1 year. Reimbursement agencies should consider incorporating disease severity into reimbursement algorithms for lower extremity endovascular interventions. PMID:26206581

  9. Diagnosing non-cavitated lesions in epidemiological studies: practical and scientific considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Joana Christina; Mestrinho, Heliana Dantas

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been growing interest in diagnosing non-cavitated lesions in epidemiological studies involving large numbers of preschool children, schoolchildren and young adults. In this context, assessment of lesions characteristics indicating whether or not there is ongoing mineral loss is also considered relevant. The reasoning sustained by these studies is that diagnosis of the caries process limited to the cavitated level is no longer in accordance with current state-of-the-art knowledge in cariology. This paper highlights one topic of the lecture entitled "Caries Process: Evolving Evidence and Understanding," presented at the 18th Congress of the Brazilian Association for Oral Health Promotion (Associação Brasileira de Odontologia de Promoção de Saúde - ABOPREV) in April 2013. In the framework of epidemiological studies, the interest in diagnosing active and inactive non-cavitated lesions was elucidated. However, relevant questions associated with the diagnosis of non-cavitated lesions that might raise concerns among researchers and health administrators were not addressed. The present paper aims to bring these questions into discussion. The contribution of this discussion in terms of developing the understanding of caries decline is analyzed by using data from a caries trends study of Brazilian preschool children residing in the Federal District of Brazil as an example. The inclusion of active and inactive non-cavitated lesions in the diagnosis of the caries process allowed us to demonstrate that, in Brazilian 1- to 5-year-old children, caries prevalence decreased significantly from 1996 to 2006, simultaneously with a reduction in the rate of caries progression.

  10. Spinal diffusion tensor tractography for differentiation of intramedullary tumor-suspected lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, K., E-mail: karl.egger@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Neuroradiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Breisacher Straße 64, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Hohenhaus, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Freiburg, Breisacher Straße 64, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Van Velthoven, V. [Department of Neurosurgery, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussel (Belgium); Heil, S.; Urbach, H. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Breisacher Straße 64, 79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Background and purpose: Primary MRI diagnosis of spinal intramedullary tumor-suspected lesions can be challenging and often requires spinal biopsy or resection with a substantial risk of neurological deficits. We evaluated whether Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) tractography can facilitate the differential diagnosis. Materials and methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients with an intramedullary tumor-suspected lesion considered for spinal surgery were studied with a Diffusion-weighted multi-shot read out segmented EPI sequence (RESOLVE). White matter tracts (“streamlines”) were calculated using the FACT algorithm and visually co-registered to a T2-weighted 3D sequence. The fused images were assessed concerning spinal streamline appearance as normal, displaced or terminated. Definite diagnosis was verified by histological analysis or further clinical work-up. Results: All patients with normal appearing streamlines (n = 6) showed an acute inflammatory demyelinating pathology in the further clinical work-up. In 10 patients streamline displacing lesions were found from which 5 patients underwent a surgical treatment with histologically confirmed low-grade tumors like ependymomas and pilocytic astrocytomas. In nine patients streamlines were terminated, from which 6 patients received a histology proven diagnoses with a more heterogenous spectrum (3 cases of high grade tumor, 1 case of low grade tumor with intralesional hemorrhage and 2 cases with gliosis but no tumor cells). Conclusion: Using multi-shot DTI spinal tractography acute inflammatory lesions can be differentiated from other tumorous intramedullary lesions. The entity diagnosis of spinal tumors seems to be more challenging, primarily due to the variety of factors like invasivity, expansion or intralesional hemorrhage.

  11. Chorioretinal Lesions Presumed Secondary to Zika Virus Infection in an Immunocompromised Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Christopher R; Al-Attar, Luma; Cruz-Chacón, Alexis M; Davis, Janet L

    2017-04-01

    Zika virus has spread rapidly throughout the Americas since 2015. The public health implications of Zika virus infection lend special importance to identifying the virus in unsuspected hosts. To describe relevant imaging studies and clinical features of chorioretinal lesions that are presumably associated with Zika virus and that share analogous features with chorioretinal lesions reported in cases of Dengue fever and West Nile virus. This is a case report from an academic referral center in Miami, Florida, of a woman in her 60s from Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, who presented with reduced visual acuity and bilateral diffuse, subretinal, confluent, placoid, and multifocal chorioretinal lesions. The patient was observed over a 5-month period. Visual acuity, clinical course, and multimodal imaging study results. Fluorescein angiography revealed early hypofluorescence and late staining of the chorioretinal lesions. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated outer retinal disruption in the placoid macular lesions. Zika RNA was detected in a plasma sample by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction testing and was suspected to be the cause of chorioretinal lesions after other viral and infectious causes were ruled out. Three weeks after the onset of symptoms, the patient's visual acuity had improved to 20/60 OD and 20/25 OS, with intraocular pressures of 18 mm Hg OD and 19 mm Hg OS. In 6 weeks, the chorioretinal lesions had healed and visual acuity had improved to 20/25 OD and 20/20 OS. Follow-up optical coherence tomography demonstrated interval recovery of the outer retina and photoreceptors. Acute-onset, self-resolving, placoid, or multifocal nonnecrotizing chorioretinal lesions may be a feature of active Zika virus chorioretinitis, as reported in other Flavivirus infections in adults. Similar findings in potentially exposed adults suggest that clinicians should consider IgM antibody or polymerase chain reaction testing for Zika virus as well as diagnostic

  12. Hepatic lesions that mimic metastasis on radiological imaging during chemotherapy for gastrointestinal malignancy: Recent updates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sung Hye; Park, Beom Jin; Kim, Yeul Hong [Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    During chemotherapy in patients with gastrointestinal malignancy, the hepatic lesions may occur as chemotherapy-induced lesions or tumor-associated lesions, with exceptions for infectious conditions and other incidentalomas. Focal hepatic lesions arising from chemotherapy-induced hepatopathies (such as chemotherapy-induced sinusoidal injury and steatosis) and tumor-associated eosinophilic abscess should be considered a mimicker of metastasis in patients with gastrointestinal malignancy. Accumulating evidence suggests that chemotherapy for gastrointestinal malignancy in the liver has roles in both the therapeutic effects for hepatic metastasis and injury to the non-tumor bearing hepatic parenchyma. In this article, we reviewed the updated concept of chemotherapy-induced hepatopathies and tumor-associated eosinophilic abscess in the liver, focusing on the pathological and radiological findings. Awareness of the causative chemo-agent, pathophysiology, and characteristic imaging findings of these mimickers is critical for accurate diagnosis and avoidance of unnecessary exposure of the patient to invasive tissue-based diagnosis and operation.

  13. Stroke Lesions in a Large Upper Limb Rehabilitation Trial Cohort Rarely Match Lesions in Common Preclinical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Matthew A.; Wang, Ximing; Liu, Brent; Ding, Li; Lane, Christianne J.; Park, Caron; Nelsen, Monica A.; Jones, Theresa A; Wolf, Steven L; Winstein, Carolee J; Dromerick, Alexander W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Stroke patients with mild-moderate upper extremity (UE) motor impairments and minimal sensory and cognitive deficits provide a useful model to study recovery and improve rehabilitation. Laboratory-based investigators use lesioning techniques for similar goals. Objective Determine whether stroke lesions in an UE rehabilitation trial cohort match lesions from the preclinical stroke recovery models used to drive translational research. Methods Clinical neuroimages from 297 participants enrolled in the Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE) study were reviewed. Images were characterized based on lesion type (ischemic or hemorrhagic), volume, vascular territory, depth (cortical gray matter, cortical white matter, subcortical), old strokes, and leukoaraiosis. Lesions were compared with those of preclinical stroke models commonly used to study upper limb recovery. Results Among the ischemic stroke participants, median infarct volume was 1.8 mL, with most lesions confined to subcortical structures (61%) including the anterior choroidal artery territory (30%) and the pons (23%). Of ICARE participants, stroke patients, but they represent a clinically and scientifically important subgroup. Compared to lesions in general stroke populations and widely-studied animal models of recovery, ICARE participants had smaller, more subcortically-based strokes. Improved preclinical-clinical translational efforts may require better alignment of lesions between preclinical and human stroke recovery models. PMID:28337932

  14. Radiologic appearance of primary jaw lesions in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Malini; Kaste, Sue C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Hopkins, Kenneth P. [Department of Surgery, Division of Dentistry, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Background: The jaw (an unusual site of primary tumors in children and adolescents) has lesions often found incidentally by dentists on routine panoramic radiographs or during examination of a child who has swelling or tooth pain. Objective: This pictorial seeks to familiarize pediatric radiologists with the radiographic appearance of a variety of primary jaw lesions. Materials and methods: We retrospectively searched institutional records for cases of primary jaw lesions in children and adolescents. Jaw lesions were characterized as: I, well-circumscribed radiolucent lesions; II, lesions with mixed or variable appearance; III, poorly circumscribed radiolucent lesions; and IV, radiopaque lesions. Results: Although most oral and maxillofacial lesions in children are benign, a broad spectrum of tumors was identified; lesions may occur in patients with unrelated prior malignancy. Conclusion: Because radiologic studies may identify jaw lesions and direct further care, familiarity with the appearance of these entities is prudent. (orig.)

  15. Molecular alterations in lesions of anogenital mammary-like glands and their mammary counterparts including hidradenoma papilliferum, intraductal papilloma, fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinova, Anastasia M; Vanecek, Tomas; Martinek, Petr; Kyrpychova, Liubov; Spagnolo, Dominic V; Stewart, Colin J R; Portelli, Francesca; Michal, Michal; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2017-06-01

    Lesions affecting anogenital mammary-like glands (AGMLG) are histopathologically very similar to those seen in the breast but whether this morphological similarity is also reflected at the genetic level is unknown. To compare the underlying molecular mechanisms in lesions of AGMLG and their mammary counterparts, we analyzed the mutational profile of 16 anogenital neoplasms including 5 hidradenomas papilliferum (HP), 1 lesion with features of HP and fibroadenoma (FA), 7 FA, 3 phyllodes tumors (PhT)) and 18 analogous breast lesions (6 intraductal papillomas (IDP), 9 FA, and 3 PhT) by high-coverage next generation sequencing (NGS) using a panel comprising 50 cancer-related genes. Additionally, all cases were analyzed for the presence of a mutation in the MED12 gene. All detected mutations with allele frequencies over 20% were independently validated by Sanger sequencing (concordance: 100%). Mutations in PIK3CA, AKT1, MET, ABL1 and TP53 genes were found in lesions of AGMLG and also their mammary counterparts. The PI3K-AKT cascade plays a role in tumors arising at both sites. It appears that some histopathologically similar anogenital and breast lesions develop along similar molecular pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Occipital neuralgia associates with high cervical spinal cord lesions in idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissoon, Narayan R; Watson, James C; Boes, Christopher J; Kantarci, Orhun H

    2018-01-01

    Background The association of trigeminal neuralgia with pontine lesions has been well documented in multiple sclerosis, and we tested the hypothesis that occipital neuralgia in multiple sclerosis is associated with high cervical spinal cord lesions. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 29 patients diagnosed with both occipital neuralgia and demyelinating disease by a neurologist from January 2001 to December 2014. We collected data on demographics, clinical findings, presence of C2-3 demyelinating lesions, and treatment responses. Results The patients with both occipital neuralgia and multiple sclerosis were typically female (76%) and had a later onset (age > 40) of occipital neuralgia (72%). Eighteen patients (64%) had the presence of C2-3 lesions and the majority had unilateral symptoms (83%) or episodic pain (78%). All patients with documented sensory loss (3/3) had C2-3 lesions. Most patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (6/8) had C2-3 lesions. Of the eight patients with C2-3 lesions and imaging at onset of occipital neuralgia, five (62.5%) had evidence of active demyelination. None of the patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (3/3) responded to occipital nerve blocks or high dose intravenous steroids, whereas all of the other phenotypes with long term follow-up (eight patients) had good responses. Conclusions A cervical spine MRI should be considered in all patients presenting with occipital neuralgia. In patients with multiple sclerosis, clinical features in occipital neuralgia that were predictive of the presence of a C2-3 lesion were unilateral episodic symptoms, sensory loss, later onset of occipital neuralgia, and progressive multiple sclerosis phenotype. Clinical phenotype predicted response to treatment.

  17. Lesion localization in aphasia without hemiparesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Midori; Senoh, Yoko; Okamoto, Koichi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hirai, Shunsaku

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of the lesions responsible for aphasia unassociated with right-sided hemiparesis was evaluated by cranial computed tomography (CT) among stroke patients. In the Broca aphasia group were observed atypical aphasic symptoms, and the lesions were far more localized than in ordinary Broca one. In the Wernicke aphasia group showed relatively large lesions in the left superior temporal gyrus, sometimes extending to supramarginal and angular gyri, which caused such additional symptoms as apraxia without motor paresis in some cases. In the Transcortical motor aphasia group showed the occlusion of the left internal carotid artery, though without obvious abnormality at CT. In another patient a circumscribed low density lesion was disclosed in the area anterior and superior to so-called Broca's area. In the Transcortical sensory aphasia group, the lesion involved the borderzone supplied by the left middle and posterior cerebral arteries. In the Amnestic aphasia group showed a lesion in the left parietal lobe, while in another no remarkable change was demonstrated. In the Global aphasia group, one had multiple isolated lesions in both anterior and posterior speech areas. Another showed a large lesion involving the whole territory of the left middle cerebral artery. In the remaining one a high density area was observed in the left superior temporal, supramarginal and angular gyri, not extending to the frontal lobe beyond with sylvian fissure. Therefore, in interpreting CTs of such aphasic patients we must take account of not only the extent of the lesion but also the severity of destruction. (J.P.N.)

  18. Lesion localization in aphasia without hemiparesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Midori; Senoh, Yoko; Okamoto, Koichi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hirai, Shunsaku (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-06-01

    The distribution of the lesions responsible for aphasia unassociated with right-sided hemiparesis was evaluated by cranial computed tomography (CT) among stroke patients. In the Broca aphasia group were observed atypical aphasic symptoms, and the lesions were far more localized than in ordinary Broca one. In the Wernicke aphasia group showed relatively large lesions in the left superior temporal gyrus, sometimes extending to supramarginal and angular gyri, which caused such additional symptoms as apraxia without motor paresis in some cases. In the Transcortical motor aphasia group showed the occlusion of the left internal carotid artery, though without obvious abnormality at CT. In another patient a circumscribed low density lesion was disclosed in the area anterior and superior to so-called Broca's area. In the Transcortical sensory aphasia group, the lesion involved the borderzone supplied by the left middle and posterior cerebral arteries. In the Amnestic aphasia group showed a lesion in the left parietal lobe, while in another no remarkable change was demonstrated. In the Global aphasia group, one had multiple isolated lesions in both anterior and posterior speech areas. Another showed a large lesion involving the whole territory of the left middle cerebral artery. In the remaining one a high density area was observed in the left superior temporal, supramarginal and angular gyri, not extending to the frontal lobe beyond with sylvian fissure. Therefore, in interpreting CTs of such aphasic patients we must take account of not only the extent of the lesion but also the severity of destruction.

  19. To die or not to die? Lessons from lesion mimic mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin eBruggeman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD is a ubiquitous genetically regulated process consisting in an activation of finely controlled signaling pathways that lead to cellular suicide. Although some aspects of PCD control appear evolutionary conserved between plants, animals and fungi, the extent of conservation remains controversial. Over the last decades, identification and characterization of several lesion mimic mutants (LMM has been a powerful tool in the quest to unravel PCD pathways in plants. Thanks to progress in molecular genetics, mutations causing the phenotype of a large number of LMM and their related suppressors were mapped, and the identification of the mutated genes shed light on major pathways in the onset of plant PCD such as (i the involvements of chloroplasts and light energy, (ii the roles of sphingolipids and fatty acids, (iii a signal perception at the plasma membrane that requires efficient membrane trafficking, (iv secondary messengers such as ion fluxes and ROS and (v the control of gene expression as the last integrator of the signaling pathways.

  20. [Genetics factors in pathogenesis and clinical genetics of binge eating disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibitov, А О; Мazo, G E

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies have shown that binge eating disorder (ВЕD) aggregates in families, heritability was estimated as about 60% and additive genetic influences on BED up to 50%. Using a genetic approach has proved useful for verifying the diagnostic categories of BED using DSM-IV criteria and supporting the validity of considering this pathology as a separate nosological category. The results confirmed the genetic and pathogenic originality of BED as a separate psychopathological phenomenon, but not a subtype of obesity. It seems fruitful to considerate BED as a disease with hereditary predisposition with significant genetic influence and a complex psychopathological syndrome, including not only eating disorders, but also depressive and addictive component. A possible mechanism of pathogenesis of BED may be the interaction of the neuroendocrine and neurotransmitters systems including the active involvement of the reward system in response to a variety of chronic stress influences with the important modulatory role of specific personality traits. The high level of genetic influence on the certain clinical manifestations of BED confirms the ability to identify the subphenotypes of BED on genetic basis involving clinical criteria. It can not only contribute to further genetic studies, taking into account more homogeneous samples, but also help in finding differentiated therapeutic approaches.

  1. The value of dual time point 18F-FDG PET imaging for the differentiation between malignant and benign lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, X.-L.; Zhang, Y.-X.; Wu, Z.-J.; Jia, Q.; Wei, H.; Gao, Z.-R.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess the clinical value of dual time point 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET) imaging for the differentiation between malignant and benign lesions. Materials and methods: Ninety-six patients (28 patients with primary lung cancer, 18 patients with digestive system carcinoma, 13 patients with other malignant tumours, and 37 patients with benign lesions) underwent FDG-PET/CT at two time points: examination 1 at 45-55 min and examination 2 at 160 ± 24 (150-180) min after the intravenous injection of 233 ± 52 (185-370) MBq 18 F-FDG. Reconstructed images were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. The maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of the lesions were calculated for both time points. An increase was considered to have occurred if the SUVs at examination 2 had increased by >10% as compared with those at the examination 1. Results: The lesions in 24 of 28 (86%) patients with primary lung cancer had an SUVmax ≥2.5 at examination 1. Of these, SUVmax values increased in 23 patients, but had not changed in one patient, at examination 2. The lesions in the other four patients with primary lung tumour had SUVmax values between 1.5 and 2.5 at examination 1, which were considered as suspected positive, increased SUVmax values were observed in three of these patients at examination 2. The malignant lesions in 17 of 18 patients with digestive system carcinoma showed SUVmax values ≥2.5 and only one patient had an SUVmax value 18 F-FDG PET imaging is an important noninvasive method for the differentiation of malignant and nonmalignant lesions

  2. Triple approach for diagnosing breast lesions-experience at a Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Mehta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast lesions are always a diagnostic challenge and range from benign to malignant. Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC is done in patients with breast lesions. However, to get an accurate and diagnostic yield is difficult at times. Aims: The aim of this study is to highlight the role of triple approach in diagnosing breast lesions. Design and Setting: This is an observational prospective study carried out in the Department of Pathology at a tertiary care hospital over 2 years. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty cases of breast lump were studied. Clinical findings, imaging findings, and cytology along with histopathological findings were correlated. Results: Cytological findings were benign in 102 out of 107 patients, who were otherwise clinically and radiologically benign. In rest five patients, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data Systems (BIRADS BIRADS II category was given on mammography. In four of these five patients, there was cytological atypia. Biopsy in these four patients showed features of fibroadenoma with mild cytological atypia and one patient showed infiltrating duct carcinoma. Mammography was suggestive of malignant breast lump in 43 patients. In three patients, breast lump was diagnosed as benign on cytological examination. However, histopathological examination confirmed the mammography findings of malignancy. Conclusion: FNAC is a well-established procedure for diagnosing breast lesion but has got many pitfalls. Hence for diagnosis a breast lesion, the triple approach consisting of histopathological examination in addition to mammography and FNAC, should be considered.

  3. Brain MRI lesions and atrophy are associated with employment status in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauhid, Shahamat; Chu, Renxin; Sasane, Rahul; Glanz, Bonnie I; Neema, Mohit; Miller, Jennifer R; Kim, Gloria; Signorovitch, James E; Healy, Brian C; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Bakshi, Rohit

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) commonly affects occupational function. We investigated the link between brain MRI and employment status. Patients with MS (n = 100) completed a Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) (general health version) survey measuring employment status, absenteeism, presenteeism, and overall work and daily activity impairment. Patients "working for pay" were considered employed; "temporarily not working but looking for work," "not working or looking for work due to age," and "not working or looking for work due to disability" were considered not employed. Brain MRI T1 hypointense (T1LV) and T2 hyperintense (T2LV) lesion volumes were quantified. To assess lesional destructive capability, we calculated each subject's ratio of T1LV to T2LV (T1/T2). Normalized brain parenchymal volume (BPV) assessed brain atrophy. The mean (SD) age was 45.5 (9.7) years; disease duration was 12.1 (8.1) years; 75 % were women, 76 % were relapsing-remitting, and 76 % were employed. T1LV, T1/T2, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores, and activity impairment were lower and BPV was higher in the employed vs. not employed group (Wilcoxon tests, p 0.05). In multivariable logistic regression modeling, adjusting for age, sex, and disease duration, higher T1LV predicted a lower chance of employment (p 0.05). We report a link between brain atrophy and lesions, particularly lesions with destructive potential, to MS employment status.

  4. Lesion-induced increase in survival and migration of human neural progenitor cells releasing GDNF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrstock, Soshana; Ebert, Allison D.; Klein, Sandra; Schmitt, Melanie; Moore, Jeannette M.; Svendsen, Clive N.

    2009-01-01

    The use of human neural progenitor cells (hNPC) has been proposed to provide neuronal replacement or astrocytes delivering growth factors for brain disorders such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease. Success in such studies likely requires migration from the site of transplantation and integration into host tissue in the face of ongoing damage. In the current study, hNPC modified to release glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (hNPCGDNF) were transplanted into either intact or lesioned animals. GDNF release itself had no effect on the survival, migration or differentiation of the cells. The most robust migration and survival was found using a direct lesion of striatum (Huntington’s model) with indirect lesions of the dopamine system (Parkinson’s model) or intact animals showing successively less migration and survival. No lesion affected differentiation patterns. We conclude that the type of brain injury dictates migration and integration of hNPC which has important consequences when considering transplantation of these cells as a therapy for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19044202

  5. Understanding participation by African Americans in cancer genetics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jasmine A; Barg, Frances K; Weathers, Benita; Guerra, Carmen E; Troxel, Andrea B; Domchek, Susan; Bowen, Deborah; Shea, Judy A; Halbert, Chanita Hughes

    2012-01-01

    Understanding genetic factors that contribute to racial differences in cancer outcomes may reduce racial disparities in cancer morbidity and mortality. Achieving this goal will be limited by low rates of African American participation in cancer genetics research. We conducted a qualitative study with African American adults (n = 91) to understand attitudes about participating in cancer genetics research and to identify factors that are considered when making a decision about participating in this type of research. Participants would consider the potential benefits to themselves, family members, and their community when making a decision to participate in cancer genetics research. However, concerns about exploitation, distrust of researchers, and investigators' motives were also important to participation decisions. Individuals would also consider who has access to their personal information and what would happen to these data. Side effects, logistical issues, and the potential to gain knowledge about health issues were also described as important factors in decision making. African Americans may consider a number of ethical, legal, and social issues when making a decision to participate in cancer genetics research. These issues should be addressed as part of recruitment efforts.

  6. Juxtacortical Lesions and Cortical Thinning in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareto, D; Sastre-Garriga, J; Auger, C; Vives-Gilabert, Y; Delgado, J; Tintoré, M; Montalban, X; Rovira, A

    2015-12-01

    The role of juxtacortical lesions in brain volume loss in multiple sclerosis has not been fully clarified. The aim of this study was to explore the role of juxtacortical lesions on cortical atrophy and to investigate whether the presence of juxtacortical lesions is related to local cortical thinning in the early stages of MS. A total of 131 patients with clinically isolated syndrome or with relapsing-remitting MS were scanned on a 3T system. Patients with clinically isolated syndrome were classified into 3 groups based on the presence and topography of brain lesions: no lesions (n = 24), only non-juxtacortical lesions (n = 33), and juxtacortical lesions and non-juxtacortical lesions (n = 34). Patients with relapsing-remitting MS were classified into 2 groups: only non-juxtacortical lesions (n = 10) and with non-juxtacortical lesions and juxtacortical lesions (n = 30). A juxtacortical lesion probability map was generated, and cortical thickness was measured by using FreeSurfer. Juxtacortical lesion volume in relapsing-remitting MS was double that of patients with clinically isolated syndrome. The insula showed the highest density of juxtacortical lesions, followed by the temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital lobes. Patients with relapsing-remitting MS with juxtacortical lesions showed significantly thinner cortices overall and in the parietal and temporal lobes compared with those with clinically isolated syndrome with normal brain MR imaging. The volume of subcortical structures (thalamus, pallidum, putamen, and accumbens) was significantly decreased in relapsing-remitting MS with juxtacortical lesions compared with clinically isolated syndrome with normal brain MR imaging. The spatial distribution of juxtacortical lesions was not found to overlap with areas of cortical thinning. Cortical thinning and subcortical gray matter volume loss in patients with a clinically isolated syndrome or relapsing-remitting MS was related to the presence of juxtacortical

  7. DW-MRI of liver lesions: Can a single ADC-value represent the entire lesion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid-Tannwald, C.; Dahi, F.; Jiang, Y.; Ivancevic, M.K.; Rist, C.; Sethi, I.; Oommen, J.; Oto, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate whether focal liver lesions (FLLs) exhibit a homogeneous appearance on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps and whether there is inter-section variation in the calculated ADC values of FLLs (inter-section range). Materials and methods: Eighty-eight patients with 128 FLLs (70 benign, 58 malignant) who underwent abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI were included. Two observers evaluated variation of signal intensity of each FLL within each ADC map image (intra-section) and among different ADC map images through the lesion (inter-section). ADC values of each FLL and neighbouring liver parenchyma were measured on all sections. The inter-section range of FLLs was compared with the neighbouring liver parenchyma. Results: Intra-section inhomogeneity was noted in 39.8% (97/244 sections) and 38.9% (95/244) of benign lesions, and 61% (114/187 sections) and 61.5% (115/187) of malignant lesions, by observer 1 and observer 2, respectively. Inter-section inhomogeneity was noted in 25.7% (18/70) and 27.1% (19/70) of benign lesions, and 51.7% (30/58) and 50% (29/58) of malignant lesions, by observer 1 and observer 2, respectively. The inter-section range for both benign (0.28 × 10 −3  mm²/s) and malignant (0.25 × 10 −3  mm²/s) FLLs were significantly greater than that of liver parenchyma surrounding benign (0.16 × 10 −3  mm²/s, p < 0.001) and malignant (0.14 × 10 −3  mm²/s, p = 0.01) FLLs. Conclusion: Due to intra-/inter-section variations in ADC values of benign and malignant FLLs, a single ADC value may not reliably represent the entire lesion

  8. Differentiated vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia is often found in lesions, previously diagnosed as lichen sclerosus, which have progressed to vulvar squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Nieuwenhof, Hedwig P.; Bulten, Johan; Hollema, Harrie; Dommerholt, Rianne G.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; de Hullu, Joanne A.; van Kempen, Leon C. L. T.

    Lichen sclerosus is considered to be the precursor lesion of vulvar squamous cell carcinoma, of which only 2-5% progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Differentiated vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) has been proposed to be the direct precursor lesion, but this is a recently recognized, and a

  9. Image covariance and lesion detectability in direct fan-beam x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frédéric

    2008-05-21

    We consider noise in computed tomography images that are reconstructed using the classical direct fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, from both full- and short-scan data. A new, accurate method for computing image covariance is presented. The utility of the new covariance method is demonstrated by its application to the implementation of a channelized Hotelling observer for a lesion detection task. Results from the new covariance method and its application to the channelized Hotelling observer are compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the impact of a bowtie filter and x-ray tube current modulation on reconstruction noise and lesion detectability are explored for full-scan reconstruction.

  10. Image covariance and lesion detectability in direct fan-beam x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    We consider noise in computed tomography images that are reconstructed using the classical direct fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, from both full- and short-scan data. A new, accurate method for computing image covariance is presented. The utility of the new covariance method is demonstrated by its application to the implementation of a channelized Hotelling observer for a lesion detection task. Results from the new covariance method and its application to the channelized Hotelling observer are compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the impact of a bowtie filter and x-ray tube current modulation on reconstruction noise and lesion detectability are explored for full-scan reconstruction

  11. ‘Emotional Intelligence’: Lessons from Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeveen, J.; Salvi, C.; Grafman, J.

    2018-01-01

    ‘Emotional intelligence’ (EI) is one of the most highly used psychological terms in popular nomenclature, yet its construct, divergent, and predictive validities are contentiously debated. Despite this debate, the EI construct is composed of a set of emotional abilities – recognizing emotional states in the self and others, using emotions to guide thought and behavior, understanding how emotions shape behavior, and emotion regulation – that undoubtedly influence important social and personal outcomes. In this review, evidence from human lesion studies is reviewed in order to provide insight into the necessary brain regions for each of these core emotional abilities. Critically, we consider how this neuropsychological evidence might help to guide efforts to define and measure EI. PMID:27647325

  12. Tratamiento no quirúrgico de lesiones periapicales Non-surgical treatment of periapical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pablo Ferro Benítez

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available El tratamiento de dientes con lesiones periapicales crónicas ha sido estudiado por diferentes autores en el campo endodóntico. Basados en los resultados obtenidos en diferentes trabajos experimentales, nos propusimos realizar la presente investigación, tomando 30 dientes humanos que al momento de realizar el tratamiento pulpo-radicular mostraban presencia de lesiones periapicales con diámetros variables, por encima de los 5 mm . Se tuvieron en cuenta 2 grupos: en uno de ellos se les realizaron a los conductos radiculares rellenos temporales de pasta de hidróxido de calcio y agua destilada; en el otro grupo a estos conductos se les realizaron rellenos temporales con pasta de hidróxido de calcio, agua destilada y paramonoclorofenol alcanforado. Se evaluó la disminución de las lesiones periapicales en ambos grupos a los 3 y 6 meses de iniciado el tratamiento, sin que se observaran diferencias estadísticamente significativas. Igual ocurrió en la evaluación de la reparación ósea periapical a los 9 meses de iniciado el tratamiento. Con ambas técnicas los resultados fueron satisfactorios, lo que demuestra una participación activa del hidróxido de calcio en la reparación de las lesiones periapicales, independientemente de su asociación con el paramonoclorofenol alcanforado.The treatment of teeth with chronic periapical lesions has been studied by different authors in the endodontics field. Based on the results attained in different experimental works, we proposed ourselves to make the present research taking 30 human teeth that at the time of applying the pulpar radicular treatment presented periapical lesions with variable diameters over 5 mm. Two groups were taken into account: in one of them, the radicular ducts were temporarily filled up with calcium hydroxide paste and distilled water, whereas in the other one these ducts were filled up with calcium hydroxide paste, distilled water and camphorated paramonochlorophenol. The

  13. CXCR3-dependent microglial recruitment is essential for dendrite loss after brain lesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rappert, A; Bechmann, [No Value; Pivneva, T; Mahlo, J; Biber, K; Nolte, C; Kovac, AD; Gerard, C; Boddeke, HWGM; Nitsch, R; Kettenmann, H

    2004-01-01

    Microglia are the resident macrophage population of the CNS and are considered its major immunocompetent elements. They are activated by any type of brain pathology and can migrate to the lesion site. The chemokine CXCL10 is expressed in neurons in response to brain injury and is a signaling

  14. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can be class......Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can...... be classified according to previously suggested radiologic characteristics and how this classification relates to prognosis. Searching the databases of eight tertiary referral centres we identified 90 adult patients (61 women, 29 men; mean age 34 years) with ≥1 AIIDL. We collected their demographic, clinical...

  15. Measuring Cutaneous Lesions: Trends in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shali; Blalock, Travis W

    2018-03-01

    Knowing the size of a cutaneous lesion can be important for tracking its progression over time, selecting the proper treatment modality, surgical planning, determining prognosis, and accurate billing. However, providers vary in their consistency, accuracy, and methods of measuring cutaneous lesions. To investigate the clinical practices of US dermatologists and dermatologic surgeons regarding how they determine the size of cutaneous lesions. A survey was electronically distributed to members of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. Four hundred twenty-six dermatologists completed the online survey. When a lesion is suspected to be malignant, 85% of respondents obtained exact measurements most, if not all, of the time; however, only 8% did for benign lesions. Most providers determined lesion sizes themselves rather than delegating to staff. When performing visual estimation, approximately three-quarters believed that they were accurate to within 1 to 2 mm. The top reasons for obtaining exact measurements were for tracking atypical pigmented lesions, determining treatment pathways, and accurate billing. The majority of respondents believed that lesion size affected management decisions; however, the need for exact measurement remains controversial, particularly for benign lesions. Future studies may investigate whether taking exact versus estimated measurements has an effect on outcomes.

  16. Male breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matushita, J.P.K.; Andrade, L.G. de; Carregal, E.; Marimatsu, R.I.; Matushita, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Roentgenographic examination of the male breast is an important aspect of the continued, intensive investigation of the radiologic morphology of the normal and diseased breast conducted in 17 cases examined at the Instituto Nacional do Cancer - RJ. It is purpose of this report to present the Roentgen appearance of various lesions of the male breast as they have been found in our practice and also to stress some of the difficulties in the differential diagnosis of these lesions. (author) [pt

  17. Risks of Being Malignant or High Risk and Their Characteristics in Breast Lesions 20 mm or Larger After Benign Results on Ultrasonography-Guided 14-Gauge Core Needle Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2016-06-01

    The malignancy risk, risk of being high-risk lesions after benign results on ultrasonography-guided 14-gauge core needle biopsies (US-CNBs), and their characteristics in breast lesions of 20 mm or greater were investigated. Eight hundred forty-seven breast lesions with benign results on US-CNB were classified as benign, high risk, and malignant through excision and clinical follow-up. The risks of being malignant or high risk were analyzed in all lesions, lesions 20 to 29 mm, and lesions 30 mm or greater. Their clinicopathological characteristics were evaluated. Of 847, 18 (2.1%) were malignant, 53 (6.3%) were high-risk lesions, and 776 (91.6%) were benign. Of 18 malignancies, 6 (33.3%) were malignant phyllodes tumors and 12 (66.7%) were carcinomas. In benign lesions 20 to 29 mm, risks of being malignant or high risk were 1.6% (9 of 566) and 4.4% (25 of 566). In 281 lesions 30 mm or greater, the risks of being malignant or high risk were 3.2% and 10%. The risk of being high risk in lesions 30 mm or greater was 10%, significantly higher than 4.4% of lesions 20 to 29 mm (P = 0.002). Excision can be considered in lesions measuring 20 mm or larger because of the 2.1% malignancy risk and the 6.3% risk of being high-risk lesions despite benign results on US-CNB. Excision should be considered in lesions measuring 30 mm or larger because of the 3.2% malignancy risk and the 10% risk of being high-risk lesions.

  18. A rare diagnosis of a focal liver lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Del Prato

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Splenosis can be considered as a benign condition due to the presence of heterotopic splenic tissue in abdomen, thorax and pelvis because of a massive splenic trauma or surgery. Here we report the case of a patient with an unknown hepatic mass, chronic hepatitis C, liver cirrhosis and a previous splenectomy after abdominal trauma. In our case lesion could not be clearly defined by ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance. Classical features of malignancy were not demonstrated at computed tomography, while at magnetic resonance imaging the differential diagnosis of the lesion appeared quite difficult and debate. Then an ultrasound-guided biopsy demonstrated the liver mass in left hepatic lobe consisted of splenic tissue and some millimetric accessory spleens in the left upper quadrant. So the possibility of an intra-hepatic splenosis should be taken into account in patients with an unknown liver mass and a history of previous abdominal trauma, followed by splenectomy. The conclusive diagnosis of intra-hepatic splenosis was given by ultrasound-guided biopsy.

  19. Thermophysical lesions caused by HZE particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Malachowski, M.; Nelson, A.; Philpott, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper deals with a type of damage caused by heavy particles that may occur in subcellular structures. These lesions are called thermophysical radiation injury and are similar to damage produced in solids by HZE particles. This chapter summarizes some of the experimental evidence for the presence of these lesions in certain mammalian tissues including the retina, brain, cornea, lens of mice and seeds of corn. Of all tissues examined, only the cornea exhibited a type of lesion which would fulfill the criteria of thermophysical lesions

  20. Disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis diagnosis based on oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Preto Webber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a deep mycosis with primary lung manifestations that may present cutaneous and oral lesions. Oral lesions mimic other infectious diseases or even squamous cell carcinoma, clinically and microscopically. Sometimes, the dentist is the first to detect the disease, because lung lesions are asymptomatic, or even misdiagnosed. An unusual case of PCM with 5 months of evolution presenting pulmonary, oral, and cutaneous lesions that was diagnosed by the dentist based on oral lesions is presented and discussed.

  1. The use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between benign and malignant breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Fernanda Philadelpho Arantes; Martins, Gabriela; Domingues, Marisa Nassar Aidar; Domingues, Romeu Cortes [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: fephila@gmail.com; Figueiredo, Eduardo [GE Healthcare, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Lea Mirian Barbosa da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2009-09-15

    Objective: to study the utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between benign and malignant breast lesions. Materials and methods: forty-five women (mean age, 46.1 years) with 52 focal breast lesions underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The calculation of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was based on the ADC map reflecting five b values (0, 250, 500, 750, and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}). The mean ADC value of each lesion was correlated with imaging findings and histopathologic results. Cutoff ADC, sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted imaging in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions were calculated. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: the mean ADC was significantly lower for malignant lesions (0.92 {+-} 0.26 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) as compared with benign lesions (1.50 {+-} 0.34 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) (P < 0.0001). Diffusion-weighted imaging showed high sensitivity and specificity (both, 92.3%) in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. Conclusion: diffusion-weighted imaging is a potential resource as an adjuvant to breast magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate benign from malignant lesions. Such sequence can be easily added to the standard breast magnetic resonance imaging protocol, without implying any significant increase in examination time. (author)

  2. Genetics Home Reference: esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are some genetic conditions more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Isolated EA/TEF is considered to be a multifactorial condition, which means that multiple gene variations and environmental factors likely contribute to its occurrence. ...

  3. Lesiones periapicales agudas en pacientes adultos Acute periapical lesions in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Fernández Collazo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio analítico de corte transversal en el área de salud del Policlínico "27 de Noviembre" del municipio Marianao, La Habana, en el periodo correspondiente de enero a diciembre de 2009. Se incluyeron todos los pacientes que acudieron al servicio de urgencia y que presentaron lesiones periapicales agudas. Se recogió información de las variables edad, sexo, grupo dentario, causa de la enfermedad, características clínicas e higiene bucal. Esta última se clasificó en las categorías eficiente y deficiente según el índice simplificado de higiene bucal. Se utilizó el X² para estimar la relación entre las variables, y la comparación de proporciones para contrastar la hipótesis de que existieran diferencias entre las lesiones periapicales para las categorías de las variables grupo dentario, causa de la enfermedad y características clínicas. Se encontró un predominio del absceso periapical agudo en un 84,7 % del grupo de edad de 35 a 59 años y del sexo masculino, aunque no se encontraron diferencias significativas para estas variables, ni en los grupos dentarios con respecto a la enfermedad. La higiene bucal resultó estar relacionada con las lesiones periapicales. Se encontraron diferencias significativas en las lesiones periapicales respecto a todas las causas estudiadas, con excepción de las enfermedades periodontales. Respecto a las características clínicas hubo significación en cuanto al aumento de volumen del fondo del surco vestibular y la movilidad dentaria.A cross-sectional and analytical study was conducted in the health area of the "27 de Noviembre" of Marianao municipality, La Habana, from January to December, 2009 including all patients came to emergency service presenting with acute periapical lesions. Information on following variables was available: age, sex, dental group, cause of disease, clinical features and oral hygiene. This latter was classified in the efficient and deficient categories

  4. Altered growth pattern, not altered growth per se, is the hallmark of early lesions preceding cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doratiotto, S; Marongiu, F; Faedda, S; Pani, P; Laconi, E

    2009-01-01

    Many human solid cancers arise from focal proliferative lesions that long precede the overt clinical appearance of the disease. The available evidence supports the notion that cancer precursor lesions are clonal in origin, and this notion forms the basis for most of the current theories on the pathogenesis of neoplastic disease. In contrast, far less attention has been devoted to the analysis of the phenotypic property that serves to define these focal lesions, i.e. their altered growth pattern. In fact, the latter is often considered a mere morphological by-product of clonal growth, with no specific relevance in the process. In the following study, evidence will be presented to support the concept that focal growth pattern is an inherent property of altered cells, independent of clonal growth; furthermore, it will be discussed how such a property, far from being merely descriptive, might indeed play a fundamental role in the sequence of events leading to the development of cancer. Within this paradigm, the earliest steps of neoplasia should be considered and analysed as defects in the mechanisms of tissue pattern formation.

  5. Benign clavicular lesions that may mimic malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerscovich, E.G.; Greenspan, A.; Szabo, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Nontraumatic lesions of the clavicle are infrequent. Of these, malignant tumors are more common than benign lesions. From January 1988 to January 1990, we examined 17 patients with benign lesions of the clavicle; in 8, the morphologic appearance of the lesion raised the possibility of malignancy in the differential diagnosis. The radiologic findings in these patients are presented. We propose that the unique shape and embryologic development of the clavicle may contribute to the atypical, aggressive presentation of some benign lesions in that bone. (orig.)

  6. The radiology in the solitary bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, G.A.; Cardoso, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    Three methods of radiologic analysis of the solitary bone lesions are reviewed. 1. Radiological analysis of the lesions with the objective to suppose the histologic type; 2. To appreciate the velocity of growth and aggressiveness of the lesions. 3. To appreciate the biological behaviour of the bone lesions, making the diagnosis necessary for the treatment. (M.A.C.) [pt

  7. Peripheral Exophytic Oral Lesions: A Clinical Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mortazavi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of peripheral oral exophytic lesions might be quite challenging. This review article aimed to introduce a decision tree for oral exophytic lesions according to their clinical features. General search engines and specialized databases including PubMed, PubMed Central, Medline Plus, EBSCO, Science Direct, Scopus, Embase, and authenticated textbooks were used to find relevant topics by means of keywords such as “oral soft tissue lesion,” “oral tumor like lesion,” “oral mucosal enlargement,” and “oral exophytic lesion.” Related English-language articles published since 1988 to 2016 in both medical and dental journals were appraised. Upon compilation of data, peripheral oral exophytic lesions were categorized into two major groups according to their surface texture: smooth (mesenchymal or nonsquamous epithelium-originated and rough (squamous epithelium-originated. Lesions with smooth surface were also categorized into three subgroups according to their general frequency: reactive hyperplastic lesions/inflammatory hyperplasia, salivary gland lesions (nonneoplastic and neoplastic, and mesenchymal lesions (benign and malignant neoplasms. In addition, lesions with rough surface were summarized in six more common lesions. In total, 29 entities were organized in the form of a decision tree in order to help clinicians establish a logical diagnosis by a stepwise progression method.

  8. Prevalence of lesions associated with subclinical laminitis in first-lactation cows from herds with high milk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilie, R H; Hoblet, K H; Weiss, W P; Eastridge, M L; Rings, D M; Schnitkey, G L

    1996-05-01

    To determine prevalence of lesions associated with subclinical laminitis in first-lactation Holstein cows during early lactation and pregnant Holstein heifers during late gestation in herds with high milk production. Cross-sectional study. 203 cattle in 13 herbs. Cattle were placed in lateral recumbency to allow visual examination and photography of their hooves. Claws on a forelimb and hind limb were examined on all cattle. Observable categories of lesions considered to be associated with subclinical laminitis in our study included yellow waxy discoloration of the sole, hemorrhage of the sole, separation of the white line, and erosion of the heel. Lesions in at least 1 of the categories were found in all herds. Lesions in all categories were found in 11 of 13 herds. Among claws, hemorrhage of the sole was observed most frequently in the lateral claw of the hoof of the hind limb. When days in milk was treated as a covariate, significant (P < 0.01) differences were detected in the prevalence of lesions between herds. Because the prevalence of lesions differed significantly among herds, it is logical to believe that causative factors and corrective measures also may have differed among herds.

  9. Iron and Non-Iron-Related Characteristics of Multiple Sclerosis and Neuromyelitis Optica Lesions at 7T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, S; Kister, I; Wuerfel, J; Brisset, J-C; Liu, S; Sinnecker, T; Dusek, P; Haacke, E M; Paul, F; Ge, Y

    2016-07-01

    Characterization of iron deposition associated with demyelinating lesions of multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica has not been well studied. Our aim was to investigate the potential of ultra-high-field MR imaging to distinguish MS from neuromyelitis optica and to characterize tissue injury associated with iron pathology within lesions. Twenty-one patients with MS and 21 patients with neuromyelitis optica underwent 7T high-resolution 2D-gradient-echo-T2* and 3D-susceptibility-weighted imaging. An in-house-developed algorithm was used to reconstruct quantitative susceptibility mapping from SWI. Lesions were classified as "iron-laden" if they demonstrated hypointensity on gradient-echo-T2*-weighted images and/or SWI and hyperintensity on quantitative susceptibility mapping. Lesions were considered "non-iron-laden" if they were hyperintense on gradient-echo-T2* and isointense or hyperintense on quantitative susceptibility mapping. Of 21 patients with MS, 19 (90.5%) demonstrated at least 1 quantitative susceptibility mapping-hyperintense lesion, and 11/21 (52.4%) had iron-laden lesions. No quantitative susceptibility mapping-hyperintense or iron-laden lesions were observed in any patients with neuromyelitis optica. Iron-laden and non-iron-laden lesions could each be further characterized into 2 distinct patterns based on lesion signal and morphology on gradient-echo-T2*/SWI and quantitative susceptibility mapping. In MS, most lesions (n = 262, 75.9% of all lesions) were hyperintense on gradient-echo T2* and isointense on quantitative susceptibility mapping (pattern A), while a small minority (n = 26, 7.5% of all lesions) were hyperintense on both gradient-echo-T2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping (pattern B). Iron-laden lesions (n = 57, 16.5% of all lesions) were further classified as nodular (n = 22, 6.4%, pattern C) or ringlike (n = 35, 10.1%, pattern D). Ultra-high-field MR imaging may be useful in distinguishing MS from neuromyelitis optica. Different

  10. Study on the Association between Tail Lesion Score, Cold Carcass Weight, and Viscera Condemnations in Slaughter Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Dayane Lemos; Harley, Sarah; Hanlon, Alison; O’Connell, Niamh Elizabeth; More, Simon John; Manzanilla, Edgar Garcia; Boyle, Laura Ann

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between tail lesions, cold carcass weight, and viscera condemnations in an Irish abattoir. The following data were collected at the evisceration point from every third pig slaughtered over 7 days: farm identification, sex, tail lesion score, viscera inspection outcome, and cold carcass weight. Tail lesions were scored according to a 5-point scale. Disease lesions responsible for lung (pleurisy, pneumonia, and abscess), heart (pericarditis), and liver (ascariasis) condemnation were recorded based on the decision of the veterinary inspector (VI). Data on 3,143 pigs from 61 batches were available. The relationship between disease lesions, tail lesion score, and cold carcass weight was studied at individual carcass level, while the relationship between disease lesions and tail lesion score was studied at both carcass and batch level. Tail lesions (score ≥1) were found in 72% of the study population, with 2.3% affected by severe tail lesions (scores ≥3). Pleurisy (13.7%) followed by pneumonia (10.4%) showed the highest prevalence, whereas the prevalence of ascariasis showed the greatest variation between batches (0–75%). Tail lesion score, pleurisy, pleuropneumonia, and pericarditis were associated with reductions in carcass cold weight (P ≤ 0.05) ranging from 3 to 6.6 kg. Tail lesion score was associated with condemnations for pleurisy, pneumonia, and pleuropneumonia (P ≤ 0.05) at a batch level. VI shift was associated with condemnations for pneumonia, pleuropneumonia, and pericarditis (P ≤ 0.05) at a carcass level and with pneumonia at a batch level. Sex was not associated with viscera condemnations but males were more likely to be affected by tail lesions. The relationship between overall tail lesion score and the lung diseases at batch level supports the relationship between poor health and poor welfare of pigs on farms. The inclusion of tail lesion scores at post-mortem meat inspection

  11. Saving Single-rooted Teeth with Combined Endodontic-periodontal Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pico-Blanco, Alexandre; Castelo-Baz, Pablo; Caneiro-Queija, Leticia; Liñares-González, Antonio; Martin-Lancharro, Pablo; Blanco-Carrión, Juan

    2016-12-01

    Teeth affected by combined endodontic-periodontal lesions are usually considered by all prognosis classifications as hopeless teeth. The development of new biomaterials combined with modern endodontic and periodontal regeneration techniques may improve dental prognosis and maintain the affected teeth. Moreover, 1 of the replacement options for those teeth, dental implants, has shown an increasing number of biological and technical complications. Five patients were included in this case series study. Full periodontal and radiographic examination revealed generalized chronic periodontitis. Moreover, endodontic-periodontal lesions affecting single-rooted teeth were detected in those patients with tissue destruction beyond the apex. After splinting those teeth, conventional endodontic and nonsurgical periodontal treatment was performed. Three months later, periodontal regeneration was applied at those teeth in order to reconstruct supporting tissues and to improve dental prognosis. After a follow-up period ranging from 14 months to 17 years, it was observed that all teeth remain asymptomatic and in normal function. No signs of apical pathosis were observed, and the periodontium was stable. All patients were included in a strict maintenance program to check the periodontal and apical status. This case series shows that it is possible to change the prognosis of teeth affected by combined endodontic-periodontal lesions, even if the periodontal support is destroyed beyond the apex. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Muscle fibers inside a fat tumor: A non-specific imaging finding of benignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donato, M.; Vanel, D.; Alberghini, M.; Mercuri, M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The differential diagnosis between benign and low-grade well-differentiated malignant lipomatous tumors might be very difficult for both the radiologist and the pathologist, although it has practical consequences. Among the criteria, muscular fibers detected inside the lesion are considered radiologically and histologically as a reliable sign of a benign intramuscular lipoma. New genetic criteria are now available. We report two cases of fat tumors containing muscular fibers both radiologically and histologically, but which are definitely malignant, considering genetic criteria. Material and methods: Two cases of soft tissue fat tumors, containing muscular fibers on imaging examinations as well as histologically, had an aggressive behaviour, suggesting malignancy. Genetic criteria were therefore used to confirm the clinical impression. Results: MDM2 and CDK4 confirmed the malignancy in the two cases. Conclusion: Intra lesional muscular fibers detected on imaging or histological examinations should not be considered as a completely reliable sign of a benign intramuscular lipoma. In case of atypical clinical behaviour, genetic criteria should be used to prove the aggressiveness of the tumor.

  13. [Bile duct lesions in laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, J R; Ungeheuer, A; Feussner, H

    1994-09-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is both resulting in a slightly higher incidence of biliary lesions and a change of prevalence of the type of lesions. Damage to the biliary system occurs in 4 different types: The most severe case is the lesion with a structural defect of the hepatic or common bile duct with (IVa) or without (IVb) vascular injury. Tangential lesions without structural loss of the duct should be denominated as type III (IIIa with additional lesion to the vessels, type IIIb without). Type II comprehends late strictures without obvious intraoperative trauma to the duct. Type I includes immediate biliary fistulae of usually good prognosis. The increasing prevalence of structural defects of the bile ducts appears to be a peculiarity of laparoscopic cholecystectomy necessitating highly demanding operative repair. In the majority of cases, hepatico-jejunostomy or even intraparenchymatous anastomoses are required. Adaptation of well proven principles of open surgery is the best prevention of biliary lesions in laparoscopic cholecystectomy as well as the readiness to convert early to the open procedure.

  14. Computer tomographic localization and lesion size in aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, Kei

    1985-01-01

    Using a microcomputer, the locus and extent of the lesions demonstrated on CT were superimposed on standardized matrices in 127 cases with various types of aphasia, to investigate the relationship between location of the lesions and types of aphasia. Main results were as follows. 1. Broca aphasics: The lesions involved rather large areas in the deep structures of the lower part of the precentral gyrus, the insula and the lenticular nucleus. Therefore, the finding was regarded as being of little localizing value. 2. Wernicke aphasics: At least 70 % of the patients had superior temporal lesions involving Wernicke's area and the subcortical lesions of the superior and middle temporal gyri. The site of the lesion corresponded roughly with that in the previous clinico-pathological reports but was indicated in a little deeper area. 3. Amnestic aphasics: The size of the lesion was smaller than any other type but the lesions were distributed throughout the left hemisphere. Amnestic asphasia was thought to be the least localizable. 4. Conduction aphasics: Most patients had lesions in the posterior speech area involving part of Wernicke's area. In particular, in more than 80 % of the conduction aphasics the lesions were revealed in the supramarginal gyrus and it's adjacent deep structures. 5. Global aphasics: In general, the size of the lesion was very large and 70 % of the global aphasics had extensive lesions involving both Broca's and Wernicke's areas. However, there were some patients showing small and confined lesions. (author)

  15. A simple working classification proposed for the latrogenic lesions of teeth and associated structures in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2013-09-01

    Iatrogenic lesions can affect both hard and soft tissues in the oral cavity, induced by the dentist's activity, manner or therapy. There is no approved simple working classification for the iatrogenic lesions of teeth and associated structures in the oral cavity in the literature. A simple working classification is proposed here for iatrogenic lesions of teeth and associated structures in the oral cavity based on its relation with dental specialities. The dental specialities considered in this classification are conservative dentistry and endodontics, orthodontics, oral and maxillofacial surgery and prosthodontics. This classification will be useful for the dental clinician who is dealing with diseases of oral cavity.

  16. Point Genetics: A New Concept to Assess Neutron Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein Meulekamp, R.; Kuijper, J.C.; Schikorr, M.

    2005-01-01

    Point genetic equations are introduced. These equations are similar to the well-known point kinetic equations but characterize and couple individual fission generations in subcritical systems. Point genetic equations are able to describe dynamic behavior of source-driven subcritical systems on shorter timescales than is possible with point kinetic equations. Point genetic parameters can be used as a first-order characterization of the system and can be calculated using standard Monte Carlo techniques; the implementation in other calculational schemes seems straightforward. A Godiva sphere is considered to show the applicability of the point genetic equations in describing a detector response on short timescales. For this system the point genetic parameters are calculated and compared with reference calculations. Typical dynamic source behavior is considered by studying a transient in which the neutron source energy decreases from 20 to 1 MeV. For all cases studied, the point genetic equations are compared to full space-time kinetic solutions, and it is shown that point genetics performs well

  17. Precancerous Skin Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrándiz, C; Malvehy, J; Guillén, C; Ferrándiz-Pulido, C; Fernández-Figueras, M

    Certain clinically and histologically recognizable skin lesions with a degree of risk of progression to squamous cell carcinoma have been traditionally grouped as precancerous skin conditions but now tend to be classified as in situ carcinomas. This consensus statement discusses various aspects of these lesions: their evaluation by means of clinical and histopathologic features, the initial evaluation of the patient, the identification of risk factors for progression, and the diagnostic and treatment strategies available today. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. [Resin infiltration of white spot lesions during the fixed orthodontic appliance therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogodescu, A; Ogodescu, Emilia; Talpoş, S; Zetu, Irina

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the evolution of resin infiltrated white spot lesions (WSLs) during 10 month of fixed orthodontic appliance therapy using the photographic examination method. Twelve patients with mild decalcifications prior to the orthodontic treatment were examined once each month. At aggravation of the WSLs, by patients who fail to maintain good oral hygiene, the brackets were taken down, the lesions were infiltrated with resin (ICON) and the brackets were bonded in place. WSLs were evaluated from intraoral photographs taken before and during the treatment. 35.2% of existing lesions aggravated in the first 6 months of treatment. 41.2 % of the W.S.L. were considered severe and were infiltrated. In the next 10 month of orthodontic treatment 92.5% of the infiltrated WSLs were clinically stable. This clinical study showed a positive evolution of the resin infiltrated WSLs during the fixed orthodontic therapy. This is especially important for patients with long periods of treatment like interdisciplinary orthodontic-orthognathic surgery cases or patients that are refractory to oral hygiene measures.

  19. Exploring geovisualization symbology for landscape genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoidh, Eoin Mac; Martinsohn, Jann Th.; Maes, Gregory E.

    2013-01-01

    or genetic expertise. While specialist applications exist, alternative accessible solutions do not provide adequate support for the visualization of multi‐attribute spatially referenced genetic population structure information. As a solution, we document our exploration for an appropriate symbology...... to communicate landscape genetic information through an accessible, web‐based interface. A full problem description, review of available technologies, development rationale, and discussion of the symbology exploration are provided.......Landscape genetics, which considers genetic population structure in the context of spatially referenced parameters in the surrounding landscape, has been shown to be extremely useful for wildlife management. Unfortunately its widespread uptake beyond the research community is hampered due to a lack...

  20. Endo-perio lesions: Diagnosis and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Nina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The interrelationship between periodontal and endodontic disease has aroused confusion, queries and controversy. Differentiating between periodontal and endodontic problems can be difficult. A symptomatic tooth may have pain of periodontal and/or pulpal origin. The nature of that pain is often the first clue in determining the etiology of such a problem. Radiographic and clinical evaluation can help clarify the nature of the problem. In some cases, the influence of pulpal pathology may create periodontal involvement. In others, periodontal pathology may create pulpal pathology. This review article discusses the various clinical aspects to be considered for accurately diagnosing and treating endo-perio lesions.

  1. Pediatric Awake Craniotomy for Brain Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Ali; Rükşen, Mete; Çetin, H Yurday; Seval, H Özer; İşlekel, Sertaç

    2016-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is a special method to prevent motor deficits during the resection of lesions that are located in, or close to, functional areas. Although it is more commonly performed in adult patients, reports of pediatric cases undergoing awake craniotomy are limited in the literature. In our clinic, where we frequently use awake craniotomy in adult patients, we performed this method in 2 selected pediatric cases for lesion surgery. At an early age, these 2 cases diagnosed with epilepsy presented cerebral lesions, but since the lesions enclosed functional areas, surgical resection was not regarded as a treatment option at this time. In these 2 pediatric cases, we successfully completed lesion surgery with awake craniotomy. The method and the techniques employed during surgery are presented concomitant with other reports in the literature. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Changing activity in MS lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kermode, A.G.; Tofts, P.S.; Thompson, A.J.; Rudge, P.; MacManus, D.G.; Kendall, B.E.; Moseley, I.F.; Kingsley, D.P.E.; McDonald, W.I.

    1989-01-01

    Gd-DTPA enhanced T1 weighted MRI is a discriminating test for a defective blood-brain barrier, with MS lesions showing considerable variation in the pattern of enhancement. Since little is known of the changes in the blood-brain barrier in the active plaque over time, the natural history of blood-brain barrier disturbance in the MS lesion was examined to confirm earlier reports that Gd-DTPA enhancement is a consistent early event in new lesions of relapsing/remitting MS. This knowledge is essential for the use of MRI in monitoring treatment. (author). 9 refs

  3. OCT investigation of dental lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiac, Eugen; Popescu, Sanda Mihaela; Scrieciu, Monica; Mercuţ, Rǎzvan; Mercuţ, Veronica; Vǎtu, Mihaela

    2018-03-01

    There are several important non carious lesions affecting the tooth structure, lesions which may be classified into four clinical forms of dental wear: abfraction, erosion, attrition and abrasion, and different types of root resorption. Search for new, non-invasive and fast methods able to detect and describe such injuries is of utmost importance. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) proved itself as an appropriate investigation method for several medical fields including ophthalmology, dermatology, cardiology etc. Our study reveals OCT preliminary investigations as a promising tool for detecting and evaluating of the mentioned lesions.

  4. PHAEOHYPHOMYCOSIS: CUTANEOUS, SUBCUTANEOUS, NASOPHARYNGEAL LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rasoolinejad

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycosis is an amalgam of clinical diseases caused by a wide variety of dematiaceous fungi. We are reporting on a 16 year-old patient from Amol with subcutaneous cervical nodes and nasopharyngeal lesions of phaeohypho"nmycosis that were confirmed by pathological examination, direct smear, and culture. After treatment with an oral triazole (Itraconazole for 4 months, all nodes and lesions disappeared and treatment was stopped A new lesion appeared on his chest wall 8 months, therapy with itraconazole was restarted and commuted for a long time.

  5. [Discussion on combined periodontic-endodontic lesion type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Zhou, Li

    2008-02-01

    Combined the elaboration on periodontic-endodontic lesion in the textbook Periodontics with the deficiencies existed in the clinical and teaching work and demonstrated the understanding on the type of the combined periodontic-endodontic lesion, and suggested the viewpoint of no sub-type of combined periodontic-endodontic lesion. Only regard the type of pulp disease that induced by periodontal disease as genuine combined periodontic-endodontic lesion.

  6. 53BP1 nuclear bodies form around DNA lesions generated by mitotic transmission of chromosomes under replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Claudia; Savic, Velibor; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2011-01-01

    stress increases the frequency of chromosomal lesions that are transmitted to daughter cells. Throughout G1, these lesions are sequestered in nuclear compartments marked by p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and other chromatin-associated genome caretakers. We show that the number of such 53BP1 nuclear bodies...... increases after genetic ablation of BLM, a DNA helicase associated with dissolution of entangled DNA. Conversely, 53BP1 nuclear bodies are partially suppressed by knocking down SMC2, a condensin subunit required for mechanical stability of mitotic chromosomes. Finally, we provide evidence that 53BP1 nuclear...... bodies shield chromosomal fragile sites sequestered in these compartments against erosion. Together, these data indicate that restoration of DNA or chromatin integrity at loci prone to replication problems requires mitotic transmission to the next cell generations....

  7. Semi-automated Robust Quantification of Lesions (SRQL Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori L Ito

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying lesions in a reliable manner is fundamental for studying the effects of neuroanatomical changes related to recovery in the post-stroke brain. However, the wide variability in lesion characteristics across individuals makes manual lesion segmentation a challenging and often subjective process. This often makes it difficult to combine stroke lesion data across multiple research sites, due to subjective differences in how lesions may be defined. Thus, we developed the Semi-automated Robust Quantification of Lesions (SRQL; https://github.com/npnl/SRQL; DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.557114 Toolbox that performs several analysis steps: 1 a white matter intensity correction that removes healthy white matter voxels from the lesion mask, thereby making lesions slightly more robust to subjective errors; 2 an automated report of descriptive statistics on lesions for simplified comparison between or across groups, and 3 an option to perform analyses in both native and standard space to facilitate analyses in either space. Here, we describe the methods implemented in the toolbox.

  8. Genome-wide relatedness of Treponema pedis, from gingiva and necrotic skin lesions of pigs, with the human oral pathogen Treponema denticola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olov Svartström

    Full Text Available Treponema pedis and T. denticola are two genetically related species with different origins of isolation. Treponema denticola is part of the human oral microbiota and is associated with periodontitis while T. pedis has been isolated from skin lesions in animals, e.g., digital dermatitis in cattle and necrotic ulcers in pigs. Although multiple Treponema phylotypes may exist in ulcerative lesions in pigs, T. pedis appears to be a predominant spirochete in these lesions. Treponema pedis can also be present in pig gingiva. In this study, we determined the complete genome sequence of T. pedis strain T A4, isolated from a porcine necrotic ear lesion, and compared its genome with that of T. denticola. Most genes in T. pedis were homologous to those in T. denticola and the two species were similar in general genomic features such as size, G+C content, and number of genes. In addition, many homologues of specific virulence-related genes in T. denticola were found in T. pedis. Comparing a selected pair of strains will usually not give a complete picture of the relatedness between two species. We therefore complemented the analysis with draft genomes from six T. pedis isolates, originating from gingiva and necrotic ulcers in pigs, and from twelve T. denticola strains. Each strain carried a considerable amount of accessory genetic material, of which a large part was strain specific. There was also extensive sequence variability in putative virulence-related genes between strains belonging to the same species. Signs of lateral gene-transfer events from bacteria known to colonize oral environments were found. This suggests that the oral cavity is an important habitat for T. pedis. In summary, we found extensive genomic similarities between T. pedis and T. denticola but also large variability within each species.

  9. Lessons learned from family history in ocular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Meghan J

    2015-07-01

    Given the vast genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity seen in ocular genetic disorders, considering a patient's clinical phenotype in the context of the family history is essential. Clinicians can improve patient care by appropriately incorporating a patient's family history into their evaluation. Obtaining, reviewing, and accurately interpreting the pedigree are skills geneticists and genetic counselors possess. However, with the field of ophthalmic genetics vastly growing, it is becoming essential for ophthalmologists to understand the utility of the pedigree and develop their abilities in eliciting this information. By not considering a patient's clinical history in the context of the family history, diagnoses can be missed or inaccurate. The purpose of this review is to inform ophthalmologists on the importance of the family history and highlight how the pedigree can aid in establishing an accurate genetic diagnosis. This review also provides to ophthalmologists helpful tips on eliciting and interpreting a patient's family history.

  10. Recovery of brachial plexus lesions resulting from heavy backpack use: A follow-up case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pihlajamäki Harri K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brachial plexus lesions as a consequence of carrying a heavy backpack have been reported, but the typical clinical course and long-term consequences are not clear. Here we evaluated the clinical course and pattern of recovery of backpack palsy (BPP in a large series of patients. Methods Thirty-eight consecutive patients with idiopathic BPP were identified from our population of 193,450 Finnish conscripts by means of computerised register. A physiotherapist provided instructions for proper hand use and rehabilitative exercises at disease onset. The patients were followed up for 2 to 8 years from the diagnosis. We also searched for genetic markers of hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to analyze continuous data. The Fischer's exact test was used to assess two-way tables. Results Eighty percent of the patients recovered totally within 9 months after the onset of weakness. Prolonged symptoms occurred in 15% of the patients, but daily activities were not affected. The weight of the carried load at the symptom onset significantly affected the severity of the muscle strength loss in the physiotherapeutic testing at the follow-up. The initial electromyography did not predict recovery. Genetic testing did not reveal de novo hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies. Conclusions The prognosis of BPP is favorable in the vast majority of cases. Electromyography is useful for diagnosis. To prevent brachial plexus lesions, backpack loads greater than 40 kg should be avoided.

  11. Preoperative evaluation of brain lesion with 201TI brain SPECT: is it useful to differentiate benign and malignant lesions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Hyung Sun; Kim, Euy Neyng; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Yong An; Chung, Soo Kyo; Hong, Yong Gil; Lee, Youn Soo

    2000-01-01

    Thallium-201 ( 201 TI) brain SPECT, which can represent cellular activity of brain lesions, may provide more useful information in differentiating between benign and malignant brain lesions more so than CT or MRI, that merely represents anatomic changes or breakdown of blood brain barrier. We used 201 TI brain SPECT prospectively to evaluate the utility of 201 TI-indices as an indicator of benign or malignant lesions. We studied 28 patients. There were 13 cases of benign lesions (3: nonspecific benign lesion, 3: meningioma, 2: low grade glioma, 1: tuberculoma, central neurocytoma, hemangioblastoma, radiation necrosis, and choroid plexus papilloma) and 15 cases of malignant lesions (6: glioblastoma multiforme, 5: anaplastic glioma, 2: medulloblastoma, 1: metastasis and lymphoma). In all patients, CT and/or MRI were obtained and then 201 TI brain SPECT was obtained with measuring mean 201 TI index and peak 201 TI index. An unpaired t-test was performed to compare the 201 TI-indices and pathologic diagnoses to evaluate the utility of 201 TI-indices as an indicator of benign or malignant lesions. There were no statistically significant difference in 201 TI-indices between benign and malignant brain lesions (P>0.05). These results demonstrated that we could not use 201 TI indices on brain SPECT alone as an indicator of benign or malignant brain lesions

  12. Sonographic Findings of Morel-Lavalle'e Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Yu Jin; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Jung, Ah Young; Jeh, Su Kyung [Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    We reviewed the sonographic features of Morel-Lavalle'e lesions by correlating the US image findings with a lesion's age. We obtained the sonography reports of 20 Morel-Lavalle'e lesions of the hip and extremities from 18 patients with a history of trauma. The US images were reviewed to characterize the echogenicity, shape, homogeneity, margins, location and size of the lesions. The results were correlated with the age of the lesions and the clinical histories. All the Morel-Lavalle'e lesions were hypoechoic or anechoic fluid collections located between the subcutaneous fat and the underlying fascia. Regarding the shape of the fluid collections, the lobular shaped lesions were all less than 21 days for the lesion's age, and the flat fluid collections were all greater than 1 month of age. Regarding the homogeneity, the heterogeneous fluid collections were all less than 25 days of age, and the homogeneous fluid collections were all greater than 1 month of age. A Morel-Lavalle'e lesion is seen as a posttraumatic fluid collection in the potential space between the subcutaneous fat and the underlying fascia on an ultrasound examination. Acute Morel-Lavalle'e lesions tended to be heterogeneous and lobular, and they became more homogeneous and flat in shape as the lesions evolved. Awareness of these imaging findings will help us to properly diagnose Morel- Lavalle'e lesions

  13. Human brain lesion-deficit inference remapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Yee-Haur; Husain, Masud; Rees, Geraint; Nachev, Parashkev

    2014-09-01

    Our knowledge of the anatomical organization of the human brain in health and disease draws heavily on the study of patients with focal brain lesions. Historically the first method of mapping brain function, it is still potentially the most powerful, establishing the necessity of any putative neural substrate for a given function or deficit. Great inferential power, however, carries a crucial vulnerability: without stronger alternatives any consistent error cannot be easily detected. A hitherto unexamined source of such error is the structure of the high-dimensional distribution of patterns of focal damage, especially in ischaemic injury-the commonest aetiology in lesion-deficit studies-where the anatomy is naturally shaped by the architecture of the vascular tree. This distribution is so complex that analysis of lesion data sets of conventional size cannot illuminate its structure, leaving us in the dark about the presence or absence of such error. To examine this crucial question we assembled the largest known set of focal brain lesions (n = 581), derived from unselected patients with acute ischaemic injury (mean age = 62.3 years, standard deviation = 17.8, male:female ratio = 0.547), visualized with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and processed with validated automated lesion segmentation routines. High-dimensional analysis of this data revealed a hidden bias within the multivariate patterns of damage that will consistently distort lesion-deficit maps, displacing inferred critical regions from their true locations, in a manner opaque to replication. Quantifying the size of this mislocalization demonstrates that past lesion-deficit relationships estimated with conventional inferential methodology are likely to be significantly displaced, by a magnitude dependent on the unknown underlying lesion-deficit relationship itself. Past studies therefore cannot be retrospectively corrected, except by new knowledge that would render them redundant

  14. Small Lesion Size Is Associated with Sleep-Related Epilepsy in Focal Cortical Dysplasia Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jin

    2018-02-01

    the entire spectrum of SRE, potential existence of small FCD lesions should be considered when evaluating patients with SRE, and utilization of all other supportive electroclinical information for lesion detection is highly desirable.

  15. CORRELATION ANALYSIS BETWEEN DEPRESSIVE MANIFESTATIONS AND MORPHOLOGICAL LESION CHARACTERISTICS IN PATIENTS WITH STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanovic Zlatan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Knowledge of etiopathogenesis of post-stroke depressive phenomena contributes to early diagnostics which shortens recovery to a great extent and suits the social and professional rehabilitation of patients, if followed by proper psycho/pharmacotherapy. The aim of this work is to research dependence of depressive manifestations considering the size and anatomical localization of lesion. Subjects and Methods: The research included 118 patients with stroke. Lesion localization was defined on computerized axial tomography records, whereas the area and perimeter of lesion were measured by AutoCAD 2004 software. Examinations by means of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression were carried out by the method of random selection 11–40 days after stroke. Correlation analysis was made by simple linear/nonlinear regression and Cox’s hazard regression model. Results: Negative correlation was observed between the intensity of depressive manifestations and the size of cerebrovascular lesion (Spearman’s r= – 0.263, P= 0.004. By means of Cox’s regression model we determined 4.389 times higher risk for depression occurrence in female patients (P< 0.001, as well as higher risk due to lobus limbicus structure damages (hazard ratio eb(HR = 2.661, P= 0.019. Conclusion: Lower intensity of depressive manifestations with larger cerebrovascular lesions, we have explained by activation of reparation mechanisms with energy savings and decrease (due to neurological deficits of afferent peripheral sensations which antecedent the occurrence of emotions (James-Lange peripheral theory of emotions.

  16. Proliferative, reparative, and reactive benign bone lesions that may be confused diagnostically with true osseous neoplasms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wick, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic problems attending intraosseous and parosteal pseudoneoplastic lesions can be radiographic, or histological, or both. Proliferations in this category may contain cellular fibro-osseous or chondro-osseous tissues that are difficult to separate microscopically from those seen in various true neoplasms of the bones. This review considers the clinicopathologic features of fibrous dysplasia, benign fibro-osseous lesions of the jawbones, osteofibrous dysplasia, metaphyseal fibrous defect, giant-cell reparative granuloma, "brown tumor" of hyperparathyroidism, synovial chondrometaplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, tumefactive chronic osteomyelitis, proliferative Paget disease, and polyvinylpyrrolidone storage disease of bone.

  17. [Consideration of algorithms to presume the lesion location by using X-ray images of the stomach--geometric analysis of four direction radiography for the U region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henmi, Shuichi

    2013-01-01

    The author considered algorithms to presume the lesion location from a series of X-ray images obtained by four direction radiography without blind area for the U region of the stomach. The objects of analysis were six cases that protruding lesions were noticed in the U region. Firstly, from the length of short axis and measure of the lateral width of U region projected on the film, we presumed the length of longitudinal axis and angle between short axis and the film. Secondly, we calculated the rate of length to stomach walls from right side and left side of every image to the lateral width at the height passing through the center of the lesion. Using the lesion location calculated from these values, we presumed that the values that almost agreed between two images to be the lesion location. As the result of analysis, there were some cases that the lesion location could be presumed certainly or un-certainly, on the other hand, there were some cases that the lesion location could not be presumed. Since the form of the U region can be distorted by a change of position, or the angle between longitudinal axis and sagittal plane was changed, the error might have been made in calculation, and so it was considered that the lesion location could not be presumed.

  18. Sonographic-pathologic correlation of complex cystic breast lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravech Pongrattanaman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the pathologic basis for sonographic features of complex cystic lesions. Methods: From 2 646 female patients underwent breast sonography at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital from January 2005 through December 2010, 103 cystic lesions were included. Pathologic confirmation was performed by fine-needle aspiration (n=42, core needle biopsy (n=6, excision (n=54 and mastectomy (n=1. Complex cystic breast masses were classified into 3 types as followings; thick outer wall and/or thick internal septa (type I; thick septation and thick wall were defined as equal or more than 0.5 cm, masses containing mixed cystic and solid components (at least 50% of cystic component (type II, predominantly solid with eccentric cystic foci (at least 50% of solid component (type III. Results: In 103 complex cystic masses, there are 27 lesions (26% classified as type I cystic breast masses, 37 lesions (36% as type II cystic breast masses and 39 lesions (38% type III cystic breast masses, 26 lesions (25.2% are proved to be malignant. All of type I cystic breast masses in our study are benign, and 14 (38% of type II cystic breast masses and 12 lesions (31% of type III cystic breast lesions are proved to be malignant. Conclusions: Type II and III lesions should suggest possibility of malignancy and biopsy should be performed in all lesions. All type I lesion in this study are benign. None of other parameters we included in this study (size or margin can effectively differentiate between benign or malignant cystic breast lesions. Also, grading of the malignant lesions by using type of cystic breast mass cannot be applied.

  19. Visible and occult microscopic lesions of endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaleque Newaz Khan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a multifactorial disease mostly affecting women of reproductive age and is associated with chronic pelvic pain and infertility. Even after 300 years, most of the literature claims that pathogenesis and/or pathophysiology of endometriosis is still elusive. Recurrence of pain and lesion continues to occur after effective medical or surgical therapies. Once generated within the pelvis due to retrograde entry of menstrual debris, peritoneal endometriotic lesions time-dependently change their color appearance resulting from certain biochemical change within lesions. A variable pattern of endometriotic lesions within the pelvis can be detected by laparoscopy as visible peritoneal endometriosis. It is generally believed that besides ovarian steroid hormones, the growth of endometriosis can be regulated by the innate immune system in the pelvic microenvironment by their interaction with endometrial cells and immune cells. Even with the careful eyes of an expert surgeon, we may sometimes miss detecting peritoneal lesion within the peritoneal cavity or deep into the peritoneum. In such a case, random collection of normal peritoneum may carry the possibility to identify some hidden endometriotic lesions by microscopy and these lesions can be named as occult (invisible microscopic endometriosis (OME. Here, we discuss the color appearance of peritoneal lesions and activity of these lesions by analysis of a panel of activity markers. Finally we discuss our recent findings on OME, their biological and clinical significance, and try to make a possible link in the origin between visible endometriosis and OME.

  20. Imaging pattern of calvarial lesions in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garfinkle, Jarred; Melancon, Denis; Cortes, Maria; Tampieri, Donatella [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital-McGill University Health Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Calvarial lesions often present themselves as clinically silent findings on skull radiographs or as palpable masses that may cause localized pain or soreness. This review aims to explore the radiographic, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of calvarial neoplastic, inflammatory, and congenital lesions that are common in adults in order to facilitate a structured approach to their diagnosis and limit the differential diagnosis. In addition to reviewing the literature, we reviewed the records of 141 patients of the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital with radiologically documented calvarial lesions between 2001 and June 2009. CT is ideal for detecting bony lesions and is helpful in precisely localizing a lesion pre-surgically. MRI is best at identifying intradiploic lesions before they affect the cortical tables and is able to establish extraosseous involvement, especially when paramagnetic contrast is employed. (orig.)

  1. Ranavirus infections associated with skin lesions in lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Anke C; Blahak, Silvia; Heckers, Kim O; Wiechert, Jutta; Behncke, Helge; Mathes, Karina; Günther, Pascale; Zwart, Peer; Ball, Inna; Rüschoff, Birgit; Marschang, Rachel E

    2013-09-27

    Ranaviral disease in amphibians has been studied intensely during the last decade, as associated mass-mortality events are considered to be a global threat to wild animal populations. Several studies have also included other susceptible ectothermic vertebrates (fish and reptiles), but only very few cases of ranavirus infections in lizards have been previously detected. In this study, we focused on clinically suspicious lizards and tested these animals for the presence of ranaviruses. Virological screening of samples from lizards with increased mortality and skin lesions over a course of four years led to the detection of ranaviral infections in seven different groups. Affected species were: brown anoles (Anolis sagrei), Asian glass lizards (Dopasia gracilis), green anoles (Anolis carolinensis), green iguanas (Iguana iguana), and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps). Purulent to ulcerative-necrotizing dermatitis and hyperkeratosis were diagnosed in pathological examinations. All animals tested positive for the presence of ranavirus by PCR and a part of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of each virus was sequenced. Three different ranaviruses were isolated in cell culture. The analyzed portions of the MCP gene from each of the five different viruses detected were distinct from one another and were 98.4-100% identical to the corresponding portion of the frog virus 3 (FV3) genome. This is the first description of ranavirus infections in these five lizard species. The similarity in the pathological lesions observed in these different cases indicates that ranaviral infection may be an important differential diagnosis for skin lesions in lizards.

  2. Relationship between hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage and ischemic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Shinya; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    1991-01-01

    Patchy parenchymal lesions of increased intensity were frequently identified in patients with cerebral hemorrhage in T2-weighted image of high-fields MR imaging. We studied 64 patients with brain hemorrhage to determine the frequency and distribution of those lesions. We defined an area with high intensity in T2 weighted and low or iso-intensity area in T1 weighted images smaller than 1.5 cm in diameter to be 'ischemic lesion'. Ishemic lesions were found in 48 (75%) of all cases; in 25 (75%) of 32 patients with putaminal hemorrhage, in 15 (100%) of 15 with thalamic hemorrhage, in 3 (33%) of 9 with subcortical hemorrhage. Multiple ischemic lesions were more frequently seen in thalamic hemorrhage than in putaminal hemorrhage. Only 5 (10%) of 48 cases with associated ischemic lesions had a previous history related to those lesions. Multivariable regression analysis identified hypertension as the major predictor of the presence of ischemic lesions. Patients with brain hemorrhage frequently accompanied with incidental ischemic lesions, making it difficult to establish a guideline of blood pressure control for prevention of recurrent stroke. (author)

  3. Semi-automated Robust Quantification of Lesions (SRQL Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Ito

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying lesions in a robust manner is fundamental for studying the effects of neuroanatomical changes in the post-stroke brain on recovery. However, the wide variability in lesion characteristics across individuals makes manual lesion segmentation a challenging and often subjective process. This makes it difficult to combine stroke lesion data across multiple research sites, due to subjective differences in how lesions may be defined. We developed the Semi-automated Robust Quantification of Lesions (SRQL; https://github.com/npnl/SRQL; DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.267213 Toolbox that performs several analysis steps: 1 a white matter intensity correction that removes healthy white matter voxels from the lesion mask, thereby making lesions slightly more robust to subjective errors; 2 an automated report of descriptive statistics on lesions for simplified comparison between or across groups, and 3 an option to perform analyses in both native and standard space to facilitate analyses in either space, or comparisons between spaces. Here, we describe the methods implemented in the toolbox and demonstrate the outputs of the SRQL toolbox.

  4. Multiple giant cell lesions in patients with Noonan syndrome and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Thomas E; Allanson, Judith; Kavamura, Ines; Kerr, Bronwyn; Neri, Giovanni; Noonan, Jacqueline; Cordeddu, Viviana; Gibson, Kate; Tzschach, Andreas; Krüger, Gabriele; Hoeltzenbein, Maria; Goecke, Timm O; Kehl, Hans Gerd; Albrecht, Beate; Luczak, Klaudiusz; Sasiadek, Maria M; Musante, Luciana; Laurie, Rohan; Peters, Hartmut; Tartaglia, Marco; Zenker, Martin; Kalscheuer, Vera

    2009-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS) are related developmental disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding various components of the RAS-MAPK signaling cascade. NS is associated with mutations in the genes PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, or KRAS, whereas CFCS can be caused by mutations in BRAF, MEK1, MEK2, or KRAS. The NS phenotype is rarely accompanied by multiple giant cell lesions (MGCL) of the jaw (Noonan-like/MGCL syndrome (NL/MGCLS)). PTPN11 mutations are the only genetic abnormalities reported so far in some patients with NL/MGCLS and in one individual with LEOPARD syndrome and MGCL. In a cohort of 75 NS patients previously tested negative for mutations in PTPN11 and KRAS, we detected SOS1 mutations in 11 individuals, four of whom had MGCL. To explore further the relevance of aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling in syndromic MGCL, we analyzed the established genes causing CFCS in three subjects with MGCL associated with a phenotype fitting CFCS. Mutations in BRAF or MEK1 were identified in these patients. All mutations detected in these seven patients with syndromic MGCL had previously been described in NS or CFCS without apparent MGCL. This study demonstrates that MGCL may occur in NS and CFCS with various underlying genetic alterations and no obvious genotype–phenotype correlation. This suggests that dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK pathway represents the common and basic molecular event predisposing to giant cell lesion formation in patients with NS and CFCS rather than specific mutation effects. PMID:18854871

  5. Multiple giant cell lesions in patients with Noonan syndrome and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Thomas E; Allanson, Judith; Kavamura, Ines; Kerr, Bronwyn; Neri, Giovanni; Noonan, Jacqueline; Cordeddu, Viviana; Gibson, Kate; Tzschach, Andreas; Krüger, Gabriele; Hoeltzenbein, Maria; Goecke, Timm O; Kehl, Hans Gerd; Albrecht, Beate; Luczak, Klaudiusz; Sasiadek, Maria M; Musante, Luciana; Laurie, Rohan; Peters, Hartmut; Tartaglia, Marco; Zenker, Martin; Kalscheuer, Vera

    2009-04-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS) are related developmental disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding various components of the RAS-MAPK signaling cascade. NS is associated with mutations in the genes PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, or KRAS, whereas CFCS can be caused by mutations in BRAF, MEK1, MEK2, or KRAS. The NS phenotype is rarely accompanied by multiple giant cell lesions (MGCL) of the jaw (Noonan-like/MGCL syndrome (NL/MGCLS)). PTPN11 mutations are the only genetic abnormalities reported so far in some patients with NL/MGCLS and in one individual with LEOPARD syndrome and MGCL. In a cohort of 75 NS patients previously tested negative for mutations in PTPN11 and KRAS, we detected SOS1 mutations in 11 individuals, four of whom had MGCL. To explore further the relevance of aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling in syndromic MGCL, we analyzed the established genes causing CFCS in three subjects with MGCL associated with a phenotype fitting CFCS. Mutations in BRAF or MEK1 were identified in these patients. All mutations detected in these seven patients with syndromic MGCL had previously been described in NS or CFCS without apparent MGCL. This study demonstrates that MGCL may occur in NS and CFCS with various underlying genetic alterations and no obvious genotype-phenotype correlation. This suggests that dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK pathway represents the common and basic molecular event predisposing to giant cell lesion formation in patients with NS and CFCS rather than specific mutation effects.

  6. Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Avipoxvirus in House Sparrows in Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ruiz-Martínez

    Full Text Available Avipoxvirus (APV is a fairly common virus affecting birds that causes morbidity and mortality in wild and captive birds. We studied the prevalence of pox-like lesions and genetic diversity of APV in house sparrows (Passer domesticus in natural, agricultural and urban areas in southern Spain in 2013 and 2014 and in central Spain for 8 months (2012-2013. Overall, 3.2% of 2,341 house sparrows visually examined in southern Spain had cutaneous lesions consistent with avian pox. A similar prevalence (3% was found in 338 birds from central Spain. Prevalence was higher in hatch-year birds than in adults. We did not detect any clear spatial or temporal patterns of APV distribution. Molecular analyses of poxvirus-like lesions revealed that 63% of the samples were positive. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of 29 DNA sequences from the fpv167 gene, detected two strains belonging to the canarypox clade (subclades B1 and B2 previously found in Spain. One of them appears predominant in Iberia and North Africa and shares 70% similarity to fowlpox and canarypox virus. This APV strain has been identified in a limited number of species in the Iberian Peninsula, Morocco and Hungary. The second one has a global distribution and has been found in numerous wild bird species around the world. To our knowledge, this represents the largest study of avian poxvirus disease in the broadly distributed house sparrow and strongly supports the findings that Avipox prevalence in this species in South and central Spain is moderate and the genetic diversity low.

  7. Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Avipoxvirus in House Sparrows in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Martínez, Jorge; Ferraguti, Martina; Figuerola, Jordi; Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Williams, Richard Alexander John; Herrera-Dueñas, Amparo; Aguirre, José Ignacio; Soriguer, Ramón; Escudero, Clara; Moens, Michaël André Jean; Pérez-Tris, Javier; Benítez, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Avipoxvirus (APV) is a fairly common virus affecting birds that causes morbidity and mortality in wild and captive birds. We studied the prevalence of pox-like lesions and genetic diversity of APV in house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in natural, agricultural and urban areas in southern Spain in 2013 and 2014 and in central Spain for 8 months (2012-2013). Overall, 3.2% of 2,341 house sparrows visually examined in southern Spain had cutaneous lesions consistent with avian pox. A similar prevalence (3%) was found in 338 birds from central Spain. Prevalence was higher in hatch-year birds than in adults. We did not detect any clear spatial or temporal patterns of APV distribution. Molecular analyses of poxvirus-like lesions revealed that 63% of the samples were positive. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of 29 DNA sequences from the fpv167 gene, detected two strains belonging to the canarypox clade (subclades B1 and B2) previously found in Spain. One of them appears predominant in Iberia and North Africa and shares 70% similarity to fowlpox and canarypox virus. This APV strain has been identified in a limited number of species in the Iberian Peninsula, Morocco and Hungary. The second one has a global distribution and has been found in numerous wild bird species around the world. To our knowledge, this represents the largest study of avian poxvirus disease in the broadly distributed house sparrow and strongly supports the findings that Avipox prevalence in this species in South and central Spain is moderate and the genetic diversity low.

  8. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  9. Chromosomal aberrations in benign and malignant Bilharzia-associated bladder lesions analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadl-Elmula, Imad; Kytola, Soili; Leithy, Mona EL; Abdel-Hameed, Mohamed; Mandahl, Nils; Elagib, Atif; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Larsson, Catharina; Heim, Sverre

    2002-01-01

    Bilharzia-associated bladder cancer (BAC) is a major health problem in countries where urinary schistosomiasis is endemic. Characterization of the genetic alterations in this cancer might enhance our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease but, in contrast to nonbilharzia bladder cancer, BAC has rarely been the object of such scrutiny. In the present study, we aimed to characterize chromosomal imbalances in benign and malignant post-bilharzial lesions, and to determine whether their unique etiology yields a distinct cytogenetic profile as compared to chemically induced bladder tumors. DNAs from 20 archival paraffin-embedded post-bilharzial bladder lesions (6 benign and 14 malignant) obtained from Sudanese patients (12 males and 8 females) with a history of urinary bilharziasis were investigated for chromosomal imbalances using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Subsequent FISH analysis with pericentromeric probes was performed on paraffin sections of the same cases to confirm the CGH results. Seven of the 20 lesions (6 carcinomas and one granuloma) showed chromosomal imbalances varying from 1 to 6 changes. The most common chromosomal imbalances detected were losses of 1p21-31, 8p21-pter, and 9p and gain of 19p material, seen in three cases each, including the benign lesion. Most of the detected imbalances have been repeatedly reported in non-bilharzial bladder carcinomas, suggesting that the cytogenetic profiles of chemical- and bilharzia-induced carcinomas are largely similar. However, loss of 9p seems to be more ubiquitous in BAC than in bladder cancer in industrialized countries

  10. MR-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy of MRI-only lesions: a single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spick, Claudio; Schernthaner, Melanie; Pinker, Katja; Kapetas, Panagiotis; Bernathova, Maria; Polanec, Stephan H.; Bickel, Hubert; Wengert, Georg J.; Helbich, Thomas H.; Baltzer, Pascal A. [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Wien (Austria); Rudas, Margaretha [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Clinical Institute of Pathology, Wien (Austria)

    2016-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare three different biopsy devices on false-negative and underestimation rates in MR-guided, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) of MRI-only lesions. This retrospective, single-center study was IRB-approved. Informed consent was waived. 467 consecutive patients underwent 487 MR-guided VABB using three different 8-10-gauge-VABB devices (Atec-9-gauge,A; Mammotome-8-gauge,M; Vacora-10-gauge,V). VABB data (lesion-type, size, biopsy device, histopathology) were compared to final diagnosis (surgery, n = 210 and follow-up, n = 277). Chi-square, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were applied. P values < 0.05 were considered significant. Final diagnosis was malignant in 104 (21.4 %), high risk in 64 (13.1 %) and benign in 319 (65.5 %) cases. Eleven of 328 (3.4 %) benign-rated lesions were false-negative (1/95, 1.1 %, A; 2/73, 2.7 %, M; 8/160 5.0 % V; P = 0.095). Eleven high-risk (11/77, 14.3 %) lesions proved to be malignant (3/26, 11.5 % A; 4/12, 33.3 % M; 4/39, 10.3 % V; P = 0.228). Five of 34 (14.7 %) DCIS were upgraded to invasive cancer (2/15, 13.3 %, A; 1/6, 16.6 % M; 2/13, 15.3 %, V; P = 0.977). Lesion size (P = 0.05) and type (mass vs. non-mass, P = 0.107) did not differ significantly. MR-guided VABB is an accurate method for diagnosis of MRI-only lesions. No significant differences on false-negative and underestimation rates were observed between three different biopsy devices. (orig.)

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in potentially malignant and malignant lesions of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asotra Kamlesh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a family of zinc-dependent proteinases that are capable of cleaving all extra cellular matrix (ECM substrates. Degradation of matrix is a key event in progression, invasion and metastasis of potentially malignant and malignant lesions of the head and neck. It might have an important polymorphic association at the promoter regions of several MMPs such as MMP-1 (-1607 1G/2G, MMP-2 (-1306 C/T, MMP-3 (-1171 5A/6A, MMP-9 (-1562 C/T and TIMP-2 (-418 G/C or C/C. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs are naturally occurring inhibitors of MMPs, which inhibit the activity of MMPs and control the breakdown of ECM. Currently, many MMP inhibitors (MMPIs are under development for treating different malignancies. Useful markers associated with molecular aggressiveness might have a role in prognostication of malignancies and to better recognize patient groups that need more antagonistic treatment options. Furthermore, the introduction of novel prognostic markers may also promote exclusively new treatment possibilities, and there is an obvious need to identify markers that could be used as selection criteria for novel therapies. The objective of this review is to discuss the molecular functions and polymorphic association of MMPs and TIMPs and the possible therapeutic aspects of these proteinases in potentially malignant and malignant head and neck lesions. So far, no promising drug target therapy has been developed for MMPs in the lesions of this region. In conclusion, further research is required for the development of their potential diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities.

  12. The value of thyroglobulin in washout of fine needle aspirate from 16 cervical lesions in patients with thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familiar Casado, Cristina; Antón Bravo, Teresa; Moraga Guerrero, Inmaculada; Ramos Carrasco, Araceli; García García, Carmen; Villanueva Curto, Santiago

    2013-11-01

    Thyroglobulin in the needle washout (Tg-FNA) and cytology of fine needle aspiration (cyto-FNA) are recommended for diagnosis of metastatic lymphadenopathies and recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer. The objective of this study was to assess the value of these procedures in 16 cervical masses from patients with thyroid cancer of the follicular epithelium (TC). The study included six patients with TC and cervical lymphadenopathies evaluated before initial thyroid surgery and 10 patients followed up after TC surgery with cervical lumps discovered. FNA was performed in all 16 masses. Results of cyto-FNA, Tg-FNA and of the combined tests were compared to the final diagnosis of each lesion. Among 10 lesions proven to be malignant at surgery, cyto-FNA, Tg-FNA and the combination of both allowed for adequate diagnosis in 7, 9, and 10 cases respectively. Among 6 lesions considered to be benign, cyto-FNA was able to confirm diagnosis in 4, was non-diagnostic in one, and was falsely negative in the remaining case, while Tg-FNA was below the established cut-off value (to consider malignancy) in all cases. In patients with TC and suspect cervical masses, Tg-FNA improved the diagnostic yield of cyto-FNA alone, thus warranting its routine recommendation when FNA is performed. However, universal standardization of the technique and definition of valid cut-off thyroglobulin values (depending on the immunoassay used) above which the lesion should be considered to be malignant are still pending. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Location of Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesions of the Capitellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christine C; Roberts, Susanne; Mintz, Douglas; Fabricant, Peter D; Hotchkiss, Robert N; Daluiski, Aaron

    2018-04-17

    The location of capitellar osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions in the sagittal plane guides the surgical approach, and lesion location in the coronal plane influences surgical management. Although most lesions have been reported to occur between 4 o'clock and 4:30 (120° to 135° anterior to the humerus), some lesions are located elsewhere in the capitellum. The primary aim was to define the region of the capitellum affected by OCD lesions using a novel clock-face localization system. We reviewed 104 magnetic resonance imaging examinations diagnosing a nontraumatic capitellar OCD lesion. In the sagittal plane, lesion margins were recorded as degrees on the capitellum and converted into a clock-face format in which 0° corresponds to 12:00 with the forearm facing to the right. The 0° axis (12-o'clock axis) was defined as a line parallel to the anterior humeral line that intersects the capitellum center. The following coronal measurements were recorded: lesion width, capitellar width, and distance between the lateral capitellum and lateral lesion. Two independent observers took measurements. In the sagittal plane, average lesion location was 92° to 150° (3:04-5:00, clock face) and ranged from 52.1° to 249.5° (1:44-8:19, clock face). Average lesion dimensions were 10.7 mm (mediolateral width) and 5.2 mm (anteroposterior depth). Interrater reliability was high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.98). Using a magnetic resonance imaging-based clock-face localization system, we found that capitellar OCD lesions affect a broad region of the capitellum in the sagittal plane. The clock-face localization system allows for precise description of capitellar OCD lesion location, which may facilitate intraoperative decision and longitudinal monitoring. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MRI screening-detected breast lesions in high-risk young women: the value of targeted second-look ultrasound and imaging-guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, P; Dhillon, R; Bose, S; Bourke, A

    2016-10-01

    To analyse the value of targeted second-look ultrasound and imaging-guided biopsy in high-risk young women eligible for screening magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a tertiary referral centre in Perth, Western Australia. A retrospective analysis of eligible high-risk young women who underwent screening breast MRI and targeted second-look ultrasound between June 2012 and June 2014 was performed with review of data. Over a 2-year period, 139 women underwent high-risk screening MRI. Of these, 30 women (with a total of 45 lesions) were recalled for targeted second-look ultrasound. Thirty-four MRI-detected lesions were identified on targeted ultrasound with 19 of them proceeding to ultrasound-guided biopsy, while the remaining 15 lesions were considered benign on ultrasound, were not biopsied, and were stable on follow-up imaging 12 months later. One lesion proceeded to an MRI-guided biopsy to confirm a benign result. Of the 11 lesions not seen on ultrasound, nine underwent MRI biopsy, one proceeded directly to hook wire localisation and excision, and one did not return for biopsy and was lost to follow-up. The overall biopsy rate was 14.4%. The cancer detection rate was 1.4%. The results of this study indicate that targeted second-look ultrasound and ultrasound-guided biopsy is a cost-effective and time-efficient approach for MRI-detected lesions in young women at high risk of developing breast cancer. MRI-guided biopsy should be considered for ultrasonographically occult suspicious lesions as there is a low, but definite, risk of cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of Fundus Lesions Using Classifier Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Hiroto; Hiramatsu, Yoshitaka; Sako, Hiroshi; Himaga, Mitsutoshi; Kato, Satoshi

    A system for detecting fundus lesions caused by diabetic retinopathy from fundus images is being developed. The system can screen the images in advance in order to reduce the inspection workload on doctors. One of the difficulties that must be addressed in completing this system is how to remove false positives (which tend to arise near blood vessels) without decreasing the detection rate of lesions in other areas. To overcome this difficulty, we developed classifier selection according to the position of a candidate lesion, and we introduced new features that can distinguish true lesions from false positives. A system incorporating classifier selection and these new features was tested in experiments using 55 fundus images with some lesions and 223 images without lesions. The results of the experiments confirm the effectiveness of the proposed system, namely, degrees of sensitivity and specificity of 98% and 81%, respectively.

  16. Effectiveness of assigning BI-RADS category-3 to breast lesion with respect to follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masroor, I.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of assigning BI-RADS category-3 to breast lesion with respect to follow-up. Women undergoing X-ray mammography and assigned BI-RADS category-3 and recommended short-term (6-monthly) follow-up were included. Out of these, 44 patients were lost to follow-up and were excluded from the study. The lesions that remained stable after short-term follow-up were recommended routine (annual) follow-up. Needle localization and open surgical biopsy was performed, if the lesion progressed or calcifications increased in number/size and/or on physician or patient preference. The effectiveness of this approach was analyzed by determining the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value for BI-RADS category-3. Of the 65 lesions, 55 remained stable. Of the remaining 10 lesions, two showed increase in number of microcalcification prompting biopsy. Both turned out to be ductal carcinoma in situ. Eight biopsies were performed on clinician or patient preference which turned out to be benign. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 100%, 87%, 20% and 100% respectively. Assessment with short-interval mammographic follow-up is useful to confirm the nature of most non-palpable breast lesions considered probably benign and permits detection of a small number of breast cancers at an early stage. The local setup, patient compliance is a major limitation for performing a follow-up study, as the available numbers can have a profound effect on the determined accuracy value. (author)

  17. Clinical value of MRI liver-specific contrast agents: a tailored examination for a confident non-invasive diagnosis of focal liver lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Uffmann, Martin; Bastati, Nina; Herold, Christian; Schima, Wolfgang; Saini, Sanjai

    2009-01-01

    Screening of the liver for hepatic lesion detection and characterization is usually performed with either ultrasound or CT. However, both techniques are suboptimal for liver lesion characterization and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as the preferred radiological investigation. In addition to unenhanced MR imaging techniques, contrast-enhanced MR imaging can demonstrate tissue-specific physiological information, thereby facilitating liver lesion characterization. Currently, the classes of contrast agents available for MR imaging of the liver include non-tissue-specific extracellular gadolinium chelates and tissue-specific hepatobiliary or reticuloendothelial agents. In this review, we describe the MR features of the more common focal hepatic lesions, as well as appropriate imaging protocols. A special emphasis is placed on the clinical use of non-specific and liver-specific contrast agents for differentiation of focal liver lesions. This may aid in the accurate diagnostic workup of patients in order to avoid invasive procedures, such as biopsy, for lesion characterization. A diagnostic strategy that considers the clinical situation is also presented. (orig.)

  18. Percutaneous CT-guided biopsy for lung lesions 1 cm or smaller: the technique, results and complication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chi Sung

    2006-01-01

    a radiologic chest catheter to relieve moderate dyspnea. Percutaneous biopsy performed on the basis of the modified coaxial technique under CT guidance for lung lesions 1 cm or smaller is considered to be an accurate and safe procedure

  19. A numerical investigation of the functionality of coronary bifurcation lesions with respect to lesion configuration and stenosis severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagiatakis, Catherine; Tardif, Jean-Claude; L'Allier, Philippe L; Mongrain, Rosaire

    2015-09-18

    The intervention of coronary bifurcation lesions is associated with higher rates of peri- and post-procedural clinical events compared to the treatment of isolated lesions. Overall, the factors that influence the dynamics of these types of configurations are still not well understood. A geometric multiscale model, consisting of a 3D representation of the left main coronary artery bifurcation and a 0D representation of the rest of the cardiovascular system, was developed. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of the 3D domain were executed by implementing the multiscale algorithm, in order to characterize the functionality of different multilesional configurations as a function of stenosis severity. The investigation found that coronary branch steal has a significant impact on the functionality of the disease and can render a two-lesion configuration more severe compared to a three-lesion configuration. As a result of the complexity of this phenomenon, it was also suggested that certain lesion configurations could result in false negatives in diagnosis when employing a pullback pressure recording across the tandem lesions. In conclusion, this study showed that coronary bifurcation lesions are subject to intricate haemodynamic interactions which render the characterization of their functionality complex and could have significant clinical implications with regards to their diagnosis and prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Early lesion-specific 18F-FDG PET response to chemotherapy predicts time to lesion progression in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygård, Lotte; Vogelius, Ivan Richter; Fischer, Barbara M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We hypothesize that the lesion-to-lesion variability in FDG-PET response after one cycle of chemotherapy for NSCLC in an individual patient may inform radiation dose redistribution. To test this hypothesis, we investigate if time to lesion-progression in patients with mult...... patient response involves a loss of biological information on heterogeneity between lesions. Poor lesion-specific response after one cycle chemotherapy may identify lesions that would benefit from an individualized radiotherapy strategy.......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We hypothesize that the lesion-to-lesion variability in FDG-PET response after one cycle of chemotherapy for NSCLC in an individual patient may inform radiation dose redistribution. To test this hypothesis, we investigate if time to lesion-progression in patients...... with multiple lesions is dependent on lesion-specific response to chemotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed 81 patients with 184 lesions referred to curative chemo-radiotherapy for NSCLC 2010-2012. (18)F-FDG PET scans were performed at diagnosis and after one series of chemotherapy. Response of each...

  1. Prevention and treatment of white spot lesions in orthodontic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Decalcification of enamel, appearing as white spot lesions (WSLs, around fixed orthodontic appliances is a major challenge during and after fixed orthodontic treatment by considering the fact that the goal of orthodontic treatment is to enhance facial and dental esthetic appearance. Banded or bonded teeth exhibit a significantly higher rate of WSLs compared to the controls with no braces as fixed appliances and the bonding materials promote retention of biofilms. These lesions are managed in the first step by establishing good oral hygiene habits and prophylaxis with topical fluorides, including high-fluoride toothpastes, fluoride mouthwashes, gels, varnishes, fluoride-containing bonding materials, and elastic ligatures. Recently, other materials and methods have been recommended, including the application of casein phosphopeptides-amorphous calcium phosphate, antiseptics, probiotics, polyols, sealants, laser, tooth bleaching agents, resin infiltration, and microabrasion. This article reviews the currently used methods to manage enamel demineralization during and after orthodontic treatment and the risk factors and preventive measures based on the latest evidence.

  2. Genetic privacy in sports: clearing the hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callier, Shawneequa

    2012-12-01

    As genomic medicine continues to advance and inform clinical care, knowledge gained is likely to influence sports medicine and training practices. Susceptibility to injury, sudden cardiac failure, and other serious conditions may one day be tackled on a subclinical level through genetic testing programs. In addition, athletes may increasingly consider using genetic testing services to maximize their performance potential. This paper assesses the role of privacy and genetic discrimination laws that would apply to athletes who engage in genetic testing and the limits of these protections.

  3. A HISTOPATHOLOGICAL SPECTRUM OF NECK LESIONS IN A RURAL HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shri Lakshmi Surapaneni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND A multitude of lesions occur in the neck and patients come to hospital on account of morbidity associated with these lesions. Therefore a histopathological study of the spectrum of neck lesions was undertaken. MATERIALS AND METHODS All histologically diagnosed lesions of the neck from January 2014 to December 2015 were noted. Details of gender, age, location and diagnosis were recorded. The lesions were classified based on anatomic location, gross and histological features and clinically. Clinically, lesions were classified as congenital, inflammatory/infective and neoplastic. Incidence of age, gender and location of different lesions was calculated using percentage, and median. The findings were compared with other studies. RESULTS A total of 140 neck lesions were included in the current study. Neck lesions were predominant in females with 94 cases. The median age group involved was the 21-30 group. Anterior neck lesions were more common. Anterior midline lesions were 74 and mostly thyroid and thyroglossal duct origin. Lesions of the lymph node were greater in the posterior triangle. 122 lesions were solid and 18 were cystic. Histologically, there were 64 thyroid gland lesions, 40 lymph node lesions, 13 soft tissue tumours, 8 salivary lesions, 10 thyroglossal cysts and 5 skin/adnexal lesions. Clinically, congenital/developmental lesions were 11, inflammatory/infective lesions were 68 and neoplastic lesions were 61. Of the neoplastic lesions, 17 were malignant. CONCLUSION Non-neoplastic lesions of the neck were common in our study in accordance with findings in other studies. The most common malignancy was Papillary carcinoma of thyroid.

  4. Increased number of mast cells in the dermis in actinic keratosis lesions effectively treated with imiquimod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Satomi; Funasaka, Yoko; Tsuchiya, Shin-Ichi; Kawana, Seiji; Saeki, Hidehisa

    2017-08-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a cutaneous cancer in situ which develops as a result of excessive exposure to ultraviolet (UV). Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 agonist imiquimod is a topical immune response modifier and is effective for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers. Recently, the diagnostic role of the dermatoscope has been reported in the course of treatment of AK. In addition, mast cells are now considered to contribute to both the innate and adaptive immune systems in topical imiquimod therapy. We assessed the effect of imiquimod treatment by dermatoscopic and immunohistochemical findings in 14 patients with a total of 21 AK lesions. With the dermatoscope, though the mean erythema score was not significantly different between the cured lesions and the unresponsive lesions, the erythema/red pseudo-network ("strawberry") pattern was decreased significantly in the cured lesions. By immunohistochemistry, the number of Ki-67-positive proliferative cells in the epidermis was decreased and that of CD117-positive mast cells in the dermis was increased in the responding lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that the number of mast cells in the dermis was increased in AK lesions effectively treated with imiquimod. Our present result suggests that mast cells may contribute an antitumor effect in human skin treated with topical imiquimod. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  5. Optical Assessment of Caries Lesion Structure and Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert Chulsung

    New, more sophisticated diagnostic tools are needed for the detection and characterization of caries lesions in the early stages of development. It is not sufficient to simply detect caries lesions, methods are needed to assess the activity of the lesion and determine if chemical or surgical intervention is needed. Previous studies have demonstrated that polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to nondestructively image the subsurface lesion structure and measure the thickness of the highly mineralized surface zone. Other studies have demonstrated that the rate of dehydration can be correlated with the lesion activity and that the rate can be measured using optical methods. The main objective of this work was to test the hypothesis that optical methods can be used to assess lesion activity on tooth coronal and root surfaces. Simulated caries models were used to develop and validate an algorithm for detecting and measuring the highly mineralized surface layer using PS-OCT. This work confirmed that the algorithm was capable of estimating the thickness of the highly mineralized surface layer with high accuracy. Near-infrared (NIR) reflectance and thermal imaging methods were used to assess activity of caries lesions by measuring the state of lesion hydration. NIR reflectance imaging performed the best for artificial enamel and natural coronal caries lesion samples, particularly at wavelengths coincident with the water absorption band at 1460-nm. However, thermal imaging performed the best for artificial dentin and natural root caries lesion samples. These novel optical methods outperformed the conventional methods (ICDAS II) in accurately assessing lesion activity of natural coronal and root caries lesions. Infrared-based imaging methods have shown potential for in-vivo applications to objectively assess caries lesion activity in a single examination. It is likely that if future clinical trials are a success, this novel imaging

  6. Fungi isolated from the skin lesions of Ghezel and Makui sheep with suspected ringworm in Urmia, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Araghi – Sooreh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-dermatophytic fungi are frequently isolated on the cultures used in surveys of animals suspected of having ringworm. The present study was conducted to identify of saprophytic fungi and dermatophyte isolated from sheep with suspected ringworm in Urmia, Iran. A total of 1323 sheep from two breeds of Ghezel (n = 727 and Makui (n = 596 were examined for skin lesions. Only 4(0.035 % lesions with hair loss and scaling were found on ears of Ghezel sheep. Samples were examined microscopically by KOH and cultured ontoSabouraud’s dextrose agar and Sabouraud’s dextrose with chloramphenicol and cycloheximide, incubated at 25 and 37 ° C and examined for 4weeks. All (100% of the specimens yielded positive culture. Fungal isolates were Alternariaspp. (3 cases, 75 % and Mucor spp. (2 cases, 50%. No dermatophyte fungi were cultured from suspected ringworm lesions. Saprophytic fungi isolated in the present study may not be considered as cause of skin lesions in Ghezel sheep.

  7. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4400 Radiofrequency lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to produce...

  8. Hypervascular liver lesions in radiologically normal liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amico, Enio Campos; Alves, Jose Roberto; Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra de; Salviano, Fellipe Alexandre Macena; Joao, Samir Assi; Liguori, Adriano de Araujo Lima, E-mail: ecamic@uol.com.br [Hospital Universitario Onofre Lopes (HUOL/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Clinica Gastrocentro e Ambulatorios de Cirurgia do Aparelho Digestivo e de Cirurgia Hepatobiliopancreatica

    2017-09-01

    Background: The hypervascular liver lesions represent a diagnostic challenge. Aim: To identify risk factors for cancer in patients with non-hemangiomatous hypervascular hepatic lesions in radiologically normal liver. Method: This prospective study included patients with hypervascular liver lesions in radiologically normal liver. The diagnosis was made by biopsy or was presumed on the basis of radiologic stability in follow-up period of one year. Cirrhosis or patients with typical imaging characteristics of haemangioma were excluded. Results: Eighty eight patients were included. The average age was 42.4. The lesions were unique and were between 2-5 cm in size in most cases. Liver biopsy was performed in approximately 1/3 of cases. The lesions were benign or most likely benign in 81.8%, while cancer was diagnosed in 12.5% of cases. Univariate analysis showed that age >45 years (p< 0.001), personal history of cancer (p=0.020), presence of >3 nodules (p=0.003) and elevated alkaline phosphatase (p=0.013) were significant risk factors for cancer. Conclusion: It is safe to observe hypervascular liver lesions in normal liver in patients up to 45 years, normal alanine amino transaminase, up to three nodules and no personal history of cancer. Lesion biopsies are safe in patients with atypical lesions and define the treatment to be established for most of these patients. (author)

  9. Preoperative nonpalpable breast lesions localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardellin, G; Natale, F; Perin, B

    1986-01-01

    The effectiveness of real time sonography and mammography are examined in localizing with a hookwire (introduced via a straight needle) the nonpalpable breast lesions. The method, used for surgery or biopsy, was successful in a series of 13 patients with nonpalpable breast lesions, 4 affectd by carcinoma. 18 refs.

  10. CT evaluation of mass lesions in the parotid region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Shunichi; Kishikawa, Takashi; Kudo, Sho; Miyaji, Hiroshi; Kuwano, Haruo; Kaneko, Kuniyuki; Ohuchida, Toshiyuki

    1988-01-01

    CT findings of 35 patients with proven 31 parotid gland mass lesions (23 benign tumors, 5 malignant tumors, 3 inflammatory diseases) and 4 infraauricular lymphadenopathy (2 inflammatory nodes, 2 neoplastic nodes) were reviewed. CT accurately diagnosed the parotid origin in 29 of 31 parotid gland diseases. In all four patients with infraauricular lymphadenopathy, differentiation from parotid tumor was difficult. CT differentiation between superficial and deep lobe tumors agreed with surgical findings in 18 of 21 parotid gland tumors. Twenty out of 23 benign parotid gland tumors appeared as discrete masses with smooth margins. All five malignant parotid gland tumors appeared as poorly defined masses. It is concluded that when a tumor is located in the superficial lobe and appears as a sharply circumscribed mass on plain CT, it should be diagnosed as a benign lesion and contrast CT is not required. Secondly, contrast CT would be beneficial when a tumor is indistinct, or located in the deep portion of the parotid gland on plain CT. Finally, CT-sialography is considered unnecessary in the diagnosis of parotid masses. (author)

  11. Gas-contrasted computed tomography for evaluation of mediastinal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsuoka, A; Reshad, K; Kitano, M; Ishii, S [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)

    1981-03-01

    An application of gas-contrasted computed tomography (CT) was investigated for evaluation of mediastinal lesions. Findings of the gas-contrasted CT were compared with those of usual CT or conventional pneumomediastinography in nine patients with myasthenia gravis, four patients with mediastinal tumor, and five patients with other mediastinal lesions. As a result, the following results were obtained. 1) In examination for the thymus in myasthenia gravis, the shape of the thymus tissue was most accurately recognized by gas-contrasted CT, which enable one to discriminate the thymus tissue from the fatty tissue of the surrounding mediastinum with injected gas. 2) Gas-contrasted CT could most accurately evaluate adhesion or invasion of the mediastinal tumor to the surrounding organs. At the exact site of adhesion, injected gas to the mediastinum did not separate the tumor from the surroundings. Such diagnostic significance was considered to be available also to mediastinal lymphnode metastasis or suspected invasion of the malignant tumor from outside the mediastinum. 3) These findings of gas-contrasted CT were correlated well to those at operation. Hence, it was concluded that this diagnostic method presents good informations in assessing the resectability of the tumor or preoperative determination of the operation procedure. 4) However, it seemed difficult to distinguish between inflammatory (benign) adhesion and invasive (malignant) one even by gas-contrasted CT. 5) Finally, it was suggested that gas-contrasted CT might be widely adopted for clarification of lesions other than the mediastinal ones.

  12. Papillary lesions of the breast: To excise or observe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sidrah; Diaz, Adrian; Archer, Kellie J; Lehman, Rebecca R; Mullins, Tiffany; Cardenosa, Gilda; Bear, Harry D

    2018-05-01

    Papillary lesions of the breast range from benign to atypical to malignant. Although papillomas without frank cancer are benign, their management remains controversial. When a core needle biopsy of a lesion yields a diagnosis of intraductal papilloma with atypia, excision is generally recommended to rule out a concurrent malignant neoplasm. For intraductal papillomas without atypia, however, recommendations for excision versus observation are variable. The aims of this study are to evaluate the rate of concurrent malignancies for intraductal papilloma diagnosed on core needle biopsy and to assess the long-term risk of developing cancer after the diagnosis of a papillary lesion. This single institution retrospective study analyzed 259 patients that were diagnosed with intraductal papilloma (IDP) by core needle biopsy from 1995 to 2010. Patients were grouped by initial diagnosis into three groups (papilloma without atypia, papilloma with atypia, and papilloma with atypical duct hyperplasia or atypical lobular hyperplasia (ADH/ALH) and followed up for long-term outcomes. After a core needle biopsy showing IDP with atypia or IDP + ADH/ALH, surgical excision yielded a diagnosis of concomitant invasive or ductal in situ cancer in greater that 30% of cases. For intraductal papilloma without atypia, the likelihood of cancer was much lower. Moreover, even with excision, the finding of intraductal papilloma with atypia carries a significant risk of developing cancer long-term, and such patients should be followed carefully and perhaps should be considered for chemoprevention. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Gas-contrasted computed tomography for evaluation of mediastinal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuoka, Akio; Reshad, K.; Kitano, Morihisa; Ishii, Shoukei

    1981-01-01

    An application of gas-contrasted computed tomography (CT) was investigated for evaluation of mediastinal lesions. Findings of the gas-contrasted CT were compared with those of usual CT or conventional pneumomediastinography in nine patients with myasthenia gravis, four patients with mediastinal tumor, and five patients with other mediastinal lesions. As a result, the following results were obtained. 1) In examination for the thymus in myasthenia gravis, the shape of the thymus tissue was most accurately recognized by gas-contrasted CT, which enable one to discriminate the thymus tissue from the fatty tissue of the surrounding mediastinum with injected gas. 2) Gas-contrasted CT could most accurately evaluate adhesion or invasion of the mediastinal tumor to the surrounding organs. At the exact site of adhesion, injected gas to the mediastinum did not separate the tumor from the surroundings. Such diagnostic significance was considered to be available also to mediastinal lymphnode metastasis or suspected invasion of the malignant tumor from outside the mediastinum. 3) These findings of gas-contrasted CT were correlated well to those at operation. Hence, it was concluded that this diagnostic method presents good informations in assessing the resectability of the tumor or preoperative determination of the operation procedure. 4) However, it seemed difficult to distinguish between inflammatory (benign) adhesion and invasive (malignant) one even by gas-contrasted CT. 5) Finally, it was suggested that gas-contrasted CT might be widely adopted for clarification of lesions other than the mediastinal ones. (author)

  14. Attenuated sensitivity to the emotions of others by insular lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri eTerasawa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The insular cortex has been considered to be the neural base of visceral sensation for many years. Previous studies in psychology and cognitive neuroscience have accumulated evidence indicating that interoception is an essential factor in the subjective feeling of emotion. Recent neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that anterior insular cortex activation is associated with accessing interoceptive information and underpinning the subjective experience of emotional state.Only a small number of studies have focused on the influence of insular damage on emotion processing and interoceptive awareness. Moreover, disparate hypotheses have been proposed for the alteration of emotion processing by insular lesions. Some studies show that insular lesions yield an inability for understanding and representing disgust exclusively, but other studies suggest that such lesions modulate arousal and valence judgments for both positive and negative emotions.In this study, we examined the alteration in emotion recognition in three right insular and adjacent area damaged cases with well-preserved higher cognitive function. Participants performed an experimental task using morphed photos that ranged between neutral and emotional facial expressions (i.e., anger, sadness, disgust, and happiness. Recognition rates of particular emotions were calculated to measure emotional sensitivity. In addition, they performed heartbeat perception task for measuring interoceptive accuracy. The cases identified emotions that have high arousal level (e.g., anger as less aroused emotions (e.g., sadness and a case showed remarkably low interoceptive accuracy. The current results show that insular lesions lead to attenuated emotional sensitivity across emotions, rather than category-specific impairments such as to disgust. Despite the small number of cases, our findings suggest that the insular cortex modulates recognition of emotional saliency and mediates interoceptive and emotional

  15. How much we know about bisphosphonate lesions

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    Pešić Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bisphosphonate drugs are used in the treatment of the osteoporosis and malignant processes in the bone tissue. As a result of this use bisphosphonate lesions are formed in bone tissue and oral mucosis, which representing a remarkable therapeutic problem. The aim of this study was to determine how many dentists in general practice are familiar with the character, diagnosis and therapy bisphosphonate lesions. Material and Methods: An anonymous questionnaire of 13 questions was conducted in dental practices in Nis County in the period from October 2015 to December 2015. The obtained data were statistically analyzed. Results: A total of 60% dentists knew what drugs are used in the treatment of osteoporosis and malignant processes in the bones. 25% knew what the bisphosphonate bone lesions are . 66, 6% of dentists knewn what is the prevention of bisphosphonate lesions. 63.3% of dentists are aware of the complications bisphosphonate lesions. Conclusion: Dentists in general practices are insufficiently familiar with the character, diagnosis and treatment of bisphosphonate lesions. We should activate all entities that participate in more continuous medical education, in order to achieve a higher level of prevention of these therapeutic ungrateful lesions.

  16. Space Occupying Lesions in the Liver

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    Nasser Ebrahimi Daryani

    2009-01-01

    "nRadiology (imaging) plays a pivotal role for the diagnosis, staging, treatment planning, and follow-up of focal liver lesions. The differential diagnosis in patients presenting with a focal liver lesion is broad. "nThe size of the liver mass is an important consideration in guiding the evaluation. Lesions smaller than approximately 1.0 cm are commonly benign incidental findings on imaging studies, and in most cases represent small cysts, hemangiomas, or biliary hamartomas. Further...

  17. Benign Lesions of The Vocal Fold

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    Ozgur Surmelioglu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Benign lesions of vocal folds are common disorders. Fifty percent of patients who have sound complaints are found to have these lesions after endoscopic and stroboscopic examinations. Benign vocal fold diseases are primarily caused by vibratory trauma. However they may also occur as a result of viral infections and congenital causes. These lesions are often presented with the complaints of dysphonia. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 86-95

  18. Maxillary Bone Regeneration Based on Nanoreservoirs Functionalized ε-Polycaprolactone Biomembranes in a Mouse Model of Jaw Bone Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Strub

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Current approaches of regenerative therapies constitute strategies for bone tissue reparation and engineering, especially in the context of genetical diseases with skeletal defects. Bone regeneration using electrospun nanofibers’ implant has the following objectives: bone neoformation induction with rapid healing, reduced postoperative complications, and improvement of bone tissue quality. In vivo implantation of polycaprolactone (PCL biomembrane functionalized with BMP-2/Ibuprofen in mouse maxillary defects was followed by bone neoformation kinetics evaluation using microcomputed tomography. Wild-Type (WT and Tabby (Ta mice were used to compare effects on a normal phenotype and on a mutant model of ectodermal dysplasia (ED. After 21 days, no effect on bone neoformation was observed in Ta treated lesion (4% neoformation compared to 13% in the control lesion. Between the 21st and the 30th days, the use of biomembrane functionalized with BMP-2/Ibuprofen in maxillary bone lesions allowed a significant increase in bone neoformation peaks (resp., +8% in mutant Ta and +13% in WT. Histological analyses revealed a neoformed bone with regular trabecular structure, areas of mineralized bone inside the membrane, and an improved neovascularization in the treated lesion with bifunctionalized membrane. In conclusion, PCL functionalized biomembrane promoted bone neoformation, this effect being modulated by the Ta bone phenotype responsible for an alteration of bone response.

  19. Pulmonary MRI at 3T: Non-enhanced pulmonary magnetic resonance Imaging Characterization Quotients for differentiation of infectious and malignant lesions

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    Nagel, Sebastian Niko, E-mail: sebastian.nagel@charite.de [Klinik und Hochschulambulanz für Radiologie, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin (Germany); Kim, Damon, E-mail: damon.kim@charite.de [Klinik und Hochschulambulanz für Radiologie, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Röntgendiagnostik, HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Schwanebecker Chaussee 50, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Penzkofer, Tobias, E-mail: tobias.penzkofer@charite.de [Klinik und Hochschulambulanz für Radiologie, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin (Germany); Steffen, Ingo G., E-mail: ingo.steffen@charite.de [Klinik und Hochschulambulanz für Radiologie, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin (Germany); Wyschkon, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.wyschkon@charite.de [Klinik und Hochschulambulanz für Radiologie, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2017-04-15

    Objective: To investigate 3T pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for characterization of solid pulmonary lesions in immunocompromised patients and to differentiate infectious from malignant lesions. Materials and methods: Thirty-eight pulmonary lesions in 29 patients were evaluated. Seventeen patients were immunocompromised (11 infections and 6 lymphomas) and 12 served as controls (4 bacterial pneumonias, 8 solid tumors). Ten of the 15 infections were acute. Signal intensities (SI) were measured in the lesion, chest wall muscle, and subcutaneous fat. Scaled SIs as Non-enhanced Imaging Characterization Quotients ((SI{sub Lesion} − SI{sub Muscle})/(SI{sub Fat} − SI{sub Muscle})*100) were calculated from the T2-weighted images using the mean SI (T2-NICQ{sub mean}) or the 90th percentile of SI (T2-NICQ{sub 90th}) of the lesion. Simple quotients were calculated by dividing the SI of the lesion by the SI of chest wall muscle (e.g. T1-Q{sub mean}: SI{sub Lesion}/SI{sub Muscle}). Results: Infectious pulmonary lesions showed a higher T2-NICQ{sub mean} (40.1 [14.6–56.0] vs. 20.9 [2.4–30.1], p < 0.05) and T2-NICQ{sub 90th} (74.3 [43.8–91.6] vs. 38.5 [15.8–48.1], p < 0.01) than malignant lesions. T1-Q{sub mean} was higher in malignant lesions (0.85 [0.68–0.94] vs. 0.93 [0.87–1.09], p < 0.05). Considering infections only, T2-NICQ{sub 90th} was lower when anti-infectious treatment was administered >24 h prior to MRI (81.8 [71.8–97.6] vs. 41.4 [26.6–51.1], p < 0.01). Using Youden’s index (YI), the optimal cutoff to differentiate infectious from malignant lesions was 43.1 for T2-NICQ{sub mean} (YI = 0.42, 0.47 sensitivity, 0.95 specificity) and 55.5 for T2-NICQ{sub 90th} (YI = 0.61, 0.71 sensitivity, 0.91 specificity). Combining T2-NICQ{sub 90th} and T1-Q{sub mean} increased diagnostic performance (YI = 0.72, 0.77 sensitivity, 0.95 specificity). Conclusion: Considering each quotient alone, T2-NICQ{sub 90th} showed the best diagnostic performance and

  20. Spontaneous infarction of benign breast lesion during pregnancy: Ultrasonographic and pathologic findings

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    Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Kyu Soon; Kim, Ju Hun [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun Hak [Dept. of Radiology, Health Care Center, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The spontaneous infarction of benign breast lesions is a rare entity and hence is not usually considered in the differential diagnosis during radiologic or clinical examination. There have been a few published cases of infarction during pregnancy and lactation. In this study we report the ultrasonographic and pathologic features of a spontaneous infarction of a lactating adenoma with acute mastitis and abscess and a spontaneously infarcted fibroadenoma.