WorldWideScience

Sample records for genetic diversity analysis

  1. COMPARITIVE GENETIC DIVERSITY ANALYSIS OF OAT (Avena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knsccf

    Equivalence was appraised between phenotypic and molecular markers (ISSR) to analyze the genetic diversity of 20 ... Country of origin. Pedigree ... explain between and within geographical variation and granting ..... JM (2008). Development of PCR-based SCAR and ... Genetic. Resources and Crop Evolution, 56:465–480.

  2. Analysis of genetic diversity and estimation of inbreeding coefficient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of genetic diversity and estimation of inbreeding coefficient within ... The present work is a contribution to the knowledge of population structure and to the ... diversity that may be helpful to horse breeders in designing and managing ...

  3. Inbreeding and genetic diversity in dogs: results from DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Claire M

    2011-08-01

    This review assesses evidence from DNA analysis to determine whether there is sufficient genetic diversity within breeds to ensure that populations are sustainable in the absence of cross breeding and to determine whether genetic diversity is declining. On average, dog breeds currently retain approximately 87% of the available domestic canine genetic diversity. Requirements that breeding stock must be 'clear' for all genetic disorders may firstly place undue genetic pressure on animals tested as being 'clear' of known genetic disorders, secondly may contribute to loss of diversity and thirdly may result in the dissemination of new recessive disorders for which no genetic tests are available. Global exchange of genetic material may hasten the loss of alleles and this practice should be discussed in relation to the current effective population size of a breed and its expected future popularity. Genomic data do not always support the results from pedigree analysis and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  4. 1 Hierarchical Approaches to the Analysis of Genetic Diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-14

    Apr 14, 2015 ... Keywords: Genetic diversity, Hierarchical approach, Plant, Clustering,. Descriptive ... utilization) or by clustering (based on a phonetic analysis of individual ...... Improvement of Food Crop Preservatives for the next Millennium.

  5. Genetic diversity analysis of pearl millet (Pennisetum glauccum [L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was applied ... ding reliable information for the calculation of genetic dis- tance and pedigree studies. Thus, for genetic diversity assessment, molecular markers offer considerable ad- .... morphism (%) = total number of bands - number of monomorphic.

  6. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  7. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  8. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R.; Muruaga-Martínez, José S.; Vargas-Vázquez, M.L. Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-01-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation. PMID:22215964

  9. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  10. Genetic diversity analysis of fruit characteristics of hawthorn germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, K; Guo, Y S; Wang, G; Zhao, Y H; Dong, W X

    2015-12-07

    One hundred and six accessions of hawthorn intraspecific resources, from the National Germplasm Repository at Shenyang, were subjected to genetic diversity and principal component analysis based on evaluation data of 15 fruit traits. Results showed that the genetic diversity of hawthorn fruit traits varied. Among the 15 traits, the fruit shape variable coefficient had the most obvious evaluation, followed by fruit surface state, dot color, taste, weight of single fruit, sepal posture, peduncle form, and metula traits. These are the primary traits by which hawthorn could be classified in the future. The principal component demonstrated that these traits are the most influential factors of hawthorn fruit characteristics.

  11. SSR Analysis of Genetic Diversity Among 192 Diploid Potato Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In potato breeding, it is difficult to improve the traits of interest at the tetraploid level due to the tetrasomic inheritance. A promising alternative is diploid breeding. Thus it is necessary to assess the genetic diversity of diploid potato germplasm for efficient exploration and deployment of desirable traits. In this study, we used SSR markers to evaluate the genetic diversity of diploid potato cultivars. To screen polymorphic SSR markers, 55 pairs of SSR primers were employed to amplify 39 cultivars with relatively distant genetic relationships. Among them, 12 SSR markers with high polymorphism located at 12 chromosomes were chosen to evaluate the genetic diversity of 192 diploid potato cultivars. The primers produced 6 to 18 bands with an average of 8.2 bands per primer. In total, 98 bands were amplified from 192 cultivars, and 97 of them were polymorphic. Cluster analysis using UPGMA showed the genetic relationships of all accessions tested: 186 of the 192 accessions could be distinguished by only 12 pairs of SSR primers, and the 192 diploid cultivars were divided into 11 groups, and 83.3% constituted the first group. Clustering results showed relatively low genetic diversity among 192 diploid cultivars, with closer relationship at the molecular level. The results can provide molecular basis for diploid potato breeding.

  12. Castor bean organelle genome sequencing and worldwide genetic diversity analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximo Rivarola

    Full Text Available Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade.

  13. Castor bean organelle genome sequencing and worldwide genetic diversity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivarola, Maximo; Foster, Jeffrey T; Chan, Agnes P; Williams, Amber L; Rice, Danny W; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M J; Khouri, Hoda M; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Allan, Gerard J; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade.

  14. Castor Bean Organelle Genome Sequencing and Worldwide Genetic Diversity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Agnes P.; Williams, Amber L.; Rice, Danny W.; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M. J.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Allan, Gerard J.; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D.

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade. PMID:21750729

  15. Genetic diversity analysis in Piper species (Piperaceae) using RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sandeep; Skaria, Reby; Abdul Muneer, P M

    2010-09-01

    The genetic diversity of eight species of Piper (Piperaceae) viz., P. nigrum, P. longum, P. betle, P. chaba, P. argyrophyllum, P. trichostachyon, P. galeatum, and P. hymenophyllum from Kerala state, India were analyzed by Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Out of 22 10-mer RAPD primers screened, 11 were selected for comparative analysis of different species of Piper. High genetic variations were found among different Piper species studied. Among the total of 149 RAPD fragments amplified, 12 bands (8.05%) were found monomorphic in eight species. The remaining 137 fragments were found polymorphic (91.95%). Species-specific bands were found in all eight species studied. The average gene diversity or heterozygosity (H) was 0.33 across all the species, genetic distances ranged from 0.21 to 0.69. The results of this study will facilitate germplasm identification, management, and conservation.

  16. Analysis of genetic diversity in Bolivian llama populations using microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreta, J; Gutiérrez-Gil, B; Iñiguez, V; Romero, F; Saavedra, V; Chiri, R; Rodríguez, T; Arranz, J J

    2013-08-01

    South American camelids (SACs) have a major role in the maintenance and potential future of rural Andean human populations. More than 60% of the 3.7 million llamas living worldwide are found in Bolivia. Due to the lack of studies focusing on genetic diversity in Bolivian llamas, this analysis investigates both the genetic diversity and structure of 12 regional groups of llamas that span the greater part of the range of distribution for this species in Bolivia. The analysis of 42 microsatellite markers in the considered regional groups showed that, in general, there were high levels of polymorphism (a total of 506 detected alleles; average PIC across per marker: 0.66), which are comparable with those reported for other populations of domestic SACs. The estimated diversity parameters indicated that there was high intrapopulational genetic variation (average number of alleles and average expected heterozygosity per marker: 12.04 and 0.68, respectively) and weak genetic differentiation among populations (FST range: 0.003-0.052). In agreement with these estimates, Bolivian llamas showed a weak genetic structure and an intense gene flow between all the studied regional groups, which is due to the exchange of reproductive males between the different flocks. Interestingly, the groups for which the largest pairwise FST estimates were observed, Sud Lípez and Nor Lípez, showed a certain level of genetic differentiation that is probably due to the pattern of geographic isolation and limited communication infrastructures of these southern localities. Overall, the population parameters reported here may serve as a reference when establishing conservation policies that address Bolivian llama populations.

  17. Genetic diversity in the Yangtze finless porpoise by RAPD analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Shunping; Wang Ding; Wang Wei; Chen Daoquan; Zhao Qingzhong; Gong Weiming

    2005-01-01

    To estimate the genetic diversity in the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaenaphocaenoides asiaeorientalis), the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA techniquewas applied to examine ten animals captured from the Yangtze River. Out of 20 arbitrary primers used in the experiment, seventeen produced clearly reproducible bged from 0.0986 to 0.5634. Compared with other cetacean populations, this genetic distance is quite low. Such a low genetic diversity suggests that this population may be suffering from reduced genetic variation, and be very fragile. More studiesare needed for understanding the basis for this apparent low genetic diversity and to help protect this endangered, unique population.

  18. Analysis of Genetic diversity and reltionships in local Tunisian barley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    Key words: Barley, RAPD markers, SSR markers, genetic diversity. INTRODUCTION. Barley ... surveyed by each kind of marker, their distribution ..... that belong to the Center. ..... tagged-site facilitated PCR for barley genome mapping. Theor.

  19. analysis of genetic diversity in linseed using aflp markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    environments, enhanced resistance to pathogens, pests and other ... parental genotypes are often selected on the basis of phenotypic ..... M. Sc. Thesis, ... Genotype-environment interactions and ... genetic diversity assessment among wheat.

  20. Promoting Utilization of Saccharum spp. Genetic Resources through Genetic Diversity Analysis and Core Collection Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C.; Kuhn, David N.; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A.; Comstock, Jack C.; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance. PMID:25333358

  1. Promoting utilization of Saccharum spp. genetic resources through genetic diversity analysis and core collection construction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spurthi N Nayak

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1 genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2 form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance.

  2. Promoting utilization of Saccharum spp. genetic resources through genetic diversity analysis and core collection construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Spurthi N; Song, Jian; Villa, Andrea; Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C; Kuhn, David N; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A; Comstock, Jack C; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance.

  3. Analysis of Genetic Diversity Among Sweetpotato Landraces in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xue-qin; LIU Qing-chang; WANG Yu-ping; ZHAI Hong

    2004-01-01

    Genetic diversity of 48 sweetpotato landraces randomly sampled from Anhui,Fujian, Henan and Guangdong provinces in China was analyzed using RAPD, ISSR and AFLP markers. Thirty RAPD primers, 14 ISSR primers and 9 AFLP primer pairs generated 227, 249 and 260 polymorphic bands, respectively. AFLP markers were better than RAPD and ISSR markers in terms of the number of polymorphic bands detected and the experimental stability. These three molecular markers revealed the similar results that Chinese landraces exhibited a high level of genetic diversity, and the genetic variation of Guangdong landraces was significantly higher than those of the landraces from the other three regions. These results supported the hypothesis that China was a secondary center of sweetpotato diversity. The present results also supported the view that sweetpotato was first introduced to Guangdong and from there spread to other regions of China. The dendrogram based on the combined RAPD, ISSR and AFLP dataset could separate the 48 landraces into two groups: One mainly including 8 landraces from Guangdong and the other consisting of the remaining landraces from Guangdong and landraces from the other three regions. Thus, the utilization of Guangdong landraces should be specially considered in sweetpotato breeding.

  4. Development of Pineapple Microsatellite Markers and Germplasm Genetic Diversity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suping Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two methods were used to develop pineapple microsatellite markers. Genomic library-based SSR development: using selectively amplified microsatellite assay, 86 sequences were generated from pineapple genomic library. 91 (96.8% of the 94 Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR loci were dinucleotide repeats (39 AC/GT repeats and 52 GA/TC repeats, accounting for 42.9% and 57.1%, resp., and the other three were mononucleotide repeats. Thirty-six pairs of SSR primers were designed; 24 of them generated clear bands of expected sizes, and 13 of them showed polymorphism. EST-based SSR development: 5659 pineapple EST sequences obtained from NCBI were analyzed; among 1397 nonredundant EST sequences, 843 were found containing 1110 SSR loci (217 of them contained more than one SSR locus. Frequency of SSRs in pineapple EST sequences is 1SSR/3.73 kb, and 44 types were found. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats dominate, accounting for 95.6% in total. AG/CT and AGC/GCT were the dominant type of dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeats, accounting for 83.5% and 24.1%, respectively. Thirty pairs of primers were designed for each of randomly selected 30 sequences; 26 of them generated clear and reproducible bands, and 22 of them showed polymorphism. Eighteen pairs of primers obtained by the one or the other of the two methods above that showed polymorphism were selected to carry out germplasm genetic diversity analysis for 48 breeds of pineapple; similarity coefficients of these breeds were between 0.59 and 1.00, and they can be divided into four groups accordingly. Amplification products of five SSR markers were extracted and sequenced, corresponding repeat loci were found and locus mutations are mainly in copy number of repeats and base mutations in the flanking region.

  5. Genetic diversity and disease susceptibility.

    OpenAIRE

    Bodmer, W F

    1997-01-01

    The range of genetic diversity within human populations is enormous. Genetic susceptibility to common chronic disease is a significant part of this genetic diversity, which also includes a variety of rare clear-cut inherited diseases. Modern DNA-based genomic analysis can now routinely lead to the identification of genes involved in disease susceptibility, provides the basis for genetic counselling in affected families, and more widely for a genetically targeted approach to disease prevention...

  6. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso Perseguini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca bean, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats - SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms - AFLPs for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger's modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm.

  7. Genetic diversity analysis of some exotic, Indian and mutant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... Genetic make-up of Brassica crops has been playing a major contributory role towards its enhanced ... morphological and biochemical characteristics. The .... The genetic associations between genotypes were evaluated by.

  8. High Genetic Diversity in a Rare, Narrowly Endemic Primrose Species: Primula interjacens by ISSR Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUEDa-Wei; GEXue-Jun; HAOGang; ZHANGChang-Qin

    2004-01-01

    Prirnula interjacens Chen (Primulaceae) is a rare and narrow endemic species of centralsouth of Yunnan Province in China. This species consists of two varieties: P.interjacens var. interjacens known with only one population, and P.interjacens var. epilosa with two populations. Intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker was used to detect the genetic diversity of the three extant populations. We expected a low genetic diversity level, but our results revealed a high level of intraspecific genetic diversity (at population level: P=59.75%, HE=0.2368, and Hpop=0.3459; at species level: P=75.47%, HT= 0.320 5, and Hsp = 0.4618), probably resulting from floral heteromorphism and preferring outcrossing. A moderate level of genetic differentiation among populations was detected based on Nei's genetic diversity analysis (26.13%) and Shannon's diversity index (25.09%). Although P./ntedacens var. intedacens and P. interjacens var. epilosa were morphologically distinct, UPGMA cluster analysis showed that the two varieties had no distinct genetic differentiation and may be treated as a single taxon. Conservation measures are suggested, including in situ and ex situ strategies, based on the observed population genetic information.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure analysis to construct a core collection from a large Capsicum germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hea-Young; Ro, Na-Young; Jeong, Hee-Jin; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Jo, Jinkwan; Ha, Yeaseong; Jung, Ayoung; Han, Ji-Woong; Venkatesh, Jelli; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-11-14

    Conservation of genetic diversity is an essential prerequisite for developing new cultivars with desirable agronomic traits. Although a large number of germplasm collections have been established worldwide, many of them face major difficulties due to large size and a lack of adequate information about population structure and genetic diversity. Core collection with a minimum number of accessions and maximum genetic diversity of pepper species and its wild relatives will facilitate easy access to genetic material as well as the use of hidden genetic diversity in Capsicum. To explore genetic diversity and population structure, we investigated patterns of molecular diversity using a transcriptome-based 48 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large germplasm collection comprising 3,821 accessions. Among the 11 species examined, Capsicum annuum showed the highest genetic diversity (HE = 0.44, I = 0.69), whereas the wild species C. galapagoense showed the lowest genetic diversity (HE = 0.06, I = 0.07). The Capsicum germplasm collection was divided into 10 clusters (cluster 1 to 10) based on population structure analysis, and five groups (group A to E) based on phylogenetic analysis. Capsicum accessions from the five distinct groups in an unrooted phylogenetic tree showed taxonomic distinctness and reflected their geographic origins. Most of the accessions from European countries are distributed in the A and B groups, whereas the accessions from Asian countries are mainly distributed in C and D groups. Five different sampling strategies with diverse genetic clustering methods were used to select the optimal method for constructing the core collection. Using a number of allelic variations based on 48 SNP markers and 32 different phenotypic/morphological traits, a core collection 'CC240' with a total of 240 accessions (5.2 %) was selected from within the entire Capsicum germplasm. Compared to the other core collections, CC240 displayed higher genetic

  10. RAPD analysis for genetic diversity of two populations of Mystus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... Figure 4. Phylogenetic tree constructed by similarity coefficient (Jaccard's). ... Its cost effectiveness provides an advantage in popula- tion genetic .... in Chatla Haor, a floodplain wetland in Cachar district of Assam. Environ.

  11. Genetic diversity based on SSR analysis of the cultured snakehead fish, Channa argus, (Channidae) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S-R; Li, J-L; Xie, N; Zhu, L-M; Wang, Q; Yue, G-H

    2014-02-13

    The snakehead fish Channa argus is an important food fish in China. We identified six microsatellite loci for C. argus. These six microsatellite loci and four other microsatellite markers were used to analyze genetic diversity in four cultured populations of C. argus (SD, JX, HN, and ZJ) and determine their relationships. A total of 154 alleles were detected at the 10 microsatellite loci. The average expected and observed heterozygosities varied from 0.70-0.84 and 0.69-0.83, respectively, and polymorphism information content ranged between 0.66 and 0.82 in the four populations, indicating high genetic diversity. Population JX deviated from mutation-drift equilibrium and may have experienced a recent bottleneck. Analysis of pairwise genetic differentiation revealed FST values that ranged from 0.028 to 0.100, which indicates a moderate level of genetic differentiation. The largest distances were observed between populations HN and SD, whereas the smallest distances were obtained between populations HN and JX. Genetic clustering analysis demonstrated that the ZJ and HN populations probably share the same origin. This information about the genetic diversity within each of the four populations, and their genetic relationships will be useful for future genetic improvement of C. argus through selective breeding.

  12. Genetic diversity analysis and conservation of the Chinese herb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... were to (i) examine levels and distribution of genetic vari- ability within and .... TSL-4X only, which is located in the south part of the. Qinling region of .... tation of facilities, it was impossible to conserve all acces- sions in in situ ...

  13. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volmir Pitt Benedetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2% and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%. The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated.

  14. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Volmir Pitt; Savi, Daiani Cristina; Aluizio, Rodrigo; Adamoski, Douglas; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia V; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2%) and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%). The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated. PMID:27276363

  15. Analysis of population structure and genetic diversity of Egyptian and exotic rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Khaled F M; Sallam, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the population structure and genetic diversity is a very important goal to improve the economic value of crops. In rice, a loss of genetic diversity in the last few centuries is observed. To address this challenge, a set of 22 lines from three different regions - India (two), and Philippines (six), and Egypt (14) - were used to assess the genetic diversity and the features of population structure. These genotypes were analyzed using 106 SSR alleles that showed a clear polymorphism among the lines. Genetic diversity was estimated based on the number of different alleles, polymorphism information content (PIC), and gene diversity. A total of 106 SSR alleles was identified from the 23 SSR loci and used to study the population structure and carry out a cluster analysis. All SSR loci showed a wide range of the number of different alleles extended from two (one loci) to seven alleles (three loci). Five and eight loci showed high PIC and gene diversity (≥0.70), respectively. The results of population structure are in agreement with cluster analysis results. Both analyses revealed two different subpopulations (G1 and G2) with different genetic properties in number of private alleles, number of different alleles (Na), number of effective alleles (Ne), expected heterozygosity (He), and Shannon's Information Index (SII). Our findings indicate that five SSR loci (RM 111, RM 307, RM 22, RM 19, and RM 271) could be used in breeding programs to enhance the marker-assisted selection through QTL mapping and association studies. A high genetic diversity found between genotypes which can be exploited to improve and produce rice cultivars for important traits (e.g. high agronomic features and tolerance to biotic or/and abiotic stresses).

  16. Genetic diversity analysis of salinity related germplasm in cotton

    OpenAIRE

    Lina Zhang; Wuwei Ye; Junjuan Wang; Baoxiang Fan; Delong Wang

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the genetic variation of salinity related cotton germplasm, 47 upland cotton accessions including 23 salinity tolerant materials and 24 salinity sensitive materials were explored using 88 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. We detected a total of 338 alleles at 88 SSR loci with an average of 3.841 alleles per locus, 333 of these alleles were detected in salinity tolerant germplasm and 312 alleles in salinity sensitive germplasm. Mean polymorphism information content (PIC),...

  17. Bioinformatics analysis and genetic diversity of the poliovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhan; Ma, Tengfei; Liu, Jianzhu; Zhao, Xiaona; Cheng, Ziqiang; Guo, Huijun; Wang, Shujing; Xu, Ruixue

    2014-12-01

    Poliomyelitis, a disease which can manifest as muscle paralysis, is caused by the poliovirus, which is a human enterovirus and member of the family Picornaviridae that usually transmits by the faecal-oral route. The viruses of the OPV (oral poliovirus attenuated-live vaccine) strains can mutate in the human intestine during replication and some of these mutations can lead to the recovery of serious neurovirulence. Informatics research of the poliovirus genome can be used to explain further the characteristics of this virus. In this study, sequences from 100 poliovirus isolates were acquired from GenBank. To determine the evolutionary relationship between the strains, we compared and analysed the sequences of the complete poliovirus genome and the VP1 region. The reconstructed phylogenetic trees for the complete sequences and the VP1 sequences were both divided into two branches, indicating that the genetic relationships of the whole poliovirus genome and the VP1 sequences are very similar. This branching indicates that the virulence and pathogenicity of poliomyelitis may be associated with the VP1 region. Sequence alignment of the VP1 region revealed numerous mutation sites in which mutation rates of >30 % were detected. In a group of strains recorded in the USA, mutation sites and mutation types were the same and this may be associated with their distribution in the evolutionary tree and their genetic relationship. In conclusion, the genetic evolutionary relationships of poliovirus isolate sequences are determined to a great extent by the VP1 protein, and poliovirus strains located on the same branch of the phylogenetic tree contain the same mutation spots and mutation types. Hence, the genetic characteristics of the VP1 region in the poliovirus genome should be analysed to identify the transmission route of poliovirus and provide the basis of viral immunity development.

  18. Genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete SNP genotype data with imputations: an empirical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yong-Bi

    2014-03-13

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) recently has emerged as a promising genomic approach for assessing genetic diversity on a genome-wide scale. However, concerns are not lacking about the uniquely large unbalance in GBS genotype data. Although some genotype imputation has been proposed to infer missing observations, little is known about the reliability of a genetic diversity analysis of GBS data, with up to 90% of observations missing. Here we performed an empirical assessment of accuracy in genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes with imputations. Three large single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype data sets for corn, wheat, and rice were acquired, and missing data with up to 90% of missing observations were randomly generated and then imputed for missing genotypes with three map-independent imputation methods. Estimating heterozygosity and inbreeding coefficient from original, missing, and imputed data revealed variable patterns of bias from assessed levels of missingness and genotype imputation, but the estimation biases were smaller for missing data without genotype imputation. The estimates of genetic differentiation were rather robust up to 90% of missing observations but became substantially biased when missing genotypes were imputed. The estimates of topology accuracy for four representative samples of interested groups generally were reduced with increased levels of missing genotypes. Probabilistic principal component analysis based imputation performed better in terms of topology accuracy than those analyses of missing data without genotype imputation. These findings are not only significant for understanding the reliability of the genetic diversity analysis with respect to large missing data and genotype imputation but also are instructive for performing a proper genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete GBS or other genotype data.

  19. Analysis of genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei using microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Weiji; Li, Weiya; Zhang, Quanqi; Kong, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Seven microsatellite markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei, which were introduced from Central and South America to China. All seven microsatellite loci were polymorphic, with polymorphism information content ( PIC) values ranging from 0.593 to 0.952. Totally 92 alleles were identified, and the number of alleles ( Na) and effective alleles ( Ne) varied between 4 and 21 and 2.7 and 14.6, respectively. Observed heterozygosity ( H o) values were lower than the expected heterozygosity ( H e) values (0.526-0.754), which indicated that the seven stocks possessed a rich genetic diversity. Thirty-seven tests were detected for reasonable significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. F is values were positive at five loci, suggesting that there was a relatively high degree of inbreeding within stocks. Pairwise F st values ranged from 0.0225 to 0.151, and most of the stock pairs were moderately differentiated. Genetic distance and cluster analysis using UPGMA revealed a close genetic relationship of L. vannamei between Pop2 and Pop3. AMOVA indicated that the genetic variation among stocks (11.3%) was much lower than that within stocks (88.7%). Although the seven stocks had a certain degree of genetic differentiation and a rich genetic diversity, there is an increasing risk of decreased performance due to inbreeding in subsequent generations.

  20. Genetic diversity analysis in the Hypericum perforatum populations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2014-01-01

    Jan 1, 2014 ... Analysis of molecular variance by ISSR markers indicated that over half of the .... spacer; Rp, resolving power; PIC, polymorphic information content; MI, marker index ..... ISSR 07 revealed 24 monomorphic loci existed in all of.

  1. Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of Arabian horse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanshour, Anas; Conant, Eleanore; Juras, Rytis; Cothran, Ernest Gus

    2013-01-01

    The Arabian horse ignites imagination throughout the world. Populations of this breed exist in many countries, and recent genetic work has examined the diversity and ancestry of a few of these populations in isolation. Here, we explore 7 different populations of Arabians represented by 682 horses. Three of these are Middle Eastern populations from near the historical origin of the breed, including Syrian, Persian, and Saudi Arabian. The remaining Western populations are found in Europe (the Shagya Arabian and Polish Arabian) and in America (American Arabian). Analysis of genetic structure was carried out using 15 microsatellite loci. Genetic distances, analysis of molecular variance, factorial correspondence analysis, and a Bayesian method were applied. The results consistently show higher level of diversity within the Middle Eastern populations than the Western populations. The Western Arabian populations were the main source among population variation. Genetic differentiation was not strong among all Middle Eastern populations, but all American Arabians showed differentiation from Middle Eastern populations and were somewhat uniform among themselves. Here, we explore the diversities of many different populations of Arabian horses and find that populations not from the Middle East have noticeably lower levels of diversity, which may adversely affect the health of these populations.

  2. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Iranian Jujube Ecotypes (Ziziphus spp. Using RAPD Molecular Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Abbasi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. is a valuable medicinal plant which is important in Iranian traditional medicines. Although the regional plants such as jujube play an important role in our economy, but they are forgotten in research and technology. Considering the economic and medicinal importance of jujube, the first step in breeding programs is determination of the genetic diversity among the individuals. 34 ecotypes of jujube, which have been collected from eight provinces of Iran, were used in this study. The genetic relationships of Iranian jujube ecotypes were analyzed using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD marker. Six out of 15 random decamer primers applied for RAPD analysis, showed an informative polymorphism. According to clustering analysis using UPGMA's methods, the ecotypes were classified into two major groups at the 0.81 level of genetic similarity. The highest value of similarity coefficient (0.92 was detected between Mazandaran and Golestan ecotypes and the most genetic diversity was observed in ecotypes of Khorasan-Jonoubi. The affinity of Khorasan-Jonoubi and Esfahan ecotypes indicated a possible common origin for the variation in these areas. Results indicated that RAPD analysis could be successfully used for the estimation of genetic diversity among Ziziphus ecotypes and it can be useful for further investigations.

  3. Analysis of genetic diversity of a native population of Myrcia lundiana Kiaersk. plants using ISSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M F; Nizio, D A C; Brito, F A; Sampaio, T S; Silva, A V C; Arrigoni-Blank, M F; Carvalho, S V A; Blank, A F

    2016-12-02

    Myrcia lundiana Kiaersk. is a tree of the family Myrtaceae found in tropical and subtropical areas of the southern hemisphere that produces essential oil. The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic diversity of M. lundiana plants from a native population of Parque Nacional de Itabaiana, using inter-simple sequence repeat molecular markers. Thirty-five primers were tested, 20 of which were polymorphic, resulting in 135 polymorphic and informative bands. Results of the cluster analysis, obtained using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean, grouped plants into three clusters: Cluster I - MLU001, MLU002, MLU003, MLU004, MLU005, MLU006, MLU018, MLU019, MLU020, MLU021, MLU022; MLU008, MLU011, MLU012, MLU014, MLU015, MLU017, MLU026, and MLU028; Cluster II - MLU007, MLU009, MLU010, MLU013, and MLU016; and Cluster III - MLU023, MLU024, MLU025, and MLU027. Jaccard similarity coefficients for pair-wise comparisons of plants ranged between 0.15 and 0.87. MLU014 and MLU015 presented low genetic diversity, with a similarity index of 0.87. Conversely, MLU007 and MLU019 presented high diversity, with a similarity index of 0.15. According to the structure analysis, three distinct clusters were formed. Genetic diversity of M. lundiana plants was intermediate, and expansion of its genetic diversity is necessary. MLU026 and MLU028 are the most suitable for selection in breeding programs, since they clearly represent all of the diversity present in these plants. Moreover, these results provide important information on the existing genetic variability, highlighting the importance of Parque Nacional de Itabaiana for the conservation of this species.

  4. Analysis of the Genetic Diversity and Origin of Some Chinese Domestic Duck Breeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yang; CHEN Guo-hong; CHEN Yang; ZHEN Ting; HUANG Zheng-yang; CHEN Chang-yi; LI Xin-yu; DUAN Xiu-jun; DONG Biao; XU Qi

    2014-01-01

    Twelve lfuorescence-labeled microsatellite markers were used to analyze the genetic diversity of 12 domestic duck breeds and 2 wild duck breeds to determine the relationship and origin of Chinese domestic duck breeds. Gene frequency, effective number of alleles (Ne), expected heterozygosity (He), polymorphism information contents (PIC), inbreeding coefficient in population (Fis), standard genetic distance (DS), and genetic distance (DA) were calculated by FSTAT and distance and phylogenetic analysis after the dates which were output from the Microsatellite-Toolkit software. Genetic distances between 12 domestic duck breeds and 2 wild duck breeds were analyzed by variance analysis. Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) and phylogenetic trees used for cluster analysis were structured. The results indicated that 11 loci had medium-or high-level genetic diversity among the 12 loci, which could be efifciently used in the detection of the genetic parameters of each population. The values of He were 0.5414 to 0.7343, those of PIC proved similar, and those of Fis were 0.1101 to 0.3381 among all populations. All breeds were clustered into three groups by UPGMA phylogenetic trees. Banzui duck was clustered into a separate group. Differences of the DA were analysed by t-test. The results showed that difference in DA between the 12 domestic duck breeds and Lvtou duck and the Banzui duck were very signiifcant (P<0.01), indicating that these 12 domestic duck breeds originated from Lvtou wild duck, but not Banzui duck.

  5. Identification and Preliminary Analysis of the Genetic Diversity of Cenococcum geophilum Fr.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Li-hong; YAN Wei; XU Yan

    2007-01-01

    To identify Cenococcum geophilum Fr., estimate their genetic diversity and study the effects on their genetic variation,27 Chinese C. geophilum isolates from 6 host plant species and 5 French C. geophilum isolates were analyzed using morphological and molecular methods. The universal primers ITS1/ITS4 were used in PCR-RFLP to amplify the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of tested C. geophilum isolates. The amplified products were digested with EcoR Ⅰ,Hinf Ⅰ, and Mbo Ⅰ, and the digested fragments of PCR products showed that there were obvious differences. A random primer (5'-CGCACCGCAC-3') was employed in RAPD to amplify the genomic DNA of C. geophilum, and 19 detectable and reliable DNA bands of 300-2 000 bp size were observed. According to the number, position, and strength of the DNA bands in agarose gel, the genetic distance and the genetic similarity among C. geophilum isolates were calculated using the PopGen Ver. 1.31 dendrogram analysis software. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the genetic distance by the Neighbor-Joining/UPGMA in PHYLIP. The results suggest the high level of genetic diversity among C. geophilum isolates from the same or different hosts. The effects of geographical factors or host plant species on C. geophilum genetic variation are not obvious.

  6. Identification and Analysis of Genetic Diversity Structure Within Pisum Genus Based on Microsatellite Markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Xu-xiao; Rebecca Ford; Robert R Redden; GUAN Jian-ping; WANG Shu-min

    2009-01-01

    To assesse the genetic diversity among wild and cultivated accessions of 8 taxonomic groups in 2 species, and 5 subspecies under Pisum genus, and to analyze population structure and their genetic relationships among various groups of taxonomy,the study tried to verify the fitness of traditionally botanical taxonomic system under Pisum genus and to provide essential information for the exploration and utilization of wild relatives of pea genetic resources. 197 Pisum accessions from 62 counties of 5 continents were employed for SSR analysis using 21 polymorphic primer pairs in this study. Except for cultivated field pea Pisum sativum ssp. sativum vat. sativum (94 genotypes), also included were wild relative genotypes that were classified as belonging to P. fulvum, P. sativum ssp.abyssinicum, P. sativum ssp. asiaticum, P. sativum ssp. transcaucasicum, P. sativum ssp. elatius vat. elatius, P. sativum ssp. elatius vat. pumilio and P. sativum ssp.sativum vat. arvense (103 genotypes). The PCA analyses and 3-dimension PCA graphs were conducted and drawn by NTSYSpe 2.2d statistical package. Nei78 genetic distances among groups of genetic resources were calculated, and cluster analysis using UPGMA method was carried out by using Popgene V1.32 statistical package, the dendrogram was drawn by MEGA3.1 statistical package. Allelie statistics were carried out by Popgene V1.32. The significance test between groups of genotypes was carried out by Fstat V2.9.3.2 statistical package. 104 polymorphic bands were amplified using 21 SSR primer pairs with unambiguous unique polymorphic bands. 4.95 alleles were detected by each SSR primer pair in average, of which 65.56% were effective alleles for diversity. PSAD270, PSAC58, PSAA18, PSAC75, PSAA175 and PSAB72 were the most effective SSR pairs. SSR alleles were uniformly distributed among botanical taxon units under Pisum genus, but significant difference appeared in most pairwise comparisons for genetic diversity between taxon unit based

  7. Genetic diversity of populations and clones of Rhopilema esculentum in China based on AFLP analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Hongjin; LIU Xiangquan; ZHANG Xijia; JIANG Haibin; WANG Jiying; ZHANG Limin

    2013-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) markers were developed to assess the genetic variation of populations and clones of Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye (Scyphozoa,Rhizostomatidae).One hundred and seventy-nine loci from 56 individuals of two hatchery populations and two wild populations were genotyped with five primer combinations.The polymorphic ratio,Shannon's diversity index and average heterozygosity were 70.3%,0.346 and 0.228 for the white hatchery population,74.3%,0.313,and 0.201 for the red hatchery population,79.3%,0.349,and 0.224 for the Jiangsu wild population,and 74.9%,0.328 and 0.210 for the Penglai wild population,respectively.Thus,all populations had a relatively high level of genetic diversity.A specific band was identified that could separate the white from the red hatchery population.There was 84.85% genetic differentiation within populations.Individual cluster analysis using unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) suggested that hatchery populations and wild populations could be divided.For the hatchery populations,the white and red populations clustered separately; however,for the wild populations,Penglai and Jiangsu populations clustered together.The genetic diversity at the clone level was also determined.Our data suggest that there are relatively high genetic diversities within populations but low genetic differentiation between populations,which may be related to the long-term use of germplasm resources from Jiangsu Province for artificial seeding and releasing.These findings will benefit the artificial seeding and conservation of the germplasm resources.

  8. A simple ssr analysis for genetic diversity estimation of maize landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatovic-Micic Dragana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available collection of 2217 landraces from western Balkan (former Yugoslavia is maintained at Maize Research Institute Zemun Polje gene bank. Nine flint and nine dent accessions from six agro-ecological groups (races, chosen on the basis of diverse pedigrees, were analyzed for genetic relatedness using phenotypic and simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. One of the aims was to establish a reliable set of SSR markers for a rapid diversity analysis using polyacrilamide gels and ethidium bromide staining. In the principal component analysis (PCA the first three principal components accounted for 80.86% of total variation and separated most of the flint from dent landraces. Ten SSR primers revealed a total of 56 and 63 alleles in flint and dent landraces, respectively, with low stuttering and good allele resolution on the gels. High average PIC value (0.822 also supports informativeness and utility of the markers used in this study. Higher genetic variation was observed among flint genotypes, as genetic distances between flint landraces covered a larger range of values (0.11- 0.38 than between dent (0.22 - 0.33 genotypes. Both phenotypic and SSR analyses distinguished flint and dent landraces, but neither of them could abstract agro-ecological groups. The SSR method used gave clear, easy to read band patterns that could be used for reliable allele frequency determination. Genetic diversity revealed for both markers indicated that the landraces were highly adapted to specific environmental conditions and purposes and could be valuable sources of genetic variability. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31028: Exploitation of maize diversity to improve grain quality and drought tolerance

  9. Genetic Diversity Analysis of South and East Asian Duck Populations Using Highly Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dongwon; Bhuiyan, Md Shamsul Alam; Sultana, Hasina; Heo, Jung Min; Lee, Jun Heon

    2016-04-01

    Native duck populations have lower productivity, and have not been developed as much as commercials duck breeds. However, native ducks have more importance in terms of genetic diversity and potentially valuable economic traits. For this reason, population discriminable genetic markers are needed for conservation and development of native ducks. In this study, 24 highly polymorphic microsatellite (MS) markers were investigated using commercial ducks and native East and South Asian ducks. The average polymorphic information content (PIC) value for all MS markers was 0.584, indicating high discrimination power. All populations were discriminated using 14 highly polymorphic MS markers by genetic distance and phylogenetic analysis. The results indicated that there were close genetic relationships among populations. In the structure analysis, East Asian ducks shared more haplotypes with commercial ducks than South Asian ducks, and they had more independent haplotypes than others did. These results will provide useful information for genetic diversity studies in ducks and for the development of duck traceability systems in the market.

  10. Genetic Diversity Analysis of South and East Asian Duck Populations Using Highly Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongwon Seo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Native duck populations have lower productivity, and have not been developed as much as commercials duck breeds. However, native ducks have more importance in terms of genetic diversity and potentially valuable economic traits. For this reason, population discriminable genetic markers are needed for conservation and development of native ducks. In this study, 24 highly polymorphic microsatellite (MS markers were investigated using commercial ducks and native East and South Asian ducks. The average polymorphic information content (PIC value for all MS markers was 0.584, indicating high discrimination power. All populations were discriminated using 14 highly polymorphic MS markers by genetic distance and phylogenetic analysis. The results indicated that there were close genetic relationships among populations. In the structure analysis, East Asian ducks shared more haplotypes with commercial ducks than South Asian ducks, and they had more independent haplotypes than others did. These results will provide useful information for genetic diversity studies in ducks and for the development of duck traceability systems in the market.

  11. Meta-analysis of susceptibility of woody plants to loss of genetic diversity through habitat fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranckx, Guy; Jacquemyn, Hans; Muys, Bart; Honnay, Olivier

    2012-04-01

    Shrubs and trees are assumed less likely to lose genetic variation in response to habitat fragmentation because they have certain life-history characteristics such as long lifespans and extensive pollen flow. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta-analysis with data on 97 woody plant species derived from 98 studies of habitat fragmentation. We measured the weighted response of four different measures of population-level genetic diversity to habitat fragmentation with Hedge's d and Spearman rank correlation. We tested whether the genetic response to habitat fragmentation was mediated by life-history traits (longevity, pollination mode, and seed dispersal vector) and study characteristics (genetic marker and plant material used). For both tests of effect size habitat fragmentation was associated with a substantial decrease in expected heterozygosity, number of alleles, and percentage of polymorphic loci, whereas the population inbreeding coefficient was not associated with these measures. The largest proportion of variation among effect sizes was explained by pollination mechanism and by the age of the tissue (progeny or adult) that was genotyped. Our primary finding was that wind-pollinated trees and shrubs appeared to be as likely to lose genetic variation as insect-pollinated species, indicating that severe habitat fragmentation may lead to pollen limitation and limited gene flow. In comparison with results of previous meta-analyses on mainly herbaceous species, we found trees and shrubs were as likely to have negative genetic responses to habitat fragmentation as herbaceous species. We also found that the genetic variation in offspring was generally less than that of adult trees, which is evidence of a genetic extinction debt and probably reflects the genetic diversity of the historical, less-fragmented landscape. ©2011 Society for Conservation Biology.

  12. Genetic diversity analysis of Arius manillensis (Siluriformes: Ariidae) using the mitochondrial control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Brian S; Quilang, Jonas P

    2012-04-01

    Arius manillensis is a Philippine endemic species and is an economically important fishery resource in Laguna de Bay, the largest lake in the country. Drastic reduction in population sizes of A. manillensis has been recorded in the past, which may have resulted in genetic bottleneck. In this study, the genetic diversity and population structure of A. manillensis in Laguna de Bay were assessed using the mitochondrial DNA control region. Specimens were obtained from three localities along Laguna de Bay, namely Binangonan (n = 27), Tanay (n = 29), and Calamba (n = 30). Of the 86 DNA sequences generated, 22 distinct haplotypes were observed. There were four unique haplotypes for Binangonan, six for Calamba, and five for Tanay. There were two haplotypes common to the three sites. The maximum likelihood tree and median-joining network showed little geographic separation among the haplotypes. Chi-square test showed no significant differentiation in A. manillensis from the three sites. The overall computed F(ST) was 0.0144, indicating small genetic differentiation in A. manillensis from the three localities sampled. Likewise, analysis of molecular variance showed a greater percentage of variation within population (98.62%) than variation among populations (1.38%; P = 0.21). Total haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity among the specimens from the three sites were 0.775 and 0.013, respectively. The high haplotype diversity coupled with low nucleotide diversity observed in this study confirms that genetic bottleneck occurred in A. manillensis which was followed by population expansion. This is also supported by the non-significant values for both Tajima's D and Fu's F. Furthermore, multimodal mismatch distribution plots were generated, which is consistent with the model of spatial range expansion followed by demographic expansion.

  13. Genetic diversity analysis with ISSR PCR on green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Songdong

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, genetic polymorphism and diversity in unicellular clones of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck and Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick were studied with Inter Simple Sequence Repeats PCR (ISSR PCR). Samples including four clones of C. vulgaris and three clones of C. pyrenoidosa were purified by single-clone-choice method. For four C. vulgaris unicellular clones, the total number of the bands scored for 18 primers was 298; and the number of the polymorphic bands was 118, of which 39.6% were polymorphic. The size of PCR products ranged from 200 to 2 500 bp. The total number of bands scored for 18 primers, the number of polymorphic bands and the percentage of three C. pyrenoidosa unicellular clones was 194.83 and 30.8%, respectively. POPGENE analysis show that the average Nei genetic diversity (h*) and Shannon index of diversity (I*) in the four C. vulgaris unicellular clones was 0.2181 and 0.3208, respectively, which is slightly higher than those of the three C. pyrenoidosa unicellular clones (0.190 3 and 0.274 8), which agreed with the percentage of polymorphic bands in the mixed samples of the two species. The results suggest that ISSR is a useful method to Chlorella for intraspecies genetic analysis.

  14. Genetic diversity analysis with ISSR PCR on green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Songdong

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, genetic polymorphism and diversity in unicellular clones of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck and Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick were studied with Inter Simple Sequence Repeats PCR (ISSR PCR). Samples including four clones of C. vulgaris and three clones of C. pyrenoidosa were purified by single-clone-choice method. For four C. vulgaris unicellular clones, the total number of the bands scored for 18 primers was 298; and the number of the polymorphic bands was 118, of which 39.6% were polymorphic. The size of PCR products ranged from 200 to 2 500 bp. The total number of bands scored for 18 primers, the number of polymorphic bands and the percentage of three C. pyrenoidosa unicellular clones was 194.83 and 30.8%, respectively. POPGENE analysis show that the average Nei genetic diversity (h *) and Shannon index of diversity (I *) in the four C. vulgaris unicellular clones was 0.2181 and 0.3208, respectively, which is slightly higher than those of the three C. pyrenoidosa unicellular clones (0.190 3 and 0.274 8), which agreed with the percentage of polymorphic bands in the mixed samples of the two species. The results suggest that ISSR is a useful method to Chlorella for intra-species genetic analysis.

  15. Characterization of casein gene complex and genetic diversity analysis in Indian goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, P K; Kumar, A; Mandal, A; Laloe, D; Singh, S K; Roy, R

    2010-04-01

    Milk protein polymorphism plays an important role in genetic diversity analysis, phylogenetic studies, establishing geographical diversity, conservation decision, and improving breeding goals. Milk protein polymorphism in Indian goat breeds has not been well studied; therefore, an investigation was carried out to analyze the genetic structure of the casein gene and milk protein diversity at six milk protein loci in nine Indian goat breeds/genetic groups from varied agro-climatic zones. Milk protein genotyping was carried out in 1098 individual milk samples by SDS-PAGE at alphaS1-CN (CSN1S1), beta-CN (CSN2), alphaS2-CN (CSN1S2), kappa-CN (CSN3), beta-LG, and alpha-LA loci. Indian goats exhibited alphaS1-casein A allele in higher frequency in the majority of breeds except Ganjam and local goats. The alphaS1-casein A allele frequencies varied from 0.45 to 0.77. A total of 16 casein haplotypes were observed in seven breeds and breed specific haplotypes were observed with respect to geographic region. The average number of alleles was lowest in Ganjam (1.66 +/- 0.81) and highest in Sirohi goats (2.50 +/- 1.05). Expected heterozygosity at six different loci demonstrated genetic diversity and breed fragmentation. Neighbor-Joining tree was built basing on Nei's distance. There was about 16.95% variability due to differences between breeds, indicating a strong subdivision. Principal component analysis was carried out to highlight the relationship among breeds. The variability among goat breeds was contributed by alphaS2-CN, beta-LG and alphaS1-CN. The Indian goats exhibited alphaS1-CN (CSN1S1) A allele in higher frequency in all the breeds indicating the higher casein yield in their milk.

  16. Preliminary analysis of population genetic diversity of cultivated Laminaria japonica sporophyte via AFLP technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Heng; Sui, Zhenghong; Bao, Zhenmin

    2010-03-01

    The amplified fragment length polymorphic DNA (AFLP) technique was adopted to estimate the population genetic polymorphism among 30 sporophytes of Laminaria japonica collected from a cultivating farm in Rongcheng, China. Three methods were used for genomic DNA extraction from Laminaria japonica sporophyte and only the products obtained using the improved genomic DNA extraction kit method proved qualified for AFLP analysis. The parameters of the method were optimized. Samples of forty milligrams and the cell lysis time of 120 min were suggested to replace the parameters recommended by the manufacturer. Thirty individuals of Laminaria japonica from the same cultivating site were investigated using one pair of selective primers. A total of 21 loci were obtained and 17 of them were polymorphic. The mean percent age of polymorphic loci of this population was 80.95%. The Nei’s gene diversity (H) within this population was 0.3028 and the average Shannon’s Information index (I) was 0.4498. A genetic distance matrix among different individuals was constructed as well. Through this study, an applicable AFLP genetic analysis working system for Laminaria japonica sporophyte was established. The results of this research also revealed a high level of genetic diversity within the studied population.

  17. Ssr analysis for genetic structure and diversity determination of maize local populations from former Yugoslavia territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignjatović-Micić, D; Drinić, S Mladenović; Nikolić, A; Lazić-Jancić, V

    2008-11-01

    A collection of 2178 local populations from ex-Yugoslavia territories is maintained in Maize Research Institute (MRI) gene bank. These populations were characterized mainly by morphological markers. In this work 21 local populations belonging to seven different agro-ecological groups have been subjected to SSR analysis using a DNA-pooling strategy. The objective of this work was to develop genetic fingerprints for characterization, identification and classification of the populations, as well as for estimation of their genetic diversity. Also, a DNA-pooling strategy was employed with the aim to certify if it could be applied for population analysis with SSR markers. Statistical analysis of 25 informative SSR primers revealing 224 alleles (bands) showed that the average within-population mean number of alleles was 2.55, the average values for total and within-population diversity were 0.784 and 0.502, respectively and G(ST) value was 0.360. Genetic distance values calculated using Modified Rogers' Distance were in the range from 0.35 to 0.60. The silver staining method of DNA used for bulked samples showed some weakness that could be overcome with a more sensitive staining method. Nevertheless, the results in this work indicate that the SSR analysis of bulks could be used for characterizing a large number of populations in gene banks.

  18. Analysis of genetic diversity of maize hybrids in the regional tests in Sichuan and Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study,analyses of phenotypic characters,SSR molecular markers and pedigrees were done to study the genetic diversity in 186 maize hybrids that were tested in regional trials in Sichuan and Southwest China.The results showed that there were differences in the variation coefficients of different characteristics,but all of the variation coefficients changed within a narrow range.Sixty pairs of simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer distributed on the ten chromosomes of maize produced stable amplified bands and 608 alleles were detected among the hybrids.The average number of alleles per locus was 10.1 ranging from 3 to 23.The values of polymorphism information content (PIC) for each SSR locus varied from 0.5179 to 0.9256 with an average of 0.7826.The genetic similarities of SSR marker pattern among the 186 hybrids ranged from 0.6067 to 0.9162,with an average of 0.7722.There were 16499 pairs of genetic similarity,in which 96.9% were 0.70000 to 0.9256.The cluster analysis showed that the hybrids could be classified into ten clusters,with 88.2% of the hybrids included in Cluster 4,Cluster 8 and Cluster 10.The analysis of pedigree sources of 51 hybrids showed that 36 hybrids had close genetic relationships with the hybrids developed by the Pioneer Company in the late 1980s and early 1990s in the United States,such as Y78599,Y7865 and Y78698,accounting for 70.58%.Meanwhile,13 hybrids had close genetic relationships with Y78599,accounting for 8.66%.The genetic similarities of SSR marker pattern among the 51 hybrids ranged from 0.66192 to 0.8799,with an average of 0.7686.There were 1196 pairs of genetic similarity ranged between 0.7000 to 0.8796,accounting for 93.80% of all the genetic similarity pairs.The cluster analysis showed that 88.2% of the 51 hybrids were in Cluster 4,Cluster 8 and Cluster 10,which indicated that similarity was high and genetic diversity narrow among the 186 hybrids.This showed that it is necessary to broaden the genetic basis of breeding

  19. Genetic diversity analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region in artificially propagated Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yuan; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Ouyang, Shan; Huang, Xiao-Chen; Zhan, Yang; Zhou, Ping; Rong, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Ping

    2015-08-01

    The genetic diversity of the three major artificially propagated populations of Chinese sucker, an endangered freshwater fish species, was investigated using the sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control regions. Among the 89 individuals tested, 66 variable sites (7.26%) and 10 haplotypes were detected (Haplotype diversity Hd = 0.805, Nucleotide diversity π = 0.0287). In general, genetic diversity was lower in artificially propagated populations than in wild populations. This reduction in genetic diversity may be due to population bottlenecks, genetic drift and human selection. A stepping-stone pattern of gene flow was detected in the populations studied, showing much higher gene flow between neighbouring populations. To increase the genetic diversity, wild lineages should be introduced, and more lineages should be shared among artificially propagated populations.

  20. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity analysis of different rice cultivars by microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allhgholipour Mehrzad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 52 rice SSR markers well distributed on 12 chromosomes were used to characterize and assess the genetic diversity among ninety four rice genotypes. The total number of polymorphic alleles was 361 alleles with the average of 5.86 alleles per SSR locus. The study revealed that some markers such as RM276 and RM5642 on chromosome 6 and RM14 and RM1 on chromosome 1 have more than 9 observed alleles compared to other primers like RM16, RM207, RM208 and RM317 with 3-4 alleles. The highest and lowest PIC values were observed for primers RM276 (0.892 and RM208 (0.423 respectively. Using Shannon´s diversity index, a mean genetic diversity of 1.641 was obtained from the analysis, indicating a high level of genetic variation among these cultivars. Cluster analysis using the complete linkage method based on jaccard similarity coefficient revealed that all genotypes were classified to nine clusters at genetic similarity level of 0.010.75, which contained 12, 16, 2, 18, 3, 6, 16, 10 and 11 varieties, respectively. Results of discriminant analysis showed that the nine cluster groups were confirmed at high levels of correct percent (96.8 and revealed true differences among these clusters. As a final result from this study, we selected eight cultivars from different cluster including Daylamani, Tarom mohali (landrace rice cultivars, RI1843046, Back cross line, RI184472, RI184421 (promising cultivars, Line 23 and IR50 (IRRI lines as parents. All of the selected cultivars will be arranged in complete diallel design to obtain combining abilities, gene effects and heterosis for each important morphology and physico-chemical characters.

  1. Genetic diversity and species pattern of Trichoderma and Hypocrea in Manipur using in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamala, Thongram; Devi, Sarangthem Indira; Thingnam, Gourshyam; Somkuwar, Bharat Gopalrao

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the occurrence and genetic diversity of Trichoderma and Hypocrea in Manipur which lies in the Indo-Burma biodiversity hot spot region. 65 Trichoderma isolates were identified at species level by morphological as well as sequence based analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region 1 and 4. Altogether 22 different species of Trichoderma and Hypocrea were found, of which Trichoderma harzianum represent the dominant species. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a clear cut distinction of strains isolated from various collection sites which further hints the need for detail study of Trichoderma on molecular level.

  2. Genetic analysis reveals diversity and genetic relationship among Trichoderma isolates from potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Al-Oweisi, Fatma A; Edwards, Simon G; Al-Nadabi, Hamed; Al-Fahdi, Ahmed M

    2015-07-28

    Trichoderma is one of the most common fungi in soil. However, little information is available concerning the diversity of Trichoderma in soil with no previous history of cultivation. This study was conducted to investigate the most common species and the level of genetic relatedness of Trichoderma species from uncultivated soil in relation to cultivated soil and potting media. A total of 24, 15 and 13 Trichoderma isolates were recovered from 84 potting media samples, 45 cultivated soil samples and 65 uncultivated soil samples, respectively. Analysis based on the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and the translation elongation factor gene (EF1) indicated the presence of 9 Trichoderma species: T. harzianum (16 isolates), T. asperellum (13), T. citrinoviride (9), T. orientalis (3), T. ghanense (3), T. hamatum (3), T. longibrachiatum (2), T. atroviride (2), and T. viride (1). All species were found to occur in potting media samples, while five Trichoderma species were recovered from the cultivated soils and four from the uncultivated soils. AFLP analysis of the 52 Trichoderma isolates produced 52 genotypes and 993 polymorphic loci. Low to moderate levels of genetic diversity were found within populations of Trichoderma species (H = 0.0780 to 0.2208). Analysis of Molecular Variance indicated the presence of very low levels of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.0002 to 0.0139) among populations of the same Trichoderma species obtained from the potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil. The study provides evidence for occurrence of Trichoderma isolates in soil with no previous history of cultivation. The lack of genetic differentiation among Trichoderma populations from potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil suggests that some factors could have been responsible for moving Trichoderma propagules among the three substrates. The study reports for the first time the presence of 4 Trichoderma species in Oman: T

  3. Reappraisal of phylogenetic status and genetic diversity analysis of Asian population of Lentinula edodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationship within the Lentinula genus is constructed based on the sequenced ITS fragments of the 60Chinese wild L. edodes isolates and the sequence data of 48 isolates of different species from other districts downloaded from the GenBank. The 108 isolates of Lentinula genus are divided into two branches and seven groups, one branch and two groups in the New World, and the other branch and five groups in the Old World, and the isolates clustering of different groups corresponds obviously with the classification of the morphological species. Asian isolates are partitioned in group Ⅰ and Ⅴ, two of the five groups of the Old World,by which the germplasm resources status represented is of great importance shown by the phylogenetic analysis. Group V which fills up the blank of geographic distribution has become one of the mainstream groups with an increased isolate number, while group Ⅰ has a tendency to dissimilate into two subgroups (Ia and Ib) with a huge isolate quantity and a coverage of most tested districts, suggesting that China (or Asia) is an important genetic diversity center of the natural population of Lentinula genus. Genetic analysis of Asian isolates based on groups Ia, Ib and group V indicates that the diversity of the east coastal-land, northwestern highland and southwestern China and Himalayas districts is the most plentiful, which is the three priorities in diversity protection of Asian Lentinula population.

  4. Whole genome SNP discovery and analysis of genetic diversity in Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslam Muhammad L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The turkey (Meleagris gallopavo is an important agricultural species and the second largest contributor to the world’s poultry meat production. Genetic improvement is attributed largely to selective breeding programs that rely on highly heritable phenotypic traits, such as body size and breast muscle development. Commercial breeding with small effective population sizes and epistasis can result in loss of genetic diversity, which in turn can lead to reduced individual fitness and reduced response to selection. The presence of genomic diversity in domestic livestock species therefore, is of great importance and a prerequisite for rapid and accurate genetic improvement of selected breeds in various environments, as well as to facilitate rapid adaptation to potential changes in breeding goals. Genomic selection requires a large number of genetic markers such as e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs the most abundant source of genetic variation within the genome. Results Alignment of next generation sequencing data of 32 individual turkeys from different populations was used for the discovery of 5.49 million SNPs, which subsequently were used for the analysis of genetic diversity among the different populations. All of the commercial lines branched from a single node relative to the heritage varieties and the South Mexican turkey population. Heterozygosity of all individuals from the different turkey populations ranged from 0.17-2.73 SNPs/Kb, while heterozygosity of populations ranged from 0.73-1.64 SNPs/Kb. The average frequency of heterozygous SNPs in individual turkeys was 1.07 SNPs/Kb. Five genomic regions with very low nucleotide variation were identified in domestic turkeys that showed state of fixation towards alleles different than wild alleles. Conclusion The turkey genome is much less diverse with a relatively low frequency of heterozygous SNPs as compared to other livestock species like chicken and pig. The

  5. Sequence analysis and genetic diversity of five new Indian isolates of cucumber mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Gautam, K K; Raj, S K

    2015-12-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is an important virus since it causes severe losses to many economically important crops worldwide. Five new isolates of CMV were isolated from naturally infected Hippeastrum hybridum, Dahlia pinnata, Hemerocallis fulva, Acorus calamus and Typhonium trilobatum plants, all exhibiting severe leaf mosaic symptoms. For molecular identification and sequence analyses, the complete coat protein (CP) gene of these isolates was amplified by RT-PCR. The resulting amplicons were cloned and sequenced and isolates were designated as HH (KP698590), DP (JF682239), HF (KP698589), AC (KP698588) and TT (JX570732). For study of genetic diversity among these isolates, the sequence data were analysed by BLASTn, multiple alignment and generating phylogenetic trees along with the respective sequences of other CMV isolates available in GenBank Database were done. The isolates under study showed 82-99% sequence diversity among them at nucleotide and amino acid levels; however they showed close relationships with CMV isolates of subgroup IB. In alignment analysis of amino acid sequences of HH and AC isolates, we have found fifteen and twelve unique substitutions, compared to HF, DP and TT isolates, suggesting the cause of high genetic diversity.

  6. A genome-wide analysis of genetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi intergenic regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo G Panunzi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas Disease. Recently, the genomes of representative strains from two major evolutionary lineages were sequenced, allowing the construction of a detailed genetic diversity map for this important parasite. However this map is focused on coding regions of the genome, leaving a vast space of regulatory regions uncharacterized in terms of their evolutionary conservation and/or divergence. METHODOLOGY: Using data from the hybrid CL Brener and Sylvio X10 genomes (from the TcVI and TcI Discrete Typing Units, respectively, we identified intergenic regions that share a common evolutionary ancestry, and are present in both CL Brener haplotypes (TcII-like and TcIII-like and in the TcI genome; as well as intergenic regions that were conserved in only two of the three genomes/haplotypes analyzed. The genetic diversity in these regions was characterized in terms of the accumulation of indels and nucleotide changes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on this analysis we have identified i a core of highly conserved intergenic regions, which remained essentially unchanged in independently evolving lineages; ii intergenic regions that show high diversity in spite of still retaining their corresponding upstream and downstream coding sequences; iii a number of defined sequence motifs that are shared by a number of unrelated intergenic regions. A fraction of indels explains the diversification of some intergenic regions by the expansion/contraction of microsatellite-like repeats.

  7. VNTR analysis reveals unexpected genetic diversity within Mycoplasma agalactiae, the main causative agent of contagious agalactia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayling Roger D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma agalactiae is the main cause of contagious agalactia, a serious disease of sheep and goats, which has major clinical and economic impacts. Previous studies of M. agalactiae have shown it to be unusually homogeneous and there are currently no available epidemiological techniques which enable a high degree of strain differentiation. Results We have developed variable number tandem repeat (VNTR analysis using the sequenced genome of the M. agalactiae type strain PG2. The PG2 genome was found to be replete with tandem repeat sequences and 4 were chosen for further analysis. VNTR 5 was located within the hypothetical protein MAG6170 a predicted lipoprotein. VNTR 14 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG3350 and the hypothetical protein MAG3340. VNTR 17 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG4060 and the hypothetical protein MAG4070 and VNTR 19 spanned the 5' end of the pseudogene for a lipoprotein MAG4310 and the 3' end of the hypothetical lipoprotein MAG4320. We have investigated the genetic diversity of 88 M. agalactiae isolates of wide geographic origin using VNTR analysis and compared it with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis. Simpson's index of diversity was calculated to be 0.324 for PFGE and 0.574 for VNTR analysis. VNTR analysis revealed unexpected diversity within M. agalactiae with 9 different VNTR types discovered. Some correlation was found between geographical origin and the VNTR type of the isolates. Conclusion VNTR analysis represents a useful, rapid first-line test for use in molecular epidemiological analysis of M. agalactiae for outbreak tracing and control.

  8. Genetic relationship and diversity among coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) accessions revealed through SCoT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, M K; Sabana, A A; Rachana, K E; Rahman, Shafeeq; Jerard, B A; Karun, Anitha

    2015-12-01

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is one of the important palms grown both as a homestead and plantation crop in countries and most island territories of tropical regions. Different DNA-based marker systems have been utilized to assess the extent of genetic diversity in coconut. Advances in genomics research have resulted in the development of novel gene-targeted markers. In the present study, we have used a simple and novel marker system, start codon targeted polymorphism (SCoT), for its evaluation as a potential marker system in coconut. SCoT markers were utilized for assessment of genetic diversity in 23 coconut accessions (10 talls and 13 dwarfs), representing different geographical regions. Out of 25 SCoT primers screened, 15 primers were selected for this study based on their consistent amplification patterns. A total of 102 scorable bands were produced by the 15 primers, 88 % of which were polymorphic. The scored data were used to construct a similarity matrix. The similarity coefficient values ranged between 0.37 and 0.91. These coefficients were utilized to construct a dendrogram using the unweighted pair group of arithmetic means (UPGMA). The extent of genetic diversity observed based on SCoT analysis of coconut accessions was comparable to earlier findings using other marker systems. Tall and dwarf coconut accessions were clearly demarcated, and in general, coconut accessions from the same geographical region clustered together. The results indicate the potential of SCoT markers to be utilized as molecular markers to detect DNA polymorphism in coconut accessions.

  9. Development of a leafy Brassica rapa fixed line collection for genetic diversity and population structure analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pang, W.; Li, X.; Choi, S.R.; Dhandapani, V.; Im, S.; Park, M.Y.; Jang, C.S.; Yang, M.S.; Ham, I.K.; Lee, E.M.; Kim, W.; Lee, S.S.; Bonnema, A.B.; Park, S.; Piao, Z.; Lim, Y.P.

    2015-01-01

    Brassica rapa is an economically important crop with a wide range of morphologies. Developing a set of fixed lines and understanding their diversity has been challenging, but facilitates resource conservation. We investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of 238 fixed lines of leafy

  10. Genetic diversity analysis of sugarcane germplasm based on fluorescence-labeled simple sequence repeat markers and a capillary electrophoresis-based genotyping platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic diversity analysis, which refers to the elaboration of total extent of genetic characteristics in the genetic makeup of a certain species, constitutes a classical strategy for the study of diversity, population genetic structure, and breeding practices. In this study, fluorescence-labeled se...

  11. An Analysis of Social Seed Network and Its Contribution to On-Farm Conservation of Crop Genetic Diversity in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diwakar Poudel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Social seed systems are important for the maintenance of crop genetic diversity on farm. This is governed by local and informal system in the community through a farmers’ network. This paper analyses these local seed systems through application of social network analysis tools and mappings and examines the network member and its stability over space and time in a small rice farming community in Nepal. NetDraw software is used for data analysis and network mapping. We found that the dynamic network structure had key role in provisioning of traditional varieties and maintaining of crop genetic diversity on farm. We identify and ascertain the key network members, constituted either as nodal or bridging (connector farmers, occupying central position in the network who promote seed flow of local crop diversity, thus strengthening crop genetic resource diversity on farm.

  12. Inference of Tumor Evolution during Chemotherapy by Computational Modeling and In Situ Analysis of Genetic and Phenotypic Cellular Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Almendro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and posttreatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution.

  13. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Aslaug; Rye, Inga H; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Maruyama, Reo; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin L; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-02-13

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and posttreatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution.

  14. Analysis of genetic diversity of certain species of Piper using RAPD-based molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Utpal; Tanti, Bhaben; Rethy, Parakkal; Gajurel, Padma Raj

    2014-09-01

    The utility of RAPD markers in assessing genetic diversity and phenetic relationships of six different species of Piper from Northeast India was investigated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with four arbitrary 10-mer oligonucleotide primers applied to the six species produced a total of 195 marker bands, of which, 159 were polymorphic. On average, six RAPD fragments were amplified per reaction. In the UPGMA phenetic dendrogram based on Jaccard's coefficient, the different accessions of Piper showed a high level of genetic variation. This study may be useful in identifying diverse genetic stocks of Piper, which may then be conserved on a priority basis.

  15. Microsatellite Analysis of Genetic Diversity Between Loach with Different Levels of Ploidy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ya-juan; Qi Hong-rui; Ma Hai-yan; Zhou He; Xu Wen; Sui Yi; Li Jia-qi

    2014-01-01

    We used microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic parameters of three different polyploidy populations ofMisgurnus anguillicaudatus from Honghu City, Hubei Province. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis banding patterns of diploid (2n), triploid (3n) and tetraploid loaches (4n) were analyzed with PopGen software. A total of 68 alleles were obtained from seven microsatellite loci and the polymorphism information content (PIC) indices were all above 0.5. The average expected mean heterozygosity values (He) were 0.8420, 0.7186 and 0.8521; the average observed mean heterozygosity values (Ho) were 0.9674, 0.9785 and 0.8928; and the Hardy-WeinbergP values were 0.3078, 0.3151 and 0.3762, for diploid, triploid and tetraploid individuals, respectively. The results indicated that the three populations were highly polymorphic, with no deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium observed at all the seven microsatellite loci. This indicated a high level of genetic diversity within the populations. A cluster analysis diagram showed that the shortest genetic distance was between diploid and tetraploid loaches and they shared a close phylogenetic relationship. The triploid and tetraploid individuals had the most distant phylogenetic relationship.

  16. Genetic diversity analysis of tree peony germplasm using iPBS markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Y B; Guo, D L; Guo, L L; Wei, D F; Hou, X G

    2015-07-06

    We examined the genetic diversity of 10 wild species (populations) and 55 varieties of tree peony using inter-primer binding site (iPBS) markers. From a total of 36 iPBS primers, 16 were selected based on polymorphic amplification. The number of bands amplified by each primer ranged from 9 to 19, with an average of 12.88 bands per primer. The length of bands ranged from 100 to 2000 bp, concentrated at 200 to 1800 bp. Sixteen primers amplified 206 bands in total, of which 173 bands were polymorphic with a polymorphism ratio of 83.98%. Each primer amplified 10.81 polymorphic bands on average. The data were then used to construct a phylogenetic tree using unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean methods. Clustering analysis showed that the genetic relationships among the varieties were not only related to the genetic background or geographic origin, but also to the flowering phase, flower color, and flower type. Our data also indicated that iPBS markers were useful tools for classifying tree peony germplasms and for tree peony breeding, and the specific bands were helpful for molecular identification of tree peony varieties.

  17. Genetic Diversity in Passiflora Species Assessed by Morphological and ITS Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiamala Devi Ramaiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used morphological characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of nuclear ribosomal DNA to investigate the phylogeny of Passiflora species. The samples were collected from various regions of East Malaysia, and discriminant function analysis based on linear combinations of morphological variables was used to classify the Passiflora species. The biplots generated five distinct groups discriminated by morphological variables. The group consisted of cultivars of P. edulis with high levels of genetic similarity; in contrast, P. foetida was highly divergent from other species in the morphological biplots. The final dataset of aligned sequences from nine studied Passiflora accessions and 30 other individuals obtained from GenBank database (NCBI yielded one most parsimonious tree with two strongly supported clades. Maximum parsimony (MP tree showed the phylogenetic relationships within this subgenus Passiflora support the classification at the series level. The constructed phylogenic tree also confirmed the divergence of P. foetida from all other species and the closeness of wild and cultivated species. The phylogenetic relationships were consistent with results of morphological assessments. The results of this study indicate that ITS region analysis represents a useful tool for evaluating genetic diversity in Passiflora at the species level.

  18. Principal component analysis reveals the 1000 Genomes Project does not sufficiently cover the human genetic diversity in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng eLu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The 1000 Genomes Project (1KG aims to provide a comprehensive resource on human genetic variations. With an effort of sequencing 2,500 individuals, 1KG is expected to cover the majority of the human genetic diversities worldwide. In this study, using analysis of population structure based on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs data, we examined and evaluated the coverage of genetic diversity of 1KG samples with the available genome-wide SNP data of 3,831 individuals representing 140 population samples worldwide. We developed a method to quantitatively measure and evaluate the genetic diversity revealed by population structure analysis. Our results showed that the 1KG does not have sufficient coverage of the human genetic diversity in Asia, especially in Southeast Asia. We suggested a good coverage of Southeast Asian populations be considered in 1KG or a regional effort should be initialized to provide a more comprehensive characterization of the human genetic diversity in Asia, which is important for both evolutionary and medical studies in the future.

  19. Mapping genetic diversity of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.: application of spatial analysis for conservation and use of plant genetic resources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten van Zonneveld

    Full Text Available There is a growing call for inventories that evaluate geographic patterns in diversity of plant genetic resources maintained on farm and in species' natural populations in order to enhance their use and conservation. Such evaluations are relevant for useful tropical and subtropical tree species, as many of these species are still undomesticated, or in incipient stages of domestication and local populations can offer yet-unknown traits of high value to further domestication. For many outcrossing species, such as most trees, inbreeding depression can be an issue, and genetic diversity is important to sustain local production. Diversity is also crucial for species to adapt to environmental changes. This paper explores the possibilities of incorporating molecular marker data into Geographic Information Systems (GIS to allow visualization and better understanding of spatial patterns of genetic diversity as a key input to optimize conservation and use of plant genetic resources, based on a case study of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill., a Neotropical fruit tree species. We present spatial analyses to (1 improve the understanding of spatial distribution of genetic diversity of cherimoya natural stands and cultivated trees in Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru based on microsatellite molecular markers (SSRs; and (2 formulate optimal conservation strategies by revealing priority areas for in situ conservation, and identifying existing diversity gaps in ex situ collections. We found high levels of allelic richness, locally common alleles and expected heterozygosity in cherimoya's putative centre of origin, southern Ecuador and northern Peru, whereas levels of diversity in southern Peru and especially in Bolivia were significantly lower. The application of GIS on a large microsatellite dataset allows a more detailed prioritization of areas for in situ conservation and targeted collection across the Andean distribution range of cherimoya than previous studies could

  20. Mapping Genetic Diversity of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.): Application of Spatial Analysis for Conservation and Use of Plant Genetic Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zonneveld, Maarten; Scheldeman, Xavier; Escribano, Pilar; Viruel, María A.; Van Damme, Patrick; Garcia, Willman; Tapia, César; Romero, José; Sigueñas, Manuel; Hormaza, José I.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing call for inventories that evaluate geographic patterns in diversity of plant genetic resources maintained on farm and in species' natural populations in order to enhance their use and conservation. Such evaluations are relevant for useful tropical and subtropical tree species, as many of these species are still undomesticated, or in incipient stages of domestication and local populations can offer yet-unknown traits of high value to further domestication. For many outcrossing species, such as most trees, inbreeding depression can be an issue, and genetic diversity is important to sustain local production. Diversity is also crucial for species to adapt to environmental changes. This paper explores the possibilities of incorporating molecular marker data into Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to allow visualization and better understanding of spatial patterns of genetic diversity as a key input to optimize conservation and use of plant genetic resources, based on a case study of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.), a Neotropical fruit tree species. We present spatial analyses to (1) improve the understanding of spatial distribution of genetic diversity of cherimoya natural stands and cultivated trees in Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru based on microsatellite molecular markers (SSRs); and (2) formulate optimal conservation strategies by revealing priority areas for in situ conservation, and identifying existing diversity gaps in ex situ collections. We found high levels of allelic richness, locally common alleles and expected heterozygosity in cherimoya's putative centre of origin, southern Ecuador and northern Peru, whereas levels of diversity in southern Peru and especially in Bolivia were significantly lower. The application of GIS on a large microsatellite dataset allows a more detailed prioritization of areas for in situ conservation and targeted collection across the Andean distribution range of cherimoya than previous studies could do, i.e. at

  1. Analysis of Dengue Virus Genetic Diversity during Human and Mosquito Infection Reveals Genetic Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, October M; Wilm, Andreas; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Choy, Milly M; Chow, Angelia; Chong, Yuwen; Ong, Xin Mei; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Cook, Alex R; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) cause debilitating and potentially life-threatening acute disease throughout the tropical world. While drug development efforts are underway, there are concerns that resistant strains will emerge rapidly. Indeed, antiviral drugs that target even conserved regions in other RNA viruses lose efficacy over time as the virus mutates. Here, we sought to determine if there are regions in the DENV genome that are not only evolutionarily conserved but genetically constrained in their ability to mutate and could hence serve as better antiviral targets. High-throughput sequencing of DENV-1 genome directly from twelve, paired dengue patients' sera and then passaging these sera into the two primary mosquito vectors showed consistent and distinct sequence changes during infection. In particular, two residues in the NS5 protein coding sequence appear to be specifically acquired during infection in Ae. aegypti but not Ae. albopictus. Importantly, we identified a region within the NS3 protein coding sequence that is refractory to mutation during human and mosquito infection. Collectively, these findings provide fresh insights into antiviral targets and could serve as an approach to defining evolutionarily constrained regions for therapeutic targeting in other RNA viruses.

  2. Population genetic analysis reveals a low level of genetic diversity of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia' causing witches' broom disease in lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abadi, Shaikha Y; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Dickinson, Matthew; Al-Hammadi, Mohammed S; Al-Shariqi, Rashid; Al-Yahyai, Rashid A; Kazerooni, Elham A; Bertaccini, Assunta

    2016-01-01

    Witches' broom disease of lime (WBDL) is a serious phytoplasma disease of acid lime in Oman, the UAE and Iran. Despite efforts to study it, no systemic study attempted to characterize the relationship among the associated phytoplasma, 'Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia', from the three countries. This study utilized sequences of the 16S rRNA, imp and secA genes to characterize 57 strains collected from Oman (38), the UAE (9) and Iran (10). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene showed that the 57 strains shared 98.5-100 % nucleotide similarity to each other and to strains of 'Ca. P. aurantifolia' available in GenBank. The level of genetic diversity was low based on the 16S rRNA (0-0.011), imp (0-0.002) and secA genes (0-0.015). The presence of low level of diversity among phytoplasma strains from Oman, the UAE and Iran can be explained by the movement of infected lime seedlings from one country to another through trading and exchange of infected plants. The study discusses implication of the findings on WBDL spread and management.

  3. Genetic diversity analysis of Gossypium arboreum germplasm accessions using genotyping-by-sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijuan; Erpelding, John E

    2016-10-01

    The diploid cotton species Gossypium arboreum possesses many favorable agronomic traits such as drought tolerance and disease resistance, which can be utilized in the development of improved upland cotton cultivars. The USDA National Plant Germplasm System maintains more than 1600 G. arboreum accessions. Little information is available on the genetic diversity of the collection thereby limiting the utilization of this cotton species. The genetic diversity and population structure of the G. arboreum germplasm collection were assessed by genotyping-by-sequencing of 375 accessions. Using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism sequence data, two major clusters were inferred with 302 accessions in Cluster 1, 64 accessions in Cluster 2, and nine accessions unassigned due to their nearly equal membership to each cluster. These two clusters were further evaluated independently resulting in the identification of two sub-clusters for the 302 Cluster 1 accessions and three sub-clusters for the 64 Cluster 2 accessions. Low to moderate genetic diversity between clusters and sub-clusters were observed indicating a narrow genetic base. Cluster 2 accessions were more genetically diverse and the majority of the accessions in this cluster were landraces. In contrast, Cluster 1 is composed of varieties or breeding lines more recently added to the collection. The majority of the accessions had kinship values ranging from 0.6 to 0.8. Eight pairs of accessions were identified as potential redundancies due to their high kinship relatedness. The genetic diversity and genotype data from this study are essential to enhance germplasm utilization to identify genetically diverse accessions for the detection of quantitative trait loci associated with important traits that would benefit upland cotton improvement.

  4. Comparative analysis of genetic diversity in sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) using AFLP and SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jihong; Pan, Lei; Liu, Honggao; Wang, Shuzhen; Wu, Zhihua; Ke, Weidong; Ding, Yi

    2012-04-01

    The sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) is an aquatic plant of economic and ornamental importance in China. In this study, we developed twenty novel sacred lotus SSR markers, and used AFLP and SSR markers to investigate the genetic diversity and genetic relationships among 58 accessions of N. nucifera including 15 seed lotus, 12 rhizome lotus, 24 flower lotus and 7 wild lotus. Our results showed that sacred lotus exhibited a low level of genetic diversity, which may attribute to asexual reproduction and long-term artificial selection. A dendrogram based on both AFLP and SSR clustering data showed that: (1) the seed lotus accessions and rhizome lotus accessions were distinctly clustered into different groups, which indicated the significant genetic differentiation between them. This may be attributed to the two modes of reproduction and lack of genetic exchange; (2) the accessions of Thailand wild lotus were separated from other wild lotus accessions. This implied that the Thailand lotus might be genetically differentiated from other wild lotuses. In addition, Mantel test conducted gave highly significant correlation between AFLP-SSR data and each of the AFLP and SSR ones, with the values of r = 0.941 and r = 0.879, respectively, indicating the higher efficiency of the combination of these techniques (AFLP and SSR) in estimation and validation of the genetic diversity among the accession of sacred lotus. This knowledge of the genetic diversity and genetic relatedness of N. nucifera is potentially useful to improve the current strategies in breeding and germplasm conservation to enhance the ornamental and economic value of sacred lotus.

  5. Genetic Diversity of Methylotrophic Bacteria from Human Mouth Based on Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis (ARDRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CINDY OKTAVIA SUSANTO

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Methylotrophs inhabit the human mouth. In this study, methylotrophic bacteria were isolated from the human mouth microflora of 63 subjects, especially from the tongue, gingival, and subgingival area using minimal agar supplemented with 1% methanol. The obtained isolates were subjected to biochemical assays, continued with antibiotics susceptibility testing using ampicillin (10 g, tetracycline (20 g, kanamycin (30 g, trimethoprim (5 g, and streptomycin (10 g. Genetic diversity was analyzed using ARDRA method. Isolates varying in morphology characteristics were amplified for 16S rRNA gene and continued with DNA sequencing. As many as 21 methylotrophic bacterial isolates were purified and divided into seven groups with different phenotypic profiles. A majority of the isolates were resistant to trimethoprim but sensitive to kanamycin, streptomycin, and tetracycline. Resistance to ampicillin was variable in each isolate. ARDRA showed nine different digestion profiles. DNA sequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that six isolates with different phenotypic and digestion profiles were closely related to Methylobacterium radiotoleran (94%, Microbacterium esteraromaticum (99%, Pseudomonas sp. (100%, and three of them were exhibited 99, 99, and 98% sequence similarity with Gordonia sp., respectively. The results of this study revealed diversity among methylotrophic bacteria particularly in human mouth.

  6. ISSR markers for analysis of molecular diversity and genetic structure of Indian teak (Tectona grandis L.f. populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamin Akhtar Ansari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR constitute a powerful dominant DNA molecular marker system used for diversity analysis, which is indispensable for making estimates of genetic base and demarcation of populations for undertaking conservation and improvement program offorest tree species. Twenty nine populations of teak (Tectona grandis L.f. were collected from central and peninsular India for analysis of genetic diversity and structure. Genomic DNA from ten randomly selected individuals of each population was extracted and amplified using five ISSR primers (UBC-801, 834, 880, 899 and 900. The primers showed 100% polymorphism. UBC-900 recorded the highest Nei's genetic diversity (0.32 to 0.40 and UBC-899 had the highest Shannon's Information Index (0.49 to 0.59. AMOVA revealed a very high intra-population genetic diversity (91%, in comparison to inter-population genetic diversity among states (6.17% and within states (2.77%, were also indirectly confirmed by large standard deviations associated with genetic diversity estimates for individual population, as well as poor bootstrapping values for most of the cluster nodes. However, UPGMA dendrogram revealed several clusters, with populations from central India being present almost in each cluster, making groups with populations of adjoining states and distant states. Nevertheless, the cluster analysis distinguished the drier teak populations of central India from the moist teak populations of south India, which was also confirmed by Principle Coordinate Analysis. The findings advocates the need not only for enhancing selection intensity for large number of plus trees, but also for laying out more number of in situ conservation plots within natural populations of each cluster for germplasm conservation of teak aimed at improving the teak productivity and quality in future. 

  7. ISSR markers for analysis of molecular diversity and genetic structure of Indian teak (Tectona grandis L.f. populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Ansari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR constitute a powerful dominantDNA molecular marker system used for diversity analysis, which isindispensable for making estimates of genetic base and demarcation of populations for undertaking conservation and improvement program of forest tree species. Twenty nine populations of teak (Tectona grandis L.f. were collected from central and peninsular India for analysis of genetic diversity and structure. Genomic DNA from ten randomly selected individuals of each population was extracted and amplified using five ISSR primers(UBC-801, 834, 880, 899 and 900. The primers showed 100% polymorphism. UBC-900 recorded the highest Nei’s genetic diversity (0.32 to 0.40and UBC-899 had the highest Shannon’s Information Index (0.49 to 0.59. AMOVA revealed a very high intra-population genetic diversity (91%, in comparison to inter-population genetic diversity among states (6.17% and within states (2.77% which were also indirectly confirmed by large standard deviations associated with genetic diversity estimates for individual population, as well as poor bootstrapping values for most of the cluster nodes. However, UPGMA dendrogram revealed several clusters, with populationsfrom central India being present almost in each cluster, makinggroups with populations of adjoining states and distant states. Nevertheless,the cluster analysis distinguished the drier teak populations of central India from the moist teak populations of south India, which was also confirmed by Principle Coordinate Analysis. The findings advocates the need not only for enhancing selection intensity for large number of plus trees, but also for laying out more number of in situ conservation plots within natural populations of each cluster for germplasm conservation of teak aimed at improving the teak productivity and quality in future.

  8. RAPD analysis of the genetic diversity among accessions of Fabaceous forages (Poincianella spp) from the Caatinga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, R F M; Araujo Neto, R B; Nascimento, M P S B C; Lima, P S C

    2014-08-01

    Among members of the Fabaceae family, native to the Brazilian Caatinga, the species Poincianella pyramidalis and P. bracteosa exhibit particular potential as forage for cattle, sheep and goats. With the aim of establishing genetic relationships within Poincianella, random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was performed on eight accessions of P. pyramidalis and two accessions of P. bracteosa, originating from the semiarid zone of the state of Piauí, northeastern Brazil, and present in the germplasm bank of Embrapa Meio Norte (Teresina, Piauí, Brazil). Amplification reactions using 11 selected arbitrary sequence primers generated 167 fragments with an overall polymorphism of 70.38%. Five monomorphic loci were generated exclusively in P. pyramidalis accessions, while three unique monomorphic loci were associated with P. bracteosa, and these represented potential species-specific markers. The similarity coefficients between Poincianella accessions were low (mean value 0.59) but with a wide variation (range 0.443 to 0.748). The similarity matrix and the dendrogram constructed using the unweighted pair group method allowed the separation of Poincianella accessions into two major clusters represented by the two distinct species, while the accessions of P. pyramidalis could be separated further into three subgroups. The high level of genetic diversity detected in the genus Poincianella could be used in future breeding programs to produce enhanced cultivars, although the variability could be better exploited if more specimens were collected from other locations within the semiarid region of northeastern Brazil.

  9. Genetic diversity analysis of Lepidium sativum (Chandrasur) using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amandeep Kaur; Rakesh Kumar; Suman Rani; Anita Grewal

    2015-01-01

    Lepidium sativum (commonly known as garden cress) belongs to the family Brassicaceae. It is a fast-growing erect, annual herbaceous plant. Its seeds possess significant fracture healing, anti-asthmatic, anti-diabetic, hypoglycemic, nephrocurative and nephroprotective activ-ities. In the present study, we assessed the genetic diversity of various genotypes of L. sativum using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Out of 41 ISSR primers screened, 32 primers showed significant, clear and repro-ducible bands. A total of 510 amplified bands were obtained using 32 ISSR primers, out of which 422 bands were poly-morphic and 88 bands were monomorphic. The percentage of polymorphism was found to be 82. A total of 35 unique alleles ranging insize from 200 to 2,900 bp were observed. Cluster analysis based on unweighted pair-group method, arithmetic mean divided the 18 genotypes into two main clusters, with the first having only HCS-08 genotype of L. sativum and other having all of the other 17 genotypes. The Jaccard similarity coefficient revealed a broad range 32–72%genetic relatedness among the 18 genotypes.

  10. Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Sesame Accessions from Africa and Asia as Major Centers of Its Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komivi Dossa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sesame is an important oil crop widely cultivated in Africa and Asia. Understanding the genetic diversity of accessions from these continents is critical to designing breeding methods and for additional collection of sesame germplasm. To determine the genetic diversity in relation to geographical regions, 96 sesame accessions collected from 22 countries distributed over six geographic regions in Africa and Asia were genotyped using 33 polymorphic SSR markers. Large genetic variability was found within the germplasm collection. The total number of alleles was 137, averaging 4.15 alleles per locus. The accessions from Asia displayed more diversity than those from Africa. Accessions from Southern Asia (SAs, Eastern Asia (EAs, and Western Africa (WAf were highly diversified, while those from Western Asia (WAs, Northern Africa (NAf, and Southeastern Africa (SAf had the lowest diversity. The analysis of molecular variance revealed that more than 44% of the genetic variance was due to diversity among geographic regions. Five subpopulations, including three in Asia and two in Africa, were cross-identified through phylogenetic, PCA, and STRUCTURE analyses. Most accessions clustered in the same population based on their geographical origins. Our results provide technical guidance for efficient management of sesame genetic resources in breeding programs and further collection of sesame germplasm from these different regions.

  11. Genetic diversity and population genetic structure analysis of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto complex based on mitochondrial DNA signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Sharma

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity and population genetics of the Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto complex were investigated based on sequencing of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. Total 81 isolates of hydatid cyst collected from ungulate animals from different geographical areas of North India were identified by sequencing of cytochrome c oxidase subunit1 (coxi gene. Three genotypes belonging to E. granulosus sensu stricto complex were identified (G1, G2 and G3 genotypes. Further the nucleotide sequences (retrieved from GenBank for the coxi gene from seven populations of E. granulosus sensu stricto complex covering 6 continents, were compared with sequences of isolates analysed in this study. Molecular diversity indices represent overall high mitochondrial DNA diversity for these populations, but low nucleotide diversity between haplotypes. The neutrality tests were used to analyze signatures of historical demographic events. The Tajima's D test and Fu's FS test showed negative value, indicating deviations from neutrality and both suggested recent population expansion for the populations. Pairwise fixation index was significant for pairwise comparison of different populations (except between South America and East Asia, Middle East and Europe, South America and Europe, Africa and Australia, indicating genetic differentiation among populations. Based on the findings of the present study and those from earlier studies, we hypothesize that demographic expansion occurred in E. granulosus after the introduction of founder haplotype particular by anthropogenic movements.

  12. Genotyping and genetic diversity of Arcobacter butzleri by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.; Atabay, H.I.; Amisu, K.O.

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the potential of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) profiling for genotyping Arcobacter butzleri and to obtain further data on the genetic diversity of this organism. Methods and Results: Seventy-three isolates of Danish, British, Turkish, Swedish, Nigerian and Nor...

  13. AFLP analysis of genetic diversity in populations of Botrytis elliptica and Botrytis tulipae from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staats, M.; Baarlen, van P.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity and to infer the mode of reproduction of Botrytis elliptica and B. tulipae in the Netherlands. First, three molecular typing methods were compared for their ability to differentiate isolates of B. tulipae, B. elliptica, and B. cinerea.

  14. Genetic diversity and differentiation of Pinus sylvestris L. from the IUFRO 1982 provenance trial revealed by AFLP analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Androsiuk Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA markers have become effective tools in genetic diversity studies of forest trees. However, molecular marker analyses are associated with laborious and costly effort. One of the possibilities to overcome these constraints is to analyze bulked samples per population, rather than individual plants. We have used bulked DNA-based AFLP analysis to investigate genetic variations in Pinus sylvestris L. (Scots pine from the IUFRO 1982 provenance trial in Kórnik (western Poland. Four AFLP primer combinations yielded a total of 309 bands, of which 208 (67.31% were polymorphic. Thirty-six (11.65% unique alleles were deployed randomly among the populations. Estimated genetic diversity and differentiation was high, as expressed by He = 0.238 and I = 0.356, and by genetic distance values which ranged from 0.154 to 0.363. A geographic pattern of interpopulation differentiation was observed, pointing to the individual character of populations from northeastern Europe. In the light of available data, we discuss the influence of historical migration routes, gene flow and human activity on observed genetic diversity and differentiation of Scots pine in Europe. Our results indicate that the AFLP method applied to DNA templates extracted from bulked leaf samples provides an efficient approach to elucidate genetic diversity and relationships among Scots pine populations.

  15. Genetic diversity analysis of Amomum tsao-ko in Jinping County of Yunnan Province using SSR markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mengli; Wang, Tiantao; Lei, En; Meng, Hengling; Xie, Linyan; Zhu, Kunlong; Duan, Shaoze; Li, Wenqiang; Lu, Bingyue

    2017-08-01

    Genetic diversity analysis is very important for germplasm resources conservation and utilization. The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity among 44 individuals of Amomum tsao-ko from Jinping County of Yunnan Province using 5 selected SSR (simple sequence repeat) markers. A total of 23 polymorphic loci were detected among these germplasms, with an average of 4.6 polymorphic loci per SSR primer combination. The percentage of polymorphic loci was 100%, whereas the mean effective number of alleles (Ne), observed heterozygosity(Ho), expected heterozygosity (He), Shannon's information index (I), and the mean polymorphism information content (PIC) were 3. 410, 0. 491, 0. 679, 1.266 and 0. 672, respectively, indicating that the Amomum tsao-ko germplasms from Jinping County had high genetic diversity.

  16. Diversity and genetic structure analysis of three Amazonian Amerindian populations of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Yamid; Arias B, Leonardo; Barreto, Guillermo

    2012-04-01

    In the departments of the Vaupés and Guaviare, in southeastern Colombia, in a transitional area between Amazonia and the eastern plains, inhabit indigenous groups belonging to the Tukanoan (East) and Guahiban linguistic families. Although some studies have dealt with the culture and the cosmology description of these groups, little research has been done on the biological diversity and genetic relationships of such groups. To estimate the diversity, the structure, and the genetic relationships of one Guahiban and two Tukanoan groups of the Colombian Amazonian region. Samples were collected (n = 106) from unrelated individuals belonging to the Vaupés native indigenous communities. The DNA was extracted and nine autosomal microsatellites were typed. Several measures of diversity, FST, pairwise FST, and population differentiation between groups were calculated. Finally, it was estimated the genetic distances of the groups studied in relation with other Amazonian, Andean and Central American indigenous people. 1. The genetic diversity found stands within the range of other Amazonian populations, whereas compared to the mestizo and afro-descendant Colombian populations, such diversity showed to be lower. 2. The structure and population differentiation tests showed two clusters; one consisting of the Vaupés Tukanoan and Guaviare Tukanoan groups, and a second one formed by the Guayabero. 3. Tukanoan groups are found to be closer related to the Brazilian Amazonian populations than to the Guayabero. The results of this study suggest that the Guayabero group from Guaviare, are genetically differentiated from those Tukanoan groups of the Vaupés and Guaviare.

  17. Analysis of genetic diversity in pigeon pea germplasm using retrotransposon-based molecular markers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MANEESHA; KAILASH C. UPADHYAYA

    2017-09-01

    Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), an important legume crop is predominantly cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia and Africa. It is normally considered to have a low degree of genetic diversity, an impediment in undertaking crop improvement programmes.We have analysed genetic polymorphism of domesticated pigeon pea germplasm (47 accessions) across the world using earlier characterized panzee retrotransposon-based molecularmarkers. Itwas conjectured that since retrotransposons are interspersed throughout the genome, retroelements-based markers would be able to uncover polymorphism possibly inherent in the diversity of retroelement sequences. Two PCR-based techniques, sequence-specific amplified polymorphism (SSAP) and retrotransposon microsatellite amplified polymorphism (REMAP) were utilized for the analyses.We show that a considerable degree of polymorphism could be detected using these techniques. Three primer combinations in SSAP generated 297 amplified products across 47 accessionswith an average of 99 amplicons per assay. Degree of polymorphism varied from 84–95%. In the REMAP assays, the number of amplicons was much less but up to 73% polymorphism could be detected. On the basis of similarity coefficients, dendrograms were constructed. The results demonstrate that the retrotransposon-based markers could serve as a better alternative for the assessment of genetic diversity in crops with apparent low genetic base.

  18. Analysis of the genetic diversity of physic nut, Jatropha curcas L. accessions using RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, M Y; Shabanimofrad, M; Puteri Edaroyati, M W; Latif, M A

    2012-06-01

    A sum of 48 accessions of physic nut, Jatropha curcas L. were analyzed to determine the genetic diversity and association between geographical origin using RAPD-PCR markers. Eight primers generated a total of 92 fragments with an average of 11.5 amplicons per primer. Polymorphism percentages of J. curcas accessions for Selangor, Kelantan, and Terengganu states were 80.4, 50.0, and 58.7%, respectively, with an average of 63.04%. Jaccard's genetic similarity co-efficient indicated the high level of genetic variation among the accessions which ranged between 0.06 and 0.81. According to UPGMA dendrogram, 48 J. curcas accessions were grouped into four major clusters at coefficient level 0.3 and accessions from same and near states or regions were found to be grouped together according to their geographical origin. Coefficient of genetic differentiation (G(st)) value of J. curcas revealed that it is an outcrossing species.

  19. Genetic diversity analysis of two commercial breeds of pigs using genomic and pedigree data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Ricardo; Peixoto, Jane O; Cardoso, Fernando F; Cardoso, Leandro L; Biegelmeyer, Patrícia; Cantão, Maurício E; Otaviano, Antonio; Freitas, Marcelo S; Caetano, Alexandre R; Ledur, Mônica C

    2016-03-30

    Genetic improvement in livestock populations can be achieved without significantly affecting genetic diversity if mating systems and selection decisions take genetic relationships among individuals into consideration. The objective of this study was to examine the genetic diversity of two commercial breeds of pigs. Genotypes from 1168 Landrace (LA) and 1094 Large White (LW) animals from a commercial breeding program in Brazil were obtained using the Illumina PorcineSNP60 Beadchip. Inbreeding estimates based on pedigree (F x) and genomic information using runs of homozygosity (F ROH) and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) by SNP inbreeding coefficient (F SNP) were obtained. Linkage disequilibrium (LD), correlation of linkage phase (r) and effective population size (N e ) were also estimated. Estimates of inbreeding obtained with pedigree information were lower than those obtained with genomic data in both breeds. We observed that the extent of LD was slightly larger at shorter distances between SNPs in the LW population than in the LA population, which indicates that the LW population was derived from a smaller N e . Estimates of N e based on genomic data were equal to 53 and 40 for the current populations of LA and LW, respectively. The correlation of linkage phase between the two breeds was equal to 0.77 at distances up to 50 kb, which suggests that genome-wide association and selection should be performed within breed. Although selection intensities have been stronger in the LA breed than in the LW breed, levels of genomic and pedigree inbreeding were lower for the LA than for the LW breed. The use of genomic data to evaluate population diversity in livestock animals can provide new and more precise insights about the effects of intense selection for production traits. Resulting information and knowledge can be used to effectively increase response to selection by appropriately managing the rate of inbreeding, minimizing negative effects of inbreeding

  20. Analysis of genetic diversity for wild and captive green peafowl populations by random amplified polymorphic DNA technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KEYa-yong; CHANGHong; ZHANGGuo-ping

    2004-01-01

    The genetic diversity of the populations for 14 wild green peafowls (Pavo muticus) and 18 captive green peafowls was investigated by using the technology of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Totally 161 and 166 amplified bands were obtained by using 23 arbitrary primers to amplify the genomic DNA of wild and captive green peafowls respectively. The results showed that the average relative genetic distance of the wild and captive green peafowls populations was 0.0555 and 0.1355, respectively, and difference of the average relative genetic distances between the two populations was 0.1635. The Shannon diversity index for the wild and captive green peafowl populations was 0.4348 and 1.0163, respectively, which means that there exists significant difference in genetic diversity between the two populations, and the genetic diversity of wild green peafowl was low. The two populations originated from two different families according to analysis by the UPGMA method. This research can provide the theoretical basis for supervising genealogies management of peafowl populations.

  1. Genetic diversity analysis by RAPD in Cathaya argyrophylla Chun et Kuang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪小全; 邹喻苹; 张大明; 洪德元; 刘正宇

    1997-01-01

    Genetic diversity level of Cathaya argyrophylla was confirmed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Seventy five samples (individuals), collected from Hunan and Sichuan provinces of China were used in the study. 21 10-mer oligonucleotide primers detected 106 sites, and 34 (32% ) of them were polymor-phic. The level of genetic variation in C. argyrophylla was lower than those of other conifers, and was considered to be associated with the complexity of habitats. The percentages of polymorphic sites (PPS) in the Hunan and Sichuan pop-ulations were 18% and 25% respectively. 7.99% of genetic variation existed between the two populations; this value was higher than the mean value (6.8%) among populations in conifers displayed by allozyme. Some subpopulations of C. argyrophylla were greatly differentiated because of site mutation and genetic drift. The highest value of genetic dif-ference between subpopulations amounted to 16. 23% . In addition, a concept of diversity coefficient(DC), a value us

  2. A Whole Genome DArTseq and SNP Analysis for Genetic Diversity Assessment in Durum Wheat from Central Fertile Crescent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad Qasim; Çiftçi, Vahdettin; E. Sáenz de Miera, Luis; Aasim, Muhammad; Nadeem, Muhammad Azhar; Aktaş, Husnu; Özkan, Hakan; Hatipoğlu, Rüştü

    2017-01-01

    Until now, little attention has been paid to the geographic distribution and evaluation of genetic diversity of durum wheat from the Central Fertile Crescent (modern-day Turkey and Syria). Turkey and Syria are considered as primary centers of wheat diversity, and thousands of locally adapted wheat landraces are still present in the farmers’ small fields. We planned this study to evaluate the genetic diversity of durum wheat landraces from the Central Fertile Crescent by genotyping based on DArTseq and SNP analysis. A total of 39,568 DArTseq and 20,661 SNP markers were used to characterize the genetic characteristic of 91 durum wheat land races. Clustering based on Neighbor joining analysis, principal coordinate as well as Bayesian model implemented in structure, clearly showed that the grouping pattern is not associated with the geographical distribution of the durum wheat due to the mixing of the Turkish and Syrian landraces. Significant correlation between DArTseq and SNP markers was observed in the Mantel test. However, we detected a non-significant relationship between geographical coordinates and DArTseq (r = -0.085) and SNP (r = -0.039) loci. These results showed that unconscious farmer selection and lack of the commercial varieties might have resulted in the exchange of genetic material and this was apparent in the genetic structure of durum wheat in Turkey and Syria. The genomic characterization presented here is an essential step towards a future exploitation of the available durum wheat genetic resources in genomic and breeding programs. The results of this study have also depicted a clear insight about the genetic diversity of wheat accessions from the Central Fertile Crescent. PMID:28099442

  3. Nested PCR for detection and genotyping of Ehrlichia ruminantium: use in genetic diversity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Dominique; Vachiéry, Nathalie; Stachurski, Frederic; Kandassamy, Yane; Raliniaina, Modestine; Aprelon, Rosalie; Gueye, Arona

    2004-10-01

    Ehrlichia ruminantium, the agent of cowdriosis transmitted by Amblyomma ticks, presents an extensive genetic and antigenic diversity of key importance for vaccine formulation. Two means of nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting were developed to conduct molecular epidemiology studies in the Caribbean and Africa. The first used a conserved DNA fragment for detection of the pathogen in animals and vectors, and the second relied on the polymorphic map1 gene for genotyping. As compared to a PCR, the nested PCR showed a 2-Log10 improvement of sensitivity and allowed amplification from ticks, blood, brain, and lungs from infected animals, providing a more accurate picture of the tick infection rate. In Guadeloupe, this rate reached 36% (N = 212) instead of 1.7% (N = 224), as previously estimated. Genetic typing was done by restriction fragment length polymorphism or sequencing of map1 amplification products. Molecular epidemiology studies conducted in field sites selected for vaccination trials with inactivated vaccine, revealed the circulation of genetically divergent strains in limited geographical areas. It is known, then, that genetic clustering based on map1 has no predictive value regarding the protective value of a given strain against a new strain. However, tracing the strains by this technique revealed the extent of E. ruminantium diversity that one can expect in a given region, and the method allows differentiation between an inadequate immune response and the challenge by a breakthrough strain on animals dying despite vaccination. Up to now, genetic typing does not avoid cross-protection studies, which were conducted in parallel, although on a more limited scale. The importance of pathogen diversity studies for optimization of vaccine design is discussed as well as the research for new polymorphic genes. These genes may allow better predictions on cross-protection, given the recent completion of the sequence of the full genome of two E. ruminantium

  4. New analysis for consistency among markers in the study of genetic diversity: development and application to the description of bacterial diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailly Xavier

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of post-genomic methods has dramatically increased the amount of qualitative and quantitative data available to understand how ecological complexity is shaped. Yet, new statistical tools are needed to use these data efficiently. In support of sequence analysis, diversity indices were developed to take into account both the relative frequencies of alleles and their genetic divergence. Furthermore, a method for describing inter-population nucleotide diversity has recently been proposed and named the double principal coordinate analysis (DPCoA, but this procedure can only be used with one locus. In order to tackle the problem of measuring and describing nucleotide diversity with more than one locus, we developed three versions of multiple DPCoA by using three ordination methods: multiple co-inertia analysis, STATIS, and multiple factorial analysis. Results This combination of methods allows i testing and describing differences in patterns of inter-population diversity among loci, and ii defining the best compromise among loci. These methods are illustrated by the analysis of both simulated data sets, which include ten loci evolving under a stepping stone model and a locus evolving under an alternative population structure, and a real data set focusing on the genetic structure of two nitrogen fixing bacteria, which is influenced by geographical isolation and host specialization. All programs needed to perform multiple DPCoA are freely available. Conclusion Multiple DPCoA allows the evaluation of the impact of various loci in the measurement and description of diversity. This method is general enough to handle a large variety of data sets. It complements existing methods such as the analysis of molecular variance or other analyses based on linkage disequilibrium measures, and is very useful to study the impact of various loci on the measurement of diversity.

  5. Post-bottleneck genetic diversity of elephant populations in South Africa, revealed using microsatellite analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, A M; Harley, E H

    2001-09-01

    Widespread hunting had fragmented and severely reduced elephant populations in South Africa by 1900. Elephant numbers increased during the 1900s, although rates of recovery of individual populations varied. The Kruger National Park elephant population increased rapidly, to more than 6000 by 1967, with recruitment boosted by immigration from Mozambique. The Addo Elephant National Park population was reduced to 11 elephants in 1931 and remains relatively small (n = 325). Loss of genetic variation is expected to occur whenever a population goes through a bottleneck, especially when post-bottleneck recovery is slow. Variation at nine polymorphic microsatellite loci was analysed for Kruger and Addo elephants, as well as museum specimens of Addo elephants shot prior to the population bottleneck. Significantly reduced genetic variation and heterozygosity were observed in Addo in comparison to Kruger (mean alleles/locus and H(E): Addo 1.89, 0.18; Kruger 3.89, 0.44). Two alleles not present in the current Addo population were observed in the museum specimens. Addo elephants represent a genetic subset of the Kruger population, with high levels of genetic differentiation resulting from rapid genetic drift. The Kruger population is low in genetic diversity in comparison to East African elephants, confirming this population also suffered an appreciable bottleneck.

  6. Genetic diversity and structure of the zombi pea (Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich) gene pool based on SSR marker analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachapak, Sujinna; Somta, Prakit; Poonchaivilaisak, Supalak; Yimram, Tarika; Srinives, Peerasak

    2017-04-01

    Zombi pea (Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich) is an underutilized legume species and a useful gene source for resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, although there is little understanding on its genetic diversity and structure. In this study, 422 (408 wild and 14 cultivated) accessions of zombi pea from diverse origins (201 from Africa, 126 from America, 85 from Australia, 5 from Asia and 5 from unknown origin) were analyzed with 20 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to determine its genetic diversity and genetic structure. The SSR markers detected 273 alleles in total with a mean of 13.6 alleles per locus. Polymorphism information content values of the markers varied from 0.58 to 0.90 with an average of 0.76. Overall gene diversity was 0.715. Gene diversity and average allelic richness was highest in Africa (0.749 and 8.08, respectively) and lowest in America (0.435 and 4.10, respectively). Nei's genetic distance analysis revealed that the highest distance was between wild Australia and cultivated Africa (0.559), followed by wild West Africa and wild Australia (0.415). STRUCTURE, neighbor-joining (NJ), and principal coordinate analyses consistently showed that these zombi pea accessions were clustered into three major groups, viz. America, Africa and Asia, and Australia. NJ tree also suggested that American and Australian accessions are originated from East African zombi peas, and that the cultivated accessions from Africa and Asia were genetically distinct, while those from America were clustered with some cultivated accessions from Africa. These results suggest that Africa is the center of origin and diversity of zombi pea, and that domestication of this pea took place more than once in different regions.

  7. Investigation and Analysis of Genetic Diversity of Diospyros Germplasms Using SCoT Molecular Markers in Guangxi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libao Deng

    Full Text Available Knowledge about genetic diversity and relationships among germplasms could be an invaluable aid in diospyros improvement strategies.This study was designed to analyze the genetic diversity and relationship of local and natural varieties in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China using start codon targeted polymorphism (SCoT markers. The accessions of 95 diospyros germplasms belonging to four species Diospyros kaki Thunb, D. oleifera Cheng, D. kaki var. silverstris Mak, and D. lotus Linn were collected from different eco-climatic zones in Guangxi and were analyzed using SCoT markers.Results indicated that the accessions of 95 diospyros germplasms could be distinguished using SCoT markers, and were divided into three groups at similarity coefficient of 0.608; these germplasms that belong to the same species were clustered together; of these, the degree of genetic diversity of the natural D. kaki var. silverstris Mak population was richest among the four species; the geographical distance showed that the 12 natural populations of D. kaki var. silverstris Mak were divided into two groups at similarity coefficient of 0.19. Meanwhile, in order to further verify the stable and useful of SCoT markers in diospyros germplasms, SSR markers were also used in current research to analyze the genetic diversity and relationship in the same diospyros germplasms. Once again, majority of germplasms that belong to the same species were clustered together. Thus SCoT markers were stable and especially useful for analysis of the genetic diversity and relationship in diospyros germplasms.The molecular characterization and diversity assessment of diospyros were very important for conservation of diospyros germplasm resources, meanwhile for diospyros improvement.

  8. Genetic diversity analysis among pigeonpea genotypes adapted to South American regions based on microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adna Cristina Barbosa de Sousa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L Millspaugh] is one of the most important perennial legume crops utilized in the food, fodder, soil conservation, crop-livestock integrated systems, reclaiming of degraded pastures and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Microsatellite markers were used to estimate the genetic diversity of 77 pigeonpea genotypes selected from the germplasm collections at Embrapa Cattle-Southeast and, to evaluate their transferability to Phaseolus vulgaris and Vigna unguiculata species. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to12, with an average of 5.1 alleles. The PIC values ranged from 0.11 to 0.80 (average 0.49 and the D values from 0.23 to 0.91 (average 0.58. The averages of observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.25 and 0.47, respectively, showing a deficit in heterozygosity. A model-based Bayesian approach implemented in the software STRUCTURE was used to assign genotypes into clusters. A dendrogram was constructed based on the modified Roger's genetic distances using a neighbor-joining method (NJ. A total of four clusters were assembled by STRUCTURE and a strong tendency of correspondence between the Bayesian clusters in the NJ tree was observed. The genetic distance ranged from 0.09 to 0.62 (average 0.37, showing a low genetic diversity in the pigeonpea genotypes. Transferability of pigeonpea-specific microsatellites revealed a cross-amplification and the presence of polymorphic alleles in P. vulgaris and V. unguiculata.

  9. Genetic diversity of Chilean and Brazilian alstroemeria species assessed by AFLP analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, T H; de Jeu, M; van Eck, H; Jacobsen, E

    2000-05-01

    One to three accessions of 22 Alstroemeria species, an interspecific hybrid (A. aurea x A. inodora), and single accessions of Bomarea salsilla and Leontochir ovallei were evaluated using the AFLP-marker technique to estimate the genetic diversity within the genus Alstroemeria. Three primer combinations generated 716 markers and discriminated all Alstroemeria species. The dendrogram inferred from the AFLP fingerprints supported the conjecture of the generic separation of the Chilean and Brazilian Alstroemeria species. The principal co-ordinate plot showed the separate allocation of the A. ligtu group and the allocation of A. aurea, which has a wide range of geographical distribution and genetic variation, in the middle of other Alstroemeria species. The genetic distances, based on AFLP markers, determined the genomic contribution of the parents to the interspecific hybrid.

  10. Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Maize Landraces from the South Maize Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi-zhai; WANG Tian-yu; LI Yu; GUO Rong-hua; ZHAO Jiu-ran; CAI Yi-lin; WANG Feng-ge; CAO Mo-ju; WANG Rong-huan; SHI Yun-su; SONG Yan-chun

    2010-01-01

    Understanding genetic diversity and population structure of landraces is important in utilization of these germplasm in breeding programs.In the present study,a total of 143 core maize landraces from the South Maize Region(SR)of China,which can represent the general profile of the genetic diversity in the landraces germplasm of SR,were genotyped by 54DNA microsatellite markers.Totally,517 alleles(ranging from 4 to 22)were detected among these iandraces,with an average of 9.57 alleles per locus.The total gene diversity of these core landraces was 0.61,suggesting a rather higher level of genetic diversity.Analysis of population structure based on Bayesian method obtained the samilar result as the phylogeny neighbor-joining(NJ)method.The results indicated that the whole set of 143 core landraces could be clustered into two distinct groups.All landraces from Guangdong,Hainan,and 15 landraces from Jiangxi were clustered into group 1,while those from the other regions of SR formed the group 2.The results from the analysis of genetic diversity showed that both of groups possessed a similar gene diversity,but group 1 possessed relatively lower mean alleles per locus(6.63)and distinet alleles(91)than group 2(7.94 and 110,respectively).The relatively high richness of total alleles and distinet alleles preserved in the core landraces from SR suggested that all these germplasm could be useful resources in germplasm enhancement and maize breeding in China.

  11. Analysis of genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among red jungle fowls and Chinese domestic fowls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO WenBin; CHEN GuoHong; LI BiChun; WU XinSheng; SHU JingTing; WU ShengLong; XU Qi; Steffen WEIGEND

    2008-01-01

    Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among 568 individuals of two red jungle fowl subspe-cies (Gallus gallus spadiceus in China and Gallus gallus gallus in Thailand) and 14 Chinese domestic chicken breeds were evaluated with 29 microstaellite loci, the genetic variability within population and genetic differentiation among population were estimated, and then genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships were analyzed among red jungle fowls and Chinese domestic fowls. A total of 286 alleles were detected in 16 population with 29 microsatellite markers and the average number of the alleles observed in 29 microsatellite loci was 9.86±6.36. The overall expected heterozygosity of all population was 0.6708±0.0251, and the number of population deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium per locus ranged from 0 to 7. In the whole population, the average of genetic differentiation among population, measured as FST value, was 16.7% (P<0.001), and all loci contributed significantly (P<0.001) to this differentiation. It can also be seen that the deficit of heterozygotes was very high (0.015) (P<0.01). Reynolds' distance values varied between 0.036 (Xiaoshan chicken-Luyuan chicken pair) and 0.330 (G gallus gallus-Gushi chicken pair). The Nm value ranged from 0.533 (between G gallus gallus and Gushi chicken) to 5.833 (between Xiaoshan chicken and Luyuan chicken). An unrooted consensus tree was constructed using the neighbour-joining method and the Reynolds' genetic distance. The heavy-body sized chicken breeds, Luyuan chicken, Xiaoshan chicken, Beijing Fatty chicken, Henan Game chicken, Huainan Partridge and Langshan chicken formed one branch, and it had a close genetic relationship between Xiaoshan chicken-Luyuan chicken pair and Chahua chicken-Tibetan chicken pair. Chahua chicken and Tibetan chicken had closer genetic relationship with these two subspecies of red jungle fowl than other domestic chicken breeds. G gallus spadiceus showed closer phylogenetic

  12. Analysis of genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among red jungle fowls and Chinese domestic fowls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steffen; WEIGEND

    2008-01-01

    Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among 568 individuals of two red jungle fowl subspe- cies (Gallus gallus spadiceus in China and Gallus gallus gallus in Thailand) and 14 Chinese domestic chicken breeds were evaluated with 29 microstaellite loci, the genetic variability within population and genetic differentiation among population were estimated, and then genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships were analyzed among red jungle fowls and Chinese domestic fowls. A total of 286 alleles were detected in 16 population with 29 microsatellite markers and the average number of the alleles observed in 29 microsatellite loci was 9.86±6.36. The overall expected heterozygosity of all population was 0.6708±0.0251, and the number of population deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium per locus ranged from 0 to 7. In the whole population, the average of genetic differentiation among population, measured as FST value, was 16.7% (P<0.001), and all loci contributed significantly (P<0.001) to this differentiation. It can also be seen that the deficit of heterozygotes was very high (0.015) (P<0.01). Reynolds’ distance values varied between 0.036 (Xiaoshan chicken-Luyuan chicken pair) and 0.330 (G. gallus gallus-Gushi chicken pair). The Nm value ranged from 0.533 (between G. gallus gallus and Gushi chicken) to 5.833 (between Xiaoshan chicken and Luyuan chicken). An unrooted consensus tree was constructed using the neighbour-joining method and the Reynolds’ genetic distance. The heavy-body sized chicken breeds, Luyuan chicken, Xiaoshan chicken, Beijing Fatty chicken, Henan Game chicken, Huainan Partridge and Langshan chicken formed one branch, and it had a close genetic relationship between Xiaoshan chicken-Luyuan chicken pair and Chahua chicken-Tibetan chicken pair. Chahua chicken and Tibetan chicken had closer genetic relationship with these two subspecies of red jungle fowl than other domestic chicken breeds. G. gallus spadiceus showed closer phylogenetic

  13. SSR ANALYSIS IN THE STUDY OF GENETIC DIVERSITY AND SIMILARITY OF BARLEY CULTIVARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. R. Lakhneko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research was to develop an evaluation system of the genetic polymorphism for barley cultivars of Ukrainian and foreign origin based on the analysis of simple sequence repeats and valuable agricultural trait loci as well as to compose the molecular genetic passports for those cultivars. PCRs with the following separation of amplification products by agarose and polyacrylamide electrophoresis were performed to find out genetic polymorphism. Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean was used for phylogenetic relationship detection. The dandrogram of phylogenetic relationships of 55 barley cultivars was constructed and molecular genetic passports were developed. Molecular genetic passports can be involved in verification for the compliance with standards cultivars, stability and seed purity.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Genetic Diversity in Landraces of Waxy Maize from Yunnan and Guizhou Using SSR Markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-jian; HUANG Yu-bi; RONG Ting-zhao; TIAN Meng-liang; YANG Jun-pin

    2005-01-01

    Waxy maize landraces are abundant in Yunnan and Guizhou of China. Genetic diversity of waxy maize landraces from Yunnan and Guizhou were analyzed using SSR markers. We screened 38 landraces with 50 primers that generated 3 to 6 polymorphic bands, with an average of 4.13 bands. Shannon's information indices for genetic diversity of the 14 waxy maize landraces from Yunnan varied from 4.9571 to 42.1138 and averaged 26.5252; Shannon's information indices for genetic diversity of the 24 waxy maize landraces from Guizhou varied from 22.0066 to 40.6320 and averaged 32.3156. For the 14 waxy maize landraces from Yunnan, the within-landrace genetic diversity accounted for 45.40% and the among-landrace genetic diversity accounted for 54.60% of the total genetic diversity observed. For the 24 waxy maize landraces from Guizhou, the within-landrace genetic diversity accounted for 50.76% and the among-landrace genetic diversity accounted for 49.24% of the total observed. Some individual landraces possessed as much as 96.86% of the total genetic diversity occurring among landraces within origins. Differentiation between geographic origins accounted for only 3.14% of the total genetic diversity. Both Yunnan and Guizhou would be the diversity centers and the original centers of waxy maize.

  15. A Comparative Analysis of B Chromosomes and Genetic Diversity in Maize (Zea mays L.) Landraces from Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Qi-lun; YANG Ke-cheng; PAN Guang-tang; RONG Ting-zhao

    2007-01-01

    The number of B chromosomes (Bs) in 54 maize landraces from Southwest China was tested by means of cytological observations. Nine landraces with Bs were observed. A map, showing the geographic distribution of the landraces with Bs, was plotted. It was found that southeastern Sichuan Province in China was the main distribution area of the landraces with Bs in Southwest China. In order to obtain information on relationships between Bs and genetic variation, genetic diversity both among and within 11 landraces was evaluated. For each SSR marker, the number of alleles ranged from 3 to 12 with an average of 7.86, which revealed a high level of genetic diversity among maize landraces in Southwest China.Based on SSRs data, higher genetic variation was found in the landraces with 2B, and the genetic distance between the landraces with and without Bs was higher. The results together with the principal component analysis (PCA) supported the hypothesis that maize landraces in Southwest China were first introduced to the middle part of southwest Sichuan, China. At the same time, the effect of Bs on genetic variation was discussed.

  16. Analysis of the diversity of population and convergence of genetic algorithms based on Negentropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lianying; Wang Anmin

    2005-01-01

    With its wide use in different fields, the problem of the convergence of simple genetic algorithms (GAs) has been concerned. In the past, the research on the convergence of GAs was based on Holland' s model theorem. The diversity of the evolutionary population and the convergence of GAs are studied by using the concept of negentropy based on the discussion of the characteristic of GA. Some test functions are used to test the convergence of GAs, and good results have been obtained. It is shown that the global optimization may be obtained by selecting appropriate parameters of simple GAs if the evolution time is enough.

  17. Comparative analysis of antimicrobial resistance and genetic diversity of Campylobacter from broilers slaughtered in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Kinga; Denis, Edyta; Osek, Jacek

    2015-10-01

    In the current study, the relationship of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli strains isolated at slaughter was investigated using comparative analysis of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), virulence gene (VG) and PFGE profiling. A total of 254 Campylobacter isolates from poultry caeca and corresponding carcasses, including 139 C. jejuni and 115 C. coli strains were tested. The most prevalent resistance profiles observed in C. jejuni were ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and tetracycline (46 out of 139, 33.1% isolates) as well as ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline and streptomycin among C. coli strains (34 out of 115, 29.6%). Multi-resistance was found more frequently among C. coli than C. jejuni (PCampylobacter isolates tested. All Campylobacter strains were classified into 154 different PFGE types. Among them, 56 profiles (28 C. jejuni and 28 C. coli) were common for at least two isolates including 9 clusters covering from 4 to 9 strains. Campylobacter composite types generated by a combination of 154 PFGE types, 10 AMR profiles and 19 VG patterns divided 178 distinct types with 95% similarity. The majority of the composite profiles (76 for C. jejuni and 58 for C. coli; 75.3% in total) included only one bacterial isolate. Furthermore, 11 pairs of C. jejuni and 12 pairs of C. coli from caeca and the corresponding carcasses isolated from the same places possessed the identical PFGE, AMR and VG patterns. This study demonstrated that C. jejuni and C. coli isolated from poultry in Poland showed to have a high genetic diversity and a weak clonal population structure. However, the composite analysis revealed a strong evidence for cross-contamination of chicken carcasses during the slaughter process. Additionally, our results confirm that Campylobacter may easily contaminate poultry carcasses at slaughter process and spread around country. More than half of Campylobacter strains tested (50.4%) were resistant to at least two classes of antimicrobials, i

  18. Genetic diversity in Entamoeba histolytica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Graham Clark; Mehreen Zaki; Ibne Karim Md Ali

    2002-11-01

    Genetic diversity within Entamoeba histolytica led to the re-description of the species 10 years ago. However, more recent investigation has revealed significant diversity within the re-defined species. Both protein-coding and non-coding sequences show variability, but the common feature in all cases is the presence of short tandem repeats of varying length and sequence. The ability to identify strains of E. histolytica may lead to insights into the population structure and epidemiology of the organism.

  19. Analysis of genetic diversity of Laeliinae (Orchidaceae) in the State of Sergipe using ISSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni-Blank, M F; Santos, M S; Blank, A F; Rabbani, A R C; Silva-Mann, R; Santos, J B; Costa, A S; Menezes, T S A

    2016-06-03

    The Orchidaceae represent one of the largest and most diverse families on the planet. However, this family is constantly threatened by predators and by the advancement of urban centers over its natural habitats. The objective of this study was to use inter-simple sequence repeat markers to evaluate the genetic diversity between orchid accessions of the Laeliinae subtribe, which comprise part of the Orchidaceae study collection at the Department of Agronomic Engineering of the Federal University of Sergipe. DNA was extracted from each specimen by using an adapted 2% cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide protocol. Similarity between individuals was calculated using the Jaccard method. Clustering was carried out by the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean method, with resampling and 10,000 bootstraps. Eighty-seven fragments were obtained, all of which were polymorphic, revealing high variability between accessions. The mean similarity was 35.77% between Encyclia sp individuals, and 35.90% between specimens of Cattleya tigrina. For Epidendrum secundum, a relationship between geographic and genetic distances was observed, and the accession collected in the southern part of the State of Sergipe (Serra de Itabaiana National Park) was more divergent than that of the other parts of the state. The data generated in this study will guide further research aimed at the ex situ conservation of these materials.

  20. Analysis of Fungicide Sensitivity and Genetic Diversity among Colletotrichum Species in Sweet Persimmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Geun-Hye; Cho, Hyun Ji; Kim, Hye Sun; Kwack, Yong-Bum; Kwak, Youn-Sig

    2015-06-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (C. gloeosporioides; Teleomorph: Glomerella cingulata), is the most destructive disease that affects sweet persimmon production worldwide. However, the biology, ecology, and genetic variations of C. gloeosporioides remain largely unknown. Therefore, in this study, the development of fungicide resistance and genetic diversity among an anthracnose pathogen population with different geographical origins and the exposure of this population to different cultivation strategies were investigated. A total of 150 pathogen isolates were tested in fungicide sensitivity assays. Five of the tested fungicides suppressed mycelial pathogen growth effectively. However, there were significant differences in the sensitivities exhibited by the pathogen isolates examined. Interestingly, the isolates obtained from practical management orchards versus organic cultivation orchards showed no differences in sensitivity to the same fungicide. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses were performed to detect internal transcribed spacer regions and the β-tubulin and glutamine synthetase genes of the pathogens examined. Both the glutamine synthetase and β-tubulin genes contained a complex set of polymorphisms. Based on these results, the pathogens isolated from organic cultivation orchards were found to have more diversity than the isolates obtained from the practical management orchards.

  1. Analysis of Fungicide Sensitivity and Genetic Diversity among Colletotrichum Species in Sweet Persimmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geun-Hye Gang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (C. gloeosporioides; Teleomorph: Glomerella cingulata, is the most destructive disease that affects sweet persimmon production worldwide. However, the biology, ecology, and genetic variations of C. gloeosporioides remain largely unknown. Therefore, in this study, the development of fungicide resistance and genetic diversity among an anthracnose pathogen population with different geographical origins and the exposure of this population to different cultivation strategies were investigated. A total of 150 pathogen isolates were tested in fungicide sensitivity assays. Five of the tested fungicides suppressed mycelial pathogen growth effectively. However, there were significant differences in the sensitivities exhibited by the pathogen isolates examined. Interestingly, the isolates obtained from practical management orchards versus organic cultivation orchards showed no differences in sensitivity to the same fungicide. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analyses were performed to detect internal transcribed spacer regions and the β-tubulin and glutamine synthetase genes of the pathogens examined. Both the glutamine synthetase and β-tubulin genes contained a complex set of polymorphisms. Based on these results, the pathogens isolated from organic cultivation orchards were found to have more diversity than the isolates obtained from the practical management orchards.

  2. Assessment of Genetic Diversities of Selected Laminaria (Laminariales,Phaeophyta) Gametophytes by Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Liang WANG; Chen-Lin LIU; Xiao-Jie LI; Yi-Zhou CONG; De-Lin DUAN

    2005-01-01

    Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis was used to assess genetic diversity among 10pairs of male and female Laminaria gametophytes. A total of 58 amplification loci was obtained from 10selected ISSR primers, of which 34 revealed polymorphism among the gametophytes. Genetic distances were calculated with the Dice coefficient ranging from 0.006 to 0.223. A dendrogram based on the unweighted pair-group method arithmetic (UPGMA) average showed that most male and female gametophytes of the same species were clustered together and that 10 pairs of gametophytes were divided into four groups. This was generally consistent with the taxonomic categories. The main group consisted of six pairs of gametophytes, which were selected from Laminaria japonica Aresch. by intensive inbreeding through artificial hybridization. One specific marker was cloned, but was not converted successfully into a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of applying ISSR markers to evaluate Laminaria germplasm diversities.

  3. Analysis of the genetic relationships and diversity among 11 populations of Xanthoceras sorbifolia using phenotypic and microsatellite marker data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Shen

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Microsatellite markers can be used to efficiently distinguish X. sorbifolia populations and assess their genetic diversity. The information we have provided will contribute to the conservation and management of this important plant genetic resource.

  4. The analysis of genetic diversity and differentiation of six Chinese cattle populations using microsatellite markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A total of 321 individuals from six cattle populations of four species in a bovine subfamily in China were studied using 12 pairs of microsatellite markers. The genetic diversities within and between populations were calculated. The phylogenetic trees were constructed by(δμ)2 and DA distances, and the divergence times between populations were estimated by (δμ)2. Altogether, 144 microsatellite alleles were detected including 24 private alleles and nine shared alleles. Chinese Holstein had the largest number of private alleles (10), whereas,Bohai black and Buffalo had the smallest number of private alleles (2). Chinese Holstein showed the highest genetic variability. Its observed number of alleles (Na), mean effective number of alleles (MNA), and mean heterozygosity (He) were 7.7500, 4.9722, and 0.7719,respectively, whereas, the Buffalo and Yak showed low genetic variability. In the phylogenetic trees, Luxi and Holstein grouped first,followed by Bohai and Minnan. Yak branched next and buffalo emerged as the most divergent population from other cattle populations.Luxi and Bohai were estimated to have diverged 0.039-0.105 million years ago (MYA), however, buffalo and Holstein diverged 0.501-1.337 MYA. The divergence time of Yak versus Minnan, Holstein and buffalo was 0.136-0.363, 0.273-0.729, and 0.326-0.600MYA, respectively.

  5. Genetic diversity analysis of Croton antisyphiliticus Mart. using AFLP molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, T G; Pereira, A M S; Coppede, J S; França, S C; Ming, L C; Bertoni, B W

    2016-02-19

    Croton antisyphiliticus Mart. is a medicinal plant native to Cerrado vegetation in Brazil, and it is popularly used to treat urogenital tract infections. The objective of the present study was to assess the genetic variability of natural C. antisyphiliticus populations using AFLP molecular markers. Accessions were collected in the states of Minas Gerais, São Paulo, and Goiás. The genotyping of individuals was performed using a LI-COR® DNA Analyzer 4300. The variability within populations was found to be greater than the variability between them. The F(ST) value was 0.3830, which indicated that the populations were highly structured. A higher percentage of polymorphic loci (92.16%) and greater genetic diversity were found in the population accessions from Pratinha-MG. Gene flow was considered restricted (N(m) = 1.18), and there was no correlation between genetic and geographic distances. The populations of C. antisyphiliticus exhibited an island-model structure, which demonstrates the vulnerability of the species.

  6. Genetic diversity in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, John C; Carlton, Jane M

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in genetic characterisation of Trichomonas vaginalis isolates show that the extensive clinical variability in trichomoniasis and its disease sequelae are matched by significant genetic diversity in the organism itself, suggesting a connection between the genetic identity of isolates and their clinical manifestations. Indeed, a high degree of genetic heterogeneity in T vaginalis isolates has been observed using multiple genotyping techniques. A unique two-type population structure that is both local and global in distribution has been identified, and there is evidence of recombination within each group, although sexual recombination between the groups appears to be constrained. There is conflicting evidence in these studies for correlations between T vaginalis genetic identity and clinical presentation, metronidazole susceptibility, and the presence of T vaginalis virus, underscoring the need for adoption of a common standard for genotyping the parasite. Moving forward, microsatellite genotyping and multilocus sequence typing are the most robust techniques for future investigations of T vaginalis genotype-phenotype associations.

  7. Biodiversity assessment in forests - from genetic diversity to landscape diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granke O

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessing biodiversity in forests requires a reliable and sustainable monitoring concept, which must include all levels of diversity, the genetic, the species and the landscape level. Diversity studies should not be reduced to quantitative analysis, but qualitative interpretations are an important part for the understanding of the results. Also, the linkage of terrestrial data and remote sensing data as well the implementation of abiotic and biotic data collected on existing monitoring systems are useful sources to analyse cause-effect relationships and interactions between the different aspects of diversity.

  8. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese yak breeds (Bos grunniens) using microsatellite markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guixiang Zhang; Weisheng Chen; Ming Xue; Zhigang Wang; Hong Chang; Xu Han; Xinjun Liao; Donglei Wang

    2008-01-01

    Nine Chinese yak breeds (Maiwa,Tianzhu White,Qinghai Plateau,Sibu,Zhongdian,Pall,Tibetan High Mountain,Jiulong,and Xin-jiang) and Gayal were analyzed by means of 16 microsatellite markers to determine the level of genetic variation within populations,genetic relationship between populations,and population structure for each breed.A total of 206 microsatellite alleles were observed.Mean F-statistics (0.056) for 9 yak breeds indicated that 94.4% of the genetic variation was observed within yak breeds and 5.6% of the genetic variation existed amongst breeds.The Neighbor-Joining phylogenetic free was constructed based on Nei's standard genetic dis-tances and two clusters were obtained.The Gayal separated from the yaks far away and formed one cluster and 9 yak breeds were grouped together.The analysis of population structure for 9 yak breeds and the Gayal showed that they resulted in four clusters; one clus-ter includes yaks from Tibet Autonomous Region and Qinghai Province,one cluster combines Zhongdian,Maiwa,and Tianzhu White,and Jiulong and Xinjiang come into the third cluster.Pali was mainly in the first cluster (90%),Jiulong was mainly in the second cluster (87.1%),Zhongdian was primarily in the third cluster (83%),and the other yak breeds were distributed in two to three clusters.The Gayal was positively left in the fourth cluster (99.3%).

  9. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Iranian Improved Rice Cultivars through RAPD Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffar KIANI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity of Iranian improved rice varieties. Sixteen rice varieties of particular interest to breeding programs were evaluated by means of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD technique. The number of amplification products generated by each primer varied from 4 (OPB-04 to 11 (OPD-11 with an average of 8.2 bands per primer. Out of 49 bands, 33 (67.35% were found to be polymorphic for one or more cultivars ranging from 4 to 9 fragments per primer. The size of amplified fragments ranged between 350 to 1800 bp. Pair-wise Nei and Li�s (1979 similarity estimated the range of 0.59 to 0.98 between rice cultivars. Results illustrate the potential of RAPD markers to distinguish improved cultivars at DNA level. The information will facilitate selection of genotypes to serve as parents for effective rice breeding programs in Iran.

  10. Genetic diversity of Ehrlichia ruminantium in Amblyomma variegatum ticks and small ruminants in The Gambia determined by restriction fragment profile analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Genetic diversity of Ehrlichia ruminantium in Amblyomma variegatum ticks and small ruminants in The Gambia determined by restriction fragment profile analysis NETHERLANDS (Faburay, Bonto) NETHERLANDS Received: 2007-03-24 Revised: 2007-05-29 Accepted: 2007-06-14

  11. Multilocus analysis reveals large genetic diversity in Kluyveromyces marxianus strains isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino di Farindola cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasoli, Giuseppe; Barrio, Eladio; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna; Belloch, Carmela

    2016-09-16

    In the present study, we have analysed the genetic diversity in Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino di Farindola cheesemaking environment. Molecular typing methods inter-RTL fingerprint and mtDNA RFLPs, as well as, sequence diversity and heterozygosity in the intergenic region between KmSSB1 and KmRIO2 genes and analysis of the mating locus were applied to 54 K. marxianus strains. Inter-RTL fingerprint revealed a large degree of genetic heterogeneity and clustering allowed differentiation of K. marxianus strains from different geographical origins. In general, inter-LTR profiles were more discriminating than RFLPs of mtDNA; however our results also indicate that both techniques could be complementary unveiling different degrees of genetic diversity. Sequence analysis of the intergenic region between KmSSB1 and KmRIO2 genes revealed 26 variable positions in which a double peak could be observed in the sequence chromatogram. Further analysis revealed the presence of heterozygous strains in the K. marxianus population isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano. On the other hand, all strains isolated from Pecorino di Farindola were homozygous. Two very different groups of haplotypes could be observed as well as mixtures between them. Phylogenetic reconstruction divided K. marxianus dairy strains into two separate populations. A few heterozygous strains in an intermediate position between them could also be observed. Mating type locus analysis revealed a large population of diploid strains containing both MATa and MATα alleles and few haploid strains, most of them presenting the MATα allele. Different scenarios explaining the presence and maintaining of homozygous and heterozygous diploids as well as hybrids between them in the Parmigiano Reggiano K. marxianus population are proposed. A principal component analysis supported the large differences between K. marxianus isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino di Farindola.

  12. Strains and stressors: an analysis of touchscreen learning in genetically diverse mouse strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Graybeal

    Full Text Available Touchscreen-based systems are growing in popularity as a tractable, translational approach for studying learning and cognition in rodents. However, while mouse strains are well known to differ in learning across various settings, performance variation between strains in touchscreen learning has not been well described. The selection of appropriate genetic strains and backgrounds is critical to the design of touchscreen-based studies and provides a basis for elucidating genetic factors moderating behavior. Here we provide a quantitative foundation for visual discrimination and reversal learning using touchscreen assays across a total of 35 genotypes. We found significant differences in operant performance and learning, including faster reversal learning in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice. We then assessed DBA/2J and C57BL/6J for differential sensitivity to an environmental insult by testing for alterations in reversal learning following exposure to repeated swim stress. Stress facilitated reversal learning (selectively during the late stage of reversal in C57BL/6J, but did not affect learning in DBA/2J. To dissect genetic factors underlying these differences, we phenotyped a family of 27 BXD strains generated by crossing C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. There was marked variation in discrimination, reversal and extinction learning across the BXD strains, suggesting this task may be useful for identifying underlying genetic differences. Moreover, different measures of touchscreen learning were only modestly correlated in the BXD strains, indicating that these processes are comparatively independent at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Finally, we examined the behavioral structure of learning via principal component analysis of the current data, plus an archival dataset, totaling 765 mice. This revealed 5 independent factors suggestive of "reversal learning," "motivation-related late reversal learning," "discrimination learning," "speed to respond," and

  13. Strains and stressors: an analysis of touchscreen learning in genetically diverse mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybeal, Carolyn; Bachu, Munisa; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Saksida, Lisa M; Bussey, Timothy J; Sagalyn, Erica; Williams, Robert W; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Touchscreen-based systems are growing in popularity as a tractable, translational approach for studying learning and cognition in rodents. However, while mouse strains are well known to differ in learning across various settings, performance variation between strains in touchscreen learning has not been well described. The selection of appropriate genetic strains and backgrounds is critical to the design of touchscreen-based studies and provides a basis for elucidating genetic factors moderating behavior. Here we provide a quantitative foundation for visual discrimination and reversal learning using touchscreen assays across a total of 35 genotypes. We found significant differences in operant performance and learning, including faster reversal learning in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice. We then assessed DBA/2J and C57BL/6J for differential sensitivity to an environmental insult by testing for alterations in reversal learning following exposure to repeated swim stress. Stress facilitated reversal learning (selectively during the late stage of reversal) in C57BL/6J, but did not affect learning in DBA/2J. To dissect genetic factors underlying these differences, we phenotyped a family of 27 BXD strains generated by crossing C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. There was marked variation in discrimination, reversal and extinction learning across the BXD strains, suggesting this task may be useful for identifying underlying genetic differences. Moreover, different measures of touchscreen learning were only modestly correlated in the BXD strains, indicating that these processes are comparatively independent at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Finally, we examined the behavioral structure of learning via principal component analysis of the current data, plus an archival dataset, totaling 765 mice. This revealed 5 independent factors suggestive of "reversal learning," "motivation-related late reversal learning," "discrimination learning," "speed to respond," and "motivation during

  14. Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yumei Chang; Liqun Liang; Haitao Ma; Jianguo He; Xiaowen Sun

    2008-01-01

    Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis) has higher commercial value as food source than any other species of Eriocheir in China.To evaluate the germplasm resources and characterize the genetic diversity and population structure of the crabs in different water systems,two stocks and two farming populations were assessed with 25 polymorphic microsallite loci available in public GenBank.Basic statistics showed that the average observed heterozygosity (Ho) amongst populations ranged from 0.5789 to 0.6824.However,a remarkable presence of inbreeding and heterozygote deficiencies were observed.To analyze population structure,pairwise FST coefficients explained only ~10.3% variability from the subdivision of mitten crab populations,the remaining variability stems from the subdivision within subpopulations.Although the four populations had slight differentiation,different allelic frequencies resulted in distinct population structures.Two stocks and one farming population were clustered together to the phylogenetic branch of Yangtze crab,with an approximate membership of 95%.Whereas,another fanning population was clustered singly to the phylogenetic branch of the Liaohe crab,with a membership of 97.1%.The tests for individual admixture showed that Yangtze crab had probably been contaminated with individuals from other water systems.Genetic relationships between populations also supported the conclusion that Yangtze crab and Liaohe crab had different gene pools in spite of the origins of the same species.

  15. Genetic diversity analysis of rice (Oryza sativa genotypes for seedling characters under saline - alkaline condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Seetharam, S.Thirumeni, K.Paramasivam, S.Nadaradjan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rice is life for Asians as it provides 43 per cent calorie requirement for more than 70 per cent of the population. Theproduction is often limited by salinity. Understanding of physiological and genetic mechanisms is necessary for a breedingprogramme to improve crop performance under environmental stresses. Thirty rice genotypes pre-germinated in salinealkalinewater (pH-9.60; EC-10.0; SAR-54.32; RSC- 11.51 were placed in plastic cups filled with sterile soil and the stresswas imposed upto 21 days. Genetic diversity was estimated based on the observations recorded on germination per centage,vigor index, shoot length, root length, seedling length, root/shoot ratio, seeding dry weight, Na+/K+ ratio. The genotypeswere grouped in to five clusters based on the Euclidean coefficient which ranged between 2.09(CSR10 X CSR 13 and76.29 (IWP X Chettiviruppu. Cluster II was largest (22 genotypes followed by cluster I (4 genotypes. Genotypes groupedunder cluster I showed low Na+/K+ ratio which is an important physiological trait for salinity tolerance. Cluster V (MI 48 &IWP grouped the susceptible genotypes which had high Na+/K+ ratio. The hybrids thus developed from the genotypes ofcluster I & V may express high magnitude of transgressive segregants.

  16. Genetic diversity of wild Cymbidium goeringii (Orchidaceae)populations from Hubei based on Inter-simple sequence repeats analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Xiaohong; GAO Li; YANG Bo

    2007-01-01

    Cymbidium goeringii is a diploid and nonrewarding,bumblebee-pollinated species,which is distributed in China,Japan and Korea Peninsula.This species is now highly endangered due to the mass collection and forest clearance in China.In the present study,we investigated the distribution of genetic variation within and between eleven populations of Cymbidium goeringii in central China by using Inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers.Eleven primers produced a total of 127 clear and reproducible bands of which 112 were polymorphic.High genetic diversity was detected in Cymbidium goeringii for both population level (P = 63.1%;He = 0.194 5) and species level (P = 88.2%;He = 0.262 8).A higher level of genetic differentiation was detected among populations (GST = 0.244 0,FST = 0.220 7)with Nei's Gsr analysis and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA),and no correlation was found between geographical and genetic distance.Genetic drift rather than gene flow played an important role in forming the present population structure of Cymbidium goeringii.Limited gene flow among populations and gene drift increase the extinction risk of local populations.Some conservation concerns are therefore discussed together with possible strategies for implementing in situ and ex situ conservation.

  17. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Morinda citrifolia by ISSR Markers%海巴戟ISSR遗传多样性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖丹; 程江波; 聂风琴; 李明; 林道哲; 符文英

    2016-01-01

    The genetic diversity and cluster analysis of the 202 Morinda citrifolia germplasm resources were an-alyzed by using ISSR molecular markers.The results showed that 13 ISSR primers which amplified 65 loci,meaned the average of each primer could amplified five loci.Among them,63 bands (96.92%)were polymorphic.Cluster analysis result indicated that 202 germplasm resources could be clustered into five groups when the genetic similari-ty coefficient was 0.63,revealedthe characteristics of geographical distribution.The average of Shannon information index (I),Neis genetic diversity (H)and effective number of alleles (Ne)was 0.5206,0.3488 and 1.6042, respectively,which indicated there was highly genetic diversity in these 202 Morinda citrifolia resource .%利用ISSR分子标记对202份海巴戟种质材料进行遗传多样性和聚类分析。结果表明:13条ISSR引物共扩增出65个位点,每个引物平均扩增出5个位点,其中多态性位点63个,占总数的96.92%。在相似系数为0.63时,202份海巴戟种质分为5个类,表现出一定的地域分布规律。检测到有效等位基因数 Ne =1.6042,基因多样性 H=0.3488,Shannon′s信息指数 I=0.5206,说明202份海巴戟种质间存在着较高的遗传多样性。

  18. Identification of common genetic modifiers of neurodegenerative diseases from an integrative analysis of diverse genetic screens in model organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An array of experimental models have been developed in the small model organisms C. elegans, S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster for the study of various neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and expanded polyglutamine diseases as exemplified by Huntington's disease (HD and related ataxias. Genetic approaches to determine the nature of regulators of the disease phenotypes have ranged from small scale to essentially whole genome screens. The published data covers distinct models in all three organisms and one important question is the extent to which shared genetic factors can be uncovered that affect several or all disease models. Surprisingly it has appeared that there may be relatively little overlap and that many of the regulators may be organism or disease-specific. There is, however, a need for a fully integrated analysis of the available genetic data based on careful comparison of orthologues across the species to determine the real extent of overlap. Results We carried out an integrated analysis using C. elegans as the baseline model organism since this is the most widely studied in this context. Combination of data from 28 published studies using small to large scale screens in all three small model organisms gave a total of 950 identifications of genetic regulators. Of these 624 were separate genes with orthologues in C. elegans. In addition, 34 of these genes, which all had human orthologues, were found to overlap across studies. Of the common genetic regulators some such as chaperones, ubiquitin-related enzymes (including the E3 ligase CHIP which directly links the two pathways and histone deacetylases were involved in expected pathways whereas others such as the peroxisomal acyl CoA-oxidase suggest novel targets for neurodegenerative disease therapy Conclusions We identified a significant number of overlapping regulators of neurodegenerative disease models. Since the diseases

  19. Genetic diversity analysis of Hepatacodium miconioides at different altitude in Tiantal Mountain,Zhejiang Province,China and its relationship with environmental factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Zexin; Li Junmin

    2006-01-01

    The genetic diversity within and among populations of Hepatacodium miconioides collected at three different altitudes in Tiantai Mountain,Zhejiang Province and its relationships to environmental factors were analyzed by random amplified polymorphic DNA(RAPD)technique.Amplification using 12 random primers of 60 plants and 122 repetitive loci were produced.The percentage of polymorphic loci of three populations ranged from 18.85% to 23.77% with an average of 21.86%,indicating the relatively low genetic diversity of H.miconioides.The average Shannon index of phenotypic diversity(0.1329)and Nei index(0.0925)within populations were relatively low.A distinct genetic differentiation existed among populations Of H miconioides in spite of the relatively small geographical distribufion.The average genetic diversity within populations of H.miconioides accounted for 33.58% of the total genetic diversity while the genetic diversity among populations accounted for 66.42% as estimated by the Shannon index of phenotypic diversity,The genetic differentiation among populations of H.miconioides was 0.6546,as estimated by Nei index.The gene flow estimated from Gsr was only 0.2656 and it indicated that gene flow among populations of H.miconioides was relatively low.The mean value of the genetic identity among populations of H.miconioides was 0.7126 and the average of genetic distance of H.miconioides was 0.3412.The genetic identity between populations at the elevation of 990m and at the elevation of 780 m was the highest.The genetic identity between population at the elevation 500 m and other two populations was relatively low.The correlation analysis showed that the genetic diversity within populations was significantly related with the soil total nitrogen.

  20. Spatio-temporal Analysis of the Genetic Diversity of Arctic Rabies Viruses and Their Reservoir Hosts in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanke, Dennis; Freuling, Conrad M.; Fischer, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    arctic RABV full genome sequences from Greenland, Canada, USA (Alaska) and Russia obtained between 1977 and 2014, a description of the historic context in relation to the genetic diversity of currently circulating RABV in Greenland and neighboring Canadian Northern territories has been provided...... containing viruses from both Greenland and Canada. By combining analysis of full length RABV genome sequences and host derived sequences encoding mitochondrial proteins obtained simultaneously from brain tissues of 49 arctic foxes, the interaction of viruses and their hosts was explored in detail...

  1. Development of SNP markers and their application for genetic diversity analysis in the oil palm (Elaeis guineensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, P W; Maizura, I; Abdullah, N A P; Rafii, M Y; Ooi, L C L; Low, E T L; Singh, R

    2015-10-09

    The genetic evaluation of oil palm germplasm collections is required for insight into the variability among populations. The information obtained is also useful for incorporating new genetic materials into current breeding programs. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been widely used in many plant genetic studies due to the availability of large numbers of genomic sequences and expressed sequence tags. The present study examined 219 oil palms collected from two natural Angolan populations, a few hundred kilometers apart. A total of 62 SNPs were designed from oil palm genomic sequences and converted to cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS). Of these, nine were found to be informative across the two populations. The nine informative SNPs revealed mean major allele frequency of 0.693. The average expected and observed heterozygosities were 0.398 and 0.400, respectively. The mean polymorphism information content was 0.315 (ranging between 0.223 and 0.375). None of the loci deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and no rare alleles were detected. In cluster analysis using unweighted pair group method with arithmetic, the 219 oil palms fell into two clusters. This was further supported by the population structure analysis result (K = 2), suggesting that the samples were divided into two main genetic groups. However, the two groups did not coincide with the geographic populations. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that within-population variation contributed 93% of the total genetic variation. This study showed that SNP-based CAPS markers are useful for studying the genetic diversity of oil palm and have potential application for marker-trait association studies.

  2. Evolutionary analysis of HBV "S" antigen genetic diversity in Iranian blood donors: a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourkarim, Mahmoud Reza; Sharifi, Zohre; Soleimani, Ali; Amini-Bavil-Olyaee, Samad; Elsadek Fakhr, Ahmed; Sijmons, Steven; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Karimi, Gharib; Lemey, Philippe; Maes, Piet; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Van Ranst, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity of the HBV S gene has a significant impact on the prophylaxis and treatment of hepatitis B infection. The effect of selective pressure on this genetic alteration has not yet been studied in Iranian blood donors. To explore HBV evolution and to analyze the effects and patterns of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) mutations on blood screening assays, 358 Iranian blood donors diagnosed as asymptomatic HBV carriers were enrolled in this nationwide study. Large S and partial S genes were amplified and sequenced. HBV (sub) genotypes and synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations were investigated. The impact of naturally occurring mutations on HBsAg ELISA results was explored. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that isolated strains were of genotype D. The dominant subgenotype/subtype was D1/ayw2. Deletions and naturally occurring stop codons in the pre-S1 and major hydrophilic region (MHR) were identified. In total, 32.8% of the studied strains harbored 195 single or multiple mutations in the MHR, the majority of which were located at the first loop of the "a determinant" domain. The ayw2 subtype showed a significant effect on the ELISA signal/cut-off value and carried fewer mutations in the MHR. Nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution value indicated that negative selection was the dominant evolutionary force in the HBV S gene. This nationwide study revealed that mutation frequency of HBsAg among Iranian blood donors was much higher than previous reports from the different local regions. These findings regarding the significant differences in reactivity of ELISA among different subtypes of HBV and its correlation with the number of mutations at the MHR will be valuable to public health authorities.

  3. Genetic diversity in aspen and its relation to arthropod abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Vornam, Barbara; Volmer, Katharina; Prinz, Kathleen; Kleemann, Frauke; Köhler, Lars; Polle, Andrea; Finkeldey, Reiner

    2014-01-01

    The ecological consequences of biodiversity have become a prominent public issue. Little is known on the effect of genetic diversity on ecosystem services. Here, a diversity experiment was established with European and North American aspen (Populus tremula, P. tremuloides) planted in plots representing either a single deme only or combinations of two, four and eight demes. The goals of this study were to explore the complex inter- and intraspecific genetic diversity of aspen and to then relate three measures for diversity (deme diversity, genetic diversity determined as Shannon index or as expected heterozygosity) to arthropod abundance. Microsatellite and AFLP markers were used to analyze the genetic variation patterns within and between the aspen demes and deme mixtures. Large differences were observed regarding the genetic diversity within demes. An analysis of molecular variance revealed that most of the total genetic diversity was found within demes, but the genetic differentiation among demes was also high. The complex patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation resulted in large differences of the genetic variation within plots. The average diversity increased from plots with only one deme to plots with two, four, and eight demes, respectively and separated plots with and without American aspen. To test whether intra- and interspecific diversity impacts on ecosystem services, arthropod abundance was determined. Increasing genetic diversity of aspen was related to increasing abundance of arthropods. However, the relationship was mainly driven by the presence of American aspen suggesting that species identity overrode the effect of intraspecific variation of European aspen.

  4. Genetic and metabolic diversity in Stevia rebaudiana using RAPD and HPTLC analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Karishma; Tamboli, Ennus Tajuddin; Parveen, Rabea; Ahmad, Sayeed

    2013-06-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni (Asteraceae) is an important medicinal plant and is much used due to its zero calories sweetening property. Stevia leaves as well as its extracts and pure compounds are currently used in the preparation of several medicines, food products and neutraceuticals. To study the genetic and metabolic variability in S. rebaudiana among accessions of different geographical regions of India using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) analysis. The RAPD analysis of Stevia rebaudiana (11 accessions) was carried out using 20 random operon primers. Dendrogram was constructed for cluster analysis based on the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic means (UPGMA) using Winboot. The HPTLC analysis of all samples was carried out on silica using acetone:ethyl acetate:water (5:4:1, v/v/v) for fingerprinting and quantification of stevioside and rebaudioside A at 360 nm after spraying with anisaldehyde sulphuric acid. Ten out of 20 primers screened were found most informative; amplification products of the genotypes yielded a total of 87 scorable bands (67 polymorphic), whereas genetic similarity (GS) coefficient (0.01-0.08) and polymorphism (67.24-92.40%) showed huge variability. Similarly, HPTLC analysis showed large variation among different samples with respect to their presence or absence of metabolite and their concentration. Out of the 11 Stevia accessions, Delhi and Mohali varieties showed much relatedness with each other and were concluded to be the superior genotype in context to RAPD and HPTLC analysis. The information obtained here could be valuable for devising strategies for cultivating this medicinal plant.

  5. ISSR Analysis of the Genetic Diversity of the Endangered Species Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Royle) Ying from Western Sichuan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Xiao; Qun Li; Li Wang; Liang Guo; Jing Li; Lin Tang; Fang Chen

    2006-01-01

    Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Royle) Ying Is an important medicinal and endangered species. Inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) analysis was conducted on seven natural populations from western Sichuan Province to investigate the genetic diversity of S. hexandrum. Leaf samples of 140 individuals were collected.Of the 139 discernible fragments generated by 12 selected primers (among 100 primers), 54 appeared to be polymorphic. The percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB) was 38.85% at the species level, and PPB within a population ranged from 7.91% to 23.74%. Low levels of genetic variation (He=0.092, Ho=0.142) and high levels of genetic differentiation among the populations (Gst= 62.25%) was detected on the basis of results from POPGENE and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA), respectively. Furthermore, the limited gene flow (Nm=0.361) may result from biological characteristics, such as self-pollination and short distance seed dispersal. Based on the genetic and ecological information available for S. hexandrum, we propose some appropriate strategies for the conservation of the endangered medicinal species in this region,namely rescuing and conserving the core populations for in situ conservation and sampling and preserving more populations with fewer individuals from each population for ex situ conservation.

  6. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers and analysis of genetic diversity in Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqi Wang

    Full Text Available Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill, 2n = 2× = 24, Rhamnaceae is an economically important Chinese native species. It has high nutritional value, and its medicinal properties have led to extensive use in traditional oriental medicine. The characterization of genotypes using molecular markers is important for genetic studies and plant breeding. However, few simple sequence repeat (SSR markers are available for this species. In this study, 1,488 unique SSR clones were isolated from Z. jujuba 'Dongzao' using enriched genomic libraries coupled with a three-primer colony PCR screening strategy, yielding a high enrichment rate of 73.3%. Finally, 1,188 (80.87% primer pairs were amplified successfully in the size expected for 'Dongzao'. A total of 350 primer pairs were further selected and evaluated for their ability to detect polymorphisms across a panel of six diverse cultivars; among these, 301 primer pairs detected polymorphisms, and the polymorphism information content (PIC value across all loci ranged from 0.15 to 0.82, with an average of 0.52. An analysis of 76 major cultivars employed in Chinese jujube production using 31 primer pairs revealed comparatively high genetic diversity among these cultivars. Within-population differences among individuals accounted for 98.2% of the observed genetic variation. Neighbor-joining clustering divided the cultivars into three main groups, none of which correspond to major geographic regions, suggesting that the genetics and geographical origin of modern Chinese jujube cultivars might not be linked. The current work firstly reports the large-scale development of Chinese jujube SSR markers. The development of these markers and their polymorphic information represent a significant improvement in the available Chinese jujube genomic resources and will facilitate both genetic and breeding applications, further accelerating the development of new cultivars.

  7. Genetic diversity, Population structure, parentage analysis, and construction of core collections in the French apple germplasm based on SSR markers

    OpenAIRE

    Lassois, Ludivine; Denancé, Caroline; Ravon, Elisa; Guyader, Arnaud; Guisnel, Rémi; Hibrand-Saint-Oyan, Laurence; Poncet, Charles; Lasserre - Zuber, Pauline; Feugey, Laurence; Durel, Charles-Eric

    2016-01-01

    In-depth characterization of apple genetic resources is a prerequisite for genetic improvement and for germplasm management. In this study, we fingerprinted a very large French collection of 2163 accessions with 24 SSR markers in order to evaluate its genetic diversity, population structure and genetic relationships, to link these features with cultivar selection date or usage (old or modern, dessert or cider cultivars), and to construct core collections. Most markers were highly discriminati...

  8. Genetic and conservation of Araucaria angustifolia: III DNA extraction protocol and informative capacity of RAPD markers for the analysis of genetic diversity in natural population

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This study was aimed at adapting a DNA extraction protocol by Araucaria angustifolia leaves, and testing the informative capacity of RAPD markers for genetics diversity analysis in natural populations of this species. The extraction method was standardized by eight tested protocols and it was possible to obtain good quality DNA for RAPD reactions. The OD260/OD280 ratio ranged from 1.7 to 2.0 in 80% of the samples, indicating that they had a low level of protein contamination. The RAPD markers...

  9. Methodology for single-cell genetic analysis of planktonic foraminifera for studies of protist diversity and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Katharina Maria Weiner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell genetic analysis is an essential method to investigate the biodiversity and evolutionary ecology of marine protists. In protist groups that do not reproduce under laboratory conditions, this approach provides the only means to directly associate molecular sequences with cell morphology. The resulting unambiguous taxonomic identification of the DNA sequences is a prerequisite for barcoding and analyses of environmental metagenomic data. Extensive single-cell genetic studies have been carried out on planktonic foraminifera over the past 20 years to elucidate their phylogeny, cryptic diversity, biogeography and the relationship between genetic and morphological variability. In the course of these investigations, it has become evident that genetic analysis at the individual specimen level is confronted by innumerable challenges ranging from the negligible amount of DNA present in the single cell to the substantial amount of DNA contamination introduced by endosymbionts or food particles. Consequently, a range of methods has been developed and applied throughout the years for the genetic analysis of planktonic foraminifera in order to enhance DNA amplification success rates. Yet, the description of these methods in the literature rarely occurred with equivalent levels of detail and the different approaches have never been compared in terms of their efficiency and reproducibility. Here, aiming at a standardization of methods, we provide a comprehensive review of all methods that have been employed for the single-cell genetic analysis of planktonic foraminifera. We compile data on success rates of DNA amplification and use these to evaluate the effects of key parameters associated with the methods of sample collection, storage and extraction of single-cell DNA. We show that the chosen methods influence the success rates of single-cell genetic studies, but the differences between them are not sufficient to hinder comparisons between studies

  10. RAPD analysis of the genetic diversity of mango (Mangifera indica) germplasm in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, I G B; Valente, S E S; Britto, F B; de Souza, V A B; Lima, P S C

    2011-12-14

    We evaluated genetic variability of mango (Mangifera indica) accessions maintained in the Active Germplasm Bank of Embrapa Meio-Norte in Teresina, Piauí, Brazil, using RAPDs. Among these accessions, 35 originated from plantings in Brazil, six from the USA and one from India. Genomic DNA, extracted from leaf material using a commercial purification kit, was subjected to PCR with the primers A01, A09, G03, G10, N05, and M16. Fifty-five polymorphic loci were identified, with mean of 9.16 ± 3.31 bands per primer and 100% polymorphism. Application of unweighted pair group method using arithmetic average cluster analysis demonstrated five genotypic groups among the accessions examined. The genotypes Rosa 41, Rosa 48 and Rosa 49 were highly similar (94% similarity), whereas genotypes Sensation and Rosa 18 were the most divergent (only 7% similarity). The mango accessions were found to have considerable genetic variability, demonstrating the importance of analyzing each genotype in a collection in order to efficiently maintain the germplasm collection.

  11. Genetic Diversity among Parents of Hybrid Rice Based on Cluster Analysis of Morphological Traits and Simple Sequence Repeat Markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sheng-jun; LU Zuo-mei; WAN Jian-min

    2006-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 41 parental lines popularized in commercial hybrid rice production in China was studied by using cluster analysis of morphological traits and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Forty-one entries were assigned into two clusters (I.e. Early or medium-maturing cluster; medium or late-maturing cluster) and further assigned into six sub-clusters based on morphological trait cluster analysis. The early or medium-maturing cluster was composed of 15 maintainer lines, four early-maturing restorer lines and two thermo-sensitive genic male sterile lines, and the medium or late-maturing cluster included 16 restorer lines and 4 medium or late-maturing maintainer lines. Moreover, the SSR cluster analysis classified 41 entries into two clusters (I.e. Maintainer line cluster and restorer line cluster) and seven sub-clusters. The maintainer line cluster consisted of all 19 maintainer lines, two thermo-sensitive genic male sterile lines, while the restorer line cluster was composed of all 20 restorer lines. The SSR analysis fitted better with the pedigree information. From the views on hybrid rice breeding, the results suggested that SSR analysis might be a better method to study the diversity of parental lines in indica hybrid rice.

  12. Genetic diversity and evolutionary analysis of Citrus Tristeza Virus p20 gene in Pakistan: insights into the spread and epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor-Ul-Huda Ghori

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Citrus tristeza virus (CTV is a widespread disease and the most destruction causing agent of citrus. Pakistan is ranked amongst the top ten citrus producing countries around the globe and it contributes about 2% to its foreign exchange earnings. Based on this assumption it is very important to monitor and determine the evolutionary forces and the phylogeography of Pakistani CTV population. Methods: A total of 49 sequences of p20 gene from Pakistan were phylogenetically compared with CTV sequences worldwide. These sequences were analyzed for their genetic diversity and evolution using a Bayesian Probability approach and predicted secondary structure. Results: Phylogenetic analysis using Bayesian probability inference and predicted secondary structures diversity of CTV indicated that Pakistani isolates were not diverse from global isolates. Lineage analysis showed that CTV was introduced in Pakistan in three individual events from various parts of the world. After that CTV dispersed in Pakistan via vector transmission or by use of infected propagating material by local farmers. Conclusions: Our study confirmed multiple introductions of CTV in Pakistan and also confirmed the dissemination of CTV within Pakistan. This study also shows that the mutations are present in the predicted secondary structure of the p20 protein, however, it is not known if it affects the pathogenicity of the virus.

  13. Multilocus sequence analysis of nectar pseudomonads reveals high genetic diversity and contrasting recombination patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Alvarez-Pérez

    Full Text Available The genetic and evolutionary relationships among floral nectar-dwelling Pseudomonas 'sensu stricto' isolates associated to South African and Mediterranean plants were investigated by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA of four core housekeeping genes (rrs, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD. A total of 35 different sequence types were found for the 38 nectar bacterial isolates characterised. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in the identification of three main clades [nectar groups (NGs 1, 2 and 3] of nectar pseudomonads, which were closely related to five intrageneric groups: Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (NG 1; P. fluorescens, P. lutea and P. syringae (NG 2; and P. rhizosphaerae (NG 3. Linkage disequilibrium analysis pointed to a mostly clonal population structure, even when the analysis was restricted to isolates from the same floristic region or belonging to the same NG. Nevertheless, signatures of recombination were observed for NG 3, which exclusively included isolates retrieved from the floral nectar of insect-pollinated Mediterranean plants. In contrast, the other two NGs comprised both South African and Mediterranean isolates. Analyses relating diversification to floristic region and pollinator type revealed that there has been more unique evolution of the nectar pseudomonads within the Mediterranean region than would be expected by chance. This is the first work analysing the sequence of multiple loci to reveal geno- and ecotypes of nectar bacteria.

  14. The genetic diversity and evolution of field pea (Pisum studied by high throughput retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP marker analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smýkal Petr

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic diversity of crop species is the result of natural selection on the wild progenitor and human intervention by ancient and modern farmers and breeders. The genomes of modern cultivars, old cultivated landraces, ecotypes and wild relatives reflect the effects of these forces and provide insights into germplasm structural diversity, the geographical dimension to species diversity and the process of domestication of wild organisms. This issue is also of great practical importance for crop improvement because wild germplasm represents a rich potential source of useful under-exploited alleles or allele combinations. The aim of the present study was to analyse a major Pisum germplasm collection to gain a broad understanding of the diversity and evolution of Pisum and provide a new rational framework for designing germplasm core collections of the genus. Results 3020 Pisum germplasm samples from the John Innes Pisum germplasm collection were genotyped for 45 retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP markers by the Tagged Array Marker (TAM method. The data set was stored in a purpose-built Germinate relational database and analysed by both principal coordinate analysis and a nested application of the Structure program which yielded substantially similar but complementary views of the diversity of the genus Pisum. Structure revealed three Groups (1-3 corresponding approximately to landrace, cultivar and wild Pisum respectively, which were resolved by nested Structure analysis into 14 Sub-Groups, many of which correlate with taxonomic sub-divisions of Pisum, domestication related phenotypic traits and/or restricted geographical locations. Genetic distances calculated between these Sub-Groups are broadly supported by principal coordinate analysis and these, together with the trait and geographical data, were used to infer a detailed model for the domestication of Pisum. Conclusions These data provide a clear picture

  15. Comparative analysis of superintegrons: engineering extensive genetic diversity in the Vibrionaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe-Magnus, Dean A; Guerout, Anne-Marie; Biskri, Latefa; Bouige, Philippe; Mazel, Didier

    2003-03-01

    Integrons are natural tools for bacterial evolution and innovation. Their involvement in the capture and dissemination of antibiotic-resistance genes among Gram-negative bacteria is well documented. Recently, massive ancestral versions, the superintegrons (SIs), were discovered in the genomes of diverse proteobacterial species. SI gene cassettes with an identifiable activity encode proteins related to simple adaptive functions, including resistance, virulence, and metabolic activities, and their recruitment was interpreted as providing the host with an adaptive advantage. Here, we present extensive comparative analysis of SIs identified among the Vibrionaceae. Each was at least 100 kb in size, reaffirming the participation of SIs in the genome plasticity and heterogeneity of these species. Phylogenetic and localization data supported the sedentary nature of the functional integron platform and its coevolution with the host genome. Conversely, comparative analysis of the SI cassettes was indicative of both a wide range of origin for the entrapped genes and of an active cassette assembly process in these bacterial species. The signature attC sites of each species displayed conserved structural characteristics indicating that symmetry rather than sequence was important in the recognition of such a varied collection of target recombination sequences by a single site-specific recombinase. Our discovery of various addiction module cassettes within each of the different SIs indicates a possible role for them in the overall stability of large integron cassette arrays.

  16. Monitoring progress toward measles elimination by genetic diversity analysis of measles viruses in China 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Wang, H; Xu, S; Mao, N; Zhu, Z; Shi, J; Huang, G; Liu, C; Bo, F; Feng, D; Lu, P; Liu, Y; Wang, Y; Lei, Y; Chen, M; Chen, H; Wang, C; Fu, H; Li, C; He, J; Gao, H; Gu, S; Wang, S; Ling, H; Liu, Y; Ding, Z; Ba, Z; Feng, Y; Zheng, H; Tang, X; Lei, Y; Xiong, Y; Bellini, W J; Rota, P A; Jee, Y; Xu, W

    2014-09-01

    With the achievement of high coverage for routine immunization and supplementary immunization activities (SIAs), measles incidence in mainland China reached its lowest level in 2010. The proportion of measles cases in the vaccination-targeted population decreased during 2007-2010 after the SIAs. More than 60% of measles cases were in adults or infants, especially in the coastal and eastern provinces during 2009 and 2010. A total 567 isolates of measles virus were obtained from clinical specimens from 27 of 31 provinces in mainland China during 2009 and 2010. Except for two vaccine-associated cases, one genotype D4 strain, two genotype D9 strains, and four genotype D11 strains, the other 558 strains were genotype H1 cluster H1a. Genotype H1 has been the only endemic genotype detected in China since surveillance began in 1993. Only genotype H1 was found in mainland China during 1993-2008, except for one detection of genotype H2. More recently, multiple genotypes of imported measles were detected even with the background of endemic genetotype H1 viruses. Analysis of the 450-nucleotide sequencing window of the measles virus N gene showed that the overall genetic diversity of the recent geneotype H1 strains decreased between 2008 and 2010. The lower genetic diversity of H1 strains suggested that enhanced vaccination may have reduced the co-circulating lineages of endemic genotype H1 strains in mainland China.

  17. Genetic diversity in four populations of Nguni (Zulu sheep assessed by microsatellite analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nokuthula W. Kunene

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Zulu sheep are found mainly in the rural KwaZulu-Natal province and the numbers are declining due to indiscriminate inbreeding. There is thus a need for phenotypic and genetic characterisation as a first phase for planning conservation strategies. Zulu sheep populations sampled were from Makhathini research station (MS (n=33, University of Zululand (UZ (n=21, a community at KwaMthethwa (KM (n=32 and from Msinga (EM (n=33. One European breed Appen - ninica (AP was used as out group. Microsatellite analysis using 29 microsatellite loci was used in this study. Among the Zulu sheep, the mean number of alleles per locus was the lowest (3.86 in UZ and the highest (6.24 was realised in EM. The mean values of observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.57 and 0.61, respectively. Neighbour-joining tree showed two main Zulu sheep clusters: the UZ, KM and MS sheep populations clustered together and the second cluster included only representatives from the EM population. The STRUCTURE analysis showed that KM, AP and EM were founded in separate clusters, whereas UZ and MS clustered together. The study demonstrated that there was a common origin of the population from the research stations (MS and UZ populations. It also demonstrated that the EM had a different history for the other three populations. This work suggests that exchange of rams could be useful in reducing inbreeding when considering conservation breeding programmes.

  18. PCR-based VNTR core sequence analysis for inferring genetic diversity in the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freitas Patrícia Domingues de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic variation in two farmed strains (F3-Panama and F17-Venezuela of the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei was examined based on DNA multiloci analyses. Eighteen adults of each strain were analyzed by PCR using a set of VNTR core sequence primers. Genetic similarity, mean allele frequency, mean heterozygosity and the frequency of polymorphic loci were determined for both strains. A dendrogram of genetic similarity was produced by UPGMA clustering. The results for three primers (INS, M13, YN73 revealed different levels of genetic variation within the strains. The higher genetic similarity seen within strain F17 was apparently related to inbreeding, although a bottleneck effect could not be discarded. The low level of genetic variability of this strain could account for the reduced adaptive advantage of these animals and their inability to adjust to breeding conditions in Brazil.

  19. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of peanut cultivars and breeding lines from China, India and the US using simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Khera, Pawan; Huang, Bingyan; Yuan, Mei; Katam, Ramesh; Zhuang, Weijian; Harris-Shultz, Karen; Moore, Kim M; Culbreath, Albert K; Zhang, Xinyou; Varshney, Rajeev K; Xie, Lianhui; Guo, Baozhu

    2016-05-01

    Cultivated peanut is grown worldwide as rich-source of oil and protein. A broad genetic base is needed for cultivar improvement. The objectives of this study were to develop highly informative simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of peanut cultivars and breeding lines from different breeding programs in China, India and the US. A total of 111 SSR markers were selected for this study, resulting in a total of 472 alleles. The mean values of gene diversity and polymorphic information content (PIC) were 0.480 and 0.429, respectively. Country-wise analysis revealed that alleles per locus in three countries were similar. The mean gene diversity in the US, China and India was 0.363, 0.489 and 0.47 with an average PIC of 0.323, 0.43 and 0.412, respectively. Genetic analysis using the STRUCTURE divided these peanut lines into two populations (P1, P2), which was consistent with the dendrogram based on genetic distance (G1, G2) and the clustering of principal component analysis. The groupings were related to peanut market types and the geographic origin with a few admixtures. The results could be used by breeding programs to assess the genetic diversity of breeding materials to broaden the genetic base and for molecular genetics studies.

  20. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of peanut cultivars and breeding lines from China, India and the US using simple sequence repeat markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wang; Xinyou Zhang; Rajeev K. Varshney; Lianhui Xie; Baozhu Guo; Pawan Khera; Bingyan Huang; Mei Yuan; Ramesh Katam; Weijian Zhuang; Karen Harris-Shultz; Kim M. Moore; Albert K. Culbreath

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated peanut is grown worldwide as rich-source of oil and protein. A broad genetic base is needed for cultivar improvement. The objectives of this study were to develop highly informative simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of peanut cultivars and breeding lines from different breeding programs in China, India and the US. A total of 111 SSR markers were selected for this study, resulting in a total of 472 alleles. The mean values of gene diversity and polymorphic information content (PIC) were 0.480 and 0.429, respectively. Country-wise analysis revealed that alleles per locus in three countries were similar. The mean gene diversity in the US, China and India was 0.363, 0.489 and 0.47 with an average PIC of 0.323, 0.43 and 0.412, respectively. Genetic analysis using the STRUCTURE divided these peanut lines into two populations (P1, P2), which was consistent with the dendro-gram based on genetic distance (G1, G2) and the clustering of principal component analysis. The groupings were related to peanut market types and the geographic origin with a few admixtures. The results could be used by breeding programs to assess the genetic diversity of breeding materials to broaden the genetic base and for molecular genetics studies.

  1. ISSR Analysis on Genetic Diversity of the 34 Populations of Oryza meyeriana Distributing in Yunnan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-tao WAN

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of the 34 populations of wild rice Oryza meyeriana Baill. distributed in Yunnan Province, China was analyzed using 13 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR markers. A total of 168 bands were amplified, of which 135 polymorphic bands were discovered and the percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB was 80.36%. A genetic diversity was revealed as Nei's gene diversity (H = 0.2666 and Shannon information index (I = 0.4028 at population level. The 34 populations were divided into different groups based on administrative regions, latitude and longitudes, river areas, altitudes of their origins, and their indexes such as Na (number of alleles, Ne (effective number of alleles, H, I and PPB were calculated. Richer genetic diversity was found in the wild rice populations distributed in Simao Prefecture than that in Lingcang Prefecture or Xishuangbanna Prefecture whereas the least genetic diversity was in Baoshan Prefecture or Dehong Prefecture. Rich genetic diversity was also discovered in the wild rice populations originated from higher than 710 m altitude around the middle and lower reaches of the Lancang River belonging to the Pacific Ocean drainage system. The 34 populations could be classified into two groups, one group covered the wild rice distributing in Simao Prefecture only while the other group covered ones in Lingcang, Xishuangbanna and Dehong Prefectures. The issue on how to effectively conserve the wild rice germplasm was discussed.

  2. Molecular Characterization and Genetic Diversity Analysis of Sweet Orange Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck Cultivars in Iraq Using RAPD Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saeed Atiyah AL-Janabi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck is one of the most important commercially cultivated fruit crops of Citrus. Genetic diversity and inter-relationship among 5 cultivars (Indian, Iraqi, Japanese, Syrian, Egyptian of C. sinensis were analyzed based on RAPD markers. Six primers generated reproducible and easily storable RAPD profiles with a number of amplified DNA fragments ranging from 6 to 14 fragment bands. The total number of amplicons detected was 51, including 14 fragments unique bands with average reached 2.8 fragments ̸ primers. While the number of polymorphic ranged from 0 to 8 with an average reached 4.4 fragments ̸ primers with the polymorphic percentage ranged from 0% to 57.1%. While the number of monomorphic ranged from 2 to 5 fragment bands and was total of the monomorphic 15 fragments with an average reached 3 fragments ̸ primers with the monomorphic percentage was 14.2 % to 83.3%. A maximum numbers of amplicons was amplified with primer OPS-238 reached 14 fragments while the minimum number of fragments was amplified with primer OPS-253 reached 6 fragments. The highest number of polymorphic bands reached 8 fragments was obtained with primer OPS-238 with high percentage 57.1%, while the highest number of monomorphic bands reached 5 fragments with high percentage 83.3% was obtained with primer OPS-253. RAPD markers detected genetic distance and similarity, amaximum genetic distance value was observed between Japanese (Jap and Syrian (Syr cultivars reached 0.530 with less similarity value reached 47%, a minimum genetic distance value was observed between sweet Iraqi (Irq and Indian (Ind cultivars reached 0.239 with high similarity value reached 76.1%. The similarity matrices were employed in the cluster analysis to generate a dendrogram using the UPGMA method. The cluster tree analysis showed that the sweet orange cultivars were broadly divided into two main groups A and B with similarity reached 50%. A group including

  3. Analysis of the genetic diversity of selected East African sweet potato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    schemes is not very efficient due to phenotypic plasticity ... structure of genetic variation; provide insights into the ... time during plant development; and, best of all, have the .... (NaCCRI), Uganda.2*Any accession whose origin we could not determine was assigned as a landrace. ..... plasticity in driving genetic evolution. Proc ...

  4. AFLP analysis of genetic diversity and relationship among some Chinese domestic ducks and wild ducks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Feihuan; ZUO Zhenghong; CHEN Mei; SONG Yueqiang; L(U) Liangju; CHEN Yixin

    2006-01-01

    The amplified fragment length polymorphic(AFLP)technique was used to analyze the genome DNA polymorphism among 8 breeds of domestic ducks and 2 species of wild ducks.Nine of the 17 selected primers pairs gave reproducible polymorphic DNA amplification bands.The amplified bands ranged from 44 to 83 per primer pair.Of the 513 AFLP markers obtained.498 were polymorphic.The proportion of polymorphic loci was 97.1%.The genetic distance(D)and similarity coefficients(GS)were calculated based on the polymorphic data.Between domestic ducks D ranged from 0.331 to 0.589,while between domestic ducks and the wild ducks,it ranged from 0.298 to 0.520(vs.Anas Platyrhynchos)and from 0.316 to 0.522(vs.A.Poecilorhyncha),respectively.The variance analysis showed no significant difference between the two groups of data,which indicated that both mallard and spot-billed ducks made contributions to domestic duck evolution.A dendrogram was constructed according to the D value.

  5. Assessment of Worldwide Genetic Diversity of Siberian Wild Rye (Elymus sibiricus L. Germplasm Based on Gliadin Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changbing Zhang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available E. sibiricus L., the type species of the genus Elymus, is a perennial, self-pollinating and allotetraploid grass indigenous to Northern Asia, which in some countries can be cultivated as an important forage grass. In the present study, eighty-six Elymus sibiricus accessions, mostly from different parts of Asia, were assayed by gliadin markers based on Acid Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis to differentiate and explore their genetic relationships. The genetic similarity matrix was calculated by 47 polymorphic bands, which ranged from 0.108 to 0.952 with an average of 0.373. The total Shannon diversity index (Ho and the Simpson index (He was 0.460 and 0.302, respectively. Cluster analysis showed a clear demarcation between accessions from Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China and the others as separate groups. The clustering pattern was probably dependent on geographic origin and ecological adaptability of the accessions. The population structure analysis based on Shannon indices showed that the proportion of variance within and among the five geographic regions of the Northern Hemisphere was 55.9 and 44.1%, respectively, or 63.4 and 36.6% within and among six Chinese provinces. This distinct geographical divergence was perhaps depended on ecogeographical conditions such as climate difference and mountain distribution. The results of gladin analysis in this study are useful for the collection and preservation of E. sibiricus germplasm resources.

  6. High genetic diversity in gametophyte clones of Undaria pinnatifida from Vladivostok, Dalian and Qingdao revealed using microsatellite analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Tifeng; PANG Shaojun; LIU Feng; XU Na; ZHAO Xiaobo; GAO Suqin

    2012-01-01

    Breeding practice for Undaria pinnatifida (Harvey) Suringar requires the screening of a large number of offspring from gametophyte crossings to obtain an elite variety for large-scale cultivation.To better understand the genetic relationships of different gametophyte cultures isolated from different sources,20 microsatellite loci were screened and 53 gametophyte clone cultures analyzed for U.pinnatifida isolated from wild sporophytes in Vladivostok,Russia and from cultivated sporophytes from Dalian and Qingdao,China.One locus was abandoned because of poor amplification.At the sex-linked locus of Up-AC-2A8,3 alleles were detected in 25 female gametophyte clones,with sizes ranging from 307 to 316 bp.At other loci,3 to 7 alleles were detected with an average of 4.5 alleles per locus.The average number of alleles at each locus was 1.3 and 3.7 for Russian and Chinese gametophyte clones,respectively.The average gene diversity for Russian,Chinese,and for the combined total of gametophyte clones was 0.1,0.4,and 0.5,respectively.Russian gametophyte clones had unique alleles at 7 out of the 19 loci.In cluster analysis,Russian and Chinese gametophyte clones were separated into two different groups according to genetic distance.Overall,high genetic diversity was detected in gametophyte clones isolated from the two countries.These gametophyte cultures were believed to be appropriate parental materials for conducting breeding programs in the future.

  7. Genetic Diversity of RAPD Mark for Natural Davidia involucrata Populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Congwen Song; Manzhu Bao

    2006-01-01

    The genetic diversity and genetic variation within and among populations of five natural Davidia involucrata populations were studied from 13 primers based on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis.The results show that natural D.involucrata population has a rich genetic diversity,and the differences among populations are significant.Twenty-six percent of genetic variation exists among D.involucrata populations,which is similar to that of the endangered tree species Liriodendron chinense and Cathaya argyrophylla in China,but different from more widely distributed tree species.The analysis of the impacts of sampling method on genetic diversity parameters shows that the number of sampled individuals has little effect on the effective number of alleles and genetic diversity,but has a marked effect on the genetic differentiation among populations and gene flows.This study divides the provenances of D.involucrata into two parts,namely,a southeast and a northwest provenance.

  8. Genetic diversity and positive selection analysis of classical swine fever virus isolates in south China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haiyan; Pei, Jingjing; Bai, Jialin; Zhao, Mingqiu; Ju, Chunmei; Yi, Lin; Kang, Yanmei; Zhang, Xuetao; Chen, Lijun; Li, Yinguang; Wang, Jiaying; Chen, Jinding

    2011-10-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease that leads to significant economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on the accurate genotyping of CSFV isolates in south China. This study genotyped the E2 gene of 14 CSFV strains isolated during 2008-2010 from domestic pigs in different districts of south China. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all of the 14 CSFV isolates were clustered into genetic subgroup 1.1. This contrasts with most parts of China, where group 2 isolates are predominant. Furthermore, the positive selection pressures acting on the E(rns) and E2 envelope protein genes of CSFV were assessed and a site-by-site analysis of the dN/dS ratio was performed to identify specific codons that undergo diversification under positive selection. While no significant evidence for positive selection was observed in E(rns), two positively selected sites at amino acid residues 49 and 72 in the E2 encoding region were identified. Our results revealed that a predominance of subgroup 1.1 CSFV isolates is currently circulating in some districts of south China, which appear to be unrelated to the Chinese C-strain vaccine. Moreover, the envelope protein gene, E2, has undergone positive selection in 14 CSFV strains and two positively selected sites have been identified in this study. Understanding the molecular epidemiology and functional importance of these positively selected amino acid positions could help to predict possible changes in virulence, the development of vaccines and disease control.

  9. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of Bellamya quadrata from lakes of middle and lower Yangtze River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qianhong; Zhang, Man; Zhou, Chuanjiang; Zhu, Guorong; Dong, Jing; Gao, Yunni; Chen, Jie; Chen, Peng

    2015-10-01

    As an endemic species of freshwater gastropods in China, Bellamya quadrata plays an important role in ecosystem service provision and commercial importance. However, the species is overharvested and its natural habitats are under severe threat due to fragmentation and loss. To estimate the genetic diversity and population structure of B. quadrata, 285 individuals from eight lake populations across middle and lower Yangtze River were sampled. Seven microsatellite loci were genotyped. Our results showed that (i) the genetic diversity of B. quadrata was high in most of the studied populations, yet effective population sizes appear to be rather small in some populations; (ii) low levels of genetic differentiation exists among populations but gene flow was generally high; (iii) no clear geographic or genetic structure was observed in the studied region, implying mechanisms (zoochoric dispersal and anthropogenic translocations) that enhance dispersal and gene flow have promoted population connectivity. However, the comparatively high genetic diversity of B. quadrata could be attributed to a lag phase, suggesting that the genetic diversity of this species may be lost in the future and the priorities for conservation of B. quadrata are necessary.

  10. Whole genome SNP discovery and analysis of genetic diversity in Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslam, M.L.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.; Elferink, M.G.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Blomberg, L.; Fleischer, G.; Groenen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is an important agricultural species and the second largest contributor to the world’s poultry meat production. Genetic improvement is attributed largely to selective breeding programs that rely on highly heritable phenotypic traits, such as body size and

  11. Genomic Analysis of Clavibacter michiganensis Reveals Insight Into Virulence Strategies and Genetic Diversity of a Gram-Positive Bacterial Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Shree P; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Gilbertson, Robert L; Coaker, Gitta

    2017-10-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is a gram-positive bacterial pathogen that proliferates in the xylem vessels of tomato, causing bacterial canker disease. In this study, we sequenced and assembled genomes of 11 C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains isolated from infected tomato fields in California as well as five Clavibacter strains that colonize tomato endophytically but are not pathogenic in this host. The analysis of the C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis genomes supported the monophyletic nature of this pathogen but revealed genetic diversity among strains, consistent with multiple introduction events. Two tomato endophytes that clustered phylogenetically with C. michiganensis strains capable of infecting wheat and pepper and were also able to cause disease in these plants. Plasmid profiles of the California strains were variable and supported the essential role of the pCM1-like plasmid and the CelA cellulase in virulence, whereas the absence of the pCM2-like plasmid in some pathogenic C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains revealed it is not essential. A large number of secreted C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis proteins were carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). Glycome profiling revealed that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis but not endophytic Clavibacter strains is able to extensively alter tomato cell-wall composition. Two secreted CAZymes found in all C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains, CelA and PelA1, enhanced pathogenicity on tomato. Collectively, these results provide a deeper understanding of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis diversity and virulence strategies.

  12. Genetic diversity and genome-wide association analysis of cooking time in dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichy, Karen A; Wiesinger, Jason A; Mendoza, Fernando A

    2015-08-01

    Fivefold diversity for cooking time found in a panel of 206 Phaseolus vulgaris accessions. Fastest accession cooks nearly 20 min faster than average.   SNPs associated with cooking time on Pv02, 03, and 06. Dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are a nutrient dense food and a dietary staple in parts of Africa and Latin America. One of the major factors that limits greater utilization of beans is their long cooking times compared to other foods. Cooking time is an important trait with implications for gender equity, nutritional value of diets, and energy utilization. Very little is known about the genetic diversity and genomic regions involved in determining cooking time. The objective of this research was to assess cooking time on a panel of 206 P. vulgaris accessions, use genome- wide association analysis (GWAS) to identify genomic regions influencing this trait, and to test the ability to predict cooking time by raw seed characteristics. In this study 5.5-fold variation for cooking time was found and five bean accessions were identified which cook in less than 27 min across 2 years, where the average cooking time was 37 min. One accession, ADP0367 cooked nearly 20 min faster than average. Four of these five accessions showed close phylogenetic relationship based on a NJ tree developed with ~5000 SNP markers, suggesting a potentially similar underlying genetic mechanism. GWAS revealed regions on chromosomes Pv02, Pv03, and Pv06 associated with cooking time. Vis/NIR scanning of raw seed explained 68 % of the phenotypic variation for cooking time, suggesting with additional experimentation, it may be possible to use this spectroscopy method to non-destructively identify fast cooking lines as part of a breeding program.

  13. A molecular analysis of the patterns of genetic diversity in local chickens from western Algeria in comparison with commercial lines and wild jungle fowls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahammi, F Z; Gaouar, S B S; Laloë, D; Faugeras, R; Tabet-Aoul, N; Rognon, X; Tixier-Boichard, M; Saidi-Mehtar, N

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the genetic variability of village chickens from three agro-ecological regions of western Algeria: coastal (CT), inland plains (IP) and highlands (HL), to reveal any underlying population structure, and to evaluate potential genetic introgression from commercial lines into local populations. A set of 233 chickens was genotyped with a panel of 23 microsatellite markers. Geographical coordinates were individually recorded. Eight reference populations were included in the study to investigate potential gene flow: four highly selected commercial pure lines and four lines of French slow-growing chickens. Two populations of wild red jungle fowls were also genotyped to compare the range of diversity between domestic and wild fowls. A genetic diversity analysis was conducted both within and between populations. Multivariate redundancy analyses were performed to assess the relative influence of geographical location among Algerian ecotypes. The results showed a high genetic variability within the Algerian population, with 184 alleles and a mean number of 8.09 alleles per locus. The values of heterozygosity (He and Ho) ranged from 0.55 to 0.62 in Algerian ecotypes and were smaller than values found in Jungle fowl populations and higher than values found in commercial populations. Although the structuring analysis of genotypes did not reveal clear subpopulations within Algerian ecotypes, the supervised approach using geographical data showed a significant (p Algeria are characterized by a high genetic diversity and must be safeguarded as an important reservoir of genetic diversity.

  14. Genetic diversity and population genetic analysis of bovine MHC class II DRB3.2 locus in three Bos indicus cattle breeds of Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, D N; Sri Hari, V G; Hatkar, D N; Rengarajan, K; Saravanan, R; Suryanarayana, V V S; Murthy, L K

    2012-12-01

    cattle breeds. The population genetics and phylogenetic analysis have revealed pivotal information about the population structure and importance of the presently studied three Bos indicus cattle breeds as unique animal genetic resources, which have to be conserved for maintaining native cattle genetic diversity.

  15. Analysis of genetic diversity of cultivars and clones of white clover (Trifolium repens L. with the use of RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Tomkowiak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research focused on four white clover cultivars (which are synthetic clones and one cultivar generatively propagated through the selection-propagation school. The overall objective of this study was to analyse the genetic diversity of cultivars and clones of white clover and to determine the share of individual clones in the creation of cultivars based on genetic similarity specified using RAPD molecular markers. For each similarity coefficient the similarity matrix was created. Then the dendrograms were built. For the results comparison for each ratio Mantel test and Spearman correlation coefficient were used. On the basis of the analysis it was stated that selected primers generated polymorphisms, which allowed to select components for the crosses to test the ability of combinations. The dendrograms constructed with the use of the coefficients of Nei and Ochiai create similarity groups which include cultivars with their clones so they the most precisely group the forms in terms of the origin. Coefficients of Simple Matching, Hamann, Rogers and Tanimoto create groups, which often contain cultivars and clones that do not belong to a given cultivar, so they are not so useful in selecting components for the crosses.

  16. Spatio-temporal Analysis of the Genetic Diversity of Arctic Rabies Viruses and Their Reservoir Hosts in Greenland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Hanke

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been limited knowledge on spatio-temporal epidemiology of zoonotic arctic fox rabies among countries bordering the Arctic, in particular Greenland. Previous molecular epidemiological studies have suggested the occurrence of one particular arctic rabies virus (RABV lineage (arctic-3, but have been limited by a low number of available samples preventing in-depth high resolution phylogenetic analysis of RABVs at that time. However, an improved knowledge of the evolution, at a molecular level, of the circulating RABVs and a better understanding of the historical perspective of the disease in Greenland is necessary for better direct control measures on the island. These issues have been addressed by investigating the spatio-temporal genetic diversity of arctic RABVs and their reservoir host, the arctic fox, in Greenland using both full and partial genome sequences. Using a unique set of 79 arctic RABV full genome sequences from Greenland, Canada, USA (Alaska and Russia obtained between 1977 and 2014, a description of the historic context in relation to the genetic diversity of currently circulating RABV in Greenland and neighboring Canadian Northern territories has been provided. The phylogenetic analysis confirmed delineation into four major arctic RABV lineages (arctic 1-4 with viruses from Greenland exclusively grouping into the circumpolar arctic-3 lineage. High resolution analysis enabled distinction of seven geographically distinct subclades (3.I - 3.VII with two subclades containing viruses from both Greenland and Canada. By combining analysis of full length RABV genome sequences and host derived sequences encoding mitochondrial proteins obtained simultaneously from brain tissues of 49 arctic foxes, the interaction of viruses and their hosts was explored in detail. Such an approach can serve as a blueprint for analysis of infectious disease dynamics and virus-host interdependencies. The results showed a fine-scale spatial population

  17. Spatio-temporal Analysis of the Genetic Diversity of Arctic Rabies Viruses and Their Reservoir Hosts in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Dennis; Freuling, Conrad M.; Fischer, Susanne; Hueffer, Karsten; Hundertmark, Kris; Nadin-Davis, Susan; Marston, Denise; Fooks, Anthony R.; Bøtner, Anette; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Beer, Martin; Rasmussen, Thomas B.; Müller, Thomas F.; Höper, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    There has been limited knowledge on spatio-temporal epidemiology of zoonotic arctic fox rabies among countries bordering the Arctic, in particular Greenland. Previous molecular epidemiological studies have suggested the occurrence of one particular arctic rabies virus (RABV) lineage (arctic-3), but have been limited by a low number of available samples preventing in-depth high resolution phylogenetic analysis of RABVs at that time. However, an improved knowledge of the evolution, at a molecular level, of the circulating RABVs and a better understanding of the historical perspective of the disease in Greenland is necessary for better direct control measures on the island. These issues have been addressed by investigating the spatio-temporal genetic diversity of arctic RABVs and their reservoir host, the arctic fox, in Greenland using both full and partial genome sequences. Using a unique set of 79 arctic RABV full genome sequences from Greenland, Canada, USA (Alaska) and Russia obtained between 1977 and 2014, a description of the historic context in relation to the genetic diversity of currently circulating RABV in Greenland and neighboring Canadian Northern territories has been provided. The phylogenetic analysis confirmed delineation into four major arctic RABV lineages (arctic 1–4) with viruses from Greenland exclusively grouping into the circumpolar arctic-3 lineage. High resolution analysis enabled distinction of seven geographically distinct subclades (3.I – 3.VII) with two subclades containing viruses from both Greenland and Canada. By combining analysis of full length RABV genome sequences and host derived sequences encoding mitochondrial proteins obtained simultaneously from brain tissues of 49 arctic foxes, the interaction of viruses and their hosts was explored in detail. Such an approach can serve as a blueprint for analysis of infectious disease dynamics and virus-host interdependencies. The results showed a fine-scale spatial population structure

  18. Spatio-temporal Analysis of the Genetic Diversity of Arctic Rabies Viruses and Their Reservoir Hosts in Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Dennis; Freuling, Conrad M; Fischer, Susanne; Hueffer, Karsten; Hundertmark, Kris; Nadin-Davis, Susan; Marston, Denise; Fooks, Anthony R; Bøtner, Anette; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Beer, Martin; Rasmussen, Thomas B; Müller, Thomas F; Höper, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    There has been limited knowledge on spatio-temporal epidemiology of zoonotic arctic fox rabies among countries bordering the Arctic, in particular Greenland. Previous molecular epidemiological studies have suggested the occurrence of one particular arctic rabies virus (RABV) lineage (arctic-3), but have been limited by a low number of available samples preventing in-depth high resolution phylogenetic analysis of RABVs at that time. However, an improved knowledge of the evolution, at a molecular level, of the circulating RABVs and a better understanding of the historical perspective of the disease in Greenland is necessary for better direct control measures on the island. These issues have been addressed by investigating the spatio-temporal genetic diversity of arctic RABVs and their reservoir host, the arctic fox, in Greenland using both full and partial genome sequences. Using a unique set of 79 arctic RABV full genome sequences from Greenland, Canada, USA (Alaska) and Russia obtained between 1977 and 2014, a description of the historic context in relation to the genetic diversity of currently circulating RABV in Greenland and neighboring Canadian Northern territories has been provided. The phylogenetic analysis confirmed delineation into four major arctic RABV lineages (arctic 1-4) with viruses from Greenland exclusively grouping into the circumpolar arctic-3 lineage. High resolution analysis enabled distinction of seven geographically distinct subclades (3.I - 3.VII) with two subclades containing viruses from both Greenland and Canada. By combining analysis of full length RABV genome sequences and host derived sequences encoding mitochondrial proteins obtained simultaneously from brain tissues of 49 arctic foxes, the interaction of viruses and their hosts was explored in detail. Such an approach can serve as a blueprint for analysis of infectious disease dynamics and virus-host interdependencies. The results showed a fine-scale spatial population structure in

  19. Great ape genetic diversity and population history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado-Martinez, Javier; Sudmant, Peter H; Kidd, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Most great ape genetic variation remains uncharacterized; however, its study is critical for understanding population history, recombination, selection and susceptibility to disease. Here we sequence to high coverage a total of 79 wild- and captive-born individuals representing all six great ape...... species and seven subspecies and report 88.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms. Our analysis provides support for genetically distinct populations within each species, signals of gene flow, and the split of common chimpanzees into two distinct groups: Nigeria-Cameroon/western and central....../eastern populations. We find extensive inbreeding in almost all wild populations, with eastern gorillas being the most extreme. Inferred effective population sizes have varied radically over time in different lineages and this appears to have a profound effect on the genetic diversity at, or close to, genes in almost...

  20. Genetic diversity and differentiation of masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou masou) between and within cultured populations inferred from microsatellite DNA analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiying JIA; Yuyong ZHANG; Shuqiang CHEN; Lianyu SHI

    2012-01-01

    Masu salmon,Oncorhynchus masou masou,is one of the most valuable fishery species that has been introduced to China,though to date no studies on the genetic diversity and genetic relationship among hatchery populations has been performed with molecular markers.We undertook such a study and sampled 120 individuals from three hatchery stocks and analyzed 20 microsatellite loci.All loci were polymorphic and a total of 91 alleles were detected.A relatively low level of genetic diversity was revealed with effective number of allele of 3.1094,3.3299 and 3.1894 and expected heterozygosity of 0.6600,0.6648 and 0.6638 in the three stocks,respectively.Deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were found due to heterozygote deficit.Accordingly,evidence of genetic bottlenecks were found in the three stocks.An individual assignment test demonstrated that 85% of individuals were correctly assigned into their original stocks.Pairwise Fst revealed that significant differentiation occurred between these three stocks.The results of the study indicated that disequilibrium of genetic structure and differentiation has occurred in all three stocks.This information collectively provides a basis for measures to avoid of loss of genetic diversity and introgression in Chinese aquaculture.

  1. Genetic Diversity in Populations of Sepiella maindroni Using 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Part of the 16S rRNA gene is amplified with PCR and sequenced for 5 populations of common Chinese cuttlefish Sepiella maindroni: three from the South China Sea, one from East China Sea and one from Japan. The result shows that a total of 5 nucleotide positions are found to have gaps or insertions of base pairs among these individuals, and 13 positions are examined to be variable in all the sequences, which range from 494 to 509 base pairs. All of the individuals are grouped into 7 haplotypes (h1-h7). No marked genetic difference is observed among those populations. All of the individuals from Nagasaki belong to h1 and the h3 haplotype is found only in the coastal waters of China. AG transition in Nucleotide 255 is suggested to be taken as a kind of genetic marker to identify the populations distributed in East-South China Sea and the Nagasaki waters of Japan.

  2. Comparative Analysis of the Pattern of Population Genetic Diversity in Three Indo-West Pacific Rhizophora Mangrove Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yu-Bin; Duke, Norm C.; Sun, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Rhizophora species are the most widely distributed mangrove trees in the Indo-West Pacific (IWP) region. Comparative studies of these species with shared life history traits can help identify evolutionary factors that have played most important roles in determining genetic diversity within and between populations in ocean-current dispersed mangrove tree species. We sampled 935 individuals from 54 natural populations for genotyping with 13 microsatellite markers to investigate the level of genetic variation, population structure, and gene flow on a broad geographic scale in Rhizophora apiculata, Rhizophora mucronata, and Rhizophora stylosa across the IWP region. In contrast to the pattern expected of long-lived woody plants with predominant wind-pollination, water-dispersed seeds and wide geographic range, genetic variation within populations was generally low in all the three species, especially in those peripheral populations from geographic range limits. Although the large water-buoyant propagules of Rhizophora have capacity for long distance dispersal, such events might be rare in reality, as reflected by the low level of gene flow and high genetic differentiation between most of population pairs within each species. Phylogeographic separation of Australian and Pacific island populations from SE Asian lineages previously revealed with DNA sequence data was still detectable in R. apiculata based on genetic distances, but this pattern of disjunction was not always evident in R. mucronata and R. stylosa, suggesting that fast-evolving molecular markers could be more suitable for detecting contemporary genetic structure but not deep evolutionary divergence caused by historical vicariance. Given that mangrove species generally have small effective population sizes, we conclude that genetic drift coupled with limited gene flow have played a dominant role in producing the current pattern of population genetic diversity in the IWP Rhizophora species, overshadowing the

  3. Comparative Analysis of the Pattern of Population Genetic Diversity in Three Indo-West Pacific Rhizophora Mangrove Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Bin Yan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhizophora species are the most widely distributed mangrove trees in the Indo-West Pacific (IWP region. Comparative studies of these species with shared life history traits can help identify evolutionary factors that have played most important roles in determining genetic diversity within and between populations in ocean-current dispersed mangrove tree species. We sampled 935 individuals from 54 natural populations for genotyping with 13 microsatellite markers to investigate the level of genetic variation, population structure, and gene flow on a broad geographic scale in Rhizophora apiculata, R. mucronata, and R. stylosa across the IWP region. In contrast to the pattern expected of long-lived woody plants with predominant wind-pollination, water-dispersed seeds and wide geographic range, genetic variation within populations was generally low in all the three species, especially in those peripheral populations from geographic range limits. Although the large water-buoyant propagules of Rhizophora have capacity for long distance dispersal, such events might be rare in reality, as reflected by the low level of gene flow and high genetic differentiation between most of population pairs within each species. Phylogeographic separation of Australian and Pacific island populations from SE Asian lineages previously revealed with DNA sequence data was still detectable in R. apiculata based on genetic distances, but this pattern of disjunction was not always evident in R. mucronata and R. stylosa, suggesting that fast-evolving molecular markers could be more suitable for detecting contemporary genetic structure but not deep evolutionary divergence caused by historical vicariance. Given that mangrove species generally have small effective population sizes, we conclude that genetic drift coupled with limited gene flow have played a dominant role in producing the current pattern of population genetic diversity in the IWP Rhizophora species, overshadowing the

  4. Geographical and longitudinal analysis of Listeria monocytogenes genetic diversity reveals its correlation with virulence and unique evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yuelan; Tan, Weijun; Wang, Guoliang; Kong, Suwei; Zhou, Xiaohui; Zhao, Dan; Jia, Yanyan; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xin'an

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is one of the most important foodborne pathogens causing severe diseases with a mortality rate of 24%. However, the genetic diversity and evolution of L. monocytogenes, particularly at the worldwide level, are poorly defined. In this study, we performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and multi virulence locus sequence typing (MVLST) for 86 L. monocytogenes strains derived from 8 countries from 1926 to 2012 in order to better understand the molecular evolution and genetic characteristics of this pathogen. A total of 13 clonal complexes (CCs) were detected, of which CC1, CC2, CC3, CC7, CC9, CC4 are the most prevalent. Notably, polymorphism of housekeeping genes of isolates belong to CC1 (STs = 47) increased more rapidly over the time. MLST-based phylogenetic analysis showed that serotype 1/2b and 4b strains had an "interval-type" evolution pattern, while serotype 1/2a and 1/2c strains had a "progressive-type" evolution pattern. Furthermore, strains from temporally and geographically unrelated outbreaks in different countries were clustered in the same subgroup of phylogenetic tree, indicating that that L. monocytogenes developed highly similar virulence genes and genetic characteristics to adaptation in a special ecological niche. Interestingly, there was a high correlation between the population structure of MVLST and MLST among the isolates of cluster IA corresponding to CC1, CC2, CC4 and CC6 that had the highest potential to cause listeriosis outbreaks, strengthening that surveillance of these CCs is important for prevention of listeriosis. The present study offers insights into the internal relationships between the population structure, distribution and pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Population genetic diversity and fitness in multiple environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGreevy Thomas J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When a large number of alleles are lost from a population, increases in individual homozygosity may reduce individual fitness through inbreeding depression. Modest losses of allelic diversity may also negatively impact long-term population viability by reducing the capacity of populations to adapt to altered environments. However, it is not clear how much genetic diversity within populations may be lost before populations are put at significant risk. Development of tools to evaluate this relationship would be a valuable contribution to conservation biology. To address these issues, we have created an experimental system that uses laboratory populations of an estuarine crustacean, Americamysis bahia with experimentally manipulated levels of genetic diversity. We created replicate cultures with five distinct levels of genetic diversity and monitored them for 16 weeks in both permissive (ambient seawater and stressful conditions (diluted seawater. The relationship between molecular genetic diversity at presumptive neutral loci and population vulnerability was assessed by AFLP analysis. Results Populations with very low genetic diversity demonstrated reduced fitness relative to high diversity populations even under permissive conditions. Population performance decreased in the stressful environment for all levels of genetic diversity relative to performance in the permissive environment. Twenty percent of the lowest diversity populations went extinct before the end of the study in permissive conditions, whereas 73% of the low diversity lines went extinct in the stressful environment. All high genetic diversity populations persisted for the duration of the study, although population sizes and reproduction were reduced under stressful environmental conditions. Levels of fitness varied more among replicate low diversity populations than among replicate populations with high genetic diversity. There was a significant correlation

  6. Microbial diversity - insights from population genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, T.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Although many environmental microbial populations are large and genetically diverse, both the level of diversity and the extent to which it is ecologically relevant remain enigmatic. Because the effective (or long-term) population size, Ne, is one of the parameters that determines population genetic

  7. Analysis of genetic diversity of Fusarium tupiense, the main causal agent of mango malformation disease in southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango malformation disease (MMD) has become an important global disease affecting this crop. The aim of this study was to identify the main causal agents of MMD in the Axarquía region of southern Spain and determine their genetic diversity. Fusarium mangiferae was previously described in the Axarquí...

  8. 玳瑁遗传多样性的RAPD分析%Genetic Diversity Analysis of Eretmochelys Imbricata by RAPD Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    端金霞; 古河祥; 夏中荣; 叶明彬; 陈华灵; 张飞燕

    2011-01-01

    We used RAPD software to analyze the genetic diversity of seven Hawksbill Turtles(Eretmochelys imbricata) captured in the South China Sea.We used 20 random primers to amplify 1351 fragments.On average,193 bands were amplified for each individual.Sixty - nine of 193 loci were polymorphic(35.8%).The size of DNA fragments ranged from 200 bp to 3 000 bp.The genetic distance among individuals ranged from 0.082 9 to 0.181 3 and averaged 0.132 7±0.029 9.The phylogenetic tree of the seven turtles was constructed by NJTREE analysis using the RAPDistance 1.04 program.We conclude that the genetic diversity of Eretmochelys imbricata in the South China Sea is low.%应用RAPD技术分析了玳瑁的遗传多样性。用20个随机引物对中国南海海域玳瑁7个个体的基因组DNA进行了PCR扩增,共扩增出1 351条DNA片段,平均每个个体扩增出193条条带。在检测到的193条条带中,多态性条带为69条,多态性条带百分比为35.8%,条带大小在200 bp~3 000 bp之间,7个个体间遗传距离为0.082 9~0.1813,平均遗传距离为0.132 7±0.029 9,表明中国南海海域玳瑁的遗传多样性水平较低,应加强该区域玳瑁种质资源的保护。采用类平均聚类法(NJTREE)构建了7个个体相互关系的分子聚类图,表明该7个玳瑁个体没有形成种群的分化。

  9. Genetic diversity analysis in the section Caulorrhizae (genus Arachis) using microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Diversity in 26 microsatellite loci from section Caulorrhizae germplasm was evaluated by using 33 accessions of A. pintoi Krapov. & W.C. Gregory and ten accessions of Arachis repens Handro. Twenty loci proved to be polymorphic and a total of 196 alleles were detected with an average of 9.8 alleles per locus. The variability found in those loci was greater than the variability found using morphological characters, seed storage proteins and RAPD markers previously used in this germplasm. The high potential of these markers to detect species-specific alleles and discriminate among accessions was demonstrated. The set of microsatellite primer pairs developed by our group for A. pintoi are useful molecular tools for evaluating Section Caulorrhizae germplasm, as well as that of species belonging to other Arachis sections. PMID:21637613

  10. Genetic diversity analysis in the section Caulorrhizae (genus Arachis using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío A. Palmieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity in 26 microsatellite loci from section Caulorrhizae germplasm was evaluated by using 33 accessions of A. pintoi Krapov. & W.C. Gregory and ten accessions of Arachis repens Handro. Twenty loci proved to be polymorphic and a total of 196 alleles were detected with an average of 9.8 alleles per locus. The variability found in those loci was greater than the variability found using morphological characters, seed storage proteins and RAPD markers previously used in this germplasm. The high potential of these markers to detect species-specific alleles and discriminate among accessions was demonstrated. The set of microsatellite primer pairs developed by our group for A. pintoi are useful molecular tools for evaluating Section Caulorrhizae germplasm, as well as that of species belonging to other Arachis sections.

  11. Genetic diversity in Tunisian horse breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jemmali

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at screening genetic diversity and differentiation in four horse breeds raised in Tunisia, the Barb, Arab-Barb, Arabian, and English Thoroughbred breeds. A total of 200 blood samples (50 for each breed were collected from the jugular veins of animals, and genomic DNA was extracted. The analysis of the genetic structure was carried out using a panel of 16 microsatellite loci. Results showed that all studied microsatellite markers were highly polymorphic in all breeds. Overall, a total of 147 alleles were detected using the 16 microsatellite loci. The average number of alleles per locus was 7.52 (0.49, 7.35 (0.54, 6.3 (0.44, and 6 (0.38 for the Arab-Barb, Barb, Arabian, and English Thoroughbred breeds, respectively. The observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.63 (0.03 in the English Thoroughbred to 0.72 in the Arab-Barb breeds, whereas the expected heterozygosities were between 0.68 (0.02 in the English Thoroughbred and 0.73 in the Barb breeds. All FST values calculated by pairwise breed combinations were significantly different from zero (p  <  0.05 and an important genetic differentiation among breeds was revealed. Genetic distances, the factorial correspondence, and principal coordinate analyses showed that the important amount of genetic variation was within population. These results may facilitate conservation programs for the studied breeds and enhance preserve their genetic diversity.

  12. Congruence between morphological and molecular markers inferred from the analysis of the intra-morphotype genetic diversity and the spatial structure of Oxalis tuberosa Mol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissard, Audrey; Arbizu, Carlos; Ghislain, Marc; Faux, Anne-Michèle; Paulet, Sébastien; Bertin, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Oxalis tuberosa is an important crop cultivated in the highest Andean zones. A germplasm collection is maintained ex situ by CIP, which has developed a morphological markers system to classify the accessions into morphotypes, i.e. groups of morphologically identical accessions. However, their genetic uniformity is currently unknown. The ISSR technique was used in two experiments to determine the relationships between both morphological and molecular markers systems. The intra-morphotype genetic diversity, the spatial structures of the diversity and the congruence between both markers systems were determined. In the first experience, 44 accessions representing five morphotypes, clearly distinct from each other, were analyzed. At the molecular level, the accessions exactly clustered according to their morphotypes. However, a genetic variability was observed inside each morphotype. In the second experiment, 34 accessions gradually differing from each other on morphological base were analyzed. The morphological clustering showed no geographical structure. On the opposite, the molecular analysis showed that the genetic structure was slightly related to the collection site. The correlation between both markers systems was weak but significant. The lack of perfect congruence between morphological and molecular data suggests that the morphological system may be useful for the morphotypes management but is not appropriate to study the genetic structure of the oca. The spatial structure of the genetic diversity can be related to the evolution of the species and the discordance between the morphological and molecular structures may result from similar selection pressures at different places leading to similar forms with a different genetic background.

  13. Analysis of a Stochastic Predator-Prey Model with Applications to Intrahost HIV Genetic Diversity

    CERN Document Server

    Leviyang, Sivan

    2009-01-01

    During an infection, HIV experiences strong selection by immune system T cells. Recent experimental work has shown that MHC escape mutations form an important pathway for HIV to avoid such selection. In this paper, we study a model of MHC escape mutation. The model is a predator-prey model with two prey, composed of two HIV variants, and one predator, the immune system CD8 cells. We assume that one HIV variant is visible to CD8 cells and one is not. The model takes the form of a system of stochastic differential equations. Motivated by well-known results concerning the short life-cycle of HIV intrahost, we assume that HIV population dynamics occur on a faster time scale then CD8 population dynamics. This separation of time scales allows us to analyze our model using an asymptotic approach. Using this model we study the impact of an MHC escape mutation on the population dynamics and genetic evolution of the intrahost HIV population. From the perspective of population dynamics, we show that the competition betw...

  14. MORPHOLOGY AND GENETIC DIVERSITY OF MITOCHONDRIAL DNA D-LOOP REGION USING PCR-RFLP ANALYSIS IN MAGELANG DUCK AND OTHER NATIVE DUCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Purwantini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the different of plumage colors on morphological diversityof Magelang duck and genetic diversity using PCR-RFLP mtDNA D-loop region analysis of Magelangduck and four others native duck population (Tegal, Mojosari, Bali and Alabio duck in Indonesia. Bloodsample was taken from 50 Magelang ducks and 20 of each native ducks. Morphological characteristicsof body measurement, production ability and egg quality of Magelang duck were analyzed usingCompletely Randomized Design with 11 plumage colors as treatments. PCR technique was administeredto amplify fragments in mtDNA D-loop region and PCR products were digested with endonucleaserestriction enzyme AluI and HaeIII. The result showed that morphology diversity of Magelang duck wasstatistically affected by different plumage colors. PCR-RFLP analysis using AluI and HaeIII restrictionenzyme resulted in six combinations of restriction fragment pattern shown in six haplotypes (A, B, C, D,E and F. Haplotype difference showed genetic diversity in the population of Magelang duck and theother native ducks. In conclusion, the different plumage colors affected morphology diversity ofMagelang duck. Genetic diversity of Indonesian native duck population could be identified by usingPCR-RFLP analysis on mtDNA D-loop region.

  15. Analysis of the genetic diversity between Gentile di Puglia, Sopravissana and Sarda sheep breeds using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro Catillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two Italian sheep breeds – Gentile di Puglia and Sopravissana – have undergone a consistent decline in numbers and have been widely substituted by the Sarda breed, which gives higher milk yield. With the aim to provide a basis for con- servation decisions, the genetic variability of the three breeds was investigated in this study. DNA of 60 animals was PCR amplified at the following microsatellite loci: CSSM43, CSSM47, CSSM60, TGLA110, TGLA122, TGLA126, TGLA377, ETH3, ETH10, ETH225, NRAMP1, OARCP20 and SPS115. Allele frequencies, gene diversity and genetic distances were calculat- ed. The highest differences in allele frequencies were found at the following loci: TGLA377, TGLA122, NRAMP1, OARCP20 and ETH3, while at the other loci the most frequent alleles were the same. The average inbreeding rate was 0.156 in the Gentile di Puglia, 0.158 in the Sopravissana and 0.137 in the Sarda. Average gene diversity of the analysed microsatel- lites was 0.59. Genetic distance between Gentile di Puglia and Sopravissana (0.081 indicates moderate differentiation; distances between the Sarda and the endangered breeds – 0.111 from the Gentile di Puglia and 0.107 from the Sopravissana - indicate a medium-high differentiation rate. The disappearance of the two less productive breeds would entail a consistent loss of genetic diversity. The inbreeding values are low enough to allow the implementation of sound conservation programmes.

  16. Improved method for fibre content and quality analysis and their application to flax genetic diversity investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oever, van den M.J.A.; Bas, N.; Soest, van L.J.M.; Melis, C.; Dam, van J.E.G.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation for fibre content and quality in a breeding selection program is time consuming and costly. Therefore, this study aims to develop a method for fast and reproducible fibre content analysis on small flax straw samples. A protocol has been developed and verified with fibre screening methods

  17. Improved method for fibre content and quality analysis and their application to flax genetic diversity investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oever, van den M.J.A.; Bas, N.; Soest, van L.J.M.; Melis, C.; Dam, van J.E.G.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation for fibre content and quality in a breeding selection program is time consuming and costly. Therefore, this study aims to develop a method for fast and reproducible fibre content analysis on small flax straw samples. A protocol has been developed and verified with fibre screening methods

  18. The use of protein patterns in genetic diversity analysis in some Brassica napus cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Razavizadeh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, protein variations of seeds and five-day old cotyledonal leaves of four selected Brassica napus cultivars including Elite, Ocapy, Tasilo and Zarfam were analyzed by SDS-PAGE to identify protein markers. The amount of total soluble protein of seed storage proteins did not show significant differences in all cultivars whereas it was different in cotyledonal leaves. Protein patterns of seeds and cotyledonal leaves showed significant differences using SDS-PAGE and consequence analysis of bands by ImageJ program. Relative expression of six protein bands in seeds and five-day old cotyledonal leaves were significantly different. Three protein markers were identified by protein patterns of seed and cotyledonal leaves. The results of relationship analysis based on presence and absence of the specific protein bands in protein pattern of seed storage proteins showed that Tasilo and Elite cultivars had the highest similarities.

  19. Genetic diversity of native Turkish cattle breeds: Mantel, AMOVA and bottleneck analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Özşensoy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate potential extinction risk of Turkish native cattle breeds using Mantel and AMOVA tests and Bottleneck analysis. A total of 271 DNA samples were isolated from Anatolian Black, Anatolian Grey, South Anatolian Red, Native Southern Anatolian Yellow, East Anatolian Red, and Zavot cattle. In this study, genotypes of 20 microsatellites were determined by capillary electrophoresis and fragment analysis. A total of 269 different alleles were detected. The maximum and minimum numbers of total alleles were observed in TGLA122 (n=26 and INRA005 (n=7 loci, respectively. The highest average observed and expected heterozygosity values were determined as 0.619–0.852 and 0.669–0.877, respectively. The average FIS value was 0.068. Results of AMOVA and Mantel tests illustrated statistically significant differences in populations (p<0.001 and correlation (p<0.01. Bottleneck analysis revealed a normal distribution of L–shaped curve indicating that there was no recent risk of extinction for these breeds.

  20. Genetic Diversity and Differentiation of the Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides Between and Within Cultured Stocks and Wild Populations Inferred from Microsatellite DNA Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoran Lin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we employed microsatellite DNA markers to analyze the genetic diversity and differentiation between and within cultured stocks and wild populations of the orange-spotted grouper originating from the South China Sea and Southeast Asia. Compared to wild populations, genetic changes including reduced genetic diversity and significant differentiation have taken place in cultured grouper stocks, as shown by allele richness and heterozygosity studies, pairwise Fst, structure, molecular variance analysis, as well as multidimensional scaling analysis. Although two geographically adjacent orange-spotted grouper populations in China showed negligible genetic divergence, significant population differentiation was observed in wild grouper populations distributed in a wide geographical area from China, through Malaysia to Indonesia. However, the Mantel test rejected the isolation-by-distance model of genetic structure, which indicated the genetic differentiation among the populations could result from the co-effects of various factors, such as historical dispersal, local environment, ocean currents, river flows and island blocks. Our results demonstrated that microsatellite markers could be suitable not only for genetic monitoring cultured stocks but also for revealing the population structuring of wild orange-spotted grouper populations. Meanwhile, our study provided important information for breeding programs, management of cultured stocks and conservation of wild populations of the orange-spotted grouper.

  1. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) from China and Malaysia based on species-specific simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L X; Xiao, Y; Xia, W; Yang, Y D

    2015-12-08

    Genetic diversity and patterns of population structure of the 94 oil palm lines were investigated using species-specific simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. We designed primers for 63 SSR loci based on their flanking sequences and conducted amplification in 94 oil palm DNA samples. The amplification result showed that a relatively high level of genetic diversity was observed between oil palm individuals according a set of 21 polymorphic microsatellite loci. The observed heterozygosity (Ho) was 0.3683 and 0.4035, with an average of 0.3859. The Ho value was a reliable determinant of the discriminatory power of the SSR primer combinations. The principal component analysis and unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averaging cluster analysis showed the 94 oil palm lines were grouped into one cluster. These results demonstrated that the oil palm in Hainan Province of China and the germplasm introduced from Malaysia may be from the same source. The SSR protocol was effective and reliable for assessing the genetic diversity of oil palm. Knowledge of the genetic diversity and population structure will be crucial for establishing appropriate management stocks for this species.

  2. Genetic differentiation and genetic diversity of Castanopsis (Fagaceae), the dominant tree species in Japanese broadleaved evergreen forests, revealed by analysis of EST-associated microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kyoko; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Kamijo, Takashi; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Noriaki; Kato, Makoto; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The broadleaved evergreen forests of the East Asian warm temperate zone are characterised by their high biodiversity and endemism, and there is therefore a need to extend our understanding of its genetic diversity and phylogeographic patterns. Castanopsis (Fagaceae) is one of the dominant tree species in the broadleaved evergreen forests of Japan. In this study we investigate the genetic diversity, genetic structure and leaf epidermal morphology of 63 natural populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata, using 32 Expressed Sequence Tag associated microsatellites. The overall genetic differentiation between populations was low (GST = 0.069 in C. sieboldii and GST = 0.057 in C. cuspidata). Neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian clustering analyses revealed that the populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata were genetically clearly differentiated, a result which is consistent with the morphology of their epidermal cell layers. This suggests that C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata should be treated as independent species, although intermediate morphologies are often observed, especially at sites where the two species coexist. The higher level of genetic diversity observed in the Kyushu region (for both species) and the Ryukyu Islands (for C. sieboldii) is consistent with the available fossil pollen data for Castanopsis-type broadleaved evergreen trees during the Last Glacial Maximum and suggests the existence of refugia for Castanopsis forests in southern Japan. Within the C. sieboldii populations, Bayesian clustering analyses detected three clusters, in the western and eastern parts of the main islands and in the Ryukyu Islands. The west-east genetic differentiation observed for this species in the main islands, a pattern which is also found in several plant and animal species inhabiting Castanopsis forests in Japan, suggests that they have been isolated from each other in the western and eastern populations for an extended period of time, and may imply the

  3. AFLP-Based Analysis of Genetic Diversity, Population Structure, and Relationships with Agronomic Traits in Rice Germplasm from North Region of Iran and World Core Germplasm Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkheh, Karim; Masaeli, Mohammad; Chaleshtori, Maryam Hosseini; Adugna, Asfaw; Ercisli, Sezai

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of the genetic diversity and population structure of crops is very important for use in breeding programs and for genetic resources conservation. We analyzed the genetic diversity and population structure of 47 rice genotypes from diverse origins using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers and morphological characters. The 47 genotypes, which were composed of four populations: Iranian native varieties, Iranian improved varieties, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) rice varieties, and world rice collections, were analyzed using ten primer combinations. A total of 221 scorable bands were produced with an average of 22.1 alleles per pair of primers, of which 120 (54.30%) were polymorphic. The polymorphism information content (PIC) values varied from 0.32 to 0.41 with an average of 0.35. The high percentage of polymorphic bands (%PB) was found to be 64.71 and the resolving power (R p) collections were 63.36. UPGMA clustering based on numerical data from AFLP patterns clustered all 47 genotypes into three large groups. The genetic similarity between individuals ranged from 0.54 to 0.94 with an average of 0.74. Population genetic tree showed that Iranian native cultivars formed far distant cluster from the other populations, which may indicate that these varieties had minimal genetic change over time. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that the largest proportion of the variation (84%) to be within populations showing the inbreeding nature of rice. Therefore, Iranian native varieties (landraces) may have unique genes, which can be used for future breeding programs and there is a need to conserve this unique diversity. Furthermore, crossing of Iranian genotypes with the genetically distant genotypes in the other three populations may result in useful combinations, which can be used as varieties and/or lines for future rice breeding programs.

  4. Genetic diversity of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae assessed by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokotovic, Branko; Angen, Øystein

    2007-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was evaluated as a method for genotypic characterization and subtyping within the bacterial species Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. A total of 155 isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae, representing the serotypic variation described to occur within...... this species, were analyzed. In order to elucidate the species boundaries, six strains of the phylogenetically closely related species Actinobacillus lignieresii were also included. Furthermore, the ability of AFLP to subtype was studied using 42 isolates of serovar 2 and the performance compared...... to that obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). AFLP analysis provided a clear separation of A. lignieresii and A. pleuropneumoniae and divided the isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae into 20 clusters. Most of the serovars of A. pleuropneumoniae were represented by single and quite homogeneous clusters...

  5. Inbreeding and genetic diversity analysis in a hatchery release population and clones of Rhopilema esculentum based on microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tao; Chen, Zaizhong; Wang, Mosang; Hu, Yulong; Wang, Weiji

    2017-05-01

    Ten microsatellite markers were used to analyze the levels of genetic diversity and inbreeding in a hatchery release population of Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye (Scyphozoa: Rhizostomatidae). A total of 85 alleles were detected in 600 individuals. Within-population levels of observed ( H o) and expected ( H e) heterozygosity ranged from 0.152 to 0.839 (mean=0.464) and from 0.235 to 0.821 (mean=0.618), respectively. The polymorphism information content (PIC) of each marker ranged from 0.207 to 0.795 with an average of 0.580, indicating that the hatchery population maintained a high level of genetic diversity. Inbreeding levels were estimated in the hatchery population and the inbreeding coefficient was 0.203. This result revealed that a certain level of inbreeding occurred within the population. Meanwhile, we also determined genetic diversity at the clone level. Several polyps from the same scyphistomae were genotyped at the ten microsatellite loci and there was virtually no difference in their genotypes. Furthermore, we calculated the probabilities of exclusion. When both parents were known, the average exclusion probability of ten loci was 99.99%. Our data suggest that the ten microsatellite markers can not only be used to analyze the identity of individuals but they can also be applied to parentage identification. Our research provides a theoretical basis and technical support for genetic diversity detection and reasonable selection of R. esculentum hatchery populations. These findings support the use of releasing studies and conservation of R. esculentum germplasm resources.

  6. Inbreeding and genetic diversity analysis in a hatchery release population and clones of Rhopilema esculentum based on microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tao; Chen, Zaizhong; Wang, Mosang; Hu, Yulong; Wang, Weiji

    2016-07-01

    Ten microsatellite markers were used to analyze the levels of genetic diversity and inbreeding in a hatchery release population of Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye (Scyphozoa: Rhizostomatidae). A total of 85 alleles were detected in 600 individuals. Within-population levels of observed (H o) and expected (H e) heterozygosity ranged from 0.152 to 0.839 (mean=0.464) and from 0.235 to 0.821 (mean=0.618), respectively. The polymorphism information content (PIC) of each marker ranged from 0.207 to 0.795 with an average of 0.580, indicating that the hatchery population maintained a high level of genetic diversity. Inbreeding levels were estimated in the hatchery population and the inbreeding coefficient was 0.203. This result revealed that a certain level of inbreeding occurred within the population. Meanwhile, we also determined genetic diversity at the clone level. Several polyps from the same scyphistomae were genotyped at the ten microsatellite loci and there was virtually no difference in their genotypes. Furthermore, we calculated the probabilities of exclusion. When both parents were known, the average exclusion probability of ten loci was 99.99%. Our data suggest that the ten microsatellite markers can not only be used to analyze the identity of individuals but they can also be applied to parentage identification. Our research provides a theoretical basis and technical support for genetic diversity detection and reasonable selection of R. esculentum hatchery populations. These findings support the use of releasing studies and conservation of R. esculentum germplasm resources.

  7. SNP discovery in common bean by restriction-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing for genetic diversity and population structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdisser, Paula Arielle M R; Pappas, Georgios J; de Menezes, Ivandilson P P; Müller, Bárbara S F; Pereira, Wendell J; Narciso, Marcelo G; Brondani, Claudio; Souza, Thiago L P O; Borba, Tereza C O; Vianello, Rosana P

    2016-06-01

    Researchers have made great advances into the development and application of genomic approaches for common beans, creating opportunities to driving more real and applicable strategies for sustainable management of the genetic resource towards plant breeding. This work provides useful polymorphic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for high-throughput common bean genotyping developed by RAD (restriction site-associated DNA) sequencing. The RAD tags were generated from DNA pooled from 12 common bean genotypes, including breeding lines of different gene pools and market classes. The aligned sequences identified 23,748 putative RAD-SNPs, of which 3357 were adequate for genotyping; 1032 RAD-SNPs with the highest ADT (assay design tool) score are presented in this article. The RAD-SNPs were structurally annotated in different coding (47.00 %) and non-coding (53.00 %) sequence components of genes. A subset of 384 RAD-SNPs with broad genome distribution was used to genotype a diverse panel of 95 common bean germplasms and revealed a successful amplification rate of 96.6 %, showing 73 % of polymorphic SNPs within the Andean group and 83 % in the Mesoamerican group. A slightly increased He (0.161, n = 21) value was estimated for the Andean gene pool, compared to the Mesoamerican group (0.156, n = 74). For the linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis, from a group of 580 SNPs (289 RAD-SNPs and 291 BARC-SNPs) genotyped for the same set of genotypes, 70.2 % were in LD, decreasing to 0.10 %in the Andean group and 0.77 % in the Mesoamerican group. Haplotype patterns spanning 310 Mb of the genome (60 %) were characterized in samples from different origins. However, the haplotype frameworks were under-represented for the Andean (7.85 %) and Mesoamerican (5.55 %) gene pools separately. In conclusion, RAD sequencing allowed the discovery of hundreds of useful SNPs for broad genetic analysis of common bean germplasm. From now, this approach provides an excellent panel

  8. Seed Biochemical Analysis Based Profiling of Diverse Wheat Genetic Resource from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anam Khalid

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wheat is the major nutrient source worldwide. In Pakistan, it has a crucial place in agriculture as well as in national economy. For seed biochemical compositional analysis, wheat germplasm (77 genotypes was collected from different agro-climatic zones of Pakistan. Significant variation (p < 0.05 was observed for tested parameters among tested genotypes. Highest activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX was detected in Pavon (1,426.67 Units/g s. wt., catalase (CAT in Pasban-90 (633.33 Units/g s. wt., peroxidase (POD in IQBAL-2000 (42,579.6 Units/g s. wt., and superoxide dismutase (SOD in Manthar-2003 (278.93 Units/g s. wt.. Whereas, maximum activity of alpha amylase was found in SH-2002 (292.70 mg/g s. wt., esterase in Dharabi 2011 (987.80 μM/min/g s. wt., and protease in NR-234 (11,183.33 Units/g s. wt. and highest total oxidant status (TOS was detected in Faisalabad-2008 (390.0 μM/g s. wt., malondialdehyde (MDA content in Margalla-99 (679.23 μM/g s. wt., total phenolic content (TPC in Bhakkar-2000 (25,383.33 μM/g s. wt., and ascorbic acid (AsA content in SH-2002 (713.0 μg/g s. wt.. Maximum total soluble sugar was found in Saleem-2000 (29.86 mg/g s. wt., reducing sugars in Punjab-96 (12.68 mg/g s. wt., non-reducing sugars in Saleem-2000 (27.33 mg/g s. wt.. However, highest albumins was identified in TC-4928 (352.89 mg/g s. wt. and globulins in MEXI PAK (252.67 mg/g s. wt., salt soluble proteins in Faisalabad-2008 (162.44 mg/g s. wt., and total soluble proteins in Punjab-96 (487.33 mg/g s. wt. indicating good quality of wheat genotypes as well as good nutritional status. Genotypes which have been ranked high in respective parameter can be employed in breeding to enhance the nutritional quality of wheat.

  9. Analysis of Genetic Diversity in Cultivated and Wild Tomato Varieties in Chinese Market by RAPD and SSR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Fan-juan; XU Xiang-yang; HUANG Feng-lan; LI Jing-fu

    2010-01-01

    RAPD and SSR were applied to assess genetic diversity in 61 tomato varieties from different species (Solanum lycopersicum L.,hirsutum.Humb L.,pimpinellifolium Miller L.,chilense Dun.L.,chmielenskii L.,peruvianum Miller L.,parvuflorum Miller L.).2062 and 869 clear fragments were amplified by RAPD and SSR,respectively.On the other hand,more polymorphic products were found by SSR as compared to RAPD,i.e.,100 and 43.84%,respectively.In addition,a higher value of the average similarity coefficient and lower PIC value were reflected in RAPD (0.79,0.407) compared to SSR (0.56,0.687).It can be inferred that SSR was a higher effective marker than RAPD to assess genetic diversity in tomato accessions.Similarly,the genetic base of tomato varieties in Chinese market was narrow.It is suggested that wild tomato varieties should be used to enrich the genetic base of the cultivated tomato varieties.

  10. Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Relationships in a Tunisian Fig (Ficus carica) Germplasm Collection by Random Amplified Microsatellite Polymorphisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khaled Chatti; Olfa Saddoud; Amel Salhi-Hannachi; Messaoud Mars; Mohamed Marrakchi; Mokhtar Trifi

    2007-01-01

    The random amplified mirosatellite polymorphism method was performed in a set of Tunisian fig landraces using eighteen primer combinations. Atotal of sixty three random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (RAMPO) markers were scored and used either to assess the genetic diversity in these cultivars or to detect cases of mislabeling. Opportunely, data proved that the designed procedure constitutes an attractive and fast method with low costs and prevents radio exposure. As a result, we have identified the primer combinations that are the most efficient to detect genetic polymorphism in this crop. Therefore, the derived unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) dendrogram illustrates the genetic divergence among the landraces studied and exhibits a typically continuous variation. Moreover, no evident correlation between the sexes of trees was observed. In addition, using these markers, discrimination between landraces has been achieved. Thus, random amplified mirosatellite polymorphism is proved to be powerful for characterizing the local fig germplasm.

  11. Genetic diversity in soybean genotypes with resistance to Heterodera glycines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Oliveira Nogueira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity among soybean genotypes inoculated with Heteroderaglycines race 3. The experiments were conducted in a greenhouse. In two performance tests of morphological characteristics andresistance to the pathogen, 27 soybean genotypes were assessed. The coefficient of genotypic determination was estimated by themethod of analysis of variance and the genetic diversity analyzed based on dendrograms and optimization method. The estimatedcoefficients of determination indicated a predominantly genetic origin of the genotypic differences in the traits. The genetic variabilitywas maintained in the superior genotypes, which can be used in breeding programs for resistance to soybean cyst nematode

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure in Meconopsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... including the populations distributed in same location together in every group. ... Key words: Meconopsis quintuplinervia Regel, genetic diversity, random amplified ..... in its original center, and Banma population located in ...

  13. Molecular genetics of human pigmentation diversity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sturm, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    The genetic basis underlying normal variation in the pigmentary traits of skin, hair and eye colour has been the subject of intense research directed at understanding the diversity seen both between...

  14. Genetic diversity of Ehrlichia ruminantium in Amblyomma variegatum ticks and small ruminants in The Gambia determined by restriction fragment profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faburay, Bonto; Jongejan, Frans; Taoufik, Amar; Ceesay, Ansumana; Geysen, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    Understanding genetic diversity of Ehrlichia ruminantium in host and vector populations is an important prerequisite to controlling heartwater by vaccination in traditional livestock systems in sub-Saharan Africa. We carried out a study in two phases: (i) evaluating the usefulness of the PCR-RFLP assay based on the map1 coding sequence of E. ruminantium as a discriminatory tool to characterise genetic diversity, (ii) applying the technique to field samples from Amblyomma variegatum ticks and small ruminants to characterise genotypic diversity of the organism in three main agroecological zones of The Gambia, Sudano-Guinean (SG), Western Sudano-Sahelian (WSS) and Eastern Sudano-Sahelian (ESS). Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were observed among different strains of E. ruminantium supporting the usefulness of the PCR-RFLP technique for studying genetic diversity of the organism. Restriction enzyme map1 profile analysis indicated the presence in The Gambia of multiple genotypes (at least 11) of E. ruminantium with sites in the WSS and SG zones showing comparatively high number of diverse genotypes. Profiles similar to the Kerr Seringe genotype (DQ333230) showed the highest distribution frequency, being present at sites in all three agroecological zones, thereby making the strain a suitable candidate for further characterisation in cross-protection studies. An additional three genotypes showed relatively high distribution frequency and were present in all three zones making them equally important for isolation and subsequent characterisation. The study demonstrated the occurrence of mixed infections with E. ruminantium genotypes in ruminants and ticks.

  15. Joint analysis of phenotypic and molecular diversity provides new insights on the genetic variability of the Brazilian physic nut germplasm bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Alexandre Alonso; Bhering, Leonardo Lopes; Rosado, Tatiana Barbosa; Laviola, Bruno Galvêas; Formighieri, Eduardo Fernandes; Cruz, Cosme Damião

    2013-09-01

    The genetic variability of the Brazilian physic nut (Jatropha curcas) germplasm bank (117 accessions) was assessed using a combination of phenotypic and molecular data. The joint dissimilarity matrix showed moderate correlation with the original matrices of phenotypic and molecular data. However, the correlation between the phenotypic dissimilarity matrix and the genotypic dissimilarity matrix was low. This finding indicated that molecular markers (RAPD and SSR) did not adequately sample the genomic regions that were relevant for phenotypic differentiation of the accessions. The dissimilarity values of the joint dissimilarity matrix were used to measure phenotypic + molecular diversity. This diversity varied from 0 to 1.29 among the 117 accessions, with an average dissimilarity among genotypes of 0.51. Joint analysis of phenotypic and molecular diversity indicated that the genetic diversity of the physic nut germplasm was 156% and 64% higher than the diversity estimated from phenotypic and molecular data, respectively. These results show that Jatropha genetic variability in Brazil is not as limited as previously thought.

  16. Identification of single-copy orthologous genes between Physalis and Solanum lycopersicum and analysis of genetic diversity in Physalis using molecular markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingli Wei

    Full Text Available The genus Physalis includes a number of commercially important edible and ornamental species. Its high nutritional value and potential medicinal properties leads to the increased commercial interest in the products of this genus worldwide. However, lack of molecular markers prevents the detailed study of genetics and phylogeny in Physalis, which limits the progress of breeding. In the present study, we compared the DNA sequences between Physalis and tomato, and attempted to analyze genetic diversity in Physalis using tomato markers. Blasting 23180 DNA sequences derived from Physalis against the International Tomato Annotation Group (ITAG Release2.3 Predicted CDS (SL2.40 discovered 3356 single-copy orthologous genes between them. A total of 38 accessions from at least six species of Physalis were subjected to genetic diversity analysis using 97 tomato markers and 25 SSR markers derived from P. peruviana. Majority (73.2% of tomato markers could amplify DNA fragments from at least one accession of Physalis. Diversity in Physalis at molecular level was also detected. The average Nei's genetic distance between accessions was 0.3806 with a range of 0.2865 to 0.7091. These results indicated Physalis and tomato had similarity at both molecular marker and DNA sequence levels. Therefore, the molecular markers developed in tomato can be used in genetic study in Physalis.

  17. Identification of single-copy orthologous genes between Physalis and Solanum lycopersicum and analysis of genetic diversity in Physalis using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jingli; Hu, Xiaorong; Yang, Jingjing; Yang, Wencai

    2012-01-01

    The genus Physalis includes a number of commercially important edible and ornamental species. Its high nutritional value and potential medicinal properties leads to the increased commercial interest in the products of this genus worldwide. However, lack of molecular markers prevents the detailed study of genetics and phylogeny in Physalis, which limits the progress of breeding. In the present study, we compared the DNA sequences between Physalis and tomato, and attempted to analyze genetic diversity in Physalis using tomato markers. Blasting 23180 DNA sequences derived from Physalis against the International Tomato Annotation Group (ITAG) Release2.3 Predicted CDS (SL2.40) discovered 3356 single-copy orthologous genes between them. A total of 38 accessions from at least six species of Physalis were subjected to genetic diversity analysis using 97 tomato markers and 25 SSR markers derived from P. peruviana. Majority (73.2%) of tomato markers could amplify DNA fragments from at least one accession of Physalis. Diversity in Physalis at molecular level was also detected. The average Nei's genetic distance between accessions was 0.3806 with a range of 0.2865 to 0.7091. These results indicated Physalis and tomato had similarity at both molecular marker and DNA sequence levels. Therefore, the molecular markers developed in tomato can be used in genetic study in Physalis.

  18. Evolution and genetic diversity of Theileria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Hayashida, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-10-01

    Theileria parasites infect a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants worldwide, causing diseases with varying degrees of severity. A broad classification, based on the parasite's ability to transform the leukocytes of host animals, divides Theileria into two groups, consisting of transforming and non-transforming species. The evolution of transforming Theileria has been accompanied by drastic changes in its genetic makeup, such as acquisition or expansion of gene families, which are thought to play critical roles in the transformation of host cells. Genetic variation among Theileria parasites is sometimes linked with host specificity and virulence in the parasites. Immunity against Theileria parasites primarily involves cell-mediated immune responses in the host. Immunodominance and major histocompatibility complex class I phenotype-specificity result in a host immunity that is tightly focused and strain-specific. Immune escape in Theileria is facilitated by genetic diversity in its antigenic determinants, which potentially results in a loss of T cell receptor recognition in its host. In the recent past, several reviews have focused on genetic diversity in the transforming species, Theileriaparva and Theileriaannulata. In contrast, genetic diversity in Theileriaorientalis, a benign non-transforming parasite, which occasionally causes disease outbreaks in cattle, has not been extensively examined. In this review, therefore, we provide an outline of the evolution of Theileria, which includes T. orientalis, and discuss the possible mechanisms generating genetic diversity among parasite populations. Additionally, we discuss the potential implications of a genetically diverse parasite population in the context of Theileria vaccine development.

  19. Comparison Analysis of Genetic Diversity of Indonesian Mangosteens (Garcinia mangostana L. and Related Species by Means Isozymes and AFLP Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RUDY LUKMAN

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana belongs to a large genus of Garcinia that native in South East Asia, as well as Indonesia, and in order evaluate genetics diversity of mangosteen and their close relatives, we employed isoenzyme and AFLP marker on 13 accessions of mangosteen and their close relatives. Isoenzyme marker using four enzyme systems produced 25 bands and 88% out of them were polymorphic and elucidate genetic variability at similarity level ranged between 0.38-0.89. AFLP markers with three primer system produced 220 polymorphic bands and revealed genetic variability at similarity level ranged between 0.38-0.89 successfully produced high polymorphism bands and elucidates genetic variability at similarity coefficient ranged between 0.21-0.77. Both markers exhibited similar clustering pattern, and group successfully G. mangostana accessions in one clustering group. Furthermore G. malaccensis and G. porrecta consistently showed closer genetic relationship to G. mangostana clustering group in both markers, in comparison to G. hombroniana, which implies the assumption they may be the progenitor of G. mangostana, and should be reviewed with more accurate data.

  20. Genetic diversity of 11 European pig breeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavall, G.; Iannuccelli, N.; Legault, C.; Milan, D.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Andersson, L.; Fredholm, M.; Geldermann, H.; Foulley, J.L.; Chevalet, C.; Ollivier, L.

    2000-01-01

    A set of eleven pig breeds originating from six European countries, and including a small sample of wild pigs, was chosen for this study of genetic diversity. Diversity was evaluated on the basis of 18 microsatellite markers typed over a total of 483 DNA samples collected. Average breed heterozygosi

  1. Investigating Genetic Diversity of Foeniculum Vulgare Mill using Molecular Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Jadidi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants are considered valuable genetic resources in Iran. One of these medicinal as well as spice plants is Foeniculum Vulgare Mill from Umbellifetae family used in different industries such as food, medicine, and cosmetics. It seems that due to different climate conditions in Iran this plant represents a high and valuable genetic diversity; therefore, management of genetic resources protection and obtaining information about genetic diversity will help awareness of evolution processes as well as genetic erosion of this valuable plant. Genetic diversity in local masses of Foeniculum Vulgare Mill can be investigated using molecule markers such as AFLP, RAPD, ISSR, SRAP, RFLP, and so on. In investigation of over 30 ecotype of local Foeniculum Vulgare Mill, different markers have shown that mean polymorphic content (PIC is about 36% and mean genetic diversity is estimated about 40% in different samples. Data obtained from molecule software analyses help to categorize Foeniculum Vulgare Mill genotype in different groups based on climate and geographical conditions. Principle components analysis (PCOA has also confirmed the results of cluster analysis. Dendrogram obtained by cluster analysis based on similarity coefficient of simple matching (SM and UPGMA algorithm can also categorize population of Foeniculum Vulgare Mill in different groups. Results of molecular variance analysis (AMOVA have shown that most genetic variance between geographical groups can be seen in populations. In general, according to investigations, there is a significant genetic diversity regarding agronomic and molecular traits of Foeniculum Vulgare Mill masses in Iran and knowing this genetic diversity will help in breeding programs, complementary studies, categorization, and so on.

  2. Comparative genomic analysis of 45 type strains of the genus Bifidobacterium: a snapshot of its genetic diversity and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Sun

    Full Text Available Bifidobacteria are well known for their human health-promoting effects and are therefore widely applied in the food industry. Members of the Bifidobacterium genus were first identified from the human gastrointestinal tract and were then found to be widely distributed across various ecological niches. Although the genetic diversity of Bifidobacterium has been determined based on several marker genes or a few genomes, the global diversity and evolution scenario for the entire genus remain unresolved. The present study comparatively analyzed the genomes of 45 type strains. We built a robust genealogy for Bifidobacterium based on 402 core genes and defined its root according to the phylogeny of the tree of bacteria. Our results support that all human isolates are of younger lineages, and although species isolated from bees dominate the more ancient lineages, the bee was not necessarily the original host for bifidobacteria. Moreover, the species isolated from different hosts are enriched with specific gene sets, suggesting host-specific adaptation. Notably, bee-specific genes are strongly associated with respiratory metabolism and are potential in helping those bacteria adapt to the oxygen-rich gut environment in bees. This study provides a snapshot of the genetic diversity and evolution of Bifidobacterium, paving the way for future studies on the taxonomy and functional genomics of the genus.

  3. New insights on the genetic diversity of the honeybee parasite Nosema ceranae based on multilocus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudel, Mathieu; Aufauvre, Julie; Corbara, Bruno; Delbac, Frederic; Blot, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    The microsporidian parasite Nosema ceranae is a common pathogen of the Western honeybee (Apis mellifera) whose variable virulence could be related to its genetic polymorphism and/or its polyphenism responding to environmental cues. Since the genotyping of N. ceranae based on unique marker sequences had been unsuccessful, we tested whether a multilocus approach, assessing the diversity of ten genetic markers – encoding nine proteins and the small ribosomal RNA subunit – allowed the discrimination between N. ceranae variants isolated from single A. mellifera individuals in four distant locations. High nucleotide diversity and allele content were observed for all genes. Most importantly, the diversity was mainly present within parasite populations isolated from single honeybee individuals. In contrast the absence of isolate differentiation precluded any taxa discrimination, even through a multilocus approach, but suggested that similar populations of parasites seem to infect honeybees in distant locations. As statistical evolutionary analyses showed that the allele frequency is under selective pressure, we discuss the origin and consequences of N. ceranae heterozygosity in a single host and lack of population divergence in the context of the parasite natural and evolutionary history.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of VP1 gene sequences of waterfowl parvoviruses from the Mainland of China revealed genetic diversity and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao; Cheng, Xiao-Xia; Chen, Shao-Ying; Lin, Feng-Qiang; Chen, Shi-Long; Zhu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Jin-Xiang; Huang, Mei-Qing; Zheng, Min

    2016-03-01

    To determine the origin and evolution of goose parvovirus (GPV) and Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) in the Mainland of China, phylogenetic and recombination analyses in the present study were performed on 32 complete VP1 gene sequences from China and other countries. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene, GPV strains studied here from Mainland China (PRC) could be divided into three genotypes, namely PRC-I, PRC-II and PRC-III. Genotype PRC-I is indigenous to Mainland China. Only one GPV strain from Northeast China was of Genotype PRC-II and was thought to be imported from Europe. Genotype PRC-III, which was the most isolated genotype during 1999-2012, is related to GPVs in Taiwan and has been the predominant pathogen responsible for recent Derzy's disease outbreaks in Mainland China. Current vaccine strains used in Mainland China belong to Genotype PRC-I that is evolutionary distant from Genotypes PRC-II and PRC-III. In comparison, MDPV strains herein from Mainland China are clustered in a single group which is closely related to Taiwanese MDPV strains, and the full-length sequences of the VP1 gene of China MDPVs are phylogenetic closely related to the VP1 sequence of a Hungarian MDPV strain. Moreover, We also found that homologous recombination within VP1 gene plays a role in generating genetic diversity in GPV evolution. The GPV GDFSh from Guangdong Province appears to be the evolutionary product of a recombination event between parental GPV strains GD and B, while the major parent B proved to be a reference strain for virulent European GPVs. Our findings provide valuable information on waterfowl parvoviral evolution in Mainland China.

  5. Genetic diversity within and among four South European native horse breeds based on microsatellite DNA analysis: implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, A; Jugo, B M; Mériaux, J C; Iriondo, M; Mazón, L I; Aguirre, A I; Vicario, A; Estomba, A

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, genetic analyses of diversity and differentiation were performed on four Basque-Navarrese semiferal native horse breeds. In total, 417 animals were genotyped for 12 microsatellite markers. Mean heterozygosity was higher than in other horse breeds, surely as a consequence of management. Although the population size of some of these breeds has declined appreciably in the past century, no genetic bottleneck was detected in any of the breeds, possibly because it was not narrow enough to be detectable. In the phylogenetic tree, the Jaca Navarra breed was very similar to the Pottoka, but appeared to stand in an intermediate position between this and the meat breeds. Assuming that Pottoka is the breed less affected by admixture, the others gradually distanced themselves from it through varying influences from outside breeds, among other factors. In a comparative study with other breeds, the French breeds Ardanais, Comtois, and Breton were the closest to the four native breeds. Three different approaches for evaluating the distribution of genetic diversity were applied. The high intrabreed variability of Euskal Herriko Mendiko Zaldia (EHMZ) was pointed out in these analyses. In our opinion, cultural, economic, and scientific factors should also be considered in the management of these horse breeds.

  6. AFLP analysis of genetic diversity in leafy kale (Brassica oleracea L. convar. acephala (DC.) Alef.) landraces, cultivars and wild populations in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stina; von Bothmer, Roland; Poulsen, G.

    2011-01-01

    the relationship among them is due to seed dispersal through human interactions. Our results indicate that a kale population found in a natural habitat in Denmark was probably not truly wild but most likely an escape from a cultivated Danish kale that had subsequently become naturalized....... populations and one cultivar had the lowest diversity measures. The landraces that were most genetically diverse were from areas where kales are known to be extensively grown, suggesting in situ conservation in these areas as a supplement to storage of seeds in gene banks. An analysis of molecular variance...

  7. Effects of complex life cycles on genetic diversity: cyclical parthenogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, R; Reichel, K; Malrieu, F; Masson, J P; Stoeckel, S

    2016-11-01

    Neutral patterns of population genetic diversity in species with complex life cycles are difficult to anticipate. Cyclical parthenogenesis (CP), in which organisms undergo several rounds of clonal reproduction followed by a sexual event, is one such life cycle. Many species, including crop pests (aphids), human parasites (trematodes) or models used in evolutionary science (Daphnia), are cyclical parthenogens. It is therefore crucial to understand the impact of such a life cycle on neutral genetic diversity. In this paper, we describe distributions of genetic diversity under conditions of CP with various clonal phase lengths. Using a Markov chain model of CP for a single locus and individual-based simulations for two loci, our analysis first demonstrates that strong departures from full sexuality are observed after only a few generations of clonality. The convergence towards predictions made under conditions of full clonality during the clonal phase depends on the balance between mutations and genetic drift. Second, the sexual event of CP usually resets the genetic diversity at a single locus towards predictions made under full sexuality. However, this single recombination event is insufficient to reshuffle gametic phases towards full-sexuality predictions. Finally, for similar levels of clonality, CP and acyclic partial clonality (wherein a fixed proportion of individuals are clonally produced within each generation) differentially affect the distribution of genetic diversity. Overall, this work provides solid predictions of neutral genetic diversity that may serve as a null model in detecting the action of common evolutionary or demographic processes in cyclical parthenogens (for example, selection or bottlenecks).

  8. Structural and genetic diversity in antibody repertoires from diverse species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Rios, Miguel; Criscitiello, Michael F; Smider, Vaughn V

    2015-08-01

    The antibody repertoire is the fundamental unit that enables development of antigen specific adaptive immune responses against pathogens. Different species have developed diverse genetic and structural strategies to create their respective antibody repertoires. Here we review the shark, chicken, camel, and cow repertoires as unique examples of structural and genetic diversity. Given the enormous importance of antibodies in medicine and biological research, the novel properties of these antibody repertoires may enable discovery or engineering of antibodies from these non-human species against difficult or important epitopes.

  9. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E. SANTOS; M. MATOS; P. SILVA; A. M. FIGUEIRAS; C. BENITO; O. PINTO-CARNIDE

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the molecular diversity and to determine the genetic relationships amongSecalespp. and among cultivars ofSecale cerealeusing RAPDs, ISSRs and sequence analysis of six exons ofScMATE1gene.Thirteen ryes (cultivated and wild) were genotyped using 21 RAPD and 16 ISSR primers. A total of 435 markers (242 RAPDsand 193 ISSRs) were obtained, with 293 being polymorphic (146 RAPDs and 147 ISSRs). Two RAPD and nine ISSR primersgenerated more than 80% of polymorphism. The ISSR markers were more polymorphic and informative than RAPDs. Further,69% of the ISSR primers selected achieved at least 70% of DNA polymorphism. The study of six exons of theScMATE1gene also demonstrated a high genetic variability that subsists inSecalegenus. One difference observed in exon 1 sequencesfromS. vaviloviiseems to be correlated with Al sensitivity in this species. The genetic relationships obtained using RAPDs,ISSRs and exons ofScMATE1gene were similar.S. ancestrale ,S. kuprijanoviiandS. cerealewere grouped in the same clusterandS. segetalewas in another cluster.S. vaviloviishowed evidences of not being clearly an isolate species and having greatintraspecific difference

  10. Microbial diversity--insights from population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mes, Ted H M

    2008-01-01

    Although many environmental microbial populations are large and genetically diverse, both the level of diversity and the extent to which it is ecologically relevant remain enigmatic. Because the effective (or long-term) population size, N(e), is one of the parameters that determines population genetic diversity, tests and simulations that assume selectively neutral mutations may help to identify the processes that have shaped microbial diversity. Using ecologically important genes, tests of selective neutrality suggest that adaptive as well as non-adaptive types of selection act and that departure from neutrality may be widespread or restricted to small groups of genotypes. Population genetic simulations using population sizes between 10(3) and 10(7) suggest extremely high levels of microbial diversity in environments that sustain large populations. However, census and effective population sizes may differ considerably, and because we know nothing of the evolutionary history of environmental microbial populations, we also have no idea what N(e) of environmental populations is. On the one hand, this reflects our ignorance of the microbial world. On the other hand, the tests and simulations illustrate interactions between microbial diversity and microbial population genetics that should inform our thinking in microbial ecology. Because of the different views on microbial diversity across these disciplines, such interactions are crucial if we are to understand the role of genes in microbial communities.

  11. Genetic diversity of Ehrlichia canis in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, D M; Zhang, X; Melo, A L T; Pacheco, T A; Meneses, A M C; Zanutto, M S; Horta, M C; Santarém, V A; Camargo, L M A; McBride, J W; Labruna, M B

    2013-06-28

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis is a highly prevalent disease in Brazil, where the genetic diversity of Ehrlichia canis remains undefined. In this study, we used the TRP36 gene to examine the genetic diversity of E. canis strains from naturally infected dogs residing in five distinct geographic regions in Brazil. E. canis DNA was detected in 82/126 (65%) dogs by dsb-specific PCR and E. canis was isolated in cell culture from 13 dogs. Sequences obtained from dsb genes amplified from the isolates were identical to the US E. canis strain. An extended molecular characterization based on the TRP36 gene identified two major genogroups based on differences among eight isolates. Isolates with tandem repeat amino acid sequence (TEDSVSAPA) identical to the previously reported TRP36 sequence were found in the midwest, northeast and southeast regions of Brazil, and classified into the US genogroup. A novel Brazilian genotype with a different tandem repeat sequence (ASVVPEAE) was also identified in midwest, northern and southern regions. Similarity in the N-terminal sequence of a US genogroup member with the Brazilian genogroup suggested that genomic recombination between the two genogroups may have occurred. Other subtypes within the Brazilian genogroup were also identified using C-terminal amino acid divergence. We identified two distinct major Brazilian genogroups and several subtypes based on analysis of TRP36, and such information will be useful for further genotyping and possible associations with disease severity, understanding of the genetic and antigenic variability of E. canis, and for developing strain-specific vaccines and diagnostic methods based on TRP36.

  12. Genetic Diversity of Cannabis sativa L. Based on AFLP Analysis%大麻品种遗传多样性的AFLP分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡尊红; 杨明; 郭鸿彦; 胡学礼; 陈璇; 刘旭云; 郭孟壁; 张庆滢; 许艳萍; 郭丽芬

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity of 13 Cannabis populations from different sources was analyzed by POPGENE 3.2 Software. AFLP analysis showed that the Yunnan population had the highest level of genetic diversity (PPB = 88.82% ,He = 0.3011,/ = 0.4571) ,and then the Heilongjiang population (PPB = 75. 66% ,He = 0. 2572, / = 0. 3897). The percentage of polymorphic loci (PPB) of 13 Cannabis populations was 92. 11% . Nei's total genetic diversity (Ht) was 0. 3837,the genetic diversity (Hs) was 0. 1640. Coefficient of genetic differentiation among populations (Gst) was 0. 5725 ,it means that 57. 25% of the total genetic variation occurred among populations, and 42.75% genetic variation in different populations. To further analyze the genetic differentiation among populations, the genetic distance and genetic identity of Cannabis were calculated according to Nei's (1978) method. The results showed that the genetic identity among populations was from 0. 6556 to 0.9258 ,the highest degree of consensus between Guangxi population and Sichuan population was 0. 9258. Genetic identity between Yunnan population and Guizhou population or Sichuan population were 0.9196 and 0.9173. Gansu and Shanxi population with lowest genetic identity in all populations was 0. 6556. The results indicated that rich genetic diversity among 13 cannabis populations. This study analyzed genetic diversity of cannabis populations in molecular level,provided scientific evidence for the protection of seeds, breeding, evolution study of industrial hemp.%利用POPGENE 3.2软件对13个不同来源的大麻群体进行遗传多样性分析.结果显示:云南地区的大麻群体具有最高的遗传多样性水平(PPB=88.82%,He=0.3000,I=0.4571),其次为黑龙江群体(PPB=75.66%,He=0.2572,I =0.3897).13个大麻群体的多态位点百分率(PPB)为92.11%,Nei's总遗传多样性(Ht)为0.3837,Shannon's信息指数I=0.5374.群体内遗传多样性(Hs)为0.1640,群体间的遗传分化系数(Gst)为0.5725,

  13. Multi-locus analysis reveals a different pattern of genetic diversity for mitochondrial and nuclear DNA between wild and domestic pigs in East Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Qiu Ji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A major reduction of genetic diversity in mtDNA occurred during the domestication of East Asian pigs. However, the extent to which genetic diversity has been lost in the nuclear genome is uncertain. To reveal levels and patterns of nucleotide diversity and to elucidate the genetic relationships and demographic history of domestic pigs and their ancestors, wild boars, we investigated 14 nuclear markers (including 8 functional genes, 2 pseudogenes and 4 intergenic regions from 11 different chromosomes in East Asia-wide samples and pooled them with previously obtained mtDNA data for a combined analysis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results indicated that domestic pigs and wild boars possess comparable levels of nucleotide diversity across the nuclear genome, which is inconsistent with patterns that have been found in mitochondrial genome. CONCLUSIONS: This incongruence between the mtDNA and nuclear genomes is suggestive of a large-scale backcross between male wild boars and female domestic pigs in East Asia. Our data reveal the impacts of founder effects and backcross on the pig genome and help us better understand the complex demographic histories of East Asian pigs, which will be useful for future work on artificial selection.

  14. Pyrosequencing and genetic diversity of microeukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Christoffer Bugge

    Free-living, heterotrophic protozoa have an important ecological role in most terrestrial ecosystems by their grazing of bacteria as one of the first links in food chains and webs. Furthermore, some of them serve as reservoirs for disease-causing bacteria and /or as occasional opportunistic...... pathogens themselves. Protozoa is a morphological group which occurs in many different eukaryotic phyla, and many apparently morphologically similar types are very different from each others genetically. This complicates the development of good primers for analysis of their diversity with modern DNA based...... methods. Compared to other microorganisms such as fungi, algae and bacteria, much less is known about protozoa. It has been an essential element of this thesis to to advance our knowledge of protozoa by developing new primers for DNA-based studies of protozoa impact on ecosystems or as indicators...

  15. Pyrosequencing and genetic diversity of microeukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Christoffer Bugge

    Free-living, heterotrophic protozoa have an important ecological role in most terrestrial ecosystems by their grazing of bacteria as one of the first links in food chains and webs. Furthermore, some of them serve as reservoirs for disease-causing bacteria and /or as occasional opportunistic...... pathogens themselves. Protozoa is a morphological group which occurs in many different eukaryotic phyla, and many apparently morphologically similar types are very different from each others genetically. This complicates the development of good primers for analysis of their diversity with modern DNA based...... methods. Compared to other microorganisms such as fungi, algae and bacteria, much less is known about protozoa. It has been an essential element of this thesis to to advance our knowledge of protozoa by developing new primers for DNA-based studies of protozoa impact on ecosystems or as indicators...

  16. Population structure and genetic diversity of Sinibrama macrops from Ou River and Ling River based on mtDNA D-loop region analysis, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liangjie; Chenoweth, Erica L; Liu, Qigen

    2017-01-27

    In order to understand the influence of human activities such as habitat fragmentation on freshwater fish population evolution, we investigated and compared the genetic diversity and phylogeography of Sinibrama macrops populations in the Oujiang River and Ling River. Mitochondrial control region sequences (D-loop region) of 131 specimens from six populations were obtained and analyzed. The diversity of main stream in the Ou River was lower than that in Ling River. Changtan population showed the lowest diversity (H = 0.646 ± 0.077; π = 0.00060 ± 0.00820). Pairwise FST, gene flow (Nm), and genetic distance (Da) indicated that Longquan and Changtan significantly differentiate from other populations. Nested clade phylogeographical analysis (NCPA) showed some clades and total cladogram experienced isolation by distance. In conclusion, the populations from severely fragmented Ou River have the lower diversity and more intense differentiation than that from the mainstream of Ling River, Changtan population present the lowest diversity and were isolated by the dam construction.

  17. Genetic Structure and Diversity Analysis Revealed by AFLP Markers on Different Glycyrrhiza glabra L. an Endangered Medicinal Species from South of Iran and Implications for Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Atieh; Zolfaghari, Maryam; Sorkheh, Karim

    2016-09-28

    Glycyrrhiza glabra is an endangered and national-protected medicinal plant species distributed in semi-arid and arid areas of South of Iran. This study addresses the genetic diversity and relationship between populations in different habitats by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). The plant materials consisted of 90 individuals from nine different populating areas of Dezful, Ramhormoz, Ahvaz, Abadan, Khorramshahr, Behbahan, Haft-tapeh, Andimeshk, and Shushtar. Twenty-three AFLP primer combinations generated a total of 1019 bands with 94.80 % polymorphism. Unweighted pair group method based on arithmetic average (UPGMA) analysis was performed on Jaccard's similarity coefficient matrix. According to results, the genetic resources and diversity in wild populations of G. glabra were rich. The number of polymorphic fragments per primer combination detected ranged from 18 to 65 bands with an average of 41.95 bands. Average polymorphic information content (PIC) was 0.81 in overall primer combinations. M-GTC+P-AGC primer combination showed the highest PIC (0.94) which can be a good candidate primer combination to verify genetic diversity in G. glabra. The UPGMA and principal coordinate analysis showed a clear distinction among the genotypes and the genotypes divided into three clusters in the dendrogram results. A model-based structure analysis revealed the presence of three groups. The study showed that genetic variation and population structure are determined among the accessions of G. glabra collected from different locations. High level of genetic variation in both intra- and inter-species was detected. Conservational efforts have to be strengthened for all populations of the plant species in different habitats.

  18. Comparative analysis of genetic diversity of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) from Vietnam and Cambodia using agro-morphological and molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Toan Duc; Geleta, Mulatu; Bui, Tri Minh; Bui, Tuyen Cach; Merker, Arnulf; Carlsson, Anders S

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to comparatively analyze the genetic diversity of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) using agro-morphological and molecular markers. Twelve sesame populations collected from three regions in Cambodia and Vietnam were used in this study. A high genetic variation was revealed both by agro-morphological and RAPD markers within and among the 12 sesame populations. The range of agro-morphological trait based average taxonomic distance among populations (0.02 to 0.47) was wider than that of RAPD based genetic distance (0.06 to 0.27). The mean distance revealed by agro-morphological markers (0.23) and RAPD markers (0.22) was similar. RAPD based analysis revealed a relatively higher genetic diversity in populations from South Vietnam as compared to the other two regions. Interestingly, populations from this region also had higher values for yield related traits such as number of capsules per plant, number of seeds per capsule, and seed yield per plant suggesting positive correlation between the extent of genetic variation within population and yield related traits in sesame. A highly significant positive correlation (r = 0.88, P sesame, their combined use would give superior results. © 2011 The Authors.

  19. Nephronophthisis: A Genetically Diverse Ciliopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslyn J. Simms

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephronophthisis (NPHP is an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease and a leading genetic cause of established renal failure (ERF in children and young adults. Early presenting symptoms in children with NPHP include polyuria, nocturia, or secondary enuresis, pointing to a urinary concentrating defect. Renal ultrasound typically shows normal kidney size with increased echogenicity and corticomedullary cysts. Importantly, NPHP is associated with extra renal manifestations in 10–15% of patients. The most frequent extrarenal association is retinal degeneration, leading to blindness. Increasingly, molecular genetic testing is being utilised to diagnose NPHP and avoid the need for a renal biopsy. In this paper, we discuss the latest understanding in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of NPHP. We suggest an appropriate clinical management plan and screening programme for individuals with NPHP and their families.

  20. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Aslaug; Rye, Inga H; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Maruyama, Reo; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin L; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-

  1. Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analysis reveals genetic diversity within Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides small colony isolates from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankpa, N D; Manso-silvan, L; Lorenzon, S; Yaya, A; Lombin, L H; Thiaucourt, F

    2010-12-15

    A Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analysis was conducted on thirteen (13) M. mycoides mycoides Small Colony isolates from Nigeria using Tandem Repeat (TR) 34 which is a predicted lipoprotein located within the hypothetical protein MAG6170. The analysis revealed diversity within the M. mycoides mycoides Small Colony isolates with five different VNTR types indicated. Some correlation was determined between the VNTR types and their geographical origin. VNTR analysis may represent a useful, rapid first-line test for use in molecular epidemiological analysis of M. mycoides mycoides Small Colony for possible outbreak tracing and disease control.

  2. Assessment of Genetic Diversity of Zoonotic Brucella spp. Recovered from Livestock in Egypt Using Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. S. Menshawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is endemic in most parts of Egypt, where it is caused mainly by Brucella melitensis biovar 3, and affects cattle and small ruminants in spite of ongoing efforts devoted to its control. Knowledge of the predominant Brucella species/strains circulating in a region is a prerequisite of a brucellosis control strategy. For this reason a study aiming at the evaluation of the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of a panel of 17 Brucella spp. isolates recovered from domestic ruminants (cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat from four governorates during a period of five years (2002–2007 was carried out using microbiological tests and molecular biology techniques (PCR, MLVA-15, and sequencing. Thirteen strains were identified as B. melitensis biovar 3 while all phenotypic and genetic techniques classified the remaining isolates as B. abortus (n=2 and B. suis biovar 1 (n=2. MLVA-15 yielded a high discriminatory power (h=0.801, indicating a high genetic diversity among the B. melitensis strains circulating among domestic ruminants in Egypt. This is the first report of the isolation of B. suis from cattle in Egypt which, coupled with the finding of B. abortus, suggests a potential role of livestock as reservoirs of several zoonotic Brucella species in the region.

  3. Assessment of genetic diversity of zoonotic Brucella spp. recovered from livestock in Egypt using multiple locus VNTR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshawy, Ahmed M S; Perez-Sancho, Marta; Garcia-Seco, Teresa; Hosein, Hosein I; García, Nerea; Martinez, Irene; Sayour, Ashraf E; Goyache, Joaquín; Azzam, Ragab A A; Dominguez, Lucas; Alvarez, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is endemic in most parts of Egypt, where it is caused mainly by Brucella melitensis biovar 3, and affects cattle and small ruminants in spite of ongoing efforts devoted to its control. Knowledge of the predominant Brucella species/strains circulating in a region is a prerequisite of a brucellosis control strategy. For this reason a study aiming at the evaluation of the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of a panel of 17 Brucella spp. isolates recovered from domestic ruminants (cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat) from four governorates during a period of five years (2002-2007) was carried out using microbiological tests and molecular biology techniques (PCR, MLVA-15, and sequencing). Thirteen strains were identified as B. melitensis biovar 3 while all phenotypic and genetic techniques classified the remaining isolates as B. abortus (n = 2) and B. suis biovar 1 (n = 2). MLVA-15 yielded a high discriminatory power (h = 0.801), indicating a high genetic diversity among the B. melitensis strains circulating among domestic ruminants in Egypt. This is the first report of the isolation of B. suis from cattle in Egypt which, coupled with the finding of B. abortus, suggests a potential role of livestock as reservoirs of several zoonotic Brucella species in the region.

  4. Eco-geographic Distribution and Microcenters of Genetic Diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eco-geographic Distribution and Microcenters of Genetic Diversity in Faba Bean ... Ethiopia is considered an important center of secondary diversity for both ... the microcenter of genetic diversity for both crops may be located in the southern ...

  5. Limited Genetic Diversity Preceded Extinction of the Tasmanian Tiger

    OpenAIRE

    Menzies, Brandon R.; Renfree, Marilyn B; Thomas Heider; Frieder Mayer; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.; Pask, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The Tasmanian tiger or thylacine was the largest carnivorous marsupial when Europeans first reached Australia. Sadly, the last known thylacine died in captivity in 1936. A recent analysis of the genome of the closely related and extant Tasmanian devil demonstrated limited genetic diversity between individuals. While a similar lack of diversity has been reported for the thylacine, this analysis was based on just two individuals. Here we report the sequencing of an additional 12 museum-archived...

  6. Limited Genetic Diversity Preceded Extinction of the Tasmanian Tiger

    OpenAIRE

    Menzies, Brandon R; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Thomas Heider; Frieder Mayer; Thomas B. Hildebrandt; Pask, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    The Tasmanian tiger or thylacine was the largest carnivorous marsupial when Europeans first reached Australia. Sadly, the last known thylacine died in captivity in 1936. A recent analysis of the genome of the closely related and extant Tasmanian devil demonstrated limited genetic diversity between individuals. While a similar lack of diversity has been reported for the thylacine, this analysis was based on just two individuals. Here we report the sequencing of an additional 12 museum-archived...

  7. [Analysis of genetic diversity of Russian regional populations based on common STR markers used in DNA identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesik, V Yu; Fedunin, A A; Agdzhoyan, A T; Utevska, O M; Chukhraeva, M I; Evseeva, I V; Churnosov, M I; Lependina, I N; Bogunov, Yu V; Bogunova, A A; Ignashkin, M A; Yankovsky, N K; Balanovska, E V; Orekhov, V A; Balanovsky, O P

    2014-06-01

    We conducted the first genetic analysis of a wide a range of rural Russian populations in European Russia with a panel of common DNA markers commonly used in criminalistics genetic identification. We examined a total of 647 samples from indigenous ethnic Russian populations in Arkhangelsk, Belgorod, Voronezh, Kursk, Rostov, Ryazan, and Orel regions. We employed a multiplex genotyping kit, COrDIS Plus, to genotype Short Tandem Repeat (STR) loci, which included the genetic marker panel officially recommended for DNA identification in the Russian Federation, the United States, and the European Union. In the course of our study, we created a database of allelic frequencies, examined the distribution of alleles and genotypes in seven rural Russian populations, and defined the genetic relationships between these populations. We found that, although multidimensional analysis indicated a difference between the Northern gene pool and the rest of the Russian European populations, a pairwise comparison using 19 STR markers among all populations did not reveal significant differences. This is in concordance with previous studies, which examined up to 12 STR markers of urban Russian populations. Therefore, the database of allelic frequencies created in this study can be applied for forensic examinations and DNA identification among the ethnic Russian population over European Russia. We also noted a decrease in the levels of heterozygosity in the northern Russian population compared to ethnic populations in southern and central Russia, which is consistent with trends identified previously using classical gene markers and analysis of mitochondrial DNA.

  8. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of two Tunisian bivalves (Mactridae) Mactra corallina (Linnaeus, 1758) and Eastonia rugosa (Helbling, 1799) based on COI gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetoui, Imene; Denis, Françoise; Boussaid, Mohamed; Telahigue, Khoula; El Cafsi, M'Hamed

    2016-01-01

    A partial sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) was used as a genetic marker for a genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis (DNA barcoding) of two Mactridae species, Mactra corallina and Eastonia rugosa, collected from the Tunisian coast. These Mactridae species could be distinguished by DNA barcoding techniques and they will be considered as monophyletic clades with the Neighbor-Joining (NJ) tree. The genetic structure detected that E. rugosa presents three haplotypes with a high frequency of HER1 (0.89). However, M. corralina shared 14 haplotypes. The haplotypic diversity (H) was equal to 0.205 and 0.954, respectively, for E. rugosa and M. corallina. While the nucleotide diversity (π) was higher for M. corallina (π=0.0818), the mismatch distribution showed a unimodal curve for E. rugosa (a recent sudden demographic expansion) and a multimodal distribution for M. corallina (size stability). Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Phylogenetic and genetic diversity analysis in Leptospira species based on the sequence homology pattern of 16S rRNA gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupuleti Sreenivasa Rao

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a bacterial zoonosis, caused by pathogenic spirochete which belongs to the genus Leptospira. It exists in diverse ecological habitats and affects almost all the mammals including humans. Several online databases like NCBI etc will provide the complete genomic sequence data of various Leptospira species. However, the Phylogenetic and genetic diversity Analysis in Leptospira species based on 16S rRNA gene has not studied in detail. Therefore the present study was conducted. Sequences of various species related to genus Leptospira obtained from the NCBI database etc and aligned (CLUSTAL_X. Two Phylogenetic trees were constructed (MEGA-5 in which the first one is related to various serovars of L. interrogans and the other is related to various species of Leptospira. The Phylogenetic trees revealed the relationship and genetic diversity of various serovars of L. interrogans and the other Leptospira species, with their nearest phylogenetic relatives. In the first tree, two major clades were observed which were named as A and B, whereas in the second tree, three major clades were observed and named as A, B and C respectively. Aquifex pyrophilus strain has been used for out grouping in both the trees. The genetic distance between the species in the phylogenetic tree is presented by a bar which represents 0.5 nucleotide substitutions per alignment position in the 16S rRNA gene sequence among the various serovars of L. interrogans while 0.05 nucleotide substitutions in case of various species related to the genus Leptospira. Thus, the findings from the above study confirm that the genus Leptospira exhibits genetic diversity in the 16S rRNA gene. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(4.000: 369-377

  10. Mitochondrial D-loop analysis for uncovering the population structure and genetic diversity among the indigenous duck (Anas platyrhynchos) populations of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Uma; Tantia, Madhu Sudan; Mishra, Bina; Bharani Kumar, Settypalli Tirumala; Vijh, Ramesh Kumar; Chaudhury, Ashok

    2017-01-24

    The indigenous domestic duck (Anas platyrhynchos domestica) which is domesticated from Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) contributes significantly to poor farming community in coastal and North Eastern regions of India. For conservation and maintenance of indigenous duck populations it is very important to know the existing genetic diversity and population structure. To unravel the population structure and genetic diversity among the five indigenous duck populations of India, the mitochondrial D-loop sequences of 120 ducks were analyzed. The sequence analysis by comparison of mtDNA D-loop region (470 bp) of five Indian duck populations revealed 25 mitochondrial haplotypes. Pairwise FST value among populations was 0.4243 (p populations was 0.00034-0.00555, and the net divergence (Da) was 0-0.00355. The phylogenetic analysis in the present study unveiled three clades. The analysis revealed genetic continuity among ducks of coastal region of the country which formed a separate group from the ducks of the inland area. Both coastal as well as the land birds revealed introgression of the out group breed Khaki Campbell, which is used for breed improvement programs in India. The observations revealed very less selection and a single matrilineal lineage of indigenous domestic ducks.

  11. Assessment of Functional EST-SSR Markers (Sugarcane in Cross-Species Transferability, Genetic Diversity among Poaceae Plants, and Bulk Segregation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamshad Ul Haq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expressed sequence tags (ESTs are important resource for gene discovery, gene expression and its regulation, molecular marker development, and comparative genomics. We procured 10000 ESTs and analyzed 267 EST-SSRs markers through computational approach. The average density was one SSR/10.45 kb or 6.4% frequency, wherein trinucleotide repeats (66.74% were the most abundant followed by di- (26.10%, tetra- (4.67%, penta- (1.5%, and hexanucleotide (1.2% repeats. Functional annotations were done and after-effect newly developed 63 EST-SSRs were used for cross transferability, genetic diversity, and bulk segregation analysis (BSA. Out of 63 EST-SSRs, 42 markers were identified owing to their expansion genetics across 20 different plants which amplified 519 alleles at 180 loci with an average of 2.88 alleles/locus and the polymorphic information content (PIC ranged from 0.51 to 0.93 with an average of 0.83. The cross transferability ranged from 25% for wheat to 97.22% for Schlerostachya, with an average of 55.86%, and genetic relationships were established based on diversification among them. Moreover, 10 EST-SSRs were recognized as important markers between bulks of pooled DNA of sugarcane cultivars through BSA. This study highlights the employability of the markers in transferability, genetic diversity in grass species, and distinguished sugarcane bulks.

  12. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure in Argentine and Bolivian Creole cattle using five loci related to milk production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirón J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from five protein-coding loci related to dairy production were used to study the genetic diversity and population structure of Argentine and Bolivian Creole cattle breeds. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of six Creole cattle breeds: Argentine (n = 230, Patagonian (n = 25; "Saavedreño" (n = 140, "Chaqueño Boliviano" (n = 30, "Yacumeño" (n = 27, and "Chusco" (n = 11. kappa-casein, beta-lactoglobulin, growth hormone and prolactin were measured by PCR-RFLP, while alphaS1-casein was typed by PCR-ASO. The results are discussed, focusing on: historical origin, recent differentiation and selection events, Zebu gene introgression, and population structure. This work shows that: (i For the studied genes, the observed gene frequency profiles of Argentine and Bolivian Creole cattle breeds were close to the data reported for Iberian breeds and for other South-American Creole cattle breeds which are historically related; (ii although Zebu gene introgression has been reported at the studied loci, these breeds seem to be far from the Zebu gene frequency profiles; and (iii the Argentine and Bolivian Creole cattle showed significant levels of subdivision, but each population has maintained its degree of genetic variability.

  13. [Genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton of eight lakes in Nanjing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bi-ying; Chen, Mei-jun; Sun, Ying; Chen, Fei-zhou; Yang, Jia-xin

    2010-05-01

    The method of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) was used to study the genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton (0.2-5.0 microm) in the pelagic and littoral zones in 8 lakes with different trophic status in Nanjing. The objectives of this study were to confirm the difference of the genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton among lakes and the main factors affecting this difference. T-RFLP indicated that there were various fingerprints among lakes and zones. The average terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs) in the littoral and pelagic zones were 16.4 and 15.9, respectively. The littoral zone in Lake Nan and the pelagic zone in Lake Mochou had 30 T-RFs and 27 T-RFs, respectively. The T-RFs were the least abundant (10) in the pelagic zone in Lake Baijia with relatively low trophic status. The genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton was higher in the littoral zone than that in the pelagic zone except Lake Pipa and Mochou. The cluster analysis indicated that the similarities of the littoral zones and the pelagic zones were very high except Lake Baijia, Qian and Nan. The canonical correspondence analysis between the genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton and environmental factors revealed the concentration of chlorophyll a had the most important impact on the eukaryotic picoplankton communities (p = 0.004). The results indicated that the genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton is affected by the trophic status and has the difference in the pelagic and littoral zones.

  14. Microsatellite isolation and marker development in carrot - genomic distribution, linkage mapping, genetic diversity analysis and marker transferability across Apiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yildiz Mehtap

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Apiaceae family includes several vegetable and spice crop species among which carrot is the most economically important member, with ~21 million tons produced yearly worldwide. Despite its importance, molecular resources in this species are relatively underdeveloped. The availability of informative, polymorphic, and robust PCR-based markers, such as microsatellites (or SSRs, will facilitate genetics and breeding of carrot and other Apiaceae, including integration of linkage maps, tagging of phenotypic traits and assisting positional gene cloning. Thus, with the purpose of isolating carrot microsatellites, two different strategies were used; a hybridization-based library enrichment for SSRs, and bioinformatic mining of SSRs in BAC-end sequence and EST sequence databases. This work reports on the development of 300 carrot SSR markers and their characterization at various levels. Results Evaluation of microsatellites isolated from both DNA sources in subsets of 7 carrot F2 mapping populations revealed that SSRs from the hybridization-based method were longer, had more repeat units and were more polymorphic than SSRs isolated by sequence search. Overall, 196 SSRs (65.1% were polymorphic in at least one mapping population, and the percentage of polymophic SSRs across F2 populations ranged from 17.8 to 24.7. Polymorphic markers in one family were evaluated in the entire F2, allowing the genetic mapping of 55 SSRs (38 codominant onto the carrot reference map. The SSR loci were distributed throughout all 9 carrot linkage groups (LGs, with 2 to 9 SSRs/LG. In addition, SSR evaluations in carrot-related taxa indicated that a significant fraction of the carrot SSRs transfer successfully across Apiaceae, with heterologous amplification success rate decreasing with the target-species evolutionary distance from carrot. SSR diversity evaluated in a collection of 65 D. carota accessions revealed a high level of polymorphism for these

  15. Chemical analyses, antibacterial activity and genetic diversity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-25

    Jun 25, 2014 ... Key words: Citrus, genetic diversity, ISSR markers, chemical analyses, antibacterial. ... ment of DNA based marker systems has advanced our ... Total acidity of the juices was determined by titration method as ... Greek compressed C. sinensis. 37 163 ..... flavonoids have a large spectrum of biological activity.

  16. Genetic diversity among sorghum landraces and polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 Institute of Environment and Agricultural Research (INERA), BP 910 Bobo Dioulasso, ... This investigation was undertaken to study the genetic diversity among local ... resources could develop new and durable production systems. The biological basis of world food security .... Two control panel DNA samples were used in.

  17. Does genetic diversity predict health in humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne C Lie

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity, especially at genes important for immune functioning within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC, has been associated with fitness-related traits, including disease resistance, in many species. Recently, genetic diversity has been associated with mate preferences in humans. Here we asked whether these preferences are adaptive in terms of obtaining healthier mates. We investigated whether genetic diversity (heterozygosity and standardized mean d(2 at MHC and nonMHC microsatellite loci, predicted health in 153 individuals. Individuals with greater allelic diversity (d(2 at nonMHC loci and at one MHC locus, linked to HLA-DRB1, reported fewer symptoms over a four-month period than individuals with lower d(2. In contrast, there were no associations between MHC or nonMHC heterozygosity and health. NonMHC-d(2 has previously been found to predict male preferences for female faces. Thus, the current findings suggest that nonMHC diversity may play a role in both natural and sexual selection acting on human populations.

  18. Analysis on Genetic Diversity of Echinacea purpurea Moench Based on SRAP%紫锥菊遗传多样性的S RA P分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩琳娜

    2014-01-01

    采用SRAP分子标记技术,对14份引种紫锥菊材料的遗传多样性进行分析。结果显示,9对SRAP引物组合扩增出171条带,多态性比率为80.7%,说明SRAP可应用于紫锥菊种内遗传多样性分析;聚类分析表明紫锥菊样品间的亲缘关系与种质来源地存在一定的相关性。%The sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP)molecular marker was used to detect the genetic diversity among 14 introduced Echinacea purpurea from different germplasm sources.The results showed that 171 bands were obtained by 9 pairs of SRAP primers.The percentage of polymorphic bands was 80.7%.It indicated that the SRAP markers could be used for intraspecific genetic diversity analysis of Echi-nacea purpurea.Cluster analysis showed that there was certain correlation between the genetic relationship and germplasm sources.

  19. Genetic diversity of eleven European pig breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foulley Jean-Louis

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A set of eleven pig breeds originating from six European countries, and including a small sample of wild pigs, was chosen for this study of genetic diversity. Diversity was evaluated on the basis of 18 microsatellite markers typed over a total of 483 DNA samples collected. Average breed heterozygosity varied from 0.35 to 0.60. Genotypic frequencies generally agreed with Hardy-Weinberg expectations, apart from the German Landrace and Schwäbisch-Hällisches breeds, which showed significantly reduced heterozygosity. Breed differentiation was significant as shown by the high among-breed fixation index (overall FST = 0.27, and confirmed by the clustering based on the genetic distances between individuals, which grouped essentially all individuals in 11 clusters corresponding to the 11 breeds. The genetic distances between breeds were first used to construct phylogenetic trees. The trees indicated that a genetic drift model might explain the divergence of the two German breeds, but no reliable phylogeny could be inferred among the remaining breeds. The same distances were also used to measure the global diversity of the set of breeds considered, and to evaluate the marginal loss of diversity attached to each breed. In that respect, the French Basque breed appeared to be the most "unique" in the set considered. This study, which remains to be extended to a larger set of European breeds, indicates that using genetic distances between breeds of farm animals in a classical taxonomic approach may not give clear resolution, but points to their usefulness in a prospective evaluation of diversity.

  20. GENETIC DIVERSITY AND ECO-GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    3Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia ... Allelic frequency based inter-species genetic distance analysis, showed wider .... taxonomy, evolution and origin of the species ...... Age International (P) Limited, New Delhi, India ... Integrated analysis environment for genetic.

  1. Beauveria bassiana: Quercetinase production and genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eula Maria de M. B., Costa; Fabiana Cristina, Pimenta; Christian, Luz; Valéria de, Oliveira; Marília, Oliveira; Elda, Bueno; Silvana, Petrofeza

    2011-01-01

    Beauveria bassiana genetic diversity and ability to synthesize quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase (quercetinase) were analyzed. B. bassiana isolates, obtained from Brazilian soil samples, produced quercetinase after induction using 0.5 g/L quercetin. B. bassiana ATCC 7159 (29.6 nmol/mL/min) and isolate IP 11 (27.5 nmol/ml/min) showed the best performances and IP 3a (9.5 nmol/mL/min) presented the lowest level of quercetinase activity in the culture supernatant. A high level of polymorphism was detected by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. The use of internal-transcribed-spacer ribosomal region restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS-RFLP) did not reveal characteristic markers to differentiate isolates. However, the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region sequence analysis provided more information on polymorphism among the isolates, allowing them to be clustered by relative similarity into three large groups. Correlation was tested according to the Person's correlation. Data of our studies showed, that lower associations among groups, level of quercetinase production, or geographical origin could be observed. This study presents the production of a novel biocatalyst by B. bassiana and suggests the possible industrial application of this fungal species in large-scale biotechnological manufacture of quercetinase. PMID:24031599

  2. Beauveria bassiana: quercetinase production and genetic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eula Maria de M. B Costa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Beauveria bassiana genetic diversity and ability to synthesize quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase (quercetinase were analyzed. B. bassiana isolates, obtained from Brazilian soil samples, produced quercetinase after induction using 0.5 g/L quercetin. B. bassiana ATCC 7159 (29.6 nmol/mL/min and isolate IP 11 (27.5 nmol/ml/min showed the best performances and IP 3a (9.5 nmol/mL/min presented the lowest level of quercetinase activity in the culture supernatant. A high level of polymorphism was detected by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis. The use of internal-transcribed-spacer ribosomal region restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS-RFLP did not reveal characteristic markers to differentiate isolates. However, the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region sequence analysis provided more information on polymorphism among the isolates, allowing them to be clustered by relative similarity into three large groups. Correlation was tested according to the Person's correlation. Data of our studies showed, that lower associations among groups, level of quercetinase production, or geographical origin could be observed. This study presents the production of a novel biocatalyst by B. bassiana and suggests the possible industrial application of this fungal species in large-scale biotechnological manufacture of quercetinase.

  3. [Application of genetic diversity in the researches on rodents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhu; Yang, Chun-Wen; Xu, Yan-Chun; Jin, Zhi-Min; Ma, Jian-Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Genetic diversity is the base of the species diversity and ecosystem diversity, and also the foundation for biological evolution and species differentiation. Furthermore, genetic diversity is important evidence for evaluation of biological resources of nature. The genetic diversity data from a wide variety of rodents have many complex applications. We summarized the application of rodent prevention, the origin and differentiation including evolutionary history of rodents, the potential adaptation of rodents, the dynamics of population and regulatory mechanisms, and the conservation biology of rodents. Researches in the future should focus on the systematic study on the relationships between population dynamics and genetic diversity, and long-term monitoring of genetic diversity of rodents.

  4. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure within Florida coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) germplasm using microsatellite DNA, with special emphasis on the Fiji Dwarf cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerow, Alan W; Wisser, Randall J; Brown, J Steven; Kuhn, David N; Schnell, Raymond J; Broschat, Timothy K

    2003-02-01

    Using 15 simple sequence repeat (SSR) microsatellite DNA loci, we analyzed genetic variation within Cocos nucifera germplasm collections at two locations in south Florida, representing eight cultivars. The loci were also used in a parentage analysis of progeny of the 'Fiji Dwarf' variety at both locations. A total of 67 alleles were detected, with eight the highest number at any one locus. These loci identified 83 of the 110 individual palms. Gene diversity of the 15 loci ranged from 0.778 to 0.223, with a mean of 0.574. 'Fiji Dwarf', 'Malayan Dwarf', 'Green Niño' and 'Red Spicata' cultivars resolve as distinct clusters in a neighbor joining tree using modified Rogers distance, while the tall varieties form two aggregates. The highest gene diversity was found in the tall cultivars (H = 0.583 cumulatively), and the lowest in the 'Malayan Dwarf' (H = 0.202). After the tall coconuts, the 'Fiji Dwarf' was most genetically diverse (H = 0.436), and had the largest number of unique alleles. Genetic identity is highest among the 'Malayan Dwarf' phenotypes, and between the tall varieties. The 'Red Malayan Dwarf' is genetically distinct from the 'Green' and 'Yellow Malayan Dwarf' phenotypes, which cannot be distinguished with the SSR loci used. Off-type 'Malayan Dwarf' phenotypes (putative hybrids with talls) can be identified genotypically. Parentage analyses of 30 'Fiji Dwarf' progeny propagated from five adults surrounded by other cultivars estimate that only 20% of the progeny were out-crossed to the other varieties, while 40-46% were possible selfs. This suggests that a seed-production orchard of the variety maintained at reasonable distance from other varieties, will likely yield only 'Fiji Dwarf' genotypes. Our data are discussed in the context of hypotheses of coconut dissemination around the world.

  5. Analysis of viral (zucchini yellow mosaic virus) genetic diversity during systemic movement through a Cucurbita pepo vine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, J P; Simmons, H E; Holmes, E C; Stephenson, A G

    2014-10-13

    Determining the extent and structure of intra-host genetic diversity and the magnitude and impact of population bottlenecks is central to understanding the mechanisms of viral evolution. To determine the nature of viral evolution following systemic movement through a plant, we performed deep sequencing of 23 leaves that grew sequentially along a single Cucurbita pepo vine that was infected with zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), and on a leaf that grew in on a side branch. Strikingly, of 112 genetic (i.e. sub-consensus) variants observed in the data set as a whole, only 22 were found in multiple leaves. Similarly, only three of the 13 variants present in the inoculating population were found in the subsequent leaves on the vine. Hence, it appears that systemic movement is characterized by sequential population bottlenecks, although not sufficient to reduce the population to a single virion as multiple variants were consistently transmitted between leaves. In addition, the number of variants within a leaf increases as a function of distance from the inoculated (source) leaf, suggesting that the circulating sap may serve as a continual source of virus. Notably, multiple mutational variants were observed in the cylindrical inclusion (CI) protein (known to be involved in both cell-to-cell and systemic movement of the virus) that were present in multiple (19/24) leaf samples. These mutations resulted in a conformational change, suggesting that they might confer a selective advantage in systemic movement within the vine. Overall, these data reveal that bottlenecks occur during systemic movement, that variants circulate in the phloem sap throughout the infection process, and that important conformational changes in CI protein may arise during individual infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic diversity in Hemileia vastatrix based on RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, M Manuela C; Ribeiro, Ana; Várzea, Vítor M P; Rodrigues, Carlos J

    2005-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used to assess the genetic structure of Hemileia vastatrix populations. Forty-five rust isolates with different virulence spectra and from different hosts and geographical regions were analyzed. Out of 45 bands, generated with three RAPD primers, 35 (78%) were polymorphic and scored as molecular markers. Cluster analysis exhibits unstructured variability of this pathogen with regard to physiological race, geographical origin or host. The genotypic diversity (H') inferred from Shannon's index was higher than gene diversity (Ht), suggesting that diversity is distributed among clonal lineages. Estimates of gene diversity in Africa and Asia populations were higher in total (Ht) as compared to within population diversity (Hs). Genetic differentiation was considerable among coffee rust isolates from Africa (Gst = 0.865) and Asia (Gst = 0.768) but not among isolates from South America (Gst = 0.266). We concluded that genetic diversity in H. vastatrix was moderately low and that the genetic differentiation among populations shows that asexual reproduction is likely to play an important role in the population biology of this fungus. This should be taken into account for the development of breeding programs.

  7. Development of novel EST-SSRs from sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn) and their utilization for the genetic diversity analysis of N. nucifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lei; Xia, Qiuju; Quan, Zhiwu; Liu, Honggao; Ke, Weidong; Ding, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) provide a valuable resource for the development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) or microsatellite markers. This study identified SSRs within ESTs from Nelumbo nucifera (lotus or sacred lotus), developed markers from them, and assessed the potential of those markers for diversity analysis. Within 2207 ESTs from N. nucifera downloaded from GenBank, 1483 unigenes (303 contigs and 1180 singletons) were identified. After eliminating for redundancy, 125 SSR-containing ESTs were derived, and 71 unique SSRs were detected with an average density of one SSR per 13.04 kb. Dinucleotide repeats were the dominant motif in N. nucifera, whereas the sequences AG/TC/GA/CT, AAG/TTC/GAT/AGA, and AAAGCC were the most frequent of di-, tri-, and hexanucleotide motifs, respectively. The AG/TC (40.85%) and AAG (5.63%) motifs were predominant for the di- and trinucleotide repeats, respectively. Sixty-two SSR-containing ESTs were suitable for primer design. From these sequences, 23 EST-SSR markers were developed and were applied to 39 cultivated varieties of N. nucifera, 10 accessions of wild N. nucifera, and 1 accession of Nelumbo lutea (American lotus). Genetic diversity and genetic relationships were examined by constructing unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average dendrograms and principal coordinates analysis plots based on SSR polymorphisms. Results indicated genetic differentiation between cultivated and wild lotus and between seed lotus cultivars and rhizome lotus cultivars. These EST-SSR markers will be useful for further studies of the evolution and diversity of Nelumbo.

  8. Genetic diversity among varieties and wild species accessions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... Key words: Genetic diversity, SSR, Pisum, cluster analysis, assignment test. INTRODUCTION ... phological characters and (or) molecular techniques (Ellis et al., 1998; Hoey et ..... Associations among 57 wild Pisum accessions and 20 varieties were ..... repeats (SSRs) in cultivated Brassica species. Theor.

  9. Genetic diversity of Actinobacillus lignieresii isolates from different hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokotovic, Branko; Angen, Øystein; Bisgaard, Magne

    2011-01-01

    Genetic diversity detected by analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) of 54 Actinobacilus lignieresii isolates from different hosts and geographic localities is described. On the basis of variances in AFLP profiles, the strains were grouped in two major clusters; one comprisin...

  10. Development and characterization of novel EST-SSR markers and their application for genetic diversity analysis of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mornkham, T; Wangsomnuk, P P; Mo, X C; Francisco, F O; Gao, L Z; Kurzweil, H

    2016-10-24

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) is a perennial tuberous plant and a traditional inulin-rich crop in Thailand. It has become the most important source of inulin and has great potential for use in chemical and food industries. In this study, expressed sequence tag (EST)-based simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed from 40,362 Jerusalem artichoke ESTs retrieved from the NCBI database. Among 23,691 non-redundant identified ESTs, 1949 SSR motifs harboring 2 to 6 nucleotides with varied repeat motifs were discovered from 1676 assembled sequences. Seventy-nine primer pairs were generated from EST sequences harboring SSR motifs. Our results show that 43 primers are polymorphic for the six studied populations, while the remaining 36 were either monomorphic or failed to amplify. These 43 SSR loci exhibited a high level of genetic diversity among populations, with allele numbers varying from 2 to 7, with an average of 3.95 alleles per loci. Heterozygosity ranged from 0.096 to 0.774, with an average of 0.536; polymorphic index content ranged from 0.096 to 0.854, with an average of 0.568. Principal component analysis and neighbor-joining analysis revealed that the six populations could be divided into six clusters. Our results indicate that these newly characterized EST-SSR markers may be useful in the exploration of genetic diversity and range expansion of the Jerusalem artichoke, and in cross-species application for the genus Helianthus.

  11. Global genetic diversity of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria-Soria, Andrea; Ayala, Diego; Bheecarry, Ambicadutt; Calderon-Arguedas, Olger; Chadee, Dave D; Chiappero, Marina; Coetzee, Maureen; Elahee, Khouaildi Bin; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Kamal, Hany A; Kamgang, Basile; Khater, Emad I M; Kramer, Laura D; Kramer, Vicki; Lopez-Solis, Alma; Lutomiah, Joel; Martins, Ademir; Micieli, Maria Victoria; Paupy, Christophe; Ponlawat, Alongkot; Rahola, Nil; Rasheed, Syed Basit; Richardson, Joshua B; Saleh, Amag A; Sanchez-Casas, Rosa Maria; Seixas, Gonçalo; Sousa, Carla A; Tabachnick, Walter J; Troyo, Adriana; Powell, Jeffrey R

    2016-11-01

    Mosquitoes, especially Aedes aegypti, are becoming important models for studying invasion biology. We characterized genetic variation at 12 microsatellite loci in 79 populations of Ae. aegypti from 30 countries in six continents, and used them to infer historical and modern patterns of invasion. Our results support the two subspecies Ae. aegypti formosus and Ae. aegypti aegypti as genetically distinct units. Ae. aegypti aegypti populations outside Africa are derived from ancestral African populations and are monophyletic. The two subspecies co-occur in both East Africa (Kenya) and West Africa (Senegal). In rural/forest settings (Rabai District of Kenya), the two subspecies remain genetically distinct, whereas in urban settings, they introgress freely. Populations outside Africa are highly genetically structured likely due to a combination of recent founder effects, discrete discontinuous habitats and low migration rates. Ancestral populations in sub-Saharan Africa are less genetically structured, as are the populations in Asia. Introduction of Ae. aegypti to the New World coinciding with trans-Atlantic shipping in the 16th to 18th centuries was followed by its introduction to Asia in the late 19th century from the New World or from now extinct populations in the Mediterranean Basin. Aedes mascarensis is a genetically distinct sister species to Ae. aegypti s.l. This study provides a reference database of genetic diversity that can be used to determine the likely origin of new introductions that occur regularly for this invasive species. The genetic uniqueness of many populations and regions has important implications for attempts to control Ae. aegypti, especially for the methods using genetic modification of populations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Gene diversity and genetic variation in lung flukes (genus Paragonimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, David; Nawa, Yukifumi; Mitreva, Makedonka; Doanh, Pham Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    Paragonimiasis caused by lung flukes (genus Paragonimus) is a neglected disease occurring in Asia, Africa and the Americas. The genus is species-rich, ancient and widespread. Genetic diversity is likely to be considerable, but investigation of this remains confined to a few populations of a few species. In recent years, studies of genetic diversity have moved from isoenzyme analysis to molecular phylogenetic analysis based on selected DNA sequences. The former offered better resolution of questions relating to allelic diversity and gene flow, whereas the latter is more suitable for questions relating to molecular taxonomy and phylogeny. A picture is emerging of a highly diverse taxon of parasites, with the greatest diversity found in eastern and southern Asia where ongoing speciation might be indicated by the presence of several species complexes. Diversity of lung flukes in Africa and the Americas is very poorly sampled. Functional molecules that might be of value for immunodiagnosis, or as targets for medical intervention, are of great interest. Characterisation of these from Paragonimus species has been ongoing for a number of years. However, the imminent release of genomic and transcriptomic data for several species of Paragonimus will dramatically increase the rate of discovery of such molecules, and illuminate their diversity within and between species.

  13. Genetic diversity of Hungarian Maize dwarf mosaic virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Gyöngyvér; Balázs, Ervin; Petrik, Kathrin

    2010-04-01

    The genetic diversity of the coat-protein (CP) region and the untranslated C-terminal region (3'UTR) of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) was analyzed to evaluate the variability between isolates (inter-isolate sequence diversity). The results of inter-isolate sequence diversity analysis showed that the diversity of the MDMV CP gene is fairly high (p-distance: up to 0.136). During sequence analysis, a 13 amino-acid residue insertion and an 8 amino-acid residue deletion were found within the N-terminal region of the CP gene. The phylogenetic analysis showed that-unlike other potyvirus species in this subgroup-the MDMV isolates could not be distinguished on the basis of their host plants or geographic origins.

  14. Managing genetic diversity and society needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur da Silva Mariante

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Most livestock are not indigenous to Brazil. Several animal species were considered domesticated in the pre-colonial period, since the indigenous people manage them as would be typical of European livestock production. For over 500 years there have been periodic introductions resulting in the wide range of genetic diversity that for centuries supported domestic animal production in the country. Even though these naturalized breeds have acquired adaptive traits after centuries of natural selection, they have been gradually replaced by exotic breeds, to such an extent, that today they are in danger of extinction To avoid further loss of this important genetic material, in 1983 Embrapa Genetic Resources and Biotechnology decided to include conservation of animal genetic resources among its priorities. In this paper we describe the effort to genetically characterize these populations, as a tool to ensure their genetic variability. To effectively save the threatened local breeds of livestock it is important to find a niche market for each one, reinserting them in production systems. They have to be utilized in order to be conserved. And there is no doubt that due to their adaptive traits, the Brazilian local breeds of livestock can play an important role in animal production, to meet society needs.

  15. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Ana

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the population structure of Plasmodium species through genetic diversity studies can assist in the design of more effective malaria control strategies, particularly in vaccine development. Central America is an area where malaria is a public health problem, but little is known about the genetic diversity of the parasite’s circulating species. This study aimed to investigate the allelic frequency and molecular diversity of five surface antigens in field isolates from Honduras. Methods Five molecular markers were analysed to determine the genotypes of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum from endemic areas in Honduras. Genetic diversity of ama-1, msp-1 and csp was investigated for P. vivax, and msp-1 and msp-2 for P. falciparum. Allelic frequencies were calculated and sequence analysis performed. Results and conclusion A high genetic diversity was observed within Plasmodium isolates from Honduras. A different number of genotypes were elucidated: 41 (n = 77 for pvama-1; 23 (n = 84 for pvcsp; and 23 (n = 35 for pfmsp-1. Pvcsp sequences showed VK210 as the only subtype present in Honduran isolates. Pvmsp-1 (F2 was the most polymorphic marker for P. vivax isolates while pvama-1 was least variable. All three allelic families described for pfmsp-1 (n = 30 block 2 (K1, MAD20, and RO33, and both allelic families described for the central domain of pfmsp-2 (n = 11 (3D7 and FC27 were detected. However, K1 and 3D7 allelic families were predominant. All markers were randomly distributed across the country and no geographic correlation was found. To date, this is the most complete report on molecular characterization of P. vivax and P. falciparum field isolates in Honduras with regards to genetic diversity. These results indicate that P. vivax and P. falciparum parasite populations are highly diverse in Honduras despite the low level of transmission.

  16. Genetic diversity of natural Hepatacodium miconioides populations in Zhejiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Junmin; JIN Zexin

    2006-01-01

    Hepatacodium miconioides is the Class Ⅱ protected plant species in China.This paper studies the genetic diversity and differentiation of its nine natural populations in Zhejiang Province by using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique.Twelve random primers were selected in the amplification,and 164 repetitive loci were produced.The percentage of polymorphic loci in each H.miconioides population ranged from 14.60% to 27.44%,with an average of 20.73%.Among the test populations,Kuochangshan had the highest percentage of polymorphic loci,Simingshan took the second place,and Guanyinping had the lowest percentage.As estimated by Shannon index,the genetic diversity within H.miconioides populations accounted for 27.28% of the total genetic diversity,while that among H.miconioides populations accounted for 72.72%.The genetic differentiation among H.miconioides populations as estimated by Nei index was 0.715,7.This figure was generally consistent with that estimated by Shannon index,i.e.,the genetic differentiation among populations was relatively high,but that within populations was relatively low.The gene flow among H.miconioides populations was relatively low (0.198,7),and the genetic similarity ranged from 0.655,7 to 0.811,9,with an average of 0.730,6.The highest genetic distance among populations was 0.422,9,while the lowest was 0.208,3.All the results showed that there was a distinct genetic differentiation among H.miconioides populations.The genetic distance matrix of nine test populations was calculated using this method,and the clustering analysis was made using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA).The cluster analysis suggested that the ninepopulations of H.miconioides in Zhejiang Province could be divided into two groups,the eastern Zhejiang group and the western Zhejiang group.

  17. 菠萝蜜遗传多样性的ISSR分析%Analysis of genetic diversity of Jackfruit germplasm using ISSR marking method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶春海; 王耀辉; 李映志; 丰锋

    2009-01-01

    ISSR (inter-simple sequence repeat)markers were used to analyze genetic diversity in 76 accessions of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lain.). Among 477 bands produced by 24 ISSR primers, 427 were polymorphic (accounted for 89.52%). The average PIC (pelymorphism information content) was 0.23. These 76 jackfruit accessions could be discriminated by the 24 ISSR primers. Genetic distance analysis revealed that, low genetic diversity existed in the jackfruit germplasm studied, and the genetic similarity coefficient ranged from 0.626 to 0.945, with an average of 0.775. Cluster analysis showed that 4 groups could be clustered at a genetic distance coefficient of 0.752. The results indicated that, 2 accessions from Tropical Plant Garden, WJ2 and GSYWJ1, were genetically different from other accessions. Accessions of soft flesh type and firm flesh type could not be discriminated. Accessions collected from different sources could form independent clusters, while accessions collected from different areas of Leizhou peninsula could not form independent clusters.%用ISSR标记方法对76份菠萝蜜(Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.)种质资源DNA的遗传多样性进行了检测.24个引物共检测到477条带,其中427条具多态性(占89052%),平均PIC为0.23,24个引物能把76份种质完全区分开来.遗传距离分析结果显示供试种质的遗传多样性较低,在DNA水平上的遗传相似系数为0.626~0.945,平均为0.775.聚类分析表明,76份菠萝蜜材料在遗传距离系数为0.752处可分为4大类,其中热带植物园的种质WJ2和GSYWJ1与其他种质的遗传距离相对较大,干胞和湿类型不能独立聚类.另外各地区的种质与雷州半岛种质明显分开聚类,而雷州半岛各地区的种质混杂聚类在一起,不能按地区单独聚类.

  18. Molecular Diversity and Genetic Structure of Durum Wheat Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GULNAR SHIKHSEYIDOVA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To determine the genetic diversity of durum wheat, 41 accessions from Morocco, Ethiopia, Turkey, Lebanon, Kazakhstan, China, and Mongolia were analyzed through Inter-Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR molecular markers. Out of the used twenty primers, 15 primers that included a considerable polymorphism were selected for the analyses. Among the genotypes under study, 163 fragments (73.7% were polymorph. Several indexes were used to determine the most appropriate primers. While UBC812, UBC864, UBC840, and UBC808 primers were among those markers which produced the highest number of bands and polymorphic bands, they also dedicated the highest rate of polymorphic index content (PIC. These primers also possessed the highest amounts of effective multiplex ratio (EMR and marker index (MI. Therefore, these primers can be recommended for genetic evaluation of the durum wheat. The results of cluster analysis and principle component analysis indicated that the observed genetic diversity in wheat materials under study is geographically structured. The results also indicated that the genetic diversity index based on ISSR markers was higher for Turkey, Lebanon, Morocco, and Ethiopia accessions than for other countries. The high level of polymorphism in this collections durum wheat would agree with the suggestion that Fertile Crescent and parts of Africa are first possible diversity center of this crop.

  19. Genetic diversity in wild populations of Paulownia fortune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H Y; Ru, G X; Zhang, J; Lu, Y Y

    2014-11-01

    The genetic diversities of 16 Paulownia fortunei populations involving 143 individuals collected from 6 provinces in China were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). A total of 9 primer pairs with 1169 polymorphic loci were screened out, and each pair possessed 132 bands on average. The percentage of polymorphic bands (98.57%), the effective number of alleles (1.2138-1.2726), Nei's genetic diversity (0.1566-0.1887), and Shannon's information index (0.2692-0.3117) indicated a plentiful genetic diversity and different among Paulownia fortunei populations. The genetic differentiation coefficient between populations was 0.2386, while the gene flow was 1.0954, and the low gene exchange promoted genetic differentiation. Analysis of variance indicated that genetic variation mainly occurred within populations (81.62% of total variation) rather than among populations (18.38%). The 16 populations were divided by unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means (UPGMA) into 4 groups with obvious regionalism, in which the populations with close geographical locations (latitude) were clustered together.

  20. Analysis of genetic diversity of Brassica rapa var. chinensis using ISSR markers and development of SCAR marker specific for Fragrant Bok Choy, a product of geographic indication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X L; Zhang, Y M; Xue, J Y; Li, M M; Lin, Y B; Sun, X Q; Hang, Y Y

    2016-04-25

    Non-heading Chinese cabbage [Brassica rapa var. chinensis (Linnaeus) Kitamura] is a popular vegetable and is also used as a medicinal plant in traditional Chinese medicine. Fragrant Bok Choy is a unique accession of non-heading Chinese cabbage and a product of geographic indication certified by the Ministry of Agriculture of China, which is noted for its rich aromatic flavor. However, transitional and overlapping morphological traits can make it difficult to distinguish this accession from other non-heading Chinese cabbages. This study aimed to develop a molecular method for efficient identification of Fragrant Bok Choy. Genetic diversity analysis, based on inter-simple sequence repeat molecular markers, was conducted for 11 non-heading Chinese cabbage accessions grown in the Yangtze River Delta region. Genetic similarity coefficients between the 11 accessions ranged from 0.5455 to 0.8961, and the genetic distance ranged from 0.0755 to 0.4475. Cluster analysis divided the 11 accessions into two major groups. The primer ISSR-840 amplified a fragment specific for Fragrant Bok Choy. A pair of specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) primers based on this fragment amplified a target band in Fragrant Bok Choy individuals, but no band was detected in individuals of other accessions. In conclusion, this study has developed an efficient strategy for authentication of Fragrant Bok Choy. The SCAR marker described here will facilitate the conservation and utilization of this unique non-heading Chinese cabbage germplasm resource.

  1. Genetic Diversity Of Plukenetia Volubilis L. Assessed By ISSR Markers*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocelák M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity and genetic relationships in 173 sacha inchi samples were analyzed using ISSR markers. Thirty ISSR primers were used, only 8 showed variability in tested samples. ISSR fragments ranged from 200 to 2500 bp. The mean number of bands per primer was 12 and the average number of polymorphic bands per primer was 11. The lowest percentages of polymorphic bands (27%, gene diversity (0.103, and Shannon’s information index (0.15 were exhibited by the Santa Lucia population, which was also geographically most distant. This fact may be attributed to a very small size of this group. In contrast, the Dos de Mayo population exhibited the highest percentage of polymorphic bands (78%, and the Santa Cruz population the highest Nei’s gene diversity index (0.238 and Shannon’s information index (0.357. The obtained level of genetic variability was 36% among tested populations and 64% within populations. Although the diversity indices were low, a cluster analysis revealed 8 clusters containing mainly samples belonging to individual populations. Principal coordinate analysis clearly distinguished Chumbaquihui, Pucallpa, Dos de Mayo, and Aguas de Oro populations, the others were intermixed. The obtained results indicated the level of genetic diversity present in this location of Peru, although it is influenced by anthropological aspects and independent on the geographical distances.

  2. Repertoire of SSRs in the Castor Bean Genome and Their Utilization in Genetic Diversity Analysis in Jatropha curcas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Castor bean and Jatropha contain seed oil of industrial importance, share taxonomical and biochemical similarities, which can be explored for identifying SSRs in the whole genome sequence of castor bean and utilized in Jatropha curcas. Whole genome analysis of castor bean identified 5,80,986 SSRs with a frequency of 1 per 680 bp. Genomic distribution of SSRs revealed that 27% were present in the non-genic region whereas 73% were also present in the putative genic regions with 26% in 5′UTRs, 25% in introns, 16% in 3′UTRs and 6% in the exons. Dinucleotide repeats were more frequent in introns, 5′UTRs and 3′UTRs whereas trinucleotide repeats were predominant in the exons. The transferability of randomly selected 302 SSRs, from castor bean to 49 J. curcas genotypes and 8 Jatropha species other than J. curcas, showed that 211 (~70% amplified on Jatropha out of which 7.58% showed polymorphisms in J. curcas genotypes and 12.32% in Jatropha species. The higher rate of transferability of SSR markers from castor bean to Jatropha coupled with a good level of PIC (polymorphic information content value (0.2 in J. curcas genotypes and 0.6 in Jatropha species suggested that SSRs would be useful in germplasm analysis, linkage mapping, diversity studies and phylogenetic relationships, and so forth, in J. curcas as well as other Jatropha species.

  3. Repertoire of SSRs in the Castor Bean Genome and Their Utilization in Genetic Diversity Analysis in Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arti; Chauhan, Rajinder Singh

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean and Jatropha contain seed oil of industrial importance, share taxonomical and biochemical similarities, which can be explored for identifying SSRs in the whole genome sequence of castor bean and utilized in Jatropha curcas. Whole genome analysis of castor bean identified 5,80,986 SSRs with a frequency of 1 per 680 bp. Genomic distribution of SSRs revealed that 27% were present in the non-genic region whereas 73% were also present in the putative genic regions with 26% in 5'UTRs, 25% in introns, 16% in 3'UTRs and 6% in the exons. Dinucleotide repeats were more frequent in introns, 5'UTRs and 3'UTRs whereas trinucleotide repeats were predominant in the exons. The transferability of randomly selected 302 SSRs, from castor bean to 49 J. curcas genotypes and 8 Jatropha species other than J. curcas, showed that 211 (∼70%) amplified on Jatropha out of which 7.58% showed polymorphisms in J. curcas genotypes and 12.32% in Jatropha species. The higher rate of transferability of SSR markers from castor bean to Jatropha coupled with a good level of PIC (polymorphic information content) value (0.2 in J. curcas genotypes and 0.6 in Jatropha species) suggested that SSRs would be useful in germplasm analysis, linkage mapping, diversity studies and phylogenetic relationships, and so forth, in J. curcas as well as other Jatropha species.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis, genetic diversity and relationships between the recently segregated species of Corynandra and Cleoserrata from the genus Cleome using DNA barcoding and molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboli, Asif Shabodin; Patil, Swapnil Mahadeo; Gholave, Avinash Ramchandra; Kadam, Suhas Kishor; Kotibhaskar, Shreya Vijaykumar; Yadav, Shrirang Ramchandra; Govindwar, Sanjay Prabhu

    2016-01-01

    Cleome is the largest genus in the family Cleomaceae and it is known for its various medicinal properties. Recently, some species from the Cleome genus (Cleome viscosa, Cleome chelidonii, Cleome felina and Cleome speciosa) are split into genera Corynandra (Corynandra viscosa, Corynandra chelidonii, Corynandra felina), and Cleoserrata (Cleoserrata speciosa). The objective of this study was to obtain DNA barcodes for these species for their accurate identification and determining phylogenetic relationships. Out of 10 screened barcoding regions, rbcL, matK and ITS1 regions showed higher PCR efficiency and sequencing success. This study added matK, rbcL and ITS1 barcodes for the identification of Corynandra chelidonii, Corynandra felina, Cleome simplicifolia and Cleome aspera species in existing barcode data. Corynandra chelidonii and Corynandra felina species belong to the Corynandra genus, but they are not grouped with the Corynandra viscosa species, however clustered with the Cleome species. Molecular marker analysis showed 100% polymorphism among the studied plant samples. Diversity indices for molecular markers were ranged from He=0.1115-0.1714 and I=0.2268-0.2700, which indicates a significant amount of genetic diversity among studied species. Discrimination of the Cleome and Corynandra species from Cleoserrata speciosa was obtained by two RAPD primers (OPA-4 and RAPD-17) and two ISSR primers (ISSR-1 and ISSR-2). RAPD and ISSR markers are useful for the genetic characterization of these studied species. The present investigation will be helpful to understand the relationships of Cleome lineages with Corynandra and Cleoserrata species.

  5. Multilocus sequence typing and rtxA toxin gene sequencing analysis of Kingella kingae isolates demonstrates genetic diversity and international clones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Basmaci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kingella kingae, a normal component of the upper respiratory flora, is being increasingly recognized as an important invasive pathogen in young children. Genetic diversity of this species has not been studied. METHODS: We analyzed 103 strains from different countries and clinical origins by a new multilocus sequence-typing (MLST schema. Putative virulence gene rtxA, encoding an RTX toxin, was also sequenced, and experimental virulence of representative strains was assessed in a juvenile-rat model. RESULTS: Thirty-six sequence-types (ST and nine ST-complexes (STc were detected. The main STc 6, 14 and 23 comprised 23, 17 and 20 strains respectively, and were internationally distributed. rtxA sequencing results were mostly congruent with MLST, and showed horizontal transfer events. Of interest, all members of the distantly related ST-6 (n = 22 and ST-5 (n = 4 harboured a 33 bp duplication or triplication in their rtxA sequence, suggesting that this genetic trait arose through selective advantage. The animal model revealed significant differences in virulence among strains of the species. CONCLUSION: MLST analysis reveals international spread of ST-complexes and will help to decipher acquisition and evolution of virulence traits and diversity of pathogenicity among K. kingae strains, for which an experimental animal model is now available.

  6. Assessment of genetic diversity in Cattleya intermedia Lindl. (Orchidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Barbosa Machado Neto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Orchids are valuable pot plants and Cattleya intermedia is a promising species underused in breeding programs. Recently, breeding work with this species produced superior plants that are believed to be not the true species owing to the morphological differences from wild plants. The aim of this study was to estimate the level of genetic diversity and interrelationships between wild and bred Cattleya intermedia collected at three different Brazilian states and from commercial breeders with RAPD markers. A total of 65 polymorphic bands were used to generate a genetic distance matrix. No specific groupings were revealed by the cluster analysis as bred materials were not different from wild plants. The genetic differentiation (F ST = 0.01626 was very low indicating a high gene flow in C. intermedia due to artificial crosses and a high differentiation between populations. The genetic variability available within this species is high enough to allow genetic progress in flower shape and size.

  7. Genetic diversity and molecular genealogy of local silkworm varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouhe Du

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the genetic diversity and systematic differentiation pattern among silkworm varieties, aiming to guide hybridization breeding, we sequenced a total of 72 Bmamy2 gene fragments from local silkworm varieties. The analysis of nucleotide sequence diversity and systematic differentiation indicated that there was rich genovariation in the sequencing region of Bmamy2 gene, and the base mutation rate is 5.6–8.2%, the haplotype diversity is 0.8294, and the nucleotide diversity is 0.0236±0.00122, suggesting Bmamy2 being a better marking gene with rich nucleotide sequence diversity, based on which the genetic diversity among different local silkworm varieties can be identified. The same heredity population structure is proclaimed by several analysis methods that every clade consisting of varieties from different geosystems and ecological types, while the varieties from the same geosystem and ecotype belong to different clades in the phylogeny. There is no population structure pattern that different varieties claded together according to geosystem or ecotype. It can be speculated that the silkworm origins from mixture of kinds of several voltinism mulberry silkworm, Bombyx mandarina, while the domestication events took place in several regions, from which the domesticated mulberry silkworms are all devoting to the domesticated silkworm population of today.

  8. Genetic Diversity of Koala Retroviral Envelopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqin Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process.

  9. Genetic Diversity of Koala Retroviral Envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenqin; Gorman, Kristen; Santiago, Jan Clement; Kluska, Kristen; Eiden, Maribeth V.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A) were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process. PMID:25789509

  10. Polyphenols in whole rice grain: genetic diversity and health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yafang; Bao, Jinsong

    2015-08-01

    Polyphenols, such as phenolic acid, anthocyanin and proanthocyanidins, have both nutraceutical properties and functional significance for human health. Identification of polyphenolic compounds and investigation of their genetic basis among diverse rice genotypes provides the basis for the improvement of the nutraceutical properties of whole rice grain. This review focuses on current information on the identification, genetic diversity, formation and distribution patterns of the phenolic acid, anthocyanin, and proanthocyanidins in whole rice grain. The genetic analysis of polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity allows the identification of several candidate genes or quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for polyphenol variation, which may be useful in improvement of these phytochemicals by breeding. Future challenges such as how to mitigate the effects of climate change while improving nutraceutical properties in whole grain, and how to use new technology to develop new rice high in nutraceutical properties are also presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Morphological and genetic diversity of symbiotic cyanobacteria from cycads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Muralitharan, Gangatharan; Sundaramoorthy, Mariappan; Ramamoorthy, Rengasamy; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Akbarsha, Mohamed Abdulkadar; Gunasekaran, Muthukumaran

    2010-06-01

    The morphological and genetic diversity of cyanobacteria associated with cycads was examined using PCR amplification techniques and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Eighteen symbiotic cyanobacteria were isolated from different cycad species. One of the symbiotic isolates was a species of Calothrix, a genus not previously reported to form symbioses with Cycadaceae family, and the remainder were Nostoc spp. Axenic cyanobacterial strains were compared by DNA amplification using PCR with either short arbitrary primers or primers specific for the repetitive sequences. Based on fingerprint patterns and phenograms, it was revealed that cyanobacterial symbionts exhibit important genetic diversity among host plants, both within and between cycad populations. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that most of the symbiotic cyanobacterial isolates fell into well-separated clades.

  12. Optimization of DNA isolation and PCR protocol for analysis and evaluation of genetic diversity of the medicinal plant, Anemopsis californica using RAPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizette Del-Toro-Sánchez, C; Villaseñor-Alvarado, S; Zurita-Martínez, Florentina; Castellanos-Hernández, O A; Rodríguez-Sahagún, Araceli; Isabel Torres-Morán, M; Rojas-Bravo, D; Gutiérrez-Lomelí, M

    2013-06-01

    Anemopsis californica is a perennial herbaceous plant that has been utilized as a medicinal plant for the treatment of various diseases. The present work was carried out with the objective of optimizing a method of extraction of the genomic DNA of A. californica and a PCR protocol and later to evaluate the existing genetic diversity among the genotypes deriving from different origins. For DNA extraction, we tested four procedures: with the CTA B-2 protocol, we obtained the highest yield (61.5±2.2 μg DNA/g of leaf tissues) and the best quality (A260/280 1.83±0.022). To estimate genetic variability, we utilized the randomly amplified polymorphism DNA (RAPD) technique, employing 20 oligonucleotides, of which only 18 generated reproducible banding patterns, producing 123 polymorphic bands generated, thus obtaining a polymorphism rate of 93.93% among the genotypes analyzed. The Jaccard similarity coefficient generated a variation ranging from 0.325-0.921, indicating a high level of genetic variation among the studied genotypes. An Unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) group analysis indicated six distinct groups. The present optimized method for DNA isolation and RAPD protocol may serve as an efficient tool for further molecular studies.

  13. Genetic Variation, Heritability, and Diversity Analysis of Upland Rice (Oryza sativa L. Genotypes Based on Quantitative Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mst. Tuhina-Khatun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Upland rice is important for sustainable crop production to meet future food demands. The expansion in area of irrigated rice faces limitations due to water scarcity resulting from climate change. Therefore, this research aimed to identify potential genotypes and suitable traits of upland rice germplasm for breeding programmes. Forty-three genotypes were evaluated in a randomised complete block design with three replications. All genotypes exhibited a wide and significant variation for 22 traits. The highest phenotypic and genotypic coefficient of variation was recorded for the number of filled grains/panicle and yields/plant (g. The highest heritability was found for photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2, and number of filled grains/panicle and yields/plant (g. Cluster analysis based on 22 traits grouped the 43 rice genotypes into five clusters. Cluster II was the largest and consisted of 20 genotypes mostly originating from the Philippines. The first four principle components of 22 traits accounted for about 72% of the total variation and indicated a wide variation among the genotypes. The selected best trait of the number of filled grains/panicle and yields/plant (g, which showed high heritability and high genetic advance, could be used as a selection criterion for hybridisation programmes in the future.

  14. Genetic Variation, Heritability, and Diversity Analysis of Upland Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Genotypes Based on Quantitative Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhina-Khatun, Mst; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Rafii Yusop, Mohd; Wong, M Y; Salleh, Faezah M; Ferdous, Jannatul

    2015-01-01

    Upland rice is important for sustainable crop production to meet future food demands. The expansion in area of irrigated rice faces limitations due to water scarcity resulting from climate change. Therefore, this research aimed to identify potential genotypes and suitable traits of upland rice germplasm for breeding programmes. Forty-three genotypes were evaluated in a randomised complete block design with three replications. All genotypes exhibited a wide and significant variation for 22 traits. The highest phenotypic and genotypic coefficient of variation was recorded for the number of filled grains/panicle and yields/plant (g). The highest heritability was found for photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO₂, and number of filled grains/panicle and yields/plant (g). Cluster analysis based on 22 traits grouped the 43 rice genotypes into five clusters. Cluster II was the largest and consisted of 20 genotypes mostly originating from the Philippines. The first four principle components of 22 traits accounted for about 72% of the total variation and indicated a wide variation among the genotypes. The selected best trait of the number of filled grains/panicle and yields/plant (g), which showed high heritability and high genetic advance, could be used as a selection criterion for hybridisation programmes in the future.

  15. Genetic diversity of Kenyan native oyster mushroom (Pleurotus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otieno, Ojwang D; Onyango, Calvin; Onguso, Justus Mungare; Matasyoh, Lexa G; Wanjala, Bramwel W; Wamalwa, Mark; Harvey, Jagger J W

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Pleurotus, also commonly known as oyster mushroom, are well known for their socioeconomic and biotechnological potentials. Despite being one of the most important edible fungi, the scarce information about the genetic diversity of the species in natural populations has limited their sustainable utilization. A total of 71 isolates of Pleurotus species were collected from three natural populations: 25 isolates were obtained from Kakamega forest, 34 isolates from Arabuko Sokoke forest and 12 isolates from Mount Kenya forest. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was applied to thirteen isolates of locally grown Pleurotus species obtained from laboratory samples using five primer pair combinations. AFLP markers and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of the ribosomal DNA were used to estimate the genetic diversity and evaluate phylogenetic relationships, respectively, among and within populations. The five primer pair combinations generated 293 polymorphic loci across the 84 isolates. The mean genetic diversity among the populations was 0.25 with the population from Arabuko Sokoke having higher (0.27) diversity estimates compared to Mount Kenya population (0.24). Diversity between the isolates from the natural population (0.25) and commercial cultivars (0.24) did not differ significantly. However, diversity was greater within (89%; P > 0.001) populations than among populations. Homology search analysis against the GenBank database using 16 rDNA ITS sequences randomly selected from the two clades of AFLP dendrogram revealed three mushroom species: P. djamor, P. floridanus and P. sapidus; the three mushrooms form part of the diversity of Pleurotus species in Kenya. The broad diversity within the Kenyan Pleurotus species suggests the possibility of obtaining native strains suitable for commercial cultivation.

  16. A Comparative Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Structure in Jaguars (Panthera onca), Pumas (Puma concolor), and Ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) in Fragmented Landscapes of a Critical Mesoamerican Linkage Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wultsch, Claudia; Waits, Lisette P; Kelly, Marcella J

    2016-01-01

    With increasing anthropogenic impact and landscape change, terrestrial carnivore populations are becoming more fragmented. Thus, it is crucial to genetically monitor wild carnivores and quantify changes in genetic diversity and gene flow in response to these threats. This study combined the use of scat detector dogs and molecular scatology to conduct the first genetic study on wild populations of multiple Neotropical felids coexisting across a fragmented landscape in Belize, Central America. We analyzed data from 14 polymorphic microsatellite loci in 1053 scat samples collected from wild jaguars (Panthera onca), pumas (Puma concolor), and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis). We assessed levels of genetic diversity, defined potential genetic clusters, and examined gene flow for the three target species on a countrywide scale using a combination of individual- and population-based analyses. Wild felids in Belize showed moderate levels of genetic variation, with jaguars having the lowest diversity estimates (HE = 0.57 ± 0.02; AR = 3.36 ± 0.09), followed by pumas (HE = 0.57 ± 0.08; AR = 4.20 ± 0.16), and ocelots (HE = 0.63 ± 0.03; AR = 4.16 ± 0.08). We observed low to moderate levels of genetic differentiation for all three target species, with jaguars showing the lowest degree of genetic subdivision across the country, followed by ocelots and pumas. Although levels of genetic diversity and gene flow were still fairly high, we detected evidence of fine-scale genetic subdivision, indicating that levels of genetic connectivity for wild felids in Belize are likely to decrease if habitat loss and fragmentation continue at the current rate. Our study demonstrates the value of understanding fine-scale patterns of gene flow in multiple co-occurring felid species of conservation concern, which is vital for wildlife movement corridor planning and prioritizing future conservation and management efforts within human-impacted landscapes.

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Structure in Jaguars (Panthera onca, Pumas (Puma concolor, and Ocelots (Leopardus pardalis in Fragmented Landscapes of a Critical Mesoamerican Linkage Zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Wultsch

    Full Text Available With increasing anthropogenic impact and landscape change, terrestrial carnivore populations are becoming more fragmented. Thus, it is crucial to genetically monitor wild carnivores and quantify changes in genetic diversity and gene flow in response to these threats. This study combined the use of scat detector dogs and molecular scatology to conduct the first genetic study on wild populations of multiple Neotropical felids coexisting across a fragmented landscape in Belize, Central America. We analyzed data from 14 polymorphic microsatellite loci in 1053 scat samples collected from wild jaguars (Panthera onca, pumas (Puma concolor, and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis. We assessed levels of genetic diversity, defined potential genetic clusters, and examined gene flow for the three target species on a countrywide scale using a combination of individual- and population-based analyses. Wild felids in Belize showed moderate levels of genetic variation, with jaguars having the lowest diversity estimates (HE = 0.57 ± 0.02; AR = 3.36 ± 0.09, followed by pumas (HE = 0.57 ± 0.08; AR = 4.20 ± 0.16, and ocelots (HE = 0.63 ± 0.03; AR = 4.16 ± 0.08. We observed low to moderate levels of genetic differentiation for all three target species, with jaguars showing the lowest degree of genetic subdivision across the country, followed by ocelots and pumas. Although levels of genetic diversity and gene flow were still fairly high, we detected evidence of fine-scale genetic subdivision, indicating that levels of genetic connectivity for wild felids in Belize are likely to decrease if habitat loss and fragmentation continue at the current rate. Our study demonstrates the value of understanding fine-scale patterns of gene flow in multiple co-occurring felid species of conservation concern, which is vital for wildlife movement corridor planning and prioritizing future conservation and management efforts within human-impacted landscapes.

  18. Population size and time since island isolation determine genetic diversity loss in insular frog populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Supen; Zhu, Wei; Gao, Xu; Li, Xianping; Yan, Shaofei; Liu, Xuan; Yang, Ji; Gao, Zengxiang; Li, Yiming

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to loss of genetic diversity in fragmented populations is crucial for conservation measurements. Land-bridge archipelagoes offer ideal model systems for identifying the long-term effects of these factors on genetic variations in wild populations. In this study, we used nine microsatellite markers to quantify genetic diversity and differentiation of 810 pond frogs (Pelophylax nigromaculatus) from 24 islands of the Zhoushan Archipelago and three sites on nearby mainland China and estimated the effects of the island area, population size, time since island isolation, distance to the mainland and distance to the nearest larger island on reduced genetic diversity of insular populations. The mainland populations displayed higher genetic diversity than insular populations. Genetic differentiations and no obvious gene flow were detected among the frog populations on the islands. Hierarchical partitioning analysis showed that only time since island isolation (square-root-transformed) and population size (log-transformed) significantly contributed to insular genetic diversity. These results suggest that decreased genetic diversity and genetic differentiations among insular populations may have been caused by random genetic drift following isolation by rising sea levels during the Holocene. The results provide strong evidence for a relationship between retained genetic diversity and population size and time since island isolation for pond frogs on the islands, consistent with the prediction of the neutral theory for finite populations. Our study highlights the importance of the size and estimated isolation time of populations in understanding the mechanisms of genetic diversity loss and differentiation in fragmented wild populations.

  19. Extraordinary Genetic Diversity in a Wood Decay Mushroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, Maria A.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Penin, Aleksey A.; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B.; Safonova, Yana Y.; Naumenko, Sergey A.; Klepikova, Anna V.; Gerasimov, Evgeny S.; Bazykin, Georgii A.; James, Timothy Y.; Kondrashov, Alexey S.

    2015-01-01

    Populations of different species vary in the amounts of genetic diversity they possess. Nucleotide diversity π, the fraction of nucleotides that are different between two randomly chosen genotypes, has been known to range in eukaryotes between 0.0001 in Lynx lynx and 0.16 in Caenorhabditis brenneri. Here, we report the results of a comparative analysis of 24 haploid genotypes (12 from the United States and 12 from European Russia) of a split-gill fungus Schizophyllum commune. The diversity at synonymous sites is 0.20 in the American population of S. commune and 0.13 in the Russian population. This exceptionally high level of nucleotide diversity also leads to extreme amino acid diversity of protein-coding genes. Using whole-genome resequencing of 2 parental and 17 offspring haploid genotypes, we estimate that the mutation rate in S. commune is high, at 2.0 × 10−8 (95% CI: 1.1 × 10−8 to 4.1 × 10−8) per nucleotide per generation. Therefore, the high diversity of S. commune is primarily determined by its elevated mutation rate, although high effective population size likely also plays a role. Small genome size, ease of cultivation and completion of the life cycle in the laboratory, free-living haploid life stages and exceptionally high variability of S. commune make it a promising model organism for population, quantitative, and evolutionary genetics. PMID:26163667

  20. The influence of recombination on human genetic diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris C A Spencer

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In humans, the rate of recombination, as measured on the megabase scale, is positively associated with the level of genetic variation, as measured at the genic scale. Despite considerable debate, it is not clear whether these factors are causally linked or, if they are, whether this is driven by the repeated action of adaptive evolution or molecular processes such as double-strand break formation and mismatch repair. We introduce three innovations to the analysis of recombination and diversity: fine-scale genetic maps estimated from genotype experiments that identify recombination hotspots at the kilobase scale, analysis of an entire human chromosome, and the use of wavelet techniques to identify correlations acting at different scales. We show that recombination influences genetic diversity only at the level of recombination hotspots. Hotspots are also associated with local increases in GC content and the relative frequency of GC-increasing mutations but have no effect on substitution rates. Broad-scale association between recombination and diversity is explained through covariance of both factors with base composition. To our knowledge, these results are the first evidence of a direct and local influence of recombination hotspots on genetic variation and the fate of individual mutations. However, that hotspots have no influence on substitution rates suggests that they are too ephemeral on an evolutionary time scale to have a strong influence on broader scale patterns of base composition and long-term molecular evolution.

  1. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure in a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) germplasm collection based on single nucleotide polymorphism markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T; Zou, Q D; Qi, S Y; Wang, X F; Wu, Y Y; Liu, N; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Z J; Li, H T

    2016-07-29

    Knowledge of genetic diversity is important to assist breeders in the selection of parental materials and in the design of breeding programs. In this study, we genotyped 348 inbred tomato lines, representing vintage and contemporary fresh-market varieties, by using 52 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); 45 of these were found to be polymorphic. The average minor allele frequency and unbiased expected heterozygosity were 0.315 and 0.356, respectively. Population structure analysis revealed that contemporary germplasm could be distinctly divided into six subpopulations representing three market classes and breeding programs (pink, green, and red). Vintage germplasm could be separated into at least two subpopulations, and more admixtures were found in vintage lines than in contemporary lines. These findings indicate that contemporary inbred lines are more diversified than vintage inbred lines. AMOVA of vintage and contemporary lines was performed. A significant difference was found (P tomato lines and to select elite inbred lines, which will accelerate the breeding process.

  2. Intra-and inter-population genetic diversity at the HLA-DQA1 locus and their implications for parentage analysis and human identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, F. [Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, MX (United States)]|[Univ. of Texas Houston Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cerda-Flores, R. [Univ. of Texas Houston Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)]|[Centro de Investigacion Biomedica del Noreste, Monterrey, MX (United States); Zhong, Y. [Univ. of Texas Houston Health Science Center, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    HLA-DQA1 locus, studied by PCR-based sequence specific oligonucleotide probes, is highly polymorphic in all populations thus far studied. From the literature we compiled genotype and allele frequency data at this locus for 87 populations to examine the pattern of intra- and inter- population genetic diversity. In general, allele frequency variations in populations are consistent with their ethno-history, although small isolated populations (e.g. Pacific Islanders) exhibit somewhat disparate variations of allele frequencies. A nested gene diversity analysis of 41 populations, classified into 5 ethnic groups (African, n = 3; Caucasian, n = 18; American Native, n = 3; Asian, n = 8; Pacific Islanders, n = 9) showed that the total gene diversity (80.4%) is largely (95%) due to intra-population variation. Only 3% of the gene diversity is due to inter-population within ethnic group variation, with the remaining 2% due to between ethnic group variation. In terms of average heterozygosity, probability of paternity exlusion, and probability of individual identification, the inter-ethnic group variation is larger than that between poulation samples within the ethnic groups. No significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg expectations of genotype frequencies was observed in any population. With an average heterozygosity of 77% around the world, this locus provides a 57% chance of exclusion of a falsely accused person from paternity, and is able to exclude 91% of individuals for identification purposes. In terms of allele fequencies, the geometric positions of the admixed populations (e.g. African-Americans and American-Hispanics) are consistent with their admixture estimates in their gene pool.

  3. MICROSATELLITE ANALYSIS OF INTRA CULTIVAR DIVERSITY IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    were sampled to study intracultivar diversity following microsatellite analysis. The dendrogram ... composition are available on the Indian market. Notable local juicy ..... management and genetic identification of ... the application of the SSR technique allows to discriminate all .... and multivariate analysis system, version 2.1.

  4. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Theileria annulata in Oman.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salama Al-Hamidhi

    Full Text Available Theileriosis, caused by a number of species within the genus Theileria, is a common disease of livestock in Oman. It is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry due to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in both cattle and sheep. Since little is currently known about the genetic diversity of the parasites causing theileriosis in Oman, the present study was designed to address this issue with specific regard to T. annulata in cattle.Blood samples were collected from cattle from four geographically distinct regions in Oman for genetic analysis of the Theileria annulata population. Ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites representing all four chromosomes of T. annulata were applied to these samples using a combination of PCR amplification and fragment analysis. The resultant genetic data was analysed to provide a first insight into the structure of the T. annulata population in Oman.We applied ten micro- and mini-satellite markers to a total of 310 samples obtained from different regions (174 [56%] from Dhofar, 68 [22%] from Dhira, 44 [14.5%] from Batinah and 24 [8%] from Sharqia. A high degree of allelic diversity was observed among the four parasite populations. Expected heterozygosity for each site ranged from 0.816 to 0.854. A high multiplicity of infection was observed in individual hosts, with an average of 3.3 to 3.4 alleles per locus, in samples derived from Batinah, Dhofar and Sharqia regions. In samples from Dhira region, an average of 2.9 alleles per locus was observed. Mild but statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of markers was observed in populations from three of the four regions. In contrast, when the analysis was performed at farm level, no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed. Finally, no significant genetic differentiation was seen between the four populations, with most pair-wise FST values being less than 0.03. Slightly higher FST values (GST' = 0.075,

  5. Allozymes Genetic Diversity of Quercus mongolica Fisch in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wenying; GU Wanchun

    2006-01-01

    A gel electrophoresis method was used to study the genetic diversity of 8 Quercus mongolica populations throughout its range in China.Eleven of 21 loci from 13 enzymes assayed were polymorphic.Q.mongolica maintained low level of genetic variation compared with the average Quercus species.At the species level,: the mean number of alleles per locus (A) was 1.905, the percentage of polymorphic loci (P) was 52.38%, the observed heterozygosity (He) was 0.092 and the expected heterozygosity (He) was 0.099.At the population level, the estimates were A =1.421, P =28.976%, Ho= 0.088, He =0.085.Genetic differentiation (Gst was high among populations, it was 0.107.According to the UPGMA cluster analysis based on the genetic distance, 4 populations located in northeast and 2 populations in southwest of the geographical distribution are classified into 2 subgroups, but there was no clear relationship between genetic distance and geographic distance among populations.The low level of genetic diversity of Q.mongolica might be related to the long-term exploitation as economic tree species in history are comparatively seriously disturbed and damaged by human beings, and most of the existing stands are secondary forests.

  6. Assessment of genetic diversity of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Bacterial blight of rice, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae(Xoo. ), is one of the major rice diseases in China. Making clear the shift of genetic diversity of the pathogen will provide important information for rice breeding. Strains collected from 11 provinces located in Southern region of the Changjiang River in China were assessed by using inoculation method and IS-PCR(Insertion Sequence-Based Polymerase Chain Reaction) analysis.

  7. Genetic diversity in a germplasm bank of Oenocarpus mapora (Arecaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, E F; de Oliveira, M S P

    2012-11-26

    Oenocarpus mapora is an Amazonian palm species commonly used by native populations for food and in folk medicine. We measured genetic variability, using RAPD markers, of material kept in a germplasm bank composed of accessions sampled from the Brazilian Amazon. These included 74 individuals from 23 accessions sampled from 9 localities in three States of the Brazilian Amazon. Jaccard genetic similarities were calculated based on 137 polymorphic bands, amplified by 15 primers. Dendrograms constructed based on the genetic similarities among individuals and sample localities demonstrated genetic separation of Acre State from the States of Amazonas and Pará. Two models in three hierarchical levels were considered for AMOVA: one considering the grouping of sampling sites in each state, and the other considering sampling sites in each subgroup formed by the dendrograms. The first model showed no significant genetic variation among states. On the other hand, genetic variation among subgroups was significant. In this model, the within-sample-site genetic diversity was 47.15%, which is considered to be low, since O. mapora is allogamous. By means of Bayesian analysis, the sample sites were clustered into five groups, and their distribution was similar to what we found in the dendrograms based on genetic similarity.

  8. Conservation of Genetic Diversity in Culture Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAXIM A.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The most important international document relating to the conservation of biodiversity is one adopted by theUN in Rio de Janeiro (1992 that "Convention on Biodiversity". Based on this agreement, the EU has taken a series ofmeasures to reduce genetic erosion in agriculture, which grew with the expansion of industrialized agriculture.Throughout its existence, mankind has used some 10,000 growing plant species. According to FAO statistics, today,90% of food production is ensured by some 120 growing plant species. In addition to drastic reduction in specificdiversity, the advent of industrialized agriculture has generated a process of strong genetic erosion. Old varieties andlocal varieties of crops have mostly been affected, in favour of "modern" varieties. Landraces are characterized by highheterogenity. They have the advantage of being much better adapted to biotic and abiotic stress conditions (diseases,pests, drought, low in nutrients, etc. and have excellent taste qualities, which can justify a higher price recovery thancommercial varieties. Thanks to these features, these crops need small inputs, which correspond to the concept ofsustainable development. Landraces are an invaluable genetic potential for obtaining new varieties of plants and are bestsuited for crop cultivation in ecological systems, becoming more common. Also, for long term food security in thecontext of global warming, rich genetic diversity will be require. “In situ” and “ex situ” conservation are the two majorstrategies used in the conservation of plant genetic resources. There is a fundamental difference between these twostrategies: “ex situ” conservation involves sampling, transfer and storage of a particular species population away fromthe original location, while “in situ” conservation (in their natural habitat implies that the varieties of interest,management and monitoring their place of origin takes place in the community to which they belong. These

  9. 粤东海域口虾蛄遗传多样性%Genetic Diversity Analysis of Mantis Shrimps (Oratosquilla oratoria) from the Eastern Coast of Guangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄映萍; 王莹; 苗素英

    2011-01-01

    As a routine and important polymorphic marker, mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (CO I ) gene was used to analyze the genetic diversity for two populations of Oratosquilla oratoria from Shenzhen and Shanwei coast of Guangdong Province. The result revealed that 21 of the 592 bp ( 3.55% ) nucleotides were variable, among which 18 and 3 sites were identified as transition and transversion respectively. The substitution saturation analysis indicated that CO I gene was not satured in O. oratoria and could be used as an effective molecular tool for population genetic studies. Totally, 15 haplotypes were detected. The nucleotide diversity and haplotype diversity were 0. 007 55 and 0. 971 respectively. The fixation index (Fsr) was 0.036between two populations, suggesting little differentiation between them. There was no geographic clustering of haplotypes in the UPGAM tree and the network. Genetic distances among haplotypos ranged from 0.047 6 to 0.428 6, with an average value of 0. 214 1. In summary, a high level of genetic diversity and little genetic differentiation are observed in O. oratoria from the eastern coast of Guangdong province.%采用线粒体COI基因序列对粤东汕尾和深圳2个海域口虾蛄(Oratosquilla oratoria)的遗传多样性进行了分析.研究表明,所分析的口虾蛄mtDNA CO I基因(592 by)共检测到21个变异位点,占总位点的3.55%.转换和颠换位点数分别为18和3个,碱基替换的饱和性分析表明,口虾蛄CO I基因碱基替换未达到饱和,CO I基因适合作为分析口虾蛄遗传多样性研究的分子标记.所检测的个体一共有巧个单倍型,单倍型多样性为0.971,核苷酸多样性为0.00755.单倍型之间的遗传距离在0.04760.4286之间,平均遗传距离为0.214 1.两群体间遗传分化系数Fsr为0.036,群体单倍型之间的UPGAM聚类以及NETWORK亲缘关系网状图并未显示明显的地理聚类结果.粤东海域口虾蛄总体遗传多样性水平较高,遗传分化小.

  10. Genetic Diversity of Juglans regia L.Cultivars Revealed by AFLP Analysis%普通核桃遗传多样性的AFLP分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红霞; 赵书岗; 高仪; 张志华; 玄立春

    2011-01-01

    [Objective]The genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship of walnut cultivars were discussed at the molecular level, thus providing a scientific basis for more effective protection and use of these resources.[Method]The genetic diversity and relationship of 131 Juglans regia L.cultivars were analyzed by AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) -silver staining protocol.The specific bands were counted and analyzed by NTSYSpc2.11 a software.[Result]AFLP fingerprinting of 131 Juglans regia L.cultivars with twenty pairs of EcoR Ⅰ/Mse Ⅰ primers revealed a total number of 1 643 unambiguous bands, of which 1 512 ones were polymorphic and 82.15 polymorphic bands were detected by each pair of primer on average.The polymorphism frequency was 92.03%.This result showed the abundant diversities of enzyme digestion sites among Juglans regia L.cultivars.As analyzed by NTSYSpc2.11a, the similarity coefficient of 131 Juglans regia L.cultivars ranged from 0.637 to 0.928.These Juglans regia L.cultivars were divided into eight groups by UPGMA (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic aver age) based on similarity coefficient.The genetic relationship of 131 Juglans regia L.cultivars was analyzed according to the similarity coefficient.[Conclusion]There are rich genetic diversity and complex genetic background in walnut germplasms, but it is difficult to distinguish distinctly the precocious walnut and serotinous walnut by cluster analysis.%[目的]从分子水平上探讨普通核桃品种的遗传多样性和亲缘关系,为更有效地保护和利用这些品种资源提供科学依据.[方法]采用AFLP-银染分子标记技术,对131份核桃品种进行遗传多样性和亲缘关系分析,应用 NTSYSpc2.11a 分析软件对统计结果进行聚类分析.[结果]选用20对多态性高、分辨力强的EcoR I/Mse I引物组合分别对供试材料的基因组DNA进行扩增,共获得1 643条清晰可辨的条带,其中多态性带1 512条,平均每

  11. Arenavirus genetic diversity and its biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emonet, Sebastien F; de la Torre, Juan C; Domingo, Esteban; Sevilla, Noemí

    2009-07-01

    The Arenaviridae family currently comprises 22 viral species, each of them associated with a rodent species. This viral family is important both as tractable experimental model systems to study acute and persistent infections and as clinically important human pathogens. Arenaviruses are enveloped viruses with a bi-segmented negative-strand RNA genome. The interaction with the cellular receptor and subsequent entry into the host cell differs between Old World and New World arenavirus that use alpha-dystoglycan or human transferring receptor 1, respectively, as main receptors. The recent development of reverse genetic systems for several arenaviruses has facilitated progress in understanding the molecular biology and cell biology of this viral family, as well as opening new approaches for the development of novel strategies to combat human pathogenic arenaviruses. On the other hand, increased availability of genetic data has allowed more detailed studies on the phylogeny and evolution of arenaviruses. As with other riboviruses, arenaviruses exist as viral quasispecies, which allow virus adaptation to rapidly changing environments. The large number of different arenavirus host reservoirs and great genetic diversity among virus species provide the bases for the emergence of new arenaviruses potentially pathogenic for humans.

  12. The silent threat of low genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret E.

    2013-01-01

    Across the Caribbean, protected coastal waters have served as primary feeding and breeding grounds for the endangered Antillean manatee. Unfortunately, these same coastal waters are also a popular “habitat” for humans. In the past, the overlap between human and manatee habitat allowed for manatee hunting and threatened the survival of these gentle marine mammals. Today, however, threats are much more inadvertent and are often related to coastal development, degraded habitats and boat strikes. In the state of Florida, decades of research on the species’ biological needs have helped conservationists address threats to its survival. For example, low wake zones and boater education have protected manatees from boat strikes, and many of their critical winter refuges are now protected. The Florida population has grown steadily, thus increasing from approximately 1,200 in 1991 to more than 5,000 in 2010. It is conceivable that in Florida manatees may one day be reclassified as “threatened” rather than “endangered.” Yet, in other parts of the Caribbean, threats still loom. This includes small, isolated manatee populations found on islands that can be more susceptible to extinction and lack of genetic diversity. To ensure the species’ long-term viability, scientists have turned their sights to the overall population dynamics of manatees throughout the Caribbean. Molecular genetics has provided new insights into long-term threats the species faces. Fortunately, the emerging field of conservation genetics provides managers with tools and strategies for protecting the species’ long-term viability.

  13. Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Relationships of Seven Chinese Indigenous Pig Breeds and Three Exotic Pig Breeds Using the DNA Differential Display Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-gang; XIONG Yuan-zhu; DENG Chang-yan

    2006-01-01

    The genetic diversity and relationships of seven Chinese indigenous pig breeds (Meishan, Erhualian, Hezuo, Bamei, Qingping, Tongcheng, and Huainan) and three exotic pig breeds (Large White, Landrace, and Duroc) were analyzed using the DNA differential display technique by means of eight primer combinations. A total of 123 reproducible bands were used to calculate mean Nei's gene diversity, and mean Shannon's information index for each pig population. Based on these the Nei's standard genetic identity and distance were estimated, which was used to construct a dendrogram tree for the 10 pig breeds. The experimental results obtained and the method used in this study for evaluating the genetic diversity and relationships of pigs were also discussed.

  14. Genetic diversity and maternal origin of Bangladeshi chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, M S A; Chen, Shanyuan; Faruque, S; Bhuiyan, A K F H; Beja-Pereira, Albano

    2013-06-01

    Local domestic chicken populations are of paramount importance as a source of protein in developing countries. Bangladesh possesses a large number of native chicken populations which display a broad range of phenotypes well adapted to the extreme wet and hot environments of this region. This and the fact that wild jungle fowls (JFs) are still available in some regions of the country, it urges to study the present genetic diversity and relationships between Bangladeshi autochthonous chicken populations. Here, we report the results of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence polymorphisms analyses to assess the genetic diversity and possible maternal origin of Bangladeshi indigenous chickens. A 648-bp fragment of mtDNA control region (D-loop) was analyzed in 96 samples from four different chicken populations and one red JF population. Sequence analysis revealed 39 variable sites that defined 25 haplotypes. Estimates of haplotype and nucleotide diversities ranged from 0.745 to 0.901 and from 0.011 to 0.016, respectively. The pairwise differences between populations ranged from 0.091 to 1.459 while most of the PhiST (ΦST) values were significant. Furthermore, AMOVA analysis revealed 89.16 % of the total genetic diversity was accounted for within population variation, indicating little genetic differentiation among the studied populations. The median network analysis from haplotypes of Bangladeshi chickens illustrated five distinct mitochondrial haplogroups (A, D, E, F and I). Individuals from all Bangladeshi chicken populations were represented in the major clades D and E; those maternal origins are presumed to be from Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asian countries, more particularly from South China, Vietnam, Myanmar and Thailand. Further, phylogenetic analysis between indigenous chicken populations and sub-species of red JFs showed G. g. gallus and G. g. spadiceus shared with almost all haplogroups and had major influence than G. g. murghi in the origin of

  15. Genetic diversity and association mapping in a collection of selected Chinese soybean accessions based on SSR marker analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.H.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Chang, R.Z.; Qiu, L.J.

    2011-01-01

    For broadening the narrow genetic base of modern soybean cultivars, 159 accessions were selected from the Chinese soybean collection which contained at least one of seven important agronomic traits: resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN) or soybean mosaic virus (SMV), tolerance to salt, cold, or

  16. Genetic diversity of cultured and wild populations of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii based on microsatellite analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii culture in the Western Hemisphere is primarily, if not entirely, based on thirty-six individual prawn introduced to Hawaii from Malaysia in 1965 and 1966. Little information is available regarding the genetic background or current population status of cult...

  17. Genetic diversity in population of largemouth bronze gudgeon (Coreius guichenoti Sauvage et Dabry) from Yangtze River determined by microsatellite DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Futie; Tan, Deqing

    2010-01-01

    Largemouth bronze gudgeon (Coreius guichenoti Sauvage et Dabry 1874), one of the endemic fish species in the upper reaches of the Yangtze River in China, is a benthic and potamodromous fish that is typically found in rivers with torrential flow. Three dams in the Yangtze River, Ertan Dam, Three Gorges Dam and Gezhouba Dam, may have had vital impacts on the habitat and spawning behaviors of largemouth bronze gudgeon, and could ultimately threaten the survival of this fish. We studied the population genetic diversity of C. guichenoti samples collected at seven sites (JH, GLP, BX, HJ, MD, SDP and XB) within the Yangtze River and one of its tributaries, the Yalong River. Genetic diversity patterns were determined by analyzing genetic data from 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci. A high genetic diversity among these largemouth bronze gudgeon populations was indicated by the number of microsatellite alleles (A) and the expected heterozygosity (HE). No significant population variation occurred among GLP, BX, HJ and MD populations, but dramatic population differentiation was observed among JH and XB, two dam-blocked populations, versus other populations. Tests for bottlenecks did not indicate recent dramatic population declines and concurrent losses of genetic diversity in any largemouth bronze gudgeon populations. To the contrary, we found that dams accelerated the population differentiation of this fish.

  18. Genetic Diversity and Association Analysis for Salinity Tolerance,Heading Date and Plant Height of Barley Germplasm Using Simple Sequence Repeat Markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lilia Eleuch; Abderrazek Jilal; Stefania Grando; Salvatore Ceccarelli; Maria von Korff Schmising; Hisashi Tsujimoto; Amara Hajer; Abderrazek Daaloul; Michael Baum

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic diversity of barley accessions.Additionally,association trait analysis was conducted for grain yield under salinity,heading date and plant height.For this purpose,48 barley genotypes were analyzed with 22 microsatellite simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers.Four of the 22 markers (Bmac316,scssr03907,HVM67 and Bmag770) were able to differentiate all barley genotypes.Cluster and principal coordinate analysis allowed a clear grouping between countries from the same region.The genotypes used in this study have been evaluated for agronomic performance in different environments.Conducting association analysis for grain yield under salinity conditions using TASSEL software revealed a close association of the marker Bmag749 (2H,bin 13) in two different environments with common significant alleles (175,177),whereas the HVHOTR1 marker (2H,bin 3) was only significant in Sakhar_Egypt with alleles size being 158 and 161.Heading date also showed an association with scssr03907 through the common significant specific allele 111 and EBmacO415 markers in three different agro climatic locations,whereas HVCMA,scssr00103 and HVM67 were linked to heading date in the Egyptian environment only.The plant height association analysis revealed significant markers Bmag770 via the significant allele 152 and scssr09398.

  19. Assessment of Genetic diversity in mutant cowpea lines using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FKOLADE

    2016-11-09

    Nov 9, 2016 ... option of NTSYS, a rooted tree was also generated from the .... Dellarporta SF, Wood J, Hicks JB (1983). ... genetic diversity in Pigeon Pea (Cajanus sp). ... diversity in somatic mutants of grape (Vitis vinifera) cultivar Italia.

  20. A genomic scale map of genetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Alejandro A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas Disease, affects more than 16 million people in Latin America. The clinical outcome of the disease results from a complex interplay between environmental factors and the genetic background of both the human host and the parasite. However, knowledge of the genetic diversity of the parasite, is currently limited to a number of highly studied loci. The availability of a number of genomes from different evolutionary lineages of T. cruzi provides an unprecedented opportunity to look at the genetic diversity of the parasite at a genomic scale. Results Using a bioinformatic strategy, we have clustered T. cruzi sequence data available in the public domain and obtained multiple sequence alignments in which one or two alleles from the reference CL-Brener were included. These data covers 4 major evolutionary lineages (DTUs: TcI, TcII, TcIII, and the hybrid TcVI. Using these set of alignments we have identified 288,957 high quality single nucleotide polymorphisms and 1,480 indels. In a reduced re-sequencing study we were able to validate ~ 97% of high-quality SNPs identified in 47 loci. Analysis of how these changes affect encoded protein products showed a 0.77 ratio of synonymous to non-synonymous changes in the T. cruzi genome. We observed 113 changes that introduce or remove a stop codon, some causing significant functional changes, and a number of tri-allelic and tetra-allelic SNPs that could be exploited in strain typing assays. Based on an analysis of the observed nucleotide diversity we show that the T. cruzi genome contains a core set of genes that are under apparent purifying selection. Interestingly, orthologs of known druggable targets show statistically significant lower nucleotide diversity values. Conclusions This study provides the first look at the genetic diversity of T. cruzi at a genomic scale. The analysis covers an estimated ~ 60% of the genetic diversity present in the

  1. Genetic diversity and molecular epidemiology of Anaplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battilani, Mara; De Arcangeli, Stefano; Balboni, Andrea; Dondi, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Anaplasma are obligate intracellular bacteria of cells of haematopoietic origin and are aetiological agents of tick-borne diseases of both veterinary and medical interest common in both tropical and temperate regions. The recent disclosure of their zoonotic potential has greatly increased interest in the study of these bacteria, leading to the recent reorganisation of Rickettsia taxonomy and to the possible discovery of new species belonging to the genus Anaplasma. This review is particularly focused on the common and unique characteristics of Anaplasma marginale and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, with an emphasis on genetic diversity and evolution, and the main distinguishing features of the diseases caused by the different Anaplasma spp. are described as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Low genetic diversity and high genetic differentiation in the critically endangered Omphalogramma souliei (Primulaceae):implications for its conservation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan HUANG; Chang-Qin ZHANG; De-Zhu LI

    2009-01-01

    Omphalogramma souliei Franch. Is an endangered perennial herb only distributed in alpine areas of SW China. ISSR markers were applied to determine the genetic variation and genetic structure of 60 individuals of three populations of O. Souliei in NW Yunnan, China. The genetic diversity at the species level is low with P= 42.5% (percentage of polymorphic bands) and Hsp=0.1762 (total genetic diversity). However, a high level of genetic differentiation among populations was detected based on different measures (Nei's genetic diversity analysis: Gst=0.6038; AMOVA analysis: Fst=0.6797). Low level of genetic diversity within populations and significant genetic differentiation among populations might be due to the mixed mating system in which xenog-amy predominated and autogamy played an assistant role in O. Souliei. The genetic drift due to small population size and limited current gene flow also resulted in significant genetic differentiation. The assessment of genetic variation and differentiation of the endangered species provides important information for conservation on a genetic basis. Conservation strategies for this rare endemic species are proposed.

  3. Evaluation of genetic diversity in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2015-06-03

    Jun 3, 2015 ... traits, genotypes in cluster III deserve consideration for directly developing high yielding barely varieties. The result of ... Criteria for the estimation of genetic diversity can be ...... Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome, Italy.

  4. Assessment of genetic diversity in Isabgol (Plantago ovata Forsk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sandeep kaswan

    using random amplified polymorphic DNA ... RAPD markers appeared more informative than ISSR in determining the genetic ... Key words: Plantago ovata, molecular marker, RAPD, ISSR, genetic diversity, medicinal plant. .... monomorphic.

  5. SRAP Analysis on Genetic Diversity of Chinese Kale Germplasm%芥蓝种质资源遗传多样性的SRAP分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李桂花; 陈汉才; 张艳; 郭凤仪; 李向阳; 刘振翔; 张桂权

    2011-01-01

    调查56份芥蓝种质的植物学性状,并利用SRAP标记分析其遗传多样性.结果表明,从312对引物中筛选出24对引物,共扩增出稳定清晰的条带747条,其中多态性条带147条,多态性位点比例为19.6%.基于SRAP扩增结果,应用NTSYSpc2.1构建聚类树状图谱,供试材料间的遗传相似系数的变化范围是0.524~0.884,在相似系数为0.66的水平上,可将56份芥蓝分为6大类.由于芥蓝原产华南地区,其遗传多样性要小于芸薹属其它蔬菜.%The morphological characteristics of 56 Chinese kale accessions were investigated and the DNA polymorphism was analyzed by sequence related amplified polymorphism(SRAP)markers. A total of 747 bands were amplified using 24 primers selected from 312 primers, of whichl47 were polymorphic, The polymorphic percentage was 19.6% . Among these germplasm the genetic similarity was ranged from 0.524 to 0.884 by software NTSYSpc2.1 based on SRAP results, Cluster analysis showed that 56 Chinese kale germplasm were divided into six groups on genetic similarity of 0.66. Because Chinese kale was from south China, the genetic diversity of Chinese kale was smaller than other Brassica vegetables.

  6. Cell culture isolation and sequence analysis of genetically diverse US porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strains including a novel strain with a large deletion in the spike gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tomoichiro; Saif, Linda J; Marthaler, Douglas; Esseili, Malak A; Meulia, Tea; Lin, Chun-Ming; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Jung, Kwonil; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Qiuhong

    2014-10-10

    The highly contagious and deadly porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) first appeared in the US in April 2013. Since then the virus has spread rapidly nationwide and to Canada and Mexico causing high mortality among nursing piglets and significant economic losses. Currently there are no efficacious preventive measures or therapeutic tools to control PEDV in the US. The isolation of PEDV in cell culture is the first step toward the development of an attenuated vaccine, to study the biology of PEDV and to develop in vitro PEDV immunoassays, inactivation assays and screen for PEDV antivirals. In this study, nine of 88 US PEDV strains were isolated successfully on Vero cells with supplemental trypsin and subjected to genomic sequence analysis. They differed genetically mainly in the N-terminal S protein region as follows: (1) strains (n=7) similar to the highly virulent US PEDV strains; (2) one similar to the reportedly US S INDEL PEDV strain; and (3) one novel strain most closely related to highly virulent US PEDV strains, but with a large (197aa) deletion in the S protein. Representative strains of these three genetic groups were passaged serially and grew to titers of ∼5-6log10 plaque forming units/mL. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation in cell culture of an S INDEL PEDV strain and a PEDV strain with a large (197aa) deletion in the S protein. We also designed primer sets to detect these genetically diverse US PEDV strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic diversity and biogeography of red turpentine beetle Dendroctonus valens in its native and invasive regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Wen Cai; Xin-Yue Cheng; Ru-Mei Xu; Dong-Hong Duan; Lawrence R. Kirkendall

    2008-01-01

    Sequences of 479 bp region of the mitochondrial COI gene were applied to detect population genetic diversity and structure of Dendroctonus valens populations. By comparing the genetic diversity between native and invasive populations, it was shown that the genetic diversity of Chinese populations was obviously lower than that of native populations with both indices of haplotype diversity and Nei's genetic diversity, suggesting genetic bottleneck occurred in the invasive process of D. valens, and was then followed by a relatively quick population buildup. According to phylogenetic analyses of haplotypes, we suggested that the origin of the Chinese population was from California, USA. Phylogenetic and network analysis of native populations of D. valens revealed strong genetic structure at two distinct spatial and temporal scales in North America. The main cause resulting in current biogeographic pattern was supposedly due to recycled glacial events. Meanwhile, a cryptic species might exist in the Mexican and Guatemalan populations.

  8. A genome-to-genome analysis of associations between human genetic variation, HIV-1 sequence diversity, and viral control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartha, István; Carlson, Jonathan M; Brumme, Chanson J; McLaren, Paul J; Brumme, Zabrina L; John, Mina; Haas, David W; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Dalmau, Judith; López-Galíndez, Cecilio; Casado, Concepción; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Bernasconi, Enos; Vernazza, Pietro; Klimkait, Thomas; Yerly, Sabine; O'Brien, Stephen J; Listgarten, Jennifer; Pfeifer, Nico; Lippert, Christoph; Fusi, Nicolo; Kutalik, Zoltán; Allen, Todd M; Müller, Viktor; Harrigan, P Richard; Heckerman, David; Telenti, Amalio; Fellay, Jacques

    2013-10-29

    HIV-1 sequence diversity is affected by selection pressures arising from host genomic factors. Using paired human and viral data from 1071 individuals, we ran >3000 genome-wide scans, testing for associations between host DNA polymorphisms, HIV-1 sequence variation and plasma viral load (VL), while considering human and viral population structure. We observed significant human SNP associations to a total of 48 HIV-1 amino acid variants (pgenome-to-genome approach highlights sites of genomic conflict and is a strategy generally applicable to studies of host-pathogen interaction. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01123.001.

  9. Loss of genetic diversity in Maculinea populations over 10 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, David Richard; Lomborg, Andreas Eg

    I will present the results of research on the population genetics of Maculinea alcon and M. arion in Southern scandinavia, which shows a strong decrease in genetic diversity in most populations, even if those populations are apparently otherwise healthy.......I will present the results of research on the population genetics of Maculinea alcon and M. arion in Southern scandinavia, which shows a strong decrease in genetic diversity in most populations, even if those populations are apparently otherwise healthy....

  10. [Research Progress on Genetic Diversity in Animal Parasitic Nematodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    YIN, Fang-yuan; LI, Fa-cai; ZHAO, Jun-long; HU, Min

    2015-10-01

    The development of molecular genetic markers for parasitic nematodes has significant implications in fundamental and applied research in Veterinary Parasitology. Knowledge on genetic diversity of nematodes would not only provide a theoretical basis for understanding the spread of drug-resistance alleles, but also have implications in the development of nematode control strategies. This review discusses the applications of molecular genetic markers (RFLP, RAPD, PCR-SSCP, AFLP, SSR and mitochondrial DNA) in research on the genetic diversity of parasitic nematodes.

  11. A preliminary examination of genetic diversity in the Indian false vampire bat Megaderma lyra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuvel Rajan, K.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Habitat loss and fragmentation have serious consequences for species extinction as well as genetic diversity within a species. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was employed to assess the genetic diversity within and between four natural populations of M. lyra. Our results suggest that the genetic diversity varied from 0.21 to 0.26 with a mean of 0.11 to 0.13 (± SD. The mean Gst value of 0.15 was obtained from all four populations and estimated average Nm (1.41 showing gene flow between the populations. AMOVA analysis showed 88.96% within and 11.04% among the studied populations. Cluster analyses of RAPD phenotypes showed that specimens were not grouped by geographical origin. The genetic diversity found in the M. lyra population may be explained by its breeding behaviors. Though preliminary, the results indicate that all four populations should be considered to maintain the genetic diversity.

  12. 紫花苜蓿耐盐种质资源的遗传多样性分析%Analysis of genetic diversity of salt tolerant alfalfa germplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜健; 杨宝灵; 夏彤; 于淑梅; 乌云娜

    2011-01-01

    . Alfalfa is a typical outcrossing plant, and there was a direct link between their genetic structure and breeding system. Based on genetic distance (GD) analysis, 9 groups were obtained from the 25 varieties, of which, the GD of No. 1 and No. 2 Tumu was the least (GD=0. 148), and that of No. 1 Jieda and Tumu was the greatest (GD=0. 786). Genetic diversity analysis of salt-tolerant alfalfa germplasm provided a theoretical basis for the repository building of alfalfa salt-tolerant core germplasm and for the selection and breeding of new salt-tolerant varieties.

  13. Diversity array technology markers: genetic diversity analyses and linkage map construction in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Nelson, Matthew N; Aslam, M N; Rajasekaran, Ravikesavan; Wratten, Neil; Cowling, Wallace A; Kilian, A; Sharpe, Andrew G; Schondelmaier, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We developed Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for application in genetic studies of Brassica napus and other Brassica species with A or C genomes. Genomic representation from 107 diverse genotypes of B. napus L. var. oleifera (rapeseed, AACC genomes) and B. rapa (AA genome) was used to develop a DArT array comprising 11 520 clones generated using PstI/BanII and PstI/BstN1 complexity reduction methods. In total, 1547 polymorphic DArT markers of high technical quality were identified and used to assess molecular diversity among 89 accessions of B. napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. carinata collected from different parts of the world. Hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses based on genetic distance matrices identified distinct populations clustering mainly according to their origin/pedigrees. DArT markers were also mapped in a new doubled haploid population comprising 131 lines from a cross between spring rapeseed lines 'Lynx-037DH' and 'Monty-028DH'. Linkage groups were assigned on the basis of previously mapped simple sequence repeat (SSRs), intron polymorphism (IP), and gene-based markers. The map consisted of 437 DArT, 135 SSR, 6 IP, and 6 gene-based markers and spanned 2288 cM. Our results demonstrate that DArT markers are suitable for genetic diversity analysis and linkage map construction in rapeseed.

  14. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Population Genetic Structure of Corylus mandshurica in China Using SSR Markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Wei Zong

    Full Text Available Corylus mandshurica, also known as pilose hazelnut, is an economically and ecologically important species in China. In this study, ten polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR markers were applied to evaluate the genetic diversity and population structure of 348 C. mandshurica individuals among 12 populations in China. The SSR markers expressed a relatively high level of genetic diversity (Na = 15.3, Ne = 5.6604, I = 1.8853, Ho = 0.6668, and He = 0.7777. According to the coefficient of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.1215, genetic variation within the populations (87.85% were remarkably higher than among populations (12.15%. The average gene flow (Nm = 1.8080 significantly impacts the genetic structure of C. mandshurica populations. The relatively high gene flow (Nm = 1.8080 among wild C. mandshurica may be caused by wind-pollinated flowers, highly nutritious seeds and self-incompatible mating system. The UPGMA (unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages dendrogram was divided into two main clusters. Moreover, the results of STRUCTURE analysis suggested that C. mandshurica populations fell into two main clusters. Comparison of the UPGMA dendrogram and the Bayesian STRUCTURE analysis showed general agreement between the population subdivisions and the genetic relationships among populations of C. mandshurica. Group I accessions were located in Northeast China, while Group II accessions were in North China. It is worth noting that a number of genetically similar populations were located in the same geographic region. The results further showed that there was obvious genetic differentiation among populations from Northeast China to North China. Results from the Mantel test showed a weak but still significant positive correlation between Nei's genetic distance and geographic distance (km among populations (r = 0.419, P = 0.005, suggesting that genetic differentiation in the 12 C. mandshurica populations might be related to geographic

  15. Genetic and Molecular Network Analysis of Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Robert W.; Mulligan, Megan K.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides an introduction into the genetic control and analysis of behavioral variation using powerful online resources. We introduce you to the new field of systems genetics using "case studies" drawn from the world of behavioral genetics that exploit populations of genetically diverse lines of mice. These lines differ very widely in patterns of gene and protein expression in the brain and in patterns of behavior. In this chapter we address the following set of related questions:...

  16. Understanding crop genetic diversity under modern plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yong-Bi

    2015-11-01

    Maximizing crop yield while at the same time minimizing crop failure for sustainable agriculture requires a better understanding of the impacts of plant breeding on crop genetic diversity. This review identifies knowledge gaps and shows the need for more research into genetic diversity changes under plant breeding. Modern plant breeding has made a profound impact on food production and will continue to play a vital role in world food security. For sustainable agriculture, a compromise should be sought between maximizing crop yield under changing climate and minimizing crop failure under unfavorable conditions. Such a compromise requires better understanding of the impacts of plant breeding on crop genetic diversity. Efforts have been made over the last three decades to assess crop genetic diversity using molecular marker technologies. However, these assessments have revealed some temporal diversity patterns that are largely inconsistent with our perception that modern plant breeding reduces crop genetic diversity. An attempt was made in this review to explain such discrepancies by examining empirical assessments of crop genetic diversity and theoretical investigations of genetic diversity changes over time under artificial selection. It was found that many crop genetic diversity assessments were not designed to assess diversity impacts from specific plant breeding programs, while others were experimentally inadequate and contained technical biases from the sampling of cultivars and genomes. Little attention has been paid to theoretical investigations on crop genetic diversity changes from plant breeding. A computer simulation of five simplified breeding schemes showed the substantial effects of plant breeding on the retention of heterozygosity over generations. It is clear that more efforts are needed to investigate crop genetic diversity in space and time under plant breeding to achieve sustainable crop production.

  17. Genetic Diversity of Acacia mangium Seed Orchard in Wonogiri Indonesia Using Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVI YUSKIANTI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is important in tree improvement programs. To evaluate levels of genetic diversity of first generation Acacia mangium seedling seed orchard in Wonogiri, Central Java, Indonesia, three populations from each region of Papua New Guinea (PNG and Queensland, Australia (QLD were selected and analyzed using 25 microsatellite markers. Statistical analysis showed that PNG populations have higher number of detected alleles and level of genetic diversity than QLD populations. This study provides a basic information about the genetic background of the populations used in the development of an A. mangium seed orchard in Indonesia.

  18. Genetic and Functional Diversity of Propagating Cells in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara G.M. Piccirillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is a lethal malignancy whose clinical intransigence has been linked to extensive intraclonal genetic and phenotypic diversity and the common emergence of therapeutic resistance. This interpretation embodies the implicit assumption that cancer stem cells or tumor-propagating cells are themselves genetically and functionally diverse. To test this, we screened primary GBM tumors by SNP array to identify copy number alterations (a minimum of three that could be visualized in single cells by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization. Interrogation of neurosphere-derived cells (from four patients and cells derived from secondary transplants of these same cells in NOD-SCID mice allowed us to infer the clonal and phylogenetic architectures. Whole-exome sequencing and single-cell genetic analysis in one case revealed a more complex clonal structure. This proof-of-principle experiment revealed that subclones in each GBM had variable regenerative or stem cell activity, and highlighted genetic alterations associated with more competitive propagating activity in vivo.

  19. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity analysis β-glucan content variability in grain of oat (Avena sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Nevena H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In grain of ten genetically divergent oat cultivars (Merkur, Minor Abed, Flaming-Kurz, Nuptiele, Prode, Pellerva, Emperor, Astor, Osmo, Simo the variability β-glucan content were investigated. The different value of content of β-glucan was found. Among analyzed oat cultivars, the highest β- glucan contents had Pellerva (6.597%, while the least had Simo (2.971%. The contents of β-glucans were determined by ICC standard Method No 168. The value of β-glucans varied and indicated the differences and similarities between analysed cultivars. The degree of cultivar similarity was determined by dendrogram on which was discriminated two clusters of similar cultivars toward to contents of β-glucan . Within cluster 1, a small group of oats, are five cultivars with small distance (Merkur, Minor Abed, Flamings-Kurz, Nuptiele and Prode. The highest similarity in the range of 88 or the least distance in the range of 12. Within cluster 2 was four oat cultivars (Emperor, Astor, Osmo, Pellerva in which the least differences was between Emperor and Astor with average distance in range 27. Cluster 1 and cluster 2 differed with an average distance of 63. The cultivar Simo expressed the greatest distance to all analysed oat cultivars grouped in two clusters. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31092

  20. Genetic landscapes GIS Toolbox: tools to map patterns of genetic divergence and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergast, Amy G.; Perry, William M.; Lugo, Roberto V.; Hathaway, Stacie A.

    2011-01-01

    The Landscape Genetics GIS Toolbox contains tools that run in the Geographic Information System software, ArcGIS, to map genetic landscapes and to summarize multiple genetic landscapes as average and variance surfaces. These tools can be used to visualize the distribution of genetic diversity across geographic space and to study associations between patterns of genetic diversity and geographic features or other geo-referenced environmental data sets. Together, these tools create genetic landscape surfaces directly from tables containing genetic distance or diversity data and sample location coordinates, greatly reducing the complexity of building and analyzing these raster surfaces in a Geographic Information System.

  1. Genetic diversity of human RNase 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Calvin C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribonuclease 8 is a member of the RNase A family of secretory ribonucleases; orthologs of this gene have been found only in primate genomes. RNase 8 is a divergent paralog of RNase 7, which is lysine-enriched, highly conserved, has prominent antimicrobial activity, and is expressed in both normal and diseased skin; in contrast, the physiologic function of RNase 8 remains uncertain. Here, we examine the genetic diversity of human RNase 8, a subject of significant interest given the existence of functional pseudogenes (coding sequences that are otherwise intact but with mutations in elements crucial for ribonucleolytic activity in non-human primate genomes. Results RNase 8 expression was detected in adult human lung, spleen and testis tissue by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Only two single-nucleotide polymorphisms and four unique alleles were identified within the RNase 8 coding sequence; nucleotide sequence diversity (π = 0.00122 ± 0.00009 per site was unremarkable for a human nuclear gene. We isolated transcripts encoding RNase 8 via rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and RT-PCR which included a distal potential translational start site followed by sequence encoding an additional 30 amino acids that are conserved in the genomes of several higher primates. The distal translational start site is functional and promotes RNase 8 synthesis in transfected COS-7 cells. Conclusions These results suggest that RNase 8 may diverge considerably from typical RNase A family ribonucleases and may likewise exhibit unique function. This finding prompts a reconsideration of what we have previously termed functional pseudogenes, as RNase 8 may be responding to constraints that promote significant functional divergence from the canonical structure and enzymatic activity characteristic of the RNase A family.

  2. Analysis of the trap gene provides evidence for the role of elevation and vector abundance in the genetic diversity of Plasmodium relictum in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Margaret E.M.; Atkinson, Carter T.; LaPointe, Dennis A.; Jarvi, Susan I.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The avian disease system in Hawaii offers an ideal opportunity to investigate host-pathogen interactions in a natural setting. Previous studies have recognized only a single mitochondrial lineage of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) in the Hawaiian Islands, but cloning and sequencing of nuclear genes suggest a higher degree of genetic diversity. Methods: In order to evaluate genetic diversity of P. relictum at the population level and further understand host-parasite interactions, a modified single-base extension (SBE) method was used to explore spatial and temporal distribution patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (trap) gene of P. relictum infections from 121 hatch-year amakihi (Hemignathus virens) on the east side of Hawaii Island. Results: Rare alleles and mixed infections were documented at three of eight SNP loci; this is the first documentation of genetically diverse infections of P. relictum at the population level in Hawaii. Logistic regression revealed that the likelihood of infection with a rare allele increased at low-elevation, but decreased as mosquito capture rates increased. The inverse relationship between vector capture rates and probability of infection with a rare allele is unexpected given current theories of epidemiology developed in human malarias. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that pathogen diversity in Hawaii may be driven by a complex interaction of factors including transmission rates, host immune pressures, and parasite-parasite competition.

  3. Analysis of the trap gene provides evidence for the role of elevation and vector abundance in the genetic diversity of Plasmodium relictum in Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farias Margaret E M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The avian disease system in Hawaii offers an ideal opportunity to investigate host-pathogen interactions in a natural setting. Previous studies have recognized only a single mitochondrial lineage of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum in the Hawaiian Islands, but cloning and sequencing of nuclear genes suggest a higher degree of genetic diversity. Methods In order to evaluate genetic diversity of P. relictum at the population level and further understand host-parasite interactions, a modified single-base extension (SBE method was used to explore spatial and temporal distribution patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (trap gene of P. relictum infections from 121 hatch-year amakihi (Hemignathus virens on the east side of Hawaii Island. Results Rare alleles and mixed infections were documented at three of eight SNP loci; this is the first documentation of genetically diverse infections of P. relictum at the population level in Hawaii. Logistic regression revealed that the likelihood of infection with a rare allele increased at low-elevation, but decreased as mosquito capture rates increased. The inverse relationship between vector capture rates and probability of infection with a rare allele is unexpected given current theories of epidemiology developed in human malarias. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that pathogen diversity in Hawaii may be driven by a complex interaction of factors including transmission rates, host immune pressures, and parasite-parasite competition.

  4. Genetic diversity and conservation of South African indigenous chicken populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtileni, B J; Muchadeyi, F C; Maiwashe, A; Groeneveld, E; Groeneveld, L F; Dzama, K; Weigend, S

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we compare the level and distribution of genetic variation between South African conserved and village chicken populations using microsatellite markers. In addition, diversity in South African chickens was compared to that of a reference data set consisting of other African and purebred commercial lines. Three chicken populations Venda, Ovambo and Eastern Cape and four conserved flocks of the Venda, Ovambo, Naked Neck and Potchefstroom Koekoek from the Poultry Breeding Resource Unit of the Agricultural Research Council were genotyped at 29 autosomal microsatellite loci. All markers were polymorphic. Village chicken populations were more diverse than conservation flocks. structure software was used to cluster individuals to a predefined number of 2 ≤ K ≤ 6 clusters. The most probable clustering was found at K = 5 (95% identical runs). At this level of differentiation, the four conservation flocks separated as four independent clusters, while the three village chicken populations together formed another cluster. Thus, cluster analysis indicated a clear subdivision of each of the conservation flocks that were different from the three village chicken populations. The contribution of each South African chicken populations to the total diversity of the chickens studied was determined by calculating the optimal core set contributions based on Marker estimated kinship. Safe set analysis was carried out using bootstrapped kinship values calculated to relate the added genetic diversity of seven South African chicken populations to a set of reference populations consisting of other African and purebred commercial broiler and layer chickens. In both core set and the safe set analyses, village chicken populations scored slightly higher to the reference set compared to conservation flocks. Overall, the present study demonstrated that the conservation flocks of South African chickens displayed considerable genetic variability that is different from that of the

  5. Genetic diversity among Frankia strains nodulating members of the family Casuarinaceae in Australia revealed by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis with crushed root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvier, C; Prin, Y; Reddell, P; Normand, P; Simonet, P

    1996-03-01

    DNA extracted directly from nodules was used to assess the genetic diversity of Frankia strains symbiotically associated with two species of the genus Casuarina and two of the genus Allocasuarina naturally occurring in northeastern Australia. DNA from field-collected nodules or extracted from reference cultures of Casuarina-infective Frankia strains was used as the template in PCRs with primers targeting two DNA regions, one in the ribosomal operon and the other in the nif operon. PCR products were then analyzed by using a set of restriction endonucleases. Five distinct genetic groups were recognized on the basis of these restriction patterns. These groups were consistently associated with the host species from which the nodules originated. All isolated reference strains had similar patterns and were assigned to group 1 along with six of the eight unisolated Frankia strains from Casuarina equisetifolia in Australia. Group 2 consisted of two unisolated Frankia strains from C. equisetifolia, whereas groups 3 to 5 comprised all unisolated strains from Casuarina cunninghamiana, Allocasuarina torulosa, and Allocasuarina littoralis, respectively. These results demonstrate that, contrary to the results of previous molecular studies of isolated strains, there is genetic diversity among Frankia strains that infect members of the family Casuarinacaeae. The apparent high homogeneity of Frankia strains in these previous studies probably relates to the single host species from which the strains were obtained and the origin of these strains from areas outside the natural geographic range of members of the family Casuarinaceae, where genetic diversity could be lower than in Australia.

  6. Genetic diversity and variability in two Italian autochthonous donkey genetic types assessed by microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato Matassino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 13rd century, Italian domestic autochthonous donkey population has been characterised by Mediterranean grey mousy cruciate ancestral phenotype, currently typical of Amiata donkey (AD genetic type. This phenotype persisted up to the 16th century when a marked introduction of Hispanic and French big sized and dark bay or darkish coloured sires occurred. In the context of a safeguard programme of Latial Equide resources, the aim of this research was to evaluate the genetic diversity and similarity between the AD breed and an autochthonous donkey population native from Lazio, the Viterbese donkey (VD, using molecular markers. A total of 135 animals (50 AD and 85 VD were genetically characterised by using 16 short tandem repeat markers. A high genetic differentiation between populations (FST=0.158; P<0.01 and a low betweenbreeds genetic similarity (0.233±0.085 were observed. Correspondence analysis, the result of STRUCTURE software analysis and analysis of molecular variance would seem to indicate genetically different entities as well. It would be desirable to increase the number of comparison with other breeds to better understand the origin of VD. Moreover, results obtained in this study suggest that the loss of genetic variation observed in VD could mainly derive from unnoticed sub-population structuring (Wahlund effect, rather than to other factors such as inbreeding, null alleles or selection influence.

  7. Exploring Genetic Diversity in Plants Using High-Throughput Sequencing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Yoshihiko; Mochida, Keiichi

    2016-08-01

    Food security has emerged as an urgent concern because of the rising world population. To meet the food demands of the near future, it is required to improve the productivity of various crops, not just of staple food crops. The genetic diversity among plant populations in a given species allows the plants to adapt to various environmental conditions. Such diversity could therefore yield valuable traits that could overcome the food-security challenges. To explore genetic diversity comprehensively and to rapidly identify useful genes and/or allele, advanced high-throughput sequencing techniques, also called next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, have been developed. These provide practical solutions to the challenges in crop genomics. Here, we review various sources of genetic diversity in plants, newly developed genetic diversity-mining tools synergized with NGS techniques, and related genetic approaches such as quantitative trait locus analysis and genome-wide association study.

  8. Genetic Diversity and Molecular Evolution of Chinese Waxy Maize Germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongjian; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hua; Wu, Jinhong; Shi, Biao; Cai, Run; Xu, Yunbi; Wu, Aizhong; Luo, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    Waxy maize (Zea mays L. var. certaina Kulesh), with many excellent characters in terms of starch composition and economic value, has grown in China for a long history and its production has increased dramatically in recent decades. However, the evolution and origin of waxy maize still remains unclear. We studied the genetic diversity of Chinese waxy maize including typical landraces and inbred lines by SSR analysis and the results showed a wide genetic diversity in the Chinese waxy maize germplasm. We analyzed the origin and evolution of waxy maize by sequencing 108 samples, and downloading 52 sequences from GenBank for the waxy locus in a number of accessions from genus Zea. A sharp reduction of nucleotide diversity and significant neutrality tests (Tajima’s D and Fu and Li’s F*) were observed at the waxy locus in Chinese waxy maize but not in nonglutinous maize. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Chinese waxy maize originated from the cultivated flint maize and most of the modern waxy maize inbred lines showed a distinct independent origin and evolution process compared with the germplasm from Southwest China. The results indicated that an agronomic trait can be quickly improved to meet production demand by selection. PMID:23818949

  9. Limited genetic diversity preceded extinction of the Tasmanian tiger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Brandon R; Renfree, Marilyn B; Heider, Thomas; Mayer, Frieder; Hildebrandt, Thomas B; Pask, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    The Tasmanian tiger or thylacine was the largest carnivorous marsupial when Europeans first reached Australia. Sadly, the last known thylacine died in captivity in 1936. A recent analysis of the genome of the closely related and extant Tasmanian devil demonstrated limited genetic diversity between individuals. While a similar lack of diversity has been reported for the thylacine, this analysis was based on just two individuals. Here we report the sequencing of an additional 12 museum-archived specimens collected between 102 and 159 years ago. We examined a portion of the mitochondrial DNA hyper-variable control region and determined that all sequences were on average 99.5% identical at the nucleotide level. As a measure of accuracy we also sequenced mitochondrial DNA from a mother and two offspring. As expected, these samples were found to be 100% identical, validating our methods. We also used 454 sequencing to reconstruct 2.1 kilobases of the mitochondrial genome, which shared 99.91% identity with the two complete thylacine mitochondrial genomes published previously. Our thylacine genomic data also contained three highly divergent putative nuclear mitochondrial sequences, which grouped phylogenetically with the published thylacine mitochondrial homologs but contained 100-fold more polymorphisms than the conserved fragments. Together, our data suggest that the thylacine population in Tasmania had limited genetic diversity prior to its extinction, possibly as a result of their geographic isolation from mainland Australia approximately 10,000 years ago.

  10. Limited genetic diversity preceded extinction of the Tasmanian tiger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon R Menzies

    Full Text Available The Tasmanian tiger or thylacine was the largest carnivorous marsupial when Europeans first reached Australia. Sadly, the last known thylacine died in captivity in 1936. A recent analysis of the genome of the closely related and extant Tasmanian devil demonstrated limited genetic diversity between individuals. While a similar lack of diversity has been reported for the thylacine, this analysis was based on just two individuals. Here we report the sequencing of an additional 12 museum-archived specimens collected between 102 and 159 years ago. We examined a portion of the mitochondrial DNA hyper-variable control region and determined that all sequences were on average 99.5% identical at the nucleotide level. As a measure of accuracy we also sequenced mitochondrial DNA from a mother and two offspring. As expected, these samples were found to be 100% identical, validating our methods. We also used 454 sequencing to reconstruct 2.1 kilobases of the mitochondrial genome, which shared 99.91% identity with the two complete thylacine mitochondrial genomes published previously. Our thylacine genomic data also contained three highly divergent putative nuclear mitochondrial sequences, which grouped phylogenetically with the published thylacine mitochondrial homologs but contained 100-fold more polymorphisms than the conserved fragments. Together, our data suggest that the thylacine population in Tasmania had limited genetic diversity prior to its extinction, possibly as a result of their geographic isolation from mainland Australia approximately 10,000 years ago.

  11. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Chinese waxy maize germplasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjian Zheng

    Full Text Available Waxy maize (Zea mays L. var. certaina Kulesh, with many excellent characters in terms of starch composition and economic value, has grown in China for a long history and its production has increased dramatically in recent decades. However, the evolution and origin of waxy maize still remains unclear. We studied the genetic diversity of Chinese waxy maize including typical landraces and inbred lines by SSR analysis and the results showed a wide genetic diversity in the Chinese waxy maize germplasm. We analyzed the origin and evolution of waxy maize by sequencing 108 samples, and downloading 52 sequences from GenBank for the waxy locus in a number of accessions from genus Zea. A sharp reduction of nucleotide diversity and significant neutrality tests (Tajima's D and Fu and Li's F* were observed at the waxy locus in Chinese waxy maize but not in nonglutinous maize. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Chinese waxy maize originated from the cultivated flint maize and most of the modern waxy maize inbred lines showed a distinct independent origin and evolution process compared with the germplasm from Southwest China. The results indicated that an agronomic trait can be quickly improved to meet production demand by selection.

  12. Analysis of the genetic diversity and structure across a wide range of germplasm reveals prominent gene flow in apple at the European level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrestarazu, Jorge; Denancé, Caroline; Ravon, Elisa; Guyader, Arnaud; Guisnel, Rémi; Feugey, Laurence; Poncet, Charles; Lateur, Marc; Houben, Patrick; Ordidge, Matthew; Fernandez-Fernandez, Felicidad; Evans, Kate M; Paprstein, Frantisek; Sedlak, Jiri; Nybom, Hilde; Garkava-Gustavsson, Larisa; Miranda, Carlos; Gassmann, Jennifer; Kellerhals, Markus; Suprun, Ivan; Pikunova, Anna V; Krasova, Nina G; Torutaeva, Elnura; Dondini, Luca; Tartarini, Stefano; Laurens, François; Durel, Charles-Eric

    2016-06-08

    The amount and structure of genetic diversity in dessert apple germplasm conserved at a European level is mostly unknown, since all diversity studies conducted in Europe until now have been performed on regional or national collections. Here, we applied a common set of 16 SSR markers to genotype more than 2,400 accessions across 14 collections representing three broad European geographic regions (North + East, West and South) with the aim to analyze the extent, distribution and structure of variation in the apple genetic resources in Europe. A Bayesian model-based clustering approach showed that diversity was organized in three groups, although these were only moderately differentiated (FST = 0.031). A nested Bayesian clustering approach allowed identification of subgroups which revealed internal patterns of substructure within the groups, allowing a finer delineation of the variation into eight subgroups (FST = 0.044). The first level of stratification revealed an asymmetric division of the germplasm among the three groups, and a clear association was found with the geographical regions of origin of the cultivars. The substructure revealed clear partitioning of genetic groups among countries, but also interesting associations between subgroups and breeding purposes of recent cultivars or particular usage such as cider production. Additional parentage analyses allowed us to identify both putative parents of more than 40 old and/or local cultivars giving interesting insights in the pedigree of some emblematic cultivars. The variation found at group and subgroup levels may reflect a combination of historical processes of migration/selection and adaptive factors to diverse agricultural environments that, together with genetic drift, have resulted in extensive genetic variation but limited population structure. The European dessert apple germplasm represents an important source of genetic diversity with a strong historical and patrimonial value. The present

  13. Endemic insular and coastal Tunisian date palm genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehdi-Azouzi, Salwa; Cherif, Emira; Guenni, Karim; Abdelkrim, Ahmed Ben; Bermil, Aymen; Rhouma, Soumaya; Salah, Mohamed Ben; Santoni, Sylvain; Pintaud, Jean Christophe; Aberlenc-Bertossi, Frédérique; Hannachi, Amel Salhi

    2016-04-01

    The breeding of crop species relies on the valorisation of ancestral or wild varieties to enrich the cultivated germplasm. The Tunisian date palm genetic patrimony is being threatened by diversity loss and global climate change. We have conducted a genetic study to evaluate the potential of spontaneous coastal resources to improve the currently exploited Tunisian date palm genetic pool. Eighteen microsatellite loci of Phoenix dactylifera L. were used to compare the genetic diversity of coastal accessions from Kerkennah, Djerba, Gabès and continental date palm accessions from Tozeur. A collection of 105 date palms from the four regions was analysed. This study has provided us with an extensive understanding of the local genetic diversity and its distribution. The coastal date palm genotypes exhibit a high and specific genetic diversity. These genotypes are certainly an untapped reservoir of agronomically important genes to improve cultivated germplasm in continental date palm.

  14. Is there a positive relationship between naturalness and genetic diversity in forest tree communities?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehenkel, C.; Corral-Rivas, J. J.; Castellanos-Bocaz, H. A.; Pinedo-Alvarez, A.

    2009-07-01

    Abstract The concepts of genetic diversity and naturalness are well known as measures of conservation values and as descriptors of state or condition. A lack of research evaluating the relationship between genetic diversity and naturalness in biological communities, along with the possible implications in terms of evolutionary aspects and conservation management, make this subject particularly important as regards forest tree communities.We therefore examined the following hypothesis: the genetic diversity of a central-European tree stand averaged over species increases with the naturalness of the stand, as defined by the Potential Natural Vegetation (PNV). The results obtained show that the hypothesis is unsustainable because differences between the averaged genetic diversities of the unnatural and semi-natural stand classes (69 cases) were mostly non-significant. Moreover in three cases, the average genetic diversity of unnatural stand classes was significantly higher than the average genetic diversity of the semi-natural stand classes. A significantly lower average genetic diversity of unnatural stand class was not detected in the statistical analysis. Thus, the naturalness of a tree species community, as inferred from PNV, does not serve as a straightforward indicator of ecological stability when the genetic diversity and the adaptability of tree species are unknown. (Author) 30 refs.

  15. Esterase polymorphism for genetic diversity analysis of some accessions of a native forage grass, Mesosetum chaseae Luces, from the Brazilian Pantanal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Clara S. Meirelles

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to estimate the genetic diversity within the samples of Mesosetum chaseae from the Embrapa Pantanal Germplasm Bank (BAG and assess how they are genetically structured to guide proposals to: 1 identify native forages for further testing to measure their suitability for sowing in conjunction with or as an alternative to exotic forages, mainly Urochloa humidicola; and 2 improve the species M. chaseae with samples that are maintained in the BAG. Isozyme α- and β-esterases were analyzed in 10 accessions collected from different locations in the Nhecolândia sub-region of the Pantanal, and maintained in the BAG. Accessions A11, which showed the highest effective number of alleles, and A32 with the highest average values of expected and observed heterozygosity, were identified as warranting further study as possible options for sowing as pasture forages, as well as for use in recovering poor and degraded areas in the Pantanal region. A high level of population differentiation was detected among the 10 accessions, indicating that they form genetically structured populations and that all accessions are important samples of M. chaseae, which should be maintained in the BAG. Crosses between sample plants with the highest genetic distances are recommended to implement improvement plans with a prospect of broadening the genetic base of the species.Keywords: Genetic polymorphism, genetic resources, grama-do-cerrado, isoesterases, Poaceae.DOI: 10.17138/TGFT(3194-204

  16. Identification by 16S rDNA fragment amplification and determination of genetic diversity by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of Pasteurella pneumotropica isolated from laboratory rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodjo, A; Villard, L; Veillet, F; Escande, F; Borges, E; Maurin, F; Bonnod, J; Richard, Y

    1999-02-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunistic bacterium frequently isolated from colonies of various laboratory rodents. Identification of this species, including its differentiation into two distinct biotypes (Jawetz and Heyl), is usually based on the use of conventional bacteriologic methods. In this study, a 16S rDNA fragment amplification procedure was developed for use as an alternative method for identification and differentiation of P. pneumotropica. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were two distinctive fragments of 937 and 564 bp specific for biotypes Jawetz and Heyl, respectively. Specificity of PCR products could be achieved by EcoRI cleavage, leading to 596 plus 341-bp and 346 plus 218-bp fragments for each of the amplification products. Use of this procedure confirmed identification of 34 field isolates and allowed definitive identification of some strains that could not have been done by use of bacteriologic examinations. Field isolates subjected to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis had high genetic diversity among biotype Jawetz strains in contrast to biotype Heyl strains. In conclusion, RAPD could represent an additional means for identification of ambiguous strains of biotype Heyl and a valuable epidemiologic tool for identification of biotype Jawetz strains of P. pneumotropica.

  17. Analysis of genetic diversity and genetic relationship of wild hawthorn resources in Xinjiang by ISSR markers%新疆野生山楂资源遗传多样性及亲缘关系的ISSR分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘欢; 廖康; 刘娟; 赵世荣; 孙琪; 曹倩

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide some theoretical basis and technical support for protection and utilization of wild hawthorn resources, genetic diversity and genetic relationship of 63 samples from three varieties of wild hawthorn resources in Xinjiang were analyzed by ISSR molecular marker technology. The results showed that 233 bands were ampliifed with 12 primers by the ISSR-PCR ampliifcation, in which had 221 polymorphism bands, percent of polymorphism loci was 94.4%, and average 19.42 polymorphism bands were ampliifed by every primer. The results of analysis by the software of POPGENE1.32 showed that percentage of polymorphic loci, observed number of alleles, effective number of alleles, Nei’s genetic diversity and Shannon information index of Junggar hawthorn were higher than other two kinds of wild hawthorn, and the indexes of Crabapple hawthorn were lower than Junggar hawthorn and Altai hawthorn. The Nei’s genetic identities of three kinds of wild hawthorn were 0.862 2-0.904 4, and the average value was 0.890 2. The genetic distances of three kinds of wild hawthorn were 0.100 5-0.148 3, and the average value was 0.116 6. In the three kinds of wild hawthorn, genetic variation of Junggar hawthorn were more rich than the others, followed by Altai hawthorn, and Crabapple hawthorn had the less genetic variation. The genetic relationship between Altai hawthorn and Crabapple hawthorn was closer, but that was farther between Crabapple hawthorn and Junggar hawthorn.%为给新疆野生山楂资源的保护与利用提供理论依据和技术支持,采取新疆3种野生山楂共计63份材料,利用ISSR标记技术,对其遗传多样性和亲缘关系进行分析。结果表明,12条引物共扩增出233条带,其中多态性条带221条,多态性位点率为94.4%,平均每个引物获得19.42个扩增带。POPGENE1.32分析结果表明:3种野生山楂材料的多态性位点率、观测等位基因数、有效等位基因数、Nei’s基因多样性

  18. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of the attachment glycoprotein of phocine distemper viruses of the 2002 and 1988 epizootics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L; Arctander, P; Jensen, T H

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the possible origin and spread of the dramatic re-emergent 2002 distemper epizootic observed among seals in Danish Waters, we have sequenced wild-type genes of the attachment (H) glycoproteins of viruses from both the 2002 and 1988 epizootics. Phylogenetic analysis of the H genes o...... epizootic in Danish Waters was investigated and determined to be caused by canine distemper virus, the closest relative of PDV, revealing no direct epidemiological link to the seal epizootics. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......To investigate the possible origin and spread of the dramatic re-emergent 2002 distemper epizootic observed among seals in Danish Waters, we have sequenced wild-type genes of the attachment (H) glycoproteins of viruses from both the 2002 and 1988 epizootics. Phylogenetic analysis of the H genes...... of phocine distemper virus (PDV) together with other morbilliviruses, suggests that the re-emergent 2002 PDV is more closely related to a putative recent ancestral PDV than the 1988 PDV isolates. Moreover, upsurges of distemper disease in land-living carnivores linked in time and locality to the 2002 seal...

  19. Genetic diversity of seed lipid content and fatty acid composition in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-01-08

    Jan 8, 2007 ... Genetic diversity of seed lipid content and fatty acid composition in some .... Seed oil was estimated by conventional Soxhlet method using petroleum ether as .... Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC Association of Official ...

  20. Genetic diversity and population structure of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding genetic variation in germplasm collection is essential for the conservation and their efficient use in plant breeding. Cucumber is an important vegetable crop worldwide. Previous studies revealed a low genetic diversity in cucumber, but detailed insights into the crop’s genetic structu...

  1. Utility of RAPD marker for genetic diversity analysis in gamma rays and ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS)-treated Jatropha curcas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakshanamoorthy, Dharman; Selvaraj, Radhakrishnan; Chidambaram, Alagappan

    2015-02-01

    The presence of important chemical and physical properties in Jatropha curcas makes it a valuable raw material for numerous industrial applications, including the production of biofuel. Hence, the researcher's interest is diversified to develop more and better varieties with outstanding agronomic characteristics using conventional breeding. Among these, mutation breeding is one of the best approaches to bring genetic changes in plant species. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diversity and genetic relationship among J. curcas mutants, which were obtained from different doses of gamma rays (control, 5 Kr, 10 Kr, 15 Kr, 20 Kr and 25 Kr) and EMS (1%, 2%, 3% and 4%), using RAPD marker. Among the 21 random primers, 20 produced polymorphic bands. The primers, OPM-14 and OPAW-13, produced a minimum number of bands (3) each across the ten mutants, while the primer OPF-13 produced the maximum number of bands (10), followed by the primers OPU-13, OPAM-06, OPAW-09 and OPD-05, which produced 9 bands each. The number of amplicons varied from 3 to 10, with an average of 7 bands, out of which 4.57 were polymorphic. The percentage of polymorphism ranged from 0.00 to 100 with an average of 57%. In the present study, RAPD markers were found most polymorphic, with an average polymorphism information content (PIC) value of 0.347, effective multiplex ratio (EMR) of 35.14, marker index (MI) of 14.19, resolution power (Rp) of 11.19, effective marker index (EMI) of 8.21 and genotype index (GI) of 0.36, indicating that random primers are useful in studies of genetic characterization in J. curcas mutant plants. In a dendrogram constructed based on Jaccard's similarity coefficients, the mutants were grouped into three main clusters viz., (a) control, 10 Kr, 15 Kr, 20 Kr, 2% EMS, and 3% EMS, (b) 5 Kr and 1% EMS, and (c) 25 Kr and 4% EMS mutants. Based on the attributes of the random primers and polymorphism studied, it is concluded that RAPD analysis offers a useful molecular marker

  2. Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in mung bean germplasm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. Roopa Lavanya; Jyoti Srivastava; Shirish A. Ranade

    2008-04-01

    RAPD profiles were used to identify the extent of diversity among 54 accessions of mung bean that included both improved and local land races. Out of the 40 primers screened, seven primers generated 174 amplification products with an average of 24.85 bands per primer. The RAPD profiles were analysed for Jaccard’s similarity coefficients that was found to be in the range from 0 to 0.48, indicating the presence of wide range of genetic diversity at molecular level. Cluster analysis was carried out based on distances (1-similarity coefficient) using neighbour-joining method in Free Tree package. The dendrogram resolved all the accessions into two major clusters, I (with 11 accessions) and II (with 43 accessions). However, the cluster was further divided into four subclusters (II A with six, II B with nine, II C with 15 and II D with 13 accessions). The distribution of the accessions in different clusters and subclusters appeares to be related to their performance in field conditions for 10 morphological traits that were scored. This study indicated that the RAPD profiles provide an easy and simple technique for preliminary genetic diversity assessment of mung bean accessions that may reflect morphological trait differences among them.

  3. Genetic Diversity of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis Isolated in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hwan Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The plant pathogenic bacterial genus Pectobacteirum consists of heterogeneous strains. The P. carotovorum species is a complex strain showing divergent characteristics, and a new subspecies named P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis has been identified recently. In this paper, we re-identified the P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis isolates from those classified under the subspecies carotovorum and newly isolated P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis strains. All isolates were able to produce plant cell-wall degrading enzymes such as pectate lyase, polygalacturonase, cellulase and protease. We used genetic and biochemical methods to examine the diversity of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis isolates, and found genetic diversity within the brasiliensis subsp. isolates in Korea. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis based on the recA gene revealed a unique pattern for the brasiliensis subspecies. The Korean brasiliensis subsp. isolates were divided into four clades based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. However, correlations between clades and isolated hosts or year could not be found, suggesting that diverse brasiliensis subsp. isolates existed.

  4. Extreme genetic diversity in asexual grass thrips populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontcuberta García-Cuenca, A; Dumas, Z; Schwander, T

    2016-05-01

    The continuous generation of genetic variation has been proposed as one of the main factors explaining the maintenance of sexual reproduction in nature. However, populations of asexual individuals may attain high levels of genetic diversity through within-lineage diversification, replicate transitions to asexuality from sexual ancestors and migration. How these mechanisms affect genetic variation in populations of closely related sexual and asexual taxa can therefore provide insights into the role of genetic diversity for the maintenance of sexual reproduction. Here, we evaluate patterns of intra- and interpopulation genetic diversity in sexual and asexual populations of Aptinothrips rufus grass thrips. Asexual A. rufus populations are found throughout the world, whereas sexual populations appear to be confined to few locations in the Mediterranean region. We found that asexual A. rufus populations are characterized by extremely high levels of genetic diversity, both in comparison with their sexual relatives and in comparison with other asexual species. Migration is extensive among asexual populations over large geographic distances, whereas close sexual populations are strongly isolated from each other. The combination of extensive migration with replicate evolution of asexual lineages, and a past demographic expansion in at least one of them, generated high local clone diversities in A. rufus. These high clone diversities in asexual populations may mimic certain benefits conferred by sex via genetic diversity and could help explain the extreme success of asexual A. rufus populations.

  5. Genetic diversity analysis in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) using AFLP and transferable microsatellite markers from azuki bean (Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi & Ohashi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S K; Gopalakrishna, T

    2009-02-01

    Genetic diversity in 20 elite blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) genotypes was studied using microsatellite and AFLP markers. Thirty-six microsatellite markers from azuki bean (Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi & Ohashi) were successfully amplified across the 20 blackgram genotypes and 33 microsatellite markers showed polymorphism. A total of 137 microsatellite alleles were generated with an average of 4.1 alleles per locus. The number of alleles ranged from two to nine and the polymorphic information content value for the microsatellite markers varied from 0.10 to 0.87 with an average of 0.49. Microsatellite markers were highly informative and a combination of only three microsatellite markers (CEDG264, CEDG173, and CEDG044) was sufficient to discriminate all 20 blackgram genotypes. In the case of AFLP, 11 primer pairs generated 324 polymorphic marker fragments. The polymorphic information content values for AFLP primer combinations ranged from 0.21 to 0.34 with an average of 0.29. Similarity measures and clustering analyses were made using microsatellite and AFLP data separately. The resulting dendrograms distributed the 20 blackgram genotypes into five main clusters. The dendrograms were comparable with each other with the Mantel test between the cophenetic matrices of microsatellite data and AFLP data showing moderate correlation (r = 0.64). The results of the principal components analysis were well congruent with the dendrograms. In the dendrograms as well as in the principal components analyses, genotype Trombay wild (Vigna mungo var. silvestris) was placed separately from rest of the genotypes. This study demonstrated that the azuki bean microsatellite markers are highly polymorphic and informative and can be successfully used for genome analysis in blackgram. Results indicate that sufficient variability is present in the blackgram genotypes and would be helpful in the selection of suitable parents for breeding purposes and gene mapping studies.

  6. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses circulating in Bangladesh from 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, S P; Balasuriya, U B R; Yamage, M

    2013-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has been endemic in Bangladesh since its first isolation in February 2007. Phylogenetic analysis of the haemagglutinin (HA) gene of HPAI H5N1 viruses demonstrated that 25 Bangladeshi isolates including two human isolates from 2007-2011 along with some isolates from neighbouring Asian countries (India, Bhutan, Myanmar, Nepal, China and Vietnam) segregate into two distinct clades (2.2 and 2.3). There was clear evidence of introduction of clade 2.3.2 and 2.3.4 viruses in 2011 in addition to clade 2.2 viruses that had been in circulation in Bangladesh since 2007. The data clearly demonstrated the movement of H5N1 strains between Asian countries included in this study due to migration of wild birds and/or illegal movement of poultry across borders. Interestingly, the two human isolates were closely related to the clade 2.2 Bangladeshi chicken isolates indicating that they have originated from chickens. Furthermore, comparative amino acid sequence analysis revealed several substitutions (including 189R>K and 282I>V) in HA protein of some clade 2.2 Bangladeshi viruses including the human isolates, suggesting there was antigenic drift in clade 2.2.3 viruses that were circulating between 2008 and 2011. Overall, the data imply genetic diversity among circulating viruses and multiple introductions of H5N1 viruses with an increased risk of human infections in Bangladesh, and establishment of H5N1 virus in wild and domestic bird populations, which demands active surveillance. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Does genetic diversity hinder parasite evolution in social insect colonies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, William Owen Hamar; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    2006-01-01

    of host genetic diversity on parasite evolution by carrying out serial passages of a virulent fungal pathogen through leaf-cutting ant workers of known genotypes. Parasite virulence increased over the nine-generation span of the experiment while spore production decreased. The effect of host relatedness......Polyandry is often difficult to explain because benefits of the behaviour have proved elusive. In social insects, polyandry increases the genetic diversity of workers within a colony and this has been suggested to improve the resistance of the colony to disease. Here we examine the possible impact...... upon virulence appeared limited. However, parasites cycled through more genetically diverse hosts were more likely to go extinct during the experiment and parasites cycled through more genetically similar hosts had greater spore production. These results indicate that host genetic diversity may indeed...

  8. Genetic diversity in cattle of eight regions in Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Miguel Cordero-Solórzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the extent of inter-regional genetic diversity present in the cattle of Costa Rica. 1498 DNA samples were collected (year 2013 from eight different regions within the country. Allelic frequencies and major population genetic parameters were determined for eighteen microsatellite markers. An analysis of molecular variance was also carried out and genetic distances were calculated between cattle from different regions. At the national level, a high allelic diversity was found, with an average of 14.6±1.01 observed alleles and 5.6+0.37 effective alleles per marker. Observed (Ho and expected (He heterozygosities were 0.76±0.01 and 0.81±01, respectively. Polymorphic Information Content (PIC and Coefficient of Inbreeding (FIS were 0.79±0.06 and 0.06±0.004, respectively. At the regional level, Ho ranged between 0.73±0.02 in the South Central region to 0.78±0.01 in the North Huetar region. The dendrogram showed three clearly distinct groups, Metropolitan Central and West Central regions in one group, Caribbean Huetar, South Central, Central Pacific and Chorotega regions in a second group; and North Huetar and Brunca regions in a third intermediate group. Estimates of genetic differentiation (RST were significant between regions from different groups and non-significant for regions within the same group. Genetic differences between regions are related to differential proliferation of breed groups based on their adaptability to the agro-ecological conditions and production systems prevailing in each region.

  9. Genetic diversity in populations of Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranitsina, A S; Telegeev, G D; Maliuta, S S; Bezrukov, V F

    2006-01-01

    RAPD analysis was used to examine the extent of genetic polymorphism in two populations of Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) from Antarctic Islands (Petermann and Livingston). The chosen two of three 10 mer oligonucleotide primers accordingly to preliminary results showed different levels of polymorphism in Gentoo penguins at Petermann Island (from 23.53 to 42.86%) and Livingston Island (from 52.94 to 57.14%). Nei's similarity coefficients were in range from 0.5606 (when Gentoo genome profiles were compared with RAPD profiles of two related penguin species: Pygoscelis adeliae (Adelie) and Pygoscelis antarctica (Chinstrep)) to 0.9281 among observed Gentoo penguin populations. Nei's distances values ranged from 0.0746 to 0.5787 among the populations and species. The obtained results will be used for further estimation of genetic diversity of Gentoo penguins and determination of their taxonomic status.

  10. Genetic Diversity of Eight Domestic Goat Populations Raised in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Bulut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the intra- and intergenetic diversities of eight different goat populations in Turkey including Hair, Angora, Kilis, Yayladag, Shami, Honamli, Saanen, and Alpine. A total of 244 DNA samples were genotyped using 11 microsatellites loci. The genetic differentiation between breeds was considerable as a result of the statistically significant (P0.05. Heterozygosity values ranged between 0.62 and 0.73. According to the structure and assignment test, Angora and Yayladag goats were assigned to the breed they belong to, while other breeds were assigned to two or more different groups. Because this study for the first time presented genetic data on the Yayladag goat, results of structure analysis and assigned test suggest that further analyses are needed using additional and different molecular markers.

  11. Genetic diversity increases insect herbivory on oak saplings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastien Castagneyrol

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence from community genetics studies suggests that ecosystem functions supported by plant species richness can also be provided by genetic diversity within plant species. This is not yet true for the diversity-resistance relationship as it is still unclear whether damage by insect herbivores responds to genetic diversity in host plant populations. We developed a manipulative field experiment based on a synthetic community approach, with 15 mixtures of one to four oak (Quercus robur half-sib families. We quantified genetic diversity at the plot level by genotyping all oak saplings and assessed overall damage caused by ectophagous and endophagous herbivores along a gradient of increasing genetic diversity. Damage due to ectophagous herbivores increased with the genetic diversity in oak sapling populations as a result of higher levels of damage in mixtures than in monocultures for all families (complementarity effect rather than because of the presence of more susceptible oak genotypes in mixtures (selection effect. Assemblages of different oak genotypes would benefit polyphagous herbivores via improved host patch location, spill over among neighbouring saplings and diet mixing. By contrast, genetic diversity was a poor predictor of the abundance of endophagous herbivores, which increased with individual sapling apparency. Plant genetic diversity may not provide sufficient functional contrast to prevent tree sapling colonization by specialist herbivores while enhancing the foraging of generalist herbivores. Long term studies are nevertheless required to test whether the effect of genetic diversity on herbivory change with the ontogeny of trees and local adaptation of specialist herbivores.

  12. Genetic Diversity among Clinical Isolates of Candida glabrata Analyzed by Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA and Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldo, Xavier M.; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Hernández-Rodríguez, César

    2003-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 47 clinical and reference strains of Candida glabrata from several geographical origins and diverse clinical disorders, with different antifungal susceptibilities, as well as their genetic relationships were studied through multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) techniques. The genetic diversity estimated for 11 MLEE loci measured as average heterozygosity (h) was 0.055. A high level of genetic relatedness among isolates was established by cluster analysis. Forty-nine RAPD markers were analyzed, and the average genetic diversity among isolates, estimated by Shannon's index (Ho), was 0.372. The ΦST values estimated through an analysis of molecular variance to assess genetic differentiation among isolates revealed no genetic differentiation among them. Our results revealed very low genetic diversity among isolates, a lack of differentiation, and no association with their geographic origin and the clinical characteristics. PMID:14532225

  13. Comparison of genetic diversity structure analyses of SSR molecular marker data within apple (Malus×domestica) genetic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzak, Josef; Paprštein, František; Henychová, Alena; Sedlák, Jiří

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare traditional hierarchical clustering techniques and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) with the model-based Bayesian cluster analyses in relation to subpopulation differentiation based on breeding history and geographical origin of apple (Malus×domestica Borkh.) cultivars and landraces. We presented the use of a set of 10 microsatellite (SSR) loci for genetic diversity structure analyses of 273 apple accessions from national genetic resources. These SSR loci yielded a total of 113 polymorphic SSR alleles, with 5-18 alleles per locus. SSR molecular data were successfully used in binary and allelic input format for all genetic diversity analyses, but allelic molecular data did not reveal reliable results with the NTSYS-pc and BAPS softwares. A traditional cluster analysis still provided an easy and effective way for determining genetic diversity structure in the apple germplasm collection. A model-based Bayesian analysis also provided the clustering results in accordance to traditional cluster analysis, but the analyses were distorted by the presence of a dominant group of apple genetic resources owing to the narrow origin of the apple genome. PCoA confirmed that there were no noticeable differences in genetic diversity structure of apple genetic resources during the breeding history. The results of our analyses are useful in the context of enhancing apple collection management, sampling of core collections, and improving breeding processes.

  14. Population Genetic Diversity in the Australian 'Seascape': A Bioregion Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C Pope

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity within species may promote resilience to environmental change, yet little is known about how such variation is distributed at broad geographic scales. Here we develop a novel Bayesian methodology to analyse multi-species genetic diversity data in order to identify regions of high or low genetic diversity. We apply this method to co-distributed taxa from Australian marine waters. We extracted published summary statistics of population genetic diversity from 118 studies of 101 species and > 1000 populations from the Australian marine economic zone. We analysed these data using two approaches: a linear mixed model for standardised data, and a mixed beta-regression for unstandardised data, within a Bayesian framework. Our beta-regression approach performed better than models using standardised data, based on posterior predictive tests. The best model included region (Integrated Marine and Coastal Regionalisation of Australia (IMCRA bioregions, latitude and latitude squared. Removing region as an explanatory variable greatly reduced model performance (delta DIC 23.4. Several bioregions were identified as possessing notably high genetic diversity. Genetic diversity increased towards the equator with a 'hump' in diversity across the range studied (-9.4 to -43.7°S. Our results suggest that factors correlated with both region and latitude play a role in shaping intra-specific genetic diversity, and that bioregion can be a useful management unit for intra-specific as well as species biodiversity. Our novel statistical model should prove useful for future analyses of within species genetic diversity at broad taxonomic and geographic scales.

  15. 南瓜种质资源遗传多态性的ISSR分析%Analysis of Genetic Diversity in Squash by ISSR Markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱海生; 卢丽芳; 陈敏氡; 林珲; 王彬; 温庆放; 林义章

    2015-01-01

    本研究应用ISSR分子标记技术对85份南瓜种质资源进行遗传多样性分析。结果显示:从100条ISSR引物中筛选出12条引物进行PCR扩增,共获得条带125条,多态性占115条,10条条带为所有南瓜品种所共有,平均每个引物的条带数为10.42条,多态性比例为92%。通过Ntsys2.10e软件计算出85份南瓜资源的遗传相似系数0.3840~1.0000之间。通过聚类分析将所收集的南瓜品种分为三类:分别是美洲南瓜、中国南瓜和印度南瓜,其中亲缘关系较近的是中国南瓜和美洲南瓜,中国南瓜和美洲南瓜与印度南瓜的亲缘关系均比较远。本研究为南瓜种质资源的保护、利用及新品种的培育提供了科学依据。%In this study, the genetic diversity of 85 accessions in Squash was revealed by ISSR markers. 12 polymorphic primers were screened out of 100 polymorphic primers, which generated 125 DNA bands with average 10.42 bands each primer. 115 bands were polymorphic, 10 bands were shared with all tested primers. The ratio of polymorphic bands was 92%, and the genetic similarity coefficient of 85 accessions in squash ranged between 0.384 0 to 1.000 0, which was calculated by Ntsys2.10e. The cluster analysis showed that squashes could be divided into three groups: Cucurbita pepo L., Cucurbita moschata, and Cucurbita maxima. The relationship of Cucurbita moschata and Cucurbita pepo L. was close, whereas their kinship with the Cucurbita maxima was far. This study provided scientific basis for the protection and utilization of squash germplasm resources and cultivation of new varieties.

  16. Genomic and Genetic Diversity within the Pseudomonas fluorescens Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Garrido-Sanz

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas fluorescens complex includes Pseudomonas strains that have been taxonomically assigned to more than fifty different species, many of which have been described as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR with potential applications in biocontrol and biofertilization. So far the phylogeny of this complex has been analyzed according to phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA, MLSA and inferred by whole-genome analysis. However, since most of the type strains have not been fully sequenced and new species are frequently described, correlation between taxonomy and phylogenomic analysis is missing. In recent years, the genomes of a large number of strains have been sequenced, showing important genomic heterogeneity and providing information suitable for genomic studies that are important to understand the genomic and genetic diversity shown by strains of this complex. Based on MLSA and several whole-genome sequence-based analyses of 93 sequenced strains, we have divided the P. fluorescens complex into eight phylogenomic groups that agree with previous works based on type strains. Digital DDH (dDDH identified 69 species and 75 subspecies within the 93 genomes. The eight groups corresponded to clustering with a threshold of 31.8% dDDH, in full agreement with our MLSA. The Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI approach showed inconsistencies regarding the assignment to species and to the eight groups. The small core genome of 1,334 CDSs and the large pan-genome of 30,848 CDSs, show the large diversity and genetic heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens complex. However, a low number of strains were enough to explain most of the CDSs diversity at core and strain-specific genomic fractions. Finally, the identification and analysis of group-specific genome and the screening for distinctive characters revealed a phylogenomic distribution of traits among the groups that provided insights into biocontrol and bioremediation applications as well as their role as

  17. Genomic and Genetic Diversity within the Pseudomonas fluorescens Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Sanz, Daniel; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Göker, Markus; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens complex includes Pseudomonas strains that have been taxonomically assigned to more than fifty different species, many of which have been described as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) with potential applications in biocontrol and biofertilization. So far the phylogeny of this complex has been analyzed according to phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA, MLSA and inferred by whole-genome analysis. However, since most of the type strains have not been fully sequenced and new species are frequently described, correlation between taxonomy and phylogenomic analysis is missing. In recent years, the genomes of a large number of strains have been sequenced, showing important genomic heterogeneity and providing information suitable for genomic studies that are important to understand the genomic and genetic diversity shown by strains of this complex. Based on MLSA and several whole-genome sequence-based analyses of 93 sequenced strains, we have divided the P. fluorescens complex into eight phylogenomic groups that agree with previous works based on type strains. Digital DDH (dDDH) identified 69 species and 75 subspecies within the 93 genomes. The eight groups corresponded to clustering with a threshold of 31.8% dDDH, in full agreement with our MLSA. The Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) approach showed inconsistencies regarding the assignment to species and to the eight groups. The small core genome of 1,334 CDSs and the large pan-genome of 30,848 CDSs, show the large diversity and genetic heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens complex. However, a low number of strains were enough to explain most of the CDSs diversity at core and strain-specific genomic fractions. Finally, the identification and analysis of group-specific genome and the screening for distinctive characters revealed a phylogenomic distribution of traits among the groups that provided insights into biocontrol and bioremediation applications as well as their role as PGPR.

  18. Genetic diversity in introduced populations with an Allee effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Meike J; Gabriel, Wilfried; Metzler, Dirk

    2014-09-01

    A phenomenon that strongly influences the demography of small introduced populations and thereby potentially their genetic diversity is the demographic Allee effect, a reduction in population growth rates at small population sizes. We take a stochastic modeling approach to investigate levels of genetic diversity in populations that successfully overcame either a strong Allee effect, in which populations smaller than a certain critical size are expected to decline, or a weak Allee effect, in which the population growth rate is reduced at small sizes but not negative. Our results indicate that compared to successful populations without an Allee effect, successful populations with a strong Allee effect tend to (1) derive from larger founder population sizes and thus have a higher initial amount of genetic variation, (2) spend fewer generations at small population sizes where genetic drift is particularly strong, and (3) spend more time around the critical population size and thus experience more genetic drift there. In the case of multiple introduction events, there is an additional increase in diversity because Allee-effect populations tend to derive from a larger number of introduction events than other populations. Altogether, a strong Allee effect can either increase or decrease genetic diversity, depending on the average founder population size. By contrast, a weak Allee effect tends to decrease genetic diversity across the entire range of founder population sizes. Finally, we show that it is possible in principle to infer critical population sizes from genetic data, although this would require information from many independently introduced populations.

  19. Genetic diversity analysis among male and female Jojoba genotypes employing gene targeted molecular markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikrujam, Monika; Kumar, Jatin; Agrawal, Veena

    2015-09-01

    To detect genetic variations among different Simmondsia chinensis genotypes, two gene targeted markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) were employed in terms of their informativeness and efficiency in analyzing genetic relationships among different genotypes. A total of 15 SCoT and 17 CBDP primers detected genetic polymorphism among 39 Jojoba genotypes (22 females and 17 males). Comparatively, CBDP markers proved to be more effective than SCoT markers in terms of percentage polymorphism as the former detecting an average of 53.4% and the latter as 49.4%. The Polymorphic information content (PIC) value and marker index (MI) of CBPD were 0.43 and 1.10, respectively which were higher than those of SCoT where the respective values of PIC and MI were 0.38 and 1.09. While comparing male and female genotype populations, the former showed higher variation in respect of polymorphic percentage and PIC, MI and Rp values over female populations. Nei's diversity (h) and Shannon index (I) were calculated for each genotype and found that the genotype "MS F" (in both markers) was highly diverse and genotypes "Q104 F" (SCoT) and "82-18 F" (CBDP) were least diverse among the female genotype populations. Among male genotypes, "32 M" (CBDP) and "MS M" (SCoT) revealed highest h and I values while "58-5 M" (both markers) was the least diverse. Jaccard's similarity co-efficient of SCoT markers ranged from 0.733 to 0.922 in female genotypes and 0.941 to 0.746 in male genotype population. Likewise, CBDP data analysis also revealed similarity ranging from 0.751 to 0.958 within female genotypes and 0.754 to 0.976 within male genotype populations thereby, indicating genetically diverse Jojoba population. Employing the NTSYS (Numerical taxonomy and multivariate analysis system) Version 2.1 software, both the markers generated dendrograms which revealed that all the Jojoba genotypes were clustered into two major groups, one group consisting of

  20. Genetic diversity analysis among male and female Jojoba genotypes employing gene targeted molecular markers, start codon targeted (SCoT polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Heikrujam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To detect genetic variations among different Simmondsia chinensis genotypes, two gene targeted markers, start codon targeted (SCoT polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP were employed in terms of their informativeness and efficiency in analyzing genetic relationships among different genotypes. A total of 15 SCoT and 17 CBDP primers detected genetic polymorphism among 39 Jojoba genotypes (22 females and 17 males. Comparatively, CBDP markers proved to be more effective than SCoT markers in terms of percentage polymorphism as the former detecting an average of 53.4% and the latter as 49.4%. The Polymorphic information content (PIC value and marker index (MI of CBPD were 0.43 and 1.10, respectively which were higher than those of SCoT where the respective values of PIC and MI were 0.38 and 1.09. While comparing male and female genotype populations, the former showed higher variation in respect of polymorphic percentage and PIC, MI and Rp values over female populations. Nei's diversity (h and Shannon index (I were calculated for each genotype and found that the genotype “MS F” (in both markers was highly diverse and genotypes “Q104 F” (SCoT and “82–18 F” (CBDP were least diverse among the female genotype populations. Among male genotypes, “32 M” (CBDP and “MS M” (SCoT revealed highest h and I values while “58-5 M” (both markers was the least diverse. Jaccard's similarity co-efficient of SCoT markers ranged from 0.733 to 0.922 in female genotypes and 0.941 to 0.746 in male genotype population. Likewise, CBDP data analysis also revealed similarity ranging from 0.751 to 0.958 within female genotypes and 0.754 to 0.976 within male genotype populations thereby, indicating genetically diverse Jojoba population. Employing the NTSYS (Numerical taxonomy and multivariate analysis system Version 2.1 software, both the markers generated dendrograms which revealed that all the Jojoba genotypes were clustered into two major

  1. Levels of genetic diversity and taxonomic status of Epinephelus species in United Arab Emirates fish markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchum, Remi N; Dieng, Mame M; Vaughan, Grace O; Burt, John A; Idaghdour, Youssef

    2016-04-30

    Understanding the patterns of genetic diversity of fish species is essential for marine conservation and management. This is particularly important in the Arabian Gulf where marine life is subject to extreme environmental conditions that could impact genetic diversity. Here we assess genetic diversity of the most commercially important fish in the United Arab Emirates; groupers (Epinephelus spp.). Sequencing of 973 bp mitochondrial DNA from 140 tissue samples collected in four main fish markets revealed 58 haplotypes clustered within three groups. Data analysis revealed the presence of three distinct Epinephelus species being marketed as one species (hammour): Epinephelus coioides, Epinephelus areolatus and Epinephelus bleekeri. We report species-specific genetic markers and demonstrate that all three species exhibit relatively low levels of genetic variation, reflecting the effect of overfishing and environmental pressures. In light of the genetic evidence presented here, conservation and management of groupers in the UAE warrant the implementation of species-specific measures.

  2. Genetic diversity and population structure of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Sudan, Madagascar, French Guiana and Armenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegon, Michela; Durand, Patrick; Menard, Didier; Legrand, Eric; Picot, Stéphane; Nour, Bakri; Davidyants, Vladimir; Santi, Flavia; Severini, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    Polymorphic genetic markers and especially microsatellite analysis can be used to investigate multiple aspects of the biology of Plasmodium species. In the current study, we characterized 7 polymorphic microsatellites in a total of 281 Plasmodium vivax isolates to determine the genetic diversity and population structure of P. vivax populations from Sudan, Madagascar, French Guiana, and Armenia. All four parasite populations were highly polymorphic with 3-32 alleles per locus. Mean genetic diversity values was 0.83, 0.79, 0.78 and 0.67 for Madagascar, French Guiana, Sudan, and Armenia, respectively. Significant genetic differentiation between all four populations was observed.

  3. Assessment of genetic diversity in Triticum spp. and Aegilops spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... 83111, Iran. 2Ilam Agricultural Research Center, Ilam-69317 73834, Iran. ... important food crops such as wheat and its wild relatives. These species ..... diversity trends during domestication and breeding. Theor. Appl. Genet.

  4. Genetic diversity of Ghanaian local chicken populations based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity of Ghanaian local chicken populations based on ... raised across distinct agro-ecological zones and constitute unique populations with variable ... (GHFO) in the southwest and the Coastal Savannah (GHCS) along the coast in ...

  5. Genetic diversity in Kenyan populations of Acacia senegal (L.) willd ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... A. senegal is widely distributed because it tolerates .... Locations of study areas for genetic diversity study of A. senegal in Kenya situated in four districts of ..... Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Center, University of Alberta,.

  6. Study on genetic diversity in Pakistani wheat varieties using simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... genetic diversity of 10 varieties of wheat (T. aestivum) were analyzed using 14 simple sequence repeat. (SSR) primer sets ... wheat every year. To increase .... All PCR reactions were carried out in 25 µl reaction containing 50 -.

  7. Assessing the genetic diversity of cultivars and wild soybeans using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... In this study, we demonstrated the differences of genetic diversity level among 40 soybean accessions of ... It has many advantages, including .... several other provinces abroad and of unknown origin; as control and these ...

  8. Assessment of the genetic diversity of geographically unrelated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JOHN

    2005-05-05

    May 5, 2005 ... Key words: Molecular markers, distribution, cyanobacteria, genetic diversity. ..... Degree of polymorphism and average polymorphism information content (PIC) and marker index (MI) for the ..... monomorphic bands (Table 2).

  9. Centennial olive trees as a reservoir of genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Concepción M.; Trujillo, Isabel; Barrio, Eladio; Belaj, Angjelina; Barranco, Diego; Rallo, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the oldest trees could be a powerful tool both for germplasm collection and for understanding the earliest origins of clonally propagated fruit crops. The olive tree (Olea europaea L.) is a suitable model to study the origin of cultivars due to its long lifespan, resulting in the existence of both centennial and millennial trees across the Mediterranean Basin. Methods The genetic identity and diversity as well as the phylogenetic relationships among the oldest wild and cultivated olives of southern Spain were evaluated by analysing simple sequence repeat markers. Samples from both the canopy and the roots of each tree were analysed to distinguish which trees were self-rooted and which were grafted. The ancient olives were also put into chronological order to infer the antiquity of traditional olive cultivars. Key Results Only 9·6 % out of 104 a priori cultivated ancient genotypes matched current olive cultivars. The percentage of unidentified genotypes was higher among the oldest olives, which could be because they belong to ancient unknown cultivars or because of possible intra-cultivar variability. Comparing the observed patterns of genetic variation made it possible to distinguish which trees were grafted onto putative wild olives. Conclusions This study of ancient olives has been fruitful both for germplasm collection and for enlarging our knowledge about olive domestication. The findings suggest that grafting pre-existing wild olives with olive cultivars was linked to the beginnings of olive growing. Additionally, the low number of genotypes identified in current cultivars points out that the ancient olives from southern Spain constitute a priceless reservoir of genetic diversity. PMID:21852276

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria malaccensis revealed potential for future conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pradeep; Nag, Akshay; Parmar, Rajni; Ghosh, Sneha; Bhau, Brijmohan Singh; Sharma, Ram Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The endangered Aquilaria malaccensis,is an important plant with high economic values. Characterization of genetic diversity and population structure is receiving tremendous attention for effective conservation of genetic resources. Considering important repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A. malaccensis accessions from 10 home gardens of three states of northeast India were assessed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Of the 1153 fragments amplified with four AFLP primer combinations, 916 (79.4%) were found to be polymorphic. Polymorphic information content (PIC) and marker index (MI) of each primer combination correlate significantly with the number of genotypes resolved. Overall, a high genetic diversity (avg. 71.85%) was recorded. Further, high gene flow (Nm: 3.37), low genetic differentiation (FST: 0.069) and high within population genetic variation (93%) suggests that most of the genetic diversity is restricted within population. Neighbour joining (NJ), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and Bayesian-based STRUCTURE grouped all the accessions in two clusters with significant intermixing between populations, therefore, revealed that two genetically distinct gene pools are operating in the A. malaccensis populations cultivated in home gardens. Based on the various diversity inferences, five diverse populations (JOH, FN, HLF, DHM and ITN) were identified, which can be potentially exploited to develop conservation strategies for A. malaccensis.

  11. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria malaccensis revealed potential for future conservation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pradeep Singh; Akshay Nag; Rajni Parmar; Sneha Ghosh; Brijmohan Singh Bhau; Ram Kumar Sharma

    2015-12-01

    The endangered Aquilaria malaccensis, is an important plant with high economic values. Characterization of genetic diversity and population structure is receiving tremendous attention for effective conservation of genetic resources. Considering important repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A. malaccensis accessions from 10 home gardens of three states of northeast India were assessed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Of the 1153 fragments amplified with four AFLP primer combinations, 916 (79.4%) were found to be polymorphic. Polymorphic information content (PIC) and marker index (MI) of each primer combination correlate significantly with the number of genotypes resolved. Overall, a high genetic diversity (avg. 71.85%) was recorded. Further, high gene flow (m : 3.37), low genetic differentiation (ST : 0.069) and high within population genetic variation (93%) suggests that most of the genetic diversity is restricted within population. Neighbour joining (NJ), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and Bayesian-based STRUCTURE grouped all the accessions in two clusters with significant intermixing between populations, therefore, revealed that two genetically distinct gene pools are operating in the A. malaccensis populations cultivated in home gardens. Based on the various diversity inferences, five diverse populations (JOH, FN, HLF, DHM and ITN) were identified, which can be potentially exploited to develop conservation strategies for A. malaccensis.

  12. Molecular identification and genetic diversity among Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaieb, Reda E A; Abdelhadi, Abdelhadi A; El-Sadawy, Hanan A; Allam, Nesreen A T; Baiome, Baiome Abdelmaguid; Soliman, Mohamed H

    2017-05-01

    Five bacterial strains were isolated from the hemocoel of the greater wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella) infected with the entomopathogenic nematodes: Heterorhabditis bacteriophora HP88, Heterorhabditis indicus RM1 and Heterorhabditis sp (S1), Steinernema abbasi and Steinernema sp. (S II). Strains were identified as Photorhabdus luminescens HRM1, P. luminescens HS1, P. luminescens HP88, Xenorhabdus indica and X. nematophila ATTC19061 using 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To reveal the genetic diversity among these strains, three molecular markers (RAPD, ISSR and SRAP) were employed. RAPD analysis showed 73.8 and 54.5 polymorphism percentages for the Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus strains, respectively. ISSR analysis resulted in 70.1 and 75.2 polymorphism percentages among the Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus strains, respectively. The SRAP analysis indicated that 75.6 and 61.2% genetic polymorphism was detected among Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus strains, respectively. The cluster analysis grouped the three Photorhabdus strains together in one cluster and the two Xenorhabdus strains together in another cluster indicating the phylogenetic relationships among them. The genotype-specific markers detected from the three molecular markers (RAPD, ISSR and SRAP) were sufficient to distinguish between the different bacterial strains tested and can be used in the future IBM program that could be built on the use of these strains.

  13. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majori Giancarlo

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium vivax, although causing a less serious disease than Plasmodium falciparum, is the most widespread of the four human malarial species. Further to the recent recrudescence of P. vivax cases in the Newly Independent States (NIS of central Asia, a survey on the genetic diversity and dissemination in Azerbaijan was undertaken. Azerbaijan is at the crossroads of Asia and, as such, could see a rise in the number of cases, although an effective malaria control programme has been established in the country. Methods Thirty-six P. vivax isolates from Central Azerbaijan were characterized by analysing the genetic polymorphism of the circumsporozoite protein (CSP and the merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1 genes, using PCR amplifications and amplicons sequencing. Results Analysis of CSP sequences showed that all the processed isolates belong to the VK 210 type, with variations in the alternation of alanine residue (A or aspartic acid residue (D in the repeat motif GDRA(A/DGQPA along the sequence. As far as MSP-1 genotyping is concerned, it was found that the majority of isolates analysed belong to Belem and Sal I types. Five recombinant isolates were also identified. Combined analysis with the two genetic markers allowed the identification of 19 plasmodial sub-types. Conclusion The results obtained in the present study indicate that there are several P. vivax clones circulating in Azerbaijan and, consequently, a careful malaria surveillance could be of paramount importance to identify, at early stage, the occurrence of possible P. vivax malaria outbreaks.

  14. Genetic diversity revealed by AFLP markers in Albanian goat breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Anila

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP technique with three EcoRI/TaqI primer combinations was used in 185 unrelated individuals, representative of 6 local goat breeds of Albania, and 107 markers were generated. The mean Nei’s expected heterozygosity value for the whole population was 0.199 and the mean Shannon index was 0.249, indicating a high level of within-breed diversity. Wright’s FST index, Nei’s unbiased genetic distance and Reynolds’ genetic distance were calculated. Pairwise Fst values among the populations ranged from 0.019 to 0.047. A highly significant average FST of 0.031 was estimated, showing a low level of breed subdivision. Most of the variation is accounted for by differences among individuals. Cluster analysis based on Reynolds’ genetic distance between breeds and PCA were performed. An individual UPGMA tree based on Jaccard’s similarity index showed clusters with individuals from all goat breeds. Analysis of population structure points to a high level of admixture among breeds.

  15. A call for tiger management using "reserves" of genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Rachael A; Ramakrishnan, Uma; Hadly, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Tigers (Panthera tigris), like many large carnivores, are threatened by anthropogenic impacts, primarily habitat loss and poaching. Current conservation plans for tigers focus on population expansion, with the goal of doubling census size in the next 10 years. Previous studies have shown that because the demographic decline was recent, tiger populations still retain a large amount of genetic diversity. Although maintaining this diversity is extremely important to avoid deleterious effects of inbreeding, management plans have yet to consider predictive genetic models. We used coalescent simulations based on previously sequenced mitochondrial fragments (n = 125) from 5 of 6 extant subspecies to predict the population growth needed to maintain current genetic diversity over the next 150 years. We found that the level of gene flow between populations has a large effect on the local population growth necessary to maintain genetic diversity, without which tigers may face decreases in fitness. In the absence of gene flow, we demonstrate that maintaining genetic diversity is impossible based on known demographic parameters for the species. Thus, managing for the genetic diversity of the species should be prioritized over the riskier preservation of distinct subspecies. These predictive simulations provide unique management insights, hitherto not possible using existing analytical methods.

  16. Genetic diversity of seagrass seeds influences seedling morphology and biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall Hughes, A; Hanley, Torrance C; Schenck, Forest R; Hays, Cynthia G

    2016-12-01

    Genetic diversity can influence ecological processes throughout ontogeny, yet whether diversity at early life history stages is important in long-lived taxa with overlapping generations is unclear. Seagrass systems provide some of the best evidence for the ecological effects of genetic diversity among adult shoots, but we do not know if the genetic diversity of seeds and seedlings also influences seagrass ecology. We tested the effects of seagrass (Zostera marina) seed diversity and relatedness on germination success, seedling morphology, and seedling production by comparing experimental assemblages of seeds collected from single reproductive shoots ("monocultures") to assemblages of seeds collected from multiple reproductive shoots ("polycultures"). There was no difference in seedling emergence, yet seedlings from polycultures had larger shoots above and below ground than seedlings from monocultures at the end of the 1-yr experiment. Genetic relatedness of the seedlings predicted some aspects of shoot morphology, with more leaves and longer roots and shoots at intermediate levels of relatedness, regardless of seed diversity. Our results suggest that studies of only adult stages may underestimate the importance of genetic diversity if the benefits at early life history stages continue to accrue throughout the life cycle. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  17. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF WHEAT CULTIVARS ESTIMATED BY SSR MARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dvojković

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Presence and utilization of the genetic variability in the breeding programmes is prerequisite for their successfulness. Important factor for crop improvement is knowledge about the genetic diversity which providing a basis for the precise selection of parental combinations. Since beginning of 20th century, generation of wheat breeders and scientists in Croatia developed numerous advanced and successful wheat cultivars. Previous researches aimed to genetic diversity evaluation in Croatia were conducted by means of morphological traits, pedigree data (coefficients of parentage, proteins (glutenins and gliadins and RAPD DNA markers. DNA markers detect directly variation of DNA sequence for particular loci and they are not under influence of environment, epistatic and pleiotropic effects. Microsatellite markers (Simple Sequence Repeats; SSRs, as highly polymorphic, informative and codominant DNA marker system, have been extensively used for genetic diversity studies on wheat world wide. A set of 98 wheat cultivars released in Croatia during the period 1905-2007, and 24 foreign cultivar (included because of their ancestral significance or as standards, were screened by 45 microsatellite markers, covering all three wheat genomes. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the microsatellites-based genetic diversity with emphasize on cultivars created at the Agricultural Institute Osijek, as well as to investigate SSR application for selection of genetically the most distant parental pairs. Preliminary data obtained by means of SSR markers showed a satisfactory level of genetic diversity and usefulness of microsatellites for parental selection.

  18. The genetic diversity and population structure of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-16

    Jul 16, 2014 ... variation and, hence, restricting the amount of adapted genetic diversity ... the phenotypic diversity of common bean in Uganda. The selection ... The place of collection/origin was also consi- dered in ..... Bean Research and Development Programs at NaCRRI and CIAT .... Evolution 92:1101-1104. Kami JA ...

  19. The characterization of goat genetic diversity : Towards a genomic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ajmone-Marsan, P.; Colli, L.; Han, J. L.; Achilli, A.; Lancioni, H.; Joost, S.; Crepaldi, P.; Pilla, F.; Stella, A.; Taberlet, P.; Boettcher, P.; Negrini, R.; Lenstra, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of genetic diversity at molecular level has been proposed as a valuable complement and sometimes proxy to phenotypic diversity of local breeds and is presently considered as one of the FAO priorities for breed characterization. By recommending a set of selected molecular markers fo

  20. Accumulation of genetic diversity in the US Potato Genebank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficient management of ex-situ collections includes understanding how conservation technologies impact the genetic diversity and integrity of these collections. For over 60 years, research at the US Potato Genebank has produced helpful scientific insights on diverse aspects of potato conservation. ...

  1. The characterization of goat genetic diversity : Towards a genomic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ajmone-Marsan, P.; Colli, L.; Han, J. L.; Achilli, A.; Lancioni, H.; Joost, S.; Crepaldi, P.; Pilla, F.; Stella, A.; Taberlet, P.; Boettcher, P.; Negrini, R.; Lenstra, J. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067852335

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of genetic diversity at molecular level has been proposed as a valuable complement and sometimes proxy to phenotypic diversity of local breeds and is presently considered as one of the FAO priorities for breed characterization. By recommending a set of selected molecular markers

  2. Whole mitochondrial genome genetic diversity in an Estonian population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoljarova, Monika; King, Jonathan L; Takahashi, Maiko; Aaspõllu, Anu; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is a useful marker for population studies, human identification, and forensic analysis. Commonly used hypervariable regions I and II (HVI/HVII) were reported to contain as little as 25% of mitochondrial DNA variants and therefore the majority of power of discrimination of mitochondrial DNA resides in the coding region. Massively parallel sequencing technology enables entire mitochondrial genome sequencing. In this study, buccal swabs were collected from 114 unrelated Estonians and whole mitochondrial genome sequences were generated using the Illumina MiSeq system. The results are concordant with previous mtDNA control region reports of high haplogroup HV and U frequencies (47.4 and 23.7% in this study, respectively) in the Estonian population. One sample with the Northern Asian haplogroup D was detected. The genetic diversity of the Estonian population sample was estimated to be 99.67 and 95.85%, for mtGenome and HVI/HVII data, respectively. The random match probability for mtGenome data was 1.20 versus 4.99% for HVI/HVII. The nucleotide mean pairwise difference was 27 ± 11 for mtGenome and 7 ± 3 for HVI/HVII data. These data describe the genetic diversity of the Estonian population sample and emphasize the power of discrimination of the entire mitochondrial genome over the hypervariable regions.

  3. Genetic diversity of Dekkera bruxellensis yeasts isolated from Australian wineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Chris D; Bellon, Jennifer R; Henschke, Paul A; Godden, Peter W; de Barros Lopes, Miguel A

    2007-05-01

    Yeasts of the genus Dekkera and its anamorph Brettanomyces represent a significant spoilage issue for the global wine industry. Despite this, there is limited knowledge of genetic diversity and strain distribution within wine and winery-related environments. In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was conducted on 244 Dekkera bruxellensis isolates from red wine made in 31 winemaking regions of Australia. The results indicated there were eight genotypes among the isolates, and three of these were commonly found across multiple winemaking regions. Analysis of 26S rRNA gene sequences provided further evidence of three common, conserved groups, whereas a phylogeny based upon the AFLP data demonstrated that the most common D. bruxellensis genotype (I) in Australian red wine was highly divergent from the D. bruxellensis type strain (CBS 74).

  4. Genetic diversity and differentiation in roses: A gardenrose perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vukosavljev, M.; Zhang, J.; Esselink, G.; Westende, van 't W.P.C.; Cox, P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Arens, P.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    tFor the first time genetic diversity among modern garden rose cultivars has been evaluated using a setof 24 microsatellite markers covering most chromosomes. A total of 518 different alleles were obtainedin the set of 138 rose cultivars and this led to the conclusion that in terms of genetic

  5. Genetic diversity of Toxoplama gondii isolates from Ethiopian feral cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent studies indicate greater genetic variability among isolates of Toxoplasma gondii worldwide than previously thought. However, there is no information on genetic diversity of T. gondii from any host in Ethiopia. In the present study, genotyping was performed on viable T. gondii isolates by bioa...

  6. Original Paper Patterns of genetic structure and phenotypic diversity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patterns of genetic structure and phenotypic diversity in sorghum landraces in relation to farmers' management in Burkina Faso ... the role of farmer practices in phenotypic and genetic evolution of sorghum. ... varieties to marginal environments such as ...... Supporting the Convention on Biological ... A new method to.

  7. Genetic diversity and demographic evolution of baobab (Adansonia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ezedom Theresa

    2013-09-18

    Sep 18, 2013 ... This study evaluated the spatial genetic structure of baobab ... digitata, haplotype, genetic diversity, demographic evolution. ... use in domestication, conservation, management and .... Benin, and inferred some impact of the environment and ... new diploid species from Africa, which co-exists with A.

  8. Genetic diversity and population structure of maize landraces from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2016-11-02

    Nov 2, 2016 ... diversity and genetic structure of 35 maize accessions using 10 microsatellite markers. These accessions ... In addition, they provide new sources of resistance to ..... http://taylor0.biology.ucla.edu/structureHarvester/.The .... environment and in other areas. ..... Molecular population genetics and evolution. In:.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fire7-

    2016-12-28

    Dec 28, 2016 ... markers to assess the genetic diversity within and between common bean landraces, classifying them based on ... since the 1980's from continuous introduction of new ... control genotypes for the Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools, ... http://biology.anu.edu.au/GenAlEx/) was used to calculate genetic.

  10. Genetic diversity in green gram [Vigna radiata (L.)] landraces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-07-03

    Jul 3, 2006 ... Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, ... Nadu, India, to determine the extent of genetic diversity at DNA level by random amplified polymorphic ... evolutionary forces such as natural selection and genetic ... supernatant was transferred to a new centrifuge tube, and 0.7.

  11. Assessment of the genetic diversity and pattern of relationship of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-04-02

    Apr 2, 2014 ... the hierarchical partitioning of genetic variation by AMOVA demonstrated ... sorghum using both phenotypic and molecular markers ... tained population breeding and hybrid development in ... countries and diverse geographic origins in West Africa and their ...... Evolution and the genetics of populations Vol.

  12. Study of genetic diversity in finger millet (Eleusine coracana L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... portions of genome, and detects evolutionary homologous changes. ... using these data either to estimate genetic variation present within and ... Development costs ..... possibility of linkage with an area of specific phenotype. Presence of .... Assessment of genome origins and genetic diversity in the genus.

  13. Genetic structure and diversity within and among six populations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2010-04-24

    Apr 24, 2010 ... positive correlation between molecular genetic variation and actual population size. ... Key words: Capparis decidua, Tandhab, Assos, Population size, RAPD markers, Genetic diversity. .... polymorphism in some population, and were monomorphic ... highly informative and produced 152 bands with an ...

  14. Assessment of genetic diversity within sour cherry clones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, S. K.; Andersen, S. B.; Henriksen, K.;

    2013-01-01

    of improved breeding material. However, no differences in allele profile were found between or within the clones, calling into question the extent of the available genetic diversity and indicating that the observed variance in yield may have to be explained by other genetic mechanisms, including epigenetic...

  15. Conserving the genetic diversity of Bolivian wild potatoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadima Fuentes, X.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract thesis Ximena Cadima Fuentes (to be defended on 8 Dec 2014): Conserving the genetic diversity of Bolivian wild potatoes The wild relatives of potatoes (Solanum sect. Petota) form the genetic reservoir for the improvement of the cultivated

  16. Genetic diversity in farm animals - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, L. F.; Lenstra, J. A.; Eding, H.; Toro, M. A.; Scherf, B.; Pilling, D.; Negrini, R.; Finlay, E. K.; Jianlin, H.; Groeneveld, E.; Weigend, S.

    2010-01-01

    Domestication of livestock species and a long history of migrations, selection and adaptation have created an enormous variety of breeds. Conservation of these genetic resources relies on demographic characterization, recording of production environments and effective data management. In addition, m

  17. Genetic diversity and population structure of a diverse set of rice germplasm for association mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liang; Lu, Yan; Xiao, Peng; Sun, Mei; Corke, Harold; Bao, Jinsong

    2010-08-01

    Germplasm diversity is the mainstay for crop improvement and genetic dissection of complex traits. Understanding genetic diversity, population structure, and the level and distribution of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in target populations is of great importance and a prerequisite for association mapping. In this study, 100 genome-wide simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to assess genetic diversity, population structure, and LD of 416 rice accessions including landraces, cultivars and breeding lines collected mostly in China. A model-based population structure analysis divided the rice materials into seven subpopulations. 63% of the SSR pairs in these accessions were in LD, which was mostly due to an overall population structure, since the number of locus pairs in LD was reduced sharply within each subpopulation, with the SSR pairs in LD ranging from 5.9 to 22.9%. Among those SSR pairs showing significant LD, the intrachromosomal LD had an average of 25-50 cM in different subpopulations. Analysis of the phenotypic diversity of 25 traits showed that the population structure accounted for an average of 22.4% of phenotypic variation. An example association mapping for starch quality traits using both the candidate gene mapping and genome-wide mapping strategies based on the estimated population structure was conducted. Candidate gene mapping confirmed that the Wx and starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) genes could be identified as strongly associated with apparent amylose content (AAC) and pasting temperature (PT), respectively. More importantly, we revealed that the Wx gene was also strongly associated with PT. In addition to the major genes, we found five and seven SSRs were associated with AAC and PT, respectively, some of which have not been detected in previous linkage mapping studies. The results suggested that the population may be useful for the genome-wide marker-trait association mapping. This new association population has the potential to identify

  18. Benefits of host genetic diversity for resistance to infection depend on parasite diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Holly H; Ebert, Dieter

    2010-05-01

    Host populations with high genetic diversity are predicted to have lower levels of infection prevalence. This theory assumes that host genetic diversity results in variation in susceptibility and that parasites exhibit variation in infectivity. Empirical studies on the effects of host heterogeneity typically neglect the role of parasite diversity. We conducted three laboratory experiments designed to test if genetic variation in Daphnia magna populations and genetic variation in its parasites together influence the course of parasite spread after introduction. We found that a natural D. magna population exhibited variation in susceptibility to infection by three parasite species and had strong host clone-parasite species interactions. There was no effect of host heterogeneity in experimental host populations (polycultures and monocultures) separately exposed to single strains of three parasite species. When we manipulated the genetic diversity of a single parasite species and exposed them to host monocultures and polycultures, we found that parasite prevalence increased with the number of parasite strains. Host monocultures exposed to several parasite strains had higher mean parasite prevalence and higher variance than polycultures. These results indicate that effect of host genetic diversity on the spread of infection depends on the level of genetic diversity in the parasite population.

  19. Genetic diversity analysis of spawner and recaptured populations of Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis) during stock enhancement in the Bohai Bay based on an SSR marker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mosang; WANG Weiji; XIAO Guangxia; LIU Kefeng; HU Yulong; TIAN Tao; KONG Jie; JIN Xianshi

    2016-01-01

    Eight microsatellite markers were used to analyze genetic diversity, level of inbreeding, and effective population size of spawner and recaptured populations of Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis) during stock enhancement in the Bohai Bay in 2013. A total of 254 and 238 alleles were identified in the spawner and recaptured populations, respectively, and the numbers of alleles (Na) were 8–63 and 6–60, respectively. The numbers of effective alleles (Ne) were 2.52–21.60 and 2.67–20.72, respectively. The polymorphism information content ranged from 0.529 to 0.952. The observed heterozygosity (Ho) values (0.638–0.910 and 0.712–0.927) were lower than the expected heterozygosity (He) values (0.603–0.954 and 0.625–0.952), which indicated that the two populations possessed a rich genetic diversity. In 16 tests (2 populations×8 loci), 13 tests deviated from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.Fis values were positive at seven loci and the inbreeding coefficients (F) of the two populations estimated by trioML were 13.234% and 11.603%, suggesting that there was a relatively high degree of inbreeding. A certain level of inbreeding depression had occurred in the Chinese shrimp population.Fst values ranged from 0 to 0.059, with a mean of 0.028, displaying a low level of genetic differentiation in the two populations. Effective population sizes (3 060.2 and 3 842.8) were higher than the minimum number suggested for retaining the evolutionary potential to adapt to new environmental conditions. For enhancement activity in 2014, the ideal number of captured shrimp spawners should have ranged from 7 686 to 19 214 to maintain genetic diversity and effective population size. Further strategies to adjust the balance of economic cost, fishing effort and ideal number of shrimp spawners to maintain a satisfactory effective population size for ensuring the sustainability of Chinese shrimp are proposed.

  20. Genetic diversity and elite gene introgression reveal the japonica rice breeding in northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dan; WANG Jia-yu; WANG Xiao-xue; YANG Xian-li; SUN Jian; CHEN Wen-fu

    2015-01-01

    Abundant genetic diversity and rational population structure of germplasm beneift crop breeding greatly. To investigate genetic variation among geographical y diverse set of japonica germplasm, we analyzed 233 japonica rice cultivars col-lected from Liaoning, Jilin and Heilongjiang provinces of China, which were released from 1970 to 2011 by using 62 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and 8 functional gene tags related to yield. A total of 195 al eles (Na) were detected with an average of 3.61 per locus, indicating a low level of genetic diversity level among al individuals. The genetic diversity of the cultivars from Jilin Province was the highest among the three geographic distribution zones. Moreover, the genetic diversity was increased slightly with the released period of cultivars from 1970 to 2011. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that genetic differentiation was more diverse within the populations than that among the populations. The neighbor-joining (NJ) tree indicated that cultivar clusters based on geographic distribution represented three independent groups, among which the cluster of cultivars from Heilongjiang is distinctly different to the cluster of cultivars from Liaoning. For the examined functional genes, two or three al elic variations for each were detected, except for IPA1 and GW2, and most of elite genes had been introgressed in modern japonica rice varieties. These results provide a valuable evaluation for genetic backgrounds of current japonica rice and wil be used directly for japonica rice breeding in future.

  1. Hitchhiker's guide to genetic diversity in socially structured populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.S.PREMO

    2012-01-01

    When selection increases the frequency of a beneficial gene substitution it can also increase the frequencies of linked neutral alleles through a process called genetic hitchhiking.A model built to investigate reduced genetic diversity in Pleistocene hominins shows that genetic hitchhiking can have a strong effect on neutral diversity in the presence of culturally mediated migration.Under conditions in which genetic and cultural variants are transmitted symmetrically,neutral genes may also hitchhike to higher frequencies on the coattails of adaptive cultural traits through a process called cultural hitchhiking.Cultural hitchhiking has been proposed to explain why some species of matrilineal whales display relatively low levels of mitochondrial DNA diversity,and it may be applicable to humans as well.This paper provides a critical review of recent models of both types of hitchhiking in socially structured populations.The models' assumptions and predictions are compared and discussed in the hope that studies of reduced genetic diversity in humans might improve our understanding of reduced genetic diversity in other species,and vice versa [Current Zoology 58 (1):287-297,2012].

  2. Bamboo: an overview on its genetic diversity and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeasmin, Lucina; Ali, Md Nasim; Gantait, Saikat; Chakraborty, Somsubhra

    2015-02-01

    Genetic diversity represents the heritable variation both within and among populations of organisms, and in the context of this paper, among bamboo species. Bamboo is an economically important member of the grass family Poaceae, under the subfamily Bambusoideae. India has the second largest bamboo reserve in Asia after China. It is commonly known as "poor man's timber", keeping in mind the variety of its end use from cradle to coffin. There is a wide genetic diversity of bamboo around the globe and this pool of genetic variation serves as the base for selection as well as for plant improvement. Thus, the identification, characterization and documentation of genetic diversity of bamboo are essential for this purpose. During recent years, multiple endeavors have been undertaken for characterization of bamboo species with the aid of molecular markers for sustainable utilization of genetic diversity, its conservation and future studies. Genetic diversity assessments among the identified bamboo species, carried out based on the DNA fingerprinting profiles, either independently or in combination with morphological traits by several researchers, are documented in the present review. This review will pave the way to prepare the database of prevalent bamboo species based on their molecular characterization.

  3. Restriction enzyme analysis of RT-PCR amplicons as a rapid method for detection of genetic diversity among bovine respiratory syncytial virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentova, V.; Antonis, A.F.G.; Kovarcik, K.

    2005-01-01

    Our current knowledge of antigenic variability of the bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is quite limited and is mainly dependent on the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAb). In this study, we present not only analysis of the antigenic, but also of the genetic variability of BRSV. Using a panel

  4. Genetic and Metabolite Diversity of Sardinian Populations of Helichrysum italicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melito, Sara; Sias, Angela; Petretto, Giacomo L.; Chessa, Mario; Pintore, Giorgio; Porceddu, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background Helichrysum italicum (Asteraceae) is a small shrub endemic to the Mediterranean Basin, growing in fragmented and diverse habitats. The species has attracted attention due to its secondary metabolite content, but little effort has as yet been dedicated to assessing the genetic and metabolite diversity present in these populations. Here, we describe the diversity of 50 H. italicum populations collected from a range of habitats in Sardinia. Methods H. italicum plants were AFLP fingerprinted and the composition of their leaf essential oil characterized by GC-MS. The relationships between the genetic structure of the populations, soil, habitat and climatic variables and the essential oil chemotypes present were evaluated using Bayesian clustering, contingency analyses and AMOVA. Key results The Sardinian germplasm could be partitioned into two AFLP-based clades. Populations collected from the southwestern region constituted a homogeneous group which remained virtually intact even at high levels of K. The second, much larger clade was more diverse. A positive correlation between genetic diversity and elevation suggested the action of natural purifying selection. Four main classes of compounds were identified among the essential oils, namely monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Oxygenated monoterpene levels were significantly correlated with the AFLP-based clade structure, suggesting a correspondence between gene pool and chemical diversity. Conclusions The results suggest an association between chemotype, genetic diversity and collection location which is relevant for the planning of future collections aimed at identifying valuable sources of essential oil. PMID:24260149

  5. Genetic and metabolite diversity of Sardinian populations of Helichrysum italicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Melito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helichrysum italicum (Asteraceae is a small shrub endemic to the Mediterranean Basin, growing in fragmented and diverse habitats. The species has attracted attention due to its secondary metabolite content, but little effort has as yet been dedicated to assessing the genetic and metabolite diversity present in these populations. Here, we describe the diversity of 50 H. italicum populations collected from a range of habitats in Sardinia. METHODS: H. italicum plants were AFLP fingerprinted and the composition of their leaf essential oil characterized by GC-MS. The relationships between the genetic structure of the populations, soil, habitat and climatic variables and the essential oil chemotypes present were evaluated using Bayesian clustering, contingency analyses and AMOVA. KEY RESULTS: The Sardinian germplasm could be partitioned into two AFLP-based clades. Populations collected from the southwestern region constituted a homogeneous group which remained virtually intact even at high levels of K. The second, much larger clade was more diverse. A positive correlation between genetic diversity and elevation suggested the action of natural purifying selection. Four main classes of compounds were identified among the essential oils, namely monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Oxygenated monoterpene levels were significantly correlated with the AFLP-based clade structure, suggesting a correspondence between gene pool and chemical diversity. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest an association between chemotype, genetic diversity and collection location which is relevant for the planning of future collections aimed at identifying valuable sources of essential oil.

  6. Sampling strategy for wild soybean (Glycine soja) populations based on their genetic diversity and fine-scale spatial genetic structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Weiyue; ZHOU Taoying; ZHONG Ming; LU Baorong

    2007-01-01

    A total of 892 individuals sampled from a wild soybean population in a natural reserve near the Yellow River estuary located in Kenli of Shandong Province (China) were investigated.Seventeen SSR (simple sequence repeat) primer pairs from cultivated soybeans were used to estimate the genetic diversity of the population and its variation pattern versus changes of the sample size (sub-samples),in addition to investigating the fine-scale spatial genetic structure within the population.The results showed relatively high genetic diversity of the population with the mean value of allele number (A) being 2.88,expected heterozygosity (He) 0.431,Shannon diversity index (/) 0.699,and percentage of polymorphic loci (P) 100%.Sub-samples of different sizes (ten groups) were randomly drawn from the population and their genetic diversity was calculated by computer simulation.The regression model of the four diversity indexes with the change of sample sizes was computed.As a result,27-52 individuals can reach 95% of total genetic variability of the population.Spatial autocorrelation analysis revealed that the genetic patch size of this wild soybean population is about 18 m.The study provided a scientific basis for the sampling strategy of wild soybean populations.

  7. Genetic diversity among five T4-like bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Claire

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophages are an important repository of genetic diversity. As one of the major constituents of terrestrial biomass, they exert profound effects on the earth's ecology and microbial evolution by mediating horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and controlling their growth. Only limited genomic sequence data are currently available for phages but even this reveals an overwhelming diversity in their gene sequences and genomes. The contribution of the T4-like phages to this overall phage diversity is difficult to assess, since only a few examples of complete genome sequence exist for these phages. Our analysis of five T4-like genomes represents half of the known T4-like genomes in GenBank. Results Here, we have examined in detail the genetic diversity of the genomes of five relatives of bacteriophage T4: the Escherichia coli phages RB43, RB49 and RB69, the Aeromonas salmonicida phage 44RR2.8t (or 44RR and the Aeromonas hydrophila phage Aeh1. Our data define a core set of conserved genes common to these genomes as well as hundreds of additional open reading frames (ORFs that are nonconserved. Although some of these ORFs resemble known genes from bacterial hosts or other phages, most show no significant similarity to any known sequence in the databases. The five genomes analyzed here all have similarities in gene regulation to T4. Sequence motifs resembling T4 early and late consensus promoters were observed in all five genomes. In contrast, only two of these genomes, RB69 and 44RR, showed similarities to T4 middle-mode promoter sequences and to the T4 motA gene product required for their recognition. In addition, we observed that each phage differed in the number and assortment of putative genes encoding host-like metabolic enzymes, tRNA species, and homing endonucleases. Conclusion Our observations suggest that evolution of the T4-like phages has drawn on a highly diverged pool of genes in the microbial world. The T4

  8. 5个温郁金居群遗传多样性的ISSR分析%The genetic diversity of the five populations Curcuma wenyujin by ISSR analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佐元; 陶银龙; 郑蔚虹

    2013-01-01

    The genetic diversity of five populations of Curcuma wenyujin,a species endemic to Ruian,Yueqing Pingyang and,was analyzed using inter simple sequence repeat(ISSR). A total of 174 6 bands and 42 loci were amplified from 5 populations by 6 informative and reliable primers of 40 primers. Of them,34 loci were polymorphic, which accounted for 80.95%. Genetic diversity was revealed,Ht=0.239 5,Hs=0.1618,Dst=0.077 7 and GST=0.324 5. The study shows that there has a middle degree of genetic differentiation occurred among Curcuma wenyujin populations and a high genetic variation level beyond the populations of Curcuma wenyujin. Thus,Nm=1.041 0 means genetic was more keep in touch with each other among the population of Curcuma wenyujin.%应用ISSR标记技术对瑞安、乐清和平阳三个地区5个居群的温郁金(Curcuma wenyujin)遗传多样性进行分析,筛选出6个引物用于温郁金5个居群的50个个体ISSR-PCR扩增,共检测到42个结合位点多态位点34个,多态位点百分率是80.95%.总的基因多样度平均值为0.2395,居群内的基因多样度为0.1618,居群间的基因多样性为0.0777.基因分化系数在0.0191~0.9414之间,平均值为0.3245,其中居群间的遗传变异占总遗传变异的32.45%,居群内的遗传变异占总变异的67.55%.温郁金有着较高的遗传多样性水平,且居群内发生了较高的遗传分化.基因流系数Nm为1.0410,表明温郁金居群间的基因交流也比较多.

  9. Genetic diversity in Populus nigra plantations from west of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrooz Alimohamadi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to adopt strategies for forest conservation and development,it is necessary to estimate the amount and distribution of genetic diversity in existing populations of poplar in Iran. In this study, the genetic diversity between eight stands of Populus nigra established in Kermanshah province was evaluated on the basis of molecular and morphological markers. To amplify microsatellite loci (WPMS09, WPMS16 and WPMS18, DNA extraction from young and fresh leaveswas done. Various conditions of the PCR assay were examined and to evaluate the morphological variation of the morphological characters leaves (consist of 19 traits were measured. In addition, height growth was measured, to evaluate the growth function of the stands in homogeneous conditions. Genetic diversity in termof polymorphic loci was 0%, because three investigated microsatellite loci were monomorphic. The total number of alleles for 3 microsatellite loci was 6 (na = 2, ne = 2, heo = 1, hee = 0.51. Genetic identity based on Nei was 100%, so genetic distance was 0%. The whole sampled trees represented the same thus the genotype. No significant differences between the mean values of all morphological characters and height growth were revealed. Observed genetic similarity gave indication that same ramets had been selected to plant in poplar plantation established in Kermanshah province.These results suggest the need for an initial evaluation of the genetic diversity in selected ramets for planting in plantation to avoid repetition.

  10. Genetic diversity in Populus nigra plantations from west of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrooz Alimohamadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to adopt strategies for forest conservation and development, it is necessary to estimate the amount and distribution of genetic diversity in existing populations of poplar in Iran. In this study, the genetic diversity between eight stands of Populus nigra established in Kermanshah province was evaluated on the basis of molecular and morphological markers. To amplify microsatellite loci (WPMS09, WPMS16 and WPMS18, DNA extraction from young and fresh leaveswas done. Various conditions of the PCR assay were examined and to evaluate the morphological variation of the morphological characters leaves (consist of 19 traits were measured. In addition, height growth was measured, to evaluate the growth function of the stands in homogeneous conditions. Genetic diversity in term of polymorphic loci was 0%, because three investigated microsatellite loci were monomorphic. The total number of alleles for 3 microsatellite loci was 6 (na = 2, ne = 2, heo = 1, hee = 0.51. Genetic identity based on Nei was 100%, so genetic distance was 0%. The whole sampled trees represented the same thus the genotype. No significant differences between the mean values of all morphological characters and height growth were revealed. Observed genetic similarity gave indication that same ramets had been selected to plant in poplar plantation established in Kermanshah province. These results suggest the need for an initial evaluation of the genetic diversity in selected ramets for planting in plantation to avoid repetition.  

  11. Application of restriction site amplified polymorphism (RSAP) to genetic diversity in Saccharina japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Cui; LIU Cui; LI Wei; CHI Shan; FENG Rongfang; LIU Tao

    2013-01-01

    Restriction site amplified polymorphism (RSAP) was used,for the first time,to analyze the genetic structure and diversity of four,mainly cultivated,varieties of the brown alga,Saccharinajaponica.Eighty-eight samples from varieties "Rongfu","Fujian","Ailunwan" and "Shengchanzhong" were used for the genetic analyses.One hundred and ninety-eight bands were obtained using eight combinations of primers.One hundred and ninety-one (96.46%) were polymorphic bands.Nei's genetic diversity was 0.360,and the coefficient of genetic differentiation was 0.357.No inbreeding-type recession was found in the four brown alga varieties and the results of the "Ailunwan" variety using samples from 2 years showed that the variety was becoming less diverse during the selection inherent in the breeding program.Genetic diversity and cluster analyses results were consistent with these genetic relationships.The results show the RSAP method is suitable for genetic analysis.Continuous inbreeding and selection could reduce the genetic diversity effectively; therefore periodical supervision is required.

  12. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses isolated during 2006–2008 outbreaks in Pakistan reveals genetic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddique Naila

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the first outbreak recorded in northern areas of Pakistan in early 2006, highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses were isolated from commercial poultry and wild/domestic birds from different areas of Pakistan up to July 2008. Different isolates of H5N1 were sequenced to explore the genetic diversity of these viruses. Results Phylogenetic analysis revealed close clustering and highest sequence identity in all 8 genes to HPAI H5N1 isolates belonging to unified H5 clade 2.2, sub-lineage EMA-3 recovered from Afghanistan during the same time period. Two subgroups within Pakistani H5N1 viruses, from domestic and wild birds, were observed on the basis of their sequence homology and mutations. HPAI motif, preferred receptor specificity for α-(2, 3 linkages, potential N-linked glycosylation sites and an additional glycosylation site at the globular head of HA protein of four Pakistani H5N1 isolates. While, the amino acids associated with sensitivities to various antiviral drugs (Oseltamivir, Zanamivir, Amantadine were found conserved for the Pakistani H5N1 isolates. Conspicuously, some important mutations observed at critical positions of antigenic sites (S141P, D155S, R162I & P181S and at receptor binding pocket (A185T, R189K & S217P of HA-1. A high sequence similarity between Pakistani HP H5N1 and LP H9N2 viruses was also observed. Avian like host specific markers with the exception of E627K in PB2, K356R in PA, V33I in NP, I28V in M2 and L107F in NS2 proteins were also observed. Conclusions Various point mutations in different genes of H5 viruses from Pakistan were observed during its circulation in the field. The outbreaks started in Khyber Pakhtoon Khawa (North West province in 2006 and spread to the Southern regions over a period of time. Though migratory birds may have a role for this continued endemicity of clade 2.2 H5N1 viruses during 2006–2008 in Pakistan, the possibility of their transmission through legal

  13. Conservation priorities for Ethiopian sheep breeds combining threat status, breed merits and contributions to genetic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windig Jack J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prioritizing livestock breeds for conservation needs to incorporate both genetic and non-genetic aspects important for the survival of the breeds. Here, we apply a maximum-utility-strategy to prioritize 14 traditional Ethiopian sheep breeds based on their threat status, contributions to farmer livelihoods (current breed merits and contributions to genetic diversity. Contributions of the breeds to genetic diversity were quantified using Eding's marker-estimated kinship approaches. Non-genetic aspects included threats (e.g. low population size, low preferences by farmers and current merits (economic, ecological and cultural merits. Threat analysis identified eight of the 14 breeds as threatened. Analysis of current merits showed that sub-alpine and arid-lowland breeds contribute most to farmer livelihoods in comparison to other breeds. The highest contribution to the genetic diversity conserved was from the Simien breed. Simien showed high between-breed (low between-breed kinship = 0.04 as well as high within-breed diversity (low within-breed kinship = 0.09 and high HE = 0.73 and allelic richness = 6.83. We combined the results on threat status, current breed merits and contributions to genetic diversity to produce a ranking of the 14 breeds for conservation purposes. Our results balance the trade-offs between conserving breeds as insurance against future uncertainties and current sustainable utilization. The ranking of breeds provides a basis for conservation strategies for Ethiopian sheep and contributes to a regional or global conservation plan.

  14. Genetic Diversity among Ancient Nordic Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchior, Linea; Lynnerup, Niels; Siegismund, Hans R;

    2010-01-01

    , the success rate varied substantially between sites; the highest rates were obtained with untouched, freshly excavated material, whereas heavy handling, archeological preservation and storage for many years influenced the ability to obtain authentic endogenic DNA. While the nucleotide diversity at two...

  15. 长穗偃麦草醇溶蛋白的遗传多样性分析%Analysis of Genetic Diversity of Gliadins in Thinopyrum elongatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴珊

    2016-01-01

    In order to exploit the excellent germplasm resource of Thinopyrum elongatum ( Host) D. R. Dewey, the gliadins of 18 populations, collected from Iran, Turkey, America and the other four coun-tries, were analyzed and evaluated using A-PAGE methods. The results indicated that a total of 70 poly-morphic bands were detected among the 18 Thinopyrum elongatum populations, the average of PPB, h and SI were 75. 40% (varied range of 41. 43%—92. 86%), 0. 241 1 (varied range of 0. 127 0—0. 332 2) and 0. 361 1 (varied range of 0. 195 8—0. 497 0), respectively. 17. 35% of molecular variation was among populations, and the great majority of genetic variation (82. 65%) resided within populations. The cluster analysis indicated that all the accessions could be divided into five groups. There was no strong association between the clustering results and the geographical distribution. The above results showed that the gliadins of Thinopyrum elongatum ( Host) D. R. Dewey had rich genetic diversity, and could be utilized to improve wheat processing quality.%为进一步发掘长穗偃麦草[ Thinopyrum elongatum ( Host) D. R. Dewey]优异种质,采用酸性聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳法( A-PAGE ),对分别来自伊朗、土耳其、美国等7个国家的18个长穗偃麦草居群醇溶蛋白的遗传多样性进行了分析。这18个居群中共含有70种醇溶蛋白带型,平均多态性位点百分比(PPB)为75.40%(变幅41.43%~92.86%),平均Nei基因多样性指数(h)为0.2411(变幅0.1270~0.3322),平均Shannon 信息指数(SI)为0.3611(变幅0.1958~0.4970)。其中17.35%的遗传变异来自长穗偃麦草居群间,82.65%的遗传变异来自居群内。此外,聚类结果显示,所选材料被分为5组,且聚类结果与材料的地理来源并无密切相关性。以上结果表明,长穗偃麦草的醇溶蛋白位点存在丰富遗传多样性,可用于改良小麦加工品质。

  16. [Evolutionary process unveiled by the maximum genetic diversity hypothesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Xia, Meng-Ying; Huang, Shi

    2013-05-01

    As two major popular theories to explain evolutionary facts, the neutral theory and Neo-Darwinism, despite their proven virtues in certain areas, still fail to offer comprehensive explanations to such fundamental evolutionary phenomena as the genetic equidistance result, abundant overlap sites, increase in complexity over time, incomplete understanding of genetic diversity, and inconsistencies with fossil and archaeological records. Maximum genetic diversity hypothesis (MGD), however, constructs a more complete evolutionary genetics theory that incorporates all of the proven virtues of existing theories and adds to them the novel concept of a maximum or optimum limit on genetic distance or diversity. It has yet to meet a contradiction and explained for the first time the half-century old Genetic Equidistance phenomenon as well as most other major evolutionary facts. It provides practical and quantitative ways of studying complexity. Molecular interpretation using MGD-based methods reveal novel insights on the origins of humans and other primates that are consistent with fossil evidence and common sense, and reestablished the important role of China in the evolution of humans. MGD theory has also uncovered an important genetic mechanism in the construction of complex traits and the pathogenesis of complex diseases. We here made a series of sequence comparisons among yeasts, fishes and primates to illustrate the concept of limit on genetic distance. The idea of limit or optimum is in line with the yin-yang paradigm in the traditional Chinese view of the universal creative law in nature.

  17. Genetic diversity of Lombok chickens based on D-loop mitochondrial DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Syamsul Arifin Zein

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA displacement (D-loop sequences were used to study the genetic diversity and relationship of Lombok chickens. A total of 45 individuals were sampled. The D-loop segment was PCR amplified and subsequently sequenced. The sequences of the 785 nucleotides were used for analysis. Twelve haplotypes were identified from 25 polymorphic sites with polymorphism between nucleotides 200 and 400 contributing to 80% of the variation. Fu’s Fs value was - 8.768 (all samples, P = 0, indicating high genetic diversity and population expansion, a conclusion supported by a neighbor– joining analysis of the haplotypes. Nucleotides diversity of the Lombok chicken were 0.00221 and haplotype diversity were 0.654 + 0.08. The dominant haplotype found among the Lombok chickens was haplotype B (62% and genetic distances value ranged from 0.001 to 0.017.

  18. Genetic diversity analysis based on molecular marker and quantitative traits of the response of different tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cultivars to drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metwali Ehab M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The drought tolerance of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. is a trait needing urgent improvement due to recent climate changes and limited water availability. We therefore conducted a greenhouse screening experiment to identify tomato cultivars with improved drought tolerance. Several sensitivity and tolerance indices were computed based on morphological markers. With the aim of establishing a correlation to these markers, a total of 16 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR primers were used, the genetic diversity among cultivars was elucidated and clustering the cultivars into groups based on their molecular profiles was performed. The obtained results indicated that selection indices, such as geometric mean productivity (GMP, mean productivity (MP, tolerance index (TOL,and stress tolerance index (STI, represented suitable indices for screening the drought tolerance of tomato cultivars. An interesting correlation of the ISSR analyses to these morphological findings was established according to 83 detectable fragments derived from 10 primers. The highest value of the effective multiplex ratio (EMR and marker index (MI was detected for primer INC7 followed by INC1. Based on Jaccard's similarity coefficients, the genetic distance of the genotypes varied from 0.702 to 0.942 with a mean value of 0.882. The results showed a clear-cut separation of the 15 tomato cultivars due to their genetic variability, making them a valuable genetic source for their incorporation into potential breeding programs. Molecular data were in good agreement with the results as regards selection indices, and both of them will be useful tools for improvement of the tomato germplasm.

  19. Great ape genetic diversity and population history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado-Martinez, Javier; Sudmant, Peter H.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Most great ape genetic variation remains uncharacterized; however, its study is critical for understanding population history, recombination, selection and susceptibility to disease. Here we sequence to high coverage a total of 79 wild- and captive-born individuals representing all six great ape...

  20. Ensuring the genetic diversity of potatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opportunities for advances in the potato crop through genetics are great, since potato has many needs for improvement, and many related species with the traits required are available. Genebanks provide a centralized and specialized resource for providing the services of acquisition, classification, ...

  1. Genetic diversity assessment of summer squash landraces using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mady, Emad A; Helaly, Alaa Al-Din; Abu El-Hamd, Abdel Naem; Abdou, Arafa; Shanan, Shamel A; Craker, Lyle E

    2013-07-01

    Plant identification, classification, and genotyping within a germplasm collection are essential elements for establishing a breeding program that enhances the probability of plants with desirable characteristics in the market place. In this study, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used as a molecular tool to assess the diversity and relationship among 20 summer squash (Curcubita pepo L.) landraces traditionally used to treat hypertension and prostate hyperplasia. A total of 10 RAPD primers produced 65 reproducible bands of which 46 (70.77 %) were polymorphic, indicating a large number of genotypes within the summer squash lines. Cluster analysis divided the summer squash germplasm into two groups, one including one landrace and a second containing 19 landraces that could be divided into five sub-groups. Results of this study indicate the potential of RAPD markers for the identification and assessment of genetic variations among squash landraces and provide a number of choices for developing a successful breeding program to improve summer squash.

  2. Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchior, Linea Cecilie; Lynnerup, Niels; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2010-01-01

    Using established criteria for work with fossil DNA we have analysed mitochondrial DNA from 92 individuals from 18 locations in Denmark ranging in time from the Mesolithic to the Medieval Age. Unequivocal assignment of mtDNA haplotypes was possible for 56 of the ancient individuals; however......, the success rate varied substantially between sites; the highest rates were obtained with untouched, freshly excavated material, whereas heavy handling, archeological preservation and storage for many years influenced the ability to obtain authentic endogenic DNA. While the nucleotide diversity at two...... locations was similar to that among extant Danes, the diversity at four sites was considerably higher. This supports previous observations for ancient Britons. The overall occurrence of haplogroups did not deviate from extant Scandinavians, however, haplogroup I was significantly more frequent among...

  3. Estimation of the genetic diversity in tetraploid alfalfa populations based on RAPD markers for breeding purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagl, Nevena; Taski-Ajdukovic, Ksenija; Barac, Goran; Baburski, Aleksandar; Seccareccia, Ivana; Milic, Dragan; Katic, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Alfalfa is an autotetraploid, allogamous and heterozygous forage legume, whose varieties are synthetic populations. Due to the complex nature of the species, information about genetic diversity of germplasm used in any alfalfa breeding program is most beneficial. The genetic diversity of five alfalfa varieties, involved in progeny tests at Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops, was characterized based on RAPD markers. A total of 60 primers were screened, out of which 17 were selected for the analysis of genetic diversity. A total of 156 polymorphic bands were generated, with 10.6 bands per primer. Number and percentage of polymorphic loci, effective number of alleles, expected heterozygosity and Shannon's information index were used to estimate genetic variation. Variety Zuzana had the highest values for all tested parameters, exhibiting the highest level of variation, whereas variety RSI 20 exhibited the lowest. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that 88.39% of the total genetic variation was attributed to intra-varietal variance. The cluster analysis for individual samples and varieties revealed differences in their population structures: variety Zuzana showed a very high level of genetic variation, Banat and Ghareh were divided in subpopulations, while Pecy and RSI 20 were relatively uniform. Ways of exploiting the investigated germplasm in the breeding programs are suggested in this paper, depending on their population structure and diversity. The RAPD analysis shows potential to be applied in analysis of parental populations in semi-hybrid alfalfa breeding program in both, development of new homogenous germplasm, and identification of promising, complementary germplasm.

  4. Comparison of ITS, RAPD and ISSR from DNA-based genetic diversity techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyraz, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    ITS, RAPD-PCR and ISSR-PCR are most popular DNA-based techniques that are extensively applied in the determination of the genetic diversity of species among populations. However, especially for organisms having high genetic polymorphism, phylogenetic trees drawn from the results of these techniques may be different. For finding a meaningful phylogenetic tree, it should be compared phylogenetic trees obtained from these different techniques with geographic locations of populations. Lichens have a high genetic polymorphism and tolerance against different environmental conditions. In this study, these three DNA-based genetic diversity techniques were compared, using different populations of a lichen species (Xanthoria parietina). X. parietina was especially chosen because of its high genetic diversity in narrow zones. Lichen samples were collected from ten different locations in a narrow transition climate zone Bilecik (Turkey). Statistical analyses of all results were calculated using UPGMA analysis. Phylogenic trees for each technique were drawn and transferred to the Bilecik map for comparative analysis. The results of three techniques allowed us to verify that populations of X. parietina have high genetic variety in a narrow zone. But phylogenetic trees obtained from these results were found to be very different. Our comparative analysis demonstrated that the results of these techniques are not similar and have critical differences. We observed that the ITS method provides more clear data and is more successful in genetic diversity analyses of more asunder populations, in contrast to ISSR-PCR and RAPD-PCR methods.

  5. Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Linea; Lynnerup, Niels; Siegismund, Hans R; Kivisild, Toomas; Dissing, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Using established criteria for work with fossil DNA we have analysed mitochondrial DNA from 92 individuals from 18 locations in Denmark ranging in time from the Mesolithic to the Medieval Age. Unequivocal assignment of mtDNA haplotypes was possible for 56 of the ancient individuals; however, the success rate varied substantially between sites; the highest rates were obtained with untouched, freshly excavated material, whereas heavy handling, archeological preservation and storage for many years influenced the ability to obtain authentic endogenic DNA. While the nucleotide diversity at two locations was similar to that among extant Danes, the diversity at four sites was considerably higher. This supports previous observations for ancient Britons. The overall occurrence of haplogroups did not deviate from extant Scandinavians, however, haplogroup I was significantly more frequent among the ancient Danes (average 13%) than among extant Danes and Scandinavians (approximately 2.5%) as well as among other ancient population samples reported. Haplogroup I could therefore have been an ancient Southern Scandinavian type "diluted" by later immigration events. Interestingly, the two Neolithic samples (4,200 YBP, Bell Beaker culture) that were typed were haplogroup U4 and U5a, respectively, and the single Bronze Age sample (3,300-3,500 YBP) was haplogroup U4. These two haplogroups have been associated with the Mesolithic populations of Central and Northern Europe. Therefore, at least for Southern Scandinavia, our findings do not support a possible replacement of a haplogroup U dominated hunter-gatherer population by a more haplogroup diverse Neolithic Culture.

  6. Genetic diversity of Mycosphaerella fijiensis in Brazil analyzed using an ERIC-PCR marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, G F; Paixão, R D V; Queiroz, C B; Santana, M F; Souza, A; Sousa, N R; Hanada, R E; Gasparotto, L

    2014-09-26

    The Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) marker was used to analyze the genetic variability of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the causative agent of Black Sigatoka disease in banana plants. A total of 123 isolates were used, which were divided into populations based on their original hosts and collection sites in Brazil. A total of 9 loci were amplified, 77.8% of which were found to be polymorphic. The genetic diversity found in the population was 0.20. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) demonstrated that the highest level of genetic variation is within populations. Cluster analysis revealed three main groups in Brazil, with no correlation between geographic and genetic distance.

  7. Curcumin profiing and genetic diversity of different accessions of Curcuma longa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Arya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the genetic diversity and variation in active compound of turmeric rhizomes collected from different niches of Uttarakhand. Methods: Genetic diversity and relationship of Curcuma longa accessions was evaluated by random amplification polymorphism DNA analysis and curcumin profiling was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography method. Results: The curcumin contents in 20 accessions of turmeric rhizomes were found to be in the range of 0.90% to 3.26%. All accessions were separated into six groups (92% genetic similarity by using 10 decamer oligonucleotide primers for the amplification of genomic DNA. Conclusions: The results indicated the possibility of selecting high quality clones for large scale production.

  8. A comparison of the genetic diversity in Dipteronia sinensis Oliv.and Dipteronia dyeriana Henry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shan; QIAN Zengqiang; CAI Yuliang; ZHAO Guifang

    2006-01-01

    Dipteronia is an endemic genus to China and includes only two species, Dipteronia sinensis and D.dyeriana.Based on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers,a comparative study of the genetic diversity and genetic structure of Dipteronia was performed.In total,128 and 103 loci were detected in 17 D.sinensis populations and 4 D.dyeriana populations,respectively,using 18 random primers.These results showed that the proportions of polymorphic loci for the two species were 92.97% and 81.55%,respectively,indicating that the genetic diversity of D.sinensis was higher than that of D.dyeriana.Analysis,based on similarity coefficients,Shannon diversity index and Nei gene diversity index,also confirmed this result.AMOVA analysis demonstrated that the genetic variation of D.sinensis within and among populations accounted for 56.89% and 43.11% of the total variation,respectively,and that of D.dyeriana was 57.86% and 42.14%,respectively.The Shannon diversity index and Nei gene diversity index showed similar results.The abovementioned characteristics indicated that the genetic diversity levels of these two species were extremely similar and that the interpopulational genetic differentiation within both species was relatively high.Analysis of the genetic distance among populations also supported this conclusion.Low levels of interpopulational gene flow within both species were believed to be among the leading causes for the above-mentioned phenomenon.The correlation analysis between genetic and geographical distances showed the existence of a remarkably significant correlation between the genetic distance and the longitudinal difference among populations of D.sinensis (p<0.01),while no significant correlation was found between genetic and geographical distances among populations of D.dyeriana.This indicated that genetic distance was correlated with geographical distances on a large scale rather than on a small scale.This result may be related to differences in the

  9. Cotyledon storage proteins as markers of the genetic diversity in Castanea sativa Miller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, J B; Muñoz-Diez, C; Martín-Cuevas, A; Lopez, S; Martín, L M

    2003-08-01

    This study has been to analyse the useful nut globulin proteins as a marker of the genetic diversity in Castanea sativa. The evaluated populations were highly polymorphic for the globulins, being detected up to 35 polymorphic bands with a wide distribution among all the evaluated populations. Taken together for populations from all the chestnut regions, about 39.3% of total allelic variation was distributed among the populations. The estimates of genetic similarity between populations were clearly associated with the collecting site. This method of analysis of the nut storage proteins (globulins) could be a useful tool for the evaluation of genetic diversity in this and other species of the Fagaceae.

  10. Genetic Diversity in the Interference Selection Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Benjamin H.; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Neher, Richard A.; Desai, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive natural selection can strongly influence observed patterns of genetic variation, but these effects remain poorly understood when multiple selected variants segregate in nearby regions of the genome. Classical population genetics fails to account for interference between linked mutations, which grows increasingly severe as the density of selected polymorphisms increases. Here, we describe a simple limit that emerges when interference is common, in which the fitness effects of individual mutations play a relatively minor role. Instead, similar to models of quantitative genetics, molecular evolution is determined by the variance in fitness within the population, defined over an effectively asexual segment of the genome (a “linkage block”). We exploit this insensitivity in a new “coarse-grained” coalescent framework, which approximates the effects of many weakly selected mutations with a smaller number of strongly selected mutations that create the same variance in fitness. This approximation generates accurate and efficient predictions for silent site variability when interference is common. However, these results suggest that there is reduced power to resolve individual selection pressures when interference is sufficiently widespread, since a broad range of parameters possess nearly identical patterns of silent site variability. PMID:24675740

  11. Genetic Diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in Haiti: Insights from Microsatellite Markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar E Carter

    Full Text Available Hispaniola, comprising Haiti and the Dominican Republic, has been identified as a candidate for malaria elimination. However, incomplete surveillance data in Haiti hamper efforts to assess the impact of ongoing malaria control interventions. Characteristics of the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum populations can be used to assess parasite transmission, which is information vital to evaluating malaria elimination efforts. Here we characterize the genetic diversity of P. falciparum samples collected from patients at seven sites in Haiti using 12 microsatellite markers previously employed in population genetic analyses of global P. falciparum populations. We measured multiplicity of infections, level of genetic diversity, degree of population geographic substructure, and linkage disequilibrium (defined as non-random association of alleles from different loci. For low transmission populations like Haiti, we expect to see few multiple infections, low levels of genetic diversity, high degree of population structure, and high linkage disequilibrium. In Haiti, we found low levels of multiple infections (12.9%, moderate to high levels of genetic diversity (mean number of alleles per locus = 4.9, heterozygosity = 0.61, low levels of population structure (highest pairwise Fst = 0.09 and no clustering in principal components analysis, and moderate linkage disequilibrium (ISA = 0.05, P<0.0001. In addition, population bottleneck analysis revealed no evidence for a reduction in the P. falciparum population size in Haiti. We conclude that the high level of genetic diversity and lack of evidence for a population bottleneck may suggest that Haiti's P. falciparum population has been stable and discuss the implications of our results for understanding the impact of malaria control interventions. We also discuss the relevance of parasite population history and other host and vector factors when assessing transmission intensity from genetic diversity data.

  12. Vietnamese chickens: a gate towards Asian genetic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bed'Hom B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chickens represent an important animal genetic resource and the conservation of local breeds is an issue for the preservation of this resource. The genetic diversity of a breed is mainly evaluated through its nuclear diversity. However, nuclear genetic diversity does not provide the same information as mitochondrial genetic diversity. For the species Gallus gallus, at least 8 maternal lineages have been identified. While breeds distributed westward from the Indian subcontinent usually share haplotypes from 1 to 2 haplogroups, Southeast Asian breeds exhibit all the haplogroups. The Vietnamese Ha Giang (HG chicken has been shown to exhibit a very high nuclear diversity but also important rates of admixture with wild relatives. Its geographical position, within one of the chicken domestication centres ranging from Thailand to the Chinese Yunnan province, increases the probability of observing a very high genetic diversity for maternal lineages, and in a way, improving our understanding of the chicken domestication process. Results A total of 106 sequences from Vietnamese HG chickens were first compared to the sequences of published Chinese breeds. The 25 haplotypes observed in the Vietnamese HG population belonged to six previously published haplogroups which are: A, B, C, D, F and G. On average, breeds from the Chinese Yunnan province carried haplotypes from 4.3 haplogroups. For the HG population, haplogroup diversity is found at both the province and the village level (0.69. The AMOVA results show that genetic diversity occurred within the breeds rather than between breeds or provinces. Regarding the global structure of the mtDNA diversity per population, a characteristic of the HG population was the occurrence of similar pattern distribution as compared to G. gallus spadiceus. However, there was no geographical evidence of gene flow between wild and domestic populations as observed when microsatellites were used. Conclusions

  13. The DNA of coral reef biodiversity: predicting and protecting genetic diversity of reef assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkoe, Kimberly A; Gaggiotti, Oscar E; Treml, Eric A; Wren, Johanna L K; Donovan, Mary K; Toonen, Robert J

    2016-04-27

    Conservation of ecological communities requires deepening our understanding of genetic diversity patterns and drivers at community-wide scales. Here, we use seascape genetic analysis of a diversity metric, allelic richness (AR), for 47 reef species sampled across 13 Hawaiian Islands to empirically demonstrate that large reefs high in coral cover harbour the greatest genetic diversity on average. We found that a species's life history (e.g. depth range and herbivory) mediates response of genetic diversity to seascape drivers in logical ways. Furthermore, a metric of combined multi-species AR showed strong coupling to species richness and habitat area, quality and stability that few species showed individually. We hypothesize that macro-ecological forces and species interactions, by mediating species turnover and occupancy (and thus a site's mean effective population size), influence the aggregate genetic diversity of a site, potentially allowing it to behave as an apparent emergent trait that is shaped by the dominant seascape drivers. The results highlight inherent feedbacks between ecology and genetics, raise concern that genetic resilience of entire reef communities is compromised by factors that reduce coral cover or available habitat, including thermal stress, and provide a foundation for new strategies for monitoring and preserving biodiversity of entire reef ecosystems.

  14. Genetic Diversity in Commercial Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. Varieties from Turkey as Revealed by RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem ÖZBEK

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In cultivated commercial crop species, genetic diversity tends to decrease because of the extensive breeding processes. Therefore, germplasm of commercial crop species, such as Brassica napus L. should be evaluated and the genotypes, which have higher genetic diversity index, should be addressed as potential parental cross materials in breeding programs. In this study, the genetic diversity was analysed by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD technique in nine Turkish commercial rapeseed varieties. The RAPD primers (10-mer oligonucleotides produced 51 scorable loci, 31 loci of which were polymorphic (60.78% and 20 loci (39.22% were monomorphic The RAPD bands were scored as binary matrix data and were analysed using POPGENE version 1.32. At locus level, the values of genetic diversity within population (Hs and total (HT were 0.15 and 0.19 respectively. The genetic differentiation (GST and the gene flow (Nm values between the populations were 0.20 and 2.05 respectively. The mean number of alleles (na, the mean number of effective alleles (nae, and the mean value of genetic diversity (He were 2.00, 1.26, and 0.19 respectively. According to Pearson’s correlation, multiple regression and principal component analyses, eco-geographical conditions in combination had significant effect on genetic indices of commercial B. napus L. varieties were discussed.

  15. Genetic structure and diversity of Shorea obtusa (Dipterocarpaceae) in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chadaporn SENAKUN; Suchitra CHANGTRAGOON; Pairot PRAMUAL; Preecha PRATHEPHA

    2011-01-01

    Shorea obtusa is a keystone species of the dry deciduous dipterocarp forest in Thailand. In this study,the genetic structure and diversity of this species were evaluated by means of five microsatellite markers. A total of 146 trees were collected from five populations encompassing major forest regions of Thailand. High levels of genetic diversity were found among the five populations with the average He of 0.664. Genetic differentiations between populations, although significant, were low with approximately 3% of genetic variation partitioned among populations. This may indicate that the populations sampled were recently part of a continuous population. A tree constructed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average, based on Nei's genetic distance, divided the populations into three groups. This separation was consistent with the altitudinal zonation of the populations,thus indicating that altitude might play a significant role in the genetic structure of S. obtusa. Areas of high genetic diversity were identified which could be considered priorities for conservation.

  16. Genetic diversity and structure of Brazilian ginger germplasm (Zingiber officinale) revealed by AFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Eleonora Zambrano; Bajay, Miklos Maximiliano; Siqueira, Marcos Vinícius Bohrer Monteiro; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Pinheiro, José Baldin

    2016-12-01

    Ginger is a vegetable with medicinal and culinary properties widely cultivated in the Southern and Southeastern Brazil. The knowledge of ginger species' genetic variability is essential to direct correctly future studies of conservation and genetic improvement, but in Brazil, little is known about this species' genetic variability. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity and structure of 55 Brazilian accessions and 6 Colombian accessions of ginger, using AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) molecular markers. The molecular characterization was based on 13 primers combinations, which generated an average of 113.5 polymorphic loci. The genetic diversity estimates of Nei (Hj), Shannon-Weiner index (I) and an effective number of alleles (n e ) were greater in the Colombian accessions in relation to the Brazilian accessions. The analysis of molecular variance showed that most of the genetic variation occurred between the two countries while in the Brazilian populations there is no genetic structure and probably each region harbors 100 % of genetic variation found in the samples. The bayesian model-based clustering and the dendrogram using the dissimilarity's coefficient of Jaccard were congruent with each other and showed that the Brazilian accessions are highly similar between themselves, regardless of the geographic region of origin. We suggested that the exploration of the interspecific variability and the introduction of new varieties of Z.officinale are viable alternatives for generating diversity in breeding programs in Brazil. The introduction of new genetic materials will certainly contribute to a higher genetic basis of such crop.

  17. 利用SRAP标记研究四个暗纹东方鲀群体的遗传多样性%ANALYSIS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY OF FOUR TAKIFUGU OBSCURUS POPULATIONS USING SRAP MARKERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程长洪; 张敏莹; 刘凯; 徐东坡; 段金荣; 周彦锋; 施炜纲

    2012-01-01

    Takifugu species (order: Tetradotiformes; family: Tetradontidae) have attracted attention among the scientific community for their peculiar biology, physiology and genomics. Obscure puffer (Takifugu obscurus) is an anadromous fish species in China. They usually grow in the sea before turning sexually mature, then migrate to freshwater rivers for reproduction during the spawning season. Obscure puffer is a popular fish in China for its high-quality meat. In 2002, annual production of obscure puffer was 2600 tons, and it has been continuing to rise owing to its large body size, rapid growth, and high market value of the fish. However, obscure puffer resource has sharply declined because of over-fishing and water pollution. Previous studies have focused on the physiology and mitochondrial DNA. Analysis of the genetic diversity and structure of a fish species is an important prerequisite for conservation as it reflects the status and survival potential of this species. However, the genetic diversity among and within populations of obscure puffer populations remains unknown, thus it is difficult to implement effective conservation strategies. Molecular markers are useful for population genetic studies to assess the influence of various factors on genetic diversity and population structure. Among the many types of molecular markers, sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) has been recognized as a new and useful molecular marker system because of its simplicity, reproduci-bility and convenience. This method is based on two-primer amplification. The primers are 17 or 18 nucleotides long and consist of the following elements. SRAP amplifies open reading frames and is significant for gene and genetic diversity. It has been applied extensively in molecular identification, genetic linkage map construction, gene tagging, genetic diversity analysis and comparative genetics of different species. In this study, in order to investigate the genetic diversity and population

  18. Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linea Melchior

    Full Text Available Using established criteria for work with fossil DNA we have analysed mitochondrial