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Sample records for genetic code change

  1. Evolution of the genetic code by incorporation of amino acids that improved or changed protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Brian R

    2013-10-01

    Fifty years have passed since the genetic code was deciphered, but how the genetic code came into being has not been satisfactorily addressed. It is now widely accepted that the earliest genetic code did not encode all 20 amino acids found in the universal genetic code as some amino acids have complex biosynthetic pathways and likely were not available from the environment. Therefore, the genetic code evolved as pathways for synthesis of new amino acids became available. One hypothesis proposes that early in the evolution of the genetic code four amino acids-valine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glycine-were coded by GNC codons (N = any base) with the remaining codons being nonsense codons. The other sixteen amino acids were subsequently added to the genetic code by changing nonsense codons into sense codons for these amino acids. Improvement in protein function is presumed to be the driving force behind the evolution of the code, but how improved function was achieved by adding amino acids has not been examined. Based on an analysis of amino acid function in proteins, an evolutionary mechanism for expansion of the genetic code is described in which individual coded amino acids were replaced by new amino acids that used nonsense codons differing by one base change from the sense codons previously used. The improved or altered protein function afforded by the changes in amino acid function provided the selective advantage underlying the expansion of the genetic code. Analysis of amino acid properties and functions explains why amino acids are found in their respective positions in the genetic code.

  2. A change in the genetic code in Mycoplasma capricolum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum was previously found to use UGA instead of UGG as its codon for tryptophan and to contain 75 percent A + T in its DNA. The codon change could have been due to mutational pressure to replace C + G by A + T, resulting in the replacement of UGA stop codons by UAA, change of the anticodon in tryptophan tRNA from CCA to UCA, and replacement of UGG tryptophan codons by UGA. None of these changes should have been deleterious.

  3. Rewriting the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Takahito; Lajoie, Marc J; Englert, Markus; Söll, Dieter

    2017-09-08

    The genetic code-the language used by cells to translate their genomes into proteins that perform many cellular functions-is highly conserved throughout natural life. Rewriting the genetic code could lead to new biological functions such as expanding protein chemistries with noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) and genetically isolating synthetic organisms from natural organisms and viruses. It has long been possible to transiently produce proteins bearing ncAAs, but stabilizing an expanded genetic code for sustained function in vivo requires an integrated approach: creating recoded genomes and introducing new translation machinery that function together without compromising viability or clashing with endogenous pathways. In this review, we discuss design considerations and technologies for expanding the genetic code. The knowledge obtained by rewriting the genetic code will deepen our understanding of how genomes are designed and how the canonical genetic code evolved.

  4. Simple association of the genetic code with hexagrams of the Book of Changes (I Ching

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    Sergey P. Fedotov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Article "Simple association of the genetic code and hexagrams of the Book of Changes (I Ching" is based on the provisions of previous paper "The genetic code as a structure of the Five elements in Chinese philosophy" where the hypothesis regarding the principles of formation of digrams and trigrams in Chinese philosophy are proposed. It allowed to suggest an idea of digrams and trigrams as a tool for description of DNA codons in the process of their interaction, each with others as an independent oscillator (objects, generating its own natural frequency. On the basis of this hypothesis it is considered the logic of structure of trigrams from the Book of Changes (I Ching, the properties of Start and Stop codons, and the properties of their position in the general order of the King Wen. It is suggested that hexagrams order of King Wen describes dynamics of pulse process in the human body as a process of interaction of amino acids which are programmed by codons on the base of frequency (wavelength peculiarities. In addition, a comparative study of the properties between peptide products (manufactured on the base of research of Institute of Gerontology and Bioregulation – St. Petersburg and the scheme of daily activity of codons are represented.

  5. What Froze the Genetic Code?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lluís Ribas de Pouplana; Adrian Gabriel Torres; albert Rafels-Ybern

    2017-01-01

    The frozen accident theory of the Genetic Code was a proposal by Francis Crick that attempted to explain the universal nature of the Genetic Code and the fact that it only contains information for twenty amino acids...

  6. Overcoming Challenges in Engineering the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, M J; Söll, D; Church, G M

    2016-02-27

    Withstanding 3.5 billion years of genetic drift, the canonical genetic code remains such a fundamental foundation for the complexity of life that it is highly conserved across all three phylogenetic domains. Genome engineering technologies are now making it possible to rationally change the genetic code, offering resistance to viruses, genetic isolation from horizontal gene transfer, and prevention of environmental escape by genetically modified organisms. We discuss the biochemical, genetic, and technological challenges that must be overcome in order to engineer the genetic code.

  7. A unique genetic code change in the mitochondrial genome of the parasitic nematode Radopholus similis

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    Van Leeuwen Thomas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria (mt contain their own autonomously replicating DNA, constituted as a small circular genome encoding essential subunits of the respiratory chain. Mt DNA is characterized by a genetic code which differs from the standard one. Interestingly, the mt genome of nematodes share some peculiar features, such as small transfer RNAs, truncated ribosomal RNAs and - in the class of Chromadorean nematodes - unidirectional transcription. Findings We present the complete mt genomic sequence (16,791 bp of the plant-parasitic nematode Radopholus similis (class Chromadorea. Although it has a gene content similar to most other nematodes, many idiosyncrasies characterize the extremely AT-rich mt genome of R. similis (85.4% AT. The secondary structure of the large (16S rRNA is further reduced, the gene order is unique, the large non-coding region contains two large repeats, and most interestingly, the UAA codon is reassigned from translation termination to tyrosine. In addition, 7 out of 12 protein-coding genes lack a canonical stop codon and analysis of transcriptional data showed the absence of polyadenylation. Northern blot analysis confirmed that only one strand is transcribed and processed. Furthermore, using nucleotide content bias methods, regions for the origin of replication are suggested. Conclusion The extraordinary mt genome of R. similis with its unique genetic code appears to contain exceptional features correlated to DNA decoding. Therefore the genome may provide an incentive to further elucidate these barely understood processes in nematodes. This comprehension may eventually lead to parasitic nematode-specific control targets as healthy mitochondria are imperative for organism survival. In addition, the presented genome is an interesting exceptional event in genetic code evolution.

  8. What Froze the Genetic Code?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís; Torres, Adrian Gabriel; Rafels-Ybern, Àlbert

    2017-04-05

    The frozen accident theory of the Genetic Code was a proposal by Francis Crick that attempted to explain the universal nature of the Genetic Code and the fact that it only contains information for twenty amino acids. Fifty years later, it is clear that variations to the universal Genetic Code exist in nature and that translation is not limited to twenty amino acids. However, given the astonishing diversity of life on earth, and the extended evolutionary time that has taken place since the emergence of the extant Genetic Code, the idea that the translation apparatus is for the most part immobile remains true. Here, we will offer a potential explanation to the reason why the code has remained mostly stable for over three billion years, and discuss some of the mechanisms that allow species to overcome the intrinsic functional limitations of the protein synthesis machinery.

  9. Efforts and Challenges in Engineering the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao; Yu, Allen Chi Shing; Chan, Ting Fung

    2017-03-14

    This year marks the 48th anniversary of Francis Crick's seminal work on the origin of the genetic code, in which he first proposed the "frozen accident" hypothesis to describe evolutionary selection against changes to the genetic code that cause devastating global proteome modification. However, numerous efforts have demonstrated the viability of both natural and artificial genetic code variations. Recent advances in genetic engineering allow the creation of synthetic organisms that incorporate noncanonical, or even unnatural, amino acids into the proteome. Currently, successful genetic code engineering is mainly achieved by creating orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA/synthetase pairs to repurpose stop and rare codons or to induce quadruplet codons. In this review, we summarize the current progress in genetic code engineering and discuss the challenges, current understanding, and future perspectives regarding genetic code modification.

  10. Efforts and Challenges in Engineering the Genetic Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Lin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This year marks the 48th anniversary of Francis Crick’s seminal work on the origin of the genetic code, in which he first proposed the “frozen accident” hypothesis to describe evolutionary selection against changes to the genetic code that cause devastating global proteome modification. However, numerous efforts have demonstrated the viability of both natural and artificial genetic code variations. Recent advances in genetic engineering allow the creation of synthetic organisms that incorporate noncanonical, or even unnatural, amino acids into the proteome. Currently, successful genetic code engineering is mainly achieved by creating orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA/synthetase pairs to repurpose stop and rare codons or to induce quadruplet codons. In this review, we summarize the current progress in genetic code engineering and discuss the challenges, current understanding, and future perspectives regarding genetic code modification.

  11. Future of the Genetic Code

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    Hong Xue

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The methods for establishing synthetic lifeforms with rewritten genetic codes comprising non-canonical amino acids (NCAA in addition to canonical amino acids (CAA include proteome-wide replacement of CAA, insertion through suppression of nonsense codon, and insertion via the pyrrolysine and selenocysteine pathways. Proteome-wide reassignments of nonsense codons and sense codons are also under development. These methods enable the application of NCAAs to enrich both fundamental and applied aspects of protein chemistry and biology. Sense codon reassignment to NCAA could incur problems arising from the usage of anticodons as identity elements on tRNA, and possible misreading of NNY codons by UNN anticodons. Evidence suggests that the problem of anticodon as identity elements can be diminished or resolved through removal from the tRNA of all identity elements besides the anticodons, and the problem of misreading of NNY codons by UNN anticodon can be resolved by the retirement of both the UNN anticodon and its complementary NNA codon from the proteome in the event that a restrictive post-transcriptional modification of the UNN anticodon by host enzymes to prevent the misreading cannot be obtained.

  12. The path to the genetic code.

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    Szymanski, Maciej; Barciszewski, Jan

    2017-11-01

    In December of 1966 the last nucleotide triplet in the genetic code has been assigned (Brenner et al., 1967 [1]) thus completing years of studies aimed at deciphering the nature of the relationship between the sequences of genes and proteins. The end product, the table of the genetic code, was a crowning achievement of the quest to unravel the basic mechanisms underlying functioning of all living organisms on the molecular level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Problem of Evolving a Genetic Code

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    Woese, Carl R.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes models for the evolution of the genetic code and translation mechanisms. Suggests that the translation process is so complex and precise that it must have evolved in many stages, and that the evolution of the code was influenced by the constraints imposed by the evolving translation mechanism. (EB)

  14. Hacking the genetic code of mammalian cells.

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    Schwarzer, Dirk

    2009-07-06

    A genetic shuttle: The highlighted article, which was recently published by Schultz, Geierstanger and co-workers, describes a straightforward scheme for enlarging the genetic code of mammalian cells. An orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair specific for a new amino acid can be evolved in E. coli and subsequently transferred into mammalian cells. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by adding a photocaged lysine derivative to the genetic repertoire of a human cell line.

  15. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2017-02-28

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  16. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  17. A Binary Representation of the Genetic Code

    CERN Document Server

    Nemzer, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces a novel binary representation of the canonical genetic code, in which each of the four mRNA nucleotide bases is assigned a unique 2-bit identifier. These designations have a physiological meaning derived from the molecular structures of, and relationships between, the bases. In this scheme, the 64 possible triplet codons are each indexed by a 6-bit label. The order of the bits reflects the hierarchical organization manifested by the DNA replication/repair and tRNA translation systems. Transition and transversion mutations are naturally expressed as basic binary operations, and the severity of the different types is analyzed. Using a principal component analysis, it is shown that physicochemical properties of amino acids related to protein folding also correlate with particular bit positions of their respective labels. Thus, the likelihood for a particular point mutation to be conservative, and therefore less likely to cause a change in protein functionality, can be estimated.

  18. Pathways of Genetic Code Evolution in Ancient and Modern Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Supratim; Higgs, Paul G

    2015-06-01

    There have been two distinct phases of evolution of the genetic code: an ancient phase--prior to the divergence of the three domains of life, during which the standard genetic code was established--and a modern phase, in which many alternative codes have arisen in specific groups of genomes that differ only slightly from the standard code. Here we discuss the factors that are most important in these two phases, and we argue that these are substantially different. In the modern phase, changes are driven by chance events such as tRNA gene deletions and codon disappearance events. Selection acts as a barrier to prevent changes in the code. In contrast, in the ancient phase, selection for increased diversity of amino acids in the code can be a driving force for addition of new amino acids. The pathway of code evolution is constrained by avoiding disruption of genes that are already encoded by earlier versions of the code. The current arrangement of the standard code suggests that it evolved from a four-column code in which Gly, Ala, Asp, and Val were the earliest encoded amino acids.

  19. Improving the efficiency of the genetic code by varying the codon length--the perfect genetic code.

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    Doig, A J

    1997-10-07

    The function of DNA is to specify protein sequences. The four-base "alphabet" used in nucleic acids is translated to the 20 base alphabet of proteins (plus a stop signal) via the genetic code. The code is neither overlapping nor punctuated, but has mRNA sequences read in successive triplet codons until reaching a stop codon. The true genetic code uses three bases for every amino acid. The efficiency of the genetic code can be significantly increased if the requirement for a fixed codon length is dropped so that the more common amino acids have shorter codon lengths and rare amino acids have longer codon lengths. More efficient codes can be derived using the Shannon-Fano and Huffman coding algorithms. The compression achieved using a Huffman code cannot be improved upon. I have used these algorithms to derive efficient codes for representing protein sequences using both two and four bases. The length of DNA required to specify the complete set of protein sequences could be significantly shorter if transcription used a variable codon length. The restriction to a fixed codon length of three bases means that it takes 42% more DNA than the minimum necessary, and the genetic code is 70% efficient. One can think of many reasons why this maximally efficient code has not evolved: there is very little redundancy so almost any mutation causes an amino acid change. Many mutations will be potentially lethal frame-shift mutations, if the mutation leads to a change in codon length. It would be more difficult for the machinery of transcription to cope with a variable codon length. Nevertheless, in the strict and narrow sense of coding for protein sequences using the minimum length of DNA possible, the Huffman code derived here is perfect.

  20. The puzzling origin of the genetic code.

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    Cedergren, R; Miramontes, P

    1996-06-01

    Recent results add to the mystery of the origin of the genetic code. In spite of early doubts, RNA can discriminate between hydrophobic amino acids under certain contexts. Moreover, codon reassignment, which has taken place in several organisms and mitochondria, is not a random process. Finally, phylogenies of some aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases suggest that the entire code was not completely assigned at the time of the divergence of bacteria from nucleated cells.

  1. Can the genetic code be mathematically described?

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    Gonzalez, Diego L

    2004-04-01

    From a mathematical point of view, the genetic code is a surjective mapping between the set of the 64 possible three-base codons and the set of 21 elements composed of the 20 amino acids plus the Stop signal. Redundancy and degeneracy therefore follow. In analogy with the genetic code, non-power integer-number representations are also surjective mappings between sets of different cardinality and, as such, also redundant. However, none of the non-power arithmetics studied so far nor other alternative redundant representations are able to match the actual degeneracy of the genetic code. In this paper we develop a slightly more general framework that leads to the following surprising results: i) the degeneracy of the genetic code is mathematically described, ii) a new symmetry is uncovered within this degeneracy, iii) by assigning a binary string to each of the codons, their classification into definite parity classes according to the corresponding sequence of bases is made possible. This last result is particularly appealing in connection with the fact that parity coding is the basis of the simplest strategies devised for error correction in man-made digital data transmission systems.

  2. Collective evolution and the genetic code.

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    Vetsigian, Kalin; Woese, Carl; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2006-07-11

    A dynamical theory for the evolution of the genetic code is presented, which accounts for its universality and optimality. The central concept is that a variety of collective, but non-Darwinian, mechanisms likely to be present in early communal life generically lead to refinement and selection of innovation-sharing protocols, such as the genetic code. Our proposal is illustrated by using a simplified computer model and placed within the context of a sequence of transitions that early life may have made, before the emergence of vertical descent.

  3. Quaternionic representation of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlevaro, C Manuel; Irastorza, Ramiro M; Vericat, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    A heuristic diagram of the evolution of the standard genetic code is presented. It incorporates, in a way that resembles the energy levels of an atom, the physical notion of broken symmetry and it is consistent with original ideas by Crick on the origin and evolution of the code as well as with the chronological order of appearance of the amino acids along the evolution as inferred from work that mixtures known experimental results with theoretical speculations. Suggested by the diagram we propose a Hamilton quaternions based mathematical representation of the code as it stands now-a-days. The central object in the description is a codon function that assigns to each amino acid an integer quaternion in such a way that the observed code degeneration is preserved. We emphasize the advantages of a quaternionic representation of amino acids taking as an example the folding of proteins. With this aim we propose an algorithm to go from the quaternions sequence to the protein three dimensional structure which can be compared with the corresponding experimental one stored at the Protein Data Bank. In our criterion the mathematical representation of the genetic code in terms of quaternions merits to be taken into account because it describes not only most of the known properties of the genetic code but also opens new perspectives that are mainly derived from the close relationship between quaternions and rotations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Alternative genetic code for amino acids and transfer RNA revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamashima, Kiyofumi; Kanai, Akio

    2013-06-01

    The genetic code is highly conserved among all organisms and its evolution is thought to be strictly limited. However, an increasing number of studies have reported non-standard codes in prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. Most of these deviations from the standard code are attributable to tRNA changes relating to, for example, codon/anticodon base pairing and tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase recognition. In this review, we focus on tRNA, a key molecule in the translation of the genetic code, and summarize the most recently published information on the evolutionary divergence of the tRNAs. Surprisingly, although higher eukaryotes, such as the nematode (worm), utilize the standard genetic code, newly identified nematode-specific tRNAs (nev-tRNAs) translate nucleotides in a manner that transgresses the code. Furthermore, a variety of additional functions of tRNAs, beyond their translation of the genetic code, have emerged rapidly. We also review these intriguing new aspects of tRNA, which have potential impacts on translational control, RNA silencing, antibiotic resistance, RNA biosynthesis, and transcriptional regulation.

  5. Synthetic biology: Tailor-made genetic codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Michael C.; Noireaux, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Expanding the range of amino acids polymerizable by ribosomes could enable new functionalities to be added to polypeptides. Now, the genetic code has been reprogrammed using a reconstituted in vitro translation system to enable synthesis of unnatural peptides with unmatched flexibility.

  6. A binary representation of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzer, Louis R

    2017-05-01

    This article introduces a novel binary representation of the canonical genetic code based on both the structural similarities of the nucleotides, as well as the physicochemical properties of the encoded amino acids. Each of the four mRNA bases is assigned a unique 2-bit identifier, so that the 64 triplet codons are each indexed by a 6-bit label. The ordering of the bits reflects the hierarchical organization manifested by the DNA replication/repair and tRNA translation systems. In this system, transition and transversion mutations are naturally expressed as binary operations, and the severities of the different point mutations can be analyzed. Using a principal component analysis, it is shown that the physicochemical properties of amino acids related to protein folding also correlate with certain bit positions of their respective labels. Thus, the likelihood for a point mutation to be conservative, and less likely to cause a change in protein functionality, can be estimated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The neutral emergence of error minimized genetic codes superior to the standard genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Steven E

    2016-11-07

    The standard genetic code (SGC) assigns amino acids to codons in such a way that the impact of point mutations is reduced, this is termed 'error minimization' (EM). The occurrence of EM has been attributed to the direct action of selection, however it is difficult to explain how the searching of alternative codes for an error minimized code can occur via codon reassignments, given that these are likely to be disruptive to the proteome. An alternative scenario is that EM has arisen via the process of genetic code expansion, facilitated by the duplication of genes encoding charging enzymes and adaptor molecules. This is likely to have led to similar amino acids being assigned to similar codons. Strikingly, we show that if during code expansion the most similar amino acid to the parent amino acid, out of the set of unassigned amino acids, is assigned to codons related to those of the parent amino acid, then genetic codes with EM superior to the SGC easily arise. This scheme mimics code expansion via the gene duplication of charging enzymes and adaptors. The result is obtained for a variety of different schemes of genetic code expansion and provides a mechanistically realistic manner in which EM has arisen in the SGC. These observations might be taken as evidence for self-organization in the earliest stages of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Origin and evolution of the genetic code: the universal enigma.

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    Koonin, Eugene V; Novozhilov, Artem S

    2009-02-01

    The genetic code is nearly universal, and the arrangement of the codons in the standard codon table is highly nonrandom. The three main concepts on the origin and evolution of the code are the stereochemical theory, according to which codon assignments are dictated by physicochemical affinity between amino acids and the cognate codons (anticodons); the coevolution theory, which posits that the code structure coevolved with amino acid biosynthesis pathways; and the error minimization theory under which selection to minimize the adverse effect of point mutations and translation errors was the principal factor of the code's evolution. These theories are not mutually exclusive and are also compatible with the frozen accident hypothesis, that is, the notion that the standard code might have no special properties but was fixed simply because all extant life forms share a common ancestor, with subsequent changes to the code, mostly, precluded by the deleterious effect of codon reassignment. Mathematical analysis of the structure and possible evolutionary trajectories of the code shows that it is highly robust to translational misreading but there are numerous more robust codes, so the standard code potentially could evolve from a random code via a short sequence of codon series reassignments. Thus, much of the evolution that led to the standard code could be a combination of frozen accident with selection for error minimization although contributions from coevolution of the code with metabolic pathways and weak affinities between amino acids and nucleotide triplets cannot be ruled out. However, such scenarios for the code evolution are based on formal schemes whose relevance to the actual primordial evolution is uncertain. A real understanding of the code origin and evolution is likely to be attainable only in conjunction with a credible scenario for the evolution of the coding principle itself and the translation system.

  9. Origin and Evolution of the Universal Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V; Novozhilov, Artem S

    2017-08-30

    The standard genetic code (SGC) is virtually universal among extant life forms. Although many deviations from the universal code exist, particularly in organelles and prokaryotes with small genomes, they are limited in scope and obviously secondary. The universality of the code likely results from the combination of a frozen accident, i.e., the deleterious effect of codon reassignment in the SGC, and the inhibitory effect of changes in the code on horizontal gene transfer. The structure of the SGC is nonrandom and ensures high robustness of the code to mutational and translational errors. However, this error minimization is most likely a by-product of the primordial code expansion driven by the diversification of the repertoire of protein amino acids, rather than a direct result of selection. Phylogenetic analysis of translation system components, in particular aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, shows that, at a stage of evolution when the translation system had already attained high fidelity, the correspondence between amino acids and cognate codons was determined by recognition of amino acids by RNA molecules, i.e., proto-tRNAs. We propose an experimentally testable scenario for the evolution of the code that combines recognition of amino acids by unique sites on proto-tRNAs (distinct from the anticodons), expansion of the code via proto-tRNA duplication, and frozen accident. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Genetics Volume 51 is November 23, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  10. Xenomicrobiology: a roadmap for genetic code engineering.

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    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Budisa, Nediljko

    2016-09-01

    Biology is an analytical and informational science that is becoming increasingly dependent on chemical synthesis. One example is the high-throughput and low-cost synthesis of DNA, which is a foundation for the research field of synthetic biology (SB). The aim of SB is to provide biotechnological solutions to health, energy and environmental issues as well as unsustainable manufacturing processes in the frame of naturally existing chemical building blocks. Xenobiology (XB) goes a step further by implementing non-natural building blocks in living cells. In this context, genetic code engineering respectively enables the re-design of genes/genomes and proteins/proteomes with non-canonical nucleic (XNAs) and amino (ncAAs) acids. Besides studying information flow and evolutionary innovation in living systems, XB allows the development of new-to-nature therapeutic proteins/peptides, new biocatalysts for potential applications in synthetic organic chemistry and biocontainment strategies for enhanced biosafety. In this perspective, we provide a brief history and evolution of the genetic code in the context of XB. We then discuss the latest efforts and challenges ahead for engineering the genetic code with focus on substitutions and additions of ncAAs as well as standard amino acid reductions. Finally, we present a roadmap for the directed evolution of artificial microbes for emancipating rare sense codons that could be used to introduce novel building blocks. The development of such xenomicroorganisms endowed with a 'genetic firewall' will also allow to study and understand the relation between code evolution and horizontal gene transfer. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. A cybernetic approach to the origin of the genetic coding mechanism. II. Formation of the code series.

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    Batchinsky, A G; Ratner, V A

    1976-08-01

    The sequential fulfillment of the principle of succession necessarily guides the main steps of the genetic code evolution to be reflected in its structure. The general scheme of the code series formation is proposed basing on the idea of "group coding" (Woese, 1970). The genetic code supposedly evolved by means of successive divergence of pra-ARS's loci, accompanied by increasing specification of recognition capacity of amino acids and triplets. The sense of codons had not been changed on any step of stochastic code evolution. The formulated rules for code series formation produce a code version, similar to the contemporary one. Based on these rules the scheme of pra-ARS's divergence is proposed resulting in the grouping of amino acids by their polarity and size. Later steps in the evolution of the genetic code were probably based on more detailed features of the amino acids (for example, on their functional similarities like their interchangeabilities in isofunctional proteins).

  12. Cracking the Genetic Code | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Cracking the Genetic Code, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins Past Issues / ... moment in science in 2000: Cracking of the genetic code raised the prospect of pinpointing the root causes ...

  13. Two perspectives on the origin of the standard genetic code.

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    Sengupta, Supratim; Aggarwal, Neha; Bandhu, Ashutosh Vishwa

    2014-12-01

    The origin of a genetic code made it possible to create ordered sequences of amino acids. In this article we provide two perspectives on code origin by carrying out simulations of code-sequence coevolution in finite populations with the aim of examining how the standard genetic code may have evolved from more primitive code(s) encoding a small number of amino acids. We determine the efficacy of the physico-chemical hypothesis of code origin in the absence and presence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) by allowing a diverse collection of code-sequence sets to compete with each other. We find that in the absence of horizontal gene transfer, natural selection between competing codes distinguished by differences in the degree of physico-chemical optimization is unable to explain the structure of the standard genetic code. However, for certain probabilities of the horizontal transfer events, a universal code emerges having a structure that is consistent with the standard genetic code.

  14. p-Adic Degeneracy of the Genetic Code

    CERN Document Server

    Dragovich, Branko

    2007-01-01

    Degeneracy of the genetic code is a biological way to minimize effects of the undesirable mutation changes. Degeneration has a natural description on the 5-adic space of 64 codons $\\mathcal{C}_5 (64) = \\{n_0 + n_1 5 + n_2 5^2 : n_i = 1, 2, 3, 4 \\} ,$ where $n_i$ are digits related to nucleotides as follows: C = 1, A = 2, T = U = 3, G = 4. The smallest 5-adic distance between codons joins them into 16 quadruplets, which under 2-adic distance decay into 32 doublets. p-Adically close codons are assigned to one of 20 amino acids, which are building blocks of proteins, or code termination of protein synthesis. We shown that genetic code multiplets are made of the p-adic nearest codons.

  15. Metalloprotein design using genetic code expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cheng; Chan, Sunney I; Sawyer, Elizabeth B; Yu, Yang; Wang, Jiangyun

    2014-09-21

    More than one third of all proteins are metalloproteins. They catalyze important reactions such as photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and CO2 reduction. Metalloproteins such as the olfactory receptors also serve as highly elaborate sensors. Here we review recent developments in functional metalloprotein design using the genetic code expansion approach. We show that, through the site-specific incorporation of metal-chelating unnatural amino acids (UAAs), proton and electron transfer mediators, and UAAs bearing bioorthogonal reaction groups, small soluble proteins can recapitulate and expand the important functions of complex metalloproteins. Further developments along this route may result in cell factories and live-cell sensors with unprecedented efficiency and selectivity.

  16. Regulation of the genetic code in megakaryocytes and platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondina, M T; Weyrich, A S

    2015-06-01

    Platelets are generated from nucleated precursors referred to as megakaryocytes. The formation of platelets is one of the most elegant and unique developmental processes in eukaryotes. Because they enter the circulation without nuclei, platelets are often considered simple, non-complex cells that have limited functions beyond halting blood flow. However, emerging evidence over the past decade demonstrates that platelets are more sophisticated than previously considered. Platelets carry a rich repertoire of messenger RNAs (mRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), and proteins that contribute to primary (adhesion, aggregation, secretion) and alternative (immune regulation, RNA transfer, translation) functions. It is also becoming increasingly clear that the 'genetic code' of platelets changes with race, genetic disorders, or disease. Changes in the 'genetic code' can occur at multiple points including megakaryocyte development, platelet formation, or in circulating platelets. This review focuses on regulation of the 'genetic code' in megakaryocytes and platelets and its potential contribution to health and disease. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. HOW TO REPRESENT THE GENETIC CODE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Santos-Magalhães

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The advent of molecular genetic comprises a true revolution of far-reaching consequences for human-kind, which evolved into a specialized branch of the modern-day Biochemistry. The analysis of specicgenomic information are gaining wide-ranging interest because of their signicance to the early diag-nosis of disease, and the discovery of modern drugs. In order to take advantage of a wide assortmentof signal processing (SP algorithms, the primary step of modern genomic SP involves convertingsymbolic-DNA sequences into complex-valued signals. How to represent the genetic code? Despitebeing extensively known, the DNA mapping into proteins is one of the relevant discoveries of genetics.The genetic code (GC is revisited in this work, addressing other descriptions for it, which can beworthy for genomic SP. Three original representations are discussed. The inner-to-outer map buildson the unbalanced role of nucleotides of a codon. A two-dimensional-Gray genetic representationis oered as a structured map that can help interpreting DNA spectrograms or scalograms. Theseare among the powerful visual tools for genome analysis, which depends on the choice of the geneticmapping. Finally, the world-chart for the GC is investigated. Evoking the cyclic structure of thegenetic mapping, it can be folded joining the left-right borders, and the top-bottom frontiers. As aresult, the GC can be drawn on the surface of a sphere resembling a world-map. Eight parallels oflatitude are required (four in each hemisphere as well as four meridians of longitude associated tofour corresponding anti-meridians. The tropic circles have 11.25o, 33.75o, 56.25o, and 78.5o (Northand South. Starting from an arbitrary Greenwich meridian, the meridians of longitude can be plottedat 22.5o, 67.5o, 112.5o, and 157.5o (East and West. Each triplet is assigned to a single point on thesurface that we named Nirenberg-Kohamas Earth. Despite being valuable, usual representations forthe GC can be

  18. Optimality properties of a proposed precursor to the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2009-09-01

    We calculate the optimality score of a doublet precursor to the canonical genetic code with respect to mitigating the effects of point mutations and compare our results to corresponding ones for the canonical genetic code. We find that the proposed precursor is much less optimal than that of the canonical code. Our results render unlikely the notion that the doublet precursor was an intermediate state in the evolution of the canonical genetic code. These findings support the notion that code optimality reflects evolutionary dynamics, and that if such a doublet code originally had a biochemical significance, it arose before the emergence of translation.

  19. Analysis of the optimality of the standard genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Balaji; Saini, Supreet

    2016-07-19

    Many theories have been proposed attempting to explain the origin of the genetic code. While strong reasons remain to believe that the genetic code evolved as a frozen accident, at least for the first few amino acids, other theories remain viable. In this work, we test the optimality of the standard genetic code against approximately 17 million genetic codes, and locate 29 which outperform the standard genetic code at the following three criteria: (a) robustness to point mutation; (b) robustness to frameshift mutation; and (c) ability to encode additional information in the coding region. We use a genetic algorithm to generate and score codes from different parts of the associated landscape, which are, as a result, presumably more representative of the entire landscape. Our results show that while the genetic code is sub-optimal for robustness to frameshift mutation and the ability to encode additional information in the coding region, it is very strongly selected for robustness to point mutation. This coupled with the observation that the different performance indicator scores for a particular genetic code are negatively correlated makes the standard genetic code nearly optimal for the three criteria tested in this work.

  20. Expanding the genetic code of Mus musculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Songmi; Yang, Aerin; Lee, Soonjang; Lee, Han-Woong; Park, Chan Bae; Park, Hee-Sung

    2017-01-01

    Here we report the expansion of the genetic code of Mus musculus with various unnatural amino acids including Nɛ-acetyl-lysine. Stable integration of transgenes encoding an engineered Nɛ-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS)/tRNAPyl pair into the mouse genome enables site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids into a target protein in response to the amber codon. We demonstrate temporal and spatial control of protein acetylation in various organs of the transgenic mouse using a recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) as a model protein. This strategy will provide a powerful tool for systematic in vivo study of cellular proteins in the most commonly used mammalian model organism for human physiology and disease. PMID:28220771

  1. Flexibility of the genetic code with respect to DNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baisnée, P. F.; Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren

    2001-01-01

    Motivation. The primary function of DNA is to carry genetic information through the genetic code. DNA, however, contains a variety of other signals related, for instance, to reading frame, codon bias, pairwise codon bias, splice sites and transcription regulation, nucleosome positioning and DNA...... structure. Here we study the relationship between the genetic code and DNA structure and address two questions. First, to which degree does the degeneracy of the genetic code and the acceptable amino acid substitution patterns allow for the superimposition of DNA structural signals to protein coding...... sequences? Second, is the origin or evolution of the genetic code likely to have been constrained by DNA structure? Results. We develop an index for code flexibility with respect to DNA structure. Using five different di- or tri-nucleotide models of sequence-dependent DNA structure, we show...

  2. Some mathematical refinements concerning error minimization in the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrman, Harry; van der Gulik, Peter T S; Kelk, Steven M; Koolen, Wouter M; Stougie, Leen

    2011-01-01

    The genetic code is known to have a high level of error robustness and has been shown to be very error robust compared to randomly selected codes, but to be significantly less error robust than a certain code found by a heuristic algorithm. We formulate this optimization problem as a Quadratic Assignment Problem and use this to formally verify that the code found by the heuristic algorithm is the global optimum. We also argue that it is strongly misleading to compare the genetic code only with codes sampled from the fixed block model, because the real code space is orders of magnitude larger. We thus enlarge the space from which random codes can be sampled from approximately 2.433 × 10(18) codes to approximately 5.908 × 10(45) codes. We do this by leaving the fixed block model, and using the wobble rules to formulate the characteristics acceptable for a genetic code. By relaxing more constraints, three larger spaces are also constructed. Using a modified error function, the genetic code is found to be more error robust compared to a background of randomly generated codes with increasing space size. We point out that these results do not necessarily imply that the code was optimized during evolution for error minimization, but that other mechanisms could be the reason for this error robustness.

  3. A multiobjective approach to the genetic code adaptability problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Lariza Laura; de Oliveira, Paulo S L; Tinós, Renato

    2015-02-19

    The organization of the canonical code has intrigued researches since it was first described. If we consider all codes mapping the 64 codes into 20 amino acids and one stop codon, there are more than 1.51×10(84) possible genetic codes. The main question related to the organization of the genetic code is why exactly the canonical code was selected among this huge number of possible genetic codes. Many researchers argue that the organization of the canonical code is a product of natural selection and that the code's robustness against mutations would support this hypothesis. In order to investigate the natural selection hypothesis, some researches employ optimization algorithms to identify regions of the genetic code space where best codes, according to a given evaluation function, can be found (engineering approach). The optimization process uses only one objective to evaluate the codes, generally based on the robustness for an amino acid property. Only one objective is also employed in the statistical approach for the comparison of the canonical code with random codes. We propose a multiobjective approach where two or more objectives are considered simultaneously to evaluate the genetic codes. In order to test our hypothesis that the multiobjective approach is useful for the analysis of the genetic code adaptability, we implemented a multiobjective optimization algorithm where two objectives are simultaneously optimized. Using as objectives the robustness against mutation with the amino acids properties polar requirement (objective 1) and robustness with respect to hydropathy index or molecular volume (objective 2), we found solutions closer to the canonical genetic code in terms of robustness, when compared with the results using only one objective reported by other authors. Using more objectives, more optimal solutions are obtained and, as a consequence, more information can be used to investigate the adaptability of the genetic code. The multiobjective approach

  4. Recent evidence for evolution of the genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, S.; Jukes, T. H.; Watanabe, K.; Muto, A.

    1992-01-01

    The genetic code, formerly thought to be frozen, is now known to be in a state of evolution. This was first shown in 1979 by Barrell et al. (G. Barrell, A. T. Bankier, and J. Drouin, Nature [London] 282:189-194, 1979), who found that the universal codons AUA (isoleucine) and UGA (stop) coded for methionine and tryptophan, respectively, in human mitochondria. Subsequent studies have shown that UGA codes for tryptophan in Mycoplasma spp. and in all nonplant mitochondria that have been examined. Universal stop codons UAA and UAG code for glutamine in ciliated protozoa (except Euplotes octacarinatus) and in a green alga, Acetabularia. E. octacarinatus uses UAA for stop and UGA for cysteine. Candida species, which are yeasts, use CUG (leucine) for serine. Other departures from the universal code, all in nonplant mitochondria, are CUN (leucine) for threonine (in yeasts), AAA (lysine) for asparagine (in platyhelminths and echinoderms), UAA (stop) for tyrosine (in planaria), and AGR (arginine) for serine (in several animal orders) and for stop (in vertebrates). We propose that the changes are typically preceded by loss of a codon from all coding sequences in an organism or organelle, often as a result of directional mutation pressure, accompanied by loss of the tRNA that translates the codon. The codon reappears later by conversion of another codon and emergence of a tRNA that translates the reappeared codon with a different assignment. Changes in release factors also contribute to these revised assignments. We also discuss the use of UGA (stop) as a selenocysteine codon and the early history of the code.

  5. Recent evidence for evolution of the genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, S.; Jukes, T. H.; Watanabe, K.; Muto, A.

    1992-01-01

    The genetic code, formerly thought to be frozen, is now known to be in a state of evolution. This was first shown in 1979 by Barrell et al. (G. Barrell, A. T. Bankier, and J. Drouin, Nature [London] 282:189-194, 1979), who found that the universal codons AUA (isoleucine) and UGA (stop) coded for methionine and tryptophan, respectively, in human mitochondria. Subsequent studies have shown that UGA codes for tryptophan in Mycoplasma spp. and in all nonplant mitochondria that have been examined. Universal stop codons UAA and UAG code for glutamine in ciliated protozoa (except Euplotes octacarinatus) and in a green alga, Acetabularia. E. octacarinatus uses UAA for stop and UGA for cysteine. Candida species, which are yeasts, use CUG (leucine) for serine. Other departures from the universal code, all in nonplant mitochondria, are CUN (leucine) for threonine (in yeasts), AAA (lysine) for asparagine (in platyhelminths and echinoderms), UAA (stop) for tyrosine (in planaria), and AGR (arginine) for serine (in several animal orders) and for stop (in vertebrates). We propose that the changes are typically preceded by loss of a codon from all coding sequences in an organism or organelle, often as a result of directional mutation pressure, accompanied by loss of the tRNA that translates the codon. The codon reappears later by conversion of another codon and emergence of a tRNA that translates the reappeared codon with a different assignment. Changes in release factors also contribute to these revised assignments. We also discuss the use of UGA (stop) as a selenocysteine codon and the early history of the code.

  6. Schrödinger's code-script: not a genetic cipher but a code of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsby, A E; Hodge, M J S

    2017-06-01

    In his book What is Life? Erwin Schrödinger coined the term 'code-script', thought by some to be the first published suggestion of a hereditary code and perhaps a forerunner of the genetic code. The etymology of 'code' suggests three meanings relevant to 'code-script which we distinguish as 'cipher-code', 'word-code' and 'rule-code'. Cipher-codes and word-codes entail translation of one set of characters into another. The genetic code comprises not one but two cipher-codes: the first is the DNA 'base-pairing cipher'; the second is the 'nucleotide-amino-acid cipher', which involves the translation of DNA base sequences into amino-acid sequences. We suggest that Schrödinger's code-script is a form of 'rule-code', a set of rules that, like the 'highway code' or 'penal code', requires no translation of a message. Schrödinger first relates his code-script to chromosomal genes made of protein. Ignorant of its properties, however, he later abandons 'protein' and adopts in its place a hypothetical, isomeric 'aperiodic solid' whose atoms he imagines rearranged in countless different conformations, which together are responsible for the patterns of ontogenetic development. In an attempt to explain the large number of combinations required, Schrödinger referred to the Morse code (a cipher) but in doing so unwittingly misled readers into believing that he intended a cipher-code resembling the genetic code. We argue that the modern equivalent of Schrödinger's code-script is a rule-code of organismal development based largely on the synthesis, folding, properties and interactions of numerous proteins, each performing a specific task. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The degeneracy of the genetic code and Hadamard matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Petoukhov, Sergey V

    2008-01-01

    The matrix form of the presentation of the genetic code is described as the cognitive form to analyze structures of the genetic code. A similar matrix form is utilized in the theory of signal processing. The Kronecker family of the genetic matrices is investigated, which is based on the genetic matrix [C A; U G], where C, A, U, G are the letters of the genetic alphabet. This matrix in the third Kronecker power is the (8*8)-matrix, which contains 64 triplets. Peculiarities of the degeneracy of the vertebrate mitochondria genetic code are reflected in the symmetrical black-and-white mosaic of this genetic (8*8)-matrix. This mosaic matrix is connected algorithmically with Hadamard matrices unexpectedly, which are famous in the theory of signal processing, quantum mechanics and quantum computers.

  8. Decoding the non-coding genome: elucidating genetic risk outside the coding genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, C L; Misener, V L

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence emerging from genome-wide association studies indicates that the genetic underpinnings of complex traits are likely attributable to genetic variation that changes gene expression, rather than (or in combination with) variation that changes protein-coding sequences. This is particularly compelling with respect to psychiatric disorders, as genetic changes in regulatory regions may result in differential transcriptional responses to developmental cues and environmental/psychosocial stressors. Until recently, however, the link between transcriptional regulation and psychiatric genetic risk has been understudied. Multiple obstacles have contributed to the paucity of research in this area, including challenges in identifying the positions of remote (distal from the promoter) regulatory elements (e.g. enhancers) and their target genes and the underrepresentation of neural cell types and brain tissues in epigenome projects - the availability of high-quality brain tissues for epigenetic and transcriptome profiling, particularly for the adolescent and developing brain, has been limited. Further challenges have arisen in the prediction and testing of the functional impact of DNA variation with respect to multiple aspects of transcriptional control, including regulatory-element interaction (e.g. between enhancers and promoters), transcription factor binding and DNA methylation. Further, the brain has uncommon DNA-methylation marks with unique genomic distributions not found in other tissues - current evidence suggests the involvement of non-CG methylation and 5-hydroxymethylation in neurodevelopmental processes but much remains unknown. We review here knowledge gaps as well as both technological and resource obstacles that will need to be overcome in order to elucidate the involvement of brain-relevant gene-regulatory variants in genetic risk for psychiatric disorders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  9. Origin and evolutionary process of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Kenji; Niihara, Yuka

    2007-01-01

    The genetic code plots the relationship between a triplet base sequence on RNA and an amino acid that corresponds to a protein associated with a required function in organisms. Accurate knowledge about the genetic code, including its origin and evolutionary process, would be helpful for determining the causes of genetic disorders and discovering new medical treatments, as well as for understanding the origin of life. This review begins with discussion of several well-known theories on the origin of the genetic code. Then, a GNC-SNS primitive genetic code hypothesis, which we originally proposed, is explained in relation to the weak points of other theories. S and N denote G or C and any of the four bases, respectively. We also introduce our hypothesis of the GADV-protein world hypothesis on the origin of life, where GADV stands for the four amino acids, Gly[G], Ala[A], Asp[D] and Val[V]. Next, we discuss the reason why genetic disorders, which should be triggered by base replacements, are repressed at a low level under the universal genetic code. Finally, we explain the current difficulties we faced in treating genetic disorders, suggesting a prospect for a new type of treatments of these disorders.

  10. On the Uniqueness of the Standard Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamudio, Gabriel S; José, Marco V

    2017-02-13

    In this work, we determine the biological and mathematical properties that are sufficient and necessary to uniquely determine both the primeval RNY (purine-any base-pyrimidine) code and the standard genetic code (SGC). These properties are: the evolution of the SGC from the RNY code; the degeneracy of both codes, and the non-degeneracy of the assignments of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) to amino acids; the wobbling property; the consideration that glycine was the first amino acid; the topological and symmetrical properties of both codes.

  11. Evolution of the genetic code through progressive symmetry breaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenstra, Reijer

    2014-04-21

    Evolution of the genetic code in an early RNA world is dependent on the steadily improving specificity of the coevolving protein synthesis machinery for codons, anticodons, tRNAs and amino acids. In the beginning, there is RNA but the machinery does not distinguish yet between the codons, which therefore all encode the same information. Synonymous codons are equivalent under a symmetry group that exchanges (permutes) the codons without affecting the code. The initial group changes any codon into any other by permuting the order of the bases in the triplet as well as by replacing the four RNA bases with each other at every codon position. This group preserves the differences between codons, known as Hamming distances, with a 1-distance corresponding to a single point mutation. Stepwise breaking of the group into subgroups divides the 64 codons into progressively smaller subsets - blocks of equivalent codons under the smaller symmetry groups, with each block able to encode a different message. This formalism prescribes how the evolving machinery increasingly differentiates between codons. The model indicates that primitive ribosomes first identified a unique mRNA reading frame to break the group permuting the order of the bases and subsequently enforced increasingly stringent codon-anticodon basepairing rules to break the subgroups permuting the four bases at each codon position. The modern basepairing rules evolve in five steps and at each step the number of codon blocks doubles. The fourth step generates 16 codon blocks corresponding with the 16 family boxes of the standard code and the last step splits these boxes into 32 blocks of commonly two, but rarely one or three, synonymous codons. The evolving codes transmit at most one message per codon block and as the number of messages increases so does the specificity of the code and of protein synthesis. The selective advantage conferred by better functioning proteins drives the symmetry breaking process. Over time

  12. A realistic model under which the genetic code is optimal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrman, Harry; van der Gulik, Peter T S; Klau, Gunnar W; Schaffner, Christian; Speijer, Dave; Stougie, Leen

    2013-10-01

    The genetic code has a high level of error robustness. Using values of hydrophobicity scales as a proxy for amino acid character, and the mean square measure as a function quantifying error robustness, a value can be obtained for a genetic code which reflects the error robustness of that code. By comparing this value with a distribution of values belonging to codes generated by random permutations of amino acid assignments, the level of error robustness of a genetic code can be quantified. We present a calculation in which the standard genetic code is shown to be optimal. We obtain this result by (1) using recently updated values of polar requirement as input; (2) fixing seven assignments (Ile, Trp, His, Phe, Tyr, Arg, and Leu) based on aptamer considerations; and (3) using known biosynthetic relations of the 20 amino acids. This last point is reflected in an approach of subdivision (restricting the random reallocation of assignments to amino acid subgroups, the set of 20 being divided in four such subgroups). The three approaches to explain robustness of the code (specific selection for robustness, amino acid-RNA interactions leading to assignments, or a slow growth process of assignment patterns) are reexamined in light of our findings. We offer a comprehensive hypothesis, stressing the importance of biosynthetic relations, with the code evolving from an early stage with just glycine and alanine, via intermediate stages, towards 64 codons carrying todays meaning.

  13. The information capacity of the genetic code: Is the natural code optimal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruoglu, Ercan E; Arndt, Peter F

    2017-04-21

    We envision the molecular evolution process as an information transfer process and provide a quantitative measure for information preservation in terms of the channel capacity according to the channel coding theorem of Shannon. We calculate Information capacities of DNA on the nucleotide (for non-coding DNA) and the amino acid (for coding DNA) level using various substitution models. We extend our results on coding DNA to a discussion about the optimality of the natural codon-amino acid code. We provide the results of an adaptive search algorithm in the code domain and demonstrate the existence of a large number of genetic codes with higher information capacity. Our results support the hypothesis of an ancient extension from a 2-nucleotide codon to the current 3-nucleotide codon code to encode the various amino acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mathematical Fundamentals for the Noise Immunity of the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimmel, Elena; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2017-09-13

    Symmetry is one of the essential and most visible patterns that can be seen in nature. Starting from the left-right symmetry of the human body, all types of symmetry can be found in crystals, plants, animals and nature as a whole. Similarly, principals of symmetry are also some of the fundamental and most useful tools in modern mathematical natural science that play a major role in theory and applications. As a consequence, it is not surprising that the desire to understand the origin of life, based on the genetic code, forces us to involve symmetry as a mathematical concept. The genetic code can be seen as a key to biological self-organisation. All living organisms have the same molecular bases - an alphabet consisting of four letters (nitrogenous bases): adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine. Linearly ordered sequences of these bases contain the genetic information for synthesis of proteins in all forms of life. Thus, one of the most fascinating riddles of nature is to explain why the genetic code is as it is. Genetic coding possesses noise immunity which is the fundamental feature that allows to pass on the genetic information from parents to their descendants. Hence, since the time of the discovery of the genetic code, scientists have tried to explain the noise immunity of the genetic information. In this chapter we will discuss recent results in mathematical modelling of the genetic code with respect to noise immunity, in particular error-detection and error-correction. We will focus on two central properties: Degeneracy and frameshift correction. Different amino acids are encoded by different quantities of codons and a connection between this degeneracy and the noise immunity of genetic information is a long standing hypothesis. Biological implications of the degeneracy have been intensively studied and whether the natural code is a frozen accident or a highly optimised product of evolution is still controversially discussed. Symmetries in the structure of

  15. OPTIMIZATION BASED ON LMPROVED REAL—CODED GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShiYu; YuShenglin

    2002-01-01

    An improved real-coded genetic algorithm is pro-posed for global optimization of functionsl.The new algo-rithm is based om the judgement of the searching perfor-mance of basic real-coded genetic algorithm.The opera-tions of basic real-coded genetic algorithm are briefly dis-cussed and selected.A kind of chaos sequence is described in detail and added in the new algorithm ad a disturbance factor.The strategy of field partition is also used to im-prove the strcture of the new algorithm.Numerical ex-periment shows that the mew genetic algorithm can find the global optimum of complex funtions with satistaiting precision.

  16. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  17. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  18. Deciphering the genetic regulatory code using an inverse error control coding framework.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rintoul, Mark Daniel; May, Elebeoba Eni; Brown, William Michael; Johnston, Anna Marie; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2005-03-01

    We have found that developing a computational framework for reconstructing error control codes for engineered data and ultimately for deciphering genetic regulatory coding sequences is a challenging and uncharted area that will require advances in computational technology for exact solutions. Although exact solutions are desired, computational approaches that yield plausible solutions would be considered sufficient as a proof of concept to the feasibility of reverse engineering error control codes and the possibility of developing a quantitative model for understanding and engineering genetic regulation. Such evidence would help move the idea of reconstructing error control codes for engineered and biological systems from the high risk high payoff realm into the highly probable high payoff domain. Additionally this work will impact biological sensor development and the ability to model and ultimately develop defense mechanisms against bioagents that can be engineered to cause catastrophic damage. Understanding how biological organisms are able to communicate their genetic message efficiently in the presence of noise can improve our current communication protocols, a continuing research interest. Towards this end, project goals include: (1) Develop parameter estimation methods for n for block codes and for n, k, and m for convolutional codes. Use methods to determine error control (EC) code parameters for gene regulatory sequence. (2) Develop an evolutionary computing computational framework for near-optimal solutions to the algebraic code reconstruction problem. Method will be tested on engineered and biological sequences.

  19. Reducing the genetic code induces massive rearrangement of the proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Patrick; Prat, Laure; Kucklick, Martin; Schäfer, Johannes G; Riedel, Katharina; Rinehart, Jesse; Söll, Dieter; Heinemann, Ilka U

    2014-12-02

    Expanding the genetic code is an important aim of synthetic biology, but some organisms developed naturally expanded genetic codes long ago over the course of evolution. Less than 1% of all sequenced genomes encode an operon that reassigns the stop codon UAG to pyrrolysine (Pyl), a genetic code variant that results from the biosynthesis of Pyl-tRNA(Pyl). To understand the selective advantage of genetically encoding more than 20 amino acids, we constructed a markerless tRNA(Pyl) deletion strain of Methanosarcina acetivorans (ΔpylT) that cannot decode UAG as Pyl or grow on trimethylamine. Phenotypic defects in the ΔpylT strain were evident in minimal medium containing methanol. Proteomic analyses of wild type (WT) M. acetivorans and ΔpylT cells identified 841 proteins from >7,000 significant peptides detected by MS/MS. Protein production from UAG-containing mRNAs was verified for 19 proteins. Translation of UAG codons was verified by MS/MS for eight proteins, including identification of a Pyl residue in PylB, which catalyzes the first step of Pyl biosynthesis. Deletion of tRNA(Pyl) globally altered the proteome, leading to >300 differentially abundant proteins. Reduction of the genetic code from 21 to 20 amino acids led to significant down-regulation in translation initiation factors, amino acid metabolism, and methanogenesis from methanol, which was offset by a compensatory (100-fold) up-regulation in dimethyl sulfide metabolic enzymes. The data show how a natural proteome adapts to genetic code reduction and indicate that the selective value of an expanded genetic code is related to carbon source range and metabolic efficiency.

  20. Horizontal symmetry in the algebraic approach of genetic code

    CERN Document Server

    Godina-Nava, J J

    2013-01-01

    Using concepts of physics of elementary particles concerning the breaking of symmetry and grannd unified theory we propose to study with the algebraic approximation the degeneracy finded in the genetic code with the incorporation of a horizontal symmetry used in gauge theories to fit the contents of the multiplets of the genetic code. It is used the algebraic approch of Hornos et. al. \\cite{main,PRL71,PRE,MPLB}. We propose an example for the incorporation of horizontal symmetry to study mixtures of elements of the multiplets.

  1. Horizontal symmetry in the algebraic approach of genetic code

    OpenAIRE

    Godina-Nava, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Using concepts of physics of elementary particles concerning the breaking of symmetry and grannd unified theory we propose to study with the algebraic approximation the degeneracy finded in the genetic code with the incorporation of a horizontal symmetry used in gauge theories to fit the contents of the multiplets of the genetic code. It is used the algebraic approch of Hornos et. al. \\cite{main,PRL71,PRE,MPLB}. We propose an example for the incorporation of horizontal symmetry to study mixtu...

  2. The Genetic Code as a Periodic Table Algebraic Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Bashford, J D

    2000-01-01

    The systematics of indices of physico-chemical properties of codons and amino acids across the genetic code are examined. Using a simple numerical labelling scheme for nucleic acid bases, data can be fitted as low-order polynomials of the 6 coordinates in the 64-dimensional codon weight space. The work confirms and extends recent studies by Siemion of protein conformational parameters. The connections between the present work, and recent studies of the genetic code structure using dynamical symmetry algebras, are pointed out.

  3. On the Organizational Dynamics of the Genetic Code

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhang

    2011-06-07

    The organization of the canonical genetic code needs to be thoroughly illuminated. Here we reorder the four nucleotides—adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine—according to their emergence in evolution, and apply the organizational rules to devising an algebraic representation for the canonical genetic code. Under a framework of the devised code, we quantify codon and amino acid usages from a large collection of 917 prokaryotic genome sequences, and associate the usages with its intrinsic structure and classification schemes as well as amino acid physicochemical properties. Our results show that the algebraic representation of the code is structurally equivalent to a content-centric organization of the code and that codon and amino acid usages under different classification schemes were correlated closely with GC content, implying a set of rules governing composition dynamics across a wide variety of prokaryotic genome sequences. These results also indicate that codons and amino acids are not randomly allocated in the code, where the six-fold degenerate codons and their amino acids have important balancing roles for error minimization. Therefore, the content-centric code is of great usefulness in deciphering its hitherto unknown regularities as well as the dynamics of nucleotide, codon, and amino acid compositions.

  4. On the organizational dynamics of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Yu, Jun

    2011-04-01

    The organization of the canonical genetic code needs to be thoroughly illuminated. Here we reorder the four nucleotides-adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine-according to their emergence in evolution, and apply the organizational rules to devising an algebraic representation for the canonical genetic code. Under a framework of the devised code, we quantify codon and amino acid usages from a large collection of 917 prokaryotic genome sequences, and associate the usages with its intrinsic structure and classification schemes as well as amino acid physicochemical properties. Our results show that the algebraic representation of the code is structurally equivalent to a content-centric organization of the code and that codon and amino acid usages under different classification schemes were correlated closely with GC content, implying a set of rules governing composition dynamics across a wide variety of prokaryotic genome sequences. These results also indicate that codons and amino acids are not randomly allocated in the code, where the six-fold degenerate codons and their amino acids have important balancing roles for error minimization. Therefore, the content-centric code is of great usefulness in deciphering its hitherto unknown regularities as well as the dynamics of nucleotide, codon, and amino acid compositions.

  5. A Mutation Model from First Principles of the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorvaldsen, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a neutral Codons Probability Mutations (CPM) model of molecular evolution and genetic decay of an organism. The CPM model uses a Markov process with a 20-dimensional state space of probability distributions over amino acids. The transition matrix of the Markov process includes the mutation rate and those single point mutations compatible with the genetic code. This is an alternative to the standard Point Accepted Mutation (PAM) and BLOcks of amino acid SUbstitution Matrix (BLOSUM). Genetic decay is quantified as a similarity between the amino acid distribution of proteins from a (group of) species on one hand, and the equilibrium distribution of the Markov chain on the other. Amino acid data for the eukaryote, bacterium, and archaea families are used to illustrate how both the CPM and PAM models predict their genetic decay towards the equilibrium value of 1. A family of bacteria is studied in more detail. It is found that warm environment organisms on average have a higher degree of genetic decay compared to those species that live in cold environments. The paper addresses a new codon-based approach to quantify genetic decay due to single point mutations compatible with the genetic code. The present work may be seen as a first approach to use codon-based Markov models to study how genetic entropy increases with time in an effectively neutral biological regime. Various extensions of the model are also discussed.

  6. Complex phylogenetic distribution of a non-canonical genetic code in green algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeling Patrick J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A non-canonical nuclear genetic code, in which TAG and TAA have been reassigned from stop codons to glutamine, has evolved independently in several eukaryotic lineages, including the ulvophycean green algal orders Dasycladales and Cladophorales. To study the phylogenetic distribution of the standard and non-canonical genetic codes, we generated sequence data of a representative set of ulvophycean green algae and used a robust green algal phylogeny to evaluate different evolutionary scenarios that may account for the origin of the non-canonical code. Results This study demonstrates that the Dasycladales and Cladophorales share this alternative genetic code with the related order Trentepohliales and the genus Blastophysa, but not with the Bryopsidales, which is sister to the Dasycladales. This complex phylogenetic distribution whereby all but one representative of a single natural lineage possesses an identical deviant genetic code is unique. Conclusions We compare different evolutionary scenarios for the complex phylogenetic distribution of this non-canonical genetic code. A single transition to the non-canonical code followed by a reversal to the canonical code in the Bryopsidales is highly improbable due to the profound genetic changes that coincide with codon reassignment. Multiple independent gains of the non-canonical code, as hypothesized for ciliates, are also unlikely because the same deviant code has evolved in all lineages. Instead we favor a stepwise acquisition model, congruent with the ambiguous intermediate model, whereby the non-canonical code observed in these green algal orders has a single origin. We suggest that the final steps from an ambiguous intermediate situation to a non-canonical code have been completed in the Trentepohliales, Dasycladales, Cladophorales and Blastophysa but not in the Bryopsidales. We hypothesize that in the latter lineage an initial stage characterized by translational ambiguity was

  7. On the physical basis for ambiguity in genetic coding interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosjean, H J; de Henau, S; Crothers, D M

    1978-02-01

    We report the relative stabilities, in the form of complex lifetimes, of complexes between the tRNAs complementary, or nearly so, in their anticodons. The results show striking parallels with the genetic coding rules, including the wobble interaction and the role of modified nucleotides S2U and V (a 5-oxyacetic acid derivative of U). One important difference between the genetic code and the pairing rules in the tRNA-tRNA interaction is the stability in the latter of the short wobble pairs, which the wobble hypothesis excludes. We stress the potential of U for translational errors, and suggest a simple stereochemical basis for ribosome-mediated discrimination against short wobble pairs. Surprisingly, the stability of anticodon-anticodon complexes does not vary systematically on base sequence. Because of the close similarity to the genetic coding rules, it is tempting to speculate that the interaction between two RNA loops may have been part of the physical basis for the evolutionary origin of the genetic code, and that this mechanism may still be utilized by folding the mRNA on the ribosome into a loop similar to the anticodon loop.

  8. The "Wow! signal" of the terrestrial genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    shCherbak, Vladimir I.; Makukov, Maxim A.

    2013-05-01

    It has been repeatedly proposed to expand the scope for SETI, and one of the suggested alternatives to radio is the biological media. Genomic DNA is already used on Earth to store non-biological information. Though smaller in capacity, but stronger in noise immunity is the genetic code. The code is a flexible mapping between codons and amino acids, and this flexibility allows modifying the code artificially. But once fixed, the code might stay unchanged over cosmological timescales; in fact, it is the most durable construct known. Therefore it represents an exceptionally reliable storage for an intelligent signature, if that conforms to biological and thermodynamic requirements. As the actual scenario for the origin of terrestrial life is far from being settled, the proposal that it might have been seeded intentionally cannot be ruled out. A statistically strong intelligent-like "signal" in the genetic code is then a testable consequence of such scenario. Here we show that the terrestrial code displays a thorough precision-type orderliness matching the criteria to be considered an informational signal. Simple arrangements of the code reveal an ensemble of arithmetical and ideographical patterns of the same symbolic language. Accurate and systematic, these underlying patterns appear as a product of precision logic and nontrivial computing rather than of stochastic processes (the null hypothesis that they are due to chance coupled with presumable evolutionary pathways is rejected with P-value artificiality, among which are the symbol of zero, the privileged decimal syntax and semantical symmetries. Besides, extraction of the signal involves logically straightforward but abstract operations, making the patterns essentially irreducible to any natural origin. Plausible ways of embedding the signal into the code and possible interpretation of its content are discussed. Overall, while the code is nearly optimized biologically, its limited capacity is used extremely

  9. On the possible origin and evolution of the genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1974-01-01

    The genetic code is examined for indications of possible preceding codes that existed during early evolution. Eight of the 20 amino acids are coded by 'quartets' of codons with fourfold degeneracy, and 16 such quartets can exist, so that an earlier code could have provided for 15 or 16 amino acids, rather than 20. If twofold degeneracy is postulated for the first position of the codon, there could have been ten amino acids in the code. It is speculated that these may have been phenylalanine, valine, proline, alanine, histidine, glutamine, glutanic acid, aspartic acid, cysteine and glycine. There is a notable deficiency of arginine in proteins, despite the fact that it has six codons. Simultaneously, there is more lysine in proteins than would be expected from its two codons, if the four bases in mRNA are equiprobable and are arranged randomly. It is speculated that arginine is an 'intruder' into the genetic code, and that it may have displayed another amino acid such as ornithine, or may even have displayed lysine from some of its previous codon assignments. As a result, natural selection has favored lysine against the fact that it has only two codons.

  10. On the possible origin and evolution of the genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1974-01-01

    The genetic code is examined for indications of possible preceding codes that existed during early evolution. Eight of the 20 amino acids are coded by 'quartets' of codons with fourfold degeneracy, and 16 such quartets can exist, so that an earlier code could have provided for 15 or 16 amino acids, rather than 20. If twofold degeneracy is postulated for the first position of the codon, there could have been ten amino acids in the code. It is speculated that these may have been phenylalanine, valine, proline, alanine, histidine, glutamine, glutanic acid, aspartic acid, cysteine and glycine. There is a notable deficiency of arginine in proteins, despite the fact that it has six codons. Simultaneously, there is more lysine in proteins than would be expected from its two codons, if the four bases in mRNA are equiprobable and are arranged randomly. It is speculated that arginine is an 'intruder' into the genetic code, and that it may have displayed another amino acid such as ornithine, or may even have displayed lysine from some of its previous codon assignments. As a result, natural selection has favored lysine against the fact that it has only two codons.

  11. Evolution of the genetic code from the GC- to the AGUC-alphabet

    OpenAIRE

    Semenov, Denis A.

    2007-01-01

    A hypothesis of the evolution of the genetic code is proposed, the leading mechanism of which is the nucleotide spontaneous damage leading to AT-enrichment of the genome. The hypothesis accounts for stability of the genetic code towards point mutations, the presence of code dialects, and the symmetry of the genetic code table.

  12. Recent changes in Criminal Procedure Code and Indian Penal Code relevant to medical profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Swapnil S; Kumar, Lavlesh; Mestri, S C

    2010-02-01

    Some sections in Criminal Procedure Code and Indian Penal Code have a direct binding on medical practitioner. With changing times, few of them have been revised and these changes are presented in this article.

  13. A unified model of the standard genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Marco V; Zamudio, Gabriel S; Morgado, Eberto R

    2017-03-01

    The Rodin-Ohno (RO) and the Delarue models divide the table of the genetic code into two classes of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs I and II) with recognition from the minor or major groove sides of the tRNA acceptor stem, respectively. These models are asymmetric but they are biologically meaningful. On the other hand, the standard genetic code (SGC) can be derived from the primeval RNY code (R stands for purines, Y for pyrimidines and N any of them). In this work, the RO-model is derived by means of group actions, namely, symmetries represented by automorphisms, assuming that the SGC originated from a primeval RNY code. It turns out that the RO-model is symmetric in a six-dimensional (6D) hypercube. Conversely, using the same automorphisms, we show that the RO-model can lead to the SGC. In addition, the asymmetric Delarue model becomes symmetric by means of quotient group operations. We formulate isometric functions that convert the class aaRS I into the class aaRS II and vice versa. We show that the four polar requirement categories display a symmetrical arrangement in our 6D hypercube. Altogether these results cannot be attained, neither in two nor in three dimensions. We discuss the present unified 6D algebraic model, which is compatible with both the SGC (based upon the primeval RNY code) and the RO-model.

  14. Stress, Neural Systems, and Genetic Code: An Interview with Neuroscientist Judy Cameron. Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Research indicates some early life stresses can have a profound impact, resulting in changes in brain function and behavior, and even differences in the ways some genes express their particular genetic code signature. At various times during early development, different neural systems appear to have an increased sensitivity to stress and can…

  15. Stress, Neural Systems, and Genetic Code: An Interview with Neuroscientist Judy Cameron. Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Research indicates some early life stresses can have a profound impact, resulting in changes in brain function and behavior, and even differences in the ways some genes express their particular genetic code signature. At various times during early development, different neural systems appear to have an increased sensitivity to stress and can…

  16. Local conditions for global stability in the space of codons of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Dino G; Gallardo, Mauricio O; Osorio, Manuel I

    2016-12-01

    The polar requirement is an attribute of amino acids that is a major determinant of the structure and function of the proteins, and it plays a role in the flexibility and robustness of the genetic code. The viability of an organism depends on flexibility, which allows the exploration of new functions. However, robustness is necessary to protect the organism from deleterious changes derived from misreading errors and single-point mutations. Compared with random codes, the standard genetic code is one of the most robust against such errors. Here, using analytical and numerical calculations and the set of amino acid-encoding codons, we have proposed some local conditions that are necessary for the optimal robustness of the genetic code, and we explored the association between the local conditions and the robustness. The localness of the proposed conditions and the underlying evolutionary mechanism, which begins with a random code and progresses toward more efficient codes (e.g., the standard code), might be biologically plausible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exceptional error minimization in putative primordial genetic codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The standard genetic code is redundant and has a highly non-random structure. Codons for the same amino acids typically differ only by the nucleotide in the third position, whereas similar amino acids are encoded, mostly, by codon series that differ by a single base substitution in the third or the first position. As a result, the code is highly albeit not optimally robust to errors of translation, a property that has been interpreted either as a product of selection directed at the minimization of errors or as a non-adaptive by-product of evolution of the code driven by other forces. Results We investigated the error-minimization properties of putative primordial codes that consisted of 16 supercodons, with the third base being completely redundant, using a previously derived cost function and the error minimization percentage as the measure of a code's robustness to mistranslation. It is shown that, when the 16-supercodon table is populated with 10 putative primordial amino acids, inferred from the results of abiotic synthesis experiments and other evidence independent of the code's evolution, and with minimal assumptions used to assign the remaining supercodons, the resulting 2-letter codes are nearly optimal in terms of the error minimization level. Conclusion The results of the computational experiments with putative primordial genetic codes that contained only two meaningful letters in all codons and encoded 10 to 16 amino acids indicate that such codes are likely to have been nearly optimal with respect to the minimization of translation errors. This near-optimality could be the outcome of extensive early selection during the co-evolution of the code with the primordial, error-prone translation system, or a result of a unique, accidental event. Under this hypothesis, the subsequent expansion of the code resulted in a decrease of the error minimization level that became sustainable owing to the evolution of a high

  18. The genetic code as a periodic table: algebraic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashford, J D; Jarvis, P D

    2000-01-01

    The systematics of indices of physico-chemical properties of codons and amino acids across the genetic code are examined. Using a simple numerical labelling scheme for nucleic acid bases, A=(-1,0), C=(0,-1), G=(0,1), U=(1,0), data can be fitted as low order polynomials of the six coordinates in the 64-dimensional codon weight space. The work confirms and extends the recent studies by Siemion et al. (1995. BioSystems 36, 231-238) of the conformational parameters. Fundamental patterns in the data such as codon periodicities, and related harmonics and reflection symmetries, are here associated with the structure of the set of basis monomials chosen for fitting. Results are plotted using the Siemion one-step mutation ring scheme, and variants thereof. The connections between the present work, and recent studies of the genetic code structure using dynamical symmetry algebras, are pointed out.

  19. Load Flow Analysis Using Real Coded Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himakar Udatha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Real Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA for finding the load flow solution of electrical power systems. The proposed method is based on the minimization of the real and reactive power mismatches at various buses. The traditional methods such as Gauss-Seidel method and Newton-Raphson (NR method have certain drawbacks under abnormal operating condition. In order to overcome these problems, the load flow solution based on Real Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA is presented in this paper. Two cross over techniques, Arithmetic crossover and heuristic crossover are used to solve the power flow problem. The proposed method is applied for 3-bus, 5-bus and 6-bus systems and the results are presented.

  20. A Scenario on the Stepwise Evolution of the Genetic Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Fa; Xiao; Jun; Yu

    2007-01-01

    It is believed that in the RNA world the operational (ribozymes) and the infor- mational (riboscripts) RNA molecules were created with only three (adenosine, uridine, and guanosine) and two (adenosine and uridine) nucleosides, respectively, so that the genetic code started uncomplicated. Ribozymes subsequently evolved to be able to cut and paste themselves and riboscripts were acceptive to rigor- ous editing (adenosine to inosine); the intensive diversification of RNA molecules shaped novel cellular machineries that are capable of polymerizing amino acids-a new type of cellular building materials for life. Initially, the genetic code, encoding seven amino acids, was created only to distinguish purine and pyrimidine; it was later expanded in a stepwise way to encode 12, 15, and 20 amino acids through the relief of guanine from its roles as operational signals and through the recruitment of cytosine. Therefore, the maturation of the genetic code also coincided with (1) the departure of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) from the primordial translation machinery, (2) the replacement of informational RNA by DNA, and (3) the co-evolution of AARSs and their cognate tRNAs. This model predicts gradual replacements of RNA-made molecular mechanisms, cellular processes by proteins, and informational exploitation by DNA.

  1. An analysis of the metabolic theory of the origin of the genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirnovin, R.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    A computer program was used to test Wong's coevolution theory of the genetic code. The codon correlations between the codons of biosynthetically related amino acids in the universal genetic code and in randomly generated genetic codes were compared. It was determined that many codon correlations are also present within random genetic codes and that among the random codes there are always several which have many more correlations than that found in the universal code. Although the number of correlations depends on the choice of biosynthetically related amino acids, the probability of choosing a random genetic code with the same or greater number of codon correlations as the universal genetic code was found to vary from 0.1% to 34% (with respect to a fairly complete listing of related amino acids). Thus, Wong's theory that the genetic code arose by coevolution with the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids, based on codon correlations between biosynthetically related amino acids, is statistical in nature.

  2. Developmental changes in hippocampal associative coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsberry, Mary E; Kim, Jangjin; Freeman, John H

    2015-03-11

    Behavioral analyses of the ontogeny of memory have shown that hippocampus-dependent learning emerges relatively late in postnatal development compared with simple associative learning. Maturation of hippocampal mnemonic mechanisms has been hypothesized to underlie the development of the later emerging learning processes. However, the role of hippocampal maturation in learning has not been examined directly. The goal of the present study was to examine developmental changes in hippocampal neuronal coding during acquisition of a hippocampus-dependent learning task. We recorded activity from CA1 pyramidal cells in rat pups while they were trained on trace eyeblink conditioning. Trace eyeblink conditioning is a Pavlovian conditioning task that involves the association of a conditioned stimulus (CS) with an unconditioned stimulus over a stimulus-free trace interval. The inclusion of the trace interval is what makes the task hippocampus dependent. In the present study, rats were trained at 21-23, 24-26, and 31-33 d of age. Previous research from our laboratory and others shows that trace conditioning begins to emerge during the third postnatal week. The results indicate that hippocampal neurons show a substantial increase in responsiveness to task-relevant events during development. Moreover, there is an age-related increase in the proportion of neurons that respond to a combination of trial events (e.g., CS and trace). Our findings indicate that the developmental emergence of hippocampally mediated learning is related to increases in the strength and complexity of CA1 associative coding.

  3. The Genetic Codes: Mathematical Formulae and an Inverse Symmetry-Information Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tidjani Négadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available First, mathematical formulae faithfully describing the distributions of amino acids and codons and reproducing the degeneracies in the various known genetic codes, including the standard genetic code, are constructed, by hand. Second, we summarize another mathematical approach relying on the use of q-deformations to describe these same genetic codes, and add a new application not considered before. Third, by considering these same genetic codes, we find, qualitatively, that an inverse symmetry-information relationship exists.

  4. A Mathematical Model Accounting for the Organisation in Multiplets of the Genetic Code

    OpenAIRE

    Sciarrino, A.

    2001-01-01

    Requiring stability of genetic code against translation errors, modelised by suitable mathematical operators in the crystal basis model of the genetic code, the main features of the organisation in multiplets of the mitochondrial and of the standard genetic code are explained.

  5. An Autotrophic Origin for the Coded Amino Acids is Concordant with the Coevolution Theory of the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    The coevolution theory of the origin of the genetic code maintains that the biosynthetic relationships between amino acids co-evolved with the genetic code organization. In other words, the metabolism of amino acids co-evolved with the organization of the genetic code because the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids occurred on tRNA-like molecules. Thus, a heterotrophic origin of amino acids-also only of those involved in the early phase of the structuring of the genetic code-would seem to contradict the main postulate of the coevolution theory. As a matter of fact, this origin not being linked to the metabolism of amino acids in any way-being taken from a physical setting-would seem to remove the possibility that this metabolism had instead heavily contributed to the structuring of the genetic code. Therefore, I have analyzed the structure of the genetic code and mechanisms that brought to its structuring for understanding if the coevolution theory is compatible with autotrophic or heterotrophic conditions. One of the arguments was that an autotrophic origin of amino acids would have the advantage to be able to directly link their metabolism to the structure of the genetic code if-as hypothesized by the coevolution theory-the biosyntheses of amino acids occurred on tRNA-like molecules. Simultaneously, a heterotrophic origin would not have been able to link the metabolism of amino acids to the structure of the genetic code for the absence of a precise determinism of allocation of amino acids, that is to say of a clear mechanism-linked to tRNA-like molecules, for example-that would have determined the specific pattern observed in the genetic code of the biosynthetic relationships between amino acids. The conclusion is that an autotrophic origin of coded amino acids would seem to be the condition under which the genetic code originated.

  6. Frozen Accident Pushing 50: Stereochemistry, Expansion, and Chance in the Evolution of the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-05-23

    Nearly 50 years ago, Francis Crick propounded the frozen accident scenario for the evolution of the genetic code along with the hypothesis that the early translation system consisted primarily of RNA. Under the frozen accident perspective, the code is universal among modern life forms because any change in codon assignment would be highly deleterious. The frozen accident can be considered the default theory of code evolution because it does not imply any specific interactions between amino acids and the cognate codons or anticodons, or any particular properties of the code. The subsequent 49 years of code studies have elucidated notable features of the standard code, such as high robustness to errors, but failed to develop a compelling explanation for codon assignments. In particular, stereochemical affinity between amino acids and the cognate codons or anticodons does not seem to account for the origin and evolution of the code. Here, I expand Crick's hypothesis on RNA-only translation system by presenting evidence that this early translation already attained high fidelity that allowed protein evolution. I outline an experimentally testable scenario for the evolution of the code that combines a distinct version of the stereochemical hypothesis, in which amino acids are recognized via unique sites in the tertiary structure of proto-tRNAs, rather than by anticodons, expansion of the code via proto-tRNA duplication, and the frozen accident.

  7. Genetic algorithms with permutation coding for multiple sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Othman, Mohamed Tahar; Abdel-Azim, Gamil

    2013-08-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is one of the topics of bio informatics that has seriously been researched. It is known as NP-complete problem. It is also considered as one of the most important and daunting tasks in computational biology. Concerning this a wide number of heuristic algorithms have been proposed to find optimal alignment. Among these heuristic algorithms are genetic algorithms (GA). The GA has mainly two major weaknesses: it is time consuming and can cause local minima. One of the significant aspects in the GA process in MSA is to maximize the similarities between sequences by adding and shuffling the gaps of Solution Coding (SC). Several ways for SC have been introduced. One of them is the Permutation Coding (PC). We propose a hybrid algorithm based on genetic algorithms (GAs) with a PC and 2-opt algorithm. The PC helps to code the MSA solution which maximizes the gain of resources, reliability and diversity of GA. The use of the PC opens the area by applying all functions over permutations for MSA. Thus, we suggest an algorithm to calculate the scoring function for multiple alignments based on PC, which is used as fitness function. The time complexity of the GA is reduced by using this algorithm. Our GA is implemented with different selections strategies and different crossovers. The probability of crossover and mutation is set as one strategy. Relevant patents have been probed in the topic.

  8. Shannon information entropy in the canonical genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzer, Louis R

    2017-02-21

    The Shannon entropy measures the expected information value of messages. As with thermodynamic entropy, the Shannon entropy is only defined within a system that identifies at the outset the collections of possible messages, analogous to microstates, that will be considered indistinguishable macrostates. This fundamental insight is applied here for the first time to amino acid alphabets, which group the twenty common amino acids into families based on chemical and physical similarities. To evaluate these schemas objectively, a novel quantitative method is introduced based the inherent redundancy in the canonical genetic code. Each alphabet is taken as a separate system that partitions the 64 possible RNA codons, the microstates, into families, the macrostates. By calculating the normalized mutual information, which measures the reduction in Shannon entropy, conveyed by single nucleotide messages, groupings that best leverage this aspect of fault tolerance in the code are identified. The relative importance of properties related to protein folding - like hydropathy and size - and function, including side-chain acidity, can also be estimated. This approach allows the quantification of the average information value of nucleotide positions, which can shed light on the coevolution of the canonical genetic code with the tRNA-protein translation mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Different types of secondary information in the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraia, Richard J; Iben, James R

    2014-07-01

    Whole-genome and functional analyses suggest a wealth of secondary or auxiliary genetic information (AGI) within the redundancy component of the genetic code. Although there are multiple aspects of biased codon use, we focus on two types of auxiliary information: codon-specific translational pauses that can be used by particular proteins toward their unique folding and biased codon patterns shared by groups of functionally related mRNAs with coordinate regulation. AGI is important to genetics in general and to human disease; here, we consider influences of its three major components, biased codon use itself, variations in the tRNAome, and anticodon modifications that distinguish synonymous decoding. AGI is plastic and can be used by different species to different extents, with tissue-specificity and in stress responses. Because AGI is species-specific, it is important to consider codon-sensitive experiments when using heterologous systems; for this we focus on the tRNA anticodon loop modification enzyme, CDKAL1, and its link to type 2 diabetes. Newly uncovered tRNAome variability among humans suggests roles in penetrance and as a genetic modifier and disease modifier. Development of experimental and bioinformatics methods are needed to uncover additional means of auxiliary genetic information.

  10. A symbiotic liaison between the genetic and epigenetic code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger eHeyn

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available With rapid advances in sequencing technologies, we are undergoing a paradigm shift from hypothesis- to data-driven research. Genome-wide profiling efforts gave informative insights into biological processes; however, considering the wealth of variation, the major challenge remains their meaningful interpretation. In particular sequence variation in non-coding contexts is often challenging to interpret. Here, data integration approaches for the identification of functional genetic variability represent a likely solution. Exemplary, functional linkage analysis integrating genotype and expression data determined regulatory quantitative trait loci (QTL and proposed causal relationships. In addition to gene expression, epigenetic regulation and specifically DNA methylation was established as highly valuable surrogate mark for functional variance of the genetic code. Epigenetic modification served as powerful mediator trait to elucidate mechanisms forming phenotypes in health and disease. Particularly, integrative studies of genetic and DNA methylation data yet guided interpretation strategies of risk genotypes, but also proved their value for physiological traits, such as natural human variation and aging. This Perspective seeks to illustrate the power of data integration in the genomic era exemplified by DNA methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs. However, the model is further extendable to virtually all traceable molecular traits.

  11. Orthogonal transformations for change detection, Matlab code

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2005-01-01

    Matlab code to do multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data.

  12. Interleaver Design Method for Turbo Codes Based on Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Ying; Sun Hong; Zhou Huai-bei

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a new interleaver construction technique for turbo code. The technique searches as much as possible pseudo-random interleaving patterns under a certain condition using genetic algorithms(GAs). The new interleavers have the superiority of the S-random interleavers and this interleaver construction technique can reduce the time taken to generate pseudo-random interleaving patterns under a certain condition. Tbe results obtained indicate that the new interleavers yield an equal to or better performance than the Srandom interleavers. Compared to the S-random interleaver,this design requires a lower level of computational complexity.

  13. Quantum control using genetic algorithms in quantum communication: superdense coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Serna, Francisco; Rojas, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    We present a physical example model of how Quantum Control with genetic algorithms is applied to implement the quantum superdense code protocol. We studied a model consisting of two quantum dots with an electron with spin, including spin-orbit interaction. The electron and the spin get hybridized with the site acquiring two degrees of freedom, spin and charge. The system has tunneling and site energies as time dependent control parameters that are optimized by means of genetic algorithms to prepare a hybrid Bell-like state used as a transmission channel. This state is transformed to obtain any state of the four Bell basis as required by superdense protocol to transmit two bits of classical information. The control process protocol is equivalent to implement one of the quantum gates in the charge subsystem. Fidelities larger than 99.5% are achieved for the hybrid entangled state preparation and the superdense operations.

  14. Orthogonal transformations for change detection, Matlab code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Matlab code to do multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data.......Matlab code to do multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data....

  15. A Content-Centric Organization of the Genetic Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Yu

    2007-01-01

    The codon table for the canonical genetic code can be rearranged in such a way that the code is divided into four quarters and two halves according to the variability of their GC and purine contents, respectively. For prokaryotic genomes, when the genomic GC content increases, their amino acid contents tend to be restricted to the GC-rich quarter and the purine-content insensitive half, where all codons are fourfold degenerate and relatively mutation-tolerant. Conversely, when the genomic GC content decreases, most of the codons retract to the AU-rich quarter and the purine-content sensitive half; most of the codons not only remain encoding physicochemically diversified amino acids but also vary when transversion (between purine and pyrimidine) happens. Amino acids with sixfolddegenerate codons are distributed into all four quarters and across the two halves; their fourfold-degenerate codons are all partitioned into the purine-insensitive half in favorite of robustness against mutations. The features manifested in the rearranged codon table explain most of the intrinsic relationship between protein coding sequences (the informational content) and amino acid compositions (the functional content). The renovated codon table is useful in predicting abundant amino acids and positioning the amino acids with related or distinct physicochemical properties.

  16. Chirality in a quaternionic representation of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel Carlevaro, C; Irastorza, Ramiro M; Vericat, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    A quaternionic representation of the genetic code, previously reported by the authors (BioSystems 141 (10-19), 2016), is updated in order to incorporate chirality of nucleotide bases and amino acids. The original representation associates with each nucleotide base a prime integer quaternion of norm 7 and involves a function that assigns to each codon, represented by three of these quaternions, another integer quaternion (amino acid type quaternion). The assignation is such that the essentials of the standard genetic code (particularly its degeneration) are preserved. To show the advantages of such a quaternionic representation we have designed an algorithm to go from the primary to the tertiary structure of the protein. The algorithm uses, besides of the type quaternions, a second kind of quaternions with real components that we additionally associate with the amino acids according to their order along the proteins (order quaternions). In this context, we incorporate chirality in our representation by observing that the set of eight integer quaternions of norm 7 can be partitioned into a pair of subsets of cardinality four each with their elements mutually conjugate and by putting them into correspondence one to one with the two sets of enantiomers (D and L) of the four nucleotide bases adenine, cytosine, guanine and uracil, respectively. We then propose two diagrams in order to describe the hypothetical evolution of the genetic codes corresponding to both of the chiral systems of affinities: D-nucleotide bases/L-amino acids and L-nucleotide bases/D-amino acids at reading frames 5'→3' and 3'→5', respectively. Guided by these diagrams we define functions that in each case assign to the triplets of D- (L-) bases a L- (D-) amino acid type integer quaternion. Specifically, the integer quaternion associated with a given D-amino acid is the conjugate of that one corresponding to the enantiomer L. The chiral type quaternions obtained for the amino acids are used

  17. RNA editing and modifications of RNAs might have favoured the evolution of the triplet genetic code from an ennuplet code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Massimo; Moracci, Marco; Cobucci-Ponzano, Beatrice

    2014-10-21

    Here we suggest that the origin of the genetic code, that is to say, the birth of first mRNAs has been triggered by means of a widespread modification of all RNAs (proto-mRNAs and proto-tRNAs), as today observed in the RNA editing and in post-transcriptional modifications of RNAs, which are considered as fossils of this evolutionary stage of the genetic code origin. We consider also that other mechanisms, such as the trans-translation and ribosome frameshifting, could have favoured the transition from an ennuplet code to a triplet code. Therefore, according to our hypothesis all these mechanisms would be reflexive of this period of the evolutionary history of the genetic code. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Erasure Coded Storage on a Changing Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sipos, Marton A.; Venkat, Narayan; Oran, David

    2016-01-01

    As faster storage devices become commercially viable alternatives to disk drives, the network is increasingly becoming the bottleneck in achieving good performance in distributed storage systems. This is especially true for erasure coded storage, where the reconstruction of lost data can signific...

  19. Three stages in the evolution of the genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, U.; Oro, J.

    1993-01-01

    A diversification of the genetic code based on the number of codons available for the proteinous amino acids is established. Three groups of amino acids during evolution of the code are distinguished. On the basis of their chemical complexity those amino acids emerging later in a translation process are derived. Codon number and chemical complexity indicate that His, Phe, Tyr, Cys and either Lys or Asn were introduced in the second stage, whereas the number of codons alone gives evidence that Trp and Met were introduced in the third stage. The amino acids of stage 1 use purine-rich codons, while all the amino acids introduced in the second stage, in contrast, use pyrimidines in the third position of their codons. A low abundance of pyrimidines during early translation is derived. This assumption is supported by experiments on non-enzymatic replication and interactions of hairpin loops with a complementary strand. A back extrapolation concludes a high purine content of the first nucleic acids, which gradually decreased during their evolution. Amino acids independently available from prebiotic synthesis were thus correlated to purine-rich codons. Implications on the prebiotic replication are discussed also in the light of recent codon usage data.

  20. Genetic code flexibility in microorganisms: novel mechanisms and impact on physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jiqiang; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2015-11-01

    The genetic code, initially thought to be universal and immutable, is now known to contain many variations, including biased codon usage, codon reassignment, ambiguous decoding and recoding. As a result of recent advances in the areas of genome sequencing, biochemistry, bioinformatics and structural biology, our understanding of genetic code flexibility has advanced substantially in the past decade. In this Review, we highlight the prevalence, evolution and mechanistic basis of genetic code variations in microorganisms, and we discuss how this flexibility of the genetic code affects microbial physiology.

  1. Arbitrariness is not enough: towards a functional approach to the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacková, Ľudmila; Matlach, Vladimír; Faltýnek, Dan

    2017-05-09

    Arbitrariness in the genetic code is one of the main reasons for a linguistic approach to molecular biology: the genetic code is usually understood as an arbitrary relation between amino acids and nucleobases. However, from a semiotic point of view, arbitrariness should not be the only condition for definition of a code, consequently it is not completely correct to talk about "code" in this case. Yet we suppose that there exist a code in the process of protein synthesis, but on a higher level than the nucleic bases chains. Semiotically, a code should be always associated with a function and we propose to define the genetic code not only relationally (in basis of relation between nucleobases and amino acids) but also in terms of function (function of a protein as meaning of the code). Even if the functional definition of meaning in the genetic code has been discussed in the field of biosemiotics, its further implications have not been considered. In fact, if the function of a protein represents the meaning of the genetic code (the sign's object), then it is crucial to reconsider the notion of its expression (the sign) as well. In our contribution, we will show that the actual model of the genetic code is not the only possible and we will propose a more appropriate model from a semiotic point of view.

  2. FREQUENCY-CODED OPTIMIZATION OF HOPPED-FREQUENCY PULSE SIGNAL BASED ON GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zheng; Mu Xuehua

    2005-01-01

    The Frequency-Coded Pulse (FCP) signal has good performance of range and Doppler resolution. This paper first gives the mathematical expression of the ambiguity function for FCP signals, and then presents a coding rule for optimizing FCP signal. The genetic algorithm is presented to solve this kind of problem for optimizing codes. Finally, an example for optimizing calculation is illustrated and the optimized frequency coding results are given with the code length N=64 and N=128 respectively.

  3. [Analysis of selected changes in project the penal code].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Jarosław; Jurczyk, Agnieszka P; Szram, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the authors have analysed selected proposals of changes in the project of amendments in the penal code. Special attention has been placed on problem of the legality of the "comma" in art. 156 of the penal code. In this matter also a review of court jurisdiction has been made.

  4. Simulated evolution applied to study the genetic code optimality using a model of codon reassignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteagudo Ángel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the canonical code is not universal, different theories about its origin and organization have appeared. The optimization or level of adaptation of the canonical genetic code was measured taking into account the harmful consequences resulting from point mutations leading to the replacement of one amino acid for another. There are two basic theories to measure the level of optimization: the statistical approach, which compares the canonical genetic code with many randomly generated alternative ones, and the engineering approach, which compares the canonical code with the best possible alternative. Results Here we used a genetic algorithm to search for better adapted hypothetical codes and as a method to guess the difficulty in finding such alternative codes, allowing to clearly situate the canonical code in the fitness landscape. This novel proposal of the use of evolutionary computing provides a new perspective in the open debate between the use of the statistical approach, which postulates that the genetic code conserves amino acid properties far better than expected from a random code, and the engineering approach, which tends to indicate that the canonical genetic code is still far from optimal. We used two models of hypothetical codes: one that reflects the known examples of codon reassignment and the model most used in the two approaches which reflects the current genetic code translation table. Although the standard code is far from a possible optimum considering both models, when the more realistic model of the codon reassignments was used, the evolutionary algorithm had more difficulty to overcome the efficiency of the canonical genetic code. Conclusions Simulated evolution clearly reveals that the canonical genetic code is far from optimal regarding its optimization. Nevertheless, the efficiency of the canonical code increases when mistranslations are taken into account with the two models, as indicated by the

  5. Extreme genetic code optimality from a molecular dynamics calculation of amino acid polar requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Mathew, Damien; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2009-06-01

    A molecular dynamics calculation of the amino acid polar requirement is used to score the canonical genetic code. Monte Carlo simulation shows that this computational polar requirement has been optimized by the canonical genetic code, an order of magnitude more than any previously known measure, effectively ruling out a vertical evolution dynamics. The sensitivity of the optimization to the precise metric used in code scoring is consistent with code evolution having proceeded through the communal dynamics of statistical proteins using horizontal gene transfer, as recently proposed. The extreme optimization of the genetic code therefore strongly supports the idea that the genetic code evolved from a communal state of life prior to the last universal common ancestor.

  6. Extreme genetic code optimality from a molecular dynamics calculation of amino acid polar requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Mathew, Damien; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2009-06-01

    A molecular dynamics calculation of the amino acid polar requirement is used to score the canonical genetic code. Monte Carlo simulation shows that this computational polar requirement has been optimized by the canonical genetic code, an order of magnitude more than any previously known measure, effectively ruling out a vertical evolution dynamics. The sensitivity of the optimization to the precise metric used in code scoring is consistent with code evolution having proceeded through the communal dynamics of statistical proteins using horizontal gene transfer, as recently proposed. The extreme optimization of the genetic code therefore strongly supports the idea that the genetic code evolved from a communal state of life prior to the last universal common ancestor.

  7. A colorful origin for the genetic code: information theory, statistical mechanics and the emergence of molecular codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlusty, Tsvi

    2010-09-01

    The genetic code maps the sixty-four nucleotide triplets (codons) to twenty amino-acids. While the biochemical details of this code were unraveled long ago, its origin is still obscure. We review information-theoretic approaches to the problem of the code's origin and discuss the results of a recent work that treats the code in terms of an evolving, error-prone information channel. Our model - which utilizes the rate-distortion theory of noisy communication channels - suggests that the genetic code originated as a result of the interplay of the three conflicting evolutionary forces: the needs for diverse amino-acids, for error-tolerance and for minimal cost of resources. The description of the code as an information channel allows us to mathematically identify the fitness of the code and locate its emergence at a second-order phase transition when the mapping of codons to amino-acids becomes nonrandom. The noise in the channel brings about an error-graph, in which edges connect codons that are likely to be confused. The emergence of the code is governed by the topology of the error-graph, which determines the lowest modes of the graph-Laplacian and is related to the map coloring problem. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Probable relationship between partitions of the set of codons and the origin of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Dino G; Gallardo, Mauricio O; Osorio, Manuel I

    2014-03-01

    Here we study the distribution of randomly generated partitions of the set of amino acid-coding codons. Some results are an application from a previous work, about the Stirling numbers of the second kind and triplet codes, both to the cases of triplet codes having four stop codons, as in mammalian mitochondrial genetic code, and hypothetical doublet codes. Extending previous results, in this work it is found that the most probable number of blocks of synonymous codons, in a genetic code, is similar to the number of amino acids when there are four stop codons, as well as it could be for a primigenious doublet code. Also it is studied the integer partitions associated to patterns of synonymous codons and it is shown, for the canonical code, that the standard deviation inside an integer partition is one of the most probable. We think that, in some early epoch, the genetic code might have had a maximum of the disorder or entropy, independent of the assignment between codons and amino acids, reaching a state similar to "code freeze" proposed by Francis Crick. In later stages, maybe deterministic rules have reassigned codons to amino acids, forming the natural codes, such as the canonical code, but keeping the numerical features describing the set partitions and the integer partitions, like a "fossil numbers"; both kinds of partitions about the set of amino acid-coding codons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An algorithm for the study of DNA sequence evolution based on the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirakoulis, G Ch; Karafyllidis, I; Sandaltzopoulos, R; Tsalides, Ph; Thanailakis, A

    2004-11-01

    Recent studies of the quantum-mechanical processes in the DNA molecule have seriously challenged the principle that mutations occur randomly. The proton tunneling mechanism causes tautomeric transitions in base pairs resulting in mutations during DNA replication. The meticulous study of the quantum-mechanical phenomena in DNA may reveal that the process of mutagenesis is not completely random. We are still far away from a complete quantum-mechanical model of DNA sequence mutagenesis because of the complexity of the processes and the complex three-dimensional structure of the molecule. In this paper we have developed a quantum-mechanical description of DNA evolution and, following its outline, we have constructed a classical model for DNA evolution assuming that some aspects of the quantum-mechanical processes have influenced the determination of the genetic code. Conversely, our model assumes that the genetic code provides information about the quantum-mechanical mechanisms of mutagenesis, as the current code is the product of an evolutionary process that tries to minimize the spurious consequences of mutagenesis. Based on this model we develop an algorithm that can be used to study the accumulation of mutations in a DNA sequence. The algorithm has a user-friendly interface and the user can change key parameters in order to study relevant hypotheses.

  10. A large health system's approach to utilization of the genetic counselor CPT® 96040 code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Shanna L; Pfeiffer, Gail; Eng, Charis

    2011-12-01

    : In 2007, CPT® code 96040 was approved for genetic counseling services provided by nonphysician providers. Because of professional recognition and licensure limitations, experiences in direct billing by genetic counselors for these services are limited. A minority of genetics clinics report using this code because of limitations, including perceived denial of the code and confusion regarding compliant use of this code. We present results of our approach to 96040 billing for genetic counseling services under a supervising physicians National Provider ID number in a strategy for integration of genetics services within nongenetics specialty departments of a large academic medical center. : The 96040 billing encounters were tracked for a 14-month period and analyzed for reimbursement by private payers. Association of denial by diagnosis code or specialty of genetics service was statistically analyzed. Descriptive data regarding appointment availability are also summarized. : Of 350 encounters January 2008 to February 2009, 289 (82%) were billed to private payers. Of these, 62.6% received some level of reimbursement. No association was seen for denial when analyzed by the diagnosis code or by genetics focus. Through this model, genetics appointment availability minimally doubled. : Using 96040 allowed for expanding access to genetics services, increased appointment availability, and was successful in obtaining reimbursement for more than half of encounters billed.

  11. Investigations with methanobacteria and with evolution of the genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum was found by Osawa et al. to use UGA as the code of tryptophan and to contain 75% A + T in its DNA. This change could have been from evolutionary pressure to replace C + G by A + T. Numerous studies have been reported of evolution of proteins as measured by amino acid replacements that are observed when homologus proteins, such as hemoglobins from various vertebrates, are compared. These replacements result from nucleotide substitutions in amino acid codons in the corresponding genes. Simultaneously, silent nucleotide substitutions take place that can be studied when sequences of the genes are compared. These silent evolutionary changes take place mostly in third positions of codons. Two types of nucleotide substitutions are recognized: pyrimidine-pyrimidine and purine-purine interchanges (transitions) and pyriidine-purine interchanges (transversions). Silent transitions are favored when a corresponding transversion would produce an amino acid replacement. Conversely, silent transversions are favored by probability when transitions and transversions will both be silent. Extensive examples of these situations have been found in protein genes, and it is evident that transversions in silent positions predominate in family boxes in most of the examples studied. In associated research a streptomycete from cow manure was found to produce an extracellular enzyme capable of lysing the pseudomurein-contining methanogen Methanobacterium formicicum.

  12. Genetic Code Expansion as a Tool to Study Regulatory Processes of Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Moritz; Summerer, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    The expansion of the genetic code with noncanonical amino acids (ncAA) enables the chemical and biophysical properties of proteins to be tailored, inside cells, with a previously unattainable level of precision. A wide range of ncAA with functions not found in canonical amino acids have been genetically encoded in recent years and have delivered insights into biological processes that would be difficult to access with traditional approaches of molecular biology. A major field for the development and application of novel ncAA-functions has been transcription and its regulation. This is particularly attractive, since advanced DNA sequencing- and proteomics-techniques continue to deliver vast information on these processes on a global level, but complementing methodologies to study them on a detailed, molecular level and in living cells have been comparably scarce. In a growing number of studies, genetic code expansion has now been applied to precisely control the chemical properties of transcription factors, RNA polymerases and histones, and this has enabled new insights into their interactions, conformational changes, cellular localizations and the functional roles of posttranslational modifications.

  13. Coevolution Theory of the Genetic Code at Age Forty: Pathway to Translation and Synthetic Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J Tze-Fei; Ng, Siu-Kin; Mat, Wai-Kin; Hu, Taobo; Xue, Hong

    2016-03-16

    The origins of the components of genetic coding are examined in the present study. Genetic information arose from replicator induction by metabolite in accordance with the metabolic expansion law. Messenger RNA and transfer RNA stemmed from a template for binding the aminoacyl-RNA synthetase ribozymes employed to synthesize peptide prosthetic groups on RNAs in the Peptidated RNA World. Coevolution of the genetic code with amino acid biosynthesis generated tRNA paralogs that identify a last universal common ancestor (LUCA) of extant life close to Methanopyrus, which in turn points to archaeal tRNA introns as the most primitive introns and the anticodon usage of Methanopyrus as an ancient mode of wobble. The prediction of the coevolution theory of the genetic code that the code should be a mutable code has led to the isolation of optional and mandatory synthetic life forms with altered protein alphabets.

  14. Coevolution Theory of the Genetic Code at Age Forty: Pathway to Translation and Synthetic Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tze-Fei Wong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The origins of the components of genetic coding are examined in the present study. Genetic information arose from replicator induction by metabolite in accordance with the metabolic expansion law. Messenger RNA and transfer RNA stemmed from a template for binding the aminoacyl-RNA synthetase ribozymes employed to synthesize peptide prosthetic groups on RNAs in the Peptidated RNA World. Coevolution of the genetic code with amino acid biosynthesis generated tRNA paralogs that identify a last universal common ancestor (LUCA of extant life close to Methanopyrus, which in turn points to archaeal tRNA introns as the most primitive introns and the anticodon usage of Methanopyrus as an ancient mode of wobble. The prediction of the coevolution theory of the genetic code that the code should be a mutable code has led to the isolation of optional and mandatory synthetic life forms with altered protein alphabets.

  15. Coevolution Theory of the Genetic Code at Age Forty: Pathway to Translation and Synthetic Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J. Tze-Fei; Ng, Siu-Kin; Mat, Wai-Kin; Hu, Taobo; Xue, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The origins of the components of genetic coding are examined in the present study. Genetic information arose from replicator induction by metabolite in accordance with the metabolic expansion law. Messenger RNA and transfer RNA stemmed from a template for binding the aminoacyl-RNA synthetase ribozymes employed to synthesize peptide prosthetic groups on RNAs in the Peptidated RNA World. Coevolution of the genetic code with amino acid biosynthesis generated tRNA paralogs that identify a last universal common ancestor (LUCA) of extant life close to Methanopyrus, which in turn points to archaeal tRNA introns as the most primitive introns and the anticodon usage of Methanopyrus as an ancient mode of wobble. The prediction of the coevolution theory of the genetic code that the code should be a mutable code has led to the isolation of optional and mandatory synthetic life forms with altered protein alphabets. PMID:26999216

  16. The Biosynthetic Order of Amino Acid Addition to the Genetic Code

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, B K

    2002-01-01

    The previously formulated model for the evolution of the genetic code was shown to clarify why base triplets of some precursor amino acids differ by a single base from product amino acid codons, while others show less homology. First, the model indicated that the direction of code evolution changed on expansion from the N-fixers code (stage 2). Growth of the code from 16 codons in the NAN column (N, any standard nucleotide) proceeded by assignment of codons in the GNN, ANN, CNN and UNN rows. Expansion phase (stage 4 to 7) precursor/product pairs that spanned this shift included aspartate/threonine, aspartate/methionine and glutamate/proline. Both 5' and mid-base differ in the codons of each of these pairs. Second, post-expansion additions (stage 9 to 14) required codon reassignment, eliminating initial correlations. Codons for the post-expansion pair, aspartate (glutamate)/arginine, also differ at both 5' and mid-base sites. Third, the distribution of core structure groups among acceptors indicated that varia...

  17. The "periodic table" of the genetic code: A new way to look at the code and the decoding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Anton A

    2016-01-01

    Henri Grosjean and Eric Westhof recently presented an information-rich, alternative view of the genetic code, which takes into account current knowledge of the decoding process, including the complex nature of interactions between mRNA, tRNA and rRNA that take place during protein synthesis on the ribosome, and it also better reflects the evolution of the code. The new asymmetrical circular genetic code has a number of advantages over the traditional codon table and the previous circular diagrams (with a symmetrical/clockwise arrangement of the U, C, A, G bases). Most importantly, all sequence co-variances can be visualized and explained based on the internal logic of the thermodynamics of codon-anticodon interactions.

  18. A p-Adic Model of DNA Sequence and Genetic Code

    CERN Document Server

    Dragovich, Branko

    2007-01-01

    Using basic properties of p-adic numbers, we consider a simple new approach to describe main aspects of DNA sequence and genetic code. Central role in our investigation plays an ultrametric p-adic information space which basic elements are nucleotides, codons and genes. We show that a 5-adic model is appropriate for DNA sequence. This 5-adic model, combined with 2-adic distance, is also suitable for genetic code and for a more advanced employment in genomics. We find that genetic code degeneracy is related to the p-adic distance between codons.

  19. A possible step in the origin of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    It is suggested that the earliest coding polynucleotides contained a high proportion of alternating sequences of purines and pyrimidines, and that these sequences coded for polypeptides in which hydrophobic and hydrophylic amino acids alternated. Structural properties of such alternating polypeptides are discussed.

  20. A Statistical Analysis of the Robustness of Alternate Genetic Coding Tables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isil Aksan Kurnaz

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The rules that specify how the information contained in DNA is translated into amino acid “language” during protein synthesis are called “the genetic code”, commonly called the “Standard” or “Universal” Genetic Code Table. As a matter of fact, this coding table is not at all “universal”: in addition to different genetic code tables used by different organisms, even within the same organism the nuclear and mitochondrial genes may be subject to two different coding tables. Results In an attempt to understand the advantages and disadvantages these coding tables may bring to an organism, we have decided to analyze various coding tables on genes subject to mutations, and have estimated how these genes “survive” over generations. We have used this as indicative of the “evolutionary” success of that particular coding table. We find that the “standard” genetic code is not actually the most robust of all coding tables, and interestingly, Flatworm Mitochondrial Code (FMC appears to be the highest ranking coding table given our assumptions. Conclusions It is commonly hypothesized that the more robust a genetic code, the better suited it is for maintenance of the genome. Our study shows that, given the assumptions in our model, Standard Genetic Code is quite poor when compared to other alternate code tables in terms of robustness. This brings about the question of why Standard Code has been so widely accepted by a wider variety of organisms instead of FMC, which needs to be addressed for a thorough understanding of genetic code evolution.

  1. Codon size reduction as the origin of the triplet genetic code.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V Baranov

    Full Text Available The genetic code appears to be optimized in its robustness to missense errors and frameshift errors. In addition, the genetic code is near-optimal in terms of its ability to carry information in addition to the sequences of encoded proteins. As evolution has no foresight, optimality of the modern genetic code suggests that it evolved from less optimal code variants. The length of codons in the genetic code is also optimal, as three is the minimal nucleotide combination that can encode the twenty standard amino acids. The apparent impossibility of transitions between codon sizes in a discontinuous manner during evolution has resulted in an unbending view that the genetic code was always triplet. Yet, recent experimental evidence on quadruplet decoding, as well as the discovery of organisms with ambiguous and dual decoding, suggest that the possibility of the evolution of triplet decoding from living systems with non-triplet decoding merits reconsideration and further exploration. To explore this possibility we designed a mathematical model of the evolution of primitive digital coding systems which can decode nucleotide sequences into protein sequences. These coding systems can evolve their nucleotide sequences via genetic events of Darwinian evolution, such as point-mutations. The replication rates of such coding systems depend on the accuracy of the generated protein sequences. Computer simulations based on our model show that decoding systems with codons of length greater than three spontaneously evolve into predominantly triplet decoding systems. Our findings suggest a plausible scenario for the evolution of the triplet genetic code in a continuous manner. This scenario suggests an explanation of how protein synthesis could be accomplished by means of long RNA-RNA interactions prior to the emergence of the complex decoding machinery, such as the ribosome, that is required for stabilization and discrimination of otherwise weak triplet codon

  2. Matrix genetics, part 2: the degeneracy of the genetic code and the octave algebra with two quasi-real units (the genetic octave Yin-Yang-algebra)

    CERN Document Server

    Petoukhov, Sergey V

    2008-01-01

    Algebraic properties of the genetic code are analyzed. The investigations of the genetic code on the basis of matrix approaches ("matrix genetics") are described. The degeneracy of the vertebrate mitochondria genetic code is reflected in the black-and-white mosaic of the (8*8)-matrix of 64 triplets, 20 amino acids and stop-signals. This mosaic genetic matrix is connected with the matrix form of presentation of the special 8-dimensional Yin-Yang-algebra and of its particular 4-dimensional case. The special algorithm, which is based on features of genetic molecules, exists to transform the mosaic genomatrix into the matrices of these algebras. Two new numeric systems are defined by these 8-dimensional and 4-dimensional algebras: genetic Yin-Yang-octaves and genetic tetrions. Their comparison with quaternions by Hamilton is presented. Elements of new "genovector calculation" and ideas of "genetic mechanics" are discussed. These algebras are considered as models of the genetic code and as its possible pre-code ba...

  3. Expansion Under Climate Change: The Genetic Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Jimmy; Lewis, Mark A

    2016-11-01

    Range expansion and range shifts are crucial population responses to climate change. Genetic consequences are not well understood but are clearly coupled to ecological dynamics that, in turn, are driven by shifting climate conditions. We model a population with a deterministic reaction-diffusion model coupled to a heterogeneous environment that develops in time due to climate change. We decompose the resulting travelling wave solution into neutral genetic components to analyse the spatio-temporal dynamics of its genetic structure. Our analysis shows that range expansions and range shifts under slow climate change preserve genetic diversity. This is because slow climate change creates range boundaries that promote spatial mixing of genetic components. Mathematically, the mixing leads to so-called pushed travelling wave solutions. This mixing phenomenon is not seen in spatially homogeneous environments, where range expansion reduces genetic diversity through gene surfing arising from pulled travelling wave solutions. However, the preservation of diversity is diminished when climate change occurs too quickly. Using diversity indices, we show that fast expansions and range shifts erode genetic diversity more than slow range expansions and range shifts. Our study provides analytical insight into the dynamics of travelling wave solutions in heterogeneous environments.

  4. Critical roles for a genetic code alteration in the evolution of the genus Candida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Raquel M; Paredes, João A; Moura, Gabriela R; Manadas, Bruno; Lima-Costa, Tatiana; Rocha, Rita; Miranda, Isabel; Gomes, Ana C; Koerkamp, Marian J G; Perrot, Michel; Holstege, Frank C P; Boucherie, Hélian; Santos, Manuel A S

    2007-10-31

    During the last 30 years, several alterations to the standard genetic code have been discovered in various bacterial and eukaryotic species. Sense and nonsense codons have been reassigned or reprogrammed to expand the genetic code to selenocysteine and pyrrolysine. These discoveries highlight unexpected flexibility in the genetic code, but do not elucidate how the organisms survived the proteome chaos generated by codon identity redefinition. In order to shed new light on this question, we have reconstructed a Candida genetic code alteration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used a combination of DNA microarrays, proteomics and genetics approaches to evaluate its impact on gene expression, adaptation and sexual reproduction. This genetic manipulation blocked mating, locked yeast in a diploid state, remodelled gene expression and created stress cross-protection that generated adaptive advantages under environmental challenging conditions. This study highlights unanticipated roles for codon identity redefinition during the evolution of the genus Candida, and strongly suggests that genetic code alterations create genetic barriers that speed up speciation.

  5. Statistical mechanics of the genetic code: a glimpse of early life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2012-02-01

    Relics of early life, preceding even the last universal common ancestor of all life on Earth, are present in the structure of the modern day canonical genetic code --- the map between DNA sequence and amino acids that form proteins. The code is not random, as often assumed, but instead is now known to have certain error minimisation properties. How could such a code evolve, when it would seem that mutations to the code itself would cause the wrong proteins to be translated, thus killing the organism? I show how a unique and optimal genetic code can emerge over evolutionary time from digital life simulations, but only if horizontal gene transfer was a much stronger characteristic of early life than it is now. These results suggest a natural scenario in which evolution exhibits three distinct dynamical regimes, differentiated respectively by the way in which information flow, genetic novelty and complexity emerge. Possible observational signatures of these predictions are discussed.

  6. Intraspecific Genetic dynamics under Climate Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Florez Rodriguez, Alexander

    Climate change has a deep influence on the maintenance and generation of global biodiversity. Past contractions, expansions and shifts in species’ ranges drove to changes in species genetic diversity. Noteworthy, the interaction among: climate change, range, population size and extinction is ofte...

  7. The genetic code and its optimization for kinetic energy conservation in polypeptide chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloux, Antonin; Jestin, Jean-Luc

    2012-08-01

    Why is the genetic code the way it is? Concepts from fields as diverse as molecular evolution, classical chemistry, biochemistry and metabolism have been used to define selection pressures most likely to be involved in the shaping of the genetic code. Here minimization of kinetic energy disturbances during protein evolution by mutation allows an optimization of the genetic code to be highlighted. The quadratic forms corresponding to the kinetic energy term are considered over the field of rational numbers. Arguments are given to support the introduction of notions from basic number theory within this context. The observations found to be consistent with this minimization are statistically significant. The genetic code may well have been optimized according to energetic criteria so as to improve folding and dynamic properties of polypeptide chains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Engineering the Genetic Code in Cells and Animals: Biological Considerations and Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei

    2017-10-06

    increases Uaa incorporation efficiency and enables Uaa incorporation at multiple sites, making it feasible to use Uaa for directed evolution. Using these strategies, the genetic code has been effectively expanded in yeast, mammalian cells, stem cells, worms, fruit flies, zebrafish, and mice. It is also intriguing to find out that the legitimate UAG codons terminating endogenous genes are not efficiently suppressed by the orthogonal tRNA/aaRS in E. coli. Moreover, E. coli responds to amber suppression pressure promptly using transposon insertion to inactivate the introduced orthogonal aaRS. Persistent amber suppression evading transposon inactivation leads to global proteomic changes with a notable up-regulation of a previously uncharacterized protein YdiI, for which an unexpected function of expelling plasmids is discovered. Genome integration of the orthogonal tRNA/aaRS in mice results in minor changes in RNA transcripts but no significant physiological impairment. Lastly, the RF1 knockout E. coli strains afford a previously unavailable model organism for studying otherwise intractable questions on code evolution in real time in the laboratory. We expect that genetically encoding Uaas in live systems will continue to unfold new questions and directions for studying biology in vivo, investigating the code itself, and reprograming genomes for synthetic biology.

  9. A new neutron energy spectrum unfolding code using a two steps genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabinejad, H., E-mail: shahabinejad1367@yahoo.com; Hosseini, S.A.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2016-03-01

    A new neutron spectrum unfolding code TGASU (Two-steps Genetic Algorithm Spectrum Unfolding) has been developed to unfold the neutron spectrum from a pulse height distribution which was calculated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational Monte Carlo code. To perform the unfolding process, the response matrices were generated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational code. Both one step (common GA) and two steps GAs have been implemented to unfold the neutron spectra. According to the obtained results, the new two steps GA code results has shown closer match in all energy regions and particularly in the high energy regions. The results of the TGASU code have been compared with those of the standard spectra, LSQR method and GAMCD code. The results of the TGASU code have been demonstrated to be more accurate than that of the existing computational codes for both under-determined and over-determined problems.

  10. A new neutron energy spectrum unfolding code using a two steps genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabinejad, H.; Hosseini, S. A.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2016-03-01

    A new neutron spectrum unfolding code TGASU (Two-steps Genetic Algorithm Spectrum Unfolding) has been developed to unfold the neutron spectrum from a pulse height distribution which was calculated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational Monte Carlo code. To perform the unfolding process, the response matrices were generated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational code. Both one step (common GA) and two steps GAs have been implemented to unfold the neutron spectra. According to the obtained results, the new two steps GA code results has shown closer match in all energy regions and particularly in the high energy regions. The results of the TGASU code have been compared with those of the standard spectra, LSQR method and GAMCD code. The results of the TGASU code have been demonstrated to be more accurate than that of the existing computational codes for both under-determined and over-determined problems.

  11. A New Method Of Gene Coding For A Genetic Algorithm Designed For Parametric Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu BELEA

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In a parametric optimization problem the genes code the real parameters of the fitness function. There are two coding techniques known under the names of: binary coded genes and real coded genes. The comparison between these two is a controversial subject since the first papers about parametric optimization have appeared. An objective analysis regarding the advantages and disadvantages of the two coding techniques is difficult to be done while different format information is compared. The present paper suggests a gene coding technique that uses the same format for both binary coded genes and for the real coded genes. After unifying the real parameters representation, the next criterion is going to be applied: the differences between the two techniques are statistically measured by the effect of the genetic operators over some random generated fellows.

  12. Natural genetic variation impacts expression levels of coding, non-coding, and antisense transcripts in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clément-Ziza, Mathieu; Marsellach, Francesc X.; Codlin, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of how natural genetic variation affects gene expression beyond well-annotated coding genes is still limited. The use of deep sequencing technologies for the study of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) has the potential to close this gap. Here, we generated...... to be affected by eQTLs as protein-coding RNAs. We identified a genetic variation of swc5 that modifies the levels of 871 RNAs, with effects on both sense and antisense transcription, and show that this effect most likely goes through a compromised deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z. The strains, methods...... the first recombinant strain library for fission yeast and conducted an RNA-seq-based QTL study of the coding, non-coding, and antisense transcriptomes. We show that the frequency of distal effects (trans-eQTLs) greatly exceeds the number of local effects (cis-eQTLs) and that non-coding RNAs are as likely...

  13. Analysis of protein-coding genetic variation in 60,706 humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lek, Monkol; Karczewski, Konrad J; Minikel, Eric V; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Banks, Eric; Fennell, Timothy; O'Donnell-Luria, Anne H; Ware, James S; Hill, Andrew J; Cummings, Beryl B; Tukiainen, Taru; Birnbaum, Daniel P; Kosmicki, Jack A; Duncan, Laramie E; Estrada, Karol; Zhao, Fengmei; Zou, James; Pierce-Hoffman, Emma; Berghout, Joanne; Cooper, David N; Deflaux, Nicole; DePristo, Mark; Do, Ron; Flannick, Jason; Fromer, Menachem; Gauthier, Laura; Goldstein, Jackie; Gupta, Namrata; Howrigan, Daniel; Kiezun, Adam; Kurki, Mitja I; Moonshine, Ami Levy; Natarajan, Pradeep; Orozco, Lorena; Peloso, Gina M; Poplin, Ryan; Rivas, Manuel A; Ruano-Rubio, Valentin; Rose, Samuel A; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Shakir, Khalid; Stenson, Peter D; Stevens, Christine; Thomas, Brett P; Tiao, Grace; Tusie-Luna, Maria T; Weisburd, Ben; Won, Hong-Hee; Yu, Dongmei; Altshuler, David M; Ardissino, Diego; Boehnke, Michael; Danesh, John; Donnelly, Stacey; Elosua, Roberto; Florez, Jose C; Gabriel, Stacey B; Getz, Gad; Glatt, Stephen J; Hultman, Christina M; Kathiresan, Sekar; Laakso, Markku; McCarroll, Steven; McCarthy, Mark I; McGovern, Dermot; McPherson, Ruth; Neale, Benjamin M; Palotie, Aarno; Purcell, Shaun M; Saleheen, Danish; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Sklar, Pamela; Sullivan, Patrick F; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tsuang, Ming T; Watkins, Hugh C; Wilson, James G; Daly, Mark J; MacArthur, Daniel G

    2016-08-18

    Large-scale reference data sets of human genetic variation are critical for the medical and functional interpretation of DNA sequence changes. Here we describe the aggregation and analysis of high-quality exome (protein-coding region) DNA sequence data for 60,706 individuals of diverse ancestries generated as part of the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC). This catalogue of human genetic diversity contains an average of one variant every eight bases of the exome, and provides direct evidence for the presence of widespread mutational recurrence. We have used this catalogue to calculate objective metrics of pathogenicity for sequence variants, and to identify genes subject to strong selection against various classes of mutation; identifying 3,230 genes with near-complete depletion of predicted protein-truncating variants, with 72% of these genes having no currently established human disease phenotype. Finally, we demonstrate that these data can be used for the efficient filtering of candidate disease-causing variants, and for the discovery of human 'knockout' variants in protein-coding genes.

  14. Origins of gene, genetic code, protein and life: comprehensive view of life systems from a GNC-SNS primitive genetic code hypothesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Ikehara

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the origin of genes, the genetic code, proteins and life using six indices (hydropathy, -helix, -sheet and -turn formabilities, acidic amino acid content and basic amino acid content) necessary for appropriate three-dimensional structure formation of globular proteins. From the analysis of microbial genes, we have concluded that newly-born genes are products of nonstop frames (NSF) on antisense strands of microbial GC-rich genes [GC-NSF(a)] and from SNS repeating sequences [(SNS)n] similar to the GC-NSF(a) (S and N mean G or C and either of four bases, respectively). We have also proposed that the universal genetic code used by most organisms on the earth presently could be derived from a GNC-SNS primitive genetic code. We have further presented the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis of the origin of life as well as a hypothesis of protein production, suggesting that proteins were originally produced by random peptide formation of amino acids restricted in specific amino acid compositions termed as GNC-, SNS- and GC-NSF(a)-0th order structures of proteins. The [GADV]-protein world hypothesis is primarily derived from the GNC-primitive genetic code hypothesis. It is also expected that basic properties of extant genes and proteins could be revealed by considerations based on the scenario with four stages.

  15. Genetic Searching Algorithm for Optimal Runlength—Limited Codes with Error Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RenQingsheng; YeZhongxing

    1997-01-01

    A genetic searching algorithm is presented to construct arbitrarily concatenatable block code with runlength(d,k)constraints.The code also has the ability to correct error during decoding.A similar eliminating operator and an anti-symbiotic operator are suggested to improve the efficiency of the algorithm.

  16. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains Only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timofeeva, Maria N.; Ben Kinnersley, [Unknown; Farrington, Susan M.; Whiffin, Nicola; Palles, Claire; Svinti, Victoria; Lloyd, Amy; Gorman, Maggie; Ooi, Li-Yin; Hosking, Fay; Barclay, Ella; Zgaga, Lina; Dobbins, Sara; Martin, Lynn; Theodoratou, Evropi; Broderick, Peter; Tenesa, Albert; Smillie, Claire; Grimes, Graeme; Hayward, Caroline; Campbell, Archie; Porteous, David; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Northwood, Emma L.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Smith, Gillian; Wolf, Roland; Forman, David; Morreau, Hans; Ruano, Dina; Tops, Carli; Wijnen, Juul; Schrumpf, Melanie; Boot, Arnoud; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Hes, Frederik J.; van Wezel, Tom; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolgang; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Buch, Stephan; Propping, Peter; Hemminki, Kari; Foersti, Asta; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Carla; Teixeira, Manuel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernandez-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Castells, Antoni; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Campbell, Harry; Bishop, D. Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian P. M.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs cases and 29,0

  17. Problem-Based Test: An "In Vitro" Experiment to Analyze the Genetic Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: genetic code, translation, synthetic polynucleotide, leucine, serine, filter precipitation, radioactivity measurement, template, mRNA, tRNA, rRNA, aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis, ribosomes, degeneration of the code, wobble, initiation, and elongation of protein synthesis, initiation codon.…

  18. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains Only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timofeeva, Maria N.; Ben Kinnersley, [Unknown; Farrington, Susan M.; Whiffin, Nicola; Palles, Claire; Svinti, Victoria; Lloyd, Amy; Gorman, Maggie; Ooi, Li-Yin; Hosking, Fay; Barclay, Ella; Zgaga, Lina; Dobbins, Sara; Martin, Lynn; Theodoratou, Evropi; Broderick, Peter; Tenesa, Albert; Smillie, Claire; Grimes, Graeme; Hayward, Caroline; Campbell, Archie; Porteous, David; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Northwood, Emma L.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Smith, Gillian; Wolf, Roland; Forman, David; Morreau, Hans; Ruano, Dina; Tops, Carli; Wijnen, Juul; Schrumpf, Melanie; Boot, Arnoud; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Hes, Frederik J.; van Wezel, Tom; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolgang; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Buch, Stephan; Propping, Peter; Hemminki, Kari; Foersti, Asta; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Carla; Teixeira, Manuel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernandez-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Castells, Antoni; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Campbell, Harry; Bishop, D. Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian P. M.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs cases and 29,0

  19. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Timofeeva (Maria N.); B. Kinnersley (Ben); S.M. Farrington (Susan M.); N. Whiffin (Nicola); C. Palles (Claire); V. Svinti (Victoria); A. Lloyd (Amy); M. Gorman (Maggie); L.-Y. Ooi (Li-Yin); F. Hosking (Fay); E. Barclay (Ella); L. Zgaga (Lina); S.E. Dobbins (Sara E.); L. Martin (Lynn); E. Theodoratou (Evropi); P. Broderick (Peter); A. Tenesa (Albert); C. Smillie (Claire); G. Grimes (Graeme); C. Hayward (Caroline); A. Campbell (Archie); D. Porteous (David); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J.B. Northwood (John Blackman); J.H. Barrett (Jennifer H.); G. Smith (Gillian); R. Wolf (Roland); D. Forman (David); H. Morreau (Hans); D. Ruano (Dina); C. Tops (Carli); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M. Schrumpf (Melanie); A. Boot (Arnoud); H. Vasen (Hans); F.J. Hes (Frederik); T. van Wezel (Tom); A. Franke (Andre); W. Lieb (Wolgang); C. Schafmayer (Clemens); J. Hampe (Jochen); T. Buch (Thorsten); P. Propping (Peter); K. Hemminki (Kari); A. Försti (Asta); H. Westers (Helga); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); M. Pinheiro (Manuela); C. Pinto (Carla); P.J. Teixeira; C. Ruiz-Ponte (Clara); C. Fernández-Rozadilla (Ceres); A. Carracedo (Angel); A. Castells; S. Castellví-Bel; H. Campbell (Harry); D.T. Bishop (David Timothy); I. Tomlinson (Ian); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); R. Houlston (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWhilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs ca

  20. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Timofeeva (Maria N.); B. Kinnersley (Ben); S.M. Farrington (Susan M.); N. Whiffin (Nicola); C. Palles (Claire); V. Svinti (Victoria); A. Lloyd (Amy); M. Gorman (Maggie); L.-Y. Ooi (Li-Yin); F. Hosking (Fay); E. Barclay (Ella); L. Zgaga (Lina); S.E. Dobbins (Sara E.); L. Martin (Lynn); E. Theodoratou (Evropi); P. Broderick (Peter); A. Tenesa (Albert); C. Smillie (Claire); G. Grimes (Graeme); C. Hayward (Caroline); A. Campbell (Archie); D. Porteous (David); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J.B. Northwood (John Blackman); J.H. Barrett (Jennifer H.); G. Smith (Gillian); R. Wolf (Roland); D. Forman (David); H. Morreau (Hans); D. Ruano (Dina); C. Tops (Carli); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M. Schrumpf (Melanie); A. Boot (Arnoud); H. Vasen (Hans); F.J. Hes (Frederik); T. van Wezel (Tom); A. Franke (Andre); W. Lieb (Wolgang); C. Schafmayer (Clemens); J. Hampe (Jochen); T. Buch (Thorsten); P. Propping (Peter); K. Hemminki (Kari); A. Försti (Asta); H. Westers (Helga); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); M. Pinheiro (Manuela); C. Pinto (Carla); P.J. Teixeira; C. Ruiz-Ponte (Clara); C. Fernández-Rozadilla (Ceres); A. Carracedo (Angel); A. Castells; S. Castellví-Bel; H. Campbell (Harry); D.T. Bishop (David Timothy); I. Tomlinson (Ian); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); R. Houlston (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWhilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs ca

  1. Junk DNA and the long non-coding RNA twist in cancer genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Ling (Hui); K. Vincent; M. Pichler; R. Fodde (Riccardo); I. Berindan-Neagoe (Ioana); F.J. Slack (Frank); G.A. Calin (George)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe central dogma of molecular biology states that the flow of genetic information moves from DNA to RNA to protein. However, in the last decade this dogma has been challenged by new findings on non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs). More recently, long non-coding RNAs (lnc

  2. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Timofeeva (Maria N.); B. Kinnersley (Ben); S.M. Farrington (Susan M.); N. Whiffin (Nicola); C. Palles (Claire); V. Svinti (Victoria); A. Lloyd (Amy); M. Gorman (Maggie); L.-Y. Ooi (Li-Yin); F. Hosking (Fay); E. Barclay (Ella); L. Zgaga (Lina); S.E. Dobbins (Sara E.); L. Martin (Lynn); E. Theodoratou (Evropi); P. Broderick (Peter); A. Tenesa (Albert); C. Smillie (Claire); G. Grimes (Graeme); C. Hayward (Caroline); A. Campbell (Archie); D. Porteous (David); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J.B. Northwood (John Blackman); J.H. Barrett (Jennifer H.); G. Smith (Gillian); R. Wolf (Roland); D. Forman (David); H. Morreau (Hans); D. Ruano (Dina); C. Tops (Carli); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M. Schrumpf (Melanie); A. Boot (Arnoud); H. Vasen (Hans); F.J. Hes (Frederik); T. van Wezel (Tom); A. Franke (Andre); W. Lieb (Wolgang); C. Schafmayer (Clemens); J. Hampe (Jochen); T. Buch (Thorsten); P. Propping (Peter); K. Hemminki (Kari); A. Försti (Asta); H. Westers (Helga); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); M. Pinheiro (Manuela); C. Pinto (Carla); P.J. Teixeira; C. Ruiz-Ponte (Clara); C. Fernández-Rozadilla (Ceres); A. Carracedo (Angel); A. Castells; S. Castellví-Bel; H. Campbell (Harry); D.T. Bishop (David Timothy); I. Tomlinson (Ian); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); R. Houlston (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWhilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs

  3. Genetic hotels for the standard genetic code: evolutionary analysis based upon novel three-dimensional algebraic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Marco V; Morgado, Eberto R; Govezensky, Tzipe

    2011-07-01

    Herein, we rigorously develop novel 3-dimensional algebraic models called Genetic Hotels of the Standard Genetic Code (SGC). We start by considering the primeval RNA genetic code which consists of the 16 codons of type RNY (purine-any base-pyrimidine). Using simple algebraic operations, we show how the RNA code could have evolved toward the current SGC via two different intermediate evolutionary stages called Extended RNA code type I and II. By rotations or translations of the subset RNY, we arrive at the SGC via the former (type I) or via the latter (type II), respectively. Biologically, the Extended RNA code type I, consists of all codons of the type RNY plus codons obtained by considering the RNA code but in the second (NYR type) and third (YRN type) reading frames. The Extended RNA code type II, comprises all codons of the type RNY plus codons that arise from transversions of the RNA code in the first (YNY type) and third (RNR) nucleotide bases. Since the dimensions of remarkable subsets of the Genetic Hotels are not necessarily integer numbers, we also introduce the concept of algebraic fractal dimension. A general decoding function which maps each codon to its corresponding amino acid or the stop signals is also derived. The Phenotypic Hotel of amino acids is also illustrated. The proposed evolutionary paths are discussed in terms of the existing theories of the evolution of the SGC. The adoption of 3-dimensional models of the Genetic and Phenotypic Hotels will facilitate the understanding of the biological properties of the SGC.

  4. Non-Standard Genetic Codes Define New Concepts for Protein Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Bezerra, Ana R; Guimarães, Ana R.; Santos, Manuel A. S.

    2015-01-01

    The essential feature of the genetic code is the strict one-to-one correspondence between codons and amino acids. The canonical code consists of three stop codons and 61 sense codons that encode 20% of the amino acid repertoire observed in nature. It was originally designated as immutable and universal due to its conservation in most organisms, but sequencing of genes from the human mitochondrial genomes revealed deviations in codon assignments. Since then, alternative codes have been reporte...

  5. Monitoring adaptive genetic responses to environmental change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.M.; Olivieri, I.; Waller, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread environmental changes including climate change, selective harvesting and landscape alterations now greatly affect selection regimes for most organisms. How animals and plants can adapt to these altered environments via contemporary evolution is thus of strong interest. We discuss how...... for selection and establishing clear links between genetic and environmental change. We then review a few exemplary studies that explore adaptive responses to climate change in Drosophila, selective responses to hunting and fishing, and contemporary evolution in Daphnia using resurrected resting eggs. We...

  6. Breaking the Genetic Code in a Letter by Max Delbruck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Marty

    1996-01-01

    Describes a classroom exercise that uses a letter from Max Delbruck to George Beadle to stimulate interest in the mechanics of a nonoverlapping comma-free code. Enables students to participate in the rich history of molecular biology and illustrates to them that scientists and science can be fun. (JRH)

  7. Efficient Dual Domain Decoding of Linear Block Codes Using Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Azouaoui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A computationally efficient algorithm for decoding block codes is developed using a genetic algorithm (GA. The proposed algorithm uses the dual code in contrast to the existing genetic decoders in the literature that use the code itself. Hence, this new approach reduces the complexity of decoding the codes of high rates. We simulated our algorithm in various transmission channels. The performance of this algorithm is investigated and compared with competitor decoding algorithms including Maini and Shakeel ones. The results show that the proposed algorithm gives large gains over the Chase-2 decoding algorithm and reach the performance of the OSD-3 for some quadratic residue (QR codes. Further, we define a new crossover operator that exploits the domain specific information and compare it with uniform and two point crossover. The complexity of this algorithm is also discussed and compared to other algorithms.

  8. Genetic code correlations - Amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A. L.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The data here show direct correlations between both the hydrophobicity and the hydrophilicity of the homocodonic amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides. While the differences between properties of uracil and cytosine derivatives are small, further data show that uracil has an affinity for charged species. Although these data suggest that molecular relationships between amino acids and anticodons were responsible for the origin of the code, it is not clear what the mechanism of the origin might have been.

  9. An Efficient Soft Decoder of Block Codes Based on Compact Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Azouaoui

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Soft-decision decoding is an NP-hard problem with great interest to developers of communication systems. We present an efficient soft-decision decoder of linear block codes based on compact genetic algorithm (cGA and compare its performances with various other decoding algorithms including Shakeel algorithm. The proposed algorithm uses the dual code in contrast to Shakeel algorithm which uses the code itself. Hence, this new approach reduces the decoding complexity of high rates codes. The complexity and an optimized version of this new algorithm are also presented and discussed.

  10. Origins of biological information and the genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Information, defined as the capacity of a molecule or system for selective interactions with other molecules or systems, is followed through its evolution from prebiological information to protoribosomes. Emphasis is on proteins and protein-like polymers, and later on ATP. The research will contribute more to the understanding of the essence of the genetic mechanism.

  11. The Graph, Geometry and Symmetries of the Genetic Code with Hamming Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reijer Lenstra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The similarity patterns of the genetic code result from similar codons encoding similar messages. We develop a new mathematical model to analyze these patterns. The physicochemical characteristics of amino acids objectively quantify their differences and similarities; the Hamming metric does the same for the 64 codons of the codon set. (Hamming distances equal the number of different codon positions: AAA and AAC are at 1-distance; codons are maximally at 3-distance. The CodonPolytope, a 9-dimensional geometric object, is spanned by 64 vertices that represent the codons and the Euclidian distances between these vertices correspond one-to-one with intercodon Hamming distances. The CodonGraph represents the vertices and edges of the polytope; each edge equals a Hamming 1-distance. The mirror reflection symmetry group of the polytope is isomorphic to the largest permutation symmetry group of the codon set that preserves Hamming distances. These groups contain 82,944 symmetries. Many polytope symmetries coincide with the degeneracy and similarity patterns of the genetic code. These code symmetries are strongly related with the face structure of the polytope with smaller faces displaying stronger code symmetries. Splitting the polytope stepwise into smaller faces models an early evolution of the code that generates this hierarchy of code symmetries. The canonical code represents a class of 41,472 codes with equivalent symmetries; a single class among an astronomical number of symmetry classes comprising all possible codes.

  12. A four-column theory for the origin of the genetic code: tracing the evolutionary pathways that gave rise to an optimized code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgs Paul G

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arrangement of the amino acids in the genetic code is such that neighbouring codons are assigned to amino acids with similar physical properties. Hence, the effects of translational error are minimized with respect to randomly reshuffled codes. Further inspection reveals that it is amino acids in the same column of the code (i.e. same second base that are similar, whereas those in the same row show no particular similarity. We propose a 'four-column' theory for the origin of the code that explains how the action of selection during the build-up of the code leads to a final code that has the observed properties. Results The theory makes the following propositions. (i The earliest amino acids in the code were those that are easiest to synthesize non-biologically, namely Gly, Ala, Asp, Glu and Val. (ii These amino acids are assigned to codons with G at first position. Therefore the first code may have used only these codons. (iii The code rapidly developed into a four-column code where all codons in the same column coded for the same amino acid: NUN = Val, NCN = Ala, NAN = Asp and/or Glu, and NGN = Gly. (iv Later amino acids were added sequentially to the code by a process of subdivision of codon blocks in which a subset of the codons assigned to an early amino acid were reassigned to a later amino acid. (v Later amino acids were added into positions formerly occupied by amino acids with similar properties because this can occur with minimal disruption to the proteins already encoded by the earlier code. As a result, the properties of the amino acids in the final code retain a four-column pattern that is a relic of the earliest stages of code evolution. Conclusion The driving force during this process is not the minimization of translational error, but positive selection for the increased diversity and functionality of the proteins that can be made with a larger amino acid alphabet. Nevertheless, the code that results is one

  13. Conceptual change strategies in teaching genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzli, Laura Elizabeth

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of utilizing conceptual change strategies when teaching high school genetics. The study examined the effects of structuring instruction to provide students with cognitive situations which promote conceptual change, specifically instruction was structured to elicit students' prior knowledge. The goal of the study was that the students would not only be able to solve genetics problems and define basic terminology but they would also have constructed more scientific schemas of the actual processes involved in inheritance. This study is based on the constructivist theory of learning and conceptual change research which suggest that students are actively involved in the process of relating new information to prior knowledge as they construct new knowledge. Two sections of biology II classes received inquiry based instruction and participated in structured cooperative learning groups. However, the unique difference in the treatment group's instruction was the use of structured thought time and the resulting social interaction between the students. The treatment group students' instructional design allowed students to socially construct their cognitive knowledge after elicitation of their prior knowledge. In contrast, the instructional design for the control group students allowed them to socially construct their cognitive knowledge of genetics without the individually structured thought time. The results indicated that the conceptual change strategies with individually structured thought time improved the students' scientific mastery of genetics concepts and they maintained fewer post instructional alternative conceptions. Although all students gained the ability to correctly solve genetics problems, the treatment group students were able to explain the processes involved in terms of meiosis. The treatment group students were also able to better apply their knowledge to novel genetic situations. The implications

  14. Chromatin remodeling: the interface between extrinsic cues and the genetic code?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Shereen

    2008-10-01

    The successful completion of the human genome project ushered a new era of hope and skepticism. However, the promise of finding the fundamental basis of human traits and diseases appears less than fulfilled. The original premise was that the DNA sequence of every gene would allow precise characterization of critical differences responsible for altered cellular functions. The characterization of intragenic mutations in cancers paved the way for early screening and the design of targeted therapies. However, it has also become evident that unmasking genetic codes alone cannot explain the diversity of disease phenotypes within a population. Further, classic genetics has not been able to explain the differences that have been observed among identical twins or even cloned animals. This new reality has re-ignited interest in the field of epigenetics. While traditionally defined as heritable changes that can alter gene expression without affecting the corresponding DNA sequence, this definition has come into question. The extent to which epigenetic change can also be acquired in response to chemical stimuli represents an exciting dimension in the "nature vs nurture" debate. In this review I will describe a series of studies in my laboratory that illustrate the significance of epigenetics and its potential clinical implications.

  15. An evaluation of mitochondrial tRNA gene evolution and its relation to the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, R J

    1982-04-01

    Extensive sequence data on mitochondrial (mt) tRNAs give for the first time an opportunity to evaluate tRNA gene evolution in this organelle. Deductions from these gene structures relate to the evolution of tRNA genes in other cellular systems and to the origin of the genetic code. Mt tRNAs, in contrast to the prokaryotic nature of chloroplastic tRNA structure, can not at the present time be definitely related to either prokaryotic or eukaryotic tRNAs, probably because of a higher mutation rate in mitochondria. Fungal mt tRNAs having the same anticodon and function are generally similar enough to be considered homologous. Comparisons af all mt tRNA sequences contained in the same mitochondrion indicate that some tRNAs originated by duplication of a prototypic gene which, after divergence, led to tRNAs having different amino acid specificities. The deviant mt genetic code, although admittedly permitting a simpler decoding mechanism, is not useful in determining whether the origin of mitochondria had preceded or was derived from prokaryotes or eukaryotes, since the genetic code is variable even among mitochondria. Variants of the mt genetic code lead to speculation on the nature of the primordial code and its relation to the present "universal" code.

  16. Synthetic alienation of microbial organisms by using genetic code engineering: Why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubyshkin, Vladimir; Budisa, Nediljko

    2017-08-01

    The main goal of synthetic biology (SB) is the creation of biodiversity applicable for biotechnological needs, while xenobiology (XB) aims to expand the framework of natural chemistries with the non-natural building blocks in living cells to accomplish artificial biodiversity. Protein and proteome engineering, which overcome limitation of the canonical amino acid repertoire of 20 (+2) prescribed by the genetic code by using non-canonic amino acids (ncAAs), is one of the main focuses of XB research. Ideally, estranging the genetic code from its current form via systematic introduction of ncAAs should enable the development of bio-containment mechanisms in synthetic cells potentially endowing them with a "genetic firewall" i.e. orthogonality which prevents genetic information transfer to natural systems. Despite rapid progress over the past two decades, it is not yet possible to completely alienate an organism that would use and maintain different genetic code associations permanently. In order to engineer robust bio-contained life forms, the chemical logic behind the amino acid repertoire establishment should be considered. Starting from recent proposal of Hartman and Smith about the genetic code establishment in the RNA world, here the authors mapped possible biotechnological invasion points for engineering of bio-contained synthetic cells equipped with non-canonical functionalities. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A population genetics-phylogenetics approach to inferring natural selection in coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Wilson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Through an analysis of polymorphism within and divergence between species, we can hope to learn about the distribution of selective effects of mutations in the genome, changes in the fitness landscape that occur over time, and the location of sites involved in key adaptations that distinguish modern-day species. We introduce a novel method for the analysis of variation in selection pressures within and between species, spatially along the genome and temporally between lineages. We model codon evolution explicitly using a joint population genetics-phylogenetics approach that we developed for the construction of multiallelic models with mutation, selection, and drift. Our approach has the advantage of performing direct inference on coding sequences, inferring ancestral states probabilistically, utilizing allele frequency information, and generalizing to multiple species. We use a Bayesian sliding window model for intragenic variation in selection coefficients that efficiently combines information across sites and captures spatial clustering within the genome. To demonstrate the utility of the method, we infer selective pressures acting in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans from polymorphism and divergence data for 100 X-linked coding regions.

  18. Expanding the genetic code of Salmonella with non-canonical amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qinglei; Lehman, Brent P.; Bobik, Thomas A.; Fan, Chenguang

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) endows proteins with new features for a variety of biological studies and biotechnological applications. The genetic code expansion strategy, which co-translationally incorporates ncAAs into specific sites of target proteins, has been applied in many organisms. However, there have been only few studies on pathogens using genetic code expansion. Here, we introduce this technique into the human pathogen Salmonella by incorporating p-azido-phenylalanine, benzoyl-phenylalanine, acetyl-lysine, and phosphoserine into selected Salmonella proteins including a microcompartment shell protein (PduA), a type III secretion effector protein (SteA), and a metabolic enzyme (malate dehydrogenase), and demonstrate practical applications of genetic code expansion in protein labeling, photocrosslinking, and post-translational modification studies in Salmonella. This work will provide powerful tools for a wide range of studies on Salmonella. PMID:28008993

  19. Yury Borisovich Rumer and his 'biological papers' on the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimmel, Elena; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-03-13

    Yury Borisovich Rumer was one of the most important theoretical physicists of the former Soviet Union in the early 1930s. However, he also wrote a few 'biological papers' on the standard genetic code after he read Crick's and Nirenberg's pioneering papers on the topic. Rumer's articles on the 'Systematization of Codons in the Genetic Code' (Rumer 1966 Doklady Akademii nauk SSSR 167, 1393-1394); Rumer 1968 Doklady Akademii nauk SSSR 183, 225-226; Rumer 1969 Doklady Akademii nauk SSSR 187, 937-938, where he suggested the idea of partitioning codons depending on their redundancy-the first mention of symmetry in the genetic code-were published in Russian only. Due to their importance and their frequent citation, we here present translations of these articles into English in order to make them accessible to a broader community. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Mean-Adaptive Real-Coding Genetic Algorithm and its Applications to Electromagnetic Optimization (Part One

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Raida

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a novel instance of the real-coding steady-state genetic algorithm, called the Mean-adaptive real-coding genetic algorithm, is put forward. In this instance, three novel implementations of evolution operators are incorporated. Those are a recombination and two mutation operators. All of the evolution operators are designed with the aim of possessing a big explorative power. Moreover, one of the mutation operators exhibits self-adaptive behavior and the other exhibits adaptive behavior, thereby allowing the algorithm to self-control its own mutability as the search advances. This algorithm also takes advantage of population-elitist selection, acting as a replacement policy, being adopted from evolution strategies. The purpose of this paper (i.e., the first part is to provide theoretical foundations of a robust and advanced instance of the real-coding genetic algorithm having the big potential of being successfully applied to electromagnetic optimization.

  1. Possibilities for the evolution of the genetic code from a preceding form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of the interaction between mRNA codons and tRNA anticodons suggests a model for the evolution of the genetic code. Modification of the nucleic acid following the anticodon is at present essential in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes to ensure fidelity of translation of codons starting with A, and the amino acids which could be coded for before the evolution of the modifying enzymes can be deduced.

  2. Summary of evidence for an anticodonic basis for the origin of the genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This article summarizes data supporting the hypothesis that the genetic code origin was based on relationships (probably affinities) between amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides. Selective activation seems to follow from selective affinity and consequently, incorporation of amino acids into peptides can also be selective. It is suggested that these selectivities in affinity and activation, coupled with the base pairing specificities, allowed the origin of the code and the process of translation.

  3. Virus-host co-evolution under a modified nuclear genetic code

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    Derek J. Taylor

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Among eukaryotes with modified nuclear genetic codes, viruses are unknown. However, here we provide evidence of an RNA virus that infects a fungal host (Scheffersomyces segobiensis with a derived nuclear genetic code where CUG codes for serine. The genomic architecture and phylogeny are consistent with infection by a double-stranded RNA virus of the genus Totivirus. We provide evidence of past or present infection with totiviruses in five species of yeasts with modified genetic codes. All but one of the CUG codons in the viral genome have been eliminated, suggesting that avoidance of the modified codon was important to viral adaptation. Our mass spectroscopy analysis indicates that a congener of the host species has co-opted and expresses a capsid gene from totiviruses as a cellular protein. Viral avoidance of the host’s modified codon and host co-option of a protein from totiviruses suggest that RNA viruses co-evolved with yeasts that underwent a major evolutionary transition from the standard genetic code.

  4. Genetic code evolution reveals the neutral emergence of mutational robustness, and information as an evolutionary constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Steven E

    2015-04-24

    The standard genetic code (SGC) is central to molecular biology and its origin and evolution is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology, the elucidation of which promises to reveal much about the origins of life. In addition, we propose that study of its origin can also reveal some fundamental and generalizable insights into mechanisms of molecular evolution, utilizing concepts from complexity theory. The first is that beneficial traits may arise by non-adaptive processes, via a process of "neutral emergence". The structure of the SGC is optimized for the property of error minimization, which reduces the deleterious impact of point mutations. Via simulation, it can be shown that genetic codes with error minimization superior to the SGC can emerge in a neutral fashion simply by a process of genetic code expansion via tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase duplication, whereby similar amino acids are added to codons related to that of the parent amino acid. This process of neutral emergence has implications beyond that of the genetic code, as it suggests that not all beneficial traits have arisen by the direct action of natural selection; we term these "pseudaptations", and discuss a range of potential examples. Secondly, consideration of genetic code deviations (codon reassignments) reveals that these are mostly associated with a reduction in proteome size. This code malleability implies the existence of a proteomic constraint on the genetic code, proportional to the size of the proteome (P), and that its reduction in size leads to an "unfreezing" of the codon - amino acid mapping that defines the genetic code, consistent with Crick's Frozen Accident theory. The concept of a proteomic constraint may be extended to propose a general informational constraint on genetic fidelity, which may be used to explain variously, differences in mutation rates in genomes with differing proteome sizes, differences in DNA repair capacity and genome GC content between organisms, a

  5. Genetic Code Evolution Reveals the Neutral Emergence of Mutational Robustness, and Information as an Evolutionary Constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E. Massey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The standard genetic code (SGC is central to molecular biology and its origin and evolution is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology, the elucidation of which promises to reveal much about the origins of life. In addition, we propose that study of its origin can also reveal some fundamental and generalizable insights into mechanisms of molecular evolution, utilizing concepts from complexity theory. The first is that beneficial traits may arise by non-adaptive processes, via a process of “neutral emergence”. The structure of the SGC is optimized for the property of error minimization, which reduces the deleterious impact of point mutations. Via simulation, it can be shown that genetic codes with error minimization superior to the SGC can emerge in a neutral fashion simply by a process of genetic code expansion via tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase duplication, whereby similar amino acids are added to codons related to that of the parent amino acid. This process of neutral emergence has implications beyond that of the genetic code, as it suggests that not all beneficial traits have arisen by the direct action of natural selection; we term these “pseudaptations”, and discuss a range of potential examples. Secondly, consideration of genetic code deviations (codon reassignments reveals that these are mostly associated with a reduction in proteome size. This code malleability implies the existence of a proteomic constraint on the genetic code, proportional to the size of the proteome (P, and that its reduction in size leads to an “unfreezing” of the codon – amino acid mapping that defines the genetic code, consistent with Crick’s Frozen Accident theory. The concept of a proteomic constraint may be extended to propose a general informational constraint on genetic fidelity, which may be used to explain variously, differences in mutation rates in genomes with differing proteome sizes, differences in DNA repair capacity and genome

  6. GENETIC ALGORITHM FOR DECODING LINEAR CODES OVER AWGN AND FADING CHANNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. BERBIA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a decoder for binary linear codes based on Genetic Algorithm (GA over the Gaussian and Rayleigh flat fading channel. The performances and compututional complexity of our decoder applied to BCH and convolutional codes are good compared to Chase-2 and Viterbi algorithm respectively. It show that our algorithm is less complex for linear block codes of large block length; furthermore it's performances can be improved by tuning the decoder's parameters, in particular the number of individuals by population and the number of generations

  7. Finite population analysis of the effect of horizontal gene transfer on the origin of an universal and optimal genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neha; Vishwa Bandhu, Ashutosh; Sengupta, Supratim

    2016-06-01

    The origin of a universal and optimal genetic code remains a compelling mystery in molecular biology and marks an essential step in the origin of DNA and protein based life. We examine a collective evolution model of genetic code origin that allows for unconstrained horizontal transfer of genetic elements within a finite population of sequences each of which is associated with a genetic code selected from a pool of primordial codes. We find that when horizontal transfer of genetic elements is incorporated in this more realistic model of code-sequence coevolution in a finite population, it can increase the likelihood of emergence of a more optimal code eventually leading to its universality through fixation in the population. The establishment of such an optimal code depends on the probability of HGT events. Only when the probability of HGT events is above a critical threshold, we find that the ten amino acid code having a structure that is most consistent with the standard genetic code (SGC) often gets fixed in the population with the highest probability. We examine how the threshold is determined by factors like the population size, length of the sequences and selection coefficient. Our simulation results reveal the conditions under which sharing of coding innovations through horizontal transfer of genetic elements may have facilitated the emergence of a universal code having a structure similar to that of the SGC.

  8. Finite population analysis of the effect of horizontal gene transfer on the origin of an universal and optimal genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neha; Bandhu, Ashutosh Vishwa; Sengupta, Supratim

    2016-05-27

    The origin of a universal and optimal genetic code remains a compelling mystery in molecular biology and marks an essential step in the origin of DNA and protein based life. We examine a collective evolution model of genetic code origin that allows for unconstrained horizontal transfer of genetic elements within a finite population of sequences each of which is associated with a genetic code selected from a pool of primordial codes. We find that when horizontal transfer of genetic elements is incorporated in this more realistic model of code-sequence coevolution in a finite population, it can increase the likelihood of emergence of a more optimal code eventually leading to its universality through fixation in the population. The establishment of such an optimal code depends on the probability of HGT events. Only when the probability of HGT events is above a critical threshold, we find that the ten amino acid code having a structure that is most consistent with the standard genetic code (SGC) often gets fixed in the population with the highest probability. We examine how the threshold is determined by factors like the population size, length of the sequences and selection coefficient. Our simulation results reveal the conditions under which sharing of coding innovations through horizontal transfer of genetic elements may have facilitated the emergence of a universal code having a structure similar to that of the SGC.

  9. Open Genetic Code: on open source in the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deibel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of open source in the life sciences is increasingly being suggested as an alternative to patenting. This is an alternative, however, that takes its shape at the intersection of the life sciences and informatics. Numerous examples can be identified wherein open source in the life sciences refers to access, sharing and collaboration as informatic practices. This includes open source as an experimental model and as a more sophisticated approach of genetic engineering. The first section discusses the greater flexibly in regard of patenting and the relationship to the introduction of open source in the life sciences. The main argument is that the ownership of knowledge in the life sciences should be reconsidered in the context of the centrality of DNA in informatic formats. This is illustrated by discussing a range of examples of open source models. The second part focuses on open source in synthetic biology as exemplary for the re-materialization of information into food, energy, medicine and so forth. The paper ends by raising the question whether another kind of alternative might be possible: one that looks at open source as a model for an alternative to the commodification of life that is understood as an attempt to comprehensively remove the restrictions from the usage of DNA in any of its formats.

  10. Two proofreading steps amplify the accuracy of genetic code translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieong, Ka-Weng; Uzun, Ülkü; Selmer, Maria; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2016-11-29

    Aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) are selected by the messenger RNA programmed ribosome in ternary complex with elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and GTP and then, again, in a proofreading step after GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu. We use tRNA mutants with different affinities for EF-Tu to demonstrate that proofreading of aa-tRNAs occurs in two consecutive steps. First, aa-tRNAs in ternary complex with EF-Tu·GDP are selected in a step where the accuracy increases linearly with increasing aa-tRNA affinity to EF-Tu. Then, following dissociation of EF-Tu·GDP from the ribosome, the accuracy is further increased in a second and apparently EF-Tu-independent step. Our findings identify the molecular basis of proofreading in bacteria, highlight the pivotal role of EF-Tu for fast and accurate protein synthesis, and illustrate the importance of multistep substrate selection in intracellular processing of genetic information.

  11. Scientific rationality, uncertainty and the governance of human genetics: an interview study with researchers at deCODE genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjörleifsson, Stefán; Schei, Edvin

    2006-07-01

    Technology development in human genetics is fraught with uncertainty, controversy and unresolved moral issues, and industry scientists are sometimes accused of neglecting the implications of their work. The present study was carried out to elicit industry scientists' reflections on the relationship between commercial, scientific and ethical dimensions of present day genetics and the resources needed for robust governance of new technologies. Interviewing scientists of the company deCODE genetics in Iceland, we found that in spite of optimism, the informants revealed ambiguity and uncertainty concerning the use of human genetic technologies for the prevention of common diseases. They concurred that uncritical marketing of scientific success might cause exaggerated public expectations of health benefits from genetics, with the risk of backfiring and causing resistance to genetics in the population. On the other hand, the scientists did not address dilemmas arising from the commercial nature of their own employer. Although the scientists tended to describe public fear as irrational, they identified issues where scepticism might be well founded and explored examples where they, despite expert knowledge, held ambiguous or tentative personal views on the use of predictive genetic technologies. The rationality of science was not seen as sufficient to ensure beneficial governance of new technologies. The reflexivity and suspension of judgement demonstrated in the interviews exemplify productive features of moral deliberation in complex situations. Scientists should take part in dialogues concerning the governance of genetic technologies, acknowledge any vested interests, and use their expertise to highlight, not conceal the technical and moral complexity involved.

  12. An improved Genetic Algorithm of Bi-level Coding for Flexible Job Shop Scheduling Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study presents an improved genetic algorithm(GA for the flexible job shop scheduling problem (FJSP. The coding is divided into working sequence level and machine level and two effective crossover operators and mutation operators are designed for the generation and reduce the disruptive effects of genetic operators. The algorithm is tested on instances of 10 working sequences and 10 machines. Computational results show that the proposed GA was successfully and efficiently applied to the FJSP. The results were compared with other approaches, such as traditional GA and GA with neural network. Compared to traditional genetic algorithm, the proposed approach yields significant improvement in solution quality.

  13. On models of the genetic code generated by binary dichotomic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbel, Markus; Fimmel, Elena; Danielli, Alberto; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of a BDA-generated model of the genetic code which is based on binary dichotomic algorithms (BDAs). A BDA-generated model is based on binary dichotomic algorithms (BDAs). Such a BDA partitions the set of 64 codons into two disjoint classes of size 32 each and provides a generalization of known partitions like the Rumer dichotomy. We investigate what partitions can be generated when a set of different BDAs is applied sequentially to the set of codons. The search revealed that these models are able to generate code tables with very different numbers of classes ranging from 2 to 64. We have analyzed whether there are models that map the codons to their amino acids. A perfect matching is not possible. However, we present models that describe the standard genetic code with only few errors. There are also models that map all 64 codons uniquely to 64 classes showing that BDAs can be used to identify codons precisely. This could serve as a basis for further mathematical analysis using coding theory, for example. The hypothesis that BDAs might reflect a molecular mechanism taking place in the decoding center of the ribosome is discussed. The scan demonstrated that binary dichotomic partitions are able to model different aspects of the genetic code very well. The search was performed with our tool Beady-A. This software is freely available at http://mi.informatik.hs-mannheim.de/beady-a. It requires a JVM version 6 or higher.

  14. Human Disease-Associated Genetic Variation Impacts Large Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Westra, Harm-Jan; Karjalainen, Juha; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Esko, Tonu; Hrdlickova, Barbara; Almeida, Rodrigo; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Reinmaa, Eva; Hofker, Marten H.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Fu, Jingyuan; Withoff, Sebo; Metspalu, Andres; Franke, Lude; Wijmenga, Cisca; Vosa, Urmo

    2013-01-01

    Recently it has become clear that only a small percentage (7%) of disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are located in protein-coding regions, while the remaining 93% are located in gene regulatory regions or in intergenic regions. Thus, the understanding of how genetic variation

  15. Unassigned Codons, Nonsense Suppression, and Anticodon Modifications in the Evolution of the Genetic Code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.T.S. van der Gulik (Peter); W.D. Hoff (Wouter)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractThe origin of the genetic code is a central open problem regarding the early evolution of life. Here, we consider two undeveloped but important aspects of possible scenarios for the evolutionary pathway of the translation machinery: the role of unassigned codons in early stages

  16. [Direct genetic manipulation and criminal code in Venezuela: absolute criminal law void?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermeño Zambrano, Fernando G De J

    2002-01-01

    The judicial regulation of genetic biotechnology applied to the human genome is of big relevance currently in Venezuela due to the drafting of an innovative bioethical law in the country's parliament. This article will highlight the constitutional normative of Venezuela's 1999 Constitution regarding this subject, as it establishes the framework from which this matter will be legally regulated. The approach this article makes towards the genetic biotechnology applied to the human genome is made taking into account the Venezuelan penal law and by highlighting the violent genetic manipulations that have criminal relevance. The genetic biotechnology applied to the human genome has another important relevance as a consequence of the reformulation of the Venezuelan Penal Code discussed by the country's National Assembly. Therefore, a concise study of the country's penal code will be made in this article to better understand what judicial-penal properties have been protected by the Venezuelan penal legislation. This last step will enable us to identify the penal tools Venezuela counts on to face direct genetic manipulations. We will equally indicate the existing punitive loophole and that should be covered by the penal legislator. In conclusion, this essay concerns criminal policy, referred to the direct genetic manipulations on the human genome that haven't been typified in Venezuelan law, thus discovering a genetic biotechnology paradise.

  17. Real-Coded Quantum-Inspired Genetic Algorithm-Based BP Neural Network Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The method that the real-coded quantum-inspired genetic algorithm (RQGA used to optimize the weights and threshold of BP neural network is proposed to overcome the defect that the gradient descent method makes the algorithm easily fall into local optimal value in the learning process. Quantum genetic algorithm (QGA is with good directional global optimization ability, but the conventional QGA is based on binary coding; the speed of calculation is reduced by the coding and decoding processes. So, RQGA is introduced to explore the search space, and the improved varied learning rate is adopted to train the BP neural network. Simulation test shows that the proposed algorithm is effective to rapidly converge to the solution conformed to constraint conditions.

  18. Genetic plant improvement and climate changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magno Antonio Patto Ramalho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of climate change for the agribusiness in Brazil have been widely debated. The issue isdiscussed in this publication to show the expected problems, particularly those associated with increases in temperature andwater stress. It is emphasized that the genetic improvement of plants, based on the experience in the past, has much tocontribute to mitigate these problems. To invest in the breeding of new cultivars, selected under stress conditions, is certainlythe best possible strategy for agriculture to cope with changes caused by climate alterations.

  19. The non-power model of the genetic code: a paradigm for interpreting genomic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Diego Luis; Giannerini, Simone; Rosa, Rodolfo

    2016-03-13

    In this article, we present a mathematical framework based on redundant (non-power) representations of integer numbers as a paradigm for the interpretation of genomic information. The core of the approach relies on modelling the degeneracy of the genetic code. The model allows one to explain many features and symmetries of the genetic code and to uncover hidden symmetries. Also, it provides us with new tools for the analysis of genomic sequences. We review briefly three main areas: (i) the Euplotid nuclear code, (ii) the vertebrate mitochondrial code, and (iii) the main coding/decoding strategies used in the three domains of life. In every case, we show how the non-power model is a natural unified framework for describing degeneracy and deriving sound biological hypotheses on protein coding. The approach is rooted on number theory and group theory; nevertheless, we have kept the technical level to a minimum by focusing on key concepts and on the biological implications. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Dynamics of genetic variation at gliadin-coding loci in bread wheat cultivars developed in small grains research center (Kragujevac during last 35 years

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    Novosljska-Dragovič Aleksandra

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple alleles of gliadin-coding loci are well-known genetic markers of common wheat genotypes. Based on analysis of gliadin patterns in common wheat cultivars developed at the Small Grains Research Center in Kragujevac dynamics of genetic variability at gliadin-coding loci has been surveyed for the period of 35 years. It was shown that long-term breeding of the wheat cultivars involved gradual replacement of ancient alleles for those widely spread in some regions in the world, which belong to well-known cultivars-donor of some important traits. Developing cultivars whose pedigree involved much new foreign genetic material has increased genetic diversity as well as has changed frequency of alleles of gliadin-coding loci. So we can conclude that the genetic profile of modern Serbian cultivars has changed considerably. Genetic formula of gliadin was made for each the cultivar studied. The most frequent alleles of gliadin-coding loci among modern cultivars should be of great interest of breeders because these alleles are probably linked with genes that confer advantage to their carriers at present.

  1. Genetic variation in the non-coding genome : Involvement of micro-RNAs and long non-coding RNAs in disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hrdlickova, Barbara; de Almeida, Rodrigo Coutinho; Borek, Zuzanna; Withoff, Sebo

    2014-01-01

    It has been found that the majority of disease-associated genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies are located outside of protein-coding regions, where they seem to affect regions that control transcription (promoters, enhancers) and non-coding RNAs that also can influence gene

  2. PrimeIndel: four-prime-number genetic code for indel decryption and sequence read alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ching-Wan

    2014-09-25

    To decrypt a doubly heterozygous sequence (DHS) in order to define the indel mutation for mutation reporting, an algorithm recursively searching the overlapped nucleotide using an offset of nucleotide positions can decrypt the indel without using a reference sequence. However, as genetic code is letter-based, special computer programs are required to run the decryption algorithm. The previous text-based algorithm was converted to a number-based algorithm by expressing DNA sequence from a 4-letter genetic code to a 4-prime-number genetic code, i.e., converting A, C, G, T to 2, 3, 5, and 7. This algorithm based on prime-number genetic code is called PrimeIndel and is executable by spreadsheet. Using prime number coded DNA sequence, the overlapped nucleotide between any 2 positions of the DHS is represented by the greatest common divisor (GCD) of the multiplication product of 2 prime numbers. This algorithm can also be used for aligning multiple overlapping sequence reads by in-silico DHS formation. The indel size of the in-silico formed DHS indicates the positions in the paired sequences for correct alignment. DHSs were successfully decrypted by the prime number-based algorithm and sequence reads were aligned correctly. DNA sequence expressed in prime numbers can be used for the decryption of DHS and the alignment of sequence reads using a well-known mathematical function GCD of a spreadsheet program. PrimeIndel is a useful tool for mutation reporting in clinical laboratories. The software is downloadable from http://www.patho.hku.hk/staff/list/cwlam.htm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evidence from glycine transfer RNA of a frozen accident at the dawn of the genetic code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tate Warren P

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transfer RNA (tRNA is the means by which the cell translates DNA sequence into protein according to the rules of the genetic code. A credible proposition is that tRNA was formed from the duplication of an RNA hairpin half the length of the contemporary tRNA molecule, with the point at which the hairpins were joined marked by the canonical intron insertion position found today within tRNA genes. If these hairpins possessed a 3'-CCA terminus with different combinations of stem nucleotides (the ancestral operational RNA code, specific aminoacylation and perhaps participation in some form of noncoded protein synthesis might have occurred. However, the identity of the first tRNA and the initial steps in the origin of the genetic code remain elusive. Results Here we show evidence that glycine tRNA was the first tRNA, as revealed by a vestigial imprint in the anticodon loop sequences of contemporary descendents. This provides a plausible mechanism for the missing first step in the origin of the genetic code. In 448 of 466 glycine tRNA gene sequences from bacteria, archaea and eukaryote cytoplasm analyzed, CCA occurs immediately upstream of the canonical intron insertion position, suggesting the first anticodon (NCC for glycine has been captured from the 3'-terminal CCA of one of the interacting hairpins as a result of an ancestral ligation. Conclusion That this imprint (including the second and third nucleotides of the glycine tRNA anticodon has been retained through billions of years of evolution suggests Crick's 'frozen accident' hypothesis has validity for at least this very first step at the dawn of the genetic code. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr Eugene V. Koonin, Dr Rob Knight and Dr David H Ardell.

  4. On origin of genetic code and tRNA before translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szathmáry Eörs

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthesis of proteins is based on the genetic code - a nearly universal assignment of codons to amino acids (aas. A major challenge to the understanding of the origins of this assignment is the archetypal "key-lock vs. frozen accident" dilemma. Here we re-examine this dilemma in light of 1 the fundamental veto on "foresight evolution", 2 modular structures of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and 3 the updated library of aa-binding sites in RNA aptamers successfully selected in vitro for eight amino acids. Results The aa-binding sites of arginine, isoleucine and tyrosine contain both their cognate triplets, anticodons and codons. We have noticed that these cases might be associated with palindrome-dinucleotides. For example, one-base shift to the left brings arginine codons CGN, with CG at 1-2 positions, to the respective anticodons NCG, with CG at 2-3 positions. Formally, the concomitant presence of codons and anticodons is also expected in the reverse situation, with codons containing palindrome-dinucleotides at their 2-3 positions, and anticodons exhibiting them at 1-2 positions. A closer analysis reveals that, surprisingly, RNA binding sites for Arg, Ile and Tyr "prefer" (exactly as in the actual genetic code the anticodon(2-3/codon(1-2 tetramers to their anticodon(1-2/codon(2-3 counterparts, despite the seemingly perfect symmetry of the latter. However, since in vitro selection of aa-specific RNA aptamers apparently had nothing to do with translation, this striking preference provides a new strong support to the notion of the genetic code emerging before translation, in response to catalytic (and possibly other needs of ancient RNA life. Consistently with the pre-translation origin of the code, we propose here a new model of tRNA origin by the gradual, Fibonacci process-like, elongation of a tRNA molecule from a primordial coding triplet and 5'DCCA3' quadruplet (D is a base-determinator to the eventual 76 base

  5. The central role of tRNA in genetic code expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Noah M; Vargas-Rodriguez, Oscar; Söll, Dieter; Crnković, Ana

    2017-03-18

    The development of orthogonal translation systems (OTSs) for genetic code expansion (GCE) has allowed for the incorporation of a diverse array of non-canonical amino acids (ncAA) into proteins. Transfer RNA, the central molecule in the translation of the genetic message into proteins, plays a significant role in the efficiency of ncAA incorporation. Here we review the biochemical basis of OTSs for genetic code expansion. We focus on the role of tRNA and discuss strategies used to engineer tRNA for the improvement of ncAA incorporation into proteins. The engineering of orthogonal tRNAs for GCE has significantly improved the incorporation of ncAAs. However, there are numerous unintended consequences of orthogonal tRNA engineering that cannot be predicted ab initio. Genetic code expansion has allowed for the incorporation of a great diversity of ncAAs and novel chemistries into proteins, making significant contributions to our understanding of biological molecules and interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biochemistry of Synthetic Biology - Recent Developments" Guest Editor: Dr. Ilka Heinemann and Dr. Patrick O'Donoghue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Automation of RELAP5 input calibration and code validation using genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phung, Viet-Anh, E-mail: vaphung@kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Kööp, Kaspar, E-mail: kaspar@safety.sci.kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Grishchenko, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitry@safety.sci.kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Vorobyev, Yury, E-mail: yura3510@gmail.com [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov square 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pavel@safety.sci.kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Automated input calibration and code validation using genetic algorithm is presented. • Predictions generally overlap experiments for individual system response quantities (SRQs). • It was not possible to predict simultaneously experimental maximum flow rate and oscillation period. • Simultaneous consideration of multiple SRQs is important for code validation. - Abstract: Validation of system thermal-hydraulic codes is an important step in application of the codes to reactor safety analysis. The goal of the validation process is to determine how well a code can represent physical reality. This is achieved by comparing predicted and experimental system response quantities (SRQs) taking into account experimental and modelling uncertainties. Parameters which are required for the code input but not measured directly in the experiment can become an important source of uncertainty in the code validation process. Quantification of such parameters is often called input calibration. Calibration and uncertainty quantification may become challenging tasks when the number of calibrated input parameters and SRQs is large and dependencies between them are complex. If only engineering judgment is employed in the process, the outcome can be prone to so called “user effects”. The goal of this work is to develop an automated approach to input calibration and RELAP5 code validation against data on two-phase natural circulation flow instability. Multiple SRQs are used in both calibration and validation. In the input calibration, we used genetic algorithm (GA), a heuristic global optimization method, in order to minimize the discrepancy between experimental and simulation data by identifying optimal combinations of uncertain input parameters in the calibration process. We demonstrate the importance of the proper selection of SRQs and respective normalization and weighting factors in the fitness function. In the code validation, we used maximum flow rate as the

  7. 78 FR 17866 - New Animal Drug Approvals; Change of Sponsor; Change of Sponsor's Drug Labeler Code; Gonadorelin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ... Approvals; Change of Sponsor; Change of Sponsor's Drug Labeler Code; Gonadorelin Acetate; Isoflurane; Praziquantel; Propofol; Sevoflurane; Triamcinolone Acetonide AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS....

  8. "Hour of Code": Can It Change Students' Attitudes toward Programming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jie; Wimmer, Hayden; Rada, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The Hour of Code is a one-hour introduction to computer science organized by Code.org, a non-profit dedicated to expanding participation in computer science. This study investigated the impact of the Hour of Code on students' attitudes towards computer programming and their knowledge of programming. A sample of undergraduate students from two…

  9. Genetic and epigenetic changes in malignant cells of tumors of urogenital organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordiyuk V. V.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available More than 90 % of human malignant neoplasms are presented by epithelial tumors. Cancer of urogenital organs is a serious problem because of wide spread of disease and high mortality rates. Tumorogenesis is associated with different defects of genetic apparatus of cells as well as epigenetic factors (DNA methylation disorders, chromatin reorganizations in processes of histones modifications, regulation of gene expression with small non-coding RNAs. In this review we analyzed genetic and epigenetic changes in the urogenital tumors

  10. A probabilistic coding based quantum genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Hongwei; Xie, Qiaoluan; Shen, Xubang; Stojkovic, Vojislav

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an original Quantum Genetic algorithm for Multiple sequence ALIGNment (QGMALIGN) that combines a genetic algorithm and a quantum algorithm. A quantum probabilistic coding is designed for representing the multiple sequence alignment. A quantum rotation gate as a mutation operator is used to guide the quantum state evolution. Six genetic operators are designed on the coding basis to improve the solution during the evolutionary process. The features of implicit parallelism and state superposition in quantum mechanics and the global search capability of the genetic algorithm are exploited to get efficient computation. A set of well known test cases from BAliBASE2.0 is used as reference to evaluate the efficiency of the QGMALIGN optimization. The QGMALIGN results have been compared with the most popular methods (CLUSTALX, SAGA, DIALIGN, SB_PIMA, and QGMALIGN) results. The QGMALIGN results show that QGMALIGN performs well on the presenting biological data. The addition of genetic operators to the quantum algorithm lowers the cost of overall running time.

  11. A thermodynamic basis for prebiotic amino acid synthesis and the nature of the first genetic code

    CERN Document Server

    Higgs, Paul G

    2009-01-01

    Of the twenty amino acids used in proteins, ten were formed in Miller's atmospheric discharge experiments. The two other major proposed sources of prebiotic amino acid synthesis include formation in hydrothermal vents and delivery to Earth via meteorites. We combine observational and experimental data of amino acid frequencies formed by these diverse mechanisms and show that, regardless of the source, these ten early amino acids can be ranked in order of decreasing abundance in prebiotic contexts. This order can be predicted by thermodynamics. The relative abundances of the early amino acids were most likely reflected in the composition of the first proteins at the time the genetic code originated. The remaining amino acids were incorporated into proteins after pathways for their biochemical synthesis evolved. This is consistent with theories of the evolution of the genetic code by stepwise addition of new amino acids. These are hints that key aspects of early biochemistry may be universal.

  12. CONGESTION MANAGEMENT IN DEREGULATED POWER SYSTEMS USING REAL CODED GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Balaraman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an efficient method has been proposed for transmission line over load alleviation in deregulated power system using real coded genetic algorithm (RCGA. For secure operation of power system, the network loading has to be maintained within specified limits. Transmission line congestion initiates the cascading outages which forces the system to collapse. Accurate prediction and alleviation of line overloads is the suitable corrective action to avoid network collapse. In this paper an attempt is made to explore the use of real coded genetic algorithm to find the optimal generation rescheduling for relieving congestion. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm has been analyzed on IEEE 30 bus test system. The results obtained by the proposed method are found to be quite encouraging when compared with Simulated Annealing (SA and hence it will be useful in electrical restructuring.

  13. Analysis of genetic code ambiguity arising from nematode-specific misacylated tRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyofumi Hamashima

    Full Text Available The faithful translation of the genetic code requires the highly accurate aminoacylation of transfer RNAs (tRNAs. However, it has been shown that nematode-specific V-arm-containing tRNAs (nev-tRNAs are misacylated with leucine in vitro in a manner that transgresses the genetic code. nev-tRNA(Gly (CCC and nev-tRNA(Ile (UAU, which are the major nev-tRNA isotypes, could theoretically decode the glycine (GGG codon and isoleucine (AUA codon as leucine, causing GGG and AUA codon ambiguity in nematode cells. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the functionality of nev-tRNAs and their impact on the proteome of Caenorhabditis elegans. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences in the 3' end regions of the nev-tRNAs showed that they had matured correctly, with the addition of CCA, which is a crucial posttranscriptional modification required for tRNA aminoacylation. The nuclear export of nev-tRNAs was confirmed with an analysis of their subcellular localization. These results show that nev-tRNAs are processed to their mature forms like common tRNAs and are available for translation. However, a whole-cell proteome analysis found no detectable level of nev-tRNA-induced mistranslation in C. elegans cells, suggesting that the genetic code is not ambiguous, at least under normal growth conditions. Our findings indicate that the translational fidelity of the nematode genetic code is strictly maintained, contrary to our expectations, although deviant tRNAs with misacylation properties are highly conserved in the nematode genome.

  14. ANT: Software for Generating and Evaluating Degenerate Codons for Natural and Expanded Genetic Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engqvist, Martin K M; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-21

    The Ambiguous Nucleotide Tool (ANT) is a desktop application that generates and evaluates degenerate codons. Degenerate codons are used to represent DNA positions that have multiple possible nucleotide alternatives. This is useful for protein engineering and directed evolution, where primers specified with degenerate codons are used as a basis for generating libraries of protein sequences. ANT is intuitive and can be used in a graphical user interface or by interacting with the code through a defined application programming interface. ANT comes with full support for nonstandard, user-defined, or expanded genetic codes (translation tables), which is important because synthetic biology is being applied to an ever widening range of natural and engineered organisms. The Python source code for ANT is freely distributed so that it may be used without restriction, modified, and incorporated in other software or custom data pipelines.

  15. Codon sextets with leading role of serine create "ideal" symmetry classification scheme of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosandić, Marija; Paar, Vladimir

    2014-06-10

    The standard classification scheme of the genetic code is organized for alphabetic ordering of nucleotides. Here we introduce the new, "ideal" classification scheme in compact form, for the first time generated by codon sextets encoding Ser, Arg and Leu amino acids. The new scheme creates the known purine/pyrimidine, codon-anticodon, and amino/keto type symmetries and a novel A+U rich/C+G rich symmetry. This scheme is built from "leading" and "nonleading" groups of 32 codons each. In the ensuing 4 × 16 scheme, based on trinucleotide quadruplets, Ser has a central role as initial generator. Six codons encoding Ser and six encoding Arg extend continuously along a linear array in the "leading" group, and together with four of six Leu codons uniquely define construction of the "leading" group. The remaining two Leu codons enable construction of the "nonleading" group. The "ideal" genetic code suggests the evolution of genetic code with serine as an initiator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic alterations and epigenetic changes in hepatocarcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Stella Hoyos Giraldo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Hepatocarcinogenesis as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is associated with background of chronic liver disease usually in association with cirrhosis, marked hepatic fibrosis, hepatitis B virus (HBV and/or hepatitis virus (HCV infection, chronic inflammation, Aflatoxin B1(AFB1 exposure, chronic alcoholism, metabolic disorder of the liver and necroinflamatory liver disease. Hepatocarcinogenesis involve two mechanisms, genetic alterations (with changes in the cell's DNA sequence and epigenetic changes (without changes in the cell's DNA sequence, but changes in the pattern of gene expression that can persist through one or more generations (somatic sense. Hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with activation of oncogenes and decreased expression of tumor suppressor genes (TSG; include those involved in cell cycle control, apoptosis, DNA repair, immortalization and angiogenesis. AFB1 is metabolized in the liver into a potent carcinogen, aflatoxin 8, 9-epoxide, which is detoxified by epoxide hydrolase (EPHX and glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1.

    A failure of detoxification processes can allow to mutagenic metabolite to bind to DNA and inducing P53 mutation. Genetic polymorphism of EPHX and GSTM1 can make individuals more susceptible to AFB1. Epigenetic inactivation of GSTP1 by promoter hypermethylation plays a role in the development of HCC because, it leads that electrophilic metabolite increase DNA damage and mutations. HBV DNA integration into the host chromosomal DNA of hepatocytes has been detected in HBV-related HCC.

    DNA tumor viruses cause cancer mainly by interfering with cell cycle controls, and activating the cell's replication machinery by blocking the action of key TSG. HBx protein is a

  17. Inclusion of the fitness sharing technique in an evolutionary algorithm to analyze the fitness landscape of the genetic code adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, José; Monteagudo, Ángel

    2017-03-27

    The canonical code, although prevailing in complex genomes, is not universal. It was shown the canonical genetic code superior robustness compared to random codes, but it is not clearly determined how it evolved towards its current form. The error minimization theory considers the minimization of point mutation adverse effect as the main selection factor in the evolution of the code. We have used simulated evolution in a computer to search for optimized codes, which helps to obtain information about the optimization level of the canonical code in its evolution. A genetic algorithm searches for efficient codes in a fitness landscape that corresponds with the adaptability of possible hypothetical genetic codes. The lower the effects of errors or mutations in the codon bases of a hypothetical code, the more efficient or optimal is that code. The inclusion of the fitness sharing technique in the evolutionary algorithm allows the extent to which the canonical genetic code is in an area corresponding to a deep local minimum to be easily determined, even in the high dimensional spaces considered. The analyses show that the canonical code is not in a deep local minimum and that the fitness landscape is not a multimodal fitness landscape with deep and separated peaks. Moreover, the canonical code is clearly far away from the areas of higher fitness in the landscape. Given the non-presence of deep local minima in the landscape, although the code could evolve and different forces could shape its structure, the fitness landscape nature considered in the error minimization theory does not explain why the canonical code ended its evolution in a location which is not an area of a localized deep minimum of the huge fitness landscape.

  18. A quantum-inspired genetic algorithm based on probabilistic coding for multiple sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Hong-Wei; Stojkovic, Vojislav; Xie, Qiao-Luan

    2010-02-01

    Quantum parallelism arises from the ability of a quantum memory register to exist in a superposition of base states. Since the number of possible base states is 2(n), where n is the number of qubits in the quantum memory register, one operation on a quantum computer performs what an exponential number of operations on a classical computer performs. The power of quantum algorithms comes from taking advantages of quantum parallelism. Quantum algorithms are exponentially faster than classical algorithms. Genetic optimization algorithms are stochastic search algorithms which are used to search large, nonlinear spaces where expert knowledge is lacking or difficult to encode. QGMALIGN--a probabilistic coding based quantum-inspired genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment is presented. A quantum rotation gate as a mutation operator is used to guide the quantum state evolution. Six genetic operators are designed on the coding basis to improve the solution during the evolutionary process. The experimental results show that QGMALIGN can compete with the popular methods, such as CLUSTALX and SAGA, and performs well on the presenting biological data. Moreover, the addition of genetic operators to the quantum-inspired algorithm lowers the cost of overall running time.

  19. Application of hybrid coded genetic algorithm in fuzzy neural network controller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Presents the fuzzy neural network optimized by hybrid coded genetic algorithm of decimal encoding and bi nary encoding, the searching ability and stability of genetic algorithms enhanced by using binary encoding during the crossover operation and decimal encoding during the mutation operation, and the way of accepting new individuals by probability adopted, by which a new individual is accepted and its parent is discarded when its fitness is higher than that of its parent, and a new individual is accepted by probability when its fitness is lower than that of its parent. And concludes with calculations made with an example that these improvements enhance the speed of genetic algorithms to optimize the fuzzy neural network controller.

  20. File Compression and Expansion of the Genetic Code by the use of the Yin/Yang Directions to find its Sphered Cube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Chavez, Fernando

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this article is to demonstrate that the genetic code can be studied and represented in a 3-D Sphered Cube for bioinformatics and for education by using the graphical help of the ancient "Book of Changes" or I Ching for the comparison, pair by pair, of the three basic characteristics of nucleotides: H-bonds, molecular structure, and their tautomerism. The source of natural biodiversity is the high plasticity of the genetic code, analyzable with a reverse engineering of its 2-D and 3-D representations (here illustrated), but also through the classical 64-hexagrams of the ancient I Ching, as if they were the 64-codons or words of the genetic code. In this article, the four elements of the Yin/Yang were found by correlating the 3×2=6 sets of Cartesian comparisons of the mentioned properties of nucleic acids, to the directionality of their resulting blocks of codons grouped according to their resulting amino acids and/or functions, integrating a 384-codon Sphered Cube whose function is illustrated by comparing six brain peptides and a promoter of osteoblasts from Humans versus Neanderthal, as well as to Negadi's work on the importance of the number 384 within the genetic code. Starting with the codon/anticodon correlation of Nirenberg, published in full here for the first time, and by studying the genetic code and its 3-D display, the buffers of reiteration within codons codifying for the same amino acid, displayed the two long (binary number one) and older Yin/Yang arrows that travel in opposite directions, mimicking the parental DNA strands, while annealing to the two younger and broken (binary number zero) Yin/Yang arrows, mimicking the new DNA strands; the graphic analysis of the of the genetic code and its plasticity was helpful to compare compatible sequences (human compatible to human versus neanderthal compatible to neanderthal), while further exploring the wondrous biodiversity of nature for educational purposes.

  1. Genetic and molecular changes in ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert L Hollis; Charlie Gourley

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the developed world, and can be divided into five main histological subtypes: high grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and low grade serous. These subtypes represent distinct disease entities, both clinically and at the molecular level. Molecular analysis has revealed significant genetic heterogeneity in ovarian cancer, particularly within the high grade serous subtype. As such, this subtype has been the focus of much research effort to date, revealing molecular subgroups at both the genomic and transcriptomic level that have clinical implications. However, stratification of ovarian cancer patients based on the underlying biology of their disease remains in its infancy. Here, we summarize the molecular changes that characterize the five main ovarian cancer subtypes, highlight potential opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention and outline priorities for future research.

  2. Ombuds’ corner: Code of Conduct and change of behaviour

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2012-01-01

    In this series, the Bulletin aims to explain the role of the Ombuds at CERN by presenting practical examples of misunderstandings that could have been resolved by the Ombuds if he had been contacted earlier. Please note that, in all the situations we present, the names are fictitious and used only to improve clarity.   Is our Code of Conduct actually effective in influencing behaviour? Research studies suggest that codes, while necessary, are insufficient as a means of encouraging respectful behaviour among employees. Codes are only a potential means of influencing employee behaviour. For a Code of Conduct to be effective, several elements must be in place. Firstly, there needs to be communication and effective training using relevant examples to make the code real. It should be embraced by the leaders and accepted by the personnel. Finally, it should be embedded in the CERN culture and not seen as a separate entity, which requires serious discussions to raise awareness. In addition, every c...

  3. DeepSAGE reveals genetic variants associated with alternative polyadenylation and expression of coding and non-coding transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria V Zhernakova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Many disease-associated variants affect gene expression levels (expression quantitative trait loci, eQTLs and expression profiling using next generation sequencing (NGS technology is a powerful way to detect these eQTLs. We analyzed 94 total blood samples from healthy volunteers with DeepSAGE to gain specific insight into how genetic variants affect the expression of genes and lengths of 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs. We detected previously unknown cis-eQTL effects for GWAS hits in disease- and physiology-associated traits. Apart from cis-eQTLs that are typically easily identifiable using microarrays or RNA-sequencing, DeepSAGE also revealed many cis-eQTLs for antisense and other non-coding transcripts, often in genomic regions containing retrotransposon-derived elements. We also identified and confirmed SNPs that affect the usage of alternative polyadenylation sites, thereby potentially influencing the stability of messenger RNAs (mRNA. We then combined the power of RNA-sequencing with DeepSAGE by performing a meta-analysis of three datasets, leading to the identification of many more cis-eQTLs. Our results indicate that DeepSAGE data is useful for eQTL mapping of known and unknown transcripts, and for identifying SNPs that affect alternative polyadenylation. Because of the inherent differences between DeepSAGE and RNA-sequencing, our complementary, integrative approach leads to greater insight into the molecular consequences of many disease-associated variants.

  4. Hydroxylation of a conserved tRNA modification establishes non-universal genetic code in echinoderm mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Asuteka; Ohara, Mitsuhiro; Miyauchi, Kenjyo; Yokobori, Shin-Ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2017-09-01

    The genetic code is not frozen but still evolving, which can result in the acquisition of 'dialectal' codons that deviate from the universal genetic code. RNA modifications in the anticodon region of tRNAs play a critical role in establishing such non-universal genetic codes. In echinoderm mitochondria, the AAA codon specifies asparagine instead of lysine. By analyzing mitochondrial (mt-) tRNA(Lys) isolated from the sea urchin (Mesocentrotus nudus), we discovered a novel modified nucleoside, hydroxy-N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (ht(6)A), 3' adjacent to the anticodon (position 37). Biochemical analysis revealed that ht(6)A37 has the ability to prevent mt-tRNA(Lys) from misreading AAA as lysine, thereby indicating that hydroxylation of N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t(6)A) contributes to the establishment of the non-universal genetic code in echinoderm mitochondria.

  5. An overview of the major changes in the 2002 APA Ethics Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Samuel; VandeCreek, Leon

    2003-06-01

    This article summarizes the major changes that were made to the 2002 Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct of the American Psychological Association. The 2002 Ethics Code retains the general format of the 1992 Ethics Code and does not radically alter the obligations of psychologists. One goal of the Ethics Committee Task Force was to reduce the potential of the Ethics Code to be used to unnecessarily punish psychologists. In addition, the revised Ethics Code expresses greater sensitivity to the needs of cultural and linguistic minorities and students. Shortcomings of the 2002 Ethics Code are discussed.

  6. Managers, Teachers, Students, and Parents' Opinions Concerning Changes on Dress Code Practices as an Educational Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birel, Firat Kiyas

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Dressing for school has been intensely disputed and has led to periodic changes in dress codes since the foundation of the Turkish republic. Practitioners have tried to put some new practices related to school dress codes into practice for redressing former dress code issues involving mandatory dress standards for both students…

  7. Matrix genetics, part 3: the evolution of the genetic code from the viewpoint of the genetic octave Yin-Yang-algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Petoukhov, Sergey V

    2008-01-01

    The set of known dialects of the genetic code (GC) is analyzed from the viewpoint of the genetic octave Yin-Yang-algebra. This algebra was described in the previous author's publications. The algebra was discovered on the basis of structural features of the GC in the matrix form of its presentation ("matrix genetics"). The octave Yin-Yang-algebra is considered as the pre-code or as the model of the GC. From the viewpoint of this algebraic model, for example, the sets of 20 amino acids and of 64 triplets consist of sub-sets of "male", "female" and "androgynous" molecules, etc. This algebra permits to reveal hidden peculiarities of the structure and evolution of the GC and to propose the conception of "sexual" relationships among genetic molecules. The first results of the analysis of the GC systems from such algebraic viewpoint say about the close connection between evolution of the GC and this algebra. They include 8 evolutionary rules of the dialects of the GC. The evolution of the GC is appeared as the stru...

  8. Novel Ciliate Genetic Code Variants Including the Reassignment of All Three Stop Codons to Sense Codons in Condylostoma magnum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Stephen M; Mariotti, Marco; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Atkins, John F; Baranov, Pavel V

    2016-11-01

    mRNA translation in many ciliates utilizes variant genetic codes where stop codons are reassigned to specify amino acids. To characterize the repertoire of ciliate genetic codes, we analyzed ciliate transcriptomes from marine environments. Using codon substitution frequencies in ciliate protein-coding genes and their orthologs, we inferred the genetic codes of 24 ciliate species. Nine did not match genetic code tables currently assigned by NCBI. Surprisingly, we identified a novel genetic code where all three standard stop codons (TAA, TAG, and TGA) specify amino acids in Condylostoma magnum We provide evidence suggesting that the functions of these codons in C. magnum depend on their location within mRNA. They are decoded as amino acids at internal positions, but specify translation termination when in close proximity to an mRNA 3' end. The frequency of stop codons in protein coding sequences of closely related Climacostomum virens suggests that it may represent a transitory state. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. Coding conventions and principles for a National Land-Change Modeling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, David I.

    2017-07-14

    This report establishes specific rules for writing computer source code for use with the National Land-Change Modeling Framework (NLCMF). These specific rules consist of conventions and principles for writing code primarily in the C and C++ programming languages. Collectively, these coding conventions and coding principles create an NLCMF programming style. In addition to detailed naming conventions, this report provides general coding conventions and principles intended to facilitate the development of high-performance software implemented with code that is extensible, flexible, and interoperable. Conventions for developing modular code are explained in general terms and also enabled and demonstrated through the appended templates for C++ base source-code and header files. The NLCMF limited-extern approach to module structure, code inclusion, and cross-module access to data is both explained in the text and then illustrated through the module templates. Advice on the use of global variables is provided.

  10. 77 FR 18716 - Transportation Security Administration Postal Zip Code Change; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... Postal Zip Code Change; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Transportation Security Administration, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule is a technical change to correct a regulatory reference to TSA's postal zip code. This rule revises existing regulations to reflect organizational changes and it has no...

  11. Rate-prediction structure complexity analysis for multi-view video coding using hybrid genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yebin; Dai, Qionghai; You, Zhixiang; Xu, Wenli

    2007-01-01

    Efficient exploitation of the temporal and inter-view correlation is critical to multi-view video coding (MVC), and the key to it relies on the design of prediction chain structure according to the various pattern of correlations. In this paper, we propose a novel prediction structure model to design optimal MVC coding schemes along with tradeoff analysis in depth between compression efficiency and prediction structure complexity for certain standard functionalities. Focusing on the representation of the entire set of possible chain structures rather than certain typical ones, the proposed model can given efficient MVC schemes that adaptively vary with the requirements of structure complexity and video source characteristics (the number of views, the degrees of temporal and interview correlations). To handle large scale problem in model optimization, we deploy a hybrid genetic algorithm which yields satisfactory results shown in the simulations.

  12. Genetic algorithms applied to reconstructing coded imaging of neutrons and analysis of residual watermark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiankui; Hu, Huasi; Jia, Qinggang; Zhang, Fengna; Chen, Da; Li, Zhenghong; Wu, Yuelei; Liu, Zhihua; Hu, Guang; Guo, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Monte-Carlo simulation of neutron coded imaging based on encoding aperture for Z-pinch of large field-of-view with 5 mm radius has been investigated, and then the coded image has been obtained. Reconstruction method of source image based on genetic algorithms (GA) has been established. "Residual watermark," which emerges unavoidably in reconstructed image, while the peak normalization is employed in GA fitness calculation because of its statistical fluctuation amplification, has been discovered and studied. Residual watermark is primarily related to the shape and other parameters of the encoding aperture cross section. The properties and essential causes of the residual watermark were analyzed, while the identification on equivalent radius of aperture was provided. By using the equivalent radius, the reconstruction can also be accomplished without knowing the point spread function (PSF) of actual aperture. The reconstruction result is close to that by using PSF of the actual aperture.

  13. Genetic algorithms applied to reconstructing coded imaging of neutrons and analysis of residual watermark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Tiankui; Hu Huasi; Jia Qinggang; Zhang Fengna; Liu Zhihua; Hu Guang; Guo Wei [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Chen Da [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Li Zhenghong [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, CAEP, Mianyang, 621900 Sichuan (China); Wu Yuelei [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre, State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA), Beijing 100082 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Monte-Carlo simulation of neutron coded imaging based on encoding aperture for Z-pinch of large field-of-view with 5 mm radius has been investigated, and then the coded image has been obtained. Reconstruction method of source image based on genetic algorithms (GA) has been established. 'Residual watermark,' which emerges unavoidably in reconstructed image, while the peak normalization is employed in GA fitness calculation because of its statistical fluctuation amplification, has been discovered and studied. Residual watermark is primarily related to the shape and other parameters of the encoding aperture cross section. The properties and essential causes of the residual watermark were analyzed, while the identification on equivalent radius of aperture was provided. By using the equivalent radius, the reconstruction can also be accomplished without knowing the point spread function (PSF) of actual aperture. The reconstruction result is close to that by using PSF of the actual aperture.

  14. Synthesis of Site-Specific Radiolabeled Antibodies for Radioimmunotherapy via Genetic Code Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiming; Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Fei; Chen, Jingxian; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ziwei; Wu, Ling; Si, Longlong; Xu, Huan; Yao, Tianzhuo; Xiao, Sulong; Xia, Qing; Zhang, Lihe; Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Demin

    2016-10-19

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) delivers radioisotopes to antigen-expressing cells via monoantibodies for the imaging of lesions or medical therapy. The chelates are typically conjugated to the antibody through cysteine or lysine residues, resulting in heterogeneous chelate-to-antibody ratios and various conjugation sites. To overcome this heterogeneity, we have developed an approach for site-specific radiolabeling of antibodies by combination of genetic code expansion and click chemistry. As a proof-of-concept study, model systems including anti-CD20 antibody rituximab, positron-emitting isotope (64)Cu, and a newly synthesized bifunctional linker (4-dibenzocyclooctynol-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid, DIBO-DOTA) were used. The approach consists of three steps: (1) site-specific incorporation of an azido group-bearing amino acid (NEAK) via the genetic code expansion technique at the defined sites of the antibody as a "chemical handle"; (2) site-specific and quantitative conjugation of bifunctional linkers with the antibodies under a mild condition; and (3) radiolabeling of the chelate-modified antibodies with the appropriate isotope. We used heavy-chain A122NEAK rituximab as proof-of-concept and obtained a homogeneous radioconjugate with precisely two chelates per antibody, incorporated only at the chosen sites. The conjugation did not alter the binding and pharmacokinetics of the rituximab, as indicated by in vitro assays and in vivo PET imaging. We believe our research is a good supplement to the genetic code expansion technique for the development of novel radioimmunoconjugates.

  15. Real-coded genetic algorithm for optimal vibration control of flexible structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Presents the study on the optimum location of actuators/sensors for active vibration control in aerospace flexible structures with the performance function first built by maximization of dissipation energy due to control action and a real-coded genetic algorithm then proposed to produce a global-optimum solution, and proves the feasibility and advantages of this algorithm with the example of a standard test function and a two-collocated actuators/sensors cantilever, and comparing the results with those given in the literatures.

  16. Improvements of real coded genetic algorithms based on differential operators preventing premature convergence

    CERN Document Server

    Hrstka, O; 10.1016/S0965-9978(03)00113-3

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents several types of evolutionary algorithms (EAs) used for global optimization on real domains. The interest has been focused on multimodal problems, where the difficulties of a premature convergence usually occurs. First the standard genetic algorithm (SGA) using binary encoding of real values and its unsatisfactory behavior with multimodal problems is briefly reviewed together with some improvements of fighting premature convergence. Two types of real encoded methods based on differential operators are examined in detail: the differential evolution (DE), a very modern and effective method firstly published by R. Storn and K. Price, and the simplified real-coded differential genetic algorithm SADE proposed by the authors. In addition, an improvement of the SADE method, called CERAF technology, enabling the population of solutions to escape from local extremes, is examined. All methods are tested on an identical set of objective functions and a systematic comparison based on a reliable method...

  17. Erasure Coded Storage on a Changing Network: the Untold Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sipos, Marton A.; Venkat, Narayan; Oran, David

    2016-01-01

    As faster storage devices become commercially viable alternatives to disk drives, the network is increasingly becoming the bottleneck in achieving good performance in distributed storage systems. This is especially true for erasure coded storage, where the reconstruction of lost data can signific...

  18. Structural phylogenomics retrodicts the origin of the genetic code and uncovers the evolutionary impact of protein flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Wang, Minglei; Caetano-Anollés, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The genetic code shapes the genetic repository. Its origin has puzzled molecular scientists for over half a century and remains a long-standing mystery. Here we show that the origin of the genetic code is tightly coupled to the history of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase enzymes and their interactions with tRNA. A timeline of evolutionary appearance of protein domain families derived from a structural census in hundreds of genomes reveals the early emergence of the 'operational' RNA code and the late implementation of the standard genetic code. The emergence of codon specificities and amino acid charging involved tight coevolution of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and tRNA structures as well as episodes of structural recruitment. Remarkably, amino acid and dipeptide compositions of single-domain proteins appearing before the standard code suggest archaic synthetases with structures homologous to catalytic domains of tyrosyl-tRNA and seryl-tRNA synthetases were capable of peptide bond formation and aminoacylation. Results reveal that genetics arose through coevolutionary interactions between polypeptides and nucleic acid cofactors as an exacting mechanism that favored flexibility and folding of the emergent proteins. These enhancements of phenotypic robustness were likely internalized into the emerging genetic system with the early rise of modern protein structure.

  19. Real Coded Genetic Algorithm Based Improvement of Efficiency in Interleaved Boost Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Valarmathi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available   The reliability, efficiency, and controllability of Photo Voltaic power systems can be increased by embedding the components of a Boost Converter. Currently, the converter technology overcomes the main problems of manufacturing cost, efficiency and mass production. Issue to limit the life span of a Photo Voltaic inverter is the huge electrolytic capacitor across the Direct Current bus for energy decoupling. This paper presents a two-phase interleaved boost converter which ensures 180 angle phase shift between the two interleaved converters. The Proportional Integral controller is used to reshape that the controller attempts to minimize the error by adjusting the control inputs and also real coded genetic algorithm is proposed for tuning of controlling parameters of Proportional Integral controller. The real coded genetic algorithm is applied in the Interleaved Boost Converter with Advanced Pulse Width Modulation Techniques for improving the results of efficiency and reduction of ripple current. Simulation results illustrate the improvement of efficiency and the diminution of ripple current.

  20. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains Only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, Maria N.; Kinnersley, Ben; Farrington, Susan M.; Whiffin, Nicola; Palles, Claire; Svinti, Victoria; Lloyd, Amy; Gorman, Maggie; Ooi, Li-Yin; Hosking, Fay; Barclay, Ella; Zgaga, Lina; Dobbins, Sara; Martin, Lynn; Theodoratou, Evropi; Broderick, Peter; Tenesa, Albert; Smillie, Claire; Grimes, Graeme; Hayward, Caroline; Campbell, Archie; Porteous, David; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Northwood, Emma L.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Smith, Gillian; Wolf, Roland; Forman, David; Morreau, Hans; Ruano, Dina; Tops, Carli; Wijnen, Juul; Schrumpf, Melanie; Boot, Arnoud; Vasen, Hans F A; Hes, Frederik J.; van Wezel, Tom; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolgang; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Buch, Stephan; Propping, Peter; Hemminki, Kari; Försti, Asta; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Carla; Teixeira, Manuel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Castells, Antoni; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Campbell, Harry; Bishop, D. Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian P M; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs cases and 29,045 controls from six European populations. Single-variant analysis identified a coding variant (rs3184504) in SH2B3 (12q24) associated with CRC risk (OR = 1.08, P = 3.9 × 10−7), and novel damaging coding variants in 3 genes previously tagged by GWAS efforts; rs16888728 (8q24) in UTP23 (OR = 1.15, P = 1.4 × 10−7); rs6580742 and rs12303082 (12q13) in FAM186A (OR = 1.11, P = 1.2 × 10−7 and OR = 1.09, P = 7.4 × 10−8); rs1129406 (12q13) in ATF1 (OR = 1.11, P = 8.3 × 10−9), all reaching exome-wide significance levels. Gene based tests identified associations between CRC and PCDHGA genes (P < 2.90 × 10−6). We found an excess of rare, damaging variants in base-excision (P = 2.4 × 10−4) and DNA mismatch repair genes (P = 6.1 × 10−4) consistent with a recessive mode of inheritance. This study comprehensively explores the contribution of coding sequence variation to CRC risk, identifying associations with coding variation in 4 genes and PCDHG gene cluster and several candidate recessive alleles. However, these findings suggest that recurrent, low-frequency coding variants account for a minority of the unexplained heritability of CRC. PMID:26553438

  1. APPLICATION OF INTEGER CODING ACCELERATING GENETIC ALGORITHM IN RECTANGULAR CUTTING STOCK PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Hui; YIN Guofu; LI Haiqing; PENG Biyou

    2006-01-01

    An improved genetic algorithm and its application to resolve cutting stock problem are presented. It is common to apply simple genetic algorithm (SGA) to cutting stock problem, but the huge amount of computing of SGA is a serious problem in practical application. Accelerating genetic algorithm (AGA) based on integer coding and AGA's detailed steps are developed to reduce the amount of computation, and a new kind of rectangular parts blank layout algorithm is designed for rectangular cutting stock problem. SGA is adopted to produce individuals within given evolution process, and the variation interval of these individuals is taken as initial domain of the next optimization process, thus shrinks searching range intensively and accelerates the evaluation process of SGA.To enhance the diversity of population and to avoid the algorithm stagnates at local optimization result, fixed number of individuals are produced randomly and replace the same number of parents in every evaluation process. According to the computational experiment, it is observed that this improved GA converges much sooner than SGA, and is able to get the balance of good result and high efficiency in the process of optimization for rectangular cutting stock problem.

  2. Genetic coding and united-hypercomplex systems in the models of algebraic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petoukhov, Sergey V

    2017-08-01

    Structured alphabets of DNA and RNA in their matrix form of representations are connected with Walsh functions and a new type of systems of multidimensional numbers. This type generalizes systems of complex numbers and hypercomplex numbers, which serve as the basis of mathematical natural sciences and many technologies. The new systems of multi-dimensional numbers have interesting mathematical properties and are called in a general case as "systems of united-hypercomplex numbers" (or briefly "U-hypercomplex numbers"). They can be widely used in models of multi-parametrical systems in the field of algebraic biology, artificial life, devices of biological inspired artificial intelligence, etc. In particular, an application of U-hypercomplex numbers reveals hidden properties of genetic alphabets under cyclic permutations in their doublets and triplets. A special attention is devoted to the author's hypothesis about a multi-linguistic in DNA-sequences in a relation with an ensemble of U-numerical sub-alphabets. Genetic multi-linguistic is considered as an important factor to provide noise-immunity properties of the multi-channel genetic coding. Our results attest to the conformity of the algebraic properties of the U-numerical systems with phenomenological properties of the DNA-alphabets and with the complementary device of the double DNA-helix. It seems that in the modeling field of algebraic biology the genetic-informational organization of living bodies can be considered as a set of united-hypercomplex numbers in some association with the famous slogan of Pythagoras "the numbers rule the world". Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic code translation displays a linear trade-off between efficiency and accuracy of tRNA selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Magnus; Zhang, Jingji; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2012-01-01

    Rapid and accurate translation of the genetic code into protein is fundamental to life. Yet due to lack of a suitable assay, little is known about the accuracy-determining parameters and their correlation with translational speed. Here, we develop such an assay, based on Mg2+ concentration changes, to determine maximal accuracy limits for a complete set of single-mismatch codon–anticodon interactions. We found a simple, linear trade-off between efficiency of cognate codon reading and accuracy of tRNA selection. The maximal accuracy was highest for the second codon position and lowest for the third. The results rationalize the existence of proofreading in code reading and have implications for the understanding of tRNA modifications, as well as of translation error-modulating ribosomal mutations and antibiotics. Finally, the results bridge the gap between in vivo and in vitro translation and allow us to calibrate our test tube conditions to represent the environment inside the living cell. PMID:22190491

  4. Change to an Informal Interview Dress Code Improves Residency Applicant Perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Hern, H. Gene Jr.; Wills, Charlotte P.; Johnson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Residency interview apparel has traditionally been the dark business suit. We changed the interview dress code from a traditionally established unwritten ‘formal’ attire to an explicitly described ‘informal’ attire. We sought to assess if the change in dress code attire changed applicants’ perceptions of the residency program or decreased costs. Methods: The authors conducted an anonymous survey of applicants applying to one emergency medicine residency pro...

  5. The Optimization of Dispersion Properties of Photonic Crystal Fibers Using a Real-Coded Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Guo-Bing; LI Shu-Guang; LIU Shuo; WANG Xiao-Yan

    2011-01-01

    @@ A real-coded genetic algorithm (GA) combined with a fully vectorial effective index method (FVEIM) is employed to design structures of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with user defined dispersion properties theoretically.The structures of PCFs whose solid cores axe doped GeO with zero-dispersions at 0.7-3.9μm are optimized and the flat dispersion ranges through the R+L+C band and the negative dispersion is -1576.26 ps.km·nm at 1.55μm.Analyses show that the zero-dispersion wavelength (ZDW) could be one of many ZDWs for the same fiber structure; PCFs couM alter the dispersion to be flattened through the R+L+C band with a single air-hole diameter; and negative dispersion requires high air filling rate at 1.55μm.The method is proved to be elegant for solving this inverse problem.

  6. Photoactivatable Mussel-Based Underwater Adhesive Proteins by an Expanded Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauf, Matthias; Richter, Florian; Schneider, Tobias; Faidt, Thomas; Martins, Berta M; Baumann, Tobias; Durkin, Patrick; Dobbek, Holger; Jacobs, Karin; Möglich, Andreas; Budisa, Nediljko

    2017-09-19

    Marine mussels exhibit potent underwater adhesion abilities under hostile conditions by employing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-rich mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). However, their recombinant production is a major biotechnological challenge. Herein, a novel strategy based on genetic code expansion has been developed by engineering efficient aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases (aaRSs) for the photocaged noncanonical amino acid ortho-nitrobenzyl DOPA (ONB-DOPA). The engineered ONB-DOPARS enables in vivo production of MAP type 5 site-specifically equipped with multiple instances of ONB-DOPA to yield photocaged, spatiotemporally controlled underwater adhesives. Upon exposure to UV light, these proteins feature elevated wet adhesion properties. This concept offers new perspectives for the production of recombinant bioadhesives. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Nonlinear System Identification with a Real–Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherif Imen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the blind identification problem of a special class of nonlinear systems, namely, Volterra models, using a real-coded genetic algorithm (RCGA. The model input is assumed to be a stationary Gaussian sequence or an independent identically distributed (i.i.d. process. The order of the Volterra series is assumed to be known. The fitness function is defined as the difference between the calculated cumulant values and analytical equations in which the kernels and the input variances are considered. Simulation results and a comparative study for the proposed method and some existing techniques are given. They clearly show that the RCGA identification method performs better in terms of precision, time of convergence and simplicity of programming.

  8. Optimization of energy saving device combined with a propeller using real-coded genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Tomohiro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical optimization method to improve the performance of the propeller with Turbo-Ring using real-coded genetic algorithm. In the presented method, Unimodal Normal Distribution Crossover (UNDX and Minimal Generation Gap (MGG model are used as crossover operator and generation-alternation model, respectively. Propeller characteristics are evaluated by a simple surface panel method “SQCM” in the optimization process. Blade sections of the original Turbo-Ring and propeller are replaced by the NACA66 a = 0.8 section. However, original chord, skew, rake and maximum blade thickness distributions in the radial direction are unchanged. Pitch and maximum camber distributions in the radial direction are selected as the design variables. Optimization is conducted to maximize the efficiency of the propeller with Turbo-Ring. The experimental result shows that the efficiency of the optimized propeller with Turbo-Ring is higher than that of the original propeller with Turbo-Ring.

  9. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, the genetic code, and the evolutionary process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woese, C R; Olsen, G J; Ibba, M; Söll, D

    2000-03-01

    The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) and their relationship to the genetic code are examined from the evolutionary perspective. Despite a loose correlation between codon assignments and AARS evolutionary relationships, the code is far too highly structured to have been ordered merely through the evolutionary wanderings of these enzymes. Nevertheless, the AARSs are very informative about the evolutionary process. Examination of the phylogenetic trees for each of the AARSs reveals the following. (i) Their evolutionary relationships mostly conform to established organismal phylogeny: a strong distinction exists between bacterial- and archaeal-type AARSs. (ii) Although the evolutionary profiles of the individual AARSs might be expected to be similar in general respects, they are not. It is argued that these differences in profiles reflect the stages in the evolutionary process when the taxonomic distributions of the individual AARSs became fixed, not the nature of the individual enzymes. (iii) Horizontal transfer of AARS genes between Bacteria and Archaea is asymmetric: transfer of archaeal AARSs to the Bacteria is more prevalent than the reverse, which is seen only for the "gemini group. " (iv) The most far-ranging transfers of AARS genes have tended to occur in the distant evolutionary past, before or during formation of the primary organismal domains. These findings are also used to refine the theory that at the evolutionary stage represented by the root of the universal phylogenetic tree, cells were far more primitive than their modern counterparts and thus exchanged genetic material in far less restricted ways, in effect evolving in a communal sense.

  10. Three stages during the evolution of the genetic code. [Abstract only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, U.; Oro, J.

    1994-01-01

    A diversification of the genetic code based on the number of codons available for the proteinous amino acids is established. Three groups of amino acids during evolution of the code are distinguished. On the basis of their chemical complexity and a small codon number those amino acids emerging later in a translation process are derived. Both criteria indicate that His, Phe, Tyr, Cys and either Lys or Asn were introduced in the second stage, whereas the number of codons alone gives evidence that Trp and Met were introduced in the third stage. The amino acids of stage one use purines rich codons, thus purines have been retained in their third codon position. All the amino acids introduced in the second stage, in contrast, use pyrimidines in this codon position. A low abundance of pyrimidines during early translation is derived. This assumption is supported by experiments on non enzymatic replication and interactions of DNA hairpin loops with a complementary strand. A back extrapolation concludes a high purine content of the first nucleic acids which gradually decreased during their evolution. Amino acids independently available form prebiotic synthesis were thus correlated to purine rich codons. Conclusions on prebiotic replication are discussed also in the light of recent codon usage data.

  11. Bandwidth optimization of a Planar Inverted-F Antenna using binary and real coded genetic algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AMEERUDDEN Mohammad Riyad; RUGHOOPUTH Harry C S

    2009-01-01

    With the exponential development of mobile communications and the miniaturization of radio frequency transceivers, the need for small and low profile antennas at mobile frequencies is constantly growing. Therefore, new antennas should be developed to provide larger bandwidth and at the same time small dimensions. Although the gain in bandwidth performances of an antenna are directly related to its dimensions in relation to the wavelength, the aim is to keep the overall size of the antenna constant and from there, find the geometry and structure that give the best performance. The design and bandwidth optimization of a Planar Inverted-F Antenna (PIFA) were introduced in order to achieve a larger bandwidth in the 2 GHz band, using two optimization techniques based upon genetic algorithms (GA), namely the Binary Coded GA (BCGA) and Real-Coded GA (RCGA). During the optimization process, the different PIFA models were evaluated using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method-a technique belonging to the general class of differential time domain numerical modeling methods.

  12. Genetic evidence for conserved non-coding element function across species--the ears have it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric E Turner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of genomic sequences from diverse vertebrate species has revealed numerous highly conserved regions that do not appear to encode proteins or functional RNAs. Often these conserved non-coding elements, or CNEs, direct gene expression to specific tissues in transgenic models, demonstrating they have regulatory function. CNEs are frequently found near ‘developmental’ genes, particularly transcription factors, implying that these elements have essential regulatory roles in development. However, actual examples demonstrating CNE regulatory functions across species have been few, and recent loss-of-function studies of several CNEs in mice have shown relatively minor effects. In this Perspectives article, we discuss new findings in fancy rats and Highland cattle demonstrating that function of a CNE near the Hmx1 gene is crucial for normal external ear development and resembles loss-of function Hmx1 coding mutations in mice and humans. These findings provide important support for similar developmental roles of CNEs in divergent species, and reinforce the concept that CNEs should be examined systematically in the ongoing search for genetic causes of human developmental disorders in the era of genome-scale sequencing.

  13. Intramolecular interactions in aminoacyl nucleotides: Implications regarding the origin of genetic coding and protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Watkins, C. L.; Hall, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Cellular organisms store information as sequences of nucleotides in double stranded DNA. This information is useless unless it can be converted into the active molecular species, protein. This is done in contemporary creatures first by transcription of one strand to give a complementary strand of mRNA. The sequence of nucleotides is then translated into a specific sequence of amino acids in a protein. Translation is made possible by a genetic coding system in which a sequence of three nucleotides codes for a specific amino acid. The origin and evolution of any chemical system can be understood through elucidation of the properties of the chemical entities which make up the system. There is an underlying logic to the coding system revealed by a correlation of the hydrophobicities of amino acids and their anticodonic nucleotides (i.e., the complement of the codon). Its importance lies in the fact that every amino acid going into protein synthesis must first be activated. This is universally accomplished with ATP. Past studies have concentrated on the chemistry of the adenylates, but more recently we have found, through the use of NMR, that we can observe intramolecular interactions even at low concentrations, between amino acid side chains and nucleotide base rings in these adenylates. The use of this type of compound thus affords a novel way of elucidating the manner in which amino acids and nucleotides interact with each other. In aqueous solution, when a hydrophobic amino acid is attached to the most hydrophobic nucleotide, AMP, a hydrophobic interaction takes place between the amino acid side chain and the adenine ring. The studies to be reported concern these hydrophobic interactions.

  14. Heterogeneity in genetic diversity among non-coding loci fails to fit neutral coalescent models of population history.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L Peters

    Full Text Available Inferring aspects of the population histories of species using coalescent analyses of non-coding nuclear DNA has grown in popularity. These inferences, such as divergence, gene flow, and changes in population size, assume that genetic data reflect simple population histories and neutral evolutionary processes. However, violating model assumptions can result in a poor fit between empirical data and the models. We sampled 22 nuclear intron sequences from at least 19 different chromosomes (a genomic transect to test for deviations from selective neutrality in the gadwall (Anas strepera, a Holarctic duck. Nucleotide diversity among these loci varied by nearly two orders of magnitude (from 0.0004 to 0.029, and this heterogeneity could not be explained by differences in substitution rates alone. Using two different coalescent methods to infer models of population history and then simulating neutral genetic diversity under these models, we found that the observed among-locus heterogeneity in nucleotide diversity was significantly higher than expected for these simple models. Defining more complex models of population history demonstrated that a pre-divergence bottleneck was also unlikely to explain this heterogeneity. However, both selection and interspecific hybridization could account for the heterogeneity observed among loci. Regardless of the cause of the deviation, our results illustrate that violating key assumptions of coalescent models can mislead inferences of population history.

  15. Genetic variants in promoters and coding regions of the muscle glycogen synthase and the insulin-responsive GLUT4 genes in NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørbaek, C; Echwald, Søren Morgenthaler; Hubricht, P

    1994-01-01

    regions and regions of importance for translation, as well as coding sequences of the two genes, were studied using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing. The genetic analyses were performed in subgroups of 52 Caucasian NIDDM patients and 25 age-matched healthy......To examine the hypothesis that variants in the regulatory or coding regions of the glycogen synthase (GS) and insulin-responsive glucose transporter (GLUT4) genes contribute to insulin-resistant glucose processing of muscle from non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients, promoter......'-untranslated region, and the coding region of the GLUT4 gene showed four polymorphisms, all single nucleotide substitutions, positioned at -581, 1, 30, and 582. None of the three changes in the regulatory region of the gene had any major influence on expression of the GLUT4 gene in muscle. The variant at 582...

  16. Some pungent arguments against the physico-chemical theories of the origin of the genetic code and corroborating the coevolution theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Massimo

    2017-02-07

    Whereas it is extremely easy to prove that "if the biosynthetic relationships between amino acids were fundamental in the structuring of the genetic code, then their physico-chemical properties might also be revealed in the genetic code table"; it is, on the contrary, impossible to prove that "if the physico-chemical properties of amino acids were fundamental in the structuring of the genetic code, then the presence of the biosynthetic relationships between amino acids should not be revealed in the genetic code". And, given that in the genetic code table are mirrored both the biosynthetic relationships between amino acids and their physico-chemical properties, all this would be a test that would falsify the physico-chemical theories of the origin of the genetic code. That is to say, if the physico-chemical properties of amino acids had a fundamental role in organizing the genetic code, then we would not have duly revealed the presence - in the genetic code - of the biosynthetic relationships between amino acids, and on the contrary this has been observed. Therefore, this falsifies the physico-chemical theories of genetic code origin. Whereas, the coevolution theory of the origin of the genetic code would be corroborated by this analysis, because it would be able to give a description of evolution of the genetic code more coherent with the indisputable empirical observations that link both the biosynthetic relationships of amino acids and their physico-chemical properties to the evolutionary organization of the genetic code. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Translocation Properties of Primitive Molecular Machines and Their Relevance to the Structure of the Genetic Code

    CERN Document Server

    Aldana, M; Larralde, H; Martínez-Mekler, G; Aldana, Maximino; Cocho, Germinal; Larralde, Hernan; Martinez-Mekler, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    We address the question, related with the origin of the genetic code, of why are there three bases per codon in the translation to protein process. As a followup to our previous work, we approach this problem by considering the translocation properties of primitive molecular machines, which capture basic features of ribosomal/messenger RNA interactions, while operating under prebiotic conditions. Our model consists of a short one-dimensional chain of charged particles(rRNA antecedent) interacting with a polymer (mRNA antecedent) via electrostatic forces. The chain is subject to external forcing that causes it to move along the polymer which is fixed in a quasi one dimensional geometry. Our numerical and analytic studies of statistical properties of random chain/polymer potentials suggest that, under very general conditions, a dynamics is attained in which the chain moves along the polymer in steps of three monomers. By adjusting the model in order to consider present day genetic sequences, we show that the ab...

  18. An orthogonalized platform for genetic code expansion in both bacteria and eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Italia, James S; Addy, Partha Sarathi; Wrobel, Chester J J; Crawford, Lisa A; Lajoie, Marc J; Zheng, Yunan; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2017-02-13

    In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of expanding the genetic code of Escherichia coli using its own tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase and tRNA (TrpRS-tRNA(Trp)) pair. This was made possible by first functionally replacing this endogenous pair with an E. coli-optimized counterpart from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and then reintroducing the liberated E. coli TrpRS-tRNA(Trp) pair into the resulting strain as a nonsense suppressor, which was then followed by its directed evolution to genetically encode several new unnatural amino acids (UAAs). These engineered TrpRS-tRNA(Trp) variants were also able to drive efficient UAA mutagenesis in mammalian cells. Since bacteria-derived aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS)-tRNA pairs are typically orthogonal in eukaryotes, our work provides a general strategy to develop additional aaRS-tRNA pairs that can be used for UAA mutagenesis of proteins expressed in both E. coli and eukaryotes.

  19. A Real-coded Genetic Algorithm Applied to Optimum Design of a Low Solidity Vaned Diffuser for Diffuser Pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun LI; Hiroshi TSUKAMOTO

    2001-01-01

    A numerical procedure for hydrodynamic redesign of the conventional vaned diffuser into the low solidity vaned diffuser by means of a real-ceded genetic algorithm with Boltzmann, Tournament and Roulette Wheel selection is presented. In the first part, an investigation on the relative efficiency of the different real-coded genetic algorithm is carried out on a typical mathematical test function. The real-coded genetic algorithm with Boltzmann selection shows the best optimization performance compared to the Tournament and Roulette Wheel selection. In the second part, an approach to redesign the vaned diffuser profile is introduced. Goal of the optimum design is to search the highest static pressure recovery coefficient and low solidity vaned diffuser. The result of the low solidity vaned diffuser optimum design confirms that the efficiency and optimization performance of the real-coded Boltzmann selection genetic algorithm outperforms the other selection methods. A comparison between the designed low solidity vaned diffuser and original vaned diffuser shows that the diffuser pump with the redesigned low solidity vaned diffuser has the higher static pressure recovery and improved total hydrodynamic performance. In addition,the smaller outlet diameter of designed vaned diffuser tends to a more compact size of diffuser pump compared to the original diffuser pump. The obtained results also demonstrate the real-coded Boltzmann selection genetic algorithm is a promising optimization algorithm for centrifugal pumps design.

  20. Guide to the Changes between the 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mapes, Terry S.; Conover, David R.

    2012-05-31

    The International Code Council (ICC) published the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code{reg_sign} (IECC) in early 2012. The 2012 IECC is based on revisions, additions, and deletions to the 2009 IECC that were considered during the ICC code development process conducted in 2011. Solid vertical lines, arrows, or asterisks printed in the 2012 IECC indicate where revisions, deletions, or relocations of text respectively were made to 2009 IECC. Although these marginal markings indicate where changes have been made to the code, they do not provide any further guidance, leaving the reader to consult and compare the 2009 and 2012 IECC for more detail.

  1. The Hypothesis that the Genetic Code Originated in Coupled Synthesis of Proteins and the Evolutionary Predecessors of Nucleic Acids in Primitive Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Brian R

    2015-02-11

    Although analysis of the genetic code has allowed explanations for its evolution to be proposed, little evidence exists in biochemistry and molecular biology to offer an explanation for the origin of the genetic code. In particular, two features of biology make the origin of the genetic code difficult to understand. First, nucleic acids are highly complicated polymers requiring numerous enzymes for biosynthesis. Secondly, proteins have a simple backbone with a set of 20 different amino acid side chains synthesized by a highly complicated ribosomal process in which mRNA sequences are read in triplets. Apparently, both nucleic acid and protein syntheses have extensive evolutionary histories. Supporting these processes is a complex metabolism and at the hub of metabolism are the carboxylic acid cycles. This paper advances the hypothesis that the earliest predecessor of the nucleic acids was a β-linked polyester made from malic acid, a highly conserved metabolite in the carboxylic acid cycles. In the β-linked polyester, the side chains are carboxylic acid groups capable of forming interstrand double hydrogen bonds. Evolution of the nucleic acids involved changes to the backbone and side chain of poly(β-d-malic acid). Conversion of the side chain carboxylic acid into a carboxamide or a longer side chain bearing a carboxamide group, allowed information polymers to form amide pairs between polyester chains. Aminoacylation of the hydroxyl groups of malic acid and its derivatives with simple amino acids such as glycine and alanine allowed coupling of polyester synthesis and protein synthesis. Use of polypeptides containing glycine and l-alanine for activation of two different monomers with either glycine or l-alanine allowed simple coded autocatalytic synthesis of polyesters and polypeptides and established the first genetic code. A primitive cell capable of supporting electron transport, thioester synthesis, reduction reactions, and synthesis of polyesters and

  2. The Hypothesis that the Genetic Code Originated in Coupled Synthesis of Proteins and the Evolutionary Predecessors of Nucleic Acids in Primitive Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Francis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although analysis of the genetic code has allowed explanations for its evolution to be proposed, little evidence exists in biochemistry and molecular biology to offer an explanation for the origin of the genetic code. In particular, two features of biology make the origin of the genetic code difficult to understand. First, nucleic acids are highly complicated polymers requiring numerous enzymes for biosynthesis. Secondly, proteins have a simple backbone with a set of 20 different amino acid side chains synthesized by a highly complicated ribosomal process in which mRNA sequences are read in triplets. Apparently, both nucleic acid and protein syntheses have extensive evolutionary histories. Supporting these processes is a complex metabolism and at the hub of metabolism are the carboxylic acid cycles. This paper advances the hypothesis that the earliest predecessor of the nucleic acids was a β-linked polyester made from malic acid, a highly conserved metabolite in the carboxylic acid cycles. In the β-linked polyester, the side chains are carboxylic acid groups capable of forming interstrand double hydrogen bonds. Evolution of the nucleic acids involved changes to the backbone and side chain of poly(β-d-malic acid. Conversion of the side chain carboxylic acid into a carboxamide or a longer side chain bearing a carboxamide group, allowed information polymers to form amide pairs between polyester chains. Aminoacylation of the hydroxyl groups of malic acid and its derivatives with simple amino acids such as glycine and alanine allowed coupling of polyester synthesis and protein synthesis. Use of polypeptides containing glycine and l-alanine for activation of two different monomers with either glycine or l-alanine allowed simple coded autocatalytic synthesis of polyesters and polypeptides and established the first genetic code. A primitive cell capable of supporting electron transport, thioester synthesis, reduction reactions, and synthesis of

  3. The Hypothesis that the Genetic Code Originated in Coupled Synthesis of Proteins and the Evolutionary Predecessors of Nucleic Acids in Primitive Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Although analysis of the genetic code has allowed explanations for its evolution to be proposed, little evidence exists in biochemistry and molecular biology to offer an explanation for the origin of the genetic code. In particular, two features of biology make the origin of the genetic code difficult to understand. First, nucleic acids are highly complicated polymers requiring numerous enzymes for biosynthesis. Secondly, proteins have a simple backbone with a set of 20 different amino acid side chains synthesized by a highly complicated ribosomal process in which mRNA sequences are read in triplets. Apparently, both nucleic acid and protein syntheses have extensive evolutionary histories. Supporting these processes is a complex metabolism and at the hub of metabolism are the carboxylic acid cycles. This paper advances the hypothesis that the earliest predecessor of the nucleic acids was a β-linked polyester made from malic acid, a highly conserved metabolite in the carboxylic acid cycles. In the β-linked polyester, the side chains are carboxylic acid groups capable of forming interstrand double hydrogen bonds. Evolution of the nucleic acids involved changes to the backbone and side chain of poly(β-d-malic acid). Conversion of the side chain carboxylic acid into a carboxamide or a longer side chain bearing a carboxamide group, allowed information polymers to form amide pairs between polyester chains. Aminoacylation of the hydroxyl groups of malic acid and its derivatives with simple amino acids such as glycine and alanine allowed coupling of polyester synthesis and protein synthesis. Use of polypeptides containing glycine and l-alanine for activation of two different monomers with either glycine or l-alanine allowed simple coded autocatalytic synthesis of polyesters and polypeptides and established the first genetic code. A primitive cell capable of supporting electron transport, thioester synthesis, reduction reactions, and synthesis of polyesters and

  4. Genome-wide genetic changes during modern breeding of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yinping; Zhao, Hainan; Ren, Longhui; Song, Weibin; Zeng, Biao; Guo, Jinjie; Wang, Baobao; Liu, Zhipeng; Chen, Jing; Li, Wei; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Shaojun; Lai, Jinsheng

    2012-06-03

    The success of modern maize breeding has been demonstrated by remarkable increases in productivity over the last four decades. However, the underlying genetic changes correlated with these gains remain largely unknown. We report here the sequencing of 278 temperate maize inbred lines from different stages of breeding history, including deep resequencing of 4 lines with known pedigree information. The results show that modern breeding has introduced highly dynamic genetic changes into the maize genome. Artificial selection has affected thousands of targets, including genes and non-genic regions, leading to a reduction in nucleotide diversity and an increase in the proportion of rare alleles. Genetic changes during breeding happen rapidly, with extensive variation (SNPs, indels and copy-number variants (CNVs)) occurring, even within identity-by-descent regions. Our genome-wide assessment of genetic changes during modern maize breeding provides new strategies as well as practical targets for future crop breeding and biotechnology.

  5. THE NEW ROMANIAN CRIMINAL CODECHANGES SUGGESTED IN THE GENERAL PART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAI ADRIAN HOTCA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Through Law no. 286/2009, it was adopted a new Criminal code. The new Criminal code brings more changes both in the General part as well as in the Special part. Through this Criminal code, the Romanian lawgiver mainly pursued: to create a coherent legal framework from the criminal point of view by avoiding the useless overlapping of the norms in force existing in the current Criminal code and in the special laws; to facilitate the quick and unitary enforcement of the criminal legislation in the activity of the judicial organs; to transpose the regulations adopted at the European Union level into the national criminal legislative framework; to harmonize the Romanian criminal law with the systems of the other member states of the European Union. The study proposes to underline the main changes occurred in the General Part of the Criminal code.

  6. Can We Predict Types of Code Changes? An Empirical Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giger, E.; Pinzger, M.; Gall, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Preprint of paper published in: 9th IEEE Working Conference on Mining Software Repositories (MSR), 2-3 June 2012; doi:10.1109/MSR.2012.6224284 There exist many approaches that help in pointing developers to the change-prone parts of a software system. Although beneficial, they mostly fall short in

  7. Can We Predict Types of Code Changes? An Empirical Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giger, E.; Pinzger, M.; Gall, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Preprint of paper published in: 9th IEEE Working Conference on Mining Software Repositories (MSR), 2-3 June 2012; doi:10.1109/MSR.2012.6224284 There exist many approaches that help in pointing developers to the change-prone parts of a software system. Although beneficial, they mostly fall short in

  8. Discovery of coding genetic variants influencing diabetes-related serum biomarkers and their impact on risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh; Allin, Kristine Højgaard; Sandholt, Camilla Helene;

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence is spiraling globally, and knowledge of its pathophysiological signatures is crucial for a better understanding and treatment of the disease. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to discover underlying coding genetic variants influencing fasting serum levels of nine...

  9. Methodology for Evaluating Cost-effectiveness of Commercial Energy Code Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Bing [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This document lays out the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) method for evaluating the cost-effectiveness of energy code proposals and editions. The evaluation is applied to provisions or editions of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1 and the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The method follows standard life-cycle cost (LCC) economic analysis procedures. Cost-effectiveness evaluation requires three steps: 1) evaluating the energy and energy cost savings of code changes, 2) evaluating the incremental and replacement costs related to the changes, and 3) determining the cost-effectiveness of energy code changes based on those costs and savings over time.

  10. Use of fluorescent proteins and color-coded imaging to visualize cancer cells with different genetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins are very bright and available in spectrally-distinct colors, enable the imaging of color-coded cancer cells growing in vivo and therefore the distinction of cancer cells with different genetic properties. Non-invasive and intravital imaging of cancer cells with fluorescent proteins allows the visualization of distinct genetic variants of cancer cells down to the cellular level in vivo. Cancer cells with increased or decreased ability to metastasize can be distinguished in vivo. Gene exchange in vivo which enables low metastatic cancer cells to convert to high metastatic can be color-coded imaged in vivo. Cancer stem-like and non-stem cells can be distinguished in vivo by color-coded imaging. These properties also demonstrate the vast superiority of imaging cancer cells in vivo with fluorescent proteins over photon counting of luciferase-labeled cancer cells.

  11. MATLAB code to estimate landslide volume from single remote sensed image using genetic algorithm and imagery similarity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Shiuan; Yu, Teng-To; Lee, Shing-Tsz; Peng, Wen-Fei; Lin, Wei-Ling; Li, Pei-Ling

    2014-09-01

    Information regarding the scale of a hazard is crucial for the evaluation of its associated impact. Quantitative analysis of landslide volume immediately following the event can offer better understanding and control of contributory factors and their relative importance. Such information cannot be gathered for each landslide event, owing to limitations in obtaining useable raw data and the necessary procedures of each applied technology. Empirical rules are often used to predict volume change, but the resulting accuracy is very low. Traditional methods use photogrammetry or light detection and ranging (LiDAR) to produce a post-event digital terrain model (DTM). These methods are both costly and time-intensive. This study presents a technique to estimate terrain change volumes quickly and easily, not only reducing waiting time but also offering results with less than 25% error. A genetic algorithm (GA) programmed MATLAB is used to intelligently predict the elevation change for each pixel of an image. This deviation from the pre-event DTM becomes a candidate for the post-event DTM. Thus, each changed DTM is converted into a shadow relief image and compared with a single post-event remotely sensed image for similarity ranking. The candidates ranked in the top two thirds are retained as parent chromosomes to produce offspring in the next generation according to the rules of GAs. When the highest similarity index reaches 0.75, the DTM corresponding to that hillshade image is taken as the calculated post-event DTM. As an example, a pit with known volume is removed from a flat, inclined plane to demonstrate the theoretical capability of the code. The method is able to rapidly estimate the volume of terrain change within an error of 25%, without the delays involved in obtaining stereo image pairs, or the need for ground control points (GCPs) or professional photogrammetry software.

  12. Global genetic change tracks global climate warming in Drosophila subobscura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanyá, Joan; Oller, Josep M; Huey, Raymond B; Gilchrist, George W; Serra, Luis

    2006-09-22

    Comparisons of recent with historical samples of chromosome inversion frequencies provide opportunities to determine whether genetic change is tracking climate change in natural populations. We determined the magnitude and direction of shifts over time (24 years between samples on average) in chromosome inversion frequencies and in ambient temperature for populations of the fly Drosophila subobscura on three continents. In 22 of 26 populations, climates warmed over the intervals, and genotypes characteristic of low latitudes (warm climates) increased in frequency in 21 of those 22 populations. Thus, genetic change in this fly is tracking climate warming and is doing so globally.

  13. The role of crossover operator in evolutionary-based approach to the problem of genetic code optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błażej, Paweł; Wnȩtrzak, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł

    2016-12-01

    One of theories explaining the present structure of canonical genetic code assumes that it was optimized to minimize harmful effects of amino acid replacements resulting from nucleotide substitutions and translational errors. A way to testify this concept is to find the optimal code under given criteria and compare it with the canonical genetic code. Unfortunately, the huge number of possible alternatives makes it impossible to find the optimal code using exhaustive methods in sensible time. Therefore, heuristic methods should be applied to search the space of possible solutions. Evolutionary algorithms (EA) seem to be ones of such promising approaches. This class of methods is founded both on mutation and crossover operators, which are responsible for creating and maintaining the diversity of candidate solutions. These operators possess dissimilar characteristics and consequently play different roles in the process of finding the best solutions under given criteria. Therefore, the effective searching for the potential solutions can be improved by applying both of them, especially when these operators are devised specifically for a given problem. To study this subject, we analyze the effectiveness of algorithms for various combinations of mutation and crossover probabilities under three models of the genetic code assuming different restrictions on its structure. To achieve that, we adapt the position based crossover operator for the most restricted model and develop a new type of crossover operator for the more general models. The applied fitness function describes costs of amino acid replacement regarding their polarity. Our results indicate that the usage of crossover operators can significantly improve the quality of the solutions. Moreover, the simulations with the crossover operator optimize the fitness function in the smaller number of generations than simulations without this operator. The optimal genetic codes without restrictions on their structure

  14. SENDIN and SENTINEL: two computer codes to assess the effects of nuclear data changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marable, J. H.; Drischler, J. D.; Weisbin, C. R.

    1977-07-01

    A description is given of the computer code SENTINEL, which provides a simple means for finding the effects on calculated reactor and shielding performance parameters due to proposed changes in the cross section data base. This code uses predetermined detailed sensitivity coefficients in SENPRO format, which is described in Appendix A. Knowledge of details of the particular reactor and/or shielding assemblies is not required of the user. Also described is the computer code SENDIN, which converts unformatted (binary) sensitivity files to card image form and vice versa. This is useful for transferring sensitivity files from one installation to another.

  15. Changing public perceptions of genetically modified foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Bech-Larsen, Tino; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2001-01-01

    Previous research concerning public perception of GM foods indicates that European consumers hold firm negative attitudes to GM foods. These attitudes, however, are not based on risk-benefit evaluations of particular products. Rather, they seem to be a function of general sociopolitical attitudes...... that no attitude change occured. Instead, all strategies seemed to bolster pre-existing attitudes, thereby significantly decreasing consumers' preferences for GM products. The effect did not occur when consumers only saw a labeled product example. In experiment 2, we tested the effects of direct experience...

  16. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases had only a marginal role in the origin of the organization of the genetic code: Evidence in favor of the coevolution theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Massimo

    2017-11-07

    The coevolution theory of the origin of the genetic code suggests that the organization of the genetic code coevolved with the biosynthetic relationships between amino acids. The mechanism that allowed this coevolution was based on tRNA-like molecules on which-this theory-would postulate the biosynthetic transformations between amino acids to have occurred. This mechanism makes a prediction on how the role conducted by the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs), in the origin of the genetic code, should have been. Indeed, if the biosynthetic transformations between amino acids occurred on tRNA-like molecules, then there was no need to link amino acids to these molecules because amino acids were already charged on tRNA-like molecules, as the coevolution theory suggests. In spite of the fact that ARSs make the genetic code responsible for the first interaction between a component of nucleic acids and that of proteins, for the coevolution theory the role of ARSs should have been entirely marginal in the genetic code origin. Therefore, I have conducted a further analysis of the distribution of the two classes of ARSs and of their subclasses-in the genetic code table-in order to perform a falsification test of the coevolution theory. Indeed, in the case in which the distribution of ARSs within the genetic code would have been highly significant, then the coevolution theory would be falsified since the mechanism on which it is based would not predict a fundamental role of ARSs in the origin of the genetic code. I found that the statistical significance of the distribution of the two classes of ARSs in the table of the genetic code is low or marginal, whereas that of the subclasses of ARSs statistically significant. However, this is in perfect agreement with the postulates of the coevolution theory. Indeed, the only case of statistical significance-regarding the classes of ARSs-is appreciable for the CAG code, whereas for its complement-the UNN/NUN code-only a marginal

  17. Experimental studies related to the origin of the genetic code and the process of protein synthesis - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is presented of the literature on the experimental evidence for the genetic code assignments and the chemical reactions involved in the process of protein synthesis. In view of the enormous number of theoretical models that have been advanced to explain the origin of the genetic code, attention is confined to experimental studies. Since genetic coding has significance only within the context of protein synthesis, it is believed that the problem of the origin of the code must be dealt with in terms of the origin of the process of protein synthesis. It is contended that the answers must lie in the nature of the molecules, amino acids and nucleotides, the affinities they might have for one another, and the effect that those affinities must have on the chemical reactions that are related to primitive protein synthesis. The survey establishes that for the bulk of amino acids, there is a direct and significant correlation between the hydrophobicity rank of the amino acids and the hydrophobicity rank of their anticodonic dinucleotides.

  18. Experimental studies related to the origin of the genetic code and the process of protein synthesis - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is presented of the literature on the experimental evidence for the genetic code assignments and the chemical reactions involved in the process of protein synthesis. In view of the enormous number of theoretical models that have been advanced to explain the origin of the genetic code, attention is confined to experimental studies. Since genetic coding has significance only within the context of protein synthesis, it is believed that the problem of the origin of the code must be dealt with in terms of the origin of the process of protein synthesis. It is contended that the answers must lie in the nature of the molecules, amino acids and nucleotides, the affinities they might have for one another, and the effect that those affinities must have on the chemical reactions that are related to primitive protein synthesis. The survey establishes that for the bulk of amino acids, there is a direct and significant correlation between the hydrophobicity rank of the amino acids and the hydrophobicity rank of their anticodonic dinucleotides.

  19. Dynamic Change of Genetic Diversity in Conserved Populations with Different Initial Genetic Architectures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yun-feng; LI Hong-wei; WU Ke-liang; WU Chang-xin

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance and management of genetic diversity of farm animal genetic resources (AnGR) is very important for biological, socioeconomical and cultural significance. The core concern of conservation for farm AnGR is the retention of genetic diversity of conserved populations in a long-term perspective. However, numerous factors may affect evolution of genetic diversity of a conserved population. Among those factors, the genetic architecture of conserved populations is little considered in current conservation strategies. In this study, we investigated the dynamic changes of genetic diversity of conserved populations with two scenarios on initial genetic architectures by computer simulation in which thirty polymorphic microsatellite loci were chosen to represent genetic architecture of the populations with observed heterozygosity (Ho) and expected heterozygosity (He), observed and mean effective number of alleles (Ao and Ae), number of polymorphic loci (NP) and the percentage of polymorphic loci (PP), number of rare alleles (RA) and number of non-rich polymorphic loci (NRP) as the estimates of genetic diversity. The two scenarios on genetic architecture were taken into account, namely, one conserved population with same allele frequency (AS) and another one with actual allele frequency (AA). The results showed that the magnitude of loss of genetic diversity is associated with genetic architecture of initial conserved population, the amplitude of genetic diversity decline in the context AS was more narrow extent than those in context AA, the ranges of decline of Ho and Ao were about 4 and 2 times in AA compared with that in AS, respectively, the occurrence of first monomorphic locus and the time of change of measure NP in scenario AA is 20 generations and 23 generations earlier than that in scenario AS, respectively. Additionally, we found that NRP, a novel measure proposed by our research group, was a proper estimate for monitoring the evolution of genetic diversity

  20. Role of horizontal gene transfer as a control on the coevolution of ribosomal proteins and the genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woese, Carl R.; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2011-03-31

    Our main goal is to develop the conceptual and computational tools necessary to understand the evolution of the universal processes of translation and replication and to identify events of horizontal gene transfer that occurred within the components. We will attempt to uncover the major evolutionary transitions that accompanied the development of protein synthesis by the ribosome and associated components of the translation apparatus. Our project goes beyond standard genomic approaches to explore homologs that are represented at both the structure and sequence level. Accordingly, use of structural phylogenetic analysis allows us to probe further back into deep evolutionary time than competing approaches, permitting greater resolution of primitive folds and structures. Specifically, our work focuses on the elements of translation, ranging from the emergence of the canonical genetic code to the evolution of specific protein folds, mediated by the predominance of horizontal gene transfer in early life. A unique element of this study is the explicit accounting for the impact of phenotype selection on translation, through a coevolutionary control mechanism. Our work contributes to DOE mission objectives through: (1) sophisticated computer simulation of protein dynamics and evolution, and the further refinement of techniques for structural phylogeny, which complement sequence information, leading to improved annotation of genomic databases; (2) development of evolutionary approaches to exploring cellular function and machinery in an integrated way; and (3) documentation of the phenotype interaction with translation over evolutionary time, reflecting the system response to changing selection pressures through horizontal gene transfer.

  1. Application of Projection Pursuit Evaluation Model Based on Real-Coded Accelerating Genetic Algorithm in Evaluating Wetland Soil Quality Variations in the Sanjiang Plain,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU QIANG; XIE YONGGANG; WEI ZIMIN

    2003-01-01

    A new technique of dimension reduction named projection pursuit is applied to model and evaluatewetland soil quality variations in the Sanjiang Plain, Helongjiang Province, China. By adopting the im-proved real-coded accelerating genetic algorithm (RAGA), the projection direction is optimized and multi-dimensional indexes are converted into low-dimensional space. Classification of wetland soils and evaluationof wetland soil quality variations are realized by pursuing optimum projection direction and projection func-tion value. Therefore, by adopting this new method, any possible human interference can be avoided andsound results can be achieved in researching quality changes and classification of wetland soils.

  2. Quantum Genetics in terms of Quantum Reversible Automata and Quantum Computation of Genetic Codes and Reverse Transcription

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu,I C

    2004-01-01

    The concepts of quantum automata and quantum computation are studied in the context of quantum genetics and genetic networks with nonlinear dynamics. In previous publications (Baianu,1971a, b) the formal concept of quantum automaton and quantum computation, respectively, were introduced and their possible implications for genetic processes and metabolic activities in living cells and organisms were considered. This was followed by a report on quantum and abstract, symbolic computation based on the theory of categories, functors and natural transformations (Baianu,1971b; 1977; 1987; 2004; Baianu et al, 2004). The notions of topological semigroup, quantum automaton, or quantum computer, were then suggested with a view to their potential applications to the analogous simulation of biological systems, and especially genetic activities and nonlinear dynamics in genetic networks. Further, detailed studies of nonlinear dynamics in genetic networks were carried out in categories of n-valued, Lukasiewicz Logic Algebra...

  3. A binary mixed integer coded genetic algorithm for multi-objective optimization of nuclear research reactor fuel reloading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binh, Do Quang [University of Technical Education Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Huy, Ngo Quang [University of Industry Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Hai, Nguyen Hoang [Centre for Research and Development of Radiation Technology, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents a new approach based on a binary mixed integer coded genetic algorithm in conjunction with the weighted sum method for multi-objective optimization of fuel loading patterns for nuclear research reactors. The proposed genetic algorithm works with two types of chromosomes: binary and integer chromosomes, and consists of two types of genetic operators: one working on binary chromosomes and the other working on integer chromosomes. The algorithm automatically searches for the most suitable weighting factors of the weighting function and the optimal fuel loading patterns in the search process. Illustrative calculations are implemented for a research reactor type TRIGA MARK II loaded with the Russian VVR-M2 fuels. Results show that the proposed genetic algorithm can successfully search for both the best weighting factors and a set of approximate optimal loading patterns that maximize the effective multiplication factor and minimize the power peaking factor while satisfying operational and safety constraints for the research reactor.

  4. Progressive changes in non-coding RNA profile in leucocytes with age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Irizar, Haritz; Gorostidi, Ana; Alberro, Ainhoa; Osorio-Querejeta, Iñaki; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Olascoaga, Javier; de Munain, Adolfo López; Otaegui, David

    2017-01-01

    It has been observed that immune cell deterioration occurs in the elderly, as well as a chronic low-grade inflammation called inflammaging. These cellular changes must be driven by numerous changes in gene expression and in fact, both protein-coding and non-coding RNA expression alterations have been observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from elder people. In the present work we have studied the expression of small non-coding RNA (microRNA and small nucleolar RNA -snoRNA-) from healthy individuals from 24 to 79 years old. We have observed that the expression of 69 non-coding RNAs (56 microRNAs and 13 snoRNAs) changes progressively with chronological age. According to our results, the age range from 47 to 54 is critical given that it is the period when the expression trend (increasing or decreasing) of age-related small non-coding RNAs is more pronounced. Furthermore, age-related miRNAs regulate genes that are involved in immune, cell cycle and cancer-related processes, which had already been associated to human aging. Therefore, human aging could be studied as a result of progressive molecular changes, and different age ranges should be analysed to cover the whole aging process. PMID:28448962

  5. Genetic variants in promoters and coding regions of the muscle glycogen synthase and the insulin-responsive GLUT4 genes in NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørbaek, C; Echwald, Søren Morgenthaler; Hubricht, P

    1994-01-01

    regions and regions of importance for translation, as well as coding sequences of the two genes, were studied using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing. The genetic analyses were performed in subgroups of 52 Caucasian NIDDM patients and 25 age-matched healthy......'-untranslated region, and the coding region of the GLUT4 gene showed four polymorphisms, all single nucleotide substitutions, positioned at -581, 1, 30, and 582. None of the three changes in the regulatory region of the gene had any major influence on expression of the GLUT4 gene in muscle. The variant at 582...... volunteers. By applying inverse polymerase chain reaction and direct DNA sequencing, 532 base pairs (bp) of the GS promoter were identified and the transcriptional start site determined by primer extension. SSCP scanning of the promoter region detected five single nucleotide substitutions, positioned at 42...

  6. Proposal to change General Consideration 5 and Principle 2 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon; Garrity, George M

    2014-01-01

    A proposal is submitted to the ICSP to change the wording of General Consideration 5 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP), deleting the words Schizophycetes, Cyanophyceae and Cyanobacteria from the groups of organisms whose nomenclature is covered by the Code. It is further proposed to change the terms Zoological Code and International Code of Botanical Nomenclature in General Consideration 5 and in Principle 2 to International Code of Zoological Nomenclature and International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants, respectively.

  7. Anticodon Modifications in the tRNA Set of LUCA and the Fundamental Regularity in the Standard Genetic Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Gulik, Peter T. S.; Hoff, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    Based on (i) an analysis of the regularities in the standard genetic code and (ii) comparative genomics of the anticodon modification machinery in the three branches of life, we derive the tRNA set and its anticodon modifications as it was present in LUCA. Previously we proposed that an early ancestor of LUCA contained a set of 23 tRNAs with unmodified anticodons that was capable of translating all 20 amino acids while reading 55 of the 61 sense codons of the standard genetic code (SGC). Here we use biochemical and genomic evidence to derive that LUCA contained a set of 44 or 45 tRNAs containing 2 or 3 modifications while reading 59 or 60 of the 61 sense codons. Subsequent tRNA modifications occurred independently in the Bacteria and Eucarya, while the Archaea have remained quite close to the tRNA set as it was present in LUCA. PMID:27454314

  8. Simulation platform of economical operation and dispatch for power plant based on float-coded genetic algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱奕; 伞冶; 马克茂

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a float-coded genetic algorithm and its application to the optimization of the power plant operation concerning the simulation problem of economical operation for power plant systems. The method proposed realizes the load optimization between generating units of power plants and their loads, solves the problem of influence of a unit plant pause spoilage and load variance on the optimal plant combination and load, and finally establishes a simulation platform for the power plant economical operation.

  9. Attempting To Break the Code in Student Comprehension of Genetic Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2001-01-01

    Probes students' understanding of the relationships between genetic concepts. Identifies alternative conceptions and compartmentalization between related concepts. Argues that genetic instruction in 9th and 12th grade and in college in Israel needs improvement. (Author/MM)

  10. FitSKIRT: genetic algorithms to automatically fit dusty galaxies with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code

    CERN Document Server

    De Geyter, Gert; Fritz, Jacopo; Camps, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present FitSKIRT, a method to efficiently fit radiative transfer models to UV/optical images of dusty galaxies. These images have the advantage that they have better spatial resolution compared to FIR/submm data. FitSKIRT uses the GAlib genetic algorithm library to optimize the output of the SKIRT Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Genetic algorithms prove to be a valuable tool in handling the multi- dimensional search space as well as the noise induced by the random nature of the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. FitSKIRT is tested on artificial images of a simulated edge-on spiral galaxy, where we gradually increase the number of fitted parameters. We find that we can recover all model parameters, even if all 11 model parameters are left unconstrained. Finally, we apply the FitSKIRT code to a V-band image of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC4013. This galaxy has been modeled previously by other authors using different combinations of radiative transfer codes and optimization methods. Given the different...

  11. Change to an Informal Interview Dress Code Improves Residency Applicant Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hern, H. Gene Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Residency interview apparel has traditionally been the dark business suit. We changed the interview dress code from a traditionally established unwritten ‘formal’ attire to an explicitly described ‘informal’ attire. We sought to assess if the change in dress code attire changed applicants’ perceptions of the residency program or decreased costs. Methods: The authors conducted an anonymous survey of applicants applying to one emergency medicine residency program during two application cycles ending in 2012 and 2013. Applicants were asked if the change in dress code affected their perception of the program, comfort level, overall costs and how it affected their rank lists. Results: We sent the survey to 308 interviewed applicants over two years. Of those, 236 applicants completed the survey for a combined response rate of 76.6% (236/308. Among respondents, 85.1% (200 of 235 stated they appreciated the change; 66.7% (154 of 231 stated the change caused them to worry more about what to wear. Males were more uncomfortable than females due to the lack of uniformity on the interview day (18.5% of males [25/135] vs. 7.4% of females [7/95], collapsed results p-value 0.008. A total of 27.7% (64/231 agreed that the costs were less overall. The change caused 50 of 230 (21.7% applicants to rank the program higher on their rank list and only one applicant to rank the program lower. Conclusion: A change to a more informal dress code resulted in more comfort and fewer costs for applicants to a single residency program. The change also resulted in some applicants placing the program higher on their rank order list. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:127-132.

  12. Change to an informal interview dress code improves residency applicant perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hern, H Gene; Wills, Charlotte P; Johnson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Residency interview apparel has traditionally been the dark business suit. We changed the interview dress code from a traditionally established unwritten 'formal' attire to an explicitly described 'informal' attire. We sought to assess if the change in dress code attire changed applicants' perceptions of the residency program or decreased costs. The authors conducted an anonymous survey of applicants applying to one emergency medicine residency program during two application cycles ending in 2012 and 2013. Applicants were asked if the change in dress code affected their perception of the program, comfort level, overall costs and how it affected their rank lists. We sent the survey to 308 interviewed applicants over two years. Of those, 236 applicants completed the survey for a combined response rate of 76.6% (236/308). Among respondents, 85.1% (200 of 235) stated they appreciated the change; 66.7% (154 of 231) stated the change caused them to worry more about what to wear. Males were more uncomfortable than females due to the lack of uniformity on the interview day (18.5% of males [25/135] vs. 7.4% of females [7/95], collapsed results p-value 0.008). A total of 27.7% (64/231) agreed that the costs were less overall. The change caused 50 of 230 (21.7%) applicants to rank the program higher on their rank list and only one applicant to rank the program lower. A change to a more informal dress code resulted in more comfort and fewer costs for applicants to a single residency program. The change also resulted in some applicants placing the program higher on their rank order list.

  13. PCR-free quantitative detection of genetically modified organism from raw materials. An electrochemiluminescence-based bio bar code method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Debin; Tang, Yabing; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R

    2008-05-15

    A bio bar code assay based on oligonucleotide-modified gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) provides a PCR-free method for quantitative detection of nucleic acid targets. However, the current bio bar code assay requires lengthy experimental procedures including the preparation and release of bar code DNA probes from the target-nanoparticle complex and immobilization and hybridization of the probes for quantification. Herein, we report a novel PCR-free electrochemiluminescence (ECL)-based bio bar code assay for the quantitative detection of genetically modified organism (GMO) from raw materials. It consists of tris-(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (TBR)-labeled bar code DNA, nucleic acid hybridization using Au-NPs and biotin-labeled probes, and selective capture of the hybridization complex by streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads. The detection of target DNA is realized by direct measurement of ECL emission of TBR. It can quantitatively detect target nucleic acids with high speed and sensitivity. This method can be used to quantitatively detect GMO fragments from real GMO products.

  14. Mutations enabling displacement of tryptophan by 4-fluorotryptophan as a canonical amino acid of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Allen Chi-Shing; Yim, Aldrin Kay-Yuen; Mat, Wai-Kin; Tong, Amy Hin-Yan; Lok, Si; Xue, Hong; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Wong, J Tze-Fei; Chan, Ting-Fung

    2014-03-01

    The 20 canonical amino acids of the genetic code have been invariant over 3 billion years of biological evolution. Although various aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases can charge their cognate tRNAs with amino acid analogs, there has been no known displacement of any canonical amino acid from the code. Experimental departure from this universal protein alphabet comprising the canonical amino acids was first achieved in the mutants of the Bacillus subtilis QB928 strain, which after serial selection and mutagenesis led to the HR23 strain that could use 4-fluorotryptophan (4FTrp) but not canonical tryptophan (Trp) for propagation. To gain insight into this displacement of Trp from the genetic code by 4FTrp, genome sequencing was performed on LC33 (a precursor strain of HR23), HR23, and TR7 (a revertant of HR23 that regained the capacity to propagate on Trp). Compared with QB928, the negative regulator mtrB of Trp transport was found to be knocked out in LC33, HR23, and TR7, and sigma factor sigB was mutated in HR23 and TR7. Moreover, rpoBC encoding RNA polymerase subunits were mutated in three independent isolates of TR7 relative to HR23. Increased expression of sigB was also observed in HR23 and in TR7 growing under 4FTrp. These findings indicated that stabilization of the genetic code can be provided by just a small number of analog-sensitive proteins, forming an oligogenic barrier that safeguards the canonical amino acids throughout biological evolution.

  15. A Genetic Variant (COMT) Coding Dopaminergic Activity Predicts Personality Traits in Healthy Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyuk, Eszter; Duchek, Janet; Head, Denise; Szekely, Anna; Goate, Alison M; Balota, David A

    2015-08-01

    Association studies between the NEO five factor personality inventory and COMT rs4680 have focused on young adults and the results have been inconsistent. However, personality and cortical changes with age may put older adults in a more sensitive range for detecting a relationship. The present study examined associations of COMT rs4680 and personality in older adults. Genetic association analyses were carried out between the NEO and the targeted COMT rs4680 in a large, well-characterized sample of healthy, cognitively normal older adults (N = 616, mean age = 69.26 years). Three significant associations were found: participants with GG genotype showed lower mean scores on Neuroticism (p = 0.039) and higher scores on Agreeableness (p = 0.020) and Conscientiousness (p = 0.006) than participants with AA or AG genotypes. These results suggest that older adults with higher COMT enzymatic activity (GG), therefore lower dopamine level, have lower Neuroticism scores, and higher Agreeableness and Conscientiousness scores. This is consistent with a recent model of phasic and tonic dopamine release suggesting that even though GG genotype is associated with lower tonic dopamine release, the phasic release of dopamine might be optimal for a more adaptive personality profile.

  16. Obcells as proto-organisms: membrane heredity, lithophosphorylation, and the origins of the genetic code, the first cells, and photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2001-01-01

    I attempt to sketch a unified picture of the origin of living organisms in their genetic, bioenergetic, and structural aspects. Only selection at a higher level than for individual selfish genes could power the cooperative macromolecular coevolution required for evolving the genetic code. The protein synthesis machinery is too complex to have evolved before membranes. Therefore a symbiosis of membranes, replicators, and catalysts probably mediated the origin of the code and the transition from a nucleic acid world of independent molecular replicators to a nucleic acid/protein/lipid world of reproducing organisms. Membranes initially functioned as supramolecular structures to which different replicators attached and were selected as a higher-level reproductive unit: the proto-organism. I discuss the roles of stereochemistry, gene divergence, codon capture, and selection in the code's origin. I argue that proteins were primarily structural not enzymatic and that the first biological membranes consisted of amphipathic peptidyl-tRNAs and prebiotic mixed lipids. The peptidyl-tRNAs functioned as genetically-specified lipid analogues with hydrophobic tails (ancestral signal peptides) and hydrophilic polynucleotide heads. Protoribosomes arose from two cooperating RNAs: peptidyl transferase (large subunit) and mRNA-binder (small subunit). Early proteins had a second key role: coupling energy flow to the phosphorylation of gene and peptide precursors, probably by lithophosphorylation by membrane-anchored kinases scavenging geothermal polyphosphate stocks. These key evolutionary steps probably occurred on the outer surface of an 'inside out-cell' or obcell, which evolved an unambiguous hydrophobic code with four prebiotic amino acids and proline, and initiation by isoleucine anticodon CAU; early proteins and nucleozymes were all membrane-attached. To improve replication, translation, and lithophosphorylation, hydrophilic substrate-binding and catalytic domains were later

  17. MassCode liquid arrays as a tool for multiplexed high-throughput genetic profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S Richmond

    Full Text Available Multiplexed detection assays that analyze a modest number of nucleic acid targets over large sample sets are emerging as the preferred testing approach in such applications as routine pathogen typing, outbreak monitoring, and diagnostics. However, very few DNA testing platforms have proven to offer a solution for mid-plexed analysis that is high-throughput, sensitive, and with a low cost per test. In this work, an enhanced genotyping method based on MassCode technology was devised and integrated as part of a high-throughput mid-plexing analytical system that facilitates robust qualitative differential detection of DNA targets. Samples are first analyzed using MassCode PCR (MC-PCR performed with an array of primer sets encoded with unique mass tags. Lambda exonuclease and an array of MassCode probes are then contacted with MC-PCR products for further interrogation and target sequences are specifically identified. Primer and probe hybridizations occur in homogeneous solution, a clear advantage over micro- or nanoparticle suspension arrays. The two cognate tags coupled to resultant MassCode hybrids are detected in an automated process using a benchtop single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The prospective value of using MassCode probe arrays for multiplexed bioanalysis was demonstrated after developing a 14plex proof of concept assay designed to subtype a select panel of Salmonella enterica serogroups and serovars. This MassCode system is very flexible and test panels can be customized to include more, less, or different markers.

  18. 利用遗传算法构造QC-LDPC码%Construction of QC-LDPC Codes with Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑丹玲; 穆攀; 田凯; 袁建国

    2015-01-01

    A new method is proposed to construct a large girth quasi-cyclic low density parity check( QC-LDPC) code with Genetic Algorithm( GA) by consideration of LDPC codes under the influence of girth. This method depends on computer search,uses GA repeatedly,improves girth step by step. A large girth is obtained,at the same time LDPC codes with a quasi-cyclic structure is constructed. Analysis shows its complexity has a linear relationship with code length. Simulation results illustrate that when the bit error rate(BER) is 10-6 QC-LDPC codes constructed with the new method has net coding gain(NCG) of 0. 15 dB,0. 5 dB,0. 2 dB over LDPC code based on Euclidean Geometry,Gallager random codes and Mackay random codes,respectively,and it is easy to restore and be implemented in hardware because of quasi-cy-clic structure.%考虑到围长(girth)对低密度奇偶校验(LDPC)码的影响,提出了一种利用遗传算法构造大girth的准循环LDPC( QC-LDPC)码的新方法。该方法借助于计算机搜索,多次运用遗传算法,分步提高girth,在得到大girth 的同时,构造出具有准循环结构的LDPC码。分析发现,该构造方法的复杂度与码长成线性关系。仿真结果表明:在误码率( BER)为10-6时,新方法构造的QC-LDPC码比基于欧式几何构造方法、Gallager和Mackay构造法分别获得约0.15 dB、0.5 dB和0.2 dB的净编码增益( NCG),且因具有准循环结构更易于存储和硬件实现。

  19. [Assisted reproduction and artificial insemination and genetic manipulation in the Criminal Code of the Federal District, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brena Sesma, Ingrid

    2004-01-01

    The article that one presents has for purpose outline and comment on the recent modifications to the Penal Code for the Federal District of México which establish, for the first time, crimes related to the artificial procreation and to the genetic manipulation. Also one refers to the interaction of the new legal texts with the sanitary legislation of the country. Since it will be stated in some cases they present confrontations between the penal and the sanitary reglamentation and some points related to the legality or unlawfulness of a conduct that stayed without the enough development. These lacks will complicate the application of the new rules of the Penal Code of the Federal District.

  20. Genetic analysis of coding SNPs in blood-brain barrier transporter MDR1 in European Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Claudia; Soehn, Anne S; Tomiuk, Juergen; Riess, Olaf; Berg, Daniela

    2009-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of intracytoplasmic inclusions (Lewy bodies). Iron, which is elevated in the substantia nigra of PD patients, seems to be of pivotal importance, because of its capacity to enhance the amplification of reactive oxygen species. As iron enters and exits the brain via transport proteins in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), these proteins may represent candidates for a genetic susceptibility to PD. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one important efflux pump in the BBB. There is evidence that the function of P-gp is impaired in PD patients. In the current study we examined ten coding single nucleotide polymorphisms in the multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) encoding P-gp to assess whether certain genotypes are associated with PD. However, genotyping of 300 PD patients and 302 healthy controls did not reveal a significant association between coding MDR1 gene polymorphisms and PD.

  1. Genetic variants in long non-coding RNA MIAT contribute to risk of paranoid schizophrenia in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shu-Quan; Hu, Hui-Ling; Ye, Ning; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    The heritability of schizophrenia has been reported to be as high as ~80%, but the contribution of genetic variants identified to this heritability remains to be estimated. Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) are involved in multiple processes critical to normal cellular function and dysfunction of lncRNA MIAT may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the genetic evidence of lncRNAs involved in schizophrenia has not been documented. Here, we conducted a two-stage association analysis on 8 tag SNPs that cover the whole MIAT locus in two independent Han Chinese schizophrenia case-control cohorts (discovery sample from Shanxi Province: 1093 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 1180 control subjects; replication cohort from Jilin Province: 1255 cases and 1209 healthy controls). In discovery stage, significant genetic association with paranoid schizophrenia was observed for rs1894720 (χ(2)=74.20, P=7.1E-18), of which minor allele (T) had an OR of 1.70 (95% CI=1.50-1.91). This association was confirmed in the replication cohort (χ(2)=22.66, P=1.9E-06, OR=1.32, 95%CI 1.18-1.49). Besides, a weak genotypic association was detected for rs4274 (χ(2)=4.96, df=2, P=0.03); the AA carriers showed increased disease risk (OR=1.30, 95%CI=1.03-1.64). No significant association was found between any haplotype and paranoid schizophrenia. The present studies showed that lncRNA MIAT was a novel susceptibility gene for paranoid schizophrenia in the Chinese Han population. Considering that most lncRNAs locate in non-coding regions, our result may explain why most susceptibility loci for schizophrenia identified by genome wide association studies were out of coding regions.

  2. Breaking the code: Statistical methods and methodological issues in psychiatric genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stringer, S.

    2015-01-01

    The genome-wide association (GWA) era has confirmed the heritability of many psychiatric disorders, most notably schizophrenia. Thousands of genetic variants with individually small effect sizes cumulatively constitute a large contribution to the heritability of psychiatric disorders. This thesis

  3. An enhancement of selection and crossover operations in real-coded genetic algorithm for large-dimensionality optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Noh Sung; Lee, Jongsoo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The present study aims to implement a new selection method and a novel crossover operation in a real-coded genetic algorithm. The proposed selection method facilitates the establishment of a successively evolved population by combining several subpopulations: an elitist subpopulation, an off-spring subpopulation and a mutated subpopulation. A probabilistic crossover is performed based on the measure of probabilistic distance between the individuals. The concept of ‘allowance’ is suggested to describe the level of variance in the crossover operation. A number of nonlinear/non-convex functions and engineering optimization problems are explored to verify the capacities of the proposed strategies. The results are compared with those obtained from other genetic and nature-inspired algorithms.

  4. An automatic modeling system of the reaction mechanisms for chemical vapor deposition processes using real-coded genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Kinpara, Hiroki; Ema, Yoshinori

    2011-09-01

    The identification of appropriate reaction models is very helpful for developing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. In this study, we have developed an automatic system to model reaction mechanisms in the CVD processes by analyzing the experimental results, which are cross-sectional shapes of the deposited films on substrates with micrometer- or nanometer-sized trenches. We designed the inference engine to model the reaction mechanism in the system by the use of real-coded genetic algorithms (RCGAs). We studied the dependence of the system performance on two methods using simple genetic algorithms (SGAs) and the RCGAs; the one involves the conventional GA operators and the other involves the blend crossover operator (BLX-alpha). Although we demonstrated that the systems using both the methods could successfully model the reaction mechanisms, the RCGAs showed the better performance with respect to the accuracy and the calculation cost for identifying the models.

  5. Environment Changes Genetic Effects on Respiratory Conditions and Allergic Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yong; Schwager, Michelle J; Backer, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    separated population. We evaluated 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) corresponding to 8 genes (ADAM33, ALOX5, LT-α, LTC4S, NOS1, ORMDL3, TBXA2R and TNF-α), the lung function and five respiratory/allergic conditions (ever asthma, bronchitis, rhinitis, dermatitis and atopy) in two populations of Inuit...... associated with bronchitis risk. LT-α SNP rs2844484 was related to dermatitis susceptibility and was significantly influenced by the place of residence. The observed gene-phenotype relationships were exclusively present in one population and absent in the other population. We conclude that the genotype......-phenotype associations relating to bronchitis and allergy susceptibility are dependent on the environment and that environmental factors/lifestyles modify genetic predisposition and change the genetic effects on diseases....

  6. Deciphering the four-letter code : The genetic basis of complex traits and common disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulit, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is made up of four bases: adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T). Assembled in a strategic fashion, these bases code for the unique genomes of all walks of life, from viruses, to rodents, to primates. The human genome, mapped completely for the first time

  7. Deciphering the four-letter code : The genetic basis of complex traits and common disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulit, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is made up of four bases: adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T). Assembled in a strategic fashion, these bases code for the unique genomes of all walks of life, from viruses, to rodents, to primates. The human genome, mapped completely for the first time

  8. Increasing asthma mortality in Denmark 1969-88 not a result of a changed coding practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, K; Pedersen, P A

    1992-01-01

    We have studied asthma mortality in Denmark from 1969 to 1988. Age standardized mortality rates calculated in three age groups, 10-34, 35-59, and greater than or equal to 60 years, disclosed similar trends. Increasing mortality from asthma in the mid-1970s to 1988 was seen in all three age groups...... with higher mortality in 1979-88 as compared with 1969-78 of 95%, 55%, and 69%, respectively. Since the eighth revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD8) was used in Denmark over the entire 20-year period, changes in coding practice due to change of classification system cannot explain...

  9. A Discussion on Possible Indicators Related to Genetic Structure Changes in Plant Germplasm Conservation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAI Jun-yi

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to study and develop indicators and procedures for the evaluation of genetic structure changes in germplasm conservation due to social and natural environment reasons.Some basic concepts in germplasm study were introduced at first. Then, six kinds of indicators for genetic diversity as a measure of genetic potential of a germplasm collection were presented, i.e.,numbers of different entities at certain level, evenness of the entity distribution, genetic similarityand genetic distance, genetic variance and genetic coefficient of variation, multivariate genetic variation indices, and coefficient of parentage. It was pointed out that genetic dispersion did not provide a complete concept of genetic diversity if without any information from genetic richness. Based on the above, the indicators for genetic erosion as the genetic structure changes of germplasm conservation due to social reasons, the indicators of genetic vulnerability as the genetic structure changes of germplasm conservation due to environmental stresses, the measurement of genetic drift and genetic shift as the genetic structure changes of germplasm collection during reproduction or seed increase were reviewed and developed. Furthermore, the estimation procedures of the indicators by using molecular markers were suggested. Finally, the case studies on suitable conservation sample size of self-pollinated and open-pollinated populations were given for reference.

  10. On the evolution of the standard genetic code: vestiges of critical scale invariance from the RNA world in current prokaryote genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco V José

    Full Text Available Herein two genetic codes from which the primeval RNA code could have originated the standard genetic code (SGC are derived. One of them, called extended RNA code type I, consists of all codons of the type RNY (purine-any base-pyrimidine plus codons obtained by considering the RNA code but in the second (NYR type and third (YRN type reading frames. The extended RNA code type II, comprises all codons of the type RNY plus codons that arise from transversions of the RNA code in the first (YNY type and third (RNR nucleotide bases. In order to test if putative nucleotide sequences in the RNA World and in both extended RNA codes, share the same scaling and statistical properties to those encountered in current prokaryotes, we used the genomes of four Eubacteria and three Archaeas. For each prokaryote, we obtained their respective genomes obeying the RNA code or the extended RNA codes types I and II. In each case, we estimated the scaling properties of triplet sequences via a renormalization group approach, and we calculated the frequency distributions of distances for each codon. Remarkably, the scaling properties of the distance series of some codons from the RNA code and most codons from both extended RNA codes turned out to be identical or very close to the scaling properties of codons of the SGC. To test for the robustness of these results, we show, via computer simulation experiments, that random mutations of current genomes, at the rates of 10(-10 per site per year during three billions of years, were not enough for destroying the observed patterns. Therefore, we conclude that most current prokaryotes may still contain relics of the primeval RNA World and that both extended RNA codes may well represent two plausible evolutionary paths between the RNA code and the current SGC.

  11. Ancestral Reconstruction of a Pre-LUCA Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Ancestor Supports the Late Addition of Trp to the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, G P; Alm, E J

    2015-04-01

    The genetic code was likely complete in its current form by the time of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). Several scenarios have been proposed for explaining the code's pre-LUCA emergence and expansion, and the relative order of the appearance of amino acids used in translation. One co-evolutionary model of genetic code expansion proposes that at least some amino acids were added to the code by the ancient divergence of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) families. Of all the amino acids used within the genetic code, Trp is most frequently claimed as a relatively recent addition. We observe that, since TrpRS and TyrRS are paralogous protein families retaining significant sequence similarity, the inferred sequence composition of their ancestor can be used to evaluate this co-evolutionary model of genetic code expansion. We show that ancestral sequence reconstructions of the pre-LUCA paralog ancestor of TyrRS and TrpRS have several sites containing Tyr, yet a complete absence of sites containing Trp. This is consistent with the paralog ancestor being specific for the utilization of Tyr, with Trp being a subsequent addition to the genetic code facilitated by a process of aaRS divergence and neofunctionalization. Only after this divergence could Trp be specifically encoded and incorporated into proteins, including the TyrRS and TrpRS descendant lineages themselves. This early absence of Trp is observed under both homogeneous and non-homogeneous models of ancestral sequence reconstruction. Simulations support that this observed absence of Trp is unlikely to be due to chance or model bias. These results support that the final stages of genetic code evolution occurred well within the "protein world," and that the presence-absence of Trp within conserved sites of ancient protein domains is a likely measure of their relative antiquity, permitting the relative timing of extremely early events within protein evolution before LUCA.

  12. The evolutionary history of Saccharomyces species inferred from completed mitochondrial genomes and revision in the 'yeast mitochondrial genetic code'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulo, Pavol; Szabóová, Dana; Bielik, Peter; Poláková, Silvia; Šoltys, Katarína; Jatzová, Katarína; Szemes, Tomáš

    2017-06-15

    The yeast Saccharomyces are widely used to test ecological and evolutionary hypotheses. A large number of nuclear genomic DNA sequences are available, but mitochondrial genomic data are insufficient. We completed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing from Illumina MiSeq reads for all Saccharomyces species. All are circularly mapped molecules decreasing in size with phylogenetic distance from Saccharomyces cerevisiae but with similar gene content including regulatory and selfish elements like origins of replication, introns, free-standing open reading frames or GC clusters. Their most profound feature is species-specific alteration in gene order. The genetic code slightly differs from well-established yeast mitochondrial code as GUG is used rarely as the translation start and CGA and CGC code for arginine. The multilocus phylogeny, inferred from mtDNA, does not correlate with the trees derived from nuclear genes. mtDNA data demonstrate that Saccharomyces cariocanus should be assigned as a separate species and Saccharomyces bayanus CBS 380T should not be considered as a distinct species due to mtDNA nearly identical to Saccharomyces uvarum mtDNA. Apparently, comparison of mtDNAs should not be neglected in genomic studies as it is an important tool to understand the origin and evolutionary history of some yeast species. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  13. Remediating Viking Origins: Genetic Code as Archival Memory of the Remote Past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Marc; King, Turi; Brown, Steven D

    2013-10-01

    This article introduces some early data from the Leverhulme Trust-funded research programme, 'The Impact of the Diasporas on the Making of Britain: evidence, memories, inventions'. One of the interdisciplinary foci of the programme, which incorporates insights from genetics, history, archaeology, linguistics and social psychology, is to investigate how genetic evidence of ancestry is incorporated into identity narratives. In particular, we investigate how 'applied genetic history' shapes individual and familial narratives, which are then situated within macro-narratives of the nation and collective memories of immigration and indigenism. It is argued that the construction of genetic evidence as a 'gold standard' about 'where you really come from' involves a remediation of cultural and archival memory, in the construction of a 'usable past'. This article is based on initial questionnaire data from a preliminary study of those attending DNA collection sessions in northern England. It presents some early indicators of the perceived importance of being of Viking descent among participants, notes some emerging patterns and considers the implications for contemporary debates on migration, belonging and local and national identity.

  14. Biological genesis: the first step from dead matter to life. A contribution to the nature of DNA, RNA, and the genetic code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt FH

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Friedrich H Schmidt Retired, Schramberg, Germany Abstract: Information is understood semantically in the special case of the genetic code as the contents of news-bearing and genetically acting molecules. The connection of single molecules to groups and molecule chains can be referred to as syntactic. Well-defined information is not only exchanged between molecules in biology like nucleic and amino acids cooperating in the genetic code: the topic of this article is that an exchange of information could also occur between inorganic and organic substances, eg, mineral crystals interacting with organic molecules. This may have played a role in the origins of life on earth. As the origin of the genetic code and the mechanism of its translation is still an unresolved problem, so is the interaction of inorganic substances and organic substances still an open question. Stereochemical similarities existing between code and amino acids cannot explain the relationship completely and are not present between inorganic and organic molecules at all. Symmetry is a structural entity in organic chemistry and organisms, and Δ-values calculated by a mathematical algorithm and introduced in this article give an estimate of symmetry and transferred information. Symmetric Δ-values exist in minerals as well as in genetic molecules, and could thus bring dead material to life before DNA, RNA, and enzymes were developed. The fact that symmetry is important as a quality of organic matter with the function of the genetic code is pointed out in the works of other authors, who are cited in this paper. Keywords: genetic information, genetic code, symmetry in inorganic and organic molecules, calculation of Δ-values

  15. Genetic characterization of three novel chicken parvovirus strains based on analysis of their coding sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bon-Sang; Lee, Hae-Rim; Jeon, Eun-Ok; Han, Moo-Sung; Min, Kyeong-Cheol; Lee, Seung-Baek; Bae, Yeon-Ji; Cho, Sun-Hyung; Mo, Jong-Suk; Kwon, Hyuk Moo; Sung, Haan Woo; Kim, Jong-Nyeo; Mo, In-Pil

    2015-01-01

    Chicken parvovirus (ChPV) is one of the causative agents of viral enteritis. Recently, the genome of the ABU-P1 strain of ChPV was fully sequenced and determined to have a distinct genomic composition compared with that of vertebrate parvoviruses. However, no comparative sequence analysis of coding regions of ChPVs was possible because of the lack of other sequence information. In this study, we obtained the nucleotide sequences of all genomic coding regions of three ChPVs by polymerase chain reaction using 13 primer sets, and deduced the amino acid sequences from the nucleotide sequences. The non-structural protein 1 (NS1) gene of the three ChPVs showed 95.0 to 95.5% nucleotide sequence identity and 96.5 to 98.1% amino acid sequence identity to those of NS1 from the ABU-P1 strain, respectively, and even higher nucleotide and amino acid similarities to one another. The viral proteins (VP) gene was more divergent between the three ChPV Korean strains and ABU-P1, with 88.1 to 88.3% nucleotide identity and 93.0% amino acid identity. Analysis of the putative tertiary structure of the ChPV VP2 protein showed that variable regions with less than 80% nucleotide similarity between the three Korean strains and ABU-P1 occurred in large loops of the VP2 protein believed to be involved in antigenicity, pathogenicity, and tissue tropism in other parvoviruses. Based on our analysis of full-length coding sequences, we discovered greater variation in ChPV strains than reported previously, especially in partial regions of the VP2 protein.

  16. The birth of classical genetics as the junction of two disciplines: conceptual change as representational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorms, Marion

    2014-12-01

    The birth of classical genetics in the 1910's was the result of the junction of two modes of analysis, corresponding to two disciplines: Mendelism and cytology. The goal of this paper is to shed some light on the change undergone by the science of heredity at the time, and to emphasize the subtlety of the conceptual articulation of Mendelian and cytological hypotheses within classical genetics. As a way to contribute to understanding how the junction of the two disciplines at play gave birth to a new way of studying heredity, my focus will be on the forms of representation used in genetics research at the time. More particularly, I will study the design and development, by Thomas H. Morgan's group, of the technique of linkage mapping, which embodies the integration of the Mendelian and cytological forms of representation. I will show that the design of this technique resulted in a genuine conceptual change, which should be described as a representational change, rather than merely as the introduction of new hypotheses into genetics.

  17. Symmetry Breaking and Adaptation The Genetic Code of Retroviral Env Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Vera, S

    1996-01-01

    Although several synonymous codons can encode the same aminoacid, this symmetry is generally broken in natural genetic systems. In this article, we show that the symmetry breaking can result from selective pressures due to the violation of the synonym symmetry by mutation and recombination. We conjecture that this enhances the probability to produce mutants that are well-adapted to the current environment. Evidence is found in the codon frequencies of the HIV resistant to the current immunological attack, are found with a greater frequency than their less mutable synonyms.

  18. Mayo Registry for Telemetry Efficacy in Arrest (MR TEA) study: An analysis of code status change following cardiopulmonary arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Chirila, Razvan; Maniaci, Michael; Bosworth, Veronica; Whitman, Anastasia; Lewis, Patricia; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M Caroline

    2015-07-01

    Code status discussions are important during a hospitalization, yet variation in its practice exists. No data have assessed the likelihood of patients to change code status following a cardiopulmonary arrest. A retrospective review of all patients that experienced a cardiopulmonary arrest between May 1, 2008 and June 30, 2014 at an academic medical center was performed. The proportion of code status modifications to do not resuscitate (DNR) from full code was assessed. Baseline clinical characteristics, resuscitation factors, and 24-h post-resuscitation, hospital, and overall survival rates were compared between the two subsets. A total of 157 patients survived the index event and were included. One hundred and fifteen (73.2%) patients did not have a change in code status following the index event, while 42 (26.8%) changed code status to DNR. Clinical characteristics were similar between subsets, although patients in the change to DNR subset were older (average age 67.7 years) compared to the full code subset (average age 59.2 years; p = 0.005). Patients in the DNR subset had longer overall resuscitation efforts with less attempts at defibrillation. Compared to the DNR subset, patients that remained full code demonstrated higher 24-h post-resuscitation (n = 108, 93.9% versus n = 32, 76.2%; p = 0.001) and hospital (n = 50, 43.5% versus n = 6, 14.3%; p = 0.001) survival rates. Patients in the DNR subset were more likely to have neurologic deficits on discharge and shorter overall survival. Patient code status wishes do tend to change during critical periods within a hospitalization, adding emphasis for continued code status evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimal design of FIR high pass filter based on L1 error approximation using real coded genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Aggarwal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an optimal design of linear phase digital finite impulse response (FIR highpass (HP filter using the L1-norm based real-coded genetic algorithm (RCGA is investigated. A novel fitness function based on L1 norm is adopted to enhance the design accuracy. Optimized filter coefficients are obtained by defining the filter objective function in L1 sense using RCGA. Simulation analysis unveils that the performance of the RCGA adopting this fitness function is better in terms of signal attenuation ability of the filter, flatter passband and the convergence rate. Observations are made on the percentage improvement of this algorithm over the gradient-based L1 optimization approach on various factors by a large amount. It is concluded that RCGA leads to the best solution under specified parameters for the FIR filter design on account of slight unnoticeable higher transition width.

  20. Numeral series hidden in the distribution of atomic mass of amino acids to codon domains in the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlin, Åsa

    2015-03-21

    The distribution of codons in the nearly universal genetic code is a long discussed issue. At the atomic level, the numeral series 2x(2) (x=5-0) lies behind electron shells and orbitals. Numeral series appear in formulas for spectral lines of hydrogen. The question here was if some similar scheme could be found in the genetic code. A table of 24 codons was constructed (synonyms counted as one) for 20 amino acids, four of which have two different codons. An atomic mass analysis was performed, built on common isotopes. It was found that a numeral series 5 to 0 with exponent 2/3 times 10(2) revealed detailed congruency with codon-grouped amino acid side-chains, simultaneously with the division on atom kinds, further with main 3rd base groups, backbone chains and with codon-grouped amino acids in relation to their origin from glycolysis or the citrate cycle. Hence, it is proposed that this series in a dynamic way may have guided the selection of amino acids into codon domains. Series with simpler exponents also showed noteworthy correlations with the atomic mass distribution on main codon domains; especially the 2x(2)-series times a factor 16 appeared as a conceivable underlying level, both for the atomic mass and charge distribution. Furthermore, it was found that atomic mass transformations between numeral systems, possibly interpretable as dimension degree steps, connected the atomic mass of codon bases with codon-grouped amino acids and with the exponent 2/3-series in several astonishing ways. Thus, it is suggested that they may be part of a deeper reference system.

  1. Estimates of genetic parameters and genetic change for reproduction, weight, and wool characteristics of Targhee sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanford, K J; Van Vleck, L D; Snowder, G D

    2003-03-01

    Genetic parameters from both single-trait and bivariate analyses for prolificacy, weight, and wool traits were estimated using REML with animal models for Targhee sheep from data collected from 1950 to 1998 at the U.S. Sheep Experiment Station, Dubois, ID. Breeding values from both single-trait and seven-trait analyses calculated with the parameters estimated from the single-trait and bivariate analyses were compared across years of birth with respect to genetic trends. The numbers of observations were 38,625 for litter size at birth and litter size at weaning, 33,994 for birth weight, 32,715 for weaning weight, 36,807 for fleece weight and fleece grade, and 3,341 for staple length. Direct heritability estimates from single-trait analyses were 0.10 for litter size at birth, 0.07 for litter size at weaning, 0.25 for birth weight, 0.22 for weaning weight, 0.54 for fleece weight, 0.41 for fleece grade, and 0.65 for staple length. Estimate of direct genetic correlation between litter size at birth and weaning was 0.77 and between birth and weaning weights was 0.52. The estimate of genetic correlation between fleece weight and staple length was positive (0.54), but was negative between fleece weight and fleece grade (-0.47) and between staple length and fleece grade (-0.69). Estimates of genetic correlations were near zero between birth weight and litter size traits and small and positive between weaning weight and litter size traits. Fleece weight was slightly and negatively correlated with both litter size traits. Fleece grade was slightly and positively correlated with both litter size traits. Estimates of correlations between staple length and litter size at birth (-0.14) and litter size at weaning (0.05) were small. Estimates of correlations between weight traits and fleece weight were positive and low to moderate. Estimates of correlations between weight traits and fleece grade were negative and small, whereas estimates between weight traits and staple length were

  2. Estimates of genetic parameters and genetic change for reproduction, weight, and wool characteristics of Columbia sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanford, K J; Van Vleck, L D; Snowder, G D

    2002-12-01

    Genetic parameters from both single-trait and bivariate analyses for prolificacy, weight and wool traits were estimated using REML with animal models for Columbia sheep from data collected from 1950 to 1998 at the U.S. Sheep Experiment Station (USSES), Dubois, ID. Breeding values from both single-trait and seven-trait analyses calculated using the parameters estimated from the single-trait and bivariate analyses were compared with respect to genetic trends. Number of observations were 31,401 for litter size at birth and litter size at weaning, 24,741 for birth weight, 23,903 for weaning weight, 29,572 for fleece weight and fleece grade, and 2,449 for staple length. Direct heritability estimates from single-trait analyses were 0.09 for litter size at birth, 0.06 for litter size at weaning, 0.27 for birth weight, 0.16 for weaning weight, 0.53 for fleece weight, 0.41 for fleece grade, and 0.55 for staple length. Estimate of direct genetic correlation between littersize at birth and weaning was 0.84 and between birth and weaning weights was 0.56. Estimate of genetic correlation between fleece weight and staple length was positive (0.55) but negative between fleece weight and fleece grade (-0.47) and between staple length and fleece grade (-0.70). Estimates of genetic correlations were positive but small between birth weight and litter size traits and moderate and positive between weaning weight and litter size traits. Fleece weight was lowly and negatively correlated with both litter size traits. Fleece grade was lowly and positively correlated with both litter size traits, while staple length was lowly and negatively correlated with the litter size traits. Estimates of correlations between weight traits and fleece weight were positive and low to moderate. Estimates of correlations between weight traits and fleece grade were negative and small. Estimates of correlations between staple length and birth weight (0.05) and weaning weight were small (-0.04). Estimated

  3. Functional testing strategy for coding genetic variants of unclear significance in MLH1 in Lynch syndrome diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Schäfer, Dieter; Langer, Deborah; Köger, Nicole; Wittmann, Margarethe; Aretz, Stefan; Steinke, Verena; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Trojan, Jörg; König, Rainer; Zeuzem, Stefan; Brieger, Angela; Plotz, Guido

    2015-02-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by inactivating mutations in the MLH1 gene, but genetic variants of unclear significance frequently preclude diagnosis. Functional testing can reveal variant-conferred defects in gene or protein function. Based on functional defect frequencies and clinical applicability of test systems, we developed a functional testing strategy aimed at efficiently detecting pathogenic defects in coding MLH1 variants. In this strategy, tests of repair activity and expression are prioritized over analyses of subcellular protein localization and messenger RNA (mRNA) formation. This strategy was used for four unclear coding MLH1 variants (p.Asp41His, p.Leu507Phe, p.Gln689Arg, p.Glu605del + p.Val716Met). Expression was analyzed using a transfection system, mismatch repair (MMR) activity by complementation in vitro, mRNA formation by reverse transcriptase-PCR in carrier lymphocyte mRNA, and subcellular localization with dye-labeled fusion constructs. All tests included clinically meaningful controls. The strategy enabled efficient identification of defects in two unclear variants: the p.Asp41His variant showed loss of MMR activity, whereas the compound variant p.Glu605del + p.Val716Met had a defect of expression. This expression defect was significantly stronger than the pathogenic expression reference variant analyzed in parallel, therefore the defect of the compound variant is also pathogenic. Interestingly, the expression defect was caused additively by both of the compound variants, at least one of which is non-pathogenic when occurring by itself. Tests were neutral for p.Leu507Phe and p.Gln689Arg, and the results were consistent with available clinical data. We finally discuss the improved sensitivity and efficiency of the applied strategy and its limitations in analyzing unclear coding MLH1 variants.

  4. RNA splicing. The human splicing code reveals new insights into the genetic determinants of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hui Y; Alipanahi, Babak; Lee, Leo J; Bretschneider, Hannes; Merico, Daniele; Yuen, Ryan K C; Hua, Yimin; Gueroussov, Serge; Najafabadi, Hamed S; Hughes, Timothy R; Morris, Quaid; Barash, Yoseph; Krainer, Adrian R; Jojic, Nebojsa; Scherer, Stephen W; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Frey, Brendan J

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate precision medicine and whole-genome annotation, we developed a machine-learning technique that scores how strongly genetic variants affect RNA splicing, whose alteration contributes to many diseases. Analysis of more than 650,000 intronic and exonic variants revealed widespread patterns of mutation-driven aberrant splicing. Intronic disease mutations that are more than 30 nucleotides from any splice site alter splicing nine times as often as common variants, and missense exonic disease mutations that have the least impact on protein function are five times as likely as others to alter splicing. We detected tens of thousands of disease-causing mutations, including those involved in cancers and spinal muscular atrophy. Examination of intronic and exonic variants found using whole-genome sequencing of individuals with autism revealed misspliced genes with neurodevelopmental phenotypes. Our approach provides evidence for causal variants and should enable new discoveries in precision medicine.

  5. Detection of genetic diversity and selection at the coding region of the melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) gene in Tibetan pigs and Landrace pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Jin, Long; Long, Keren; Chai, Jie; Ma, Jideng; Tang, Qianzi; Tian, Shilin; Hu, Yaodong; Lin, Ling; Wang, Xun; Jiang, Anan; Li, Xuewei; Li, Mingzhou

    2016-01-10

    Domestication and subsequent selective pressures have produced a large variety of pig coat colors in different regions and breeds. The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene plays a crucial role in determining coat color of mammals. Here, we investigated genetic diversity and selection at the coding region of the porcine melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) in Tibetan pigs and Landrace pigs. By contrast, genetic variability was much lower in Landrace pigs than in Tibetan pigs. Meanwhile, haplotype analysis showed that Tibetan pigs possessed shared haplotypes, suggesting a possibility of recent introgression event by way of crossbreeding with neighboring domestic pigs or shared ancestral polymorphism. Additionally, we detected positive selection at the MC1R in both Tibetan pigs and Landrace pigs through the dN/dS analysis. These findings suggested that novel phenotypic change (dark coat color) caused by novel mutations may help Tibetan pigs against intensive solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and camouflage in wild environment, whereas white coat color in Landrace were intentionally selected by human after domestication. Furthermore, both the phylogenetic analysis and the network analysis provided clues that MC1R in Asian and European wild boars may have initially experienced different selective pressures, and MC1R alleles diversified in modern domesticated pigs.

  6. Gene arrangement convergence, diverse intron content, and genetic code modifications in mitochondrial genomes of sphaeropleales (chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Paul O; González-Halphen, Diego; Lewis, Louise A

    2014-08-08

    The majority of our knowledge about mitochondrial genomes of Viridiplantae comes from land plants, but much less is known about their green algal relatives. In the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyta), only one representative mitochondrial genome is currently available-that of Acutodesmus obliquus. Our study adds nine completely sequenced and three partially sequenced mitochondrial genomes spanning the phylogenetic diversity of Sphaeropleales. We show not only a size range of 25-53 kb and variation in intron content (0-11) and gene order but also conservation of 13 core respiratory genes and fragmented ribosomal RNA genes. We also report an unusual case of gene arrangement convergence in Neochloris aquatica, where the two rns fragments were secondarily placed in close proximity. Finally, we report the unprecedented usage of UCG as stop codon in Pseudomuriella schumacherensis. In addition, phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes yield a fully resolved, well-supported phylogeny, showing promise for addressing systematic challenges in green algae. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Adaptive genetic potential of coniferous forest tree species under climate change: implications for sustainable forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Georgeta; Birsan, Marius-Victor; Teodosiu, Maria; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Daia, Mihai; Mirancea, Ionel; Ivanov, Paula; Alin, Alexandru

    2017-04-01

    Mountain ecosystems are extremely vulnerable to climate change. The real potential for adaptation depends upon the existence of a wide genetic diversity in trees populations, upon the adaptive genetic variation, respectively. Genetic diversity offers the guarantee that forest species can survive, adapt and evolve under the influence of changing environmental conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the genetic diversity and adaptive genetic potential of two local species - Norway spruce and European silver fir - in the context of regional climate change. Based on data from a long-term provenance experiments network and climate variables spanning over more than 50 years, we have investigated the impact of climatic factors on growth performance and adaptation of tree species. Our results indicate that climatic and geographic factors significantly affect forest site productivity. Mean annual temperature and annual precipitation amount were found to be statistically significant explanatory variables. Combining the additive genetic model with the analysis of nuclear markers we obtained different images of the genetic structure of tree populations. As genetic indicators we used: gene frequencies, genetic diversity, genetic differentiation, genetic variance, plasticity. Spatial genetic analyses have allowed identifying the genetic centers holding high genetic diversity which will be valuable sources of gene able to buffer the negative effects of future climate change. Correlations between the marginal populations and in the optimal vegetation, between the level of genetic diversity and ecosystem stability, will allow the assessment of future risks arising from current genetic structure. Therefore, the strategies for sustainable forest management have to rely on the adaptive genetic variation and local adaptation of the valuable genetic resources. This work was realized within the framework of the project GENCLIM (Evaluating the adaptive potential of the main

  8. Heavy-ion induced genetic changes and evolution processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. H.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.; Mei, M.

    1994-01-01

    On Moon and Mars, there will be more galactic cosmic rays and higher radiation doses than on Earth. Our experimental studies showed that heavy ion radiation can effectively cause mutation and chromosome aberrations and that high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) heavy-ion induced mutants can be irreversible. Chromosome translocations and deletions are common in cells irradiated by heavy particles, and ionizing radiations are effective in causing hyperploidy. The importance of the genetic changes in the evolution of life is an interesting question. Through evolution, there is an increase of DNA content in cells from lower forms of life to higher organisms. The DNA content, however, reached a plateau in vertebrates. By increasing DNA content, there can be an increase of information in the cell. For a given DNA content, the quality of information can be changed by rearranging the DNA. Because radiation can cause hyperploidy, an increase of DNA content in cells, and can induce DNA rearrangement, it is likely that the evolution of life on Mars will be effected by its radiation environment. A simple analysis shows that the radiation level on Mars may cause a mutation frequency comparable to that of the spontaneous mutation rate on Earth. To the extent that mutation plays a role in adaptation, radiation alone on Mars may thus provide sufficient mutation for the evolution of life.

  9. Cell biology and genetics of minimal change disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Moin A; Kobayashi, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Minimal change disease (MCD) is an important cause of nephrotic syndrome and is characterized by massive proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, resulting in edema and hypercholesterolemia. The podocyte plays a key role in filtration and its disruption results in a dramatic loss of function leading to proteinuria. Immunologic disturbance has been suggested in the pathogenesis of MCD. Because of its clinical features, such as recurrent relapse/remission course, steroid response in most patients, and rare familial cases, a genetic defect has been thought to be less likely in MCD. Recent progress in whole-exome sequencing reveals pathogenic mutations in familial cases in steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) and sheds light on possible mechanisms and key molecules in podocytes in MCD. On the other hand, in the majority of cases, the existence of circulating permeability factors has been implicated along with T lymphocyte dysfunction. Observations of benefit with rituximab added B cell involvement to the disease. Animal models are unsatisfactory, and the humanized mouse may be a good model that well reflects MCD pathophysiology to investigate suggested "T cell dysfunction" directly related to podocytes in vivo. Several candidate circulating factors and their effects on podocytes have been proposed but are still not sufficient to explain whole mechanisms and clinical features in MCD. Another circulating factor disease is focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and it is not clear if this is a distinct entity, or on the same spectrum, implicating the same circulating factor(s). These patients are mostly steroid resistant and often have a rapid relapse after transplantation. In clinical practice, predicting relapse or disease activity and response to steroids is important and is an area where novel biomarkers can be developed based on our growing knowledge of podocyte signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss recent findings in genetics and podocyte biology in MCD.

  10. Cell biology and genetics of minimal change disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Moin A.; Kobayashi, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Minimal change disease (MCD) is an important cause of nephrotic syndrome and is characterized by massive proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, resulting in edema and hypercholesterolemia. The podocyte plays a key role in filtration and its disruption results in a dramatic loss of function leading to proteinuria. Immunologic disturbance has been suggested in the pathogenesis of MCD. Because of its clinical features, such as recurrent relapse/remission course, steroid response in most patients, and rare familial cases, a genetic defect has been thought to be less likely in MCD. Recent progress in whole-exome sequencing reveals pathogenic mutations in familial cases in steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) and sheds light on possible mechanisms and key molecules in podocytes in MCD. On the other hand, in the majority of cases, the existence of circulating permeability factors has been implicated along with T lymphocyte dysfunction. Observations of benefit with rituximab added B cell involvement to the disease. Animal models are unsatisfactory, and the humanized mouse may be a good model that well reflects MCD pathophysiology to investigate suggested “T cell dysfunction” directly related to podocytes in vivo. Several candidate circulating factors and their effects on podocytes have been proposed but are still not sufficient to explain whole mechanisms and clinical features in MCD. Another circulating factor disease is focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and it is not clear if this is a distinct entity, or on the same spectrum, implicating the same circulating factor(s). These patients are mostly steroid resistant and often have a rapid relapse after transplantation. In clinical practice, predicting relapse or disease activity and response to steroids is important and is an area where novel biomarkers can be developed based on our growing knowledge of podocyte signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss recent findings in genetics and podocyte biology in

  11. Proposal of Functional-Specialization Multi-Objective Real-Coded Genetic Algorithm: FS-MOGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Naoki; Tanaka, Masaharu; Sakuma, Jun; Kobayashi, Shigenobu; Ono, Isao

    This paper presents a Genetic Algorithm (GA) for multi-objective function optimization. To find a precise and widely-distributed set of solutions in difficult multi-objective function optimization problems which have multimodality and curved Pareto-optimal set, a GA would be required conflicting behaviors in the early stage and the last stage of search. That is, in the early stage of search, GA should perform local-Pareto-optima-overcoming search which aims to overcome local Pareto-optima and converge the population to promising areas in the decision variable space. On the other hand, in the last stage of search, GA should perform Pareto-frontier-covering search which aims to spread the population along the Pareto-optimal set. NSGA-II and SPEA2, the most widely used conventional methods, have problems in local-Pareto-optima-overcoming and Pareto-frontier-covering search. In local-Pareto-optima-overcoming search, their selection pressure is too high to maintain the diversity for overcoming local Pareto-optima. In Pareto-frontier-covering search, their abilities of extrapolation-directed sampling are not enough to spread the population and they cannot sample along the Pareto-optimal set properly. To resolve above problems, the proposed method adaptively switches two search strategies, each of which is specialized for local-Pareto-optima-overcoming and Pareto-frontier-covering search, respectively. We examine the effectiveness of the proposed method using two benchmark problems. The experimental results show that our approach outperforms the conventional methods in terms of both local-Pareto-optima-overcoming and Pareto-frontier-covering search.

  12. Performing aggressive code optimization with an ability to rollback changes made by the aggressive optimizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwind, Michael K

    2013-07-23

    Mechanisms for aggressively optimizing computer code are provided. With these mechanisms, a compiler determines an optimization to apply to a portion of source code and determines if the optimization as applied to the portion of source code will result in unsafe optimized code that introduces a new source of exceptions being generated by the optimized code. In response to a determination that the optimization is an unsafe optimization, the compiler generates an aggressively compiled code version, in which the unsafe optimization is applied, and a conservatively compiled code version in which the unsafe optimization is not applied. The compiler stores both versions and provides them for execution. Mechanisms are provided for switching between these versions during execution in the event of a failure of the aggressively compiled code version. Moreover, predictive mechanisms are provided for predicting whether such a failure is likely.

  13. Timing of critical genetic changes in human breast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Ellsworth, Darrell L; Deyarmin, Brenda; Hoffman, Laurel R; Love, Brad; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Shriver, Craig D

    2005-12-01

    Breast cancer development has been characterized as a nonobligatory sequence of histological changes from normal epithelium through invasive malignancy. Although genetic alterations are thought to accumulate stochastically during tumorigenesis, little is known about the timing of critical mutations. This study examined allelic imbalance (AI) in tissue samples representing a continuum of breast cancer development to examine the evolution of genomic instability. Laser-microdissected DNA samples were collected from histologically normal breast specimens (n = 25), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH, n = 16), ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS, n = 37), and stage I to III invasive carcinomas (n = 72). Fifty-two microsatellite markers representing 26 chromosomal regions commonly deleted in breast cancer were used to assess patterns of AI. AI frequencies were .0001). DCIS lesions contain levels of genomic instability that are characteristic of advanced invasive tumors, and this suggests that the biology of a developing carcinoma may already be predetermined by the in situ stage. Observations that levels of AI in ADH lesions are similar to those in disease-free tissues provide a genomic rationale for why prevention strategies at the ADH level are successful and why cases with ADH involving surgical margins do not require further resection.

  14. Genetic polymorphisms and lipid response to dietary changes in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weggemans, R.M.; Zock, P.L.; Ordovas, J.M.; Ramos-Galluzzi, J.; Katan, M.B.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies on the effects of genetic polymorphisms on the serum cholesterol response to dietary treatments were often inconsistent and frequently involved small numbers of subjects. We studied the effect of 10 genetic polymorphisms on the responses of serum cholesterol to saturated and trans f

  15. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and coding (hardware) gene segments. For quantitative traits the bulk of variation, particularly that near the population mean, appears to reside in regulatory segments. The main exceptions to this rule concern proteins which handle extrinsic substances, here termed extrovert proteins. The immune system includes an unusually large proportion of this exceptional category, but even so its chief source of variation may well be polymorphism in regulatory gene segments. The main evidence for this view emerges from genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTL), which in the case of the immune system points to a major contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Further support comes from sequencing of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II promoters, where a high level of polymorphism has been detected. These Mhc promoters appear to act, in part at least, by gating the back-signal from T cells into antigen-presenting cells. Both these forms of polymorphism are likely to be sustained by the need for flexibility in the immune response. Future work on promoter polymorphism is likely to benefit from the input from genome informatics.

  16. Evolutionary patterns in the sequence and structure of transfer RNA: a window into early translation and the genetic code.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Jie Sun

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA molecules play vital roles during protein synthesis. Their acceptor arms are aminoacylated with specific amino acid residues while their anticodons delimit codon specificity. The history of these two functions has been generally linked in evolutionary studies of the genetic code. However, these functions could have been differentially recruited as evolutionary signatures were left embedded in tRNA molecules. Here we built phylogenies derived from the sequence and structure of tRNA, we forced taxa into monophyletic groups using constraint analyses, tested competing evolutionary hypotheses, and generated timelines of amino acid charging and codon discovery. Charging of Sec, Tyr, Ser and Leu appeared ancient, while specificities related to Asn, Met, and Arg were derived. The timelines also uncovered an early role of the second and then first codon bases, identified codons for Ala and Pro as the most ancient, and revealed important evolutionary take-overs related to the loss of the long variable arm in tRNA. The lack of correlation between ancestries of amino acid charging and encoding indicated that the separate discoveries of these functions reflected independent histories of recruitment. These histories were probably curbed by co-options and important take-overs during early diversification of the living world.

  17. Biological imprinting: Some genetic considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammad Saad Zaghloul Salem

    2014-06-21

    Jun 21, 2014 ... Abstract Genetic imprinting represents one of the most puzzling, still unexplained, phenomena in genetics. Changing .... acid defined by the new code comprising the new base), .... advantages constitutes the core concept of evolution. Though .... different mechanisms under independent genetic control. 8.

  18. Climatic changes can drive the loss of genetic diversity in a Neotropical savanna tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jacqueline S; Ballesteros-Mejia, Liliana; Lima-Ribeiro, Matheus S; Collevatti, Rosane G

    2017-03-13

    The high rates of future climatic changes, compared with the rates reported for past changes, may hamper species adaptation to new climates or the tracking of suitable conditions, resulting in significant loss of genetic diversity. Trees are dominant species in many biomes and because they are long-lived, they may not be able to cope with ongoing climatic changes. Here, we coupled ecological niche modelling (ENM) and genetic simulations to forecast the effects of climatic changes on the genetic diversity and the structure of genetic clusters. Genetic simulations were conditioned to climatic variables and restricted to plant dispersal and establishment. We used a Neotropical savanna tree as species model that shows a preference for hot and drier climates, but with low temperature seasonality. The ENM predicts a decreasing range size along the more severe future climatic scenario. Additionally, genetic diversity and allelic richness also decrease with range retraction and climatic genetic clusters are lost for both future scenarios, which will lead genetic variability to homogenize throughout the landscape. Besides, climatic genetic clusters will spatially reconfigure on the landscape following displacements of climatic conditions. Our findings indicate that climate change effects will challenge population adaptation to new environmental conditions because of the displacement of genetic ancestry clusters from their optimal conditions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Worldwide genetic and cultural change in human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creanza, Nicole; Feldman, Marcus W

    2016-12-01

    Both genetic variation and certain culturally transmitted phenotypes show geographic signatures of human demographic history. As a result of the human cultural predisposition to migrate to new areas, humans have adapted to a large number of different environments. Migration to new environments alters genetic selection pressures, and comparative genetic studies have pinpointed numerous likely targets of this selection. However, humans also exhibit many cultural adaptations to new environments, such as practices related to clothing, shelter, and food. Human culture interacts with genes and the environment in complex ways, and studying genes and culture together can deepen our understanding of human evolution.

  20. An efficient genetic algorithm for structural RNA pairwise alignment and its application to non-coding RNA discovery in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taneda Akito

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aligning RNA sequences with low sequence identity has been a challenging problem since such a computation essentially needs an algorithm with high complexities for taking structural conservation into account. Although many sophisticated algorithms for the purpose have been proposed to date, further improvement in efficiency is necessary to accelerate its large-scale applications including non-coding RNA (ncRNA discovery. Results We developed a new genetic algorithm, Cofolga2, for simultaneously computing pairwise RNA sequence alignment and consensus folding, and benchmarked it using BRAliBase 2.1. The benchmark results showed that our new algorithm is accurate and efficient in both time and memory usage. Then, combining with the originally trained SVM, we applied the new algorithm to novel ncRNA discovery where we compared S. cerevisiae genome with six related genomes in a pairwise manner. By focusing our search to the relatively short regions (50 bp to 2,000 bp sandwiched by conserved sequences, we successfully predict 714 intergenic and 1,311 sense or antisense ncRNA candidates, which were found in the pairwise alignments with stable consensus secondary structure and low sequence identity (≤ 50%. By comparing with the previous predictions, we found that > 92% of the candidates is novel candidates. The estimated rate of false positives in the predicted candidates is 51%. Twenty-five percent of the intergenic candidates has supports for expression in cell, i.e. their genomic positions overlap those of the experimentally determined transcripts in literature. By manual inspection of the results, moreover, we obtained four multiple alignments with low sequence identity which reveal consensus structures shared by three species/sequences. Conclusion The present method gives an efficient tool complementary to sequence-alignment-based ncRNA finders.

  1. 76 FR 13101 - Building Energy Codes Program: Presenting and Receiving Comments to DOE Proposed Changes to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... Part 430 Building Energy Codes Program: Presenting and Receiving Comments to DOE Proposed Changes to... CONTACT: Mr. Robert Dewey, U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building... sustainability with safety and performance. The IgCC is intended to provide a green model building...

  2. Impact of literacy and numeracy on motivation for behavior change after diabetes genetic risk testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassy, Jason L; O'Brien, Kelsey E; Waxler, Jessica L; Park, Elyse R; Delahanty, Linda M; Florez, Jose C; Meigs, James B; Grant, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes genetic risk testing might motivate at-risk patients to adopt diabetes prevention behaviors. However, the influence of literacy and numeracy on patient response to diabetes genetic risk is unknown. The authors investigated the association of health literacy, genetic literacy, and health numeracy with patient responses to diabetes genetic risk. and Measurements Overweight patients at high phenotypic risk for type 2 diabetes were recruited for a clinical trial of diabetes genetic risk testing. At baseline, participants predicted how their motivation for lifestyle modification to prevent diabetes might change in response to hypothetical scenarios of receiving "high" and "low" genetic risk results. Responses were analyzed according to participants' health literacy, genetic literacy, and health numeracy. Two-thirds (67%) of participants (n = 175) reported very high motivation to prevent diabetes. Despite high health literacy (92% at high school level), many participants had limited health numeracy (30%) and genetic literacy (38%). Almost all (98%) reported that high-risk genetic results would increase their motivation for lifestyle modification. In contrast, response to low-risk genetic results varied. Higher levels of health literacy (P = 0.04), genetic literacy (P = 0.02), and health numeracy (P = 0.02) were associated with an anticipated decrease in motivation for lifestyle modification in response to low-risk results. While patients reported that high-risk genetic results would motivate them to adopt healthy lifestyle changes, response to low-risk results varied by patient numeracy and literacy. However, anticipated responses may not correlate with true behavior change. If future research justifies the clinical use of genetic testing to motivate behavior change, it may be important to assess how patient characteristics modify that motivational effect.

  3. Clues to tRNA Evolution from the Distribution of Class II tRNAs and Serine Codons in the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Harold S

    2016-02-24

    We have previously proposed that tRNA(Gly) was the first tRNA and glycine was the first amino acid incorporated into the genetic code. The next two amino acids incorporated would have been the other two small hydrophilic amino acids serine and aspartic acid, which occurred through the duplication of the tRNA(Gly) sequence, followed by mutation of its anticodon by single C to U transition mutations, possibly through spontaneous deamination. Interestingly, however, tRNA(Ser) has a different structure than most other tRNAs, possessing a long variable arm; because of this tRNA(Ser) is classified as a class II tRNA. Also, serine codons are found not only in the bottom right-hand corner of the genetic code table next to those for glycine and aspartic acid, but also in the top row of the table, next to those for two of the most hydrophobic amino acids, leucine and phenylalanine. In the following, I propose that the class II tRNA structure of tRNA(Ser) and the arrangement of serine codons in the genetic code provide clues to the early evolution of tRNA and the genetic code. In addition, I address Di Giulio's recent criticism of our proposal that tRNA(Gly) was the first tRNA, and discuss how early peptides produced from a restricted amino acid alphabet of glycine, serine and aspartic acid might have possessed proteolytic activity, which is possibly important for the early recycling of amino acid monomers.

  4. Liposarcoma or lipoma: Does genetics change classic imaging criteria?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidault, F. [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France)], E-mail: bidault@igr.fr; Vanel, D. [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Musculoskeletal Oncology Research Center, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, 1/10 via di Barbiano, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Terrier, Ph.; Jalaguier, A. [Department of Pathology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Bonvalot, S. [Department of Surgery, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Pedeutour, F. [Laboratoire de Genetique, Centre hospitalier Universitaire de Nice (France); Couturier, J.M. [Service de Genetique Oncologique, Institut Curie, 26 rue d' Ulm, 75231 Paris (France); Dromain, C. [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France)

    2009-10-15

    Differentiating benign from malignant fatty tumours has always been very difficult for both radiologists and pathologists. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses provide complementary tools for differentiating soft tissue tumours. Our objective was to compare imaging criteria of malignancy with a new diagnostic gold standard, namely, pathological analysis combined with cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses. Nineteen patients with a fatty tumour were included. All had computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging examination before any biopsy or surgery. All had histopathological and cytogenetic and/or molecular genetic analyses. The imaging diagnosis of benign or malignant lesions was accurate in 15 cases, with 4 false positives for malignancy. Erroneous criteria were a large size (4 cases), and a mass that was not purely fatty. In conclusion, the main pitfall for a false positive radiological diagnosis of liposarcoma is certainly a large-sized tumour. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses contribute to the diagnosis and can be performed at the same time with a core biopsy.

  5. Orthogonal transformations for change detection, Matlab code (ENVI-like headers)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Matlab code to do (iteratively reweighted) multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data; accommodates ENVI (like) header files.......Matlab code to do (iteratively reweighted) multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data; accommodates ENVI (like) header files....

  6. The subtle role of climate change on population genetic structure in Canada lynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Jeffrey R; Wilson, Paul J; Gomez, Celine; Koen, Erin L; Bowman, Jeff; Thornton, Daniel; Murray, Dennis L

    2014-07-01

    Anthropogenically driven climatic change is expected to reshape global patterns of species distribution and abundance. Given recent links between genetic variation and environmental patterns, climate change may similarly impact genetic population structure, but we lack information on the spatial and mechanistic underpinnings of genetic-climate associations. Here, we show that current genetic variability of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) is strongly correlated with a winter climate gradient (i.e. increasing snow depth and winter precipitation from west-to-east) across the Pacific-North American (PNO) to North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) climatic systems. This relationship was stronger than isolation by distance and not explained by landscape variables or changes in abundance. Thus, these patterns suggest that individuals restricted dispersal across the climate boundary, likely in the absence of changes in habitat quality. We propose habitat imprinting on snow conditions as one possible explanation for this unusual phenomenon. Coupling historical climate data with future projections, we also found increasingly diverging snow conditions between the two climate systems. Based on genetic simulations using projected climate data (2041-2070), we predicted that this divergence could lead to a threefold increase in genetic differentiation, potentially leading to isolated east-west populations of lynx in North America. Our results imply that subtle genetic structure can be governed by current climate and that substantive genetic differentiation and related ecological divergence may arise from changing climate patterns. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Unique Characteristics of the Pyrrolysine System in the 7th Order of Methanogens: Implications for the Evolution of a Genetic Code Expansion Cassette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Borrel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrrolysine (Pyl, the 22nd proteogenic amino acid, was restricted until recently to few organisms. Its translational use necessitates the presence of enzymes for synthesizing it from lysine, a dedicated amber stop codon suppressor tRNA, and a specific amino-acyl tRNA synthetase. The three genomes of the recently proposed Thermoplasmata-related 7th order of methanogens contain the complete genetic set for Pyl synthesis and its translational use. Here, we have analyzed the genomic features of the Pyl-coding system in these three genomes with those previously known from Bacteria and Archaea and analyzed the phylogeny of each component. This shows unique peculiarities, notably an amber   tRNAPyl with an imperfect anticodon stem and a shortened tRNAPyl synthetase. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that a Pyl-coding system was present in the ancestor of the seventh order of methanogens and appears more closely related to Bacteria than to Methanosarcinaceae, suggesting the involvement of lateral gene transfer in the spreading of pyrrolysine between the two prokaryotic domains. We propose that the Pyl-coding system likely emerged once in Archaea, in a hydrogenotrophic and methanol-H2-dependent methylotrophic methanogen. The close relationship between methanogenesis and the Pyl system provides a possible example of expansion of a still evolving genetic code, shaped by metabolic requirements.

  8. Genome-wide conserved non-coding microsatellite (CNMS) marker-based integrative genetical genomics for quantitative dissection of seed weight in chickpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Deepak; Saxena, Maneesha S.; Kujur, Alice; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Tripathi, Shailesh; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Gowda, C. L. L.; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic footprinting identified 666 genome-wide paralogous and orthologous CNMS (conserved non-coding microsatellite) markers from 5′-untranslated and regulatory regions (URRs) of 603 protein-coding chickpea genes. The (CT)n and (GA)n CNMS carrying CTRMCAMV35S and GAGA8BKN3 regulatory elements, respectively, are abundant in the chickpea genome. The mapped genic CNMS markers with robust amplification efficiencies (94.7%) detected higher intraspecific polymorphic potential (37.6%) among genotypes, implying their immense utility in chickpea breeding and genetic analyses. Seventeen differentially expressed CNMS marker-associated genes showing strong preferential and seed tissue/developmental stage-specific expression in contrasting genotypes were selected to narrow down the gene targets underlying seed weight quantitative trait loci (QTLs)/eQTLs (expression QTLs) through integrative genetical genomics. The integration of transcript profiling with seed weight QTL/eQTL mapping, molecular haplotyping, and association analyses identified potential molecular tags (GAGA8BKN3 and RAV1AAT regulatory elements and alleles/haplotypes) in the LOB-domain-containing protein- and KANADI protein-encoding transcription factor genes controlling the cis-regulated expression for seed weight in the chickpea. This emphasizes the potential of CNMS marker-based integrative genetical genomics for the quantitative genetic dissection of complex seed weight in chickpea. PMID:25504138

  9. Developmental-Genetic Effects on Level and Change in Childhood Fears of Twins during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, Lindon J.; Silberg, Judy L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: If the adaptive significance of specific fears changes with age, the genetic contribution to individual differences may be lowest at the age of greatest salience. The roles of genes and environment in the developmental-genetic trajectory of five common childhood fears are explored in 1094 like-sex pairs of male and female monozygotic…

  10. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  11. THE LEGAL STATUS OF PROFESSIONALS IN THE CONTEXT OF CHANGES BROUGHT BY THE NEW CIVIL CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OANA-CARMEN RĂVAŞ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adoption of the New Civil Code (NCC meant a "turning point" for the radical concept of the subjects participating in legal relations which, according to the Commercial Code (now repealed almost all provisions usually were traders. Currently, the Unification of Private Law, according to the monistic conception embraced by NCC there are a series of difficulties in the conceptual framework of "professionals", the "company" and, especially, the professional traders. Professional traders are individuals: the individual, authorized individual and family business. The legal status of the three categories of individuals falling into the category of professionals traders is regulated by Ordinance no. 44/2008, amended.

  12. Bottlenecks drive temporal and spatial genetic changes in alpine caddisfly metapopulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokela Jukka

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extinction and re-colonisation of local populations is common in ephemeral habitats such as temporary streams. In most cases, such population turnover leads to reduced genetic diversity within populations and increased genetic differentiation among populations due to stochastic founder events, genetic drift, and bottlenecks associated with re-colonisation. Here, we examined the spatio-temporal genetic structure of 8 alpine caddisfly populations inhabiting permanent and temporary streams from four valleys in two regions of the Swiss Alps in years before and after a major stream drying event, the European heat wave in summer 2003. Results We found that population turnover after 2003 led to a loss of allelic richness and gene diversity but not to significant changes in observed heterozygosity. Within all valleys, permanent and temporary streams in any given year were not differentiated, suggesting considerable gene flow and admixture between streams with differing hydroperiods. Large changes in allele frequencies after 2003 resulted in a substantial increase in genetic differentiation among valleys within one to two years (1-2 generations driven primarily by drift and immigration. Signatures of genetic bottlenecks were detected in all 8 populations after 2003 using the M-ratio method, but in no populations when using a heterozygosity excess method, indicating differential sensitivity of bottleneck detection methods. Conclusions We conclude that genetic differentiation among A. uncatus populations changed markedly both temporally and spatially in response to the extreme climate event in 2003. Our results highlight the magnitude of temporal population genetic changes in response to extreme events. More specifically, our results show that extreme events can cause rapid genetic divergence in metapopulations. Further studies are needed to determine if recovery from this perturbation through gradual mixing of diverged populations by

  13. Population-level genetic variation and climate change in a biodiversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierenbeck, Kristina A

    2017-01-01

    Estimated future climate scenarios can be used to predict where hotspots of endemism may occur over the next century, but life history, ecological and genetic traits will be important in informing the varying responses within myriad taxa. Essential to predicting the consequences of climate change to individual species will be an understanding of the factors that drive genetic structure within and among populations. Here, I review the factors that influence the genetic structure of plant species in California, but are applicable elsewhere; existing levels of genetic variation, life history and ecological characteristics will affect the ability of an individual taxon to persist in the presence of anthropogenic change. Persistence in the face of climate change is likely determined by life history characteristics: dispersal ability, generation time, reproductive ability, degree of habitat specialization, plant-insect interactions, existing genetic diversity and availability of habitat or migration corridors. Existing levels of genetic diversity in plant populations vary based on a number of evolutionary scenarios that include endemism, expansion since the last glacial maximum, breeding system and current range sizes. A number of well-documented examples are provided from the California Floristic Province. Some predictions can be made for the responses of plant taxa to rapid environmental changes based on geographic position, evolutionary history, existing genetic variation, and ecological amplitude. The prediction of how species will respond to climate change will require a synthesis drawing from population genetics, geography, palaeontology and ecology. The important integration of the historical factors that have shaped the distribution and existing genetic structure of California's plant taxa will enable us to predict and prioritize the conservation of species and areas most likely to be impacted by rapid climate change, human disturbance and invasive species.

  14. Change to CERN Safety Rules: Abolition of Safety Code A7

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    As from 3 June 2016 Safety Code A7 “Road traffic at CERN” is abolished.   CERN's current practice to follow French or Swiss road traffic regulations on the corresponding parts of the CERN site will continue to apply. HSE Unit

  15. School Dress Codes in Post-Scarcity Japan: Contradictions and Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yuichi

    2007-01-01

    Focusing on dress codes, this article aims at providing a better understanding of current practices of youth socialization in Japanese schools and of cultural consequences of post-scarcity on schools. Since the late 1980s, there has been a national trend among Japanese secondary schools granting students more freedom of individual expression…

  16. Codes of conduct and the promise of a change of climate in worker organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koçer, R.G.; Fransen, L.

    2009-01-01

    Do codes of conduct adopted by multinational companies help to advance the position of workers in emerging economies? We focus on three workplaces in the Turkish clothing industry in order to assess their ability to promote Freedom of Association, in the context of a restrictive legal framework,

  17. The distribution of Elongation Factor-1 Alpha (EF-1alpha), Elongation Factor-Like (EFL), and a non-canonical genetic code in the ulvophyceae: discrete genetic characters support a consistent phylogenetic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gile, Gillian H; Novis, Philip M; Cragg, David S; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C; Keeling, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    The systematics of the green algal class Ulvophyceae have been difficult to resolve with ultrastructural and molecular phylogenetic analyses. Therefore, we investigated relationships among ulvophycean orders by determining the distribution of two discrete genetic characters previously identified only in the order Dasycladales. First, Acetabularia acetabulum uses the core translation GTPase Elongation Factor 1alpha (EF-1alpha) while most Chlorophyta instead possess the related GTPase Elongation Factor-Like (EFL). Second, the nuclear genomes of dasycladaleans A. acetabulum and Batophora oerstedii use a rare non-canonical genetic code in which the canonical termination codons TAA and TAG instead encode glutamine. Representatives of Ulvales and Ulotrichales were found to encode EFL, while Caulerpales, Dasycladales, Siphonocladales, and Ignatius tetrasporus were found to encode EF-1alpha, in congruence with the two major lineages previously proposed for the Ulvophyceae. The EF-1alpha of I. tetrasporus supports its relationship with Caulerpales/Dasycladales/Siphonocladales, in agreement with ultrastructural evidence, but contrary to certain small subunit rRNA analyses that place it with Ulvales/Ulotrichales. The same non-canonical genetic code previously described in A. acetabulum was observed in EF-1alpha sequences from Parvocaulis pusillus (Dasycladales), Chaetomorpha coliformis, and Cladophora cf. crinalis (Siphonocladales), whereas Caulerpales use the universal code. This supports a sister relationship between Siphonocladales and Dasycladales and further refines our understanding of ulvophycean phylogeny.

  18. Behaviour Change Techniques embedded in health and lifestyle apps: coding and analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaston Antezana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background There is evidence showing that commercially available health and lifestyle apps can be used as co-adjuvants to clinical interventions and for the prevention of chronic and non-communicable diseases. This can be particularly significant to support and improve wellbeing of young people given their familiarity with these resources. However it is important to understand the content and consistency of Behaviour Change Techniques (BCT’s embedded in the apps to maximise their potential benefits. Objectives This study explores the BCT content of a selected list of health and lifestyle tracking apps in three behavioural dimensions: physical activity, sleep and diet. We identified BCT commonalities within and between categories to detect the most frequently used and arguably more effective techniques in the context of wellbeing and promotion of health behaviours. Methods Apps were selected by using keywords and by reviewing the “health and fitness” category of GooglePlay (477 apps. The selection criteria included free apps (even if they also offered paid versions and being common to GooglePlay and AppStore. A background review of each app was also completed. Selected apps were classified according to user ratings in GooglePlay (apps with less that 4+ star ratings were disregarded. The top ten apps in each category were selected, making it a total of 30 for the analysis. Three coders used the apps for two months and were trained to use a comprehensive 93 items taxonomy (BCTv1 to complete the analysis. Results Strong BCT similarities were found across all three categories, suggesting a consistent basic content composition. Out of all 93 BCTS’s 8 were identified as being present in at least 50% of the apps. 6 of these BCT’s are concentrated in categories “1. Goals and Planning” and “2. Feedback and Monitoring”. BCT “Social support (unspecified” was coded for in 63% of the apps, as it was present through different features in

  19. Effects of physics change in Monte Carlo code on electron pencil beam dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader, E-mail: toutaoui.aek@gmail.com [Departement de Physique Medicale, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon BP399 Alger RP, Algiers (Algeria); Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia, E-mail: nadiakhelassi@yahoo.fr [Departement de Physique Medicale, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon BP399 Alger RP, Algiers (Algeria); Brahimi, Zakia, E-mail: zsbrahimi@yahoo.fr [Departement de Physique Medicale, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon BP399 Alger RP, Algiers (Algeria); Chami, Ahmed Chafik, E-mail: chafik_chami@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Sciences Nucleaires, Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumedienne, BP 32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-01-15

    Pencil beam algorithms used in computerized electron beam dose planning are usually described using the small angle multiple scattering theory. Alternatively, the pencil beams can be generated by Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport. In a previous work, the 4th version of the Electron Gamma Shower (EGS) Monte Carlo code was used to obtain dose distributions from monoenergetic electron pencil beam, with incident energy between 1 MeV and 50 MeV, interacting at the surface of a large cylindrical homogeneous water phantom. In 2000, a new version of this Monte Carlo code has been made available by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), which includes various improvements in its electron-transport algorithms. In the present work, we were interested to see if the new physics in this version produces pencil beam dose distributions very different from those calculated with oldest one. The purpose of this study is to quantify as well as to understand these differences. We have compared a series of pencil beam dose distributions scored in cylindrical geometry, for electron energies between 1 MeV and 50 MeV calculated with two versions of the Electron Gamma Shower Monte Carlo Code. Data calculated and compared include isodose distributions, radial dose distributions and fractions of energy deposition. Our results for radial dose distributions show agreement within 10% between doses calculated by the two codes for voxels closer to the pencil beam central axis, while the differences are up to 30% for longer distances. For fractions of energy deposition, the results of the EGS4 are in good agreement (within 2%) with those calculated by EGSnrc at shallow depths for all energies, whereas a slightly worse agreement (15%) is observed at deeper distances. These differences may be mainly attributed to the different multiple scattering for electron transport adopted in these two codes and the inclusion of spin effect, which produces an increase of the effective range of

  20. The optimal code searching method with an improved criterion of coded exposure for remote sensing image restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lirong; Cui, Guangmang; Feng, Huajun; Xu, Zhihai; Li, Qi; Chen, Yueting

    2015-03-01

    Coded exposure photography makes the motion de-blurring a well-posed problem. The integration pattern of light is modulated using the method of coded exposure by opening and closing the shutter within the exposure time, changing the traditional shutter frequency spectrum into a wider frequency band in order to preserve more image information in frequency domain. The searching method of optimal code is significant for coded exposure. In this paper, an improved criterion of the optimal code searching is proposed by analyzing relationship between code length and the number of ones in the code, considering the noise effect on code selection with the affine noise model. Then the optimal code is obtained utilizing the method of genetic searching algorithm based on the proposed selection criterion. Experimental results show that the time consuming of searching optimal code decreases with the presented method. The restoration image is obtained with better subjective experience and superior objective evaluation values.

  1. The Future of Genetics in Psychology and Psychiatry: Microarrays, Genome-Wide Association, and Non-Coding RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert; Davis, Oliver S. P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Much of what we thought we knew about genetics needs to be modified in light of recent discoveries. What are the implications of these advances for identifying genes responsible for the high heritability of many behavioural disorders and dimensions in childhood? Methods: Although quantitative genetics such as twin studies will continue…

  2. Reproduction in farm animals in an era of rapid genetic change: will genetic change outpace our knowledge of physiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxcroft, G R

    2012-08-01

    Compared with other domestic species, genetic nucleus selection has gradually increased both prolificacy and productivity of the breeding sow and the post-natal growth performance of commercial progeny. However, increasing variation in litter birth weight and foetal development may be indirect consequences of interactions among multiple genes controlling prolificacy and prenatal development. Phenotypic plasticity in the litter phenotype also results from effects of sow metabolic state on the developing embryo. New genomic tools may provide the opportunity to better balance the selection of genes controlling the component traits affecting the size and quality of litters born, particularly in multiparous sows. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Return of individual genetic results in a high-risk sample: enthusiasm and positive behavioral change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, Sarah M; Olfson, Emily; Culverhouse, Robert; Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia; Chen, Li-Shiun; DuBois, James; Fisher, Sherri; Kaphingst, Kimberly; Kaufman, David; Plunk, Andrew; Ramnarine, Shelina; Solomon, Stephanie; Saccone, Nancy L; Bierut, Laura J

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this study was to examine participant responses to disclosure of genetic results in a minority population at high risk for depression and anxiety. Eighty-two subjects in a genetic study of nicotine dependence were offered personalized genetic results. All were nicotine-dependent and 64% self-identified as African American. Pathway Genomics was used to evaluate genetic risks for five complex diseases. Participants returned 4-8 weeks after enrollment for in-person genetic counseling interviews and evaluation of baseline measures. A telephone follow-up was performed 4-8 weeks later to assess responses to results. Fifty of the 82 subjects (61%) were interested in receiving genetic results. These participants had multiple risk factors, including high baseline measures of depression (66%) and anxiety (32%), as well as low rates of employment (46%), adequate health literacy (46%), and health insurance (45%). Pathway Genomics reported "increased risk" for at least one disease in 77% of subjects. Ninety-five percent of participants reported that they appreciated the genetic results, and receiving these results was not associated with changes in symptoms of depression or anxiety. Furthermore, after return of genetic results, smoking cessation attempts increased (P = 0.003). Even in an underserved population at high risk for adverse psychological reactions, subjects responded positively to personalized genetic results.

  4. Real-Code Genetic Algorithm for Ground State Energies of Hydrogenic Donors in GaAs-(Ga,Al)As Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hai-Qing; TANG Chen; LIU Ming; ZHANG Hao

    2005-01-01

    We present a global optimization method, called the real-code genetic algorithm (RGA), to the ground state energies. The proposed method does not require partial derivatives with respect to each variational parameter or solving an eigenequation, so the present method overcomes the major difficulties of the variational method. RGAs also do not require coding and encoding procedures, so the computation time and complexity are reduced. The ground state energies of hydrogenic donors in GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum dots have been calculated for a range of the radius of the quantum dot radii of practical interest. They are compared with those obtained by the variational method. The results obtained demonstrate the proposed method is simple, accurate, and easy implement.

  5. Meeting review. Uncovering the genetic basis of adaptive change: on the intersection of landscape genomics and theoretical population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joost, Stéphane; Vuilleumier, Séverine; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Schoville, Sean; Leempoel, Kevin; Stucki, Sylvie; Widmer, Ivo; Melodelima, Christelle; Rolland, Jonathan; Manel, Stéphanie

    2013-07-01

    A workshop recently held at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL, Switzerland) was dedicated to understanding the genetic basis of adaptive change, taking stock of the different approaches developed in theoretical population genetics and landscape genomics and bringing together knowledge accumulated in both research fields. Indeed, an important challenge in theoretical population genetics is to incorporate effects of demographic history and population structure. But important design problems (e.g. focus on populations as units, focus on hard selective sweeps, no hypothesis-based framework in the design of the statistical tests) reduce their capability of detecting adaptive genetic variation. In parallel, landscape genomics offers a solution to several of these problems and provides a number of advantages (e.g. fast computation, landscape heterogeneity integration). But the approach makes several implicit assumptions that should be carefully considered (e.g. selection has had enough time to create a functional relationship between the allele distribution and the environmental variable, or this functional relationship is assumed to be constant). To address the respective strengths and weaknesses mentioned above, the workshop brought together a panel of experts from both disciplines to present their work and discuss the relevance of combining these approaches, possibly resulting in a joint software solution in the future.

  6. A parallel code to calculate rate-state seismicity evolution induced by time dependent, heterogeneous Coulomb stress changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattania, C.; Khalid, F.

    2016-09-01

    The estimation of space and time-dependent earthquake probabilities, including aftershock sequences, has received increased attention in recent years, and Operational Earthquake Forecasting systems are currently being implemented in various countries. Physics based earthquake forecasting models compute time dependent earthquake rates based on Coulomb stress changes, coupled with seismicity evolution laws derived from rate-state friction. While early implementations of such models typically performed poorly compared to statistical models, recent studies indicate that significant performance improvements can be achieved by considering the spatial heterogeneity of the stress field and secondary sources of stress. However, the major drawback of these methods is a rapid increase in computational costs. Here we present a code to calculate seismicity induced by time dependent stress changes. An important feature of the code is the possibility to include aleatoric uncertainties due to the existence of multiple receiver faults and to the finite grid size, as well as epistemic uncertainties due to the choice of input slip model. To compensate for the growth in computational requirements, we have parallelized the code for shared memory systems (using OpenMP) and distributed memory systems (using MPI). Performance tests indicate that these parallelization strategies lead to a significant speedup for problems with different degrees of complexity, ranging from those which can be solved on standard multicore desktop computers, to those requiring a small cluster, to a large simulation that can be run using up to 1500 cores.

  7. Genic non-coding microsatellites in the rice genome: characterization, marker design and use in assessing genetic and evolutionary relationships among domesticated groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Nagendra

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Completely sequenced plant genomes provide scope for designing a large number of microsatellite markers, which are useful in various aspects of crop breeding and genetic analysis. With the objective of developing genic but non-coding microsatellite (GNMS markers for the rice (Oryza sativa L. genome, we characterized the frequency and relative distribution of microsatellite repeat-motifs in 18,935 predicted protein coding genes including 14,308 putative promoter sequences. Results We identified 19,555 perfect GNMS repeats with densities ranging from 306.7/Mb in chromosome 1 to 450/Mb in chromosome 12 with an average of 357.5 GNMS per Mb. The average microsatellite density was maximum in the 5' untranslated regions (UTRs followed by those in introns, promoters, 3'UTRs and minimum in the coding sequences (CDS. Primers were designed for 17,966 (92% GNMS repeats, including 4,288 (94% hypervariable class I types, which were bin-mapped on the rice genome. The GNMS markers were most polymorphic in the intronic region (73.3% followed by markers in the promoter region (53.3% and least in the CDS (26.6%. The robust polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification efficiency and high polymorphic potential of GNMS markers over genic coding and random genomic microsatellite markers suggest their immediate use in efficient genotyping applications in rice. A set of these markers could assess genetic diversity and establish phylogenetic relationships among domesticated rice cultivar groups. We also demonstrated the usefulness of orthologous and paralogous conserved non-coding microsatellite (CNMS markers, identified in the putative rice promoter sequences, for comparative physical mapping and understanding of evolutionary and gene regulatory complexities among rice and other members of the grass family. The divergence between long-grained aromatics and subspecies japonica was estimated to be more recent (0.004 Mya compared to short

  8. Genetic and Environmental Regulation on Longitudinal Change of Metabolic Phenotypes in Danish and Chinese Adult Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuxia; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Pang, Zengchang

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The rate of change in metabolic phenotypes can be highly indicative of metabolic disorders and disorder-related modifications. We analyzed data from longitudinal twin studies on multiple metabolic phenotypes in Danish and Chinese twins representing two populations of distinct ethnic...... environmental contribution to blood pressure but no genetic contribution to longitudinal change in body mass traits. CONCLUSION: Our results emphasize the major contribution of unique environment to the observed intra-individual variation in all metabolic phenotypes in both samples, and meanwhile reveal...... differential patterns of genetic and common environmental regulation on changes over time in metabolic phenotypes across the two samples....

  9. Technological change in the wine market? The role of QR codes and wine apps in consumer wine purchases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey M. Higgins

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As an experiential good, wine purchases in the absence of tastings are often challenging and information-laden decisions. Technology has shaped the way consumers negotiate this complex purchase process. Using a sample of 631 US wine consumers, this research aims to identify the role of mobile applications and QR codes in the wine purchase decision. Results suggest that wine consumers that consider themselves wine connoisseurs or experts, enjoy talking about wine, and are interested in wine that is produced locally, organically, or sustainably are more likely to employ technology in their wine purchase decision. While disruption appears to have occurred on the supply side (number of wine applications available and the number of wine labels with a QR code, this research suggests that relatively little change is occurring on the demand side (a relatively small segment of the population—those already interested in wine—are employing the technology to aid in their purchase decision.

  10. Cryopreservation Causes Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Zebrafish Genital Ridges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta F Riesco

    Full Text Available Cryopreservation is an important tool routinely employed in Assisted Reproduction Technologies (ARTs and germplasm banking. For several years, the assessment of global DNA fragmentation seemed to be enough to ensure the integrity of genetic material. However, cryopreservation can produce molecular alterations in key genes and transcripts undetectable by traditional assays, such modifications could interfere with normal embryo development. We used zebrafish as a model to study the effect of cryopreservation on key transcripts and genes. We employed an optimized cryopreservation protocol for genital ridges (GRs containing primordial germ cells (PGCs considered one of the best cell sources for gene banking. Our results indicated that cryopreservation produced a decrease in most of the zebrafish studied transcripts (cxcr4b, pou5f1, vasa and sox2 and upregulation of heat shock proteins (hsp70, hsp90. The observed downregulation could not always be explained by promoter hypermethylation (only the vasa promoter underwent clear hypermethylation. To corroborate this, we used human spermatozoa (transcriptionally inactive cells obtaining a reduction in some transcripts (eIF2S1, and LHCGR. Our results also demonstrated that this effect was caused by freezing/thawing rather than exposure to cryoprotectants (CPAs. Finally, we employed real-time PCR (qPCR technology to quantify the number of lesions produced by cryopreservation in the studied zebrafish genes, observing very different vulnerability to damage among them. All these data suggest that molecular alterations caused by cryopreservation should be studied in detail in order to ensure the total safety of the technique.

  11. Integrating population and genetic monitoring to understand changes in the abundance of a threatened seabird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina Vásquez-Carrillo; R. William Henry; Laird Henkel; M. Zachariah. Peery

    2013-01-01

    Population monitoring programs for threatened species are rarely designed to disentangle the effects of movements from changes in birth and death rates on estimated trends in abundance. Here, we illustrate how population and genetic monitoring can be integrated to understand the cause of large changes in the abundance of a threatened species of seabird, the Marbled...

  12. Quantum genetic algorithm based on multi-chain coding scheme%基于多链拓展编码方案的量子遗传算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王之腾; 张宏军; 张睿; 邢英; 何健

    2012-01-01

    为了提高量子遗传算法的性能,提出了一种基于多链拓展编码方案的量子遗传算法.根据编码方案,将每个量子位分解为多个并列的基因,有效地拓展了搜索空间;结合编码方案提出量子更新策略,并引入了动态调整旋转角机制对个体进行更新,使用量子非门变异策略实现量子变异.仿真实验中,分析了使用不同变异概率[0,0.1,…,0.9,1]时对算法性能的影响,对比了分别使用普通量子遗传算法、双链编码方案、三链编码方案以及四链编码方案的量子遗传算法在优化函数极值问题时算法的性能.实验结果证明,通过增加基因链可以显著提高算法的性能,多链拓展编码方案可以提高量子遗传算法的性能,是有效的.%In order to improve the efficiency of the quantum genetic algorithm, this paper proposed a quantum genetic algorithm based on a expanded multi-chain coding scheme. The algorithm took qubit as chromosome. Each chromosome generated multiple and parallel gene chains which were mapping to multiple optimized solutions by separating qubit into multiple and parallel genes. The expanded genes chains expanded the searching space effectively and increased evolutionary rate for quantum genetic algorithm. It introduced the dynamic adjusting rotation angle mechanism to quantum rotation gate to guide individual e-volution and used quantum not-gate to prevent algorithm occurring premature convergence. The method further improved searching efficiency. In the simulation experiment, analysed the influence for the algorithm with different variation probability ( [0,0. 1 ,…,0. 9,1 ] )and used different code schemes to optimize extremal function. The simulation experiment result shows that it can obviously improve the efficiency of quantum genetic algorithm by adding gene chain, and the quantum genetic algorithm based on a expanded multi-chain coding scheme is efficient.

  13. Well-being & psychological distress : genetic and environmental influences on stability, change, and covariance

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    An important goal to psychological research is to advance knowledge on development and sustenance of positive mental health. This study is the first large scale twin study investigating the genetic and environmental influences on stability and change in both psychological well-being and distress during the developmental juncture of young adulthood. The study also aims to illuminate the extent to which genetic and environmental influences on indicators of well-being and distress are overlappin...

  14. Gene and genon concept: coding versus regulation. A conceptual and information-theoretic analysis of genetic storage and expression in the light of modern molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Klaus; Jost, Jürgen

    2007-10-01

    , as steered by the genon. It emerges finally as an uninterrupted nucleic acid sequence at mRNA level just prior to translation, in faithful correspondence with the amino acid sequence to be produced as a polypeptide. After translation, the genon has fulfilled its role and expires. The distinction between the protein coding information as materialised in the final polypeptide and the processing information represented by the genon allows us to set up a new information theoretic scheme. The standard sequence information determined by the genetic code expresses the relation between coding sequence and product. Backward analysis asks from which coding region in the DNA a given polypeptide originates. The (more interesting) forward analysis asks in how many polypeptides of how many different types a given DNA segment is expressed. This concerns the control of the expression process for which we have introduced the genon concept. Thus, the information theoretic analysis can capture the complementary aspects of coding and regulation, of gene and genon.

  15. Significant issues and changes for ANSI/ASME OM-1 1981, part 1, ASME OMc code-1994, and ASME OM Code-1995, Appendix I, inservice testing of pressure relief devices in light water reactor power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seniuk, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper identifies significant changes to the ANSI/ASME OM-1 1981, Part 1, and ASME Omc Code-1994 and ASME OM Code-1995, Appendix I, {open_quotes}Inservice Testing of Pressure Relief Devices in Light-Water Reactor Power Plants{close_quotes}. The paper describes changes to different Code editions and presents insights into the direction of the code committee and selected topics to be considered by the ASME O&M Working Group on pressure relief devices. These topics include scope issues, thermal relief valve issues, as-found and as-left set-pressure determinations, exclusions from testing, and cold setpoint bench testing. The purpose of this paper is to describe some significant issues being addressed by the O&M Working Group on Pressure Relief Devices (OM-1). The writer is currently the chair of OM-1 and the statements expressed herein represents his personal opinion.

  16. Genetic changes in Mammalian cells transformed by helium cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. (Naples Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche); Yang, T.C.; Roots, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Midterm Syrian Hamster embryo (SHE) cells were employed to study high LET-radiation induced tumorigenesis. Normal SHE cells (secondary passage) were irradiated with accelerated helium ions at an incident energy of 22 MeV/u (9--10 keV/{mu}m). Transformed clones were isolated after growth in soft agar of cells obtained from the foci of the initial monolayer plated postirradiation. To study the progression process of malignant transformation, the transformed clones were followed by monolayer subculturing for prolonged periods of time. Subsequently, neoplasia tests in nude mice were done. In this work, however, we have focused on karyotypic changes in the banding patterns of the chromosomes during the early part of the progressive process of cell transformation for helium ion-induced transformed cells. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Real-time monitoring of RAG-catalyzed DNA cleavage unveils dynamic changes in coding end association with the coding end complex

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guannan; Dhar, Kajari; Swanson, Patrick C.; Levitus, Marcia; Chang, Yung

    2012-01-01

    During V(D)J recombination, the RAG1/2 recombinase is thought to play an active role in transferring newly excised recombination ends from the RAG post-cleavage complex (PCC) to the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) machinery to promote appropriate antigen receptor gene assembly. However, this transfer mechanism is poorly understood, partly because of the technical difficulty in revealing weak association of coding ends (CEs) with one of the PCCs, coding end complex (CEC). Using fluorescence ...

  18. Non-coding RNAs change their expression profile after Retinoid induced differentiation of the promyelocytic cell line NB4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caporaso Maria G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs as fine regulators of eukaryotic gene expression has emerged by several studies focusing on microRNAs (miRNAs. miRNAs represent a newly discovered family of non coding-RNAs. They are thought to be crucial players of human hematopoiesis and related tumorigenesis and to represent a potential tool to detect the early stages of cancer. More recently, the expression regulation of numerous long ncRNAs has been linked to cell growth, differentiation and cancer although the molecular mechanism of their function is still unknown. NB4 cells are promyelocytic cells that can be induced to differentiation upon retinoic acid (ATRA treatment and represent a feasible model to study changes of non coding RNAs expression between cancer cells and their terminally differentiated counterpart. Findings we screened, by microarray analysis, the expression of 243 miRNAs and 492 human genes transcribing for putative long ncRNAs different from miRNAs in NB4 cells before and after ATRA induced differentiation. Our data show that 8 miRNAs, and 58 long ncRNAs were deregulated by ATRA induced NB4 differentiation. Conclusion our data suggest that ATRA-induced differentiation lead to deregulation of a large number of the ncRNAs that can play regulatory roles in both tumorigenesis and differentiation.

  19. Time for change: a roadmap to guide the implementation of the World Anti-Doping Code 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Jiri; Baume, Norbert; Botré, Francesco; Broséus, Julian; Budgett, Richard; Frey, Walter O; Geyer, Hans; Harcourt, Peter Rex; Ho, Dave; Howman, David; Isola, Victor; Lundby, Carsten; Marclay, François; Peytavin, Annie; Pipe, Andrew; Pitsiladis, Yannis P; Reichel, Christian; Robinson, Neil; Rodchenkov, Grigory; Saugy, Martial; Sayegh, Souheil; Segura, Jordi; Thevis, Mario; Vernec, Alan; Viret, Marjolaine; Vouillamoz, Marc; Zorzoli, Mario

    2014-05-01

    A medical and scientific multidisciplinary consensus meeting was held from 29 to 30 November 2013 on Anti-Doping in Sport at the Home of FIFA in Zurich, Switzerland, to create a roadmap for the implementation of the 2015 World Anti-Doping Code. The consensus statement and accompanying papers set out the priorities for the antidoping community in research, science and medicine. The participants achieved consensus on a strategy for the implementation of the 2015 World Anti-Doping Code. Key components of this strategy include: (1) sport-specific risk assessment, (2) prevalence measurement, (3) sport-specific test distribution plans, (4) storage and reanalysis, (5) analytical challenges, (6) forensic intelligence, (7) psychological approach to optimise the most deterrent effect, (8) the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) and confounding factors, (9) data management system (Anti-Doping Administration & Management System (ADAMS), (10) education, (11) research needs and necessary advances, (12) inadvertent doping and (13) management and ethics: biological data. True implementation of the 2015 World Anti-Doping Code will depend largely on the ability to align thinking around these core concepts and strategies. FIFA, jointly with all other engaged International Federations of sports (Ifs), the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), are ideally placed to lead transformational change with the unwavering support of the wider antidoping community. The outcome of the consensus meeting was the creation of the ad hoc Working Group charged with the responsibility of moving this agenda forward.

  20. Plasticity and genetic adaptation mediate amphibian and reptile responses to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Mark C; Richardson, Jonathan L; Freidenfelds, Nicole A

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation are predicted to mitigate some of the negative biotic consequences of climate change. Here, we evaluate evidence for plastic and evolutionary responses to climate variation in amphibians and reptiles via a literature review and meta-analysis. We included studies that either document phenotypic changes through time or space. Plasticity had a clear and ubiquitous role in promoting phenotypic changes in response to climate variation. For adaptive evolution, we found no direct evidence for evolution of amphibians or reptiles in response to climate change over time. However, we found many studies that documented adaptive responses to climate along spatial gradients. Plasticity provided a mixture of adaptive and maladaptive responses to climate change, highlighting that plasticity frequently, but not always, could ameliorate climate change. Based on our review, we advocate for more experiments that survey genetic changes through time in response to climate change. Overall, plastic and genetic variation in amphibians and reptiles could buffer some of the formidable threats from climate change, but large uncertainties remain owing to limited data.

  1. [Modification changes of the genetic material in Saccharomyces yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repnevskaia, M V; Kashkin, P K; Inge-Vechtomov, S G

    1989-03-01

    The problem of mating-type switches in heterothallic yeast cells was investigated. In selective system for cytoduction in alpha x alpha crosses alpha-cytoductants were predominantly obtained. Thus matings in alpha x alpha crosses can proceed through non-heritable changes (modifications) of the mating type alpha----a. The frequency of alpha-cytoductants after UV-irradiation of the recipient cells exceeded the control value 50-90 times. The extra copy of MAT alpha dramatically decreased the frequency of cytoductants in alpha x alpha crosses, either spontaneously or after UV-irradiation. The rad18 recipient defective in postreplication repair had 70-times increased level of mating-type modifications, as compared with isogenic Rad+ strain. An explanation consistent with these data is that mating-type modifications are due to phenotypic expression of primary lesions of MAT alpha locus. Such lesions might be expressed as transient a-mating type. After the mating event, these lesions can be repaired or turned to true mutations within the MAT locus. In fact, approximately half of non-mating cytoductants from alpha x alpha crosses had the phenotype of mat alpha 2 mutants.

  2. Assessment of genetic mutations in the XRCC2 coding region by high resolution melting curve analysis and the risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Fayaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is the major pathway for repairing double strand breaks (DSBs in eukaryotes and XRCC2 is an essential component of the HR repair machinery. To evaluate the potential role of mutations in gene repair by HR in individuals susceptible to differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC we used high resolution melting (HRM analysis, a recently introduced method for detecting mutations, to examine the entire XRCC2 coding region in an Iranian population. HRM analysis was used to screen for mutations in three XRCC2 coding regions in 50 patients and 50 controls. There was no variation in the HRM curves obtained from the analysis of exons 1 and 2 in the case and control groups. In exon 3, an Arg188His polymorphism (rs3218536 was detected as a new melting curve group (OR: 1.46; 95%CI: 0.432-4.969; p = 0.38 compared with the normal melting curve. We also found a new Ser150Arg polymorphism in exon 3 of the control group. These findings suggest that genetic variations in the XRCC2 coding region have no potential effects on susceptibility to DTC. However, further studies with larger populations are required to confirm this conclusion.

  3. Genetic Coding Variant in GPR65 Alters Lysosomal pH and Links Lysosomal Dysfunction with Colitis Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lassen, Kara G.; McKenzie, Craig I.; Mari, Muriel; Murano, Tatsuro; Begun, Jakob; Baxt, Leigh A.; Goel, Gautam; Villablanca, Eduardo J.; Kuo, Szu Yu; Huang, Hailiang; Macia, Laurence; Bhan, Atul K.; Batten, Marcel; Daly, Mark J.; Reggiori, Fulvio; Mackay, Charles R.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous polymorphisms have been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), identifying the function of these genetic factors has proved challenging. Here we identified a role for nine genes in IBD susceptibility loci in antibacterial autophagy and characterized a role for one of the

  4. Genetic and epigenetic changes associated with cholangiocarcinoma: From DNA methylation to microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinomas are malignant epithelial liver tumors arising from the intra- and extra-hepatic bile ducts. Little is known about the molecular development of this disease, and very few effective treatment options are available. Thus, prognosis is poor. Genetic and epigenetic changes play an integral role in the neoplastic transformation of human cells to their malignant counterparts. This review summarizes some of the more prevalent genetic alterations (by microRNA expression)and epigenetic changes (hypermethylation of specific gene promoters) that are thought to contribute to the carcinogenic process in cholangiocarcinoma.

  5. The Baldwin effect and genetic assimilation: revisiting two mechanisms of evolutionary change mediated by phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispo, Erika

    2007-11-01

    Two different, but related, evolutionary theories pertaining to phenotypic plasticity were proposed by James Mark Baldwin and Conrad Hal Waddington. Unfortunately, these theories are often confused with one another. Baldwin's notion of organic selection posits that plasticity influences whether an individual will survive in a new environment, thus dictating the course of future evolution. Heritable variations can then be selected upon to direct phenotypic evolution (i.e., "orthoplasy"). The combination of these two processes (organic selection and orthoplasy) is now commonly referred to as the "Baldwin effect." Alternately, Waddington's genetic assimilation is a process whereby an environmentally induced phenotype, or "acquired character," becomes canalized through selection acting upon the developmental system. Genetic accommodation is a modern term used to describe the process of heritable changes that occur in response to a novel induction. Genetic accommodation is a key component of the Baldwin effect, and genetic assimilation is a type of genetic accommodation. I here define both the Baldwin effect and genetic assimilation in terms of genetic accommodation, describe cases in which either should occur in nature, and propose that each could play a role in evolutionary diversification.

  6. Looping Genomes: Diagnostic Change and the Genetic Makeup of the Autism Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navon, Daniel; Eyal, Gil

    2016-03-01

    This article builds on Hacking's framework of "dynamic nominalism" to show how knowledge about biological etiology can interact with the "kinds of people" delineated by diagnostic categories in ways that "loop" or modify both over time. The authors use historical materials to show how "geneticization" played a crucial role in binding together autism as a biosocial community and how evidence from genetics research later made an important contribution to the diagnostic expansion of autism. In the second part of the article, the authors draw on quantitative and qualitative analyses of autism rates over time in several rare conditions that are delineated strictly according to genomic mutations in order to demonstrate that these changes in diagnostic practice helped to both increase autism's prevalence and create its enormous genetic heterogeneity. Thus, a looping process that began with geneticization and involved the social effects of genetics research itself transformed the autism population and its genetic makeup.

  7. The physiology of climate change: how potentials for acclimatization and genetic adaptation will determine 'winners' and 'losers'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somero, G N

    2010-03-15

    Physiological studies can help predict effects of climate change through determining which species currently live closest to their upper thermal tolerance limits, which physiological systems set these limits, and how species differ in acclimatization capacities for modifying their thermal tolerances. Reductionist studies at the molecular level can contribute to this analysis by revealing how much change in sequence is needed to adapt proteins to warmer temperatures--thus providing insights into potential rates of adaptive evolution--and determining how the contents of genomes--protein-coding genes and gene regulatory mechanisms--influence capacities for adapting to acute and long-term increases in temperature. Studies of congeneric invertebrates from thermally stressful rocky intertidal habitats have shown that warm-adapted congeners are most susceptible to local extinctions because their acute upper thermal limits (LT(50) values) lie near current thermal maxima and their abilities to increase thermal tolerance through acclimation are limited. Collapse of cardiac function may underlie acute and longer-term thermal limits. Local extinctions from heat death may be offset by in-migration of genetically warm-adapted conspecifics from mid-latitude 'hot spots', where midday low tides in summer select for heat tolerance. A single amino acid replacement is sufficient to adapt a protein to a new thermal range. More challenging to adaptive evolution are lesions in genomes of stenotherms like Antarctic marine ectotherms, which have lost protein-coding genes and gene regulatory mechanisms needed for coping with rising temperature. These extreme stenotherms, along with warm-adapted eurytherms living near their thermal limits, may be the major 'losers' from climate change.

  8. Simulating population genetics of pathogen vectors in changing landscapes: guidelines and application with Triatoma brasiliensis.

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    Francois Rebaudo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms that influence the population dynamics and spatial genetic structure of the vectors of pathogens infecting humans is a central issue in tropical epidemiology. In view of the rapid changes in the features of landscape pathogen vectors live in, this issue requires new methods that consider both natural and human systems and their interactions. In this context, individual-based model (IBM simulations represent powerful yet poorly developed approaches to explore the response of pathogen vectors in heterogeneous social-ecological systems, especially when field experiments cannot be performed.We first present guidelines for the use of a spatially explicit IBM, to simulate population genetics of pathogen vectors in changing landscapes. We then applied our model with Triatoma brasiliensis, originally restricted to sylvatic habitats and now found in peridomestic and domestic habitats, posing as the most important Trypanosoma cruzi vector in Northeastern Brazil. We focused on the effects of vector migration rate, maximum dispersal distance and attraction by domestic habitat on T. brasiliensis population dynamics and spatial genetic structure. Optimized for T. brasiliensis using field data pairwise fixation index (FST from microsatellite loci, our simulations confirmed the importance of these three variables to understand vector genetic structure at the landscape level. We then ran prospective scenarios accounting for land-use change (deforestation and urbanization, which revealed that human-induced land-use change favored higher genetic diversity among sampling points.Our work shows that mechanistic models may be useful tools to link observed patterns with processes involved in the population genetics of tropical pathogen vectors in heterogeneous social-ecological landscapes. Our hope is that our study may provide a testable and applicable modeling framework to a broad community of epidemiologists for formulating scenarios of

  9. Modeling sea level changes and geodetic variations by glacial isostasy: the improved SELEN code

    CERN Document Server

    Spada, Giorgio; Galassi, Gaia; Colleoni, Florence

    2012-01-01

    We describe the basic features of SELEN, an open source Fortran 90 program for the numerical solution of the so-called "Sea Level Equation" for a spherical, layered, non-rotating Earth with Maxwell viscoelastic rheology. The Sea Level Equation was introduced in the 70s to model the sea level variations in response to the melting of late-Pleistocene ice-sheets, but it can be also employed for predictions of geodetic quantities such as vertical and horizontal surface displacements and gravity variations on a global and a regional scale. SELEN (acronym of SEa Level EquatioN solver) is particularly oriented to scientists at their first approach to the glacial isostatic adjustment problem and, according to our experience, it can be successfully used in teaching. The current release (2.9) considerably improves the previous versions of the code in terms of computational efficiency, portability and versatility. In this paper we describe the essentials of the theory behind the Sea Level Equation, the purposes of SELEN...

  10. The Poitiers School of Mathematical and Theoretical Biology: Besson-Gavaudan-Schützenberger's Conjectures on Genetic Code and RNA Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demongeot, J; Hazgui, H

    2016-12-01

    The French school of theoretical biology has been mainly initiated in Poitiers during the sixties by scientists like J. Besson, G. Bouligand, P. Gavaudan, M. P. Schützenberger and R. Thom, launching many new research domains on the fractal dimension, the combinatorial properties of the genetic code and related amino-acids as well as on the genetic regulation of the biological processes. Presently, the biological science knows that RNA molecules are often involved in the regulation of complex genetic networks as effectors, e.g., activators (small RNAs as transcription factors), inhibitors (micro-RNAs) or hybrids (circular RNAs). Examples of such networks will be given showing that (1) there exist RNA "relics" that have played an important role during evolution and have survived in many genomes, whose probability distribution of their sub-sequences is quantified by the Shannon entropy, and (2) the robustness of the dynamics of the networks they regulate can be characterized by the Kolmogorov-Sinaï dynamic entropy and attractor entropy.

  11. Change in genetic size of small-closed populations: lessons from a domestic mammal population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Ghafouri-Kesbi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to monitor changes in genetic size of a small-closed population of Iranian Zandi sheep, by using pedigree information from animals born between 1991 and 2005. The genetic size was assessed by using measures based on the probability of identity-by-descend of genes (coancestry, f, and effective population size, Ne, as well as measures based on probability of gene origin (effective number of founders, f e, effective number of founder genomes, f g, and effective number of non-founder genomes, f ne. Average coancestry, or the degree of genetic similarity of individuals, increased from 0.81% to 1.44% during the period 1993 to 2005, at the same time that Ne decreased from 263 to 93. The observed trend for f e was irregular throughout the experiment in a way that f e was 68, 87, 77, 92, and 80 in 1993, 1996, 1999, 2002, and 2005, respectively. Simultaneously, f g, the most informative effective number, decreased from 61 to 35. The index of genetic diversity (GD which was obtained from estimates of f g,decreased about 2% throughout the period studied. In addition, a noticeable reduction was observed in the estimates of f ne from 595 in 1993 to 61 in 2005. The higher than 1 ratio of f e to f g indicated the presence of bottlenecks and genetic drift in the development of this population of Zandi sheep. From 1993 to 1999, f ne was much higher than f e, thereby indicating that with respect to loss of genetic diversity, the unequal contribution of founders was more important than the random genetic drift in non-founder generations. Subsequently, random genetic drift in non-founder generations was the major reason for f e> f ne. The minimization of average coancestry in new reproductive individuals was recommended as a means of preserving the population against a further loss in genetic diversity.

  12. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Ole F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. Results Theoretical derivations showed that parameter estimates and estimated marker effects in marker-based models are the same irrespective of the allele coding, provided that the model has a fixed general mean. For the equivalent models, the same results hold, even though different allele coding methods lead to different genomic relationship matrices. Calculated genomic breeding values are independent of allele coding when the estimate of the general mean is included into the values. Reliabilities of estimated genomic breeding values calculated using elements of the inverse of the coefficient matrix depend on the allele coding because different allele coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being

  13. Unintended compositional changes in genetically modified (GM) crops: 20 years of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Rod A; Price, William D

    2013-12-04

    The compositional equivalency between genetically modified (GM) crops and nontransgenic comparators has been a fundamental component of human health safety assessment for 20 years. During this time, a large amount of information has been amassed on the compositional changes that accompany both the transgenesis process and traditional breeding methods; additionally, the genetic mechanisms behind these changes have been elucidated. After two decades, scientists are encouraged to objectively assess this body of literature and determine if sufficient scientific uncertainty still exists to continue the general requirement for these studies to support the safety assessment of transgenic crops. It is concluded that suspect unintended compositional effects that could be caused by genetic modification have not materialized on the basis of this substantial literature. Hence, compositional equivalence studies uniquely required for GM crops may no longer be justified on the basis of scientific uncertainty.

  14. Functional divergence of APETALA1 and FRUITFULL is due to changes in both regulation and coding sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth W. McCarthy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplications are prevalent in plants, and functional divergence subsequent to duplication may be linked with the occurrence of novel phenotypes in plant evolution. Here, we examine the functional divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana APETALA1 (AP1 and FRUITFULL (FUL, which arose via a duplication correlated with the origin of the core eudicots. Both AP1 and FUL play a role in floral meristem identity, but AP1 is required for the formation of sepals and petals whereas FUL is involved in cauline leaf and fruit development. AP1 and FUL are expressed in mutually exclusive domains but also differ in sequence, with unique conserved motifs in the C-terminal domains of the proteins that suggest functional differentiation. To determine whether the functional divergence of AP1 and FUL is due to changes in regulation or changes in coding sequence, we performed promoter swap experiments, in which FUL was expressed in the AP1 domain in the ap1 mutant and vice versa. Our results show that FUL can partially substitute for AP1, and AP1 can partially substitute for FUL; thus, the functional divergence between AP1 and FUL is due to changes in both regulation and coding sequence. We also mutated AP1 and FUL conserved motifs to determine if they are required for protein function and tested the ability of these mutated proteins to interact in yeast with known partners. We found that these motifs appear to play at best a minor role in protein function and dimerization capability, despite being strongly conserved. Our results suggest that the functional differentiation of these two paralogous key transcriptional regulators involves both differences in regulation and in sequence; however, sequence changes in the form of unique conserved motifs do not explain the differences observed.

  15. Genetic and Environmental Regulation on Longitudinal Change of Metabolic Phenotypes in Danish and Chinese Adult Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuxia; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Pang, Zengchang; Zhang, Dongfeng; Duan, Haiping; Tan, Qihua; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Kruse, Torben; Dalgård, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The rate of change in metabolic phenotypes can be highly indicative of metabolic disorders and disorder-related modifications. We analyzed data from longitudinal twin studies on multiple metabolic phenotypes in Danish and Chinese twins representing two populations of distinct ethnic, cultural, social-economic backgrounds and geographical environments. The study covered a relatively large sample of 502 pairs of Danish adult twins followed up for a long period of 12 years with a mean age at intake of 38 years (range: 18-65) and a total of 181 Chinese adult twin pairs traced for about 7 years with a mean baseline age of 39.5 years (range: 23-64). The classical twin models were fitted to the longitudinal change in each phenotype (Δphenotype) to estimate the genetic and environmental contributions to the variation in Δphenotype. Moderate to high contributions by the unique environment were estimated for all phenotypes in both Danish (from 0.51 for low density lipoprotein cholesterol up to 0.72 for triglycerides) and Chinese (from 0.41 for triglycerides up to 0.73 for diastolic blood pressure) twins; low to moderate genetic components were estimated for long-term change in most of the phenotypes in Danish twins except for triglycerides and hip circumference. Compared with Danish twins, the Chinese twins tended to have higher genetic control over the longitudinal changes in lipids (except high density lipoprotein cholesterol) and glucose, higher unique environmental contribution to blood pressure but no genetic contribution to longitudinal change in body mass traits. Our results emphasize the major contribution of unique environment to the observed intra-individual variation in all metabolic phenotypes in both samples, and meanwhile reveal differential patterns of genetic and common environmental regulation on changes over time in metabolic phenotypes across the two samples.

  16. Effects of climate change on nutrition and genetics of White-tailed Ptarmigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Stricker, Craig A.; St. John, Judy; Wann, Gregory T.; O'Donnell, Michael S.; Aldridge, Cameron L.

    2011-01-01

    White-tailed Ptarmigan (Lagopus leucura) are well suited as a focal species for the study of climate change because they are adapted to cool, alpine environments that are expected to undergo unusually rapid climate change. We compared samples collected in the late 1930s, the late 1960s, and the late 2000s using molecular genetic and stable isotope methods in an effort to determine whether White-tailed Ptarmigan on Mt. Evans, Colorado, have experiences recent environmental changes resulting in shifts in genetic diversity, gene frequency, and nutritional ecology. We genotyped 115 individuals spanning the three time periods, using nine polymorphic microsatellite loci in our genetic analysis. These samples were also analyzed for stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition. We found a slight trend of lower heterozygosity through time, and allelic richness values were significantly lower in more recent times, but not significantly using an alpha of 0.05 (P 13C and δ15N values decreased significantly across time periods, whereas the range in isotope values increased consistently from the late 1930s to the late time periods. Inferred changes in the nutritional ecology of White-tailed Ptarmigan on Mt. Evans relate primarily to increased atmospheric deposition of nutrients that likely influenced foraging habits and tundra plant composition and nutritional quality. Future work seeks to integrate genetic and isotopic data with long-term demographics to develop a detailed understanding of the interaction among environmental stressors on the long-term viability of ptarmigan populations.

  17. Sex change and effective population size: implications for population genetic studies in marine fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, I; Chopelet, J; Waples, R S; Mann, B Q; Mariani, S

    2016-10-01

    Large variance in reproductive success is the primary factor that reduces effective population size (Ne) in natural populations. In sequentially hermaphroditic (sex-changing) fish, the sex ratio is typically skewed and biased towards the 'first' sex, while reproductive success increases considerably after sex change. Therefore, sex-changing fish populations are theoretically expected to have lower Ne than gonochorists (separate sexes), assuming all other parameters are essentially equal. In this study, we estimate Ne from genetic data collected from two ecologically similar species living along the eastern coast of South Africa: one gonochoristic, the 'santer' sea bream Cheimerius nufar, and one protogynous (female-first) sex changer, the 'slinger' sea bream Chrysoblephus puniceus. For both species, no evidence of genetic structuring, nor significant variation in genetic diversity, was found in the study area. Estimates of contemporary Ne were significantly lower in the protogynous species, but the same pattern was not apparent over historical timescales. Overall, our results show that sequential hermaphroditism may affect Ne differently over varying time frames, and that demographic signatures inferred from genetic markers with different inheritance modes also need to be interpreted cautiously, in relation to sex-changing life histories.

  18. Loss of genetic diversity and increased subdivision in an endemic Alpine Stonefly threatened by climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Steve; Giersch, Jonathan J.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Hotalling, Scott; Fanning, Liz; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Much remains unknown about the genetic status and population connectivity of high-elevation and high-latitude freshwater invertebrates, which often persist near snow and ice masses that are disappearing due to climate change. Here we report on the conservation genetics of the meltwater stonefly Lednia tumana (Ricker) of Montana, USA, a cold-water obligate species. We sequenced 1530 bp of mtDNA from 116 L. tumana individuals representing “historic” (>10 yr old) and 2010 populations. The dominant haplotype was common in both time periods, while the second-most-common haplotype was found only in historic samples, having been lost in the interim. The 2010 populations also showed reduced gene and nucleotide diversity and increased genetic isolation. We found lower genetic diversity in L. tumana compared to two other North American stonefly species, Amphinemura linda (Ricker) and Pteronarcys californica Newport. Our results imply small effective sizes, increased fragmentation, limited gene flow, and loss of genetic variation among contemporary L. tumana populations, which can lead to reduced adaptive capacity and increased extinction risk. This study reinforces concerns that ongoing glacier loss threatens the persistence of L. tumana, and provides baseline data and analysis of how future environmental change could impact populations of similar organisms.

  19. Genetic and environmental relationships between change in weight and insulin resistance: the Healthy Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yun-Mi; Lee, Kayoung; Sung, Joohon

    2014-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between weight change from 20 years of age and insulin resistance (IR), and genetic and environmental relationships between these traits. In 594 Korean twins and family members (209 men, 385 women, 44.0 ± 10.8 years old), the percentage of weight change was calculated using self-reported body weight at 20 years of age and currently measured bodyweight. IR traits were assessed using fasting plasma glucose and insulin, the homeostasis model assessment of IR index (HOMA-IR), and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI). Linear mixed analysis was applied after adjusting for household, body mass index (BMI) at the age of 20 years, age, sex, alcohol, smoking, physical activity, and caloric intake. Heritabilities and genetic and environmental correlations were estimated after adjusting for covariates. In 55 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for HOMA-IR level by >0.3, a conditional logistic regression analysis was conducted regarding weight change. Increases in glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR and a decrease in QUICKI were associated with a higher percentage of weight change (p change since 20 years old, after adjusting for lifestyle-related factors. In conclusion, both genetic and environmental influences played significant roles in the positive association between weight change from 20 years of age and IR.

  20. Adaptive introgression as a resource for management and genetic conservation in a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jill A; Miller, Joshua M

    2016-02-01

    Current rates of climate change require organisms to respond through migration, phenotypic plasticity, or genetic changes via adaptation. We focused on questions regarding species' and populations' ability to respond to climate change through adaptation. Specifically, the role adaptive introgression, movement of genetic material from the genome of 1 species into the genome of another through repeated interbreeding, may play in increasing species' ability to respond to a changing climate. Such interspecific gene flow may mediate extinction risk or consequences of limited adaptive potential that result from standing genetic variation and mutation alone, enabling a quicker demographic recovery in response to changing environments. Despite the near dismissal of the potential benefits of hybridization by conservation practitioners, we examined a number of case studies across different taxa that suggest gene flow between sympatric or parapatric sister species or within species that exhibit strong ecotypic differentiation may represent an underutilized management option to conserve evolutionary potential in a changing environment. This will be particularly true where advanced-generation hybrids exhibit adaptive traits outside the parental phenotypic range, a phenomenon known as transgressive segregation. The ideas presented in this essay are meant to provoke discussion regarding how we maintain evolutionary potential, the conservation value of natural hybrid zones, and consideration of their important role in adaptation to climate.

  1. Salinity contamination response to changes in irrigation management. Application of geochemical codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iker Garcia-Garizabal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Salinity contamination caused by irrigation has been widely studied but the analysis of geochemical processes regarding agronomic variables has not adequately been considered yet. The research presented here analyzes the influence of changes in irrigation management on salinity contamination, through the use of geochemical modeling techniques, in an agricultural basin during the hydrological year of 2001 and within the period 2005-2008. The results indicate that the changes implemented in irrigation management reduced the masses of salts exported in 72%, although water salinity increased by 25% (this salinity level does not restrict its use for irrigation. The different ionic ratios in drainage water, the results of the salinity balances, and the results of geochemical calculations (mass balances and speciation-solubility indicate, mainly, precipitation of calcite, dissolution of gypsum and halite and cation exchange. The salt contamination index decreased from approximately 70% to levels close to those presented in modern irrigation areas, indicating that the changes in irrigation management were effective. Petrocalcic genesis and punctual sodification of soils can constitute an agroenvironmental problem that requires adequate management of irrigation and drainage considering future modernization of irrigation areas.

  2. Linkage relationships among five enzyme-coding gene loci in the copepod Tigriopus californicus: a genetic confirmation of achiasmiatic meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, R S; Feldman, M W; Swisher, S G

    1981-12-01

    Linkage relationships among five polymorphic enzyme-coding gene loci in the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus have been determined using electrophoretic analysis of progeny from laboratory matings. Phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI; EC 5.3.1.9) was found to be tightly linked to glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT; EC 2.6..1.2), with only one recombinant observed in 364 progeny; glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT; EC 2.6.1.1) is linked to the PGI-GPT pair, with a recombination fraction of approximately 0.20 in male double heterozygotes. Phosphoglucomutase (PGM; EC 2.7.5.1) and an esterase (EST; EC 3.1.1.1) are not linked to the PGI, GPT, GOT grouping, which has been designated linkage group I. Reciprocal crosses have revealed that no recombination occurs in female T. californicus; this observation confirms a previous report that meiosis in female Tigriopus is achiasmatic.

  3. Social Welfare Improvement by TCSC using Real Code Based Genetic Algorithm in Double-Sided Auction Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MASOUM, M. A. S.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a genetic algorithm (GA to maximize total system social welfare and alleviate congestion by best placement and sizing of TCSC device, in a double-sided auction market. To introduce more accurate modeling, the valve loading effects is incorporated to the conventional quadratic smooth generator cost curves. By adding the valve point effect, the model presents nondifferentiable and nonconvex regions that challenge most gradient-based optimization algorithms. In addition, quadratic consumer benefit functions integrated in the objective function to guarantee that locational marginal prices charged at the demand buses is less than or equal to DisCos benefit, earned by selling that power to retail customers. The proposed approach makes use of the genetic algorithm to optimal schedule GenCos, DisCos and TCSC location and size, while the Newton-Raphson algorithm minimizes the mismatch of the power flow equations. Simulation results on the modified IEEE 14-bus and 30-bus test systems (with/without line flow constraints, before and after the compensation are used to examine the impact of TCSC on the total system social welfare improvement. Several cases are considered to test and validate the consistency of detecting best solutions. Simulation results are compared to solutions obtained by sequential quadratic programming (SQP approaches.

  4. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standen, Ismo; Christensen, Ole Fredslund

    2011-01-01

    Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker...... effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous...... genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call...

  5. Coding early naturalists' accounts into long-term fish community changes in the Adriatic Sea (1800-2000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaso Fortibuoni

    Full Text Available The understanding of fish communities' changes over the past centuries has important implications for conservation policy and marine resource management. However, reconstructing these changes is difficult because information on marine communities before the second half of the 20(th century is, in most cases, anecdotal and merely qualitative. Therefore, historical qualitative records and modern quantitative data are not directly comparable, and their integration for long-term analyses is not straightforward. We developed a methodology that allows the coding of qualitative information provided by early naturalists into semi-quantitative information through an intercalibration with landing proportions. This approach allowed us to reconstruct and quantitatively analyze a 200-year-long time series of fish community structure indicators in the Northern Adriatic Sea (Mediterranean Sea. Our analysis provides evidence of long-term changes in fish community structure, including the decline of Chondrichthyes, large-sized and late-maturing species. This work highlights the importance of broadening the time-frame through which we look at marine ecosystem changes and provides a methodology to exploit, in a quantitative framework, historical qualitative sources. To the purpose, naturalists' eyewitness accounts proved to be useful for extending the analysis on fish community back in the past, well before the onset of field-based monitoring programs.

  6. ANATOMICAL MNEMONICS OF THE GENETIC CODE: A FUNCTIONAL ICOSAHEDRON AND THE VIGESIMAL SYSTEM OF THE MAYA TO REPRESENT THE TWENTY PROTEINOGENIC AMINO ACIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Chavez, Fernando

    In programming and bioinformatics, the graphical interface is vital to describe and to abbreviate aspects and concepts of the physical world. The Mayan Culture developed the vigesimal system, a numerical system based on their count of fingers and toes. My objective is to equate the Mayan system and their numerical representation to the twenty amino acids according to size, except for the number one, represented by a dot, that here is given to cysteine, which acts as glue among peptides as one of its properties; in such a way, two vertical dots will be easily used to represent its related selenocysteine. The Mayan numerical system included the zero, represented by the Maya with an empty shell that here is used to represent the stop codons. On the other hand, the Chinese had a binary numerical system, similar to the binary comparisons of the three properties of Nucleotides within the double helix: H-Bonds, C-Rings and Tautomerism, called the I Ching which here is applied to the natural groups of amino acids that result of the 64-codons compared in binary in their H-Bonds versus their C-Rings, used here to successfully represent the mature sequence of the glucagon amino acids. Additional anatomical tools for the mnemonics of the genetic code and of its amino acid groups are also presented, as well as a functional icosahedron to represent them. Concluding, tools are presented for the visual analysis of proteins and peptide sequencing in bioinformatics and education to teach the genetic code and its resulting amino acids, plus their numerical systems.

  7. Analysis of the genetic determinants coding for the S-fimbrial adhesin (sfa) in different Escherichia coli strains causing meningitis or urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, M; Hacker, J; Schmoll, T; Jarchau, T; Korhonen, T K; Goebel, W

    1986-12-01

    Recently we have described the molecular cloning of the genetic determinant coding for the S-fimbrial adhesin (Sfa), a sialic acid-recognizing pilus frequently found among extraintestinal Escherichia coli isolates. Fimbriae from the resulting Sfa+ E. coli K-12 clone were isolated, and an Sfa-specific antiserum was prepared. Western blots indicate that S fimbriae isolated from different uropathogenic and meningitis-associated E. coli strains, including O83:K1 isolates, were serologically related. The Sfa-specific antibodies did not cross-react with P fimbriae, but did cross-react with F1C fimbriae. Furthermore the sfa+ recombinant DNAs and some cloned sfa-flanking regions were used as probes in Southern experiments. Chromosomal DNAs isolated from O18:K1 and O83:K1 meningitis strains with and without S fimbriae and from uropathogenic O6:K+ strains were hybridized against these sfa-specific probes. Only one copy of the sfa determinant was identified on the chromosome of these strains. No sfa-specific sequences were observed on the chromosome of E. coli K-12 strains and an O7:K1 isolate. With the exception of small alterations in the sfa-coding region the genetic determinants for S fimbriae were identical in uropathogenic O6:K+ and meningitis O18:K1 and O83:K1 strains. The sfa determinant was also detected on the chromosome of K1 isolates with an Sfa-negative phenotype, and specific cross-hybridization signals were visible after blotting against F1C-specific DNA. In addition homology among the different strains was observed in the sfa-flanking regions.

  8. An RNA Phage Lab: MS2 in Walter Fiers' laboratory of molecular biology in Ghent, from genetic code to gene and genome, 1963-1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrel, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    The importance of viruses as model organisms is well-established in molecular biology and Max Delbrück's phage group set standards in the DNA phage field. In this paper, I argue that RNA phages, discovered in the 1960s, were also instrumental in the making of molecular biology. As part of experimental systems, RNA phages stood for messenger RNA (mRNA), genes and genome. RNA was thought to mediate information transfers between DNA and proteins. Furthermore, RNA was more manageable at the bench than DNA due to the availability of specific RNases, enzymes used as chemical tools to analyse RNA. Finally, RNA phages provided scientists with a pure source of mRNA to investigate the genetic code, genes and even a genome sequence. This paper focuses on Walter Fiers' laboratory at Ghent University (Belgium) and their work on the RNA phage MS2. When setting up his Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Fiers planned a comprehensive study of the virus with a strong emphasis on the issue of structure. In his lab, RNA sequencing, now a little-known technique, evolved gradually from a means to solve the genetic code, to a tool for completing the first genome sequence. Thus, I follow the research pathway of Fiers and his 'RNA phage lab' with their evolving experimental system from 1960 to the late 1970s. This study illuminates two decisive shifts in post-war biology: the emergence of molecular biology as a discipline in the 1960s in Europe and of genomics in the 1990s.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA of Clathrina clathrus (Calcarea, Calcinea): six linear chromosomes, fragmented rRNAs, tRNA editing, and a novel genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, Dennis V; Pett, Walker; Voigt, Oliver; Wörheide, Gert; Forget, Lise; Lang, B Franz; Kayal, Ehsan

    2013-04-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are a large and ancient group of morphologically simple but ecologically important aquatic animals. Although their body plan and lifestyle are relatively uniform, sponges show extensive molecular and genetic diversity. In particular, mitochondrial genomes from three of the four previously studied classes of Porifera (Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, and Homoscleromorpha) have distinct gene contents, genome organizations, and evolutionary rates. Here, we report the mitochondrial genome of Clathrina clathrus (Calcinea, Clathrinidae), a representative of the fourth poriferan class, the Calcarea, which proves to be the most unusual. Clathrina clathrus mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) consists of six linear chromosomes 7.6-9.4 kb in size and encodes at least 37 genes: 13 protein codings, 2 ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), and 24 transfer RNAs (tRNAs). Protein genes include atp9, which has now been found in all major sponge lineages, but no atp8. Our analyses further reveal the presence of a novel genetic code that involves unique reassignments of the UAG codons from termination to tyrosine and of the CGN codons from arginine to glycine. Clathrina clathrus mitochondrial rRNAs are encoded in three (srRNA) and ≥6 (lrRNA) fragments distributed out of order and on several chromosomes. The encoded tRNAs contain multiple mismatches in the aminoacyl acceptor stems that are repaired posttranscriptionally by 3'-end RNA editing. Although our analysis does not resolve the phylogenetic position of calcareous sponges, likely due to their high rates of mitochondrial sequence evolution, it confirms mtDNA as a promising marker for population studies in this group. The combination of unusual mitochondrial features in C. clathrus redefines the extremes of mtDNA evolution in animals and further argues against the idea of a "typical animal mtDNA."

  10. Demographic factors and genetic variation influence population persistence under environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willi, Yvonne; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2009-01-01

    Population persistence has been studied in a conservation context to predict the fate of small or declining populations. Persistence models have explored effects on extinction of random demographic and environmental fluctuations, but in the face of directional environmental change they should also integrate factors affecting whether a population can adapt. Here, we examine the population-size dependence of demographic and genetic factors and their likely contributions to extinction time under scenarios of environmental change. Parameter estimates were derived from experimental populations of the rainforest species, Drosophila birchii, held in the lab for 10 generations at census sizes of 20, 100 and 1000, and later exposed to five generations of heat-knockdown selection. Under a model of directional change in the thermal environment, rapid extinction of populations of size 20 was caused by a combination of low growth rate (r) and high stochasticity in r. Populations of 100 had significantly higher reproductive output, lower stochasticity in r and more additive genetic variance (V(A)) than populations of 20, but they were predicted to persist less well than the largest size class. Even populations of 1000 persisted only a few hundred generations under realistic estimates of environmental change because of low V(A) for heat-knockdown resistance. The experimental results document population-size dependence of demographic and adaptability factors. The simulations illustrate a threshold influence of demographic factors on population persistence, while genetic variance has a more elastic impact on persistence under environmental change.

  11. EVOLUTION AND EXTINCTION IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT: A QUANTITATIVE-GENETIC ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Reinhard; Lynch, Michael

    1995-02-01

    Because of the ubiquity of genetic variation for quantitative traits, virtually all populations have some capacity to respond evolutionarily to selective challenges. However, natural selection imposes demographic costs on a population, and if these costs are sufficiently large, the likelihood of extinction will be high. We consider how the mean time to extinction depends on selective pressures (rate and stochasticity of environmental change, and strength of selection), population parameters (carrying capacity, and reproductive capacity), and genetics (rate of polygenic mutation). We assume that in a randomly mating, finite population subject to density-dependent population growth, individual fitness is determined by a single quantitative-genetic character under Gaussian stabilizing selection with the optimum phenotype exhibiting directional change, or random fluctuations, or both. The quantitative trait is determined by a finite number of freely recombining, mutationally equivalent, additive loci. The dynamics of evolution and extinction are investigated, assuming that the population is initially under mutation-selection-drift balance. Under this model, in a directionally changing environment, the mean phenotype lags behind the optimum, but on the average evolves parallel to it. The magnitude of the lag determines the vulnerability to extinction. In finite populations, stochastic variation in the genetic variance can be quite pronounced, and bottlenecks in the genetic variance temporarily can impair the population's adaptive capacity enough to cause extinction when it would otherwise be unlikely in an effectively infinite population. We find that maximum sustainable rates of evolution or, equivalently, critical rates of environmental change, may be considerably less than 10% of a phenotypic standard deviation per generation. © 1995 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Rational genomics I: antisense open reading frames and codon bias in short-chain oxido reductase enzymes and the evolution of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duax, William L; Huether, Robert; Pletnev, Vladimir Z; Langs, David; Addlagatta, Anthony; Connare, Sonjay; Habegger, Lukas; Gill, Jay

    2005-12-01

    The short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family of enzymes includes over 6000 members, extending from bacteria and archaea to humans. Nucleic acid sequence analysis reveals that significant numbers of these genes are remarkably free of stopcodons in reading frames other than the coding frame, including those on the antisense strand. The genes from this subset also use almost entirely the GC-rich half of the 64 codons. Analysis of a million hypothetical genes having random nucleotide composition shows that the percentage of SCOR genes having multiple open reading frames exceeds random by a factor of as much as 1 x 10(6). Nevertheless, screening the content of the SWISS-PROT TrEMBL database reveals that 15% of all genes contain multiple open reading frames. The SCOR genes having multiple open reading frames and a GC-rich coding bias exhibit a similar GC bias in the nucleotide triple composition of their DNA. This bias is not correlated with the GC content of the species in which the SCOR genes are found. One possible explanation for the conservation of multiple open reading frames and extreme bias in nucleic acid composition in the family of Rossman folds is that the primordial member of this family was encoded early using only very stable GC-rich DNA and that evolution proceeded with extremely limited introduction of any codons having two or more adenine or thymine nucleotides. These and other data suggest that the SCOR family of enzymes may even have diverged from a common ancestor before most of the AT-rich half of the genetic code was fully defined.

  13. The genetic code did not originate from an mRNA codifying polyglycine because the proto-mRNAs already codified for an amino acid number greater than one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Massimo

    2014-11-21

    I reply to Bernhart and Patrick (2014) that claim that the first amino acid to be codified in the genetic code was glycine, and that from mRNAs codifying for polyglycine originated all other codons of the genetic code. Indeed, given that the origin of protein synthesis should have preceded the one of the genetic code, then proto-mRNAs codifying for polimeric catalysts of the world in which originated the protein synthesis, should have been the more direct ancestors of mRNAs that originated in the world in which evolved the true genetic code. Therefore, it is clear that there would have been at least a partial evolutionary continuity between these proto-mRNAs and mRNAs. This evolutionary continuity has as logical consequence that cannot have existed of mRNAs codifying for only an amino acid because these mRNAs would descend from proto-mRNAs that already codified for more than one amino acid. Therefore, these mRNAs would not have reshaped their codifying capability to a single amino acid, without loss in the meaning of their coding, and this could not have occurred being counter selected. I also reply to other imprecisions made by Bernhart and Patrick (2014). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic predictions of prion disease susceptibility in carnivore species based on variability of the prion gene coding region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Stewart

    Full Text Available Mammalian species vary widely in their apparent susceptibility to prion diseases. For example, several felid species developed prion disease (feline spongiform encephalopathy or FSE during the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE epidemic in the United Kingdom, whereas no canine BSE cases were detected. Whether either of these or other groups of carnivore species can contract other prion diseases (e.g. chronic wasting disease or CWD remains an open question. Variation in the host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C largely explains observed disease susceptibility patterns within ruminant species, and may explain interspecies differences in susceptibility as well. We sequenced and compared the open reading frame of the PRNP gene encoding PrP(C protein from 609 animal samples comprising 29 species from 22 genera of the Order Carnivora; amongst these samples were 15 FSE cases. Our analysis revealed that FSE cases did not encode an identifiable disease-associated PrP polymorphism. However, all canid PrPs contained aspartic acid or glutamic acid at codon 163 which we propose provides a genetic basis for observed susceptibility differences between canids and felids. Among other carnivores studied, wolverine (Gulo gulo and pine marten (Martes martes were the only non-canid species to also express PrP-Asp163, which may impact on their prion diseases susceptibility. Populations of black bear (Ursus americanus and mountain lion (Puma concolor from Colorado showed little genetic variation in the PrP protein and no variants likely to be highly resistant to prions in general, suggesting that strain differences between BSE and CWD prions also may contribute to the limited apparent host range of the latter.

  15. The Chromatic Code changes in the Abc front pages 1936-1939

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Pedro Pérez Cuadrado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1936 Abc was a daily newspaper that edited in an outstanding way and in full colour its Sundays editions. The paper worked with two different printing systems: typography and rotogravure; and it was the leading technical paper in Spain. This research proposes, firstly, to show how the newspaper became high quality, and apart from this, establishes the process for printing in colour (three inks and four inks in a regular form and for the first time in Spanish printing media.In the same way, this research wants to focus on the meanings that colour offers in a printing media in the mid thirties (we have to be conscious of the fact that it took sixty more years to make common colour printing came back to Spanish press, and how the Civil War changed the process in a radical way: firstly, to modify the languages of colour towards a military point of view and, secondly, to make it disappear for obvious reasons.

  16. Genetics of gliadins coded by the group 1 chromosomes in the high-quality bread wheat cultivar Neepawa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachkevitch, T; Redaelli, R; Biancardi, A M; Metakovsky, E V; Pogna, N E

    1993-04-01

    The inheritance and biochemical properties of gliadins controlled by the group 1 chromosomes of the high-quality bread wheat cultivar Neepawa were studied in the progeny of the cross Neepawa x Costantino by six different electrophoretic procedures. Chromosome 1B of Neepawa contains two gliadin loci, one (Gli-B1) coding for at least six ω- or γ-gliadins, the other (Gli-B3) controlling the synthesis of gliadin N6 only. The map distance between these loci was calculated as 22.1 cM. Amongst the chromosome 1A gliadins, three proteins are encoded at the Gli-A1 locus whereas polypeptides N14-N15-N16 are controlled by a remote locus which recombines with Gli-A1. Six other gliadins are controlled by a gene cluster at Gli-D1 on chromosome 1D. Canadian wheat cultivars sharing the Gli-B1 allele of Neepawa were found to differ in the presence or absence of gliadin N6. The electrophoretic mobilities of proteins N6 and N14-N15-N16 were unaffected by the addition of a reducing agent during two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamid-gel electrophoresis, suggesting the absence of intra-chain disulphide bonds in their structure.

  17. Landscape prerequisites for the survival of a modelled metapopulation and its neutral genetic diversity are affected by climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobben, M.M.P.; Verboom, J.; Opdam, P.F.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.; Jochem, R.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In response to climate change a species may move, adapt, or go extinct. For the adaptability of a population its genetic diversity is essential, but climate change-induced range shifts can cause a loss of genetic diversity. We investigated how landscape structure affects the level and distribution

  18. Seasonal Genetic Changes of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Populations in Selected Sites of Cebu City, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayson, S L; Gloria-Soria, A; Powell, J R; Edillo, F E

    2015-07-01

    Aedes aegypti (L.) is the primary vector of dengue virus in the Philippines, where dengue is endemic. We examined the genetic changes of Ae. aegypti collected from three selected sites in Cebu city, Philippines, during the relatively wet (2011-2012) and dry seasons (2012 and 2013). A total of 493 Ae. aegypti adults, reared in the laboratory from field-collected larvae, were analyzed using 11 microsatellite loci. Seasonal variation was observed in allele frequencies and allelic richness. Average genetic differentiation (DEST=0.018; FST=0.029) in both dry seasons was higher, due to reduced Ne, than in the wet season (DEST=0.006; FST=0.009). Thus, average gene flow was higher in the wet season than in the dry seasons. However, the overall FST estimate (0.02) inclusive of the two seasons showed little genetic differentiation as supported by Bayesian clustering analysis. Results suggest that during the dry season the intense selection that causes a dramatic reduction of population size favors heterozygotes, leading to small pockets of mosquitoes (refuges) that exhibit random genetic differentiation. During the wet season, the genetic composition of the population is reconstituted by the expansion of the refuges that survived the preceding dry season. Source reduction of mosquitoes during the nonepidemic dry season is thus recommended to prevent dengue re-emergence in the subsequent wet season.

  19. Genetic Structure and Indica/Japonica Component Changes in Major Inbred Rice Varieties in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ping; YUAN Xiao-ping; XU Qun; WANG Cai-hong; YU Han-yong; WANG Yi-ping; TANG Sheng-xiang

    2013-01-01

    We used 39 SSR markers to analyze the genetic structure of 304 major Chinese inbred rice varieties,and to compare changes in the indica or japonica components in these varieties that have been widely cultivated from the 1950s to the 1990s in China.The genetic structure analysis showed that these rice varieties were distinctly divided into two populations,indica and japonica.The sub-structure of indica varieties was more complex than that of japonica ones.Among the various lines,late-season indica and early season japonica varieties had simpler genetic backgrounds.The seasonal ecotypes were not quite consistent with the subtypes of genetic structure.Twelve SSR loci with specific differentiation between indica and japonica were used to calculate the indica/japonica components.The differences in indica/japonica components among the five decades were not significant,except for late-season indica varieties in the 1990s,which had a significantly higher japonica component.These results will help to understand the genetic structure of the major Chinese inbred rice varieties and will be useful for indica-japonica hybrid breeding in China.

  20. Speech coding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  1. Geographic, genetic and life-history variability in a sex-changing fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Benvenuto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sequential hermaphroditism, commonly referred to as sex change or sex reversal, is a striking phenomenon in mating-system evolution and the most remarkable example of sexual plasticity. Among vertebrates, it is specific to teleosts. Some fish species reproduce initially as females and then change into males (protogynous hermaphrodites or vice versa (protandrous hermaphrodites. The white sea bream, Diplodus sargus, exhibits a high degree of sexual plasticity: populations have been reported to be gonochoristic, protandrous or digynic (with primary females, derived from intersexual juveniles, and secondary females, derived from males. We analysed populations collected from eight different locations across the species distribution range (between the Mediterranean and the North-Eastern Atlantic. These populations are characterized by different degrees of connectivity, spatial demographics and life histories. Using individual-based analyses, we linked the genetic structure of each specimen with environmental heterogeneity, life-history traits and reproductive modes. Our aim is to gather a better understanding of the variation in reproductive life-history strategies in this sexually plastic species. Diplodus sargus is a valuable candidate organism to investigate sequential hermaphroditism and it also has a commercial value. The application of population genetics tools against the background of life-history theory can bring valuable insights for the management of marine resources. The geographical patterns of sex change (and of age- and size-at-sex change linked with population genetics can be pivotal for both theoretical investigations and conservation and management plans in marine areas.

  2. Ecological change predicts population dynamics and genetic diversity over 120 000 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horreo, Jose Luis; Jiménez-Valverde, Alberto; Fitze, Patrick S

    2016-05-01

    While ecological effects on short-term population dynamics are well understood, their effects over millennia are difficult to demonstrate and convincing evidence is scant. Using coalescent methods, we analysed past population dynamics of three lizard species (Psammodromus hispanicus, P. edwardsianus, P. occidentalis) and linked the results with climate change data covering the same temporal horizon (120 000 years). An increase in population size over time was observed in two species, and in P. occidentalis, no change was observed. Temporal changes in temperature seasonality and the maximum temperature of the warmest month were congruent with changes in population dynamics observed for the three species and both variables affected population density, either directly or indirectly (via a life-history trait). These results constitute the first solid link between ecological change and long-term population dynamics. The results moreover suggest that ecological change leaves genetic signatures that can be retrospectively traced, providing evidence that ecological change is a crucial driver of genetic diversity and speciation.

  3. [Does the amendment of the rules of Criminal Code referring to mandatory treatment mean paradigm change in the judgement of mentally ill criminals?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapos, Miklós Péter

    2011-01-01

    Talking of the Act LXXX. of 2009, the amendment of the Act IV. of 1978 on Criminal Code, the author reviews the Hungarian history of the changes of regulations referring to mentally ill criminals. He discusses the treatment regulations referring to criminals identified as insane, too. From historical and legal philosophical points of view, those parts of the modification of Criminal Code are analyzed that deal with mandatory treatment and took effect in he May 2010. The changes are judged as paradigm changing in a negative course that represents a doubtful step from the direction of perpetrator based criminal law to criminal act based criminal law.

  4. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  5. New Approaches for Crop Genetic Adaptation to the Abiotic Stresses Predicted with Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Redden

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Extreme climatic variation is predicted with climate change this century. In many cropping regions, the crop environment will tend to be warmer with more irregular rainfall and spikes in stress levels will be more severe. The challenge is not only to raise agricultural production for an expanding population, but to achieve this under more adverse environmental conditions. It is now possible to systematically explore the genetic variation in historic local landraces by using GPS locators and world climate maps to describe the natural selection for local adaptation, and to identify candidate germplasm for tolerances to extreme stresses. The physiological and biochemical components of these expressions can be genomically investigated with candidate gene approaches and next generation sequencing. Wild relatives of crops have largely untapped genetic variation for abiotic and biotic stress tolerances, and could greatly expand the available domesticated gene pools to assist crops to survive in the predicted extremes of climate change, a survivalomics strategy. Genomic strategies can assist in the introgression of these valuable traits into the domesticated crop gene pools, where they can be better evaluated for crop improvement. The challenge is to increase agricultural productivity despite climate change. This calls for the integration of many disciplines from eco-geographical analyses of genetic resources to new advances in genomics, agronomy and farm management, underpinned by an understanding of how crop adaptation to climate is affected by genotype × environment interaction.

  6. CHANGES IN THE GENETIC STRUCTURE OF A VALLEY IN THE PYRENEES (CATALONIA, SPAIN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Alejandra; Pámpanas, Leyre; García, David; Pettener, Davide; González-Martin, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    In some situations the use of isonymy is the best strategy for studying the genetic structure of a population and its biological history. In this study different population parameters were calculated for one of the most isolated valleys in the Pyrenees - the region of the Alta Ribagorça in Catalonia, Spain. Surnames from marriage records covering the continuous period from 1638 to 1988 were used. From 1950 onwards this region underwent important social, economic and biological changes related to the introduction of hydroelectric and mining industries, and the change from livestock farming to a society based on services. Two periods were analysed (1638-1950 and 1951-1988) allowing population changes that occurred in the region to be determined. The study focused on calculating the number of surnames by gender, diversity index (H), population sub-structure (RP-RPr)/RPr and inbreeding coefficient (F t) and detection of possible genetic barriers. The results demonstrate the importance that geography initially had in shaping the genetic structure of the population and how this was gradually replaced by other parameters such as roads or the social and economic importance of towns. An interesting phenomenon is that inbreeding has traditionally been associated with rural life, isolation and endogamy. However, for the Alta Ribagorça it was observed that in the second period, 1951-1988, inbreeding mainly depended on the composition of migrant groups and the reaction of the native population to the arrival of migrants from outside the region.

  7. All about Genetics (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or sequence) of these four bases determines each genetic code. The segments of DNA that contain the instructions ... laboratory dyes. continue Genetic Problems Errors in the genetic code or "gene recipe" can happen in a variety ...

  8. Benchmarking of numerical codes against analytical solutions for multidimensional multicomponent diffusive transport coupled with precipitation-dissolution reactions and porosity changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, M.; Kosakowski, G.; Jakob, A.; Churakov, S.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical computer codes dealing with precipitation-dissolution reactions and porosity changes in multidimensional reactive transport problems are important tools in geoscience. Recent typical applications are related to CO2 sequestration, shallow and deep geothermal energy, remediation of contaminated sites or the safe underground storage of chemotoxic and radioactive waste. Although the agreement between codes using the same models and similar numerical algorithms is satisfactory, it is known that the numerical methods used in solving the transport equation, as well as different coupling schemes between transport and chemistry, may lead to systematic discrepancies. Moreover, due to their inability to describe subgrid pore space changes correctly, the numerical approaches predict discretization-dependent values of porosity changes and clogging times. In this context, analytical solutions become an essential tool to verify numerical simulations. We present a benchmark study where we compare a two-dimensional analytical solution for diffusive transport of two solutes coupled with a precipitation-dissolution reaction causing porosity changes with numerical solutions obtained with the COMSOL Multiphysics code and with the reactive transport code OpenGeoSys-GEMS. The analytical solution describes the spatio-temporal evolution of solutes and solid concentrations and porosity. We show that both numerical codes reproduce the analytical solution very well, although distinct differences in accuracy can be traced back to specific numerical implementations.

  9. Effects of genetic, processing, or product formulation changes on efficacy and safety of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Mary Ellen; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Pot, Bruno; Johansen, Eric; Heimbach, James T; Marco, Maria L; Tennilä, Julia; Ross, R Paul; Franz, Charles; Pagé, Nicolas; Pridmore, R David; Leyer, Greg; Salminen, Seppo; Charbonneau, Duane; Call, Emma; Lenoir-Wijnkoop, Irene

    2014-02-01

    Commercial probiotic strains for food or supplement use can be altered in different ways for a variety of purposes. Production conditions for the strain or final product may be changed to address probiotic yield, functionality, or stability. Final food products may be modified to improve flavor and other sensory properties, provide new product formats, or respond to market opportunities. Such changes can alter the expression of physiological traits owing to the live nature of probiotics. In addition, genetic approaches may be used to improve strain attributes. This review explores whether genetic or phenotypic changes, by accident or design, might affect the efficacy or safety of commercial probiotics. We highlight key issues important to determining the need to re-confirm efficacy or safety after strain improvement, process optimization, or product formulation changes. Research pinpointing the mechanisms of action for probiotic function and the development of assays to measure them are greatly needed to better understand if such changes have a substantive impact on probiotic efficacy.

  10. "Hypothesis for the Modern RNA World": A pervasive Non-coding RNA-Based Genetic Regulation is a Prerequisite for the Emergence of Multicellular Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada-Chávez, Irma; Stadler, Peter F.; Prohaska, Sonja J.

    2011-12-01

    The transitions to multicellularity mark the most pivotal and distinctive events in life's history on Earth. Although several transitions to "simple" multicellularity (SM) have been recorded in both bacterial and eukaryotic clades, transitions to complex multicellularity (CM) have only happened a few times in eukaryotes. A large number of cell types (associated with large body size), increased energy consumption per gene expressed, and an increment of non-protein-coding DNA positively correlate with CM. These three factors can indeed be understood as the causes and consequences of the regulation of gene expression. Here, we discuss how a vast expansion of non-protein-coding RNA (ncRNAs) regulators rather than large numbers of novel protein regulators can easily contribute to the emergence of CM. We also propose that the evolutionary advantage of RNA-based gene regulation derives from the robustness of the RNA structure that makes it easy to combine genetic drift with functional exploration. We describe a model which aims to explain how the evolutionary dynamic of ncRNAs becomes dominated by the accessibility of advantageous mutations to innovate regulation in complex multicellular organisms. The information and models discussed here outline the hypothesis that pervasive ncRNA-based regulatory systems, only capable of being expanded and explored in higher eukaryotes, are prerequisite to complex multicellularity. Thereby, regulatory RNA molecules in Eukarya have allowed intensification of morphological complexity by stabilizing critical phenotypes and controlling developmental precision. Although the origin of RNA on early Earth is still controversial, it is becoming clear that once RNA emerged into a protocellular system, its relevance within the evolution of biological systems has been greater than we previously thought.

  11. Evaluation of the Genetic Variation of Non Coding Control Region of BK Virus Using Nested-PCR Sequencing Method in Renal Graft Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Emami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Polyomaviruses (BK is a comprehensive infection with more than of 80% prevalence in the world. One of the most important reasons of BK virus nephropathy is in the renal transplant recipients and rejection of transplanted tissue between them. Non Coding region of this virus play a regulatory role in replication and amplification of the virus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic patterns of this area in renal graft at Namazi Transplantation Center, Shiraz, Iran. Methods: In the present experimental study, 380 renal allograft serums were collected. DNAs of 129 eligible samples were extracted and evaluated using a virus genome. The presence of the virus was determined by qualitative and sequencing. Of these, 129 samples were tested for the presence of virus according to the condition study, using quantitative, qualitative genomic amplification and sequencing. Results: The study showed symptoms of nephropathy, 76 (58.9% of them were males and 46 (35.7% were females with the mean age 38.0±.089 years of age. In general, 46 patients (35.7% percent were positive for BK Polyomaviruses. After comparing the genomic sequence with applications of molecular they were categorized in three groups and then recorded in gene bank. Conclusion: About 35% of renal transplant recipients with high creatinine levels were positive for the presence of BK virus. Non-coding region of respondents in the sample survey revealed that among patients with the most common genotypes were rearranged the entire transplant patients were observed at this tranplant center. Examination of these sequences indicated that this rearrangments had a specific pattern, different from the standard strain of archaea type.

  12. Use of genetic algorithms for optimization of subchannel simulations; Application des algorithmes genetiques pour l'optimisation d'un code d'analyse des sous-canaux d'une grappe de combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava Dominguez, A

    2004-07-01

    To facilitate the modeling of a rod fuel bundle, the most common used method consist in dividing the complex cross-sectional area in small subsections called subchannels. To close the system equations, a mixture model is used to represent the intersubchannel interactions. These interactions are as follows: diversion cross-flow, turbulent void diffusion, void drift and buoyancy drift. Amongst these mechanisms, the turbulent void diffusion and void drift are frequently modelled using diffusion coefficients. In this work, a novel approach has been employed where an existing subchannel code coupled to a genetic algorithm code which were used to optimize these coefficients. After several numerical simulations, a new objective function based in the principle of minimum dissipated energy was developed. The use of this function in the genetic algorithm coupled to the subchannel code, gave results in good agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Disclosure of genetic information and change in dietary intake: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiva E Nielsen

    Full Text Available Proponents of consumer genetic tests claim that the information can positively impact health behaviors and aid in chronic disease prevention. However, the effects of disclosing genetic information on dietary intake behavior are not clear.A double-blinded, parallel group, 2:1 online randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine the short- and long-term effects of disclosing nutrition-related genetic information for personalized nutrition on dietary intakes of caffeine, vitamin C, added sugars, and sodium. Participants were healthy men and women aged 20-35 years (n = 138. The intervention group (n = 92 received personalized DNA-based dietary advice for 12-months and the control group (n = 46 received general dietary recommendations with no genetic information for 12-months. Food frequency questionnaires were collected at baseline and 3- and 12-months after the intervention to assess dietary intakes. General linear models were used to compare changes in intakes between those receiving general dietary advice and those receiving DNA-based dietary advice.Compared to the control group, no significant changes to dietary intakes of the nutrients were observed at 3-months. At 12-months, participants in the intervention group who possessed a risk version of the ACE gene, and were advised to limit their sodium intake, significantly reduced their sodium intake (mg/day compared to the control group (-287.3 ± 114.1 vs. 129.8 ± 118.2, p = 0.008. Those who had the non-risk version of ACE did not significantly change their sodium intake compared to the control group (12-months: -244.2 ± 150.2, p = 0.11. Among those with the risk version of the ACE gene, the proportion who met the targeted recommendation of 1500 mg/day increased from 19% at baseline to 34% after 12 months (p = 0.06.These findings demonstrate that disclosing genetic information for personalized nutrition results in greater changes in intake for some dietary components compared to

  14. Association of the position of a hospital-acquired condition diagnosis code with changes in medicare severity diagnosis-related group assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tricia; Kane, Jason M; Odwazny, Richard; McNutt, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Incentives to improve quality include paying less for adverse events, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' policy to not pay additionally for events classified as hospital-acquired conditions (HACs). This policy is controversial, as variable coding practices at hospitals may lead to differences in the inclusion and position of HACs in the list of codes used for Medicare Severity Diagnosis-Related Group (MS-DRG) assignment. Evaluate changes in MS-DRG assignment for patients with an HAC and test the association of the position of an HAC in the list of International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis codes with change in MS-DRG assignment. Retrospective analysis of patients discharged from hospital members of the University HealthSystem Consortium's Clinical Data Base between October 2007 and April 2008. Comparisons were made between the MS-DRG assigned when the HAC was not included in the list of ICD-9 diagnosis codes and the MS-DRG that would have been assigned had the HAC code been included in the assignment. Of the 7027 patients with an HAC, 13.8% changed MS-DRG assignment when the HAC was removed. An HAC in the second position versus third position or lower was associated with a 40-fold increase in the likelihood of MS-DRG change. The position of an HAC in the list of diagnosis codes, rather than the presence of an HAC, is associated with a change in MS-DRG assignment. HACs have little effect on reimbursement unless the HAC is in the second position and patients have minor severity of illness. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  15. Familial adenomatous polyposis-associated desmoids display significantly more genetic changes than sporadic desmoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els Robanus-Maandag

    Full Text Available Desmoid tumours (also called deep or aggressive fibromatoses are potentially life-threatening fibromatous lesions. Hereditary desmoid tumours arise in individuals affected by either familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP or hereditary desmoid disease (HDD carrying germline mutations in APC. Most sporadic desmoids carry somatic mutations in CTNNB1. Previous studies identified losses on 5q and 6q, and gains on 8q and 20q as recurrent genetic changes in desmoids. However, virtually all genetic changes were derived from sporadic tumours. To investigate the somatic alterations in FAP-associated desmoids and to compare them with changes occurring in sporadic tumours, we analysed 17 FAP-associated and 38 sporadic desmoids by array comparative genomic hybridisation and multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification. Overall, the desmoids displayed only a limited number of genetic changes, occurring in 44% of cases. Recurrent gains at 8q (7% and 20q (5% were almost exclusively found in sporadic tumours. Recurrent losses were observed for a 700 kb region at 5q22.2, comprising the APC gene (11%, a 2 Mb region at 6p21.2-p21.1 (15%, and a relatively large region at 6q15-q23.3 (20%. The FAP-associated desmoids displayed a significantly higher frequency of copy number abnormalities (59% than the sporadic tumours (37%. As predicted by the APC germline mutations among these patients, a high percentage (29% of FAP-associated desmoids showed loss of the APC region at 5q22.2, which was infrequently (3% seen among sporadic tumours. Our data suggest that loss of region 6q15-q16.2 is an important event in FAP-associated as well as sporadic desmoids, most likely of relevance for desmoid tumour progression.

  16. Improved Transient Performance of a Fuzzy Modified Model Reference Adaptive Controller for an Interacting Coupled Tank System Using Real-Coded Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asan Mohideen Khansadurai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the paper is to design a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC with improved transient performance. A modification to the standard direct MRAC called fuzzy modified MRAC (FMRAC is used in the paper. The FMRAC uses a proportional control based Mamdani-type fuzzy logic controller (MFLC to improve the transient performance of a direct MRAC. The paper proposes the application of real-coded genetic algorithm (RGA to tune the membership function parameters of the proposed FMRAC offline so that the transient performance of the FMRAC is improved further. In this study, a GA based modified MRAC (GAMMRAC, an FMRAC, and a GA based FMRAC (GAFMRAC are designed for a coupled tank setup in a hybrid tank process and their transient performances are compared. The results show that the proposed GAFMRAC gives a better transient performance than the GAMMRAC or the FMRAC. It is concluded that the proposed controller can be used to obtain very good transient performance for the control of nonlinear processes.

  17. Melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 polymorphisms are associated with components of energy balance in the Complex Diseases in the Newfoundland Population: Environment and Genetics (CODING) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine-Bisson, Bénédicte; Thorburn, James; Gregory, Anne; Zhang, Hongwei; Sun, Guang

    2014-02-01

    The melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that regulates energy balance and body composition in animal models. Inconsistent effects of MCHR1 polymorphisms on energy homeostasis in humans may partly be attributable to environmental factors. We examined the effect of 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs133073, rs133074, rs9611386, and rs882111) in the MCHR1 gene on body composition as well as energy-related lifestyle factors (diet and physical activity). We also examined the effect of gene-lifestyle interactions on body composition. A total of 1153 participants (248 men and 905 women) from the cross-sectional Complex Diseases in the Newfoundland Population: Environment and Genetics (CODING) study were genotyped by using probe-based chemistry validated assays. Diet and physical activity were estimated by using validated frequency questionnaires, and body composition was assessed by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Three polymorphisms (rs9611386, rs882111, and rs133073) were associated with differences in body-composition measurements (all P energy intakes (P = 0.02). A similar interaction was shown with rs882111 (P = 0.02). Interactions were also observed between each of these polymorphisms (rs9611386, rs882111, and rs133073) and physical activity score on body-composition measurements (all P gene are associated with differences in body composition and interact with physiologic and energy-related lifestyle factors.

  18. Spatio-temporal changes in the genetic structure of the Passerina bunting hybrid zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carling, Matthew D; Zuckerberg, Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Although theoretical models predict that the structure of a hybrid zone can change under a variety of scenarios, only a few empirical studies of hybrid zones have unequivocally demonstrated zone movement. These studies are rare because few data sets exist that include repeated, temporally spaced, samples of the same hybrid zone. We analysed mitochondrial DNA haplotype data from samples separated by 40-45 years from across the Passerina amoena (Lazuli Bunting) and Passerina cyanea (Indigo Bunting) hybrid zone to investigate whether the genetic structure of this zone has changed during that interval. Both cline and generalized linear mixed modelling analyses uncovered a significant narrowing and a substantial westward shift of the Passerina bunting hybrid zone, clearly illustrating hybrid zone movement. The cause of the change may be due to a combination of ecological, demographic and behavioural factors. Our results predict that the width of the hybrid zone will continue to narrow over time, a finding consistent with reinforcement theory.

  19. A Novel Genetic Variant in Long Non-coding RNA Gene NEXN-AS1 is Associated with Risk of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hua; Liu, Hongliang; Liu, Zhensheng; Owzar, Kouros; Han, Younghun; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Hung, Rayjean J.; McLaughlin, John; Brhane, Yonathan; Brennan, Paul; Bickeboeller, Heike; Rosenberger, Albert; Houlston, Richard S.; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria Teresa; Heinrich, Joachim; Risch, Angela; Christiani, David C.; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Klein, Robert J.; Amos, Christopher I.; Wei, Qingyi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer etiology is multifactorial, and growing evidence has indicated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important players in lung carcinogenesis. We performed a large-scale meta-analysis of 690,564 SNPs in 15,531 autosomal lncRNAs by using datasets from six previously published genome-wide association studies (GWASs) from the Transdisciplinary Research in Cancer of the Lung (TRICL) consortium in populations of European ancestry. Previously unreported significant SNPs (P value < 1 × 10−7) were further validated in two additional independent lung cancer GWAS datasets from Harvard University and deCODE. In the final meta-analysis of all eight GWAS datasets with 17,153 cases and 239,337 controls, a novel risk SNP rs114020893 in the lncRNA NEXN-AS1 region at 1p31.1 remained statistically significant (odds ratio = 1.17; 95% confidence interval = 1.11–1.24; P = 8.31 × 10−9). In further in silico analysis, rs114020893 was predicted to change the secondary structure of the lncRNA. Our finding indicates that SNP rs114020893 of NEXN-AS1 at 1p31.1 may contribute to lung cancer susceptibility. PMID:27713484

  20. Land Cover Change Detection Based on Genetically Feature Aelection and Image Algebra Using Hyperion Hyperspectral Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydi, S. T.; Hasanlou, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth has always been under the influence of population growth and human activities. This process causes the changes in land use. Thus, for optimal management of the use of resources, it is necessary to be aware of these changes. Satellite remote sensing has several advantages for monitoring land use/cover resources, especially for large geographic areas. Change detection and attribution of cultivation area over time present additional challenges for correctly analyzing remote sensing imagery. In this regards, for better identifying change in multi temporal images we use hyperspectral images. Hyperspectral images due to high spectral resolution created special placed in many of field. Nevertheless, selecting suitable and adequate features/bands from this data is crucial for any analysis and especially for the change detection algorithms. This research aims to automatically feature selection for detect land use changes are introduced. In this study, the optimal band images using hyperspectral sensor using Hyperion hyperspectral images by using genetic algorithms and Ratio bands, we select the optimal band. In addition, the results reveal the superiority of the implemented method to extract change map with overall accuracy by a margin of nearly 79% using multi temporal hyperspectral imagery.

  1. Age-related molecular genetic changes of murine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster Keith A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are pluripotent cells, present in the bone marrow and other tissues that can differentiate into cells of all germ layers and may be involved in tissue maintenance and repair in adult organisms. Because of their plasticity and accessibility these cells are also prime candidates for regenerative medicine. The contribution of stem cell aging to organismal aging is under debate and one theory is that reparative processes deteriorate as a consequence of stem cell aging and/or decrease in number. Age has been linked with changes in osteogenic and adipogenic potential of MSCs. Results Here we report on changes in global gene expression of cultured MSCs isolated from the bone marrow of mice at ages 2, 8, and 26-months. Microarray analyses revealed significant changes in the expression of more than 8000 genes with stage-specific changes of multiple differentiation, cell cycle and growth factor genes. Key markers of adipogenesis including lipoprotein lipase, FABP4, and Itm2a displayed age-dependent declines. Expression of the master cell cycle regulators p53 and p21 and growth factors HGF and VEGF also declined significantly at 26 months. These changes were evident despite multiple cell divisions in vitro after bone marrow isolation. Conclusions The results suggest that MSCs are subject to molecular genetic changes during aging that are conserved during passage in culture. These changes may affect the physiological functions and the potential of autologous MSCs for stem cell therapy.

  2. LAND COVER CHANGE DETECTION BASED ON GENETICALLY FEATURE AELECTION AND IMAGE ALGEBRA USING HYPERION HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Seydi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Earth has always been under the influence of population growth and human activities. This process causes the changes in land use. Thus, for optimal management of the use of resources, it is necessary to be aware of these changes. Satellite remote sensing has several advantages for monitoring land use/cover resources, especially for large geographic areas. Change detection and attribution of cultivation area over time present additional challenges for correctly analyzing remote sensing imagery. In this regards, for better identifying change in multi temporal images we use hyperspectral images. Hyperspectral images due to high spectral resolution created special placed in many of field. Nevertheless, selecting suitable and adequate features/bands from this data is crucial for any analysis and especially for the change detection algorithms. This research aims to automatically feature selection for detect land use changes are introduced. In this study, the optimal band images using hyperspectral sensor using Hyperion hyperspectral images by using genetic algorithms and Ratio bands, we select the optimal band. In addition, the results reveal the superiority of the implemented method to extract change map with overall accuracy by a margin of nearly 79% using multi temporal hyperspectral imagery.

  3. Genetic variation for body weight change in mice in response to physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lightfoot J Timothy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity is beneficial in reducing the weight gain and associated health problems often experienced by individuals as they age, but the association of weight change with physical activity remains complex. We tested for a possible genetic basis for this association between 9-12-week body weight change (WTC and the distance, duration, and speed voluntarily run by 307 mice in an F2 population produced from an intercross of two inbred strains (C57L/J and C3H/HeJ that differed dramatically in their physical activity levels. Results In this population WTC did show the expected negative association with the physical activity traits, but only the phenotypic correlation of WTC with speed (-0.18 reached statistical significance. Using an interval mapping approach with single-nucleotide polymorphism markers, we discovered five (four suggestive and one significant quantitative trait loci (QTLs affecting body weight change, only one of which appeared to show pleiotropic effects on the physical activity traits as well. Genome-wide epistasis scans also detected several pairwise interactions of QTLs with pleiotropic effects on WTC and the physical activity traits, but these effects made a significant contribution (51% only to the covariance of WTC with speed. Conclusion It was concluded that the genetic contribution to the phenotypic association between WTC and the physical activity traits in this population of mice was primarily epistatic in origin, restricted to one measure of physical activity, and could be quite variable among different populations depending on the genetic background, experimental design and traits assessed.

  4. Population dynamics of a natural red deer population over 200 years detected via substantial changes of genetic variation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffmann, Gunther Sebastian; Johannesen, Jes; Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2016-01-01

    ... of the structure of extant populations. Here, we investigate for the first time the change in the genetic constitution of a natural red deer population over two centuries, using up to 200‐year‐old antlers (30 generations...

  5. Genetic and epigenetic changes of genes on chromosome 3 in human urogenital tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordiyuk V. V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous disorders of genes and alterations of their expression are observed on a short arm of human chromosome 3, particularly in 3p14, 3p21, 3p24 compact regions in epithelial tumors. These aberrations affect the key biological processes specific for cancerogenesis. Such genes or their products could be used for diagnostics and prognosis of cancer. Genetical and epigenetical changes of a number of genes on chromosome 3 in human urogenital cancer, their role in cellular processes and signal pathways and perspectives as molecular markers of cancer diseases are analyzed in the review

  6. Genetic profiling links changing sea-ice to shifting beluga whale migration patterns

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing concern over how Arctic fauna will adapt to climate related changes in sea-ice. We used long-term sighting and genetic data on beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) in conjunction with multi-decadal patterns of sea-ice in the Pacific Arctic to investigate the influence of sea-ice on spring migration and summer residency patterns. Substantial variations in sea-ice conditions were detected across seasons, years and sub-regions, revealing ice–ocean dynamics more complex than ...

  7. Interaction between genetic predisposition to obesity and dietary calcium in relation to subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars Henrik; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate an effect of dietary calcium on change in body weight (BW) and waist circumference (WC), but the results are inconsistent. Furthermore, a relation could depend on genetic predisposition to obesity.......Studies indicate an effect of dietary calcium on change in body weight (BW) and waist circumference (WC), but the results are inconsistent. Furthermore, a relation could depend on genetic predisposition to obesity....

  8. Molecular genetic alterations in egfr CA-SSR-1 microsatellite and egfr copy number changes are associated with aggressiveness in thymoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Salvatore; Gallo, Enzo; Sioletic, Stefano; Facciolo, Francesco; Palmieri, Giovannella; Lauriola, Libero; Evoli, Amelia; Martucci, Robert; Di Benedetto, Anna; Novelli, Flavia; Giannarelli, Diana; Deriu, Gloria; Granone, Pierluigi; Ottaviano, Margaret; Muti, Paola; Pescarmona, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Background The key role of egfr in thymoma pathogenesis has been questioned following the failure in identifying recurrent genetic alterations of egfr coding sequences and relevant egfr amplification rate. We investigated the role of the non-coding egfr CA simple sequence repeat 1 (CA-SSR-1) in a thymoma case series. Methods We used sequencing and egfr-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to genotype 43 thymomas; (I) for polymorphisms and somatic loss of heterozygosity of the non-coding egfr CA-SSR-1 microsatellite and (II) for egfr gene copy number changes. Results We found two prevalent CA-SSR-1 genotypes: a homozygous 16 CA repeat and a heterozygous genotype, bearing alleles with 16 and 20 CA repeats. The average combined allele length was correlated with tumor subtype: shorter sequences were significantly associated with the more aggressive WHO thymoma subtype group including B2/B3, B3 and B3/C histotypes. Four out of 29 informative cases analysed for somatic CA-SSR-1 loss of heterozygosity showed allelic imbalance (AI), 3/4 with loss of the longer allele. By egfr-FISH analysis, 9 out of 33 cases were FISH positive. Moreover, the two integrated techniques demonstrated that 3 out of 4 CA-SSR-1-AI positive cases with short allele relative prevalence showed significantly low or high chromosome 7 “polysomy”/increased gene copy number by egfr-FISH. Conclusions Our molecular and genetic and follow up data indicated that CA-SSR-1-allelic imbalance with short allele relative prevalence significantly correlated with EGFR 3+ immunohistochemical score, increased egfr Gene Copy Number, advanced stage and with relapsing/metastatic behaviour in thymomas. PMID:27076933

  9. Estimation of genetic parameters and genetic change for stillbirth in Iranian Holstein cows: a comparison between linear and threshold models

    OpenAIRE

    N.G. HOSSEIN-ZADEH

    2008-01-01

    Data on stillbirth from the Animal Breeding Center of Iran collected from January 1990 to December 2007 and comprising 668810 Holstein calving events from 2506 herds were analyzed. Linear and threshold animal and sire models were used to estimate genetic parameters and genetic trends for stillbirth in the first, second, and third parities. Mean incidence of stillbirth decreased from first to third parities: 23.7%, 22.1%, and 21.8%, respectively. Phenotypic rates of stillbirth decreased from 1...

  10. Optimal Parameter Exploration for Online Change-Point Detection in Activity Monitoring Using Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Khan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, smart phones with inbuilt sensors have become popular devices to facilitate activity recognition. The sensors capture a large amount of data, containing meaningful events, in a short period of time. The change points in this data are used to specify transitions to distinct events and can be used in various scenarios such as identifying change in a patient’s vital signs in the medical domain or requesting activity labels for generating real-world labeled activity datasets. Our work focuses on change-point detection to identify a transition from one activity to another. Within this paper, we extend our previous work on multivariate exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA algorithm by using a genetic algorithm (GA to identify the optimal set of parameters for online change-point detection. The proposed technique finds the maximum accuracy and F_measure by optimizing the different parameters of the MEWMA, which subsequently identifies the exact location of the change point from an existing activity to a new one. Optimal parameter selection facilitates an algorithm to detect accurate change points and minimize false alarms. Results have been evaluated based on two real datasets of accelerometer data collected from a set of different activities from two users, with a high degree of accuracy from 99.4% to 99.8% and F_measure of up to 66.7%.

  11. Vulnerability of dynamic genetic conservation units of forest trees in Europe to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueler, Silvio; Falk, Wolfgang; Koskela, Jarkko; Lefèvre, François; Bozzano, Michele; Hubert, Jason; Kraigher, Hojka; Longauer, Roman; Olrik, Ditte C

    2014-05-01

    A transnational network of genetic conservation units for forest trees was recently documented in Europe aiming at the conservation of evolutionary processes and the adaptive potential of natural or man-made tree populations. In this study, we quantified the vulnerability of individual conservation units and the whole network to climate change using climate favourability models and the estimated velocity of climate change. Compared to the overall climate niche of the analysed target species populations at the warm and dry end of the species niche are underrepresented in the network. However, by 2100, target species in 33-65 % of conservation units, mostly located in southern Europe, will be at the limit or outside the species' current climatic niche as demonstrated by favourabilities below required model sensitivities of 95%. The highest average decrease in favourabilities throughout the network can be expected for coniferous trees although they are mainly occurring within units in mountainous landscapes for which we estimated lower velocities of change. Generally, the species-specific estimates of favourabilities showed only low correlations to the velocity of climate change in individual units, indicating that both vulnerability measures should be considered for climate risk analysis. The variation in favourabilities among target species within the same conservation units is expected to increase with climate change and will likely require a prioritization among co-occurring species. The present results suggest that there is a strong need to intensify monitoring efforts and to develop additional conservation measures for populations in the most vulnerable units. Also, our results call for continued transnational actions for genetic conservation of European forest trees, including the establishment of dynamic conservation populations outside the current species distribution ranges within European assisted migration schemes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The lack of foundation in the mechanism on which are based the physico-chemical theories for the origin of the genetic code is counterposed to the credible and natural mechanism suggested by the coevolution theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Massimo

    2016-06-21

    I analyze the mechanism on which are based the majority of theories that put to the center of the origin of the genetic code the physico-chemical properties of amino acids. As this mechanism is based on excessive mutational steps, I conclude that it could not have been operative or if operative it would not have allowed a full realization of predictions of these theories, because this mechanism contained, evidently, a high indeterminacy. I make that disapproving the four-column theory of the origin of the genetic code (Higgs, 2009) and reply to the criticism that was directed towards the coevolution theory of the origin of the genetic code. In this context, I suggest a new hypothesis that clarifies the mechanism by which the domains of codons of the precursor amino acids would have evolved, as predicted by the coevolution theory. This mechanism would have used particular elongation factors that would have constrained the evolution of all amino acids belonging to a given biosynthetic family to the progenitor pre-tRNA, that for first recognized, the first codons that evolved in a certain codon domain of a determined precursor amino acid. This happened because the elongation factors recognized two characteristics of the progenitor pre-tRNAs of precursor amino acids, which prevented the elongation factors from recognizing the pre-tRNAs belonging to biosynthetic families of different precursor amino acids. Finally, I analyze by means of Fisher's exact test, the distribution, within the genetic code, of the biosynthetic classes of amino acids and the ones of polarity values of amino acids. This analysis would seem to support the biosynthetic classes of amino acids over the ones of polarity values, as the main factor that led to the structuring of the genetic code, with the physico-chemical properties of amino acids playing only a subsidiary role in this evolution. As a whole, the full analysis brings to the conclusion that the coevolution theory of the origin of the

  13. Plant genetics and interspecific competitive interactions determine ectomycorrhizal fungal community responses to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Catherine; Flores-Rentería, Dulce; Sthultz, Christopher M; Leonard, Tierra M; Flores-Rentería, Lluvia; Whipple, Amy V; Whitham, Thomas G

    2014-03-01

    Although the importance of plant-associated microbes is increasingly recognized, little is known about the biotic and abiotic factors that determine the composition of that microbiome. We examined the influence of plant genetic variation, and two stressors, one biotic and one abiotic, on the ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal community of a dominant tree species, Pinus edulis. During three periods across 16 years that varied in drought severity, we sampled the EM fungal communities of a wild stand of P. edulis in which genetically based resistance and susceptibility to insect herbivory was linked with drought tolerance and the abundance of competing shrubs. We found that the EM fungal communities of insect-susceptible trees remained relatively constant as climate dried, while those of insect-resistant trees shifted significantly, providing evidence of a genotype by environment interaction. Shrub removal altered the EM fungal communities of insect-resistant trees, but not insect-susceptible trees, also a genotype by environment interaction. The change in the EM fungal community of insect-resistant trees following shrub removal was associated with greater shoot growth, evidence of competitive release. However, shrub removal had a 7-fold greater positive effect on the shoot growth of insect-susceptible trees than insect-resistant trees when shrub density was taken into account. Insect-susceptible trees had higher growth than insect-resistant trees, consistent with the hypothesis that the EM fungi associated with susceptible trees were superior mutualists. These complex, genetic-based interactions among species (tree-shrub-herbivore-fungus) argue that the ultimate impacts of climate change are both ecological and evolutionary. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Learned vocal variation is associated with abrupt cryptic genetic change in a parrot species complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul F H Ribot

    Full Text Available Contact zones between subspecies or closely related species offer valuable insights into speciation processes. A typical feature of such zones is the presence of clinal variation in multiple traits. The nature of these traits and the concordance among clines are expected to influence whether and how quickly speciation will proceed. Learned signals, such as vocalizations in species having vocal learning (e.g. humans, many birds, bats and cetaceans, can exhibit rapid change and may accelerate reproductive isolation between populations. Therefore, particularly strong concordance among clines in learned signals and population genetic structure may be expected, even among continuous populations in the early stages of speciation. However, empirical evidence for this pattern is often limited because differences in vocalisations between populations are driven by habitat differences or have evolved in allopatry. We tested for this pattern in a unique system where we may be able to separate effects of habitat and evolutionary history. We studied geographic variation in the vocalizations of the crimson rosella (Platycercus elegans parrot species complex. Parrots are well known for their life-long vocal learning and cognitive abilities. We analysed contact calls across a ca 1300 km transect encompassing populations that differed in neutral genetic markers and plumage colour. We found steep clinal changes in two acoustic variables (fundamental frequency and peak frequency position. The positions of the two clines in vocal traits were concordant with a steep cline in microsatellite-based genetic variation, but were discordant with the steep clines in mtDNA, plumage and habitat. Our study provides new evidence that vocal variation, in a species with vocal learning, can coincide with areas of restricted gene flow across geographically continuous populations. Our results suggest that traits that evolve culturally can be strongly associated with reduced gene flow

  15. Genetic risk factors for longitudinal changes in structural MRI in former organolead workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Bryan D; Caffo, Brian; Stewart, Walter F; Yousem, David; Davatzikos, Christos; Schwartz, Brian S

    2011-01-01

    This study examined associations between polymorphisms in three genes, apolipoprotein E (APOE), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), and vitamin D receptor (VDR), and longitudinal change in brain volumes and white matter lesions (WML) as well as effect modification by cardiovascular factors and tibia lead concentrations. Two MRIs, an average of 5 years apart, were obtained for 317 former organolead workers and 45 population-based controls. Both regions-of-interest and voxel-wise analyses were conducted. APOE ε3/ε4 and ε4/ε4 genotypes were associated with less decline in white matter volumes. There was some evidence of interaction between genetic polymorphisms and cardiovascular risk factors (ACE and high-density lipoprotein; VDR and diabetes) on brain volume decline. The VDR FokI ff genotype was associated with an increase in WML (no association for APOE or ACE). This study expands our understanding of how genetic precursors of dementia and cardiovascular diseases are related to changes in brain structure.

  16. Real Time Updating Genetic Network Programming for Adapting to the Change of Stock Prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Mabu, Shingo; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    The key in stock trading model is to take the right actions for trading at the right time, primarily based on the accurate forecast of future stock trends. Since an effective trading with given information of stock prices needs an intelligent strategy for the decision making, we applied Genetic Network Programming (GNP) to creating a stock trading model. In this paper, we propose a new method called Real Time Updating Genetic Network Programming (RTU-GNP) for adapting to the change of stock prices. There are three important points in this paper: First, the RTU-GNP method makes a stock trading decision considering both the recommendable information of technical indices and the candlestick charts according to the real time stock prices. Second, we combine RTU-GNP with a Sarsa learning algorithm to create the programs efficiently. Also, sub-nodes are introduced in each judgment and processing node to determine appropriate actions (buying/selling) and to select appropriate stock price information depending on the situation. Third, a Real Time Updating system has been firstly introduced in our paper considering the change of the trend of stock prices. The experimental results on the Japanese stock market show that the trading model with the proposed RTU-GNP method outperforms other models without real time updating. We also compared the experimental results using the proposed method with Buy&Hold method to confirm its effectiveness, and it is clarified that the proposed trading model can obtain much higher profits than Buy&Hold method.

  17. Stakeholder perspectives on the implementation of genetic carrier screening in a changing landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Kim C A; Vos, Evelien M; Rigter, Tessel; Lakeman, Phillis; Henneman, Lidewij; Cornel, Martina C

    2017-02-16

    In most countries, genetic carrier screening is neither offered, nor embedded in mainstream healthcare. Technological developments have triggered a two-fold transition in carrier screening: the expansion from screening one single disorder to many disorders simultaneously, and offering screening universally, regardless of ancestry. This study aims to identify general and population-specific barriers and needs reflected by stakeholders regarding the implementation of carrier screening in a changing landscape. Seventeen semi-structured interviews were conducted with Dutch key stakeholders working in the practical and scientific field of carrier screening. The constellation approach was used to categorise barriers and needs into three levels: culture, structure and practice. Barriers on a cultural level include: undecidedness about the desirability of carrier screening, and a lack of priority of screening in mainstream healthcare. On a structural level barriers included: need for organisational structures in healthcare for embedding carrier screening, need for guidelines, financial structures, practical tools for overcoming challenges during counselling, and a need for training and education of both professionals and the public. A lack of demand for screening by the public, and a need for a division of responsibilities were barriers on a practical level. The absence of a collective sense of urgency for genetic carrier screening, a lack of organisational structures, and uncertainty or even disagreement about the responsibilities seem to be important barriers in the implementation of carrier screening. Stakeholders therefore suggest that change agents should be formally acknowledged to strategically plan broadening of current initiatives and attune different stakeholders.

  18. Effects of Knowledge on Attitude Formation and Change Toward Genetically Modified Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xie, Xiaofei

    2015-05-01

    In three waves, this study investigates the impact of risk and benefit knowledge on attitude formation toward genetically modified (GM) foods as well as the moderating effect of knowledge level on attitude change caused by receiving information. The data in Wave 1 (N = 561) demonstrate that both benefit and risk knowledge either directly contribute to attitude formation or indirectly affect attitudes through the mediating roles of benefit and risk perceptions. Overall, benefit and risk knowledge affect consumer attitudes positively and negatively, respectively. In Wave 2, 486 participants from Wave 1 were provided with information about GM foods, and their attitudes were assessed. Three weeks later, 433 of these participants again reported their attitudes. The results indicate that compared with the benefit and mixed information, risk information has a greater and longer lasting impact on attitude change, which results in lower acceptance of GM foods. Furthermore, risk information more strongly influences participants with a higher knowledge level. The moderating effect of knowledge on attitude change may result from these participants' better understanding of and greater trust in the information. These findings highlight the important role of knowledge in attitude formation and attitude change toward GM foods as well as the necessity of considering the determinants of attitude formation in attitude change studies.

  19. Ancient DNA sequence revealed by error-correcting codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Marcelo M; Spoladore, Larissa; Faria, Luzinete C B; Rocha, Andréa S L; Silva-Filho, Marcio C; Palazzo, Reginaldo

    2015-07-10

    A previously described DNA sequence generator algorithm (DNA-SGA) using error-correcting codes has been employed as a computational tool to address the evolutionary pathway of the genetic code. The code-generated sequence alignment demonstrated that a residue mutation revealed by the code can be found in the same position in sequences of distantly related taxa. Furthermore, the code-generated sequences do not promote amino acid changes in the deviant genomes through codon reassignment. A Bayesian evolutionary analysis of both code-generated and homologous sequences of the Arabidopsis thaliana malate dehydrogenase gene indicates an approximately 1 MYA divergence time from the MDH code-generated sequence node to its paralogous sequences. The DNA-SGA helps to determine the plesiomorphic state of DNA sequences because a single nucleotide alteration often occurs in distantly related taxa and can be found in the alternative codon patterns of noncanonical genetic codes. As a consequence, the algorithm may reveal an earlier stage of the evolution of the standard code.

  20. A New Code for Calculating Post-seismic Displacements as Well as Geoid and Gravity Changes on a Layered Visco-Elastic Spherical Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shanghua; Fu, Guangyu; Liu, Tai; Zhang, Guoqing

    2017-03-01

    Tanaka et al. (Geophys J Int 164:273-289, 2006, Geophys J Int 170:1031-1052, 2007) proposed the spherical dislocation theory (SDT) in a spherically symmetric, self-gravitating visco-elastic earth model. However, to date there have been no reports on easily adopted, widely used software that utilizes Tanaka's theory. In this study we introduce a new code to compute post-seismic deformations (PSD), including displacements as well as Geoid and gravity changes, caused by a seismic source at any position. This new code is based on the above-mentioned SDT. The code consists of two parts. The first part is the numerical frame of the dislocation Green function (DGF), which contains a set of two-dimensional discrete numerical frames of DGFs on a symmetric earth model. The second part is an integration function, which performs bi-quadratic spline interpolation operations on the frame of DGFs. The inputs are the information on the seismic fault models and the information on the observation points. After the user prepares the inputs in a file with given format, the code will automatically compute the PSD. As an example, we use the new code to calculate the co-seismic displacements caused by the Tohoku-Oki Mw 9.0 earthquake. We compare the result with observations and the result from a full-elastic SDT, and we found that the Root Mean Square error between the calculated and observed results is 7.4 cm. This verifies the suitability of our new code. Finally, we discuss several issues that require attention when using the code, which should be helpful for users.

  1. Estimation of genetic parameters and genetic change for stillbirth in Iranian Holstein cows: a comparison between linear and threshold models

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    N.G. HOSSEIN-ZADEH

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Data on stillbirth from the Animal Breeding Center of Iran collected from January 1990 to December 2007 and comprising 668810 Holstein calving events from 2506 herds were analyzed. Linear and threshold animal and sire models were used to estimate genetic parameters and genetic trends for stillbirth in the first, second, and third parities. Mean incidence of stillbirth decreased from first to third parities: 23.7%, 22.1%, and 21.8%, respectively. Phenotypic rates of stillbirth decreased from 1993 to 1998, for first, second and third calvings, and then increased from 1998 to 2007 for the first three parities. Direct heritability estimates of stillbirth for parities 1, 2 and 3 ranged from 2.2 to 8.7%, 0.6 to 5.1% and 0.1 to 3.8%, respectively, and maternal heritability estimates of stillbirth for parities 1, 2 and 3 ranged from 1.4 to 6.3%, 0.5 to 4.2% and 0.08 to 2.0%, respectively, using linear and threshold animal models. The threshold sire model estimates of heritabilities for stillbirth in this study were 0.021 to 0.071, while the linear sire model estimates of heritabilities for stillbirth in the current study were from 0.003 to 0.021 over the parities. There was a slightly increasing genetic trend for stillbirth rate in parities 1 and 2 over time with the analysis of linear animal and linear sire models. There was a significant decreasing genetic trend for stillbirth rate in parity 1 and 3 over time with the analysis of threshold animal and threshold sire models, but the genetic trend for stillbirth rate in parity 2 with these models of analysis was significantly positive. The low estimates of heritability obtained in this study implied that much of the improvement in stillbirth could be attained by improvement of production environment rather than genetic selection.;

  2. Importance of ICD-10 coding directive change for acute gastroenteritis (unspecified) for rotavirus vaccine impact studies: illustration from a population-based cohort study from Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah E; Deeks, Shelley L; Rosella, Laura C

    2015-09-15

    In Ontario, Canada, we conducted an evaluation of rotavirus (RV) vaccine on hospitalizations and Emergency Department (ED) visitations for acute gastroenteritis (AGE). In our original analysis, any one of the International Classification of Disease, Version 10 (ICD-10) codes was used for outcome ascertainment: RV-specific- (A08.0), viral- (A08.3, A08. 4, A08.5), and unspecified infectious- gastroenteritis (A09). Annual age-specific rates per 10,000 population were calculated. The average monthly rate of AGE hospitalization for children under age two increased from 0.82 per 10,000 from January 2003 to March 2009, to 2.35 over the period of April 2009 to March 31, 2013. Similar trends were found for ED consultations and in other age groups. A rise in events corresponding to the A09 code was found when the outcome definition was disaggregated by ICD-10 code. Documentation obtained from the World Health Organization confirmed that a change in directive for the classification of unspecified gastroenteritis occurred with the release of ICD-10 in April 2009. AGE events previously classified under the code K52.9, are now classified under code A09.9. Based on change in the classification of unspecified gastroenteritis we modified our outcome definition to also include unspecified non-infectious-gastroenteritis (K52.9). We recommend other investigators consider using both A09.9 and K52.9 ICD-10 codes for outcome ascertainment in future rotavirus vaccine impact studies to ensure that all unspecified cases of AGE are captured, especially if the study period spans 2009.

  3. Utilizing forest tree genetic diversity for an adaptation of forest to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueler, Silvio; Lackner, Magdalena; Chakraborty, Debojyoti

    2017-04-01

    Since climate conditions are considered to be major determinants of tree species' distribution ranges and drivers of local adaptation, anthropogenic climate change (CC) is expected to modify the distribution of tree species, tree species diversity and the forest ecosystems connected to these species. The expected speed of environmental change is significantly larger than the natural migration and adaptation capacity of trees and makes spontaneous adjustment of forest ecosystems improbable. Planting alternative tree species and utilizing the tree species' intrinsic adaptive capacity are considered to be the most promising adaptation strategy. Each year about 900 million seedlings of the major tree species are being planted in Central Europe. At present, the utilization of forest reproductive material is mainly restricted to nationally defined ecoregions (seed/provenance zones), but when seedlings planted today become adult, they might be maladapted, as the climate conditions within ecoregions changed significantly. In the cooperation project SUSTREE, we develop transnational delineation models for forest seed transfer and genetic conservation based on species distribution models and available intra-specific climate-response function. These models are being connected to national registers of forest reproductive material in order support nursery and forest managers by selecting the appropriate seedling material for future plantations. In the long-term, European and national policies as well as regional recommendations for provenances use need to adapted to consider the challenges of climate change.

  4. Mild folate deficiency induces genetic and epigenetic instability and phenotype changes in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsui Sei-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Folate (vitamin B9 is essential for cellular proliferation as it is involved in the biosynthesis of deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP and s-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet. The link between folate depletion and the genesis and progression of cancers of epithelial origin is of high clinical relevance, but still unclear. We recently demonstrated that sensitivity to low folate availability is affected by the rate of polyamine biosynthesis, which is prominent in prostate cells. We, therefore, hypothesized that prostate cells might be highly susceptible to genetic, epigenetic and phenotypic changes consequent to folate restriction. Results We studied the consequences of long-term, mild folate depletion in a model comprised of three syngenic cell lines derived from the transgenic adenoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP model, recapitulating different stages of prostate cancer; benign, transformed and metastatic. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated that mild folate depletion (100 nM sufficed to induce imbalance in both the nucleotide and AdoMet pools in all prostate cell lines. Random oligonucleotide-primed synthesis (ROPS revealed a significant increase in uracil misincorporation and DNA single strand breaks, while spectral karyotype analysis (SKY identified five novel chromosomal rearrangements in cells grown with mild folate depletion. Using global approaches, we identified an increase in CpG island and histone methylation upon folate depletion despite unchanged levels of total 5-methylcytosine, indicating a broad effect of folate depletion on epigenetic regulation. These genomic changes coincided with phenotype changes in the prostate cells including increased anchorage-independent growth and reduced sensitivity to folate depletion. Conclusions This study demonstrates that prostate cells are highly susceptible to genetic and epigenetic changes consequent to mild folate depletion as compared to cells grown with

  5. Mild folate deficiency induces genetic and epigenetic instability and phenotype changes in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Folate (vitamin B9) is essential for cellular proliferation as it is involved in the biosynthesis of deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP) and s-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). The link between folate depletion and the genesis and progression of cancers of epithelial origin is of high clinical relevance, but still unclear. We recently demonstrated that sensitivity to low folate availability is affected by the rate of polyamine biosynthesis, which is prominent in prostate cells. We, therefore, hypothesized that prostate cells might be highly susceptible to genetic, epigenetic and phenotypic changes consequent to folate restriction. Results We studied the consequences of long-term, mild folate depletion in a model comprised of three syngenic cell lines derived from the transgenic adenoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model, recapitulating different stages of prostate cancer; benign, transformed and metastatic. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated that mild folate depletion (100 nM) sufficed to induce imbalance in both the nucleotide and AdoMet pools in all prostate cell lines. Random oligonucleotide-primed synthesis (ROPS) revealed a significant increase in uracil misincorporation and DNA single strand breaks, while spectral karyotype analysis (SKY) identified five novel chromosomal rearrangements in cells grown with mild folate depletion. Using global approaches, we identified an increase in CpG island and histone methylation upon folate depletion despite unchanged levels of total 5-methylcytosine, indicating a broad effect of folate depletion on epigenetic regulation. These genomic changes coincided with phenotype changes in the prostate cells including increased anchorage-independent growth and reduced sensitivity to folate depletion. Conclusions This study demonstrates that prostate cells are highly susceptible to genetic and epigenetic changes consequent to mild folate depletion as compared to cells grown with supraphysiological

  6. Evaluating Changes in Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake after Receiving Personal FADS1 Genetic Information: A Randomized Nutrigenetic Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roke, Kaitlin; Walton, Kathryn; Klingel, Shannon L; Harnett, Amber; Subedi, Sanjeena; Haines, Jess; Mutch, David M

    2017-03-06

    Nutrigenetics research is anticipated to lay the foundation for personalized dietary recommendations; however, it remains unclear if providing individuals with their personal genetic information changes dietary behaviors. Our objective was to evaluate if providing information for a common variant in the fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1) gene changed omega-3 fatty acid (FA) intake and blood levels in young female adults (18-25 years). Participants were randomized into Genetic (intervention) and Non-Genetic (control) groups, with measurements taken at Baseline and Final (12 weeks). Dietary intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was assessed using an omega-3 food frequency questionnaire. Red blood cell (RBC) FA content was quantified by gas chromatography. Implications of participation in a nutrigenetics study and awareness of omega-3 FAs were assessed with online questionnaires. Upon completion of the study, EPA and DHA intake increased significantly (p = 1.0 × 10(-4)) in all participants. This change was reflected by small increases in RBC %EPA. Participants in the Genetic group showed increased awareness of omega-3 terminology by the end of the study, reported that the dietary recommendations were more useful, and rated cost as a barrier to omega-3 consumption less often than those in the Non-Genetic group. Providing participants FADS1 genetic information did not appear to influence omega-3 intake during the 12 weeks, but did change perceptions and behaviors related to omega-3 FAs in this timeframe.

  7. Landscape genetics as a tool for conservation planning: predicting the effects of landscape change on gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Strien, Maarten J; Keller, Daniela; Holderegger, Rolf; Ghazoul, Jaboury; Kienast, Felix; Bolliger, Janine

    2014-03-01

    For conservation managers, it is important to know whether landscape changes lead to increasing or decreasing gene flow. Although the discipline of landscape genetics assesses the influence of landscape elements on gene flow, no studies have yet used landscape-genetic models to predict gene flow resulting from landscape change. A species that has already been severely affected by landscape change is the large marsh grasshopper (Stethophyma grossum), which inhabits moist areas in fragmented agricultural landscapes in Switzerland. From transects drawn between all population pairs within maximum dispersal distance (landscape planning.

  8. Stability of genetic variance and covariance for reproductive characters in the face of climate change in a wild bird population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garant, Dany; Hadfield, Jarrod D; Kruuk, Loeske E B; Sheldon, Ben C

    2008-01-01

    Global warming has had numerous effects on populations of animals and plants, with many species in temperate regions experiencing environmental change at unprecedented rates. Populations with low potential for adaptive evolutionary change and plasticity will have little chance of persistence in the face of environmental change. Assessment of the potential for adaptive evolution requires the estimation of quantitative genetic parameters, but it is as yet unclear what impact, if any, global warming will have on the expression of genetic variances and covariances. Here we assess the impact of a changing climate on the genetic architecture underlying three reproductive traits in a wild bird population. We use a large, long-term, data set collected on great tits (Parus major) in Wytham Woods, Oxford, and an 'animal model' approach to quantify the heritability of, and genetic correlations among, laying date, clutch size and egg mass during two periods with contrasting temperature conditions over a 40-year period (1965-1988 [cooler] vs. 1989-2004 [warmer]). We found significant additive genetic variance and heritability for all traits under both temperature regimes. We also found significant negative genetic covariances and correlations between clutch size and egg weight during both periods, and among laying date and clutch size in the colder years only. The overall G matrix comparison among periods, however, showed only a minor difference among periods, thus suggesting that genotype by environment interactions are negligible in this context. Our results therefore suggest that despite substantial changes in temperature and in mean laying date phenotype over the last decades, and despite the large sample sizes available, we are unable to detect any significant change in the genetic architecture of the reproductive traits studied.

  9. Proposal to consistently apply the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP) to names of the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria), including those validly published under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN)/International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (ICN), and proposal to change Principle 2 of the ICNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinevich, Alexander V

    2015-03-01

    This taxonomic note was motivated by the recent proposal [Oren & Garrity (2014) Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 64, 309-310] to exclude the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria) from the wording of General Consideration 5 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP), which entails unilateral coverage of these prokaryotes by the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN; formerly the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, ICBN). On the basis of key viewpoints, approaches and rules in the systematics, taxonomy and nomenclature of prokaryotes it is reciprocally proposed to apply the ICNP to names of cyanobacteria including those validly published under the ICBN/ICN. For this purpose, a change to Principle 2 of the ICNP is proposed to enable validation of cyanobacterial names published under the ICBN/ICN rules. © 2015 IUMS.

  10. Norm Change in Genetic Services. How the Discourse of Choice Replaced the Discourse of Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane B. Paul

    Full Text Available Abstract In the 1960s and '70s, it was generally assumed that reproductive choices have social consequences and thus are a matter of social concern. Socially-responsible reproductive behavior, in turn, was assumed to entail minimizing the risk of transmitting grave genetic diseases. Over time, such a view came increasingly to be labelled "eugenics," a term that would in much of the world acquire strongly negative connotations. By the 1990s, the old view had been largely replaced in the West by the tenet that procreation is a private matter, and that there are no right or wrong reproductive decisions. The primary aim of this essay is to explain and interpret this transformation, which was largely a product of the 1980s. Drawing on social-norms theory, which assumes that norms are always to some degree contested, it asks how those with an interest in changing prevailing attitudes were able to achieve such apparent rapid success.

  11. BREEDING AND GENETICS SYMPOSIUM: Climate change and selective breeding in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Lim, P; Kause, A; Mulder, H A; Olesen, I

    2017-04-01

    breeding programs would be more heavily used. Aquaculture should use genetically improved and robust organisms not suffering from inbreeding depression. This will require using fish from well-managed selective breeding programs with proper inbreeding control and breeding goals. Policymakers and breeding organizations should provide incentives to boost selective breeding programs in aquaculture for more robust fish tolerating climatic change.

  12. Climate change underlies global demographic, genetic, and cultural transitions in pre-Columbian southern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehren-Schmitz, Lars; Haak, Wolfgang; Mächtle, Bertil; Masch, Florian; Llamas, Bastien; Cagigao, Elsa Tomasto; Sossna, Volker; Schittek, Karsten; Isla Cuadrado, Johny; Eitel, Bernhard; Reindel, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Several archaeological studies in the Central Andes have pointed at the temporal coincidence of climatic fluctuations (both long- and short-term) and episodes of cultural transition and changes of socioeconomic structures throughout the pre-Columbian period. Although most scholars explain the connection between environmental and cultural changes by the impact of climatic alterations on the capacities of the ecosystems inhabited by pre-Columbian cultures, direct evidence for assumed demographic consequences is missing so far. In this study, we address directly the impact of climatic changes on the spatial population dynamics of the Central Andes. We use a large dataset of pre-Columbian mitochondrial DNA sequences from the northern Rio Grande de Nasca drainage (RGND) in southern Peru, dating from ∼840 BC to 1450 AD. Alternative demographic scenarios are tested using Bayesian serial coalescent simulations in an approximate Bayesian computational framework. Our results indicate migrations from the lower coastal valleys of southern Peru into the Andean highlands coincident with increasing climate variability at the end of the Nasca culture at ∼640 AD. We also find support for a back-migration from the highlands to the coast coincident with droughts in the southeastern Andean highlands and improvement of climatic conditions on the coast after the decline of the Wari and Tiwanaku empires (∼1200 AD), leading to a genetic homogenization in the RGND and probably southern Peru as a whole.

  13. Genetic profiling links changing sea-ice to shifting beluga whale migration patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Andrew R.; Suydam, Robert; Quakenbush, Lori; Whiting, Alex; Lowry, Lloyd; Harwood, Lois

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing concern over how Arctic fauna will adapt to climate related changes in sea-ice. We used long-term sighting and genetic data on beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) in conjunction with multi-decadal patterns of sea-ice in the Pacific Arctic to investigate the influence of sea-ice on spring migration and summer residency patterns. Substantial variations in sea-ice conditions were detected across seasons, years and sub-regions, revealing ice–ocean dynamics more complex than Arctic-wide trends suggest. This variation contrasted with a highly consistent pattern of migration and residency by several populations, indicating that belugas can accommodate widely varying sea-ice conditions to perpetuate philopatry to coastal migration destinations. However, a number of anomalous migration and residency events were detected and coincided with anomalous ice years, and in one case with an increase in killer whale (Orcinus orca) sightings and reported predation on beluga whales. The behavioural shifts were likely driven by changing sea-ice and associated changes in resource dispersion and predation risk. Continued reductions in sea-ice may result in increased predation at key aggregation areas and shifts in beluga whale behaviour with implications for population viability, ecosystem structure and the subsistence cultures that rely on them.

  14. Coding Partitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Burderi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the study of decipherability conditions for codes weaker than Unique Decipherability (UD, we introduce the notion of coding partition. Such a notion generalizes that of UD code and, for codes that are not UD, allows to recover the ``unique decipherability" at the level of the classes of the partition. By tacking into account the natural order between the partitions, we define the characteristic partition of a code X as the finest coding partition of X. This leads to introduce the canonical decomposition of a code in at most one unambiguouscomponent and other (if any totally ambiguouscomponents. In the case the code is finite, we give an algorithm for computing its canonical partition. This, in particular, allows to decide whether a given partition of a finite code X is a coding partition. This last problem is then approached in the case the code is a rational set. We prove its decidability under the hypothesis that the partition contains a finite number of classes and each class is a rational set. Moreover we conjecture that the canonical partition satisfies such a hypothesis. Finally we consider also some relationships between coding partitions and varieties of codes.

  15. Exploiting genetic diversity from landraces in wheat breeding for adaptation to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marta S; El-Basyoni, Ibrahim; Baenziger, Peter S; Singh, Sukhwinder; Royo, Conxita; Ozbek, Kursad; Aktas, Husnu; Ozer, Emel; Ozdemir, Fatih; Manickavelu, Alagu; Ban, Tomohiro; Vikram, Prashant

    2015-06-01

    Climate change has generated unpredictability in the timing and amount of rain, as well as extreme heat and cold spells that have affected grain yields worldwide and threaten food security. Sources of specific adaptation related to drought and heat, as well as associated breeding of genetic traits, will contribute to maintaining grain yields in dry and warm years. Increased crop photosynthesis and biomass have been achieved particularly through disease resistance and healthy leaves. Similarly, sources of drought and heat adaptation through extended photosynthesis and increased biomass would also greatly benefit crop improvement. Wheat landraces have been cultivated for thousands of years under the most extreme environmental conditions. They have also been cultivated in lower input farming systems for which adaptation traits, particularly those that increase the duration of photosynthesis, have been conserved. Landraces are a valuable source of genetic diversity and specific adaptation to local environmental conditions according to their place of origin. Evidence supports the hypothesis that landraces can provide sources of increased biomass and thousand kernel weight, both important traits for adaptation to tolerate drought and heat. Evaluation of wheat landraces stored in gene banks with highly beneficial untapped diversity and sources of stress adaptation, once characterized, should also be used for wheat improvement. Unified development of databases and promotion of data sharing among physiologists, pathologists, wheat quality scientists, national programmes, and breeders will greatly benefit wheat improvement for adaptation to climate change worldwide. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Comparative Genome Sequencing Reveals Within-Host Genetic Changes in Neisseria meningitidis during Invasive Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klughammer, Johanna; Dittrich, Marcus; Blom, Jochen; Mitesser, Vera; Vogel, Ulrich; Frosch, Matthias; Goesmann, Alexander; Müller, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Some members of the physiological human microbiome occasionally cause life-threatening disease even in immunocompetent individuals. A prime example of such a commensal pathogen is Neisseria meningitidis, which normally resides in the human nasopharynx but is also a leading cause of sepsis and epidemic meningitis. Using N. meningitidis as model organism, we tested the hypothesis that virulence of commensal pathogens is a consequence of within host evolution and selection of invasive variants due to mutations at contingency genes, a mechanism called phase variation. In line with the hypothesis that phase variation evolved as an adaptation to colonize diverse hosts, computational comparisons of all 27 to date completely sequenced and annotated meningococcal genomes retrieved from public databases showed that contingency genes are indeed enriched for genes involved in host interactions. To assess within-host genetic changes in meningococci, we further used ultra-deep whole-genome sequencing of throat-blood strain pairs isolated from four patients suffering from invasive meningococcal disease. We detected up to three mutations per strain pair, affecting predominantly contingency genes involved in type IV pilus biogenesis. However, there was not a single (set) of mutation(s) that could invariably be found in all four pairs of strains. Phenotypic assays further showed that these genetic changes were generally not associated with increased serum resistance, higher fitness in human blood ex vivo or differences in the interaction with human epithelial and endothelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, we hypothesize that virulence of meningococci results from accidental emergence of invasive variants during carriage and without within host evolution of invasive phenotypes during disease progression in vivo. PMID:28081260

  17. Utilization of farm animal genetic resources in a changing agro-ecological environment in the Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha eKantanen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Livestock production is the most important component of northern European agriculture and contributes to and will be affected by climate change. Nevertheless, the role of farm animal genetic resources in the adaptation to new agro-ecological conditions and mitigation of animal production’s effects on climate change has been inadequately discussed despite there being several important associations between animal genetic resources and climate change issues. The sustainability of animal production systems and future food security require access to a wide diversity of animal genetic resources.There are several genetic questions that should be considered in strategies promoting adaptation to climate change and mitigation of environmental effects of livestock production. For example, it may become important to choose among breeds and even among farm animal species according to their suitability to a future with altered production systems. Some animals with useful phenotypes and genotypes may be more useful than others in the changing environment.Robust animal breeds with the potential to adapt to new agro-ecological conditions and tolerate new diseases will be needed. The key issue in mitigation of harmful greenhouse gas effects induced by livestock production is the reduction of methane (CH4 emissions from ruminants. There are differences in CH4 emissions among breeds and among individual animals within breeds that suggest a potential for improvement in the trait through genetic selection.Characterization of breeds and individuals with modern genomic tools should be applied to identify breeds that have genetically adapted to marginal conditions and to get critical information for breeding and conservation programmes for farm animal genetic resources. We conclude that phenotyping and genomic technologies and adoption of new breeding approaches, such as genomic selection introgression, will promote breeding for useful characters in livestock species.

  18. Code Flows : Visualizing Structural Evolution of Source Code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Auber, David

    2008-01-01

    Understanding detailed changes done to source code is of great importance in software maintenance. We present Code Flows, a method to visualize the evolution of source code geared to the understanding of fine and mid-level scale changes across several file versions. We enhance an existing visual met

  19. Code flows : Visualizing structural evolution of source code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Auber, David

    2008-01-01

    Understanding detailed changes done to source code is of great importance in software maintenance. We present Code Flows, a method to visualize the evolution of source code geared to the understanding of fine and mid-level scale changes across several file versions. We enhance an existing visual met

  20. Oral mucosa and lung cancer: Are genetic changes in the oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-03

    Feb 3, 2016 ... Aim: To compare genetic aberrations in the oral epithelium of lung cancer patients with those without cancer. Subjects and ... to lung cancer, although other risk factors (such as genetic ..... NSCLC/adenocarcinoma. 6 (12.0).

  1. Autocatalysis, information and coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, P R

    2001-01-01

    Autocatalytic self-construction in macromolecular systems requires the existence of a reflexive relationship between structural components and the functional operations they perform to synthesise themselves. The possibility of reflexivity depends on formal, semiotic features of the catalytic structure-function relationship, that is, the embedding of catalytic functions in the space of polymeric structures. Reflexivity is a semiotic property of some genetic sequences. Such sequences may serve as the basis for the evolution of coding as a result of autocatalytic self-organisation in a population of assignment catalysts. Autocatalytic selection is a mechanism whereby matter becomes differentiated in primitive biochemical systems. In the case of coding self-organisation, it corresponds to the creation of symbolic information. Prions are present-day entities whose replication through autocatalysis reflects aspects of biological semiotics less obvious than genetic coding.

  2. Genetic programming approach on evaporation losses and its effect on climate change for Vaipar Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S.Kasiviswanathan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is the major problem that every human being is facing over the world. The rise in fossil fuel usage increases the emission of `greenhouse' gases, particularly carbon dioxide continuously into the earth's atmosphere. This causes a rise in the amount of heat from the sun withheld in the earth's atmosphere that would normally radiated back into space. This increase in heat has led to the greenhouse effect, resulting in climate change and rise in temperature along with other climatological parameters directly affects evaporation losses. Accurate modelling and forecasting of these evaporation losses are important for preventing further effects due to climate change. Evaporation is purely non-linear and varying both spatially and temporally. This needs suitable data driven approach to model and should have the ability to take care of all these non-linear behaviour of the system. As such, though there are many empirical and analytical models suggested in the literature for the estimation of evaporation losses, such models should be used with care and caution. Further, difficulties arise in obtaining all the climatological data used in a given analytical or empirical model. Genetic programming (GP is one such technique applied where the non-linearity exist. GP has the flexible mathematical structure which is capable of identifying the non-linear relationship between input and output data sets. Thus, it is easy to construct 'local' models for estimating evaporation losses. The performance of GP model is compared with Thornthwaite method, and results from the study indicate that the GP model performed better than the Thornthwaite method. Forecasting of meteorological parameters such as temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity has been performed using Markovian chain series analysis subsequently it is used to estimate the future evaporation losses using developed GP model. Finally the effect of possible future climate change on

  3. Roles of maternal effects and nuclear genetic composition change across the life cycle of crop-wild hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Helen M; Emry, D Jason; Pace, Brian A; Kost, Matthew A; Sparks, Kathryn A; Mercer, Kristin L

    2014-07-01

    • Premise of the study: The fitness of an offspring may depend on its nuclear genetic composition (via both parental genotypes) as well as on genetic maternal effects (via only the maternal parent). Understanding the relative importance of these two genetic factors is particularly important for research on crop-wild hybridization, since traits with important genetic maternal effects (e.g., seed size) often differ among crops and their relatives. We hypothesized that the effects of these genetic factors on fitness components would change across the life cycle of hybrids.• Methods: We followed seed, plant size, and reproductive traits in field experiments with wild and four crop-wild hybrids of sunflower (Helianthus annuus), which differed in nuclear genetic composition and maternal parent (wild or F1 hybrid).• Key results: We identified strong genetic maternal effects for early life cycle characteristics, with seeds produced on an F1 mother having premature germination, negligible seed dormancy, and greater seedling size. Increased percentages of crop alleles also increased premature germination and reduced dormancy in seeds produced on a wild mother. For mature plants, nuclear genetic composition dominated: greater percentages of crop alleles reduced height, branching, and fecundity.• Conclusions: Particular backcrosses between hybrids and wilds may differentially facilitate movement of crop alleles into wild populations due to their specific features. For example, backcross seeds produced on wild mothers can persist in the seed bank, illustrating the importance of genetic maternal effects, whereas backcross individuals with either wild or F1 mothers have high fecundity, resulting from their wild-like nuclear genetic composition.

  4. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Chromosomally Stable and Unstable Progeny of Irradiated Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baulch, Janet E.; Aypar, Umut; Waters, Katrina M.; Yang, Austin; Morgan, William F.

    2014-09-24

    Radiation induced genomic instability is a well-studied phenomenon, the underlying mechanisms of which are poorly understood. Persistent oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cytokine levels and epigenetic changes are among the mechanisms invoked in the perpetuation of the phenotype. To determine whether epigenetic aberrations affect genomic instability we measured DNA methylation, mRNA and microRNA (miR) levels in well characterized chromosomally stable and unstable clonally expanded single cell survivors of irradiation. While no changes in DNA methylation were observed for the gene promoters evaluated, increased LINE-1 methylation was observed for two unstable clones (LS12, CS9) and decreased Alu element methylation was observed for the other two unstable clones (115, Fe5.0-8). These relationships also manifested for mRNA and miR expression. mRNA identified for the LS12 and CS9 clones were most similar to each other (261 mRNA), while the 115 and Fe5.0-8 clones were more similar to each other, and surprisingly also similar to the two stable clones, 114 and 118 (286 mRNA among these four clones). Pathway analysis showed enrichment for pathways involved in mitochondrial function and cellular redox, themes routinely invoked in genomic instability. The commonalities between the two subgroups of clones were also observed for miR. The number of miR for which anti-correlated mRNA were identified suggests that these miR exert functional effects in each clone. The results of this study demonstrate significant genetic and epigenetic changes in unstable cells, but similar changes almost equally common in chromosomally stable cells. Possible conclusions might be that the chromosomally stable clones have some other form of instability, or that some of the observed changes represent a sort of radiation signature for and that other changes are related to genomic instability. Irrespective, these findings again suggest that a spectrum of changes both drive genomic

  5. Developmental Changes in Genetic and Shared Environmental Contributions to Smoking Initiation and Subsequent Smoking Quantity in Adolescence and Young Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, Cristina B; Kendler, Kenneth S; Maes, Hermine H

    2015-10-01

    Few studies examining the genetic architecture of cigarette smoking have focused on adolescents or examined developmental changes in additive genetic, shared environment, and unique environmental influences on liability to initiate cigarette smoking and quantity of cigarettes smoked. The aim of this study was to add to the literature on liability to initiate and use cigarettes during adolescence using a nationally representative sample. Data for this study came from adolescent and young adult twin pairs (aged 14-33 years) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. We ran a series of developmental causal-contingent-common pathway models to examine whether additive genetic, shared, and unique environmental influences on liability to the initiation of cigarette use are shared with those on smoking quantity, and whether their contributions change across development. We found evidence for a developmental shift in genetic and shared environmental contributions to cigarette use. Early in adolescence, genetic and environmental influences work independently on liability to cigarette smoking initiation and quantity of cigarettes smoked, but liability to these behaviors becomes correlated as individuals age into young adulthood. These findings provide insight into the causal processes underlying the liability to smoke cigarettes. With age, there is greater overlap in the genetic and environmental factors that influence the initiation of cigarette smoking and quantity of cigarettes smoked.

  6. Population dynamics of a natural red deer population over 200 years detected via substantial changes of genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Gunther Sebastian; Johannesen, Jes; Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2016-05-01

    Most large mammals have constantly been exposed to anthropogenic influence over decades or even centuries. Because of their long generation times and lack of sampling material, inferences of past population genetic dynamics, including anthropogenic impacts, have only relied on the analysis of the structure of extant populations. Here, we investigate for the first time the change in the genetic constitution of a natural red deer population over two centuries, using up to 200-year-old antlers (30 generations) stored in trophy collections. To the best of our knowledge, this is the oldest DNA source ever used for microsatellite population genetic analyses. We demonstrate that government policy and hunting laws may have strong impacts on populations that can lead to unexpectedly rapid changes in the genetic constitution of a large mammal population. A high ancestral individual polymorphism seen in an outbreeding population (1813-1861) was strongly reduced in descendants (1923-1940) during the mid-19th and early 20th century by genetic bottlenecks. Today (2011), individual polymorphism and variance among individuals is increasing in a constant-sized (managed) population. Differentiation was high among periods (F ST > ***); consequently, assignment tests assigned individuals to their own period with >85% probability. In contrast to the high variance observed at nuclear microsatellite loci, mtDNA (D-loop) was monomorphic through time, suggesting that male immigration dominates the genetic evolution in this population.

  7. Cell biology and genetics of minimal change disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moin A. Saleem

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Minimal change disease (MCD is an important cause of nephrotic syndrome and is characterized by massive proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, resulting in edema and hypercholesterolemia. The podocyte plays a key role in filtration and its disruption results in a dramatic loss of function leading to proteinuria. Immunologic disturbance has been suggested in the pathogenesis of MCD. Because of its clinical features, such as recurrent relapse/remission course, steroid response in most patients, and rare familial cases, a genetic defect has been thought to be less likely in MCD. Recent progress in whole-exome sequencing reveals pathogenic mutations in familial cases in steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS and sheds light on possible mechanisms and key molecules in podocytes in MCD. On the other hand, in the majority of cases, the existence of circulating permeability factors has been implicated along with T lymphocyte dysfunction. Observations of benefit with rituximab added B cell involvement to the disease. Animal models are unsatisfactory, and the humanized mouse may be a good model that well reflects MCD pathophysiology to investigate suggested “T cell dysfunction” directly related to podocytes in vivo. Several candidate circulating factors and their effects on podocytes have been proposed but are still not sufficient to explain whole mechanisms and clinical features in MCD. Another circulating factor disease is focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, and it is not clear if this is a distinct entity, or on the same spectrum, implicating the same circulating factor(s. These patients are mostly steroid resistant and often have a rapid relapse after transplantation. In clinical practice, predicting relapse or disease activity and response to steroids is important and is an area where novel biomarkers can be developed based on our growing knowledge of podocyte signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss recent findings in genetics and

  8. Changes in gene expression foreshadow diet-induced obesity in genetically identical mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Koza

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available High phenotypic variation in diet-induced obesity in male C57BL/6J inbred mice suggests a molecular model to investigate non-genetic mechanisms of obesity. Feeding mice a high-fat diet beginning at 8 wk of age resulted in a 4-fold difference in adiposity. The phenotypes of mice characteristic of high or low gainers were evident by 6 wk of age, when mice were still on a low-fat diet; they were amplified after being switched to the high-fat diet and persisted even after the obesogenic protocol was interrupted with a calorically restricted, low-fat chow diet. Accordingly, susceptibility to diet-induced obesity in genetically identical mice is a stable phenotype that can be detected in mice shortly after weaning. Chronologically, differences in adiposity preceded those of feeding efficiency and food intake, suggesting that observed difference in leptin secretion is a factor in determining phenotypes related to food intake. Gene expression analyses of adipose tissue and hypothalamus from mice with low and high weight gain, by microarray and qRT-PCR, showed major changes in the expression of genes of Wnt signaling and tissue re-modeling in adipose tissue. In particular, elevated expression of SFRP5, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, the imprinted gene MEST and BMP3 may be causally linked to fat mass expansion, since differences in gene expression observed in biopsies of epididymal fat at 7 wk of age (before the high-fat diet correlated with adiposity after 8 wk on a high-fat diet. We propose that C57BL/6J mice have the phenotypic characteristics suitable for a model to investigate epigenetic mechanisms within adipose tissue that underlie diet-induced obesity.

  9. Changes in gene expression foreshadow diet-induced obesity in genetically identical mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koza, Robert A; Nikonova, Larissa; Hogan, Jessica; Rim, Jong-Seop; Mendoza, Tamra; Faulk, Christopher; Skaf, Jihad; Kozak, Leslie P

    2006-05-01

    High phenotypic variation in diet-induced obesity in male C57BL/6J inbred mice suggests a molecular model to investigate non-genetic mechanisms of obesity. Feeding mice a high-fat diet beginning at 8 wk of age resulted in a 4-fold difference in adiposity. The phenotypes of mice characteristic of high or low gainers were evident by 6 wk of age, when mice were still on a low-fat diet; they were amplified after being switched to the high-fat diet and persisted even after the obesogenic protocol was interrupted with a calorically restricted, low-fat chow diet. Accordingly, susceptibility to diet-induced obesity in genetically identical mice is a stable phenotype that can be detected in mice shortly after weaning. Chronologically, differences in adiposity preceded those of feeding efficiency and food intake, suggesting that observed difference in leptin secretion is a factor in determining phenotypes related to food intake. Gene expression analyses of adipose tissue and hypothalamus from mice with low and high weight gain, by microarray and qRT-PCR, showed major changes in the expression of genes of Wnt signaling and tissue re-modeling in adipose tissue. In particular, elevated expression of SFRP5, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, the imprinted gene MEST and BMP3 may be causally linked to fat mass expansion, since differences in gene expression observed in biopsies of epididymal fat at 7 wk of age (before the high-fat diet) correlated with adiposity after 8 wk on a high-fat diet. We propose that C57BL/6J mice have the phenotypic characteristics suitable for a model to investigate epigenetic mechanisms within adipose tissue that underlie diet-induced obesity.

  10. Decoding the codes: A content analysis of the news coverage of genetic cloning by three online news sites and three national daily newspapers, 1996 through 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Jon E.

    This study compared news coverage of genetic cloning research in three online news sites (CNN.com, ABC.com, and MSNBC.com) and three national daily newspapers (The New York Times, The Washington Post, and USA Today). The study involved the analysis of 230 online and print news articles concerning genetic cloning published from 1996 through 1998. Articles were examined with respect to formats, sources, focus, tone, and assessments about the impact of cloning research. Findings indicated that while print news formats remained relatively constant for the duration of this study, online news formats changed significantly with respect to the kinds of media used to represent the news, the layouts used to represent cloning news, and the emphasis placed on audio-visual content. Online stories were as much as 20 to 70% shorter than print stories. More than 50% of the articles appearing online were composed by outside sources (wire services, guest columnists, etc.). By comparison, nearly 90% of the articles published by print newspapers were written "in-house" by science reporters. Online news sites cited fewer sources and cited a smaller variety of sources than the newspapers examined here. In both news outlets, however, the sources most frequently cited were those with vested interests in furthering cloning research. Both online and print news coverage of cloning tends to focus principally on the technical procedures and on the future benefits of cloning. More than 60% of the articles focused on the techniques and technologies of cloning. Less than 25% of the articles focused on social, ethical, or legal issues associated with cloning. Similarly, articles from all six sources (75%) tended to be both positive and future-oriented. Less than 5% of the total articles examined here had a strongly negative or critical tone. Moreover, both online and print news sources increasingly conveyed a strong sense of acceptance about the possibility of human cloning. Data from this study

  11. PI Parameter Optimization Method Based on the Floating-Point Coded Genetic Algorithm%基于浮点数编码遗传算法的PI参数优化算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何同祥; 韩宁青; 李洪亮; 常保春

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces PID parameter optimization method based on the floating-point coded genetic algorithm, using the performance index -time squared integral of the error as the objective function, making use of the global search ability of genetic algorithm to achieve an optimum solution of the optimization, to reduce the difficulty to design PID performance, and overall improve system performance. The simulation results show that coded by floating-point genetic algorithm parameter optimization enables system PI has a good dynamic quality and steady state characteristics.%本文介绍了基于浮点数编码遗传算法寻优的PID参数优化方法,采用误差绝对值时间平方积分性能指标作为参数选择的目标函数,利用遗传算法的全局搜索能力,实现对全局最优解的寻优,以降低PID参数整定的难度,达到总体提高系统性能的目的.仿真结果表明,通过浮点数编码遗传算法进行PI参数优化可使系统具有很好的动态品质和稳态特性.

  12. Genetic analysis of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A of Indian origin and detection of positive selection and recombination in leader protease- and capsid-coding regions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S B Nagendrakumar; M Madhanmohan; P N Rangarajan; V A Srinivasan

    2009-03-01

    The leader protease (Lpro) and capsid-coding sequences (P1) constitute approximately 3 kb of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). We studied the phylogenetic relationship of 46 FMDV serotype A isolates of Indian origin collected during the period 1968–2005 and also eight vaccine strains using the neighbour-joining tree and Bayesian tree methods. The viruses were categorized under three major groups – Asian, Euro-South American and European. The Indian isolates formed a distinct genetic group among the Asian isolates. The Indian isolates were further classified into different genetic subgroups (< 5% divergence). Post-1995 isolates were divided into two subgroups while a few isolates which originated in the year 2005 from Andhra Pradesh formed a separate group. These isolates were closely related to the isolates of the 1970s. The FMDV isolates seem to undergo reverse mutation or convergent evolution wherein sequences identical to the ancestors are present in the isolates in circulation. The eight vaccine strains included in the study were not related to each other and belonged to different genetic groups. Recombination was detected in the Lpro region in one isolate (A IND 20/82) and in the VP1 coding 1D region in another isolate (A RAJ 21/96). Positive selection was identified at aa positions 23 in the Lpro ( < 0.05; 0.046*) and at aa 171 in the capsid protein VP1 ( < 0.01; 0.003**).

  13. Holographic codes

    CERN Document Server

    Latorre, Jose I

    2015-01-01

    There exists a remarkable four-qutrit state that carries absolute maximal entanglement in all its partitions. Employing this state, we construct a tensor network that delivers a holographic many body state, the H-code, where the physical properties of the boundary determine those of the bulk. This H-code is made of an even superposition of states whose relative Hamming distances are exponentially large with the size of the boundary. This property makes H-codes natural states for a quantum memory. H-codes exist on tori of definite sizes and get classified in three different sectors characterized by the sum of their qutrits on cycles wrapped through the boundaries of the system. We construct a parent Hamiltonian for the H-code which is highly non local and finally we compute the topological entanglement entropy of the H-code.

  14. Sharing code

    OpenAIRE

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing.

  15. Effects of climate change on plant-insect interactions and prospects for resistance breeding using genetic resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pritchard, J.; Broekgaarden, C.; Vosman, B.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the components (elevated CO2, temperature and drought) of climate change and their direct and indirect effects on plant-insect interactions. The genetic resources (such as wild relatives and traditional, locally adapted landraces) important for increasing pest/disease resistan

  16. Effects of climate change on plant-insect interactions and prospects for resistance breeding using genetic resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pritchard, J.; Broekgaarden, C.; Vosman, B.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the components (elevated CO2, temperature and drought) of climate change and their direct and indirect effects on plant-insect interactions. The genetic resources (such as wild relatives and traditional, locally adapted landraces) important for increasing pest/disease

  17. Effectiveness of the Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied by Concept Maps about Students' Understanding of the Molecules Carrying Genetical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tastan, Ibrahim; Dikmenli, Musa; Cardak, Osman

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of concept maps, together with conceptual change texts, given to 11th grade students' on the subject of molecules carrying genetical information. The semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 5 upper class students to find misconceptions related to the subject. A success test was developed…

  18. The contribution of genetic and environmental factors to changes in total and ¿’ fibrinogen over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobse, A.; Pieters, M.; Nienaber-Rousseau, C.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Hoekstra, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Increased fibrinogen is associated with cardiovascular disease risk. It is, however, not known to what extend environmental and genetic factors and/or their interaction influence changes in total and ¿’ fibrinogen over time. We aimed to determine how variation within the fibrinogen gene

  19. Effectiveness of the Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied by Concept Maps about Students' Understanding of the Molecules Carrying Genetical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tastan, Ibrahim; Dikmenli, Musa; Cardak, Osman

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of concept maps, together with conceptual change texts, given to 11th grade students' on the subject of molecules carrying genetical information. The semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 5 upper class students to find misconceptions related to the subject. A success test was developed…

  20. Imidacloprid induces changes in the structure, genetic diversity and catabolic activity of soil microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Markowicz, Anna; Borymski, Sławomir; Wójcik, Marcin; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2013-12-15

    This is the first report describing the effect of imidacloprid applied at field rate (FR, 1 mg/kg of soil) and 10 times the FR (10*FR, 10 mg/kg of soil) on the structural, genetic and physiological diversity of soil bacterial community as determined by the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the community level physiological profile (CLPP) approaches. PLFA profiles showed that imidacloprid significantly shifted the microbial community structure and decreased the biomass of the total, bacterial and fungal PLFAs, however, this effect was transient at the FR dosage. The alterations in DGGE patterns caused by imidacloprid application, confirmed considerable changes in the overall richness and diversity of dominant bacteria. Although, as a result of imidacloprid application, the metabolic activity of microbial communities was generally lower, the richness and functional biodiversity of the soil microbial community were not negatively affected. In general, the analysis of the variance indicated that the measured parameters were significantly affected by treatment and the incubation time, however, the incubation time effect explained most of the observed variance. Imidacloprid degradation and the appearance of some new bands in DGGE profiles suggest the evolution of bacteria capable of degrading imidacloprid among indigenous microflora.

  1. Amphibian DNA shows marked genetic structure and tracks pleistocene climate change in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaval, Ana Carolina; Bates, John M

    2007-12-01

    The glacial refugia paradigm has been broadly applied to patterns of species dynamics and population diversification. However, recent geological studies have demonstrated striking Pleistocene climate changes in currently semiarid northeastern Brazil at time intervals much more frequent than the climatic oscillations associated with glacial and interglacial periods. These geomorphic data documented recurrent pulses of wet regimes in the past 210,000 years that correlate with climate anomalies affecting multiple continents. While analyzing DNA sequences of two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b and NADH-dehydrogenase subunit 2) and one nuclear marker (cellular-myelocytomatosis proto-oncogene) in the forest-associated frogs Proceratophrys boiei and Ischnocnema gr. ramagii, we found evidence of biological responses consistent with these pluvial maxima events. Sampled areas included old, naturally isolated forest enclaves within the semiarid Caatinga, as well as recent man-made fragments of humid coastal Atlantic forest. Results show that mtDNA lineages in enclave populations are monophyletic or nearly so, whereas nonenclave populations are polyphyletic and more diverse. The studied taxa show evidence of demographic expansions at times that match phases of pluvial maxima inferred from geological data. Divergence times between several populations fall within comparatively drier intervals suggested by geomorphology. Mitochondrial and nuclear data show local populations to be genetically structured, with some high levels of differentiation that suggest the need of further taxonomic work.

  2. Partition of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in two different structural classes dating back to early metabolism: implications for the origin of the genetic code and the nature of protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, M

    1995-12-01

    We describe, on the molecular level, a possible fuzzy and primordial translation apparatus capable of synthesizing polypeptides from nucleic acids in a world containing a mixture of coevolving molecules of RNA and proteins already arranged in metabolic cycles (including cofactors). Close attention is paid to template-free systems because they are believed to be the immediate ancestors of this primordial translation apparatus. The two classes of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), as seen today, are considered as the remnants of such a simple imprecise translation apparatus and are used as guidelines for the construction of the model. Earlier theoretical work by Bedian on a related system is invoked to show how specificity and stability could have been achieved automatically and rather quickly, starting from such an imprecise system, i.e., how the encoded synthesis of proteins could have appeared. Because of the binary nature of the underlying proto-code, the first genetically encoded proteins would then have been alternating copolymers with a high degree of degeneracy, but not random. Indeed, a clear signal for alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues in present-day protein sequences can be detected. Later evolution of the genetic code would have proceeded along lines already discussed by Crick. However, in the initial stages, the translation apparatus proposed here is in fact very similar to the one postulated by Woese, only here it is given a molecular framework. This hypothesis departs from the paradigm of the RNA world in that it supposes that the origin of the genetic code occurred after the apparition of some functional (statistical) proteins first. Implications for protein design are also discussed.

  3. Contributing to a Quality Patient Experience: Applying Evidence Based Practice to Support Changes in Nursing Dress Code Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Margaret Mary; Wantz, Debra; Campbell, Patricia; Rosler, Greta; Troutman, Dawn; Muthler, Crystal

    2016-01-31

    The public image of nurse professionalism is important. Attributes of a professional nurse, such as caring, attentive, empathetic, efficient, knowledgeable, competent, and approachable, or lack thereof, can contribute positively or negatively to the patient experience. Nurses at a hospital in central northeast Pennsylvania offer their story as they considered the impact of a wide variety of individual uniform and dress choices. This article describes an evidence based practice project and survey created to increase understanding of patient perceptions regarding the professional image of nurses in this facility. Exploring patient perception of nurse image provided insight into what patients view as important. A team approach included the voice of nurses at different levels in the process. Ultimately, this work informed a revision of the health system nursing dress code. The study team also reflects on challenges, next steps in the process, and offers recommendations based on their experiences.

  4. Vibrational circular dichroism analysis reveals a conformational change of the baccatin III ring of paclitaxel: visualization of conformations using a new code for structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hiroshi; Ogata, Atsushi; Nafie, Laurence A; Dukor, Rina K

    2008-03-21

    The comparison between measured and conformer-weighted calculated VCD spectra of the baccatin III ring of paclitaxel and visualization of the conformations using the new code for structure-activity relationships are reported for the first time. The VCD spectrum of paclitaxel closely resembles that of the baccatin III ring. The large characteristic nuCO VCD bands with bisignate signs (1732 cm-1, Deltaepsilon = -1.6 x 10(-1); 1715 cm(-1), Deltaepsilon = 2.4 x 10(-1)) strongly reflect the structural property of the family of conformations bacc-ABC32F defined using the new code. The comparison with the conformation of the baccatin III core in the electron micrograph of the crystal structure of tubulin-paclitaxel (1JFF) suggests a conformational change of paclitaxel corresponding to a switch through the binding with beta-tublin and the intermolecular interactions involving the hydroxyl group (D) and carbonyl of acetoxy group (E). The representation of conformational codes allows complicated conformations to be very easily compared and facilitates future computational analyses such as those for the large-molecule calculations as well as genome analysis.

  5. Genetic polymorphism of T6235C mutation in 3 non-coding region of CYP1A1 and GSTM1 genes and lung cancer susceptibility in the Mongolian population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the relative risk for lung cancer associated with genetic polymorphism of T6235C mutation in 3' non-coding region(MspⅠ)of cytochrome P450 1A1(CYP1A1)and glutathione S-transferase M1(GSTM1)in the Mongolian population in Inner Mongolian Region of China.Methods Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism(PCR-RFLP)and multiplex PCR methods were used to analyze blood samples obtained from 263 case subjects and 263 control subjects to determine their genotypes for CYP1...

  6. Conservation genetics in a globally changing environment : present problems, paradoxes and future challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pertoldi, Cino; Bijlsma, R.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2007-01-01

    Despite recent advances in conservation genetics and related disciplines and the growing impact that conservation genetics is having in conservation biology, our knowledge on several key issues in the field is still insufficient. Here we identify some of these issues together with addressing several

  7. Conservation genetics in a globally changing environment : present problems, paradoxes and future challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pertoldi, Cino; Bijlsma, R.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2007-01-01

    Despite recent advances in conservation genetics and related disciplines and the growing impact that conservation genetics is having in conservation biology, our knowledge on several key issues in the field is still insufficient. Here we identify some of these issues together with addressing several

  8. European genetic conservation strategies of forest trees in the context of currently running climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de S.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of forests, at the level of species and at the level of genetic diversity within species, is an important resource for Europe. Over the past several decades countries have made efforts to conserve the diversity of tree species and genetic diversity. However, there was no harmonised app

  9. An approach based on genetic algorithms with coding in real for the solution of a DC OPF to hydrothermal systems; Uma abordagem baseada em algoritmos geneticos com codificacao em real para a solucao de um FPO DC para sistemas hidrotermicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Diego R.; Silva, Alessandro L. da; Luciano, Edson Jose Rezende; Nepomuceno, Leonardo [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica], Emails: diego_eng.eletricista@hotmail.com, alessandrolopessilva@uol.com.br, edson.joserl@uol.com.br, leo@feb.unesp.br

    2009-07-01

    Problems of DC Optimal Power Flow (OPF) have been solved by various conventional optimization methods. When the modeling of DC OPF involves discontinuous functions or not differentiable, the use of solution methods based on conventional optimization is often not possible because of the difficulty in calculating the gradient vectors at points of discontinuity/non-differentiability of these functions. This paper proposes a method for solving the DC OPF based on Genetic Algorithms (GA) with real coding. The proposed GA has specific genetic operators to improve the quality and viability of the solution. The results are analyzed for an IEEE test system, and its solutions are compared, when possible, with those obtained by a method of interior point primal-dual logarithmic barrier. The results highlight the robustness of the method and feasibility of obtaining the solution to real systems.

  10. Direct-to-consumer Genetic Testing: Changes in the EU Regulatory Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slokenberga, Santa

    2015-12-01

    Rapid advances in genomics and technology have rendered genetic testing services easily accessible to consumers over the Internet in the form of direct-to-consumer genetic testing. In the EU, the IVD Directive has been animadverted for its inability to tackle the challenges direct-to-consumer genetic testing has posed. Currently, the EU legislation is in a transition state. It is thus, timely to assess, to what extent the proposed IVD Regulation is intended to address the performance requirements and utility of direct-to-consumer genetic tests, which are made available to consumers within the EU over the Internet, and discuss the developments vis-à-vis the IVD Directive. To compare with the IVD Directive, the IVD Regulation presents a major shift in how direct-to-consumer genetic testing is treated in the E U. It remains unclear, whether and how the EU requirements can be applied beyond the EU market.

  11. Study on Bar-coding of Wheat Variety Based on Genetic Diversity of Seed Storage Protein%基于籽粒贮藏蛋白遗传多样性的小麦条形码研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康志钰; 王建军

    2012-01-01

    为便于小麦品种管理及保护,针对植物DNA条形码研制存在的问题,以36份品种为材料,分析其HMW-GS和醇溶蛋白组分,并根据谱带的有无,对谱带进行数量化处理,存在的谱带标为1,不存在的谱带标为0,建立谱带二进制代码,再转化为十进制代码,最后通过数据整合,建立了小麦品种身份识别码,并将其转换为条形码,研制出基于籽粒贮藏蛋白遗传多样性的小麦身份识别码制作方法,使原来需要用119位数字表明的品种间差距现在只需37位数字即可表示出来。%To be convenient for the management and protection of wheat varieties, and aimed at the problems on DNA bar-coding of plant, the high molecular weight gluten subunit (HMW-GS) and gli- adin of 36 wheat varieties were investigated and used to establish their codes. By number processing, according to the presence and absence of the bands as presence of band was signed with "1" and ab- sence of band was signed with "0", the binary code system was established and then the binary code system was translated into decimal code system, finally, the identification code system of wheat varie- ty was established through the conformity of data, and translated the identification code for bar-cod- ing. An method for the identification code system of wheat was built bas